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MINISTRY OF EDUCATION OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA One Hundred and Sixth Annual Report JULY 1,… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1980]

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 MINISTRY OF
EDUCA TION
OF THE PROVINCE
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
One Hundred and Sixth
Annual Report
JULY 1, 1976, TO JUNE 30, 197:
MINISTER OF EDUCA TION
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
  To Colonel the Honourable
Walter S. Owen, Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the One Hundred
and Sixth Report of the Ministry of Education.
Dr. Patrick L. McGeer
Minister of Education
  TABLE OF CONTENTS
Personnel  6
From the Minister  10
Schools Department  13
Special Programs  20
Field Personnel  22
Administration and District Services  22
Post-Secondary Department  27
Continuing Education  29
Universities Council of British Columbia 30
Ministry Services  33
Financial Services  34
Facilities Services  36
Educational Data Services ~ 36
Statistical Tables  39
 PERSONNEL
MINISTERS OFFICE
Minister of Education
The Honourable Patrick L. McGeer,
B.A., Ph.D., M.D.
DEPUTY MINISTER'S OFFICE
Deputy Minister of Education
W. G. Hardwick, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Associate Deputy Minister—Schools
Department
J. Phillipson, B.A., B.Ed.
Associate Deputy Minister—Post-Secondary
Department
A. E. Soles, B.A., M.Ed.
Associate Deputy Minister—Department of
Ministry Services
J. R. Fleming, B.A.
Director of Education Policy Development
R. J. Carter, B.A., M.Ed.
Program Superintendent
J. Walsh, B.Sc, M.Ed.
Executive Director, Metric Conversion
Committee
E. Gosh, CD., B.Sc.
SCHOOLS DEPARTMENT
Superintendent, Educational Programs
(Schools)
J. R. Meredith, B.A., M.Ed..
Assistant Superintendent
J. T. McBurney, B.Com., M.Ed.
Director, Curriculum Development
W. B. Naylor, B.A.
Assistant Director, Curriculum Development
W. D. Oliver, B.A.
Director, Learning Assessment
J. J. Mussio, M.A, Ph.D.
Co-ordinator, Learning Assessment
R. N. Greer, B.A., M.A., Ed.D.
Assistant Director, Examinations
H. C. D. Chalmers, CD., B.Sc, Ph.C
French Program Co-ordinator
C. Fournier, B.A.
Director, Vocational and Industrial Education
J. Jupp
Home Economics Consultants
J. Campbell, B.Sc, M.A., Dip.Ed.
H. Krueger, B.Sc.
Special Programs
Assistant Superintendent
F. L. Fleming, B.Ed., M.Ed.
Director, Special Education
L A. G. Gittins, B.Ed., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Director, Indian Education
S. E. Arbess, B.A., M.Ed., M.A., Ph.D.
Administration and District Services
Superintendent
J. L. Canty, B.A., M.Ed.
Director, Publication Services
D. W. Huggins, C.G.A.
Director, Correspondence Education
J. R. Hind, B.A., B.Pccd.
Director, Provincial Educational Media Centre
B. A. Black, B.Ed.
Field Personnel
Superintendent, Field Personnel
R. J. Leskiw, B.Ed., M.Ed., D.Ed.
Director, Field Services (Acting)
D. L. Hartwig, B.A.
Teacher Services
Director, Teacher Services
B. A. Andrews, B.A., M.A.
Assistant Director, Teacher Certification
E. D. Cherrington, B.A., Dip.PublicAdmin.
POST-SECONDARY DEPARTMENT
Superintendent, Post-Secondary Department
H. E. Justesen
Executive Director, Management Services
J. F. Newberry, B.Ed., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Executive Director, Continuing Education
R. L. Faris, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D.
 Executive Director, Program Services
[Vacant]
Director, Business and Industry Programs
D. MacRae, B.Sc.
Director, Career Programs
D. Goard, B.Ed., M.A.
Director, Trades Training and
Journeyman Upgrading
J. D. Meredith
DEPARTMENT OF MINISTRY
SERVICES
Financial Services
Superintendent, Financial Services
G. E. Wilcox, C.G.A.
Director, School Finance
G. Gamble, R.I.A.
Director, Post-Secondary Finance
W. G. Stewart, F.C.I.B., C.G.A.
Director, Ministerial Finance
N. Aleksenko, R.I.A.
Facilities Services
Superintendent, Facilities Services
W. L. B. Hawker, B.A., B.Ed.
Director, Facilities Planning
W. G. Argyle, Dip.Arch., R.I.B.A., A.I.B.C,
R.A.I.C.
Director, Facilities Development—Schools
F. B. Simpson, M.R.A.I.C, A.R.I.B.A.
Director, Facilities Development—
Post-Secondary
D. S. McLelland, M.R.A.I.C.
Personnel Services
Director, Personnel Services
J. A. Holmes, Dip.PublicAdmin.
Library
Librarian
A. Armstrong, B.A.
Information Services
Director, Information Services
[Vacant]
Educational Data Services
Director, Educational Data Services
K. Plant, B.Com., M.B.A.
Co-ordinator, Educational Data Services
R. C. May, B.A., M.Sc.
DISTRICT SUPERINTENDENTS
OF SCHOOLS
G. S. Armstrong, B.Ed., Burns Lake
W. W. Baldry, B.A., M.Ed., Grand Forks
O. E. Bedard, B.Ed., M.A., Peace River South
L. B. Beduz, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Creston
R. S. Boyle, B.A., B.Ed., Qualicum
C. A. Bruce, B.A., B.Ed., Kamloops
A. D. Campbell, B.A., B.Ed., Chilliwack
E. M. Carlin, B.Ed., M.Ed., West Vancouver
C Cuthbert, B.Acc, B.Ed., M.Ed., Langley
J. R. Denley, B.Ed., M.Ed., Sechelt
J. L. Doyle, B.A., M.Ed., Smithers
D. E. A. Eldred, B.Ed., M.Ed., Campbell
River
T. G. Ellwood, B.Ed., M.Ed., Courtenay
W. F. T. Fisher, B.Ed., M.Ed., Revelstoke
R. E. Flower, B.A., B.Ed., Nelson
P. C. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Vernon
F. M. Hamilton, B.Ed., M.Ed., Terrace
N. B. Hoadley, B.Ed., M.Ed., Nanaimo
J. Holden, B.A., M.Ed., Castlegar
C Holob, B.S.A., M.Ed., Richmond
C. Hopper, B.Ed., M.Ed., Hope
R. W. Huestis, B.Com., B.Ed., Lake Cowichan
W. B. Johnston, B.Ed., M.Ed., Trail
E. A. Killough, B.Ed., M.A., Maple Ridge
E. E. Lewis, B.A., B.P/Ed., Saanich
J. G. Leaman, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Coast
Central
G. C. Lind, B.A., M.Ed., Peace River North
J. M. Lowe, B.Ed., M.Ed., Kimberley
R. F. Lucas, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Prince
Rupert
R. G. Lyon, B.Ed., M.Ed., Port Alberni
N. W. McDonald, B.A., M.Ed., Shuswap
D. E. McFee, B.A., M.A., Merritt
A. P. McKay, B.Com., M.Ed., Penticton
D. H. MacKirdy, D.F.C, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed.,
Cowichan
A. V. N. MacMillen, B.A., M.Ed.,
Queen Charlotte Islands
P. G. McLoughlin, B.A., Dip.Ed., B.Ed.,
Mission
E. A. Maglio, B.Com., B.Ed., Howe Sound
W. F. Marshall, B.A., M.Ed., Fernie
W. Maslechko, B.P.E., Nechako
F. T. Middleton, B.A., B.Ed., Abbotsford
G. W. Moulds, B.Ed., M.Ed., Delta
A. J. H. Newberry, B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D.,
Fort Nelson
R. J. Patrick, B.A., B.Ed., Quesnel
M. G. Pendharkar, B.Sc, B.T., B.Ed., M.Ed.,
North Thompson
P. B. Pullinger, B.A., B.Ed., Sooke
 M. Roscoe, B.A., M.A., Vancouver Island
North
L. P. Sampson, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Ph.D.,
Armstrong
H. Sayers, M.A., M.Ed., Cranbrook
D. R. Smyth, B.P.E., M.Ed.,
Cariboo-Chilcotin
D. R. Sutherland, B.Ed., Kitimat
R. B. Taylor, B.Ed., M.Ed., Ashcroft
M. V. Thorsell, B.A., M.Ed., Powell River
B. G. Webber, B.A., M.A., South Okanagan
D. N. Weicker, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., New
Westminster
W. J. Zoellner, B.A., B.Ed., Central
Okanagan
STAFF APPOINTMENTS AND
PROMOTIONS
Headquarters
G. E. Wilcox
Appointed Superintendent
Financial Services Division
W. G. Stewart
Appointed Director of Post-Secondary Finance
Financial Services Division
W. G. Argyle
Appointed Director of Facilities Planning
Facilities Services Division
 J. D. Meredith
Appointed Director, Trades Training and
Journeyman Upgrading
Post-Secondary Department
Dr. S. E. Arbess
Appointed Director of Indian Education
Schools Department
N. Aleksenko
Appointed Director, Ministerial Finance
Financial Services Division
Dr. J. J. Mussio
Promoted to Director, Learning Assessment
Schools Department
Dr. N. Greer
Appointed Co-ordinator, Learning Assessment
Schools Department
LONG SERVICE
35-year Gold Watch Award
H. G. Pidcock
25-year Continuous Service Certificate
G. A. Batterbury
R. I. Krowchenko
N. H. Hamilton
EXECUTIVE DEVELOPMENT
TRAINING PLAN GRADUATES
E. E. Walker
Field
D. Glass
Appointed District Superintendent of Schools
Fort St. John
K. S. Granger
Appointed District Superintendent of Schools
Revelstoke
F. M. Hamilton
Appointed District Superintendent of Schools
Terrace
R. S. Johnstone
Appointed District Superintendent of Schools
Kimberley
N. Keis
Appointed District Superintendent of Schools
Queen Charlotte Islands
J. G. Leaman
Appointed District Superintendent of Schools
Mission City
D. A. Lynn
Appointed District Superintendent of Schools
Fort Nelson
R. Moss
Appointed District Superintendent of Schools
Vanderhoof
O. W. Taylor
Appointed District Superintendent of Schools
Revelstoke
R. B. Taylor
Appointed District Superintendent of Schools
Ashcroft
RETIREMENTS
R. D. Crawford, Clerk, Publications,
after 34 years of service.
T. Scott, Clerk, Publications,
after 30 years of service.
H. Parker, Vocational Instructor, B.C.
Vocational School, Burnaby,
after 15 years of service.
R. C. Smith, Inspector of Technical Classes,
after 15 years of service.
P. C. MacGregor, Director, Trades Training
and Journeyman Upgrading,
after 15 years of service.
J. H. Fraser, Stockman, B.C. Vocational
School, Burnaby,
after 12 years of service.
F. S. Butler, Vocational Instructor, B.C.
Vocational School, Burnaby,
after 11 years of service.
F. G. Sambrook, Stockman, B.C. Vocational
School, Burnaby,
after 10 year of service.
 Dr. Patrick L. McGeer
Minister of Education
The 1976/77 school-year has been a
dynamic one—a year in which the Ministry of
Education began to reassert itself in response
to the educational needs of the times, a year
highlighted by the establishment of a core
curriculum for all our schools and the further
development of an assessment program to
monitor across-the-board performance.
In November of 1976, 11 months after the
election of the present Government and my
assumption of responsibility for education in
British Columbia, I issued a policy statement in
which it was noted that the citizens of the
Province expected the Government to play a
more positive role in defining what should
be taught in our schools.
The statement expressed the view that public
school curriculum material should fall into
three categories—that which must be taught,
that which should be taught, and that which
may be taught. The first part of that trinity
—the fundamental skills and knowledge that
every able child should acquire—was to be
contained in a set of core curriculum goals to
be in use in every school by September 1977.
FROM THE
MLNISTER
The definition of those goals, and some
changes made as a result of a large and overwhelmingly favourable response from the
public and educators alike, was perhaps the
most significant single accomplishment of
the Ministry of Education during the school-
year. Yet it was only the beginning of what I
envisage as a major improvement to the existing
public school system. The Provincial Learning Assessment Program, which has now
completed Province-wide testing of pupil
achievement in various grades in language arts,
mathematics, and social studies, will be used
to monitor the whole public school system,
including the core curriculum program.   On
the basis of test results, changes will be made to
curriculum content and methodology and, if it
appears desirable, to teacher pre-service and
in-service training.
As the school-year ended and the monitoring
system took shape, I asked my officials to
develop ways of further challenging every
pupil to the utmost of his or her ability.   In
years past the concept of failure was virtually
banished from schools everywhere. Yet
 awareness of possible failure and the struggle
to overcome it is an indispensible ingredient
of any successful life in our society.   So
challenge must be an essential ingredient of a
successful school system, challenge for every
youngster.   If the core curriculum is equivalent
to running a mile in eight minutes, then we
must challenge those with the capability
figuratively to run the mile in six minutes, or
even four. This objective, and additional steps
to help those who, figuratively or otherwise,
can hardly run at all, were receiving a great
deal of continuing attention as the year ended.
The purpose of the whole public-school
upgrading process is to increase the ability of
public school graduates to apply their
knowledge functionally in the complex modern
world of work, while at the same time
improving their grasp of, and appreciation for,
the classical aspects of education. With this
in mind, steps were taken to launch pilot
projects, which were to be in operation in September, toward the articulation of secondary
graduation programs with pre-apprenticeship
and pre-employment vocational training and
with post-secondary academic and career
training.
This is another way in which the Ministry
began to reassert itself. The fact that
nearly half the jobless in the Province were
under the age of 25—the phenomenon of the
educated unemployed—made it apparent that
steps had to be taken to see that high-school
students had marketable skills to
accompany their graduation certificates.
Meanwhile, the Ministry received and
studied the results of several commissions that
had been established to help tailor
post-secondary education and training to British Columbia's needs of today and tomorrow.
During the year under review, I was pleased
to receive reports from the Goard Commission
on Vocational, Technical, and Trades Training; the Faris Committee on Continuing
and Community Education; and the Winegard
Commission on University Programs in
Non-Metropolitan Areas, which led to establishment of the Interior University Programs
Board, and the Gaudry Study of the State
of Research and Research Funding in British
Columbia.
As these reports came in, Ministry officials
and consultants were involved in the laborious
task of using their findings to draw up a
comprehensive post-secondary program to
be embodied in the Colleges and Provincial
Institutes Act. The privately owned Notre
Dame University in Nelson was purchased by
the Government and renamed the David
Thompson University Centre for eventual
inclusion in Interior university programs.   Also
during this year, a Distance Education Planning Group was established to begin designing
a system for delivering educational opportunities to those who are geographically
or socially remote.
To facilitate these developments, the Post-
secondary Department of the Ministry was
itself reorganized, with executive directors
given clear responsibility for the various
program areas.
I wish to take this opportunity to
commend all three departments of the Ministry
for their dedication and effort during this
period.   As I noted, it has been a dynamic
year and Ministry personnel have proven once
again their dedication to the principle of
developing a relevant and responsible education system in British Columbia.
In closing, I cannot overlook the economic
crisis our society has been facing. The
declining enrolments of recent years affords
us the opportunity to de-escalate rising
educational costs.   Strong managerial
capability and keen fiscal responsibility are
absolutely necessary attributes of every
administration in the educational field today.
In a word, what we all must seek is excellence—excellence in our students, excellence
in our graduates, and excellence in our
educational administration.
11
  SCHOOLS
The 1976/77 school-year saw two major
thrusts undertaken by the Educational
Programs Division of the Ministry of Education.
The primary focus of curriculum leaders
was on the development and implementation
of a core curriculum.   At the same time,
the Learning Assessment Program, which had
been established earlier, produced the
first report on language programs in the
Province.
The development of the core curriculum
and the involvement of the public in the final
determination of its goals and learning
outcomes was a massive undertaking.   A
preliminary statement and list of goals was
produced and comment from parents,
trustees, and teachers invited.   Hundreds of
meetings were held throughout the
Province to discuss the core curriculum,
the material which every student should
be taught during his or her school career.
Over 15,000 responses from individuals and
groups were received by the Ministry.
The replies were tabulated and analysed, and
revisions to the core document then begun
so that it could be placed in the schools
by September 1977.
The revised document was not planned
as the final word on the core curriculum.
The statement of core goals is expected to be
an evolving one, always tuned to the
changing needs of our society.   Four areas
of core remained unsettled as the school-year
ended.   The question of the atypical
learner and the core curriculum was not
finalized, and three other areas—health, the
arts, and French—were still being discussed.
The second major development of the
Educational Programs Division was the
first report of the Learning Assessment Branch
on the language programs of the Province.
For the first time in recent years the Ministry
of Education and the school boards had
comprehensive data on the performance of
students in relation to the expectations
of teachers, trustees, and citizens.
The assessment went beyond the
examination of the student's achievement
and looked into such matters as the training of
the teachers and the effectiveness of the
courses in providing materials that
help students acquire the necessary skills and
knowledge.
13
 School Boards, local teachers, and
administrators were asked to examine the
assessment results for their own districts.
It was the hope of the Ministry that
examination by local educators and trustees
would result, where necessary, in action to
meet any weaknesses that might exist.
A close examination of the Provincial
results indicated that a limited number of
districts were performing well below
expectations.   The Ministry assigned senior
personnel to work with the local
superintendents and teachers in each of the
districts to improve the learning situations
which caused the lower-than-average results.
If solutions are found that require additional
resources, the Ministry has indicated a
willingness to share in the funding.
During the spring of 1977 the second phase
of the assessment program was begun
with tests in mathematics, social studies, and
language.   A continuing series of assessments
is planned in the years to come.   The
constant flow of information will be
used to modify curriculum, redirect teacher
education, and reform administrative practice
to ensure maximum effectiveness in the
use of educational resources.
A number of other important steps were
taken by the Ministry during the year to
address emerging areas of need within the
Province's educational system.
The problem of unemployment among
recent graduates of schools, colleges, and
universities led to a re-examination of
the existing emphasis upon general
education.   The need for skill development
among young people was identified by
the Organization for Economic Co-operation
and Development in a report on youth
unemployment as one of the prime underlying
factors in the unsatisfactory job picture for
young people.   This information led the
Ministry to initiate a series of pilot projects to
examine the possibility of providing
secondary school graduates with specific
skills in addition to their general education
graduation.   Pre-apprenticeship programs
were developed in conjunction with the
Apprenticeship Branch of the Ministry
of Labour, and pre-career programs were
developed in conjunction with the community
colleges.   Close monitoring of the
effectiveness of these programs when they start
will assist in the establishment of policy in
this critical area.
