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SERVICES FOR PEOPLE ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MINISTRY OF HUMAN RESOURCES HON. WILLIAM N. VANDER ZALM 1976… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1977

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 ISSN 0317-4670
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
SERVICES FOR PEOPLE
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE
MINISTRY OF HUMAN RESOURCES
HON. WILLIAM N. VANDER ZALM
1976
With Fiscal Addendum
April 1, 1975, to March 31, 1976
 Victoria, B.C., April 1977
To Colonel the Honourable Walter Stewart Owen, Q.C, LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province oj British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Ministry of Human Resources for the calendar year
1976, with fiscal addendum April 1, 1975, to March 31, 1976, is herewith respectfully submitted.
WILLIAM N. VANDER ZALM
Minister oj Human Resources
Office oj the Minister oj Human Resources,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
 Ministry of Human Resources
Victoria, B.C., April 1977
The Honourable William N. Vander Zalm,
Minister oj Human Resources,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir: I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Ministry of Human
Resources for the calendar year 1976, with fiscal addendum April 1, 1975, to
March 31, 1976.
JOHN NOBLE
Deputy Minister of Human Resources
  SERVICES FOR PEOPLE
  FOREWORD
The Annual Report has been organized to provide information on the most
important programs offered by the Ministry. An introductory section outlines
administrative and organizational characteristics of the Ministry. Programs are
discussed under the following four headings:
Services for Families and Children.
Services for Everyone.
Services for Special Needs.
Services for Senior Citizens.
The programs are reported on according to their goals and how these goals
are achieved. Important changes in 1976 are discussed, as is cost-sharing with the
Federal Government.
It is hoped this format will be useful in providing an understanding of what the
Ministry of Human Resources is attempting to do in co-operation with the people
of British Columbia.
This Report is for the calendar year 1976. The Ministry has been reporting
on the January 1 to December 31 calendar year basis for the past three years.
Because formal accounting in the Ministry is done on a fiscal year basis, the
calendar year figures must be estimates in some instances. These figures have the
advantage of showing trends, but fiscal year figures are also printed as official year-
end totals. A fiscal addendum, at the end of the Report, provides further tables on
statistics for the 1975/76 fiscal year period.
A special note on cost-sharing — Municipalities at present cost-share in
social assistance programs, day care subsidies, health care programs, maintenance
of dependent children, homemaker service, and adult care. In 1975, municipalities
were charged $27,634,910, or approximately 10 per cent of the cost of these programs. Throughout this Report we refer to cost-sharing between the Federal and
Provincial Governments; it must be remembered that, for the programs mentioned
above, municipal sharing is part of the Provincial contribution.
  SERVICES FOR PEOPLE
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Highlights of 1976  11
Ministerial Expenditures, 1976  12
Administration and Organization
Introduction  17
Regional Map  18
Personnel Activities  19
Accounting and Budget  20
Office Administration and Public Information  21
Staff Development  21
Research  21
Ministerial Inspectors Program  22
Ministry Evaluation Team  24
Services for Families and Children
Preventive and Protective Services for Children and Their Families  27
Day Care—A Preventive Service  32
Special Services to Children and Their Families . 38
Youth Hostel Program  39
Child Care Resources—Introduction  41
Foster Homes  42
Therapeutic Homes  43
Group Homes  44
Specialized Residential Treatment Programs  45
Adoption  46
Services for Everyone
Income Assistance  53
Employment Services  56
Repatriation  58
Homemaker/Housekeeper Services  59
Counselling  62
Community Advisory Committees  65
Vancouver Resources Board  66
Health Care Services.  66
Burials  68
Community Grants  69
 V 10 HUMAN RESOURCES
Services for Special Needs Page
GAIN (Guaranteed Available Income for Need) for Handicapped Persons 79
Achievement Centres  80
Educational Upgrading and Vocational Training  84
Work Activity Projects  85
Incentive Opportunities Program  87
Community Involvement Program  88
Services for the Retarded (Woodlands, Tranquille, and Glendale)  88
Children's Rehabilitation Services  91
Meals on Wheels  95
Hostels and Transition Houses  96
Halfway Houses  96
Services for Senior Citizens
GAIN (Guaranteed Available Income for Need) for Seniors and Handicapped Persons     99
Senior Citizens Counsellor Service  102
B.C. Hydro Bus Pass for Seniors and Handicapped Persons  104
Adult Care  104
Pharmacare  106
Community Grants to Projects for Senior Citizens  108
Legislation  109
Fiscal Addendum, 1975/76  111
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976
V 11
HIGHLIGHTS OF 1976
By John Noble, Deputy Minister
You will note that this is the first report of the Ministry of Human Resources;
the change from Department to Ministry occurred in the fall of 1976.
For convenience, we have listed certain items here, all of which are the subject
of more complete comment elsewhere in the Report!
• On December 22, 1975, the Honourable William N. Vander Zalm became
the Minister of Human Resources, and, during the year, several initiatives
were undertaken.
• Program responsibility and the 49 employees of the Alcohol and Drug Commission were transferred to the Ministry of Health.
• The administrative costs of social services in the eight Lower Mainland
municipalities were assumed by the Ministry, completing the program that
began in 1969, of transferring responsibility of local social service departments to the Provincial Ministry.
• To improve the level of accountability, two new divisions were established.
The Evaluation Team was established to undertake a Ministry-wide review
of the service delivery system with the expectation that their socio-economic
audits would assist in evaluating systems, procedures and policies and their
effectiveness in assuring the intent of Government policies. Ministry
Inspectors were appointed in each region, to assist those responsible for
administering income maintenance services, to detect fraudulent activities as
these occur, and particularly to prevent them from occurring.
• To assist income assistance recipients, the handicapped, and other marginally employable persons find work and independence, a Province-wide
job-finding program was established. The Provincial Rehabilitation and
Employment Program works closely with Canada Manpower, employers,
and the Ministry.
• The reader will notice a dramatic increase in reported child abuse incidents,
but we believe improved public awareness and legislated changes of the
previous year accelerated and improved reporting of incidents.
• The number of children in care reached its lowest level in six years, reflecting increased and continuing effort to keep families together and children in
their own homes.
• New Guaranteed Available Income for Need regulations came into effect.
• For the second year in a row, total income assistance costs declined, reflecting a drop in applicants.
• A new, more equitable formula for financing achievement centres to serve
the handicapped was established, improving the funding by the Ministry of
most centres.
• This report marks the first by myself as Deputy Minister. In September
1976, James H. Sadler retired as Deputy Minister. His social service career
with the Province began in the depression years and, except for his war-time
army service, continued over 39 years.
 V 12
HUMAN RESOURCES
MINISTERIAL EXPENDITURES,  1976
Figure 1
General Administration
0.8%
$4.1
Other Programs
2.3%
$11.0
Field Service
3.1%
$14.8
Special Programs
for the Retarded
6.3%
$30.4
Medical Services
and Pharmacare
7.2%
$34.7
Income Assistance—Basic assistance, low-income supplement.
GAIN—Handicapped, age 60-64 years, age 65 years and over.
Child Care—Group, receiving, and foster homes; treatment resources; day care; special services
to children.
Medical Services and Pharmacare—Drugs, dental, optical, medical, medical transportation,
emergency health aid.
Special Programs for the Retarded—Residential programs at Woodlands, Tranquille, Glendale, and other institutions.
Adult Care—Personal, intermediate, and nursing-home care.
Community Grants—Grants to community-based, non-profit societies.
Field Service—Direct field staff expenses.
Other Programs—Burials, transportation, repatriation, special needs, housekeeper, homemaker,
work activity projects.
General Administration—Headquarters, administrative and support services, office expenses
for all staff.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976
V  13
The Ministry of Human Resources provides a wide range of services to families
and children, and those disadvantaged because of age, handicap, and unemployment.
Expenditures for the calendar year 1976 totalled $482.5 million. Table 1 illustrates
a comparison of expenditures from 1972/73 through 1976.
Table 1—Ministry oj Human Resources Gross Expenditures—
Comparison oj Fiscal Years 1972/73 to 1975/76 and Calendar Year 1976
1976
($ millions)
482.5
1975/76
($ millions)
474.8
1974/75
($ millions)
382.6
1973/74
($ millions)
264.6
1972/73
($ millions)
172.2
The Federal Government continued to contribute a significant proportion of
Ministry operating costs, under an agreement with the Provinces provided for in the
Canada Assistance Plan (C.A.P.) Act of 1967.
According to the terms of the Canada Assistance Plan, the Province can claim
50 per cent of expenditures on income maintenance and social service benefits,
providing they are administered according to predetermined and agreed policies,
which includes an individual needs test of each individual or family applicant.
Naturally, the provinces continue to negotiate toward optimum sharing and,
because the Federal legislation sets no ceiling on the amount they will share, their
sharing of costs has been increasing. However, only some programs are shareable.
For instance, income assistance and child welfare services are shareable, but the
Guaranteed Available Income for Need payments to persons 60 years and over are
only partially shareable, and the GAIN payments to persons receiving Old Age
Security and the Pharmacare expenditures to persons 65 years and over are not
shareable.
  ADMINISTRATION AND
ORGANIZATION, 1976
  REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976
V 17
INTRODUCTION
A major thrust in the Ministry's administrative and organization efforts during
the year was a speed-up in applying the concept of accountability.
• The financial management information system, introduced the previous year,
was in full operation. As a result a monthly report on all fiscal activities by
service, object of expenditure, and location is now available within 10
working-days of the following month.
• To relieve those municipalities still administering their own social service
department of burdensome costs, and to ensure equitable and universally
applied policies and procedures, the Ministry assumed responsibility for the
administration of all social services in the Province, except in Vancouver
City (administered by the Vancouver Resources Board) and in four communities served by Community Human Resource and Health Centres
(Houston, Granisle, Queen Charlotte Island, and the James Bay neighbourhood in Victoria).
• To assist in the administrative process of determining eligibility for income
assistance and associated health care and other benefits, the previous Social
Assistance Act and the Guaranteed Minimum Income Assistance Act were
all incorporated into a new Guaranteed Available Income jor Need Act
(GAIN).
• Administrative responsibilities were reassigned and responsibilities for the
formulation of major policy and procedural recommendations were referred
to an Executive Committee. The committee met weekly under the Chairmanship of the Deputy Minister, and its members were the Associate Deputy
Minister, Executive Directors, the Superintendent of Child Welfare, the
Ministry Comptroller, and the Managers of Personnel, Office Administration
and Public Information.
• An Evaluation Team was established to be responsible for audits of social
welfare programs, policies, systems, and procedures administered by Ministry staff, Municipal and Resources Board staff, and by society-operated
organizations receiving grants from the Ministry.
• A Ministry Inspectors Program was established to assist local office personnel with the investigation and follow-up of all matters pertaining to
suspected or alleged fraud or overpayment of Ministry benefits or grants.
 V 18
HUMAN RESOURCES
REGIONAL MAP
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976
V  19
PERSONNEL ACTIVITIES
As at December 31, 1976, there were 3,245 staff members in the Ministry of
Human Resources.
Personnel statistics from the Vancouver Resources Board are not included in
this review of personnel activities. The Vancouver Resources Board provides social
services in Vancouver, but operates outside the Public Service of British Columbia.
In 1976 the number of permanent positions in the Ministry increased from
2,990 to 3,025.
Table 2—Permanent Positions Established in 1976
Established positions as of December 31, 1975	
Positions added by transfer from Ministry of Health
Positions deleted by transfer to Ministry of Health	
Established positions as of December 31, 1976
2,990
41
6
3,025
During 1976 the following staff changes took place:
(1) 49 employees and positions in the Alcohol and Drug Commission
were transferred to the Ministry of Health;
(2) 5 employees and positions, in the Mechanical Section were transferred to the Ministry of Health;
(3) 41 employees and positions in the Accounting Division, Ministry of
Health, were transferred to the Ministry of Human Resources;
(4) 201 employees and positions were added to the Ministry of Human
Resources from the Municipalities of Richmond, Surrey, Burnaby,
Coquitlam, New Westminster, North Vancouver, West Vancouver,
effective January 1, 1977;
(5) 84 employees were hired for the Ministry Inspectors Program, Ministry Evaluation Team, and the Provincial Rehabilitation and Employment Program (PREP).
Table 3—Promotions in 1976
10
2
Nurse 	
Psychologist 	
Social Worker/Rehabilitation Officers   4
Activity Worker     5
Clerical   28
Administrative Officer     2
Building Service Worker
Child Care Counsellor	
  1
  2
Financial Assistance Worker  2
Executive Secretary   2
Total
58
 V 20
HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 4—Reclassifications1 in 1976
Clerical   	
Psychologist 	
Building Service Worker .
Laundress   	
  103
  3
  3
  4
Activity Worker   1
Accountant   1
Administrative Officer   1
Financial Assistance Worker and
Case Aides  45
Child Care Counsellor  17
Custodial Attendant  2
Office Equipment Operator  1
Orderly   1
Personnel Officer  2
Social Worker   68
Program Manager  16
Executive Secretary 1-2  2
Total
270
1 Reclassification is the upward movement of staff within a classification series as a result of meeting experience or educational requirements as set out in position specifications, or as a result of position
upgrading after a classification review.
In 1976, there were 787 retirements and resignations from the Ministry. Of
this number, 117 were clerical, 18 were Child Care Counsellors, 74 were Social
Workers, 314 were Nurses and Psychiatric Aides, 19 were Financial Assistance
Workers, 29 were Dietary Aides, 40 were Activity Workers, and 21 were Building
Service Workers. The balance was made up of small numbers of various other job
categories.
The following table summarizes personnel activities in 1976 with comparative
data from 1975.
Table 5—Personnel Ac
Activities                                  1976       1975
Vacancies filled   738      790
Promotions       58       40
'ivities in 1976 and 1975
Activities                                  1976
Retirements and resignations 787
Transfers (non-promotional
movement of staff  100
1975
8841
110
Reclassifications   270      167
1 Revision of 1975 Annual Report figures.
The Division recorded 76 grievances in 1976, submitted under provisions of
the various collective agreements.
ACCOUNTING AND BUDGET
During 1976 the Accounting Division continued its efforts to provide more
effective financial and fiscal controls and a better understanding of accountability
through decentralized budgeting and regional training seminars.
To improve financial control and assembly of statistical data in the area of
income assistance, a new processing system has been implemented and is performing
well in the Vancouver Resources Board. During 1977 a phased implementation of
this system is planned for the Lower Mainland area and at this date is under way in
Burnaby and Richmond.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976 V 21
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION AND PUBLIC INFORMATION
The Division of Office Administration and Public Information provides a range
of administrative support services to the Ministry. These include analysis and consultation on administrative requirements in a variety of program areas; co-ordinating the purchase of supplies and equipment; design and distribution of forms; planning and co-ordination of office space and buildings; the preparation, printing, and
distribution of program policy, procedures, and administration information; and
providing general information to the public.
The Division is also responsible for headquarters mail services and for the
issuance of bus passes to senior citizens.
STAFF DEVELOPMENT
Staff Development Division is a Ministry support service. It provides training
and library services to staff in all Ministry classifications—management supervision,
administrative support, social work, nursing, rehabilitation officers, etc. Programs
provided range from general orientation of new staff to special counselling and
personal care courses.
The Division frequently extends its services to other Government employees
and volunteers working in related services—probation officers, teachers, foster
parents, senior citizen counsellors, mental health workers, etc.
The Division liaises with universities and colleges in the development and
maintenance of career programs relating to employment in the social services.
In 1976 a reported total of 3,848 persons participated in 527 workshops,
courses, lectures, and special conferences.
The Ministry library development was curtailed for the fiscal year.
The Ministry training grants program was discontinued in 1976.
RESEARCH
A more definite direction of Research Division activities emerged during 1976.
This was evident in both the development of basic research projects as well as an
improved ability to respond to more short-term immediate questions. At the same
time, a high-level activity in the area of Federal-Provincial planning was maintained
as well as ongoing work in program evaluation, policy analysis, and information
system development.
In the area of Federal-Provincial planning, staff members participated in both
the Working Party on Income Maintenance and in the review of the Social Services
Act. The activities of the Working Party on Income Maintenance reached their conclusion during 1976 with the issuing of a comprehensive report on their findings.
The review of the proposed Federal Social Services Act continued throughout the
year and absorbed a high level of staff time. In addition, 1976 saw the turnover of
responsibility for supervising the Community Employment Pilot Project in Kamloops and Nanaimo to the Community Grants Division.
Two major research projects were started during 1976. The first involved the
development of a Predictive Model of Social Assistance Caseloads and Costs.
Although the refinement of this model will require considerable ongoing work, a
preliminary model was developed and presented during the year. The second
project undertaken was a rather extensive survey of income assistance clients. This
 V 22 HUMAN RESOURCES
project will continue into 1977. During 1976 the preliminary design work was
compiled and the first block of data was gathered. Preliminary analysis of these
data shows considerable promise.
Considerable effort was expended in 1976 in improving the ability of the
Research Division to answer non-routine questions about Ministerial programs.
These involved improved access to program data sources and the acquisition of
data from non-Ministerial sources. In addition, new estimation techniques were
explained and improved data handling technologies were adopted. During 1976,
two staff members were trained in the use of the new Government Honeywell
computer.
The Research Division provided considerable consulting service in the area of
program evaluation, statistical development, and policy analysis. Papers were presented on a variety of specific programs or portions of programs as well as on
proposed policies on both the Federal and Provincial level. The Division also continued to maintain the computerized information system for the Personnel Division.
Finally, the Research Division engaged in liaison work with Government and
outside agencies on projects of mutual interest. Contacts with Research Divisions
of other provinces and the Federal Government have emerged as an especially
fruitful endeavour.
MINISTERIAL INSPECTORS PROGRAM
Goal—This program was established late in 1976 to assist line workers in the
responsibility for investigation and follow-up of all matters pertaining to suspected
or alleged fraud or overpayment of the Financial Assistance Benefits.
Description—During the late summer of 1976, from August 17 to December
1, 1976, 10 Ministerial Inspectors were hired. This has provided one such Inspector
in all but Region 8 (Dawson Creek), Region 15 (Vancouver Resources Board),
and Region 12 (Surrey). The latter two have their own investigators employed on
duties similar to the Ministerial Inspectors in the other regions. The Inspectors work
under the direct supervision of the Regional Manager and are subject to his direction
for day-to-day operational matters. Policy is being and will continue to be set by
Provincial Headquarters. The calibre of staff engaged in this program is good. The
majority have considerable investigating background and all are well motivated and
adjusted toward social services work.
The program began with an Indoctrination Course in Victoria from October
26 to 29, 1976, inclusive. It was designed to familiarize all Inspectors with the basic
essentials needed to carry out their function. Policies, procedures, forms, legislation, and directives having a bearing on their work were explained.
Development and highlights of the program—(a) A Provincial Coordinator has been appointed and the various Inspectors are now fulfilling their
duties in the field with reportedly good effects and results.
(b) Presence of the Inspectors has relieved field workers of most of the burden
of investigating reports and suspicions of alleged fraud, for which most are
untrained. At the same time it permits the client/worker relationship to be maintained while an in-depth investigation proceeds.
Co-operation and support of the program by field personnel has been remarkably good. The Inspectors are now accepted as part of the "team."
(c) There is a noticeable awareness by the public that a special investigative
body has been formed to examine their complaints and check on welfare abuses.
Although some complaints received are proving to be unfounded, or possibly
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976
V 23
exaggerated, the public appear comforted to know that the matter of overpayment
and alleged wrongdoing is being looked into. Many very favourable comments
have been received throughout the Province.
(d) While no immediate statistics are available it is well established that
several suspected or reported cases which have come under investigation have
resulted in the client discontinuing on social assistance of their own volition. The
deterrent effect appears most evident, though difficult to measure at this early stage.
There is every indication that "the word is out" among would-be violators that the
investigative body is at work.
(e) It is felt that a gradual tightening up without a heavy prosecution program
will serve best to curb fraudulent tendencies without creating bitterness and adverse
criticism toward the Ministry. Due to the overburdened Court system we are
attempting at the outset to present only the more flagrant violations for prosecution.
Where restitution and other means of correction are appropriate, cases are not
prepared for prosecution. This is being done on the suggestion of Crown Counsel.
(/) Emphasis has been and will continue to be on prevention of fraudulent
acts. Close attention is being paid to what appears to be weaknesses in the system
which lend themselves to fraud in varying degrees. These will be passed to proper
authorities in order that policies and procedures may be amended to overcome these
weaknesses.
The following statistics to the end of 1976 on Table 6 are an indication of the
work load performed by this Branch since its inception. In reality it has been operational for approximately three months. It should be noted that the number of
complaints and reports received includes a backlog to early 1976 which was previously unattended to.
Table 6—Statistics jor All Regions {Excluding VRB and Surrey),
October 1 to December 31, 1976
Total number of cases reported for investigation
Charges laid
Still under investigation	
Unfounded complaints or insufficient evidence to proceed..
Settlement otherwise negotiated 	
Value of recoveries made, ordered, or agreed to	
  586
     30
  275
  186
     54
$22,717.00
Table 7—Statistics jor All Regions (Excluding VRB and Surrey)
January 1 to October 1, 1976
Cases reported (suspected but not necessarily investigated)     403
Charges laid       73
Convicted     41
 V 24 HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 8—Statistics jor Vancouver Resources Board, 1976
Cases reported  402
Charges laid     44
Convicted         18
Statistics for Surrey, May to December 1976—
Cases reported  236
Convicted         16
While statistical records have not been as complete as they could have been
prior to commencement of the Ministerial Inspectors Program, there has been a
remarkable increase in the number of cases processed, particularly in the regions
outside the Greater Vancouver area. As the program continues, the complaints
and reports from the public are decreasing rapidly. The social workers are now
by far the largest contributors of information and leads pertaining to suspected
overpayments. This is providing good insight into weaknesses in our application
system. Workers and Inspectors are now beginning to work as a "team," and firm
measures are being taken to eliminate overpayments by change of policy, early
detection, and through investigation. In the short time the program has been in
operation the results have been positive and encouraging. Likewise the co-operation and input from field personnel, in an obvious effort to assist the Inspectors,
has been a prime factor in the success of the program.
MINISTRY EVALUATION TEAM
During 1976 the Ministry of Human Resources established an Evaluation
Team.   The new team has emphasized the following:
• Operational internal audits of the District Offices of the Ministry, focusing
on the programs, policies, systems, and procedures related to the delivery
of financial assistance.
• Financial and operational evaluations of society-operated organizations receiving grants from the Ministry.
• Examinations of the procedures for administering the various allowances
provided to residents of adult care facilities.
