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Ministry of Highways and Public Works REPORT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1976/77 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Minister of Highways
and
Public Works
REPORT
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
1976/77
ISSN 0524-5362
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1977
  The Honourable Alex. V. Fraser, Minister of Highways and Public Works.
 To Colonel the Honourable Walter Stewart Owen, Q.C, LL.D.
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I respectfully submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Highways for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1977, in compliance with the provisions of the Department of Highways Act.
ALEX. V. FRASER
Minister of Highways and Public Works
Office of the Minister of Highways
and Public Works,
Parliament Buildings, August 31,1977.
 Victoria, B.C., August 12, 1977
The Honourable Alex. V. Fraser,
Minister of Highways and Public Works,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir: I am pleased to present the Annual Report of the Highways section of
this Ministry for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1977.
The Report contains details of the work undertaken by the department in all
phases of its operations during that period, and I will comment briefly on some
of the highlights.
Construction activity increased rapidly in the year from the previous 12-month
period. An indication of the impetus afforded to highway activity was the announcement in the Throne Speech on January 13, 1977, of the intention of the
Government to undertake the design and construction of a highway between Hope
and Merritt by what is known as the Coquihalla route. This will be a four-lane,
60 m.p.h., access-controlled rural arterial highway of 70 miles in length and will
reduce the road mileage between Hope and Kamloops by 40 miles. Avalanche
snow conditions, environmental effect studies, and preliminary route reconnaisance
and selection have been under way on this route for the last three years.
Work continued on the extension of the Island Highway to Port Hardy in
northern Vancouver Island. The final 43-mile section of new highway route was
40 per cent complete by the end of the fiscal year and completion is expected by
the end of 1978.   Four-laning continued on the Island Highway south of Parksville.
On the Cassiar-Stewart Highway work progressed to completion on a 22-mile
reconstruction contract and a further 24 miles was let to contract. In March 1977
the Province signed an Agreement for Western Northlands Highways with the
Federal Government. This agreement provided for joint participation retroactive
to April 1, 1976, and up until March 31, 1979, for a total Federal contribution of
$15 million to be matched by the Province. This will apply primarily to Highway
37 in the Province.
In highway surfacing, 196 miles of highway were paved in the summer of 1976
and contracts called, but not completed, totalled 322 miles, of which 270 remained
to be paved in 1977.
It was a wet, cool, and cloudy late spring and summer, affecting local paving;
however, excellent weather in the fall and winter enabled road improvement work
to proceed rapidly, partially with funds saved from snow removal and sanding,
which was reduced in cost due to the mild winter. Over a million tons of crushed
rock were prepared by contract in the fall of 1976.
The year was a fortunate one with little in the way of serious flood or weather
conditions; however, the end of the fiscal year in March saw the commencement
of one of the worst spring thaws for bad road effect in recent history, in the
Chilcotin Plateau and Bella Coola areas.
During the fiscal year the position of Deputy Minister saw a change of
incumbent with H. F. Sturrock leaving the position on September 9, 1976, succeeded on that day by the undersigned, and the title was changed to Deputy Minister
of Highways and Public Works.
J. A. Dennison and A. E. Rhodes, formerly Chief Highway Engineer and
Comptroller of Expenditure respectively, became Assistant Deputy Minister and
Chief Engineer, and Assistant Deputy Minister, Public Works and Administration.
 The Department of Highways during this fiscal year became the Ministry of
Highways and Public Works.
During the year, retirement of long-service employees were:
36 years: Neil C. Tattrie, Chief Property Negotiator.
36 years: Mrs. Hilda Haylmore, Office Manager, Lillooet.
R. G. HARVEY
Deputy Minister
R. G. Harvey
 March 28, 1977
The Honourable Alex. V. Fraser,
Minister of Highways and Public Works,
Parliament Buildings.
Sir: I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Public Works
section of this Ministry for the fiscal year 1976/77.
Respectively submitted,
G. L. GILES, F.R.A.I.C.,
Deputy Minister
G. L. Giles
  TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Title  1
Photo of Minister  3
Minister's Letter  4
Deputy Minister of Highways    5
Deputy Minister of Public Works  7
HIGHWAYS
List of Highways Personnel  13
Assistant Deputy Minister and Chief Engineer.  16
Executive Director, Engineering Division  17
Director of Highway Design and Surveys  17
Director of Geotechnical and Materials Engineering  26
Director of Bridge Engineering  35
Bridge Design Engineer  35
Bridge Construction Engineer  37
Dock Design, Construction, and Maintenance  40
Director of Traffic Engineering  42
Highway Safety Engineer .  44
Executive Director, Construction Division  46
Director of Construction  46
Director of Paving  5 2
Legal Survey Officer.  5 7
Executive Director, Operations Division  58
Director of Maintenance Services  58
Maintenance Management  5 9
Director of Equipment Services  65
Superintendent of Ferries  65
Communications Engineer  68
Executive Director, Planning Division  69
Transportation  69
Approving  70
Systems Planning  71
Assistant Deputy Minister, Public Works and Administration  72
Director of Personnel Programs  74
Director of Property Services  76
Insurance and Claims Officer    77
Contract Statistics    79
Summary by Electoral Districts of Projects  79
Tenders Received and Contracts Awarded  83
Highways  83
Paving  85
Bridges  89
Ferry Terminals  91
Miscellaneous  93
 TABLE OF CONTENTS^Confmued
HIGHWAYS—Continued
Page
Regional Reports    96
Day-labour Statistics  138
Snow Removal  160
Highway Statistics..  161
Mileage by Surface Type  161
Mileage by Class  163
Classified Mileage by Municipality  165
PUBLIC WORKS
Report of Client Project Director  177
Report of Mechanical Branch  181
Report of Senior Civil Engineer.  183
Report of Electrical Engineer  185
Report of Architect Planner  187
Report of Senior Quantity Surveyor  189
Report of Property Services  191
Report of Senior Programmer  192
Report of Interior Design Architect  194
Report of Personnel Services  196
Report of Operation Services  199
Report of Co-ordinator of Construction  200
Report of Assistant Director of Operations and Services  202
Report of Co-ordinator of Technical Services    204
Report of Director of Safety Engineering Services Division  206
Report of Boiler Safety Branch  208
Report of Building Standards, Research, and Specifications Branch  212
Report of Chief Gas Inspector  214
Report of Chief Electrical Inspector  216
Major Tenders Received and Contracts Awarded for Buildings  221
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS
Reports of the Director of Financial Services  246
Highways Division  246
Public Works Division  296
10
   HIGHWAYS PERSONNEL AS AT MARCH 31,  1977
The Honourable Alex. V. Fraser, Minister of Highways and Public Works
Victoria
R. G. Harvey, Deputy Minister and Chairman, Highway Board.
J. A. Dennison, Assistant Deputy Minister and Chief Engineer, Highway Board.
Engineering Division
M. G. Elston, Executive Director.
E. E. Readshaw, Director of Highway Designs and Surveys.
I. W. G. Kerr, Director of Geotechnical
and Materials Engineering.
W. A. Bowman, Director of Bridge Engineering.
J. H. Harding, Director of Traffic Engineering.
I. Lisman, Highway Safety Engineer.
Construction Division
R. G. White, Executive Director.
N. R. Zapf, Director of Construction.
D. F. Martin, Director of Paving.
F. A. Clapp, Land Survey Officer.
Operations Division
T. R. lohnson, Executive Director.
P. B. MacCarthy, Director of Maintenance
Services.
E. A. Lund, Maintenance Management Engineer, Director of Equipment Services.
S. E. Blanchard, Superintendent of Ferries.
C. G. Shearing, Communications Engineer.
Planning Division
E. B. Wilkins, Executive Director.
D. R. Parkes, Transportation Planning
Engineer.
D. L. South, Service Approving Officer.
J, A. Stewart, Municipal Programs Engi-
A. E. Rhodes, Assistant Deputy Minister, Public Works and Administration, Highway Board.
A.   R.   Limacher,   Director   of   Personnel
Programs.
A. F.  Park, Senior Training and Safety
Officer.
W. I. N. Higgins, Senior Personnel Officer.
S. E. Price, Director of Financial Services.
G.  A.  Cavin,  Insurance  Claims  Officer.
V. A. Drew, Director of Property Services.
R. J. Baines, Senior Information Officer.
R. A. Fisher, Contract Documents Officer.
C. E. Parker, Chief Records Officer.
(Mailing address for above-
Ministry of Highways and Public Works, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C. V8V 2M3)
Region 1
P. J. Carr, Regional Highway Engineer.
Position vacant, Assistant Regional Highway
Engineer.
J. H. Lawrence, Regional Personnel Officer.
Position vacant, Regional Construction Engineer.
W. E. Mercer, Regional Approving Officer.
A. G. Tranfield, Regional Superintendent
of Highway Design and Surveys.
A. J. Montador, Regional Geotechnical and
Materials Engineer.
D. Byers, Regional Maintenance Methods
Engineer.
J. Hynds, Regional Paving Superintendent.
L. H. Mercier, Regional Property Negotiator.
R. D. Page, Regional Traffic Superintendent.
T. R. Yearsley, Regional Mechanical Superintendent.
O. T. King, Regional Office Manager.
H. Dennies, Regional Safety Officer.
R. W. Veitch, District Highways Manager,
North Vancouver.
M. Forsyth, District Highways Manager,
Gibsons.
Walisser,   District  Highways   Manager,
New Westminster.
W. Wells, District Highways Manager,
Chilliwack.
13
 Region 2
R. W. Gittins, Regional Highway Engineer.
D. C. MacVicar, Assistant Regional Highway  Engineer.
J. D. Sutherland, Regional Personnel Officer.
A. W. Slater, Regional Construction Engineer.
H. F. Blunden, Regional Approving Officer.
A. W. G. Smith, Regional Superintendent of
Highway Design and Surveys.
G. E. Miller, Regional Geotechnical and
Materials Engineer.
R. L. Chapman, Regional Maintenance
Methods Engineer.
J. F. Meidinger, Regional Paving Engineer.
R. E. Burnett, Regional Property Negotiator.
J. T. Evans, Regional Mechanical Superintendent.
D. W. Hill, Regional Office Manager.
D. W. Grant, Regional Safety Officer.
D. P. Doyle, District Highways Manager,
Kamloops.
W. A. Budden, District Highways Manager,
Salmon Arm.
P. S. Dunn, District Highways Manager,
Vernon.
S. N. A. McLeod, District Highways Manager, Penticton.
N. Hope, District Highways Manager, Merritt.
J. P. O'Toole, District Highways Manager,
Lillooet.
H. F. Popoff, District Highways Manager,
100 Mile House.
W. J. McDonald, District Highways Manager, Kelowna.
Region 3
W. M. Sproul, Regional Highway Engineer.
H. J. Kelsall, Assistant Regional Highway-
Engineer.
E.   K.  Lloyd,  Regional  Personnel  Officer.
G. I. Sutherland, Regional Construction Engineer.
P. J. Bonser, Regional Highway Design and
Surveys Engineer.
P. Barnes, Regional Geotechnical and Materials Engineer.
L. M.Wagar, Regional Maintenance Methods
Engineer.
R. Pratt, Regional Paving Engineer.
J. Mintak, Regional Property Negotiator.
R. E. lohnson, Regional Mechanical Superintendent.
S. J. Dixey, Regional Office Manager.
R. Mack, Regional Safety Officer.
G. R. Kent, District Highways Manager,
Nelson.
R. E. McKeown, District Highways Manager, Rossland.
W. G. Helmsing, District Highways Manager, Grand Forks.
B. D. Hunter, District Highways Manager,
New Denver.
S. J.  Sviatko, District Highways  Manager,
Cranbrook.
G. K. Austin, District Highways Manager,
Fernie.
C. S. Shaw, District Highways Manager,
Golden.
J. W. Lay, District Highways Manager, Revelstoke.
R. A. lackman, District Highways Manager,
Creston.
Region 4
L. A. Broddy, Regional Highway Engineer.
A. L. Freebairn, Assistant Regional Highway Engineer.
W. I. Doddridge, Regional Personnel Officer,
Regional Construction Engineer.
E. A. Beaumont, Regional Highway Design
and Surveys Engineer.
F. J. Morey, Regional Geotechnical and
Materials Engineer.
A. H. Willekes, Regional Maintenance Methods Engineer.
H. A. Waring, Regional Paving Superintendent.
D. I. F. MacSween, Regional Property Negotiator.
G. A. Warrington, Regional Mechanical Superintendent.
C.  J.  Smaaslet,  Regional  Office Manager.
I. B. Mill, Regional Approving Officer.
C. E. Lord, Regional Safety Officer.
D. G. lohnson, Project Design Engineer.
Position vacant, District Highways Manager,
Prince George.
A.  N.  Hepp, District Highways Manager,
Quesnel.
S. D. Gladysz, District Highways Manager,
Dawson Creek.
H.  L.  Good, District Highways Manager,
Fort St. lohn.
Position vacant, District Highways Manager,
Vanderhoof.
J.  E.  Steven,  District  Highways  Manager,
Williams Lake.
S. Young, P.Eng., District Highways Manager, McBride.
14
 Region 5
M. J. O'Connor, Regional Highway Engineer.
(This region is being phased in over the
next several months.   Districts will continue
to be administered through existing regions
until the new region is operational.)
W.   R.   Ball,   District   Highways   Manager,
Prince Rupert.
R. M. McMillan, District Highways Manager, Terrace. District Highways Manager, Dease Lake.
F. J. R. Martin, District Highways Manager,
Smithers.
D. H. Hutton, District Highways Manager,
Burns Lake.
Region 6
B.L'Hirondelle, Regional Highway Engineer.
(This region is being phased in over the
next several months.   Districts will continue
to be administered through existing regions
until the new region is operational.)
J. W. Morris, District Highways Manager,
Nanaimo.
G. W. Harper, District Highways Manager,
Saanich.
R. W. Ellis, District Highways Manager,
Port Alberni.
R. G. Mulcaster, District Highways Manager, Courtenay.
15
 B 16
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
J. A. Dennison.
REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER
AND CHIEF ENGINEER
Submitted herewith are the reports of the Executive Directors of the Engineering, Construction, Operations, and Planning Divisions.
As will be seen from the detailed content of this Report, the productivity of
this Ministry was quite extensive in all phases of operation and enhanced by
favourable weather conditions throughout the year.
The four-lane construction program at the lower end of Vancouver Island
is progressing as is the similar program to Hope.
Inflation was again very pronounced in British Columbia with an increase
in construction costs of more than 16 per cent. Maintenance costs have also increased but the Maintenance Management Program is enabling the Ministry to
attain maximum efficiency for monetary value.
The Ministry has also been preparing itself for the changeover to metric
measurement in the next fiscal year. Thousands of signs have been prepared in
readiness for the event effecting speed limits and distance signs that will be changed
throughout the Province in the early part of September 1977. Training programs
and other aspects of this changeover have also been prepared.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B  17
M. G. Elston, Executive Director,
Engineering Division.
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF HIGHWAY DESIGN AND SURVEYS
E. E. Readshaw
Highway design and surveys carried out during the fiscal year from March
1976 to March 1977 are listed in the text of this Report, totalling 196.56 miles of
completed design work, 217.13 miles of location line survey, and 276.48 miles of
preliminary surveys.
Of the design mileage completed, 26 separate projects were submitted to the
Chief Highway Engineer for approval for award either to contract or to be constructed by the Ministry's own forces, a total of 111.30 miles.
The most significant development in the year was that of the long-planned
Coquihalla route from Hope to Merritt. This route will reduce the distance from
Hope to Kamloops by about 40 miles. The highway will be constructed over the
next eight years as a four-lane controlled access highway. Its estimated cost in
1976 dollars is $150 million. An environmental study has been initiated based on
extensive preliminary work carried out in previous years. Staff on the Secretariat
of the Environment and Land Use Committee are working jointly with the Branch
to prepare a Stage I report. A centreline projection has been made on 1-inch to
100-foot mapping, and field survey work will commence in the coming year.
In connection with the proposed coal development in the Chetwynd-Dawson
Creek area of the Province, the Ministry of Highways has carried out studies for
the development of primary highway alternatives to link the proposed new townsite
with the existing highway system.
This project was carried out under the direction of the Transport Subcommittee
on N.E. Coal Development, one of a number of subcommittees reporting to the
Senior Co-ordinating Committee. Through this committee structure we are able
to obtain environmental and social input to add to our own engineering data, resulting in a well-rounded study.
Two routes were selected for development from six possible corridors. One
route was developed by consultants, the other by our own staff. The planning work
was carried out in metric units.
Approximately 50 kilometres of one route have been surveyed, and the
clearing and grubbing contracts prepared. These will be awarded in the next fiscal
year's work. Survey and design of the remaining 34 kilometres will also follow in
the coming year.
 B 18
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
Lougheed Highway Connector, Cape Horn-Pitt River Highway, Project 3144: Phase I.
Looking north, Stormont-McBride Avenue, showing Stormont Interchange.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B  19
Alternate routes, Highway 13, Hedley to Keremeos.
At Revelstoke, B.C. Hydro's planning for their proposed high dam involves
the relocation of approximately 50 miles of highway, 23 between Revelstoke and
the Mica Damsite. The Ministry has supervised the survey and design work for
this task which, because of the volume of other work by our own staff, was awarded
to consultants. Preliminary studies to the route are complete and arrangements
for final design are in hand for next year.
In the Trail area, the design of the final section of the new route from Kinnaird
to Meadow Siding on Highway 3 was completed and the project let to contract.
In Victoria, the design of the long-planned Blanshard Street Extension was
finally completed and advertised for tenders. In addition, Highway 1 itself will be
reconstructed to four lanes for 3V^ miles out of Victoria. These two projects
should greatly relieve the growing traffic congestion at the entrance to Victoria.
At the north end of Vancouver Island, designs were completed and contracts
let for the final 28 miles of the Island Highway between Kelsey Bay and Port Hardy.
This project was noteworthy in that it was designed in conformity with the recommendations of a full environmental study through a very sensitive area comprising
major fish-producing rivers and the Tsitika River Ecological Reserve. Specifications provided for the assignment of full-time staff to monitor the contractors'
construction activities to ensure the maximum degree of protection for fish and
ecological concerns along the route.
In the north, on Highway 37 from Kitwanga to Meziadin Lake, two design
projects totalling 25.07 miles were also completed and are being let to contract.
Here again, full environmental studies were made in previous years and specifications drawn up to ensure the maximum degree of protection of fish and wildlife
values.
Many other projects too numerous to mention individually are listed in the
following tables.
 B 20
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
SURVEY AND DESIGN SECTION
Name of Project
Distance in Miles
P-Line
L-Line
Design
Trans-Canada Highway 1
Harriet Road to Thetis Lake Overhead-
Duncan to Chemainus River.	
Horsehoe Bay runaway lane	
Third Street to Capilano Bridge..
Capilano River to Mosquito Creek to St. Georges Street (Second Narrows)       	
Lynn Valley Interchange, curb and gutter.
Mountain Highway exit ramp (metric), 0.50 km.
Cambridge Street access loop  _ 	
Clearbrook Interchange  _	
Wahleach to Jones Creek 	
Savona Hill East Junction	
Savona Hill to Cherry Creek	
Cherry Creek to Cornwall Lodge-
Valley view to Campbell Creek	
Chase west entrance  _
Eagle River bridge approaches at Kay Falls..
Rotton Row left-turn slot  	
Shuswap Avenue left-turn slot _ 	
Highway lp.
200th Street to 202nd Street, Langley, curb and gutter..
128th Street bus lanes  - _ 	
Old Ya!e Road to Vedder Road Interchange  	
Totals _	
Highway 3
Hope-Princeton (District Lot 980 to Princeton) ..
District Lot 221 to Princeton Slide	
Hedley to Keremeos.
Keremeos to Kaleden (Twin Lake Junction to Kaleden Junction).
Intersection at Grand Forks  - 	
Intersection at Sparwood ..   	
Alpine Road Intersection  _	
Trail to Glenmerry, 5.74 km.
Glenmerry Pedestrian Underpass, 0.53 km..
Glenmerry to Montrose...
Champion Creek to Meadow Siding.
Salmo to Creston Summit revision	
Boulder Creek revision  	
Cranbrook to Cranbrook Avenue, curb and gutter-
Totals .._ „ 	
Lower Mainland Roads
Highway 7
Community builders access	
Clearview Drive to Pinetree .
Highway 7a
C Street to Mission..
Highway 11
Matsqui to Abbotsford (drainage) -	
Highway 95\
Kimberley to extension of Blarchmont Hill, curb and gutter..
Highway 99
Mamquam River to Alice Lake Junction	
Mamquam revision _	
Brohm Lake to Cheakamus Canyon   _	
Cheakamus Canyon .
Cheakamus Canyon to Green Lake 	
Cheakamus Canyon to Whistler Mountain .
