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Minister of Highways and Public Works PUBLIC WORKS REPORT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1975/76 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1976

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Minister of Highways and
Public Works
PUBLIC WORKS REPORT
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
1975/76
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1976
  To Colonel the Honourable Walter Stewart Owen, Q.C, LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Public Works for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1976, in compliance with the
provisions of the Public Works Act.
ALEX. V. FRASER
Minister of Highways and Public Works
Office of the Minister of Highways and Public Works,
Parliament Buildings, December 30, 1976.
  INDEX
Pace
Report of the Deputy Minister     7
Design Division—
Report of the Director of Design  9
Report of the Client Project Director  10
Report of the Senior Mechanical Engineer  12
Report of the Senior Civil Engineer  14
Report of the Senior Electrical Engineer  15
Report of the Architect Planner    16
Report of the Senior Quantity Surveyor  18
Report of the Property Services Branch  19
Report of the Senior Programmer and Space Planner  20
Report of the Interior Design Architect  22
Personnel Division—
Report of the Director of Personnel Services  24
Operations and Technical Services Division—
Report of the Director of Operation Services  25
Report of the Co-ordinator of Construction  27
Report of the Assistant Director of Operation Services  29
Report of the Co-ordinator of Technical Services  32
Safety Engineering Services Division—
Report of the Director of Safety Engineering Services  34
Report of the Chief Boiler Inspector  35
Report of the Chief Gas Inspector  38
Report of the Chief Electrical Inspector.  40
Report of the Research, Standards, and Specifications Branch  43
Accounting Division—
Report of the Comptroller of Expenditure  45
Tenders Received and Contracts Awarded for Buildings  57
 "We must lead, not follow."
—Department of Public Works.
 REPORT OF THE  DEPUTY MINISTER
The Honourable Alex. V. Fraser,
Minister of Highways and Public Works,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir:
I have the honour to submit, for your consideration, the Annual Report of the
Department of Public Works for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1976.
Elsewhere in this Report will be included those of the heads of divisions which
set out the work accomplished and planned, tenders called and accepted, and
Departmental accounts.
The Department of Public Works has been in continuous operation under that
title since its inception in 1911, and, since this will be the last report as an independent department, it is appropriate, I believe, to reflect on the changes which
have featured the service role carried out by the Department and its staff.
From its inception until 1955 the Department included the responsibility for
the provision of highways within the Province. Since 1955, at which time the
Department of Highways was structured, the Department has continued with its
primary role of the provision of accommodation and other services to Government
with, I believe, some considerable distinction.
Among the many achievements which the Department can point to with pride
are:
• The changes in quality of Government office accommodation from the
rigid cellular structures, exemplified in the Douglas Building and the
Blanshard Building in Victoria, to the newer flexible open-plan acoustically corrected multi-purpose structures as exemplified in the Project
61 in Vancouver, and the new Health Building in Victoria.
• The vast improvement in the landscaping of Provincial buildings
around the Province, as exemplified in the gardens adjoining the Prince
Rupert Courthouse, the Justice Court in Vernon, and the area adjoining the Centennial Museum in Victoria.
• The initiation of functional programming which has been brought to a
high degree of effectiveness with consequent benefit to many other
departments of Government in assisting in the evaluation and definition of the building requirements for their programs.
• The initiation of an Art Policy which has received many favourable
comments, and the provision of an Art Collection which is intended
to be representative of the best of contemporary art.
• We have seen the results of this Department actively planning and
working in conjunction with municipalities to enhance their communities, such as at Duncan, Smithers, and, latterly, the joint development
(Project 400) with the City of Prince George.
• The initiation of a Tour Guide program in the Parliament Buildings
which has entertained up to 179,000 visitors per year.
 D 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
• The development of major planning studies such as the precinct report
in Victoria, the results of which are at present taking shape.
• The development of a co-ordinated office furniture system which has
encouraged British Columbia manufacturing capabilities.
• The sharing of expertise in construction with other departments with
consequent build-up within these departments of design/construct
cores of knowledge.
• The initiation of construction management techniques with benefit to
the Crown at a time of rapidly escalating prices.
• The development of joint consultative and planning procedures with
the construction industry resulting in the Joint Technical Planning
Committee which meets regularly each month.
As we now pass the majority of the functions of this Department to the British
Columbia Buildings Corporation, I have a deep sense of gratitude for being
permitted the opportunity of serving the Government and the people of this
Province as the 10th Deputy Minister in company with such distinguished contemporary and antecedent colleagues and would, at this time, extend my sincere
thanks to all those staff members and consultants who have contributed to the
developments with which this Department has been associated.
Respectfully submitted,
G. L. GILES, F.R.A.I.C.,
Deputy Minister
Public Works Maintenance Building, Kamloops.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
D 9
REPORT OF THE  DIRECTOR OF  DESIGN
This report will be the last report from the Director of Design. The position
has been divided into three new positions called Client Project Directors. The three
groups of departments served by these Directors are currently as follows:
George H. Kerr will look after the Ministries of Agriculture and Economic
Development, Mines, Forests, Environment, Recreation and Conservation, and
Special Office Buildings. Hector L. Mclntyre will look after the needs of the
Ministries of Education, Health, Human Resources, Labour, Consumer and Corporate Affairs, and Municipal Affairs and Housing. I will continue to look after
the Ministries of Attorney-General, Highways and Public Works, Energy, Transport
and Communications, Provincial Secretary and Travel Industry, and Finance.
Ill health has forced J. A. Cochrane to resign his directorship and take the
position of Senior Architect. His contribution to the Department has been immense
and we are fortunate that he will continue to contribute in his present capacity.
Following this report is a table compiled from previous Annual Reports showing the number of projects and their distribution over a value scale. It will be
apparent that the volume, both in number and value, has increased by well over
100 per cent. Concurrent with this increase in work load, there has been a virtual
staff freeze over the majority of the period shown. The staff must be complimented
for this high standard of production. They have always been ready to give one
more push, and for this I thank them one and all.
Value of Projects
Number of Projects in Fiscal Year
($000)
1972/73
1973/74
1974/75
1975/76
Over 1,000,000   	
500,000 to 1,000,000	
3
9
36
34
37
6
10
38
7
14
45
10
6
100,000 to 500,000 	
33
50,000 to 100,000	
35
35
18
25,000 to 50,000	
32                              30
42
0 to 25,000	
96
106                              277
399
215                            227                            408                            508
.t?.7.non.nnn     l     S37.ooo.ooo
S4i.onn.oon     I    S46.onn.nnn
W. W. Ekins, B.Arch., Dip.Pub.Admin.
Director of Design
 D  10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CLIENT PROJECT DIRECTOR
WORK INITIATED AND CARRIED OUT FOR RESOURCE
DEPARTMENTS,  1975/76 FISCAL YEAR
Agriculture
The design for a Laboratory Building in Abbotsford for the Department of
Agriculture was commenced. Ron Howard, Consultant Architect, was retained
to design the project.
R. Christoffer of Public Works was appointed Project Manager.
Alterations were made to Federal Agriculture Stations in British Columbia
to accommodate the Provincial Agriculture facilities in the same buildings. These
stations are located at Summerland, Prince George, Saanichton, and Creston.
Water Resources
An Environmental Laboratory Building for Water Resources is being planned
on the University Endowment Lands. Negotiations were carried out to provide
space in the laboratory in exchange for the site. H. G. Charania of Public Works
was appointed Project Manager.
Recreation and Conservation
Construction on a trout hatchery commenced at Abbotsford. The building is
known as the Fraser Valley Trout Hatchery.
Commonwealth Construction Ltd. is the general contractor, and Cedric True-
man of Public Works is the Project Manager. The project is expected to be
completed at the end of 1976.
A new carving shed was completed in Thunderbird Park, as was interior
alteration work in the Dogwood Building.
General Purpose Office Buildings
Alterations were completed in St. Ann's Academy for the benefit of the
Department of Education, and for temporary housing of the Judiciary while alteration work is completed in the Law Courts Building. M. Lewis is the Project
Manager for Public Works.
Extensive alterations were commenced in the Provincial Government Office
Building at 411 Dunsmuir Street in Vancouver. Underwood, McKinley, Wilson
and Smith, Architects, were appointed as the consultant architects. Ron Christ-
offer of Public Works is the Project Manager in charge. The project is expected
to be completed and the building reoccupied by the end of 1976.
Provincial Government Office Building 3—
Burdett Avenue and Blanshard Street, Victoria
This Government Office Building designed by the Department commenced
construction, the main contract being awarded on February 18, 1975, at a contract
sum of $1.7 million.
D. Grey of Public Works is Project Manager. The building is now occupied
by the Department of Housing.
Provincial Government Office Building 2—
Blanshard and Courtney Streets, Victoria
Construction of a major office building, at a total cost of approximately $18
million, was commenced. Eng and Wright and Hawthorn completed the design
for the project, and M. Lewis is Project Manager for Public Works.
Construction is anticipated to take about two years from start of construction.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
D  11
Provincial Government Office Building 1—
(Health Services Building), Pandora Avenue, Victoria
Construction well under way. Siddall Dennis Warner are the consultant
architects and M. Lewis is Public Works Project Manager.
Cana Construction are Construction Managers. The building is expected to
be completed in January 1977. This building will accommodate the entire Ministry
of Health when Hydro complete a new building elsewhere, and the old Hydro
Building is renovated and linked with the new building.
A Iterations to the Old Dowell Building, Wharf Street
Commenced; design was carried out by M. Bawtinheimer of Public Works,
with D. Grey as Project Manager. This building is expected to be completed at
the end of 1976.   Total cost of the work approximately $1.5 million.
Blocks 51, 61, 71 Project, Vancouver
Construction on site commenced on Block 61, of Blocks 51, 61, 71 Project
in Vancouver.
Arthur Erickson, Architects, Concordia Management Company Ltd. is the
Construction Manager, and Ron Christoffer is Owner's Representative for Public
Works.
The traffic tunnels under Howe Street were completed, as was excavation on
Block 61.   Excavation also commenced on Block 71 for the Courthouse.
Furniture Study
A furniture study to provide standard furniture for all Provincial Government
Office Buildings was undertaken by Geoff Shuttleworth of Public Works with Allan
Bailey as Project Manager. It is expected that, as a result of this study, British
Columbia furniture manufacturers will be able to manufacture and supply furniture
directly to the Provincial Government for its many new and interesting office
buildings.
G. H. Kerr
Client Project Engineer
Law Courts (addition), Victoria.
 D  12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE SENIOR MECHANICAL  ENGINEER
METRICATION AND THE DEPARTMENT
Now, most people in Canada have some awareness of the fact that Canada is
changing to the Metric System of measurement.
It is interesting to note that the Metric System of measurement was devised in
France in the late 18th century as a rational system of measurement to promote
trade and commerce. Today for the same reason Canada has decided to adopt the
system and promote its general use.
Although United States, Great Britain, and Canada recognized the advantages
of the Metric System of measurement as early as 1873 and authorized its use as a
second system of measurement, the Imperial System continued in common use;
only the scientific sector of these countries adopted and used the Metric System.
In 1965, Canada became concerned about the use of the Imperial System and
its effect on. world trade when the British Government stated that it would be
desirable for that country to change to the Metric System. By 1970, India, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa were converted or actively converting to the
Metric System. Well over 90 per cent of the world population is using the Metric
System, leaving the North American continent as the only major population block
still using the Imperial System.
In 1970 the White Paper on Metric Conversion in Canada was presented to
Parliament and was endorsed by all political parties. The following year the Metric
Commission was formed and work of planning the change in Canada started.
The Commission approached the process of conversion by considering that it
consisted of four phases, i.e., investigation, planning, scheduling and implementation, and dividing the Canadian community up into 10 sectors of activity.
The Federal Government, upon setting up the Metric Commission, decided
that the conversion to the Metric System in Canada would be done on a voluntary
basis, and that the Government would guide the process. Following this policy,
the Commission asked trade, industry, labour, and the Canadian community for
volunteers to work with the Sector Managers of the Commission.
In the meantime the provinces and the territories were approached and asked
to participate in the conversion process. They all agreed and appointed their representatives to work with the Commission.
In British Columbia, as with the other provinces, a Provincial Government
Committee was formed with representatives from each department commission and
board to co-ordinate the Provincial activity in the conversion process.
During 1972 and 1973 the Mechanical Branch of the Department did some
experimenting with dual dimensioning on drawings, using a "soft" conversion of the
imperial dimensions. The experience was illuminating. It demonstrated to us the
need to think in new numbers, the need for standards in metric dimensions, and the
ease of working in a decimal system. We were surprised at the lack of comment,
both from people in the Department and from the contractors.
The 1974 Conference of Deputy Ministers of Public Works decided to set up
a working committee to co-ordinate the metric conversion programs of Government construction and help to create the environment in which metric conversion
could be effectively and economically achieved throughout the construction sectors
of the economy.
The Department has its own Committee for Metric Conversion which is
charged with the responsibility to disseminate information on the S.I. Metric
System, planning and training.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
D  13
The British Columbia Construction Association has also formed a Metric
Conversion Committee and has asked the Department to participate. This committee is broader than just the Contractors' Association. It has representatives from
Architectural Institute, Professional Engineers' Association, material suppliers,
trades and labour.
The investigation phase is finished. The planning and scheduling phases are
well under way. Many of the sectors have chosen target dates to start the implementation phase.
The construction industry has chosen January 1, 1978, for their date and most
people connected with construction are now aware of that date.
The date chosen means that the Department will have to start design work in
the metric mode in the summer of 1977.
Standards-writing bodies are very busy adapting standards.
Statutes and their attendant regulations are being worked on.
It appears that there will be some confusion to start, some misunderstandings
will certainly arise, but the conversion process has been carefully planned and these
problems should be minimal.
With the country-wide co-ordination taking place, in which I am pleased to
say that the Department is taking its part, the transition period should not last too
long, although it will be many years before Canada can completely drop the
Imperial System of measurement.
GENERAL
This discipline has provided input either directly or through liaison with consulting firms in the private sector to the majority of projects listed elsewhere within
this report. Projects basically mechanical in nature that have been designed include
the Fraser Valley Trout Hatchery at Abbotsford and the Central Heating Plant at
Kamloops. An early completion of design is anticipated on the Riverview Laundry.
This office is continuing work with an architectural consultant on renovation work
in the Parliament Buildings. Consideration is being given to converting some steam
plants to hot-water operation.
In design projects in existing institutions, consultation with operating personnel provides a wealth of knowledge not otherwise obtainable. The appreciation
of this office of the feedback thus obtained is herewith expressed.
W. E. Mills, P.Eng.
Senior Mechanical Engineer
. _ •     .        --•
Provincial Government Building, Kimberley.
 D  14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE  SENIOR CIVIL  ENGINEER
ENERGY CONSERVATION
The writer served as Chairman of a Public Works Department committee
instructed to prepare Energy Conservation Standards for the Department of Public
Works. These standards are now completed and serve as a guideline to outside
consultants and our own staff in the design of Government buildings.
With dwindling conventional energy supplies and attendant increases in cost,
the question of energy conservation has the utmost priority at all levels of government. The Federal Government has begun a crash program on energy conservation,
and has invited the provinces and outside industry to participate. The first concrete
outcome of this program is scheduled to be the standardization of energy conservation regulations in the National Building Code of Canada. The Federal Government is taking the lead in the standardization of computer programs for working out
the total energy requirements and criteria for buildings. Members of our staff are
working with the Federal and Provincial authorities towards this goal.
Energy can be conserved to a certain extent by improvements in building
standards such as more insulation, smaller windows, reuse and circulation of warm
air, and a more efficient lighting layout. In the end, however, the reduction in
comfort standards is the only way that further significant amounts of energy can
be saved. The Department, in its new standards, has reduced the maximum heating temperature from 72°F to 68°F and reduced over-all lighting levels. In lighting
design, we are concentrating on the concept of task lighting rather than over-all
lighting.
Many of our modern buildings are designed to fight the climate, not to exist
with it. In days before the widespread use of air-conditioning and cooling, many
of the older buildings v/ere designed to live with the climate. They had thick walls
which tended to even out temperature extremes, small windows and sun shades on
windows. Admittedly, there were a few unpleasantly hot days, especially in the
Interior, but people got used to it or had no other choice than to bear it. If our
buildings have to be heated to a lower temperature, we will have to put more clothes
on. The increasing cost and scarcity of energy will change the whole ball game
and we will have to learn to live within our means—energy-wise.
As an incentive to a reduction in the use of energy, many authorities are
looking into tax concessions. In Florida, for example, it is mandatory for all new
housing to provide connections for the installation of solar water-heaters. The
State of California has passed a bill which outlines mandatory standards for the
design of housing. This applies to new construction and stringently outlines the
amount of energy that can be used in housing. They make an exception for non-
depletable energy, such as solar and wind, to encourage its use. The U.S. Federal
Government has issued energy standards along with many states, and many authorities are fostering the building of experimental houses and buildings embodying the
use and part-use of solar and wind energy. That "the old order changeth" is
exemplified in the new energy restrictions which illustrate that we must "live within
our means."
I trust that my work will be as enjoyable and rewarding under the new system
as it was, for the most part, under the old.
J. R. Simpson, P.Eng.
Senior Civil Engineer
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
D  15
REPORT OF THE SENIOR  ELECTRICAL  ENGINEER
Two significant conditions became apparent during the fiscal year 1975/76—
a certain financial restraint and the restructuring of the organization of the Design
Division in the Department of Public Works. The participative management
organization showed its effects on the Electrical Engineering Branch in the same
way as on the other branches, yet, I can proudly say that the members of the Electrical Engineering Branch coped with the new situation in a very positive manner.