The Special Programs Branch of the
Educational Programs Division published a
booklet, Guidelines for Special Educational
Programs, to assist those charged with
establishing programs at the local level.   The
booklet established a more open philosophy for
for dealing with educational needs of
children.   To quote from its preamble:
"The development of special education has
reached a point where primary emphasis must
shift from grouping according to handicap to
consideration of the individual child and
his educational needs."
The decentralization of services to hearing-
impaired children, where practical, moved
forward over the school-year.   The Provincial
Co-ordinator of the Education of the
Hearing Impaired is facilitating the process
through efforts to provide materials,
equipment, and expertise to local boards of
school trustees that have established services.
The Field Personnel Branch of the
Ministry has moved to increase and
co-ordinate in-service education programs.
Its efforts have spanned the educational
spectrum from management seminars
for superintendents to curriculum workshops
for the implementation of new programs.
The more stable nature of the teaching force
in British Columbia has caused a new emphasis
to be placed upon the professional
development of educators.
 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
The development of a set of core
curriculum goals, studying the public reaction
to them, and the subsequent development
of the publication Guide to the Core
Curriculum highlighted the work of this branch
during the past year.   During the last half
of the school-year the branch participated in a
number of public and professional meetings
and responded to numerous telephone and
written inquiries concerning the working
paper on the goals of the core curriculum that
had been developed and distributed.   The
branch was encouraged by the overwhelmingly
positive response to the working paper.
The Analysis of the Public Response to the
Core Curriculum prepared by
Dr. John Bottomley of the Universities Council
of British Columbia stated that, of
approximately 15,000 responses received,
85.9 per cent indicated that none or only one
of the goals in the working paper needed
reconsidering.
After study of the analysis, some
modifications were made to the goals and
•earning outcomes listed in the working paper
and the revised goals and learning
outcomes were cross-referenced to existing
curriculum publications in the preparation of
the guide that was printed and distributed
to schools in time for the opening of the
1977/78 school-year.
In addition to its involvement in core
curriculum, the branch carried on with
its regular work of curriculum development and
identification of resource materials to support
Provincially developed courses.   During
the year under review, guides were prepared
for a total of 19 new or revised courses
in elementary science, German,
drama, business education, chemistry, geology,
and mathematics.   In addition, teacher
resource guides were developed for elementary
French, junior secondary English, industrial
education, and elementary science.   In all,
102 new titles were added to the prescribed
textbook list.
The practice was continued whereby
outstanding teachers in the Province were
released by boards of school trustees to work
with the Curriculum Development Branch
as curriculum consultants.   This year's
appointees were Mrs. S. M. Hoenson
(Saanich), Mrs. H. D. Cruchley (Abbotsford),
and W. G. Dunlop (North Vancouver).
ISMIHHINI -V<*
.':,'-        '•,   :... '       ,    ..
 The Director gratefully acknowledges the
assistance of W. D. Oliver, Assistant
Director of the branch, and J. J. Lowther,
seconded from School District No. 61
(Greater Victoria), who co-directed the branch
during the Director's absence on study leave.
LEARNING ASSESSMENT
The lack of Province-wide information
describing what is being learned in the schools
and the quality of that learning was a major
concern to many educators and the public.
As a result of that concern, a five-year
assessment timetable was announced by the
Minister in the spring of 1976, following two
years of planning and consultation with a
number of organizations in the Province.
The assessment program is designed
to survey instructional practices and student
learning in selected areas.   The main principle
underlying the program is that decisions
about education (allocating resources,
developing in-service teacher-training programs, improving curricula) should be
based on an understanding of what and how
children are learning.
It is expected that, over a period of time,
the assessment program will evaluate learning
in many of the areas identified in the core
curriculum.   Attempts will also be made to
assess learning outcomes identified in the more
extensive curriculum guides, as well as
additional outcomes identified as important
by teachers, parents, and other members
of the public.   All of this information will be
used in the continual upgrading of the
curriculum.
The first phase of the Ministry's Province-
wide learning assessment program was
completed in the fall in 1976.   This study,
which was to serve as a pilot for future
assessments, concluded that achievement by
students in the English language arts is
satisfactory, but that some areas of weakness
do exist.
The three reports, which were prepared
by a team headed by Dr. Peter Evanechko of
the University of Victoria, concluded that,
on the basis of a reading test administered
to 35,000 Grade IV students, students
appear to be performing at a satisfactory level
in such areas as basic vocabulary, understanding parts of words, identifying the main
idea of a paragraph, applying logical
reasoning skills, and understanding products
labels.   The only major weakness noted at the
Grade IV reading level was in the use of
the dictionary.
On the basis of an essay written by a random
sample of 3,700 Grade VIII and XII
students and marked by a group of experienced
teachers, it was found that students are strong
in communicating their basic ideas but
weak in the mechanics of writing.   This would
indicate that higher priority be given to
improving writing skills.
Grade VIII students were found to be
able to maintain a point of view, organize and
use acceptable vocabulary, and use
acceptable handwriting, whereas their weaknesses include the clarity and structure of
sentences, spelling, and punctuation.
At the Grade XII level the researchers
indicated that students were able to maintain
a point of view and use acceptable vocabulary
and handwriting.   The weaknesses were
identified as sentence structure, development
of paragraphs, and maturity of expression.
One of the main recommendations of the
over 100 that are contained in the language
assessment reports is that teachers at the
secondary level apportion more time
to composition, place more emphasis on writing
as a unique subject, and assign more
compositions.
The study found that about one third of
Grade VIII teachers and one quarter
of Grade XI and XII teachers had no
university training in composition teaching.
It urges the faculties of education at the
universities to ensure that their students acquire
appropriate academic backgrounds as well
as necessary professional training in oral
communication, reading, writing, and
children's literature at the elementary level and
composition, listening, and speaking skills
at the secondary level.
As a result of the 1976 language assessment
pilot study, from which over 100 recommendations were presented to the Ministry,
a number of curriculum revisions were begun.
In addition, the Ministry began to develop
a plan that will provide assistance and
support to those school districts which,
judging by assessment results, are experiencing
difficulties in achieving their educational
objectives.
The branch continued to provide consultative services to schools and districts by
 way of in-service workshops.   It has also
been involved extensively in the co-ordination
of 1977 assessments in mathematics, reading,
and social studies and in planning 1978
assessments in written expression and science.
The branch was fortunate in being able to
utilize the services of Robert Aitken,
from Burnaby, and John Mc Vicar, from New
Westminster.   The co-operation of these
two districts is genuinely appreciated.
EXAMINATIONS
The Examinations Branch has four areas of
responsibility—the Grade XII scholarship
examination program, the General Educational
Development testing program, the issuance
of student transcripts, and evaluation of
secondary school education from other places.
A total of 4,158 candidates applied during
1976/77 to write scholarship examinations
which included a compulsory qualifying
examination in English.   Of these, 1,437
completed the requirements and a total of 846
won scholarships of $500 each.   A survey
of the winners indicates that 98 per cent
of the recipients will use the award to defray
the costs of continuing their education.
Margaret Ruth Brighouse, a student at
Salmon Arm Senior Secondary School, ranked
first in the 1976/77 Provincial competition
and won the Governor-General's Silver
Medal with an average of 92.7 per cent.
The Governor-General's Bronze Medal was
awarded to Shelley Ann Mann, a student
at Crofton House School in Vancouver,
who ranked second with an average of 86
per cent.
Id
 British Columbia continues to lead the other
provinces and territories in the number
of adults undertaking the General Educational
Development testing program.   During the
school-year 1976/77, 4,125 candidates
applied to write the battery of five standardized
tests.   Of these, 2,915 qualified.   Since the
inception of the program, 19,235 candidates
have applied and, of these, 13,783 have
been granted the British Columbia Ministry of
Education Grade XII Equivalency Certificate.
FRENCH PROGRAMS
Support for French language programs
has continued to grow as a result of
Provincial and Federal-Provincial endeavours.
Specific funding for French language
programs included the distribution of
$1,670,000 to 69 school districts for French
language support grants and the expenditure of
$216,000 for bursaries to second-language
teachers (718 teachers were involved in
workshops and in receipt of bursaries as a
result of these provisions).   In addition, 22
students from British Columbia were
accepted in other provinces and British
Columbia accepted 57 francophone students
under provisions of the Second-Language
Monitor Program.   A total of $694,410 was
awarded under the Special Projects Program
for 28 separate French language projects.
The French Programs Co-ordinator provided
extensive consultative assistance
to school districts, particularly with respect to
the initiation of French programs and the
administration of programs under the current
Federal-Provincial agreement.   In addition, he
was also involved in the initiation of two
new projects—the Summer Institute for
Elementary French Teachers, held at
the Lester B. Pearson College of the Pacific,
and a pilot project for two four-week
immersion programs for 80 high school
students, one conducted by Capilano College
and the other by the University of Quebec
at Three Rivers.
 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
The number of students taking industrial
education in secondary schools in 1976/77 was
167,350, an increase of 7.1 per cent
over 1975/76.   The interest in programs for
particular occupations accounted for most
of the increase, with 5,165 pupils enrolled
compared to 2,389 the previous year.
One of the major efforts of the Industrial
Education Branch during the year was
the secondary/post-secondary articulation
program. Fifteen senior secondary schools will
be offering pre-apprentice pilot projects
commencing in September 1977.   These
programs will be monitored by the
Apprenticeship Branch of the Ministry of
Labour, and students will have the option of
writing the Ministry of Labour apprenticeship
examination at the end of Grade XII.
Successful students will also obtain the regular
Grade XII Dogwood Certificate.
In addition to the pre-apprenticeship
programs, senior secondary school pilot
projects in career programs are also being
administered by the branch.   Eight schools are
participating, and advanced placement
or credit will be granted by the appropriate
post-secondary agency.
Smaller districts, where the opportunities
for local employment are good, have
shown considerable interest in secondary/
post-secondary articulation programs. Representatives of industry in these communities
are most anxious for the schools to develop
new programs leading directly to employment.
Meanwhile the new industrial education
curriculum guide emphasizing learning
outcomes, job skills, and student/teacher
expectations was completed.   In support of the
new style curriculum, the Industrial
Education Branch has established the Provincial Industrial Education Resource Centre
at 3750 Willingdon Avenue in Burnaby—
in the same building as the Industrial
Education teacher training program
sponsored by the Ministry of Education with
tuition provided by The University of
British Columbia.   The Shop Teachers'
Provincial Specialist Association of the British
Columbia Teachers' Federation is actively
involved in the centre and will assist in
developing resource materials, teaching
strategies, project design, bibliographies, new
industrial education policies such as dust
collection and noise abatement, suggested
equipment specifications, and new industrial
developments.   Each school district resource
centre receives one copy of each item
for reproduction purposes.
In the area of industrial education staffing,
49 teacher trainees graduated on the
12-month sponsored program in August
1976, and successfully completed the special
teaching internship program during the
1976/77 school-year.   They are now qualified
to receive a B.C. Teaching Licence.
On the regular teacher-training program,
25 graduates of the five-year university
program (bachelor of education, I.E. major)
also entered the teaching force.
In all, 1,270 teachers were employed in
industrial education in the 1976/77
school-year.
HOME ECONOMICS
Indicative of student enthusiasm for home
economics during the 1976/77 school-year
was the total course enrolment of 114,860, an
increase of 5,159 or 4.7 per cent over
that of 1975/76.
Home economics departments were operated
in 321 schools, an increase of nine over
the previous year.   The number of teachers
of home economics rose by 62 to 960,
an increase of 6.9 per cent.
The advisers of the Home Economics
Branch carried out regular consultative field
work in addition to conducting in-service
training workshops for teachers.   In
co-operation with the Faculty of Education of
The University of British Columbia, the
advisers visited the home economics graduates
on the Integrated Teacher Training Program
who were employed on letters of permission
in many schools throughout the Province.
The lending library of the Home Economics
Branch has become a recognized and
valuable source of useful, current, professional
books and resource materials.   During the
1976/77 school-year the branch sent to
the teachers of home economics a total
of 8,397 items such as books on a loan basis,
bulletins prepared by the advisers, kits
of resource materials, and selected
teaching aids.
 SPECIAL PROGRAMS
The 1976/77 school-year was a very active
one for special education in British
Columbia.   The Special Programs Branch,
formerly Integrated and Supportive Services,
was reorganized as a branch of the
Schools Department, losing none of its identity
but accepting increased responsibility and
improved opportunity to work on behalf
of atypical children in a much broader field.
The Special Programs Branch recognized
the need for autonomy in the school districts
and their need for flexibility in attempting
to meet needs of all children in a variety
of ways.   This philosophy on the part
of the Ministry of Education, and directions
recommended by the branch, were
embodied in a booklet called Guidelines,
which went into a third printing, and
was widely utilized for staff and workshop
discussion.
Recognizing that the rapidly falling school
populations in the urban school districts
would endanger the resource centres, around
which are clustered the learning assistance
programs, the ratio of one approval for
each 350 pupils was adopted.
As a steady flow of moderately and severely
retarded and handicapped children moved
into the public schools, resources were
provided to accommodate them.   The warm
reception being given these children by
staff and pupils was noted.   Autistic children
are now being served, and job training
classes for special needs pupils are moving into
senior secondary schools.
Regular inter-ministry discussions,
organized at the Deputy Minister level, were
commenced to ensure adequate community
support for the severely handicapped
children who are being placed in public
schools.
Work study/work experience programs
continued to flourish as literally thousands of
boys and girls from age 15 upward
engaged in on-the-spot training in the world
of work.   This program is supported by
the Ministry of Labour and the Workers'
Compensation Board.
Some 150 rehabilitation classes were jointly
set up by the Ministry of Education and
the Ministry of Human Resources.
These classes, designed for school-leavers,
 have been a fine influence in the life of
many young people.
Experience having shown that more than
one year of intensive work is required before an
immigrant child can acquire fluent
English, support allocated to English as a
second language was adjusted from a one-year
to a three-year phase-out program, a move
much appreciated in the field.
The methods of delivery of speech therapy
services in school districts were clarified,
and the Ministry of Health geared up
to respond to numerous requests from all
school districts to contract with local health
units for such services.   Co-operation
with the Ministry of Health has brought about
a system of providing auditory training
equipment to all hearing-impaired children,
regardless of where they are located, at no cost
to the school district.
Second-level funding of all special programs
was cost-shared by the Provincial Government
and the local school districts.   Budgets
were expended to accommodate over 2,000
special programs, as follows:
Learning assistance, elementary and
kindergarten 702
Learning assistance, secondary 409
Classes accepted from chapter schools 158
Programs for hospital- and
home-bound 116
Programs for physically handicapped 7
Programs for English as a second
language 196
Programs to assist native Indian
children 114
Programs for visually impaired 25
Programs for hearing impaired 76
Programs for speech impaired 59
Rehabilitation programs 151
Programs for specific local needs 117
JERICHO HILL SCHOOLS
The Jericho Hill School for the Blind,
under the principalship of Mrs. Doris Corrigan,
enrolled 11 day students and 19 students in
residence.   The School for the Deaf enrolled
76 day students and 46 students in
residence.   Henry Minto was appointed to
the principalship early in the year, and, until he
could assume his duties, the position of
principal was filled by A. B. Wright.
In addition to the 122 deaf students on
campus, 14 students boarded at Jericho and
attended off-campus classes, while 47
students lived at home and attended off-campus
classes.   These included two classes in
Victoria.
There were 51 teachers and three
vocational instructors employed by the
Jericho Hill Schools, supported by six teacher
aides and 25 child care workers, as well as
psychologists, a physiotherapist, and a
speech therapist.
John Anderson, Acting Provincial Coordinator of the Education of the Hearing-
Impaired, made Jericho Hill his headquarters.
The resource centre aspect of the school
was stressed as districts continued to support
local classes wherever practical.
INDIAN EDUCATION
The Ministry of Education created the
position of Director of Indian Education in
1972 to help meet the special learning
needs of native Indians in the public schools.
The Ministry, through the Director of the
Indian Education Branch, maintains a system
of special approval funds which are made
available to school districts to provide
native Indian para-educators such as home-
school co-ordinators and teacher aides, native
Indian language and culture programs, and
alternative education programs.   In addition,
Indian children benefit from other forms
of special approvals available to serve
all children in the area of learning assistance.
Special approvals for Indian education
increased from 92 in 1975/76, valued
at $1,564,000, to 113.5 with a value of
$2,224,600 in 1966/77—a 40 per-cent
increase.
Research and development grants are
made from time to time to meet
Ministry objectives in Indian education and
for 1976/77 had a value of approximately
$81,000.
These programs attempt to improve
academic skills, but also reflect the cultural,
linguistic, and social background of
Indian children in school programs that are
developed in co-operation with the
Indian community.
 FIELD PERSONNEL
The Division of Field Personnel is
responsible for the supervision of Provincially
appointed school superintendents and
liaison with locally appointed superintendents,
teacher certification and document
evaluation, international teacher exchange
programs, liaison with faculties of education,
the evaluation of instructional programs at the
secondary level, and interprovincial liaison
on matters related to the division's responsibility. The division has two branches,
Field Services and Teacher Services.
FIELD SERVICES
A major thrust of the division during
the 1976/77 school-year was the co-ordination
on a Province-wide basis of in-service
programs in a variety of subject fields.   These
in-service activities were held in conjunction
with other divisions of the Ministry and
were conducted in several different centres
throughout British Columbia.
A professional development program for
school and district administrators throughout
the Province was continued and expanded.
Activities included separate conferences
for beginning and experienced school
principals, district supervisors, and directors of
instruction.   In addition, two professional
development conferences were held for
district superintendents and superintendents
of schools.   All of the conferences and
workshops dealt with administrative
matters.   As the year ended plans were being
considered for the eventual expansion
of the entire professional development program
for educational administrators.
Instructional personnel were involved
in a series of regional curriculum orientation
workshops, held at various centres in the
Province.   More than a thousand teachers
participated in these programs.
The Field Services Branch is primarily
concerned with the supervision of
district superintendents.   In addition to their
work within school districts, district superintendents continued to be involved in
many Provincial activities.   One of these
activities, the secondary school accreditation
program, continues to increase in scope.
To the formal Provincial external evaluation
teams, assistance is provided to many districts
to help them secure evaluative personnel
in order that they may improve the
examination of programs offered in their
secondary schools.
Two studies being conducted by the
Education Research Institute of British
Columbia on behalf of the Ministry will be
completed in the near future and the results of
these studies are intended to provide
ways for assisting small schools in developing
educational programs comparable in
quality to those in larger secondary schools
in the Province.
