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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA SERVICES FOR PEOPLE ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES HON.… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1976

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 ISSN 0317-4670
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
SERVICES FOR PEOPLE
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE
DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES
HON. WILLIAM N. VANDER ZALM
1975
With Fiscal Addendum
April 1, 1974, to March 31, 1975
 Victoria, B.C., February 1976
To Colonel the Honourable Walter Stewart Owen, Q.C, LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Human Resources for the calendar
year 1975, with fiscal addendum April 1, 1974, to March 31, 1975, is herewith
respectfully submitted.
WILLIAM N. VANDER ZALM
Minister of Human Resources
Office of the Minister of Human Resources,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
 Department of Human Resources
Victoria, B.C., February 1976
The Honourable William Vander Zalm,
Minister of Human Resources,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir: I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Human Resources for the calendar year 1975, with fiscal addendum April 1, 1974,
to March 31, 1975.
J. A. SADLER
Deputy Minister of Human Resources
  SERVICES FOR PEOPLE
  FOREWORD
The Annual Report has been organized to provide information on the most
important programs offered by the Department.   An introductory section outlines
administrative and organizational characteristics of the Department.   Programs are
discussed under the following four headings:
Services for Families and Children.
Services for Everyone.
Services for Special Needs.
Services for Senior Citizens.
The programs are reported on according to their goals and how these goals
are achieved.   Important changes in 1975 are discussed, as is cost-sharing with the
Federal Government.
It is hoped this format will be useful in providing an understanding of what
the Department of Human Resources is attempting to do in co-operation with the
people of British Columbia.
This Report is for the calendar year 1975. The Department has been reporting on the January 1 to December 31 calendar year basis for the past two years in
an effort to provide information that is up to date as possible at the time of publication.
The alternative would be to report on a fiscal year basis, but this would mean
that this Report, published in spring 1976, would be comprised of figures for the
period April 1, 1974, to March 31, 1975. Because formal accounting in the
Department is done on a fiscal year basis, the calendar year figures must be estimates
in some instances. We have felt that the more recent (December 31, 1975) figures
have the advantage of showing trends, but fiscal year figures are also printed as
official year-end totals. A fiscal addendum, at the end of the Report, provides
further tables on statistics for the 1974/75 fiscal year period.
A special note on cost-sharing—Municipalities at present cost-share in
social assistance programs, day care subsidies, health care programs, maintenance
of dependent children, homemaker service, and adult care. In 1975, municipalities
were charged $27,634,910, or approximately 10 per cent of the cost of these programs. Throughout this Report we refer to cost-sharing between the Federal and
Provincial Governments; it must be remembered that, for the programs mentioned
above, municipal sharing is part of the Provincial contribution.
  SERVICES FOR PEOPLE
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Highlights of 1975  11
Departmental Expenditures, 1975  13
Administration and Organization, 1975
Introduction  19
Organization Chart  20
Regional Map  21
Personnel Activities  22
Accounting and Budget  23
Office Administration and Public Information  23
Staff Development  24
Research  24
Services for Families and Children
Preventive and Protective Services for Children and Their Families  29
Day Care  34
Special Services to Children  40
Youth Hostel Program ,  40
Child Care Resources—Introduction  42
Foster Homes  44
Therapeutic Homes  46
Group Homes  46
Specialized Residential Treatment Programs  47
Adoption  48
Services for Everyone
Social Assistance  57
Employment Services  60
Repatriation  62
Homemaker/Housekeeper Services  63
Counselling  66
Community Resources Boards  69
Health Care Services  73
Burials  75
Community Grants  75
 M 10 HUMAN RESOURCES
Page
Services for Special Needs
Mincome (Handicapped Persons' Income Assistance)  83
Activity Centres  84
Educational Upgrading and Vocational Training  88
Work Activity Program .  89
Incentive Opportunities Program  91
Services for Retarded Persons (Woodlands, Tranquille, and Glendale)-— 92
Children's Rehabilitation Services  99
Meals on Wheels  102
Hostels for Adults  102
Halfway or Transition Houses  103
Services for Senior Citizens
Mincome  107
Senior Citizens Counsellor Service    110
B.C. Hydro Bus Pass for Senior Citizens  112
Adult Care  113
Pharmacare  115
Community Grants to Projects for Senior Citizens  116
Legislation  117
Fiscal Addendum, 1974/75  119
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M   11
HIGHLIGHTS OF  1975
By J. A. Sadler, Deputy Minister
Some of the major efforts made by the Department in 1975 to improve the
living conditions of British Columbia residents are itemized here. More detailed
descriptions of these changes and others appear in the body of the Annual Report.
• The first British Columbia Conference on the Family, sponsored jointly by
the Provincial Government and several religious bodies, was held in Victoria.
A full-time co-ordinator operating out of the Department of Human Resources organized the three-day meeting, attended by 150 delegates from all
parts of the Province.
• 42 additional senior citizens were appointed in November to work as senior
citizen counsellors. Their monthly allowance for out-of-pocket expenses
was increased from $50 to $60.
• Expansion of the Infant Stimulation Program was carried out, to provide
extra help for very young handicapped children.
• 180 Indians from northern reserves were employed at the British Columbia
Government-financed Port Simpson Cannery near Prince Rupert. On-the-
job training at the fish-processing plant provided skills for trainees who
would likely otherwise be out of work and unskilled.
• In April, contingency plans were made to deal with up to 500 children, on
a temporary basis, who might be expected as refugees from Indochina. The
actual number of children who arrived for adoption was much smaller, but
all efforts were made to ensure their safe transport to waiting families in
British Columbia and elsewhere in Canada.
• Four quarterly cost-of-living increases were passed along to Mincome recipients in 1975, raising the guaranteed income level from $234.13 at January
1, 1975, to $249.82 by December 31, 1975.
• 1975 saw the first year of Departmental responsibility for Woodlands and
Tranquille and other services to retarded persons. These responsibilities
were transferred from the Department of Health to the Department of
Human Resources in accordance with the Government's commitment to
integrated and community-based services, and to allow for cost-sharing with
the Federal Government under the Canada Assistance Plan.
• Homemaker services expanded considerably in 1975, with Departmental
expenditures of $6.5 million—nearly double the 1974 expenditure.
• Departmental expenditures to assist persons in boarding and rest homes
and private hospitals more than doubled in 1975, as the numbers of persons
assisted more than doubled.
• Following 16 months of work, the Royal Commission on Family and ChiU
dren's Law presented its recommendations to the Provincial Government in
mid-year. The Commission had been instructed to inquire into all aspects
of Provincial law relating to children and family relationships.   Appointed
 M  12
HUMAN RESOURCES
by the Minister of Human Resources and the Attorney-General, the Commission drew up its recommendations for legislative change following 35
public hearings, numerous contacts with lay and professional communities,
and intensive study by working parties.
• Just over 300 students were hired in 1975 to work in Department-directed
jobs financed by the Provincial Summer Student Employment Program.
Administrative changes undertaken to carry out these programs more efficiently
are described in the "Administration and Organization" section of the Report.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1975
M 13
DEPARTMENTAL EXPENDITURES,  1975
($460.6 million)
Figure 1
Other Programs
1.2%
$5.5
General Administration
1.3
$6.0
Community Grants
1.8%
$8.25
Adult Care
4.5%
$20.8
Special Programs
for Retarded
4.6%
$21.3
Medical Services
and Pharmacare
5.8%
$26.4
Social Assistance—Basic assistance, low-income supplement.
Mincome—Handicapped, age 60-64 years, age 65 years and over.
Child Care—Group, receiving, and foster homes; treatment resources; day care;
special services to children.
Field Service—Direct field staff expenses.
Medical Services and Pharmacare—Drugs, dental, optical, medical, medical
transportation, emergency health aid.
Special Programs for Retarded—Residential programs at Woodlands, Tranquille, Glendale, and other institutions.
Adult Care—Personal, intermediate, and nursing home care.
 M  14 HUMAN RESOURCES
Community Grants—Grants to community-based, nonprofit societies.
General  Administration—Headquarters administrative and support services,
office expenses for all staff.
Other  Prorgams—Burials, transportation,  repatriation,  special needs,  housekeeper, homemaker, work activity projects.
The Department of Human Resources is providing a wide range of needed
services to children and families, to senior citizens, and to the handicapped in this
Province. Total expenditures for the calendar year 1975 totalled $460.6 million.
A comparison of expenditures is illustrated in Table 1.
Table 1—Department of Human Resources Gross Expenditures—
A Comparison of Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1974/75 and Calendar Year 1975
1975 1974/75 1973/74 1972/73 1971/72
($ millions) ($ millions) ($ millions) ($ millions) ($ millions)
460.6 382.6 264.6 172.2 148.9
The Federal Government contribution to Departmental costs came .0 37 per
cent of the total expenditure in 1975. This is an increase of 4 per cent in the
Federal Government share as compared with 1974. Federal Government sharing
in the cost of social services is provided for in the Canada Assistance Plan (CAP),
signed by nine provinces and the Federal Government in 1967.
tinder terms of the Canada Assistance Plan, provinces can recoup 50 per cent
of the cost of expenditures on income maintenance and welfare benefits, // the
expenditures are in line with regulations both Governments agree to. The Federal
legislation sets no ceiling on the amount to which it will share, but requires that
need be determined by an individual needs test of each applicant or family.
The substantial increase in services offered by the Department of Human
Resources in the last few years has meant that far more social service dollars have
been contributed to the Province by the Federal Government, but the negotiation
of Federal agreements to cost-share new programs has been a lengthy business, and
still continues. Some programs that are offered on a universal basis, such as the
Mincome guarantee for all persons over 60 years of age, regardless of assets, are
not eligible for sharing on a 50:50 basis with the Federal Government. The Federal
Government does not share at all on Provincial Mincome payments to persons in
receipt of Old Age Security. Pharmacare expenditures for persons over 65 years
of age are also not shared by the Federal Government.
The increased Federal contribution in 1975 is best explained by three factors:
1. Some agreements made with the Federal Government in 1975 on cost-
sharing were allowed to apply retroactively to 1974 expenditures.
2. The Federal cost-sharing on Mincome payments was increased in 1975
when the Federal Government agreed to increased sharing. The increase can be
seen by comparing the agreement in 1974 and in 1975.
7974 Agreement—Mincome payments to persons aged 60 to 64 years
and handicapped persons were cost-shared on a 50:50 basis for
persons with asset levels no higher than
$1,000, single person
$1,500, married couple
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M  15
up to $160 for persons 60 to 64 years and up to $200 for handicapped persons per month (Mincome payments were $228.96 as
of December 31, 1974).
1975 Agreement—Mincome payments to persons aged 60 to 64 years
and handicapped persons are cost-shared on a 50:50 basis for
persons with asset levels no higher than
$1,500, single person
$2,500, married couple
up to #760 for persons 60 to 64 years and up to $215 for handicapped persons per month (Mincome payments were $249.82 on
December 31, 1975).
3. Federal cost-sharing on the Special Services to Children Program was
agreed to in 1975.
  ADMINISTRATION AND
ORGANIZATION, 1975
  REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1975
M  19
INTRODUCTION
The review of the Department's administration and organization initiated in
1974 continued through 1975. Major emphasis in the conduct of this review was
given to the concepts of accountability and regionalization. Some of the more significant changes in administration resulting from this review were as follows:
• Development and introduction of a new financial and management information system, providing a detailed analysis of Departmental expenditures
by program activities and by region.
• Establishment of a new Departmental Comptroller's office responsible for
all accounting and budget services for the Department of Human Resources.
Prior to 1975, these services were provided by the Department of Health
Accounting Division.
• Appointment of a planning group to oversee the development of a new
information and pay system for the social assistance program.
• Appointment of a Chief Technical Negotiator to oversee cost-sharing
arrangements with the Federal Government under the Canada Assistance
Plan..
• Staffing of the new Community Human Resources and Health Centres for
Grand Forks-Boundary, Houston, Granisle, the Queen Charlotte Islands,
and the James Bay neighbourhood in Victoria. Under the direction of
locally elected citizen boards, these centres are responsible for the planning
and administration of the full range of health and social services in those
communities.
• Reorganization and decentralization of services under the auspices of the
new Vancouver Resources Board.
• A Consultant in Nutrition and Home Management Services was added to
staff in March 1975. The Consultant works primarily on the development
of nutrition services to community groups serving the aged, handicapped,
and low-income people.
• Appointment of a Provincial Co-ordinator for the Infant Development
Program. This program assists children with developmental problems and
offers support to their parents in overcoming the handicapping condition.
 M 20
HUMAN RESOURCES
ORGANIZATION CHART
Department of Human Resources - December   1975
MINISTER OF HUMAN RESOURCES
HONOURABLE H,   N.  VANDER ZALM
DEPUTY   MINISTER
J.  A.   SADLER
ASSOCIATE  DEPUTY  MINISTER
E. L.   NORTHUP
DEPARTMENTAL COMPTROLLER
H.   COOK
DIRECTOR - OFFICE ADMINISTRATION S
PUBLIC INFORMATION
A.   G.   GILMORE
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR -  SOCIAL SERVICES
4  INCOME  SECURITY PROGRAMMES
__-_ J,  NOBLE
DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION
C.   R.  SPENCE
CHIEF TECHNICAL NEGOTIATOR - C.A
G.  WOOD
EXECUTIVE  DIRECTOR -  COMMUNITY SERVICES
R. J.  BURNHAM
(Educational   Leave of Absence)	
EXECUTIVE  DIRECTOR - LONG RANGE
PLANNING £ RESEARCH
T.   D. BINGHAM
SUPERINTENDENT OF
CHILD WELFARE
J.  V.   BELKNAP
ASSIST.  EXECUTIVE   DIPEC-:.H.
■ INCOME  SECURITY PROGRAMMES
H.   SAVILLE
MEDICAL CONSULTANT
DR.   R.  DUNCAN
ASSIST.  EXEC.  DIR.
COMMUNITY  SERVICES
R.  K.  BUTLER
DIRECTOR -  RESIDENTIAL
& TREATMENT PROGRAMMES
R.   CRONIN
DIRECTOR -  INCOME
ASSISTANCE  DIVISION
N.  S.  BROOKE
DIRECTOR - COMMUNITY
PROGRAMMES DIVISION
R.   H.   JONES
DIRECTOR - PHARMACARE 011
P.  TIDBALL
CONSULTANT
DIRECTOR  -  HEALTH
CARE DIVISION
W.  J.   CAMOZZI
DIRECTOR - SPECIAL CARE
ADULTS DIVISION
MRS.   E,   A.  BRISTOWE
REGIONAL DIRECTOR    (3)
OKANAGAN
G.  A.  REED
REGIONAL  DIRECTOR    (S)
KOOTENAYS
T.  PRYSIAZNIUK
REGIONAL DIRECTOR    (5)
'RINCE GEORGE -  CARIBOO
E.   HOOGSTRATEN
DIRECTOR - STAFF
DEVELOPMENT
O.J.L.   PETERSEN
EXECUTIVE  DIRECTOR
WOODLANDS
DR.  P.  HUGHES
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
TRANQUIL LE
DR.  J.   BOWER
EXECUTIVE  DIRECTOR
GLENDALE
B.   HAYES
RESEARCH DIVISION
REGIONAL DIRECTOR (6)
FRASER VALLEY
A.   E.  BINGHAM
REGIONAL DIRECTOR    (7)
BULKLEY -  SKEENA
MRS.   M.   GREENING
REGIONAL DIRECTOR (8)
PEACE  RIVER
R. E.  PHILLIPS
REGIONAL DIRECTOR (9]
KAMLOOPS
G.  EGGLETON
REGIONAL DIRECTOR (10)
VANCOUVER  ISLAND
MISS   I.  WOODWARD
REGIONAL DIRECTOR (11]
CAPITAL REGION
J.  A.  MOLLBERG
REGIONAL DIRECTOR    (12)
FRASER SOUTH
T.  POLLARD
REGIONAL DIRECTOR    (13]
FRASER NORTH
K. LEVITT
MANAGER [15!
VANCOUVER RESOURCES BOARD
0.  D.  SCHRECK
i appointed by order
The Vancouver Resources Board (V.R.B.) is established under the Comnunity Resources Boards Act and is responsible for the delivery of al-
regional and local social services in the Vancouver area. The Regional Manager is the chief executive officer and reports administratis
to the Directors of the V.R.B.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1975
M 21
REGIONAL MAP
 M 22 HUMAN RESOURCES
PERSONNEL ACTIVITIES
As at December 31, 1975, there were 3,653 staff members in the Department
of Human Resources. This number includes temporary assistance staff who are
employed in positions which are not permanent.
Personnel statistics from the Vancouver Resources Board are not included in
this review of personnel activities. The Vancouver Resources Board provides social
services in Vancouver, but operates outside the Public Service Commission.
In 1975 the number of permanent positions in the Department increased from
1,485 to 2,995. This increase included 1,440 positions at Woodlands and Tranquille transferred from the Department of Health on January 1, 1975, plus 50
added to open new units at Tranquille and several other additions.
Table 2—Permanent Positions Established in 1975
Established positions as of December 31, 1974  1,485
Positions added by transfer from Health Department  1,440
Positions added through salary contingency including new units in
Tranquille    70
Established positions as of December 31, 1975  2,995
The Personnel Division carried out the necessary work connected with placing
individuals in 790 vacancies in the Department during 1975. These vacancies arose
from retirements or resignations, new established positions and appointments.
Table 3—Promotions in 1975
Administrative Officer     1        Hospital Housekeeper     1
Clerk-Stenographer and Typist . 14        Nurse      6
Program Manager     1        Occupational Therapist     1
Regional Director     1 Psychologist      1
Social Worker  12 —
Building Service Worker     2 Total  40
Table 4—Reclassifications1 in 1975
Clerk  1        Stockman  1
Clerk-Stenographer and Typist  84        Phychologist    2
Child Care Counsellor  19        Nurse    3
Financial Assistance Worker and Case               Building Service Worker    1
Aide   19        Mechanic      2
Orderly   2        Machine Operator    3
Program Manager  1                                                                            	
Social Worker  29                   Total    167
1 Reclassification is the upward movement of staff within a classification series as a result of meeting
experience or educational requirements as set out in position specifications, or as a result of position
upgrading after a classification review.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M 23
In 1975 there were 884 retirements and resignations from the Department.
Of this number, 182 were typists and stenographers, 34 were Child Care Counsellors, 91 were Social Workers, 207 were Nurses and Psychiatric Aides, and 31
were Financial Assistance Workers. The balance was made up of small numbers
of various other job categories. Nonpromotional movement of staff by transfer
involved 110 employees this past year.
The following table summarizes personnel activities in 1975 with comparative
data from 1974:
Table 5—Personnel Activities in 1975 and 1974
Activities                                        1975 1974 Activities                                        1975 1974
Vacancies filled   790 660 Retirements and resignations.. 284 358
Promotions      40 70 Transfers (nonpromotional
Reclassifications   167 105           movement of staff)   110 127
The Division recorded 63 Step Three Grievances in 1975, submitted under
provisions of the various collective agreements. Step Three refers to the final stage
before arbitration; one grievance proceeded to arbitration during the year.
ACCOUNTING AND BUDGET
During 1975 the Department of Human Resources established its own Departmental Comptroller's office, replacing the services provided by the Departmental
Comptroller's .office of the Department of Health.
The new Division has emphasized the following:
• More effective financial and fiscal control through a reorganization of the
Accounting Division.
• Introduction of an improved financial reporting system to meet current
demands for financial information.
• The improvement of financial control and assembly of statistical data
through the development of a new system for processing social assistance
payments.   This system is scheduled to be implemented in 1976.
• A better understanding of accountability through the introduction of a
decentralized budgeting process involving program and regional staff.
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION AND PUBLIC INFORMATION
The Division of Office Administration and Public Information provides a
range of administrative support services to the Department. These include analysis
and consultation on administrative requirements in a variety of program areas;
co-ordinating the purchase of all required supplies and equipment; design and
distribution of forms; planning and co-ordination of office space and buildings;
the preparation, printing, and distribution of program policy, procedures, and
administration information; and providing general information to the public.
The Division is also responsible for headquarters mail services and for the
issuance of bus passes to senior citizens.
 M 24 HUMAN RESOURCES
Courtesy cards to senior citizens were also issued by the Division up to
October 1, 1975. Courtesy cards provided a 40-per-cent reduction on B.C. Hydro
bus fares in the greater Vancouver and Victoria areas and senior citizen identification for discounts in some commercial businesses. The issuance of courtesy cards
was discontinued after October 1 as Pharmacare cards were accepted for identification purposes. The change to use of Pharmacare cards for bus discounts had the
effect of immediately expanding the number of persons eligible for discounts on
B.C. Hydro buses from the 140,000 persons who have applied for and received
courtesy cards since the program was started in 1972 to the 241,000 persons over
65 who have -a Pharmacare card. Issuance of Pharmacare cards is automatic at
one's 65th birthday.
The decision to phase out issuance of the courtesy card also represents an
annual saving in processing costs of over $12,000.
STAFF DEVELOPMENT
Staff Development services took on a new look in 1975. The inclusion of
Woodlands, Tranquille, and other adult care residential facilities created a much
broader and more diverse training network. Previously, staff development in the
Department of Human Resources focused on the development of knowledge and
skills in the provision of income assistance and family and child welfare services.
The residential centres brought with them a multitude of courses and seminars
on care of the handicapped and other aspects of physical health and psychiatric and
geriatric care. Unlike the eight social service staff who largely co-ordinate regional
training activity, the seven centre training staff do most of the training themselves.
The geographic convenience of staff in one location, rather than spread throughout
the Province, enables a more direct and continuing involvement with staff being
trained.
Both social service and residential staff have maintained the policy of encouraging participation of staff from other related Government departments and community services. A close working relationship exists between our staff development
program and university and college services.
In 1975 a reported total of 5,945 persons participated in 432 workshops,
seminars, courses, lectures, and special conferences. Because attendance at the
programs was not recorded every time, the total reported is an estimated minimum figure.
The Department's library service is becoming well established. The book and
journal collection covers an increasing range of social welfare concerns. The film,
audio-visual, and audio-cassette collection was established in 1975 and now needs
to be expanded. During the year, library services have been extended to include
Woodlands, Tranquille, Glendale, and Tillicum Lodge.
Training grants in the amount of $40,318 were provided in 1975 to staff on
educational leave. One regional staff development co-ordinator was seconded
for the year to assist in the establishment of the Vancouver Resources Board staff
development program.
RESEARCH
The major activities of the Research Division in 1975 were in the areas of
Federal-Provincial planning and basic research on the origins of client populations.
In addition, there was ongoing work in program evaluation, policy analysis, and
technical assistance in the design and operation of information reporting systems.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1975
M 25
In the area of Federal-Provincial planning, staff members participated in
numerous meetings of the Federal-Provincial Working Party on Income Maintenance. In addition, 1975 saw the institution of a pilot project in two communities
in British Columbia, under the Community Employment Strategy.
In Kamloops and Nanaimo, the pilot project involved efforts to help persons
who had difficulty finding and keeping employment. Co-ordination of existing
Federal and Provincial programs was improved and new programs were established
where gaps existed. By year-end, a consensus was developing that efforts should
be focused on job creation more than on-job training and referral. The Department participated in the Federal-Provincial Working Group which oversees the
project as well as providing evaluative consultation.
The major research effort has been devoted to providing a conceptual framework and pilot verification of the systematic origins of our client populations. This
has required the periodic efforts of four staff members in the design, data collection,
analysis, and ancillary statistical work.
In the area of program evaluation, papers have been produced on Mincome,
Day Care, Northwest Development, Sex Discrimination in the Personnel System, as
well as many shorter analyses of specific programs or portions of programs.
The year saw the completion of a computerized information system for Personnel Division, which is maintained by the Research Division on an ongoing basis.
Finally, the Division is engaged in liaison with other Governmental agencies
on projects of mutual interest. These include the Department of Labour, the Environment and Land Use Secretariat, the Vancouver Resources Board, Canada Manpower, the Royal Commission on Family and Children's Law, and the Department
of Indian Affairs and Northern Development.
  SERVICES FOR FAMILIES
AND CHILDREN
  REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975 M 29
PREVENTIVE AND PROTECTIVE SERVICES FOR
CHILDREN AND THEIR FAMILIES
Protective Services are provided within the statutory responsibilities of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare in the Protection of Children Act. Few of the
children who come to the attention of the staff of the Department of Human
Resources as being in need of protection, however, are brought before a court
under this Act or separated from their families.
Alternatives to apprehension and court appearance are provided by direct and
indirect services such as family counselling, the placement of a homemaker to help
the parents cope more adequately, or a special child care worker to work directly
with a difficult child. Efforts to maintain a child within his or her family unit have
provided an ongoing challenge to the staff of the Department of Human Resources
and have resulted in some excellent innovative programs and a greater involvement
of communities in family services.