Highway 99k, King George Highway
96th Avenue to 62nd Avenue  	
0.93
0.31
0.66
0.50
2.00
2.33
1.50
1.10
2.60
1.30
2.23
0.80
0.90
0.21
0.40
0.60
10.71      i 9.04
12.40      |        34.16      |
3.30
1.00
0.25
0.50
3.60
3.50
0.18
0.12
0.20
0.50
13.60
2.30
0.25
0.25
1.80
2.00
0.25
0.80
7.65
0.75
2.85
0.25
4.63
0.23
0.24
2.25
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B 21
SURVEY AND DESIGN SECTION—Continued
Name of Project
Distance in Miles
P-Line
L-Line
Design
Highway 101
Airport Road to Trout Lake (Field Road to Mason Road)-.
Miscellaneous
Bridge Road to River Road-   _	
172nd Street, Surrey (Second Avenue to Eighth Avenue)-
B.C. Hydro railway crossing at Sardis..
Broadway Avenue Extension to Gaglardi Way 	
Northwest Marine Drive (West Mall to West Gage Residence) ..
Dollarton Highway at Indian Reserve 3  	
Chillukthan Slough: Delta  _	
Golden Ears Park _ _ _ 	
Twin Creeks Road 	
Totals _ 	
1.50
1.38
0.57
2.70
0.75
1.00
45.88 20.45
Vancouver Island Highways
Highway 4
Port Alberni to Redford Street, curb and gutter	
Pete Wolf Creek-
Jordan River _
Highway 14
Blanshard Street Extension .
Highway 17
Boulder Creek .
Highway 18
Highway 18\
West approach to Riverside Bridge (Lake Cowichan)..
Beck Creek culvert (Nanaimo) _
Courtenay North (Coleman Road)~
Craigs Crossing to Highway 4..
Highway 19
1.50
2.50
0.70
11.40
Norwell Drive to Hammond Bay Road.
Bowen Road _	
Eve River to Tsitika River .
Tsitika River to Woss Camp.
Port Hardy Airport to Port Hardy ferry approaches..
Parksville drainage _ _	
Black Creek bridge site	
Kirby Creek  _	
Nanaimo to River Road.
Compton Road	
Totals _..
Miscellaneous
1.50
0.60
0.80
1.00
0.30
18.20
2.10
Interior Highways
Highway 37
Derrick Creek to District Lot 3411 (Kitwanga-Meziadin)..
Kitwanga River to Kitwancool (District Lot 1206)	
Nass River to District Lot 3411 	
Bear Pass to Strohn Creek 	
Pinetree Lake to Cassiar Junction .
Totals  _	
Highway 97
Camp McKinney Road 75 (Osoyoos)	
District Lot 1822 to District Lot 3030	
Copper Mountain Road Interchange at Princeton..
Kaleden Junction to Game Farm _ 	
Channel Parkway (Penticton)
Harvey Avenue to Abbott Street, curb and gutter (Kelowna)..
District Lot 4056 to Kelowna    	
Vernon to Swan Lake _ _	
4.11
1.16
0.74
0.19
0.09
13.60
0.95
0.95
2.18
0.71
0.13
10.00
0.13
0.90
1.00
6.87
0.64
14.74
0.75
1.42
0.13
0.50
3.61
2.97
2.00
1.80
3.50
0.50
0.50
17.68
10.00
11.00
14.07
24.48
59.55
1.64
1.00
0.50
1.55
 B 22
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
SURVEY AND DESIGN SECTION—Continued
Name of Project
Highway 97—Continued
Reids Corner to Ellison Lake __	
Left-turn slot (Junction Highway 97 and 12b).
Williams Lake to Airport Road Intersection	
Williams Lake North truck route -	
Quesnel North (upgrading Highway 97)..
Salmon River to Parsnip River (Salmon Valley to Summit Lake)
Parsnip River South to McLeod Lake Hotel _ —
Honeymoon Creek to District Lot 8917 (Pine Pass)
Salmon River to Parsnip River (Bear Lake to Red Rocky Creek)
Kiskatinaw Bridge approaches   —
Totals - -	
Miscellaneous Numbered Highways
Highway 5
Merritt to Nicola Avenue   	
Heffley to Louis Creek (slide area) 	
Paul Creek to Heffley Creek _. _ _	
Tete Jaune access relocation   	
Blackpool slide area   _ _	
Highway 6
Fauquier slide   	
Vernon to Aberdeen Road  	
Highway 12
District Lot 3629 to Sallus Creek...   _	
Fountain Creek to Gibbs Creek  „	
Fraser River crossing at Lillooet	
Highway 12%
Gibbs Creek to Sallus Creek _ _ 	
Highway 16
Kasiks River to Backwater Creek
Backwater Creek to CNR Tunnel (Kwinitsa)	
Prince George to Airport Hill   	
Smithers, Toronto Street to Alberta Street, curb and gutter
Prince Rupert to Galloway Rapids - - —
Prince Rupert, Fairview Bay to Eighth Street, curb and gutter
Highway 24
Little Fort to Phinetta Lake _  	
Highway 26
Barkerville Road (Mile 18 slide) _  	
Mitchell Bridge relocation _	
Highway 27
Nechako River Bridge approaches at Vanderhoof
Wasa to Skookumchuk.
Wasa to Wasa Bridge....
Ta Ta Creek	
Highway 95
Highway 95\
Wycliffe to Cranbrook, CPR Overhead and airport access
Kimberley curb and gutter  	
Totals _	
Miscellaneous Highways
Sylvester Road, Phase 3— _	
Kensington to Sprott, curb and gutter (New Westminster)
Chilliwack curb and gutter.
Springhill Drive to Mission Flats 	
Waneta to Nelway (Tillicum Creek to Salmo River), 3.19 km
Glenrosa Road—   _ _
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B 23
SURVEY AND DESIGN SECTION—Continued
Name of Project
Distance in Miles
P-Line
L-Line
Design
Miscellaneous Highways—Continued
6.50
2.50
0.20
1.80
3.30
0.77
0.38
1.20
2.02
3.40
2.84
0.79
0.44
0.14
0.76
0.53
0.57
5.33
7.40
3.71
15.00
60.65
0.30
3.30
2.00
0.96
0.50
2.55
0.40
0.77
3.72
3.50
3.80
28.11
17.85
8.63
0.10
3.30
0.77
0.80
1.20
0.77
2.70
3.42
0.63
10.00
4.01
5.70
1.37
0.80
0.80
	
Forest Grove to Canim Lake (100 Mile House to Canim Lake) 	
Toby Creek Road                                      _   	
Alaska Highway to NWT boundary (Fort Nelson bridge approaches)
Highway 97 to Martin Creek.	
Martin Creek to Gwillim Lake (N.E. Coal)                     	
Fellers Heights to Tumbler Ridge (N.E. Wood Preservers)	
Foothills Road to Chief Lake Road   	
Fort St. John to Centre Avenue, curb and gutter	
Totals __            	
123.43
81.18
40.01
276.48
217.13
196.56
PRELIMINARY STUDY SECTION
The following has been undertaken by this section of the .
Branch between April 1, 1976, and March 31, 1977.
Sufficient high-level photography was obtained to produ
mapping on the following:
1. Kitwanga to Meziadin Lake.
2. Champion Lakes (north access).
3. Victoria to Campbell River.
4. Lower Mainland.
Sufficient low-level photography was obtained to produce
on the following:
1. Quesnel area.
2. Walachin Bluffs.
3. Millstream to Latoria.
4. Como Lake to Kingsway.
5. Port Moody.
Design an
ce low-oi
ligh-ordei
d Surveys
der recce
- mapping
 B 24 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
Low-order mapping was obtained on the following:
1. Kitwanga to Meziadin Lake (sections).
2. Sukunka River to Tumbler Ridge.
3. Arras to Tumbler Ridge.
4. Nechako River to Northbound Access.
5. Phinetta Lake to Sheridan Lake.
6. Surprise Creek area.
7. Bitter Creek North.
8. Narcosli Creek.
High-order mapping was obtained on the following:
1. Golden Ears Park access.
2. Smithers Arterial.
3. Westbank.
4. Tillicum Road to Thetis Lake Overhead (1 a) .
Route projections or layouts were made on aerial photographs for the
following:
1. Como Lake Road to Port Coquitlam.
2. Sukunka River to Tumbler Ridge.
3. Oak Street Bridge (north approach).
4. Hudson Hope to Bear Flats.
5. Courtenay Second Crossing (continuing).
6. Cook Street to Canyon Street (Creston).
7. Bennet Creek to West Pine.
8. West Pine Bridge.
9. Harriet Road to Thetis Lake Overhead.
10. Kitimat Industrial Road.
11. Hope-Merritt (continuing).
12. Cowichan Bay Road to Duncan (continuing).
The Avalanche Occurrence and Frequency Study through Boston Bar Creek
continued with bi-weekly trips being made into the area between September 1976
and May 1977.
This investigation is continuing with the aid of the B.C. Research Council, the
Hydrology Division of the Ministry of the Environment, and the Atmospheric
Environment Service of the Federal Government.
Consultants
Design Miles
Project Urban Rural
North Road to Cape Horn  1.80 	
Cape Horn to Pitt River  0.50 	
Haney to Silverdale ] 1 2.00
Highway 10, Ladner  0.40 ______
Westsyde Road, Kamloops  0.40 	
McKenzie Avenue, Williams Lake  0.10 	
Highway 97, Prince George North  0.80 1.00
Springhill Drive to Mission Flats  0.20 0.30
Totals   4.20        3.30
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B 25
Preliminary Study
Stanley Park Causeway.
Cape Horn to Pitt River.
Rossland Avenue Interchange, Trail.
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE METRIC ENGINEER,  1976/77
Monthly meetings of the Metric Conversion Committee were held with representatives present from most Branches of the Highways Ministry. The planning
phase of metric conversion was substantially completed, and scheduling of major
events is being finalized.
Metric amendments of the various Highway Acts were completed, and are
awaiting presentation to the Legislature for approval.
Manufacture of new metric speed and distance signing got under way so that
the conversion date of September 1977 can be met. Quotations were received from
five advertising agencies for a comprehensive program to advise the motoring public
of the metric sign conversion. A brochure, newspaper ads and columns, billboard
signs, radio messages, and TV clips will be used in this public awareness program.
Close liaison has been established with the RCMP and municipal police regarding
enforcement of metric signing.
Revision of construction specifications, manuals, forms, and permits have been
proceeding and will be finalized in April 1978.
Some bulk purchasing of metric equipment has been undertaken, and more is
contemplated.
Plans for metric training of Ministry personnel are still in the formative steps.
An adviser is available from the Ministry of Education to assist in advancing this
program.
It was resolved that where possible, all new highway projects will be prepared
in metric units after September 1977.
J. W. Nelson, Metric Engineer
NOTE ON ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY, 1976/77
Two archaeological survey teams were funded by the Ministry for the purpose
of examining rights-of-way that may contain archaeological sites.
One team examined 184 projects and discovered five new sites, two in direct
conflict with proposed highway alignment. The other team examined 63 key
projects, uncovering 12 sites, two in direct conflict. In all, the teams covered
17,000 miles of territory in their investigation.
This is a continuing project in order that we may best preserve the historic
and prehistoric history of our Province.
 B 26 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF GEOTECHNICAL AND
MATERIALS ENGINEERING
J. W. G. Kerr
GENERAL
The Geotechnical and Materials Branch continued to provide geotechnical
and materials quality control services to other branches of the Ministry and to
other ministries and agencies of the Province of British Columbia during 1976,
within the limits of its resources.
MANAGEMENT, ADMINISTRATION, AND SERVICES
The establishment of a small field centre at Terrace has been completed, including provision of a limited laboratory, offices, and reporting Headquarters for
five technical personnel. It is expected that this will result in the provision of
improved economical service for northwest British Columbia and provide a base
for a future geotechnical and materials centre to serve Region 5.
The main laboratory and office building in Prince George has for a number
of years been housed in a poorly heated and ventilated warehouse where operating
conditions has been less than satisfactory. However, this year Public Works have
arranged to provide a new, properly designed laboratory and office building which
is under construction. This will not only conform to health and safety regulations
but also provide testing facilities and operating conditions normally expected of an
accredited laboratory. As a result it is hoped that both the quality of test results
and the productivity of the staff will be improved.
To expedite soil surveys and aggregate exploration for the N.E. Coal feasibility study and other high-priority projects in northern British Columbia, two new
Mobile B33 drills mounted on articulated all-terrain vehicles were purchased and
put into service in Region 4. Also a tracked personnel and equipment carrier was
obtained to transfer personnel and small drills as well as to service Go-Trac
mounted drilling equipment operating in areas of difficult terrain with minimal
access preparation.
Instrumentation for geophysical testing has been updated. A Time Domain
Resistivity unit and 24-channel seismic unit were purchased to improve the accuracy and production of geophysical surveys to assess subsurface deposits and soil
information. Field testing of an EM34 electromagnetic instrument has been
initiated to evaluate its time and cost saving potential in aggregate investigations.
Staff members attended a number of courses and seminars related to geophysics, terrain evaluation, geotechnical engineering, materials testing, and junior
management. Two employees are enrolled in the three-year Executive Development Training Program. Five members of the staff were authors or co-authors
of four technical papers. One on "Terrain Evaluation and Highway Engineering"
was presented to the Western Cordilleran Section of the Canadian Geotechnical
Society. Papers on "Aspects of Natural Slope Stability in Silt Deposits near Kamloops, B.C." and "Treatment of Rock Slopes on Transportation Routes" were presented to the 29th Canadian Geotechnical Conference. A paper on "Concrete
Bridge Deck Performance in British Columbia" was presented at the Transportation Research Board Meeting in Washington, D.C.
Other staff members served on Canadian Standards Association Committees
A-23-2, Methods of Tests for Concrete, 080 Wood Preservatives, 823.4 Precast
Concrete and A266 Concrete Admixtures; on the Roads and Transportation
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B 27
Association of Canada Pavement Management Committee, which has achieved a
final draft of a Pavement Management manual, on the National Advisory Committee on Rock Mechanics, and on the Technical Committee of the Canadian Diamond Drilling Association. The Branch also had representation on the Environmental Subcommittee, Transportation Subcommittee, and Townsite and Community
Development Subcommittee of the N.E. Coal Committee. Information has also
been provided for the Pacific Rim Transportation Study. The sharing of useful
knowledge and establishment of standards, which lead to better methods of work,
is prime output of these committees.
The Branch regrets the death in service of Bud Botham, Drilling Superintendent. Mr. Botham worked his way up through the organization to this position.
His cheerful hardworking contribution will be missed.
The Branch also lost a valuable geographer, Research Officer 3, through
resignation, whose position has remained unfilled.
ROUTE SURVEY INVESTIGATION
This function comprises terrain evaluation, field investigation of surface and
subsurface materials and interpretation of data which when combined with geometric land surveys provided the basis for highway location and design. Terrain
evaluation includes study of available information, geological history, landforms
and airphoto interpretation; this provides a relatively quick and economical information base from which potential problems along the proposed route may be
identified and, wherever possible, avoided by changes in preliminary alignment.
The second stage of route appraisal consists of field exploration by geophysical
methods such as resistivity and seismic refraction, field rock mapping, auger and
diamond drilling and sampling or test pitting, use of penetrometers or other sampling techniques. Because these methods are costly, time consuming, and frequently
involve some degree of surface and environmental damage to provide access and
perform the exploration, the work requires careful planning and supervision to
minimize impact and ensure that investigations yield the maximum benefit for the
cost and the best use of our limited resources. Field samples are tested and the
engineering properties identified. Other field information such as resistivity and
seismic refraction patterns, drilling resistance, penetration resistance, loss of water,
dip, stroke, and jointing patterns of rock are analysed in conjunction with laboratory information to assess the strength, support value, and settlement characteristics
of the materials along the line to be traversed and its potential for use as fill material
or aggregate. From this it is possible to estimate safe cut and fill slopes, acceptable
heights of embankment and construction rates, required protection from rock falls,
and to recommend preferred foundation designs for bridges and other structures.
Aggregate sources can be identified, quantified, and assessed for optimum use.
This season soil survey work was done on some 25 major projects representing about 150 line miles of highway. This included extensive work in connection
with the N.E. Coal feasibility study, including townsite investigations, Kitwanga to
Meziadin Lake, Prince George to Parsnip River, proposed relocation east of Hope
and near Cranbrook, as well as projects of lesser length but with more complex
problems such as the proposed Cheakamus Canyon reconstruction north of
Squamish and Cape Horn Bluffs at Slocan Lake. Preparations were made to carry
out surficial geology mapping and terrain evaluation this summer along the Coquihalla corridor between Hope and Merritt. In the Fraser Canyon at Slide 5 in
the vicinity of Hells Gate, use was made of the statistical analytical procedure developed in conjunction with Dr. Piteau to relocate the highway an acceptable distance away from bouncing rock and, incidentally, to minimize traffic interruption
 B 28 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
from minor avalanches. Use of an extension of this procedure was also made to
assess the statistical hazard from rolling rock on the proposed roadway relocation at
Hope Slide.
FOUNDATION INVESTIGATION AND DESIGN
Foundation investigations require more detailed and costly subsurface exploration, sampling, testing, and close analysis of data than is normal for general route
surveys to provide the required information necessary for the safety and economical
design of bridge foundations, buildings, large culverts, and major fills. Foundation
design reports all make recommendations concerning construction procedures such
as permissible loading and settlement rate to avoid as far as possible subsurface
or slope failures and assist in planning and scheduling construction. There has
been a very uneven flow of requests for such investigations during the fiscal year.
After a slow start in 1976 the number of requests for such investigation, many
of them apparently urgent, increased rapidly toward the end of the year, with a
falling off of demands again in spring 1977. Foundation reports were prepared
for 21 bridge sites, 6 buildings, 8 high fills, and numerous large culverts.
Pile-bearing capacities are usually difficult to establish accurately despite a
variety of methods and tools applied to the subsurface investigations. The Branch,
therefore, attempts to follow up on new investigation techniques and field trials.
Studies have been started on a wave equation method of pile capacity prediction
during driving and an assessment of necessary instrumentation is being made. The
Branch also participated in the analysis, instrumentation, and load testing of a
243-foot-long test pile for the new Pitt River Bridge, the object being to arrive at
the most economical pile design for this structure.
STABILITY INVESTIGATIONS
Landslides and rock falls are a recurring feature along the highways of British
Columbia where the geology, topography, and precipitation combine to produce
mass movements which are both a nuisance and a hazard to the public. Fortunately, relatively few serious slides occured in 1976. At Thuya Creek, 60 miles north
of Kamloops, Highway 5 was severed for several days by a fill failure, the cause
of which was attributed to underground seepage from a broken irrigation pipe. In
the Peace River area, a very large slide at Cameron River cut off access to communities at Halfway River after heavy rains. Such was the extent of general instability along this side road that local reconstruction was considered impractical and
access was provided by a different route.
The Peace River Hill Slide at Mile 31.5 on the Alaska Highway, which cut
the road for several days in 1975, was partly stabilized by regrading and by the
installation of 8,200 lineal feet of horizontal drains to relieve high water pressures
in the unstable sandstone and shale rock in the area. At Francois Lake where
severe movement occurred during construction of a new ferry terminal last year,
monitoring and analysis were used to permit carefully controlled reconstruction of
the facilities this year. Numerous smaller slides, many exhibiting relatively small
movement, were investigated. These minor recurrent failures require continuous
maintenance and, apart from the economic drain and nuisance to the Ministry, can
result in wastage of adjacent land.
A number of troublesome slides are monitored over a period of time as opportunity permits to attempt to determine the type or depth of movement, seepage
zones, variations in water pressure, and other factors which will eventually result
in a stabilization design which may be more effective and economical than a procedure based on quick preliminary appraisals.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B 29
One such stability problem is located on Highway 97 at Stone Creek about 25
miles south of Prince George where danger of complete disruption of highway and
railway communication exists.
Instability of rock slopes were investigated at Driftwood Canyon Park and
Lardeau; while mapping of rock structures was done for widening of Savona Bluffs
on Highway 1 as well as proposed rock cuts for Cheakamus Canyon. Advice was
also provided on rock instability problems at Salmon River Bridge near Sayward
(Highway 19) and Highway 99 between Horseshoe Bay and Squamish.
The crew specializing in scaling and rock work on high faces has continued
to follow a program of activity with the potential volume of work likely to increase
as the excavated rock slopes age and weather. Some of the more interesting projects
of the crew were widening of a narrow section on the switchbacks above Young
Creek on Highway 20 to Bella Coola; excavation, assessment, reinforcing, and
protective concreting of foundation rock at the west pier of the Chilcotin Bridge;
scaling at the approaches to Paulson Bridge on Highway 3; and grouting under the
north abutment footing of the Nicoamen Creek Bridge in the Thompson Canyon,
Highway 1. Studies and estimates are also being made for possible remedial
stabilization and rock work at Slide 5 in the Fraser Canyon, Elko Tunnel near
Fernie on Highway 3, and Odium Bluffs on Route 7 near Hope. Monitoring the
movement of potential rock slides, on rock fall areas above highways continues.
This work uses movement hubs, electronic distance measuring and precise survey
techniques. The possibility of using remote monitoring is under review to assess
whether a more reliable, continuous, and less expensive record of slope movements
can be employed.