The division has formed a committee to
develop an elementary school assessment
model.   The work of this committee is well
under way and a final draft of this
evaluation booklet for schools is anticipated
by September 1978.
TEACHER  SERVICES
The Teacher Services Branch is responsible
for teacher certification, assisting with
professional development, and co-ordinating
an interprovincial and international exchange
program.   Twelve British Columbia
teachers received exchange fellowships to
Great Britain, eight to the state of Victoria
in Australia, and two received exchange
positions in the United States.   In addition, the
interprovincial exchange program involved
the placement of eight teachers and two
administrators in Ontario.   Plans are
under way to expand the exchange program in
1978 to include the other Australian states.
ADMINISTRATION AND
DISTRICT SERVICES
Until the end of 1976, the former
Division of Administrative Services was
responsible for general administration, school
district services, and facilities services.
At the beginning of 1977 the Division of
Facilities Development, within the Department
of Ministry Services, assumed responsibility
for capital approvals.
The Division of Administration and
School District Services has assumed
responsibility for the co-ordination of development of legislation and Public Schools Act
Regulations, the general administration
of the Schools Department, advising and
counselling the school districts on matters
 involving the implementation of the
provisions of the Public Schools Act and
Regulations, the co-ordination of program
development involving more than one division
of the department, and general liaison
between the Schools Department and other
departments of the Ministry.   In addition, it is
planned that this division will assume
responsibility for the approvals for grant
purposes of conveyance and boarding services
offered by school districts.
Branches within the division include
Publication Services, Correspondence Education, and the Provincial Educational
Media Centre.
PUBLICATION SERVICES
The Publication Services Branch has two
major functions—the acquisition and
distribution of learning resources for the
schools of the Province, done chiefly from
Victoria, and the provision of print services
for many Ministry curriculum needs, done in
Burnaby.
The work of the first was facilitated by
the expansion of warehousing facilities in the
Vancouver area, which permitted the
outflow of full-carton orders of textbooks to
all schools on the Mainland.   The Victoria
warehouse continued to supply less-than-carton
quantities to all schools as well as full-
carton orders to schools on Vancouver
Island.   Computer services were expanded
and much experience gained toward
improving delivery procedures for materials.
Invoices processed for purchasing
learning materials totalled almost $8 million.
 The branch continued to act as distributor
for all circulars and publications
developed by the Ministry of Education.
Print Services, located in Burnaby, continued
its support function for all branches of the
Ministry.   Production proceeded at a
pace in excess of half a million impressions per
month.   The main focus of the service is
on new publications in support of curriculum
designs.
CORRESPONDENCE EDUCATION
The 1976/77 booklet Correspondence
Education was released in July 1976 and
contained a listing of the 186 course offerings
and the regulations which apply to
correspondence instruction at the elementary
and secondary levels in British Columbia.
On March 4 and 5, 1977, the Ministry of
Education sponsored a Distance Education Conference in Vancouver, attended by
persons from the universities and community
colleges as well as the Ministry, including
12 from the Correspondence Branch.
The conference revealed a vast amount of
interest in this special field, discussing
delivery techniques and administration
generally.
 In the area of course writing, the branch
was principally concerned with the
revision of existing material because of the
requirements for metrication and the activity of
the Ministry's Curriculum Development
Branch in setting new guidelines in core
curriculum.   During the year the
branch's English for Adults 2 was accepted by
the Ministry as a suitable course for study
by candidates who failed to obtain satisfactory
standing in the College Entrance Examination.
Enrolment declined from 1975/76, partly
because a $10 deposit, returnable if a
course is completed within a year, was made
mandatory for all free courses, and partly
because of expanded services offered by the
community colleges in relatively remote
areas of the Province.
The enrolment figures for the year follow:
General enrolment:
Grades VIII-XII and
Special Vocational
Courses
Kindergarten
Grades I-VII (Victoria)
Grades I-VII (Dawson
Creek)
Gilan Project, Iran
1975/76
Fiscal Year
15,084
85
1,019
126
30
1976/77
Fiscal Year
12,178
93
1,057
112
138
16,344
13,578
Certain groups for
whom free instruction
was provided:
Inmates of institutions
380
378
Social assistance cases
106
89
Special illness
363
284
Recent immigrants
104
146
Needed at home
5
10
Distance cases
399
345
1,357    1,252
PROVINCIAL EDUCATIONAL
MEDIA CENTRE
An ambitious schedule of film, television,
and radio programs was completed by
the production unit during the past year.   One
program from the series Kid's Radio
won an Ohio Award at the prestigious
American Exhibition of Educational
Radio/Television Programs.   The series was
chosen for "some of the most imaginative
programs ever heard on a school broadcast."
Another major project of the centre was the
completion of the 12-part television series
OneWorld, compiled from material recorded
during the United Nations Conference
on Human Settlements held in Vancouver in
June 1976.   Originally carried by CBC
as school broadcasts, the programs were also
distributed on videotape for use in school
and college geography courses.
Since the increased use of video technology
has been accompanied by substantial
purchases of videotape by schools and colleges,
PEMC negotiated a Province-wide contract
price for both videotape and audiotape.
Savings to school districts and colleges totalled
more than a quarter of a million dollars.
After four years of operation, the video
dubbing centre has distributed more than
50,000 videotape programs to educational
institutions in the Province.   Film circulation
increased by 14 per cent following the introduction of a computerized reservation
system and a courier service to various regions
of the Province.
25
  POST-SECONDAR Y
Post-secondary education in British
Columbia encompasses academic and professional education at the universities and
colleges and a wide range of vocational and
technological training available at 14 colleges,
three vocational training centres, the British
Columbia Institute of Technology, and the
Marine Training Centre operating under the
auspices of an advisory council and currently a
division of Vancouver Community College.
The Post-Secondary Department of the
Ministry of Education maintains liaison
with the universities through the Universities
Council of B.C., and with the colleges.
The department administers the Provincially
operated vocational training centres,
develops training programs as required,
provides for co-operation with other
Provincial ministries and the Government of
Canada in matters relating to manpower
training, and has considerable involvement in
adult and community education.
During the past year the Post-Secondary
Department was restructured into three
operating divisions—Management Services,
Continuing Education, and Program Services.
Intensive planning took place during the
year to help formulate legislation for a
proposed Colleges and Provincial Institutes
Act.   A major contribution to the development of the legislation was made by the
comprehensive report of the Commission on
Vocational, Technical and Trades Training in
British Columbia whose chairman, Dean
H. Goard, presented the commission's report
to the Minister of Education in January
1977.   It is anticipated that the Act will
benefit all British Columbians in that it
will help the department to increase post-
secondary educational opportunities
and offerings in the fields of academic, career,
technical, and vocational programs.   Such
programming will fulfil the Ministry's
stated policy of offering post-secondary
educational opportunities to all citizens,
irrespective of age, academic standing,
or geographic location.
27
 As an integral part of this policy,
institutional facilities continue to be upgraded
and expanded with capital construction
projects.   Core facilities construction on the
Nanaimo campus of Malaspina College
was completed and similar core facilities are
nearing completion at the College of New
Caledonia at Prince George.   The 1976
building on the British Columbia Institute of
Technology's Willingdon campus was
completed and the Inglis Building of the British
Columbia Vocational School in Burnaby
was opened.
Approval was given for construction of the
first stage of core facilities development at
the Kelowna campus of Okanagan College at
an anticipated cost of $12 million.   A
program of upgrading facilities at the
Haney Educational Centre was also
undertaken.
The main area of growth in post-secondary
credit enrolment during the school-year
was in part-time registration, especially in the
college academic/technical area.   Here,
combined enrolments for university transfer,
career technical, and college preparatory
programs increased by 17 per cent.
University part-time enrolments increased by
6 per cent.   The only areas of growth for
full-time students were career/technical and
vocational enrolments, which increased
by 10 and 7 per cent respectively.   Full-time
academic enrolments at universities and
colleges remained essentially unchanged from
the previous year.
In response to the high levels of unemployment during the winter, approximately
$1 million was made available for more than
a hundred additional vocational training
courses.   A main thrust of the Post-Secondary
Department is to ensure that the students
who leave our colleges or institutions have
developed marketable skills which will
help them in obtaining satisfactory
employment.
28
 CURRICULUM AND PROGRAM
DEVELOPMENT
In July 1976 the Curriculum and Programs
Development Branch added a research
capability to its staff.   One of the research
projects completed since that time was a study
on Basic Training for Skill Development
done jointly with the Federal Ministry of
Manpower and Immigration.   Data on over
22,000 manpower-sponsored students in
Basic Training for Skill Development classes
in the four-year period 1973-76 were analysed.
In curriculum design, two projects of
special note were the development of a
completely new curriculum and instructional
package for the Travel Counsellor Program
run by the Ministry of the Provincial
Secretary and Travel Industry, and the
commission of a training improvement project
to introduce a systematic approach to
curriculum development for all vocational
instructors in the field.
The second project was funded by a Training
Improvement Project grant from Canada
Manpower and Immigration and was
contracted to The University of British
Columbia.   The results of this project,
scheduled for completion in March 1978, will
include the production of a series of six
slide-tape presentations with accompanying
brochures which will explain all phases
of the curriculum development process.
CONTINUING
EDUCATION
A Provincial committee was appointed by
the Minister of Education to engage the
public in discussion of continuing education
needs and services and to report on its
findings.   The committee's report, which
highlighted the magnitude of present and
future demand for continuing education, was
tabled in the Legislature in January 1977.
A Ministry committee on adult basic education
was formed and a related study on basic
education services for handicapped adults was
also initiated.   During the spring, two series
of professional development regional
workshops were sponsored by the Ministry
on the topics of adult basic education and
community needs identification.
The Adult Education Grant-Aid Program
was expanded during the year to include
special projects initiated in community
and adult basic education.   In addition, steps
were taken to plan for development of a
Provincial distance education system.   The
department was represented at the Ministry
conference in March which initiated a
process of assessing needs and resources for
learning at a distance.   A committee of
college principals assisted in preliminary program development and a multi-media
project in English as a second language was
developed in co-operation with The University
of British Columbia's Centre for Continuing
Education.
29
 POST-SECONDARY CO-ORDINATING
COMMITTEE
During 1976/77 the B.C. Post-Secondary
Co-ordinating Committee reviewed
proposals for new programs and changes in
existing programs at the universities and
colleges, alterations in admission requirements
at the universities, and specific transfer
problems in some disciplines.   A transfer
policy statement was agreed to in principle
and circulated to all colleges and universities
for response.   Dr. Ian McTaggart-Cowan,
the chairman, participated as an observer
in the first evaluation of one of the
Provincial colleges.
UNIVERSITIES COUNCIL
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Universities Council has positions for 11
members, one of whom is the chairman.
All are appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council.
30
The Universities Council enjoyed a productive year in 1976/77.   Significant advances
were made with a new budget format,
a systematic evaluation of new programs, and
a new procedure for handling capital funds
for university buildings.   The council
appointed its first Executive Director, Gerald
A. Schwartz, to administer the operational
activities of the council and to represent
it in contacts with the universities and the
Government.
One of the major developments related to
university education in British Columbia
which has been of concern to the council for
some time has been the provision of additional
opportunities for participation in post-
secondary education for people presently
unable to attend university, particularly those
people who are presently resident in areas
of the Province at some distance from the
Lower Mainland-Lower Vancouver
Island areas.   Council requested the establishment of a Commission on University
Programs in Non-Metropolitan Areas, and
Dr. William C. Winegard, former President of
 the University of Guelph in Ontario, was
appointed chairman of the commission
in May 1976.
In March 1976 the Minister of Finance
announced an operating grant to the
university system for the 1976/77 year of
$164,450,000.
The Universities Council made its second
submission to the Provincial Government
on October 15, 1976, requesting $194,235,000
for the operation of the three universities
in British Columbia for the fiscal year
1977/78.   In January 1977 the Minister of
Finance advised that the Legislature would
be asked to vote on 1977/78 estimates,
including $184,500,000 for university
operating grants and $3,000,000 for Interior
program grants.   The Universities Council
believes the universities should address
themselves to the need for a long-term policy
on student fee rates, taking into account
the desirability of annual fee reviews in order
to ensure that the financial contribution
by students represents a reasonable proportion
of the cost of post-secondary education.
In its review of the universities' submissions,
and in reaching its conclusion about financial
allocations, the council identified a number
of areas warranting increasing attention
in the future.   Among these were the
establishment of standards for faculty service
loads; recognition of demographic trends;
reduction of course offerings for which there
is little demonstrated demand, the elimination
of courses where unnecessary duplication may
exist in the Province, and the investigation
of new methods of instruction.
The enactment in 1976 of the British
Columbia Educational Institutions Capital
Financing Authority Act has brought
about fundamental changes in the method of
financing capital development for the
universities.
The borrowing of $15,562,500 for capital
projects was approved on March 12, 1977.
The universities in addition have submitted to
the Universities Council proposals for
capital development projects for the period
April 1, 1977, to March 31, 1982.   These
proposals, totalling $259,000,000 in addition
to the $15,562,500 already approved for
borrowing, will be considered by the
Universities Council during the 1977/78 year.
At its meeting on August 26, 1976, the
Universities Council passed a motion
establishing an ad hoc committee on long-
range planning for the university system
in British Columbia.   The general purpose of
this ad hoc committee is to hold discussions
on institutional roles, academic objectives, and
long-range planning for the universities.
In addition to helping to clarify the roles to be
taken by the universities and the Universities
Council, it is hoped that such a co-operative
effort will produce a sound statement on
the direction to be taken by the universities in
this Province and the goals which are to
be achieved.
31
  MLNISTR Y SERVICES
During the last year the organization of
the Department of Ministry Services
was basically completed.   The following
functions were melded into a new major operational unit within the Ministry: Financial
Services, Facilities Services, Information
Services, Educational Data Services,
the Departmental Library, and Personnel Services.   The primary function of the
department is to provide the necessary
operational support to the schools and post-
secondary sectors through the provision
of financial and physical resources which
allow programs to be delivered efficiently.
The department also has a major
responsibility in the interface between the
Ministry and various other agencies of
the Government.   These include the Government Employees Relations Bureau, the
Public Service Commission, Treasury Board,
Inter-Governmental Relations, the B.C.
Systems Corporation, the B.C. Buildings
Corporation, and the Insurance Corporation
of B.C.
A major effort for the department was an
attempt to improve management effectiveness
within the education system.   During the
school-year, reorganization and recruitment of
staff combined to build an effective work
force.   Planning continued for a major
financial and administrative study with the goal
of improving information available to local
and Provincial education managers.   The
school capital building programs were analysed
and greater attention given to the priorities
of building programs and the application of
funds to support them.   New processes
for universities capital financing were
developed and smoothly put in to operation.
Efforts to reconstruct Ministry estimates
on a programmatic basis were continued in
order to make them more meaningful
and amenable to effective analysis.   Further,
at year-end a major workshop for all
33
 management personnel in the department
analysed existing policy and identified areas for
improved development.
Throughout the year the Facilities Services
Division, assisted by Financial Services,
directed the attention of the school system to
the urgent necessity to upgrade the physical
facilities in terms of fire prevention and
vandalism protection.   The Insurance
Corporation of B.C. acted as agent for the
Ministry in providing technical advice to school
districts as to what improvements should
be incorporated into building programs.
A considerable portion of the capital funds
expended during the last year was directed to
this purpose.   As the school-year ended
the results of this effort appeared to be
extremely gratifying, with major losses in
school fires at their lowest level for a number
of years.   While vandalism is a difficult
social problem, and arson its most serious
manifestation in the school system, improved
technology and construction have successfully worked to alleviate the major losses
of previous years.   Continuing vigilance and
technical attention will continue to be
directed to this element of school buildings.
It is expected that, during the next
reporting-year, basic management structural
changes initiated this year will develop
fully and that the next annual report will reflect
greater improvements in over-all operational
management throughout the education system.
FINANCIAL SERVICES
The Division of Financial Services saw a
number of senior personnel changes in the
past year.   G. E. Wilcox, C.G.A., was
appointed Superintendent; W. G. Stewart,
C.G.A., was appointed Director of Post-
Secondary Finance, and N. N. Alexsenko,
R.I.A., was appointed Director of Ministerial
Finance.
The Directorate of Ministerial Finance is
responsible for all internal financial
matters, including budgetary control and the
administration of the payroll office.   It also
prepares the Ministry's estimates, including
internal and external expenditures, which, for
the 1976/77 fiscal year, amounted to
$846,300,662—more than 23 per cent of the
entire Provincial Government budget.
The main function of the Directorate of
Schools Finance is to monitor the expenditure
of capital and operating funds within each
school district.   It analyses the budgetary
requirements of school districts, calculates the
value of the instructional unit (the basis
on which operating grants to districts
are determined), advises the Government on
the effects of various funding levels, determines
the mill rates for property taxes for school
purposes, and calculates the grants payable to
each district, once funds are approved.
For the 1976 calendar year, school
district expenditures exceeded $900 million
(see Table XX for details).   Prior to 1976
budgets being finalized, a budget review was
conducted in each school district location
by senior staff of the division.
Between July 1, 1976, and June 30, 1977,
50 capital expense proposals, amounting in
total to more than $45 million, were
processed.   Capital expense proposals provide
borrowing authority for the school districts
for the acquisition of capital assets in the
form of buildings and equipment.   The actual
cost is met by means of debentures sold to
the British Columbia School Districts Capital
Financing Authority.
In the area of post-secondary finance,
1976/77 was a period of continuing growth in
both programs and enrolment of the
existing colleges and vocational training
centres.   This growth was reflected in the
budgetary provisions for Government grants,
which exceeded $106 million for operating,
debt servicing, and capital expenditures.
Because of staff vacancies, the main
functions of the Directorate of Post-Secondary
Finance were restricted to analysing college
budget requests, monitoring the expenditures
in relation to budgets, and estimating
future requirements based on actual financial
performance and future expectations of
the Ministry of Education and the colleges.
When the staff situation is improved, emphasis
will also be placed on operational auditing
and the evaluation of programs.
The directorate also calculates and
administers the cost of vocational training
courses conducted on behalf of the B.C.
Ministry of Labour and Canada Manpower.
The latter is governed by the provisions
of the Audit Occupational Training Act and
 the 1974 agreement under which approximately
40 per cent of all vocational training carried
on in the Province is purchased.
Another area of Federal-Provincial
financial co-operation is the Federal-Provincial
Fiscal Arrangement Act, under which the
Federal Government contributes to post-
secondary education by way of return of a
portion of personal, corporate, and nonresident income taxes paid by British Columbia
residents and collected by the Federal
Government.   It is a direct responsibility of
the directorate to prepare the claim under
the Act and analyse the effects of changes on
the financial framework of the post-secondary
system.