For some children, conditions within their own families cannot be ameliorated
except over a fairly lengthy period of time, and these children must be separated
from their parents, brought before the court, and committed to the care of the
Superintendent in order to avoid their continued exposure to an environment in
which they are at risk. Services continue to the family during the period the
children are "in care," with the goal of reuniting the family as soon as possible.
Children who cannot be returned to parents become permanent wards of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare through a court order under the Protection of
Children Act, and the Department of Human Resources is continually seeking
permanent homes where these children can put down new roots and become a part
of a new family. When children are of school age and older it becomes more
difficult for them to adjust to new parents and a new environment. It therefore
rests with every community to provide those services which, in addition to the
protective services of the Department of Human Resources, will help to prevent
family breakdown and assist in early referrals of family and child problems.
Children presently in the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare under
the Protection of Children Act are shown in the following table:
Table 6—Number of Children in the Care and Legal Responsibility of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare Under the Terms of the Protection of
Children Act, as at December 31, 19751
Children Awaiting
Hearing Before
Location Wards the Courts
In British Columbia   5,937 460
Outside British Columbia        206 	
Total     6,143 460
1 These figures are actual as of December  1975  and do not take into  account movement,  that  is,
children who come into care and then leave.
 M 30 HUMAN RESOURCES
Within the area of child protection services lies the critical community concern
for children whose physical safety, and perhaps whose life, depends upon early
recognition and reporting of child abuse. In June 1974, the Protection of Children
Act was amended to make it mandatory that any person who has reason to believe
that a child "has been or is being abandoned, deserted, or maltreated," or "is otherwise in need of protection," report the matter to the Superintendent of Child
Welfare. Throughout the past year there has been evidenced a growing awareness
of this problem in the community, and an increase in the number of reports
received. The year 1975 was the first in which child neglect figures intentionally
appear in the gross totals; 171 cases were reported in both 1973 and 1974, 430
cases were reported in 1975. These gross figures are reduced before analysis by
removing cases of unsubstantiated child abuse or of neglect.
Table 7—Cases of Probable Child Abuse—A Comparison
Age and Sex 19721
Male—under 3 years  26
3-10 years  24
11 years and older  7
No age reported    	
Female—under 3 years  13
3-10 years  22
11 years and older  13
Totals   105 122 140 262
umber
s of Children
19731
19741
197.
24
28
50
37
36
66
15
12
2
25
21
27
31
11
24
46
14
16
44
1 Figures are revised from those appearing in the 1974 Report. Cases of child neglect or unsubstantiated child abuse were included in the figures published in 1974 for period 1971 to 1974. Child neglect
and unsubstantiated child abuse cases do not appear in the 1972-74 figures presented here.
There remains, however, much more to be done in helping members of the
public to better understand the problem of child abuse and their responsibility for
reporting suspected cases, as well as developing better skills in giving help to the
families of abused or neglected children. Doctors and social workers are developing
a team approach to this problem in several communities, and self-help groups are
starting for parents who are concerned about the way in which they react to their
children in times of stress.
Children come into the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare in other
ways besides action under the Protection of Children Act. There has been an increase in the number of cases of children placed by the courts in the interim custody
of the Superintendent because of conflict between the two parents over custody. The
two statutes most frequently invoked are the Family Relations Act in the Provincial
Court and the Equal Guardianship of Infants Act in the Supreme Court. Where
parents are bitterly contesting the custody of children following a separation, the
Judge may order that the children be placed in a neutral setting until the matter is
settled.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1975 M 31
Under a provision of the Equal Guardianship of Infants Act, the Superintendent of Child Welfare also becomes the guardian of children who are orphaned and
for whom no other guardian has been named by the parents. Many of the children
are cared for by close relatives, to whom in some instances, the Superintendent of
Child Welfare has been able to transfer his guardianship by indenture.
Table 8—Number of Children in the Care and Legal Responsibility of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare, Under the Terms of the Equal Guardianship of Infants Act and Other Acts,1 as at December 31, 1975
EGIA, FRA and
Location Similar Wardsi
In British Columbia  423
Outside British Columbia      57
Total   480
1 The new Family Relations Act results in temporary commitals to the Superintendent's care, and
Supreme Court Judges occasionally make temporary orders through other Acts.
Committal of children to the charge of the Superintendent of Child Welfare may
also be a disposition of the Provincial Court under the Juvenile Delinquents Act, and
in 1975, the numbers of children "in care" under this Act are shown in the following
table:
Table 9—Number of Children in the Care and Legal Responsibility of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare, as a Result of a Finding Under the
Juvenile Delinquents Act, as at December 31, 1975
Location of Children JPA Wards
In British Columbia      625
Outside British Columbia           3
Total   628
Children also come into the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare as "non-
wards." This refers to instances in which children are placed in the care of the
Superintendent through a mutual agreement between the parents and the Department. This agreement, of course, does not have the binding nature of a court order
and the agreement may be broken by either party at any time. This group of children has the highest turn-over of all the children in the care of the Superintendent.
The act of taking children into nonward care is essentially one of a preventive nature.
Besides the children mentioned above, 241 children who were wards from other
provinces were also in the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare at year-end.
 M 32
HUMAN RESOURCES
The following figure compares the total number of children-in-care over several
years:
Figure 2
Total Number of Children-in-Care and Legal Responsibility of the Superintendent of
Child Welfare as at March 31, 1972-75, and at December 31, 1975
10,274
March 31,
1972
9,913
March 31,
1973
9,584
March 31,
1974
9,883
March 31,
1975
9,866
December 31,
1975
Repatriation of children—Another service that the Child Welfare Division
is involved in is the repatriation of children, that is, arranging for the return of
children to their province or state of residence. Children under 17 years of age who
are temporarily stranded in British Columbia and children from British Columbia
stranded in other provinces or states are looked after by this program. Arrangements
for transportation, contact with parents, stop-over supervision, escort where required, and liaison with other child welfare authorities is undertaken.
Under the latest interprovincial agreement, which excludes Ontario, there is no
chargeback (i.e., billing the child's province of previous residence for maintenance
costs) if a British Columbia child in care moves to another province. Ontario continues to charge back for children arriving there on their own. All provinces charge
back if a child is placed in an institution. The number of children repatriated over
the last several years is illustrated in the following figure:
Figure 3
Repatriation of Children, Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1974/75 and
Calendar Year 1975
674
1971/72
595
1972/73
717
1973/74
904
1974/75
843
1975
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1975
M 33
These figures include movement in and out of the Province only. Within the
Province there is, also, substantial movement in returning children to their own
homes.
In 1975, the Royal Commission on Family and Children's Law, chaired by the
Honourable Mr. Justice Berger, set out its recommendations after more than a year
of research and public hearings. These recommendations encompass a large area
of law affecting families and children, including the whole area of the protection of
children, their custody, and guardianship.
During 1975, the following community grants were made by the Department to
preventive programs for youth. All funded projects include counselling services:
YOUTH PROGRAMS
Amount
Granted,
1975
Name of Project and Location
Armstrong: $
Armstrong Community Services—Youth Centre (drop-in)        6,354
Burnaby:
Burnaby Citizens Development Fund (counselling, intensive care)    69,387
Burnaby PURPOSE (special care)   70,800
Bridge the Gap (integration of Indians, and rehabilitative and preventive services)   8,423
Lochdale Community School Worker (detached worker)     7,875
Campbell River:
Campbell River Youth Centre (drop-in centre)        22,761
Comox:
Comox Youth Services (two street workers)          1,750
Cowichan :
Lake Cowichan & District Activity and Resource Centre (youth activity)      52,596
Regional District of Cowichan Valley Activity Centre      25,125
Cranbrook:
Cranbrook Boys and Girls Club (special project)      18,672
Delta:
Hillside Boys Club of Delta (special project)           13,653
Duncan:
Duncan Community Options (alternate living, drop-in centre).        32,971
Kamloops:
Kamloops Boys and Girls Club      14,673
Kamloops Community Y    25,575
Kamloops Westsyde Students Service (outreach project)   ._. 10,935
Kitimat:
Kitimat Youth Centre (street workers)            6,615
Maple Ridge:
Hammond School Worker (street worker)
6,615
Nanaimo:
Nanaimo AID (crisis and drop-in centre)            14,466
Nanaimo Boys Club          20,358
Nelson:
Nelson Youth Activities Centre (drop-in centre with counselling)       13,638
New Westminster:
New Westminster Y Detached Worker ...          31,740
North Shore:
North Shore Family Service Centre (counselling)          9,060
 M 34 HUMAN RESOURCES
YOUTH PROGRAMS—Continued
Amount
Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1975
Penticton : $
Penticton Special Action (youth counselling)   9,947
Port Renfrew :
Port Renfrew Community Centre (drop-in centre)   11,826
Prince Rupert:
Third Avenue Worker (street worker)   1,815
City of Prince Rupert Youth Attendance Centre    5,890
Richmond:
Project Contact  89,124
Salmon Arm:
Shuswap Youth Centre (drop-in)   45,155
Smithers:
Smithers Youth Centre (drop-in)   25,443
Surrey:
Surrey Apartment Complex (six staff in three-apartment complex—preventive
service)    36,891
Vancouver:
Capilano Youth Council (counselling and leadership development)   2,000
Recreational Track and Field   16,398
Cedar Cottage Youth Employment    30,375
Dunbar/West Point Grey Youth Project  30,313
Summer Fun, 1975  8,811
Kitsilano Youth Project  27,423
Youth Activity Group   3,350
Killarney Gardens Summer Fun  200
Khalsa Diwan     50
OK School  360
Explore Vancouver     4,452
Tenants Rights for Children  300
Victoria :
Victoria Society for Autistic Children (workers with handicapped children)   42,096
Langford Boys Club   14,235
Victoria Y Detached Workers (outreach project)   69,811
Vic West Neighbourhood House (Vic West Development, drop-in)   44,706
Williams Lake:
The Lighthouse (drop-in centre)   8,784
Total Community Grants    999,562
DAY CARE—A PREVENTIVE SERVICE
The objective for this program during 1975 has continued to be twofold. First,
to develop a variety of day care services that are truly good for children and supportive to families; and second, to enable the lower income family to use these
services through subsidization.
Description: Though it is impossible to determine with any accuracy the total
number of children receiving some type of day care in British Columbia, we do
know there are at least 18,603 community care facilities licensed pre-school spaces
for children. The unlicensed service, where a family day care mother offers care to
only one or two children, adds at least several thousand to this number. The
Department of Human Resources is not involved in monitoring unlicensed family
day care, unless subsidization is requested. See Table 10 for a breakdown of numbers of children receiving subsidization during 1975.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M 35
Table 10—Children Receiving Subsidized Day Care as of December 31, 1975
Program                                                            Half Day Full Day Total
Group day care          137 4,009 4,146
Family day care         141 3,090 3,231
Nursery school        727 10 737
Out of school     1,809 124 1,933
Special need centre       459 572 1,031
In-home day care        103 697 800
3,376 8,502 11,878
The single-parent family continues to be the most frequent recipient of subsidization, comprising nearly 70 per cent of the total number.
Six different types of day care services exist to meet individual family needs.
Subsidies for attendance in private kindergarten was dropped this year, as the public
school system now provides this service for the majority of 5-year-olds. Parents
choose the program they prefer, and complete an income or needs test should they
require help with fees. Eligibility is based on net income, including family allowance (see Table 11). Approximately 5 per cent of British Columbia's pre-school
population presently receives some type of Provincially subsidized day care.
1. Family day care—Day care provided in a home other than the child's own,
may be either licensed or unlicensed. A mother caring for three to five children
requires a Community Care Facilities licence. If one or two children are involved,
then no formal licence is needed, but subsidization of parents using the home is
dependent on the approval of Department of Human Resources' staff. This usually
takes the form of a home visit and check of references.
Family day care has the advantage of being able to accommodate a wide age-
range of children. Hours can be flexible, and care more readily found for children
in their own neighbourhood, or near their schools.
At the close of 1975, there were 1,141 community care facilities licensed
family day care home spaces in British Columbia, up from approximately 900 in
1974. An average 3,200 children received subsidization each month in this program, including both licensed and unlicensed homes.
2. Group day care—A regular group day care centre may provide service for
up to 25 children in one group for a period of up to 10 hours per day, five days
per week. Some children attend centres for half the day only. Staff require special
preparation in child care, and the services generally must meet basic standards of
health and safety. Facilities are inspected at least annually by the Department of
Health.
Group day care has the advantage of offering care by specially trained staff,
and makes it possible for children to mix with other children of diverse backgrounds. There are 47 specialized group day centres offering services to 943 handicapped children.
At the close of 1975, approximately 607 of the total number of community
care facilities licensed group day care spaces were filled by children receiving
subsidies. This represents a drop from 1974 when 70 per cent of the total spaces
were occupied by children receiving the Provincial subsidy.
3. In-home care—This service is designed to enable subsidization of parents
who hire someone to come into their homes to care for their children. Each plan
must be individually approved by the administering authority in terms of suitability
and social need.
 M 36
HUMAN RESOURCES
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M 37
Since this has been a difficult program to administer, a policy change in March
restricted subsidization to shift-working parents.
4. Out-of-school care—Family and group centres can often accommodate a
child up to 12 years of age, needing care and supervision after school or when
school is not in session.
As of October 1975, 89 community care facilities specially licensed out-of-
school programs were providing services to 1,389 children. This represents an
expansion of 29 new programs in 1975.
A maximum of $50 monthly is available under the subsidy program for children requiring care for four hours or less daily during school sessions.
Many communities are expressing an interest in this service and see it as an
area of increasing need. Approximately 1,900 children are being subsidized each
month in this service.
5. Nursery schools—This is a part-time service offering care, extra stimulation,
and preparation for school for children 3 to 5 years of age. It is also viewed as a
support for families where the parent may require short periods of relief, but not
necessarily full-time day care.
There are 304 community care facilities licensed nursery schools in the Province, providing a service for 7,138 children. Fewer than 750 are receiving
subsidization.
6. Special needs—Specially licensed part-day programs offer specialized care
for handicapped children.
Capital and Equipment Grant Program—The capital grants program, initiated
in April 1973, assists in the development of needed day care spaces. Grants up
to a maximum of $20,000 for capital expenditures and $2,500 for equipment
expenditures are available to nonprofit societies on a "matching" basis. "Matching" can be accomplished in various ways, such as donations of land, materials,
cash, labour, or professional skills.
The rapid expansion of the program over the previous two years was followed
by a slowing of development in 1975. As a result, many more applications for
grants were received than could be accommodated. A number of groups were
therefore unable to proceed.
Capital grants totalled $317,783.28. This amount included 10 maximum and
two partial capital grants, and grants to cover renovating and upgrading costs
for 26 centres throughout the Province.
Expenditure for equipment grants totalled $71,534.93.
Pre-fab day care units—During 1975 nine Government-purchased prefabricated units for group day care began operating on sites provided by the City of
Vancouver. Work on three additional units was started on sites provided in Surrey,
Kelowna, and Sparwood. In all areas there was considerable local participation
and contributions on the part of city, municipal, and school board officials, community and parent volunteers. The Department of Public Works, together with
our Department's Division of Office Administration, gave much helpful advice and
supervision in carrying out the project. Capital expenditures of $493,248.74
were made for these units in 1975.
Under a lease arrangement with our Department, nonprofit societies are
managing nine of these day care centres. In Vancouver, three of the centres are
managed directly by the Vancouver Resources Board, in the absence of community-
parent societies.
In summary, the total capital and equipment grants expenditure was
$882,566.95 to 49 day care societies.
 M 38
HUMAN RESOURCES
Changing patterns—Compared to the rapid growth experienced during
1973 and 1974, day care expansion slowed in 1975. This was partly brought about
by the limitation of funds available for new development, and partly by the fact
that while incomes have generally increased, it has not been possible to change
the income test used to determine eligibility for subsidization. Fewer families are
now qualifying for subsidization.
As an example, a single parent with a net income of $620 in 1974, and two
children to support, would have to contribute $65 to monthly day care costs. By
1975, if the parent's income had increased to $720, the parent would be required
to contribute $ 115 to day care. With the sharply increased cost of living cutting
into the parent's $100 increase, the family would have to pay an additional $50
for day care.
Figure 4
Children Receiving Subsidized Day Care, as of December 31, 1971-75
2,000
2,500
9,500
1971 1972 1973
12,950
1974
11,878
1975
A number of group day care centres that began development during 1973
and 1974 were completed this year, bringing our total number of centres to 2<S6
with 6,532 spaces. More than two-thirds of these centres are being operated by
nonprofit parent community societies.
Figure 5
Number of Group Day Care Centres in British Columbia Operating
and Being Developed at Year-end 1970-75
■■'-■■■:   ?m-
54
1970
67
1971
152
1972
250
1973
280
1974
1975
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1975
M 39
Group day care centre operators faced numerous hurdles during 1975. Fees
did not increase, but staff demands for improved salaries and benefits did. Approximately 40 centres are unionized, with their operating societies becoming
directly involved in negotiations with the unions—some for the first time in 1975.
As a result, very difficult decisions have had to be made about funding priorities
in order to meet increased costs.
This problem has been augmented by the fact that enrolment was not always
stable. This can be accounted for by two trends—higher unemployment had led
to more parents at home with their children, and, as mentioned earlier, families
with employed members were generally paying a relatively larger portion of their
disposable income for day care. As a result, vacancies in day care were not uncommon.
The demand for day care facilities for children under three years of age continues to be felt. Centre care for this age group is very costly, with standards
difficult to meet. There are presently 25 pilot group centres licensed to offer
"under-3" care. The cost of care varies from $160 to $220 per month per child,
based on the operating budget of the centre. Pre-school training courses to prepare staff to care for this age-group are still lacking in British Columbia.
Alternative ways to meet this need are being explored, with supported family
day care programs a promising possibility.
Supported family day care refers to a service provided for family day care
operators whereby they are offered an opportunity to take part in such things as
equipment exchanges, relief services in emergencies, instruction in child care, and
to generally become more directly involved in improving the quality of family
home care. The service is usually sponsored by a nonprofit agency or group with
staff who are experienced and trained in child care.
Evaluation and review of existing services continues, with day care consultant staff available to outlying areas for this purpose.
Cost-sharing—The Federal Government agreed to 50:50 cost-sharing on
day care subsidies in 1974. Attempts have been made to modify the income test
to present-day levels, but since Federal approval for cost-sharing is dependent
on increases in Provincial social assistance rates, no decisions have yet been made.
There was progress in 1975 in the area relating to cost-sharing of capital and
equipment costs. A simplified formula for sharing is being worked out whereby
British Columbia will be able to obtain sharing for the $2,124,546 spent for this
purpose since 1973.
Table 12-
Year
—Total Day Care Expenditures and Federal Sharing,
Calendar Years 1971—75
Federal          Percentage That Federal
Provincial                     Portion                   Sharing Is of
Expenditure                  Claimed          Provincial Expenditure
$                                 $
1975
..... 12,865,779
4,158,700                    32.3
3,845,000                    37.7
1,609,000                    37.7
660,000                    43.0
518,000                    43.4
1974
....   10,198,000
1973  .   .....
     .....    4,267,000
1972 	
....    .        1,534,000
1971  	
                1,194,000
 M 40 HUMAN RESOURCES
SPECIAL SERVICES TO CHILDREN
Goal—The goal of the Special Services to Children and Their Families Program is to enable children to grow up successfully in their own homes or communities. It focuses on situations in which a child is clearly in danger of being removed
from his or her own family or community.
Description—Services are provided by individuals in the community who
have the ability to form understanding and empathetic relationships and who can,
through their relationships, work toward specific objectives of service. The Department contracts with individuals or societies on an hourly basis to a maximum
of 35 hours per week to provide specific services to particular families. Contracts
are generally short-term in nature, from 8 to 12 weeks duration.
Since the inception of this program in November of 1973, a three-stage evaluation program was undertaken, the result of which was the drafting of a set of
guidelines which focused on the goals and limits of the program. Although the
guidelines (which became effective April 1, 1975) limited to an extent the degree of innovation in the program, there have been numerous positive results from
the use of the program over the past year.
In several instances adolescents who had a history of conflicts with the law
curbed their delinquent behaviour as a result of having formed a positive relationship with a special services worker. Multi-problem families in which frequent
crisis situations had in the past resulted in apprehension of one or more of the
children were kept together with the input of a special services worker at the time
of crisis.   The cost of these services rarely exceeded $450 per contract per month.
Departmental expenditures for Special Services to Children are as follows:
Table 13—Special Services to Children, Departmental Expenditure,
Fiscal Year 1974/75 and Calendar Years 1974 and 1975
$
1975    ;  7,140,000
1974     4,300,000
1974/75   6,189,700
Educational support services, funded out of the Special Services budget in
1974, were administered as a separate program (see Children's Rehabilitative
Program) in 1975. Educational support services totalled $1.1 million in 1974.
The increase in expenditure for special services in 1975, then, represents a larger
expansion of the program than can be inferred by the $2.8-million increase noted
in the table above, since educational programs are no longer included in the budget.
Cost-sharing—An agreement in principal was reached with the Federal
Government in 1975 to allow for cost-sharing on this program. The percentage
of total costs that the Federal Government will share was still under discussion
at year-end.
YOUTH HOSTEL PROGRAM
Goal—Youth hostels are provided to make low-cost accommodation available for Canadian youth travelling in British Columbia.
Description—Youth are referred to hostels for a maximum stay of three
days and are asked to pay $1.50 per day in Vancouver and $1 per day outside
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M 41
Vancouver. This entitles them to a bed and two meals for a maximum stay of three
days. The average age of travellers was around 20 years, but ages ranged from 16
to over 25 years.
This year, the Summer Youth Hostel Program involved 17 hostels, most of
them temporary, in 12 communities across British Columbia. These hostels provided 47,394 bed-nights to 26,603 individuals between June and September.
As in past years, financial responsibility for the program was shared between
the British Columbia Department of Human Resources and the Office of the
Federal Secretary of State. Secretary of State, through grants to community
groups, funded most of the salary and operational costs of the hostels. A grant
from the Department of Human Resources to the Association of British Columbia
Hostels was used primarily for costs associated with the eight hostels in Vancouver.
This year's experience re-emphasized the fact that the costs of the hostel program
need not be exorbitant. Hostel users contributed $44,500 toward the cost of the
program. The hostel program also provided shelter and food for several thousand
destitute travellers.
Provincial expenditures for the youth hostel program over the last several
years were as follows:
Table 14-
Year
1975 	
-Youth Hostels,
Provincial Expenditures,
1972 to 1975
Calendar Years
Amount
$
66,814
1974 	
.      120,503
1973 	
127,592
1972 	
  425.000
The Association of British Columbia Hostels, funded through the Department
of Human Resources, administered the moneys for food which were not met by the
user fees to the hostels outside Vancouver. Two training sessions were sponsored
by ABCH under their Provincial grant. The ABCH played a significant role in
bringing hostel operators from across the Province together to share ideas and
experiences as well as developing a new hostel this year.
Community support for the hostel program increased in several areas. In
Port Alberni the city council gave the hostel a grant of $2,300 to renovate the
hostel building and the Community Resources Society appointed two of their members to serve on the hostel board. In Smithers and Fort St. John the Community
Resources Societies actually took over the responsibility for the operation of the
hostel. In Kelowna the City Manager was requested by City Council to aid ,the
hostel committee in their search for a suitable building. In Vancouver and
Nanaimo the use of schools for hostels has become a routine matter.
Once again in 1975, The British Columbia Wayfarers Guide was published
for youth travellers in British Columbia and was distributed to all the hostels in the
Province.
Total numbers of people who used the Summer Hostel Program are illustrated
in the following table. As a result of the hostel program, some young people, who
in the past may have ended up on social assistance, have been encouraged to
remain off assistance and to return home, using the temporary help of hostels where
necessary.
 M 42
HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 15—
Summer
Hostel Program Statistics, 1975
Money
Number
Number
Number
Cana
Col
of
of
of
dian Cit
U.S. Cit
lected
Bed-
Persons
Males
Females
izenship
izenship
Other
$
nights
For St. John 	
328
263
65
166
88
74
333
368
Hope  	
...     2,525
1,849
676
1,639
594
292
2,443
3,107
100 Mile House	
295
221
74
166
78
51
707
417
Kamloops   -
...      1,185
869
316
851
185
149
988
1,293
Nanaimo 	
....     2,331
1,564
767
1,431
519
381
2,444
3,385
Port Alberni  	
....     1,063
748
315
680
216
167
2,094
1,255
Prince George 	
1,148
860
288
635
337
176
1,360
1,525
829
532
297
368
340
121
1,555
1,258
Revelstoke 	
...     1,451
1,107
344
951
306
194
1,429
1,676
Smithers  	
284
194
90
177
81
26
362
409
Victoria	
Subtotals	
Vancouver:
4,811
2,949
1,862
2,385
1,687
739
10,052
7,204
16,250
11,156
5,094
9,449
4,431
2,370
23,767
21,897
Catholic Charities ....