 SERVICES FOR FAMILIES
AND CHILDREN
  REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976
V 27
PREVENTIVE AND PROTECTIVE SERVICES FOR
CHILDREN AND THEIR FAMILIES
The Protection oj Children Act, a Provincial statute, provides for legal authority of the Superintendent of Child Welfare to intervene in the affairs of a family
and, where necessary, to involve the Supreme Court when care of a child falls
below the minimal acceptable standards of the community in which he lives, or
where a child's life or health may be endangered by the actions, or lack of action,
of his parents. Only a small proportion of these cases do come to court. The
Superintendent's representatives in Ministry of Human Resources offices throughout British Columbia continue to diligently seek alternatives in helping families to
resolve their problems and improve the standard of care for their children, so that
the family may be maintained as a unit, in preference to court action which may
result in the removal of children from their homes. Such efforts may appear to
leave a child, for a period of time, in a less than desirable situation. However,
since changes are often slow, Ministry of Human Resources staff have been equally
active in their efforts to involve the community in the planning. In all matters
involving the protection of children and services to their families, the most successful planning has been evolved with community understanding and participation.
These efforts cannot always succeed in preventing the removal of children
who may, for their own safety and well being, need to be separated from their
parents temporarily. Service to the family continues during any period of temporary separation with a view to the earliest possible return of the child.
In those cases where a permanent separation is ordered by the court because
of circumstances which indicate that the child's good must take precedence over
the rights of parents who are unable, in the foreseeable future, to meet his
needs, every effort is made to find a permanent resource in which the child can remain until independent. In particular circumstances, and for some older children,
ties with their natural family are maintained through visiting, even though they are
in permanent care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare.
Children at present in care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare under the
Protection of Children Act are shown in the following table:
Table 9—Number of Children in Care and Legal Responsibility of the Superintendent of Child Welfare Under the Terms of the Protection of Children Act, as at December 31, 19761
Location Wards
In British Columbia  5,861
Outside British Columbia         242
Totals
6,103
Children Awaiting
Hearing Before
the Courts
416
3
419
1 These figures are actual as of December 1976 and do not take into account movement, that is,
children who come into care and then leave.
Under the section of the legislation dealing with mandatory reporting of child
abuse and neglect, increasing activity is noted through 1976, both in the number
of reports received and in the development of resources and skills to meet this
 V 28 HUMAN RESOURCES
particular problem. With the increasing awareness of the public at large, as well
as the professional people involved, situations are more frequently being referred
for service before any serious abuse has occurred, and parents who fear that they
may react violently against their children in a moment of stress are referring themselves for help. With the development of knowledge and skills in this area, together with community-based support services, fewer children need to be separated
from their families because of physical abuse and can be maintained safely in their
own homes.
Table 10—Cases of Probable Child Abuse—A Comparison
Numbers of Children
Age and Sex                                                    19721        19731         19741       1975 1976
Male—under 3 years        26          24          28          50 58
3-10 years      24          37          36          66 92
11 years and older        7          15          12          25 41
No age reported .—      ....   2
Female—under 3 years       13          21          27          31 52
3-10 years      22          11          24          46 90
11 years and older      13          14          16          44 84
Totals    105        122        1452      262 417
1 Figures are revised from those appearing in the 1974 Report. Cases of child neglect or unsubstantiated child abuse were included in the figures published in 1974 for period 1971 to 1974. Child
neglect and unsubstantiated child abuse cases do not appear in the 1972-74 figures presented here.
2 Figures are revised from those appearing in the 1975 Report.
Children may come into care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare on an
agreement between the parents and the Superintendent. This "non-ward" care
does not require intervention by the courts, but is a voluntary short-term arrangement to help parents who may need a temporary placement of their children due
to some crisis in their lives, such as ill-health, but who will shortly be able to resume
their parenting role. This type of care may also be a preventive service to families
where a child's "acting-out" or a parent's emotional problems due to marriage
breakdown or other stress require a temporary separation as a period of respite.
A responsibility of Protective and Preventive Services not directly related to
children coming into care is the preparation of reports for the Supreme Court on
matters concerning custody of children under the Equal Guardianship of Infants
Act and the Divorce Act. If the separated parents are unable to agree on arrangements for custody of, and access to the children of the marriage, the court may request, through the Superintendent of Child Welfare, a report on the circumstances
of each parent to assist the Judge in making his decision. There were 68 such
reports prepared in 1976 for the British Columbia courts. This service is also
provided to other provinces and approximately 40 requests were received during
1976.
Issues of custody frequently come to the attention of the Superintendent of
Child Welfare because of the action of one parent in "snatching" a child from the
other parent, to whom a court has awarded custody, and removing the child from
the jurisdiction of the court.   These are extremely difficult cases to deal with, and
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976 V 29
create serious hardship and anxiety for the parent who so "loses" a child. A new
Act passed in British Columbia in June 1976 provides for the enforcement in
British Columbia of custody orders made in other provinces. The Province of
Manitoba has similar legislation. Legislation of this nature provides one of the
tools that will help to protect children against the damaging effects of becoming
victims of a tug-of-war between parents.
Table 11—Number of Children in the Care and Legal Responsibility of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare, Under the Terms of the Equal Guardianship of Infants Act, the Family Relations Act1, and Other Acts, as
at December 31, 1976
Location
In British Columbia  	
EGIA, FRA, and
Similar Wardsi
„ 438
Outside British Columbia	
      ...    53
Total  	
  491
1 The Family Relations Act results in temporary committals to the Superintendent's care, and Supreme Court Judges occasionally make temporary orders through other Acts.
Committal of children to the charge of the Superintendent of Child Welfare
may also be a disposition of the Provincial Court under the Juvenile Delinquents
Act, and for 1976, the number of children "in care" under this Act are shown in
the following table:
Table 12—Number of Children in the Care and Legal Responsibility of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare, as a Result of a Finding Under the
Juvenile Delinquents Act, as at December 31, 1976
Location JDA Wards
In British Columbia    512
Outside British Columbia        7
Total   519
The Superintendent of Child Welfare has responsibilities under the provisions
of another statute, the Children oj Unmarried Parents Act. This Act makes provisions for agreements or court orders for the maintenance of children born out
of wedlock. This Act also provides that any woman who is a mother within the
definition of the Act may apply to the Superintendent for advice and protection in
any matter connected with her child or the birth of her child.
Such services as are required are offered by the representatives of the Superintendent of Child Welfare in the local offices of the Ministry of Human Resources
and may include counselling, financial assistance, appointment of legal counsel
where necessary to represent the mother in Court action, assistance toward reaching agreements between the putative father, the mother, and the Superintendent
for maintenance of the child, and such other services as may be necessary to ensure
that the mother has all possible assistance in planning for her child.
 V 30
HUMAN RESOURCES
The following figure compares the total number of children-in-care over
several years:
Figure 2
Total Number of Children-in-care and Legal Responsibility of the Superintendent of Child Welfare as at March 31, 1972—76, and at December
31, 1976
10,274
9,913
9,584
9,883
9,859
9,485
March 31
1972
March 31,
1973
March 31,
1974
March 31,
1975
March 31,
1976
December 31,
1976
Assistance is also provided to the mother in enforcing or applying for variation
in any order of maintenance made by the courts. A record is maintained in Child
Welfare Division of all moneys paid under the terms of an agreement or a maintenance order so that action may be taken as quickly as possible when arrears begin
to accrue.
During the period from April 1975 to March 1976, approximately 150 Children of Unmarried Parents Act orders and agreements were received in Child
Welfare Accounts.
Total payments on CUPA receipts between April 1975 and March 1976
amounted to $327,019, giving an average of $27,000 collected monthly.
Repatriation of transient and destitute children—Another service
that the Child Welfare Division is involved in is the repatriation of children, that
is, arranging for the return of children to their province or state of residence.
Children under 17 years of age who are temporarily stranded in British Columbia
and children from British Columbia stranded in other provinces or states are looked
after by this program. Arrangements for transportation, contact with parents,
stop-over supervision, escort where required, and liaison with other child welfare
authorities is undertaken; and, during 1975/76, 965 transient and destitute children were repatriated. This figure includes movement in and out of the Province
only. Within the Province there is, also, substantial movement in returning children to their own homes.
During 1976 a number of community grants were made by the Ministry of
Human Resources for the purpose of providing preventive programs for youth.
All the projects funded under this program offered counselling services:
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976 V 31
YOUTH PROGRAMS
Amount
Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1976
Abbotsford: $
Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford Community Services Association (percentage)    16,000!
Burnaby:
Burnaby Citizens Development Fund   74,199
Burnaby Lochdale Area Community School (community youth worker) 11,238
Burnaby PURPOSE   77,811
Burns Lake:
Bridge the Gap Society       9,570
Campbell River:
Campbell River Youth Centre Society      32,883
Courtenay:
Courtenay Youth Chance Society    20,349
Cowichan:
Cowichan Valley Regional District Activity Centre (percentage)      12,8271
Cranbrook:
Cranbrook Boys and Girls Club (youth project)     20,985
Delta:
Hillside Boys Club of North Delta      20,301
Duncan:
Duncan Community Options Society      22,071
Falkland:
Falkland and District Community Association (youth centre)        6,626
Hazelton:
Hazelton Area Community Services Association (youth project)        9,918
Kamloops:
Kamloops Boys and Girls Club (youth project)   19,438
Kamloops Community "Y" (youth project)   25,788
Westsyde Human Action Movement (youth project)   15,316
Kitimat:
Kitimat Community Services Association (youth project)        3,675
Maple Ridge:
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Community Services Association (percentage)      8,4001
Nanaimo:
Nanaimo Boys and Girls Club Youth Project     27,662
Nelson:
Nelson Youth Activities Society      16,952
New Westminster:
New Westminster YM-YWCA Detached Youth Program     32,199
North Shore:
Family Services of Greater Vancouver—North Shore Branch (family
services centre)      18,284
North Shore "Y" (youth worker)       3,710
1 The figure shown indicates a proportion of the total grant that was applied to these particular programs.
 V 32 HUMAN RESOURCES
YOUTH PROGRAMS—Continued
Amount
Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1976
Penticton : $
Penticton and District Health and Welfare Association (Penticton Em-
ployability Project)      21,984
Port Renfrew:
Port Renfrew Community Resource Centre         3,342
Powell River:
Powell River Youth Service Society       6,651
Prince Rupert:
Prince Rupert Third Avenue Social Worker    480
Richmond:
Friendship Home Society (Lindsay Gardens Project)      25,502
Richmond Human Resources Committee (Project Contact)     97,110
Salmo:
Salmo and District Youth Recreation Association      2,100
Salmon Arm:
Shuswap Youth Centre Association     41,434
Smithers:
Smithers Community Services Association (youth project)      28,270
Surrey:
Surrey Grandeur Recreation Society      58,534
Vancouver:
Capilano Community Services Centre       4,873
Victoria:
Victoria Boys and Girls Club (Langford)   14,057
Victoria Boys and Girls Club (Newton Gardens Project)   6,769
Victoria YM-YWCA Detached Youth Worker Program   82,511
Vic West Community Development Association (neighbourhood centre) 51,585
Williams Lake:
Cariboo Youth Outreach—The Lighthouse      12,675
Total community grants    964,079
DAY CARE—A PREVENTIVE SERVICE
During 1976 the primary focus of the Day Care Program continued to be the
low-income family needing day care support. With a decrease in the development of
new services this year, more emphasis was placed on screening and improving services in operation. This was achieved primarily through increased home visiting
and more consultative support being made available to centres and parents.
Description—As in previous years, the largest number of children are
receiving day care through unlicensed and community care facilities licensed family
day care homes (see pages 33, 35, and 36 for definitions).
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976
V 33
By far the majority of children are in unlicensed family day care homes, most
of which are informal arrangements made by non-subsidized parents. Since the
Ministry of Human Resources is involved only when subsidization is requested, we
are unable to determine exact numbers. The following table gives the numbers of
children receiving subsidization during 1976:
Table 13—Children Receiving Subsidized Day Care
as of December 31, 1976
Program                                                           Half Day Full Day Total
Group day care        138 3,508 3,646
Family day care      201' 2,901 3,102
Nursery school         548 — 548
Out of school  1,905 119 2,024
Special need centre      413 559 972
In-home day care       89 531 620
3,294 7,618 10,912
The single-parent family accounts for approximately 75 per cent of total expenditures for day care subsidies.
Six different types of day care services exist to meet individual family needs.
Parents choose the program they prefer, and complete an income or needs test
should they require help with fees. Eligibility is based on net income, including
family allowance (see Table 14). As of June 1, 1976, in order to qualify for
subsidization, applications were also required to meet social need criteria established
by the Federal Government for cost-sharing purposes. These criteria are as follows:
(1) A single-parent family requires day care services and that parent
works or attends an educational institution, or is undertaking
medical treatment or a rehabilitative program.
(2) A two-parent family requires day care services and both parents
work, or one parent works and the other spouse is either incapacitated, attends an educational institution, or is undertaking medical
treatment or a rehabilitative program.
(3) A single-parent or two-parent family requires day care services that
are recommended by or arranged by a social welfare agency as part
of a child protection service; or are arranged by or recommended by
a social welfare agency on the basis of an individual assessment of
special needs of the family or the child, including physical, emotional,
mental, developmental, language, or other identifiable and recognized handicaps; or are arranged by or recommended by a social
welfare agency due to conditions in which it is possible to document
aspects of the physical, social, or cultural environment which are
seriously detrimental to the development of a child and his equality
of opportunity when he enters the formal education system.
(4) A single-parent or a two-parent family requires day care services
due to a short-term family crisis which is regarded as such by the
administering authority.
Family day care—Day care provided in a home other than the child's own may
be either licensed or unlicensed. A mother caring for three to five children requires
a community care facilities licence.   If one or two children are involved, then no
2
 V 34
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 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1976
V 35
formal licence is needed, but subsidization of parents using the home is dependent
on the approval of Ministry of Human Resources' staff. This usually takes the form
of a home visit and check of references.
Family day care has the advantage of being able to accommodate a wide age-
range of children. Hours can be flexible, and care more readily found for children
in their own neighbourhood, or near their schools.
At the close of 1976, there were 243 licensed family day care homes in British
Columbia. This compares with 230 at the close of 1975.
An average of 3,100 children received subsidization each month in the licensed
and unlicensed family day care programs.
Group day care—A regular group day care centre may provide service for up
to 25 children in one group for a period of up to 10 hours per day, five days per
week. Some children attend centres for half the day only. Staff require special
preparation in child care, and the services generally must meet basic standards of
health and safety. Facilities are inspected at least annually by the Ministry of
Health.
Group day care has the advantage of offering care by specially trained staff,
and makes it possible for children to mix with other children of diverse backgrounds.
At the close of 1976, approximately 46 per cent of the total number of community care facilities licensed group day care spaces were filled by children receiving
subsidies. There were 283 centres, licensed to provide 6,368 group day care spaces.
Figure 3
Number of Group Day Care Centres in British Columbia Operating
and Being Developed at Year-end 1971 to 1976
67
152
250
280
2861
283
1971 1972
1 Revision of 1975 Report figures.
1973
1974
1975
1976
In-home care—This service is designed to enable subsidization of shift-working
parents to hire someone to come into their homes to care for their children. Each
plan must be individually approved by the administering authority in terms of
suitability and social need.
Out-of-school care—Family and group centres can often accommodate a child
up to 12 years of age needing care and supervision after school or when school is
not in session.
As of December, 1976, 107 community care facilities licensed out-of-school
services were providing services to 1,396 children. This represents an expansion of
18 new programs since 1975.
 V 36 HUMAN RESOURCES
A maximum of $50 monthly is available under the subsidy program for children requiring care for four hours or less daily during school sessions.
Nursery schools—This is a part-time service offering care, extra stimulation,
and preparation for school for children 3 to 5 years of age. It is also viewed as a
support for families where the parent may require short periods of relief, but not
necessarily full-time day care.
There are 321 community care facilities licensed nursery schools in the Province, providing a service for 7,365 children. An average of 250 children are receiving subsidization each month. Families requesting subsidization are required to
meet financial need criteria only.
Special needs—The objective of the special needs service is to enable children
with physical, social, and (or) emotional problems to receive assistance through
available day care programs in both regular and specialized centres:
(1) A child with social, physical, or emotional handicaps requiring more
support and services than the regular day care program is equipped
to provide may be designated as "special needs." As far as possible,
the integration of these children into existing regular programs is
encouraged.
(2) Where it is possible to document aspects of physical, social, or emotional problems seriously detrimental to the development of the
child, a non-profit group day care centre, nursery school, after-
school centre, with an enrolment of 50 per cent or more children
requiring very specialized care, may be designated as a specialized
pre-school service. A community care facilities licence for specialized day care is required.
Placement is made on an individual basis, related to the developmental needs
of the child.
There are now 50 specialized day care centres in the Province, serving 1,000
children.
Responsibility for these programs is shared with a number of Government
ministries and voluntary agencies. This is one instance in which a high degree of
interministerial co-operation is necessary.
Capital and Equipment Grant Program—The grants program for new day care
development which saw a slowing down of expansion in 1975 was suspended for
1976. There was instead a budget allocation for "contingency" use in high-priority
areas. A total of $36,865 was spent to the end of the year in a variety of ways,
including renovation costs to meet licensing standards and equipment grants for
already established day care centres, and "special needs" centres.
One half of the contingency budget was designated for three pilot projects to
develop supported family day care programs. These projects are located in Abbotsford, Kelowna, and Nelson and are sponsored by local community non-profit
societies. Each society receives a monthly grant of $2,000 to administer and staff
the program.
These projects were started in an attempt to improve the quality of family day
care services. Exact figures are not available, but there are an estimated 10,000
children in British Columbia who spend a large portion of their growing years in
family day care arrangements.
Experience everywhere has shown that children in unsupervised day care can
be "at risk." By developing some services for parent users and caregivers, we are
trying to ensure a standard of child care that will provide both quality and continuity
of child care.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976
V 37
These supported family day care projects offer the following:
(1) Assistance to parents, in planning for children up to 12 years of age
with referral to available choices of care arrangements.
(2) Careful selection of day care parents.
(3) Support services for day care givers, including
(a) relief for the day care mother in emergencies;
(b) equipment and book loan service;
(c) opportunity for child care learning and information sharing
through meetings and (or) newsletters;
(d) assistance in planning for children with special needs;
(e) regular home visiting for consultation about the care of the
day care children;
(/)   increasing community awareness of what is involved in
good family day care.
Ongoing evaluation of these projects is taking place in order to determine the
feasibility of continuing or expanding this approach during 1977.
Changing patterns—During 1976 a number of changes and modifications were
made to existing day care policies.
In order to qualify for subsidization of fees, parents are now required to meet
social need criteria, mentioned earlier in the day care description. It is anticipated
this step will realize an increase in the cost-sharing dollars obtained from the Federal
Government. For the most part, other than the two-parent family where both are
attending an educational institution, this change has not affected day care users.
There were no basic changes to the sliding income test scale or the needs test
used to ascertain financial eligibility.
On June 1, 1976, maximum subsidies available were raised for group day
centre care from $120 to $140 per child per month, and for family day care from
$90 to $100 per child per month.
The fee ceiling which operators were allowed to charge for services was lifted
and day care givers may now establish rates in line with true operating costs of the
service. Prior to this, when any child in the program was in receipt of a subsidy,
the operator was limited to the maximum subsidy in effect. This proved not only
difficult to enforce, but prohibitive to services facing rising operating costs and
Figure 4
Children Receiving Subsidized Day Care, as of December 31, 1971—76
2,500
2,000
1971
1972
9,500
1973
12,950
1974
11,878
1975
10,912
1976
 V 38                                                   HUMAN RESOURCES
differing expenses.   So far, the majority of services have been able to keep fees at
or near, maximum subsidy levels.   However, the impact of this policy on day care
users is being monitored and will be reviewed during this coming year.
Lowered enrolment was a major problem faced by many group day care centres
during 1976.   A number of reasons have been suggested as being responsible,
including higher unemployment, lowered birth rates, higher costs of group care,
more intensive subsidy screening, and increasing preference of parents for alternative types of day care programs.   It is probable that all of these had some effect,
although toward the end of 1976 a reversal of this trend was being observed.
Cost-sharing—The Federal Government cost-shares in the day care subsidy
program on a 50:50 basis.   We do not, however, receive cost-sharing for those
parents qualifying for subsidies using the income test, whose children attend privately operated group day care centres.   Since nearly one half of British Columbia's
group centres fall into this category, it has meant a substantial loss of revenue.
Table 15—Total Day Care Expenditures and Federal Sharing,
Calendar Years 1971-76
Percentage That
Federal                                  Federal Sharing
Provincial                    Portion                                   Is of Provincial
Year                                        Expenditure                  Claimed                                     Expenditure
$                                 $
1976     .                     10,854,971           3,879,035   35.7
1975                             .   12,865,779            4,158,700   32.3
1974                                 10,198,000            3,845,000..                 37.7
1973      4,267,000            1,609,000   37.7
1972      1,534,000               660,000   43.0
1971       1,194,000              518,000    .  43.4
SPECIAL SERVICES TO CHILDREN AND THEIR FAMILIES
Goal—The goal of the Special Services to Children and Their Families Program is to enable children to grow up successfully in their own homes or communities.    Services focus on situations in which a child is clearly in danger of being
removed from his or her own family or community.
Description—Special Services is a program whereby time-limited, one-to-
one services are provided to identified children and their families.    Services are
Durchased, on a fee-for-service basis, from community societies which employ
Special Services workers.    The nature, intensity, duration, and costs of services
vary according to the needs of the individual families, and specific goals of service
are defined at the outset of the intervention.
The first half of 1976 saw a levelling off of the use of this program under the
then-existing policy.   In an attempt to make the program more responsive to the
changing needs of families and children, a Task Group of representative field
staff met in September 1976 and formulated a report with recommendations for
solicy changes.   Since the implementation of some of these recommendations (i.e.,
more flexibility in the duration of service and streamlining of administrative procedures), there has been an increase in the usage of the program and in the number
of societies administering the program.
As of December 31, 1976, there were 35 societies employing a total of 167
Special Services workers.   Over 400 children and families were receiving services.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976 V 39
Ministerial expenditures for Special Services to Children are as follows:
Table 16—Special Services to Children, Ministerial Expenditure,
Fiscal Year 1975/76 and Calendar Years 1975 and 1976
$
1976     1,836,477
1975    3,209,0711
1975/76   3,117,539
1 Revision of 1975 Report figures.
There was a general consensus in the Task Group that the Special Services
to Children and Their Families Program has been and continues to be one of the
most effective and responsive programs for families and children in providing a
viable alternative to apprehension and residential treatment.
Cost-sharing—The Federal Government has agreed to 50:50 cost-sharing
on all expenditures under this program with the exception of expenses for Family
Service status children (an amount which represents less than one half of 1 per
cent of the total budget in 1976).
YOUTH HOSTEL PROGRAM
Goal—Youth hostels are provided to make low-cost accommodation available for Canadian youth travelling in British Columbia.
Description—Youth are referred to hostels for a maximum stay of three
days and are asked to pay $2 per day in Vancouver and between $1.50 and $3 per
day outside Vancouver. This entitles them to a bed and two meals for a maximum
stay of three days. The average age of the travellers was around 20 years, but
ages ranged from 16 to over 25 years.
This year, the Summer Youth Hostel Program involved 14 hostels, most of
them temporary, in nine communities in British Columbia. These hostels provided 25,912 bed-nights for 17,368 individuals between June and September.
Asked to participate in the organization of housing for non-registered participants
in the Habitat Forum, the Association of British Columbia Hostels maintained a
consulting role during Habitat.