.:■:..'.■■■
 FACILITIES SERVICES
As a result of reorganization within the
Ministry of Education during the last
school-year, the Division of Facilities Services
has been separated from the former Division
of Administrative Services.   In order to
improve its capacity to respond to capital
program requests, an internal realignment of
staff has also taken place.   Teams of staff
members have been assigned to regions
of the Province to reduce the number of
persons a school district or college
may need to contact in order to develop a
capital program or follow the processing of a
project through to completion.   This
process of reorganization is substantially
complete.
Considerable attention was given to a review
of the whole process of program development
and processing of request for capital
projects.   A number of improvements were
made to the system and the revision will
be completed by the end of 1977.
Members of the division have visited every
school district and college region in the
Province to provide consultative services in
respect to site acquisition, building acquisition,
and development, and the planning of new
capital programs.
The division has continued to receive
valuable service from the Equipment Advisory
Committee, composed of highly experienced
professional personnel from school district
staff.   This service has provided for a
continuous updating of standards-of-equipment
lists to meet current and future needs.
While demands for new facilities for
schools have been much less than in previous
years when student enrolments were
increasing, there is a considerable need for
building renovations to bring older facilities
up to current standards for program
needs, safety, and fire protection.
The Division reviews some two hundred
project requests per month and during
1976 approved a total of 822.
Capital expenditures for the 1976 calendar
year (section 190 approvals) were:
Schools:
Sites
Buildings
Equipment
Other
13,901,546
89,971,556
20,109,318
8,805,680
132,788,100
Colleges:
$
Sites
293,334
Buildings
9,681,175
Equipment
3,902,714
Other
529,700
14,406,923
ADULT SCHOOL CROSSING
GUARD PROGRAM
In 1976 a total of 44 school districts
received Ministry cost-sharing for the
employment of adult school crossing guards
for 236 crossing points.   The Ministry
supplies a standard equipment kit for each
guard.
BOARDING ALLOWANCE
During the 1975/76 school-year the
Province shared the cost of boarding allowances for 332 pupils in 32 school districts at a
cost of $253,375.   This represents an
allowance of $100 per pupil, an increase over
the previous shareable allowance of $75
per pupil.
TRANSPORTATION ASSISTANCE
Transportation assistance is made available
to the parents of pupils who reside in
isolated areas of the Province where there are
insufficient pupils to establish a bus route or
a school with the appropriate grade.   During
the school-year the Province provided
transportation assistance to the value of
$1,675,993, for 4,228 pupils in 64 school
districts.
EDUCATIONAL
DATA SERVICES
Educational Data Services carries out,
routinely and by request, extensive
data collection operations covering the public
school system, boards of school trustees,
community colleges, vocational training
establishments, and the universities of the
Province.
 Data on enrolments, staffing, resources,
facilities, programs, and many other aspects
of educational activity are gathered, and
analyses of the data by demographic, academic,
occupational, administrative, geographic, and
other characteristics are carried out using
computerized statistical techniques.
Educational Data Services exchanges data
with other provinces and Federal Government
agencies, and with the U.S. National Center
for Educational Statistics, and works
closely with Statistics Canada and other
educational and statistical research
organizations.   In conjunction with these
groups the branch operates a number of
econometric-type computerized forecasting
models for enrolment and population
forecasting and for teacher supply and demand.
The branch also processes data for Federal-
Provincial cost-recovery accounting in the
field of education.
Educational Data Services has a number of
regular statistical publications showing
trends, analyses, and forecasts covering such
areas as pupil and student populations, teacher
and faculty populations, resource centres,
class sizes, and pupil-teacher ratios.   They are
listed on these pages and most are available
upon request.
Educational Data Services operates two
Province-wide committees, the B.C. Public
Schools Statistics Committee and the
B.C. Post-Secondary Statistics Committee, for
discussion and development of educational
data activity.
A limited amount of data is now being
collected annually on the independent schools
operating in British Columbia.
The Educational Data Services Branch is
organized into two major sectors, public
schools and post-secondary, each headed by a
research officer.
The responsibilities of each sector include
the drafting, distribution, collection,
editing, processing, and analysing of over
50,000 documents.
In both the public schools and post-
secondary sector, the past year has been
marked by an increase in the demand for
statistical information.   The requests
for information, in addition to becoming more
numerous, have become more complex.
As a result, the branch is now developing a
computerized capability for the extraction
of special reports.
An activity that has occupied much of the
time of the public schools sector is a
major revision of the instructions relating to
the administration of certain forms in order
to make them more easy to complete by
the respondents who supply basic information.
During the year, developmental work
was initiated on a refinement of the enrolment
forecasting model to forecast for regions
smaller than a school district.   This work is
still in an early stage.
For the post-secondary sector, the year
marked the first time a comprehensive report
containing post-secondary education data has
been produced.   The booklet B.C. Post-
Secondary Statistics was widely distributed
throughout the Province.   This was also
the first year that a detailed analysis was
carried out on the college staff list and faculty
work load forms This analysis was used
extensively by the Post-Secondary Department on budget review trips around the
Province.   A similar procedure was
introduced for the computerization of continuing education data for British Columbia
colleges and school boards.
PUBLICATIONS AVAILABLE FROM
EDUCATIONAL DATA SERVICES
British Columbia Public School System
September Enrolment Projections
1977-1987.
Teacher Demand and Supply in
British Columbia 1977-1986.
Teacher Demand and Supply in
British Columbia.
Appendix Report
Teacher Demand by School District
1977-1986.
Organization of Secondary Schools
1976-77.
Uses of the Teacher Demand and Supply
Model 1975-76 and 1976-77.
List of Schools in British Columbia
With Names and Addresses and Phone
Numbers of Secretary-Treasurers and
Principals or Head Teachers
September 1976.
B.C. Public School Enrolment Information
September 1976.
B.C. Public School Teacher Information
September 1976.
37
 B.C. Public School Library Data
by School District
1974 Calendar Year.
1971 Census Data by
B.C. Public School Districts.
Population of Census Divisions and
Subdivisions in British Columbia, 1971 and
1976.
B.C. Population Project—
an educational application.
B.C. Post-Secondary Statistics
1975-76 and 1976-77.
STUDENT SERVICES
Two major changes were introduced by the
Student Services Branch during the 1976/77
school-year.
A seven-member committee to assist in
upgrading services to British Columbia's
post-secondary students was established.   The
committee acts in an advisory capacity
to the Student Services Branch.   One
of its main tasks will be to develop and
recommend a Provincial model for student
service functions for all post-secondary
institutions.   Among areas to be examined by
the committee are financial aid programs,
student information programs, student
housing, student transportation, and other areas
affecting student life.
A pilot work-study program to provide
part-time on-campus employment for
students in need of financial assistance was
introduced.   Approximately $100,000
was allocated to provide about 150 work
opportunities for college and university
students.   The pilot program is designed to
complement, not replace, the present
student assistance program.
During the 1976/77 fiscal year, 18,950
loans and 13,550 grants to students
were authorized.   The average loan and grant
were $1,151 and $567 respectively.
One hundred fellowships valued at $2,000
and 1,308 second-language bursaries
valued at $800 were administered in
co-operation with the Federal-Provincial
bilingual training program.
METRIC CONVERSION
The Metric Conversion Office was
established under the Ministry of the Provincial
Secretary in 1973 and transferred to the
Ministry of Education on April 1, 1976.
The principal responsibilities of the office are
to serve as metric conversion consultants
to Government ministries, municipalities,
industry, trade, labour, and consumer associations; to assist those groups with their
metric training programs; and to serve as a
metric conversion information centre.
Since the branch was transferred to the
Ministry of Education, a cost-sharing
arrangement has been negotiated with the
Federal Government for the establishment of
a metric conversion information centre.
A full-time Metric Training Co-ordinator
was assigned to the Metric Conversion
Office and, since January 1, 1977, he has
conducted 44 training seminars.
British Columbia schools from kindergarten
through Grade XII are now using metric
units in mathematics and science courses.
 C39
STATISTICAL TABLES
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
PAGE
Pupils  41
Teachers  99
Financial  119
Schools  129
Post-Secondary Education  137
PUPILS
Actual Enrolment by Type of School  41
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex  42
Average Daily Attendance by Type of School  42
Summary of Actual Enrolment  43
Recapitulation of Actual Enrolment by Type of School, Grade, and Sex of
Pupils  97
Changes in Enrolment During the School-year, from September to September,
and From June to June  98
  C41
TABLE 1.1 Actual Enrolment by Type of School
Enrolment in Public Schools dropped from 542,688 in September 1975 to 536,192 in
September 1976. An 8,761 elementary decrease outweighed a secondary increase
of 2,265.
Actual1 Enrolment, September, 1976
Type of School
Number
Per Cent
of
Male
Female
Tolal
of
Schools
Total
23
11,184
11,447
22,631
4.2
141
57,745
56,647
114,392
21.3
126
38,235
36,519
74,754
14.0
16
3,052
2,763
5,815
1.1
67
6,881
6,431
13,312
2.5
1,229
157,408
147,880
305,288
56.9
Senior Secondary	
Secondary	
Junior Secondary	
Elementary-Senior Secondary	
Elementary-Junior Secondary	
Elementary	
TOTALS        1,602
274,505
261,687
536,192
100.0
Source: September, 1976 Form B.
'Actual enrolment is defined as the number of pupils actually enrolled for whom an
attendance record is required to be kept as of the reporting date.
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled:
Secondary School Correspondence classes, regular students (exclusive
of the 2,963 officially registered in other schools)	
In the Elementary School Correspondence classes, regular students ..
Under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, pupils receiving
instruction	
2,442
1,090
57
3,589
Adult Education
Canadian Vocational Training Program
Day  41,757
Night  9,4762
Public School Adult Education  147,3993
Secondary School Correspondence (adults only)  6,793
Elementary School Correspondence (adults only)  22
Public colleges and British Columbia Institute of Technology
Full-time  15,159
Part-time  21,230
241,836
includes 121,550 nonvocational
•'This figure is an October 31 snapshot
 C42
TABLE 1.2 Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex.
The following table provides a distribution of pupils by grade and sex for
September, 1976 and a comparison of the totals with September, 1975.
Grade
Secondary
Grade XII	
Grade XI	
Totals, Senior Secondary Grades ..
Grade X 	
Grade IX	
Grade VIII	
Totals, Grades VIII to X	
Secondary Special	
Totals, Secondary Grades	
Elementary
Grade VII	
Grade VI	
Grade V	
Grade IV	
Totals, Grade IV to VII	
Grade III	
Grade II	
Grade I	
Kindergarten	
Totals, Kindergarten to Grade III .
Elementary Special	
Total Total Ratio
Male Female       Sept 1976     Sep, „75     1976; 1975
17,735
20,496
18,184
20,683
35,919
41,179
34,863
39,949
1.030
1.030
38,231
38,867
77,098
74,812
1.030
22,396
23,671
24,375
22,153
23,070
23,270
44,549
46,741
47,645
44,677
46,552
47,703
0.997
1.004
0.998
70,442
68,493
138,935
138,932
1.000
3,477
1,980
5,457
5,481
0.995
112,150
109,340
221,490
219,225
1.010
22,560
20,825
19,103
18,637
21,590
19,652
18,241
17,833
44,150
40,477
37,344
36,470
45,618
44,320
40,331
37,298
81,125
77,316
158,441
167,567
19,262
19,825
18,163
37,425
38,633
36,539
37,722
0.967
0.913
0.925
0.977
0.945
1.024
1.024
20,896
18,165
19,253
16,906
40,149
35,071
39,545
37,072
1.015
0.946
78,148
73,130
151,278
150,878
1.002
3,082
1,901
4,983
5,018
0.993
     162,355
152,347
314,702
323,463
0.972
     274,505
261,687
536,192
542,688
0.988
Source: September Form B.
Note: Occupational has not been reported separately as it is now included with Secondary Special.
TABLE 1.3 Average Daily Attendance by Type of School
For 1976-77 School Year
Type of School
Senior Secondary	
Secondary	
Junior Secondary	
Elementary-Senior Secondary	
Elementary-Junior Secondary	
Elementary	
TOTAL 	
Average Actual
Daily Attendance
Average Possible
Daily Attendance
Actual as %
of Possible
Attendance
18,110.6
19,894.4
91.03
97,291.5
106,329.3
91.50
73,886.0
80,426.2
91.87
5,133.2
5,640.0
91.01
11,722.0
12,801.6
91.57
278,082.9
294,851.1
94.31
484,226.2
519,942.6
93.13
Source: June 1977 Form I
 C43
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 C99
TEACHERS
TABLE PAGE
2.1 Distribution of Full and Part-Time Professional Staff by Type of School  101
2.2 Teachers' Certificates  102
2.3 Teachers and Principals With and Without University Degrees  103
2.4 Highest Degree by Faculty and Level  103
2.5 New Inquiries and Sources of Full-Time and Part-Time Teaching Staff  104
2.6 British Columbia Public School Full-Time and Part-Time Teacher Flow,
September 1975 to September 1976  105
2.7 Changes in Numbers of Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Teachers During the
School Year         106
2.8 Sources of Teachers Beginning in British Columbia, September 1976 (Those
With Less Than One Year of British Columbia Experience)         106
2.9 Numbers of Trainees Completing Certification at British Columbia
Universities in 1975-76 and Teaching/Not Teaching in September 1976         107
2.10 Certificates Issued During the 1976-77 School Year (July 1,1976 to June 30,
1977)         108
2.11 Number of Full-Time and Part-Time Teachers by Type of Certificate and
Average Years of British Columbia Experience        108
2.12 Certificates and Degrees of Full-Time and Part-Time Teachers, Principals and
Supervisors, September 1975 and September 1976        109
2.13 Certification of Full-Time and Part-Time British Columbia Teachers
According to Location of Initial Teacher Training, September 1975 and
September 1976        110
Teachers' Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Salaries by Type of School:
2.14 Supervising Principals and Vice-Principals  Ill
2.15 School Attached Teachers (Including Teaching Principals and Vice-
Principals)  112
2.16 District-Wide Supervisory and Instructional Staff  113
2.17 Total District-Wide and School Attached Teachers  114
2.18 Full-Time Equivalent District-Employed — Administrative and Instructional
Staff (Not assigned to Specific Schools)        115
2.19 B.C. Public School Pupil/Teacher Ratios by School District        116
PROVINCIAL EDUCATIONAL MEDIA CENTRE
2.20 School Broadcasts        117
2.21 (1) Distribution of Audio-Visual Materials       117
(2) Distribution Services Circulation Report       118
  TABLE 2.1 Distribution of Full and Part-Time
Professional Staff by Type of School
c 101
Type of School
Number
of
Schools
Administrative
Instructional
Staff 0.
Staff (2)
Staff
63
1,293
1.356
246
5.535
5.781
229
4.033
4,262
21
382
403
46
732
778
821
13,910
14.731
—
532
532
393
—
393
Senior Secondary  23
Secondary  141
Junior Secondary  126
Elementary-Senior Secondary  16
Elementary-Junior Secondary  67
Elementary  1,229
District-Wide Instructional Staff  —
District-Wide Administrative Staff  —
TOTALS  1,602
1,819
28,236
Source: September 1976 Forms B and J
(1) Administrative staff includes principals and vice-principals who spend 51% or more of their time in
administration.
(2) Instructional staff includes principals and vice-principals who teach at least 50% of their time.
Note: 154 teachers have been excluded because of missing or incorrect information. Total number of
teachers = 28,390.
  C 103
TABLE 2.3 Teachers and Principals With and Without University Degrees
(September, 1976)
Highest Degrees
No Degrees
Total Teachers
Type of School
Masters or
Doctorate
% of teachers
in school type
% of teachers
in school type
Number
of all teachers
Senior Secondary  996 247 91.7 113 8.3 1,356 4.8
Secondary  4,337 923 90.6 543 9.4 5,803 20.5
Junior Secondary  3,340 503 90.1 423 9.9 4,266 15.1
Elementary-Senior Secondary.... 282 40 79.9 81 20.1 403 1.4
Elementary-Junior Secondary.... 524 51 73.9 203 26.1 778 2.8
Elementary  8,155 663 59.8 5,919 40.2 14,737 52.1
District-Wide Instructors  282 135 77.8 119 22.2 536 1.9
Total Instructional Staff  17,916 2,562 73.5 7,401 26.5 27,879       -       98.6
District-Wide Supervisory Staff.. 213 152 93.6 25 6.4 390 1.4
Total Staff  18,129 2,714 73.7 7,426 26.3 28,269 100.0
Source: September, 1976 Form J.
Note: 121 teachers have been excluded from this table because of missing or incorrect information.
Total number of teachers in September 1976 = 28,390. Part-time teachers are included.
TABLE 2.4 Highest Degree by Faculty and Level — September, 1976
Bachelors
Masters
Doctorates
Totals
Faculty
Elem.      Sec.       Total     Elem.       Sec.       Total     Elem.       Sec.       Total     Elem.
Sec.
Total
Education  5,926
Arts  2,286
Science  263
Physical Education  195
Home Economics  17
Commerce and  Business
Administration  34
Agriculture  17
Music  120
Library Science  23
Forestry  4
Fine and Applied Arts ... 35
Social Work  13
Engineering   and   Applied
Science  9
Journalism  3
Environmental Studies ... 5
Architecture  —
Unclassified  23
TOTALS  8,973
3,730
9,656
670
951
1,621
16
29
45
6,612
4,710
11,322
2,807
5,093
181
452
633
4
11
15
2,471
3,270
5,741
1,201
1,464
31
141
172
1
1
2
295
1,343
1,638
461
656
12
44
56
—
1
1
207
506
713
424
441
—
6
6
—
1
1
17
431
448
172
206
14
21
35
_
	
	
48
193
241
77
94
—
7
7
—
—
—
17
84
101
119
239
18
26
44
	
	
—
138
145
283
20
43
11
34
45
—
—
—
34
54
88
18
22
—
5
5
—
—
—
4
23
27
69
104
3
14
17
	
	
	
38
83
121
6
19
1
6
7
1
—
1
15
12
27
81
3
1
90
6
6
1
10
11
-
-
-
10
3
6
91
3
3
101
6
9
1
2
3
	
	
	
6
6
—
1
1
—
—
—
—
7
7
32
55
1
2
3
—
—
—
24
34
58
9,227      18,200
2,666
65  9,939  10,992 20,931
Source: September, 1976 Form J.
Note: This table includes full-time and part-time teachers and principals as well as district-wide administrative and instructional staff.