...     1.209
1,209
468
4,836
F. Nightingale ...
626
143
483
285
235
106
1,754
1,258
Henry Hudson	
842
842
423
223
196
2,066
1,532
....     1,991
1,042
949
1,072
584
335
5,004
5,851
Queen Mary	
936
936
430
315
191
2,299
1,601
-     1,833
1,833
1,240
335
258
2,343
3,210
Tribal Village...	
924
924
2,003
3,696
YWCA	
Subtotals	
1,992
1,992
1,185
506
301
4,753
3,513
....   10,353
6,929
3,424
4,635
2,198
1,387
20,690
25,497
Totals	
26,603
18,085
8,518
14,084
6,629
3,757
44,457
47,394
Federal-Provincial cost-sharing — The two senior Governments shared
costs of the program in 1975 as follows:
Table 16—Youth Hostel Program, Provincial and Federal Funding,
Calendar Year 1975
$
Federal contribution    157,941
Total provincial contribution     66,814
Total Government funding  224,755
Provincial recovery re cost-sharing     33,407
Total Federal contribtuion  191,348
CHILD CARE RESOURCES—INTRODUCTION
The Department of Human Resources attempts to provide the best individual
care for children who, for whatever reason, cannot remain in their own homes. In
placing children in outside resources, all efforts are made to help the children lead
as natural and normal a life-style as possible.
The following figure illustrates the variety of placements that are used for
children in the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare:
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M 43
Figure 6
Children in Care by Type of Care as at December 31, 1975
Receiving and
Group Homes and
Therapeutic Homes
Adoption
Probation
Children
Foster homes   5,965
Own homes or homes of relatives and boarding homes    1,396
Specialized treatment resources   1,492
Receiving and group homes and therapeutic homes  598
Adoption probation   415
Total number of children in care       9,866
Under the discussion of protective and preventive services for children, we
underlined the Government's intent of keeping children in their own homes and
communities. In keeping with this philosophy, social workers attempt to place
children as near as possible to their families for visiting and to make easier their
transition back home. This has meant that many communities have had to develop,
for the first time, a variety of suitable child care resources within their own communities. This is a great improvement over the previous situation where children
were often sent some distance to a large institution or other resource.
A description of the types of care mentioned in the figure above follows,
beginning with the most frequently used resource—foster homes.
 M 44
HUMAN RESOURCES
FOSTER HOMES
Foster homes first emerged in British Columbia in the 1930's as an alternative
to institutional care. In 1975, as the above figure illustrates, foster homes were
the most frequently used resource for children not in their own homes. Of the
9,866 children in care at December 31, 1975, 5,965 were in foster homes.
Children placed in foster homes come into care with the voluntary consent of
parents, as temporary or permanent wards under the Protection of Children Act;
as Equal Guardianship of Infants Act wards; or because of a conviction under the
Federal Juvenile Delinquents Act.
The goals of those working with foster children are many. Most important is
the good substitute care which foster parents offer to the child to meet his or her
physical, emotional, and social needs. Foster parents provide a home and family
relationship which is supportive and serves as a model for the child's future.
Social workers involved in foster placements attempt to find a family for each
child that is most suitable to the child's individual requirements. The overriding
goal is, if at all possible, to reunite the child with his or her natural family at some
future date. Human Resources staff work, therefore, with the child's "natural"
family as well as with the child and the foster family. If it is demonstrated that it
is not possible to reunite the child with his/her family, then the social worker
attempts to provide an alternative permanent plan at the earliest possible date.
Usually this alternative plan is adoption, particularly in the case of younger
children. In some circumstances, however, especially with an older child, adoption may not be possible. Many older children are ready for independence and
sometimes have strong ties with the original parents or present foster parents.
Usually in these cases the child is placed in a resource that best meets his/her
needs, such as a group home or an independent boarding-home.
In certain situations, particularly when a child is orphaned, a relative or close
friend of the parents assumes the foster parent role. This is often a voluntary
arrangement, with the Department providing advice or assistance if called upon.
Foster parents are paid varying rates according to the age of the child. These
rates cover clothing and basic maintenance such as food, the child's share of household equipment and operation, transportation, recreation, gifts, and spending allowances. Family allowances are included in the rates but there is no fee for service
in the regular rates.
In special instances where the child requires extra care or special management,
a reasonable fee for service is paid to foster parents based on the extra amount of
their time and skills that are required. Service fees take into consideration tasks of
preparing special diets, special routines, discipline, extra help with homework, and
arranging the child's visits with family and social workers. Standard fees for foster
care are outlined in Table 17.
Table 17—Regular Foster Home Rates as of December 31, 1975
Basic Clothing
Age-group                                                              Maintenance Allowance Total
$ $ $
Birth to 5 years      82.08 9 91.08
6-11 years      97.08 17 114.08
12-13 years     118.08 21 139.08
14 years and over  130.08 24 154.08
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M 45
Foster parents are usually very dedicated and actively involved in child care
interests. The B.C. Federation of Foster Parent Associations, a registered society
which brings together foster parents, social workers, and other interested people,
works actively at improving and enhancing the care of foster children in British
Columbia. Approximately 20 per cent of all foster parents are active in the 31
Foster Parent Associations throughout the Province. In 1975 the Provincial body
received funds totalling $34,858! from Government to carry out its work. A total
of 50 social workers in Department of Human Resources offices throughout British
Columbia act as consultants to the local chapters of the Federation.
The Foster Parents Association in the Capital Region received an additional
$9,026x in 1975 to carry out a highly successful program. Frequent appeals in
the media for new foster parents were followed up by discussion groups in which
experienced foster parents shared their experiences with prospective foster parents.
Despite the close inter-relationship with Government, the Federation maintains an independent watchdog role, providing valuable feedback to Government
on the effectiveness of child welfare policies. A regular newsletter is sent to all
foster parents of policy changes. For those wishing to find out more about the
Foster Parent Federation, please write to British Columbia Federation of Foster
Parent Associations, Room 207, 800 Cassiar Street, Vancouver, B.C. (telephone
299-9131).
During the last several years, expenditure on foster care has increased while
the actual number of children in foster homes has declined slightly. A comparison
of the number of children in foster care over the last few years is illustrated in the
following table:
Table
1
December
March 31,
March 31,
March  31,
March 31,
18—Number of Children in Foster Home Care,
December 31, 1975, and March 31,1972 to 1975
N
31.  1975 .       ....    	
is at
amber of Children
... 5,965
1975 	
.... 6,109
1974 .   .....
.... 6,140
1973 	
.... 6,471
1972 	
.... 6,762
As a result of the Government policy of offering more help to families so that
children are taken "into care" as a last resort only, some change in the general
characteristics of children, who have become the Department's responsibility, has
been observed. We have a relatively greater number of children with severe problems, as compared with the children in care of 5 or 10 years ago.
Because more of the children with milder problems are being assisted to
remain in their own families, foster parents find themselves, in general, faced with
a more demanding role. The Department is recognizing that it must extend more
support to foster parents. Programs of recruitment and training were expanded in
1975 and will continue.
Departmental expenditures on foster home care in 1975 and fiscal years
1971/72 to 1974/75 are as follows:
lAn additional $10,875  to  the  Federation of Foster Parents  and  $2,636  to  the  Capital  Region   Foster
Parents Association had been awarded in 1974 for operating expenses in the first three months of 1975.
 M 46 HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 19—Foster Home Care, Departmental Expenditures,
Calendar Year 1975 and Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1974/75
$ Million
1975    13.9
1974/75	
  14.6
1973/74 	
 .  11.6
1972/73 	
  10.3
1971/72 	
     9.5
Cost-sharing—Foster care is-cost-shared 50:50 by the Federal and Provincial Governments.
THERAPEUTIC HOMES
Description—A therapeutic home is a residential resource, usually for one
child, operated by a person with child care worker skills in his or her own home.
The resource is selected when a child requires intensive treatment and would benefit from receiving it in a family setting rather than a treatment institution. It is
frequently used in communities where no treatment institutions exist and the child
would otherwise have to move from the community.
A contract is drawn up between the therapeutic parent and the Department of
Human Resources for three months, and where necessary, for further three-month
periods up to a maximum of one year. The contract outlines treatment goals,
methods to be used, and a date when progress will first be reviewed. Guidelines
outlining this policy for therapeutic homes were developed, effective April 1, 1975,
following a review of the program that was still continuing at year-end. The program was instituted in 1974, with more open-ended procedures in its first year of
operation.
The therapeutic home is a short-term placement with the goal of resolving
specific behavioural or emotional problems and with a view to returning the child
to his or her home or to a less-intensive community resource within one year. This
program was started in 1974 and is in line with Government philosophy of getting
away from institutional placements for children, of solving children's problems in
their own community, and of creating an appropriate resource for a particular
child rather than always expecting the child to adapt to existing institutions.
In the 1974/75 fiscal year, $674,251 was expended on this program which
provided for an average of 47 homes on a total-year basis. Departmental expenditures on the program from January 1 to December 31, 1975, was $386,688. The
reduction in expenditure in 1975 is directly related to the institution of more
stringent administrative guidelines, referred to above.
Cost-sharing—Payments to persons running therapeutic homes are shared
with the Federal Government on a 50:50 basis.
GROUP HOMES
Goal—The purpose of group homes is to provide skilled, effective parenting,
or child care services to children who cannot remain in their own or foster homes
but who are able to function as members of the community.
Description—Group homes are normally staffed by resident houseparents.
These homes have a capacity for five to eight children and are primarily suitable for
adolescents.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M 47
Group homes may have specialized functions such as receiving, assessment,
short-term treatment, or long-term care of difficult children, or they may provide
a combination of services.
Group homes may be contracted for with private individuals, community nonprofit societies, or a combination of these two.
Fees for service on a contractual basis are paid to group home parents at rates
of $1,428 or $1,501 monthly, depending upon experience. Contractual payments
to group home parents also include allocations for food, clothing, and personal
supplies for the children, as well as an amount to cover relief help, care and maintenance of the facility, planned programs of activity, recreation, and transportation.
Where need for a receiving home fluctuates or where there is no suitable
resource potential for group homes as outlined above, the Department may contract for a "bed subsidy home" on a yearly renewable basis. Under the bed subsidy
arrangement, the Department pays $50 to $80 per month to ensure that a bed space
is maintained for emergencies. Several bed spaces in one home may be guaranteed
in such a way. Regular foster home rates are also paid for children when actually
placed. These resources are privately operated and are usually short-term in
nature.
During 1975, there were 160 group homes functioning with 1,004 beds
available.
Table 20—Group Homes (Including Receiving Homes), Departmental
Expenditures, Calendar Year 1975 and Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1974/75
$ Millions $ Millions
Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1975  4.77        Fiscal year 1972/73   1.94
Fiscal year 1974/75  3.73        Fiscal year 1971/72   1.55
Fiscal year 1973/74  3.54
The most significant change this year has been the move to regional budgetting
and management of the group and therapeutic home program.
The number of group homes doubled in the period 1972-74. The year 1975
has largely been a year of consolidation with emphasis on utilization of already
established resources. The emphasis in 1976 will continue on utilization as well as
improvement in standards of service provided.
An evaluation of the program was begun in August 1975 and continues.
Cost-sharing—Payments made to group home parents are shareable with the
Federal Government on a 50:50 basis.
SPECIALIZED RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT PROGRAMS
Goal—To provide residential care for children in need of specialized child
care services because of emotional or behavioural difficulties, or because of physical
and mental handicaps. The goal of this program is to provide specialized care and
treatment to restore the child to as normal a life-style as possible. The efforts of
Government have been to reduce the size of institutions and the numbers of children
placed in institutions wherever possible.
Description—Residential placements for emotional and behavioural difficulties are generally utilized when the problems are sufficiently severe that they
require a higher level of professional care than can be provided in community
programs. There are approximately 500 children in British Columbia in this
position who utilize a number of resources. The average capacity of these resources
is approximately 20 children.
 M 48 HUMAN RESOURCES
The majority of such programs are operated through independent societies and
vary in philosophy and treatment. Thirty-five nonprofit societies are funded by the
Department to provide this intensive care. The Department continues to emphasize
shorter-term residential treatment and greater community involvement and family
support. The goal of this kind of residential placement is to help the child adjust
to living again in his or her community with the minimum of support possible. A
number of the programs are developing shorter-term assessment capacities and have
initiated day programs to assist this movement.
The resources we are discussing are generally highly staffed. A number of
resources have staff resident ratios of 1:1. The trend toward shorter-term programs
and more community and family involvement has continued in 1975.
The range of residential treatment resources for mentally retarded children and
adults are described in the section "Services for Special Needs."
Departmental expenditures for specialized treatment programs in calendar year
1975 and fiscal years 1971-75 were as follows:
Table 21—Specialized Residential Treatment Programs, Departmental
Expenditures, Calendar Year 1975, and Fiscal Years 1971-75
$ Millions
1975   12.81
1974/75       8.41
1973/74      8.82
1972/73       4.7
1971 /72      4.4
1 Excludes operating costs for Woodlands, Glendale, and Tranquille.
2 Includes operating costs for Glendale.
Cost-sharing—Residential treatment programs are cost-shared with the Federal Government on a 50:50 basis.
ADOPTION
Goal—Adoption is primarily a service to the child. It is the legal placement
of a child in a permanent adoptive home. Services are rendered also to the person
or persons who want to become adoptive parents, as well as the biological parents
of adopted children.
The Department is responsible for ensuring that the legal and social requirements have been met in each adoption completed in British Columbia.
Description—The program will be described in two sections—adoption
placement and adoption completion.
A. Adoption Placement
All children available for adoption are planned for as soon as sufficient
information is available to do so. In the case of infants, placement directly from
hospital on the eleventh day continues to receive first priority. The number of
infants referred, newborns to one month, maintains an average level of 35 per
month. Preference is given to those homes where there can be no children born
to the marriage and within this group to those waiting over 12 months for a child.
A majority of the newborn children are placed from Vancouver hospitals and, of
these, it is estimated that 60 per cent of the relinquishing parents have their, homes
in other areas of the Province or outside British Columbia.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M 49
The remaining children placed include a large number of hard-to-place children and those with special needs. Such needs can refer to medical problems,
emotional difficulties, and being part of a large family group.
The following table illustrates the number of children with special needs placed
for adoption by the Department of Human Resources and the Vancouver Resources
Board during the 1974/75 fiscal year:
Table 22—Number of Children With Special Neea
Department of Human Resources and Vancouvt
Fiscal Year 1974/75.
Department
of Human
Resources
Inter-racial origin and origin
other than white           184
s Placed for Adoption by
'.r Resources Board During
Vancouver
Resources
Board                   Total
32                      216
6                 161
29                    57
67                  434
origin other than white or have a
and are not shown in the category
Health problems	
         155
Over 1 year of age *	
           28
Totals 	
        367
inter-racial origin and
of the first categories
1 Children over 1 year of age who are of
health problem have been shown in either one
"Over 1 year of age."
One highlight of this past year has been the placement of a large family group,
an orphaned family of six. These children had been previously in two foster homes
and had kept in touch with one another. Other satisfying placements have included
two siblings ages 10 and 12 years for whom we had almost despaired of finding a
family they could call their very own. The children had been available for some
time but no adopting parents seemed willing to take the risk with children of this age.
This placement is proceeding with adjustments on everyone's part, of course, but
with a genuine commitment from adopting parents and children to ensure its success.
This example could be repeated with most of the 45 children over the age of 6 years
available for adoption.
The following table gives a breakdown of the age-range of children placed
from January 1 to December 31, 1975:
Table 23—Ages of Children Placed for Adoption by Department of Human
Resources and Vancouver Resources Board During Calendar Year 1975
Age
Number
of
Children
308
Birth up to but not including 15 days
15 days up to but not including
1 month  105
1 month up to but not including
3 months   69
3 months up to but not including
6 months    42
6 months up to but not including
1 year  51
1 year  46
2 years  25
3 years    15
4 years     11
5 years  13
6 years   14
7 years     7
Number
of
Age Children
8 years        9
9 years      10
10 years       5
11 years         7
12 years          3
13 years
14 years
15 years
16 years
17 years
18 years
19 years
20 years
1
Total
743
 M 50 HUMAN RESOURCES
The constitutional issue, which caused adoptions of registered Indian children
to be held in abeyance since May 1973, was resolved by a judgment handed down
on October 7, 1975, by the Supreme Court of Canada, ruling that registered Indians
could be adopted under provincial statutes without losing any of the rights bestowed
on them by the Federal Indian Act.
This resulted in the Department being finally able to put forward for adoption
completion the many children who had waited in legal limbo. These children had
been placed on a "free home" basis with adoption delayed until the decision was
handed down.
A project was started in 1974 to recruit more adoption and foster homes of
Indian origin. Operating with Department of Human Resources funding and the
co-operation of the Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs and the British Columbia Association of Non-Status Indians, teams of two Indian workers visited homes
in both the Campbell River and the Kamloops areas. The project came to a premature end on May 31, 1975, when the Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs
and the British Columbia Association of Non-Status Indians decided to withdraw
from projects involving Government funds. Within its short lifespan the project
succeeded in recruiting several Indian homes for the placement of Indian children
and improved communication between the native Indian community and the Department in the districts involved.
An improvement on the national level was brought about by the establishment,
in September 1975, of a National Desk in Ottawa operating out of the Federal
Department of Health and Welfare. This desk is designed as a resource centre for
hard-to-place children, and for adoption homes which cannot be used within their
own province. British Columbia was one of the first provinces to utilize this
resource and a placement was made in November in spite of the disastrous effect
on this program of the lengthy postal disruption.
April and May of 1975 also saw a tremendous surge of interest on the part of
British Columbia citizens in children from Southeast Asia. Over 2,000 telephoned
offers of adoptive homes were received in spite of the fact that no additional children
were destined for Canada as a result of the war. The children who had previously
been referred in the normal course of our program through International Social
Service, and who had been adopted through a form of proxy adoption in Vietnam, all
arrived safely. In this program a total of 14 were placed from South Vietnam, 11
of these arriving in 1975. All of these children were fully identified as orphans in
their own country prior to coming to British Columbia.
A major change in the administration of this progiam in 1975 has been the
inclusion of the private agencies of Vancouver and Victoria in the Provincial adoption process. A total of 60 adoption homes were received from the Vancouver
agencies in March 1975 and new referrals of homes have been submitted since
that time.
A comparison over the last several years of the number of children placed for
adoption appears in the following illustration:
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M 51
Figure 7
Number of Adoption Placements Made by the Department of Human Resources and the
Vancouver Resources Board, Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1974/75 and Calendar Year 1975
1971/72
1972/73
1973/74
1974/75
1975
The following table gives a breakdown by type of placement for the children
placed in 1975:
Table 24—Adoption Placements in Calendar Year 1975, by Type of Placement
Type of Placement
Direct Placement
Foster Home to Adoption
Location
Six
Months'
Probation
Long-term
Probation*
Within
Same
Home
In Another Home
Total
Six
Months'
Probation
Long-term
Probationi
In British Columbia...	
Outside British Columbia
351
4
49
2
305
7
25
734
9
Totals	
351
4
51
312
25
743
1 These are placements of children with health or other problems requiring a longer period of probation.
 M 52
HUMAN RESOURCES
B. Adoption Completion
The Department must prepare the Superintendent's report and recommendation
to the Supreme Court in all adoptions (including those not placed by the Department).
All documents necessary for legal completion of adoptions of children placed
by the Department also must be submitted to the Supreme Court, together with the
Superintendent's report.
In 1975 the Superintendent of Child Welfare submitted reports on 1,653
children to the Supreme Court. This is not the number of children legally adopted
in the calendar year, as there is normally a time lag between submission of the
report and making of the adoption order.
Note should be made that reports and recommendations are made on the
adoption of all children placed by the Department of Human Resources, the Vancouver Resources Board, and private agencies, as well as adoptions by step-parents
or other relatives.   The following table gives a breakdown:
Table 25—Adoption Reports Filed by Adoption Completion Division,
by Type of Adoption, Calendar Year 1975
Type of Adoption Number of Reports Filed
Department of Human Resources and Vancouver Resources Board
placement         674
Step-parent       856
Other relative             71
Private sources         52
Total    1,653
As shown in the table above, over 50 per cent of the adoptions processed in
British Columbia are adoptions by step-parents. This is more than double their
proportion five years ago. About 40 per cent of the total number of children
adopted were placed in adoptive homes by the Department of Human Resources
and the Vancouver Resources Board; this represents a declining proportion of the
total as relatively fewer young mothers relinquish their babies for adoption.
A comparison of the number of adoptions legally completed over the past few
fiscal years illustrates the declining trend:
Figure 8
Number of Children Legally Adopted in British Columbia,
Fiscal Years 1970/71 to 1974/75
2,804
1970/71
2,306
1971/72
1,820
1972/73
1973/74
1,721
1974/75
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1975 M 53
The Supreme Court decision regarding the adoption of status Indians, referred
to earlier, gave the Adoption Competion Section authority to go ahead with the
backlog of adoptions of about 211 Indian children, some of which had been delayed
for 2Vz years. In most cases it was necessary to obtain updated reports from
district offices. The delay in processing the adoptions of Indian children has, of
course, depressed the number of legally completed adoptions in the last two fiscal
years.
By December 31, 1975, approximately 136 reports in adoptions of registered
Indians had been sent to the courts (almost two-thirds of the total backlog).
Although the over-all total adoptions continues to decrease year by year, the
pressure of work in Adoption Completion Section continues at a high level. There
seem to be at least two reasons for this:
(1) The increasing complexity of the work required of the section.
(2) An increase in requests for services to completed adoptions.
As an example of increasing complexity, the rise in divorces has resulted in
more complicated marital histories of both adopting and natural parents, requiring
added work in taking histories and confirming marital status and legal paternity.
Another factor is that with an increase in recent years in services by the
Department and other professions aimed at helping parents to keep their children,
some children are coming in and out of the Department's care for a number of
years before finally being relinquished for adoption.
In a recent court report on the adoption of a child, there was a history of
some three years of assistance by social workers and others, interspersed with
periods of nonward care before the child was made a permanent ward and placed
for adoption. This history had to be set forth in the report, whereas in the past
the child probably would have been surrendered or removed permanently from the
mother at birth, which would have been stated very briefly in the report.
The increasing attention, which has quite properly been paid to Indian rights
in the past few years, has necessitated careful work in establishing whether or not
children have Indian status and should be registered, and making sure that the
adopting parents and the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development
in Ottawa are advised of the child's status in each adoption of a status Indian child.
There always has been a steady trickle of requests by and on behalf of adopted
persons for social and health information from the completed adoption records, and
for confirmation of adoption for various purposes such as to establish dependent
status for financial benefits, or legal relationship for citizenship or eligibility to
inherit from estates. There have always been a small number of adopted persons
who wished to meet members of their original families. Department policy is that
nonidentifying social information is given, but names are not revealed; nor does
the Department give any assistance in reuniting persons separated by adoption from
their original families.
Accurate statistics have not been kept on requests for services to completed
adoptions, but in the past two or three years it seems there has been a considerable
increase in requests. Some requests are very time-consuming and all require skill
and tact. The actions of civil rights groups and the publicity surrounding the
inquiries of the Royal Commission on Family and Children's Law have given an
impetus to the growing number of requests by adopted persons for information about
natural parents and for reunions.
There were 145 recorded cases of all types of services to completed adoptions
in the calendar year 1975, but reporting on these is by no means complete, and there
may well have been as many as double that number. An effort will be made to
keep a more complete record in  1976,  as reviewing completed adoption files,
 M 54 HUMAN RESOURCES
mostly microfilmed, and supplying information or other services from them is forming an ever-larger part of Adoption Completion Section's duties.
Cost-sharing—No accounts are kept of Departmental expenditures with
regard to adoption, as it is entirely a service program, with no ready means of
assessing costs. Federal contribution is on a 50:50 basis toward the social workers'
salaries.
 SERVICES FOR EVERYONE
  REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1975
M 57
SOCIAL ASSISTANCE
Goal—To provide a substitute income sufficient to maintain a basic standard
of living for those unable to provide for themselves through employment or other
resources.
In 1975, new regulations to the Social Assistance Act were introduced to
comply with requirements of the Canada Assistance Plan. The changes related to
earnings exemptions, asset levels, appeal procedures, and confidentiality.
Description—Social assistance recipients are comprised of the following
groups of people:
1. Single-parent families—This, the largest group of recipients, is made up
mainly of mothers and their children. The intent of the program is to provide
security to the mother so that she can devote her time to raising her children.
2. Persons unable to be employed for physical or mental health reasons—
Often, the disability is of a temporary nature and the program attempts to provide
the necessary financial and social supports during the period of convalescence. It is
hoped that the recipient will eventually be able to return to full-time or at least
part-time employment. People in this group are under extra psychological stress
due to the fact that they are no longer participating in the work force and often
not even in the social life of the community.
3. Children living with relatives—Although the Department's goal is to keep
parents and children together, in some instances of parental illness, desertion, or
other reasons children must be placed in another home. Settling them with relatives
is usually a positive step in that some continuity of familiar surroundings is provided,
and the child is less upset by the move. The program provides the relatives with
financial assistance at the same rates as for foster children.