As in past years, financial responsibility for the program was shared between
the Ministry of Human Resources and the Office of the Federal Secretary of State.
The Secretary of State, through grants to community groups, funded most of the
salary and operational costs of the hostels. The grant from the Ministry of Human
Resources was used primarily for costs which were not met by user fees for those
hostels outside the Vancouver area. The grant moneys also assisted the Association of British Columbia Hostels to co-sponsor, with Hostels Alberta, a staff training seminar.
The British Columbia Wayfarers Guide was published for youth travellers in
British Columbia and was distributed to all hostels in the Province.
The Association of British Columbia Hostels also acted in a consultant
capacity for a feasibility study conducted by the Canadian Youth Hostels Association.
 V 40
HUMAN RESOURCES
Provincial expenditures for the youth hostel program over the last several
years were as follows:
Year
1976
1975
1974
1973
1972
Table 17—Youth Hostels, Provincial Expenditures,
Calendar Years 1972 to 1976
Amount
$
     ....                                                   78 172
           66,814
     120,503
                    ...                      127,592
        ..... 425,000
The total number of people who used the Summer Youth Hostel Program are
illustrated in the following table:
Table 18—Summer Youth Hostel Program Statistics,
Number Number Number  Canadian U.S.
of of of Cit- Cit-
Persons Males Females izenship izenship Other
Hope           2,022 1,399 623 1,391 421 210
Kamloops       1,263 893 370 809 222 232
Kelowna      1,871 1,234 637 1,466 168 237
Nanaimo       1,560 1,019 541 1,024 287 249
Port Alberni ._.._       583 386 197 403 100 80
Prince George       730 537 193 406 152 172
Prince Rupert        564 351 213 202 225 137
Victoria 1    4,577 2,820 1,757 2,235 1,504 838
Subtotals     13,170 8,639 4,531 7,936 3,079 2,155
Vancouver:
Florence Nightingale.      675 421 254 390 151 134
Henry Hudson        529 523 6 311 98 120
Home Placement _      204 98 106 116 65 23
Queen Mary  _       995 813 182 532 257 206
The Lodge        338 310 28 200 68 70
YWCA     1,457  _ 1,457 815 358 284
Youth Referral
Centrei   _ - —   — —	
Subtotal   —-   4,198 2,165 2,033 2,364 997 837
Totals     17,368 10,804 6,564 10,300 4,076 2,992
1 Placements included in statistics of hostels listed.
2 A further 184 persons were referred to Catholic charities and 49 to tribal villages
7976
Money
Col
Bed-
lected
$
3,564.59
nights
2,610
2,194.80
1,396
3,723.97
2,699
3,218.50
2,078
1,009.05
599
1,669.25
1,087
1,757.68
782
13,746.27
6,628
30,884.11
17,879
485.41
1,332
644.14
1,137
860.00
664
2,034.92
1,927
466.02
657
3,676.45
2,317
5,144.71
	
13,311.65
8,034
44,195.76
25,913
Federal-Provincial Cost-sharing—The two senior Governments shared
costs of the program in 1976 as follows:
Table 19—Youth Hostel Program, Provincial and Federal Funding,
Calendar Year 1976
Federal contribution 	
Total Provincial contribution
142,500
78,172
Total Government funding  220,672
Provincial recovery re cost-sharing      39,086
Total Federal contribution
181,586
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976
V 41
CHILD CARE RESOURCES—INTRODUCTION
It is universally accepted that a sense of belonging is necessary to every child
in order for him to be able to inter-relate in a community of others. It is also
accepted that a child acquires this attribute by deeply experiencing that he is wanted.
Similarly a child builds his own storehouse of self-esteem by being with others
who accept and appreciate who and what he is.
The child acquires an ability to give and to love by being loved and given to.
A child obtains his own individual personhood by having the freedom to
discover what other people mean to him and what he in turn means to them.
A child grows through a stage of youth to maturity only when his personhood
is respected and cherished as being uniquely his.
He grows into a free individual in an atmosphere of freedom and love.
This Ministry and other ministries of Government provide highly developed
programs and professional skills to meet the needs of children. These programs and
approaches can only be effective in our Provincial community if the people who
make up this community want and love children in a climate of hope and joy rather
than despair and fear.
The following figure illustrates the variety of placements that are used for
children in the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare:
Figure 5
Children in Care by Type of Care as at December 31, 1976
Adoption Probation
4%
Receiving and Group Homes
and Therapeutic Homes
7%
Own Homes
or Homes of
Relatives and
Independent
Living
12%
Foster homes
Children
   6,002
Own homes or homes of relatives and independent living  1,148
Receiving and group homes and therapeutic homes  610
Adoption probation     395
Other resources  1,154
Total number of children in care .
9,309
A description of the types of care mentioned in the figure above follows,
beginning with the most frequently used resource—foster homes.
 V 42                                                  HUMAN RESOURCES
FOSTER HOMES
During 1976, some 6,000 out of a total of approximately 9,500 children of al
ages were nurtured and cared for by foster families.   Foster parents form a unique
and vital part of the Ministry's services to children.
Foster families are uncommon in that their greatest gift to the children is their
gift of love. They are also uncommon inasmuch as they lend their own life experiences to the business of nurturing and growing the children entrusted to them.
These same foster parents have taken the challenge upon themselves to
organize into a force for the good interests of children.    Each year the Foster
Parent Federation of British Columbia becomes more alive and vigorous in its
endeavours through able and dedicated leadership. The Federation has, in its own
right, become an authentic voice and conscience that can speak and act on behall
of children.
Foster parents are paid varying rates according to the age of the child. These
rates cover clothing and basic maintenance such as food, the child's share of household equipment and operation, transportation, recreation, gifts, and spending allowances.
In special instances where the child requires extra care or special management,
a reasonable fee for service is paid to foster parents based on the extra amount ol
their time and skills that are required.    Service fees take into consideration tasks
of preparing special diets, special routines, discipline, extra help with homework,
and arranging the child's visits with family and social workers.   Standard fees for
foster care are outiined in Table 20.
Table 20—Regular Foster Home Rates as of December 31,1976
Basic                Clothing
Age-group                                                   Maintenance        Allowance              Total
Birth to 5 years     82.08                  9                  91.08
6-11 years    97.08               17               114.08
12-13 years  118.08              21               139.08
14 years and over  130.08               24               154.08
The year 1976 was one of consolidation in the Child-in-care Section.   Significant progress was made administratively on revising the Policy and Procedures
Manual and the child welfare forms.   These improvements will be completed in
1977.
In December 1976 an important demonstration project was initiated to recruit,
train, and support foster parents in selected areas of the Province.   It is hoped that
this project will result in an increase in the number of trained foster parents,
essential to the Child Welfare Program.  A serious shortage of foster homes for
teenagers became evident across the Province in 1976. The Foster Family Worker
Project is an attempt to find more homes for these children-iri-care and to involve
'oster parents in the process more than in the past.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976 V 43
A comparison of the number of children in foster care during the last several
years is illustrated in the following table:
Table 21—Number of Children in Foster Home Care, as at
December 31,1976, and March 31,1972 to 1976
Number of Number of
Children Children
December 31, 1976 .  6,002 March 31, 1974   6,140
March 31, 1976   6,070 March 31, 1973   6,471
March 31, 1975   6,109 March 31, 1972   6,762
Ministerial expenditures on foster home care in 1976 and fiscal years 1971/72
to 1975/76 are as follows:
Table 22—Foster Home Care, Ministerial Expenditures,
Calendar Year 1976 and Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1975/76
$ Million $ Million
1976   12.5 1973/74   11.6
1975/76   13.3 1972/73   10.3
1974/75   14.6 1971/72   9.5
Cost-sharing—Foster care is cost-shared 50:50 by the Federal and Provincial
Governments.
THERAPEUTIC HOMES
Description—A therapeutic home is a residential resource, usually for one
child, operated by a person with child care worker skills in his or her own home.
The resource is selected when a child requires intensive treatment and would benefit
from receiving it in a family setting rather than a treatment institution. It is frequently used in communities where no treatment institutions exist and the child
would otherwise have to move from the community.
A contract is drawn up between the therapeutic parent and the Ministry of
Human Resources for three months and, where necessary, for further three-month
periods up to a maximum of one year. The contract outlines treatment goals,
methods to be used, and a date when progress will first be reviewed. Guidelines
outlining this policy for therapeutic homes were developed, effective April 1, 1975.
The therapeutic home is a short-term placement with the goal of resolving
specific behavioural or emotional problems and with a view to returning the child
to his or her home or to a less-intensive community resource within one year. This
program was started in 1974 and is in line with Government philosophy of getting
away from institutional placements for children, of solving children's problems in
their own community, and of creating an appropriate resource for a particular child
rather than expecting the child to adapt to existing institutions. The program is
currently under review in order to explore whether it can be altered and with a view
to making it more responsive to current needs.
 V 44 HUMAN RESOURCES
In the 1975/76 fiscal year, $286,352 was expended on this program which
provided for an average of 55 homes on a total-year basis. Ministerial expenditures
on the program from January 1 to December 31, 1976, were $327,974.
Cost-sharing — Payments to persons running therapeutic homes are shared
with the Federal Government on a 50:50 basis.
GROUP HOMES
Goal—The purpose of group homes is to provide skilled, effective parenting
or child care services to children who cannot remain in their own or foster homes
but who are able to function within the community.
Description—Group homes are normally staffed by resident houseparents.
These homes have a capacity for five to eight children and are primarily suitable for
adolescents.
Group homes may have specialized functions such as receiving, assessment,
short-term treatment, or long-term care of difficult children, or they may provide
a combination of services.
Group homes may be contracted for with private individuals, community nonprofit societies, or a combination of these two.
Fees for service are paid to group home parents at monthly rates ranging from
$810 for one full-time houseparent to $1,651 for two experienced full-time house-
parents. Contractual payments to group home parents also include allocations for
food, clothing, and personal supplies for the children, as well as an amount to cover
relief help, care and maintenance of the facility, planned programs of activity,
recreation, and transportation.
Where need for a receiving home fluctuates or where there is no suitable
resource potential for group homes as outlined above, the Ministry may contract for
a "bed subsidy home" on a yearly renewable basis. Under the bed subsidy arrangement the Ministry pays a fee for service of $50 to $150 per month per bed for up
to six beds. Regular foster home rates are also paid for each child placed. These
resources are privately operated. The bed subsidy home in the past has been used
primarily to guarantee bed spaces for short-term receiving or emergency services.
This past year, in response to a growing need for a resource which falls between the
foster home and the group home, more flexibility has been built in to the bed subsidy
home concept. While some bed subsidy homes are still for short-term placements,
a number have now been established which provide longer term care. The most
significant change in the Group Home Program this year has been the increase in
the number of bed subsidy homes.
During 1976, there were 157 group homes budgeted for with 944 bed spaces
involved. The slight drop in the number of resources and beds budgeted for is due
to the reallocation of funds to other programs in the Vancouver area.
Table 23-
-Group Homes (Including Receiving Homes), Ministerial
Expenditures,
Calendar Year 1976 and Fiscal Years 1971/72
to 1975/76
$ Million
$ Million
Ian. 1 to Dec. 31, 1976
.. 6.41
Fiscal year 1973/74 ..
  3.54
Fiscal yeai
■ 1975/76 .....
.. 4.42
Fiscal year 1972/73 ■
..... 1.94
Fiscal year
1974/75
3.73
Fiscal year 1971/72
1.55
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976 V 45
The process of consolidation and the emphasis on utilization, begun in 1975,
has continued in 1976. As a result, some of the resources budgeted for have not
been in operation for all or part of the year, pending further documentation of need,
relevance, and the availability of suitable persons to operate group home resources.
Cost-sharing—Payments made to group home parents are shareable with the
Federal Government on a 50:50 basis.
SPECIALIZED RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT PROGRAMS
Goal—To provide residential care for children in need of specialized child
care services because of emotional or behavioural difficulties, or because of physical
and mental handicaps. The goal of this program is to provide specialized care and
treatment to restore the child to as normal a life-style as possible. The efforts of
Government have been to reduce the size of institutions and the numbers of children
placed in institutions, wherever possible.
Description—Residential placements for emotional and behavioural difficulties are generally utilized when the problems are sufficiently severe that they
require a higher level of professional care than can be provided in community programs. There are approximately 400 children in British Columbia at any given
time who utilize a number of resources. The average capacity of these resources
is 15.
There are also approximately 238 mentally handicapped children in specialized
residential resources in British Columbia at any given time. The average capacity
of these resources is 11. (This figure does not include those children in residential
care at Woodlands, Glendale, or Tranquille which are dealt with under Services
for Special Needs.)
The majority of these programs are operated through independent societies
and vary in philosophy and treatment. The Ministry continues to emphasize shorter
term residential treatment and greater community involvement and family support.
The goal of this kind of residential placement is to help the child adjust to living
again in his community with the minimum of support possible. A number of the
programs are developing shorter term assessment capacities and have initiated
day programs to assist this movement.
The majority of the resources we are discussing are highly staffed. A number
of resources have staff resident ratios of 1:1. The trend toward shorter term programs and more community and family involvement has continued since 1975.
Ministerial expenditures for specialized residential treatment programs in
calendar year 1976 and fiscal years 1971/72 to 1975/76 were as follows:
Table 24—Specialized Residential Treatment Programs, Ministerial
Expenditures, Calendar Year 1976 and Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1975/76
$ Million $ Million
1976   14.1 1973/74   8.82
1975/76   13.2 1972/73   4.7
1974/75   8.4i 1971/72   4.4
i Excludes operating costs for Woodlands, Glendale, and Tranquille.
2 Includes operating costs for Glendale.
Cost-sharing — Residential treatment programs are cost-shared with the
Federal Government on a 50:50 basis.
 V 46 HUMAN RESOURCES
ADOPTION
Goal—Adoption is primarily a service to the child. It is the legal placement
of a child in a permanent adoptive home. Services are rendered also to the person
or persons who want to become adoptive parents, as well as the biological parents
of adopted children.
The Ministry is responsible for ensuring that the legal and social requirements
have been met in each adoption completed in British Columbia.
Description—The program will be described in two sections — adoption
placement and adoption completion.
Adoption Placement
The highlight of the year for Adoption Placement Section was the Provincial
Workshop held in early April 1976. The gathering of chosen representatives from
regional staff, together with some Divisional representatives, was preceded by
Regional Workshops where the total adoption program was discussed. The results
were presented later to the Executive Committee of this Ministry where all recommendations were approved in principle or approved without reservation.
The most important outcome of this conference was the creation of a Provincial Policy and Practices Committee. Within this committee all aspects of practice
and policies will be reviewed and recommendations made to the Superintendent of
Child Welfare or to the Executive Committee. This committee is an active working
group on an ongoing basis to whom questions of practice can be referred.
The Canadian exchange system is actively working out of Ottawa, where it is
identified as the National Desk. Through that office, homes available in one province and not used are referred for children also registered with the Desk. At the
time of writing, a total of 29 homes has been referred in which we have placed two
children from other provinces. We have also registered a total of five children for
whom there is no resource in this Province.
We continue to maintain a level of approximately 630 homes available for all
children, even with limiting placement of healthy infants to those with one or no
children and unable to have more. However, as this Province appears to have a
relatively large number of infants available, first placements are being made usually
within one and one-half years of the date of application.
We also continue to place on an average 33 infants each month who are one
month old or younger. This number has remained steady since January 1975. Our
statistics reveal further that more than 50 per cent of our placements are for children
with special needs such as age, race, emotional, physical, or mental difficulties or by
virtue of being part of a large family group.
The following table illustrates the number of children with special needs placed
for adoption by the Ministry of Human Resources and the Vancouver Resources
Board during the 1975/76 fiscal year:
Table 25—Number of Children With Special Needs Placed for Adoption by
Ministry of Human Resources and Vancouver Resources Board During
Fiscal Year 1975/76
Inter-racial origin and origin other than white
Health problems
Over 1 year of age1
Ministry
of Human
Resources
Vancouver
Resources
Board
Total
150
39
189
131
29
160
2
2
Totals       281 70 351
i Children over 1 year of age who are of inter-racial origin and origin other than white or have a
health problem have been shown in either one of the first categories and are not shown in the category
"Over 1 year of age."
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976                                      V 47
Some interesting sidelights to these placements include:
• The 8-year-old boy whose grandmother had been previously involved but
was unable to continue caring for him.  She was able to visit the adopting
parents' home to satisfy herself that she, and we, were doing right by her
grandson.
• The rejected 6-year-old boy for whom a special non-English-speaking home
had to be located to satisfy the parents who were relinquishing.
• The little boy who had been placed with grandparents who were young
enough to raise him but financially unable to meet the cost of an adoption
medical (not covered through BCMP).
• The whole community where adopting parents reside entered into the placement of a family of four, thus creating an atmosphere of acceptance and
welcome which augurs well for the future.
• Brothers who had been placed a year previously from a treatment centre,
constantly referred to three other children (siblings) who remained behind.
Adopting parents made inquiries to learn that the three had not yet been
placed, asked for information, got to know them, and finally those three
were placed in the brothers' home.
• A 4-year-old boy with serious questions still unanswered about his functioning in the future was placed in an area where he can continue to receive
the special education that he needs.
The following table gives a breakdown of the age-range of children placed
"rom January 1 to December 31, 1976:
Table 26—Ages of Children Placed for Adoption by Ministry of Human
Resources and Vancouver Resources Board During Calendar Year 1976
Number                                                                                Number
of                                                                                         of
Age                                                            Children            Age                                                            Children
Birth up to but not including 15 days 296          7 years      13
15 days up to but not including 1                 8 years        21
month                                     119          9 years      '■                 12
1 month up to but not including 3                  10 years      12
months                                  -       - -    75          11 years  ...      11
3 months up to but not including 6                  12 years        4
months    28          13 years          2
6 months up to but not including 1                   14 years     . . __                 2
year           37          15 years          4
1 year       39           16 years        1
2 years     40          17 years        6
3 years .   ,'                18          18 years         2
4 years             31                                                                      	
5 years     20                        Total     814
6 years      21
Single parents continue to apply and have children placed with them. A single
father received his son in the summer, having spent almost a month living in the
foster home (at their invitation) to get to know him. Father and son now wish to
apply for another boy in the near future to complete their family.
"Hard-to-place" parents continue to receive consideration for placement—the
paraplegic father, formerly a logger, now no longer able to go out to work; the blinc
 V 48
HUMAN RESOURCES
mother who has developed special ways of caring for her baby; the couple who have
to some extent reversed roles in that father's occupation enables him to be at home
to cope with routine household tasks while his wife works out of the home.
During the ensuing year our focus will be on developing and using new techniques to locate homes for children with special needs, particularly for children who
are intellectually limited. Also, we will continue to develop systems to support field
social workers in pursuing the goal of a Life Plan for every child in care.
A comparison over the last several years of the number of children placed for
adoption appears in the following figure:
Figure 6
Number of Adoption Placements Made by the Ministry of Human Resources and the
Vancouver Resources Board, Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1975/76 and Calendar Year 1976
1,254
1,077
836
757
751
814
1971/72
1972/73
1973/74
1974/75
1975/76
1976
The following table gives a breakdown by type of placement for the children
placed in 1976:
Table 27—Adoption Placements in Calendar Year 1976,
by Type oj Placement
Type of Placement
Location
Direct Placement
Foster Home to Adoption
Six
Months'
Probation
Long-term
Probation!
Within
Same
Home
In Another Home
Total
Six Months'
Probation
Long-term
Probation1
In British Columbia	
328
1
119
14
342
3
7
797
Outside British Columbia.
17
Totals	
328
1
133
345
7
814
i These are placements of children with health or other problems requiring a longer period of probation.
 report of the ministry, 1976 v 49
Adoption Completion
The following table, prepared from the monthly worksheets of social workers
in Adoption Completion Section, shows the number of children for whose adoptions
the Superintendent of Child Welfare submitted reports to the Supreme Court in the
calendar year 1976 and the types of adoption. Figures for the calendar year of
1975 are given as a comparison. (These figures will not coincide exactly with the
number of adoption orders made in the corresponding periods because (a) in the
case of reports submitted late in the year, the orders were not made until the next
calendar year, (b) there were a few cases where orders were refused.)
Table 28—Adoption Reports Filed for Adoption Completion Division,
by Type of Adoption, Calendar Years 1975 and 1976
Number of Reports Filed
Type of Adoption 1975 1976
Ministry of Human Resources and Vancouver Resources
Board Placement  674 831
Step-parent   856 867
Other relative     71 93
Private sources   52 54
Totals   1,653        1,845
There was an 11.6-per-cent increase in the total number of children reported
on in 1976 as compared to 1975. The bulk of the increase was in Ministry of
Human Resources placements, up 157 from 1975. This is partly accounted for by
the backlog of adoptions of status Indian children, which could not go to court until
after the rendering of the favourable decision of the Supreme Court of Canada in
October 1975. There were, therefore, fewer Indian children than usual adopted in
1975, and more than usual in 1976. The backlog was cleared up in the first few
months of 1976. Relative adoptions other than step-parent increased by 22, a
large increase considering the small total number of this type of adoption. It is
possible that this increase in relative adoptions resulted from applications by
Canadian citizens and landed immigrants from other countries to adopt related
children, usually nieces and nephews, frequently teenagers, who have come into
Canada from their native lands. It appears that this type of adoption is increasing.
Many of these young people, unless adopted, would not be eligible to remain permanently in Canada, and it appears likely that in some cases no adoption application
would have been made had there been other means available of gaining their
permanent admission to Canada. A tally will be kept by Adoption Completion
Section staff in 1977 of this type of adoption.
Private placements, i.e., those in which the child is unrelated to the petitioners,
and the placement was not arranged through the Ministry of Human Resources or
other social agency, have increased by only two. A much larger increase might have
been expected in view of the continuing shortage of newborn infants for adoption
through the Ministry of Human Resources. It is probable that the supply of privately available babies is being diminished by the same factors which lessen the
numbers placed through the Ministry of Human Resources.
The total number of services to completed adoptions recorded by Adoption
Completion Section workers in the calendar year of 1976 was 363 compared with
 V 50
HUMAN RESOURCES
145 recorded in the calendar year 1975. These services include mainly dealing with
requests for medical and social background information, identifying information
about natural parents, assistance in reunions between adoptees and original blood
relatives, and requests for confirmation of adoption. The policy of the Ministry still
is that no identifying information is given, and no assistance with reunions, but
otherwise all possible information is supplied. A review of some Adoption Completion worksheets of four or five years ago shows a monthly total average of about
five cases of service to completed adoptions, compared to the monthly average of
approximately 30 in 1976.
The following figure gives a comparison of the number of adoptions legally
completed over the past few fiscal years, illustrating what may be a levelling off of
the declining trend reported in previous years:
Figure 7
Number of Children Legally Adopted in British Columbia, Fiscal Years
1970/71 to 1975/76
2,804
1970/71
2,306
1971/72
1,820
1972/73
1,920
1973/74
1,721
1974/75
1,626
1975/76
   REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976
V 53
INCOME ASSISTANCE
Goal—To provide a substitute income sufficient to maintain a basic standard
of living for those unable to provide for themselves through employment or other
resources.