 C 104
TABLE 2.5 New Inquiries and Source of
Full-Time and Part-Time Teaching Force
Source of
Initial Teacher
Training
New Inquiries
Received in
School-year
1976/77
First Certificate
Issued in
School-year
1976/77
to Persons
Initially
Inquiring
Teaching in
Sept 1976 but
not Teaching
in B.C.
Public School
System in
Sept. 1975
1,226
39.09
2,444
86.85
2,613
72.1
375
11.58
149
5.29
300
8.3
358
11.05
82
2.91
171
4.7
211
6.51
31
1.10
37
1.0
230
7.10
39
1.38
65
1.8
2,439
75.32
2,745
97.54
3,186
87.9
214
6.60
16
.56
101
2.8
113
3.48
12
.42
48
1.3
374
11.55
41
1.45
188
5.2
98
3.02
1
.03
58
1.6
Total
Sept. 1976
Teachers
British Columbia:
Number	
Per Cent	
Prairie Provinces:
Number	
Per Cent	
Ontario:
Number	
PerCent	
Quebec:
Number	
PerCent	
Atlantic Provinces:
Number	
PerCent	
Total Canada:
Number	
Per Cent	
United Kingdom:
Number	
Per Cent	
Other Europe:
Number	
PerCent	
United States:
Number	
Per Cent	
Australia, New Zealand:
Number	
Per Cent	
Other Non-Canadian and Not Reported:
Number	
PerCent	
Total Non-Canadian and Not Reported:
44
1.2
20,840
73.5
2,792
9.8
834
2.9
197
.7
355
1.3
25,018
1,051
3.7
435
1.5
1,194
4.2
396
1.4
290
1.0
Number	
PerCent	
                   799
                24.67
69
2.45
439
12.1
3,366
11.8
GRAND TOTAL:
Number	
                  3,238
                  100.0
2,814
100.0
3,625
100.0
28,384
100.0
Note: 6 teachers have been excluded from this table because of missing or incorrect information. Total
number of teachers = 28,390.
  C 106
TABLE 2.7 Changes in Numbers of Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Teachers
During the School Year
Changes
Sept.          Feb.
1975           1976
Changes
Sept.        Feb.
1976         1977
Changes
Sept.        Sept.
1975         1976
Sept.
1975
February
1976
Number
Per
Cent
Sept.
1976
February
1977
Number
Per
Cent
n,     u          Per
Number     Cem
Total FTE Teachers1
27,145.8
27,420.3
274.5
1.0
27,664.9
27,847.1
182.2
0.7
519.1           1.9
Source: September 1975 Form B.
February 1976 Form B.
September 1976 Form B.
February 1977 Form B.
'Includes school-attached and district-wide public school teachers.
TABLE 2.8 Sources of Teachers1
Beginning in British Columbia September 1976
(Those with less than one year of British Columbia Experience)
Elementary Beginners
Secondary Beginners
Location of Initial
Teacher Education
Number
Per Cent
of Elementary
Beginners
Per Cent
of All
Beginners
Per Cent
of Secondary
Beginners
Per Cent
of All
Beginners
British Columbia
UBC  334                31.0                17.4
UVIC  181               16.8                 9.4
SFU  224               20.8               11.7
NDU  31                 2.9                 1.6
B.C. Normal School, other and not
reported  27                 2.5                 1.4
TOTALS, PROVINCIAL  797                73.9                41.6
Alberta  49
Saskatchewan  24
Manitoba  16
Ontario  57
Quebec  11
Atlantic Provinces  19
Yukon  —                 —                 —
TOTALS, OTHER PROVINCES  176               16.3                 9.2
United Kingdom and Europe  35
United States  57
Africa  1
Asia  2
Australia  1
New Zealand  3
Other North America  1
South America	
TOTAL, NON-CANADIAN	
Not Reported	
TOTAL BEGINNERS  1,078             100.0               56.3
374
96
96
6
44.6
11.5
11.5
0.7
1.7
586
69.9
160
19.1
100.0
19.5
0.1
0.1
0.3
0.3
8.4
708
277
320
37
1,383
4.5
2.6
43
5.1
2.2
92
2.2
1.3
15
1.8
0.8
39
1.5
0.8
14
1.7
0.7
30
5.3
3.0
54
6.4
2.8
111
1.0
0.6
10
1.2
0.5
21
1.8
1.0
24
2.9
1.3
43
336
3.2
1.8
27
3.2
1.4
62
5.3
3.0
48
5.7
2.5
105
0.1
0.1
—
—
	
1
0.2
0.1
2
0.2
0.1
4
0.1
0.1
4
0.5
0.2
5
0.3
0.2
—
—
—
3
0.1
0.1
2
0.2
0.1
3
100
9.3
5.2
83
9.9
4.3
183
5
0.5
0.3
9
1.1
0.5
14
1,916
Source: September 1976 Form J.
■Includes school-attached and district-wide full-time and part-time public school teachers.
6 teachers have,been excluded from this table because of missing or incorrect information. The total
number of beginning teachers = 1,922.
 C 107
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 C 108
TABLE 2.10 Certificates Issued During the 1976/77 School Year
(July 1, 1976 to June 30, 1977)
Standard Professional „. .
2 Diploma
144 731 2
— 1 1
1,248 3,822 72
1,392 4,554 75
'Composed of 6 Permanent Vocational Instructor's certificates. In addition, 377 Letters of Permission
were issued for the 1976/77 school year.
Teaching
Licence
Standard
Professional
Instructor's
Diploma
Other
Total
Interim	
Permanent	
Non expiring	
28
144
1,248
731
1
3,822
2
1
72
6'
905
8
5,142
TOTALS	
                28
1,392
4,554
75
6
6,055
TABLE 2.11 Number of Full-Time and Part-Time Teachers by Type of Certificate
and Average Years of British Columbia Experience
Certificate
Professional
Standard
Teaching
Licence
Elemen-      Vocational
tary C        Certificate
Instructor's
Diploma
Letter of
Permission
Total
Number of Teachers	
Average years of British
Columbia experience ..
21,896
8.5
4,828
6.8
1,254
14.9
4                 20
8.8                 9.2
25
8.4
357
2.3
28,384
8.4
Source: September 30,1976 Form J.
Note: 6 teachers have been excluded from this table because of missing or incorrect information.
Total number of teachers = 28,390.
 C 109
TABLE 2.12 Certificates and Degrees of Full-Time and Part-Time Teachers,
Principals and Supervisors September, 1975 and September, 1976
September
1975
September 1976
Changes in
of Staff,
Qualifications
Sept.-Sept.
Number
Percentage
of
Total
Teachers
Number
Percentage
of
Total
Teachers
Number
Per Cent
Certificate
Professional	
Standard3	
21,038
4,873
1,348
75.9
17.6
4.9
0.0
0.0
0.1
1.5
21,896
4,828
1,254
4
20
25
357
77.1
17.0
4.4
0.0
0.1
0.1
1.3
858
- 45
- 94
- 3
- 1
- 1
-46
4.1
- 0.9
- 7.0
7
- 42.9
19
- 5.3
Instructor's Diploma	
26
403
- 3.8
- 11.4
TOTALS	
27,714
100.0
28,384
100.0
670
2.4
Degree
Doctorate	
Master's	
Bachelor's	
None	
62
2,372
17,289
7,967
0.2
8.6
62.4
28.8
65
2,649
18,129
7,426
0.2
9.4
64.1
26.3
3
277
840
- 541
4.8
11.7
4.9
-6.8
TOTALS	
27,690
100.0
28,269
100.0
579
2.1
Source: September, 1976 Form J.
Note: 6 teachers have been excluded from the September, 1976 certificate figures and 121 teachers have
been excluded from the degree figures because of missing or incorrect information.
Including Professional Advanced, Professional Basic, Professional C.
including Elementary A.
including Elementary B.
 CHO
TABLE 2.13 Certification of Full-Time and Part-Time British Columbia Teachers
According to Location of Initial Teacher Training,
i
September, 1975 and September, 1976
Source of Initial Teacher Training
Current
Othe
r
British Columbia
British Columbia
Canadi
an
Other
Not
Totals
Certificate
Provinces
Countries
Reported
Sept. '75
Sept. '76
Sept. '75    Sept. '76
Sept. '75
Sept. '76
Sept. '75
Sept. '76
Sept. '75
Sept. 76
Professional
N	
15,635
16,305
2,977
3,081
2,416
2,508
26
6
21,054
21,900
A	
76.3
78.3
71.3
73.7
72.9
75.2
33.8
19.4
—
—
B	
74.3
74.5
14.1
14.1
11.5
11.5
0.1
0.0
100.0
100.0
c	
56.4
57.4
10.7
10.9
8.7
8.8
0.1
0.0
75.9
77.1
Standard7
N	
3,282
3,311
847
817
733
696
11
6
4,873
4,830
A	
16.3
15.9
20.3
19.6
22.1
20.9
14.3
19.4
—
—
B	
67.4
68.6
17.4
16.9
15.0
14.4
0.2
0.1
100.0
100.0
c	
11.8
11.7
3.1
2.9
2.6
2.5
0.0
0.0
17.6
17.0
Teaching Licence1
N	
988
982
266
210
89
62
2
—
1,345
1,254
A	
4.9
4.7
6.4
5.0
2.7
1.9
2.6
—
—
—
B	
73.5
78.3
19.8
16.7
6.6
4.9
0.2
—
100.0
100.0
c	
3.6
3.5
1.0
0.7
0.3
0.2
0.0
—
4.9
4.4
Elementary C
N	
5
4
2
—
—
—
—
—
7
4
A	
0.0
0.0
0.1
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
B	
71.4
100.0
28.6
—
—
—
—
—
100.0
100.0
c	
0.0
0.0
0.0
—
—
—
—
—
0.0
0.0
Instructor's Diploma
N	
18
18
5
4
3
3
—
—
26
25
A	
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
—
—
—
—
B	
69.2
72.0
19.2
16.0
11.5
12.0
—
—
100.0
100.0
C	
0.1
0.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
—
—
0.1
0.1
Letter of Permission
N	
213
204
78
67
74
67
38
19
403
357
A	
1.1
1.0
1.9
1.6
2.2
2.0
49.4
61.3
—
—
B	
52.9
0.8
57.1
0.7
19.4
0.3
18.8
0.2
18.4
0.3
18.8
0.2
9.4
0.1
5.3
0.1
100.0
1.5
100.0
1.3
C	
Totals
N	
20,141
20,824
4,175
4,179
3,315
3,336
77
31
27,724"
28,390s
A	
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
B	
72.6
73.3
15.1
14.7
12.0
11.8
0.3
0.1
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
C	
Source: September,
1976 Form J.
N = Number of full-time teachers from that jurisdic
tion who hold the type of certificate shown ex-
pressed as a percentage of:
A — Percentage of teachers from that jurisdiction holding ALL types of certificates.
B — Percentage of teachers from ALL JURISDICTIONS holding that
type of certificate.
C — Percentage of teachers from all jurisdictions holding all types of certificates
■Including Professional Advanced, Professional Basic,
and Professional C Certificates.
including Elementary A Certificates.
including Elementary B Certificates.
including 19 Vocational Instructor's '
Certificates
including 20 Vocational Instructor's Certificates.
 C 111
TABLE 2.14 School-Attached Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Supervising Principals
and Vice-Principals
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Elem.-
Junior
Senior
Sec.
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
Per Cent
FTE
Salaries
39,750—40,249  —
39,250—39,749  —
38,750—39,249  —
38,250—38,749  —
37,750—38,249  —
27,250—37,749  —
36,750—37,249  —
36,250—36,749  —
35,750—36,249  —
35,250—35,749  —
34,750—35,249  —
34,250—34,749  2.0
33,750—34,249  —
33,250—33,749  51.0
32,750—33,249  3.0
32,250—32,749  15.0
31,750—32,249  19.0
31,250—31,749  33.0
30,750—31,249  48.0
30,250—30,749  29.0
29,750—30,249  26.0
29,250—29,749  46.0
28,750—29,249  60.0
28,250—28,749  42.0
27,750—28,249  59.0
27,250—27,749  40.0
26,750—27,249  46.0
26,250—26,749  45.0
25,750—26,249  34.0
25,250—25,749  43.0
24,750—25,249  32.0
24,250—24,749  29.0
23,750—24,249  24.0
23,250—23,749  18.0
22,750—23,249  19.0
22,250—22,749  12.0
21,750—22,249  8.0
21,250—21,749  10.0
20,750—21,249  6.0
20,250—20,749  6.0
19,750—20,249  6.0
19,250—19,749  3.0
18,750—19,249  —
18,250—18,749  1.0
17,750—18,249  2.0
17,250—17,749  2.0
16,750—17,249  —
16,250—16,749  1.0
15,750—16,249  —
15,250—15,749  —
14,750—15,249  1.0
Not Reported  —
TOTALS  821.0
MEDIANS  $27,940
2.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
4.0
1.0
10.0
2.0
7.0
6.0
11.0
18.0
11.0
4.0
12.0
13.0
12.0
6.0
13.0
15.0
14.0
8.0
6.0
8.0
10.0
9.0
1.0
5.0
5.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
4.0
2.0
7.0
4.0
6.0
3.0
4.0
7.0
1.0
10.0
7.0
10.0
11.0
8.0
13.0
10.0
10.0
8.0
13.0
5.0
9.0
16.0
18.0
11.0
8.0
3.0
7,0
4.0
2.0
5.0
6.0
1.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
6.0
1.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
6.0
1.0
6.0
3.0
4.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
1.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
5.0
9.0
13.0
3.0
22.0
14.0
20.0
72.0
25.0
52.0
47.0
52.0
72.0
59.0
48.0
64.0
98.0
80.0
93.0
65.0
56.0
68.0
50.0
58.0
40.0
40.0
34.0
22.0
28.0
19.0
13.0
15.0
9.0
9.0
6.0
5.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
1.0
1.0
100.0
99.6
99.4
99.3
98.6
97.8
97,1
96.6
95.8
94.7
94.4
92.6
91.4
89.7
83.8
81.8
77.7
74,0
70.0
64.6
60.2
56.7
52.1
45.2
39.6
33.3
28.9
25.2
20.8
17.7
14.0
11.6
9.2
7.2
6.0
4.4
3.4
2.7
1.9
1.4
1.0
0.7
0.4
0.3
0.2
46.0
21.0
229.0
246:0
63.0
1,426.0
$28,083
$27,562
$29,854
$30,875
$31,000
$28,706
Median Salary = $28,706; Mean Salary = $28,751.
Source: September 30, 1976 Form J.
 C 112
TABLE 2.15 School-Attached Full-Time Equivalent (FTE)
(Including Teaching Principals and Vice-Principals)
Salary
Elem-
tary
Elem.-       Elem.-
Junior       Senior
Sec. Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secon-        Senior
dary Sec
Total
Cumulative
Per Cent
FTE
Salaries
$
40,250-^0,749  0.4
39,750—40,249  —
39,250—39,749  —
38,750—39,249  —
38,250—38,749  0.5
37,750—38,249  0.4
37,250—37,749  0.4
36,750—37,249  —
36,250—36,749  —
35,750—36,249  —
35,250—35,749  —
34,750—35,249  1.0
34,250—34,749  0.2
33,750—34,249  —
33,250—33,749  0.4
32,750—33,249  —
32,250—32,749  —
31,750—32,249  —
31,250—31,749  —
30,750—31,249  —
30,250—30,749  —
29,750—30,249  2.5
29,250—29,749  4.0
28,750—29,249  11.5
28,250—28,749  12.5
27,750—28,249  8.0
27,250—27,749  13.0
26,750—27,249  13.5
26,250—26,749  17.0
25,750—26,249  27.5
25,250—25,749  44.5
24,750—25,249  29.5
24,250—24,749  34.0
23,750—24,249  107.6
23,250—23,749  109.4
22,750—23,249  78.0
22,250—22,749  64.5
21,750—22,249  180.1
21,250—21,749  256.3
20,750—21,249  371.1
20,250—20,749  134.2
19,750—20,249  124.4
19,250—19,749  205.2
18,750—19,249  676.9
18,250—18,749  663.2
17,750—18,249  328.2
17,250—17,749  324.4
16,750—17,249  421.3
16,250—16,749  762.1
15,750—16,249  1,100.4
15,250—15,749  818.8
14,750—15,249  1,021.6
14,250—14,749  1,243.3
13,750—14,249  906.6
13,250—13,749  719.4
12,750—13,249  885.3
12,250—12,749  555.6
11,750—12,249  451.2
11,250—11,749  282.3
10,750—11,249  237.4
10,250—10,749  38.5
9,750—10,249  24.1
9,250— 9,749  3.0
8,750— 9,249  1.0
Not Reported  5.5
TOTALS  13,321.9
MEDIANS  $15,426
0.5
0.5
0.4
1.0
0.4
0.4
0.5
1.0
0.2
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
—
1.0
—
—
—
1.0
100.0
—
—
—
1.0
—
1.0
100.0
—
—
—
—
—
2.5
99.9
—
1.0
—
1.0
2.0
8.0
99.9
2.0
—
—
—
—
13.5
99.9
—
—
—
1.0
—
13.5
99.8
—
—
2.0
2.0
1.0
13.0
99.7
1.0
—
2.0
2.0
—
18.0
99.6
—
—
1.0
0.5
—
15.0
99.5
—
1.0
4.0
4.0
—
26.0
99.4
0.1
—
1.0
6.0
—
34.6
99.2
2.0
2.0
12.0
102.0
5.0
167.5
99.0
2.0
—
6.0
41.0
14.0
92.5
98.0
2.0
5.0
17.0
36.0
10.0
104.0
97.5
6.0
13.0
33.0
319.6
30.0
509.2
96.9
14.0
9.0
101.0
243.3
99.0
575.7
94.1
2.0
10.0
112.0
178.0
56.0
436.0
90.9
5.0
3.0
60.0
104.0
34.0
270.5
88.6
15.5
22.0
61.5
287.4
42.0
608.5
87.2
16.0
6.0
255.0
394.8
106.0
1,034.0
84.1
29.0
14.0
413.0
425.7
216.0
1,468.8
78.9
19.0
3.0
113.0
123.5
31.0
423.7
71.8
17.0
16.5
90.5
128.5
29.0
405.9
69.7
18.0
9.0
104.5
122.5
30.0
490.2
67.8
16.0
11.0
167.8
239.3
47.0
1158.0
65.6
48.6
9.0
187.1
224.2
58.0
1,190.1
60.5
29.1
11.5
120.0
201.1
25.0
715.0
55.4
12.0
14.5
148.7
201.0
52.9
753.5
52.4
40.8
15.5
166.0
169.1
49.0
861.7
49.4
31.0
19.0
200.5
210.2
49.0
1,271.8
46.0
40.0
25.0
225.3
242.6
49.0
1,682.3
41.1
39.4
19.0
217.2
204.0
47.0
1,345.4
34.8
48.2
32.9
264.1
282.5
50.0
1,701.3
30.0
57.5
26.0
218.8
272.6
41.6
1,859.8
24.1
36.4
17.0
222.0
247.4
32.0
1,461.5
17.8
56.5
16.5
220.4
180.8
39.0
1,232.6
13.1
36.1
17.0
148.3
177.0
23.0
1,286.6
9.2
14.5
7.2
42.5
45.0
11.5
676.3
5.3
23.7
8.0
34.2
37.0
6.0
560.1
3.3
15.6
1.0
14.5
7.6
0.5
321.5
1.8
7.0
10.0
9.3
10.7
—
274.5
0.9
3.9
—
2.0
2.0
—
46.4
0.2
2.0
1.0
1.0
1.3
1.0
30.4
0.1
—
—
1.0
1.0
1.0
6.0
1.0
31.5
—
—
	
4.0
22.0
	
	
709.0   376.6
$15,920  $16,452
4,003.7
$17,293
5,502.5
$18,798
1,287.5
$20,285
25,204.3
$16,289
Median Salary = $16,289; Mean Salary = $17,102.