4. Persons who are employable but out of work—The program provides short-
term help to those individuals without means to support themselves. Many of these
recipients are only marginally employable as they do not have the necessary skills
to compete for the more permanent jobs. The turnover rate in this group is high
as many require help for only a short period of time.
Applying for Social Assistance—Eligibility for social assistance is carried
out according to established criteria. An examination of need is made based on
financial assets, income, housing costs, and family size. Certain assets and income
are excluded from consideration; for example, the family home and car and family
allowances are asset exemptions.
Basic social assistance rates to eligible persons are as follows:
Table 26—
Basic Social Assistance Rate Schedule as of December 1975
Family Unit Size
Total
(Number of Persons)
Support                     Shelter
Basic Maximum
$                                $
$
1	
       85                      75
160
2 	
      150                    120
270
3	
     185                     135
320
4	
      220                    150
370
5	
    260                    160
420
6	
     295                   170
465
7	
    325                     180
505
8	
     355                    190
545
9	
    385                    200
585
10	
      415                    210
625
 M 58 HUMAN RESOURCES
In the case of a family where the actual shelter cost exceeds the amount of
the rate for shelter, 75 per cent of the extra amount required may be provided by
the Department. For example, if the actual shelter cost for a family of four is
$225 per month, an additional housing overage of $56.25 per month may be
granted:
$225—actual shelter cost
— $150—basic shelter rate for family of 4
$ 75—excess shelter cost over basic shelter rate
75 per cent of $75=$56.25
There are often other items of special need required by recipients and these
can be provided by the Department up to a maximum of $500 per 12-month
period. Examples of special need are repairs to a stove, purchase of bedding, a
crib for a child, essential repair to a house, such as a new roof, or minor repairs
to a car in remote areas of the Province where public transportation is unavailable.
Expenditures for items of special need were as follows:
Table 27—Items of Special Need, Departmental Expenditures,
Calendar Year 1975 and Fiscal Years 1971-75
$ $
1975    3,178,000 1972/73   281,555
1974/75   2,344,397 1971/72    158,921
1973/74  1,097,095
Various other forms of help are given by the Department and include purchase of tools or clothing to help a recipient secure employment and provision of
transportation and moving costs when it is necessary to move to take advantage
of a confirmed job opportunity in another community. A dietary allowance for
special health conditions, of up to $20 per month, may be granted on the recommendation of the family physician. A natal diet allowance of $25 per month to
cover higher food costs may be allotted to expectant mothers for several months
before and after the birth. To help families with children, there are school start-up
fees of $15 per year for children under 12 years of age, and $25 per year for
children over the age of 12. It is practice to allot an additional $10 per single
recipient or $20 per family at Christmas time.
A very supportive policy for recipients has been the earnings exemption. This
allows a recipient to engage in part-time work without losing all financial gain
through deductions from the social assistance cheque.
The Department allows exemptions on earnings of $50 per month for a single
person and $100 per month for a person with dependents or a single handicapped
person. This policy encourages part-time employment that helps the recipient to
gain or retain job skills that may eventually lead to full-time employment (see also
description of the Incentive Opportunities Program).
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M 59
Figure 9
Average Number of Recipients per Month: Basic Social Assistance
133,200 123,400 105,300 108,500 111,693 127,000
1970/71
1971/72
1972/73
1973/74
1974/75
1975
Averaging over 1975, the number of social assistance recipients in various
categories were as follows: 30,000 heads of families, of which many were single
parents; 67,000 dependents, mainly children; 13,000 "unemployable" single people; and 17,000 single people were classified as "employable."
Approximately two-thirds of the monthly average of 30,000 heads of families
on social assistance were single parents. Based on Vancouver figures, 96 per cent
of the 20,000 single parents on social assistance were women, and 4 per cent were
men. The proportion of male and female single-parent family heads may be
slightly altered when the Province is taken as a whole, but probably not significantly.
Supplementation of Low-income Earners — Persons working in part-
time or full-time employment at low wages may apply to have their income supplemented up to the appropriate social assistance level, as determined by family size.
Total expenditures on social assistance are as follows:
Figure 10
Total Social Assistance, Departmental Expenditures,
Fiscal Years 1971-75 and Calendar Year 1975
$94
$92
$117
$187.5
$198.92
million
million
million
million
million
1971/72
1972/73
1973/74
1974/75
1975
 M 60 HUMAN RESOURCES
With increased unemployment in 1975, extra demand was felt for the social
assistance program. The average number of recipients per month (including
dependents) increased by approximately 7,000. This produced a corresponding
increase in the costs of basic social assistance.
At the same time, inflation was making it more and more difficult for social
assistance recipients and others on fixed incomes to pay for basic necessities such
as food, clothing, shelter, and utilities. They were falling further behind as income
support payments remained unchanged in the face of rising prices.
Cost-sharing—The financial basis of this program is a shared one with the
Federal Government providing 50 per cent of the costs, municipalities 10 per cent,
and the Provincial Government, 40 per cent.
The following community grants were made in 1975 to anti-poverty/low-
income groups:
Amount
Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1975
$
Courtenay:
Upper Island Low Income Group          9,963
Nelson:
Community Action     540
New Westminster:
SANE        24,570
North Shore:
North Shore Co-operative      16,764
Penticton:
South Okanagan Buyer's Co-op        7,440
Sidney:
Community Action   663
Surrey :
Surrey SHARE        31,137
Vancouver:
Federated Anti-Poverty Group (Vancouver Branch)        9,737
Unemployed Citizens Welfare Improvement Council        6,847
Vancouver & District Public Housing and Tenants         5,670
Victoria:
Community Action   31,408
Regional Rental Referral Agency   1,281
Vancouver Island Mobile Community Food   11,427
Victoria Self Help      6,612
Province-wide:
Federated Anti-Proverty Groups       14,850
Total.          178,909
EMPLOYMENT SERVICES
Goal—To ensure that the full range of employment services provided through
Canada Manpower offices, community resources, and Provincial departments, are
made available to assist employable social assistance recipients in their efforts to
secure employment.
Description—Employable social assistance applicants are required to make
all necessary efforts to find employment. To this end, the Department's liaison
workers and job finders, with assistance from Canada Manpower, the Provincial
Labour Department, and other systems which have access to job vacancies, help
employable applicants and recipients avail themselves of employment opportunities.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M 61
Beginning in the fall of 1974, all regional offices and district offices of the
Department of Human Resources made a major effort at developing better liaison
with Canada Manpower offices and Unemployment Insurance offices. The goal
was to find better ways of placing social assistance recipients into jobs, better ways
of avoiding unnecessary delays in payment of unemployment insurance benefits,
and better ways of preventing duplication of benefits to social assistance recipients.
Almost every region reported a major improvement in working relationships with
Canada Manpower Centre and Unemployment Insurance offices.
In some areas this process is carried out by having the employable applicant
attend the local Manpower office and utilize the services of a Department of Human
Resources liaison worker to find employment prior to receiving social assistance.
A number of Department of Human Resources offices also have social assistance
clients on the "incentive program" working in local CMC offices to monitor the
job placement board so that suitable jobs can be immediately referred to the Department of Human Resources offices. The incentive workers also assist Department of Human Resources clients in job selection and job referral.
HIGHLIGHTS OF THE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM
• In the Capital Region an employment co-ordinator was hired late in 1973 to
develop a number of contacts with employees, making direct job referrals possible. In February 1975, the employment co-ordinator relocated his office in
the new CMC office with four employment counsellors who visit the district
offices, and one job finder who works full-time contacting potential employers
and assisting clients in employment situations. The project was funded by a
departmental community grant of $57,700 in 1975.
• A "job bank system" was set up using incentive people to telephone potential
employers. All job opportunities received through this system are available to
the Human Resources workers for 24 hours. If within that time the position
cannot be filled, the order is then given to Canada Manpower for immediate
referral of their clients. The chief advantages of this system are the availability
of more job advances to aid social assistance recipients and a closer and more
co-operative working relationship between Department of Human Resources
staff and Canada Manpower. A daily report is made to the social worker, indicating action taken. This move represented the first time in Canada that two
levels of Government have united forces in the same office to help the unemployed.
• A position for a job co-ordinator was created in the Kamloops office of the
Department of Human Resources in May 1975.
• A Work Activity Project sponsored by the Provincial Department of Labour
provided work experience for single men on social assistance aged between 17
to 24 years at Lake Cowichan. The forestry project began in June 1975 and
drew on referrals from the Capital Region and Duncan areas (see also section on
"Work Activity Program").
• Surrey had an employment co-ordinator, an assistant, and eight incentive workers
helping social assistance recipients to find work. The incentive staff work out
of the local Canada Manpower Centre office with access to the job bank list.
• In late 1974 the Burnaby Department of Human Resources created an Employment Referral Program in co-operation with the local CMC office.   Two social
 •
•
M 62 HUMAN RESOURCES
assistance clients on the incentive program were placed in the CMC office.
These incentive workers interviewed and registered all employable social assistance applicants referred by Department of Human Resources staff and where
possible clients were referred to prospective employers or to CMC counsellors
for job placement or training.
• As of December 1975, six job-finders were employed by the Vancouver Resources Board to carry out employment functions in the Vancouver area for
social assistance applicants and recipients.
• A Departmental community grant of $9,000 in 1975 to Friendship House Association in Prince Rupert helped the society to carry out a program that included
the placement of approximately 20 persons per month in short- or long-term
employment.
A job-finders group in Terrace named the "Golden Rule" received a Departmental grant of $11,500 in 1975. The Human Resources office in Terrace required that unemployed persons who could work were to register with both
Canada Manpower and the Golden Rule organization before seeking social
assistance.
A project in Smithers called the Smithers Employment Counsellors received a
Departmental community grant of $6,800 in 1975 to carry out similar work.
In Penticton a project called the "Penticton Employability Project" received a
community grant of $19,400 to help young people find employment. In Vancouver the YM-YWCA received a $3,200 grant to provide a youth employment
service.
A great amount of effort was placed on employment programs by all levels
of Government in 1975. The increasing unemployment pattern across North
America reinforced the co-operation between Government agencies to help the
unemployed find work. The situation today affects not only the individual with
limited skills that we usually see on temporary social assistance, but also those with
marketable skills who are, due to the economic decline, losing jobs. It is of course
the individual without specialized skills who is fast becoming redundant in terms
of obtaining and holding permanent full-time employment. It may be that, unless
a greater diversity of job situations is created, we will see a permanent group of
recipients, increasing in size every year, unable to break out of the social assistance
framework, and totally dependent on the system for income maintenance.
Cost-sharing—Costs for liaison workers and supporting staff are shared on
a 50:50 basis with the Federal Government. Employment-oriented community
grants are financed 100 per cent by the Provincial Government.
REPATRIATION
Goal—To assist social assistance recipients to return to other provinces and
occasionally, other countries, when required for social reasons.
Description—This program is available to social assistance recipients who
demonstrate a social need for this type of help. Often this is because of health
reasons, having a family in another province, finding employment in another province, or wishing to return permanently to one's homeland in another country. The
program, although of much benefit to the client from a strictly humanitarian
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M 63
standpoint, is also a constructive force in that many clients reunited with their
families, or in a job, are no longer on continued social assistance.
Table 28-
Year
1975	
-Repatriation, Departmental Expenditure
Year 1975, and Fiscal Years 1971-75
Amount                Year
$
  34.050               1972/73	
by Calendar
Amount
$
     9,224
1974/75	
... . 30,325
1971/72 	
  21,369
1973/74	
...... 11,951
The increased expenditures for repatriation reflect in the main extra costs of
individual repatriation rather than an upsurge in the number of repatriations.
Cost-sharing—The program is shared on a 50:50 basis with the Federal
Government.
HOMEMAKER/HOUSEKEEPER SERVICES
Goal—A broad range of homemaker-housekeeper services is provided as an
alternative to institutional care for the aged, handicapped, physically and mentally
ill, and to keep families together in times of emotional, mental, or physical stress.
Homemaker services are also provided to ease the burden of long-term chronic
illness, to encourage the reintegration into the community of young disabled persons
and to assist in improving the child care and home management skills of parents
whose children are "at risk."
Description—Homemakers provide temporary or long-term care for families,
the ill and aged. Duties include household cleaning, laundry, shopping, meal
preparation, teaching of household routine, limited personal care, and the care of
children. A homemaker works under supervision and acts as part of a team in the
support of the family or individual client.
During 1975, nearly 3,000 people worked as homemakers or home aides on a
full- or part-time basis. This represented a doubling of the 1,500 homemakers
and home aides working in 1974. A large number of men were recruited to work
with the elderly and disabled and many more homemakers were employed on a
full-time salaried basis. By year-end, approximately 600 homemakers were working on a full-time basis.
On behalf of eligible persons, the Department purchases the homemaker service from nonprofit homemaker societies. The Department also awards grants to
community groups that provide home help services.
Some progress was made in 1975 to develop special services to physically disabled persons living independently in the community. Specially trained home-
makers gave assistance to persons living in the new Paraplegic Lodge in Vancouver,
providing short-term but essential support to persons on the way to returning to
their community.
Sixty-two nonprofit societies were funded in 1975 to provide homemaker services. The Department of Human Resources is working closely with these agencies
and with the Association of Visiting Homemaker Services to develop better training
opportunities for homemakers and to standardize service throughout the Province.
New nonprofit homemaker societies were established in 1975 (with the help of
the Department) to provide homemaker services in Quesnel, Smithers, Castlegar,
Squamish, Saltspring Island, Hazelton, and Terrace.
 M 64
HUMAN RESOURCES
The cost of the service rose dramatically, chiefly due to increases in wages to
homemakers and supervisors. Even with increases in 1975, however, homemakers'
hourly wages ranged from below the minimum wage to $4.10 per hour. Home-
maker societies set the rate and the Department is charged a rate to cover the
homemaker's wage plus overhead of the society. Most homemaker societies are
still paid on a fee-for-service basis that covers the hours of service only.
The use of homemaker services is effective in creating an alternative to the
sometimes unnecessary use of higher levels of care, such as acute care hospitals,
personal, and intermediate care homes. The cost of providing a 24-hour homemaker
service ranges from $35 to $55 per day. Even at this level, the service can be an
economical one and most persons, of course, prefer to stay at home if the proper
care can be provided there.
The year 1975 saw a distinct upswing in the use of homemakers in the care
of the elderly with 58 per cent of the services being provided to elderly persons,
12 per cent to disabled persons, and 30 per cent to families in crisis.
Eligibility for the service is determined by a social, clinical, or functional
assessment of the person, and subsidies are provided on the basis of individual
financial need, in accordance with the Social Assistance Regulations.
Subsidies for the service are provided by the Department to
(a) Social Assistance recipients, and
(b) individuals with insufficient income as determined by a needs test.
Individuals are ineligible for the subsidy if assets exceed $1,500 for a single person,
$2,500 for a person with dependents. Approximately 10 per cent of the total
recipients of homemaker services pay for the entire service themselves.
The following figure illustrates Departmental expenditure for homemakers in
fiscal years 1971/72 to 1974/75 and calendar year 1975:
Figure 11
Homemakers Services, Departmental Expenditures by Fiscal Year
1971/72 to 1974/75 and Calendar Year 1975
$1,187,491 $1,394,221
$2,812,704 $4,258,384 $6,533,544
1971/72
1972/73
1973/74
1974/75
1975
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1975
M 65
The following nonprofit societies received grants through the Department of
Human Resources in 1975:
HOMEMAKER SOCIETIES
Campbell River: Campbell River Homemaker Service.
Castlegar: Castlegar and District Homemaker Services Association.
Chilliwack: Chilliwack Homemaker Service.
Courtenay: Comox Valley Homemakers Service.
Cranbrook: Cranbrook Homemakers Service.
Creston: Creston Valley Homemaker Services.
Delta: Delta Homemakers Service Society.
Duncan:
Cowichan Family Life Association Homemakers.
Duncan Child and Family Service Society.
Fort St. John: North Peace Homemakers Service Association.
Ganges: Salt Spring Island Homemaker Service.
Grand Forks: Boundary Homemakers Service Association.
Hazelton: Hazelton Community Resource Society Homemaker Service.
Kamloops: (Greater) Kamloops Homemaker Service Association.
Kelowna: Kelowna Homemakers Service.
Kimberley: Kimberley and District Homemakers Society.
Langley: Langley Homemakers Society.
Maple Ridge: Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Homemaker Service.
Mission: Central Fraser Valley Homemaker Service Society.
Nakusp: Nakusp and District Homemakers Services.
Nanaimo: Nanaimo Red Cross Homemaker Service.
Nelson: Nelson and District Homemakers Services.
New Westminster: New Westminster Red Cross Homemaker Service.
North Vancouver: VON, North Shore.
100 Mile House: South Cariboo Homemakers Service.
Osoyoos: South Okanagan Homemaker Society.
Parksville: District 69 Homemaker Service.
Penticton: Penticton Homemakers Service.
Port Alberni: Port Alberni Homemakers Society.
Powell River: Powell River and District Homemakers Service.
Prince George: Prince George and District Homemakers Service Society.
Prince Rupert: Prince Rupert Homemakers Service Association.
Princeton: Princeton and District Community Services.
Quesnel: Quesnel Homemaker Service.
Sechelt: Sunshine Coast Homemaker Service.
Smithers: Smithers Community Services Association.
Sorrento: Shuswap Homemakers Service.
Sparwood: Sparwood-Elkford Homemakers Service.
Squamish: Howe Sound Homemakers Society.
Summerland: Summerland Community Homemaker Service.
Surrey: Surrey and White Rock Community Homemakers Service.
Terrace: Terrace and District Community Resources Society.
Trail: Trail and District Homemakers Service Association.
 M 66 HUMAN  RESOURCES
Vancouver:
(Greater) Vancouver Area Homemaker Association.
Mother's Help Program (Vancouver Resources Board).
Teaching and Emergency Homemaker Program (Vancouver Resources
Board).
Vernon: Vernon and District Homemakers Society.
Victoria: Victoria Red Cross Homemaker Service.
Williams Lake: Williams Lake and District Homemakers Service.
HOME AIDES SOCIETIES
Brentwood Bay: Aid to Pensioners.
Chilliwack: Chilliwack Home Aides.
Cranbrook: Sparkling Grannies.
Merritt: Merritt Home Care Services.
Princeton: Princeton and District Community Services.
Vancouver:
Cedar Cottage Services to Seniors.
The Downtown Community Health Clinic.
Fraserview Service for Seniors.
Home Aides Resource Team.
Kitsilano Inter-Neighbourhood Development.
Marpole-Oakridge Senior Program.
St. James Social Service Society.
Senior Citizens Outreach.
West End Services to Seniors.
COUNSELLING
Goal—To assist in the resolution of personal and family problems.
Description—Most people who come to the Department seek financial
help primarily. Over the years, however, the social work component of the Department have been increasingly involved in giving counsel to persons with individual and family problems. Counselling incorporates a wide range of services
from basic information giving to resolving marital and family stress.
This service is carried out directly by staff or by referral to other agencies,
many of which are funded by the Department's Community Grants Program.
Cost-sharing—Staff costs are shared by the two senior governments on a
50:50 basis.
The following community grants were made in 1975 to nonprofit societies
offering counselling services:
FAMILY LIFE PROGRAMS
Amount
Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1975
Burnaby: $
Burnaby Family Life             10,455
Campbell River:
Campbell River Community Resources Society Family Life Program        13,581
Cowichan:
Cowichan Family Association              6,084
Kamloops:
Kamloops Family Life         28,606
Nanaimo:
Nanaimo Family Life          12,169
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1975
M 67
Name of Project and Location
Northern Vancouver Island:
North Island Family Life 	
North Shore:
North Shore Living and Learning	
Port Alberni:
Port Alberni Family Guidance	
Saanich:
Saanich Peninsula Guidance Association	
Surrey-White Rock:
Surrey-White Rock Family Life	
Vancouver:
Unitarian Family Life Centre	
Dunbar West Point Grey Ecumenical Committee
Weir Family Education Centre ....
Fleming Family Education Centre	
Victoria:
Greater Victoria Citizens Counselling Service	
Province-wide:
Vanier Institute of the Family	
Amount
Granted,
1975
7,605
10,465
11,756
7,420
11,667
14,280
7,475
1,510
1,510
28,257
25,000
CRISIS CENTRE PROGRAMS
Campbell River:
Campbell River Community Resources Society Family Counselling and
Crisis Line         13,581
Chetwynd :
Chetwynd Community Resources Board (Crisis Line)   225
Coquitlam:
Coquitlam Share (Life Line Program)   8,700
Courtenay:
Crossroads Crisis Centre        21,405
Cranbrook :
East Kootenay Crisis and Information Centre        17,187
East Kootenay Mental Health  5,247
Nanaimo :
Nanaimo AID           21,429
Nelson:
Nelson Community Services Centre        11,520
Prince George:
Prince George Crisis Intervention Society  9,282
Richmond:
Chimo-Richmond Crisis Centre         33,171
Surrey:
Surrey Inter-Section Society         52,662
Terrace :
Terrace Community Resource Council Crisis Centre  7,092
Vancouver:
Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention         10,200
Vancouver Crisis Centre (Emergency Beds)         11,340
Vancouver Emotional Emergency Centre         60,894
B.C. Association for the Advancement of Coloured People  300
Victoria :
Need Crisis Intervention and Public Information Society       23,859
INFORMATION AND REFERRAL CENTRES
Burnaby:
Burnaby North Information Centre  	
Burnaby South Information Centre 	
Kelowna:
Advice Service 	
Merritt:
Merritt Listening Post 	
6,615
6,615
5,175
13,050
 M 68
HUMAN RESOURCES
Name of Project and Location
Nelson:
Nelson Community Services	
North Vancouver:
Burrard View Information Centre  	
Hub Information Centre 	
Lower Lonsdale Information Centre 	
Richmond:
Richmond Information Centre 	
Vancouver:
Community Information Centre 	
Mount Pleasant Information Centre 	
Fairview Information Centre	
Red Door Information Centre 	
West End Information Centre	
AID Information Centre (Cedar Cottage) ....
Renfrew Collingwood Information Centre	
Grandview Woodlands Information Centre ..
Marpole Oakridge Information Centre 	
Information Services Joint Committee 	
Downtown Eastside Information Centre 	
Dunbar West Point Grey Information Centre
Fraserview Killarney Action Centre 	
Sunset Information Centre 	
Contact Centre	
Kitsilano Information Centre ...
Frog Hollow Information
City of Vancouver Social Planning Department Information Centre
Vancouver Information Centres	
YWCA Multi Lingual Information Service  	
Victoria:
Community Information 	
Amount
Granted,
1975
$
7,368
2,205
6,615
6,615
8,721
46,605
4,489
2,925
4,250
6,145
4,499
3,832
2,785
4,432
55,288
2,885
11,536
14,606
16,039
11,475
21,838
15,000
6,905
35,472
16,989
4,824
FAMILY SUPPORT PROGRAMS
Burnaby:
Burnaby Life Line  	
Coquitlam:
Coquitlam Share Society	
Kamloops:
Kamloops Y Women's Program 	
North Shore:
North Shore Neighbourhood House   	
Parksville:
District 69 Society of Organized Services 	
Princeton:
Princeton & District Community Services  	
Surrey:
Surrey Emergency Shelter      ......
Terrace:
Hope to Cope       	
Vancouver:
Catholic Community Services    	
John Howard Society    	
Vancouver Association of Children with Learning Disabilities
Big Sisters  	
Volunteer G randparents   	
Family Place   	
Sundown Program  	
Killarney Parents Advisory Club 	
Omnia Place	
Family Night Program (Action Centre)  	
Dream Holiday  	
Women in Need      	
48,096
88,094
8,820
13,661
8,520
7,200
28,027
6,876
50,000
42,291
11,070
13,068
28,547
36,232
7,965
100
2,100
294
2,000
2,000
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1975
M 69
Name of Project and Location
Vancouver—Continued
Foster Parents Association 	
Culloden Court Tenants Association ....
Vernon:
Vernon & District Community Services
Victoria :
Vic West Community Development	
Total community grants	
Amount
Granted,
1975
500
450
31,284
44,706
1,343,633
COMMUNITY RESOURCES BOARDS
Goal—The intent of Community Resources Boards is to provide integration
of social services at the local level.
Description—The Community Resources Boards Act was passed in the
spring session of the Legislature, 1974. Regulations to the Community Resources
Boards Act were passed by Order in Council in October 1975.
Nineteen Community Resources Societies received core funding to carry
out interim Board functions. Fifteen additional communities continued to discuss
the feasibility of electing a local Resources Board.
In November of 1975 public elections were held for nine Community Resources Boards. They were Abbotsford/Matsqui, Campbell River, Kamloops,
Nakusp, Norgate/Capilano (on the North Shore of Vancouver), Port Alberni,
Prince George, Surrey/White Rock, and Terrace.