Although it was regretted by all members of the Electrical Engineering staff
that so many "glamorous" projects had been delegated to consultants, there was
enough work to be tackled, work of a nature that just could not be farmed out since
knowledge of and familiarity with local conditions available to our own staff members were of great importance. Still, these jobs had to be done with utmost attention and diligence.
The restoration of the Legislative Building was continued. A few pictures of
the completed new Executive Council Chamber and its former look, when "Vital
Statistics" still occupied the space, will show the significance of the change. The
solution of the illumination problem should here be mentioned. Similar to the
Legislative Chamber's restoration the year before, the character of the "Ratten-
bury" era was to be restored. And yet, adequate and comfortable lighting was to
be provided, too. The two suspended chandeliers enhance the character of the
room, and hidden light sources above the suspended canopy over the conference
table provide the illumination necessary for the members of the Council to work
comfortably. Dimming facilities of the lights give the Council members the possibility to adjust the light level to suit their needs.
While the Legislative Chamber's illumination was created by an internationally
known expert, with the completion of the restoration of the Executive Council
Chamber's illumination we have demonstrated that our own engineers are capable
of doing an excellent job which compares well with the work of outsiders.
Other restoration projects are still under way, the restoration of the Revelstoke
Courthouse and the Dowell Building at Wharf Street, Victoria. Our architects and
engineers in fruitful co-operation are here again doing their best to bring these
projects to a more than satisfactory completion.
Yet, where our engineers and staff really showed their perseverance was the
many unnamed projects such as new Highways establishments and so many other
projects throughout the Province. Preparation of hundreds of thousands of square
feet of rented and purchased space for occupation by the various departments was
carried out to satisfy their ever-differing needs. Special projects—computer expansion or underground power distribution systems—have been completed. One
cannot make a great name for oneself with such work, but the work has to be done.
This "everyday" work has been achieved by the staff of the Electrical Engineering
Branch to the satisfaction of the management as well as the user departments.
In spite of the "shock" of reorganization, the staff of the Electrical Engineering
Branch adjusted itself to the situation and has completed the work load in a most
satisfactory manner. New changes are ahead and new tasks have to be completed.
The Electrical Engineering Branch looks forward to the work ahead.
H. E. Beier, P.Eng.
Senior Electrical Engineer
 D  16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF  THE ARCHITECT  PLANNER
With the commencement of the year under review, this office found itself in
the position of being able to organize with a small staff a computer-oriented survey
of building occupancy throughout the Province. This was in full swing from April
to December 1975, during which time 50 per cent of leased and rented properties
and 10 per cent of Crown-owned properties were measured, and the space occupancy
recorded. Over and above this operation, a vacant and under-utilized space blitz
was successfully performed throughout the Province, the high proportion of leases
being "inherited" from client departments which had initiated contracts outside the
scope of this Department and compounded the over-all space-use program by
"walking away" from their agreements, and leaving Public Works to pick up the
pieces. When completed, the library information will include dimensional floor
plans, space use and departmental occupancy, together with colour photographic
records. An inventory of Crown-owned properties was commenced in 1976 and
will contain information on land improvements, colour photographs, legal descriptions, plot and site plans. Among its varied responsibilities, this office continued
to offer draughting and drymount press services to all branches and divisions upon
request.
This office continues to act as Departmental Representative on Socio-Economic
and Intergovernmental Committees such as Provincial Guidelines for Coal Development, Urban and Regional Research, and Redistribution of Boundaries for Correctional Centres.
While the administrative sphere of the work attempts to handle the demands
for special briefs, detailed analyses, syntheses, and policy advice in regard to
planning matters including zoning, public hearings, legal agreements, development
proposals, the total land use proceeds at a higher speed, and we are subject to
pressures and demands from without the Government service as well as within. This
is true of areas in Burnaby, Kamloops, and Victoria, where, a decade ago, building
projects were minimal. Today that Crown acreage is fast disappearing, with major
capital projects of high class design by this Department, together with the consequent large programs of maintenance and security.
The Province is in a cycle of building investment where we are compelled to
undertake greater capital expenditures; however, the criteria for our building
environment in the last quarter of this century demands that the most important
factor be the people who inhabit any place, whether large or small. We must
provide a suitable envelope for people's activities, for it is by these forces that
townscape is shaped.
The growth of the population of this Province, and the Public Service, tied to
this factor whether we like it or not, has, during the past two decades, risen at a
speed second only to Ontario and Quebec. During this period the ratio of employee per 1,000 population has doubled to 13.3 per cent.
As we multiply more rapidly, man in his infinite wisdom has hit upon the
most space-clogging form of community growth. Consumption of land-space is
greater, per capita, than city growth.
Zoning is, at best, but a set of generalities and book guide-lines for intending
entrepreneurs. It is not design, it is not plotting, it is not subdivision, it is certainly
not town planning, it is specific space allocation, and therein lies the rub.
The modern changes in quality of public taste, townscape, and techniques
have come with the alteration of function, so that there is little doubt that the
ugliness of the modern cityscape can be related almost entirely to tax and restrictive
loan policies.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
D  17
As this report will be the last of a series of over 20 within the jurisdiction of
the Department of Public Works as an authority on its own standing, and will mark
the termination of a format initiated in 1957/58 by the then Deputy Minister and
this office opening the way to use the abundant expertise of our technical and
professional skills, untapped prior to that period, it is pertinent and appropriate to
pay tribute to staff in this office who have exhibited a great devotion to duty, and a
capability to produce only top-grade work under difficult conditions. This office
has, during the preceding years, been most fortunate in being the recipient of an
excellent rapport from all departments of Government in all tiers, as a constant
communication is maintained with Canada, other Provincial authorities, Municipal Councils, Regional Boards, statutory corporations, and Town Planning
Commissions.
The future is always uncertain, but if the pages of our Department Reports
have any message in comparison to others, we might be permitted one last act of
self-adulation in the phrase of the well-known advertisement: "You have come a
long way B—Y." As to this office in particular, it has been a challenge to provide
and produce a facet of the design prospect that was not in evidence prior to the
1950's, but what contribution we have been permitted to make may have had an
effect that will sow some seed of advancement in the future. As far as the writer
is concerned, the relevance is best translated in a quote from John Dryden (Poet
Laureate, 1631-1700) —
Happy the Man, and happy he alone,
He, who can call today his own;
He who secure within, can say:
"Tomorrow do thy worst, for I have lived today.
Be fair, or foul, or rain, or shine,
The joys I have possessed, in spite of fate are mine.
Not heaven itself upon the past has power;
But what has been, has been, and I have had my hour."
W.   D.   LOUGHER-GOODEY,
F.R.T.P.I., F.I.L.A., M.I.F.L.A., M.C.P.I.,
M.A.S.P.O., A.I.Struct.E.
Architect Planner
Ministry of Housing Building, Victoria.
 D  18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE SENIOR QUANTITY SURVEYOR
During the first part of the fiscal year 1975/76, the volume of construction
in the Province continued at a relatively high level, with a resulting increase in
prices of approximately 15 per cent in the first six months. By September, however, the value of work being tendered had started to drop and, for the remaining
six months, prices were virtually unchanged. Carpenters' wages, a group that can
be regarded as indicative of all groups in the industry, increased by 11 per cent in
the first six months and 16 per cent over the 12-month period. Material prices
moved up by an average of 5 per cent over the year, although some, e.g., reinforcing steel, that had become overpriced in the 1973/74 period dropped by 20.25
per cent.
The outlook for the coming year is for a lower than normal volume of
construction, with a resulting low increase in prices. If the Anti-Inflation Board
guidelines are maintained and increases in wages are restrained accordingly, the
increases in prices in the period 1976/77 should be in the range of 6 to 8 per cent.
The Branch introduced a system to show the flow of the expenditures of
projects in design and construction. This enables the Directors to check at monthly
intervals the financial status of their projects and thus to decide whether or not
they can add new projects.
The projected payments are based on the assumption that monthly payments
follow a normal distribution curve. During the year the projected payments are
replaced by actual payments and new jobs added or cancelled projects withdrawn
from the system. It is now possible to obtain within a few days the status of each
Director's budget.
The computer program for the Department's cash flow system will be used as
the basis for a program from which projected expenditures in the industry will be
obtained. The data obtained from this will give an indication of how busy the
construction industry will be in the following 12-month period. It is hoped to have
the system operating by the end of 1976.
S. R. Toller, M.C.I.Q.S.
Senior Quantity Surveyor
Abbotsford Trout Hatchery.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
D  19
REPORT OF THE  PROPERTY SERVICES  BRANCH
The Property Services Branch performs a variety of real estate services
including property appraisals, negotiations for acquisition and leases, easements,
property disposals, and expropriations.
Through its two offices in Victoria and Vancouver, the Property Services field
staff handles all the appraisals and negotiations, while the small component at
Headquarters provides the essential backup for formal documentation, handling
day-to-day problems in leased premises, and liaising with senior staff of all
departments.
Details of the volume of leasing and land acquisition is included within the
Comptroller's Report. In addition, this Branch has provided extensive services to
several departments, e.g., Education for college sites and related facilities, Attorney-
General for sites for remand facilities and community correctional centres, and the
Bureau of Transit in connection with land expropriated for their North Shore
Terminus for the Burrard Inlet Ferry Crossing.
In connection with the last-mentioned project, it is interesting to note that,
whereas determination of compensation to be paid to an expropriated owner is often
a lengthy process at best, involving negotiations with owners and often their
solicitors, the time involved in an arbitration procedure is a considerably lengthier
process. A specific case in this project involved Arbitration Board hearings and
an appeal involved two of the Branch's staff as well as the Departmental Solicitor
exclusively for almost one month. Fortunately, only a small percentage of
property acquisitions involve expropriation and, in most expropriations, settlement
is often reached without resort to arbitration or courts.
Due recognition should be given to all Branch staff for the way in which the
excessive work load has been handled during this period.
P. Gregory, A.A.C.I.
Manager
 D 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE  SENIOR  PROGRAMMER AND  SPACE  PLANNER
The formation of Programming Section was recorded in the 1971/72 Report.
Programming is the objective function of developing the performance specifications
for new buildings or major conversions to which designers respond. It is a service
to Government, users, and designers which aims to ensure that the buildings the
Department of Public Works creates respond economically and effectively to the
ever-changing organizational, technical, and human needs of their occupants and
visitors over the lifetime of the building.
Space planning is the process of preparing for the initial occupancy of new
buildings and of monitoring layouts and managing change thereafter.
A significant part of the work of Programming Group during the period under
review has been devoted to office buildings.
Three related projects undertaken by Programming Group serve well io
illustrate the scope and practical nature of its contribution—to the development of
better buildings and better working environments.
Much detailed experience accumulated in previous years' work on offices was
consolidated in the development of a simple concise program and design criteria
for general purpose office buildings. This program has been successfully applied
by Department of Public Works Design Staff for an office building in Kamloops
and by consultant architects for one in Prince George, speedily and economically
to create schematic proposals for attractively different buildings, each appropriate
to its urban setting. Yet both embody common innovative features which will
ensure comfortable occupancy by a wide range of potential tenants, together with
flexibility and reduced costs in use.
A second project was concerned with the development of performance
specifications for a comprehensive system of Government office furniture appropriate for the larger and also the open-form-layout office buildings of which the
first is scheduled for occupancy early in 1977. The project included a study of the
existing furniture market. This indicated that no currently available system
adequately responds to the over-riding economic requirements of Government or
the particular needs of public servants and their visitors. These needs were
identified by means of a program of observations and tests in which a representative
group of public servants from all departments was invited to participate. Performance specifications were developed for a more appropriate system and, through
the normal tendering procedures, industry was invited to respond. It did so with
enthusiasm. The new system will be produced in British Columbia with more than
90 per cent British Columbia content and the successful supplier has expressed
his intention to offer the system to the commercial market also.
Using the new furniture system, a space-planning team has been working with
the "clients" and the design team to prepare for the occupancy of the new office
building at the intersection of Blanshard Street and Pandora Avenue in which, at
the beginning of 1977, the Ministry of Health will be able to consolidate its
activities at present scattered over many small premises. Working in close collaboration with the future occupants, this space-planning team has devoted
particular attention to the development of layouts which optimise organizational
proximities and satisfy individual needs such that full advantage is taken of the
opportunity to consolidate the Department and increase productivity.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
D 21
Other projects undertaken by the Programming and Space Planning Section
have included:
1. For Hospital Programs—In an evaluation of the Riverview Complex with
a view to reorganizing in-patient grouping and improving internal design, planning,
space, and amenity standards, a preliminary schematic proposal was prepared and
presented to Riverview staff for review.
2. For Community Health Service—We commenced preparation of a functional program and design guide entitled Public Health Facilities in Smaller Communities. The guide will encompass four building types of varying size and
function.
Extensive programmatic services have been rendered on behalf of the Corrections Branch of the Attorney-General Department.
Each year some 12,000 persons find their way into the Provincial Corrections
system. These are held for varying lengths of time under varying degrees of
security—from "maximum security" at one end of the scale to "open house" at
the other. It is of interest to note that related accommodation varies from the
highest to lowest cost per person of any other comparative ward of the Province,
i.e., provisions by Health, Education, Human Resources, etc. For maximum
security the cost per inmate may exceed $70,000, dropping to a low of $2,000
per inmate in an open-camp setting.
Recent changes in correctional philosophy have called for the provision of
normal, humane surroundings, conducive to rehabilitation and with security as
unostentatious as possible, compared to the previous concepts of brutal imprisonment. Additionally, a far higher percentage of sentenced persons are presently
"out" on work release than at any other previous period. These persons are
normally accommodated in the recently provided Community Correctional Centres.
Programmatic efforts have been directed toward the remodelling and upgrading of existing facilities and the provision of new facilities empathetic to new
correctional philosophies.
The cost of security runs high, it will take approximately $40 million to
replace the totally antiquated Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre
(Oakalla) alone.
If and when funds become available, this Province could emerge with a
Correctional system and facilities second to none.
G. W. Shuttleworth
Senior Programmer
Health Services Building, Victoria.
 D 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE  INTERIOR  DESIGN ARCHITECT
The work of the Interior Design Branch is among some of the most varied
activities in the Department of Public Works, not only in the type of work undertaken but also in the range of services offered. On many occasions our work
would seem to overlap that of other branches such as Architectural, Programming,
Specifications, and others, but this is always in a spirit of co-operation, with a
successful outcome being the only motivating force.
The following descriptions of the work of this Branch assume a full service
which may not be required or available in all cases.
Interior Design in New Buildings
1. Consultation with Project Architect in initial design stage with input into
interior space arrangements.
2. Design or selection of structural surfacing materials, design of panelling or
special features and built-in furniture or fitments.
3. Preparing both interior and exterior colour schemes.
4. Furnishing throughout. Consulting with user departments as to their
special requirements, selecting and specifying furnishings, fabrics, and equipment;
preparing requisitions for the Purchasing Commission.
5. Selecting and specifying carpet if not included under paragraph 2.
6. Selecting and specifying drapes.
Interior Design in Existing Buildings
At the request of other departments, the Interior Design Office performs any
or all of the above services even though the furnishings or equipment may be
charged to the client department. Requisitions or contract documents and drawings
are prepared in this office for signature by the client.
Consultants
Briefing consultants on Government policy with regard to furnishings and
procedures for obtaining same. Checking requisitions prepared by consultants or
preparing requisitions based on consultants' selections.
Estimating
At any appropriate stage of work, estimates are prepared for budgeting or as
a check against bids from suppliers.
Accounting
Evaluating bids on furniture and equipment and recommending placement of
order from the Purchasing Commission. Checking purchase orders against requisitions. Checking invoices against delivery to consignee, against purchase orders,
and recommending payment.
Contract Work
Apart from placing orders through the Purchasing Commission, much work
is organized through Public Works Contracts Division, either as a formal or
informal contract. Contract drawings and specifications are prepared and assistance
is given to the Project Inspector on supervision of the work. Changes to the work
during construction are handled either by change order or by letter as appropriate.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
D 23
A rchitecture
In addition to strictly interior design, this division handles many renovations,
alterations, and complete architectural projects.
Renovations being considered as changing interior spaces by removal of nonstructural partitions for a different type of occupancy, refinishing and refurnishing.
Alterations being considered as changing the structure by wholesale gutting
of the interior; adding elevators and staircases or additions to the building itself.
Architectural projects being complete new buildings such as the Fraser Valley
Trout Hatchery.
Presentation
The Public Works model making activity for presentation of architectural
designs is included in the Interior Design Division, and also the productions of
architectural perspective renderings. Both these are not only prepared as a
presentation to the client but also as an aid to the design team during the early
development of the design.
Programming Assistance and Reports
Programming is mainly confined to interior design work, but can be extensive
in an open-planning arrangement where several activities are performed in the
same area. Reports on the condition of existing buildings, together with recommendations and estimates, are compiled together with those of the other divisions
in the form of one report.
Ralph P. H. Gillett, M.S.I.A.D., M.R.A.I.C.
Interior Design Architect
Rithet Building, Tourism British Columbia, Victoria.
 D 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE  DIRECTOR OF  PERSONNEL SERVICES
The past year has been a particularly busy one for the Personnel Services
Division. In addition to maintaining and upgrading our regular services of recruitment, job evaluation, and employee relations, we have been deeply involved in
developing a complete safety program, assisting in the introduction of collective
bargaining within the Public Service, and consulting on a significant organizational
change with the Department.