Source: September 30, 1976 Form J.
 TABLE 2.16 District-Wide Full-Time Equivalent(FTE)
Supervisory and Instructional Staff
(Not Attached to Specific Schools)
C 113
Salary Range
Cumulative
Salary
Number of
Per Cent
Mid-Point
Persons
FTE
Salaries
40,500
0.4
100.0
40,000
0.5
99.9
39,500
—
—
39,000
—
—
38,500
1.0
99.8
38,000
7.0
99.6
37,500
2.0
98.2
37,000
—
—
36,500
5.0
97.9
36,000
4.0
96.9
35,500
2.0
96.2
35,000
1.0
95.8
34,500
13.0
95.6
34,000
8.0
93,3
33,500
8.0
91.9
33,000
7.0
90.5
32,500
8.0
89.3
32,000
13.0
88.0
31,500
2.0
85.8
31,000
5.0
85.5
30,500
21.0
84.7
30,000
10.0
81.4
29,500
16.0
79.9
29,000
12.0
77.4
28,500
15.4
75.6
28,000
7.6
73.4
27,500
14.0
72.3
27,000
13.0
70.3
26,500
16.3
68.5
26,000
20.0
66.2
25,500
18.0
63.5
25,000
22.0
61.2
24,500
13.0
58.3
24,000
16.0
56.7
23,500
28.5
54.7
23,000
31.4
51.3
22,500
20.0
47.5
22,000
14.0
45.2
21,500
32.0
43.6
21,000
35.7
40.1
20,500
24.0
36.2
20,000
30.3
33.7
19,500
29.5
30.5
19,000
33.6
27.6
18,500
36.1
24.3
18,000
14.0
20.8
17,500
21.5
19.5
17,000
19.6
17.6
16,500
23.6
15.9
16,000
34.1
13.9
15,500
17.8
11.0
15,000
24.0
9.6
14,500
27.2
7.7
14,000
28.5
5.7
13,500
14.8
3.6
13,000
15.4
2.6
12,500
9.9
1.6
12,000
5.6
0.9
11,500
0.4
0.6
11,000
4.3
0.6
10,500
3.5
0.3
10,000
1.6
0.1
9,500
—
—
9,000
1.0
—
1.0
—
$
40,250-^10,749..
39,750-^(0,249..
39,250—39,749..
38,750—39,249..
38,250—38,749..
37,750—38,249..
37,250—37,749..
36,750—37,249..
36,250—36,749..
35,750—36,249..
35,250—35,749..
34,750—35,249..
34,250—34,749..
33,750—34,249..
33,250—33,749..
32,750—33,249..
32,250—32,749..
31,750—32,249..
31,250—31,749..
30,750—31,249..
30,250—30,749..
29,750—30,249..
29,250—29,749..
28,750—29,249..
28,250—28,749..
27,750—28,249..
27,250—27,749..
26,750—27,249..
26,250—26,749..
25,750—26,249..
25,250—25,749..
24,750—25,249..
24,250—24,749..
23,750—24,249..
23,250—23,749..
22,750—23,249..
22,250—22,749..
21,750—22,249..
21,250—21,749..
20,750—21,249..
20,250—20,749..
19,750—20,249..
19,250—19,749..
18,750—19,249..
18,250—18,749..
17,750—18,249. .
17,250—17,749..
16,750—17,249..
16,250—16,749..
15,750—16,249..
15,250—15,749..
14,750—15,249..
14,250—14,749..
13,750—14,249..
13,250—13,749..
12,750—13,249..
12,250—12,749..
11,750—12,249..
11,250—11,749..
10,750—11,249..
10,250—10,749..
9,750—10,249..
9,250— 9,749..
8,750— 9,249..
Not Reported ..
TOTAL 	
MEDIAN	
21,047
Median Salary = $21,047; Mean Salary = $21,934.
Source: September 30, 1976 Form J.
 C114
TABLE 2.17 Total Full-Time Equivalent(FTE) District-Wide and
School-Attached Teachers
Salary Range
Cumulative
Salary
Number of
Per Cent
Mid-Point
Persons
FTE
Salaries
$
40,500
0.8
100.0
40,000
4.5
100.0
39,500
2.0
100.0
39,000
1.0
99.9
38,500
10.0
99.9
38,000
15.4
99.9
37,500
10.4
99.7
37,000
5.0
99.7
36,500
14.0
99.6
36,000
17.0
99.5
35,500
5.5
99.4
35,000
24.0
99.3
34,500
27.2
99.2
34,000
28.0
99.0
33,500
80.4
98.8
33,000
32.0
98.2
32,500
60.0
98.0
32,000
60.0
97.6
31,500
54.0
97.2
31,000
78.0
96.9
30,500
81.0
96.4
30,000
60.5
95.9
29,500
88.0
95.5
29,000
123.5
95.0
28,500
108.9
94.3
28,000
113.6
93.6
27,500
97.0
93.0
27,000
84.0
92.4
26,500
110.3
92.0
26,000
104.6
91.4
25,500
243.5
90.8
25,000
154.5
89.6
24,500
157.0
88.8
24,000
559.2
88.0
23,500
626.2
85.3
23,000
495.4
82.3
22,500
309.5
80.0
22,000
635.5
78.5
21,500
1,081.0
75.7
21,000
1,513.5
71.0
20,500
456.7
64.5
20,000
443.2
62.6
19,500
523.7
60.8
19,000
1,191.6
58.7
18,500
1,228.2
54.1
18,000
731.0
49.5
17,500
779.0
46.8
17,000
881.3
44.0
16,500
1,296.4
40.9
16,000
1,716.4
36.6
15,500
1,365.1
31.0
15,000
1,724.3
26.7
14,500
1,887.0
21.4
14,000
1,490.0
15.8
13,500
1,247.4
11.6
13,000
1,302.1
8.1
12,500
686.2
4.7
12,000
565.7
2.9
11,500
321.9
1.6
11,000
278.7
0.8
10,500
49.9
0.2
10,000
32.0
0.1
9,500
6.0
—
9,000
2.0
—
—
32.5
—
$
40,250-^(0,749.
39,750-^(0,249.
39,250—39,749.
38,750—39,249.
38,250—38,749.
37,750—38,249.
37,250—37,749.
36,750—37,249.
36,250—36,749.
35,750—36,249.
35,250—35,749..
34,750—35,249.
34,250—34,749.
33,750—34,249.
33,250—33,749.
32,750—33,249.
32,250—32,749..
31,750—32,249..
31,250—31,749..
30,750—31,249..
30,250—30,749..
29,750—30,249..
29,250—29,749..
28,750—29,249..
28,250—28,749..
27,750—28,249.
27,250—27,749..
26,750—27,249..
26,250—26,749..
25,750—26,249..
25,250—25,749..
24,750—25,249..
24,250—24,749..
23,750—24,749..
23,250—23,749..
22,750—23,249..
22,250—22,749..
21,750—22,249. .
21,250—21,749..
20,750—21,249..
20,250—20,749..
19,750—20,249..
19,250—19,749..
18,750—19,249..
18,250—18,749..
17,750—18,249..
17,250—17,749..
16,750—17,249. .
16,250—16,749..
15,750—16,249..
15,250—15,749..
14,750—15,249..
14,250—14,749..
13,750—14,249..
13,250—13,749..
12,750—13,249..
12,250—12,749..
11,750—12,249..
11,250—11,749..
10,750—11,249..
10,250—10,749..
9,750—10,249..
9,250—9,749...
8,750—9,249...
Not Reported ..
TOTAL 	
MEDIAN	
27,514.3
16,661
Median Salary = $16,661; Mean Salary = $17,862.
Source: September 30, 1976 Form J.
 C 115
TABLE 2.18 Full-Time Equivalent District-Employed Administrative and
Instructional Staff (Not Assigned to Specific Schools)
School District Number and Name
District-Wide
Administrative Staff
District-Wide
Instructional Staff
Total
District-Wide Staff
1. Fernie	
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
7. Nelson	
9. Castlegar	
10. Arrow Lakes	
11. Trail	
12. Grand Forks	
13. Kettle Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan	
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos	
17. Princeton	
18. Golden	
19. Revelstoke	
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen	
22. Vernon	
23. Central Okanagan	
24. Kamloops	
26. North Thompson	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
30. South Cariboo	
31. Merritt	
32. Hope	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
39. Vancouver	
40. New Westminster	
41. Burnaby	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver	
45. West Vancouver	
46. Sechelt	
47. Powell River	
48. Howe Sound	
49. Central Coast	
50. Queen Charlotte	
52. Prince Rupert	
54. Smithers	
55. Burns Lake	
56. Nechako	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
64. Gulf Islands	
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz-Harrison	
77. Summerland	
80. Kitimat	
81. Fort Nelson	
84. Vancouver Island West	
85. Vancouver Island North	
86. Creston-Kaslo	
87. Strikine	
88. Terrace	
89. Shuswap	
92. Nisgha	
TOTAL 	
Source: September 1976 Form J.
1.0
1.0
2.0
3.0
—
3.0
—
5.5
5.5
1.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
5.0
1.0
3.5
4.5
1.0
—
1.0
4.0
2.0
6.0
—
1.0
1.0
	
2.5
2.5
2.0
3.0
5.0
	
1.0
1.0
—
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
—
1.0
1.0
5.0
7.0
12.0
11.0
5.0
16.0
12.0
12.0
24.0
2.0
1.0
3.0
8.0
7.8
15.8
5.0
17.0
22.0
2.0
1.5
3.5
—
1.0
1.0
—
2.0
2.0
1.0
3.0
4.0
4.0
21.0
25.0
6.0
8.5
14,5
7.0
15.4
22.4
6.0
56.5
62.5
2.0
11.0
13.0
7.0
14,0
21.0
25.0
39.5
64.5
2.0
5.0
7.0
7.0
21.0
28.0
5.0
13.0
18.0
4.0
15.0
19.0
10.7
26.0
36.7
3.0
11.0
14.0
1.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
5.0
7.0
2.0
3.0
5.0
1.0
	
1.0
1.0
6.2
7.2
—
2.0-
2.0
2.0
1.0
3.0
3.5
2.0
5.5
15.0
18.5
33.5
5.0
10.1
15.1
2.0
2.0
4.0
3.0
54.2
57.2
6.0
8.6
14.6
1.0
5.0
6.0
1.0
1.4
2.4
7,0
11.0
18.0
1.5
4.9
6.4
5.0
24.9
29.9
—
1.0
1.0
4.0
10.5
14.5
3.0
16.7
19.7
4.0
1.0
5.0
2.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
2.7
5.7
2.0
0.5
2.5
3.0
2.0
5.0
1.0
3.0
4.0
5.0
4.5
9.5
5.0
9.0
14.0
1.0
—
1.0
556.4
800.1
 C 116
TABLE 2.19 B.C. Public School Pupil/Teacher Ratios by School District
October 31, 1975 to October 31, 1976
School District
FTE
Pupils
October 31st, 1975
FTE
Teachers
Pupil/
Teacher
Ratio
FTE
Pupils
October 31st, 1976
FTE
Teachers
Pupil/
Teacher
Ratio
1. Fernie  3,478 177.0 19.65 3,460 184.50 18.75
2. Cranbrook  4,470 228.9 19.53 4,630 233.00 19.87
3. Kimberley  2,130 111.6 19.09 2,058 114.80 17.93
4. Windermere  1,416 79.6 17.79 1,403 80.12 17.51
7. Nelson  4,371 223.7 19.54 4,261 228.60 18.64
9. Castlegar  2,966 146.1 20.30 2,933 156.20 18.78
10. Arrow Lakes  1,052 53.24 19.76 1,056 61.85 17.07
11. Trail  4,870 247.275 19.69 4,760 246.53 19.31
12. Grand Forks  1,511 76.65 19.71 1,496 81.25 18.41
13. Kettle Valley  762 40.0 19.05 772 43.00 17.95
14. Southern Okanagan  2,516 117.5 21.41 2,517 126.60 19.88
15. Penticton  5,114 250.47 20.42 5,037 260.10 19.37
16. Keremeos  709 36.4 19.48 665 39.00 17.05
17. Princeton  1,018 59.0 17.25 1,020 58.50 17.44
18. Golden  1,686 86.0 19.60 1,587 89.60 17.71
19. Revelstoke  2,253 123.0 18.32 2,198 128.50 17.11
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen... 1,408 71.5 19.69 1,406 76.00 18.50
22. Vernon  8,571 425.62 20.14 8,653 442.64 19.55
23. Central Okanagan  15,757 821.5 19.18 16.140 860.30 18.76
24. Kamloops  18.082 962.76 18.78 18.098 957.04 18.91
26. North Thompson  1,230 74.7 16.47 1,313 76.70 17.12
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin  8,161 412.1 19.80 8,192 453.10 18.08
28. Quesnel  5,673 305.2 18.59 5,631 310.32 18.15
29. Lillooet  987 56.0 17.63 979 58.00 16.88
30. South Cariboo  2,132 117.5 18.14 2,080 120.20 17.30
31. Merritt  2,619 134.0 19.54 2,552 134.00 19.04
32. Hope  1,818 93.5 19.44 1,800 96.00 18.75
33. Chilliwack  8,821 451.51 19.54 8,635 445.90 19.37
34. Abbotsford  8,647 437.4 19.77 8,815 464.60 18.97
35. Langley  10,725 551.41 19.45 11,122 601.10 18.50
36. Surrey  28,557 1,531.5 18.65 27.975 1,510.60 18.52
37. Delta  17,068 884.3 19.30 17,205 913.30 18.84
38. Richmond  17,910 918.21 19.51 18,092 953.33 18.98
39. Vancouver  64,240 3,244.5 19.80 62,207 3,215.00 19.35
40. New Westminster  5,297 277.0 19.12 4,841 271.50 17.83
41. Burnaby  24,669 1,313.5 18.78 23,080 1,276.25 18.08
42. Maple Ridge  7,611 387.4 19.65 7,598 398.40 19.07
43. Coquitlam  23,759 1,232.8 19.27 23,277 1,223.40 19.03
44. North Vancouver  20,737 1,148.32 18.06 19,779 1,122.36 17.62
45. West Vancouver  7,357 370.7 19.85 6,991 368.78 18.96
46. Sechelt  2,485 133.5 18.61 2,471 144.35 17.12
47. Powell River  4,766 261.0 18.26 4,610 262.00 17.60
48. Howe Sound  2,713 139.41 19.46 2,835 146.43 19.36
49. Ocean Falls  843 53.0 15.91 857 54.70 15.67
50. Queen Charlotte  1,293 79.24 16.32 1,353 84.00 16.11
52. Prince Rupert  4,397 224.8 19.56 4,227 226.50 18.66
54. Smither  2,730 144.14 18.94 2,748 144.64 19.00
55. Burns Lake  1,987 113.5 17.51 1,958 116.90 16.75
56. Nechako  3,349 173.0 19.36 3,345 183.50 18.23
57. PrinceGeorge  20,355 1,086.32 18.74 20,628 1,132.11 18.22
59. Peace River South  5,711 308.23 18.53 5,540 305.13 18.16
60. Peace River North  5,361 278.6 19.24 5,506 288.50 19.08
61. Greater Victoria  27,227 1,419.05 19.19 26,129 1,378.76 18.95
62. Sooke  7,793 406.5 19.17 7,715 419.80 18.38
63. Saanich  6,031 320.72 18.80 5,920 334.80 17.68
64. Gulf Islands  948 50.2 18.88 1,014 58.20 17.42
65. Cowichan  7,832 410.7 19.07 7,870 420.50 18.72
66. Lake Cowichan  1,482 87.45 16.95 1,441 86.45 16.67
68. Nanaimo  12,211 633.6 19.27 12,172 670.00 18.17
69. Qualicum  2,336 121.5 19.23 2,362 134.30 17.59
70. Alberni  8,166 436.83 18.69 8,216 438.80 18.72
71. Courtenay  7,387 365.2 20.23 7,377 376.06 19.62
72. Campbell River  5,715 285.6 20.01 5,785 299.10 19.34
75. Mission  4,114 213.5 19.27 4,271 225.20 18.97
76. Agassiz-Harrison  890 49.0 18.16 845 48.00 17.60
77. Summerland  1,437 73.5 19.55 1,472 75.00 19.63
80. Kitimat  3,259 178.0 18.31 3,155 179.50 17.58
81. Fort Nelson.'  1,071 62.5 17.14 1,118 63.17 17.70
84. Vancouver Island West  930 57.8 16.09 1,024 56.50 18.12
85. Vancouver Island North.... 3,043 177.5 17.14 3,057 187.85 16.27
86. Creston-Kaslo  2,754 143.0 19.26 2,633 145.10 18.15
87. Stikine  438 33.0 13.27 485 31.95 15.18
88. Skeena-Cassiar  6,050 331.25 18.26 5,764 317.25 18.17
89. Shuswap  5,721 301.85 18.95 5,685 305.40 18.61
92. Nisgha  361 22U6 \629 523 3100 14.14
GR AND TOTAL  525,344 27,454.515 19_14 518,425 27,858.42 18.61
Source: Form AD — Division of Financial Services.
Note: Calculation of F.T.E. pupils - each Grade I through XII pupil is counted as 1.0; each Kindergarten pupil is
counted as 0.5.