Table 29—Resource Boards and Societies Funded by Community Programs
Division, 1975 Calendar Year
This table available on request from Division of Office Administration
and Public Information, Department of Human Resources, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
2. Vancouver Resources Board (a Regional Board) and Community Resources
Boards in the City of Vancouver—During 1975, public elections were held for
Community Resources Boards in 10 areas of Vancouver: West End, Downtown,
Strathcona, Grandview/Woodlands, Renfrew/Collingwood, Cedar Cottage/Kensington, South Cambie/Riley Park, Shaughnessy/Arbutus/Kerrisdale, Marpole/
Oakridge, and Fairview/Mount Pleasant. These elections completed the public
election of 14 Community Resources Boards, covering all parts of the City of
Vancouver.
The Vancouver Resources Board (the regional board), has responsibility for
the management and delivery of both statutory and nonstatutory social services
through the community boards. During 1975 the Vancouver Resources Board
has been setting priorities for services and implementing the decentralization of
statutory services into 14 local areas.
The following list of some of the services available through the Department of
Human Resources illustrates the distinction between statutory and nonstatutory
services. Generally, statutory services are those which the Government is obligated, by statute, to provide to all citizens of British Columbia. Nonstatutory
services are those social services which may be financially supported by Government but which are generally staffed and run by local voluntary organizations.
 M 70
HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 30—Services Provided by, or Funded
Through, the Department
of Human Resources
Statutory Services
Nonstatutory Services
Protection of children as authorized by the Protection of
Child and family support coun
Children Act, Equal Guardianship of Infants Act,
selling programs.
the Juvenile Delinquents Act, and the Children of
Unmarried Parents Act—
Crisis and drop-in centres.
Maintenance of children in care.
Adoption services.
Specialized child care treatment resources.
Community grants to low income advocacy groups.
Social assistance and health care services to recipients of
Special  services for native Indians.
social assistance.
Day care payments.
Homemaker payments.
Services for youth "at risk."
Support services for elderly and
handicapped persons.
Activity centre payments.
Meals on Wheels.
Special services to children payments.
Homemaker services.
Pharmacare.
Volunteer Bureaux.
Mincome—Guaranteed income of $249.82  (as at De
Information Centres.
cember 1975) to all citizens over 60 years of age
and to handicapped persons over 18 years of age.
Provincially based agencies.
Boarding,  rest home,  and private  hospital  care costs
Seniors' Day Care.
(paid for recipients of social assistance).
Women's Transition Houses.
Rehabilitation services—
Educational upgrading.
Day Care development.
Vocational training.
Halfway houses for  alcoholics
Work Preparation Program.
and  people released  from
Incentive Opportunities Program.
prisons, mental patients.
3. Community Human Resources and Health Centres (CHR and HC)—The
Community Human Resources and Health Centres, jointly supported and financed
by the Department of Human Resources and the Department of Health, have
three main objectives:
(1) Community involvement.
(2) Integration of services.
(3) Emphasis on prevention.
A task force, called the Development Group for Community Human Resources
and Health Centres, acts as a link between the two Government departments and
the Community Human Resources and Health Centres. Composed of six professionals from several disciplines, the group functions include management and
consultation.
There are now five Community Human Resources and Health Centres, each
with an elected board of 10 to 15 members. For the most part, the facilities are
complete, having frequently involved only the renovation of existing structures.
The basic services being integrated by the centres include social services,
public health nursing services, primary medical care, and mental health services.
Orders in Council passed in 1975 officially recognized the boards and transferred
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1975
M 71
to them the statutory powers for social services, public health nursing services, and
mental health services. There are just over 100 multi-disciplinary staff in the five
centres, with about one-third of those to be seconded from their respective Departments. Each centre is administered by a board-hired co-ordinator and is now
beginning to develop multi-service teams.
In 1975, the total operating budget for the centres was $842,967, the Department of Human Resources portion being $126,002.
(a) Houston Community Human Resources and Health Centre is located in
a one industry community of 3,000, and now provides primary medical care, public
health nursing, social services, and psychological services.
The 1975 operating budget of $263,076 included $53,722 from the Department of Human Resources.
(b) Granisle Community Human Resources and Health Centre, in this mining
community of 2,400, provides primary medical care, social services, and part-time
public health nursing.   Plans are under way to include dental care.
The 1975 operating budget of $86,938 included $4,500 from the Department
of Human Resources.
(c) Boundary Community Human Resources and Health Centre (Grand
Forks area) services a population of 9,500 in a large geographic area of approximately 100 by 60 miles. The centre has one board and administrator with three
different locations—in Rock Creek, Greenwood, and Grand Forks. Services include primary medical care (Rock Creek), social services, public health nursing,
mental health services, and some probation services.
The 1975 operating budget of $108,058 included $16,280 from the Department of Human Resources.
(d) James Bay Community Human Resources and Health Centre, serving a
population of 10,000, is the only urban centre in the project. Services include
community medical care, social services, day care, a family life program, drug
program, volunteer services, and a community school. The centre also acts as a
base for probation services, public health nursing, outreach programs for manpower, and mental health services.
The 1975 operating budget of $106,317 included $30,060 from the Department of Human Resources.
(e) Queen Charlotte Islands Community Human Resources and Health
Centre services an isolated population of 5,600 in the four separate locations of
Sandspit, Queen Charlotte City, Port Clements, and Masset. There is one regional
Board and a common administration, and the services include primary medical care,
public health nursing, social services, dental care, physiotherapy, youth preventive
programs, and senior citizen visiting. Plans are now under way to include the services of the United Church Hospital in Queen Charlotte City.
The 1975 budget of $278,578 included $21,440 from the Department of
Human Resources.
Cost-sharing—Social services administered through Community Resources
Boards are eligible for the same cost-sharing arrangements with the Federal Government as those administered directly by the Department of Human Resources.
For information on specific cost-sharing arrangements, refer to the sections in this
Report on each individual service.
 M 72 HUMAN  RESOURCES
HEALTH CARE SERVICES
Goal—The goal of health care services is to arrange for provision of quality
health care for eligible persons at a reasonable cost.
Description—The Department's Health Care Division offers consultation to
social services and paramedical personnel and ensures that people are aware of the
available services. In order to ensure the best possible service, the Division has
the capacity to retain specialists in any field for consultation.
The following groups of persons are eligible for health care coverage through
the Department:
Recipients of Handicapped Persons' Income Assistance.
"Unemployable" persons under 60 years of age who receive social
assistance.
Children in the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare or in the
home of a relative who receives social assistance on their behalf.
Mincome recipients who qualify through a needs test.
Medical Services Plan W cards are issued to eligible persons.   At year-end
1975, 126,633 persons (family heads and dependents) were covered.
Figure 12
Total Nu
■HHHH
nber
of Persons Eligible for Health Care
as a
t December .
U
197
1 to 1975
115,813
„,«
120,084
131,855
^::-~     '-'.v,r.'
126,633
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
As with all persons covered by the B.C. Medical Plan, accounts from medical
practitioners (doctors, chiropractors, physiotherapists, etc.) are paid by the Medical
Services Plan of the Department of Health. Accounts for hospital services are
paid by the Hospital Programs Branch of the Department of Health. The Health
Care Division of the Department of Human Resources processes accounts for the
following additional services:
A. Medical services—Payment is made for examinations that are required by
the Department of Human Resources in connection with the administration of the
Social Assistance and Handicapped Persons' Income Assistance Programs.
Payment is made on behalf of eligible persons who require medical clearance
for activities such as camp attendance and sports.
In some cases, when the yearly Medical Services Plan limit for physiotherapy has
been exhausted, the Division may pay for a limited number of additional treatments.
B. Provincial Pharmacy—The Provincial Pharmacy provides drugs to Government institutions such as Haney Correctional Institute and Government-financed
operations such as Community Health Clinics, the Downtown Health Clinic (in
Vancouver), and the Kinsmen Foundation.
Drugs and medical supplies are also provided to persons holding Medical
Services Plan W cards. Holders of cards may obtain drugs from the Provincial
Pharmacy or from their corner pharmacies; 33,537 prescriptions were filled in 1975.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M 73
C. Dental services—Basic dental care is provided for all eligible persons.
Special dental care, such as partial dentures, etc., may be provided, with the prior
approval of the Division and its consultative staff.
Dentists are paid at 90 per cent of their 1975 fee schedule.
D. Optical services—Standard single vision or bifocal glasses are provided
when prescribed by an ophthalmologist or optometrist. Unusual needs, such as
special lenses, trifocals, or contact lenses may also be provided, with prior approval
of the Division.
Optical suppliers are paid wholesale costs of materials, plus a fee for service.
E. Ancillary services—The Division provides prescribed nontransferable medical needs such as braces, artificial limbs and eyes, and surgical supports, when
clients' assets do not permit private purchase. If cost is less than $25, local offices
of the Department of Human Resources may authorize purchase. If cost is over
$25, prior approval of the Division is required.
Prescribed wheelchairs may also be provided, but in such cases the client's
needs may be assessed by the Canadian Paraplegic Association or other specialized
agencies, at the Division's request, for the best advice in ordering the specific chair
or other equipment which will meet the client's physical needs and environmental
circumstances.
F. Transportation—Transportation to and from clinics, nursing-homes, rehabilitation centres, and hospitals can be provided for clients who cannot use public
transportation. In cases of life-saving emergencies, transportation costs may be
met for persons on marginal incomes.
Local transportation can be authorized by the local office; out-of-Province
transportation requires the prior approval of the Division.
G. Special Health Needs Program—The Division may, at its discretion, provide any of the services listed in sections A to F (above) to persons on marginal
incomes.
H. Experimental programs—Although program budget is limited, the Division
is always willing to consider provision of extraordinary items or treatment which
may be prescribed for eligible clients. In 1975, for instance, the Division made
some payments for acupuncture treatments, in two British Columbia centres, when
the attending physician confirmed that standard medical care had not helped his
patient.
Table 31—Gross Costs oj Medical Services for
Fiscal Years 1971/72 to
1974/75 and Calendar Year 1975
Provincial
Ancillary
Transpor.
Year            Medical
Pharmacy           Dental
Optical
Services
tation
Total
$
$           $
$
$
$
$
1975           1,026,862
641,0801   3,218,006
449,381
354,158
390,770
6,080,257
1974/75...     754,422
59L5391   2,380,266
409,213
257,808
387,554
4,780,801
1973/74...     634,136
3,256,259     2,655,573
322,489
328,510
419,451
7,616,420
1972/73...     677,194
3,626,268     2,429,538
304,387
264,522
367,888
7,669,797
1971/72..     614,365
3,334,160     2,403,257
in  1974/75  and  1975  Prov
290,116     165,979     342,712
ncial  Pharmacy  costs  are  accounted
7,150,589
for  by the
1 Substantial reductior
introduction  of  the  Pharmacare  Program,   commencing  January   :
,   1974.     Drug  costs   for
individuals
eligible for the Department's health care services had
been budgetted through
the Provinci
tl Pharmacy
prior to January 1, 1974.
Cost-sharing—Health Care Division programs are cost-shared with the
Federal Government on a 50:50 basis.
 M 74 HUMAN RESOURCES
BURIALS
Goal—To provide for burial in those instances where there is no family or
estate that can assume responsibility for the deceased.
Description—Arrangements have been negotiated with the Funeral Directors' Association for the provision of caskets, funeral plots, and funeral services for
deceased persons who have not left a sufficient estate to provide for burial and
where family resources are insufficient.
Table 32—Burials, Departmental Expenditures by Calendar Year 1975
and Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1974/75
Year                                             Amount Year Amount
$ $
1975    189,000           1972/73.   166,212
1974/75  187,027           1971/72...   187,513
1973/74  158,109
Cost-sharing—The Federal-Provincial sharing on expenditures is 50:50.
COMMUNITY GRANTS
Goal—To provide encouragement to those nonprofit societies offering
community-based, innovative social services supportive of the statutory programs
of the Department.
Description—In all areas outside Vancouver, societies submit applications
for community grants through the local office of the Department and the Community Resources Society, if one exists. In order to ensure that services are coordinated, do not duplicate or fragment existing programs, and fall within the
priority guidelines of the Department, all submissions were considered by the local
office and by the Community Resources Board, if existent, before being forwarded
to the Regional Director. The Regional Director reviews the proposals and sends
them to the Community Programs Division in Victoria. In this way, the particular
nonstatutory services required in the area can be determined by those most knowledgeable of the unique needs of the community and the region.
The grants procedure within the Vancouver Resources Board was slightly
different in 1975. The Vancouver Resources Board was provided with a global
budget for all community grants in the City of Vancouver. Grant applications that
sought to provide services of a city-wide nature were submitted to the Vancouver
Resources Board Grants Officer, who made recommendations directly to the Vancouver Resources Board. Applications from societies providing services specific
to a particular neighbourhood were submitted to the appropriate Community
Resources Board. Each Community Resources Board was allocated a global
grants budget by the Vancouver Resources Board, and within the constraints of the
global budget individual applications were recommended to the Vancouver Resources Board for funding, or rejected.
In 1975, 365 grants to community projects provided 760 jobs throughout
British Columbia. The emphasis, however, is on community participation through
the use of volunteers, and a far greater number of persons assisted projects by
giving their time and effort.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M 75
The following table shows Departmental expenditures on community grants
in calendar year 1975 and fiscal years 1971/72 through 1974/75:
Table 33—Community Grants, Departmental Expenditures,1 Calendar Year
1975 and Fiscal Years 1971/72 Through 1974/75
$
Calendar Year 1975   8,252,696
Fiscal Year 1974/75   9,313,165
Fiscal Year 1973/74.... ....  2,871,707
Fiscal Year 1972/73....        737,850
Fiscal year 1971/72     242,678
1 Includes the Vancouver Resources Board.
Most of the projects that received community grants are listed in the Report
under the related statutory programs they support. Funded projects that do not
easily fit into one specific category are listed here:
TRANSPORTATION PROGRAMS FOR HANDICAPPED AND SENIOR CITIZENS
Amount
Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1975
Abbotsford: $
Abbotsford Senior Citizens Services          34,318
Coquitlam:
Coquitlam Senior Citizens Service        64,689
Dawson Creek:
Community Effort for Senior Citizens         41,758
Delta :
Deltassist        78,720
Nelson:
Nelson & District Homemakers              6,330
New Westminster:
New Westminster Senior Citizens Bureau      106,489
North Shore:
North Shore Transportation Service        84,560
Penticton :
Co-operative Community Services—MS Transportation   5,670
Port Alberni:
Port Alberni Handicapped Transportation Committee   1,794
Prince George:
Carefree Society           64,431
Princeton:
Princeton & District Community Services         31,335
Richmond:
Richmond Volunteer Transportation   720
Sechelt:
Sunshine Coast Community Resources Council           29,370
Surrey:
Surrey Community Resources Centre           38,961
Vernon:
Vernon & District Community Services         7,200
Victoria :
Arbutus Crafts Association      2,250
Victoria & Vancouver MS Society         9,999
Province-wide:
B.C. Lion's Society for Crippled Children        53,284
 M 76 HUMAN RESOURCES
MULTI-SERVICE AGENCIES
Amount
Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1975
Armstrong: $
Armstrong Community Services          42,447
Chilliwack:
Chilliwack Community Services               35,772
Crescent Beach:
Crescent Beach Community Services             33,843
Delta :
Deltassist          84,614
Langley:
Langley Community Services           54,360
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows:
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Community Services .        55,941
Matsqui/Sumas/Abbotsford :
Matsqui/Sumas/Abbotsford Community Services         79,956
Mission:
Mission Community Services        41,623
Nelson:
Nelson Community Services        54,660
Penticton :
Co-operative Community Services         51,242
Surrey:
Surrey Co-ordinating Centre       9,183
Surrey Community Resource Centre       187,920
White Rock:
White Rock Community Aid               75,921
INDIAN CENTRES (COUNSELLING AND SUPPORT PROGRAMS)
Burns Lake:
Burns Lake Community Development Association       162,765
Campbell River:
B.C. Association of Non-Status Indians (BCANSI) Home Finding Project       15,742
Chemainus:
Indian Halalt Band Council   7,641
Coquitlam:
PACIFIC (Provincial co-ordinating body of Indian Friendship Centres)   ...       39,706
Dawson Creek:
Nawican Friendship Centre (drop-in centre)   6,903
Fort St. John:
Keeginaw Friendship Centre  6,903
Good Hope Lake:
B.C. Association of Non-Status Indians (BCANSI)           30,877
Kamloops:
Interior Indian Friendship Society  .        38,079
Kelly Lake:
B.C. Association of Non-Status Indians (BCANSI)—Kelly Lake and Frontier College program         23,396
Kelowna:
Central Okanagan Indian Friendship Centre  8,989
Mission-Abbotsford :
Mission-Abbotsford Friendship Centre            8,989
Nanaimo:
Tillicum Haus Society   6,903
Penticton:
Sinu'llstn Indian Friendship Centre   .  4,386
Port Alberni:
Port Alberni Friendship Centre   8,989
Prince George:
Doh De Day Claa Friendship Centre   8,034
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1975
M 77
Name of Project and Location
Prince Rupert:
Native Action for Social Justice	
Qualicum:
Qualicum Indian Band Council 	
Quesnel:
Quesnel Tillicum Society 	
Salmon Arm :
Salmon Arm Indian Development Project 	
Skeena River:
Skeena River Native Co-operative Ad Hoc Committee
Smithers:
Smithers Indian Friendship Society 	
Vancouver:
B.C. Indian Homemakers	
Vancouver Indian Centre	
Allied Indian Metis (hostel) 	
Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs	
Native Information Centre 	
Vancouver Indian Centre Society 	
B.C. Association of Non-Status Indians (BCANSI) Home Finding Project
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT WORKERS
Saltspring Island:
Saltspring Island Community Society	
Vancouver :
City of Vancouver Strathcona Community Development Worker 	
Victoria:
Downtown-Blanshard Advisory Committee   	
Esquimalt-Vic West-View Royal Advisory Committee 	
Fairfield Community Association   .	
Fernwood Community Association 	
Regional Advisory Committee   	
Amount
Granted,
1975
9,001
10,000
8,989
2,709
20,000
2,301
10,260
2,301
29,249
7,026
13,102
20,467
8,352
5,626
6,600
11,112
13,356
50
13,716
500
VOLUNTEER BUREAUX (PROVIDE SUPPORT TO MANY OTHER PROGRAMS)
Coquitlam:
Coquitlam Share       5,714
North Shore:
North Shore Volunteers for Seniors  6,924
Prince George:
Prince George Volunteer Bureau              9,648
Vancouver:
Volunteer Bureau of Greater Vancouver        33,909
Victoria:
Greater Victoria Volunteer Bureau Society    4,134
MISCELLANEOUS PROGRAMS
Campbell River:
Campbell River John Howard Society	
Fort St. James:
Edwin Reid Association—Stuart Trembleur Lakes Feasibility Study
Nakusp:
Nakusp Community Resources Society     	
Nanaimo:
Community Employment Strategy Board     ._ 	
Nelson:
Valhallelujah Rangers     	
Richmond:
Golden Rods & Reels	
Telegraph Creek:
Drop-in centre     	
1,650
12,375
2,100
2,280
500
1,500
375
 M 78 HUMAN RESOURCES
Amount
Name of Project and Location Granted, 1975
Vancouver: $
Dunsmuir House      50,173
City of Vancouver Strathcona Community Development   6,600
Dugout (Drop-in Community Centre)   7,125
New Hope Drop-in     3,000
Patient Aftercare Support Services      16,932
SEARCH      6,076
B.C. Civil Liberties Association    22,869
B.C. Association of Social Workers    3,000
Grandview Terrace Recreation Project    7,098
Kitsilano Inter-Neighbourhood Development     18,714
Kitsilano Neighbourhood House  2,502
Neighbourhood Services Association   11,250
North Shore Neighbourhood House    5,319
United Housing Foundation     5,000
Urban Design Centre .  2,589
Vancouver YWCA     4,164
X-Kalay Foundation      33,000
West End Volunteer Seniors Service Centre    15,667
West End Landlord-Tenant Centre  _. 2,469
Greater Vancouver Helpful Neighbour Society    36,712
Hatfield House Society   35,318
Multi-Lingual Society Social Service     84,978
Language Aid        35,385
Basic Job Readiness Program     960
West Broadway Citizens Committee    12,803
Downtown East News      500
Gastown Residents Association     983
Downtown Eastside Women's Centre  3,000
Downtown Eastside Recreation Program   1,550
Killarney's Women's Group     75
Dunbar West Point Grey Contingency Fund    465
Victoria:
James Bay Association   6,675
Region 11 Foster Parents     9,026
Province-wide:
Federation of Foster Parents of B.C.      34,858
SPARC—Social Planning and Review Council of B.C.     30,000
Resources Exchange Project    45,019
B.C. Association of Social Workers       16,500
B.C. Civil Liberties Association     22,869
Total community grants   2,724,711
 SERVICES FOR
SPECIAL NEEDS
  REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1975
M 81
MINCOME  (HANDICAPPED PERSONS' INCOME ASSISTANCE)
Goal—To provide the income essential for disabled persons to meet their
everyday living requirements and maintain their sense of independence and dignity.
Description—As a part of the Guaranteed Minimum Income Assistance
Program (Mincome), disabled persons over 18 years of age are guaranteed a
monthly income of $249.82 per person (December 1975 rates). For detailed
statistics and further information, see the section on Mincome in "Services for
Seniors."
Field staff of the Department determine eligibility in so far as income is concerned, then each applicant's medical documentation is sent to the Department's
Health Care Division in Vancouver for a determination of sociomedical eligibility.
The following table depicts the number of recipients and Departmental expenditures for the month of December in each of the years 1973, 1974, and 1975:
Table 34—Mincome (Handicapped Persons' Income Assistance)
Number of Departmental
Recipients Expenditures
$
December  1973      6,300 1,237,000
December   1974      8,700 1,892,000
December   1975       9,918 2,326,103
Mincome payments were readjusted four times in  1975 to allow for cost-of-living
increases.
Cost-sharing—The Federal Government participates in the cost of Mincome
to handicapped persons in those cases where assets do not exceed $1,500 (single)
or $2,500 (couple). This agreement provides for a maximum net return to the
Province of 50 per cent of the cost associated with ensuring that a $215 needs
budget is met.
Example—A fully shareable  handicapped  Mincome  recipient  receives  a  monthly
maximum of $249.82.   The Federal Government's net return to the Province is $107.50.
$
Federal share—50%  of $215 = 107.50
Mincome guarantee    249.50
Less  107.50
Provincial share   142.32
The following community grants were made to nonprofit societies operating
programs for handicapped persons during 1975:
 M 82 HUMAN RESOURCES
Amount
Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1975
Courtenay: $
Bevan Lodge Association   6,975
Mission:
Mission Workshop Association   19,680
Nelson :
Kootenay Society for the Handicapped   2,538
North Shore :
North Shore Y Integrated Handicapped    5,275
Surrey :
Surrey Rehabilitation Workshop  57,878
Surrey SCAMP  ,.  70,468
Vancouver:
Canadian Red Cross—Swimming for the Disabled   18,108
Coast Foundation Society Boarding House/Resocialization Project   85,611
Handicapped Resource Centre   71,284
South Vancouver Health & Fun Club   1,608
3H Society   7,290
Vancouver Community Workshop   26,853
Vancouver Resource Society for the Physically Disabled   21,881
Western Institute for the Deaf   4,800
Victoria:
Canadian Mental Health Association  6,000
Disability Rights Association   22,928
EFECT Research Centre  1,350
Physically Handicapped Action Committee   4,347
Province-wide:
Association of Concerned Handicapped   25,752
Canadian Paraplegic Association   58,400
Cerebral Palsy Association of British Columbia  4,976
Wheelchair Sports & Recreation Association  7,650
Total    531,652
ACTIVITY CENTRES
Goal—To provide assistance to registered nonprofit societies or agencies
which operate activtiy centres designed to improve the quality of life for handicapped
people over school-leaving age.
Description—At least three types of activity centres have evolved throughout
the Province:
(1) Centres which operate primarily as premises for social activities with
opportunities for disabled people to meet and take part in arts and
crafts and related pastimes.
(2) Sheltered workshops which offer ongoing work for people unable to
compete in the regular work force. Such workshops typically (a)
arrange contracts with businesses or Government for the completion
of a labour-intensive task, and (b) manufacture household articles
for sale to the public.
(3) Rehabilitation workshops which, in addition to sheltered work, also
provide ability assessment, vocational training, and job placement in
their program.
To be eligible for financial support from the Department of Human Resources,
centres must agree to the following conditions:
(1) To serve physically or mentally handicapped persons over school-
leaving age, regardless of the handicapping condition.
(2) To provide evidence of continuing community support.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M 83
(3) To accept participants from community boarding-homes without
charging a fee (approximately half of the subsidized centres in the
Province charge a "training fee" to participants who do not reside in
boarding-homes).
(4) To ensure that charges made for contract work are comparable to
rates charged by the private sector for similar work performed.