Commencing with the appointment of the first full-time Safety Officer for
Public Works, we have been able to organize a Safety Program that begins with
the development of policy at the executive level and which involves the active
participation of all staff at various levels throughout the Department. Already we
are beginning to see a change in attitudes with regard to safety and health that is
showing results in an improvement in our lost time due to accidents. Through
continuous communication with all Safety Committees, we intend to improve upon
the accomplishments to date.
In the field of labour relations we have assisted the Public Service Commission
in representing the interests of management at the bargaining table with the B.C.
Government Employees' Union and the B.C. Government Professional Employees'
Association. In addition, we have acquainted the line management of this Department of the provisions of these collective agreements and have assisted in providing
interpretations, resolving grievances, and preparing cases for arbitration. While
we recognize the adversarial nature of the collective bargaining approach, we are
proud of our record in establishing good working relationships with the bargaining
agents of both employee groups.
Over the past year we have worked in concert with Departmental line managers in attempting to foster a more participative style of decision-making. While
always being cognizant of management's right and obligation to make decisions,
we believe the best decisions are those that have received the input of the best
advice possible. To this end we have provided consulting advice in an attempt to
ensure that all staff have an opportunity to make a significant contribution on
those decisions that concern their responsibilities. We believe some success has
been achieved both in terms of a better quality of decision-making and in the
commitment of our staff toward the goals of this Department. We look forward
to further gains in this direction within the forthcoming year.
As is our mission, we shall continue to improve upon the services delivered
by this Division in an attempt to provide the best possible consulting services to
line management.
M. V. COLLINS
Director of Personnel Services
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
D 25
REPORT OF THE  DIRECTOR OF OPERATION  SERVICES
One of the main preoccupations of the Department during the 1975/76 fiscal
period has been to bring about a better utilization of space in both Government-
owned and leased premises. The rapid expansion of Government departments in
this and previous years had resulted in client departments obtaining their own
accommodation, and in some instances projected space requirements in excess of
the predictable immediate future requirements had occurred. In order to correct
the poor utilization and waste of valuable space, a committee was formed and this
Division's Superintendents of Works were charged with the responsibility of making
an inventory of space with a view to locating and releasing unused space, encouraging client departments to consolidate their operations, and generally participate
in all matters relating to the effective use of accommodation. In many instances
the Superintendents of Works' in-house forces were used to carry out the finishing
and partitioning of premises to effect their speedy utilization.
During the period under review new workshops and offices for Zone 4 were
completed in Kamloops, which enabled us to vacate the outdated and inadequate
accommodation available to us in the Tranquille Hospital grounds. Further, this
move has promoted a sense of independence, together with the improved facilities
now available which will enable us to serve our clientele better, both in the Kamloops area and throughout the zone. In addition, the Division was also fortunate
in obtaining property at Terrace to relocate the subzone workshops and offices,
thus vacating property within the Skeenaview Lodge site. The new location provides larger yard space and improved workshops, stores, and associated facilities,
which will no doubt enable us to improve the economic function of this unit.
There were two major power failures in institutions during the year. In this
respect, the BCIT at Burnaby experienced six cable insulation breakdowns in the
primary circuits which caused a power outage for a period in excess of 24 hours.
With the co-operation of B.C. Hydro Authority who were able to supply replacement cable at short notice, we were able to reduce that which might have been a
severe disruption of the client's use of the total facilities. Similar help and cooperation were obtained in respect to an outage at Woodlands School, New Westminster. Although the Operations Section of this Division has only one Electrical
Engineer in its employment, it was able to design and direct our field crews in the
installation of a 250-kva generator set required to keep operative the Highways
establishment at Meziadin Lake, in addition to giving advice to our Electrical
Foremen and pinpointing many areas requiring attention to obtain the effective
utilization of electric power sources.
The Technical Services Branch of the Division called tenders for some 77
projects during the period under review. The range of projects extended from
small moving contracts, reroofing buildings, and carrying out more extensive building alterations to satisfy client use. In this respect the conversion of: the old
Liquor Store premises at 140 East Eighth Avenue, to provide accommodation for
the Film Classification Branch, is an example of the scope of work carried out
successfully by this section. In addition, the acquisition of property at 1190 Melville Street, Vancouver, previously under the control of a client department,
necessitated the subdivision of some 50,000 square feet of office space and the
subsequent release of lease space previously occupied by the new Government
department tenants. Both the above projects were carried out by our personnel
acting as Project Managers and the zone staff participating in the site construction,
 D 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
and the promotion of the use of the space by client departments. Beside the above
activity, the section continued to provide to our field organization drawings,
specifications, and technical information for all types of work undertaken both
in-house and by contract.
The Division's Regional Representatives have been kept busy implementing
an energy conservation program, the operation of a pilot computerized cost system
in Zone 3, and many support functions given to our field organization.
Although the Glendale Laundry total load has not appreciably increased
during the period under review, our Laundry Administrator instituted an active
program to obtain better utilization of both labour and machinery which has resulted in employee productive output being raised to 70 pounds per hour. The
Assistant Director of Operations and the Laundry Administrator have continued
throughout the year to promote the use of a linen service, also obtain a universal
standard for the purchase of new linen supplies.
Our Security Section has, during the past year, developed a series of brief
lectures for delivery to public servants on the first aid measures in extinguishing
fires within premises, and has now completed the delivery to personnel in Government owned and leased premises in the Victoria area.
In conclusion, as this is the last independent report of the Department of
Public Works, I would like to pay especial and sincere tribute to all staff in the
Division, and the help we have received from members of this Department and
other agencies of Government.
Stanley Lloyd, M.R.A.I.C, A.R.I.B.A., Dip.Pub.Admin.
Director of Operation Services
Provincial Courts, 222 Main Street, Vancouver.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
D 27
REPORT OF THE COORDINATOR OF CONSTRUCTION
In my annual report for 1972/73 I mentioned that the Construction Branch
had tackled its first project to be carried out on a "construction management"
basis. I stated at that time that the industry was starting to move away from the
traditional concept of general contracting, and mentioned that "flexibility, cost,
and time-saving" were desirable features which were capable of achievement under
the construction management system.
The following three years have amply proved out this capability, thanks to
the efforts of the staff of the Construction Branch.
Since that report the Construction Branch has handled some 21 management-
type projects to a value of $53 million, of which 15 have now been completed.
All of these projects were brought in under budget, and, with one exception,
ahead of schedule.
We have evolved an eminently successful system for packaging contracts,
scheduling, budget analysis, cost control, and construction supervision. We have
been able to educate a succession of "first-time" construction managers from the
ranks of the industry to operate within the system and have then been able to
enforce the close control which is an absolute essential for success in this type of
contracting method. Perhaps the most notable major project completed to date
is the Multi Discipline Building at the Burnaby Vocational School at a cost of $4.8
million. The net cost per square foot is less than $23, which, when one considers
that the average office building costs $40 to $50 per square foot, is an outstanding
success. Much of the credit for this extremely low cost goes to the capable
designers from our Design Division.
Another very significant feature of the work of the branch has been an
unbroken string of successful management projects carried out by our own "in
house" staff.
Several former project inspectors have been trained in construction management methods, and have proved to be very capable; the essential back-up and type
of service normally found in a contractor's office has been provided by the branch
headquarters staff. Much credit must be given to the Assistant Co-ordinator and
the Quantity Surveyor, who have provided invaluable service with great dedication.
Credit must also be given to the Electrical Inspector who has kept under very tight
control the provision of temporary services, problems arising from contract overlap,
and all of the unexpected electrical problems inherent in construction management.
Some of the more prominent "in-house" managed projects are the conversion
of a former bowling alley at 914 Yates Street, Victoria ($500,000); Jordan River
Correctional Camp ($208,000); CLEU Building, Vancouver ($556,000); Detox'
Centre, Vancouver ($250,000); Provincial Building, Kimberley ($350,000);
Revelstoke Courthouse renovations and alterations ($1,200,000); and restoration
and renovations to the Dowell Building, Victoria ($1,500,000).
Of particular interest is the Jordan River Correctional Camp which was put
into action three months after the Construction Branch was asked to handle it—
without drawings and without water, supply, or power. We rented equipment to
clear the site and excavate, sank a well, ran an overhead power system, requisitioned trailers and set them up, installed a septic tank and drainage field, complete
in 12 weeks.
The conversion of the former Dowell Building warehouse was an even greater
challenge, since the existing building consisted of a broken-down old brick ware-
 D 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
house without power or heating, having an old leaking roof, decrepit wood
windows, and rotted beams. On this project the unexpected was the norm, but
thanks to the efforts of the Design Team, Field Manager, the Quantity Surveyor,
and others of the Construction Branch, it has been brought in under budget. It is
now a high quality, showpiece building, the construction of which epitomized the
flexibility and lack of friction which is characteristic of a good management-type
project.
I have stressed the management methods, but would be remiss if I did not
mention that, during this period, we also supervised a large number of conventional contracts which have been satisfactorily concluded.
In conclusion, on behalf of the staff of the Construction Branch, I wish to
express my thanks to the entire Design Division, together with the management
and staff of the Operations and Services Division, for their co-operation.
D. Grey, M.C.I.Q.S., Dip.Pub.Admin.
Co-ordinator of Construction
Stsmemelt Village, Tranquille.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
D 29
REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT  DIRECTOR OF OPERATION  SERVICES
GLENSHIEL HOTEL
The Glenshiel Hotel property at 606 Douglas Street in Victoria was acquired
in December 1972 to protect the Government's land assembly interest in the
precinct. Pending other use, its operation as a hotel has continued under the
direction of a professional manager and a committee composed of Department of
Public Works employees.
The Manager is Bert Hanson and the committee consists of H. J. Greig
(Chairman), A. E. Rhodes, S. Lloyd, and M. V. Collins.
The facility has 75 rooms to let, and offers a transient hotel service and
dining-room as well as board and room at monthly rates. A staff of 22 is
permanently employed.
The hotel is fortunate in having secured the services of Bert Hanson as
Manager. Mr. Hanson has had extensive training and experience in the hotel
business, latterly in Kamloops, and the Management Committee is confident that
the affairs of the hotel are in good hands. Mr. Hanson assumed his position
officially on May 1, 1975. George Ford, who was acting Manager since September
1974, continued on staff as part-time auditor.
Gross revenue for the year was up $12,000 to $217,493.58, but expenses
rose $24,000 to $218,497, resulting in a net operating loss of $1,004.22.
On May 27, 1975, a collective agreement was signed between the hotel and
the Beverage Dispensers and Culinary Workers Union, Local 835. This was the
standard agreement in effect at other Victoria hotels which are members of the
B.C. Hotel Association.  The agreement expires April 30, 1976.
As a result of this agreement, the average wage of the employees has increased
by 50 per cent; for instance, a waitress earning $2.50 an hour prior to May 27
received $3.73 an hour in January 1976, which includes health and welfare payment of 13 cents an hour and pension contribution of 9 cents an hour.
The management has minimized the effect of this drastic rise in operating cost
by reducing work time wherever possible. Total hours in 1974 were 42,940; total
hours in 1975 were 38,741, a reduction of 4,199 hours, with no reduction of
service to the guests. As most of the reduction occurred during the latter half of
the period, it is expected that the next full year's operation will show a further
1,000 hours' reduction.
This stringent economy in the use of labour has resulted in only a 10.7-percent rise in the total payroll expense this year.
A new schedule of rates was put into effect November 1, 1975, averaging a
10-per-cent increase in room rent and a 20-per-cent increase in meal charges.
The Management Committee does not consider the Glenshiel Hotel to have
the potential to become a viable commercial enterprise, either under present
management or if it was in private hands. Therefore, the objective of breaking
even financially while maintaining the physical asset and providing economical
room and board for elderly people is considered to be a worthy one.
 D 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
GLENDALE LAUNDRY
In May 1975 the Glendale Laundry assumed the final increment of the Royal
Jubilee Hospital linen load, enabling that institution to retire its obsolete equipment
and use the old laundry space for more productive purposes. Laundry workers at
Jubilee were given the opportunity to transfer to Glendale and many did so.
In August, L. Balmer joined the staff as Laundry Manager. He is a very
experienced laundry executive who was previously Manager of the Royal Inland
Hospital Linen Services, Kamloops.
A total of 6,619,836 pounds of linen was processed, about 50 per cent from
Royal Jubilee Hospital, and the balance from seven other customers. Total cost of
the service was $1,254,615.66, and total credits received from customers were
$1,359,019.53.   Average cost per pound of linen processed was $0.1895.
Total Credits to March 31, 1976
Royal Jubilee Hospital (19370)
Glendale Lodge	
Saanich Peninsula Hospital	
Gorge Road Hospital	
Royal Jubilee Hospital (18436) (Memorial Pavilion)
Camosun College	
Regional Correction Centre	
Glenshiel Hotel	
Detoxification Centre	
Hospital Programs 	
$
622,723.62
344,927.13
39,210.46
185,592.67
149,809.74
3,374.60
9,404.49
2,470.00
1,456.82
50.00
1,359,019.53
Increased efficiency resulting from programs initiated by Mr. Balmer made
possible a reduction in staff from 104 at the beginning of the period to 94 in March
1976. Further economies will be effected as modernization of the plant continues
and adjustments are made in the linen and clothing processed. Improvements to
the soiled linen area were made during this fiscal period to facilitate unloading,
weighing, and sorting operations.
Discussions have been initiated with the customer hospitals regarding the
establishment of a Linen Service to replace the existing Laundry Service. If the
talks are productive, linen will be standardized as to type, dimensions, and colour
throughout the hospitals dealing with Glendale Laundry, and, hopefully, throughout
the Capital Region District. Bulk purchasing will be by the Linen Service and
present quotas will be delivered to each customer daily. Linen will be withdrawn
from use by the Linen Service Manager when it is unfit and unrepairable, and the
cost of linen replacement will be averaged over the budget period and charged out
at a unit cost per pound of linen processed. This modern system permits economies
in bulk purchasing and requires a great deal less handling labour in the laundry,
as sorting by customer is not necessary. An improvement in the usage factor of
the washers is another benefit, as full loads of similar items requiring special
treatment can be processed.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
D 31
LIONS GATE TOURIST COURT
The Lions Gate Tourist Court, 329 Marine Drive, West Vancouver, was
purchased by the Department of Highways to protect that Department's interests
in the event of reconstruction of approaches to the First Narrows Crossing. Pending redevelopment, it is operated by a Committee of the Department of Public
Works, who employ a resident Manager.
The Manager is F. McBain, and the Committee members are H. J. Greig
(Chairman), S. Lloyd, A. E. Rhodes, and E. W. Mabbett.
The motel consists of 18 units of an older type which rent at the low end of
the scale. A staff of four are employed and full municipal taxes are paid. A
surplus of $11,293.27 was achieved in the year under review.
H. J. Greig
Assistant Director of Property Services
Provincial Government Office Build-
jjj ing, Broughton and Blanshard Streets,
Victoria, under construction.
Motor-vehicle Station, Vancouver.
 D 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE COORDINATOR OF TECHNICAL SERVICES
The Technical Services Branch during the year provided technical support and
specialized services to the zone areas on matters of concern related to maintenance,
repairs, renovations, or alterations to buildings and the operation of the building
plants and services. Specific technical studies and reports were also prepared for
the Director of Operations Services, the Assistant Director, and the Regional
Representatives.
During the year, contracts were awarded for 77 projects, and in addition
designs and drawings were prepared for work projects carried out by the field trade
forces. Throughout the year frequent field trips were made by staff members to
survey building installations and provide advice and assistance to Zone Superintendents and their staffs on a wide variety of operational and maintenance
problems.
The Architectural Section undertook projects ranging from moving contracts,
demolition contracts, reroofing jobs, and both minor and major building renovations and alterations. Extensive alterations were made in converting a former
Liquor Store at 140 West Eighth Avenue for use by the Film Classification Branch.
Another extensive project undertaken involved space development and the complete interior reconstruction of a seven-storey 50,000-square-foot building located
at 1190 Melville Street, Vancouver. Section staff members were the Project Managers on both the above projects.
The Electrical Section, in addition to providing electrical designs incorporated
into general contracts for building alterations, provides for the upgrading and
alteration of electrical plants and services. Notable of which was the rebuilding
of the overhead system in the Highways Maintenance Establishment, Cloverdale;
Protective Relay Co-ordination Study at BCIT; installation of a 250-kva diesel
generator plant at the Highways Maintenance Establishment, Meziadin Lake; modifications to the electrical generating plant at the Highways Maintenance Establishment, Bob Quinn Lake. The latter two jobs were carried out by Departmental
trades staffs under the site direction and assistance of this Section's Electrical
Engineer.
The Civil and Structural Section conducted investigations and studies to
determine the structural capabilities of Highways maintenance establishments at
Prince Rupert, Bella Coola, Pouce Coupe, and Revelstoke for existing and proposed added loadings. Surveys and designs were carried out for retaining-walls
and road-widening work at the B.C. Vocational School, Burnaby; Valley Hospital;
and Duncan. Improvements to drainage systems were made to the Alouette River
Unit, Maple Ridge, and the Northern Training Centre, Smithers, as well as at
various locations in the Victoria area. Personnel of this section made regular visits
to sewage treatment plants to instruct operators; on proper methods of operation
and maintenance and on modifications required to provide efficient plant operation,
and to ensure that regulatory requirements were being met on these and other
waste-disposal systems.