The panel of specialist consultants is still studying the potential hazard at
Rubble Creek.
Another major activity within the stability investigation program is the preliminary terrain and slide hazard evaluation of proposed subdivision areas. A total
of 164 areas representing some 1500 housing lots was reported as checked in this
way. The Kamloops region alone saw a demand increase from 35 areas in 1975 to
over 124 in 1976, which places a heavy burden on the limited resources for such
work in that region. Area-wide studies are being completed east of Kamloops and
a geologic hazard report has been completed for the West Bench-Sage Mesa area
near Penticton. A start has been made on a general geologic hazard study for the
Columbia and Windermere Lakes areas.
AGGREGATE INVESTIGATIONS
The search and quality testing for new sources of construction aggregates
demands increasing effort as the best and most easily accessible sources are being
depleted. A total of 154 areas was investigated by backhoe, auger drill, and geophysical methods. Field-run resistivity testing was done for 12 projects covering
78 line miles of survey at an average cost of $540 per mile, a saving of approximately $90 per mile of 1974, costs due to increased productivity resulting from
improved instrumentation. Extensive field testing was done in the N.E. Coal area
where construction aggregate deposits appear to be scarce or of poor quality. Preliminary road designs include plans for special base course stabilization in this area.
Intensive gravel prospecting work is planned for Highway 27 between Fort St.
James and Germansen Landing, as well as for the Districts of Burns Lake and
Quesnel. B.C. Hydro and their consultants recently completed a study of future
aggregate demand and availability in the Fort St. John-Dawson Creek area following
a request by this Branch on behalf of the Ministry two years ago as part of the
 B 30 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
environmental impact study for additional dam sites on the Peace River. The final
report is a valuable reference for commercial and public agency producers alike
in the management of aggregate resources and land use. Such area-wide studies on
future needs and availability of aggregate appears to be desirable for other areas in
the Province.
PAVEMENT EVALUATION AND DESIGN
The Benkelman Beam Test Procedure, which measures the support strength
of the road at the time of concern and provides for seasonal adjustments, is still the
mainstay of our road maintenance, pavement thickness design, and construction
quality control programs. In the construction and reconstruction program the
strength and thickness requirements of 390 miles of roadway were assessed using
Benkelman Beam Test equipment using the Canadian developed rebound method.
Additionally, some 202 segments of road were evaluated to determine the shortest
time that load restriction had to be imposed without causing unreasonable damage
to the highway network.
Special projects included the site testing, design, and construction supervision
of a new air tanker base for the B.C. Forest Service at the Prince George Airport.
The mild spring of 1977 has caused road weaknesses to occur earlier than usual
in some areas, with the resultant increased demand on testing time.
With the dwindling of good aggregate supplies in some areas of the Province
and the increase in price of oil-based products, studies into the use of stabilization
of lower-quality aggregates on new construction projects have increased this year to
an important size. Pavement designs based on cement stabilization of aggregates
have been tested primarily for contracts in the Prince George region.
QUALITY ASSURANCE AND SPECIFICATION COMPLIANCE
MONITORING
The Branch continued to perform an extensive program of concrete mix
design, field and plant inspection, and laboratory testing of material samples; to
co-operate and consult with other Branches of the Ministry, with the Purchasing
Commission and other ministries for the purpose of ensuring sound construction,
specification, and purchase of materials of the required uniform level of quality. For
example, Branch representatives participated in the revision process of 16 standard
specifications either as originator or commentator on the proposal of others; approximately 1,300 separate materials inspections were done and some 3,300 concrete test cylinders were tested in compression.
An interesting inspection program involved assurance of the proper application of water-proofing epoxy resin in a trout hatchery facility at Abbotsford.
Branch staff prepared a program and monitored blasting at Hunter Creek Bluffs to
ensure that vibration levels in the ground did not damage the Trans Mountain Oil
Pipeline. Useful field data was acquired which may be applied for the improvement of future blast control specifications.
Branch personnel recommended and co-operated with Bridge Branch and
Construction Branch to undertake hydro brooming of deteriorated concrete on
the deck of Lynn Creek Bridge and the inside of Rogers Creek box culvert to prepare the underlying sound concrete for resurfacing with high-strength concrete surfacing. Hydro brooming is a process whereby loss of deteriorated concrete can
be removed from the surface of a structure by application of a very fine jet of very
high-velocity water. The advantages and apparent success of the process indicates
its acceptability for wider use in future in preference to chipping, abrading, and
sand blasting.    On behalf of the Purchasing Commission, a series of tests have
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B 31
started which will lead to the selection of approved hard safety hats for use by staff
of all Government ministries.
APPLIED RESEARCH
One of the three low-powered automatic recording units designed and built
in this Branch has been used since April to record floor temperature changes in the
rotunda of the Parliament Buildings. The changes in temperature may be causing
the cracking of the floor tiles. In furtherance of our ongoing study of black ice
problems, an analog temperature recording device was designed, built, and installed
at the Port Mann Bridge for field testing. Is it anticipated that this will provide
data to form the basis for a prediction system of freezing conditions on the bridge
deck.
Design and assembly of instrumentation for ice-pressure measurement at
Kitwanga Bridge was continued consisting mainly of refining and modification of
equipment. In close co-operation with the Bridge Branch a detailed field investigation of the cause of bridge deck deterioration has been largely completed and
will be refined into a standard investigative procedure that may assist in early identification of possible trouble areas for attention. As part of the development of
better night traffic controls for other Ministry branches, a darkroom to simulate
night-time conditions has been completed. Also equipment has been developed
to compare the light reflectance of various materials. A second field trial of long-
wearing thermo-plastic lane markers was placed in the Vancouver area this summer.
The special task group involved in reducing hazards from dust, noise, and fumes
completed a joint remedial program with Region 3 in the operation of the Ministry's
asphalt mixing plant there. Latest measurements and assessments indicate both
the Workers' Compensation Board and operators are both very satisfied. The
somewhat cool weather this year did not allow completion of a field assessment
of fume and airborne dispersions behind the Ministry's asphalt sprayers, although
an interim report has been prepared.
In co-operation with Dr. Campanella of UBC Civil Engineering Department,
conversion of our Headquarters laboratory triaxial soil-testing equipment to an
air-pressure system was commenced to improve testing control and improve operator safety. A start was also made on development of a system to automatically
collect and electronically record output of data from laboratory test equipment.
This will permit more continuous recording of information and reduce overtime
work.
Three sections of the Cariboo Highway (Highway 97) from Quesnel south
to Williams Lake were investigated to determine and evaluate the cause underlying
the worst frost heaves. The Region 4 Auger Drill was modified for this purpose
to drill with compressed air and C02 in order to retrieve cores of roadway and fill
materials in their frozen state with the ice layers still present. These cores were
analysed and a study report was issued relating frost heave to soil type with guidelines for the use of frost-resistent soils and construction methods. This modified
rig was also used to investigate frost heaves in Regions 2 and 3 in the Okanagan
and at Golden.
Consultant Dr. D. Piteau has, on assignment by the Branch, produced a final
report and computer program to simulate falling rocks based on Slide 5 in the
Fraser Canyon, Hope Slide, and Porteau Bluffs on Squamish Highway. The program should enable predictions to be made concerning the statistically probable
runout distances for falling rocks and enable improved highway designs and locations to be selected to minimize hazard to the travelling public and damage to
highway structures.
 B 32
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
New A.T.V.-mounted mobile auger drill sampling gravel prospects
for North East Coal Study.
New A.T.V. drill on foundation investigations.   Salmon Valley Overpass, Region 4.
Coring frost heaves with compressed air and CO2.   Highway 97, Region 4.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B 33
Truck-mounted diamond drill exploring slide failure of Highway 5
north of Little Fort (Thuya Creek).
1 m „
Go-trac-mounted diamond drill exploring silt bluffs east of Kamloops.
Reconstruction slide section Mile 32 Alaska Highway, Region 4.
 B 34
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
-™Y .rt
Ice-pressure fittings,
Kitwanga Bridge Pier.
Ice observation platform,
Kitwanga Bridge.
Foundation investigations. End result, Halfway River Bridge—old and new.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B 35
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BRIDGE ENGINEERING
W. A. Bowman
A total of $20 million was expended on bridges and ferry terminals, and the
following reports of the Bridge Design Engineer, Bridge Construction Engineer,
and the Dock Engineer give details of the activities of the Branch over the year.
The completion of the Halfway River Bridge on the Hudson Hope-Fort St.
John Highway and construction activity on a Pitt River duplicate bridge and the
replacement of the Kiskatinaw River Bridge on the Alaska Highway were of particular note on the bridge scene.
At ferry terminals the completion of new berths at Tsawwassen and Swartz
Bay and modifications to the Little River and Westview terminals to accommodate
a larger ferry, the Sechelt Queen, were the major activities.
Bridge Design
Design work continues to be diversified throughout the Province. Of particular interest is the commencement of work on the design of structures for the four-
laning of the Trans-Canada at the Victoria outlet and also the Blanshard Street
Connection to Highway 17.
Contract documents were completed for a number of structures on the northern end of the Island Highway.
The following are details of the program:
i Included in Highway contract.
Name of Structure
Preliminary
Study
Design in
Progress
Design
Completed
Tenders
Called in
1976/77
Trans-Canada Highway
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
C1)
C1)
(*)
Yellowhead Highway
Andesite 	
X
Basalt	
X
Breccia	
X
 B 36
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
Name of Structure
Preliminary
Study
Design in
Progress
Design
Completed
Tenders
Called in
1976/77
Southern Trans-Provincial Highway and Alternatives
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Fairy Creek 	
	
Lougheed Highway
X
Mission By-pass
Island Highway
X
Lukwa Creek	
Stowe ..-.     	
	
Englishman River (Upper) _	
X
Black Creek	
Region 1—Miscellaneous
Quinsam Bridge _	
Mamquam 	
X
Bonsall Creek 2	
Cheakamus Canyon Structure	
loco Overhead 	
Region 2—Miscellaneous
Lillooet Bridge concrete alterations	
Cherryville Bridge	
C2)
Ellis Creek _.__	
Skaha Lake  	
Ten Mile Bridge (Guichon).      .   .
X
Pavilion Overhead _	
Region 3—Miscellaneous
Boivin	
(2)
Wilkinson 	
Region 4—Miscellaneous
x
West Pine	
x
2 Day labour.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B 37
Bridge Construction
In the 1976/77 fiscal year, two vehicular bridges were completed or opened
to traffic with minor work yet to be done. In addition, one bridge was improved by
redecking, another had a sidewalk attached, and a third was raised. On March 31,
1977, 14 structures were under construction.
Construction activity was slow throughout the year due to a cut in appropriations for the first five months and to two lockouts in the industry.
One bright spot in the program was Pitt River Bridge on the Lougheed Highway.
Work continued on the construction of the approach fills until their completion in
October and construction commenced in April on the substructure. Except for the
lockout periods, progress was excellent.
Toward the end of November work commenced on the substructure for the
new crossing of the Kiskatinaw River Bridge on the Alaska Highway, about 24 miles
southeast of Fort St. John. Work continued throughout the winter, which was
milder than most, and by March 31 work on the substructure was about 50 per cent
complete. At the same time, behind the scenes, the steel fabricator responsible for
the construction of the bridge had shop drawings prepared and steel plate for the
bridge was arriving.
On Vancouver Island deck construction commenced in mid-summer at Nanaimo
River and Haslam Creek Bridges and this project was virtually complete by the end
of the fiscal year. Due in part to a good winter, excellent progress was made on the
substructure of the Englishman River Bridge which is located on new highway
construction near Parksville.
Of the approximate 2,800 tons of steelwork fabricated and (or) erected this
year, a very small percentage went into new bridge superstructure construction.
Most of the tonnage, aside from the 1,500 tons of pipe pile spliced and coated for
the Pitt River Bridge, was involved in extending, upgrading, and refurbishing existing structures. Three hundred and seventy-four tons of steel-grid decking was
erected on the north roadway of the CNR bridge at Prince George. This steel grid
was fabricated out of Province and indicates a trend in structural steelwork, the
result of strong price competition from other areas.
The inspection of the plant manufacture of precast prestressed-concrete bridge
units continued throughout the year. Total production included 153 box girders
or 7,500 lineal feet, 52 I beams or 3,375 lineal feet, 12 piles or 645 lineal feet.
Nine bridge decks totalling 144,180 square feet were resurfaced by application
of a thin concrete overlay.
Because of the slow year it was necessary for many members of the Bridge
Construction Staff to assume new and different duties, for short periods of time.
It was not a wasted year, for staff members gained knowledge and experience and
many small projects benefited from their expertise.
 B 38
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
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 B 40 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
Dock Design, Construction, and Maintenance Design
DESIGN
The following design works have been completed or are in progress:
A. British Columbia Ferry Corporation
T.F. 153—Long Harbour Ferry Terminal—Design for revised and enlarged
holding compound and parking areas and additions to offices and waiting rooms.
Design in progress.
T.F. 183—Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal—Additions to foot-passenger walkways to service new Berth 3. Design in progress. Also electrical works for new
fifth berth.   Design completed.
T.F. 191—Langdale Ferry Terminal—Sewage-treatment plant, including outfall and building to house treatment equipment. Design completed.
M-92—Horseshoe Bay Ferry Terminal—Fire protection system consisting of
four fire hydrants connected to municipal system. Metered standpipes also being
provided for hosing down of terminal area.   Design completed.
Vesuvius and Crofton Ferry Terminals—Proposals for enlarging of these
terminals to provide improved holding compounds and reconstruction of existing
berths.   Proposed drawings and estimates in progress.
Deas Maintenance Facility—Provision of fourth maintenance berth. Design
in progress.
Port Hardy Ferry Terminal—Proposals for relocation of Kelsey Bay Ferry
Terminal to the Port Hardy area.   Proposal drawings and estimates in progress.
B. Ministry of Highways and Public Works
B.P. 1101—Nanaimo and Gabriola Ferry Terminals—Revisions to existing
docks to accommodate larger ferry now being constructed for this service. Design
completed.
Little River Ferry Terminal—Revisions to reverse the landing direction of the
Sechelt Queen at this terminal.   Design in progress.
CONSTRUCTION
COMPLETED
A. British Columbia Ferry Corporation
T.F. 184—Swartz Bay Ferry Terminal—Construction of fifth ferry berth.
Also additions to foot-passenger walkways, including preboarding waiting-room
and loading tower at new berth.
B. Ministry of Highways and Public Works
T.F. 189—Westview Ferry Terminal—Modifications to berths and holding
compound to accommodate the Sechelt Queen.
B.P. 1026—Francois Lake Ferry Terminals—Complete rebuilding of terminals, including fill area, new berths, waiting/washrooms, electrical systems, sewerage systems, and bubbler systems for keeping berth areas clear of ice.
B.P. 1033—Campbell River and Quathiaski Cove Ferry Terminals—Repairs
and additions to wingwalls and dolphins at both terminals.
B.P. 1091—Campbell River Ferry Terminal—Redredgingof approach channel
to ferry berth.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B 41
IN PROGRESS
A. British Columbia Ferry Corporation
T.F. 183—Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal—New fifth berth and breakwaters to
protect north basin.
T.F. 188—Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal—Rebuilding of Berth 2, including repairs to ramp, wingwalls, and dolphins.
T.F. 190—Horseshoe Bay Ferry Terminal—Relocation of toll booths and
provision of protective canopy.
T.F. 192—Langdale Ferry Terminal—New turning dolphin in Berth 1 to
accommodate stretch ferries.
B. Ministry of Highways and Public Works
T.F. 189—Little River Ferry Terminal—Revisions to terminal to accommodate the Sechelt Queen.
B.P. 1097—Westview Ferry Terminal—Major repairs and revisions to wingwalls.
MAINTENANCE
In addition to the above operations, major maintenance projects as well as
normal maintenance at all B.C. Ferry Corporation terminals and at those Ministry
of Highways ferry terminals under this jurisdiction were carried out.
T. A. Tasaka, Dock Engineer
 B 42 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF TRAFFIC ENGINEERING
During the past year, activity again increased in the Province and the number
of vehicles using British Columbia highways was significantly higher than in the
previous year. The Traffic Engineering Branch continued to co-operate with individuals and organizations in the associated fields of traffic safety, traffic planning,
standardization of traffic control devices, and traffic operations.
The Director of Traffic Engineering represented the Ministry on the Roads and
Transportation Association Council on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Canada
and the Roads and Transportation Association Committee on Traffic Operations.
Short-duration annual traffic counts were taken with automatic equipment at
approximately 700 locations throughout the Province. Traffic volumes are recorded
continuously throughout the year at 21 additional locations and eight of these
recorders count traffic separately for each direction of travel. A further 133 automatic counts were taken for special purposes such as railway crossing, intersection,
and planning studies.
Punched-tape traffic counters are used as much as possible so that calculation
of traffic count information can be done with data processing equipment. A translator machine located in the Traffic Engineering Branch office is used to transfer
information from punched tapes to computer cards.
In the summer of 1972, the Branch began to install electronic loop detection
systems at regular short-duration traffic count stations on high speed/high volume
highways. The new detectors, replacing the rubber road tubes previously used,
allow employees to set up counters on the shoulder without having to venture onto
the travelled lanes. Over 650 "loops" have already been installed at approximately
200 count stations throughout the Province. The program will be continued this
summer.
Summer daily traffic volumes for 1976 showed approximately 55,000 vehicles
on First Narrows Bridge, 71,000 vehicles on Second Narrows Bridge, 44,000
vehicles on Knight Street Bridge, and 56,000 vehicles in the George Massey Tunnel.
Data from the permanent count stations showed increases in 1976 over 1975 of
approximately 3 per cent in the Southern Interior, 2 per cent on Vancouver Island,
a decrease of 2 per cent in the Fraser Valley and an increase of 6 per cent in the
Northern Interior.
Many intersection problems were investigated during the year. This work
included the taking of counts of manual vehicle turning movements and the preparation of design for the improvement of approximately 42 intersections. These
improvements included widening, channelization, signing, and signal revisions to
give greater capacity, eliminate hazards, and generally improve the flow of traffic.
Numerous highway design plans were reviewed to ensure that intersections and
interchanges would function well under actual traffic conditions.
Six railway grade crossings were signalized in co-operation with the Federal
Railway Transport Committee and the railways under the committee's jurisdiction.
A number of speed limits were reviewed due to changing traffic conditions and,
in consultation with the police authorities, changes were made where they appeared
to be warranted. In some cases actual travel speeds were checked by means of
radar speed meter.
An addition of two changeable message signs to the existing system was completed by the Ministry late in 1976. This brings to nine the number of changeable
message signs located in areas where severe winter conditions occur. These signs
provide drivers with up-to-date information on road conditions.   Drivers assisted
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B 43
by the signs are those travelling the Salmo-Creston Highway, Fraser Canyon, Hope-
Princeton Highway, and Terrace to Prince Rupert section of Route 16. The sign
locations were selected on the basis of the avalanche hazard index, volume of traffic,
and length and duration of road closures. The signs warn motorists of road conditions far enough in advance so that they have time to consider taking an alternative
route.
The signs have, in a mini-computer, a memory of 64 one-line messages. Up to
eight messages can be displayed in sequence at any time. The messages, made up
of 18-inch-high letters, are called up through telephone lines by a portable computer
terminal.   All that is required is the terminal and a telephone.
The ease of operation enables the Ministry to make available to the public
current information concerning road conditions, road closures, detour routes, and
length and location of delays. The motorist sees a series of three messages which
flash in sequence. Each message is exposed for a minimum of two seconds. The
message is read by motorists as they drive, in much the same way as overhead
directional signs. The signs can be controlled from the base of the sign, from the
local highway foreman's office, from the regional radio room, or from Headquarters
in Victoria.
Cost of the two new signs added to the system, designed and installed by the
Ministry, is $110,000.   They were operational December 10, 1976.
Traffic signals were designed and installed at 43 intersections throughout the
Province. Flashing beacons were installed at eight intersections. Approximately
700 street-lighting luminaires were installed at intersections, highway interchanges,
and ferry-landings.
A stand-by generator system for Swartz Bay was designed and installed to
supply power to the ferry terminal when B.C. Hydro power fails.
Energy conservation continues to be the design criteria of the electrical section.
All new lighting installations are designed with the more efficient yellow sodium
fixtures. Massey Tunnel, the first tunnel relit in North America with sodium lighting,
has now operated for a year. Comparison of B.C. Hydro billing for the years 1975
and 1976 shows a 19 per cent reduction in power consumed, even though daytime
lighting levels were increased 20 times.
Lighting of isolated intersections will use 150-watt high-pressure sodium fixtures
instead of 400-watt mercury fixtures which reduces power consumption by 60 per
cent while still giving 80 per cent of the light of the mercury fixture.
Electrical design in traffic control is aimed at reducing maintenance by
employing solid state equipment, which does not require regular maintenance, but
does allow more design flexibility.
 B 44 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
REPORT OF HIGHWAY SAFETY ENGINEER
J. LlSMAN
The year saw a continuance of work started last year, and the planning of a
systematic data collection process to spot road segments of above-average hazard.