Calculation of F.T.E. teachers — part-time as well as full-time teachers are counted. Each part-time teacher is counted
according to the appropriate decimal fraction of full-time (i.e. a half-time teacher is counted as 0.5). All district-wide
(i.e. directors of instruction, supervisors, teacher consultants, coordinators, district librarians, district counsellors, relieving teachers, etc.) as well as school-attached teachers (i.e. principals, vice-principals, department heads, librarians,
counsellors, regular classroom teachers, etc.) are counted.
 C 117
PROVINCIAL EDUCATIONAL MEDIA CENTRE
TABLE 2.20 SCHOOL BROADCASTS
Television
Programs Broadcast 161
Schools Reporting Use 653
Radio
Programs Broadcast 169
Schools Reporting Use 560
TABLE 2.21 (1) Distribution of Audio-Visual Materials
Total Films Supplied 34,275
Film Catalogues 3,500
School Broadcast Guidebooks 27,000
School Broadcast Calendars 27,000
Sing Out Booklets 70,000
Let's Sing Together Booklets 70,000
Chantez, First French, A Propos (French) booklets 12,000
Videotape Catalogues 3,500
 C 118
TABLE 2.21 (2)
Distribution Services Circulation Report
Motion Pictures,
District No.
No.
and Name
Supplied
1.
Fernie	
                         578
2.
Cranbrook	
                         678
3.
                           432
4.
                           250
7.
Nelson	
                           525
9.
                             96
10.
                         206
11.
Trail	
                           333
12.
                           390
13.
                           261
14.
                             46
15.
Penticton	
                           535
16.
                           197
17.
Princeton	
                           163
18.
Golden	
                           601
19.
Revelstoke	
                           754
21.
                             78
22.
Vernon	
                           683
23.
                           615
24.
Kamloops	
                           615
26.
                           306
27.
Cariboo-Chilcotin	
                         1,683
28.
Quesnel	
                           449
29.
Lillooet	
                           126
30.
South Cariboo	
                           293
31.
Merritt	
                           539
32.
Hope	
                           329
33.
Chilliwack	
                         1,884
34.
Abbotsford	
                             66
35.
Langley	
                          148
36.
Surrey	
                        2,035
37.
Delta	
                           404
38.
Richmond	
                           146
39.
Vancouver	
                           350
40.
                           263
41.
Burnaby 	
                           356
42.
Maple Ridge	
                           229
43.
Coquitlam	
                           317
44.
                           463
45.
                           226
46.
Sechelt	
                           503
47.
Powell River	
                           330
48.
                           487
49.
                           539
50.
Queen Charlotte	
                           615
52.
Prince Rupert	
                           310
54.
Smithers	
                           381
55.
                           283
56.
Nechako	
                           525
57.
Prince George	
                           139
59.
Peace River South	
                           492
60.
Peace River North	
                             442
61.
                           109
62.
Sooke 	
                             347
63.
Saanich	
                           259
64.
                           249
65.
Cowichan	
                           414
66.
Lake Cowichan	
                           198
68.
Nanaimo	
                         1,005
69.
Qualicum	
                           581
70.
Alberni	
                           768
71.
Courtenay	
                           341
72.
Campbell River	
                         318
75.
                         459
76.
                           141
77.
Summerland	
                             28
80.
Kitimat	
                           586
81.
                           225
84.
Vancouver Island, West	
                           580
85.
Vancouver Island, North	
                           797
86.
                           493
87.
Stikine	
                          176
88.
                           932
89.
Shuswap	
                       1,099
92.
                             71
98.
                           349
Miscellaneous	
                             56
TOTAL 	
                       34,275
 C 119
FINANCIAL DATA
TABLE PAGE
3.1 Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education
at June 30  121
3.2 Expenditure for Education, Calendar Year 1976  122
3.3 Cost per Pupil, Calendar Year 1976  123
3.4 Expenditure by School District for the Calendar Year 1976  124
3.5 Revenue by School District for the Calendar Year 1976  126
3.6 Transportation Costs  128
3.7 Summary of School Dormitory Data, 1976/77  128
  C121
TABLE 3.1 Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education at
June 30
Number Number June Average Percent- Government Total
of                  of Net Daily age of Expenditure Expenditure
School-year                Teachers School Enrol- Atten- Atten-                    for for
Employed Districts ment dance dance1               Education Education
1882/83.
1887/88.
1892/93.
1897/98.
1902/03.
1907/08.
1912/13.
1913/14.
1917/18.
1922/23.
1927/28.
1928/29.
1929/30.
1930/31.
1931/32.
1932/33.
1933/34.
1934/35.
1935/36.
1936/37.
1937/38.
1938/39.
1939/40.
1940/41.
1941/42.
1942/43.
1943/44.
1944/45.
1945/46.
1946/47.
1947/48.
1948/49.
1949/50.
1950/51.
1951/52.
1952/53.
1953/54.
1954/55.
1955/56.
1956/57.
1957/58.
1958/59.
1959/60.
1960/61.
1961/62.
1962/63.
1963/64.
1964/65.
1965/66.
1966/67.
1967/68.
1968/69.
1969/70.
1970/71.
1971/72.
1972/73.
1973/74.
1974/75.
1975/76.
1976/77.
69
128
267
429
607
816
1,597
1,859
2,246
3,118
3,668
3,784
3,854
3,948
3,959
3,912
3,873
3,942
3,956
4,025
4,092
4,194
4,220
4,248
4,224
4,055
4,162
4,354
4,512
4,833
5,116
5,496
5,873
6,272
6,598
7,105
7,574
8,185
8,690
9,474
10,171
10,839
11,513
12,137
12,772
13,571
14,415
15,327
16,173
17,742'
19,191
20,481
21,828
22,678
23,224
23,365
24,585'
26,877
27,870
28,390
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741
721
720
730
696
661
654
650
93
97
97
98
101
100
104
104
102
103
102
101
98
97
99
100
100
93
93
87
85
85
85
80
75
74
74
75
75
75
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
164,212
173,354
183,112
195,290
210,174
223,840
240,674
260,069
277,070
291,223
305,837
321,760
340,290
358,905
378,641
400,080
420,790
445,228
467,486
489,596
513,079
527,106
534,523
537,106
548,999
553,991
555,238
547,994
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102,085
93,473
102,999
107,599
114,590
121,334
129,859
138,941
147,583
154,077
163,364
176,138
191,061
204,239
218,303
235,396
252,490
267,052
281,513
298,175
312,173
332,585
348,472
367,718
379,045
408,452
425,514
447,643
466,264
476,643
481,353
481,686
489,303
494,877
495,715
484,226
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
86.08
87.91
88.36
88.81
89.67
90.26
89,19
89.58
90.62
91.25
91.63
91.12
90.98
91.71
92.32
92.61
93.23
92.69
93.76
93.23
93.25
91.50
93.28
92.64
93.87
93.74
93.41
93.38
93.20
92.86
93.13
92.95
93.13
60,758.75!
113.689.362
174,775.43
290,255.26
473,802.29
544,671.60
1,663,003.34
1,885,654.11
1,653,796.60
3,176,686.28*
3,532,518.95
3,765,920.69
3,743,317.08
3,834,727.19
4,015,074.37
2,849,972.02
2,611,937.80
2,835,040.74
2,972,385.04
3,277,660.23
3,524,962.69
3,630,670.78
3,585,769.00
3,963,848.24
4,028,397.88
3,924,243.53
4,244,898.82
5,022,534.59
5,765,205.50
9,398,473.46
12,468,653.18
17,363,430.94
22,809,631.23
25,830,076.88
26,885,980.43
26,555,080.24
24,060,233.15
34,279,302.27
41,067,740.34
43,989,524.32
50,861,473.63
53,288,028.94
59,472,055.06
70,174,999.84
77,632,903.48
83,782,121.79
95,497,375.16
105,017,594.75
119,871,278.31
144,702,607.40
181,854,578.21
251,827,287.92
292,556,398.29
354,470,298.48
382,221,877.00
425,505,748.00
481,823,740.00
551,647,880.00
704,839,307.00
822,600,150.00
215,056.22'
425,555.10
604,357.86
1,220,509.85
4,658,894.97
4,634,877.56
3,519,014,61
7,630,009.54'
9,261,094.98
11,149,996.27
10,008,255.66
10,061,387.99
9,719,333.81
8,941,497.34
8,213,369.04
8,458,156.00
8,775,353.78
9,593,562.64
10,193,367.08
10,640,740.47
10,521,684.92
10,982,364.49
11,120,801.94
11,502,291.35
12,231,029.35
13,683,538.18
14,818,625.81
20,176,930.53
25,768,392.09
35,538,079.88
47,726,750.37
54,195,133.95
57,881,559.48
58,401,121.15
70,791,844.25
80,823,263.71"
69,314,181.24?
77,653,192.32
90,483,765.63
101,351,107.94
115,941,018.06
133,401,622.84
145,535,715.48
157,614,783.79
177,539,584.16
199,114,313.75
227,937,392.31
269,217,969.40
332,702,367.21
384,336,617.68
437,743,656.54
516,309,118.90
557,875,205.00
612,808,108.00
694,357,161.00
832,876,042.00s
1,068,408,139.00
1,223,758,028.00
'Average daily attendance as a percentage of FTE net enrolment. Since 1968/69 percentage of attendance is total actual attendance as a percentage of total possible attendance.
2The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
'Excluding unknown expenditure made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
4Since 1922/23 this amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the provincial universities and since 1963/64 to school district and regional colleges.
sSince 1955/56 this amount is exclusive of capital expenditures from by-law funds.
6The numbers of teachers reported from 1966/67 on include district-wide teachers with supervisory and
administrative duties. These district-wide teachers were excluded from this table prior to 1966/67.
7Since 1973/74 the number of teachers is reported as of September 30th rather than June 30th.
   C 124
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TABLE 3.6 Transportation Costs
Calendar Year
Conveyance
Total District
Conveyance
Costs as a
Expenditures
Costs
Percentage of
District Expenditures
$
118,269,991
$
2,477,202
2.1
127,616,486
2,611,370
2.0
136,432,687
2,721,510
2.0
150,790,702
2,886,696
1.9
165,814,555
3,125,447
1.9
185,566,119
3,475,895
1.9
214,156,353
4,009,393
1.9
248,031,667
4,610,089
1.9
285,686,761
5,355,378
1.87
323,153,465
5,891,894
1.82
361,429,563
6,556,422
1.81
401,033,384
7,216,520
1.89
438,901,005
8,072,883
1.84
502,596,294
9,688,206
1.93
599,460,473
12,548,230
2.09
748,419,484
16,363,823
2.19
863,163,406
19,298,273
2.24
1960.
1961.
1962.
1963.
1064.
1965.
1966..
1967..
1968..
1969'.
1970'.
1971'.
1972'.
1973'.
1974'.
1975'.
1976'.
■Excluding college expenditures.
TABLE 3.7 Summary of School Dormitory Data, 1976-77
School District or School
Capacity
Occupancy
St;
iff
Grade Limits
Male
Female
Male
Female
Full
Time
Part
Time
From           To
40
40
34
33
2
1
8              12
30
30
14
16
3
1
8              12
29
29
22
14
4
1
8              12
16
21
6
7
4
0
8              12
68
58
23
39
7
1
8              12
25
25
11
16
3
1
8               12
27. Columneetza	
27. 100 Mile House	
29. Lillooet	
57. Prince George	
60. Peace River North	
85. Vancouver Island North
TOTALS 	
 C129
SCHOOLS
TABLE PAGE
4.1 Number of Public Schools in Operation by Type, September 1971-76  131
4.2 Senior Secondary Schools  131
4.3 Secondary Schools  132
4.4 Junior Secondary Schools  133
4.5 Elementary-Senior Secondary Schools  134
4.6 Elementary-Junior Secondary Schools  134
4.7 Elementary Schools  135
4.8 Summary of All Schools  136
  TABLE 4.1 Number of Public Schools in Operation by Type
September, 1971-76
c 131
Senior Secondary	
Secondary	
Junior Secondary	
Elementary-Senior Secondary.
Elementary-Junior Secondary.
Numbers Open in September
Type
No.
1971   1972   1973   1974   1975
6 20
5 117
4 103
3 12
2 51
23
118
115
10
46
24
115
126
14
44
23
123
122
17
55
1976
21 23
135 141
122 126
16 16
56 67
Change
1976-71
+ 3
+24
+23
+ 4
+ 16
Elementary	
1         1,210
1,209
1,221
1,234
1,232
1,229
+19
TOTAL SCHOOLS	
— 1,513
— 524
1,521
526
1,544
536
1,574
542
1,582
543
1,602
536
+89
TOTAL ENROLMENT IN THOUSANDS ...
+ 12
Source: September 30th, Form B.
TABLE 4.2 Senior Secondary Schools
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
FTE1
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
22.   Vernon	
24.   Kamloops	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin.
28. Quesenl	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
41.   Burnaby	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver.
61. Greater Victoria ..
65.  Cowichan	
68.   Nanaimo	
72. Campbell River...
89.   Shuswap	
TOTAL 	
1
60.0
1,146
2
106.0
2,073
1
33.4
658
1
34.0
623
1
56.0
1,028
1
54.5
917
4
153.0
2,818
1
67.0
1,229
2
82.6
1,680
1
62.6
1,161
2
148.0
2,763
1
74.0
1,273
1
57.0
1,095
1
51.4
1,028
1
81.5
1,585
1
43.0
818
1
40.0
736
1,204.0
22,631
'In tables 4.2 through 4.8 data on teachers are expressed in full-time equivalents and apply to school-attached personnel only, i.e., the totals do not include district-wide professional staff.
Source: September, 1976 Form B.
 C 132
TABLE 4.3 Secondary Schools
District Number and Name
Number of
FTE
September 30
Schools
Teachers
Enrolment
2
64.2
1,102
49.0
914
28.0
527
29.0
492
48.0
874
46.0
857
18.0
321
75.2
1,409
36.6
647
19.0
324
45.0
860
67.0
1,231
18.3
300
35.0
640
44.0
746
20.5
342
30.0
559
282.5
5,256
107.6
1,789
27.5
472
28.0
570
20.0
339
43.5
728
54.5
1,002
27.5
545
108.0
2,105
32.0
615
72.0
1,263
129.6
2,320
92.0
1,706
65.3
1,323
19
1,397.7
28,392
127.0
2,381
259.2
4,846
150.6
2,714
49.0
934
317.0
5,818
186.3
3,527
44.5
727
46.9
860
61.0
1,118
21.5
290
20.0
309
33.3
677
22.1
390
29.8
499
37.5
643
288.9
5,071
43.0
795
38.0
738
6
278.8
5,315
6
141.0
2,573
2
85.9
1,581
20.5
344
34.5
615
37.2
590
26.3
503
34.0
577
87.3
1,604
68.5
1,396
30.0
562
37.5
712
38.0
710
72.5
1,260
22.5
351
11.6
206
27.3
447
54.0
976
69.8
1,163
1. Fernie	
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
7. Nelson	
9. Castlegar	
10. Arrow Lakes	
11. Trail	
12. Grand Forks	
13. Kettle Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan	
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos	
18. Golden	
19. Revelstoke	
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen .
22. Vernon	
23. Central Okanagan	
24. Kamloops	
26. North Thompson	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
29. Lillooet	
30. South Cariboo	
31. Merritt	
32. Hope	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta!'.'".	
38. Richmond	
39. Vancouver	
40. New Westminster	
41. Burnaby 	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver	
45. West Vancouver	
46. Sechelt	
47. Powell River	
48. Howe Sound	
49. Central Coast	
50. Queen Charlotte	
52. Prince Rupert	
54. Smithers	
55. Burns Lake	
56. Nechako	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
64. Gulf Islands	
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
75. Mission	
77. Summerland	
80. Kitimat	
81. Fort Nelson	
84. Vancouver Island West...
85. Vancouver Island North ..
86. Creston-Kaslo	
88. Terrace	
TOTAL 	
6,113.3
114,392
Source: September, 1976 Form B.
 TABLE 4.4 Junior Secondary Schools
C 133
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
FTE
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
2.
7.
9.
11.
15.
21.
22.
23.
24.
27.
28.
30.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
41.
42.
43.
44.
46.
47.
52.
54,
57.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
65.
68.
70.
71,
72.
75.
80.
Cranbrook	
Nelson	
Castlegar	
Trail	
Penticton	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen .
Vernon	
Central Okanagan	
Kamloops	
Cariboo-Chilcotin	
Quesnel	
South Cariboo	
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta	
Richmond	
Burnaby 	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam	
North Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River	
Prince Rupert	
Smithers	
Prince George	
Peace River South	
Peace River North	
Greater Victoria	
Sooke 	
Saanich 	
Cowichan	
Nanaimo	
Alberni	
Courtenay	
Campbell River	
Mission	
Kitimat	
Vancouver Island West...
Vancouver Island North ..
Terrace	
30.0
36.0
22.0
29.0
56.0
17.0
115.0
102.5
212.4
70.0
86.6
9.0
97.0
97.1
123.1
345.1
207.5
245.4
236.2
21.0
330.0
122.0
16.3
66.7
45.0
24.9
138.7
60.0
64.0
299.1
27.5
29.5
100.3
161.9
102.0
104.3
52.5
56.4
2.0
1.0
19.0
65.0
548
709
422
538
1,019
299
2,105
1,851
3,905
1,292
1,484
101
1,865
1,809
2,045
6,473
3,737
4,918
4,085
362
6,285
2,023
294
1,082
884
448
2,537
1,071
1,173
5,594
465
479
1,755
2,973
1,731
1,946
19
15
269
1,175
89.  Shuswap	
                 2
58.5
1,095
TOTAL 	
              126
4,104.5
74 754
Source: September, 1976 Form B.
 C134
TABLE 4.5 Elementary-Senior Secondary Schools
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
FTE
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
7.   Nelson	
10.   Arrow Lakes	
17.   Princeton	
39.   Vancouver	
50.  Queen Charlotte	
54. Smithers	
55. Burns Lake	
56. Nechako	
59.   Peace River South	
76.   Aggassiz-Harrison	
84. Vancouver Island West.
86. Creston-Kaslo	
87. Stikine	
89.  Shuswap	
TOTAL 	
1         17.0
264
1         14.3
234
1         31.0
564
1          5.3
98
1        20.8
322
1         23.0
402
1         26.0
435
2         62.5
1,256
1        30.6
519
1        27.0
471
1         9.0
123
2         25.2
432
1        16.0
235
1         24.2
460
331.9
5,815
Source: September, 1976 Form B.