(5) To operate under the auspices of a registered agency or nonprofit
society.
Once approved, centres submit monthly billing forms to the Department of
Human Resources and payment is based on a formula determined by the number of
user-hours per month. The monthly grants give assistance with staff salaries and
costs of supplies.
Payments are made on the following basis:
Table 35—Departmental Assistance Rates
to Activity Centres
Basic
Payment for
Payment
Supplies and
Total
for Staff
Material
$
$
$
600 participant hours/month up to_.
600
120
720
900 participant hours/month up to..
675
135
810
1,200 participant hours/month up to..
750
150
900
1,500 participant hours/month up to .
825
165
990
1,800 participant hours/month up to..
900
180
1,080
2,100 participant hours/month up to.
975
195
1,170
2,400 participant hours/month up to
1,050
210
1,260
3,000 participant hours/month up to..
1,200
240
1,440
3,600 participant hours/month up to..
1,350
270
1,620
4,200 participant hours/month up to.
1,500
300
1,800
4,800 participant hours/month up to
1,650
330
1,980
5,400 participant hours/month up to
1,800
360
2,160
For example, a centre with 33 participants attending the centre five hours per
day may be eligible for subsidization up to $1,620 per month (33 participants X
five hours per day X 22 working-days per month = 3,630 participant hours per
month).
The over-all size of the program has remained substantially the same as in
1974; at year-end, 65 centres were in receipt of grants and these are listed at the end
of this section. One further centre, White Rock Community Services, received a
capital grant of $3,500 from the Department's Community Programs Division.
Approximately 3,500 persons attend the centres each month.
Those centres which are committed to workshop programs continue to seek
contracts for work projects, or provision of services, which may be adapted to the
ability levels of the participants. In this way the centres aspire to improve motor
skills, together with opportunities to earn some remuneration, albeit small. Some
innovative work programs have evolved, such as a bookbindery workshop in Kamloops, and in Richmond a workshop now manufactures insulated food containers
which are available to "Meals on Wheels" services throughout the Province. The
latter is an example of how one service may channel its efforts to help another.
Departmental grants to activity centres totalled $1,204,014 in 1975, up from
$994,362 granted to centres in 1974.
 M 84
HUMAN RESOURCES
Cost-sharing—The Federal Government shares costs based on the percentage
of activity centre participants whose income is no higher than Provincial support
levels. For example, if 40 per cent of an activity centre's participants are HPIA
recipients (and the other participants have a higher income level), the Federal Government will pay 50 per cent of the costs on that 40 per cent, or 20 per cent of the
total departmental expenditure to that centre.
Departmental expenditures to activity centres were as follows in 1975:
Activity Centres Funded in 1975
Abbotsford":
MSA Community Services .
25,557.46
27,840.00
15,210.00
MSA Association for the Retarded (Wildwood) 	
Armstrong:
Armstrong-Enderby Association for Mentally Retarded	
Burnaby:
Burnaby Association for the Mentally Retarded (Burnaby Activity Workshop) 	
Campbell River:
Campbell River District Association for the Mentally Retarded	
Castlegar:
Silver Birch Society  	
Chilliwack:
Chilliwack & District Opportunity Workshop 	
Courtenay:
Courtenay Special Opportunity Centre (Bevan Lodge) 	
Cranbrook:
Kootenay Society for Handicapped Children (Occupational Workshop)....
Creston :
Kootenay Society for Handicapped (Cresteramics Workshop) 	
Dawson Creek:
Dawson Creek Society for Retarded Children	
Duncan:
Duncan & District Association for the Mentally Retarded 	
Grand Forks:
Grand Forks & District Society for Handicapped	
Hope:
Association for the Mentally Retarded (Tillicum Workshop) 	
Invermere:
Windermere & District Society for Handicapped Children	
Kamloops:
Kamloops Society for the Retarded (Pleasant Services)	
Kelowna:
Canadian Mental Health Association (The Discovery Club)	
Kelowna & District Society for the Mentally Retarded (Sunnyvale Workshop)    .'	
Rutland & Winfield Discovery Club	
Langley:
Langley Association for the Mentally Retarded (Langley Adult Training
Centre)           13,584.00
Maple Ridge:
Haney Activity Centre (previously Haney Clothing Depot)        15,160.42
Harold E. Johnson Centre  '.        20,315.00
Merritt:
Nicola Valley Association for the Mentally Retarded (Merritt Workshop)        14,880.00
Mission :
Mission Workshop Association           20,160.00
25,080.00
12,456.00
9,362.711
10,795.00
31,800.00
20,070.00
9,465.00
18,720.00
21,780.00
8,640.001
1,800.002
12,511.42
31,800.00
16,354.00
28,300.00
14,130.00
1 December figure estimated.
2 Funded through Community Programs Division.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
Activity Centres Funded in 1975—Continued
Nanaimo:
Canadian Mental Health Association (White Cross Centre) 	
Nanaimo Association for the Mentally Retarded (Narco Centre)	
Nelson:
Kootenay Society for Handicapped Children (Nelson Workshop)	
New Westminster:
New Westminster & District Society for the Retarded (Beacon Services) ...
New Westminster & District Association for the Retarded (Beacon Service
—Port Moody Division) 	
Canadian Mental Health Association (Sha Sha Club)	
North Vancouver:
Canadian Mental Health Association (Corner House) 	
North Shore Association for the Mentally Retarded (ARC Services)	
North Shore Association for the Mentally Retarded (Cooinda Progress
Centre) 	
Penticton :
Penticton & District Society for the Mentally Retarded (Penticton Training Centre) 	
Port Alberni:
Alberni & District Association for the Mentally Retarded  (Arrowsmith
Services Workshop) 	
Powell River:
B.C. Association for the Mentally Retarded (Artaban Services) 	
Prince George:
Prince George & District Association for the Retarded (Aurora Services)
Princeton:
Princeton Activity Centre    	
Quesnel:
Quesnel Association for the Mentally Retarded	
Richmond:
Vancouver-Richmond Association for the Mentally Retarded (Richmond
Sheltered Workshop No. 3 Centre) 	
Salmon Arm:
Shuswap Sheltered Workshop	
Sardis :
Upper Fraser Valley Society for the Retarded (Sunshine Dr. School) 	
Surrey :
Surrey  Association  for  the  Mentally  Retarded   (The  Clover  Training
Centre)     	
Squamish:
Squamish Activity Centre  	
Terrace:
Terrace Association for the Mentally Retarded (Three Rivers Workshop)
Trail:
Kootenay Society for Handicapped Children (Kinsmen Workshop) 	
Vancouver :
Canadian Arthritis & Rheumatism Society 	
Canadian Mental Health Association (White Cross Centre) 	
Coast Foundation Society	
Mental Patients Association .	
St. James Social Service (Gastown Workshop) 	
Vancouver-Richmond Association for the Mentally Retarded (Varco No.
1 Centre) 	
Vancouver-Richmond Association for the Mentally Retarded (Clarke Dr.
Workshop No. 2 Centre) 	
Vernon :
Canadian Mental Health Association (Vernon Workshop) 	
Vernon & District Society for the Retarded (Venture Training Centre)	
M 85
15,390.00
21,060.00
15,300.00
30,840.00
19,800.00
29,880.00
12,645.00
12,600.00
22,731.00
28,580.00
12,535.00
23,760.00
18,180.00
14,750.00
12,060.00
25,080.00
17,365.00
12,780.00
21,420.00
8,730.00
17,713.40
13,320.00
11,250.001
20,641.32
27,960.001
16,854.00
15,165.00
43,680.00
27,120.00
19,300.00
31,680.00
1 December figure estimated.
 M 86 HUMAN RESOURCES
Activity Centres Funded in 1975—Continued
Victoria:
Arbutus Crafts Association  .  21,600.00
Canadian Mental Health Association (Community Explorations)   10,710.00
Canadian Mental Health Association (Cornerstone)   11,700.00
Canadian Mental Health Association (White Cross Center)  28,890.00
Greater Victoria Association for the Retarded (Haywood Centre Branch) 10,206,261
Greater Victoria Association for the Retarded (Langwood Branch)   10,581.811
Greater Victoria  Association  for  the  Retarded   (Winnifred  M.   Clark
Centre)     28,200.001
Williams Lake:
The Summit Activity Centre  2,790.002
White Rock:
Association for the Mentally Retarded (Semiahmoo House)   7,415.OO2
Modern Service Club    25,980.00
Total cost of Activity Centres Program in 1975   1,204,013.80
i December figure estimated.
2 Funded through Community Programs Division.
For more information contact your local Department of Human Resources or
the Director, Special Care Adults Division, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
EDUCATIONAL UPGRADING AND VOCATIONAL TRAINING
Goal—To assist social assistance recipients who need vocational, educational,
or rehabilitative training in order to obtain employment.
Description—Bodies primarily concerned with educational upgrading and
vocational training (such as Canada Manpower, the Department of Education, and
Aid to the Handicapped) are contacted for help before the Department of Human
Resources becomes involved in direct financial assistance for the purpose. When
assistance with tuition cannot be obtained from other sources, the Department of
Human Resources may pay such costs on behalf of social assistance recipients who
must have further training.
When a social assistance recipient has been given a loan or grant from the
Student Services Branch (Department of Education), to prepare for employment
within one or two years, our Department may continue providing social assistance
while the recipient is in school. In 1975 a new policy was established to allow
such students a $100 exemption on their social assistance cheques for grants or
loans that include living expenses. Eligibility for medical and dental coverage is
not affected by attendance in school; day care subsidies are available.
In addition to the program mentioned above, persons in receipt of social
assistance are encouraged to upgrade their education through night school courses
offered in local senior secondary schools or community colleges. Such upgrading
may be necessary to qualify the person to take technical or vocational courses
sponsored by Canada Manpower. A training grant of up to $25 monthly if the
person has dependents, or $15 monthly if single, is available to assist with such
academic upgrading or technical refresher courses.
With the declining demand for unskilled labour or for persons with a "generalized" arts degree in the employment market, there is an increased need to meet
the remaining demand for technically or vocationally trained and skilled people.
The more the Department can assist recipients of social assistance to achieve the
necessary training or education to fit themselves for such job openings, the more
their dependence on social assistance will be lessened. Therefore, more emphasis
must be put into this aspect of our program.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1975
M 87
The Income Assistance Division took part in an Interdepartmental Student
Support Committee initiated this year by the Student Services Branch of the
Department of Education, to co-ordinate the efforts of all Departments in planning
for student training and employment. The interdepartmental structure proved quite
successful.
The following figure shows Departmental expenditures on Educational Upgrading and Vocational Training:
Figure 13
Educational Upgrading and Vocational Training, Calendar Years 1972-75
$160,000
1972
$80,000
1973
$185,000
1974
$290,000
1975
Cost-sharing—Costs of training grants are shared with the Federal Government on a 50:50 basis.
WORK ACTIVITY PROGRAM
Goal—The thrust of this program is to develop employment preparation-
type projects which will provide social assistance recipients or persons likely to be
in need with an improved capacity for entry or re-entry into employment.
The focus is on the development of elementary skills relating to work and the
restoration of self-confidence and a positive approach to real life situations, both
in work and in the personal and social environment of the participant.
Description—The goals of the program are accomplished by
(a) providing a work experience;
(b) training in life skills and classroom instruction in academic courses,
if required;
(c) referral and follow-up to job-finding agencies, vocational training.
Three work activity projects were funded by the Department in 1975.  The
three projects in operation are:
 M 88 HUMAN RESOURCES
FOR ADULTS
The Forestry Employment Project program is run in conjunction with the
Provincial Forestry Department which arranges for a work experience base. The
project is located in the Fraser Valley area. Practical classroom experience,
including a Life Skills Program, is provided through the Fraser Valley Community
College, and social work counselling and follow-up is met by a Departmental staff
member.
During the four years of this program's operation, a steady stream of individuals have re-entered the employment market. An estimated 45 per cent of the
participants have not returned to the role of social assistance recipients.
During 1975, 170 men participated in this project. The greater proportion
of the participants were between 18 and 30 years of age. The average length of
time spent on a project was four months, although individuals could participate up
to a maximum of six months.
Departmental expenditures on the program cover the salaries of the forestry
foreman and supervisors, all educational costs, and allowances paid to the participants which are over and above their social assistance payments. Allowances
ranged from $180 for single men to $100 for men with dependents. The higher
rate for single persons was made to offset lower basic social assistance payments
for this group (see section on "Social Assistance"). Participation in the project
amounts to approximately 36 hours per week.
A second work activity project, for adults, ceased operation early in 1975.
The Langley Work Activity Project had provided work activity for both men and
women.
FOR YOUTH
The work activity projects for boys and girls 15 to 18 years of age provide
educational and (or) vocational training to youth who have withdrawn early from
school.
Two work activity projects for youth were funded in the Capital Region in
1975. Both projects are administered by the Greater Victoria Boys' and Girls'
Club, a nonprofit society.
Participants are referred from the Family Court, the Department of Human
Resources and the school system.
The two projects provide work experience, primarily through outdoor activity
such as grounds maintenance, brush-clearing, environmental improvement activities, and a wood-lot operation. Some work placements in private businesses are
also carried out on a short-term basis.
A life-skill program is also provided which includes training in first aid, life-
saving, and sports. Educational upgrading is strongly encouraged through participation in individual correspondence courses with the full co-operation of the
local school district.
During the latter part of 1974, additional satellite projects were commenced
in the Burnside and Lakehill areas of Victoria, but these were phased out by June
1975. The two main centres for the program are still Victoria and Langford. The
Victoria section is limited to boys, while the Langford operation provides an opportunity for both boys and girls.
A total of 162 young people participated in the projects between January and
December 1975.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975 M 89
Departmental expenditures for work activity projects are as follows:
Table 36—Work Activity Projects, Departmental Expenditures,
Calendar Year 1975 and Fiscal Years 1972/73 to 1974/75
Year Expenditure
$
1975       333,000
1974/75     313,117
1973/74     366,710
1972/73      279,257
Cost-sharing—Work activity projects are initiated by Provincial departments
and shared on a 50:50 basis with the Federal Government.
INCENTIVE OPPORTUNITIES PROGRAM
Goal—The objective of this program is rehabilitative. It seeks to provide
work experience for social assistance and handicapped recipients. Such practical
experience may improve the individual's competitive position in the labour market
such that the individual can achieve economic independence.
Description—The program is operated at the local level, with training
placements being found by recipients and district offices in both Governmental and
private nonprofit agencies. The range of a job-training placement is, therefore,
quite broad. Participants work in hospitals, libraries, schools, recreational associations, and social service agencies.
The focus of the program is highly individualized with each recipient aiming
to improve specific work-skill areas. At the outset, a staff worker from the district
office and the recipient enter into a written agreement that outlines the goals the
individual seeks to achieve, the job to be performed, and the agency where the
opportunity is located. In return, the district office agrees to grant up to $50 per
month for single recipients who provide a minimum of 20 hours of service per
month, and up to $100 per month for recipients with dependents who provide at
least 40 hours of service per month. The grants are not construed as a wage, but
are considered as an honorarium to assist the individual with the extra costs he or
she encounters. Participation in the program is purely voluntary and normally
limited to six months duration per contract.
The following table illustrates numbers of persons and costs involved in the
incentive opportunities program:
Table 37—Incentive Opportunities Program
Calendar Year Number on Program
(Average over
12-month Period) Cost of Program
$
1975        2,000 2,415,000
1974     4,200 4,400,000
1973     2,400 2,550,000
1972   2,300 1,750,000
 M 90 HUMAN RESOURCES
The number of social assistance recipients on the Incentive Program declined
in 1975 following a policy decision to limit participation more strictly to instances
where job training was leading to a definite job at the end of the six months period
on the program. Previously, social assistance recipients had often remained on
the Incentive Program for a greater length of time than the six months period.
Cost-sharing—Costs are shared 50:50 with the Federal Government.
SERVICES FOR THE RETARDED
As mentioned briefly in the 1974 Annual Report, responsibility for services
for the retarded, including the residential facilities of Woodlands and Tranquille,
was transferred from the Department of Health to the Department of Human
Resources effective July 1, 1974.
The transfer came about for three reasons:
The Department of Human Resources, through foster homes, boarding
and group home placements, and through Handicapped Persons'
Income Assistance payments, served many mentally retarded persons, and therefore, integration of the majority of services in one
department was desirable.
A growing public awareness that retardation is not an illness, and that
training in social skills is the single most important emphasis in
service delivery, led logically to the conclusion that the Department
of Human Resources should assume responsibility.
Cost-sharing under provisions of the Canada Assistance Plan could be
realized.
Goals—The Department of Human Resources strives to provide the opportunity for every mentally retarded person to achieve his or her maximum potential.
As far as possible, every retarded child should have the opportunity to live with
his or her own family and to participate fully in community life. As an adult, the
retarded person has a right to economic security and the opportunity to engage
in a meaningful occupation as determined by his or her capability.
Description—The decision was made to refrain from creating a special
division or branch designated as being responsible for retardation services. Departmental services, including those for retarded persons, are seen as being available to all citizens of the Province based on need for the service rather than on a
label or category.
Each district office in the Province appointed a staff member to act as a liaison
person to work with the local chapter of the Association for the Retarded. The
liaison person acts as a resource person in the community to examine the need for
service and to link those persons who need a service with the appropriate agency
or resource.
Co-ordinators have been appointed in five of the larger regions. The coordinator assists the Regional Director in the development and enrichment of
community services specifically designed for retarded persons.
Each region is served by one of the large residential units:
Tranquille for the regions east of Hope.
Woodlands for the regions west of Hope to the Coast.
Glendale for Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M 91
Each Departmental program is reported in detail in its appropriate section
of this Report. Below, however, is a listing of programs which have specific relation to the needs of the mentally retarded.
Day Services
Infant development (birth to 3 years)—A review of services elicited the information that valuable time may be lost if a delay occurs in providing appropriate
stimulation and remedial assistance for the infant. A pilot home-based project
sponsored by the Vancouver-Richmond Association for the Mentally Retarded
had proven how effective direct service for the young child and support service
for parents could be. The staff provide families with medical and social information and assist the families in utilizing specialist services in the community.
In 1975, new programs were funded by the Department to commence in
Burnaby, North Vancouver, Surrey, Victoria, and Duncan, adding to those already
in operation in Vancouver and New Westminster. Further inquiries have been
received from Kamloops, Kelowna, Castlegar, and Haney.
A Provincial Co-ordinator for the Infant Development Program was appointed
effective September 1, 1975.
A Provincial Advisory Committee was appointed by the Minister in the fall
of 1975 and will be invaluable in overseeing the orderly Provincial growth of this
important service.
Day care (age 3 to 6 years)—Day care services, particularly under the policy
of day care for children with special needs, has assisted many handicapped children
to enjoy a useful day care experience.
School-age children—Through special chapter schools and School Board
sponsored schools and special class opportunities, increasing numbers of mentally
retarded children are able to attend school with their peers.
In some communities the Department has funded alternative school projects
that have been designed to meet the special needs of retarded youngsters.
Activity centres—Through a growing number of activity centres and sheltered
workshops, most handicapped adults can spend the greater part of each day in
productive and rewarding activities.
Residential Programs
Foster homes—Many handicapped children and some adults, unable to continue in their own homes, have found foster homes to be a placement of choice.
Group homes—For many handicapped persons, group homes (sponsored by
local community groups or chapters of the Association for the Retarded) provide
an agreeable place to live. By the end of the year, 260 retarded persons resided
in group homes.
Short-stay hostels—Many parents need a short respite from the responsibility
of caring for a handicapped child. New short-stay hostel accommodation was
developed and funded in Burnaby and Victoria in 1975 to meet this need. Similar
hostels had been established earlier in Sardis and Vancouver.
A summer program was launched in co-operation with the Loyal Protestant
Home for Children in New Westminster. Year-round capacity is available for
short stays for retarded children and adults in several extended-care facilities,
Woodlands, Tranquille, and Glendale.
 .
M 92 HUMAN RESOURCES
Training centres—The following centres are available to assist residents to
prepare for independent living in their own homes or communities:
Name of Training Centre and Location Capacity
Endicott Home, Creston  62
Northern Training Centre, Smithers   30
Beaver Lodge, Oliver  32
Variety Farm, Delta  44
Chrisholme, Langley  24
Bevan Lodge, Courtenay  74
Springwood, Victoria  25
Total capacity  291
These training centres are funded by the Department of Human Resources to
provide life-skill instruction for retarded adults who have previously lived in institutions but who may be able to move to more independent living arrangements
once they have learned to perform basic daily skills. Many necessities such as
shopping and cleaning one's clothes are, of course, carried out by others in institutional settings so these skills must be taught to persons who have not had the
opportunity to develop the ability and confidence needed for greater independence.
Boarding and personal care homes—A total of 3,600 handicapped persons
reside in boarding and personal care homes throughout the Province. The Department is grateful to the many volunteers who visit and arrange programs over and
above those supplied by the home operators.
Independent living—More emphasis is being given to providing apartments
or condominiums for handicapped persons who can look after themselves as long
as they have someone to turn to should extraordinary circumstances arise.
An example of this arrangement is the Arlington Street Townhouses sponsored by the Vancouver-Richmond Association for the Retarded in Vancouver.
RESIDENTIAL INSTITUTIONS
I. Glendale Lodge
Glendale serves the residents of Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands by
providing residential care and training for 300 severely and profoundly retarded
persons.
Additional services include assessment services for mentally retarded persons,
audiological assessments for children with hearing handicaps and day care service
for multiple-handicapped adults residing in the Greater Victoria area.
The Glendale Lodge Society is operated under the Societies Act by a Board
of Directors appointed by Order in Council for a two-year term.
For program planning purposes, Glendale relates to the Department of Human
Resources in the same manner as do Woodlands and Tranquille.
During 1975 the extended-care unit ceased to be listed under the Hospital
Insurance Act and full funding was assumed by the Department of Human Resources from May 1.
■
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
The following table gives statistical information on Glendale:
M 93
Table 38—Glendale Hospital
1974 1975
Resident population as at December 31    287 307
Admissions, 12 months    114 142
Discharges    110 122
Waiting-list        31 9
Staff establishment as at December 31   384.5 384.5
II. Tranquille
Tranquille is a facility for the mentally retarded of all ages, located in Kamloops. Living in Tranquille are long-stay residents who require training and education and extended-care patients who require active nursing and medical care.
There are also numerous short-stay residents. The emphasis in Tranquille is placed
on preparing the residents for gradual return to community living.
Tranquille has four physicians who live on the grounds and provide an immediate service, a dentist, and nursing staff.
The training program is directed by a psychologist, and stresses behaviour
modification.
A Group Living Home has been established for some 2Vi years at Tranquille.
This is sometimes colloquially referred to as a "Quarter-way House" and the
residents live there in a family situation, together with a nursing staff member. It
has been a very popular resource and its therapeutic impact has been considerable.
Toward the end of the year the Group Home had to be discontinued. A residence
is being converted for use as a small school for the retarded-talking children from
the community, from Fitzwater School and some of those residing at Tranquille.
One residence, as part of the therapeutic program for families, is used by visiting
parents.
During the year, progress has been made toward the completion of several
20-bed units, but an unfortunate accident to a transformer, which resulted in a fire,
slowed down the project. It should be possible to move residents into the buildings
early in 1976.
Many staff have participated throughout the year in many community activities with a view to furthering community interest in Tranquille. Radio and television broadcasts have been made, and talks and lectures given to various bodies.
There is an ongoing association with the Cariboo College Departments of Nursing,
Psychology, and Social Work.
The following table gives statistical information on Tranquille:
Table 39—Tranquille
1974 1975
Resident population as at December 31   408 410
Admissions, 12 months      47 80
Discharges      90 65
Staff establishment as at December 31   441 491
Waiting-list as at December 31      34 20
 M 94 HUMAN RESOURCES
III. Woodlands
Woodlands is the largest facility for the mentally retarded in British Columbia.
In residence are those children and adults (many of whom have complex problems
in addition to the retardation) for whom there is no available resource to meet
their needs within their own community. Over the last decade community services
have expanded and this is the major factor in the decrease of the waiting-list; hopefully in the next few years these community services will have a greater impact on
the still remaining overcrowded conditions at Woodlands. Woodlands continues to
support the growing network of community resources in a number of ways, such as
Outpatient Diagnostic and Planning Services, a Home Management Program, emergency admissions, sharing technical and professional knowledge through Staff
Development, and participation in a variety of committees.
With the transfer of Woodlands to the Department of Human Resources in
1975, children under 17 years of age became the responsibility of the Superintendent of Child Welfare. One of the major advantages to the residents under this
system has been the provision of personal comforts funds to enrich their daily lives.
There is now a more active involvement by the various regional district social
workers in the current planning for Woodlands' residents within their home community.