School pedestrian problems again presented many cases requiring careful individual
treatment.
The 12.1-per-cent reduction in traffic deaths during 1976 continued the downward trend which started last year, and can be attributed in part to the effect of the
lower highway speed limits. The reduced deaths for the complete freeway/expressway network show that these inherently safer highways are producing the best
benefit from lower travelling speeds. Maximum speed limits were carefully
reviewed, with RCMP advice, and several increases proposed after examining the
low fatal-accident record. This review is an ongoing process as roads are reconstructed and major improvements carried out.
Following the review of traffic accident information, advice was given to the
field staff on road improvement works, aimed at reducing hazard, such as easing of
curves, improving sight distances, and placing guardrail. Certain sections of two-
lane undivided highway, having an apparently poor accident record, were selected
for study and work is proceeding to determine what practical improvements can be
made to reduce risk to the average driver.
Work continued in the installation of the sand-barrel Impact Attenuator
devices on Highway 1 through Burnaby, and concrete guardwall was placed to
protect errant vehicles from colliding with bridge support structures. Several accidents were reported in which vehicles crashed into the water-cushion Impact
Attenuators at Second Narrows Bridge and the Brunette Exchange, first installed
last year. The only injuries to the vehicle occupants were minor bruises or abrasions, contrasting with previous accidents at these locations, in which serious injury
and death resulted.
A major volume of Branch administrative work was again concerned with
school pedestrian problems, responding in most cases to requests for treatment from
parents. As experience was gained in dealing with these requests it was realized
that there is need for a better system of handling them in order to deal with them
more effectively, and a policy recommendation is now under preparation which will
seek to include local communities more directly in these matters.
The "Zebra" marking layout, which was experimented with last year, was
adapted to produce a new standard school crosswalk treatment which is now being
applied throughout the Province.
The need for an improved guardrail program has been given close attention,
and arrangements made for increasing production. Technical questions have
arisen regarding the redirective capabilities of these guardwalls, and research initiated to determine the limitations of each of the three concrete types currently used
in the Province.
During the year problems of accurately locating accidents in the Provincial
highway network were considered and, in consultation with the RCMP and the
Motor-vehicle Branch, a marker system was devised which should enable police to
report accident locations to within one-tenth of a kilometre. A pilot project was
approved to place kilometre posts on Highway 3, from Hope to Keremeos, to test
the new procedure before applying it generally in the Province.  The new location
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B 45
reporting will be made on the revised Police Motor-vehicle Accident Form, which
came into effect on January 1, 1977.
The Highway Safety Engineer serves as a member of the Canadian committee
dealing with the economic elimination of roadside hazards, and represents the
Province on a Federal-Provincial technical committee which guides development
on road safety matters. In addition, he had continued to chair the Inter-Ministry
Working Group of public servants, who consider traffic safety problems of common
concern and assist in the formation of traffic safety policy.
Hunter Creek Bluff, Trans-Canada Highway 1 west of Hope.
Under construction.
Completed four-lane divided highway.
 B 46 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
R. G. White, Executive Director,
Construction Division.
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CONSTRUCTION
N. R. Zapf
A very wet summer throughout most areas of the Province hampered construction progress. However, a dry autumn and a mild winter enabled most projects
to remain on schedule. Work was performed on 35 projects, with a total value of
$109,656,646.47 and an expenditure during the fiscal period of $35,928,640.
Fourteen of the projects were fully completed during the year. The completed
projects accounted for 95 miles of the 260 miles under construction.
The final two contracts on the difficult North Island Highway between Sayward and Kelsey Bay have been awarded and work is progressing favourably. Care
is being taken to avoid any permanent environmental damage that could occur.
Good co-operation between this Ministry, environmental agencies, and the contractor has been achieved on the development of these projects in a very sensitive
area.
Four-lane development on southern sections of the Island Highway has
reduced much of the congestion. Work is continuing north of Duncan, south of
Nanaimo, and at Parksville and further multi-lane projects are expected in the near
future.
Several new projects have been called in northern areas with emphasis on the
John Hart Highway north of Prince George, Highway 16 between Terrace and
Prince Rupert, and the Cassiar-Stewart Highway. On Highway 16 one major
quarry project west of Terrace was completed and another begun. The section
immediately east of Prince George should be completed in early fall. On the John
Hart Highway two major projects will be under way this season.
The Champion Lakes cut-off between Castlegar and Meadow Siding on Highway 3 is nearing completion. The first and second contracts are complete to sub-
base gravel and the third is progressing favourably. A crushed gravel and paving
contract over all three sections will be called perhaps in the fall to be completed for
the travelling public in 1978.
A much needed four-lane development project on the Trans-Canada Highway
east of Kamloops recently commenced. Aside from the increase in through Trans-
Canada traffic, rapid local development has taxed the capacity of the existing two-
lane system. Completion of the first multi-lane portion is expected by the end of
1977.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B 47
Construction Branch personnel assisted the regions and districts in a number
of areas by supervising major Day Labour projects. Some of these were the Foothills Boulevard in Prince George; Highway 97, both south and north of Prince
George; Highway 16 west of Prince George; Cassiar Junction to Good Hope Lake;
clearing at Kitwanga; Hope-Princeton passing lanes; north approach Overlanders
Bridge and Halston Overhead, Kamloops; and four-laning of the Trans-Canada
Highway from Haslam Creek to the Nanaimo River. The latter project includes a
37-foot span by 26-foot rise steel multi-pate structural pipe to be used as an underpass for the South Wellington Road.   Installation is expected to commence shortly.
The Branch has also assisted in the survey and design of several sections of the
John Hart Highway and widening programs south and west of Prince George.
Surveys and design are continuing on the leg from Cassiar Junction to the townsite
and in advance of Day Labour to Good Hope.
Dry storage shed under construction, Dease Lake Highways District yard, spring 1976.
 B 48
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
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 B 50
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
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 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER   B 51
Day-labour Projects
2808    Cedar Junction to Haslam Creek.
2823    Cassiar Junction to Good Hope Lake.
2845    North Approach Overlanders Bridge and Halston Overhead.
3076    Foothills Boulevard, Prince George.
John Hart Highway widening, Chief Lake Road to Summit Lake.
Highway 97 widening, Stone Creek South.
Highway 16 widening, Mud Creek to Bednesti.
Kitwanga clearing.
Third-lane construction on Okanagan Highway 97 near Kaleden Junction,
Penticton Highway District.
 B 52
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF PAVING
D. F. Martin
SURFACING
During the year, 196 miles (315 kilometres) of roadway were paved under
contract. Of this total, approximately 144 miles (231 kilometres) were contracted
for prior to this year. In 1976, 32 contracts were called for the paving of 322 miles
(518 kilometres) of which 52 miles (84 kilometres) were completed, and the
balance is expected to be completed in 1977. In addition to the contract work,
crews of the Paving Branch completed the roadmix paving of 68 miles (109
kilometres) of roadway, and the surface treatment of 193 miles (311 kilometres) of
roadway and 97 miles (155 kilometres) of shoulders.
In following the plan started last year, of timing the calling of contracts to
allow for the winter-time utilization of personnel and equipment, it appears that a
saving results. Despite the universal increase in prices during the period, the
prices bid for contract items, on the average, show less than a 2-per-cent increase
over the 1975 prices.
In the interests of long-range planning for the efficient and economical
maintenance of safe and acceptable surfacing on the Province's highways, a detailed
study of the history and performance of the asphalt-concrete pavements was made.
During the period of the study, it was ascertained that the volume of traffic had
doubled every 10 years; in the 20 years between 1955 and 1975, traffic volumes
had quadrupled. The accompanying chart indicates the rate at which the lengths
of paved highways is increasing, the rate at which surfaces are being recapped, and
the rate at which the surfaces should be recapped so that the maximum pavement
age should not exceed 15 years.
South abutment of Allison Creek Bridge, Princeton-Merritt Highway 5,
Penticton Highway District.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B
Asphalt Concrete Pavements, British Columbia Provincial Highways
53
*
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ngth of asphalt concrete pavement.
tive lengths of re-cap paving done.
tive lengths of recap paving required
/e been done to maintain 15 year life.
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LENGTHS
Kilometre         Mile
10 000
9 000
5,000
8 000
7 000
4,000
6 000
5 000
3,000
4 000
2,000
3 000
2 000
1,000
1000
0\
 B 54
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
Materials Used Under Contract, 1976/77
Description
Conventional
Unit
Quantity
Metric
Unit Quantity
Common excavation  	
Trench excavation _	
Select granular base	
Crushed granular base _.	
Crushed granular suracing	
Crushed shoulder aggregate	
Crushed aggregate in stockpile ~
Sealcoat aggregate in stockpile..
Asphalt concrete pavement-
Asphalt concrete mix f.o.b. plant.
Asphalt curb .
Portland cement curb and gutter-
Portland cement curb	
Portland cement guardrail	
Asphalt cement. 	
Cutback asphalt.— —	
cu. yds.
cu. yds.
tons
tons
tons
tons
tons
tons
tons
tons
lin. ft.
lin. ft.
lin. ft.
lin. ft.
tons
gals.
63,000
17,400
125,400
80,700
348,900
209,800
115,500
7,740
759,340
4,330
39,860
20,030
4,800
1,234
33,236
492,500
m3
m3
tonnes
tonnes
tonnes
tonnes
tonnes
tonnes
tonnes
tonnes
metres
metres
metres
metres
tonnes
litres
48 190
13 300
113 800
73 200
316 500
190 300
104 800
7 020
688 860
3 930
12 150
6 105
1467
376
30151
2 238 895
Materials Used by Branch Crews
tons
tons
gals,
gals.
170,600
13,700
1,410,862
1,462,596
tonnes
tonnes
litres
litres
154 800
12 430
6 413 906
6 649 093
Paving Contracts
Project
No.
S-0174
S-0725
S-0475
S-0775
S-0975
S-2175
S-2375
S-2475
S4374
S-4375
S-6075
S-6175
S-6375
S-6575
S-0176
S^)276
S-0376
S-0476
S-0576
S-0676
S-0776
S-0876
Highway and Section
Highway   101—Port   Mellon   to   Sechelt,
Creek Road and Redroofs Road.
Roberts
Highway 19—Campbell River, Fisherman's Wharf-
Evergreen Road, curb and gutter.	
Highway 1 and miscellaneous roads, in Chilliwack
and Agassiz area
Scott Road, 80th to 96th Avenues, curb and gutter	
Parksville area roads  _	
Highway 5—Miledge Creek to Clemina Overhead	
Highway 97—Schwebs Bridge to Pinaus Lake Road .
Highway 97—100 Mile House to Lac la Hache	
Highway 1—Golden to Yoho and Highway 95 Interchange
Highway 6—South Slocan to Slocan City 	
Highway 16—Terrace bridge approaches and Keith
Avenue, curb and gutter —	
Highway 97—Parsnip River to Honeymoon Creek	
Highway 97—Mountain House Road to Marguerite —
Fort St. John roads, curb and gutter -	
Mission—First Avenue, Railway Avenue, Home
Street, and CPR access road  —
West Saanich Road, Verdier Avenue, and Shawnigan Lake area roads
Cypress Bowl access road _	
Highway 99 and Ladner Interchange	
Highway 1—Westview to Lonsdale and Lynn Valley
Road - 	
Highway 99—Whistler Mountain area _	
Highway 7a, St. Johns Street, Port Moody, curb and
gutter _  	
Highway 1—Haslam Creek to Fielding Road	
Total
Length
(Miles)
32.00
1.01
13.05
1.99
26.60
25.30
16.70
13.02
17.00
29.00
1.47
14.20
25.90
5.15
1.80
29.40
4.80
5.65
1.58
18.18
0.97
5.80
Length
Completed
This
Fiscal
Year
(Miles)
2.50
1.01
13.05
1.99
26.60
3.10
16.70
13.02
9.70
29.00
0.47
0.50
25.90
1.80
8.50
Remarks
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Continuing.
Completed.
Continuing.
Completed.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B 55
Paving Contracts—Continued
Project
No.
Highway Section
Total
Length
(Miles)
Length
Completed
This
Fiscal
Year
(Miles)
Remarks
S-0976
S-1076
S-2076
S-2176
S-2276
S-2376
S-2476
S-2576
S-2676
S-2776
S-2876
S-2976
S-3076
S-3176
S-4076
S-4176
S^1276
S-4376
S^»476
S^1576
S-6076
S-6176
S-6276
S-6376
S-6476
S-6576
S-6676
S-6776
Highway 10—Intermittent paving -	
Marine  Drive,  Capilano  Road  to  Capilano  River
bridges	
Highway 1—Alexanlra-Boston Bar sections	
Highway 5—Little Fort south sections 	
Highways 3 and 3a — Medium-cover aggregate and
crushed surfacing in stockpile, Keremeos..
Highway 1—Medium-cover aggregate in stockpile,
Salmon Arm „	
Highway 3—Hope to Rhododendron Flats	
Highway 1—Chase to Sorrento _ _	
Highway 97a—Grindrod to Sicamous.	
Highways 5 and 8—Nicola Avenue, curb and gutter,
Merritt    _ _	
Highway 20—Riske Creek section	
Dog Creek Road and miscellaneous sections,
liams Lake   _ _.
Wil-
-Intermittent paving, Kamloops
-Intermittent paving, Kamloops
Highways 1 and 5
East	
Highways 5 and 1-
West    _	
Highways 3 and 93—Elko to Wardner and Wardner
to Rampart, intermittent sections	
Highway 3a—Kootenay Bay to Sanca Creek	
Highway 3 and Elk Valley Road, intermittent sections
Medium-cover   aggregate   in   stockpile,   Fernie   to
Cranbrook _  	
Crushed aggregate in stockpile, Salmo -	
Highways 95 and 95a—Marysville to Skookumchuck
Highway 25—Kitimat Village Road __ _	
Highway 16—Sob Lake to Bednesti	
Highway 97—Plett Road to Cale Creek _	
Highway 16—Terrace to Esker sections 	
Highway 16—Crushed aggregate in stockpile	
Highway 16—Bednesti to Parkridge	
Fort Nelson streets - 	
3.10
0.45
14.50
9.80
15.50
8.30
17.00
1.20
12.20
7.50
2.80
3.50
17.20
26.74
23.30
17.80
7.30
15.40
30.60
10.10
Prince Rupert, curb and gutter..
26.00
1.80
1.20
0.45
14.50
7.50
2.80
3.50
7.30
1.80
Continuing.
Completed.
Completed.
Continuing.
Completed.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Completed.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Completed.
Continuing.
Surface Treatments by Paving Branch Crews
Orr
Roadway
Shoulder
SOl-76
S02-76
S03-76
S04-76
SOS-76
S06-76
S07-76
S08-76
S09-76
SO10-76
SOI 1-76
S012-76
S013-76
SP1-76
SP2-76
SP3-76
SP4-76
SP5-76
SP6-76
SP7-76
SP8-76
SP9-76
Little Fort to Blackpool..
Blackpool to Clearwater.
Rayleigh  -	
Westsyde Road..
Barnhartvale and Tod Road	
Highway 97—100 Mile House to Clinton .
Canim Lake Road	
Highway 16—Hazelton _	
Highway 16—Smithers	
Houston streets	
Vanderhoof _ —	
Highway 97—Quesnel South
Highway 97—McLeese Lake.
Highway 99 __	
Highway 99a  _	
Highway 1—Langley	
Highway 1—Chilliwack	
Highway 31—Kaslo	
Highway 6—Nelson to Euphrates .
Big White	
Holding road.
Highland Valley Road and Mammit Lake Road .
Totals	
13.2
11.6
22.4
28.1
18.1
13.5
1.0
19.3
24.4
9.0
4.3
8.0
20.5
193.4
12.1
10.9
0.7
15.3
1.7
27.0
5.1
9.6
11.2
3.0
96.6
 B 56
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
PK-1
PK-2
PK-3
PK-4
PK-5
PK-6
PK-7
PK-8
PK-9
PK-10
PK-11
PK-12
PK-13
PK-14
PK-15
PP-1
PP-2
PP-3
PP-4
Roadmix Paving by Paving Branch Crews
Tueulnutt 	
Oliver Ranch Road	
Fairview Loop
Roads 11 and 16	
Observatory to Willowbrook
Green Lake Road	
Armstrong to Chopaka __
Big White to Highway 33
Holding road
Chase to Falkland Road	
Highland Valley Road	
Lac Le Jeune	
Highway 8—Spences Bridge section
Highway 8—Merritt Section	
Coldwater Road 	
Grand Forks area roads
Jewel Lake Road	
Casino Road	
Highway 6	
1
Total
Miles
3.20
0.85
1.15
1.05
1.95
2.55
5.25
3.90
8.10
1.00
5.25
2.75
0.40
1.55
2.30
3.70
3.00
5.60
4.55
68.10
Substructure piers of the upstream
Pitt River Bridge, Lougheed Highway 7.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B 57
REPORT OF LEGAL SURVEYS OFFICER
F. A. Clapp
Expenditures were:
Legal Surveys Vote	
Construction Project Votes
$
339,191.10
144,375.85
483,566.95
One hundred and fifty miles of highway right-of-way were surveyed as well
as a number of reference, subdivision, and reposting plans. Funds were also used
to reference right-of-way monuments prior to construction and to replace integrated
survey monuments destroyed by reconstruction.
Legal surveys carried out under Project Votes were:
Project S-0775—Scott Road curb and gutter.
Project 2486—Highway 9—Wahleach Power Station.*
Project 2490—Lougheed Highway 7a to Dewdney Trunk Road.f
Project 2505—Woss Camp to Nimpkish Lake.
Project 2519—Genelle Bluffs.
Project 2524—Valleyview to Campbell Creek section, f
Project 2562—Cedar Junction to Nanaimo.*
Project 2575—Springfield Road to Kelowna.*
Project 2582—Sayward to Keta Summit, f
Project 2597—Endako River crossing.*
Project 2686—Hunter Creek to Floods.f
Project 2692—Duncan to Chemainus.f
Project 2733—100 Mile House to Lac la Hache truck lanes.*
Project 2749—Craig's Crossing to Parksville. f
Project 2774—Prince George to Tabor Lake.f
Project 2808—Haslam Creek to Nanaimo River, f
Project 2900—Hammond Bay Road to Norwell Drive.f
Project 2978—Harriet Road to Thetis Lake Overpass, t
* Continuing surveys now complete,
t Continuing surveys.
 B 58 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
T. R. lohnson, Executive Director, Operation Division.
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF MAINTENANCE SERVICES
P. B. MacCarthy
Projected cost of maintaining the highway system in this fiscal year, including
bridges, ferries, and machinery, is expected to be less than the budgeted amount of
$119 million. While wage increases and inflation generally are responsible for an
increased expenditure over previous years, there has been, with the implementation
of the maintenance management program, a more effective utilization of all the
maintenance resource requirements and a more obvious accomplishment of planned
objectives.
Below-normal precipitation, particularly in southern areas of the Province,
was experienced throughout the winter of 1976/77. The only significant winter
precipitation was in March when amounts were near normal.
Correspondingly, throughout the Province, avalanche activity affecting highways was low. The activity that did occur was at Kootenay Pass in southeastern
British Columbia. Here an expanded avalanche control by explosives program
was implemented this season, which proved very successful.
Avalanche training programs were again held in conjunction with the National
Research Council Canada, Parks Canada, and B.C. Institute of Technology. Many
in-service courses were also held. Over 220 employees received avalanche training
during the year.
Information meetings were held at various locations throughout the Province
to inform the public of avalanche problems on our highways and the Ministry's
program to control them.
Avalanche hazard forecasting and safety were improved by the upgrading of
equipment for the various weather, safety, and rescue operations.
Wet, cool, and cloudy weather during the late spring and summer months,
particularly in the Interior of the Province, seriously curtailed the accomplishment
of paving, oiling, and other dust-control programs for local roads involving district
crews and equipment.
The major day-labour program was greatly expanded in all districts with the
allocation of substantial capital funds in the late summer. The excellent weather
that has prevailed from early fall to this time has enabled most districts to extend
road construction projects well beyond the normal shut-down period.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER   B 59
The Ministry's gravel-crushing program was greatly supplemented in the fall
with the calling of 16 contracts in various districts of the Province for the supply of
an additional million tons of crushed granular material. This will substantially
facilitate district programs for side road upgrading and paving in the next fiscal year.
MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
The 1976/77 fiscal year marked the first time that road and bridge maintenance
funds had been allocated by the performance budget process. In addition to allocating the basic maintenance funds, there was also an allocation for minor betterment
work which amounted to 6.5 per cent of the basic maintenance.
This year a revolving account was initiated for the supply of crushed gravel
and pre-mixed asphalt to districts. This account will allow districts to purchase
crushed gravel and pre-mixed asphalt at set prices while the actual production of
these materials can be accomplished by Ministry forces or outside contract. Materials used for this account were:
Minus %-inch crushed gravel 261,667 cu. yd. @ $ 2.55/cu. yd.
Minus %-inch crushed gravel 1,397,873 cu. yd. @ $ 1.90/cu. yd.