TABLE 4.6 Elementary-Junior Secondary Schools
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
FTE
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
1. Fernie	
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
7.  Nelson	
11.  Trail	
14.  Southern Okanagan	
19. Revelstoke	
24.   Kamloops	
20. North Thompson	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
32.   Hope	
41.   Burnaby 	
46. Sechelt	
47. Powell River	
50.  Queen Charlotte	
52.   Prince Rupert	
55.   Burns Lake	
57.   Prince George	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
63. Saanich	
64. Gulf Islands	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
84. Vancouver Island West..
85. Vancouver Island North .
87.  Stikine	
89.  Shuswap	
92.   Nisgha	
TOTAL 	
18.0
316
30.0
575
29.0
493
8.8
141
7.0
95
16.5
309
27.5
514
14.0
243
15.0
352
5.5
93
1
71.7
1,338
3
12.5
129
5.5
107
24.3
462
54.8
985
2.0
9
9.5
144
11.5
215
3
29.0
484
11.3
185
3.0
21
7.0
145
4
35.7
682
2
46.0
729
2
64.0
1,168
2
10.6
155
2
42.0
718
1
3.5
49
1
3.0
29
2
18.5
354
1
4.0
63
6
62.4
1,076
2
8.6
132
2
23.2
433
1
24.1
369
759.0
13,312
Source: September, 1976 Form B.
 TABLE 4.7 Elementary Schools
C135
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
FTE
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
1. Fernie	
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
7. Nelson	
9. Castlegar	
10. Arrow Lakes	
11. Trail	
12. Grand Forks	
13. Kettle Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan	
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos	
17. Princeton	
18. Golden	
19. Revelstoke	
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen .
22. Vernon	
23. Central Okanagan	
24. Kamloops	
26. North Thompson	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
30. South Cariboo	
31. Merritt	
32. Hope	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
39. Vancouver	
40. New Westminster	
41. Burnaby 	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver	
45. West Vancouver	
46. Sechelt	
47. Powell River	
48. Howe Sound	
49. Central Coast	
50. Queen Charlotte	
52. Prince Rupert	
54. Smithers	
55. Burns Lake	
56. Nechako	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke 	
63. Saanich	
64. Gulf Islands	
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz-Harrison	
77. Summerland	
80. Kitimat	
81. Fort Nelson	
84. Vancouver Island West...
85. Vancouver Island North .
86. Creston-Kaslo	
87. Stikine	
88. Terrace	
89. Shuswap	
7
19
11
5
11
3
6
5
12
3
5
7
8
2
14
41
37
7
28
17
4
4
25
32
30
62
28
36
94
9
41
20
45
36
13
10
14
8
5
5
8
7
7
11
54
16
16
40
18
15
3
27
7
35
8
21
16
13
16
3
3
5
3
5
12
9
3
16
21
99.8
121.0
56.4
40.1
116.6
82.0
26.0
118.7
43.5
24.0
51.7
129.8
20.5
26.5
52.2
66.0
36.1
223.4
458.5
485.9
38.8
232.3
168.5
28.0
64.0
76.5
40.1
211.4
264.1
323.5
839.5
533.3
531.4
1,699.1
137.5
633.4
211.7
659.2
564.6
160.7
75.8
133.0
80.2
33.2
30.5
111.2
73.5
45.3
69.5
641.9
149.9
143.3
657.6
233.8
148.5
26.5
218.8
44.3
356.6
56.3
231.1
180.2
149.2
126.2
21.0
36.5
100.2
38.0
31.0
72.5
62.9
6.5
171.6
140.9
2,189
2,725
1,113
814
2,472
1,744
559
2,640
895
469
1,179
2,892
393
502
1,011
1,269
805
5,065
9,594
10,646
789
4,604
3,556
591
1,317
1,648
844
4,987
5,715
7,322
17.463
11,264
10,826
35,639
2,686
12,857
4,807
14,074
11,284
3,594
1,548
2,691
1,786
587
560
2,423
1,636
891
1,522
13,870
3,136
3,089
14,246
4,940
2,897
533
4,640
880
7,512
1,151
5,082
4,245
3,368
2,728
411
810
1,984
806
658
1,380
1,291
117
3,682
3,179
92.   Nisgha	
                    2
10.0
166
TOTAL 	
            1,229
14,403.8
305,288
Source: September, 1976 Form B.
 C136
TABLE 4.8 Summary of All Schools
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
FTE
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
1. Fernie	
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
7.   Nelson	
9.  Castlegar	
10. Arrow Lakes	
11. Trail	
12. Grand Forks	
13. Kettle Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan 	
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos	
17. Princeton	
18. Golden	
19. Revelstoke	
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen .
22. Vernon	
23. Central Okanagan	
24. Kamloops	
26. North Thompson	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
28. Quesnel 	
29. Lillooet	
30. South Cariboo	
31. Merritt	
32. Hope	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
39. Vancouver	
40. New Westminster	
41. Burnaby 	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver	
45. West Vancouver	
46. Sechelt	
47. Powell River	
48. Howe Sound	
49. Central Coast	
50. Queen Charlotte	
52.   Prince Rupert	
54. Smithers	
55. Burns Lake	
56. Nechako	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
64. Gulf Islands	
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni.'	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz-Harrison	
77. Summerland	
80. Kitimat	
81. Fort Nelson	
84. Vancouver Island West...
85. Vancouver Island North ..
86. Creston-Kaslo	
87. Stikine	
88. Terrace	
89. Shuswap	
92.   Nisgha	
TOTAL 	
11
11
10
9
24
13
7
15
4
7
7
15
4
6
8
10
4
19
52
50
9
43
24
6
11
9
7
31
37
37
78
36
45
114
10
54
25
57
45
16
14
19
10
7
9
13
10
10
14
66
21
23
58
25
20
6
32
8
42
11
27
23
18
19
4
4
7
4
9
20
12
6
21
27
3
182.0
230.0
113.4
77.9
224.6
150.0
58.3
239.4
80.1
43.0
124.2
252.8
38.8
57.5
87.2
124.0
73.6
428.4
843.5
926.9
71.8
435.4
301.6
53.5
116.5
131.0
91.9
416.4
449.2
573.1
1,467.2
899.8
924.7
3,102.1
264.5
1,246.2
383.3
1,186.2
1,077.6
347.0
138.6
256.1
141.2
54.7
82.8
218.5
143.5
112.4
169.5
1,072.5
290.5
281.0
1,338.5
402.3
327.9
57.6
405.0
81.5
626.3
132.3
423.9
356.0
293.2
220.1
48.0
74,5
174.7
60.5
56.6
181.2
1421
31.1
306.4
286.8
34.1
3,607
4,762
2,133
1,447
4,414
3,023
1,114
4,896
1,542
793
2,553
5,142
693
1,066
1,651
2,258
1,446
8,875
16,701
18,765
1,354
8,462
5,792
1,037
2,146
2,650
1,851
8,957
9,167
11,547'
29,074
17,936
18,747
64,129
5,067
23,934
7,883
24,056
20,398
7,121
2,578
4,777
2,904
877
1,406
4,468
2,876
2,010
3,421
21,499
5,666
5,682
26,979
7,978
6,125
1,032
8,038
1,470
12,573
2,446
8,466
7,616
5,990
4,426
882
1,520
3.263
1,157
1,065
3,172
2,699
484 :
6,020
5,903
535
26,916.5
536,192
Source: September, 1976 Form B.
 C137
POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION
TABLE GENERAL DATA PAGE
5.1 Total (Full-Time plus Part-Time) Academic and Career/Technical Enrolment
at British Columbia Universities, Public Community Colleges and B.C.IT.
(1967-68 to 1976-77)         139
UNIVERSITY DATA
5.2 Degree Enrolment in British Columbia Universities, 1976-77  140
5.3 Undergraduate Students (Full-Time plus Part-Time) Enrolled for Credit at
British Columbia Universities, by Faculty for Fall 1976  141
5.4 Graduate Students (Full-Time plus Part-Time) Enrolled for Credit at British
Columbia Universities, by Faculty for Fall 1976  142
PUBLIC COMMUNITY COLLEGE, VOCATIONAL
SCHOOL AND TECHNICAL INSTITUTE DATA
5.5 Enrolment in Public Community Colleges and B.C.I.T., October 31,1976 .... 143
5.6 Median Class Sizes for British Columbia Public Community Colleges and
B.C.IT., October 31,1976  144
5.7 Course Registrants for University Transfer Students in British Columbia
Public Community Colleges, October 31,1976  145
5.8 Course Registrants for Career/Technical Students in British Columbia Public
Community Colleges, October 31,1976         146
5.9 Enrolment in Vocational Schools and Vocational Divisions of British
Columbia Public Community Colleges, 1976-77  147
5.10 Full-Time Enrolments by Program in Vocational Schools and Vocational
Divisions of Public Community Colleges, 1976-77         148
5.11 British Columbia Institute of Technology Full-Time Enrolments, Fall 1976. . . 152
5.12 Staff at British Columbia Public Community Colleges, Vocational Schools and
B.C.I.T., October 31,1976  153
5.13 Total (Academic, Career/Technical and Vocational) Faculty at British
Columbia Public Community Colleges, Vocational Schools and B.C.IT. by
Subject Area, October 31,1976  154
5.14 Academic Faculty at British Columbia Public Community Colleges,
Vocational Schools and B.C.I.T. by Subject Area, October 31,1976  155
5.15 Career/Technical Faculty at British Columbia Public Community Colleges,
Vocational Schools and B.C.I.T. by Subject Area, October 31,1976  156
5.16 Vocational Faculty at British Columbia Public Community Colleges,
Vocational Schools and B.C.I.T. by Subject Area, October 31,1976  157
5.17 Continuing Education Enrolment in British Columbia Public Community
Colleges, 1976-77         158
SCHOOL DISTRICT DATA
5.18 Classification of Adult Education Courses, and Enrolment for School
Districts, 1976-77	
158
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TABLE 5.2 Degree Enrolment1 in British Columbia Universities, 1976-77
British
Columbia
University
Simon
Fraser2
Notre
Dame
FULL-TIME
Undergraduate  18,218                  5,091                    6,234
Graduate  2,161                     279                      608
TOTALS  20,379                   5,370                    6,842
PART-TIME
Graduate  757
On Campus  1,984
Off Campus  1,215
Correspondence  932
Summer Session, 1976  4,145                   1,735                        —
Interim Session  2,145                       —                       —
TOTALS  11,178                  3,825                    3,871
GRAND TOTALS  31,557                  9,195                  10,713
306
340
1,482
3,531'
302
—
201
341
29,683
3,048
32,731
1,403
7,105
1,524
932
5,966
2,145
19,075
51,806
Source: Universities Council of B.C. Data reported as at December 31st, except for SFU; SFU data reported as at October 1st, February 1st and June 1st.
Notes:   'Excludes those enrolled in noncredit and other courses not leading toward a University degree.
Adult education non-credit enrolment statistics for 1975-76 and 1976-77 are as follows:
1975-76    UBC   —52,813
U Vic —   3,242
SFU    —   2,173
1976-77    UBC   —50,644
U Vic —  4,080
SFU   —   8,822
2Simon Fraser Undergraduate enrolments are based on the sum of the enrolments for all 3 terms
divided by 2; graduate enrolments are based on the sum of the enrolments for all 3 terms
divided by 3.
'Totals may not agree with those on Table 5.1 as different forms were used.
412 of these students are taking Selkirk courses.
5SFU off Campus, Correspondence, Summer Session and Interim Session enrolments are included with On Campus enrolments.
647 of these are taking Selkirk courses.
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 C147
TABLE 5.9 Enrolment in Vocational Schools andVocational Divisions of British
Columbia Public Community Colleges, 1976-77
B.C. Mining	
Camosun	
Capilano	
Cariboo	
Douglas	
East Kootenay	
Fraser Valley	
Malaspina	
Marine Training Centre
New Caledonia	
Northern Lights	
North Island	
Northwest	
Okanagan	
P.V.t. Burnaby	
P.V.I. Maple Ridge	
Selkirk	
Special Projects1	
Vancouver	
TOTAL 	
July 1, 1976 to
As at October 31, 1976
June 30, 1977
Full-Time
Part-Time
Total
Full-Time
53
53
232
818
572
1,390
3,626
159
0
159
397
584
492
1,076
2,532
235
109
344
1,188
67
191
258
324
213
684
897
1,007
659
632
1,291
2,929
104
—
104
793
429
705
1,134
1,984
249
32
281
840
313
2
315
587
319
102
421
1,286
462
609
1,071
2,543
1,667
1,200
2,867
10,150
174
0
174
737
389
92
481
1,244
220
—
220
915
2,435
4,054
6,489
8,443
9,549
9,476
19,025
Source:
Notes:
Full-Time — Form TV-27.
Part-Time — College Statistical Reports and Form TV-27A.
'Special Projects Division closed in July/77; therefore, there were no new enrolments after
March 31, 1977.
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 C152
TABLE 5.11 British Columbia Institute of Technology
Full-Time Enrolments, Fall 19761
Course
Male
Total
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
Administrative Management	
Broadcast Communications	
Computer Programming and Systems	
Financial Management	
Hotel, Motel and Food Service	
Marketing Management	
Operations Management	
ENGINEERING
Building	
Chemical and Metallurgy	
Civil and Structural	
Electrical and Electronics	
Biological Sciences	
Forestry	
Forest Products	
Natural Gas & Petroleum	
Instrumentation and Systems	
Mechanical	
Mining	
Surveying	
HEALTH
Medical Laboratory	
Medical Radiography	
Nuclear Medicine	
Nursing	
Biomedical Electronics	
Health Data	
Environmental Health Services	
TOTALS 	
1st
31
70
101
2nd
21
45
66
1st
23
36
59
2nd
13
23
36
1st
29
40
69
2nd
21
30
51
1st
44
70
114
2nd
33
50
83
1st
39
74
113
2nd
18
39
57
1st
25
67
92
2nd
21
69
90
1st
3
37
40
2nd
1
14
15
1st
5
66
71
2nd
12
53
65
1st
13
45
58
2nd
5
24
29
1st
0
51
51
2nd
1
63
64
1st
3
182
185
2nd
2
136
138
1st
33
45
78
2nd
25
37
62
1st
10
107
117
2nd
26
109
135
1st
2
53
55
2nd
0
16
16
1st
0
13
13
2nd
1
7
8
1st
0
37
37
2nd
0
31
31
1st
0
77
77
2nd
0
57
57
1st
0
12
12
2nd
0
11
11
1st
5
64
69
2nd
0
77
77
1st
59
2
61
2nd
75
4
79
1st
47
4
51
2nd
41
4
45
1st
11
5
16
2nd
11
3
14
1st
200
17
217
2nd
168
7
175
1st
4
20
24
2nd
1
12
13
1st
15
0
15
2nd
16
0
16
1st
12
25
37
2nd
6
25
31
1st
2nd
1,2
613
518
1,131
1,219
946
2,165
1,832
1,464
3,296
Source: B.C.I.T. Registrar's Office (November, 1976).
Note: 'Tables 5.1 and 5.5 represent Oct. 31 snapshot data, while this table represents enrolments in
November, 1976.
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 C 155
TABLE 5.14 Academic1 Faculty2 at British Columbia Public Community Colleges,
Vocational Schools, and B.C.I.T., by Subject Area, October 31,1976
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Haney	
Malaspina	
New Caledonia..
Northern Lights.
North Island
Northwest	
Okanagan	
Selkirk	
Vancouver	
TOTAL	
12
30
20
43
4
21
18
13
3
22
8
24
19
73
17
15
14
27
4
9
13
12
3
4
4.
25
17
38
5
0
8
1
1
5
4
1
8
0
9
6
24
0
3
1
20
0
3
9
4
0
3
0
1
2
20
10
15
8
41
3
11
5
5
2
8
10
16
5
45
1
0
0
48
0
0
0
68
0
0
2
45
,0
0
6
155
5
3
0
20
0
0
0
45
0
0
1
51
0
0
0
38
0
0
0
9
6
0
4
55
0
0
0
22
3
4
0
82
1
0
3
53
8
10
10
228
184
26
919
Source: Staff List, October 31, 1976. Subject areas are Statistics Canada codes.
Notes:'Academic includes College Preparatory.
!Does not include instructional administration (department heads, etc.).
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TABLE 5.17 Continuing Education Enrolment in British Columbia Public
Community Colleges, 1976-77
Camosun	
Capilano	
Cariboo	
Douglas	
East Kootenay..
Fraser Valley...
Malaspina	
New Caledonia.
Northern Lights
North Island ...
Northwest	
Okanagan	
Selkirk	
Vancouver	
TOTAL 	
PROGRAM
Academic
Upgrading
Vocational
Part-Time
General and
Community
Education
Professional
Development
Total
186
1,143
9,396
792
11,517
0
0
2,998
1,131
4,129
184
2,375
6,305
31
8,895
0
509
3,473
2,252
6,234
170
634
1,428
712
2,944
428
2,264
8,238
211
11,141
502
1,321
5,945
254
8,022
155
1,997
1,747
950
4,849
41
51
1,155
114
1,361
701
1,794
7,087
189
9,771
14
158
80
10
262
1,084
2,472
15,223
445
19,224
73
212
4,987
1,238
6,510
1,576
4,999
6,784
3,737
17,096
5,114
19,929
74,846
Source: Continuing Education Annual Report, 1976-77, collected by Division of Educational Programs
(Post-Secondary).
TABLE 5.18 Classification of Adult Education Courses, and
Enrolment for School Districts, 1976-77'
Number of Classes
Number of
Instructors
Vocational Programs
Business Management	
Commercial	
Automotive	
Machine Shop	
Construction Trades	
Electricity and Electronics ..
Lumbering and Forestry	
Engineering	
Service Trades	
Health Services	
Agriculture	
Vocational Preparatory	
Miscellaneous	
TOTALS	
Non-Vocational Programs
Academic Upgrading	
English and Citizenship ....
Liberal Studies	
Fine Arts	
Domestic Arts	
Hobbies and Crafts	
Social Awareness Education.
Recreation and Fitness	
Driver Training	
Metric Courses	
Safety and First Aid	
Miscellaneous	
163
124
2,695
410
243
7,467
129
87
2,462
41
28
542
99
77
1,677
79
68
1,126
56
23
1,273
6
6
100
122
84
1,939
71
43
1,260
25
29
477
150
113
2,527
137
120
2,304
1.488
1,045
25,849
492
377
8,814
336
280
4,717
674
472
12,120
541
432
8,292
783
478
13,021
1,392
729
25,060
312
296
6,257
1,120
658
22,220
157
99
2,826
20
16
339
210
159
4,435
712
534
13,449
TOTALS	
                 6,749
4,530
121,550
GRAND TOTALS.   .
                 8,237
5,575
147,399
Source: Continuing Education Annual Report, 1976-77, collected by Division of Educational Programs
(Post-Secondary).
Note: 'Data are for the 29 School Districts which offered Adult Education courses.

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