The following table gives comparative statistical information on Woodlands:
Table 40—Woodlands
1969
Resident population as at December 31    1,261
Admissions, 12 months       178
Deaths, 12 months         14
Waiting-list as at December 31       200
Staff establishment as at December 31       924
1974
1975
1,075
1,004
57
49
17
16
13
2
999
999
The above table reveals the lack of major change in resident population over
the last several years. The change most evident is the decrease in the waiting-list
and the decrease in the number of admissions. The minimal increase in numbers
of staff has not balanced the decrease in manpower hours negotiated for staff
through collective bargaining, so that although there is a fund of expertise within
this organization, it cannot be shared as widely with communities as would be
desirable unless it is done at the expense of the resident population. Youth employed through the Provincial Summer Student Program have made it possible to
enrich the summer program in many ways, just as numerous volunteers do throughout the year.
In 1973, Woodlands was reorganized into five program units. This division
provides more homogeneous groupings and emphasis on the type of services required.
1. The Health Care Program Unit, as well as meeting needs of those who would
otherwise be served by extended-care hospitals, includes wards for residents of
Woodlands with acute physical illnesses or infectious diseases.
2. The very youngest children who are ambulant are cared for on a developmental model within the Developmental Opportunity Program Unit.
3. A high proportion of the ambulant population at Woodlands is severely or
profoundly retarded. Those who are more capable have returned to the community.
The severely and profoundly retarded residents are divided into two large program
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M 95
units, the Intermediate Care Motivation and the Intermediate Care Preparation
Units, with the latter being the residents nearest to being ready to leave Woodlands
for regional boarding-home programs or other community facilities.
4. The fifth program unit called Life Education is for the moderately and
mildly retarded persons who are at Woodlands primarily because of psychosocial
problems.
Each program unit has a Multi-discipline Advisory Council with the majority
of the members elected from ward teams.
The Training and Education Services at Woodlands are provided by 41 program staff and are organized into five departments: Education, including kindergarten and a Special Education School; Occupational Therapy, which provides
pediatric and therapeutic programs; Recreation, with campus camp and community
programs; Vocational Services, providing adult education, job training, and placement; and the Developmental Services Pre-school. In addition to these direct services, 23 residents in 1975 were enrolled in community schools, two attended Jericho
Hill School for the deaf, and 32 adults travelled on their own daily to community
workshops or jobs.
Permission to hire substitute teachers at the Woodlands Academic School made
it possible for the first time in 1975 to maintain uninterrupted classes. Summer
students and OFY students offered innovative programming under teacher supervision during June, July, and August. Three child care workers from Jericho Hill
School helped in the classrooms with deaf pupils as well as instructing staff in sign
language. Throughout the year the teachers provided orientation, information, and
instruction to well over 100 special eduaction teachers who arranged to spend their
professional development days in Woodlands classrooms.
The wooded ravine at the northwest border of Woodlands' grounds served as a
training area for young men learning basic work skills during the year, and the
picnic area with barbecue they constructed beside the pond is the beginning of
what will be a valuable recreation area for several hundred residents whose handicaps prevent their frequent use of community recreation facilities. Co-operation
and co-participation with the community and adult education increased during the
year, not only through participation of residents in community sheltered workshops,
but also through programs in which residents helped senior citizens with gardening
chores, attendance of adult residents at the Riverview Pub Therapy, participation of
community workshops in the Woodlands Christmas Bazaar, and joint meetings which
are facilitating the systematic movement of Woodlands' residents into community
education and work facilities.
A full complement of three occupational therapists for the first time in a number
of years was assigned to work intensively with multiple-handicapped children. In
co-operation with the Psychology Department an intensive developmental program
of Infant Stimulation was undertaken for six multiple-handicapped residents. The
results showed measurable developmental progress and a second project was
planned. Working jointly with staff at the Cerebral Palsied Workshop and with the
co-operation of the Nursing Department, a program using the visual communication
system of Bliss Symbols has been introduced.
Highlight of the recreation year for most residents is camping, and 23 ward
groups attended Gold Creek, near Alouette Lake, over a four-month camping season
in the summer. A new camp-site, Lakewood, in beautiful forest land along the
 M 96 HUMAN RESOURCES
Alouette River has been assigned to Woodlands as a permanent camp-site. The
projected development will not only provide excellent summer camping facilities for
Woodlands' residents, but will also allow some community participation by individual families with retarded children or other community groups serving the retarded. In addition, provision is being made at Camp Lakewood for the year-round
Country Living Program for disturbed adolescents and young men which has been
providing successful rehabilitation at Gold Creek for the past two years. In August,
eight residents competed in International Special Olympics in Ontario and Michigan,
sponsored by the Kennedy Foundation.
The Developmental Services Department has been set up to provide a stimulation type of pre-school experience for residents within the Developmental Opportunity Program Unit. Twenty-eight youngsters were enrolled for IVi to 2 hours
a day in a play and communication-oriented program under the direction of two
pre-school instructors.
In the fall of the year the first steps were taken to recognize the needs of the
350 children of school age living at Woodlands who were not receiving education.
Adjoining School Districts of Surrey and Coquitlam agreed to work with the Training and Education Department on a plan to provide education for 150 children from
Woodlands. The plan is to enrol an additional 50 Woodlands' residents in community schools and to set up at Woodlands a Developmental Program for 100
children.
This year the Queen's Park Hospital for Extended Care began construction at
Woodlands.
As of December 31, 1975, there were 270 volunteers providing an enrichment
for residents of Woodlands. Throughout the year, 12,777 volunteer hours were
utilized for a multitude of special programs, from helping with parties, helping in
evening craft classes at the drop-in centre, distributing toys and supervising a newly
developed Playroom Program, to helping residents select clothes in the Apparel
Shop, and many, many others. The Auxiliary provides funds for extra equipment,
operates the canteen, and organizes a mammoth annual Christmas Light Tour.
The following table reports Departmental expenditures at Woodlands, Tranquille, and Glendale in 1975:
Table 41—Residential Institutions for the Retarded, Departmental
Expenditures, Calendar Year 1975
Name of Institution $ Millions
Woodlands    11.51
Tranquille        4.71
Glendale     6.22
1 Departmental fundings for period April 1 to December 31, 1975.   Funding to Woodlands and Tranquille previous to April 1, 1975, was provided by the Department of Health.
2 Indicates Departmental funding for period January 1 to December 31, 1975.
The British Columbia Association for the Mentally Retarded and Local Association Chapters have been most co-operative in working with the Departmental
staff. A sense of full partnership in the common enterprise of improving services
for the mentally retarded throughout our Province has been consistently evident.
The Association has been most responsible in bringing to the attention of the
Department areas of service where improved policy and practice is needed.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975 M 97
CHILDREN'S REHABILITATION SERVICES
Goal—To provide alternative rehabilitation programs to youth not attending
public schools.
Description—Rehabilitation programs for teenage youngsters have been in
existence in British Columbia for at least five years. Typically, they were started by
groups or societies which identified significant numbers of young people who were
dropping out of school without any viable alternative and simultaneously exhibiting
other social and (or) legal problems. These programs were funded from a number
of sour.ces—LIP, OFY, Community Grants (Department of Human Resources), as
well as some private sources. These programs were formalized for the fiscal year
1974/75 and provision was made for joint funding by the Departments of Education
and Human Resources on a regularized basis. There has also been some financial
input from the Corrections Branch (Department of the Attorney-General) to a few
of the programs.
The group of children we are attempting to serve via this program are those
who are "high risk," and the most frequent indicator is the fact that they have or
are about to "drop out" of school. There is certainly sufficient evidence to suggest
that, for large numbers of children who take this step, further difficulties ensue.
Our Department's function is largely a facilitating one in making it possible
for these children and young people to continue to participate in an educational
experience. In addition, there are very definite steps taken in most of the programs
to deal with family difficulties, acquisition of acceptable social skills, and an orientation to the world of work. The Department's involvement in the program is through
the provision of child care workers to the 94 programs.
Close to half of the programs have some kind of work activity component which
is similar in its objectives to the Federally funded work activity programs for adults.
There is also a very significant life-skills component to most of the programs which
includes budgeting, job finding, cooking, and housekeeping, etc.
Most of the programs show a fairly high rate of reintegration into the community as indicated by return to regular school programs, entrance to vocational training programs, or securing employment. In most cases this kind of movement can
be attributed to the intervention of the child care worker who is able to bring about
some modification of the behaviours which have led in many cases to the child's
exclusion from the school situation.
A survey conducted in 1974 indicated that almost half of the children enrolled
in these programs were on probation and a considerably higher proportion had been
in conflict with the law in some way.
In 1975 we expanded the use of this program to serve younger children who
are physically and (or) mentally handicapped. This has resulted in the inclusion of
significant numbers of children who have been excluded from school and the concomitant socializing experiences.
Ninety-four programs operated in 1975 throughout the Province at a cost to
the Department of $1.1 million.
Cost-sharing—Arrangements with the Federal Government to share costs on
the Children's Rehabilitation Services Program was under negotiation at year-end.
Projects funded by the Department of Human Resources in 1975 were as
follows:
Abbotsford: Reach Out.
Alert Bay: Alert Bay Alternate School.
Armstrong: Armstrong Rehabilitation Program.
 M 98 HUMAN RESOURCES
Burnaby:
Bonsar Park Alternate School Program.
Donald Patterson School.
Burns Lake: Rehabilitative Program for Youth.
Campbell River: Chimo School.
Castlegar: Open Road Centre.
Chetwynd: Chetwynd Attendance Centre.
Chilliwack:
Operation "Bridge."
Re-entry.
Coquitlam: Shaft Rehabilitative Program.
Courtenay:
The House.
Sandwick School.
Cranbrook:
Cranbrook Early Intervention Program.
Junior Secondary Rehabilitation Program.
Creston Rehabilitation Program.
Dawson Creek: Dawson Creek Attendance Centre.
Duncan: Cowichan Valley Family Life.
Fort St. John: Fort St. John Rehabilitation Programs.
Golden: Golden Alternate School Program.
Gold River: Gold River Alternate School.
Gulf Islands: Gulf Islands Resource Worker.
Kamloops:
Clinical Class.
McDonald Park.
Operation Re-entry.
Kelowna: Kelowna Alternate School Program.
Kimberley: Focus Lab.
Kitimat: Kitimat City High.
Lake Cowichan: Lake Cowichan Alternate Education.
Langley:
Alternate Learning Environment Program.
D. W, Poppy Junior Secondary School.
Maple Ridge: Maple Ridge Rehabilitation Program.
Merritt: Merritt Alternate School Program for Youth.
Mission: Education for Life Program.
Nanaimo:
Northfield Alternate Program.
Rehabilitation Class.
Nelson: Aspire Program.
New Westminster: New Westminster Rehabilitation Program.
North Vancouver:
Project Alternative Secondary School (PASS).
Prince Charles School.
Progress Centre.
Oliver: Oliver Alternate School Program.
100 Mile House: Cedar Crest School.
Penticton: Penticton Rehabilitation Class—"SKAHA House."
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M 99
Port Alberni:
Emotionally Disturbed Class (Gill School Class).
Project 70/74.
Project 70/75.
Port Hardy: Port Hardy Alternate Education Program.
Powell River: Powell River Rehabilitation School.
Prince George:
Aurora School for the Trainable Mentally Retarded.
Physically Handicapped Class.
Queen  Charlotte  Islands:   Rehabilitation  of Educationally  Disadvantaged
Students.
Quesnel: Alternate Class Project.
Richmond: Richmond Alternate Education Program—Station Stretch.
Saanich: Warehouse School.
Salmon Arm: Salmon Arm Alternate Learning Program.
Smithers: Smithers Alternate School Program.
Sooke Village: Sooke Alternative Program.
Squamish: Squamish Alternate School.
Summerland: Summerland Rehabilitation Class.
Surrey: Surrey Alternate Education Programs (four programs).
Tahsis: Tahsis Alternate School.
Terrace: Terrace Alternate Education Program.
Trail:
Elementary Rehabilitation Class.
Secondary Rehabilitation Program.
Trail Autistic Class.
Sunningdale School for the Trainable Mentally Retarded.
West Vancouver: Sentinal Work Activity Program (SWAP).
Vancouver:
Bridge.
Byng Satellite.
8J-9J.
Hastings Learning Centre.
KAT Class.
Last Chance.
Oakridge School.
OK School.
Operation Step-up.
Outreach School.
Riley Rehabilitation.
Strathcona Continuation.
Total Education.
The Vinery.
Vanderhoof: Nechako Attendance Centre.
Victoria:
George Jay Rehabiltiation Program.
Girls Alternative Program.
Group Home Day Program.
S. J. Willis Rehabilitation Program.
Victoria Autistic Society.
 M  100 HUMAN RESOURCES
MEALS ON WHEELS
Goal—To provide nutritious meals to persons who are unable to cook or
shop for themselves on a regular basis and who have no one to do these things for
them.
Description—Meals on Wheels is a voluntary community service that provides a preventive and therapeutic service. Meals on Wheels can be used in conjunction with other services, such as homemaker services, on a long- or short-term
basis.
Volunteers provide the staffing for the program and their visit provides a
continuing link between the homebound individual and the community, as well as
helping to identify other problems and needs before a crisis occurs.
The Department of Human Resources has been involved in assisting with the
establishment of several new programs. Grants have been made to some Meals on
Wheels groups to offset the costs of co-ordinating the service or to partially subsidize the cost of providing the meals. It is important to note that Government
input has been to support the efforts of the volunteers, without whom Meals on
Wheels programs would founder.
Forty-two Meals on Wheels programs are now operating throughout the
Province, making British Columbia the leader in Canada in this area.   In several
communities, Meals on Wheels is run in association with a homemaker service.
Community grants were made to Meals on Wheels programs in the following
communities during 1975:
Burnaby: Burnaby Meals on Wheels.
Campbell River: Campbell River Meals on Wheels.
Chilliwack: Chilliwack Meals on Wheels.
Comox-Courtenay-Cumberland: Comox Valley Meals on Wheels.
Kelowna: Kiwanis Meals on Wheels.
Nakusp: Nakusp Meals on Wheels.
Nelson: Nelson Community Resources Board Meals on Wheels.
New Denver: Upper Slocan Meals on Wheels.
New Westminster: New Westminster Meals on Wheels.
North Shore  (North and West Vancouver):  North Shore Meals on
Wheels.
Port Alberni: Port Alberni Meals on Wheels.
Saltspring Island: Saltspring Island Meals on Wheels.
Sooke: Sooke Meals on Wheels.
Trail: Trail Meals on Wheels.
Victoria: Victoria Silver Threads Meals on Wheels.
HOSTELS FOR ADULTS
Goal—To provide short-term shelter for persons who require a temporary
place to stay.
Description—Thirty hostels in the Province provide shelter on a limited
time basis. Most hostels are administered by nonprofit societies. When hostel
residents require financial aid, they may apply to the nearest Department of Human
Resources office where their needs may be met in the form of direct social assistance
from which they will pay for the cost of their accommodation, or the hostel oper-
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1975
M  101
ators may be authorized to bill the Department directly on a per diem basis at a
predetermined rate.
Hostels are licensed by the Adult Branch of the Community Care Facilities
Licensing Board of the Department of Human Resources. By year-end, the bed
capacity of these hostels exceeded 1,000.
Cost-sharing—Shelter costs are shared 50:50 with the Federal Government
for persons designated by the Federal Government as being "in need."
HALFWAY OR TRANSITION HOUSES
Goal—To provide temporary room and board to persons who are "in transition" and who lack financial means—transient workers, drug and alcohol dependents, persons who have recently left prison, women in transition, etc.
Description—When persons eligible for social assistance reside in halfway or
transition houses, their living expenses are covered by the Department of Human
Resources. Funds to nonprofit societies operating halfway houses designed to meet
the needs of specific groups are funded by the appropriate Government department.
For example, halfway houses for drug addicts and alcoholics received grants
directly from the Provincial Alcohol and Drug Commission. In 1975 there were 37
halfway houses in British Columbia licensed by the Community Care Facilities
Licensing Board to provide lodging and counselling to persons with drug and (or)
alcohol problems.
Bed capacity for all halfway houses in the Province stood at approximately
1,250 by year-end 1975.
Three transition houses for women were supported by direct Human Resources
funding in 1975. The Ishtar Women's Transition House in Aldergrove offered
counselling, training, seminars, and lodging on a $31,019 grant. The Victoria
Women's Transition House offered board and room with counselling on a $53,632
grant. The Vancouver Transition House came directly under the administration of
the Vancouver Resources Board in 1975 with staff employed by the Vancouver
Resources Board.
In contrast to hostels, halfway houses usually provide counselling services and
information on other community organizations.
Cost-sharing—50:50 sharing with the Federal Government is claimed on
expenditures for social assistance recipients who are lodged temporarily in halfway
or transition houses.
For more information on halfway houses, contact your local office of the
Department of Human Resources, or the Director, Special Care, Adults Division,
Department of Human Resources, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
  SERVICES FOR
SENIOR CITIZENS
  REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1975
MINCOME
M  105
Goal—To provide a guaranteed minimum income to senior citizens and
handicapped persons to assist them in meeting their everyday living requirements
and maintaining their sense of independence and dignity.
Description—The Mincome Program residents of the Province aged 60 and
over (18 and over if handicapped) a minimum income of $249.82 per person per
month (December 1975 rates).
To be eligible for Mincome an individual must meet the following qualifications:
(a) Must be aged 60 or over (18 or over if handicapped):
(b) Must have five consecutive years' residence in Canada with landed
immigrant status, or hold Canadian citizenship:
(c) Monthly income must not exceed the Mincome guaranteed level.
Persons aged 60 and over in receipt of the Old Age Security/Guaranteed Income Supplement or the Spouse's Allowance will receive Mincome automatically if
eligible.   No application is required.
Handicapped individuals and those aged 60 to 64, not in receipt of Spouse's
Allowance, must make application for Mincome at their nearest office of the
Department of Human Resources.
The following bar graph represents the number of people in receipt of Mincome payments in December of 1972, 1973, 1974, and 1975. You will note that the
number of recipients declined somewhat in the last year. The reduction is due to the
increasing numbers of persons covered by the Federal Canada Pension Plan and the
introduction of the new Spouse's Allowance Program. With the $209.81 Spouse's
Allowance payment, many persons have become no longer eligible for Mincome in
cases where their spouse's allowance is augmented by another source of income that
pushes their monthly income over the guaranteed Mincome level.
Figure 14
Total Mincome Program Recipients
110,000
persons
December
1972
128,000
persons
122,000
persons
December
1973
December
1974
December
1975
 M  106
HUMAN RESOURCES
As mentioned earlier, Mincome benefits are paid to handicapped persons or
senior citizens whose monthly income does not exceed the Mincome guarantee.
The proportion of persons receiving Mincome who are
(Group A)  handicapped;
(Group B) aged 60 and over, not in receipt of Old Age Security and
Guaranteed Income Supplement benefits, or Spouse's Allowance; or
(Group C) 60 and over in receipt of Old Age Security and Guaranteed
Income Supplement benefits or Spouse's Allowance
are depicted in the following pie graph:
Figure 15
Mincome Recipients as at December 1975
(Group A)
17.0%
Handi
(Group B)
capped
Age Benefit (60
v    8.2%
and over not
receiving
Federal
pensions)
Handicapped: 9,918 persons
Over 60  (not receiving OAS/GIS or Spouse's
Allowance): 20,714 persons.
Over 60  (not receiving OAS/GIS or Spouse's
Allowance): 90,389 persons.
The number of (Group B) Mincome Age Benefit recipients (those aged 60
and over not in receipt of Old Age/Guaranteed Income Supplement or Spouse's
Allowance) has steadily risen in previous years; however, due to the introduction
of the Federal Spouse's Allowance Program, you will note that the total number
of recipients has, in fact, dropped for the period July 1975 to December 1975,
inclusive.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M  107
Figure 16
Number of Mincome Age Benefit (60 and Over Not in Receipt of Old Age Security/
Guaranteed Income Supplement or Spouse's Allowance) Recipients
As at
January 1975
22,879
As at
July 1975
As at
December
975
Expenditures by the Department of Human Resources for the Mincome Program are shown in the following table:
Table 42—Departmental Expenditures, Mincome Program, 1972—75
Calendar Year Expenditure
$
1975   106,990,000
1974       100,042,000
1973     54,479,000
19721    4,624,000
1 Program commenced December 1972.
The Spouse's Allowance Program has had a net effect of reducing the cost of
the Provincial Mincome Program. Prior to the introduction of the Spouse's
Allowance Program in October 1975, certain individuals may have received the
maximum Mincome payment of $249.82. Once in receipt of Spouse's Allowance
the maximum Mincome payment was reduced to $40.01, with the Federal Government picking up the balance of $209.81.
The slight increase in 1975 (offset by the introduction of the Spouse's Allowance), can be attributed to two factors:
(a) Growth in the number of recipients (primarily handicapped):
(b) Quarterly cost-of-living increases.
No program changes were introduced in the calendar year 1975.
Due to the fact that the Group A and Group B recipients do not qualify for
the Federal Old Age Security Pension or Guaranteed Income Supplement, the
Province must contribute a much higher proportion of the payments made to these
groups. The following pie graph breaks out Department expenditures for the
Mincome Program for the month of December 1975.
 M  108
HUMAN RESOURCES
Figure 17
Proportion of Total Expenditure, Mincome, December 1975
As can be seen by the pie graph, the cost to the Department for the 60 to 64
age-group makes up almost half the cost of the Mincome Program although the
number of recipients in that category is not so large. The reason for this is that
persons aged 60 to 64 are not eligible for Federal benefits and the Province provides total support up to the guaranteed level in a great number of cases.
Currently, British Columbia is the only province to offer a universal guaranteed income on a per person basis starting at 60 years of age.
Cost-sharing—The Federal Government shares in the cost of assistance to
those individuals designated as "persons in need" under the Canada Assistance
Plan. Under the current agreement, approximately. 20 per cent of the total Provincial expenditure for Mincome is returned to the Province in the form of Federal
cost-sharing payments. Canada shares only in the Age Benefit and Handicapped
portions of the Mincome Program (Groups A and B).
SENIOR CITIZENS COUNSELLOR SERVICE
Goal—To provide a counselling and information service to senior citizens,
run by counsellors who are senior citizens themselves.
Description—The program began in 1968 with 30 senior citizen counsellors
recommended to the Department by old-age pensioners' groups. The number of
counsellors has grown yearly and by the end of 1975 there were 160 senior citizen
counsellors volunteering their time and energy in all parts of British Columbia.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M  109
Senior citizen counsellors are called on to help with an almost limitless variety of undertakings. Their reports have shown them driving elderly people to
their doctor or hospital, assisting in the development of housing projects and activity centres, helping to establish the Meals on Wheels Program, visiting housebound senior citizens, writing letters for elderly people who have difficulty writing,
and providing information on Government programs such as Mincome and Pharmacare.
Prospective counsellors are recommended for appointment by district offices
of the Department of Human Resources and (or) MLAs. Once appointed by the
Minister of Human Resources, they make themselves known in the community
by speaking to senior citizens groups and contacting service agencies.
Senior citizen counsellors are senior themselves who have a strong social
interest in other elderly citizens; it is their dedication and peer group support
which explains the continuing effectiveness of this program. The program does
not presume to offer an in-depth type of counselling, but can make referrals where
such is necessary. One of the most valuable aspects of the program is that the
counsellor often becomes a good friend.
Counsellors submit reports of out-of-pocket expenses, which may be reimbursed up to $60 per month. The following table shows expenditures for the Senior
Citizen Counsellor Program in 1975 and the fiscal years 1971/72 through 1974/75:
Table 43—Senior Citizen Counsellor Service, Departmental Expenditures
Calendar Year 1975 and Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1974/75
$ $
1975 (calendar) ......  54,320 1972/73     25,000
1974/75   48,763 1971/72     21,100
1973/74   38,074
The following table gives an estimate of the number of people that have been
served by senior citizen counsellors in 1975 and the last four years:
Table 44—Numbers of Persons Served by Senior Citizen Counsellors
Calendar Year 1975 and Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1974/75
1975   66,750 1972/73    44,200
1974/75   57,000 1971/72     37,600
1973/74   49,000
In the 1971 census there were 198,000 people in British Columbia over 65
years of age. By year-end, 1975, 241,000 persons in British Columbia were 65
years of age or older. The group over 65 is increasing at a rate of 5.4 per cent
per year, whereas the general population is increasing at a lower rate of 3.9 per
cent per year.
The Special Care Adults Division helps to publicize the work of counsellors
by informing local groups and the district offices of the Department of Human
Resources of the counsellors in their areas, thereby encouraging more contacts
between counsellors and local Human Resources services.
 M  110 HUMAN RESOURCES
Counsellors have in the past had an opportunity to meet one another and
learn more about the Department by attending conferences periodically. One
large conference or several smaller regional conferences may be held for senior
citizen counsellors in 1976.
Cost-sharing—The Federal Government shares in the costs of this program
on a 50:50 basis.
For more information about the program, contact your local Department of
Human Resources office, or the Director, Special Care, Adults Division, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
B.C. HYDRO BUS PASS FOR SENIOR CITIZENS
Goal—To aid and encourage mobility among senior citizens.