In 1976, new regulations to the new GAIN Act were introduced to comply
with requirements of the Canada Assistance Plan. The changes related to benefit
levels, earnings exemptions, asset levels, appeal procedures, and confidentiality.
Description—Basic income assistance recipients are comprised of the following groups of people:
1. Single-parent families—This, the largest group of recipients, is made up
mainly of mothers and their children. The intent of the program is to provide
security to the mother so that she can devote her time to raising her children.
2. Persons unable to be employed for physical or mental health reasons—
Often, the disability is of a temporary nature and the program attempts to provide
the necessary financial and social supports during the period of convalescence. It
is hoped that the recipient will eventually be able to return to full-time or at least
part-time employment. People in this group are under extra psychological stress
due to the fact that they are no longer participating in the work force and often not
even in the social life of the community.
3. Children living with relatives—Although the Ministry's goal is to keep
parents and children together, in some instances of parental illness, desertion, or
other reasons, children must be placed in another home. Settling them with relatives is usually a positive step in that some continuity of familiar surroundings is
provided, and the child is less upset by the move. The program provides the relatives with financial assistance at the same rates as for foster children.
4. Persons who are employable but out of work—The program provides short-
term help to those individuals without means to support themselves. Many of these
recipients are only marginally employable as they do not have the necessary skills
to compete for the more permanent jobs. The turnover rate in this group is high as
many require help for only a short period of time.
Applying for income assistance—Eligibility for income assistance is carried
out according to established criteria. An examination of need is made based on
financial assets, income, housing costs, and family size. Certain assets and income
are excluded from consideration, for example, the family home and car and family
allowances are exempt.
Basic income assistance rates to eligible persons are as follows:
Table 29—Basic Income Assistance Rate Schedule as of December 1976
(For persons receiving assistance for less than five consecutive calendar months)
Family Unit Size
(Number of Persons)
One .
Two
Three
Four _
Five -
Six _
Seven
Eight .
Nine .
Ten ...
Support
$
_ 85
.. 150
.. 185
.. 220
.. 260
._ 295
.. 325
_ 355
_. 385
.. 415
Shelter
$
75
120
135
150
160
170
180
190
200
210
Total
Basic Maximum
160
270
320
370
420
465
505
545
585
625
 V 54
HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 30—Basic Income Assistance Rate Schedule
(For persons on assistance five or more consecu
Family Unit Size
(Number of Persons)                                                                   Support
$
One (age 55 or over)   155
Two (one adult, one child)   200
Two (two adults, one or both over age 55) .. 220
Three   235
as of December 1976
tive months)
Total
Shelter        Basic Maximum
$                         $
75                230
120                320
120                340
135                370
150                420
160                470
170                515
180                555
190               595
200               635
210               675
Four 	
Five 	
Six 	
Seven 	
270
310
345
375
405
._ 435
Eight 	
Nine 	
Ten 	
465
In the case of a family where the actual shelter cost exceeds the amount of the
rate for shelter, 75 per cent of the extra amount required may be provided by the
Ministry. For example, if the actual shelter cost for a family of four is $225 per
month, an additional housing average of $56.25 per month may be granted:
$225—actual shelter cost
— $150—basic shelter rate for family of four
$ 75—excess shelter cost over basic shelter rate
75 per cent of $75 = $56.25
As stated in last year's Report, there are often items of special need required
by recipients who are faced with various emergencies but do not have assets, family
help, or credit resources to meet the need. Within the provisions of the new GAIN
Regulations, effective October 1, 1976, most of these needs, if they are essential,
can be provided. Examples of special need are repairs to washing-machines, stoves,
and such appliances, repairs to septic tanks, or other essential household repairs
where non-repair could result in a hazardous condition or one deleterious to health.
Changes in the GAIN Act and Regulations have dealt with special needs and
have "tightened up" the administration of this program. Sections 12 (1) and
12 (2) of the GAIN Regulations have redefined items that may be provided and
have made the Regional Director responsible for the authorization of expenditures
rather than the line worker. It is expected that the changes will ensure only essential requests are granted after a thorough exploration by the staff of alternatives
available to the recipient.
Expenditures for items of special need were as follows:
Table 31—Items of Special Need, Ministerial Expenditures,
Calendar Year 1976 and Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1975/76
1976   3,349,615
1975/76   3,995,513
1974/75   2,344,397
1973/74   1,097,095
1972/73      281,555
1971/72       158,921
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976
V 55
Various other forms of help are given by the Ministry and include purchase of
tools or clothing to help a recipient secure employment and provision of transportation and moving costs when it is necessary to move to take advantage of a confirmed
job opportunity in another community. A dietary allowance for special health conditions, of up to $20 per month, may be granted on the recommendation of the
family physician. A natal diet allowance of $25 per month to cover higher food
costs may be allotted to expectant mothers for several months before and after the
birth. To help families with children, there are school start-up fees of $15 per year
for children under 12 years of age, and $25 per year for children over the age of 12.
It is practice to allot an additional $15 per single recipient or $25 per family at
Christmas time.
A very supportive policy for recipients has been the earnings exemption. This
allows a recipient to engage in part-time work without losing all financial gain
through deductions from the cheque.
The Ministry allows exemptions on earnings of $50 per month for a single
person and $100 per month for a person with dependents or a single handicapped
person. This policy encourages part-time employment that helps the recipient to
gain or retain job skills that may eventually lead to full-time employment (see also
description of the Incentive Opportunities Program).
Figure 8
Average Number of Recipients per Month: Basic Income Assistance
Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1975/76 and Calendar Year 1976
123,400
105,300
108,500
111,693
125,552
115,058
1971/72
1972/73
1973/74
1974/75
1975/76
1976
Averaging over 1976, the number of basic assistance recipients in various
categories were as follows: 28,553 heads of families, of which many were single
parents; 62,659 dependents, mainly children; 13,833 single men; 10,013 single
women.
Approximately two thirds of the monthly average of 28,553 heads of families
on basic assistance were single parents. Based on Vancouver figures, approximately
96 per cent of the single parents on basic assistance were women, and 4 per cent
were men.
Supplementation of low-income earners—Persons working in part-time
or full-time employment at low wages may apply to have their income supplemented
up to the appropriate income assistance level, as determined by family size.
 V 56 HUMAN RESOURCES
Total expenditures on income assistance are as follows:
Figure 9
Total Income Assistance, Ministerial Expenditures, Fiscal Years
1971/72 to 1975/76 and Calendar Year 1976
$117
million
$94
million
$92
million
$187.5
million
$171.98
million
$158.12
million
1971/72
1972/73
1973/74
1974/75
1975/76
1976
Cost-sharing—The financial basis of this program is a shared one with the
Federal Government providing 50 per cent of the costs, municipalities 10 per cent,
and the Provincial Government 40 per cent.
EMPLOYMENT SERVICES
Goal—1. To assist in accomplishing the Ministry's desire to find jobs for
employable persons receiving income assistance:
(a) The promotion of programs designed to help employable income
assistance applicants and recipients in securing employment.
(b) The effective administration of these programs, whether separate
from or in conjunction with Federal departments, other Provincial
ministries, municipal and regional authorities and agencies, and all
such other bodies, public or private, whose goals are compatible
with those of the Ministry and the public interest.
2. To assist the Ministry in the implementation of those regulations which
require employable income assistance applicants and recipients to make reasonable
efforts to find and accept employment.
Description—In May of this year the Minister of Human Resources
announced a major plan to reduce welfare costs and simultaneously assist recipients
to gain or regain a useful place in the work force. Previously there had been a
number of more or less successful efforts to achieve similar goals. However, these
were largely of a local or regional nature, although Provincial sanction was accorded
to some by way of grants or sponsorship.
The scope of the present Provincial Rehabilitation and Employment Program
(PREP), as it has become known, is Province-wide. It is the intention that the
services of the program shall be brought within reach of everyone in need of them.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976 V 57
A comprehensive counselling service is provided for income assistance applicants and recipients, to help them find a way to employment in what, for many of
them, is a confusing and disheartening complex societal structure. These services
include advice on behaviour before referral for a job interview, and in-depth
research of complicated motivational problems. PREP not only seeks to serve the
readily employable, but as the staff situation and facilities permit, the severely
handicapped, drop-out youths, single parents, and other special needs categories.
A referral system is operative between the District Offices of Ministry of Human
Resources and PREP, whereby all employable assistance applicants and recipients
are directed to the PREP offices for job registration and referral. In the case of
less readily employable persons, there is, generally, ongoing communication between
the two sets of offices, and as expected, the flow of these referrals is growing as the
program progresses, with heavier demands upon the skills and time of the counselling and job-finding staff.
The actual job-finding process is handled by local employment co-ordinators.
A variety of methods are applied to ensure a constant flow of jobs to those whom
PREP serves. Job banks are created by personal visits and telephone job-search
techniques. To handle the latter calls, incentive trainees are engaged. Letters
encouraging employers to use PREP's services are mailed out at appropriate times
and intervals. These local activities are further reinforced by informational services
supplied to the news media, trades organizations, employer groups, and other
directly or indirectly job-generating resources. In addition, there is regular liaison
at both the executive level and with the line staff of Government departments and
ministries for job openings in the public sector.
With the co-operation and support of the Department of Manpower and Immigration, PREP enjoys the use of that Department's facilities at the majority of its
locations. PREP offices monitor the Canada Manpower Job Information Centres
for openings to which clients may be referred and, vice versa, the Canada Manpower
Centres receive information from PREP about job openings for which the latter has
no suitable candidates. Plugging into the opportunities presented by Canada
Manpower sponsored training courses, apprenticeship programs, industrial training
programs, and special programs for youth, the handicapped, etc., the PREP staff
endeavours to make available for its clientele every opportunity to gain, or regain,
a useful place in our Province's economy.
Highlights of the Provincial Rehabilitation and Employment Program
• By Order in Council the Provincial Co-ordinator for the Program, R. Stew, was
appointed on May 1, 1976. He had previously been the co-ordinator of the
successful Surrey employment program.
• At the end of the year, 30 PREP offices were in operation, with a staff complement of over 70, including clerk-stenographers. The offices make use of the
services of incentive volunteers, who thus gain valuable training in elementary
life skills, such as being at work on time, and in various office tasks and procedures. The Provincial Co-ordinator maintained supervision and direction of
all offices. As the year drew to a close, the need was evident for delegation of
certain responsibilities to Area Co-ordinators and the establishment of an Administrative Office facility with appropriate support staff.
Even in a period of economic decline and relatively high unemployment the
PREP program has performed remarkably well, averaging between 700 and 800
job placements each month.   In terms of financial savings, its direct and indirect
 V 58
HUMAN RESOURCES
impact is great. In terms of humanitarian values, to combat feelings of unemployment depression, worthlessness, attraction to crime, etc., and replace them with
hope, renewal of self-esteem and contributing to a better society for all British
Columbians, the PREP program can hardly be over-estimated.
Community employment strategy—In the early part of the year, Ministry
staff continued participation with the Community Employment Strategy Advisory
Boards in both Nanaimo and Kamloops. While field staff worked in close cooperation with the local Boards and their staff, headquarters' staff participated on
the Federal-Provincial Work Groups which oversees the projects. The Ministry
again provided a grant to the Nanaimo Community Employment Advisory Board
for an employment liaison worker, while in Kamloops, Ministry staff worked on the
development of a Work Activity Project in co-operation with Kamloops Community
Employment Strategy Board and staff.
Table 32—Community Grants Made Available in the Early Part of 1976
$
  45,097
    6,255
Nanaimo Community Employment Strategy Advisory Board  10,122
Victoria Employment Counsellors1
Terrace Golden Rule1	
i During the summer of 1976 these services were replaced by the PREP Program.
REPATRIATION
Goal—To assist recipients to return to other provinces, and occasionally other
countries, when required for social reasons.
Description—This program is available to recipients who demonstrate a
social need for this type of help. Often this is because of health reasons, having a
family in another province, finding employment in another province, or wishing to
return permanently to one's homeland in another country. The program, although
of much benefit to the client from a strictly humanitarian standpoint, is also a constructive force in that many clients reunited with their families, or in a job, are no
longer on continued assistance.
Table 33—Repatriation, Ministerial Expenditures, Calendar Year 1976
and Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1975/76
Year
Amount
1976   47,158
1975/76   32,482
1974/75   30,325
Year Amount
$
1973/74   11,951
1972/73       9,224
1971/72   21,369
The increased expenditures for repatriation reflect in the main extra costs of
individual repatriation rather than an upsurge in the number of repatriations.
Cost-sharing—The program is shared on a 50:50 basis with the Federal
Government.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976 V 59
HOMEMAKER/HOUSEKEEPER SERVICES
Goal—A broad range of homemaker/housekeeper services is provided as an
alternative to institutional care for the aged, handicapped, physically and mentally
ill, and to keep families together in times of emotional, mental, or physical stress.
Homemaker services are also provided to ease the burden of long-term chronic
illness, to encourage the reintegration into the community of young disabled persons,
and to assist in improving the child care and home management skills of parents
whose children are "at risk."
Description—Homemakers provide temporary or long-term care for families,
the ill, and aged. Duties include household cleaning, laundry, shopping, meal
preparation, teaching of household routine, limited personal care, and the care of
children. A homemaker works under supervision and acts as part of a team in the
support of the family or individual client.
During 1976, nearly 2,800 people worked as homemakers or home aides on a
full- or part-time basis. A number of men continued to work with the elderly and
disabled and many more homemakers were employed on a full-time salaried basis.
By year-end, approximately 600 homemakers were working on a full-time basis.
On behalf of eligible persons, the Ministry purchases the homemaker service
from non-profit homemaker societies. The Ministry also awarded some grants to
community groups to provide home help services.
Continued efforts were made in 1976 to maintain special services to physically
disabled persons living independently in the community. Specially trained home-
makers gave assistance to persons living in the Paraplegic Lodge in Vancouver,
providing short-term but essential support to persons on the way to returning to
their community.
Sixty-two non-profit societies were funded in 1976 to provide homemaker
services. The Ministry of Human Resources is working closely with these agencies
and with the Community Homemaker Services Association of British Columbia to
develop better training opportunities for homemakers and to standardize service
throughout the Province.
New non-profit homemaker societies were established in 1976 (with the help
of the Ministry) to provide homemaker services in Fernie, Golden, Kaslo, Keremeos,
Revelstoke, and Victoria.
During 1976 the cost of the service continued to rise again due to increases in
wages to homemakers and supervisors. Even with increases in 1976, however,
homemakers' hourly wages ranged from below the minimum wage to $4.20 per
hour. Homemaker societies set the rate and the Ministry is billed this rate, which
covers the homemaker's wage plus overhead of the society. Most homemaker
societies are still paid on a fee-for-service basis that covers the hours of service only.
The use of homemaker services is effective in creating an alternative to the
sometimes unnecessary use of higher levels of care, such as acute care hospitals,
personal, and intermediate care homes. The cost of providing a 24-hour home-
maker service ranges from $40 to $45 per day. Even at this level the service can
be an economical one and most persons, of course, prefer to stay at home if the
proper care can be provided there.
The year 1976 saw a small increase in use of homemakers in the care of the
elderly with 60 per cent of the services being provided to elderly persons, 12 per
cent to disabled persons, and 28 per cent to families in crisis.
 V 60
HUMAN RESOURCES
Eligibility for the service is determined by a social, clinical, or functional
assessment of the person, and subsidies are provided on the basis of individual financial need, in accordance with the GAIN Regulations.
Subsidies for the service are provided by the Ministry to
(a) income assistance recipients, and
(b) individuals with insufficient income as determined by a needs test.
Individuals are ineligible for the subsidy if assets exceed $1,500 for a single
person, $2,500 for a person with dependents.  Approximately 10 per cent of the
total recipients of homemaker services pay for the entire service themselves.
The following figure illustrates the Ministry's expenditure for homemakers in
fiscal years 1971/72 to 1975/76 and calendar year 1976.
Figure 10
Homemaker Services, Ministerial Expenditures, Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1975/76
and Calendar Year 1976
1 1
$1,187,491  $ 1,394,22 i  $2,812,704  $4,258,384  $7,000,155  $7,200,675
1971/72    1972/73    1973/74    1974/75    1975/76     1976
The following non-profit societies received grants through the Ministry of
Human Resources in 1976:
HOMEMAKER SOCIETIES
Campbell River: Campbell River Homemaker Service
Castlegar: Castlegar and District Homemaker Services Association
Chilliwack: Chilliwack Homemaker Service
Courtenay: Comox Valley Homemakers Service.
Cranbrook: Cranbrook Homemakers Service
Creston: Creston Valley Homemaker Services
Delta: Delta Homemakers Service Society
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976 V 61
Duncan:
Cowichan Family Life Association Homemakers
Duncan Child and Family Service Society
Fernie: Fernie Homemaker Service
Fort St. John: North Peace Homemakers Service Association
Ganges: Salt Spring Island Homemaker Service
Golden: Golden Community Resources Society
Grand Forks: Boundary Homemakers Service Association
Hazelton: Hazelton Community Resource Society Homemaker Service
Kamloops: (Greater) Kamloops Homemaker Service Association
Kaslo: Kaslo Homemaker Services
Kelowna: Kelowna Homemakers Service
Keremeos: Lower Similkameen Community Services Society
Kimberley: Kimberley and District Homemakers Society
Langley: Langley Homemakers Society
Maple Ridge: Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Homemaker Service
Mission: Central Fraser Valley Homemaker Service Society
Nakusp: Nakusp and District Homemakers Services
Nanaimo: Nanaimo Red Cross Homemaker Service
Nelson: Nelson and District Homemakers Services
New Westminster: New Westminster Red Cross Homemaker Service
North Vancouver: VON, North Shore Branch
100 Mile House: South Cariboo Homemakers Service
Osoyoos: South Okanagan Homemaker Society
Parksville: District 69 Homemaker Service
Penticton: Penticton Homemakers Service
Port Alberni: Port Alberni Homemakers Society
Powell River: Powell River and District Homemakers Service
Prince George: Prince George and District Homemakers Service Society
Prince Rupert: Prince Rupert Homemakers Service Association
Quesnel: Quesnel Homemaker Service
Revelstoke: Revelstoke Homemaker Service
Sechelt: Sunshine Coast Homemaker Service
Smithers: Smithers Community Services Association
Sorrento: Shuswap Homemakers Service
Sparwood: Sparwood-Elkford Homemakers Service
Squamish: Howe Sound Homemakers Society
Summerland: Summerland Community Homemaker Service
Surrey: Surrey and White Rock Community Homemakers Service
Terrace: Terrace and District Community Resources Society
Trail: Trail and District Homemakers Service Association
Vancouver:
(Greater) Vancouver Area Homemaker Association
Mother's Help Program (Vancouver Resources Board)
Teaching and Emergency Homemaker Program (Vancouver Resources
Board)
Vernon: Vernon and District Homemakers Society
Victoria:
Victoria Red Cross Homemaker Service
James Bay Community Project
Williams Lake: Williams Lake and District Homemakers Service
 V 62 HUMAN RESOURCES
HOME AIDES SOCIETIES
Brentwood Bay: Aid to Pensioners
Chilliwack: Chilliwack Home Aides
Cranbrook: Sparkling Grannies
Merritt: Merritt Home Care Services
Vancouver:
Cedar Cottage Services to Seniors
The Downtown Community Health Clinic
Fraserview Service for Seniors
Home Aides Resource Team
Kitsilano Inter-Neighbourhood Development
Marpole-Oakridge Senior Program
St. James Social Service Society
Senior Citizens Outreach
COUNSELLING
Goal—To assist in the resolution of personal and family problems.
Description—Over the years the Ministry has become increasingly involved
in providing counsel to persons with individual and family problems. Counselling
involves a wide range of services from basic information to resolving marital and
family stress.
The service is carried out by staff or by referral to other agencies which are
funded under the Ministry's Community Grants Program.
Cost-sharing—Staff costs are shared by the two senior Governments on a
50:50 basis. In the case of community grants, the sharing is determined by the
numbers of persons who are in need, which involves taking into account income
levels according to family size.
The following community grants were made in 1976 to non-profit societies
offering counselling services:
FAMILY LIFE PROGRAMS
Amount Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1976
Abbotsford: $
Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford Community Services         16,000 J
Burnaby:
Burnaby Family Life             2,928
Campbell River:
Campbell River Family Counselling & Crisis Line (percentage)         13,3981
Chilliwack:
Chilliwack Community Services (percentage)          4.1401
Cowichan:
Cowichan-Malahat Family Life Association          8,990
Kamloops:
Kamloops Family Life Association       36,615
Langley:
Langley Family Life Association        19,269
i The figure shown indicates a proportion of the total grant that was applied to these particular programs.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1976 V 63
Amount Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1976
Mission: $
Mission Community Services (percentage)          4,3651
Nanaimo:
Nanaimo Family Life Association        15,989
North Shore:
North Shore Institute of Living and Learning        15,200
Port Alberni:
Port Alberni Family Guidance and Volunteer Bureau (percentage) —       16,2041
Port Alice:
North Island Family Life  1,995
Saanich:
Saanich Peninsula Guidance Association         10,600
Surrey-White Rock:
Surrey-White Rock Family Life Association        15,225
Victoria:
Greater Victoria Citizens Counselling Service  ...      32,050
CRISIS CENTRE PROGRAMS
Campbell River:
Campbell River Family Counselling and Crisis Line (percentage)           13,3981
Coquitlam:
Coquitlam Share Society (percentage)        42,000 *
Courtenay:
Courtenay Crossroads Crisis Centre       23,841
Cranbrook:
East Kootenay Mental Health Society       24,813
Kelowna:
Advice ^Service  .  750
Maple Ridge:
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Community Services (percentage)         15,600 *
Nanaimo :
Nanaimo Association for Intervention and Development       39,987
Nelson:
Nelson Community Services Centre (percentage)         18,8041
Prince George:
Prince George Crisis Centre         19,618
Quesnel:
Quesnel Contact Line       26,856
Richmond:
Chimo-Richmond Crisis Centre  .       59,946
Surrey:
Surrey Intersection Society       35,880
iThe figure shown indicates a proportion of the total grant that was applied to these particular programs.