Plus 3-inch crushed gravel 52,536 cu. yd. @ $ 1.75/cu. yd.
Pre-mix asphalt  93,037 cu. yd. @ $17.10/cu. yd.
for a total revenue to this revolving account of $4,831,894.
A revolving account was also set up for the self-rental of Ministry equipment
which, in turn, would finance the operations of the Equipment Services Branch.
The maintenance management system collected $37,767,730 revenue for this
revolving account.
All district and regional field crews, with the exception of mechanical and
ferries, reported into the maintenance management system for a total of 7,544,439
man-hours.
During the year an emphasis was placed on the work-scheduling procedures
with all foremen receiving training in scheduling techniques and on-the-job assistance
from district co-ordinators and regional maintenance management personnel. Due
to enlarged capital day-labour programs and a very light winter, the work scheduling
portion of the maintenance management program was only partially effective.
The stock control system instituted at the beginning of April was slow to
become operational due to some system design faults and the need to revise office
procedures in the field. By year-end the system was operating well and was being
used extensively by about 50 per cent of the districts to control their materials by
location as well as by quantity.
During the summer of 1976, all the roads in the Province were inventoried
for physical features, using 16 inventory teams equipped with metric measuring
devices. The attached table is a summary of the road features inventory for the
Province, see Table 1.
Table of work activities performed by Ministry maintenance crews in the
1976/77 fiscal year, see Table 2.
ROADSIDE DEVELOPMENT
The roadside development program was less active in some areas and more
active in others during the year 1976. Hydroseeding operations, along with the
accelerated vegetation control program, provided the mainstay of this years activities. The safety rest area construction program has been decelerated although minor
upgrading of existing sites was accomplished.
 B 60 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
The hydroseeding program totalled 4,844 acres, of which 2,807 were seeded,
360 were mulched, and 1,677 were refertilized. Because of this year's weather
conditions, the accomplishment was not as high as desired.
The vegetation control program was very active this year, with shoulder
sterilization and the control of noxious weeds and some amount of brush control by
machine. In total, 1,113 acres of road shoulder were sterilized and 2,174 acres of
right-of-way were treated for noxious weeds where approved by the Interdepartmental Pesticide Committee (primarily Knapweed and Canada Thistle). The
control of noxious weeds is an ongoing concern each year and, subject to approval,
a program is again planned for next season.
Work on roadside safety rest areas was minimal this year in all regions. No
new rest area construction was undertaken; however, several sites in Region 3
received upgrading, while Alexandria rest area in the Fraser Canyon, started in 1975,
was a step closer to completion after additional work was carried out this fall.
The sewage-disposal design for the Tourist Information Centre and rest area
at Bradner Road, near Abbotsford, was completed this year and construction of the
information centre building is expected to start in 1977.
A total of eight Highways yard-sites received some amount of landscaping in
1976 through installation of trees, shrubs, and ground covers.
The major landscaping project, started in 1975 on the Upper Levels Highway
in Vancouver, continued in 1976. A total of 7 miles of roadway is involved, with
all major interchanges landscaped. Extensive use of sod, ground cover plants, and
rockwork highlight the impressive project. Completion of the landscape work is
scheduled for March of 1977.
Proposals and preliminary landscape drawings were completed for sections
of the Victoria to Thetis Lake Overpass, Blanshard Street Extension, Cranbrook
Arterial, and Prince George Bypass.
As in 1975, a large landscape maintenance program was carried out at the
Knight Street Bridge site. Efforts were made to reduce weed infestation through
use of plastic sheeting and bark mulch. Preliminary discussions and planning were
achieved for tendering next year's maintenance programs to private contractors for
both Knight Street Bridge and Upper Levels Highway.
CENTRELINE AND PAVEMENT MARKINGS
During the 1976 road-marking season, six centreline painting crews, two crosswalk crews and one reflective marking crew were utilized. The early part of the
season was much hampered by bad weather, especially in the Lower Mainland,
Vancouver Island, and northern Mainland areas. However, the good weather in
the fall helped offset the slow start in the spring. The program for the year was
almost completed, except for in the far north. An extensive catseye and reflector
program was carried out in the Nanaimo area during the late fall.
Statistics for the work completed are as follows:
Centrelines painted, 6,798.0 miles; edge and lane lines painted, 2,747.2 miles;
pre-lining, 923.6 miles; crosswalks painted, 257; stop lines painted, 674; arrows
painted, 1,084; parking stalls and digits painted, 319; traffic islands painted, 518;
curbs, no-post, and guardrail painted, 63,858 feet; plastix and scotchlane applied,
457 feet; thermoplastic lane lines, 8 miles; catseye and reflective road marker, installations and replacements, 4,428 catseye castings; 5,641 catseye rubber inserts; 8,341
reflective road markers.
Materials used: Yellow paint, 133,162 gallons; white paint, 37,183 gallons;
paint thinners, 14,360 gallons; glass bead, 973,550 pounds; thermoplastic material,
82,100 pounds.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B 61
Maintenance Management
Table 1—Road Feature Inventory
Totals
Region 1
Region 2
Region 3
Region 4
Region 5 Region 6
Surface type (lane kilometres)—
Hotmix  	
Coldmix..
Concrete .
Treated...
Gravel	
Dirt	
Other (not open) .
Total quantity 	
Road profile (lane kilometres)—
4-lane divided _.
4-lane undivided.
2-lane	
1-lane	
Other (not open) _
Total quantity 	
Road shoulders (kilometres)—
—1 metre paved.	
— 1 metre treated	
— 1 metre gravel _.	
+1 metre paved  ,	
4-1 metre treated	
-f-1 metre gravel	
Ditches (kilometres)	
Culverts each) —
Entrance ,
Road drainage	
Dust sites (each)	
Signs (each)—
Structures 	
Posts 	
Guardrail (metres)—
Steel and wood post.
No-post concrete	
Rest areas (each) —
Lay by	
Rest stop
Litter barrels (each)	
Special traffic lanes (kilometres)..
Delineators (each) -	
Mowing—
Swath (kilometres)	
Area (hectares) -	
Railroad crossing (each)	
Cattle guards (each)..
Tunnels and snow sheds (each).
Catch basins (each)	
Curb and gutter (metres)	
Manholes (each)	
I
22 517
10 317
34
494
35 958
8 027
1084
3 381
600
31
803
38
123
78 432
4 976
649
1059
72 538
3 148
1038
406
313
4 051
82
124
78 432
4 976
10 576
266
11 241
2 945
3 294
11 200 |
38 461
51,961
72,616
11,949
1,135
77,567
97 801
541 131
146
134
1,474
970
47,697
40 065
1618
828
934
20
8,377
886 544
1,670
324
514
717
396
1313
1999
6,528
4,674
1,092
629
16,532
10 257
206 861
4
6
106
171
9,755
5 501
523
69
3
7
3,342
349 073
520
4 962
3 690
33
9 567
1468
3 592
2 699
1
297
4 103
891
198
4 974
581
7
14 160
4 899
535
1945
169
4 575
671
225
19 719 I 11781
I
118      	
126 17
18 309 I 10 638
1 166 | 928
  I 198
286
24 032
364
474
44
6 878
430
234
19 719 I 11781
25 156 I    7 586
8 392
28
3 170
791
364
1877
3 919
7,418 ] 3,455
13,732 | 11,619
2,517       1,746
425
35
4 169
581 |
1247 |
2 370 |
6 058 [
96
17,081
41016
74 989
81
43
458
243
6,075
8 300
96
249
590
7
532
97 919
399
107
10,942
17 196
173 012
13
31
333
183
4,396
4 773
88
164
200
6
1,037
76 043
41
583
163
1255
370
854
2 658
17 768 j
19,011
20,023
3,362
113
13,435
8 016
17 616
32
30
331
213
18,106
11429
687
144
96
1,646
184 692
465
655
40
563
74
404
929
4 296
1,944
8,032
833
28
5,436
7 356
11983
7
18
179
60
5,009
2 877
123
41
41
702
52 439
56
3664
2 578
1
158
2 750
60
3
25 156 | 7 586 |  9 214
125
273
8 630
176
9
9 214
197
1570
411
29
2 054
4 421
13,605
14,536
2,399
162
14,141
13 958
56 667
9
6
67
100
4,356
7 185
100
161
4
1,118
126 378
189
 B 62 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
Table 2—Work Activities Performed by Ministry Maintenance Crews
Activity
No.
Description
Man-hours
Accomplishment
Average
Unit Cost
Total Cost
100
101
102
103
104
110
111
112
113
120
121
122
130
131
139
200
201
202
203
204
209
220
221
222
230
231
232
233
234
235
239
250
251
252
253
254
255
256
259
300
301
302
303
304
305
306
307
308
309
310
311
319
400
401
402
403
404
405
430
431
432
435
436
437
439
450
451
452
459
460
Hand patching	
Machine patch..	
Surface treatment-
Crack sealing	
Pavement burning...
Grade re-shape..	
Grading —
Dust control	
Regravel roads	
Regravel shoulders.
Grade shoulders	
Sundry shoulder maintenance..
Road base repair ..
Railway crossing maintenance-
Other surface _	
Ditch clean —
Grader ditch :_ _	
Culvert maintenance	
Catch basin maintenance	
Culvert replace 	
Other drainage _.	
Machine mowing 	
Hand brushing   ._ ~
Machine brushing	
Gardening '..	
Shoulder sterilization —
Right-of-way seeding _„ —
Refertilizing_.
Hydroseeder mulching 	
Weed and brush control	
Other  vegetation  control   and   landscaping
Roadside litter pickup ___ - —	
Garbage barrels	
Rest area maintenance	
Rock and debris patrol -	
Road surface clean	
Rock scaling   „	
Hand surface cleaning  	
Other litter, garbage and debris 	
Truck plough _	
Sand — —	
Chemical   - —	
Patrol (winter)	
Grader plough	
Ice blading
Miscellaneous snow-clearing.
Drainage thawing	
Stockpile salt	
Snowfences    	
Ploughboards  	
Grader winging _ -	
Other winter	
Install signs	
Maintain signs 	
Delineators	
Sign structure maintenance	
Signposts (yard)	
Sign fabrication 	
Pavement markings - 	
Reflective road stud installation—	
Traffic line painting	
Pavement marking eradication	
Pre-lining      	
Thermoplastic line application 	
Other sign and marking 	
Signal maintenance _	
Signal repair -	
Electrical patrol 	
Other traffic controls	
Lighting maintenance	
194,432
55,605
6,927
1,789
1,216
19,484
131,795
9,321
87,970
64,685
19,455
3,833
30,303
2,563
8,222
130,133
5,325
39,139
6,446
24,055
16,056
26,285
154,774
17,732
31,926
2,034
5,053
1,920
2,744
7,001
9,976
33,228
29,920
15,709
24,403
17,316
6,381
11,682
5,242
63,225
162,919
14,434
161,709
42,884
16,215
21,433
19,941
19,636
2,595
1,390
16,596
25,058
31,178
69,342
10,682
2,164
12,864
6,405
8,134
228
7,140
188
1,935
1,509
21,476
5,778
8,361
4,185
1,873
3,453
31,616
65,716
252
152
40
14,219
326,236
13,550
717,908
360,796
36,912
18,550
201,403
2,559
8,235
3,298,469
2,508
37,426
9,873
2,516
16,124
22,617
154,154
4,838
32,312
1,778
2,669
1,819
370
3,084
10,019
cubic yards
cubic yards
miles
lane miles
lane miles
miles
pass miles
sites
cubic yards
cubic yards
pass miles
cubic yards
cubic yards
man-hours
man-hours
feet
miles
culverts
catch basins
culverts
man-hours
acres
man-hours
acres
man-hours
shoulder miles
acres
acres
acres
acres
man-hours
33
78
3
27
28
6
11.
5
915
420
20
1,879.
198
66
21
20
58
53
2
64.
25
23
120
34
34.
6
368.
1.
2.
12.
410 man-hours
012 barrels
535 areas
,527 man-hours
251 pass miles
.378 man-hours
630 man-hours
.235 man-hours
044 plough miles
,073 cubic yards
,110 cubic yards
264 miles
,768 plough miles
257 plough miles
508 man-hours
,428 man-hours
,432 tons
,168 feet
,491 plough boards
157 plough miles
,089 man-hours
588 posts
,585 posts
,130 posts
440 structures
,688 posts
,550 man-hours
,501 square feet
,824 road studs
,292 pass miles
,522 square feet
253 pass miles
90 pass miles
290 man-hours
922 intersections
561 intersections
.320 miles
,853 man-hours
,469 poles
97.55
34.10
1,228.37
157.27
574.97
45.72
12.46
45.26
3.73
5.07
15.21
4.43
4.57
23.47
22.28
.87
56.16
15.57
9.30
301.06
17.82
24.00
10.92
142.51
10.73
52.64
107.75
55.53  |
398.08
67.31
15.96
12.84
4.95
69.26
17.27
13.57
17.49
11.87
17.30
1.67
14.02
64.60
1.67
6.76
7.37
24.26
14.70
51.28
.63
16.23
7.49
17.34
28.98
8.54
4.15
115.54
3.59
10.57
.29
3.21
136.20
.19
84.24
640.08
12.94
103.35
96.57
1.68
17.10
45.79
3,084,405
2,241,336
309,182
23,906
23,114
650,198
4,064,994
613,382
2,684,225
1,831,069
561,513
82,283
922,198
60,051
183,542
2,883,840
140,877
582,938
91,854
757,514
287,727
543,026
1,683,700
689,535
346,986
93,609
287,644
100,994
147,410
207,582
159,998
429,315
386,839
244,846
475,607
383,541
111,566
138,106
90,602
1,537,114
5,892,853
1,299,102
3,138,838
1,344,435
488,567
521,966
300,341
2,996,583
33,862
40,436
480,700
435,269
683,763
1,030,223
141,808
50,838
124,607
69,278
110,046
5,858
312,133
2,396
21,288
57,672
288,508
102,532
150,747
69,680
31,688
67,245
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B 63
Table 2—Work Activities Performed by Ministry Maintenance Crews—Continued
Activity
No.
Description
Man-hours
Accomplishment
Average
Unit Cost
Total Cost
461
465
466
467
469
470
471
475
476
479
500
501
502
503
504
505
506
507
508
509
510
511
513
515
516
520
521
522
523
524
529
560
561
563
564
565
566
567
568
569
570
571
572
579
600
601
602
603
604
605
606
607
608
609
611
612
613
614
615
616
617
618
619
650
651
653
654
656
Lighting repairs..
Other lighting
Motor generator maintenance .
Motor generator repairs	
Other motor generator...
Electrical service maintenance-
Electrical service repair	
Control device repair	
Control device manufacturing
Other control device shop ....
Bridge clean _	
Bridge rail paint  	
Bridge structure paint„ _
Sand blast	
Stream channel maintenance	
Deck surface repair.
Bridge repair and maintenance .
Bridge inspection.
Bailey bridge maintenance	
Miscellaneous hand painting .
Tunnel maintenance	
Tunnel washing -
Deck linseed oiling	
Building maintenance 	
| Miscellaneous carpentry.
I Concrete guardrail maintenance and
repair
Fence repair — 	
Cattleguard maintenance	
Steel   and   timber   guardrail   maintenance
Special fencing maintenance	
Other structure maintenance	
Screen and stockpile  	
Pit preparation and clean-up	
Crush (gravel)    	
Crush (fine gravel)	
Asphalt mix   _ 	
Quarrying    	
Grader premix 	
Gravel stockpiling _. _	
Other materials 	
Ferry operation .
Ferry boat maintenance ..
Ferry dock maintenance .
Other ferry work	
General supervision	
Training and safety	
Vacation and leave	
Sick time	
Workers' Compensation Board.
Union business 	
Stand-by   	
Equipment service	
Fueling.
Hauling (equipment) _
Travelling (4 hours minimum )..
Traffic patrol 	
Yard maintenance 	
Stock control 	
Camp operation.
Mechanical travel	
Compensatory time off-
Tending  —
Other overhead 	
Clerical	
Complaints and requests 	
Draughting and calculating..
Maintenance management....
Permits -	
14,153
1,446
1,575
1,904
669
1,440
427
5,826
297
958
19,134
9,042
4,756
10,169
10,389
7,072
107,336
5,074
3,558
1,978
2,104
1,121
492
32,377
25,475
12,647
4,799
1,656
4,138
2,943
22,024
82,158
28,862
28,924
11,042
21,378
168
2,009
13,344
7,727
7,995
3,850
41,112
6,757
575,905
96,801
869,231
165,656
24,161
4,034
30,070
185,376
15,370
85,210
18,321
98,758
132,438
93,505
28,869
21,728
28,967
46,183
27,479
34,002
16,295
65,645
94,943
25,242
5,035
1,407
452
149
642
215
61
764
25
958
1,483
64,455
2,042
2,022
10,375
64,025
107,194
2,367
16,770
365
2,111
36
27,309
32,407
25,535
218,954
poles
man hours
units
units
man-hours
units
units
devices
devices
man-hours
bridges
linear feet
tons of steel
man-hours
square feet
man-hours
bridges
pieces
gallons
man-hours
washes
square yards
man-hours
man-hours
linear feet
164,855 linear feet
149 cattleguards
48,850 linear feet
2,952
22,087
776,667
29,733
1,713,976
427,450
106,250
10,579
7,794
566,560
7,370
7,995
3,853
41,464
6,795
575,612
96,751
869,295
165,642
24,161
4,041
30,069
185,276
15,362
85,790
18,326
99,058
132,708
93,448
44,696
21,642
28,951
47,295
27,637
33,980
16,302
65,688
94,978
25,249
man-hours
man-hours
cubic yards
man-hours
tons
tons
cubic yards
cubic yards
cubic yards
cubic yards
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
meals per day
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
67.22
19.27
46.42
97.95
13.66
100.15
101.93
93.60
125.84
10.93
153.80
1.80
46.32
80.49
20.39
1.91
18.25
23.04
3.67
57.28
13.71
623.61
.31
12.43
11.42
1.08
.42
225.97 |
1.36
16.82
23.88
4.65
41.15
.98
1.14
18.27
2.31
13.43
2.47
25.39
9.78
12.96
28.18
15.72
10.95
9.04
8.21
8.19
8.22
8.18
8.37
11.11
14.63
22.85
13.21
12.38
11.37
13.85
8.98
12.55
8.31
10.12
18.91
8.61
9.55
8.72
9.50
9.53
338,496
27,117
20,986
14,595
8,765
21,533
6,218
71,513
3,146
10,477
228,118
116,204
94,610
162,782
211,643
122,576
1,956,864
54,543
61,699
20,885
28,960
22,450
8,626
402,925
291,793
238,363
70,471
33,671
66,587
49,668
527,486
3,618,147
1,223,674
1,682,754
489,453
1,941,899
24,495
104,694
1,403,570
187,139
78,259
49,974
1,168,756
106,856
6,305,750
875,543
7,139,483
1,357,823
198,721
33.073
251,860
2,059,360
224,859
1,960,586
242,259
1,226,652
1,509,670
1,294,966
401,558
271,728
240,687
479,029
522,853
292,818
155,728
572,889
902,428
240,811
 B 64 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
Table 2—Work Activities Performed by Ministry Maintenance Crews—Continued
Activity
No.
Description
Man-hours
1,
658
660
661
666
668
669
700
701
702
703
704
705
706
707
708
709
710
712
713
714
715
716
717
718
719
720
721
722
723
724
725
726
727
728
729
730
731
732
733
734
735
736 |
737 |
738
799
81C
900
901
902
903
904
909
997
998
999
| Subdivisions, land use contracts, and
rezoning
I Surveying     —
f Avalanche management	
| District administration 	
Surveying, other-
Other district and technical work
Clearing and grubbing	
Rock blasting	
Road bed construction _	
Road widening _	
Shoulder widening.
Drainage ditch construction
Culvert installation   	
Multi-plate installation	
Machine paving ._ _	
Road or pulvimix...
Guardrail installation	
Right-of-way landscaping	
Right-of-way fencing	
Roadside rest area development-
Retaining wall construction	
Riprap.
Curb and gutter construction	
Manhole and catch basin construction
Cattleguard installation   	
Chain link fence installation	
Yard betterments _	
Building construction	
Dock construction  	
Bridge construction -.