The Mechanical Section designed and awarded contracts for 15 projects for
upgrading and renovations to mechanical systems, and in addition provided designs
for incorporation in general building alteration contracts. Many of the older Highways maintenance establishments do not have adequate systems for exhausting the
vehicle exhaust fumes from their buildings. A program was started this year for
the upgrading of these systems. Three such systems were completed and planning
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
D 33
for others started. One project of note was the redesign of the steam-heating system
in the old Powell River Courthouse. This redesign was precipitated by the decision
of the pulp-mill to discontinue steam supply to this building from their central steam
plant. To preclude the simple expedient of installing our own steam plant which
would require additional labour costs for licensed boiler plant operation, it was
advisable to provide a hot-water system. To change from steam to hot water would
normally require a complete renewal of the radiation and piping systems. However, in this instance, after feasibility studies, it was determined that a functional
system could be provided with the renewal of the condensate return main only and
the installation of a hot-water boiler. This conversion was therefore carried out
with minimal prime and operating costs.
F. D. Sturdy, P.Eng.
Co-ordinator of Technical Services
Provincial Government Building and Law Courts, Fort St. lohn.
 D 3-4
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF
SAFETY ENGINEERING SERVICES
In the activities undertaken by the Safety Engineering Services Division to meet
the primary objective of providing a safe environment in the disciplines of boilers
and pressure vessels, electricity, and gas, service-oriented programming has been
emphasized.
To optimize the use of resources, the thrust toward an increased content of
safety education was accentuated through an improved information system on safety
for the industry and society. Within the scope of the individual branches there have
been innovations in the form of seminars, technical bulletin releases, etc., to assist
the industry in becoming well informed and knowledgeable on the latest safety
standards. This activity provides for a sharing of responsibility with industry,
thereby reducing pressure for increased inspectional forces.
While continuing to participate in the development and utilization of national
standards to the greatest degree possible, advisory committees have been actively
maintaining and developing requirements appropriate for environmental conditions
in British Columbia. The system for developing and interpreting standards is under
revision to provide for increased input from industry and society. Appeals procedures are being adopted to ensure that persons subject to rulings of enforcing
authorities will be able to obtain an impartial hearing on any of their concerns.
To ensure that services are delivered in the most efficient and effective manner,
decentralization was continued for decision-making and the provision of services.
To coincide with this staff development, activities are under way so they will be
better equipped to make prompt and knowledgeable decisions at the local level.
Specific branch activities include survey of plans and designs to ensure conformance with adopted safety standards, examination and certification of persons
and equipment, investigations of accidents and fires, installation inspections, and
educational functions which include standards development meetings, code seminars,
and dissemination of information on new and amended requirements.
Following are selected statistical data for 1975/76:
Inspections conducted	
Work permits issued	
Equipment certified	
Examinations given	
Individuals or contractors certified	
Investigations conducted	
Plans examined or designs surveyed	
Meetings or seminars conducted	
Written recommendations and reports on defects and
hazards (estimated) 	
202,474
111,848
12,956
7,975
13,192
198
8,163
284
71,000
G. W. Lawson
Director of Safety Engineering Services
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
D 35
REPORT OF THE CHIEF  BOILER  INSPECTOR
The top priority goal for the Branch was to establish working boards with
regular meetings where persons involved in design, manufacture, ownership, use,
and operation of pressure plant equipment could discuss implications of the regulations and make recommendations for any changes as well as review the effectiveness
of the programs in force. Accordingly, five boards and committees in the sectors
for which we have regulations are in place and are holding scheduled meetings.
Numerous briefs have been reviewed and minutes of all proceedings have been
distributed to members and to supplemental lists of interested parties. Much still
needs to be done to increase the levels of communication and to expand objective
understanding of safety and the prevention of hazards by complying with the codes
and standards.
Within the Branch, reorganization studies have been conducted to seek out
better and more effective ways to administer and perform our activities. We are
sadly lacking in supervisory capability and have plans to fill this vacuum. We have
only begun to look at data processing and other means to streamline the host of
documents in use, the records and the analytical tools and information we need to
evaluate the activities and staffing requirements of the Branch. To continue to perform as we are at present doing will require additional personnel. The alternative
would be to look for ways to place further onus upon contractors, trades people,
and owners to meet the requirements of the regulations; then to administer such
programs by audit surveys or other reporting methods.
There were five explosions involving pressure plant equipment during the year,
resulting in property damage only; no fatalities or serious injuries to persons.
Many hazards and potential hazards were eliminated through the activities of
the Branch—defective controls corrected, faulty safety valves repaired or replaced,
equipment removed from service and cracks in tubes, shells, and tubesheets repaired. Full reports are on file of the explosions, hazardous conditions, and the
investigation carried out.
Activity charts are included.
Following are selected statistical data for 1975/76:
Boiler Safety Branch
Inspections conducted	
Work permits issued	
  12,500
  800
Equipment certified   7,371
Examinations given  6,733
  6,607
  70
  784
  140
Individuals or contractors certified.
Investigations conducted 	
Plans examined or designs surveyed
Meetings or seminars conducted	
Written recommendations and reports on defects and
hazards      7,000
B. W. Cole
Chief Boiler Inspector
 D 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
D 37
71-72      72-73      73-74      74-75      75-76
EXAMINATIONS GIVEN
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 D 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CHIEF GAS  INSPECTOR
The Gas Safety Branch continued to maintain a high work load during the
past year despite a slowdown in the construction industry in some areas of the
Province.
The Branch has reorganized its staff in the Lower Mainland and, with the
location of a new inspector in Langley, the Branch is better able to give service to
the areas requiring it. The Fraser Valley still has the heaviest work load in the
Province.
No changes were made to the Act or regulations, although many bulletins
were sent to the trade to cover requirements of new and varied types of equipment
that are coming into British Columbia. Changes to the gas regulations are contemplated for later this year.
Gas service was extended into three new areas in the Kootenays, i.e., Salmo,
Fruitvale, and Montrose, and they all requested the Gas Safety Branch to undertake the inspection service.
During the year, nine explosions were investigated, two of them resulting in
fatalities. Also, 24 fires were investigated in which nine fatalities occurred. The
reports are on file and some of these incidents are still under investigation. Two
alleged suicides resulted in four of the fatalities.
The number of gas permits issued for the whole Province was up about 7 per
cent over last year.
Summary of Work
New designs checked ,  3,040
Appliance certifications  1,800
Gas permits (including municipalities)   32,200
Gas fitter examinations  565
Gas fitter licences issued (new)  343
Gas fitter licences renewed  2,540
Gas contractor licences issued (new)   93
Gas contractor licences renewed  675
Inspections (all types) over 90,000
Special investigations—
Explosions (two fatalities)   9
Fires (nine fatalities)  24
Number of meetings conducted (including regional
meetings)   24
W. R. Montgomery, P.Eng.
Chief Gas Inspector
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
D 39
3,500
3,400
3,300
3,200
3,100
3,000
2,900
2,800
2,700
2,600
2,500
2,400
2,300
2,200
2,100
2,000
1,900
1,800
1,700
1,600
1,500
1,400
1,300
1,200
MAJOR ACTIVITY CHARTS
GAS SAFETY BRANCH
(Comparison with previous years)
3'/2 per cent increase in new designs
approved.
2 per cent increase in number of gas
fitter licences issued.
2 per cent increase in number of appliances certified  (field approval).
72/73
73/74
74/75
75/76
22,000
20,000
7 per cent increase in permits issued
for all municipalities.
72/73
73/74
74/75
75/76
 D 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CHIEF  ELECTRICAL  INSPECTOR
Published building permit statistics indicate the value of construction projects
throughout the Province as $1,458,500, or approximately 29 per cent above the
value for the previous fiscal year. The Electrical Safety Branch experienced an
increased demand for its services.
The number of examinations for certificates of competency decreased by
4 per cent over the number of examinations held during the previous fiscal year;
the total number held, however, was 677, and represents a significantly high level.
The number of certificates of competency issued throughout the year totalled 2,934;
distribution of these certificates was
A—257
B—388
C—416
PA—347
PB—517
PC—748
RA— 11
RB— 22
RC—288
As a means of reducing paper flow, greater stress was placed upon multiple
use of permit forms. Where separate permits had previously been issued to cover
functions such as temporary construction services, temporary connections, and
main permits, these were, wherever possible, combined into one permit related to a
specific installation. In consequence, the physical count of permits issued decreased
to 78,848; the estimated total number of permits based on previous practice would
approach 95,000. The number of inspections performed totalled 99,974, an
increase of 19.3 per cent over the previous fiscal year.
Plans received for approval during the year totalled 1,693 sets with the number
of individual drawings totalling 4,339. These statistics indicate an increased number
of smaller installations of a class or kind requiring the submission of plans.
During the year the Branch met with representatives of the electrical industry
to discuss ways of improving service to the trade and industry. From these meetings was born the Electrical Safety Review Board. This board struck a subcommittee, the Electrical Wiring and Equipment Standards Committee, to assist with
review of codes and standards; the committee held meetings to receive and consider
proposals to be included in the adoption of the 12th Edition of the Canadian Electrical Code.
A. R. Luck, P.Eng.
Chief Electrical Inspector
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
ELECTRICAL BRANCH STATISTICS
D 41
FIRE AND ACCIDENT
INCIDENTS INVESTIGATED
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
CERTIFIED
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Fiscal year
1693
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PLANS EXAMINED
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 D 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
PERMITS ISSUED
INSPECTIONS
170
110
100
90
80
70
60
120
110
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0
1 80
3
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60
Fiscal year
Fiscal year
EXAMINATIONS HELD
CONTRACTOR CERTIFICATES
ISSUED
800
700
600
Fiscal year
3
1
1
Fiscal year
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
D 43
REPORT OF THE  RESEARCH, STANDARDS, AND
SPECIFICATIONS  BRANCH
The past year has been extremely eventful for this office, with ever-increasing
expansion of our varied functions. There was considerable polarization, resulting
in the virtual separation of work involving specifications from that dealing with
codes.
In the field of specifications, the effect of the general cutback in projects was
drastic, although without this cutback, our staff shortage would have made the
situation impossible. Greater emphasis was placed on alterations, restorations, and
contract management types of contracts. These place a much higher work load on
a Specification Writer than normal contracts, a point which is seldom appreciated.
Staff in this area were also involved in the development of performance specifications and several minor contracts were dealt with on this basis to decrease design
time, make use of outside developers, and take advantage of the competition prevailing in the prefabricated-building industry.
It was hoped to establish a master specification, utilizing the services of a
consultant, but this did not proceed, possibly fortunately in view of future organization changes.
The other aspects of our work which received little publicity under our old
title will, I am sure, be given due credit and more work when we are separated as
the Building Standards and Research Branch, a branch of Safety Engineering.
Hopefully at that time additional staff can be employed, allowing us to give a full
technical support service to the whole building industry.
We provide the support necessary for the Building Code Appeal Board, the
busiest and most effective in the country, which was involved in 104 appeals during
the year. About a third more were settled by discussion, avoiding the submission
of appeals. Our role with the board has become widely known and we have now
been discovered by the legal profession. At one point we narrowly avoided being
the sandwich-filling in a court case between a developer and a municipality. At
another, an appeal decision resulted in discussions with a surprising number of
law offices, we now find ourselves in the interesting position of giving legal advice
to lawyers.
Our contact with code users throughout the Province has expanded tremendously, both by mail and telephone. We provide a technical advisory service to
municipalities, prepare periodical summaries of appeal decisions and circulate
these to all concerned. Our mailing list includes, apart from municipalities, design
offices, associations within the construction industry, every province and territory
in Canada, Federal organizations such as the CMHC and the National Research
Council, and we are now receiving requests for inclusion from lawyers. The list is
in process of being computerized for simplicity. We receive telephone calls for
information from throughout Canada and a surprising number from the United
States, even from as far as their East Coast. The new Provincial Advisory Committee on the National Building Code was formed and is now finding its feet. I
represent British Columbia on this committee, which promises to be the most
powerful in the country in the field of building regulations. We are represented
on the Canadian Building Officials Advisory Council and are finding this also to be
developing into an extremely busy function, dealing with, among many other things,
mobile homes, certification of building materials, factory fabrication, and the education of building officials.
Two members of this office have made a tremendous effort in the preparation
of building requirements for the handicapped. The first draft should soon be avail-
 D 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
able for public comment. It is hoped that a final draft will be available by the end
of the year, ready for adoption as part of the B.C. Building Code.
With building standards our involvement is immense. It is doubtful whether
most people realize the extent to which their lives are governed by such standards.
We participate in the writing of probably over 200 of these at present, by membership of steering committees and individual standard writing committees. Our
approach has been realistic and critical, resulting in considerable improvement to
these standards, a fact for which we have received written appreciation from the
bodies concerned. The Standards Council of Canada, responsible for publishing
the new range of National Standards, written by four accredited organizations, is
very active. They are also involved in the preparation of international standards,
in which we assist. We provide one of the five-man Canadian content on a newly
formed international committee of this body.
All this work has required a tremendous amount of technical research by members of this office. There are numerous meetings, mostly in the east, but with those
for international standards in Europe, we deal with most issues by correspondence,
but utilize different people to attend meetings when attendance is critical.
Metric conversion is another issue with which we are deeply involved. We
serve, at their request, on the Provincial Construction Metric Conversion Committee. We have agreed to act as a communication channel between them and all
municipal building officials through a regular newsletter which we plan to publish.
I have skimmed over our activities, lack of space prevents me doing otherwise,
I have also refrained from mentioning a number of other essential tasks on which
work is at a standstill due to shortage of staff.
In essence, the main role of the new branch, when established, will be to
provide a complete technical support service for all building officials and other code
users, covering both the code and all standards.
J. C. Currie, A.R.I.C.S.
Branch Head
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1975/76
D 45
REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF  EXPENDITURE
The following pages present in detail the expenditures relating to the construction, alterations, and repairs on the various Government buildings and institutions,
etc., coming under the management, charge, and direction of the Minister of Highways and Public Works.
A. E. RHODES
Comptroller of Expenditure
STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE, FISCAL YEAR 1975/76
ADMINISTRATION AND MAINTENANCE VOTES
(For details, see Public Accounts)
.(gross)
.(gross)
Vote 231—Minister's Office	
Vote 232—General Administration 	
Vote 233—Government Buildings 	
Vote 235—Rentals 	
Vote 236—Safety Inspection Division	
Vote 237—Glendale Laundry Operation  (gross)
Vote 23 8—Salary Contingencies 	
Less credits—
Items recovered from the Department of Education re technical and
vocational schools (Government Buildings Vote) 	
Items recovered from various departments, commissions, etc. (Rentals
Vote)     	
Items recovered from various departments (Glendale Laundry Operation Vote)  1	
72,904.60
1,128,891.53
27,224,358.97
14,841,979.53
3,465,534.42
810,993.10
3,122,986.93
3,753,915.21
803,954.04
11,342.95
46,098,436.88
CAPITAL VOTES
Vote 234—Construction of Provincial Buildings  (see expenditure by  building)  ....(gross)    46,499,595.16
Vote 23855 (Fund)—British Columbia Government Building Fund (Vancouver), Special Fund, Revenue Surplus Appropriation Act, 1969     12,461,633.27
Less credits—Items recovered from the Department of Education re technical and vocational schools 1       4,902,363.48
54,058,864.95
SUMMARY
Gross expenditure, Department of Public Works—
Administration, maintenance, and salary contingencies _..,  50,667,649.08
Capital i  58,961,228.43
Gross expenditure       109,628,877.51
Less credits—
Maintenance   4,569,212.20
Capital     4,902,363.48
Net expenditure  .  100,157,301.83
 D 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Project
1-2-B1
1-18-B1
5-5-B1
26-0
122-5-B1
29-5-B1
11-10-B1
11-31-B1
20-0-B1
20-29-B1
20-50-B1
20-103-B1
20-502-R1
20-504-R1
20-508-R1
20-592-R1
32-509-R1
46-9-B1
36-1-B1
38-69-B1
41-1-B1
42-506-R1
42-516-R1
50-51-B1
50-51-B2
145-512-R1
51-0
51-5-B1
12-0-B1
12-3-B1
12-10-B1
12-14-B1
12-15-B1
12-17-B1
14-0-B1
14-54-B1
14-71-B1
54-6-B1
56-1-B1
56-7-B1
VOTE 234—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS
Description
Abbotsford—
Courthouse   	
Fraser Valley Trout Hatchery	
Allison Pass—Highways establishment	
Bella Coola—Purchase of property 	
Bob Quinn Lake—Highways establishment 	
Brannan Lake—Duplex residence, Island Youth Centre
Burnaby—
Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre—
Isolation cells 	
Women's Main Building  	
Willingdon Avenue School—■
West Complex electrical distribution system
Renovations   	
Dairy Laboratory 	
Dogwood Lodge 	
Tenant improvements—
4455 luneau Street	
4240 Manor Street 	
3876 Norland Avenue
4211 Kingsway/4288 Grange Street	
Campbell River—Tenant improvements—Provincial Safety Building 	
Chetwynd—Weighmaster's residence 	
Chilliwack—Courthouse renovations 	
Cloverdale (Surrey)—Sheriff's Office	
Courtenay—Alterations—Provincial Government Building
Cranbrook—
Tenant improvements—
St. Eugene School 	
1517 Baker Street   	
Dawson Creek—
Provincial Building 	
Landscaping   	
Delta—Tenant improvements-
and 80th Street 	
-Delta Shopping Mall, 80th Avenue
Duncan—
Purchase of property—Community Correctional Centre
Provincial Building and Law Courts 	
Essondale—
Riverview Hospital—
Sewer and pumping work	
Boiler plant
East Lawn Building renovations
North Lawn Building 	
Pennington Hall 	
Colony Farm—
Riverside Building
Drainage and dyke improvements
Dairy building	
Cow barn	
Fernie—Highways establishment
Fort St. John—
Old Government Building ...