 V 64 HUMAN RESOURCES
Amount Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1976
Terrace: $
Terrace Community Resources Council (percentage)   6,575 *
Victoria:
Victoria NEED Crisis Line   26,339
INFORMATION AND REFERRAL CENTRES
Burnaby:
Burnaby North Information Centre          2,940
Burnaby South Information Centre          2,940
Kelowna:
Advice Service Kelowna (percentage)   11,7941
North Vancouver:
Burrard View Information Centre         2,205
Hub Information Centre         2,205
Lower Lonsdale Information Centre         2,205
Richmond :
Richmond Information Centre            2,940
Victoria:
Victoria Community Information   1,850
FAMILY SUPPORT PROGRAMS
Armstrong:
Armstrong-Spallumcheen Community Services (percentage)         35,824J
Burnaby:
Burnaby Life Line Society   .       52,059
Cassiar:
B.C. Association of Non-Status Indians—Good Hope Lake Project        17,594
Chilliwack:
Chilliwack Community Services (percentage)          9,6001
Coquitlam:
Coquitlam SHARE Society         40,906
Coquitlam SHARE Society Home Aid Program  5,0431
Cranbrook:
Cranbrook Sparkling Grannies Association         26,606
Kelly Lake:
B.C. Association of Non-Status Indians—Kelly Lake Frontier College       25,298
Maple Ridge:
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Community Services (percentage)   1.2001
Merritt:
Merritt Listening Post Society         18,276
Merritt Home Care Services              11,337
Nelson:
Nelson Family Day Care and Child Care Society        11,397
North Shore:
North Shore Neighbourhood House         15,918
North Shore Supportive Family Day Care Society         4,947
iThe figure shown indicates a proportion of the total grant that was applied to these particular programs.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1976
V 65
Name of Project and Location
Parksville:
Parksville District 69 Society of Organized Services
Penticton:
Penticton Special Action Groups 	
Prince George:
Prince George Moms & Kids Drop-In Centre
Prince Rupert:
Prince Rupert Friendship House Association
Princeton:
Princeton Community Services (percentage) ..
Salmo :
Salmo Community Playschool	
Surrey:
Parents in Crisis	
Surrey Emergency Shelter Society
Terrace:
Terrace Mothers Time Off	
Vancouver:
Family Service Group—lohn Howard Society
Catholic Community Services
Family Services of Greater Vancouver
Vernon:
Vernon & District Community Services (percentage)
John Howard Society—Howard House	
Amount Granted,
1976
9,806
12,898
11,816
11,472
8.9101
75
7,850
6,999
10,646
42,296
37,500
61,149
34.3751
50,000
Total community grants   1,178,251
i The figure shown indicates a proportion of the total grant that was applied to these particular programs.
COMMUNITY ADVISORY COMMITTEES
Goal—Advisory Committees are an expression of the Ministry's desire to
facilitate citizen input, create public understanding, and determine how social services meet the needs of people.
Description—For the first three months of the calendar year a number of
grants were continued to elected Community Resources Boards prior to their dissolution (see table).
Late in September 1976 the Ministry finalized and approved "Guidelines" for
development of Ministry of Human Resources Advisory Commitees. These were
distributed on request to mayors, councils, and school trustees in those communities
where Community Resources Boards had been elected, as well as to members of
other interested communities.
At year-end, Prince George and Surrey had constituted Ministry of Human
Resources Advisory Committees, with discussions going on regarding commitee
establishment in several other communities. No financial payments were made on
behalf of Advisory Committees during the 1976 calendar year.
 V 66 HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 34—Community Resources Boards and Societies Funded by
Community Programs Division for 1976 Calendar Year
Amount
Project Authorized
$
Nelson Community Resources Society  9,888.00
Prince George Community Resources Board    8,100.001
South Cariboo Community Resource Council  1,890.00
Hazelton Community Resource Society  1,155.00
Lakes District Community Resources Society  222.00
Prince Rupert Community Resources Society  6,438.00
Smithers Community Services Association  6,663.00
Dawson Creek Area Resources Society   6,525.00
Kamloops Community Resources Board   7,305.001
Campbell River Community Resources Board  8,211.00 *
Comox Valley Community Resources Society  690.00
Nanaimo Regional District Community Resources Society  5,468.00
Port Alberni Community Resources Board  6,558.0c1
Powell River Community Resources Society  4,572.00
Surrey/White Rock Community Resources Board   1,393.001
Nakusp Community Resources Board   2,940.001
Lillooet Community Resources Society   32.50
North Peace Community Resources Society (percentage)   15,109.OO2
1 Grant continued for first three months of calendar year prior to dissolution of Board.
2 The figure shown indicates a proportion of the total grant that was applied to this particular
program.
VANCOUVER RESOURCES BOARD
Vancouver Resources Board—The Vancouver Resources Board was intended to integrate various publicly funded social services in Vancouver and
undertake decentralization of the social service delivery system.
The staff was reorganized early in 1976 and the role of the former Community
Resource Boards changed to that of advisers to the seven-member Vancouver
Resources Board. There was renewed emphasis on foster home recruitment and
there were major changes in accounting services and a position control system
implemented.
Copies of the Annual Report of the Vancouver Resources Board for 1976
are available on request from the Ministry of Human Resources, Division of Office
Administration and Public Information.
HEALTH CARE SERVICES
Goal—The goal of health care services is to arrange for provision of quality
health care for eligible persons at a reasonable cost.
Description—The Ministry's Health Care Division offers consultation to
social services and paramedical personnel and ensures that people are aware of the
available services. In order to ensure the best possible service, the Division has the
capacity to retain specialists in any field for consultation.
The following groups of persons are eligible for health care coverage through
the Ministry:
"Unemployable" persons under 60 years of age who receive GAIN
payments.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976
V 67
Children in the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare or in the
home of a relative who receives income assistance on their behalf.
GAIN recipients over 60 years of age who qualify through a needs test.
Medical Services Plan "W" cards are issued to eligible persons.  At year-end
1976, 117,682 persons (family heads and dependents) were covered.
T
otal Num
Figure 11
ber of Persons Eligible for Health Care as
at December 3
/, 1971 to 19'/
6
131,855
115,813
120,084
126,633
117,682
112,836
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
Accounts from medical practitioners (doctors, chiropractors, physiotherapists,
etc.) are paid by the Medical Services Plan of British Columbia. Accounts for
hospital services are paid by the Hospital Programs Branch of the Ministry of
Health. The Health Care Division of the Ministry of Human Resources processes
accounts for the following additional services:
A. Medical services—Payment is made for examinations that are required by
the Ministry of Human Resources in connection with the administration of the
GAIN Program.
Payment is made on behalf of eligible persons who require medical clearance
for activities such as camp attendance and sports.
In some cases, when the yearly Medical Services Plan limit for physiotherapy
has been exhausted, the Division may pay for a limited number of additional
treatments.
B. Provincial Pharmacy—The Provincial Pharmacy provided drugs to Government institutions such as Haney Correctional Institute and Government-financed
operations such as community health clinics, the Downtown Health Clinic (in Vancouver), and the Kinsmen Foundation.
Drugs and medical supplies are also provided to persons holding Medical Services Plan "W" cards. Holders of cards may obtain drugs from the Provincial
Pharmacy or from their local pharmacies; 34,404 prescriptions were filled in 1976
by the Provincial Pharmacy.
C. Dental services—Basic dental care is provided for all eligible persons.
Special dental care, such as partial dentures, etc., may be provided, with the prior
approval of the Division and its consultative staff.
Dentists are paid at 90 per cent of their 1976 fee schedule.
D. Optical services—Standard single vision or bifocal glasses are provided
when prescribed by an ophthalmologist or optometrist. Unusual needs, such as
special lenses, trifocals, or contact lenses, may also be provided, with prior approval
of the Division.
Optical suppliers are paid wholesale costs of materials, plus a fee for service.
 V 68
HUMAN RESOURCES
E. Ancillary services—The Division provides prescribed nontransferable
medical needs such as braces, artificial limbs and eyes, and surgical supports when
clients' assets do not permit private purchase. If cost is less than $50, local offices
of the Ministry of Human Resources may authorize purchase. If cost is over $50,
prior approval of the Division is required.
Prescribed wheelchairs may also be provided, but in such cases the client's
needs may be assessed by the Canadian Paraplegic Association or other specialized
agencies, at the Division's request, for the best advice in ordering the specific chair
or other equipment which will meet the client's physical needs and environmental
circumstances.
F. Transportation—Transportation to and from clinics, nursing-homes, rehabilitation centres and hospitals can be provided for clients who cannot use public
transportation. In cases of life-saving emergencies, transportation costs may be
met for persons on marginal incomes.
Local transportation can be authorized by the local office; out-of-Province
transportation requires the prior approval of the Division.
G. Special Health Needs Program—The Division may, at its discretion, provide any of the services listed in sections A to F (above) to persons on marginal
incomes.
H. Experimental programs—Although program budget is limited, the Division is always willing to consider provision of extraordinary items or treatment
which may be prescribed for eligible clients. In 1976, for instance, the Division
made some payments for acupuncture treatments, in two British Columbia centres,
when the attending physician confirmed that standard medical care had not helped
his patient.
Table 35—Gross Costs oj Medical Services jor Fiscal Years 1971/72
to 1975/76 and Calendar Year 1976
Provincial Ancillary    Transpor-
Year Medical        Pharmacy Dental Optical        Services        tation Total
1976   _    687,193 690,955 5,296,651 615,005 785,489 436,239 8,511,532
1975/76      793,8681 622,300 4,209,007 486,080 616,2343 374,850 7,102,339
1974/75     754,422 591,5392 2,380,266 409,213 257,808 387,554 4,780,801
1973/74     634,136 3,256,259 2,655,573 322,489 328,510 419,451 7,616,420
1972/73     677,194 3,626,268 2,429,538 304,387 264,522 367,888 7,669,797
1971/72   _  614,365 3,334,160 2,403,257 290,116 165,979 342,712 7,150,589
i Costs in 1975 Report included some figures which are now under ancillary services.
2 Substantial reduction in 1974/75 and 1975 Provincial Pharmacy costs are accounted for by the
introduction of the Pharmacare Program, commencing January 1, 1974. Drug costs for individuals
eligible for the Ministry's health care services had been budgeted through the Provincial Pharmacy prior
to January 1, 1974.
3 Increase over 1975 Report costs is due to inclusion of figures which were previously under
medical costs.
Cost-sharing—Most Health Care Division programs are cost-shared with the
Federal Government on a 50:50 basis.
BURIALS
Goal—To provide for burial in those instances where there is no family or
estate that can assume responsibility for the deceased.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976
V 69
Description—Arrangements have been negotiated with the Funeral Directors' Association for the provision of caskets, funeral plots, and funeral services
for deceased persons who have not left a sufficient estate to provide for burial and
where family resources are insufficient.
Table 36—Burials, Ministerial Expenditures, Calendar Year 1976 and
Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1975/76
Year
1976 	
1975/76
1974/75
Amount
$
275,898
220,654
187,027
Year
1973/74
1972/73
1971/72
Amount
$
158,109
166,212
187,513
Cost-sharing—The Federal-Provincial sharing on expenditures is 50:50.
COMMUNITY GRANTS
Goal—To provide encouragement to non-profit, community based societies
who offer social services programs which meet a recognized need, are supportive to
the statutory programs of the Ministry and, in addition, offer opportunities for citizens to volunteer their services.
Description—In all areas outside Vancouver City, societies submit applications for grants through the local office of the Ministry. In order to ensure that
services are co-ordinated, do not duplicate or fragment existing programs, and fall
within the guidelines of the Ministry, all proposals are screened by the Regional
Director. Recommendations are then forwarded to Community Programs Division, who process the information for senior administration.
In 1976, 210 grants to community projects provided 490 full or part-time
jobs throughout British Columbia (excluding Vancouver City which is reported as
a separate item). The emphasis, however, continues to be on encouraging the use
of volunteers and thus a far greater number of persons assisted projects by providing skills, time, and effort.
The following table shows Ministerial expenditures on community grants in
calendar year 1976 and fiscal years 1971/72 through 1975/76.
Table 37—Community Grants, Ministerial Expenditures,1 Calendar Year
1976 and Fiscal Years 1971/72 and 1975/76
1976
7,003,534
1973/74
2,871,707
1975/76  8,092,303
1974/75   9,313,165
1972/73       737,850
1971/72      242,678
i Includes the Vancouver Resources Board.
Most of the projects that received community grants are listed in the Report
under the related statutory programs they support. Funded projects that do not
easily fit into one specific category are listed here:
 V 70 HUMAN RESOURCES
TRANSPORTATION PROGRAMS FOR HANDICAPPED AND SENIOR CITIZENS
Amount Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1976
Armstrong: $
Armstrong-Spallumcheen Community Services Society (percentage)          8,280J
Coquitlam:
Coquitlam Senior Citizens Service        20,986
Dawson Creek:
Dawson Creek Community Effort for Senior Citizens       35,404
Delta:
Deltassist Transportation Program (percentage)        90,7801
Matsqui-Abbotsford :
Matsqui-Abbotsford Senior Citizens Transportation Service        31,401
Mission:
Mission Community Services (percentage)   3,000J
Nelson:
Nelson & District Homemakers Service Transportation Project          9,330
New Westminster:
New Westminster Western Society for Senior Citizens      126,369
North Shore:
North Shore Transportation Service       92,489
Penticton:
Penticton Health & Welfare Association, re Penticton Multiple Sclerosis
Project          8,353
Port Alberni:
Port Alberni Wheels for the Handicapped         8,589
Prince George:
Prince George Carefree Society       74,917
Princeton:
Princeton Community Services (percentage)         32,9491
Quesnel:
Quesnel & District Community Aid Society       24,802
Richmond:
Richmond Volunteer Transportation  1,410
Sechelt:
Sunshine Coast Community Resources Society Mini Bus (percentage)       26,6761
Surrey:
Surrey Community Resources Society—Transportation Program (percentage)          33,342!
Vernon:
Vernon & District Community Services Society (percentage)  ..  4691
Victoria:
Victoria Arbutus Crafts Society         9,702
Victoria & Vancouver Island Multiple Sclerosis Society        10,780
1 The figure shown indicates a proportion of the total grant that was applied to these particular programs.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1976 V 71
Amount Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1976
White Rock: $
White Rock Community Aid (percentage)   49,7051
Province-wide:
B.C. Lions Society for Crippled Children  72,929
MULTI-SERVICE AGENCIES
Chilliwack:
Chilliwack Community Services (percentage)        26,2081
Cowichan:
Cowichan Lake Activity Centre (percentage)        41,115 *
Delta:
Deltassist (percentage)        51,200x
Langley:
Langley Community Services         3,66c1
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows:
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Community Services        32,5921
Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford :
Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford Community Services (percentage)         35,135r
Mission:
Mission Community Services (percentage)        31,1911
Nelson;
Nelson Community Services Centre (percentage)        33,1761
Penticton:
Penticton Co-operative Community Services (percentage)        26,593 *
Sechelt:
Sunshine Coast Community Services Centre (percentage)         18.4801
Surrey:
Surrey Community Resource Society      113,7621
INDIAN FRIENDSHIP CENTRES (COUNSELLING AND SUPPORT PROGRAMS) 2
Dawson Creek:
Dawson Creek Nawican Indian Friendship Centre         4,602
Fort St. John:
Fort St. John Keeginaw Indian Friendship Centre         4,602
Kamloops:
Kamloops Interior Indian Friendship Centre         4,602
Kelowna:
Kelowna Central Okanagan Indian Friendship Centre         4,602
Mission-Abbotsford :
Mission-Abbotsford Indian Friendship Centre Society         4,602
Nanaimo:
Nanaimo Tillicum Haus Society         4,602
i The figure shown indicates a proportion of the total grant that was applied to these particular programs.
2 Effective July 1, 1976, the funding of Indian Friendship Centres was provided by the First Citizens' Fund
(.Indian Advisory Act) but administered by the Ministry of Human Resources.
 V 72 HUMAN RESOURCES
Amount Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1976
Port Alberni: $
Port Alberni Indian Friendship Centre         4,602
Prince George:
Prince George Doh De Day Claa Indian Friendship Society         2,301
Quesnel:
Quesnel Tillicum Society .         4,602
Smithers:
Smithers Friendship House Association         4,602
Vancouver:
Vancouver Indian Centre Society          2,301
Victoria:
Victoria Native Indian Friendship Centre         4,602
Williams Lake:
Williams Lake Cariboo Indian Friendship Society         4,602
Province-wide:
Pacific Association of Communication in Friendship Indian Centres       22,152
VOLUNTEER BUREAUX  (PROVIDE SUPPORT TO MANY OTHER PROGRAMS)
Chilliwack:
Chilliwack Community Services (percentage)          8,0521
Cranbrook:
Cranbrook East Kootenay Volunteer Bureau         7,965
Delta:
Deltassist  (percentage)           9,1201
Fort St. John:
North Peace Community Resources Society (percentage)         11,870 J
Golden :
Golden Community Resources Society   3,772
Kitimat:
Kitimat Community Services (percentage)    7,0931
Langley:
Langley Community Services (percentage)          4,2401
Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford :
Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford Community Services (percentage)         16,0001
Mission:
Mission Community Services (percentage)         5,0401
North Shore:
North Shore Volunteers for Seniors          8,985
Penticton:
Penticton Co-operative Community Services (percentage)          8,760r
Port Alberni:
Port Alberni Family Guidance & Volunteer Bureau (percentage)         16,204!
Prince George:
Prince George Volunteer Bureau         3,216
i The figure shown indicates a proportion of the total grant that was applied to these particular programs.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976 V 73
Amount Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1976
Terrace: $
Terrace Community Resource Council (percentage)          6,5751
Vancouver:
Volunteer Bureau of Greater Vancouver, re Voluntary Action Resource Centre       27,291
Vernon:
Vernon Volunteer Bureau          5,376
Victoria:
Victoria Volunteer Bureau         19,759
ANTI-POVERTY/LOW-INCOME GROUPS
Coquitlam:
Coquitlam SHARE Society (percentage)       42,000J
Courtenay:
Upper Island Low Income Society       8,463
Houston:
Houston Social Culture and Recycle Arts Program       6,930
Nelson:
Nelson Community Action Society  180
New Westminster:
New Westminster Self Aid Never Ends Society (SANE)      25,857
North Shore:
North Shore Co-operative Projects Society     19,185
Penticton:
South Okanagan Buyers Co-operative       2,031
Sidney:
Sidney Community Action Society         743
Surrey:
Surrey SHARE Centre      7,836
Vancouver:
Federated Anti-Poverty Group        9,450
Vernon:
Vernon North Okanagan Aid Society       5,688
Victoria:
Victoria Community Action Society  35,843
Victoria & Vancouver Island Mobile Community Food Service  13,978
Victoria Self Help Society  2,714
MISCELLANEOUS PROGRAMS
Aldergrove:
Ishtar Women's Transition House         8,710
Duncan:
Halalt Indian Band Association         2,548
i The figure shown indicates a proportion of the total grant that was applied to these particular programs.
 V 74
HUMAN RESOURCES
Name of Project and Location
Prince George:
Prince George Community Services Centre
Prince Rupert:
Pacific Northwest Native Co-operative	
Richmond:
Golden Rods and Reels 	
Saanich:
Saanich Peninsula Community Resource Society	
Saltspring Island:
Saltspring Island Community Society 	
Shuswap:
Shuswap Youth Centre Society, re Salmon Arm Community Project
Surrey:
Surrey Co-ordinating Centre 	
Terrace:
Native Action for Social Justice	
Vancouver:
The Vinery
Outreach Program
SEARCH 	
Victoria:
Victoria Women's Transition House
Resources Exchange Project 	
Fernwood Community Association
Esquimalt-Vic West-View Royal Advisory Association
Downtown Blanshard Advisory Association	
Province-wide:
B.C. Federation of Foster Parents Association
Social Planning and Review Council	
B.C. Association of Social Workers 	
Canadian Council on Social Development
B.C. Indians Homemakers Association	
Amount Granted,
1976
$
4,500
36,407
1,500
11,508
13,504
11,763
12,045
3,955
900
1,500
4,528
17,340
9,532
1,393
14,556
14,114
55,000
22,500
15,000
16,000
3,420
In Vancouver City, the Vancouver Resources Board administered the Community Grants Program on behalf of the Ministry, to provide non-statutory social
services to Vancouver residents. To be eligible, an agency's program must fall
within the guidelines and priorities of the Ministry and the Vancouver Resources
Board, and not include educational, medical, recreational, or correctional projects.
The following is a list of community agencies, funded by the Vancouver
Resources Board, Community Grants Program, in the fiscal year 1976/77, for
grants approved as of December 31, 1976. Also shown is the percentage breakdown of each category of service and the total grants approved in each category:
CHILD AND FAMILY SUPPORT PROGRAMS
23 Grants    (18.25%)    $292,415.54
Co-Op Homes for Single Parents
Big Sisters
Unitarian Family Life _
Volunteer Grandparents
Family Place	
48,152.00
18,729.00
15,100.00
37,895.00
55,618.96
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1976 V 75
$
Kits Focus  5,000.00
Killarney Family Centre   1,510.00
Fleming Family Education   1,510.00
Foster Parents Association   750.00
Family Outreach Project  29,395.00
Natural Parents Group  2,400.00
Renfrew Collingwood Family Project  19,260.00
Grandview Woodland Family Project  11,845.36
Mt. Pleasant Family Centre  24,530.00
People Place   11,690.22
One Parent Project  160.00
Parents & Adolescents in Crisis Group  372.00
Killarney Life Skills   495.00
Single Parents Student Group   240.00
Fijian Family Worker   3,547.00
Native Orientation for Women  250.00
Kits Mothers & Tots Group  104.00
S. Vancouver Native Indian Worker  3,862.00
SUPPORT SERVICES FOR SENIORS AND HANDICAPPED
Seniors    (15.26%)    $244,581
Carefree   3,500.00
Crossreach   56,529.00
ASK Seniors   19,332.00
Cedar Cottage Seniors  60,780.00
Marpole Oakridge Seniors   37,299.00
Tonari Gumi  16,550.00
Chown Adult Day Centre  8,877.00
FACES    5,000.00
Mt. Pleasant Seniors  500.00
Renfrew Collingwood Seniors Program  20,700.00
Happy Family Activities Group  200.00
Activities Research Senior Citizens  250.00
Kitsilano Seniors Party  244.00
West End Adult Care  6,570.00
Elderly Citizens Handicapped Co-ordinator  8,250.00
HANDICAPPED    (20.54%)    $329,089
Mental Patients Association  1  43,949.00
Vancouver Community Workshop   _ 34,214.40
3H Society   10,692.00
Coast Foundation     97,165.00
Handicapped Resource Centre  104,550.00
Downtown Handicapped Program  11,064.00
HEAR HEAR Program    5,400.00
Kitsilano Workshop   20,149.00
Douglas Park Handicapped Outreach  1,680.60
Perceptual Motor Skills  225.00
YOUTH PROGRAMS
24 Grants    (9.53%)    $152,764.72
Kitsilano Youth Worker   16,000.00
Gordon House Childrens Program   7,900.00
Gordon House Youth Worker  9,500.00
Strathcona Youth Co-ordinator  13,333.00
Native Indian Youth Worker  11,000.00
Fairview Mt. Pleasant Summer Fun  3,373.00
Kiwassa MacDonald Project   4,104.00
 V 76 HUMAN RESOURCES
$
Marpole Oakridge Summer Youth Diversion  500.00
SAK Summer Youth Diversion Project  1,000.00
Social Enrichment ~—  10,726.00
Streetfront Development   300.00
Summer Fun 1976  2,400.00
Kivan Summer Fun   1,980.00
Franklin School Youth Worker  9,333.00
Strathcona Summer Enrichment Program  2,650.00
Perspective   460.00
Fraser School Child Care Counsellor  9,839.00
Guidance Through Group Work  8,000.00
Cedar Cottage Kensington Youth Project  8,343.00
Carleton Social Adjustment   3,486.60
Mt. Pleasant Teen Centre  7,000.00
Marpole Oakridge Youth Project   5,814.36
SAK Youth Project   6,447.76
Grandview Woodland Native Youth Worker  9,275.00
CRISIS CENTRES AND DROP-IN CENTRES
4 Grants    (2.86%)    $45,827
Crisis Centre
Vancouver Crisis Centre    21,464.00
Drop-in Centres
Door Is Open  10,000.00
New Hope Drop In  2,813.00
Dugout Day Centre   11,550.00
LOW INCOME GROUPS
4 Grants    (2.84%)    $45,541.20
Greater Vancouver Helpful Neighbour Society  38,319.20
Grandview Free Store   __ 5,770.00
Little Mountain Activities Society   952.00
Little Mountain Tenants Association   500.00
TRANSPORTATION FOR SENIORS AND HANDICAPPED
6 Grants    (6.69%)    $107,303.50
Senior Citizens Outreach      52,800.00
Kitsilano Senior Citizens Group  12,033.00
Fraserview Transportation Service   16,057.00
Kitsilano Transportation Service  8,211.00
Fairview Mt. Pleasant Transportation Service ,  8,662.50
Grandview Senior Citizens Outreach   9,540.00
MISCELLANEOUS
9 Grants    (23.99%)    $384,477.06
MOSAIC    111,000.00
Vancouver Indian Centre  23,859.00
St. James Social Service   104,785.92
Downtown Community Health Society  87,458.80
MacLean Park Driver Training Project   11,000.00
Kitsilano Greek Worker    12,421.00
Tenants Advisory Counselling Service  11,782.50
Neighbour to Neighbour  13,817.00
Mt. Pleasant Neighbourhood Centre  8,352.84
 SERVICES FOR
SPECIAL NEEDS
  REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1976 V 79
GAIN  (GUARANTEED AVAILABLE INCOME FOR NEED)
FOR HANDICAPPED PERSONS
Goal—To provide the income essential for disabled persons to meet their
everyday living requirements and maintain their sense of independence and dignity.