Fabrication of rest area appliances	
Electrical construction	
Gravelling	
Asphalt curb construction _	
Traffic islands -	
Shoulder paving    	
Shoulder stabilization	
Shoulder surface treatment	
Rock drilling - _	
Slope and ditch surfacing	
Gravel surface treatment 	
Fabrication of 18-inch no-post guardrail
Fabrication of 27-inch no-post guardrail
Road stabilization 	
Other projects and betterments	
Benkleman    beam    control    section
testing
Flood control and damage repairs	
Slide repair and removal	
Snow slides 	
Winter damage repairs  	
Island area maintenance	
Other extraordinary maintenance -	
District journal vouchers	
Stock transfer   	
District overhead	
I
40,401
94,569
3,165
561,547
55,049
19,858
131,406
17,728
106,319
169,032
59,666
29,639
37,428
12,951
22,166
28,019
19,745
6,421
26,976
7,126
12,408
6,379
4,641
2,736
1,256
3,648
34,199
35,502
6,608
73,671
2,028
31,215
175,568
1,832
4,149
3,546
5,412
59
25,710
5,277
2,842
1,036
16,034
236
44,346
3,218
86,177
33,165
1,282
55,671
10,114
7,149
Accomplishment
Average
Unit Cost
5,061
40,403 man-hours
94,449 man-hours
3,314 man-hours
568,145 man-hours
55,077 man-hours
19,858 man-hours
4,501 acres
571,236 cubic yards
5,176 miles
6,014 miles
3,325 miles
708,086 linear feet
124,406 linear feet
4,096 linear feet
407 miles
321 miles
155,979 linear feet
901 acres
562,291 linear feet
6,929 man-hours
37,462 square feet
126,449 cubic yards
18,656 linear feet
119 manholes
55 cattleguards
14,758 linear feet
34.323 man-hours
35,514 man-hours
6,595 man-hours
74,729 man-hours
89 appliances
31,334 man-hours
4,925,350 cubic yards
21,539 linear feet
6,981 square yards
62 shoulder miles
129 shoulder miles
9 shoulder miles
784,211 linear feet
65,659 square yards
36 miles
5,118 linear feet
47,599 linear feet
22 miles
44.324 man-hours
458 control sections
87,265 man-hours
34,433 man-hours
1,250 man-hours
56,117 man-hours
10,176 man-hours
7,137 man-hours
33 debit notes
1,857 types of material
178,413 vouchers
9.47
9.41
22.65
8.98
9.37
10.50
740.18
1.33
1,716.58
1,496.62
975.32
1.58
12.98
129.43
8,059.02
4,042.09
5.96
229.63
.91
21.68
7.91
3.63
11.04
473.28
973.89
3.99
19.26
17.14
56.13
25.06
437.79
21.10
2.51
1.51
10.03
2,082.35
1,685.14
145.10
1.64
2.45
3,087.32
4.12
7.23
559.37
54.12
67.17
25.39
23.55
31.66
24.31
13.38
24.16
79.96
561.06
37.66
Total Cost
382,824
889,183
75,087
5,106,478
516,562
208,514
3,331,639
764,888
| 8,884,162
9,000,537
3,243,139
1,120,369
1,615,981
530,151
3,279,219
1,299,129
929,955
207,155
515,245
150,236
296,665
460,256
206,056
56,321
53,564
59,022
661,271
609,052
370,258
1,873,429
38,964
661,368
12,376,540
32,650
70,076
129,939
217,552
1,335
1,286,588
161,153
109,600
21,130
344,188
12,474
2,398,952
30,768
2,215,887
810,969
39,592
1,364,449
136,214
172,448
2,639
1,041,900
6,719,242
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B 65
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF EQUIPMENT SERVICES
The Equipment Services Branch enjoyed an active year in supplying and repairing of machinery and rolling-stock required for the maintenance of the highway
system.
Approximately $13,608,000 was spent to acquire and service equipment in the
form of 425 trucks, 45 graders, 28 loaders, 34 farm tractors, and many other items
ranging from a 200-amp welder to an 80-ton/hour asphalt drum mixer.
The Branch held three auctions at its Cloverdale establishment where approximately 158 pieces of machinery were sold. These auctions are very popular as the
spectrum of equipment offered attracts people from every sector of industry and the
general public. In addition, numerous pieces of equipment were transferred to
other Government agencies for, in some cases, educational purposes.
The American tire industry was on strike most of last summer; however,
Canadian production was not seriously affected and the Ministry was still able to
purchase approximately 3,000 tires. Our increased utilization of steel radial-type
tires has been helpful to reduce the volume of annual tire purchases.
During the year we adopted the policy of equipping our vehicles with fire
extinguishers. This required the purchase of 2,900 units of various sizes and already
we have benefited by having a grader saved last winter.
Computerization of our machinery maintenance and accounting systems progressed well during the year. Numerous sections of the program were introduced
and the availability of processed information has improved for the benefit of our
field staff. One major benefit which the headquarters staff appreciates is the much
easier method of processing our annual 4,600 licence renewals. Information is now
becoming available for determining fleet costs and utilization rates.
Custom fabrication by our Langford establishment continues to supply superior
products in the form of tailgate sanders, underbody ploughs, front-mount plough
frames, and hydraulic circuits for the single- and tandem-axle trucks. Special attention was given to improve the control of material flow from our tailgate sanders. We
are now able to regulate the flow to much closer limits to a controllable minimum of
80 lb./mile for salt application. Retrofit hydraulic kits are now being assembled for
summer installation.
The approaching deadline of September 1977 for the conversion of our highway signs has placed extra demand on production at our Langford Sign Shop. To
facilitate this demand, additional equipment was installed and extra staff hired.
Annual production is approximately 40,000 signs per year. The value of signs
produced at the sign shop this year is $578,296.
Superintendent of Ferries
During the past year ferry service was provided on 36 routes under the direct
jurisdiction of the Ministry, apart from those served by the B.C. Ferry Corporation.
This was accomplished with a fleet of 22 registered ferries, 8 reaction ferries, 4 cable
ferries, 5 subsidized ferries, and 4 miscellaneous ferries. There are also 2 tugs and
6 barges maintained for emergency service.
Traffic
The fleet carried 6,864,090 passengers and 2,751,959 vehicles.
3
 B 66
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
Major Changes
The Sechelt Queen, an 83-car vessel was taken over from B.C. Ferries and put
into operation between Comox and Powell River.
A new vessel, the 35-car Omineca Princess, was constructed and put into service on Francois Lake. In order to accommodate this vessel a floating drydock
was also constructed. This dock is presently only large enough to lift one end of
the new ferry in the event of repairs being required. The ferry, North Island
Princess, and the route between Kelsey Bay and Beaver Cove was taken over financially from B.C. Ferry Corporation on January 1, 1977; with complete takeover
effective April 1, 1977.
A contract was let for construction of a new 50-car ferry for Gabriola Island.
Revenue
$
Comox-Powell River   908,646.90
Cortes Island i   68,218.80
Denman Island   62,443.10
Gabriola Island   152,057.00
Hornby Island  19,859.30
Nimpkish  151,013.37
Quathiaski Cove  168,035.80
Queen Charlotte Islands  71,480.85
Texada Island    132,111.95
Thetis Island  29,015.90
Woodfibre   15,542.00
Total
1,778,424.97
Flooding at Bytown, west of Burns Lake, spring 1976.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B 67
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 B 68 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
Communications Engineer
During the 1976/77 fiscal year, many changes were made to the Ministry's
Region 2 mobile communications system. Five mobile radio repeaters were moved,
two were eliminated, and the radio equipment in the remaining sites had to be
changed.
These system modifications were required to increase mobile radio coverage
in the Chilcotin, Falkland, and Chase areas. Some repeaters were eliminated to
reduce over-reach, a cause of considerable interference. The radio repeaters which
were moved incorporated the more robust foundation design. New lightning protection systems were installed in many of the repeaters. The number of lightning-
related repeater failures is decreasing as a result of our continuing installation of
these systems.
During the year, 500 mobile radios, 30 base stations, 180 portable radios,
38 trunk radios, 60 remote-control units, and many other accessory items were
purchased for new and replacement purposes. The Ministry's mobile radio system
is nearly 100 per cent solid state.
Over the past few years the amount of radio equipment used by the Ministry
has more than doubled. Maintaining this equipment with no increase in field
radio maintenance staff has been possible due to the gradual retirement of the older
tube-type radio equipment which requires a lot of maintenance time. Nevertheless,
in 1976 it was necessary to add a Communications Technician in Salmon Arm, a
graduate from our Cloverdale training program. We now have 12 Communications Technicians attached to the regions, and two Communications Technicians,
a Stockman, and an Apprentice in Cloverdale, a Headquarters facility where special
projects are organized, our stock is kept, and where our relief and training staff are
located. The Victoria staff consists of the Communications Engineer, his Assistant,
and a Laboratory Technician who builds and tests the special devices designed in
Victoria. This Communications Technician spends part of his time maintaining
field equipment for Region 1 in the Lower Vancouver Island area.
In Victoria, planning is under way to upgrade the mobile radio system in
Region 4. General systems development is continuing. Solar power, state-of-the-
art low-power repeater equipment, and new repeater buildings are being studied,
designed, and tested.
Three remote meteorological data-gathering stations were installed near Salvus
Camp, Kootenay Pass Camp, and Boston Bar. These stations are located near the
source of avalanche zones. Wind speed and direction, humidity, and temperature
are continuously monitored at these sites, and forwarded by radio to the nearby
camps mentioned. These stations have been designed to operate unattended for
five years, at which time battery replacement and other minor maintenance will be
required. The remote station at Boston Bar is housed in a new steel building to
afford maximum protection from lightning. Although constructed of steel, these
buildings can be lifted, complete with radio equipment, by normally available Bell
206B helicopters. Only batteries where needed have to be installed after building
placement. The total weight of this radio repeater system, minus batteries, is less
than 950 pounds.
In October the Headquarters staff at Cloverdale moved into a larger building.
All stock items are now located under one roof and a dedicated bay is available for
vehicular radio installations.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B 69
E. B. Wilkins,
Executive Director,
Planning Division.
REPORT OF PLANNING DIVISION
During the year, as a result of organizational changes, the Geotechnical and
Materials Testing Branch was transferred from Planning to the Design Division.
In addition, M. G. Elston, the former Senior Planning Engineer, took over responsibilities as the Executive Director of Engineering. The activities of the four
remaining sections of the Planning Division are reported as follows:
TRANSPORTATION SECTION
The main thrust of this section was directed toward identifying street networks
adequate to accommodate several cycles of land use over a long period of time.
This co-operative work was continued in 43 communities and initiated in eight
other communities. Several of the network plans were adopted at the regional
district level and approved by the Ministry.
Travel information was obtained in urban areas to support the street network
decision. Traffic counts were recorded across strategically located screenlines in
six communities as a continuation of a program, initiated in 1972, of monitoring
vehicle volumes and vehicle occupancy characteristics. Two hundred fifty-nine
person-days were required to complete this work using primarily summer students.
Intersection counts and turning movements, representing 109 person-days of work,
were recorded at critical sites in 13 communities.
This information was supplemented by recording trip generation for various
specific land uses. Twenty-five land uses were investigated, including a major
hospital, a golf course, a marina, and several apartments and condominium blocks.
A noise level survey was repeated at an overpass location which had previously
been measured in 1975. The purpose of the survey was to record the difference
in traffic noise levels at adjacent properties with the overpass in use compared to
no overpass.
In rural areas, roadside interviews were conducted at 33 locations throughout
the Province utilizing 456 person-days. At two of these locations, data was
obtained on inter-regional goods movements while at the other 31 sites information
was recorded on inter-regional recreational travel. Origin destination trip tables
were established from this information.
 B 70 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
In addition, 17 licence-plate tracing surveys were undertaken. In 14 cases
the purpose was either to quantify traffic which had origins or destinations external
to a community or to assess circulation patterns within the community. The other
three surveys were implemented to determine travel patterns on urban arterials or
freeways.   These licence-plate surveys required 138 person-days to complete.
In addition to the above, the transportation implications of several potential
major developments were also investigated. These included the South East Coal
Block, a recreation community, a B.C. Hydro dam, and a revised strategy for
population distribution in the Lower Mainland, and the impact on the primary
highway system of inter-provincial traffic between the Prairie Provinces and the
Pacific Coast.
The activity in the Transportation Section showed a 25-per-cent increase over
that of 1975/76 and was accomplished with the addition of one engineer in a
supernumerary position.
APPROVING SECTION
Major changes have been made in the administration of the Approving Section.
In 1975 a court case ruled that the Minister of Highways could not delegate his
authority in the Controlled Access Highways Act to his staff. This meant that the
approval of zoning by-laws and controlled-access permits were delayed until such
time that his Deputy Minister, who had the signing authority, could accommodate
more work on top of a heavy work load. The Constitution Act was amended in the
spring session of the Legislature, giving a Minister authority of delegation. Later
in the year the Regional Approving Officers were designated by the Minister to sign
on his behalf. This has meant a great saving in time for the public having by-laws
and permits processed at the regional level.
Late in the year the Liquor Administration regulations were amended not
allowing neighbourhood public houses within one-half mile of a major or secondary
highway, except with the permission of the General Manager of the Liquor Administration Board. This amendment relieves the Ministry of recommendations on the
location of neighbourhood public houses throughout the Province.
The section is continuing with educational meetings from time to time with
regional and district staffs who are involved with the approvals process.
MUNICIPAL PROGRAMS SECTION
In the fiscal year 1976/77 the Municipal Programs Section dealt with numerous matters of common concern to both the organized municipalities of the Province
and the Ministry of Highways and Public Works. Funds were administered in the
amount of $1,511,594 to cover the Ministry's share of costs for construction work
carried out on secondary highways, and $237,821 to cover the Ministry's share of
costs for maintaining these secondary highways. Negotiations were carried out with
26 municipalities concerning cost-sharing work on arterial highways and with seven
municipalities concerning cost-sharing work on bridges. A very large number of
changes in classification were considered with 13 arterial highways being rescinded
and 12 new arterials being established. Four secondary highways were rescinded
and one was established. Comments were given to the Ministry of Municipal Affairs
and Housing regarding proposed municipal boundary extensions. Negotiations
have continued with Kamloops, Kelowna, Prince George, and Nanaimo regarding
amalgamation agreements.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND CHIEF ENGINEER    B 71
SYSTEMS PLANNING SECTION
The Systems Planning Section introduced the recently developed British Columbia pavement smoothness gauge (metric version) to the Paving Branch to obtain
measurements on newly laid pavements. Research is continuing to establish specifications for new paving contracts. The capital project status file was kept current
and included work authorizations, construction programs, and annual estimates.
The highway route mileage and landmarks file was updated and various computer
listings and reports were produced and circulated. Changes were made to produce
the inventory in kilometres. Some 10,000 miles of road were photologged, including 2,500 of special coverage for the Ministry of Energy, Transport and Communications of a 14-foot 6-inch-wide load travelling through the Province on a test run.
Metrication of the photologging vehicle was completed along with a general update
of the photographic unit to improve accuracy and readability of the instruments.
The Systems Planning Engineer is co-ordinating data-processing services and equipment within the Ministry. He also assisted in negotiations leading to the three-year
Federal Provincial Western Northlands Agreement on cost sharing for Highway 37.
Finally, the section co-ordinated research activity reporting procedures for the Ministry in conjunction with transportation agencies.
 B 72 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
A. E. Rhodes, Assistant Deputy Minister.
REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER,
PUBLIC WORKS AND ADMINISTRATION
The Government Reorganization Act, 1976 provided for a new Ministry of
Highways and Public Works, thereby combining into one ministry the former separate Departments of Highways and Public Works. During the same period the
British Columbia Building Corporation Act was given assent, the effect of which
will in time transfer to the new Crown corporation the responsibility to provide and
manage land and buildings for the accommodation of Provincial Government Ministries and Agencies of the Crown, to provide and maintain certain public amenities,
and to acquire property for new facilities.
The new corporation which will become operational on April 1, 1977, will
eventually assume many of the functions previously performed by the Department
of Public Works, the only exceptions being Safety Engineering Services and the
Glendale Regional Laundry. These latter responsibilities will remain as part of the
new Ministry.
Construction of the new modern buildings and renovations of old has been
the theme of the Public Works section in the past year which has resulted in fine
new buildings such as the Health Services Building in Victoria being completed and
occupied. The restoration of the Rithet Building in Victoria and 411 Dunsmuir
Street in Vancouver was completed and such are now occupied. All are excellent
examples of the theories, skills, and practical application of the personnel involved
in the design and construction. There are numerous projects still in varying stages
of design and construction to be completed under the jurisdiction of the British
Columbia Building Corporation.
The Safety Engineering Services reports a steady increase in their productivity
reflecting not only a continuous growth of the Province but a continuing contribution
to the national standards through representation and research to ensure that such
standards are beneficial to industry and to society.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER, PUBLIC WORKS
B 73
Expenditures for the acquisition of property and the return from sales of surplus properties more than doubled last year's figures.
Accidents involving all Government vehicles were fewer than the previous
year with this Ministry recording a reduction of 13 per cent. Ironically, however,
the total cost of all insurance premiums paid by the Government rose by 13 per cent.
The financial reports of both Highways and Public Works conclude this
Report.
Dawson Creek Highway District, Project C-2586, reconstruction of the slide area on the
Peace River Hill, Alaska Highway, at Mile 32. All loose and wet material was removed and
a road embankment was constructed on more stable soil near the sandstone strata.
j^Kl'. jjf
Dawson Creek Highway District, Rolla area, machine ditch-cleaning silt from road ditches.
Heavy rains during the summer of 1976 washed hundreds of tons of soil into road ditches and
necessitated ditch-cleaning which extended until freeze-up.
 B 74 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL PROGRAMS
A. R. Limacher
The approved work force of the Ministry as at March 31, 1977, was 5,273
regular positions. In addition, seasonal auxiliary employees were hired to meet
temporary work requirements. The total auxiliaries on staff reached a peak of
2,243 in the month of August 1976 and included 721 students.
As in the past, the majority of new employees were hired directly within districts and branches for entrance level positions. Promotional opportunities during
the past year required 1,321 postings of which 361 were processed through the
Public Service Commission and the balance by Headquarters, regional, and district
offices with the assistance of Personnel Officers. This office authorized expenses on
transfers for 149 employees at a total cost of $291,000.
Personnel Officers from this Branch, together with operating officials, continue
to take an active part in Union negotiations and participated as management representatives on numerous committees established under the various B.C. Government
Employees' Union Contracts and Professional Employees' Association Contract.
This office processed 65 grievances and 20 appeals during the year. All were
resolved without reference to an Arbitration Board.
STAFF DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING
The Training Section administers all training and staff development functions
in the Ministry. Courses for the Highway Technology Training Program are being
developed jointly with the British Columbia Institute of Technology and we currently have 13 courses available and an additional nine well under way. Approximately 850 employees are enrolled in the training program.
The Ministry has 64 apprentices employed in seven different trade groups.
Twelve apprentices graduated this year and have continued employment with the
Ministry as journeymen.
The demand for operator training continued heavy and this could only be met
by the regional driver-trainers with the assistance of district training operators.
Ten driver-trainers and training operators received bronze awards from the Canada
Safety Council for instructing Defensive Driving Courses.
The Ministry had two employees, M. J. O'Connor and O. T. King, successfully complete the three-year Executive Development Training Program through
the University of Victoria and a further two employees, J. J. Chenoweth and L. F.
Johanson, complete the one-year correspondence course in public administration.
Several hundred employees were sponsored to attend seminars and miscellaneous training courses in addition to those noted earlier.
SAFETY AND HEALTH
New incumbents were appointed to the positions of Regional Safety Officers
in Regions 2, 3, and 4. Districts and Regional Safety and Health Committees conducted meetings on a regular basis and forwarded a number of agenda items to
the Headquarters Committee for consideration.
The sound-level survey made good progress with measurements being completed on 26 ferries. Two dosimeter units were purchased and a program started
on sound measurements on mobile units. Regional Safety Officers were given
instructions on the use of these units as well as how to carry out illumination
surveys.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER, PUBLIC WORKS
B 75
Workers' Compensation Board claims totalled 320 time-loss and 333 medical
aid. The countable accident frequency for the Ministry was 43.7 as compared to
42.2 in the previous year. Region 2 won the Honourable the Minister's trophy
and Regional Safety Awards were won by Chilliwack, Lillooet, Creston, and Fort
St. John.
Total vehicle miles driven by Ministry operators was 36,150,316 miles. There
were 515 vehicle accidents of which 248 were preventable and 267 were nonpre-
ventable.
The Ministry processed 36 employees through the Division of Occupational
Health and the Union Management Screening Committee in an attempt to relocate
employees who no longer could perform their job due to health or other reasons.
Dawson Creek Highway District construction of farm and settlement roads in the Lone
Prairie road south of Chetwynd.
Note the pull-grader used to elevate the soil into an earth embankment about 26-30
feet wide.
 B 76
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
REPORT OF DIRECTOR PROPERTY SERVICES
V. A. Drew
In the 1976/77 fiscal year, 795 claims were settled and a further 1,039 claims
were in the process of negotiation.   Two arbitration cases were completed.
The expenditure on acquisition of rights-of-way and other property required
by the Ministry totalled $8,781,450.94.
Land expenditure for the Libby Project required an expenditure of $387,725.
There were 63 buildings sold by public auction and tender for removal from
highway rights-of-way. The sales were conducted by the Purchasing Commission
and recovery from sales amounted to $46,743.
During the period, 150 buildings and parcels of land were under lease or
rental. Gross revenue from rentals was $69,684.97. In addition to this, a number
of properties were transferred to commissions under the jurisdiction of other ministries for agricultural and housing purposes.
In the fiscal year a research section was formed to gather historical information on the status of roads within Indian reserves throughout the Province. This is
an arduous task, and will require a number of years to complete.