Provincial Building 	
Expenditure
$
880.00
4,000,822.92
76,249.10
35,000.00
31,896.33
511.66
36,032.70
29,225.30
45,481.34
21,607.66
4,061.40
71,148.18
34,410.52
7,851.31
7,314.07
3,180.46
1,385.00
5,939.24
85,895.89
94,566.93
6,019.39
19,808.91
4,829.04
28,359.45
40,655.14
1,707.20
140,000.00
7,785.62
233,949.41
2,803.18
2,358.48
58,965.25
7,978.05
8.361.33
24,668.17
38,085.71
28,138.27
528,866.35
33,092.51
127,357.72
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
D 47
VOTE 234—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project
19-480-B1
19-480-B2
19-480-B3
19-484-B1
19-485-B1
19-490-B1
19-490-B2
19-490-B4
19-490-B5
19-490-B6
61-10-B1
61-21-B1
10-19-B1
10-501-R1
70-1-B1
69-2-B1
17-0-B1
17-0-B2
17-14-B1
17-25-B1
17-28-B1
17-81-B1
71-3-B1
73-3-B1
79-0
79-2-B1
17-122-B1
110-71-B1
83-502-R1
122-4-B1
89-0
89-1-B1
89-51-B1
90-2-B1
90-51-B1
90-506-R1
91-7-B1
91-15-B1
92-15-B1
Description
General—
Standard/Stock items for buildings (coats of arms, etc.)
Furnishings for rental buildings 	
Provincial Art Collection 	
Well-drilling—Various locations 	
First aid stations—Various locations
General expenses
Wages and expenses—Casual design staff
COSBO expenses
Expenses—Building openings and ceremonials 	
Fees and expenses—Building land appraisal 	
Golden—
Highways establishment  -.	
Visitor Reception Centre 	
Haney—
Kitchen and dining-room—Alouette River Unit (freezer
installation)   	
Tenant improvements—22460 Dewdney Trunk Road (Public
Safety Building, Courtroom)  	
Invermere—Provincial Building 	
Jordan   River—Jordan   River   Correctional
water system 	
Kamloops—
Site development—
Columbia Street 	
Notre Dame Road 	
Land Registry Office	
Central heating plant
Camp—Emergency
Ponderosa Lodge, Columbia Street (formerly personal care
home) 	
Public Works maintenance building	
Kaslo—Highways equipment building 	
Kimberley—Provincial Building 	
Lillooet—
Purchase of property   	
Highways establishment 	
Logan Lake—Highways equipment building	
McLeese Lake—Highways equipment building 	
Merritt—Tenant   improvements—Nicola   Valley   Indian   Services
Association Building 	
Meziadin Lake—Highways establishment 	
Nanaimo—
Purchase of property 	
Courthouse   	
Motor-vehicle inspection station 	
Nelson—.
Forestry Building 	
Provincial Building, Ward Street 	
Tenant improvements—Public Health Laboratory, Kootenay
Lake District Hospital 	
New Denver—
Personal care facility 	
Highways maintenance establishment  (Credit)
New Haven—Workshop Building—New Haven Correctional Centre (Burnaby) 	
Expenditure
$
15,836.66
108,229.08
178,119.22
1,565.81
6,327.71
437,443.25
1,870,438.85
17,293.30
9,126.45
22,549.10
23,833.23
28,049.60
2,377.71
568.07
5,523.95
7,096.89
161,443.69
69,801.98
8,662.10
3,779.99
139,590.82
172,432.63
4,673.63
357,158.32
10,000.00
2,112.80
294.00
10,145.40
2,017.20
120,423.58
46,410.45
9,328.11
47.80
19,012.55
22,290.61
82,051.00
387,644.93
12,000.00
5,693.87
 D 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOTE 234—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project
13-2-B1
13-8-B1
13-21-B1
96-0
102-1-B1
102-10-B1
103-21-B1
104-1-B1
104-2-B1
106-51-B1
106-520-R1
106-522-R1
106-523-R1
107-1-B1
107-3-B1
107-13-B1
107-51-B1
107-510-R1
110-51-B1
110-17-B1
112-1-B1
126-71-B1
118-12-B1
54-21-B1
121-510-R1
38-0
38-515-R1
38-518-R1
47-3-B1
126-0
126-49-B1
15-48-B1
15-92-B1
4-4-B1
141-503-R1
16-0
16-1-B1
16-3-B1
16-14-B1
16-110-B1
16-26-B1
16-31-B1
16-35-B1
Description
New Westminster (Woodlands School) —
Swimming-pool 	
Academic and Activity Building 	
Fraserview Building and Beech Cottage
Oliver—Purchase of property 	
Penticton—
Provincial Building 	
Offices, 152 Main Street (Annex) 	
Pouce Coupe—Weigh-scale station 	
Powell River—
Old Courthouse	
Provincial Building 	
Prince George—
Tenant improvements—
Public Works Building .....
Oxford Building
IWA Building, 1777 Third Avenue .	
Public Health Unit, Tabor Boulevard
Prince Rupert—
Courthouse   	
Forestry Building	
Land Registry  	
Highways establishment 	
Tenant improvements—Second Avenue and Second Street
Quesnel—
Highways establishment	
Transport and Communications Trailer Office 	
Revelstoke—Courthouse 	
Salvus—Storage shed (Highways) 	
Smithers—Provincial Buildings  .	
Sparwood—Highways equipment building	
Squamish — Tenant   improvements — 38040
(Health)  	
Surrey—
Purchase of property 	
Tenant improvements—
10344-56, 137a Street 	
Mental Health Unit 	
Cleveland   Avenue
Tatogga Lake—Highways equipment building —
Terrace—
Purchase of property 	
Weighmaster's residence	
Tranquille—
Barn complex   	
20 bed and training units	
Trout Lake—Highways establishment	
Ucluelet—Tenant improvements—Davison Plaza
Vancouver—
Purchase of property
Courthouse (includes court work in Pacific Centre)
Jericho Hill School—
Fire-alarm system 	
Centennial Gymnasium	
Site work 	
411 Dunsmuir Street—Renovations 	
Motor-vehicle inspection station 	
Government Office Building, 501 West 12th Avenue
Expenditure
$
20,946.68
49,926.75
151,971.81
2,712.55
5,392.89
136.28
152.73
33,122.06
9,641.01
12,897.75
41,690.18
5,885.50
33,869.09
7,555.68
1,902.94
136,762.58
19.72
1,414.01
5,400.36
1,023.87
128,123.15
4,149.58
84,716.35
131,602.87
29,338.62
1,278,975.97
2,511.86
45,805.40
5,622.49
442,012.19
14,072.59
274.33
294,229.86
33,171.10
27,521.78
1,874,610.85
5,052.19
56,412.39
3,427.20
5,333.10
150,532.30
17,002.64
12,662.59
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
D 49
VOTE 234—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project
16-39-Bl
16-39-B2
16-39-B3
16-44-B1
16-48-B1
16-162-B1
16-176-B1
16-181-B1
16-236-B1
16-236-B2
16-237-0
16-237-B1
16-505-R1
16-532-R1
16-606-R1
16-614-R1
16-616-R1
16-627-R1
16-630-R1
16-637-R1
18-1-B1
18-512-R1
19-0
19-1-B1
19-4-B1
19-7-B1
19-33-B1
19-34-B1
19-35-B1
19-49-B1
19-73-B1
19-83-B1
19-96-B1
19-96-B2
10-100-B1
19-101-B1
19-103-B1
19-129-B1
19-133-B1,
19-134-B1
19-135-B1
19-136-B1
19-141-B1
19-144-B1
19-146-B1
19-159-B1
19-224-B1
19-224-B2
19-483-B1
19-489-B1
I9-499-B1
Description
Vancouver—Continued
Pearson Hospital—
Emergency power (Polio Pavilion)   	
Boiler plant  .__.	
Site works 	
Dogwood Lodge, West 57th Avenue	
Willow Building 	
Improvements—1190 Melville Street (Vancouver City College)
Offices, 140 East Eighth Avenue	
Purchase of hangar—Pacific Western Airlines, Vancouver International Airport  I	
Provincial Court facilities, 222 Main Street 	
Purchase of property—
222 Main Street 	
Unified Family Courts, Richmond   	
Unified Family Courts, Richmond  ...  	
Tenant improvements—
635 Burrard Street  .	
Court facilities, Pacific Centre 	
1620 West Eighth Avenue	
Offices, Library Development Commission,
Eighth Avenue 	
Consumer Services, 370 East Broadway	
1525  West
CLEU Building, 214/250 West Seventh Avenue
805 West Broadway
Detox Centre, 59/65 West Pender Street (Credit)
Vernon—
Provincial Building  	
Pollution Control Building, 3301—43rd Avenue  	
Victoria—
Purchase of property   	
Parliament Buildings 	
Alterations, Finance Building    	
Douglas Building
Mines Analytical Laboratory (Precinct) 	
No. 4 Temporary Building, 544 Michigan Street 	
Data Processing Centre, 421 Menzies Street	
Government House 	
Dogwood Building, 1019 Wharf Street	
Law Courts Building	
B.C. Museum Complex 	
B.C. Museum, moving of artifacts 	
Thunderbird Park and buildings   	
Eric Martin Institute 	
Health  Services  Building,   Pandora Avenue  and  Blanshard
Street   	
Offices, 914 Yates Street
St. Ann's Complex 	
Broca Building, 2588 Cadboro Bay Road 	
Office Building, Courtney and Blanshard Streets 	
Offices, 1113 Wharf Street 	
Office Building 3, Burdett Avenue and Blanshard Street 	
Offices, 2631 Douglas Street 	
Premises, Wharf Street at Government Street  	
Provincial Government Service Centre   	
Provincial Government Service Centre (purchase) 	
Alarm systems—Various locations 	
Motorized overhead doors,  Highways establishments—Various locations 	
Mobile homes and trailers—Various zones 	
Expenditure
$
176.03
71,952.93
10,327.27
35,463.05
31,019.19
220,272.14
59,437.81
223,894.36
209,209.46
2,500,000.00
827,017.12
75,317.30
2,300.00
30,711.31
11,595.84
19,138.20
709.00
485,069.28
73,106.80
9,447.43
57,063.25
12,396.05
2,882,120.44
2,669,658.18
9,738.02
203,604.14
15,363.47
18,249.91
205,402.81
14,520.24
7,317.63
914,161.19
327,146.34
17,431.76
94,451 10
2,338.26
5,360,607.26
132,988.80
548,480.82
48,824.33
2,510,635.41
854,929.75
1,675,465.58
176,650.17
33,070.50
30,039.66
75,000.00
16,162.41
313.01
19,816.63
 D 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOTE 234—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project
19-501-Rl
19-506-R1
19-526-R1
19-527-R1
19-533-R1
19-541-R1
19-547-R1
19-574-R1
19-596-R1
19-619-R1
19-641-R1
39-10-B1
39-15-B1
39-19-B1
101-1-B1
101-4-B1
146-1-B1
135-16-B1
137-1-B1
20-15-B1
20-18-B1
20-19-B1
20-23-B1
20-23-B4
20-48-B1
20-53-B1
20-107-B1
20-102-B1
20-105-B1
72-7-B1
72-22-B1
90-13-B1
126-22-B2
126-24-B1
19-491-B1
19-492-B1
19-493-B1
19-494-B1
19-495-B1
19-496-B1
19-491-B4
19-496-B4
1-2-3
1-5-1
1-13-1
1-17-2
1-21-0
Description
Victoria—Continued
Tenant improvements—
Weiler Building, 609 Broughton Street ....
777 Broughton Street	
International House, 880 Douglas Street
Offices, 2840 Nanaimo Street 	
534 Broughton Street (Nordick House) ..
345 Quebec Street, Harbour Towers (mechanical alterations)
535 Yates Street (Bastion Arcade) 	
1016 Langley Street	
878 Viewfield Road 	
929 Ellery Street 	
1006 Fort Street 	
Glendale Laundry, Colquitz 	
Glendale Lodge, Markham Road, Colquitz .
Tillicum Lodge, Interurban Road, Colquitz
Hangars, International Airport, Pat Bay
Highways establishment, Keating Cross Road
Whistler—Highways equipment building 	
Williams Lake—Predator control and storage building
Yahk—Weigh-scale station 	
British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby—
Cafeteria, Food Training Centre 	
Alterations, Cafeteria Building
Classroom Administration Building
Central heating plant
Sundry work and ancillary site work
Library
Portable classroom and similar units
Classroom Laboratory Building 	
British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby-
Horticultural Training Building 	
Multi Discipline Building	
British Columbia Vocational School, Kelowna-
Classroom conversion 	
Welding shop 	
British Columbia Vocational  School,  Nelson—Electrical  underground systems
British Columbia Vocational School, Terrace—
Fire alarm and emergency lighting	
Dormitory and cafeteria 	
General—
Structural alterations—
Zone 1 	
Zone
Zone
Zone
Zone
Zone
Minor work-
Zone 6   	
Planned/Proposed Projects—
Abbotsford—
Provincial Government Building, Landscaping
Lay house alterations
-Zone 1
Animal Pathology Laboratory irrigation 	
Poultry Testing Station, mechanical update
Agriculture Centre 	
Expenditure
2,527.64
13,370.94
5,921.27
45,315.85
2,022.38
19,437.49
18,074.34
19,739.02
1,129.34
2,485.79
380.08
86,342.60
20,152.16
64,564.14
41,051.15
434,291.55
1,354.93
3,176.00
11,610.76
10,310.81
183,671.64
126,049.15
252,364.63
1,249.89
78.40
28,918.46
3,339,203.73
216.47
820,259.89
475.44
690.94
40,056.77
5,333.05
23,700.99
49,903.76
65,384.18
130,047.51
65,891.97
40,122.95
45,285.25
27,089.90
10,188.15
182.87
687.75
326.63
686.70
19,434.98
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
D 51
VOTE 234—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project
1-22-0
1-517-1
3-0-0
4-0-2
4-4-2
4-4-4
4-922-101
5-22-1
6-922-112
10-37-1
10-50-1
10-151-2
10-151-3
11-5-1
12-1-1
12-3-0
12-4-1
12-63-1
12-63-2
12-832-1
12-895-1
13-0-3
13-1-0
13-4-3
13-21-3
13-21-4
13-351-3
13-503-1
14-56-0
14-80-1
15-0-0
15-0-1
15-45-1
16-3-2
16-8-1
16-8-2
16-26-2
16-38-7
16-50-1
16-93-0
16-110-3
16-112-1
16-114-1
16-152-0
16-160-1
Description
Planned/Proposed Projects—Continued
Bradner—Tourist Centre 	
Matsqui—Courthouse renovations  (Justice Building)   32203
S. Fraser  :.  	
Alert Bay—Pump house (electrical design only)   	
Shelter Bay—Water system 	
Trout Lake—
Highways equipment building, landscaping	
Highways diesels 	
Galena Bay—Roadside rest area irrigation	
Manning Park—Pinewood Lodge (concession) renovations ...
Ashcroft—Courthouse 	
Haney—
Steam plant repair, Alouette River	
Woodland Recreation Camp relocation	
Twin Maples Camp, sewage site	
Twin Maples Camp fire alarm  	
Oakalla—Prison Report and Licence Plate Shop ..
Essondale—■
Riverview (Riverside) "Annex" Remodelling
Access roads and steam lines  —
Centre Lawn renovations 	
Coquitlam Regional Laundry 	
Regional Laundry equipment 	
Site updating (plans) 	
Garbage handling	
Woodlands—
Frontage road (Queens Park) 	
Paging systems (sound system) 	
Water supply	
Electrical distribution (Queens Park)
Steam distribution, Fraser Building to Queens Park
Hospital 	
Reposition trailer, Attorney-General, Coquitlam	
Simon Fraser Health 	
Colony Farm, pig barn    .	
Sewage pump station 	
Tranquille—
Miscellaneous requirements 	
Transformer Station	
Substantial addition to laundry	
Vancouver—
Jericho Hill School—Boiler renewal   	
Auditorium  	
Lawrence Hall Temporary Boiler .
411 Dunsmuir Street, alterations and renovations 	
Pearson Hospital, Polio Section, investigations of floor
settlements  	
Jericho Hill School, new workshop, McDonald Hall	
Liquor Administration, renovations and additions, 3100
E. Broadway 	
Jericho Hill School, cafeteria and infirmary, landscaping
UBC Public Safety Building  	
Remand Centre 1 	
Jericho Hill School, covered play area, Lawrence Hall
addition 	
Water Resources (Environmental Laboratory) 	
Expenditure
$
4,409.70
426.11
314.86
7,205.03
32.49
9.70
270.19
406.21
183.63
98.10
3,618.27
620.22
153.57
3,693.57
2,212.26
2,183.43
1,601.78
134,315.81
9,886.44
858.50
170.75
2,497.47
301.78
118.85
46.83
442.76
34.04
80.24
45.43
195.42
2,026.79
152.73
1,461.30
68.65
1,443.23
1,185.96
456.05
882.40
1,896.88
46,734.04
1,933.92
1,405.03
2,447.47
21.19
9,688.31
 D 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOTE 234—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project
16-160-2
16-161-1
16-172-0
16-173-0
16-182-1
16-205-1
16-206-1
16-634-0
16-922-22
16-922-112
16-922-412
17-12-0
17-22-0
17-24-1
17-26-1
17-27-1
17-28-6
17-28-7
17-55-0
17-55-1
17-89-0
17-122-2
17-126-1
17-151-1
17-921-1
17-922-0
17-922-112
17-922-212
18-1-3
18-6-1
18-21-1
19-8-2
19-30-1
19-32-1
19-41-1
19-42-1
19-92-1
19-94-1
19-97-1
19-97-3
19-98-1
19-98-2
19-98-3
19-112-1
19-128-1
19-131-0
19-138-1
19-143-0
19-155-2
19-156-1
19-160-1
19-160-2
Description
Planned/Proposed Projects—Continued
Vancouver—Continued
Water   Resources   (Environmental   Laboratory),   landscaping 	
Provincial Health Laboratory (Shaughnessy) 	
Jericho Hill School Laundry, landscaping .	