Description—As a part of the Guaranteed Available Income for Need Program (GAIN), disabled persons over 18 years of age are guaranteed a monthly
income of $265 per person (December 1976 rates). For detailed statistics and
further information, see the section on GAIN in "Services for Senior Citizens."
Field staff of the Ministry determine eligibility in so far as income is concerned,
then each applicant's medical documentation is sent to the Ministry's Health Care
Division in Vancouver for a determination of sociomedical eligibility.
The following table depicts the number of recipients and Ministerial expenditures for the month of December in each of the years 1973, 1974, 1975, and 1976:
Table 38—GAIN jor Handicapped Persons
Number of Ministerial
Recipients Expenditures
$
December 1973        6,300 1,237,000
December 1974     8,700 1,892,000
December  1975        9,918 2,326,103
December 1976   10,680 2,660,052
Cost-sharing—The Federal Government participates in the cost of GAIN
for handicapped persons in those cases where assets do not exceed $1,500 (single)
or $2,500 (couple).
The following community grants were made to non-profit societies operating
programs for handicapped persons during 1976:
Amount Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1976
Courtenay: $
Bevan Lodge Association       1,800
Grand Forks:
Grand Forks Society for the Handicapped  5,833
Mission:
Mission Workshop Association     4,920
Nelson :
Kootenay Society for the Handicapped   770
Nelson Silver King Workshop      3,098
North Shore:
North Shore YMCA—Integrated Handicapped Program ,.  4,770
Surrey:
Surrey Rehabilitation Workshop     30,800
Surrey Senior Citizens Activation and Motivation Program   65,361
 V 80 HUMAN RESOURCES
Amount Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1976
Vancouver: $
Canadian Red Cross Swimming for the Disabled  6,036
Vancouver-Richmond Association for the Mentally Retarded   10,000
Victoria:
Greater Victoria Activity Centre Society, re Swan Lake Centre  50,000
Victoria Citizens Advocacy     14,000
Victoria Physically Handicapped Action Committee   6,846
Province-wide:
Association of Concerned Handicapped  23,577
B.C. Mental Retardation Institute     33,000
Canadian Paraplegic Association   58,000
Canadian Wheelchair Sports Association (B.C. Division)   10,200
Total   329,011
ACHIEVEMENT CENTRES
This program was previously called the Activity Centres Program for Handicapped Persons. The new name better reflects the diversity of programs offered by
agencies in their quest to help handicapped persons improve their quality of life.
Goal—To provide assistance to registered non-profit societies or agencies
which operate programs designed to improve the quality of life for handicapped
persons over school-leaving age.
Description—At least three types of achievement centres have evolved
throughout the Province:
(1) Centres which offer programs for teaching and practice of life skills,
social skills, and which often use arts and crafts as focal points of
operation.
(2) Workshops which aim to provide supervised and non-competitive
work for those persons unable to enter the regular labour force. This
is most often accomplished by the manufacture or refurbishing of
articles for sale, or contract work for other organizations.
(3) Comprehensive work-rehabilitation programs, which by means of
assessment, training, and job seeking, aim to place people into the
regular labour force.
A number of centres operate components of all three programs.
To be eligible for financial support from the Ministry of Human Resources,
centres must agree to the following conditions:
(1) To serve physically or mentally handicapped persons over school-
leaving age, regardless of the handicapping condition.
(2) To provide evidence of continuing community support.
(3) To accept participants from community boarding-homes without
charging a fee (approximately half of the subsidized centres in the
Province charge a "training fee" to participants who do not reside
in boarding-homes).
(4) To ensure that charges made for contract work are comparable to
rates charged by the private sector for similar work performed.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976 V 81
(5) To operate under the auspices of a registered agency or non-profit
society.
Once approved, centres submit monthly billing forms to the Ministry of Human
Resources and payment is based on a formula determined by the number of user/
hours per month. The monthly grants give assistance with staff salaries and (or)
costs of supplies.
Effective July 1, 1976, a new formula of payments was introduced. The effect
has been to remove certain anomalies contained in the old formula, and to provide
an increased grant to the majority of centres. The new formula pays a rate of 62.5
cents for each user/hour. At year-end, 64 centres were in receipt of grants, and the
amounts paid to each are listed at the end of this section.
Approximately 3,600 persons attend the centres each month.
During the year there has been an upsurge in the number of workshops aiming
to expand their areas of manufactured items for sale. Usually this has been directed
toward a movement away from items which, historically and traditionally, have been
produced by handicapped people, into new and innovative areas of production.
To help this concept, the Ministry of Human Resources and the Ministry of
the Provincial Secretary jointly sponsored an exhibition of work from workshops
for the handicapped at the Pacific National Exhibition. The diversity and complexity of goods displayed has done much to enhance the public image of the
capabilities of workshops.
A second exhibition was shown to the trade at the Pacific Furniture Market
during November 1976. The result has been a dramatic increase in the potential
volume of production work, and a number of centres are currently addressing ways
and means of meeting the new challenge.
Ministerial grants to Achievement Centres totalled $1,608,458 in 1976, up
from $1,204,014 in 1975.
Cost-sharing—The Federal Government shares costs based on the percentage
of achievement centre participants whose income is no higher than Provincial support levels. For example, if 80 per cent of an achievement centre's participants are
GAIN (handicapped allowance) recipients, the Federal Government will pay 50
per cent of the costs on that 80 per cent.
Ministerial expenditures to Achievement Centres in 1976 were as follows:
Amount Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1976
Abbotsford: $
MSA Community Services         31,872.75
MSA Association for the Retarded           38,664.25
Armstrong:
Armstrong-Enderby Association for the Mentally Retarded         18,008.50
Burnaby:
Burnaby Association for the Mentally Retarded        40,372.50
Campbell River:
Campbell River District Association for the Mentally Retarded ....       13,987.50
Castlegar:
Kootenay Society for the Handicapped        10,890.00
Chilliwack:
Chilliwack & District Opportunity Workshop         18,950.00
Courtenay:
Bevan Lodge Association          46,432.25
 V 82 HUMAN RESOURCES
Amount Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1976
Cranbrook: $
Kootenay Society for Handicapped Children        21,679.001
Creston:
Kootenay Society for Handicapped Children        11,260.00
Dawson Creek:
Dawson Creek Society for Handicapped Children        16,022.49
Duncan:
Duncan and District Association for the Mentally Retarded       32,476.37
Grand Forks:
Grand Forks and District Society for the Handicapped         9,360.00
Hope:
Hope Association for the Retarded        11,610.00
Invermere:
Windermere and District Social Service Society        14,387.87
Kamloops:
Kamloops Society for the Retarded       54,710.00
Kelowna :
Canadian Mental Health Association        40,575.87
Kelowna and District Society for the Mentally Retarded       42,126.75
Langley:
Langley Association for the Handicapped       23,456.24
Maple Ridge:
Maple Ridge Association for the Mentally Retarded        25,328.00
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Community Services Council        28,120.35
Merritt:
Nicola Valley Association for the Mentally Retarded        12,875.00
Mission:
Mission Workshop Association        30,416.22
Nanaimo :
Canadian Mental Health Association         15,240.00
Nanaimo Association for the Mentally Retarded        26,362.49
Nelson:
Kootenay Society for the Handicapped          17,993.75
New Westminster:
New Westminster-Coquitlam Society for the Retarded        76,928.99
Sha-Sha Club       28,263.00
North Vancouver:
Canadian Mental Health Association          13,512.50
North Shore Association for the Mentally Retarded       46,169.372
Penticton :
Penticton and District Society for the Mentally Handicapped        46,423.00
Port Alberni:
Alberni District Association for the Mentally Retarded        14,743.75
i December figure estimated.
2 November figure estimated.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1976 V 83
Amount Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1976
Port Coquitlam: $
New View Society        12,000.00
Powell River:
Powell River Association for the Mentally Handicapped       32,156.74
Prince George:
Prince George and District Association for the Retarded       23,508.13
Princeton :
Princeton and District Community Services         7,250.00
Quesnel:
Quesnel and District Association for the Mentally Retarded        11,790.00
Salmon Arm:
Salmon Arm Association for the Mentally Retarded       23,692.50
Sardis:
Upper Fraser Valley Society for the Retarded        14,943.12
Squamish:
Howe Sound Association for the Mentally Retarded         2,160.00
Surrey:
Surrey Association for the Mentally Retarded       29,385.62
Terrace:
Terrace Association for the Mentally Retarded         7,060.00
Trail:
Kootenay Society for the Handicapped        14,545.62
Vancouver:
Canadian Mental Health Association   37,688.74!
Coast Foundation Society   41,540.623
St. lames' Social Service Society  11,608.00!
Carscraft Bluebird Workshop    11,340.00
Vancouver Mental Patients Association Society  23,590.74
Vancouver-Richmond Association for the Mentally Retarded  141,402.50!
Vernon:
Canadian Mental Health Association        22,414.37
Vernon and District Association for the Mentally Retarded       45,705.00
Victoria :
Arbutus Crafts Association   28,199.99
Canadian Mental Health Association  50,563.12
Greater Victoria Association for the Mentally Retarded  71,704.70
White Rock:
White Rock District Modern Services Club for the Handicapped       23,760.00
Semiahmoo House Association        28,720.00
Williams Lake:
The Summit         12,510.00
Total cost of Achievement Centres Program in 1976  1,608,458.27
i December figure estimated.
3 November and December figures estimated.
For more information, contact your local Ministry of Human Resources or the
Director, Special Care Adults Division, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
 V 84 HUMAN RESOURCES
EDUCATIONAL UPGRADING AND VOCATIONAL TRAINING
Goal—To assist income assistance recipients needing vocational, educational,
or rehabilitative training in order to obtain employment.
Description—In 1976, policy was revised in order to eliminate single employable people from receiving educational assistance rather than seeking work. A close
liaison is maintained with the Provincial Rehabilitation and Employment Program
(PREP) counsellors, and it is only when they advise that a person requires further
educational or vocational upgrading to become "job ready" that such assistance is
provided. In addition, income assistance recipients who are single parents with
dependent children are now screened more thoroughly to ensure that attendance at
an education or training facility is essential for their future employment and to
ensure that, by obtaining employment with their current education and training,
their children will not suffer from loss of parenting by the provision of day care.
Emphasis is now more on short-term vocational training than on longer term university training.
When an income assistance recipient has been given a loan or grant from the
Student Services Branch (Ministry of Education), to prepare for employment within
one or two years, our Ministry may continue providing income assistance while the
recipient is in school. In 1975 a new policy was established to allow such students
a $100 exemption on their income assistance cheques for grants or loans that
include living expenses. Eligibility for medical and dental coverage is not affected
by attendance in school and day care subsidies are available.
In addition to the program mentioned above, persons in receipt of income
assistance are encouraged to upgrade their education through night school courses
offered in local senior secondary schools or community colleges. Such upgrading
may be necessary to qualify the person to take technical or vocational courses sponsored by Canada Manpower. A training grant of up to $25 monthly if the person
has dependents, or $15 monthly if single, is available to assist with such academic
upgrading or technical refresher courses.
The restricted employment market this year has presented problems to staff
members attempting a counselling service for income assistance recipients to determine a selection of upgrading and vocational training courses that will best benefit
the individual when seeking employment. A survey of major district offices indicated the following problems:
(1) Lengthy waiting-lists for Canada Manpower training courses where
clients were "lost" because the waiting-period outlasted their motivation.
(2) Canada Manpower, in rapidly changing economic and technological
times, cannot foresee the job market for a trainee months ahead of
graduation. Consequently, Ministry of Human Resources district
offices must continue income assistance payments to individuals who
have not obtained employment upon completion of courses and who,
as a result, also require additional counselling and encouragement.
In order to overcome these problems at the field level, a closer co-operation
with PREP personnel in selecting recipients for assistance with training is being
encouraged. Centrally, closer co-operation is being developed with the Ministry of
Education branch responsible for vocational training.
The Income Assistance Division continued to successfully participate in the
Interministerial Student Support Committee initiated last year by the Student Services Branch of the Ministry of Education.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976
V 85
The following figure shows Ministerial expenditures on Educational Upgrading
and Vocational Training:
Figure 12
Educational Upgrading and Vocational Training, Ministerial Expenditures,
Calendar Years 1972-76
.160,000
$80,000
$185,000
$290,000
$303,566
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
Cost-sharing—Costs of training grants are shared with the Federal Government on a 50:50 basis.
WORK ACTIVITY PROJECTS
Goal—The thrust of this program is to develop employment preparation-type
projects which will provide income assistance recipients or persons likely to be in
need with an improved capacity for entry or re-entry into employment.
The focus is on the development of elementary skills relating to work, the
restoration of self-confidence and a positive approach to real life situations, both
in work and in the personal and social environment of the participant.
Description—The goals of the program are accomplished by
(a) providing a work experience;
(b) training in life skills and classroom instruction in academic courses;
if required;
(c) referral and follow-up to job-finding agencies, vocational training.
Three work activity projects were funded by the Ministry in 1976. The three
projects in operation are:
FOR ADULTS
The Fraser Valley Work Activity Project, headquartered in Mission, continues
to offer participants employment preparation through forestry and related work.
The five crews (two in Chilliwack, one serving Mission and Abbotsford, and one
each in Hope and Maple Ridge) work in the bush under the supervision of Forest
 V 86
HUMAN RESOURCES
Service foremen for three weeks out of every four. During the fourth week the
crews attend a Life Skills program co-ordinated by Fraser Valley College.
Each participant in the project works an average of 140 hours per month and
receives between $100 and $180 more than basic social assistance. However, the
real value of the program lies not in the extra money the participants receive but the
work experience and training which help prepare many of them for regular employment.
Slightly over half (58 of 115) of the participants who left the project during
1976 left to take full-time employment. Others went on to vocational training and
upgrading; but even for those who didn't find jobs the program was a success as
many participants reported greatly enhanced feelings of self-worth and accomplishment after having worked on the project crews.
The project expanded into Maple Ridge in November 1976, and by year-end
58 people were working on the five crews. This brought total participation to 173
persons.
With the continued co-operation of the Forest Service and Fraser Valley
College the program will undoubtedly continue to benefit many people.
Projected future plans for the work activity project include provision of more
meaningful work experiences for female participants as well as the addition of two
staff members—one to help in the planning of work projects and the other to help
with counselling and the referral and follow-up of participants to employment or
vocational training.
FOR YOUTH
The work activity projects for boys and girls 15 to 18 years of age provide
educational and (or) vocational training to youth who have withdrawn early from
school.
Two work activity projects for youth were funded in the Capital Region in
1976. Both projects are administered by the Greater Victoria Boys' and Girls' Club,
a non-profit society.
Participants are referred from the Family Court, the Ministry of Human
Resources, and the school system.
The two projects provide work experience, primarily through outdoor activity
such as grounds maintenance, brush-clearing, environmental improvement activities, and a wood-lot operation. Some work placements in private businesses are
also carried out on a short-term basis.
A life-skill program is also provided which includes training in first aid, life-
saving, and sports. Educational upgrading is strongly encouraged through participation in individual correspondence courses with the full co-operation of the local
school district.
Ministerial expenditures for work activity projects are as follows:
Table 39—Work Activity Projects, Ministerial Expenditures, Calendar Year
1976, and Fiscal Years 1972/73 to 1975/76
Expenditure
Year $
1976   353,372
1975/76   399,604
1974/75   313,117
Expenditure
Year $
1973/74   366,710
1972/73    279,257
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976 V 87
The two main centres for the program are Victoria and Langford. The Victoria
section is limited to boys, while the Langford operation provides an opportunity for
both boys and girls.
A total of 100 young people participated in the projects between January and
December 1976.
Cost-sharing — Work activity projects are initiated by Provincial Ministries
and shared on a 50:50 basis with the Federal Government.
INCENTIVE OPPORTUNITIES PROGRAM
Goal—The objective of this program is rehabilitative. It seeks to provide a
work-like experience for recipients. Such practical experience may improve the
individual's competitive position in the labour market such that the individual can
achieve economic independence.
Description—The program is operated at the local level, with training placements being found by recipients and district offices in both Governmental and
private non-profit agencies. The range of a job-training placement is, therefore,
quite broad. Participants work in hospitals, libraries, schools, recreational associations, and social service agencies.
The focus of the program is highly individualized with each recipient aiming
to improve specific work-skill areas. At the outset, a staff worker from the district
office and the recipient enter into a written agreement that outlines the goals the
individual seeks to achieve, the job to be performed, and the agency where the
opportunity is located. In return, the district office agrees to grant up to $50 per
month for single recipients who provide a minimum of 20 hours of service per
month, and up to $100 per month for recipients with dependents who provide at
least 40 hours of service per month. The grants are not construed as a wage, but
are considered as an honorarium to assist the individual with the extra costs he or
she encounters. Participation in the program is purely voluntary and normally
limited to six months' duration per contract.
The following table illustrates numbers of persons and costs involved in the
Incentive Opportunities Program.
Table 40—Incentive Opportunities Program
Number on
Program (Average
Over 12-month Cost of Program
Calendar Year                                                                                     Period) $
1976   2,400 2,965,270
1975   2,000 2,415,000
1974   4,200 4,400,000
1973   2,400 2,550,000
1972   2,300 1,750,000
The number of recipients on the Incentive Opportunities Program declined in
1975 following a policy decision to limit participation more strictly to instances
where job training was leading to a definite job at the end of the six-month period on
the program. Previously, recipients had often remained on the Incentive Program
for a greater length of time than the six-month period.
Cost-sharing—Costs are shared 50:50 with the Federal Government.
 V 88 HUMAN RESOURCES
COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT PROGRAM
Goal—The object of this program is to provide an opportunity for socially
handicapped or otherwise unemployable persons to participate with others in
Community Services endeavours, thereby benefiting both themselves and their
community.
Description—This program was introduced in June 1976. Like the Incentive
Opportunities Program, the Community Involvement Program is operated at the
local level with proceeds from both Governmental and private non-profit agencies
and through co-operative ventures where mutual benefit is derived by participation
with others.
The Ministry of Human Resources provides a grant to participants in this program of $50 per month to cover transportation, clothing, and miscellaneous
expenses associated with the program.
Unlike the Incentive Opportunities Program, there are no compulsory hours
for participants in the Community Involvement Program, nor is the duration of the
contract time limited. These aspects are determined by the needs of the individual.
Cost-sharing—The Community Involvement Program is cost-shared by the
Federal Government on a 50:50 basis.
SERVICES FOR THE RETARDED
Goal—The Ministry of Human Resources strives to provide the opportunity
for every mentally retarded person to achieve his or her maximum potential. As
far as possible, every retarded child should have the opportunity to live with his or
her own family and to participate fully in community life. As an adult, the retarded
person has a right to economic security and the opportunity to engage in a meaningful occupation as determined by his or her capability.
Description—It is still considered to be in the best interests of the mentally
retarded, and in keeping with the principle of normalization, to refrain from creating
a special division or department. Ministerial services, including those for retarded
persons, are available to all citizens of the Province, based on the need for service,
not by label or category.
Each Ministerial program is reported in detail in its appropriate section of this
Report. Below, however, is a listing of programs which have specific relation to the
needs of the mentally retarded.
Day Services
Injant development (birth to 3 years) —A review of services indicated that
valuable time may be lost if a delay occurs in providing appropriate stimulation and
remedial assistance for the infant. A pilot home-based project sponsored by the
Vancouver-Richmond Association for the Mentally Retarded had proven how effective direct service for the young child and support service for parents could be. The
staff provide families with medical and social information and assist the families in
utilizing specialist services in the community.
In 1976, two new programs were funded by the Ministry in Kamloops and
Kelowna, bringing the total number of Infant Development Programs to nine.
Some 300 infants are now being seen on a regular basis, many group sessions
for mothers and infants are also now in operation.
Encouraging results are being reported of youngsters from the earlier programs
who are now attending regular pre-school and kindergarten classes.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976 V 89
Requests for further programs continue to be received. The Provincial Advisory Committee has been very active during the year, establishing guidelines,
standards, and philosophy.
Day care (age 3 to 6 years)—Day care services, particularly under the policy
of day care for children with special needs, has assisted many handicapped children
to enjoy a useful day care experience.
School-age children—Through special chapter schools and School Board sponsored schools and special class opportunities, increasing numbers of mentally
retarded children are able to attend school with their peers.
In some communities the Ministry has funded alternative school projects that
have been designed to meet the special needs of retarded youngsters.
Activity centres—Through a growing number of activity centres and sheltered
workshops, most handicapped adults can spend the greater part of each day in
productive and rewarding activities.
Residential Programs
Foster homes—Many handicapped children and some adults, unable to continue in their own homes, have found foster homes to be a placement of choice.
Group homes—For many handicapped persons, group homes (sponsored by
local community groups or chapters of the Association for the Retarded) provide
an agreeable place to live. By the end of the year, 446 retarded persons resided in
group homes.
Short-stay hostels—Many parents need a short respite from the responsibility
of caring for a handicapped child. New short-stay hostel accommodations were
developed and funded in Burnaby and Victoria in 1975 to meet this need. Similar
hostels had been established earlier in Sardis and Vancouver.
A summer program was launched in co-operation with the Loyal Protestant
Home for Children in New Westminster. Year-round capacity is available for short
stays for retarded children and adults in several extended-care facilities, Woodlands,
Tranquille, and Glendale.