Sandstone rock production to
be used for road-base construction and erosion control. The
Dawson Creek Highway District
ripped and pushed into stockpile
for future use 28,000 cubic
yards of this material during
the winter of 1976/77.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER, PUBLIC WORKS
B 77
REPORT OF THE INSURANCE AND CLAIMS OFFICER
G. A. Cavin
(Motor-vehicle statistics are based on licence-year March 1 to February 28.)
The number of traffic accidents involving vehicles owned by (or leased to)
the Government was 1,310, including 189 accidents in which the Government
vehicles were parked.   In the previous year these were 1,604 accidents.
During the year, claim settlements were still being completed pertaining to
accidents occurring prior to March 1, 1974, at which date third-party liability
insurance coverage was effected for all licensed Government motor-vehicles. A
total of $1,461 was paid in settlement of these claims. The Government recovered,
either from its own collision damage insurers or from the third-party liability insurers, a total of $180,365.
Motor-vehicles Involved in Accidents
(1975/76 figures in parentheses)
Ministry
Number of
Accidents
Number of
Vehicles
Per Cent of
Vehicles
Per Cent of
Accidents
Agriculture	
Attorney-General	
Consumer and Corporate Affairs-
Education _  	
Energy, Transport and Communications-
Environment	
Finance	
Forests _	
Health _.
Highways and Public Works	
Human Resources 	
Labour   	
Mines and Petroleum Resources _.
Provincial Secretary and Travel Industry .
Recreation and Conservation _	
Other ministries  _ _	
18
123
5
3
34
52
5
230
64
583
57
13
3
19
102
(23)
(154)
(!)
(6)
(27)
(36)
(8)
(319)
(97)
(669)
(94)
(!)
(!)
(23)
(122)
(30)
148
813
44
32
137
280
53
1,572
524
4,083
285
65
79
140
671
3
(168)
(789)
(!)
(128)
(105)
(267)
(49)
(1,560)
(435)
(4,509)
(290)
(!)
(!)
(102)
(762)
(63)
1.7
9.1
0.5
0.4
1.5
3.1
0.6
17.6
5.9
45.7
3.2
0.7
0.9
1.6
7.5
(1.8)
(8.6)
(!)
(1.4)
(1.1)
(2.9)
(0.5)
(16.9)
(4.7)
(48.9)
(3.1)
(!)
(!)
(1.1)
(8.3)
(0.7)
1.4
9.4
0.4
0.2
2.6
4.0
0.4
17.5
4.9
44.6
4.2
1.0
0.2
1.4
7.8
(1.4)
(9.6)
O)
(0.4)
(1.7)
(2.2)
(0.5)
(19.8)
(6.0)
(41.6)
(5.9)
(!)
(!)
(1.4)
(7.6)
(1.9)
Total.
1,3112 (1,608)  | 8,929 (9,227)
100.0 (100.0)  |  100.0 (100.0)
1 Included with other ministries in previous years.
2 One accident involved vehicles of two ministries.
Claims other than those arising out of accidents involving Government motor-
vehicles resulted in recovery of repair costs of $339,845 for damages to 94 lamp
standards; 62 bridges; 52 guardrails; 91 signs, signals, and flashers; and 67 miscellaneous items. Major items of recovery were $10,700, a steel bridge in Burns
Lake District; $6,800, overhead sign bridge at Knight Street Bridge in New Westminster District; $7,600, Trout Creek Bridge in Penticton District; $6,700, Copper
River Bridge in Terrace District; $6,600, Fraser River Bridge in Williams Lake
District; $7,800, traffic signal and controller in New Westminster District; $5,400,
British Columbia Ferries dock at Beaver Cove; and $5,000, toll booth at Tsawwassen Terminal. Also recovered from the insurers of a Government-owned building
was $5,600 for windstorm damage.
The total paid out for 236 third-party miscellaneous claims was $130,798,
including $38,347 paid for .75 claims against British Columbia Ferries. Among
these were a claim of $21,500 for property damage sustained to a fuel truck while
proceeding aboard a B.C. Ferries vessel and $8,900 to a passenger who sustained
burns aboard the TEV Princess Marguerite of B.C. Steamship Co. (1975) Ltd.
 B 78
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
Thirteen cases which had gone to litigation were concluded as follows: 1
against the Government, 1 plaintiff withdrew, 1 dismissed and 10 settled before
trial.   There are presently 78 cases in various stages of litigation.
Premiums Paid for Insurance Placed During 1976/77
$
     82,725
B.C. Steamship Co. (1975) Ltd	
Ministry of Highways and Public Works
British Columbia Ferry Corporation	
Other ministries	
Total
25,056
121,350
197,269
426,400
The Dawson Creek Highway District removes, over frozen ground, from areas with poor
access, 202,510 cubic yards of pit-run gravel and place in stockpile in desirable locations for
future use. The mild winter made it possible to carry out the project with very little down-time
due to storms or very cold weather. The photo shows only one, the Brown Pit east of Pouce
Coupe.   Twelve other stockpiles were produced.
 CONTRACT STATISTICS
B 79
CONTRACT STATISTICS
SUMMARY OF ELECTORAL DISTRICTS OF GRADING, PAVING,
BRIDGE, FERRY-LANDING, FERRY, AND MISCELLANEOUS
CONTRACT  PROJECTS  COMPLETED   OR  IN  PROGRESS
Electoral District Project
Atlin Grading:
2690   Pine Tree Lake to Cassiar Junction on Stewart-Cassiar Highway
on the Barkerville-Bowron Lake Road.
2702   Nass River Bridge to DL 3411  on  Kitwanga-Meziadin Lake
Highway 37.
Boundary-Similkameen Paving:
S-2276   Medium-cover   aggregate   and   crushed   granular   surfacing   in
stockpile, Keremeos area on Highway 3.
Burnaby North Grading:
2972   Construction of Broadway Avenue between Gaglardi Way and
North Road.
Cariboo Paving:
S-2876   Riske Creek section of the Chilcotin Highway 20 (12.2 miles).
S-6276   Cariboo Highway 97 between Plett Road and Cale Creek (30.6
miles).
Bridges:
1030    Contract  1:   General construction of the Antler Creek Bridge
on the Barkerville-Bowron Lake Road.
1096   Modifications to reaction and aerial ferry-landings.
Miscellaneous:
M-3021    Contract 4:  Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile at Hances
Timber, Red and Sterling Pits.
M-3021    Contract 5:   Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile at Taca-
tooly, Graham, McClinchie, and Anahim Pits.
M-3021    Contract 16: Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile at Carson
Pit.
M-3021    Contract 17: Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile at Hang-
mans Pit.
Chilliwack-	
Columbia River..
Comox 	
Coquitlam..
..Grading:
2771    Contract 1: Construction of the B.C. Hydro railway crossing at
Sardis on Trans-Canada Highway 1.
..Paving:
S-4576   Highway  95   and   95a   between   Marysville   and   Skookumchuk
(17.8 miles).
..Grading:
2584 Construction of the Eve River to Tsitika River section of the
Island Highway 19.
2585 Construction of the Tsitika River to Woss Camp section of the
Island Highway 19.
2848    Clearing   and   grubbing   of   the   Port  Hardy  Airport   to   ferry
approaches on the Island Highway 19.
Bridges:
1033    Wingwall repairs and Dolphin renewals at the Campbell River
and Quathiaski Cove ferry terminals.
1075    Contract  1:   Substructure of the Salmon River Bridge on the
Island Highway 19.
1075    Contract 2: Fabrication and erection of the structural steelwork
on the Salmon River Bridge.
Ferry Terminals:
T.F. 189    Contract 2:  Dredging, placing fill, and wingwalls at the Little
River ferry terminal.
M-90   Replacement of dolphin and walkway at the Kelsey Bay ferry
terminal.
1091 Channel dredging at the Campbell River ferry terminal.
1092 Replacement of Dolphin at the Little River ferry terminal.
..Grading:
2490   Reconstruction of the Lougheed Highway 7 between junction of
Highway 7a and Dewdney Trunk Road.
Paving:
S-0776   Storm sewer,  curb and gutter,  and paving of St. John Street,
Highway 7a, Port Moody.
Bridges:
1071    Contract 1: General construction of the Sharpe Street Pedestrian
Overpass over Lougheed Highway 7.
1077   General construction of the Gauthier Avenue Pedestrian Overpass over Lougheed Highway 7.
 B 80
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
Electoral District
Cowichan-Malahat	
Delta.
Dewdney..
Esquimalt.
Fort George..
Kamloops..
Kootenay..
Langley..
Mackenzie-
Project
...Grading:
2692   Reconstruction  of  the Duncan  to  Chemainus  section  of  the
Trans-Canada Highway 1 (7.59 miles).
Paving:
S-0276   Shawnigan Lake area roads.
Bridges:
981    Contract 3:   Decks and painting Halsam Creek and Nanaimo
River bridges on the Trans-Canada Highway 1.
...Paving:
S-0476   Highway 99 and Ladner Interchange section (5.65 miles).
S-0976   Intermittent paving on Highway 10.
Ferry-landings:
T.F. 183    General construction of Berth 5 and breakwaters at the Tsawwassen ferry terminal.
T.F. 188    General construction of Berth 1  and marine structures at the
Tsawwassen ferry terminal.
Miscellaneous:
E-7654   Closed-circuit television system in the George Massey Tunnel.
...Grading:
2490    Reconstruction of the Lougheed Highway 7  between junction
of Highway 7a and Dewdney Trunk Road.
Miscellaneous:
M-3021 Contract 18: Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile at Morris
Valley Pit.
-Grading:
2978    Reconstruction of the Harriet Road to Thetis Lake Overhead on
the Trans-Canada Highway 1 (3.46 miles).
-Grading:
3070    Reconstruction of the Parsnip River Bridge to  McLeod Lake
Hotel on the John Hart Highway 97 (12.95 miles).
Paving:
S-6276   Paving the Plett Road to Cale Creek section of the Cariboo
Highway 97 (30.6 miles).
S-6576   Paving  the   Bednesti  to  Parkridge  subdivision   section   of  the
Yellowhead Highway 16 (26.0 miles).
Bridges:
1096   Modifications to reaction and aerial ferry-landings.
Miscellaneous:
M-3021 Contract 7: Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile at Kings
Creek, Tinsley, and Horsey Creek Pits.
..Grading:
2524    Contract   1:   Reconstruction   of   the   Valleyview   to   Campbell
Creek section of the Trans-Canada Highway 1 (4.56 miles).
Paving:
S-2176   Paving from 15.8 miles south of Littlefort to Littlefort on the
Yellowhead South Highway 5 (9.8 miles).
Bridges:
984   Contract 2:   Fabrication  and erection  of structural  steelwork
for sidewalk and reconstruct curb of the Fortune Drive Underpass on the Tranquille Highway.
1096    Modifications to reaction and aerial ferry-landings.
.Paving:
S-4076 Paving the Elko to Wardner section of Highway 93 and intermittent sections of the Wardner to Rampart section of Highway
3 (17.2 miles).
S-4276 Paving the Sparwood to Eikford section of the Elk Valley Road
and Michel intermittent sections of the Southern Trans-Provincial Highway 3 (23.3 miles).
S-4376 Medium cover aggregate in stockpile for the Fernie and Cranbrook areas.
S-4576 Paving the Marysville to Skookumchuk section of Highways 95
and 95a (17.8 miles).
.Grading:
2537    Contract 3: Construction of the Clover Valley Road and Roberts
Bank Overpass approaches at Cloverdale.
Miscellaneous:
3137   Landscape  development of the Pike Road  Interchange  to  C
Street Overhead section of the Trans-Canada Highway 1.
..Ferry Terminals:
M-82   Installation of outside services at Langdale ferry terminal.
T.F. 192   Contract 1:  New turning dolphin and walkway at Berth  1  of
the Langdale ferry terminal.
Miscellaneous:
M-3021 Contract 6: Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile at Atnarto,
Mile 253, Burnt Bridge Creek, Noosgulch and Nusatum Pits.
 CONTRACT STATISTICS
B 81
Nanaimo..
Electoral District Project
 Bridges:
981    Contract  3:   Decks   and  painting  of  the   Haslam   Creek   and
Nanaimo River bridges on the Trans-Canada Highway 1.
1074   Contract  1:   Substructure of the Englishman River Bridge on
the Island Highway.
1074   Contract 2: Fabrication and erection of structural steel on the
Englishman River Bridge on the Island Highway.
Ferries:
1094   Passenger and automobile ferry for the Gabriola Island service.
Ferry Terminals:
M-84   Dredging at the Departure Bay ferry terminal.
M-91   Wingwall   and   dolphin  repairs   at   the   Departure   Bay  ferry
terminal.
Miscellaneous:
M-3021    Contract 20: Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile at Dumont
Pit.
Nelson-Creston.
North Okanagan .
North Peace River-
North Vancouver-Seymour..
Omineca.
Prince Rupert.
Revelstoke-Slocan .
Richmond.
...Paving:
S-4176   Paving from Kootenay Bay to Sanka Creek section of Highway
3a (26.74 miles).
S-4476   Crushed aggregates in stockpile in the Balfour and Salmo areas.
...Miscellaneous:
M-3021 Contract 8: Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile in the Vernon Highway District.
..Grading:
3048   Clearing of the Fort Nelson River to Tsinhia Lake section of
the Liard Highway (28.11 miles).
Paving:
S-6575    Storm sewer, curb and gutter, and paving in the Town of Fort
St. John.
Bridges:
985    Contract 3: Deck on the Halfway River Bridge on the Hudson
Hope Highway 29.
Miscellaneous:
M-3021   Contract 15: Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile at Moore,
Leahy, and Imperial pits.
3126   Disposal of waste material between Mile 19 and Mile 25.5 on
the Liard Highway.
. Paving:
S-0576 Paving the Westview Drive to Lonsdale Avenue section of the
Trans-Canada Highway 1 and Lynn Valley Road (1.58 miles).
...Paving:
S-6176   Paving the  Sob  Lake  to  Bednesti  section  of the  Yellowhead
Highway 16 (15.4 miles).
Bridges:
1026   Contract   5:   Terminal   buildings   at   the   Francois   Lake   ferry
terminal.
1026   Contract 6: Bubbler system at the Francois Lake ferry terminal.
1026   Contract 7:   Floating  trim  dock  at  the  Franjois  Lake  ferry
terminal.
1086    General construction of the Necoslie River Bridge on the Van-
derhoof-Stuart Lake Road.
Ferry Terminals:
1026   Contract 3:   Electrical installation at the Franjois Lake ferry
terminal.
1026   Contract 4:  Sanitary sewer system at the Francois Lake ferry
terminal.
..Paving:
S-6776 Storm sewer, curb and gutter, and paving the Fairview Bay to
Eighth Street section of the Yellowhead Highway 16 in the City
of Prince Rupert.
-Bridges:
860   Contract 3:  Deck for the  Revelstoke East Overhead on the
eastern access to Revelstoke.
..Grading:
2591    Contract 3:   Construction of the Knight Street roadworks and
the Westminster Highway.
Paving:
S-0476   Paving Highway 99 and the Ladner Interchange sections  (5.65
miles).
Miscellaneous:
E-7654   Closed-circuit television system in the George Massey Tunnel.
M-89   Gas piping at the Deas maintenance facility.
 B 82 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
Electoral District Project
Rossland-Trail Grading:
2902   Construction of the Champion Creek to Meadows Siding section of the Southern Trans-Provincial Highway 3 (6.57 miles).
2905    Reconstruction of the Glenmerry to Montrose section of the
Southern Trans-Provincial Highway 3 (3.58 miles).
Miscellaneous:
M-3021    Contract 11: Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile at Border
Pit.
Saanich and the Islands Paving:
S-0276   Paving miscellaneous roads on the Saanich Peninsula.
Ferry terminals:
M-86    Starboard wingwall repairs at the Long Harbour ferry terminal.
M-88    Repairs to wingwalls at the Otter Bay ferry terminal.
T.F. 184    Contract   2:   Electrical  installations   at   the   Swartz   Bay  ferry
terminal.
T.F. 184   Contract 3: Construction of a foot-passenger loading facility at
Berth 5 of the Swartz Bay ferry terminal.
Miscellaneous:
M-3021    Contract 24: Supply of crushed granular surfacing in stockpile
at Saltspring Island.
Shuswap —Paving:
S-2375    Paving the  Schwebs  Bridge to  Pinaus Lake  Road  section  of
Highway 97 (16.7 miles).
S-2376    Medium-cover aggregate in stockpile in the Salmon Arm area
on Trans-Canada Highway 1.
S-2576   Paving the Chase to Sorrento section of the Trans-Canada Highway 1 (8.3 miles).
S-2676   Paving the Grindrod to Sicamous section of Highway 97a (17.0
miles).
Miscellaneous:
M-3021    Contract 2: Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile at the Baird
Pit near Enderby.
M-3021    Contract 3: Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile at Bach Pit
at Armstrong.
M-3021    Contract 19:  Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile at Annis
Pit.
M-3021    Contract 21:  Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile at Grube
Pit near Salmon Arm.
M-3021    Contract 23: Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile at Bundas
Pit, Salmon Arm.
Skeena _ —Grading:
3032    Reconstruction  of   the   Backwater   Creek   to   CNR   Tunnel   at
Kwinitsa section of the Yellowhead Highway 16  (5.88 miles).
Paving:
S-6076    Paving from the junction of Highway 25 to the Kitamaat Indian
Village (7.3 miles).
S-6376   Paving Arterial 362r in Terrace and the Polywog to Esker section of the Yellowhead Highway 16  (10.1 miles).
S-6476   Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile in the Hazelton area.
Bridges:
1085   General construction of the Andesite Creek, Basalt Creek, and
Breccia Creek bridges on the Yellowhead Highway 16.
1096    Modifications to reaction and aerial ferry-landings.
South Okanagan Miscellaneous:
M-3021    Contract 1:  Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile at Pyman
and Lewis Pits.
South Peace River Grading:
2799   Construction of the Kiskatinaw River bridge approaches  (6.72
miles).
Bridges:
1031    General  construction of the Kiskatinaw River bridge on  the
Alaska Highway 97.
Miscellaneous:
M-3021   Contract 13: Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile at Jack-
fish and East Pine Pits.
M-3021    Contract 14: Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile at Patnode
Pit.
Surrey Paving:
S-0976   Intermittent paving on Highway 10.
Miscellaneous:
3137   Landscape  development of the Pike  Road  Interchange  to  C
Street Overhead on the Trans-Canada Highway 1.
Victoria _ Grading:
2978    Reconstruction of the Harriet Road to Thetis Lake Overhead
section of the Trans-Canada Highway 1.
 CONTRACT STATISTICS
B 83
Electoral District                                                                             Project
West Vancouver-Howe Sound       .Paving:
S-0376   Paving the Cypress Bowl access highway.
S-0676   Paving the Garibaldi Highway 99 in the Whistler Mountain area
(18.18 miles).
Bridges:
1090    Contract 2: Fabrication and erection of structural steel on the
Mamquam River bridge on the Garibaldi Highway 99.
Yale-Lillooet Paving:
S-2076   Paving  the  Alexandra  to   Boston   Bar   section   of  the   Trans-
Canada Highway 1 (14.5 miles).
S-2476   Paving miscellaneous sections of the Southern Trans-Provincial
Highway 3 between Hope and Rhododendron Flats (15.5 miles).
S-2776   Merritt curb and gutter on Nicola Avenue, Arterial Highways
5 and 8 (1.20 miles).
Bridges:
1096   Modifications to reaction and aerial ferry-landings.
Miscellaneous:
2555    Crushed  granular  surfacing  in  stockpile   at   Spius   Creek  Pit,
Merritt.
M-3021    Contract 9: Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile at Florence
Pit.
M-3021    Contract 10:  Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile at Moha
Pit.
M 3021    Contract 12:  Crushed granular surfacing in Stockpile at Logan
Lake East Pit.
M-3021    Contract 22: Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile at Bryson
Pit.
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED
Highways
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project 2490—Lougheed Highway 7 construction Highway 7a
to Dewdney Trunk Road section (4.05 miles):
$
2,469,854.75
2,548,610.02
2,566,544.00
2,776,575.30
2,783,276.00
2,819,184.50
3,336,337.00
2,741,120.00
3,175,487.30
3,280,504.50
3,540,937.15
3,854,247.00
3,885,636.40
4,076,699.00
7,265,285.00
8,678,187.00
9,391,494.00
5,564,620.00
5,897,998.00
6,585,780.00
854,448.00
857,600.60
1,034,728.80
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd	
H.B. Contracting Ltd	
Project 2524—Contract 1: Trans-Canada Highway reconstruction: Valleyview to Campbell Creek section (4.56 miles):
Commonwealth Construction Co. Ltd.	