Description—Bus passes are issued to (1) persons 65 years or over who
are in receipt of the Federal Guaranteed Income Supplement and (or) Mincome,
and (2) persons under 65 years of age who are in receipt of Handicapped Persons
Income Assistance or Mincome for the 60 to 64 age-group. The pass is issued
semi-annually for the period December 1 to May 31 and the period June 1 to
November 30. The cost is $5 for all or part of each six-month issue period. No
fare is necessary when travelling on B.C. Hydro metropolitan services vehicles in
Victoria and Vancouver. Reduced fares are offered on suburban services vehicles
on the Lower Mainland with the pass.
The following table shows the number of passes issued in the two issuing
periods in 1975 and for the previous two years:
Table 45—Number of Passes Issued
December 1975 ._                       27,4071        June 1974
.... 23,000
June 1975  26,685         November 1973 	
.... 20,570
December 1974  25,4282       May 1973         	
....  18,657
1 Estimate for 16th issue (December 1, 1975, to May 31, 1976): 28,100.
- Revision of 1974 Annual Report figures.
Approximately 2,500 first-time applications are processed each issue.
During the postal stoppage in October and November passes for the Vancouver area were available for pick-up at the Vancouver Resources Board office
at 411 Dunsmuir Street. A similar arrangement was made for Victoria area passes
to be picked up at 614 Humboldt Street.
While most of the passes were picked up, those remaining were mailed out
when the mail began moving again.
It is anticipated that the program will continue to grow at its present steady
rate.
Cost-sharing—Administrative costs of this program are borne by the
Department of Human Resources. All revenue occurring as a result of the $5
charge is remitted to B.C. Hydro. The Federal Government does not participate in
this program.
For more information on the program, write to the Division of Office Administration and Public Information, Department of Human Resources, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria (telephone 387-3125, 387-6092).
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M  111
ADULT CARE
Goal—To subsidize those elderly or handicapped persons who must be cared
for outside their own homes, and whose income is insufficient to meet the need,
and to encourage the development of appropriate resources for this purpose among
private societies and the private sector.
Description—The Department estimates that 2 per cent of persons over 65
years of age in the Province require extended care, while a further 3 to 4 per cent
require personal and intermediate care.
Rates paid to institutions on behalf of persons requiring care vary with the
intensity of care required.
A definition of the types of care subsidized by the Department of Human
Resources follows:
Table 46—Definition of Types of Care in British Columbia
Subsidized by the Department of Human Resources
TYPE 1—PERSONAL CARE
This is the type of care required by persons of any age whose physical disabilities are such
that their primary need is for room and board, limited lay supervision, assistance
with some of the activities of daily living, and a planned program of social and
recreational activities.
It is also the type of care required by persons with mild mental disorders who primarily
require room and board and limited lay supervision in a supportive  environment.
Facilities providing Type 1 care have usually been called rest homes or boarding-homes.
The term personal care home is new, being used by both the Department of Health
and the Department of Human Resources.
TYPE 2—INTERMEDIATE CARE
This is the type of care required by persons of any age whose physical disabilities are such
that their primary need is for room and board, daily professional nursing supervision
and (or) psychiatric supervision, assistance with some of the activities of daily living,
and a planned program of social and recreational activities.
It is also the type of care required by persons with mental disorders who primarily require
room and board, daily professional supervision by a person with appropriate psychiatric training, and a program designed to assist them to reach their maximum potential
in the activities of daily living.
Facilities providing Type 2 care are called intermediate care homes by the Department or
Health and the Department of Human Resources.
PRIVATE HOSPITAL NURSING-HOME CARE
This type of facility provides care to persons of any age with a severe chronic disability,
which has usually produced a functional deficit, who require skilled 24-hour-a-day
nursing services and continuing medical supervision. Most people who need this
type of care have a limited potential for rehabil'tation and often require institutional
care on a permanent basis.
Extended-care hospitals provide this type of care, through the British Columbia Medical
Plan, at a charge of $1 per day in December 1975. Private hospitals provide the care
at up to $900 per month to persons who are unable to find a vacancy in an extended-
care hospital. At year-end the Department of Human Resources was paying $525 per
month to private hospitals, on behalf of patients with insufficient income.
 M  112 HUMAN RESOURCES
Rates Authorized
At year-end the rate paid to private operators for eligible persons requiring
personal care was $250 per month, ranging up to $400 per month for intermediate
care. The rate for an adult in a private hospital was $525 per month.
Eligible residents of personal and intermediate care facilities operated by
nonprofit societies were subsidized to assist them to purchase their care at a rate
approved by the Director, Special Care for Adults, Department of Human
Resources.
Eligibility for subsidy in adult care facilities is the same as eligibility for social
assistance, except that assets of no more than $1,500 for a single person and
$2,500 for married couples are allowable. Any assets in excess of these amounts
must be used to pay costs of the person's care.
Requests to the local Human Resources offices for referral of patients to care
facilities are made by relatives, friends, doctors, staff at acute care hospitals, and
other members of the community. Local Departmental staff are responsible for
reviewing each application and are charged with making placements in the most
appropriate facility. The patient contributes to care costs to the extent his income
permits, the balance of the cost being provided by the Department of Human
Resources.
A monthly comforts allowance of up to $25 is paid to residents of adult care
facilities whose personal assets do not exceed $500.
Departmental programs such as Meals on Wheels and Homemaker/House-
keeper Services play a role in helping the elderly or handicapped person who wishes
to remain at home. Details of these programs may be found elsewhere in this
Report. ,
The following table gives expenditures and numbers of persons subsidized in
adult care facilities by the Department of Human Resources for calendar year 1975,
plus fiscal years 1972/73 to 1974/75:
Table 47—Adult Care Expenditures and Number of Persons Assisted by the
Department of Human Resources, Calendar Year 1975 and Fiscal Years
1972/73 to 1974/75
Private Hospital Care (Nursing-home)
Estimated Number of
Expenditure Persons Assisted
$ millions per Month (Average)
1975    8,810,410 2,600
1974/75    5,120,742 2,300
1973/74   2,523,189 1,350
1972/73    2,537,450 1,400
Personal and Intermediate Care (Board and Rest Homes) l
1975   18,417,750 13,000
1974/75    10,426,930 10,000
1973/74    5,160,263 3,600
1972/73    4,908,706 3,300
1 Excludes New Denver Pavilion and Ponderosa Lodge, Kamloops.
There have been substantial increases in Departmental expenditures in 1975
for adult care. Higher operating costs of these facilities through unionization of
personnel, a general rise in the cost of living, and increases in the minimum wage
are among the reasons.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1975
M  113
Cost-sharing—The cost of subsidies for adult care are shared 50 per cent by
the Federal Government for persons designated as being "in need."
For more information on adult care facilities, contact your local office of the
Department of Human Resources, or the Director of Special Care, Adults Division,
Department of Human Resources, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
PHARMACARE
Goal—To provide assistance in purchasing prescriptions to those individuals
and families with limited financial means, and to provide free prescription drugs to
senior citizens aged 65 and over and to eligible social assistance recipients.
Description—Pharmacare is of particular benefit to the senior citizens of
British Columbia; of the 241,000 senior citizens in the Province, more than half
have no taxable income. Approximately 30 per cent of the elderly suffer from one
or more chronic diseases or conditions, many of which can be controlled or alleviated by the proper use of drugs.
Before establishment of this program in 1974 the expense of proper medication
represented a heavy burden for the elderly. Accounting for less than 10 per cent
of our population, the elderly received 22 per cent of all prescriptions and accounted
for over 28 per cent of all drug expenditures. Following the lead of British Columbia, most other provinces have instituted free drug programs for the elderly. Ninety
per cent of Canada's senior citizens are now covered by a provincial drug plan.
Normal professional services of physicians and pharmacists are extended to
Pharmacare recipients in an identical manner to that enjoyed by all citizens.
A higher number of prescriptions are being filled for elderly citizens than was
the case prior to Pharmacare. This, however, was a prime consideration in establishing the program, as many elderly citizens avoided having a prescription filled due to
the cost factors. Failure to obtain necessary medication meant incomplete therapy
and possible waste of the medical and (or) hospital care already provided.
Pharmacare administers three drug programs, each benefiting a different group
of people.
Plan A—Any person who has resided in the Province of British Columbia for
90 days or more and who is 65 years of age or more is entitled to receive free of
charge any drug prescribed by a physician upon presentation of a Pharmacare card
to the pharmacist filling the prescription.
Any person registered with one of the Province's medical insurance carriers
(the British Columbia Medical Plan, the Medical Services Association, and the
CU & C Health Services Society) and who can meet the age requirement is automatically provided with a Pharmacare card.
Plan B—Plan B was formerly known as the "British Columbia Prescription
Drug Subsidy Plan" and it subsidizes the cost of prescription drugs for eligible
persons.
Any person who has resided in the Province for at least 12 months who was
not required to pay income tax in the previous year and who has completed an
acceptable declaration to that effect for one of the Province's medical insurance
carriers is eligible for benefits under Plan B. The dependants of the head of a
household who can meet the requirements outlined above are also eligible.
The beneficiary of Plan B is required to pay the first $2 of the cost of each
prescription plus half the balance. Plan B pays the remainder of the cost. In
other words, if a prescription costs $5, the beneficiary is required to pay $3.50
and Plan B will pay $1.50.
 M 114
HUMAN RESOURCES
Plan C—Plan C is designed to provide eligible persons (exclusive of senior
citizens) in receipt of financial assistance from the Department of Human Resources with their prescription drugs free of charge.
As a general rule, the persons eligible for benefits under Plan C are those
persons in receipt of financial assistance from the Department of Human Resources
because of inability to work or, in the case of single parents, those persons who
must stay home to care for their young children. The person who is able to work,
but who is temporarily in receipt of financial assistance because of unemployment,
is not eligible for these benefits.
The drug benefits are identical under the three plans and include all prescription drugs.
The following table presents figures on the number of persons registered for
benefits in the three plans:
Table 48—Numbers of Persons Served by Pharmacare in 1975
Plan
A .
B .
C .
Number of Persons
...... 241,000
...... 218,000
...... 100,000
Total  559,000
Departmental expenditures for the Pharmacare Program are as follows:
Table 49—Pharmacare, Departmental Expenditures,
Calendar Year 1975, Fiscal Year 1974/75
1975
Plan A
$
16,182,488
1974/75   12,684,000
PlanB
$
448,097
380,000
Plane
$
3,834,599
3,135,000
Total
$
20,465,184
16,199,000
About 33,000 more persons were covered by Pharmacare in 1975 than in
1974.
Cost-sharing status—At present, only the costs under Plan C are shared
with the Federal Government. Plans A and B are financed entirely by the Government of British Columbia.
For more information on Pharmacare, contact your local office of the Department of Human Resources, or Pharmacare, Department of Human Resources,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
COMMUNITY GRANTS TO PROJECTS FOR SENIOR CITIZENS
Departmental community grants were made to several senior citizen centres
and projects in 1975.   Senior citizen centres provide counselling and referrals and
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975
M  115
a place to "drop-in" for group recreation and socializing.  The following programs
were funded in 1975:
Amount
Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1975
North Shore: $
North Shore Adult Day Care Centre        34,938
North Vancouver:
Silver Harbour Manor Society      71,142
Penticton:
Penticton Retirement Centre       23,034
Vancouver:
Cedar Cottage/Kensington Services to Seniors (day program)  57,872
Crossreach (day program for persons in boarding and rest homes)    47,949
Marpole/Oakridge Seniors (day program)  16,923
Dunbar West Point Grey Retired Adult Services (survey of need)  7,803
New Moon Welcome Centre (day program)    29,066
Senior Citizens Outreach Bureau (drop-in and transportation)  48,777
Hastings Community Association Elder Citizens Co-ordinator (recreation and
socializing program)   5,160
Japanese Community Centre (drop-in)  1,200
Old Age Pensioners Organization      925
Victoria:
Silver Threads Service        70,353
Total    415,142
LEGISLATION
ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF
HUMAN RESOURCES
Department of Human Resources Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap. 111, as amended)
—This Act establishes the Department of Human Resources as having jurisdiction
over all matters relating to social and public welfare and social assistance.
Social Assistance Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap. 360, as amended)—The purpose
of this Act and its regulations is to provide financial assistance and other services
that are essential for a reasonably normal and healthy existence to individuals and
families who are unable to maintain themselves by their own efforts.
Children of Unmarried Parents Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap. 52, as amended)—
This Act is to ensure that the interests of the mother and her child born out of
wedlock are protected.
Adoption Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap. 4, as amended)—The purpose of this
Act is to provide the same rights and privileges for adopted children as those of
children born to both parents in a family.
Provincial Home Act, 19691 (S.B.C. 1969, chap. 29)—The purpose of this
Act is to provide care for persons who are unable to maintain themselves by their
own efforts.
Handicapped Persons' Income Assistance Act (S.B.C. 1972 (2nd Sess.), chap.
4)—The purpose of this Act is to provide financial assistance and other services to
the blind and disabled.
1 This Act has been inoperative since the Provincial Home, in Kamloops, was closed early in 1975.   Residents were transferred to Ponderosa Lodge, an intermediate care facility built by the Provincial Government.
 M 116 HUMAN RESOURCES
Guaranteed Minimum Income Assistance Act (S.B.C. 1972 (2nd Sess.), chap.
3)—This Act provides a guaranteed minimum assistance to persons 60 years of
age and over.
Protection of Children Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap. 303, as amended)—-The
purpose of this Act is to provide protection and care for children who are neglected,
abused, abandoned, or without proper supervision or guardianship. Amendments
to the Act in 1974 provide for increased reporting and investigating requirements
in regard to battered children and lay representation on panels in hearings.
Human Resources Facilities Development Act (S.B.C. 1974, chap. 39)—The
purpose of this Act is to provide development grants to municipalities, societies,
and the boards established under the Community Resources Boards Act.
Community Resources Boards Act (S.B.C. 1974, chap. 18)—This Act provides for greater local control over the administration of social services.
 FISCAL ADDENDUM,
1974115
  REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1975 M  119
Table 50—Proportion of Total Gross Welfare Expenditures
1973/74
1974/75
Value
Per Cent
Value
Per Cent
Administration (includes Minister's Office
and part of Accounting Division)	
Field Service      	
$
2,585,204
8,933,806
2,172,583
1.0
3.4
0.8
0.7
11.5
4.1
53.0
25.5
$
2,988,918
18,300,929
1,847,904
0.8
4.7
Summer Employment Program      	
0.5
Provincial Alliance of Businessmen
Institutions    „           .   .
1,788,653
30,456,705
10,821,559
140,367,218
67,430,107
2,925,991
45,726,474
21,493,154
191,963,094
100,970,347
0.8
Maintenance of dependent children  (includes New Denver Youth Centre)..
11.8
Medical services, drugs, etc  	
Social Allowances, work activity projects,
and burials	
5.6
49.7
Mincome and allowances for aged and
handicapped	
26.1
Totals	
264,555,835
100.0
386,216,811
100.0
Municipal share of costs.... .
Federal-Provincial cost-sharing—
Canada Assistance Plan    ..
24,381,179
82,401,344
1,236,737
18,830,239
123,943,048
Department of Indian Affairs    _
1.073 616
 M  120
HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 51—Number of Cases by Category of Service,1 as at
March 31, 1974 and 1975
Category
Family Service 	
Social assistance—
Single person	
Couple	
Two-parent family	
One-parent family	
Child with relative	
Social assistance totals
Region 3—
Okanagan
Mar. I Mar.
1974 11975
384|   436
I
1,47011,462
204]   215
523|   553
1,131|1,370
150[   131|
Region 4—
Kootenays
Mar. Mar.
1974 11975
150
178
,534 1,560
150 148
386| 397
860 j 1,035
109    156
3,862|4,167 3,189 3,474
Region 5—
Prince
George/
Cariboo
Region 6—
Fraser
Valley
Mar. I Mar. Mar.'Mar.
1974 I 1975 11974 11975
I I
Region 7—
Prince
Rupert/
Bulkley
Valley
Region 8—
North and
South
Peace
River
f I
Mar. I Mar. I Mar.
1974   197511974
I
I I
258|   360]   435
!       I
1,851 1,810 2,798
232|   224|   299
625|   906 j   949
l,05l|l,424'2,517
140]    199|    155
263
2,039
209
717
1,600
154
4,157[4,923|7,153[4,982
I I I
100
182|     76
732] 545| 384
113] 69| 50
294 j 243! 180
440]   439|   417
244|_240| 76
,92311,71811,183
I        I
Mar.
1975
90
Region 9—
Kamloops
Mainline
I
Mar. I Mar.
197411975
I
273
746
104
274
,350
192
302|   576
737|1,113
112[   147
2,274|3,652
I
Category
Region 10—
Vancouver
Island
North of
Malahat
Region 11-
Capital
Regional
District
Mar. I Mar.
1974 I 1975
Mar. I Mar.
1974 11975
I
Region 12—
. Fraser
South2
Region 13-
Fraser
North2
I I I
Mar. I Mar. I Mar.I Mar.
19741197511974 11975
I I I
Region 14—
North
Vancouver-
Region 15—
Vancouver^
Mar.
1974
Family Service	
Social assistance—
Single person	
Couple	
Two-parent family.
One-parent family...
Child with relative.
Social assistance total
353|   350]   668
I I
2,157|3,099|3,537
289j   4491   248
5611   926|   553
1,503[1,951|1,719
1771   2581     69
598
3,414
327
621
1,785
101
5,040|7,033]6,794 6,846
I I
I   628].
I I
.]1,453|-
-I   107J
..|   612|..
-|1,882|.
-I     81| .
663
2,193
162
479
2,126
133
..|4,763| |5,756
I
Mar. I Mar. I Mar.
19751 1974    1975
I
1971 2,037
I
896 j 12,660
66|     747
150
663
40
1,480
7,073
306
Totals
Mar.
1974
1,042
9,155
462
748
3,875
166
2,012[24,303|15,448
I I
4,734
27,869
2,436
5,853
17,448
1,538
Mar.
1975
5,261
29,462
2,702
7,179
19,797
1,914
59,878i;66,315i
1 Source: Case Load Report Form W2.
2 Regions 12, 13, and 14 were "created" out of the former Regions 2 and 6 in July 1974. Social assistance
totals, therefore, as at March 31, 1974, for the geographic area bounded by Regions 12, 13, and 14, appear in the
1974 figures for Region 15.
Table 52—Selected Expenditures for Social Assistance, 1974/75
Basic social assistance      —
Repatriation, transportation within the Province, nursing and boarding-home care,
personal care, special allowances, and grants
142,748,281
6,250,147
Housekeeper and homemaker services           4,284,252
Emergency payments      2,344,397
Hospitalization of social assistance recipients       10,367
Total        155,637,444
Table 53—Average Monthly Number Receiving Social Assistance During
1973/74 and 1974/75
Average Case Load and
Recipients per Month
Category 1973/74 1974/75
Heads of families       23,807 25,432
Single persons     26,708 27,852
Total case load (average)   50,515 53,284
Dependents        58,313 58,408
Average monthly total     108,825 111,693
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1975 M  121
Table 54—Gross Costs of Medical Services for Fiscal Years 1966-75
Year
Medical
Drugs i
Dental
Optical
Transportation
Other
Total
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
1969/70
1970/71
1971/72	
$
2,422,702
2,344,676
1,403,378
465,738
591,206
614,365
677,194
634,136
754,422
$
2,095,733
2,157,182
2,423,798
2,444,968
3,102,874
3,334,159
3,626,268
6,461,400 2
17,303,8923
$
670,580
773,979
792,475
1,611,115
2,491,589
2,403,257
2,429,538
2,655,573
2,380,266
$
118,003
145,588
140,591
219,858
282,272
290,116
304,695
322,489
409,213
$
183,285
187,357
212,550
252,999
326,166
342,712
367,888
419,451
387,554
$
48,723
50,524
53,571
72,862
121,892
165,980
264,700
328,510
257,808
$
5,539,026
5,659,306
5,026,363
5,067,540
6,915,999
7,150,589
1972/73
1973/74
1974/75
7,670,283
10,821,559
21,493,154
i Included in these figures is the cost of drugs purchased by the dispensary for welfare institutions.
2 Includes drug costs incurred in the Pharmacare Program in the last three months of the fiscal year 1973/74.
(Pharmacare Program commenced January 1, 1974.)
3 Includes costs under the Pharmacare Program as well as drugs purchased by the dispensary for welfare
institutions.
Table 55—Cost of Maintaining Children in Care, Fiscal Year 1974/75
The cost to Provincial Government of maintaining children for the fiscal year
was as follows:
Gross cost of maintenance of children in the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare
(excluding Vancouver)—
$ $
Foster homes       8,557,756
Other residential resources   14,210,430
Receiving special services      3,930,503
  26,698,689
Gross cost to Provincial Government of maintenance of children in care of Vancouver Resources Board     16,165,257
Gross cost of transportation of children in care of the Superintendent of Child
Welfare.              190,049
Gross cost of hospitalization of new-born infants being permanently planned for by
the Superintendent of Child Welfare  41,113
Gross expenditures       43,095,078
Less collections        6,297,172
Net cost to Provincial Government as per Public Accounts  36,797,906
 M  122
HUMAN RESOURCES
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 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1975
M 123
Table 57-—Number of Children in Care and Legal Responsibility of the Superintendent of Child Welfare, by Type of Care, as at March 31, 1975
Supervised by—
Type of Care
Department
of Human
Resources
Vancouver
Resources
Board
Total
Paid foster-home care	
Boarding-home, child maintains self .
4,798
191
824
342
1,596
149
1,311
36
147
131
330
28
6,109
227
Free home and free relatives' (or parents') home_.._
Adoption home	
Resources1              ....
971
473
1,926
AWOL	
177
Totals	
7,900
1,983
9,883
i This is a new term covering
to Federal institutions.
the wide variety of placements ranging from privately operated receiving-homes
Table 58—Children in Care and Legal Responsibility of the Superintendent of
Child Welfare, by Age-group, as at March 31, 1975
Age-group
Department
of Human
Resources
Vancouver
Resources
Board
518
182
610
170
2,264
523
2,637
554
1,436
424
435
130
Total
Under 3 years	
3-5 years, inclusive .....
6-11 years, inclusive ...
12-15 years, inclusive .
16-17 years, inclusive
18 years 	
Totals  	
7,900
1,983
700
780
2,787
3,191
1,860
565
9,883
Table 59—Number of Children Placed for Adoption by the Department of Human
Resources and Vancouver Resources Board for Fiscal Years 1973/74 and 1974/75
1973/74     1974/75
Department of Human Resources   637 604
Vancouver Resources Board    199 153
Totals    836 757
The following tables are available, on request, from the Division of Office
Administration and Public Information, Department of Human Resources, Victoria:
Table 60—Total Persons Receiving Social Assistance and Costs in Regions, by Unorganized
and Municipal Areas, in March 1974 and 1975.
Table 61—Number of Family Service Cases (Not in Receipt of Financial Assistance from the
Department of Human Resources) Served by the Department of Human Resources During
the Fiscal Year 1974/75.
Table 62—Number of Unmarried Mothers Served by Department of Human Resources and
Vancouver Resources Board for Fiscal Year 1974/75.
 M  124 HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 63—Number of Children Born Out of Wedlock in British Columbia, by Age-group of
Mother, During Fiscal Years 1973/74 and 1974/75.
Table 64—Cases Receiving Services from Department of Human Resources and Vancouver
Resources Board Related to Protection of Children by Type of Service, for Fiscal Years
1973/74 and 1974/75.
Table 65—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare During and at End
of Fiscal Year 1974/75.
Table 66—Number of Children Admitted to Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare by Legal
Status, During Fiscal Year 1974/75.
Table 67—Reasons for New Admissions of Children to Care of Superintendent of Child
Welfare During Fiscal Year 1974/75.
Table 68—Number of Children Discharged from Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare by
Legal Status During Fiscal Year 1974/75.
Table 69—Reasons for Discharge of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare for
Fiscal Year 1974/75.
Table 70—Children Who Are Legal Responsibility of Superintendent of Child Welfare Receiving Institutional Care as at March 31, 1975.
Table 71—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of Human Resources, by
Regions, and Vancouver Resources Board, by Type of Placement, for Fiscal Year 1974/75.
Table 72—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of Human Resources, by
Regions, and Vancouver Resources Board, by Religion of Adopting Parents, for Fiscal
Year 1974/75.
Table 73—Ages of Children Placed for Adoption by Department of Human Resources and
Vancouver Resources Board During Fiscal Year 1974/75.
Table 74—Number of Legally Completed Adoptions, by Type of Placement, by Regions, and
by Vancouver Resources Board, During Fiscal Year 1974/75.
Table 75—Total Number of Persons Eligible for Health Care as at December 31, 1966 to 1975.
Table 76—Payments to British Columbia Doctors (Gross Costs), 1966-75.
Table 77—Dental Expenses, 1966-75.
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1976

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