Training centres — The following centres are available to assist residents to
prepare for independent living in their own homes or communities:
Name of Training Centre and Location Capacity
Endicott Home, Creston  62
Northern Training Centre, Smithers  33
Beaver Lodge, Oliver   32
Variety Farm, Delta  44
Chrisholme, Langley   24
Bevan Lodge, Courtenay  65
Total capacity    260
These training centres are funded by the Ministry of Human Resources to
provide life-skill instruction for retarded adults who have previously lived in institutions but who may be able to move to more independent living arrangements once
they have learned to perform basic daily skills. Many necessities such as shopping
and cleaning one's clothes are, of course, carried out by others in institutional settings, so these skills must be taught to persons who have not had the opportunity
to develop the ability and confidence needed for greater independence.
Boarding and personal care homes — A total of 3,600 handicapped persons
reside in boarding and personal care homes throughout the Province. The Ministry
 V 90 HUMAN RESOURCES
is grateful to the many volunteers who visit and arrange programs over and above
those supplied by the home operators.
Independent living—More emphasis is being given to providing apartments or
condominiums for handicapped persons who can look after themselves as long as
they have someone to turn to should extraordinary circumstances arise.
An example of this arrangement is the Arlington Street Townhouses sponsored
by the Vancouver-Richmond Association for the Retarded in Vancouver.
RESIDENTIAL INSTITUTIONS
I. Glendale Lodge
Glendale serves the residents of Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands by
providing residential care and training for 300 severely and profoundly retarded
persons.
Additional services include assessment services for mentally retarded persons,
audiological assessments for children with hearing handicaps, and day care service
for multiple-handicapped adults residing in the Greater Victoria area.
The Glendale Lodge Society is operated under the Societies Act by a Board
of Directors appointed by Order in Council for a two-year term.
For program planning purposes, Glendale relates to the Ministry of Human
Resources in the same manner as Woodlands and Tranquille.
The following table gives statistical information on Glendale:
Table 41—Glendale Lodge
1975 1976
Resident population as at December 31   307 305
Admissions, 12 months  142 14
Discharges   122 16
Waiting-list   9                	
Staff establishment as at December 31  384.5 383
II. Tranquille
Tranquille is a facility for the mentally retarded of all ages, located in Kamloops. Living in Tranquille are long-stay residents who require training and
education and extended-care patients who require active nursing and medical care.
There are also numerous short-stay residents. The emphasis in Tranquille is placed
on preparing the residents for gradual return to community living.
The highlight of 1976 was the opening of Stsmemelt Village, which consists
of 100 beds for children. It has 10 apartments, each containing 10 beds and in this
facility the most active of the treatment programs are carried out.
The following table gives statistical information on Tranquille:
Table 42—Tranquille
1975 1976
Resident population as at December 31  410 384
Admissions, 12 months  80 36
Discharges   65 24
Waiting-list   20 45
Staff establishment as at December 31  491 490
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976 V 91
III. Woodlands
Woodlands is the largest Provincial facility for the mentally retarded. In
residence are children and adults for whom there is no available resource within their
own community.
The main goals in 1976 were community involvement, staff development,
reduction of overcrowding, and improvement of the facilities.
Staff Development and Psychology Department arranged practicums and
workshops for staff, students, community agencies, and people from a variety of
professional backgrounds. Training and Education Department participated in
planning with Government departments and local school boards to initiate schooling
for all resident school-age children. The Vocational Service Department collaborated with community resources to provide adult education for residents.
A close interaction with medical facilities within the community has continued.
Volunteer programs emphasized personal attention to the individual resident. The
reduction of population at Woodlands is a direct reflection of community placement.
However, it is still apparent that there are few suitable alternatives in the community
for the severe and profoundly retarded. Only one child from the younger ambulant
group was placed. Of the 75 placements to community resources, 15 were to
extended-care hospitals.
The following table gives statistical information on Woodlands:
Table 43—Woodlands
1969 1975 1976
Resident population as at December 31   1,261 1,004 962
Admissions, 12 months        178 49 50
Deaths, 12 months         14 16 10
Waiting-list       200 2 3
Staff establishment as at December 31        924 999 999
The following table reports Ministerial expenditures at Woodlands, Tranquille,
and Glendale in 1976:
Table 43A—Residential Institutions jor the Retarded, Ministerial
Expenditures, Calendar Year 1976
Name of Institution $ Millions
Woodlands         15.91
Tranquille          7.81
Glendale        6.22
i Ministerial fundings for period April 1 to December 31, 1976.   Funding to Woodlands and Tranquille
previous to April 1, 1975, was provided by the Department of Health.
2 Indicates Ministerial funding for period January 1 to December 31, 1976.
CHILDREN'S REHABILITATION SERVICES
Goal—To provide alternative rehabilitation programs to youth not attending
public schools.
Description—Rehabilitation programs for teenage youngsters have been in
existence in British Columbia for at least five years. Typically, they were started
by groups or societies which identified significant numbers of young people who
were dropping out of school without any viable alternative and simultaneously
exhibiting other social and (or) legal problems. These programs were funded from
 V 92 HUMAN RESOURCES
a number of sources—LIP, OFY, community grants (Ministry of Human Resources), as well as some private sources. These programs were formalized for the
fiscal year 1974/75 and provision was made for joint funding by the Ministries of
Education and Human Resources on a regularized basis. There has also been some
financial input from the Corrections Branch (Ministry of the Attorney-General) to
a few of the programs.
The group of children we are attempting to serve via this program are those
who are "high risk," and the most frequent indicator is the fact that they have or
are about to "drop out" of school. There is certainly sufficient evidence to suggest
that, for large numbers of children who take this step, further difficulties ensue.
Our Ministry's function is largely a facilitating one in making it possible for
these children and young people to continue to participate in an educational experience. In addition, there are very definite steps taken in most of the programs to deal
with family difficulties, acquisition of acceptable social skills, and an orientation
to the world of work. The Ministry's involvement in the program is through the
provision of child care workers to the 94 programs.
Close to half of the programs have some kind of work activity component
which is similar in its objectives to the Federally funded work activity programs for
adults. There is also a very significant life-skills component to most of the programs
which include budgeting, job finding, cooking, and housekeeping, etc.
Most of the programs show a fairly righ rate of reintegration into the community as indicated by return to regular school programs, entrance to vocational
training programs, or securing employment. In most cases this kind of movement
can be attributed to the intervention of the child care worker who is able to bring
about some modification of the behaviours which have led in many cases to the
child's exclusion from the school situation.
A survey conducted in 1974 indicated that almost half of the children enrolled
in these programs were on probation and a considerably higher proportion had been
in conflict with the law in some way.
In 1975 we expanded the use of this program to serve younger children who
are physically and (or) mentally handicapped. This has resulted in the inclusion
of significant numbers of children who have been excluded from school and the
associated socializing experiences.
At a cost to the Ministry of $1.7 million, 112 programs operated in 1976
throughout the Province.
Cost-sharing—Arrangements with the Federal Government to share costs on
the Children's Rehabilitation Services Program was under negotiation at year-end.
Projects funded by the Ministry of Human Resources in 1975 were as follows:
Abbotsford:
Reach Out
Transition Class
Armstrong: Armstrong Rehabilitation Program
Bella Coola: Bella Coola Rehabilitation Program
Burnaby:
Bonsar Park Alternate School Program
Donald Patterson School
Burns Lake: Rehabilitative Program for Youth
Campbell River:
Chimo School
Campbelton Elementary Class
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976 V 93
Castlegar: Open Road Centre
Chetwynd: Chetwynd Attendance Centre
Chilliwack:
Operation "Bridge"
Re-entry
Program III
Coquitlam: Shaft Rehabilitative Program
Courtenay:
The House
Sandwick School
Cowichan: Cowichan Valley Family Life Program
Cranbrook:
Cranbrook Early Intervention Program
Creston Rehabilitation Program
Dawson Creek: Dawson Creek Attendance Centre
Fort St. John: Fort St. John Rehabilitation Programs
Golden: Golden Alternate School Program
Gold River: Gold River Alternate School
Gulf Islands: Gulf Islands Resource Worker
Invermere: Opportunities Co-ordination
Kamloops:
McDonald Park
Operation Re-entry
Kelowna: Kelowna Alternate School Program
Kimberley: Focus Lab.
Kitimat: Kitimat City High
Lake Cowichan: Lake Cowichan Alternate Education
Langley:
Alternate Learning Environment Program
D. W. Poppy Junior Secondary School
Brookswood
Lillooet: Lillooet Rehabilitation Program
Maple Ridge: Maple Ridge Rehabilitation Program
Merritt: Merritt Alternate School Program for Youth
Mission: Education for Life Program
Nanaimo:
Northfield Alternate Program
Rehabilitation Class
Physically Handicapped Class
Gyro Park
Nelson: Aspire Program
New Westminster: New Westminster Rehabilitation Program
North Vancouver:
Project Alternative Secondary School (PASS)
Prince Charles School
Progress Centre
Oliver: Oliver Alternate School Program
 V 94 HUMAN RESOURCES
100 Mile House:
Cedar Crest School
100 Mile House Rehabilitation Program
Parksville: Parksville-Qualicum Rehabilitation Program
Penticton: Penticton Rehabilitation Class—"SKAHA House"
Port Alberni:
Emotionally Disturbed Class (Gill School Class)
Project 70/74
Project 70/75
Project 70/76
Port Hardy: Port Hardy Alternate Education Program
Powell River: Powell River Rehabilitation School
Prince George:
Aurora School for the Trainable Mentally Retarded
Physically Handicapped Class
Queen Charlotte Islands: Rehabilitation of Educationally Disadvantaged
Students
Quesnel: Alternate Class Project
Revelstoke: Revelstoke Rehabilitation Program
Richmond:
Richmond Alternate Education Program—Station Stretch
Cook School
Saanich:
Warehouse School
Royal Oak
Salmon Arm: Salmon Arm Alternate Learning Program
Sechelt: Sechelt Rehabilitation Program
Smithers: Smithers Alternate School Program
Sooke Village: Sooke Alternative Program
Squamish: Squamish Alternate School
Summerland: Summerland Rehabilitation Class
Surrey: Surrey Alternate Education Programs (four programs)
Tahsis: Tahsis Alternate School
Terrace: Terrace Alternate Education Program
Trail:
Elementary Rehabilitation Class
Secondary Rehabilitation Program
Trail Autistic Class
Sunningdale School for the Trainable Mentally Retarded
West Vancouver: Sentinal Work Activity Program (SWAP)
Williams Lake:
Williams Lake Rehabilitation Program
Program II
Vancouver:
Bridge
Byng Satellite
8J-9J
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976 V 95
KAT Class
Kumtuks
Last Chance
OK West
OK East
Riley Rehabilitation
Sunrise East
Streetfront
Total Education
The Vinery
Vanderhoof: Nechako Attendance Centre
Vavenby: Rehabilitation Program
Vernon: Vernon Rehabilitation Program
Victoria:
George Jay Rehabilitation Program
Girls Alternative Program
S. J. Willis Rehabilitation Program
MEALS ON WHEELS
Goal—To provide nutritious meals to persons who are unable to cook or shop
for themselves on a regular basis and who have no one to do these things for them.
Description—Meals on Wheels is a voluntary community service that provides a preventive and therapeutic service. Meals on Wheels can be used in
conjunction with other services, such as homemaker services, on a long- or short-
term basis.
Volunteers provide the staffing for the program and their visits provide a
continuing link between the homebound individual and the community, as well as
helping to identify other problems and needs before a crisis occurs.
The Ministry of Human Resources has been involved in assisting with the
establishment of several new programs. Grants have been made to some Meals
on Wheels groups to offset the costs of co-ordinating the service or to partially
subsidize the cost of providing the meals. It is important to note that Government
input has been to support the efforts of the volunteers, without whom Meals on
Wheels programs would founder.
Forty-six Meals on Wheels programs are now operating throughout the Province, making British Columbia the leader in Canada in this area. In several communities, Meals on Wheels is run in association with a homemaker service.
Community grants were made to Meals on Wheels programs in the following
communities during 1976:
Burnaby: Burnaby Meals on Wheels
Campbell River: Campbell River Meals on Wheels
Castlegar: Castlegar Meals on Wheels
Chilliwack: Chilliwack Meals on Wheels
Comox: Comox Valley Meals on Wheels
Cranbrook: Cranbrook "Sparkling Grannies"
Grand Forks: Grand Forks Meals on Wheels
Kelowna: Kiwanis Meals on Wheels
Nakusp: Nakusp Meals on Wheels
Nanaimo: Nanaimo Meals on Wheels
 V 96 HUMAN RESOURCES
New Denver: Upper Slocan Meals on Wheels
New Westminster: New Westminster Meals on Wheels
North Vancouver: North Shore Mobile Meals
Parksville: Parksville SOS Meals on Wheels
Prince Rupert: Prince Rupert Meals on Wheels
Saltspring Island: Saltspring Island Meals on Wheels
Terrace: Terrace Meals on Wheels
Trail: Trail Meals on Wheels
Victoria: Victoria Silver Threads
Cost-sharing—The Federal Government does not participate in this program.
HOSTELS AND TRANSITION HOUSES
Goal—To provide short-term shelter for persons who require a temporary
place to stay.
Description—Twenty-four facilities in the Province provide shelter on a
limited-time basis. Most are administered by non-profit societies. When residents
require financial aid, they may apply to the nearest Ministry of Human Resources
office where their needs may be met in the form of direct income assistance, or the
hostel/transition house operators may be authorized to bill the Ministry directly on
a per diem basis at a pre-determined rate.
Hostels are licensed through the Community Care Facilities Licensing Board
of the Ministry of Health, and hotels, which are sometimes used as hostel resources,
are locally approved by Ministry of Human Resources offices. By year-end, the bed
capacity available to the Ministry of Human Resources was approximately 650.
Cost-sharing—Shelter costs are shared 50:50 with the Federal Government
for persons designated by the Federal Government as being "in need."
HALFWAY HOUSES
Goal—To provide temporary room and board to persons who are "in transition" and who lack financial means—drug and alcohol dependents, persons who
have recently left prison or mental institutions.
Description—When persons eligible for income assistance reside in halfway
houses, their living expenses are covered by the Ministry of Human Resources.
Other funds to non-profit societies operating halfway houses designed to meet the
needs of specific groups are provided by the appropriate Government ministry.
For example, halfway houses for drug addicts and alcoholics received grants
directly from the Provincial Alcohol and Drug Commission. In 1976 there were
27 halfway houses in British Columbia licensed by the Community Care Facilities
Licensing Board to provide lodging and counselling to persons with drug and (or)
alcohol problems.
Bed capacity for all halfway houses in the Province stood at approximately 635
by year-end 1976.
In contrast to hostels, halfway houses usually provide counselling services and
information on other community organizations.
Cost-sharing—50:50 sharing with the Federal Government is claimed on
expenditures for income assistance recipients who are lodged temporarily in halfway
or transition houses.
 SERVICES FOR
SENIOR CITIZENS
  REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976
V 99
GAIN  (GUARANTEED AVAILABLE INCOME FOR NEED)
FOR SENIORS AND HANDICAPPED PERSONS
Goal—To provide a guaranteed minimum income to senior citizens and handicapped persons to assist them in meeting their everyday living requirements and
maintaining their sense of independence and dignity.
Description—The GAIN Program provides for residents of the Province
aged 60 and over (18 and over if handicapped), a minimum income of $265 per
person per month (December 1976 rates).
To be eligible for GAIN an individual must meet the following qualifications:
(a) Must be aged 60 or over (18 or over if handicapped):
(b) Must have five consecutive years' residence in Canada with landed
immigrant status, or hold Canadian citizenship:
(c) Monthly income must not exceed the GAIN guaranteed level:
(d) Assets must not exceed $2,500 if single or $5,000 if married.
Persons aged 60 and over in receipt of the Old Age Security/Guaranteed
Income Supplement or the Spouse's Allowance will receive GAIN automatically if
eligible. No application is required.
Handicapped individuals and those aged 60 to 64, not in receipt of Spouse's
Allowance, must make application for GAIN for Seniors at their nearest office of
the Ministry of Human Resources.
The following bar graph represents the number of people in receipt of GAIN
for Seniors and Handicapped payments in December of 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975,
and 1976. The number of recipients declined somewhat in 1975 and increased in
1976. The Federal Government's Spouses' Allowance accounted for much of the
1975 reduction. This program has now levelled off and increases will now be due
solely to numbers in the group becoming eligible for GAIN for Seniors and Handicapped.
Figure 13
Total GAIN for Seniors and Handicapped Recipients, 1972 to 1976
110,000
persons
118,000
persons
128,000
persons
122,000
persons
124,000
persons
December
1972
December
1973
December
1974
December
1975
December
1976
 V 100
HUMAN RESOURCES
As mentioned earlier, benefits are paid to handicapped persons or senior
citizens whose monthly income does not exceed the GAIN guarantee.   The proportion of persons receiving GAIN who are
(Group A) handicapped;
(Group B) aged 60 and over, not in receipt of Old Age Security and
Guaranteed Income Supplement benefits, or Spouse's Allowance; or
(Group C) 60 and over in receipt of Old Age Security and Guaranteed
Income Supplement benefits or Spouse's Allowance
are depicted in the following pie graph:
Figure 14
GAIN Recipients as at December 1976
Handicapped:  10,680 persons
Over 60 (not receiving OAS/GIS or Spouse's
Allowance): 16,281 persons
Over   60    (receiving   OAS/GIS   or   Spouse's
Allowance): 97,198 persons
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976
V 101
The number of (Group B) GAIN for Seniors recipients (those aged 60 and
over not in receipt of Old Age/Guaranteed Income Supplement or Spouse's Allowance) has steadily risen in previous years; however, due to the introduction of the
Federal Spouse's Allowance Program, the total number of recipients dropped for
the period July 1975 to December 1975. There is a similar decrease for 1976 which
can likely be accounted for both through those receiving Spouse's Allowance rather
than GAIN for Seniors, and the asset level requirements as well.
Group A and Group B recipients do not qualify for the Federal Old Age
Security Pension or Guaranteed Income Supplement; however, the Province
recovers 46.6 per cent of Group A costs and 31.4 per cent of Group B costs.
The following pie graph shows Ministerial expenditures for the GAIN Program for the month of December 1976:
Figure 15
Proportion of Total Expenditure, GAIN for Seniors and Handicapped, December 1976
 V 102
HUMAN RESOURCES
Figure 16
Number of GAIN for Seniors (60 and Over Not in Receipt of Old Age
Security /Guaranteed Income Supplement or Spouse's Allowance) Recipients
20,714
16,281
As at December 1975
As at December 1976
Expenditures by the Ministry of Human Resources for GAIN for Seniors and
Handicapped Program are shown in the following table:
Table 44—Ministerial Expenditures, GAIN jor Seniors and
Handicapped Program, 1972—76
Calendar Year
1976
1975.
1974.
Expenditure
$
114,220,370
106,990,000
100,042,000
1 Program commenced December 1972.
Calendar Year
1973
19721.
Expenditure
$
54,479,000
4,624,000
Cost-sharing—The Federal Government shares in the cost of assistance to
those individuals designated as "persons in need" under the Canada Assistance Plan.
Under the current agreement, 25.3 per cent of the total Provincial expenditure for
GAIN for Seniors and Handicapped is returned to the Province in the form of
Federal cost-sharing payments. The Federal Government shares only in the Age
Benefit and Handicapped portions of the GAIN Program (Groups A and B).
SENIOR CITIZENS COUNSELLOR SERVICE
Goal—To provide a counselling and information service to senior citizens by
counsellors who are themselves senior citizens.
Description—The program began in 1968 with 30 senior citizen counsellors
recommended to the Ministry by old-age pensioners' groups. In 1976, there were
140 counsellors throughout British Columbia.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976
V 103
Working as volunteers, the counsellors' interest in other senior citizens involves
them in a helping role in a wide variety of activities—driving elderly people for
medical appointments; visiting the lonely, providing information, counselling and
referral services; advising on Government programs; assisting with the completion
of forms; or aiding in the development of programs in the community to meet the
special needs of senior citizens.
Counsellors are recommended for appointment by regional offices of the Ministry of Human Resources. Effective in 1977, the appointments will be for one
year with the possibility of an additional year if indicated. This change will be
implemented in recognition of the heavy demands made upon the time and effort
of the counsellors and the belief that these responsibilities should be shared between
more people in the community.
Counsellors submit monthly reports for out-of-pocket expenses, and may be
reimbursed up to a maximum of $60 per month. The following table shows expenditures for the Senior Citizens Counsellor Service for the fiscal years 1971/72
through 1975/76 and calendar year 1976:
Table 45—Senior Citizens Counsellor Service, Ministerial Expenditures,
Calendar Year 1976 and Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1975/76
1976 (calendar)
1975/76  	
1974/75  	
63,370
54,874
48,763
1973/74
1972/73
$
38,074
25,000
1971/72   21,100
The following table gives an estimate of the number of people served by senior
citizen counsellors.
Table 46—Numbers oj Persons Served by Senior Citizen Counsellors,
Calendar Year 1976 and Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1975/76
Number of Number of
Persons Persons
1976 (calendar)   70,000 1973/74    49,000
1975/76    66,750 1972/73    44,200
1974/75    57,000 1971/72    37,600
Cost-sharing—The Federal Government shares in the cost of this program
on a 50:50 basis.
For more information about the program, contact your local Ministry of
Human Resources office or the Community Programs Division, Ministry of Human
Resources, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
 V 104
HUMAN RESOURCES
B.C. HYDRO BUS PASS FOR SENIORS AND
HANDICAPPED PERSONS
Goal—To aid and encourage mobility among seniors and handicapped
persons.
Description—Bus passes are issued to (1) persons 65 years of age and over
who are in receipt of GAIN for Seniors and (or) a Federal Guaranteed Income
Supplement to their basic Old Age Pension, (2) persons 60 to 64 years of age who
are in receipt of GAIN for Seniors Age Benefits, and (3) persons 18 to 59 years
of age in receipt of GAIN for Handicapped Persons.
The pass is issued semi-annually from December 1 to May 31 and from June 1
to November 30. The cost is $5 for all or part of each six-month issuing period.
No fare is necessary when travelling on B.C. Hydro urban vehicles in Victoria and
the Greater Vancouver area.
Approximately 2,500 first-time applications are processed each issue. It is
anticipated that the program will continue to grow at its present steady rate.
The following table shows the number of passes issued in the last eight issuing
periods:
Table 47—Number oj B.C. Hydro Bus Passes Issued
December 1976  29,543 December 1974  25,428
June 1976  28,718 lune 1974  23,000
December 1975   27,9701 November 1973   20,570
June 1975  26,685 May 1973  18,657
i Revision of 1975 Annual Report estimated figure.
Cost-sharing—Administrative costs of this program are borne by the Ministry of Human Resources. All revenue occurring as a result of the $5 charge is
remitted to B.C. Hydro. The Federal Government does not participate in this
program.
ADULT CARE
Goal—To subsidize those elderly or handicapped persons who must be cared
for outside their own homes, and whose income is insufficient to meet the need, and
to encourage the development of appropriate resources for this purpose among
private societies and the private sector.