Transit Building, North Vancouver 	
10 Day Care Centres	
2625 Yale Street, Remand Centre and Family Court 	
Provincial    Building,    Chemically    Dependent    Adults,
China Creek Health Centre, Seventh Avenue	
525 Seymour, office alterations	
Greenhouse 	
Courthouse	
Lower Mainland Custody Facility, 60 beds	
Kamloops—
Health Centre 	
Field Service Centre, Fish and Wildlife 	
Incinerator Pyrolysis and Gasification	
Provincial Government Office Building
Department of Highways Geotechnical Laboratory
Ponderosa Lodge—Rectification	
Emergency Lighting and Fire Alarm ...
Correction Centre—Administration Centre
Sewerage 	
Motor-vehicle Inspection Station 	
Logan Lake, Highways establishment start-up costs
Courthouse	
Clearwater, Bear Creek, Attorney-General's mobile units
Future buildings, development programs	
Gas Pyrolysis Study 	
Clearwater Courthouse 	
Courthouse 	
Vernon—
Provincial Government Office Buildings, Probation Staff
and Courtroom renovations	
Dellview Hospital—Emergency Lighting	
Public Health Centre 	
Victoria—
Emergency lighting generator (boiler house) 	
Queen's Printer Office renovations	
525 Superior Street, Forestry renovations	
Photo Laboratory, Forestry, 527 Michigan Street 	
Queen's Printer Quonset Hut renovations	
780 Blanshard Street, Water Resources Building	
Windermere Building 	
Archives Art Gallery, lighting 	
Archives security alarm, Art Gallery
Curatorial Tower sundry alterations .
Salt-water tank aquarium 	
Curatorial condensation problems
Attorney-General's Headquarters Building 	
B.C. Resources Building, Humboldt Street ....
Museum Storage, 800 Viewfield Road	
Spencer House, alterations	
Transit Centre 	
Todd House, 2564 Heron Street, restorations
Day Care Centre, 433 Kingston Street 	
Craigflower School, curb and drain	
Craigflower School 	
Expenditure
246.62
5,798.69
56.19
729.29
4,689.03
874.98
7,204.65
384.57
217.82
840.17
278.70
28,943.61
1,103.80
81,206.69
5,089.56
263.10
1,052.90
78.63
1,195.06
3,144.23
25.57
23.59
989.65
224.60
9,480.39
161.15
119.53
2,501.28
1,569.85
916.26
3,945.82
2,987.50
65.26
118.74
704.49
88.97
90.19
715.46
237.96
23.26
93.43
1,135,31
59.48
113,879.93
1,951.38
4,737.37
448.39
2,910.05
100.72
398.39
141.54
23.74
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
D 53
VOTE 234—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project
19-172-1
19-224-3
19-227-0
19-227-1
19-228-1
19-351-3
19-481-1
19-490-7
19-499-0
19-499-2
19-921-0
19-922-22
19-922-114
20-30-1
20-37-0
20-60-1
20-62-1
20-71-2
20-103-4
20-500-0
20-922-1
25-1-1
28-1-1
28-509-1
28-922-212
29-11-2
29-11-3
32-31-0
32-922-112
33-5-0
33-922-101
33-922-112
35-2-1
36-55-0
36-502-1
38-61-0
38-63-0
38-65-2
38-67-1
38-69-1
39-2-1
39-3-1
39-7-1
39-15-3
39-922-1
41-922-117
42-0-3
42-1-1
42-22-0
42-922-101
Description
Planned/Proposed Projects—Continued
Victoria—Continued
512/514 Fort Street, renovations 	
Government Service Centre, art storage and Gardener's
Office 	
Saanich Highways Office Building, 280 West Burnside
Road	
Saanich, Highways Regional Office, 280 West Burnside
Road, landscaping	
Point Ellis House, security and fire alarm	
Repositioning trailer, Cloverdale to Hope	
Radio Relay Buildings—Various locations  	
Metric conversion	
Dental Services Mobile Clinics	
Highways,    temporary    accommodation,    Government
Street 	
James Bay guidelines 	
Greenhouse 	
Park and ride site	
Burnaby—
Youth Development Centre, renovations to three cottages
B.C. Vocational School Auto Paint and Fibreglass Shop
Youth Development Centre—Male dormitories 	
Closed TV	
Motor-vehicle Inspection Station, extension  	
Dogwood Lodge, fencing   	
Preliminary, property transfer of BCIT	
Willingdon site study for area 	
Barkerville—Bowron Lake storage building   	
Burns Lake—Courthouse renovations   	
Houston—Shopping centre alterations	
Courthouse  	
Brannan Lake—Youth Centre, Phase 2	
Youth Centre site works, Campbell Building
Campbell River—Fish and Wildlife storage
Snowden—Correction Branch mobile unit replace	
Castlegar—Guardrail building (fabrication shop) 	
Brilliant—Roadside rest area 	
Castlegar—Courthouse 	
Chase—Courthouse  —
Atchelitz Creek—Tourist Centre   _
Chilliwack—Public Health Centre	
Surrey—Motor-vehicle Inspection Station	
Highways establishment building, Pike Road 	
Cloverdale—Highways, storage, Pike Road   	
Surrey—Pike Road, Highways District maintenance establishment building 	
Cloverdale—Small Claims Court (LCB) 	
Colquitz—Regional Correctional Centre Office conversion ....
Conversion of Warden's residence to Community Correction Centre   	
Staff Building kitchen alterations/decorations, Wilkinson
Glendale Lodge, Markham Road (pressure valves) 	
Purchase trailer, site works, Wilkinson 	
Courtenay—Mental  Health  building  suitability   (investigate
only) 	
Fort Steele—Electrical underground distribution 	
Cranbrook—Courthouse renovation to court facilities 	
Fish and Wildlife Control Station 	
Rampart—Rest area, Highways Region 3 	
Expenditure
$
2,821.60
99.22
16,133.05
2,710.53
331.09
42.00
10,715.02
4,916.18
46.52
43.19
37.00
172.65
110.08
270.92
1,357.43
1,952.98
146.90
80.80
42.08
533.99
1,061.27
324.94
234.36
252.77
16.65
137.14
1,390.00
16.39
8.92
2,379.85
83.56
83.56
41.50
3,096.64
5,456.80
397.35
14,083.71
25.49
1,045.32
6,550.92
7,245.66
263.28
368.47
94.49
761.65
554.65
1,975.41
1,769.82
114.74
149.82
 D 54 BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOTE 234—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project Description                                                                                 Expenditure
Planned/Proposed Projects—Continued $
42-922-112              Cranbrook—Courthouse    3,321.55
43-3-0                      Creston—Courthouse renovations (existing)    6,607.68
43-504-1 Federal Agriculture Station, Department of Agriculture
Office  1,866.68
46-21-1                    Mackenzie—Provincial Building   155.78
46-922-212                      Courthouse     804.77
47-3-0                      Tatogga Lake—Generator   247.44
51-7-0                      Duncan—Highways equipment/storage office  34.51
51-12-0                            Motor-vehicle Inspection Station   9.95
52-2-0                      Enderby—Highways equipment/storage/office   3,133.08
54-1-0                      Fernie—Courthouse, landscaping   157.68
54-11-1                            Old hospital conversion    594.06
54-31-1                    Sparwood—Day Care Centre   5,394.85
54-922-101              Fernie—Kikomun Creek Rest Area, Highways Region 3   149.82
54-922-201              Olson—Roadside rest area  83.56
58-31-0                    Fort Nelson Weigh-scale Station  781.52
61-21-0                    Golden—Information Centre—Landscaping   2,261.95
61-21-3                                    Flagpole   47.18
61-922-101             Braisher Creek—Roadside rest area  83.56
61-922-201              Doyle Creek—Roadside rest area    83.56
64-15-1                    Hutda—Baldy Hughes Recreation Centre  3,705.37
65-3-1                      Kitwanga—Highways sewer and water   72.14
67-22-1                    Hope—Salt shed  206.67
67-922-101                      Alexander Creek rest station   177.31
69-2-0                      Jordan River—Colquitz Temporary Remand Centre  2,260.56
69-8-1                              Gymnasium/Office/Storage/new building   2,776.54
72-43-1                    Kelowna—Day Care Centre     401.16
73-3-2                      Kimberley—Courthouse, landscaping   939.74
73-4-0                              LCB alterations   362.01
73-922-101              Wasa—Roadside rest area   83.56
74-1-1                      Kitimat—Provincial Building   32.03
77-1-0                      Lumby—Health Centre   2,955.77
78-3-2                      Langford—Paint Shop   1,382.14
78-3-3                              Sign shop addition   3,409.19
83-1-1                      Merritt—Courthouse renovations (existing)   189.80
84-1-1                      Mission—Courthouse irrigation (existing)   57.41
84-2-1                              Highways yard-site   340.16
86-2-1                      Mayne Island—Medical Centre   3,535.55
87-922-101              Nakusp—Summit Lake, rest area, Highways Region 3   222.28
89-52-0 Cassidy—Equipment/Storage/Office/Highways, guardrail facilities   :  23,929.56
89-53-0                    Nanaimo—Public Health Centre   1,796.05
89-54-0                            Fish and Wildlife, Field Service Centre  190.46
89-922-112                      Courthouse    89.42
90-1-2 Nelson—Courthouse renovations, 320 Ward Street (existing) 1,076.70
90-1-3                              Courthouse, landscaping    338.67
90-4-1                              Old Land Registry Building   275.26
90-6-1                              Geotechnical Survey Laboratory, 302 Ward Street   801.55
90-9-1                             BCIT classroom and laboratory reroofing  40.00
90-18-1                           Highways District Office extension   1,952.17
90-25-1                            Vocational School of Arts, Selkirk College   243.34
90-51-4                          Provincial Building, Ward Street, Landscaping   1,210.74
90-74-0                            Fish and Wildlife Field Service Centre  106.55
90-75-2                            Highways equipment storage office building  11,695.39
90-75-3                           Highways site works   208.41
90-922-101              Stewart Creek—Rest area, Highways Region 3   150.27
90-922-113              Nelson—Arterial highways, irrigation   1,405.20
90-922-121                     Provincial Government Office Building  76.92
91-7-0                      New Denver Centre   8,806.76
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76
D 55
VOTE 234—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project
91-922-101
92-0-1
92-0-2
92-2-2
92-12-1
92-16-1
93-1-1
93-2-0
93-11-0
93-922-112
96-922-101
101-1-3
101-5-1
102-501-0
105-1-1
106-1-1
106-6-2
106-12-1
106-14-1
106-35-0
106-91-1
106-537-1
107-14-0
107-52-1
107-52-2
107-922-313
110-9-2
110-9-3
113-1-1
113-1-2
113-922-112
113-922-113
114-922-112
115-4-1
116-1-1
116-6-1
116-7-1
118-12-5
118-011-0
121-5-1
122-7-1
126-1-1
126-51-0
126-51-1
126-63-0
130-12-1
130-13-1
130-922-212
134-2-0
135-31-0
135-922-121
141-3-1
142-1-1
144-1-1
200-2-0
Description
Planned/Proposed Projects—Continued
Lemon Creek—Roadside rest area  	
New Haven—Electrical distribution 	
Borstal School 	
Site works, Correctional Centre 	
Convert Director's residence to Correctional Centre	
Dormitory, Correctional Centre 	
New Westminster—
Courthouse renovations, Room 301, Attorney-General —
Courthouse Judicial Building, alterations and renovations
Provincial Government Office Building (100,000 sq. ft.)
Courthouse 	
Anarchist—Rest area, Highways Region 3 	
Pat Bay—Airport Hangar 1, alterations to office 	
Salt shed 	
Penticton—Public Health Offices 	
Princeton—Courthouse, air-conditioning 	
Prince   George—Feasibility   study,   Provincial
Government
Office Building, steam heating	
Correctional Centre water system 	
New Caledonia—College, Prince George, boiler study
Prince George—Weigh-scale Station 	
Public Health Centre	
Office building (100,000 sq. ft.) 	
Federal Agriculture Station, Agriculture Office
Prince Rupert—Portable dental unit 	
Pending Highways maintenance establishment .
Highways Yard-site 	
Highways crew accommodation 	
Quesnel—Courthouse   (existing)
Boiler replacement, Government Building 	
Rossland—Courthouse, landscaping (existing)   	
Sheriff's Office  	
Courthouse      	
Highways maintenance establishment 	
Rayleigh—Replacement   for   Correction   Branch   (mobile)
(Credit)   	
Port Hardy—Provincial Government Office Building 	
Salmon Arm—Courtroom (air-conditioning) 	
Highways fire alarm	
Provincial Government Office Building ...	
Smithers—Provincial Government Office Building, landscaping and irrigation    	
Fish and Wildlife storage extension 	
Diamond Head—Shelter, check consult design 	
Meziadin Lake—Highways, trailer crew quarters	
Terrace—Courthouse, office building, move personnel 	
Public Health Centre ......
Landscaping
Skeenaview Personal Care Home, 75 beds	
Fort St. James—Government Office Building, Court Registry
Residence, Government Agent 	
Vanderhoof—Courthouse   	
Trail—Government Office Building (20,000 sq. ft.) 	
Williams Lake—Weighmaster's residence 	
Provincial Government Office Building	
Ucluelet—Residence, Government Agent 	
Summerland—Trout hatchery, modify pumps/effluent outfall
Pender Harbour—Public Health Centre 	
Likely—Highways office equipment/storage office 	
Expenditure
$
83.56
444.10
104.55
11.63
585.81
44,464.36
5,605.84
3,052.39
74.48
12,168.50
1,329.43
91.09
752.98
34.01
1,213.78
1,501.22
1,030.78
83.70
11.03
1,122.64
4,768.28
3,877.86
929.28
535.65
127.44
137.48
196.91
131.12
2,939.52
78.84
697.86
11.03
43.05
174.85
654.85
235.69
118.01
336.89
106.55
169.90
12.19
442.85
17,502.46
1,620.70
5,637.71
89.73
8.32
44.49
32,663.37
242.25
1,211.27
167.37
136.24
18.50
736.41
 D 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOTE 234—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project
200-7-0
200-21-1
214-8-0
536
537
556
800
801-2-0
801-5-0
801-6
801-6-1
809-0-1
811-3-0
811-3-1
811-3-2
813-0-0
865-0-0
881
895-1-18
895-002-1
895-2-18
895-3-0
895-006-2
895-322-1
895-322-2
895-322-3
895-322-4
895-322-6
895-420-0
895-420-1
895-561-0
895-922-00
895-922-1
895-922-3
895-922-101
895-922-120
921-1-1
921-1-2
922-0-0
922-1-0
922-5-0
922-11-0
922-13-0
922-19-0
Planned/Proposed Projects—Continued
Description
Bridge Lake—Highways office/storage 	
100 Mile House—Salt shed	
Essondale—Valleyview Hospital, renovations
Conferences and seminars—Technical 	
Professional 	
B.C. Government Professional Employees' Association
General policies 	
Master specifications
National Building Codes and Standards 	
Plumbing Advisory Council 	
Cross Connection Control Committee 	
Quantity Surveyors, pricing planning	
Health policies, planning (Mental) 	
Department of Health, Development Group
General Public Health planning
Office plants (general, interior decorating)
Power Systems Study
Energy Program Solar 	
Corrections liaison, planning 	
Justice Development Commission Studies
Court facilities in general
Hospital Program, general and liaison  	
Highways water supply and sewerage, 25 sites	
Miscellaneous administration duties—Architectural
Structural 	
Electrical 	
Mechanical 	
Construction Services	
Cash Flow Program—Departmental
Industry research
British Columbia Government Employees' Union  (negotiations)  	
Gas pumps—Various locations	
Reports on buildings and sites for miscellaneous requirements
and repairs	
Estimates for departments other than Public Works	
Okanagan Basin—Trout hatchery 	
Design fees for motor-vehicle licence-plate  shops,  location
not determined 	
Cost in use, administration 	
Pilot Study 	
Accommodations Study 	
Recreation and Conservation, liaison time 	
Human Resources Development Program	
Department of Education, policies planning	
Department of Highways, planning and liaison
Department of Housing, liaison 	
Retroactive Pay Clearing Account
Salary contingencies adjustments and revisions (Credit)
Expenditure
1,575.93
312.70
8,484.71
4,697.03
4,920.72
880.33
1,361.70
1,344.18
34,892.81
284.46
518.30
1,807.73
8,922.74
9,130.58
1,148.21
2,450.09
338.00
8,218.36
749.73
30,033.02
340.46
21,718.16
532.71
1,641.51
118.03
109.26
802.10
1,445.85
100.43
888.94
278.37
227.40
9,468.36
817.65
1,203.81
1,727.51
6,878.27
904.96
4,908.12
108.32
20,138.50
9,941.19
222.46
7,782.35
325,574.69
5,412.00
Total gross expenditure   46,499,595.16
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1975/76
D 57
MAJOR TENDERS  RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS
AWARDED  FOR BUILDINGS
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names ot Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
1-18-B1
ABBOTSFORD
Fraser Valley Trout Hatchery
Construction, Two-storey Hatchery Building:
$
5,654,803.00
5,771,192.00
5,779,000.00
6,175,000.00
6,265,000.00
6,668,718.00
219,000.00
227,900.00
264,064.00
34,807.87
33,933.00
35,307.87
6,575.00
9,810.00
18,160.00
18,673.00
19,236.00
21,567.00
23,820.00
27,442.00
167,855.00
173,202.00
194,446.00
108,741.00
143,636.00
146,031.00
189,887.00
16,569.00
16,660.60
25,500.00
27,894.00
13,295.00
13,340.00
16,657.00
23,600.00
Per cent
mark-ups
90,531.00
63,742.00
75,239.30
85,881.00
92,231.00
96,167.00
130,500.00
Awarded.
Van Construction (Div. of Van Vliet Construction Co.
Ltd.)                                            	
Northern Construction Co. (Div. of Morrison Knudson
Co. Ltd.)        .                           	
Instrumentation:
Awarded.
Aquaria and Stream Tank:
Not awarded.
Aquaria and Stream Tank (retender):
Webb & Trace Ltd     _
Awarded.
Ichthyological Exhibit:
John Ritchel	
Awarded.
20-502-R1
BURNABY
4455 Juneau Street, Audio-Visual Services:
Allan & Viner Construction Ltd..— •	
Turnbull & Gale Construction Co. Ltd	
Awarded.
F. & A. Construction Ltd.-                                             	
20-18-B1
British Columbia Institute of Technology
Cafeteria Alterations:
20-23-B1
Central Heating Plant Boiler Installation:
H. S. Crombie Ltd.	
20-105-B1
British Columbia Vocational School
Multi Discipline Complex
Concrete Paths and Roads (Contract 32):
Janitorial Clean-up Service (Contract 34):
Ackron Building Maintenance ____ _
20-107-B1
British Columbia Institute of Technology
Classroom and Laboratory Building
Sundry Labour (Contract CLB 5):
Sun Screens (Contract CLB 7):
Sun Screens (Contract CLB 7) (retender):
Metal Cladding (Contract CLB 12):
Weiss Industries Ltd ____ ____         	
Westeel Rosco Ltd ___	
Robertson Building Systems Ltd	
 D 58 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
20-107-B1
BURNABY—Continued
British Columbia Institute of Technology
Classroom and Laboratory Building—Continued
Metal Cladding (Contract CLB 12) (retender):
E. A. Stark Applicators Ltd.   	
J. K. Campbell & Associates Ltd.   —
Weiss Industries Ltd — _	
Roofing and Flashings (Contract CLB 15):
Maurice Fox & Associates Ltd _	
Aetna Roofing (1965) Ltd _	
Campbell & Grill Ltd	
Seaboard Sheet Metal Ltd.   	
Fluid Applied Membranes (Contract CLB 16):
Duron (B.C.) Ltd  	
Industrial Waterproofing Systems (B.C.) Ltd..
Acoustical Treatment (Contract CLB 18):
F. Drexel Co. Ltd  	
Chalkboards and Tackboards (Contract CLB 20):
Component Structures Ltd.	
Shanahan's Ltd	
Northwood Mills Ltd..
Special Folding Doors (Contract CLB 21A):
Stanley-Taymouth Ltd	
Panel Products _..	
Shanahan's Ltd	
Finish Carpentry and Millwork (Contract CLB 23):
Nikolai Millwork Industries Ltd	
Sigurdson Millwork Co. Ltd	
Creighton Construction Co. Ltd	
Rough Carpentry (Contract CLB 27):
Creighton Construction Co. Ltd	
Gadicke Construction Co. Ltd  —	
Miscellaneous Metals 11 (Contract CLB 28):
Pearson Iron Works Ltd	
Carpet and Resilient Flooring (Contract CLB 29):
Johnston Floor Co. Ltd	
Jordans Commercial Furnishings Ltd	
Craftsman Floors (B.C.) Ltd	
Atlas Floors Ltd	
Painting and Decorating (Contract CLB 30):
Burrard Painting & Decorating Ltd	
L. O. Hansen Ltd  _._	
Kerschbaumer Coating Inc. __	
Laboratory Benches (Contract CLB 33):
Art Laboratory Furniture Ltd. (metal)-	
McGaw Supply Ltd. (metal)    	
Nikolai Millwork Industries Ltd. (wood) _	
Nikolai Millwork Industries Ltd. (metal)	
Creighton Construction Co. Ltd. (wood)	
Plumbing (Contract CLB 34):
Hodgson Plumbing & Heating Ltd	
H. S. Crombie Ltd	
Outside Finishing Work (Contract CLB 37):
Turnbull & Gale Construction Co. Ltd	
Creighton Construction Co. Ltd..
Van Construction (Div. of Van VHet Construction Co.
Ltd.)  	
Bengal Construction Co. Ltd	
Doyle Construction Co. Ltd	
Duron (B.C.) Ltd  .....	
19-493-B4
38-69-B1
CLOVERDALE
Highways Maintenance Establishment Power Distribution System:
Trans-Power Construction Ltd 	
Canem Systems Ltd	
Civil Courts
Mechanical Alterations:
United Power Ltd  	
D. C. Festing & Sons Ltd	
Electrical Alterations:
Blitz Electric Ltd.    	
Summit Electric Ltd  	
Christopherson Electric Ltd..
United Power Ltd	
Jensen Electric Ltd	
$
41,695.00
49,890.00
64,756.00
31,188.00
35,194.00
40,912.00
43,858.00
17,975.00
19,787.00
18,176.00
14,777.00
15,334.00
18,078.00
12,379.00
14,704.00
14,950.00
92,750.00
96,492.00
96,609.00
23,024.00
55,700.00
57,544.00
52,672.00
53,240.00
59,776.00
66,000.00
59,980.00
69,640.00
72,145.00
83,554.00
91,279.00
123,726.00
140,143.00
126,548.00
22,824.00
23,183.00
151,951.00
159,634.00
167,029.00
167,761.00
182,800.00
206,661.00
19,619.00
33,672.00
38,553.00
39,500.00
17,721.00
18,276.00
18,806.00
20,970.00
24,935.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1975/76 D 59
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Remarks
COLQUITZ  (VICTORIA)
Glendale Lodge Laundry Alterations:
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd	
Hunter Construction Ltd	
Australian Construction Ltd	
I2-14-B1
ESSONDALE
Riverview Hospital, North Lawn Building Kitchen Renovations:
Jepsen Mulder Construction Ltd    	
D. C. Festing & Sons Ltd 	
Seaward Construction Ltd 	
Bengal Construction Co. Ltd 	
Gadicke Construction Co. Ltd	
17-1-B1
73-3-B1
KAMLOOPS
Provincial Government Precinct, New Boilers:
Babcock & Wilcox (Canada) Ltd	
Foster Wheeler Ltd	
Bacon Engineering Ltd	
Volcano Ltd 	
KIMBERLEY
Provincial Government Building, Phase 2
Framing (Contract 1):
Bill Carson Building Services Ltd	
Carron Construction Ltd	
Phillmac Enterprises Ltd	
Tri Square Construction Ltd..
Framing and Sundry Labour (Contract 1) (retender):
Discrimination Construction Co	
Phillmac Enterprises Ltd _	
Carron Construction Ltd	
Plumbing (Contract 3):
Philpot Plumbing Ltd     	
M. & K. Plumbing & Heating Ltd	
Fred's Mechanical Contractors Ltd 	
G. & D. Plumbing & Heating Ltd	
Setter-Donaldson Mechanical Ltd- __.  	
T. Schmidt Plumbing & Heating Ltd _____	
Electrical (Contract 4A):
Tri-Ron Electrical Ltd.  	
Inducom Electrical Installations Ltd	
Johnson Electric Corp.  	
Interior Industrial Electric  	
Columbia Electrocentre Ltd 	
Mountain View Electric  	
Marysville Electric	
Concrete Work (Contract 5):
Trowelex Concrete Contractors Ltd	
Mechanical (Contract 6):
E.K. Plumbing & Heating Ltd-	
Keith Plumbing & Heating Ltd 	
Finish Carpentry and Sundry Work (Contract 7):
Phillmac Enterprises Ltd   _	
Drywall and Acoustical (Contract 8):
Phillmac Enterprises Ltd  	
86-2
T&C
90-51-B1
MAYNE ISLAND
Community Medical Clinic Building:
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd	
D. C. Festing & Sons Ltd	
Australian Construction Ltd	
NANAIMO
Cottle Hill, Steel Building, Radio Repeater Station Renovations:
Wheaton Construction Ltd 	
D. Robinson Construction Ltd	
T. & B. Construction Ltd 	
NELSON
Provincial Office Building Exterior Concrete Work:
Trowelex Concrete Contractors Ltd	
Fame Construction Ltd	
Granby Installations Ltd	
56,530.00
64,660.00
67,000.00
83,507.94
87,945.00
92,820.00
96,357.00
118,724.00
347,600.00
420,000.00
458,920.00
571,684.00
22,928.00
30,928.00
32,412.00
39,847.00
29,828.00
32,350.00
32,983.00
11,882.00
13,650.00
17,600.00
18,416.00
19,450.00
20,907.00
37,300.00
37,740.00
47,900.00
50,000.00
52,400.00
57,938.00
62,946.00
17,881.00
63,955.00
67,400.00
57,682.00
60,847.00
64,945.00
71,900.00
14,873.00
16,252.00
19,500.00
15,200.00
31,912.00
49,017.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Not awarded.
Not awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Not awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
 D 60 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
91-7-B1
NEW DENVER
Personal Care Facility Alterations and Renovations:
$
370,000.00
409,155.00
414,800.00
562,300.00
28,428.00
45,000.00
13,330.00
14,570.00
31,600.00
32,468.00
33,275.00
35,544.00
36,700.00
37,236.00
177,500.00
287,700.00
25,000.00
27,345.00
26,050.00
26,235.00
30,813.00
40,000.00
36,906.00
46,470.00
39,728.00
14,268.00
15,400.00
44,479.00
46,438.00
47,200.00
49,999.00
51,230.00
52,691.00
53,000.00
53,941.00
54,562.00
55,981.00
85,676.00
Pacific Coast Construction Co. Ltd.	
13-8-B1
NEW WESTMINSTER
Woodlands School Covered Playground:
19-494-B1
100 MILE HOUSE
Highways  Maintenance  Establishment   Water  Conditioning and
Pressure Booster System:
Dave's Plumbing & Heating (1962) Ltd.	
104-1-B1
POWELL RIVER
Courthouse and  Office Building Hot-water Boiler and Heating
Alterations:
106-523-R1
PRINCE GEORGE
Public Health Centre, Tabor Boulevard Alterations:
Dezell Construction Co. Ltd 	
107-13-B1
PRINCE RUPERT
Land Registry Offices Alterations:
D. C. Festing & Sons Ltd	
233
QUESNEL
Provincial Office Building, Installation ol New Boilers:
Dave's Plumbing & Heating (1962) Ltd	
233
REVELSTOKE
Highways Maintenance Establishment Fume Exhaust Work:
McKinnon Plumbing & Heating (1973) Ltd	
O.K. Plumbing & Heating (1971) Ltd._
D. C. Cross Ltd	
112-1-B1
Courthouse Alterations and Renovations, Phase 3
Renovations (Contract 1):
Elevators (Contract 2):
Otis Elevator Co. Ltd  	
Awarded.
Elevators (Contract 2) (retender):
118-1-B1
SMITHERS
Provincial   Office  Building  and   Courthouse   Outside   Concrete
Work:
38-518-R1
SURREY
Mental Health Unit, 10677 King George VI Highway, Improvement Work:
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76 D 61
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
I6-93-B1
16-206-B1
16-236-B1
16-20
UCLUELET
Court Facilities Renovations:
Turner Contracting (Alberni) Ltd.
Port Alberni Home Builders Ltd	
VANCOUVER
Liquor Administration Branch, 3200 East Broadway, Alterations,
Phase 1:
Bengal Construction Ltd ___ __ __	
Allan & Viner Construction Ltd __ _	
Turnbull & Gale Construction Ltd _	
D. C. Festing & Sons Ltd  _.	
Fairview Construction Ltd — — —
Smith Bros. & Wilson Ltd. .__ _ _
Bent Construction Ltd ___ _
Seaward Construction Ltd.____ „...  .__
Pacific Coast Construction Co. Ltd	
China Creek Centre for Chemically Dependent Adults:
Chimo Structures Ltd _	
222 Main Street, Provincial Court, Additional Washroom
Facilities:
Turnbull & Gale Construction Co. Ltd _	
Allan & Viner Construction Ltd _ _	
Seaward Construction Ltd 	
Jepsen Mulder Construction Ltd _.__	
Blocks 51, 61, 71 Project (Georgia, Howe, Nelson, Hornby
Streets)
Precast-concrete Double "T" Units, Blocks 51, 61 (Contract
BCB43):
Con-Force Products Ltd 	
Bordignon Masonry Ltd __ _ 	
North Footings, Blocks 51, 61, and Substructure, Blocks 51,
61, 71 (Contract BCB47):
Bird Construction Co. Ltd	
Dawson & Hall Ltd  	
Van Construction (Div. of Van Vliet Construction Co.
Ltd.)	
Biely Construction Co. Ltd.	
Dillingham Corp. (Canada) Ltd _	
H. Haebler Co. Ltd.... _.
Miscellaneous Metals for Substructure, Blocks 51, 61 (Contract BCB48):
Alpine Steel Ltd  	
Pearson Ironworks Ltd. ...	
Surrey Ironworks Ltd.	
Temporary Power, Phase 3 (Contract BCB49):
Trans-Power Construction Ltd	
Arcrite Electric Ltd- 	
Asphalt Paving, Truck and Car Tunnels (Contract BCB51):
Standard General Construction Ltd	
Columbia Bithulithic Ltd _.-	
Crane Track, Block 61 (Contract BCB52):
A. & B. Rail Contractors Ltd 	
Railcon Construction Ltd.   _ _	
Pacific Northern Rail Construction Corp  	
Elevators and Escalators, Blocks 51, 61 (Contract BCB53):
Montgomery Elevator Co. Ltd—	
Otis Elevator Co. Ltd __ 	
Westinghouse Canada Ltd. _ _	
Dover Corp. (Canada) Ltd. (elevator only) __ _	
Bulk Excavation and Shoring, Block 71 (Contract BCB54):
United Contractors Ltd ___	
Fownes Construction Co. Ltd. __	
Dillingham Corp. (Canada) Ltd  	
Dawson Construction Ltd _ ~	
Miller Cartage & Contracting Ltd	
Standard General Construction Ltd —_	
Waterproofing Smithe Street Underpasses (Contract BCB56).
Davis Foundation Spray Ltd 	
Coast Hudson Ltd- __ _	
Duron (B.C.) Ltd.  	
Gillan Waterproofing Ltd  _	
24,392.00
28,366.00
489,737.00
494,300.00
501,853.00
507,270.00
509,202.00
509,905.00
514,123.00
517,762.00
534,849.00
239,525.00
10,794.00
13,990.00
15,266.00
16,782.00
360,435.00
367,500.00
2,082,904.00
2,378,415.00
2,493,138.00
2,605,000.00
2,647,000.00
2,927,000.00
31,304.00
37,699.00
38,433.00
27,647.00
29,990.00
12,390.00
15,900.00
32,800.00
36,283.50
46,839.00
659,245.00
754,190.00
874,795.00
428,000.00
1,108,029.00
1,130,989.00
1,164,175.00
1,173,227.00
1,193,278.00
1,689,530.00
31,390.00
34,883.00
37,489.00
40,200.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Not awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
 D 62 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
16-20
VANCOUVER—Continued
Blocks 51, 61, 71 Project (Georgia, Howe, Nelson, Hornby
Streets ) —Con tinued
Public Pavilion and Covered Walkway, Miscellaneous and
Structural Metal (Contract BCB62):
George Third & Son Ltd. _	
Ancient Mariner Industries Ltd _	
Surrey Ironworks Ltd. _ __	
Alpine Steel Ltd    	
Westeel Rosco Ltd. _ 	
Metro Construction Co. Ltd   _	
Tower Crane (Contract BCB65) (monthly rental):
Jasco Equipment Supply Ltd 	
F. B. Kroll A/S _____	
Bordingnon Masonry Ltd _ _	
Precast-concrete "U" Beams and Floor Planks, Blocks 51,
61 (Contract BCB68):
Con-Force Products Ltd 	
Bordingnon Masonry Ltd _____ 	
Electrical, Blocks 51, 61 (Contract BCB69):
D. Thompson  (Western)  Ltd.)
The State Electric Co. Ltd.     5 (joint venture)	
Flanders Installations Ltd _	
16-26-B1
Commonwealth Construction Co. Ltd.	
Reinforced-concrete Superstructure, Blocks 51, 61 (Contract
BCB70):
Dawson & Hall Ltd ______	
Poole Construction Ltd. __ _ _ 	
Van Construction (Div. of Van Vliet Construction Co.