Description—The Ministry estimates that 2 per cent of persons over 65 years
of age in the Province require extended care, while a further 5 per cent require
personal and intermediate care.
Rates paid to institutions on behalf of persons requiring care vary with the
intensity of care required.
A definition of the types of care subsidized by the Ministry of Human Resources follows:
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1976
V 105
Table 48—Definition oj Types of Care in British Columbia
Subsidized by the Ministry of Human Resources
TYPE 1—PERSONAL CARE
This is the type of care required by persons of any age whose physical disabilities are
such that their primary need is for room and board, limited lay supervision, assistance
with some of the activities of daily living, and a planned program of social and
recreational activities.
It is also the type of care required by persons with mild mental disorders who primarily
require room and board and limited lay supervision in a supportive environment.
Facilities providing Type 1 care have usually been called rest homes or boarding-homes.
The term "personal care home" is new, being used by both the Ministry of Health
and the Ministry of Human Resources.
TYPE 2—INTERMEDIATE CARE
This is the type of care required by persons of any age whose physical disabilities are
such that their primary need is for room and board, daily professional nursing
supervision, and (or) psychiatric supervision, assistance with some of the activities
of daily living, and a planned program of social and recreational activities.
It is also the type of care required by persons with mental disorders who primarily
require room and board, daily professional supervision by a person with appropriate psychiatric training, and a program designed to assist them to reach their
maximum potential in the activities of daily living.
Facilities providing Type 2 care are called intermediate care homes by the Ministry of
Health and the Ministry of Human Resources.
PRIVATE HOSPITAL NURSING-HOME CARE
This type of facility provides care to persons of any age with a severe chronic disability,
which has usually produced a functional deficit, who require skilled 24-hour-a-day
nursing services and continuing medical supervision. Most people who need this
type of care have a limited potential for rehabilitation and often require institutional
care on a permanent basis.
Extended-care hospitals provide this type of care, through the British Columbia Medical
Plan, at a charge of $1 per day (December 1976 rate). Private hospitals provide the
care at up to $900 per month to persons who are unable to find a vacancy in an
extended-care hospital. At year-end the Ministry of Human Resources was paying
$750 per month to private hospitals, on behalf of patients with insufficient income.
RATES AUTHORIZED
At year-end the rate paid to private operators for eligible persons requiring
personal care was $340 per month, ranging up to $500 per month for intermediate
care. The rate for an adult in a private hospital was $750 per month.
Eligible residents of personal and intermediate care facilities operated by
non-profit societies were subsidized to assist them to purchase their care at a rate
approved by the Director, Special Care for Adults, Ministry of Human Resources.
Eligibility for subsidy in adult care facilities is the same as eligibility for social
assistance, except that assets of no more than $1,500 for a single person and $2,500
for married couples are allowable. Any assets in excess of these amounts must be
used to pay costs of the person's care.
 V 106                                                 HUMAN RESOURCES
Requests to the local Human Resources offices for referral of patients to care
facilities are made by relatives, friends, doctors, staff at acute care hospitals, and
other members of the community.   Local Ministerial staff are responsible for reviewing each application and are charged with making placements in the most appropriate facility. The patient contributes to care costs to the extent his income permits,
the balance of the cost being provided by the Ministry of Human Resources.
A monthly comforts allowance of up to $25 is paid to residents of adult care
facilities whose personal assets do not exceed $500.
Ministerial programs such as Meals on Wheels and Homemaker/Housekeeper
Services play a role in helping the elderly or handicapped person who wishes to
remain at home.   Details of these programs may be found elsewhere in this Report.
The following table gives expenditures and numbers of persons subsidized in
adult care facilities by the Ministry of Human Resources for calendar year 1976
and fiscal years 1972/73 to 1975/76:
Table 49—Adult Care Expenditures and Number of Persons Assisted by the
Ministry of Human Resources, Calendar Year 1976 and Fiscal Years
1972/73 to 1975/76
Private Hospital Care (Nursing-home)
Estimated Number
Expenditure          of Persons Assisted
($ million)          per Month (Average)
1976      9,042,050                  2,000
1975/76      6,727,770                  2,600
1974/75         5,120,742                 2,300
1973/74        5,523,189                  1,350
1972/73       2,537,450                  1,400
Personal and Intermediate Care (Board and Rest Homes)1
1976   18,901,985               13,000
1975/76     14,064,092                 13,000
1974/75    10,426,930                10,000
1973/74       5,160,263                  3,600
1972/73        4,908,706                  3,300
i Excludes New Denver Pavilion and Ponderosa Lodge, Kamloops.
There have been substantial increases in Ministerial expenditures in 1976 for
adult care.   Higher operating costs of these facilities through unionization of personnel, a general rise in the cost of living, and increases in the minimum wage are
among the reasons.
Cost-sharing—The cost of subsidies for adult care are shared 50 per cent by
the Federal Government for persons designated as being "in need."
PHARMACARE
Goal—To provide assistance in purchasing prescriptions to those individuals
and families with limited financial means, and to provide free prescription drugs to
senior citizens aged 65 and over and to eligible income assistance recipients.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1976 V 107
Description—Pharmacare is of particular benefit to the senior citizens of
British Columbia; of the 266,000 senior citizens in the Province, more than half
have no taxable income. Approximately 30 per cent of the elderly suffer from one
or more chronic diseases or conditions, many of which can be controlled or alleviated by the proper use of drugs.
Before establishment of this program in 1974 the expense of proper medication
represented a heavy burden for the elderly. Accounting for less than 10 per cent of
our population, the elderly received 22 per cent of all prescriptions and accounted
for over 28 per cent of all drug expenditures. Following the lead of British Columbia, most other provinces have instituted free drug programs for the elderly, and
90 per cent of Canada's senior citizens are now covered by a provincial drug plan.
Normal professional services of physicians and pharmacists are extended to
Pharmacare recipients in an identical manner to that enjoyed by all citizens.
A higher number of prescriptions are being filled for elderly citizens than was
the case prior to Pharmacare. This, however, was a prime consideration in establishing the program, as many elderly citizens avoided having a prescription filled
due to the cost factors. Failure to obtain necessary medication meant incomplete
therapy and possible waste of the medical and (or) hospital care already provided.
Pharmacare administers three drug programs, each benefiting a different group
of people.
Plan A—Any person who has resided in the Province of British Columbia for
90 days or more and who is 65 years of age or more is entitled to receive free oj
charge any drug prescribed by a physician upon presentation of a Pharmacare card
to the pharmacist filling the prescription.
Any person 65 years or over registered with one of the Province's medical
insurance carriers (the British Columbia Medical Plan, the Medical Services Association, and the CU & C Health Services Society) is automatically provided with a
Pharmacare card.
Plan B—Plan B was formerly known as the "British Columbia Prescription
Drug Subsidy Plan" and it subsidizes the cost of prescription drugs for eligible
persons.
Any person who has resided in the Province for at least 12 months who was
not required to pay income tax in the previous year and who has completed an
acceptable declaration to that effect for one of the Province's medical insurance
carriers is eligible for benefits under Plan B. The dependents of the head of a household who can meet the requirements outlined above are also eligible.
The beneficiary of Plan B is required to pay the first $2 of the cost of each
prescription plus half the balance. Plan B pays the remainder of the cost. In other
words, if a prescription costs $5, the beneficiary is required to pay $3.50 and Plan B
will pay $1.50.
Plan C—Plan C is designed to provide eligible persons (exclusive of senior
citizens) in receipt of financial assistance from the Ministry of Human Resources
with their prescription drugs free of charge.
As a general rule, the persons eligible for benefits under Plan C are those
persons in receipt of financial assistance from the Ministry of Human Resources
because of inability to work or, in the case of single parents, those persons who
must stay home to care for their young children. The person who is able to work,
but who is temporarily in receipt of financial assistance because of unemployment,
is not eligible for these benefits.
The drug benefits are identical under the three plans and include all prescription drugs.
 V 108 HUMAN RESOURCES
The following table presents figures on the number of persons registered for
benefits in the three plans:
Table 50—Numbers of Persons Served by Pharmacare in 1976
Number of
Plan Persons
A      266,000
B        225,000
C      100,000
Total    591,000
Ministerial expenditures for the Pharmacare Program are as follows:
Table 51—Pharmacare, Ministerial Expenditures, Calendar Year 1976
and Fiscal Year 1975/76
Plan A Plan B Plan C Total
$ $ $ $
1976  20,411,560 749,827 4,758,126 25,919,513
1975/76  18,684,858 517,594 4,439,895 23,642,347
About 32,000 more persons were covered by Pharmacare in 1976 than in
1975.
Cost-sharing—At present, only the costs under Plan C are shared with the
Federal Government. Plans A and B are financed entirely by the Government of
British Columbia.
COMMUNITY GRANTS TO PROJECTS FOR SENIOR CITIZENS
As part of the Ministry's Community Grants Program, a number of grants
were made to senior citizens' centres and projects in 1976. These centres provide
information, counselling, and a place for seniors to drop in for group recreation and
socializing. The following programs were funded in 1976:
Amount Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1976
Armstrong: $
Armstrong Old Timers Drop In Centre (capital grant)      11,957
Bridesville:
Bridesville Senior Citizens Service (capital grant)       2,000
Campbell River:
Campbell River Old Age Pensioners Activity Centre      3,645
Cowichan:
Regional District of Cowichan Valley Activity Centre (percentage)       4,8871
Lake Cowichan Activity Centre (percentage)       2,799 *
North Shore:
North Shore Adult Day Care Service     34,065
North Shore Silver Harbour Manor Society    71,145
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976 V 109
Amount Granted,
Name of Project and Location 1976
Osoyoos: $
Osoyoos Senior Citizens Association (capital grant)        1,292
Penticton:
Penticton Retirement Centre      21,072
Revelstoke:
City of Revelstoke—Senior Citizens Drop-In Centre (capital grant)      15,333
Salmon Arm:
Salmon Arm Senior Citizens Centre (capital grant)        8,836
Victoria:
Victoria Silver Threads Service    98,752
Total   275,783
i The figure shown indicates a proportion of the total grant that was applied to these particular programs.
LEGISLATION
ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE MINISTRY OF
HUMAN RESOURCES
Ministry of Human Resources Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap. Ill, as amended)—
This Act establishes the Ministry of Human Resources as having jurisdiction over
all matters relating to social and public welfare and income assistance.
Children oj Unmarried Parents Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap. 52, as amended)—
This Act is to ensure that the interests of the mother and her child born out of wedlock are protected.
Adoption Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap. 4, as amended)—The purpose of this
Act is to provide the same rights and privileges for adopted children as those of
children born to both parents in a family.
Provincial Home Act, 19691 (S.B.C. 1969, chap. 29) —The purpose of this
Act is to provide care for persons who are unable to maintain themselves by their
own efforts.
Protection oj Children Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap. 303, as amended) —The
purpose of this Act is to provide protection and care for children who are neglected,
abused, abandoned, or without proper supervision or guardianship. Amendments
to the Act in 1974 provide for increased reporting and investigating requirements in
regard to battered children and lay representation on panels in hearings.
Human Resources Facilities Development Act (S.B.C. 1974, chap. 39)—The
purpose of this Act is to provide development grants to municipalities, societies, and
the boards established under the Community Resources Boards Act.
Community Resources Boards Act (S.B.C. 1974, chap. 18)—This Act provides for greater local control over the administration of social services.
Guaranteed Available Income jor Need Act (GAIN) (S.B.C. 1976, chap. 19)
—This Act was introduced during 1976 to replace the Social Assistance Act, the
Handicapped Persons' Income Assistance Act, and the Guaranteed Minimum
Income Assistance Act. The GAIN provides a guaranteed minimum income to
senior citizens and handicapped persons, and to individuals and families who are
unable to maintain themselves through their own efforts.
i This Act has been inoperative since the Provincial Home in Kamloops was closed early in 1975.  Residents
were transfered to Ponderosa Lodge, an intermediate-care facility built by the Provincial Government.
  FISCAL ADDENDUM,
1975/76
  REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976 V 113
Table 52—Proportion oj Total Gross Welfare Expenditures
1974/75
1975/76
Value
Per Cent
Value
Per Cent
Administration (includes Minister's Office
and part of Accounting Division)    .   .. .
$
2,988,918
18,300,929
1,847,904
0.8
4.7
0.5
0.8
11.8
5.6
49.7
26.1
$
3,720,198
33,486,8631
882,494
0.8
Field Service	
7.1
Summer Employment Program	
0.2
Provincial Alliance of Businessmen
Institutions...   	
2,925,991
45,726,474
21,493,154
191,963,094
100,970,347
29,323,8872
45,739,531
30,744,687
180,402,5583
147,843,248
6.2
Maintenance of dependent children  (includes New Denver Youth Centre) 	
9.7
Medical services, drugs, etc	
Social Allowances, work activity projects,
and burials	
6.5
38.2
Mincome and allowances for aged and
handicapped  	
31.3
Totals..	
386,216,811
100.0
472,143,466*
100.0
Municipal share of costs	
18,830,239
123,943,048
1.073.616
30,165,
183,096,
1,015,
337
Federal-Provincial cost-sharing—•
Canada Assistance Plan	
091
Department of Indian Affairs	
433
i Includes VRB and Community Resource Boards.
2 Includes Woodlands, Tranquille, and Glendale.
3 Includes community grants and assistance for the retarded.
* Does not include $654,910 re Alcohol and Drug Commission.
 V 114
HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 53—Number of Cases by Category of Service,1 as at
March 31, 1975 and 1976
Category
Region 3—
Okanagan
Region 4—
Kootenays
Region 5—
Prince
George/
Cariboo
Region 6—
Fraser
Valley
Region 7—
Prince
Rupert/
Bulkley
Valley
Region 8—
North and
South
Peace
River
Region 9—
Kamloops
Mainline
Mar.
1975
Mar.
1976
Mar.
1975
Mar.
1976
Mar.
1975
Mar.
1976
Mar.
1975
Mar.
1976
Mar.
1975
Mar.
1976
Mar.
1975
Mar.
1976
Mar. Mar.
1975  1976
1
Family Service 	
Income assistance—
Single person 	
Couple	
Two-parent family	
One-parent family	
Child with relative 	
436
1,462
215
553
1,370
131
398
1,609
215
470
1,503
161
178
1,560
148
397
1,035
156
240
1,326
158
404
1,029
137
360
1,810
224
906
1,424
199
270
1,779
253
794
1,609
211
263
2,039
209
717
1,600
154
229
2,467
204
628
1,701
163
182
545
69
243
439
240
301
571
57
226
508
230
90
486
72
251
534
108
97
521
73
194
539
95
274
1,350
192
576
1,113
147
173
1,284
125
362
1,143
122
Income assistance totals...
4,167|4,356
1
3,474|3,294
1
4,923
4,916
4,982
5,392
1,718
1,893
1,541
1,519
3,652
3,209
Category
Region 10—
Vancouver
Island
North of
Malahat
Region 11
—Capital
Regional
District
Region 12—
Fraser
South
Region 13
■—Fraser
North
Region 14—
North
Vancouver
Region 15—
Vancouver
Totals
Mar.
1975
Mar.
1976
Mar.
1975
Mar.
1976
Mar.
1975
Mar.
1976
Mar.
1975
Mar.
1976
Mar.
1975
Mar.
1976
Mar.
1975
Mar.
1976
Mar.
1975
Mar.
1976
Family Service	
Income assistance—
Single person	
350
3,099
449
926
1,951
258
322
3,000
349
943
2,176
274
598
3,414
327
621
1,785
101
551
3,479
284
521
1,904
121
628
1,453
107
612
1,882
81
458
1,841
108
629
2,254
136
663
2,193
162
479
2,126
133
602
2,387
175
443
1,952
131
197
896
66
150
663
40
295
974
72
136
695
45
1,042
9,155
462
748
3,875
166
2,178
8,466
269
513
3,743
40
5,261
29,462
2,702
7,179
19,797
1,914
6,114
29,704
2,342
Two-parent family.	
One-parent family	
Child with relative	
6,263
20,756
1,866
Income assistance total-
7,033
7,064
6,846
6,860
4,763
5,426
5,756
5,690
2,012
2,217
15,448
13,031
66,3151
64,867
1 Source: Case Load Report Form W2.
Table 54—Selected Expenditures for Income Assistance, 1975/76
Basic income assistance
150,361,575
Repatriation, transportation within the Province, nursing and boarding-home care,
special allowances and grants  32,482
Housekeeper and homemaker services  7,000,155
Emergency payments  37,895
Hospitalization of income assistance recipients  285,176
Total
157,717,283
Table 55-
Category
Heads of families
Single persons
-Average Monthly Number Receiving Income Assistance
During 1974/75 and 1975/76
Total case load (average)      53,284
Dependents
Average monthly total
Average Case Load and
Recipients
per Month
1974/75
1975/76
25,432
30,427
27,852
13,993
53,284
44,420
58,408
69,138
111,692
113,558
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1976 V  115
Table 56—Gross Costs of Medical Services for Fiscal Years 1966-76
Year
Medical
Drugs1
Dental
Optical
Transportation
Other
Total
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1966/67	
2,422,702
2,095,733
670,580
118,003
183,285
48,723
5,539,026
1967/68	
2,344,676
2,157,182
733,979
145,588
187,357
50,524
5,659,306
1968/69	
1,403,378
2,423,798
792,475
140,591
212,550
53,571
5,026,363
1969/70	
465,738
2,444,968
1,611,115
219,858
252,999
72,862
5,067,540
1970/71	
591,206
3,102,874
2,491,589
282,272
326,166
121,892
6,915,999
1971/72	
614,365
3,334,159
2,403,257
290,116
342,712
165,980
7,150,589
1972/73	
677,194
3,626,268
2,429,538
304,695
367,888
264,700
7,670,283
1973/74	
634,136
6,461,4002
2,655,573
322,489
419,451
328,510
10,821,559
1974/75	
754,422
17,303,8923
2,380,266
409,213
387,554
257,808
21,493,154
1975/76	
1,099,479
23,642,347*
4,209,007
486,080
374,850
310,623
30,122,386
1 Included in these figures is the cost of drugs purchased by the dispensary for welfare institutions.
2 Includes drug costs incurred in the Pharmacare Program in the last three months of the fiscal year 1973/74.
(Pharmacare Program commenced January 1, 1974.)
3 Includes costs under the Pharmacare Program as well as drugs purchased by the dispensary for welfare
institutions.
* Includes operating costs of the Provincial Pharmacy only. For Pharmacare costs, see Table 51.
Table 57—Cost of Maintaining Children in Care, Fiscal Year 1975/76
The cost to Provincial Government of maintaining children for the fiscal year
was as follows:
Gross cost of maintenance of children in the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare
(excluding Vancouver)— $ $
Foster homes     8,657,253
Other residential resources  16,561,781
Receiving special services      3,294,171
  28,513,205
Gross cost to Provincial Government of maintenance of children in care of Vancouver Resources Board     7,422,0061
Gross cost of transportation of children in care of Superintendent of Child Welfare   	
Gross cost of hospitalization of new-born infants being permanently planned for by
the Superintendent of Child Welfare	
Gross expenditures
379,369
72,991
  36,387,571
Less collections      7,13 8,767
Net cost to Provincial Government as per Public Accounts  29,248,804
1 Gross cost for maintenance of children in care of Children's Aid Societies, Vancouver, in 1974/75 was
$16,165,257, but this included the operating costs of these societies. Operating costs for Vancouver Resources
Board do not show in this Report.
 V 116
HUMAN RESOURCES
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 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1976
V 117
Table 59—Number of Children in Care and Legal Responsibility of the Superintendent of Child Welfare, by Type of Care, as at March 31,1976
Supervised by—
Type of Care
Ministry
of Human
Resources
Vancouver
Resources
Board
Total
Paid foster-home care  	
5,174
196
843
326
1,651
152
896
23
139
85
346
28
6,070
Boarding-home, child maintains self  	
219
Free home and free relatives' (or parents') home-
Adoption home	
Resources1	
982
411
1,997
AWOL	
180
Totals	
8,342
1,517
9,859
i This covers a wide variety of placements ranging from subsidized receiving-homes to Federal institutions.
Table 60—Children in Care and Legal Responsibility of the Superintendent
of Child Welfare, by Age-group, as at March 31,1976
Age-group
Ministry
of Human
Resources
Vancouver
Resources
Board
516
152
595
151
2,305
306
2,807
441
1,599
319
520
148
Total
Under 3 years	
3-5 years, inclusive	
6-11 years, inclusive	
12-15 years, inclusive..
16-17 years, inclusive..
18 years	
Totals..
8,342
1,517
668
746
2,611
3,248
1,918
668
9,859
Table 61—Number of Children Placed for Adoption by the Ministry of Human
Resources and Vancouver Resources Board for Fiscal Years 1974/75 and 1975/76
Ministry of Human Resources
Vancouver Resources Board ...
J74/75
1975/76
604
648
153
103
Totals
757
751
The following tables are available, on request, from the Division of Office
Administration and Public Information, Ministry of Human Resources, Victoria:
Table 62—Number of Family Service Cases (Not in Receipt of Financial Assistance from the
Ministry of Human Resources) Served by the Ministry of Human Resources During the
Fiscal Year 1975/76.
Table 63—Number of Unmarried Mothers Served by Ministry of Human Resources and Vancouver Resources Board for Fiscal Year 1975/76
Table 64—Number of Children Born Out of Wedlock in British Columbia, by Age-group of
Mother, During Fiscal Years 1974/75 and 1975/76.
 V 118 HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 65—Cases Receiving Services from Ministry of Human Resources and Vancouver Resources Board Related to Social Investigation Requests, by Type of Service, for Fiscal
Years 1974/75 and 1975/76.
Table 66—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare During and at End
of Fiscal Year 1975/76.
Table 67—Number of Children Admitted to Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare by Legal
Status, During Fiscal Year 1975/76.
Table 68—Reasons for New Admissions of Children to Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare
During Fiscal Year 1975/76.
Table 69—Number of Children Discharged from Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare by
Legal Status During Fiscal Year 1975/76.
Table 70—Reasons for Discharge of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare for
Fiscal Year 1975/76.
Table 71—Children Who Are Legal Responsibility of Superintendent of Child Welfare Receiving Institutional Care as at March 31, 1976.
Table 72—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Ministry of Human Resources, by
Regions, and Vancouver Resources Board, by Type of Placement, for Fiscal Year 1975/76.
Table 73—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Ministry of Human Resources, by
Regions, and Vancouver Resources Board, by Religion of Adopting Parents, for Fiscal
Year 1975/76.
Table 74—Ages of Children Placed for Adoption by Ministry of Human Resources and Vancouver Resources Board During Fiscal Year 1975/76.
Table 75—Number of Legally Completed Adoptions, by Type of Placement, by Regions, and
by Vancouver Resources Board, During Fiscal Year 1975/76.
Table 76—Total Number of Persons Eligible for Health Care as at December 31, 1966 to 1976.
Table 77—Payments to British Columbia Doctors (Gross Costs), 1966/67 to 1975/76.
Table 78—Dental Expenses, 1966/67 to 1975/76.
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1977
4,030-1077-3493

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