Ltd.)  	
Bird Construction Ltd __	
Northern Construction Co. (Div. of Morrison Knudson
Co. Ltd.)  	
Dillingham Corp. (Canada) Ltd _	
Commonwealth Construction Co. Ltd.__ _._ __	
Fire Protection, Blocks 51, 61 (Contract BCB75):
Kal Sprinkler Co. Ltd	
Automatic Sprinkler Ltd	
Viking Sprinkler Co. Ltd  	
Grinnell Fire Protection Co. Ltd 	
Waterproofing, Vertical Walls Below Grade, Blocks 51, 61
(Contract BCB86):
Davis Foundation Spray Ltd.	
Duron (B.C.) Ltd   	
Coast Hudson Ltd  	
Aetna Roofing (1954) Ltd..
16-176-B1
411 Dunsmuir Street Alterations and Renovations
Phase 1:
Turnbull & Gale Construction Co. Ltd	
Pacific Coast Construction Ltd 	
Allan & Viner Construction Ltd	
H. Haebler Co. Ltd	
International Construction Co. Ltd	
Double V Construction Ltd 	
Phase 2:
Allan & Viner Construction Ltd _ ___
Turnbull & Gale Construction Co. Ltd— _.
Smith Bros. & Wilson Ltd 	
140 East Eighth Avenue, Film Classification Board
Heating and Ventilation:
McNeil Plumbing & Heating Ltd—	
Fenk Plumbing & Heating Ltd _ 	
Partitions:
Benton & Overbury Ltd 	
Whitehall Contracting Ltd	
Installation of Lighting:
Ross Morrison Electrical Ltd ...	
Arcrite Electric Ltd _	
Fred Moore Electrical Services Ltd __
7,962.00
11,325.42
14,425.00
16,923.00
17,236.00
17,900.00
11,800.00
11,900.00
17,600.00
1,492,200.00
2,182,000.00
2,605,163.00
2,771,453.00
3,020,832.00
4,727,838.00
4,970,108.00
5,017,046.00
5,408,189.00
6,321,530.00
7,224,000.00
7,662,827.00
369,990.00
468,105.00
519,819.00
559,805.00
29,250.00
31,888.00
42,500.00
105,840.00
68,856.00
78,319.00
80,430.00
85,500.00
97,449.00
98,124.00
476,200.00
489,914.00
492,946.00
19,000.00
20,595.00
15,520.00
23,157.00
10,298.00
10,443.00
13,555.00
Qualified bid.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1975/76 D 63
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Remarks
J6-627-R1
VANCOUVER—Continued
Co-ordinated Law Enforcement Unit Building, 214/250 West
Seventh Avenue
Framing (Contract 1):
Allan & Viner Contruction Ltd.	
Double V Construction Ltd— ._.
Seaward Contruction Ltd ._  	
Gadicke Construction Ltd 	
Structural Steel (Contract 2):
Mitchell Sheet Metal & Steel Fabricators Ltd	
Key Installations Ltd.   __	
Brenda Steel Ltd. _...	
AIM Steel Ltd ... 	
A. & K. Construction Ltd ____ ___ _ _ .__.	
Alpine Steel Ltd _..    	
Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd	
Structural Steel (Contract 2) (retender):
Royal City Iron Works Ltd— _ _	
Allan & Viner Contruction Ltd   	
AIM Steel Ltd.	
Electrical (Contract 5):
The J. H. McRae Co. Ltd  	
D. Thompson (Western) Ltd-	
Canadian Electrical Construction Ltd 	
Canem Systems Ltd.   _	
Houle Electric Ltd __	
N.B. Electric Ltd   	
I.C.R. Electric Ltd  	
Paragon Electric Co. Ltd.  __	
Masonry (Contract 6):
Elligott Masonry Ltd _ —__	
H. Banka Masonry Ltd  	
Alton & Nerheim Masonry Ltd ___ _	
Letch Masonry  	
Drywall and Ceilings (Contract 15):
Chalifour Bros. Ltd	
W. R. Shields Ltd  _____  	
Western Lathing p& Plastering Ltd. 	
Allan & Viner Construction Ltd __	
A.K. Construction Ltd. and Central Drywall	
Painting (Contract 16):
Alpine Painting Ltd _ _._._ ____ __	
A. Krigg & Sons 	
Combined Painting Ltd.	
L. O. Hansen Ltd  _ _ _._ _	
W. W. Bittel Painting & Decorating  	
Acme Commercial Painting Ltd _ _	
Kerchbaumer Coatings Inc  _.	
Rino Painting Ltd. __   	
Sprayed Fireproofing (Contract 18):
Chalifour Bros. Contruction Ltd ____ _	
Gallagher Bros. Contractors Ltd   	
Plumbing (Contract 19A):
Fenk Plumbing & Heating Ltd  	
H. & A. Plumbing & Heating ...	
Mechanical (Contract 19B):
Haakon Industries (Canada) Ltd  	
Argus Installations Ltd.  	
Fenk Plumbing & Heating Ltd.	
Canem Systems Ltd.
B.& B. Plumbing p& Heating Contractors Ltd.__
Fire Alarm System (Contract 20A):
Standguard Electronic Systems Ltd—	
The J. H. McRae Co. Ltd	
Resilient Flooring and Carpets (Contracts 26, 27):
Hal H. Paradise Ltd ..... ____	
Woodward's Contract Sales Division	
Johnson Floors Ltd 	
Maxwell Floors Ltd    _____
F. M. Beatty Floors Ltd  	
East India Carpets Ltd  .__	
49,960.00
52,247.00
54,769.00
67,600.00
14,353.00
15,900.00
16,825.40
20,219.00
24,035.00
25,127.00
42,560.00
12,885.00
20,760.00
23,667.00
121,250.00
127,635.00
127,754.00
129,800.00
134,810.00
139,980.00
143,535.00
148,511.00
13,843.00
14,337.00
15,800.00
19,500.00
21,986.00
29,720.00
35,429.00
35,850.00
57,240.00
12,981.00
14,474.00
14,898.00
14,940.00
16,101.00
17,692.00
21,900.00
29,188.00
11,500.00
15,205.00
32,825.00
33,848.00
92,983.00
117,926.00
117,992.00
119,700.00
124,000.00
20,232.68
20,600.00
18,448.00
20,440.18
22,800.00
23,062.00
23,461.00
23,666.00
Awarded.
Not awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Not awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
 D 64
BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
16-637-R1
VANCOUVER— Continued
Detoxification Centre, 59 West Pender Street
Carpentry (Contract 2):
$
24,650.00
11,412.00
12,769.00
14,500.00
16,730.00
27,790.00
28,800.00
14,809.00
15,667.85
57,575.00
60,828.00
62,640.00
91,133.00
32,643.00
36,400.00
13,500.00
14,975.00
15,000.00
10,450.00
11,530.00
10,728.00
11,150.00
84,665.00
88,370.00
12,160.00
14,850.00
19,678.00
20,200.00
20,758.00
22,320.00
15,368.00
16,743.00
17,557.00
17,997.00
18,762.00
174,661.00
185,682.00
198,000.00
53,755.00
58,975.00
61,137.00
34,021.00
35,938.43
37,140.31
40,996.00
42,224.00
46,505.00
29,530.00
29,683.92
36,351.00
Cabinet Work (Contract 3):
B.C. Millwork Products Ltd.                                             	
Steel Stud and Drywall (Contract 6):
Food and Service Equipment (Contract 13):
Terminal Sheet Metal (Div. of Arbutus Buscombe Co.)
Awarded.
Mechanical (Contract 15):
Electrical (Contract 16):
Sprinkler System (Contract 19):
L. & L. Plumbing & Heating Ltd	
19-1-B1
VICTORIA
Parliament Buildings Exit Stair,  Centre Block South, Ironwork
(Contract 102):
19-34-B1
Edwards Welding Ltd   '■	
546 Michigan Street, No. 4 Temporary Building Alterations:
19-100-B1
Thunderbird Park Carving Shed:
19-146-B1
Office Building, 2631 Douglas Street, Minor Modifications:
19-224-B1
Service Centre, 3285 Oak Street, Alterations:
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd. ,
19-574-R1
Offices, 1016 Langley Street, Renovations:
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd.
B.C. Gypsum Dry-Wall Systems Ltd	
19-35-B1
421 Menzies Street, Data Processing Centre
Computer Installation:
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd.
Alarm Systems:
Walter Kidde & Co. of Canada Ltd.
H. J. Langdon & Sons (1970) Ltd	
19-73-B1
1019 Wharf Street, Dogwood Building
Floor Covering:
Jordan's Contract Sales (B.C.) Ltd.
Atlas Floors Ltd.	
Floor Covering (retender):
Jordan's Contract Sales (B.C.) Ltd.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1975/76 D 65
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
19-83-B1
VICTORIA—Continued
Law Courts
Additions and Alterations:
$
1,869.700.00
1,899,363.00
1,957,000.00
1,968,300.00
11,827.00
13,855.00
975,513.00
1,004,510.00
1,016,849.00
1,153,453.00
1,842,500.00
1,892,585.00
1,896,600.00
1,905,000.00
429,487.00
18,110.00
24,940.00
145,485.00
132,554.00
135,380.00
143,799.70
137,890.00
141,909.00
145,780.00
148,634.00
268,000.00
274,999.00
277,735.00
278,900.00
280,848.00
284,107.00
43,706.00
53,882.00
61,039.00
224,444.00
225,900.00
248,000.00
260,413.00
284,097.00
325,767.00
333,800.00
325,733.00
380,280.00
75,937.00
97,529.00
20,800.00
48,838.00
55,270.00
59,359.00
61,500.00
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd ,              	
Temporary Courts, St. Ann's Academy, Millwork:
D. Mowat & Son Ltd  	
19-103-B1
Provincial    Office    Building,    Pandora    Avenue/Blanshard
Street
Electrical (Contract 8):
Awarded.
Mott Electric Ltd	
Mechanical (Contract 9):
Awarded.
Keith Plumbing & Heating Co. Ltd                  	
Fred Welsh Ltd	
Precast-concrete (Contract 10):
Materials Hoist (Contract 12):
Swing Stage Rentals & Sales Ltd	
Roofing (Contract 13):
Concrete Sealants (1965) Ltd                  	
Food Services Equipment (Contract 17):
Awarded.
Acoustical Panel Ceilings (Contract 18):
F. Drexel Co. Ltd 	
Awarded.
B.C. Gypsum Dry-Wall Systems Ltd. .                	
Carpets (Contract 19):
Awarded.
Ceramic Tile (Contract 20):
Star Tile Co. Ltd ....	
Awarded.
Steel Studs and Drywall (Contract 21):
B.C. Gypsum Dry-Wall Systems Ltd 	
Curtain Wall and Windows (Contract 22):
PPG Industries (Canada) Ltd.
Canadian   Pittsburgh   Industries    (Div.   of   Pilkington
Glass Ltd.            	
Roofing (Contract 24):
More-Ply Roofing & Sheet Metal Ltd.                   	
Resilient Floor (Contract 27):
Awarded.
Quarry Tile (Contract 28):
Awarded.
Star Tile Co. Ltd.  	
Wm. O'Neii Tile Ltd 	
 D 66 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
19-103-B1
19-129-B1
19-133-B1
VICTORIA—Continued
Provincial   Office   Building,   Pandora   Avenue/Blan shard
Street—Continued
Elevator (Contract 30):
Montgomery Elevator Co. Ltd _ _	
Otis Elevator Co. Ltd _	
Dover Corp. (Canada) Ltd	
Pressed Steel Doors and Frames (Contract 35):
Shanahan's Ltd	
Campbell & Grill Ltd   	
Waco Associated Distributors Ltd  	
Hardware (Contract 37):
Allmar Distributors Ltd. _____ _.._	
Acklands Ltd _.._ _____	
Waco Associated Distributors Ltd _ __	
Metal Siding (Contract 43):
J. K. Campbell & Associates Ltd   	
Robertson Building System Ltd  	
Westeel Rosco Ltd.	
E. A. Stark Applicators Ltd.,.-	
Rough Carpentry (Contract 44) and Structure (Contract 7):
Dura Contruction Ltd _	
Office Building, 914 Yates Street
Partitioning, Main Floor:
B.C. Gypsum Dry-Wall Systems Ltd	
Benton & Overbury Ltd 	
Pacific Partitions Ltd	
General Alterations:
Laupland & Louie Construction Ltd	
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd   _	
Government Offices, St. Ann's Academy
Carpeting:
The T. Eaton Co. Ltd	
Hourigan's Carpets & Linos Ltd.
19-136-B1
Jordan's Contract Sales Division (a)..
Jordan's Contract Sales Division (&)..
Gold Safe & Office Equipment Ltd	
L. Frederick Interiors Ltd	
B. & E. Floor Coverings Ltd	
Elevator:
Dover Corp. (Canada) Ltd	
Otis Elevator Co. Ltd	
Montgomery Elevator Co. Ltd	
Paving:
Victoria Paving Co. Ltd	
O.K. Paving Co. Ltd..
Provincial Office Building, Courtney/Blanshard Streets
Construction Management Services:
Dawson & HaU Ltd 	
Concordia Management Co. Ltd _....	
Cana Construction Co. Ltd __	
Pentagon Construction (1969) Co. Ltd _	
Spantec Ltd..
Turnkey Development Engineering & Contract Management Ltd.  	
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd  	
Pacific Coast Construction Ltd	
Farmer Construction Ltd 	
Construction Hoarding (Contract V02):
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd 	
Dura Construction Ltd.	
Australian Construction Ltd	
Excavation (Contract V03):
Webb & Trace Ltd	
Farmer Construction Ltd. ___  	
Chew Excavating Ltd.
Fownes Construction Co. Ltd....
Elevators (Contract V04):
Dover Corp. (Canada) Ltd	
Montgomery Elevator Co. Ltd.__
Otis Elevator Co. Ltd	
Armor Elevator (Canada) Ltd..
359,740.00
392,950.00
419,600.00
23,322.00
25,575.00
28,061.00
13,220.00
13,663.65
14,425.00
25,998.00
26,420.00
29,320.00
44,500.00
2,254,700.00
12,477.00
18,790.00
21,200.00
20,453.00
22,391.00
30,952.50
32,812.50
34,137.00
37,137.00
35,755.00
37,160.00
37,874.00
39,495.00
43,220.00
55,362.00
24,419.00
45,935.00
486,000.00
530,840.00
540,000.00
561,200.00
575,000.00
658,000.00
720,000.00
897,236.00
954,000.00
18,833.00
31,880.00
39,000.00
2,044,500.00
2,147,333.00
2,277,000.00
2,324,782.00
498,930.00
483,897.00
529,095.00
599,426.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1975/76 D 67
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
19-136-B1
VICTORIA—Continued
Provincial Office Building, Courtney/Blanshard Streets—
Continued
Structural Concrete (Contract VOS):
$
4,680,376.00
4,716,893.00
4,965,295.00
5,090,000.00
5,186,000.00
5,248,000.00
5,488,000.00
63,266.00
64,747.00
78,690.00
84,383.00
40,550.00
43,298.00
52,500.00
239,760.00
248,211.00
52,893.00
58,446.00
62,116.00
71,200.00
77,442.00
78,700.00
201,200.00
213,217.00
216,377.00
219,883.00
220,430.00
168,766.00
184,484.00
58,535.00
59,592.00
69,545.00
90,772.00
183,434.00
184,900.00
63,756.00
109,000.00
116,200.00
119,920.00
26,584.00
27,779.00
23,069.00
31,470.00
Dawson & Hall Ltd.      ...                 	
Poole Construction Ltd. .,,,	
Cana Construction Co. Ltd  _	
Government Street Development Ltd./(joint venture)
D. Robinson Construction (1962) Ltd	
I9-I41-B1
Office Building, 1113/1121 Wharf Street (Dowell)
Renovations (Contract 6):
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd.
Exterior Renovations (Contract 7):
Awarded.
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd.
Main Structural (Contract 8):
Awarded.
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd.
Plumbing (Contract 9):
Mmajja Holdings Ltd. (Oak Bay Plumbing & Heating)
Awarded.
Gordon Cooper Plumbing & Heating (1970) Ltd	
M. Griffin Ltd	
Mechanical (Contract 10):
Awarded.
M. Griffin Ltd	
Electrical (Contract 11):
Awarded.
Ricketts Sewell Electric Ltd.
Masonry (Contract 12):
Awarded.
M. J. Peddlesden Ltd	
Ken Toby Ltd. _.            —.                              	
Carpentry and Casework (Contract 13):
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd..
Awarded.
Steel Stud, Dry Wall, and Plaster (Contract 15):
Awarded.
Integrated Ceilings (Contract 20):
F. Drexel Co. Ltd  	
Awarded.
B.C. Gypsum Dry-Wall Systems Ltd  	
19-144-B1
Provincial Office Building, Burdett Avenue/Blanshard Street
Excavation:
Southwest Contracting Ltd.._  	
H.B. Contracting Ltd..      	
Farmer Construction Ltd   	
Webb & Trace Ltd _...	
Chew Excavating Ltd.   	
O.K. Paving Co. Ltd    	
Construction of Building:
Dura Construction Ltd 	
Farmer Construction Ltd    	
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd 	
Wheaton Construction Ltd. _ _	
48,800.00
71,925.00
77,550.00
88,852.00
98,994.00
150,332.00
1,701,780.00
1,704,700.00
1,776,900.00
1,884,692.00
| Awarded.
Awarded.
 Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1976
630-1176-3270

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