Project 2584—Vancouver Island Highway construction:  Eve
River to Tsitika River section (12.8 miles):
Project 2585—Vancouver Island Highway construction: Tsitika River to Woss Camp section (9.81) miles):
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd	
Project 2591—Contract 3:   Knight Street roadworks, Westminster Highway:
Standard General Construction Ltd '	
*
 B 84
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
Highways—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project 2690—Stewart-Cassiar Highway reconstruction: Pine-
tree Lake to Cassiar Junction section (24.48 miles):
$
5,681,442.00
6,998,619.00
7,832,884.00
10,333,718.35
11,252,548.00
5,630,309.00
5,648,219.00
7,393,276.40
3,372,139.30
3,599,348.90
3,925,047.20
4,063,085.75
4,432,983.00
4,969,756.25
7,838,413.00
8,880,624.00
9,365,257.00
9,404,011.00
10,329,728.00
13,286,412.00
527,668.20
668,826.22
694,133.18
744,910.00
823,251.30
830,077.00
874,491.00
2,451,245.00
3,117,625.00
3,609,335.00
4,652,078.00
5,028,602.00
150,105.00
286,100.00
289,500.00
320,969.00
358,800.00
429,675.00
3,707,121.00
3,856,295.00
4,083,096.00
4,112,653.00
4,204,267.30
4,449,866.00
4,498,366.00
1,794,211.50
1,896,393.00
2,149,219.00
2,195,337.15
2,263,922.60
2,650,157.50
2,828,026.00
First call for tenders (not
awarded).
Emil Anderson Construction Co. Ltd  .—
Commonwealth Construction Co. Ltd.  and Geddes Con-
Second call for tenders.
Project 2692—Trans-Canada Highway reconstruction: Duncan
to Chemainus River section (7.59 miles):
Hub City Paving Ltd.          	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd.	
Project  2702—Kitwanga-Meziadin  Lake  Highway  construction:   Nass   River   Bridge   to   DL   3411   section   (23.99
miles):
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd              _	
Project 2771—Contract 1: Trans-Canada Highway construction: B.C. Hydro railway crossing at Sardis (0.91 mile):
Prism Enterprises Ltd. and James Pearce Contracting Ltd	
Emil Anderson Construction Co. Ltd	
Miller Cartage & Contracting Ltd	
Project 2799—Alaska  Highway  97  construction:   Kiskatinaw
River bridge approaches (6.72 miles):
North American Road Ltd            .   .. .
Awarded.
Edgeworth Construction & Rentals Ltd.	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd	
General Enterprises ltd.
Emil Anderson Construction Co. Ltd. 	
Project 2848—Island Highway:  Port Hardy airport to Port
Hardy ferry approaches (3.77 miles) :
Waywind Industries Ltd          ...   .
Clearing and grubbing.   Second
call for tenders.
Nudanmyra Clearing Contractors Ltd	
B & G Logging Ltd.	
Awarded.
Port Hardy Bulldozing Ltd	
Penner Bros. Utility Builders Ltd	
Emil Anderson Construction Co. Ltd	
Project 2902—Southern Trans-Provincial Highway 3 construction: Champion Creek to Meadows Siding (6.57 miles):
Edco Construction Co	
Geddes Contracting Co. Ltd	
Emil Anderson Construction Co. Ltd	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd	
H.B. Contracting Ltd	
Dillingham Corporation Canada Ltd	
View Construction Ltd	
Project 2905—Southern Trans-Provincial Highway 3 reconstruction: Glenmerry to Montrose section (3.58 miles):
View Construction Ltd	
Edco Construction Co.	
Emil Anderson Construction Co. Ltd	
Unger Construction Co. (1976) Ltd	
H.B. Contracting Ltd	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd	
Geddes Contracting Co. Ltd	
 CONTRACT STATISTICS
B 85
Highways—Continued
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Project 2972—Broadway Avenue construction: Gaglardi Way
to North Road section (0.35 mile):
Standard General Construction Ltd —
H.B. Contracting Ltd. _  	
Sonora Construction Ltd — __	
Project 2978—Trans-Canada Highway reconstruction: Harriet
Road to Thetis Lake Overhead section (3.46 miles):
H.B. Contracting Ltd.
Standard General Construction Ltd.
Edco Construction Co	
Chew Excavating Ltd..
Emil Anderson Construction Co. Ltd...
Hub City Paving Ltd..
Project 3032—Yellowhead Highway 16 reconstruction: Backwater  Creek  to  CNR Tunnel,  Kwinitsa  section   (5.88
miles):
Dawson Construction Ltd.. _	
Majestic Wiley Contractors Ltd	
Chinook Construction & Engineering Ltd..
Emil Anderson Construction Co. Ltd	
Loram International Ltd...	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd. 	
Dillingham Corporation Canada Ltd 	
Granby Construction & Equipment Ltd - _	
Project 3048—Fort Nelson to Fort Simpson (Liard) Highway clearing: Fort Nelson to Tsinhia Lake section (28.11
miles):
Tacfor Logging Ltd  _	
Sikanni Oilfield Construction Ltd.     	
Miann Contracting Ltd	
Eric G. Tompkins & Arthur B. Tompkins	
Chinook Construction & Engineering Ltd.
Project 3070—John Hart Highway 97 reconstruction: Parsnip
River Bridge to McLeod Lake Hotel section (12.95
miles):
Dawson Construction Ltd.	
Majestic Wiley Contractors Ltd   	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd 	
Geddes-Commonwealth (a joint venture)..
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd.  	
Emil Anderson Construction Co. Ltd	
255,489.47
265,763.85
277,764.99
3,283,510.30
3,388,942.35
3,606,730.00
3,797,905.25
4,287,418.00
4,418,139.00
7,058,137.70
7,553,594.00
8,163,937.00
8,359,293.00
8,398,224.00
9,668,520.00
9,684,922.00
11,134,879.30
293,890.00
366,998.12
531,500.00
533,000.60
929,180.00
2,932,951.50
3,105,135.40
3,582,697.00
4,122,025.00
4,146,000.00
4,158,680.00
Remarks
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Paving
Project S-2375—Highway 97, Schweb's Bridge to Pinaus Lake
Road (16.7 miles):
H. Williamson Blacktop and Landscaping Ltd..
LeDuc Paving Ltd _. 	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd _. _
Catre Industries Ltd. -  	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd  	
Midvalley Construction Ltd   _	
Project S-6575—MacKenzie Street and Centre Avenue, Town
of Fort St. John, and Beatton River Hill section of District Road 103 (5.15 miles):
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd   _
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd..
H.B. Contracting Ltd.~
Project S-0276—Section   1,  Peninsula miscellaneous  roads;
section 2, Shawnigan Lake area roads (29.4 miles):
Island Asphalt Producers Ltd     _.
Hub City Paving Ltd.
Standard General Construction Ltd	
LeDuc Paving Ltd _	
768,360.00
868,372.50
873,790.00
1,063,064.00
1,077,550.00
1,114,810.00
2,608,695.90
2,694,998.10
2,793,059.35
608,577.10
715,857.50
770,517.00
776,866.30
Crushed granular surfacing,
levelling course, asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Storm     drainage,     curb     and
gutter,   paving,   lighting   and
lighting installation.
j Awarded.
| Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
 B 86
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
Paving—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project S-0376—Cypress Bowl Access Highway, Mile 4.7 to
Mile 9.5, including service roads and parking-lots (4.8
miles):
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd _	
B.A. Blacktop Ltd,
I
Standard General Construction Ltd - —	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd.— _	
Dawson Construction Ltd _	
Project  S-0476—Highway  99,   southerly  from  Deas  Slough
Bridge and Ladner Interchange (5.65 miles):
Coquitlam Bitulithic Ltd.	
Jack Cewe Ltd _ 	
Dawson Construction Ltd - -	
Imperial Paving Ltd _ - —	
Project S-0576—Trans-Canada Highway, Westview Drive to
Lonsdale Avenue section and Lynn Valley Road (1.58
miles):
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd  	
Jack Cewe Ltd. ... _ _ _	
H.B. Contracting Ltd.
Standard General Construction Ltd	
B.A. Blacktop Ltd _. _.
United Contractors Ltd 	
Project S-0676—Garibaldi Highway 99, Whistler Mountain
area, Mile 46.01 to Mile 53.30, Mile 55.30 to Mile 66.19
(18.18 miles):
Midvalley Construction Ltd _ _	
Dawson Construction Ltd -	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd  	
Project S-0776—St. John's Street, Highway 7a, Port Moody
between Grant Street and Clearview Street (0.97 mile):
Jack Cewe Ltd.      	
Standard General Construction Ltd...  	
Winvan Paving Ltd...
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd _	
H.B. Contracting Ltd _ _ _ _	
Project  S-0976—Highway   10,   intermittent  sections  between
bottom of Enderly Hill and Latimer Road  (3.1 miles):
Imperial Paving Ltd.
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd...
Jack Cewe Ltd.  	
Winvan Paving Ltd.-
Standard General Construction Ltd -   -	
Project S-2076—Trans-Canada Highway, Alexandra to Boston
Bar section (14.5 miles) :
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd.
LeDuc Paving Ltd..
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd..
Catre Industries Ltd	
Project S-2176—Highway 5 from 15.8 miles south of Little
Fort to Little Fort intermittent sections (9.8 miles):
LeDuc Paving Ltd _ - „	
H. Williamson Blacktop and Landscaping Ltd -	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd _	
Long Lake Paving Ltd  	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd	
Midvalley Construction Ltd..
Project S-2276—Highway 3 and Highway 3a, Keremeos area:
Ptarmigan Gravel Ltd	
Peters Bros. Industries Ltd 	
Argus Aggregates Ltd.	
Midvalley Construction Ltd	
Project S-2376—Highway 1, Salmon Arm area:
Salmon Arm Ready Mix Ltd—
Argus Aggregates Ltd 	
Dawson Construction Ltd	
247,410.00
250,870,60
271,922.00
313,750.00
355,890.00
497,812.10
536,244.00
597,876.00
603,431.22
552,279.90
616,560.00
621,088.71
646,686.35
649,684.13
663,395.40
963,974.00
988,831.00
1,150,200.00
1,212,456.00
568,319.23
651,216.75
673,624.70
687,402.17
729,885.15
155,826.00
157,650.00
171,942.00
172,439.95
187,686.00
786,640.00
796,279.60
836,980.00
914,500.00
638,184.18
668,074.00
692,651.00
762,683.00
768,716.00
798,507.00
60,889.00
82,899.00
101,636.00
116,118.00
45,475.00
107,100.00
107,950.00
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Highway earthwork, drainage,
base courses, paving, lighting
installation.
Awarded.
Crushed      granular      surfacing,
asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Storm  sewer,   curb   and  gutter,
paving.
Awarded.
Recap paving.
Awarded.
12 miles of asphalt concrete
paving, 2.5 miles of intermittent recap.
Awarded.
Crushed    granular    surfacing,
asphalt concrete paving.
Awarded.
Medium-cover aggregate crushed granular surfacing in
stockpile.
Awarded.
I
[ Medium-cover aggregate in
stockpile.
| Awarded.
i
j	
 CONTRACT STATISTICS
Paving—Continued
B 87
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project  S-2476—Southern   Trans-Provincial   Highway,   Hope
to Rhododendron Flats sections (15.5 miles):
$
723,425.00
771,346.00
834,850.00
836,685.00
945,250.00
480,186.00
495,727.00
502,295.00
525,417.00
551,100.00
567,450.00
679,880.00
722,100.00
815,190.00
824,310.00
845,340.00
862,110.00
949,550.00
451,238.86
475,622.30
479,636.00
524,341.00
542,389.65
582,643.00
682,070.00
797,790.00
814,244.00
936.046.00
1,095,600.00
1,133,000.00
1,155,550.00
858,180.00
882,030.00
927,340.00
1,076,720.00
1,132,627.00
1,028,211.00
1,074,874.00
1,092,464.37
1,349,418.00
1,396,311.00
941,255.00
960,987.00
994,662.50
1,037,963.00
1,062,800.00
Asphalt concrete levelling
course, asphalt cncretoe pavement.
Awarded.
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Storm sewers, curb and gutter,
granular surfacing, asphalt
concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Crushed    granular    surfacing,
asphalt   concrete   pavement.
Awarded.
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Crushed granular surfacing,
levelling course asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd '■    	
Project S-2576—Trans-Canada Highway,  Chase to Sorrento
section (8.3 miles):
LeDuc Paving Ltd ....	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd	
Project S-2676—Highway 97a, Grindrod to Sicamous section
(17.0 miles):
H. Williamson Blacktop and Landscaping Ltd.	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd.. ' '	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd— ,	
Project S-2776—Nicola Avenue, Arterial Highways 5 and 8,
Merritt:
B.A. Blacktop (Kamloops) Ltd.                          	
H.B. Contracting Ltd	
Project S-2876—Chilcotin Highway Riske Creek section between Mile 33.7 to Mile 45.9 (12.2 miles):
H. Williamson Blacktop and Landscaping Ltd	
Blackstone Paving Ltd. and West Coast Paving Co. Ltd,
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd.            	
Project S-4076—Highways 3 and 93, Elko to Wardner section
and   intermittent   sections   Wardner   to   Rampart   (17.2
miles) :
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd.	
Project S-4176—Highway 3a, Kootenay Bay to Sanca Creek
section (26.74 miles):
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd	
Project S-4276—Elk Valley Road, Sparwood to Eikford section  (22.8 miles)   and Highway 3, intermittent sections
near Michel (0.5 mile) (total 23.3 miles):
LeDuc Paving Ltd _
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd	
 B 88                     HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
Paving—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project S-4376—Fernie and Cranbrook areas:
$
286,815.40
388,495.00
130,340.00
156,850.00
194,648.00
215,655.00
783,620.00
834,880.00
845,350.00
847,795.00
864,605.00
1,047,297.00
446,200.00
593,726.00
797,100.00
849,230.00
974,400.00
1,035,180.00
1,039,850.00
.
1,458,150.00
1,491,030.00
1,535,790.00
1,701,210.00
1,716,260.00
980,420.00
1,090,062.50
1,214,915.00
1,274,850.00
47,100.00
78,000.00
87,000.00
1,166,700.00
1,215,100.00
1,262,890.00
1,314,000.00
1,345,600.00
1,368,830.00
1,388,585.00
Medium cover aggregate in
stockpile.
Awarded.
Crushed granular aggregate in
stockpile.
Awarded.
Crushed    granular    surfacing,
asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Crushed    granular   surfacing,
asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Crushed   granular   surfacing,
asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Crushed granular surfacing,
in stockpile. First call for
tenders no bids received.
Second call for tenders.
Awarded.
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Project S-4476—Balfour and Salmo areas:
Ptarmigan Gravel Ltd. ■	
F.W.P. Construction Ltd	
Project S-4576—Highways 95a and 95, Marysville to Skook-
umchuck section (17.8 miles):
Blackstone Paving Ltd. and West Coast Paving Co. Ltd	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd    	
Project S-6076—Kitamaat Indian Village Road from Highway 25 to Kitamaat Indian Village (7.3 miles):
Project  S-6176—Yellowhead   Highway,   Sob   Lake   Road   to
Bednesti section (15.4 miles) :
H. Williamson Blacktop and Landscaping Ltd	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd	
Project S-6276—Cariboo Highway, Plett Road to Cale Creek
section (30.6 miles):
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd _.
Project S-6376—Highway 16, Arterial 362R, Terrace Kitsum-
kalum Bridge to Eby Street and Polywog Creek to Esker
Creek sections (10.1 miles):
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd	
Project S-6476—Yellowhead Highway, Hazelton area:
F.W.P. Construction Ltd	
L. G. Scott & Son's Construction Ltd	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd	
Project S-6576—Yellowhead Highway, Bednesti to Parkridge
Subdivision section, Mile 29.5 to Mile 55.5 (26.0 miles):
H. Williamson Blacktop & Landscaping Ltd	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd	
 CONTRACT STATISTICS
B 89
Paving—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project  S-6776—Highway   16,   Pillsbury   Avenue   to   Eighth
Street and Eighth Street to Third Avenue, Prince Rupert:
H.B. Contracting Ltd..
Jack Cewe Ltd. _	
Granby Construction & Equipment Ltd...
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd —	
H.B. Contracting Ltd 	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd 	
Jack Cewe Ltd	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd.
1,837,485.20
1,726,041.13
1,783,565.77
1,795,328.70
1,882,444.90
1,894,857.00
1,892,878.47
2,137,119.00
Reconstruction and widening
Pillsbury Avenue to Eighth
Street, recapping Eighth Street,
to Third Avenue. First call
for tenders.
Not awarded.
Second call for tenders. Asphalt
paving.
Not awarded.
Alternative cement concrete.
Not awarded.
Bridges
Project 860—Contract 3:  Revelstoke East Overhead, eastern
access to Revelstoke:
Kingston Construction Ltd  	
Kenyon Construction Ltd _	
Manning Construction Ltd  	
Grimwood Construction Co. Ltd  _ _.	
Ansha Contracting Co. Ltd.
Project 981—Contract 3: Haslam Creek and Nanaimo River
Bridges, Island Highway:
Cana Construction Co. Ltd	
Kingston Construction Ltd.
Manning Construction Ltd...
Bastion Construction Ltd	
Ansha Contracting Co. Ltd   	
Project 984—Contract 2: Fortune Drive Underpass, Tranquille
Highway:
S. & C. Products Ltd _ _ _ 	
Juniper Construction Ltd   	
Project  985—Contract   3:   Halfway   River   Bridge,   Hudson
Hope Highway:
Dyke Construction Ltd.
Kingston Construction Ltd _ 	
Ansha Contracting Co. Ltd _ _	
Manning Construction Ltd	
Kenyon Construction Ltd. _	
Project 1030—Contract 1: Antler Creek Bridge, Barkerville-
Bowron Lake Road:
Hallcraft Construction Co. Ltd 	
Ansha Contracting Co. Ltd 	
Kenyon Construction Ltd   	
Kingston Construction Ltd..
Caversham Construction Ltd	
F. Hedges Construction Ltd	
Manning Construction Ltd _..
Pine Tree Construction Co. Ltd..
Interior Contracting Co. Ltd...
Dillingham Corporation Canada Ltd...
Project 1031—Contract 1: Kiskatinaw River Bridge, Alaska
Highway relocation:
Canron Ltd	
Commonwealth Construction Co. Ltd _	
Chinook Construction & Engineering Ltd..
Brittain Steel Ltd   _ 	
Dillingham Corporation Canada Ltd...
Poole Construction Ltd	
Barnett-McQueen Co. Ltd 	
188,754.80
211,983.00
228,670.00
249,312.50
257,357.50
272,649.50
306,309.77
317,968.00
330,853.65
370,419.50
32,621.35
40,078.09
211,485.00
225,584.05
237,395.00
274,875.00
350,719.00
189,721.20
194,620.00
198,781.05
199,550.30
218,145.00
219,638.00
224,058.00
241,273.00
305,723.00
318,912.00
3,330,684.00
3,550,909.00
3,583,093.00
3,625,692.80
3,674,955.00
4,063,002.00
3,148,294.20
Deck.
Awarded.
Decks and painting.
Awarded.
Fabrication and erection of
steelwork for sidewalk and
reconstruction of roadway
curb.
Awarded.
Deck.
Awarded.
General.
Awarded.
General.
Awarded.
Alternate proposal.
 B 90
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
Bridges—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project 1071—Contract 1: Sharpe Street Pedestrian Overpass,
Lougheed Highway:
$
103,802.40
111,038.36
112,657.50
113,668.50
113,853.00
116,241.00
117,222.00
122,673.00
127,118.00
134,866.04
171,686.80
178,827.00
190,934.00
199,056.85
213,573.56
217,823.65
228,266.50
242,120.96
246,362.00
249,822.01
286,873.60
318,535.00
324,649.16
4,279,970.14
929.054.00
1,060,196.00
1,215,659.00
1,274,000.00
432,276.83
489,533.00
490,514.30
497,144.00
528,482.00
539,691.50
540,544.00
558,093.10
985,944.00
421,322.00
467,460.00
487,132.00
531,900.00
741,000.00
68,575.00
86,608.00
91,768.00
104,209.00
108,202.30
134,894.50
302,163.50
349.366.00
412,119.00
507,889.40
596,056.00
General.
Van Construction, division of Van Vliet Construction Co.
Ltd.                                	
Kingston Construction Ltd.	
Project 1074—Englishman River Bridge, Island Highway:
Contract 1—
Substructure.
Awarded.
Kenyon Construction Ltd	
Caversham Construction Ltd	
D. Robinson Construction (1952) Ltd.
Dawson & Hall Ltd	
Souther Construction (1968) Ltd _  .
Contract 2—
Brittain Steel Ltd.                	
Fabrication and erection of
structural steelwork.
Awarded.
Project 1075—Salmon River Bridge, Island Highway:
Contract 1—
Cascade Industries Ltd „	
Substructure.
Awarded.
G. W. Carlson Construction Ltd	
Pine Tree Construction Co. Ltd	
Manning Construction Ltd  _	
Contract 2—
Fabrication and erection of
structural steelwork.
Awarded.
Project 1077—Gauthier Avenue Pedestrian Underpass, Lougheed Highway:
General.
Awarded.
Hallcraft Construction Co. Ltd	
Project 1085—Contract 1: Andesite Creek, Basalt Creek and
Breccia Creek Bridges, Yellowhead Highway:
Kingston Construction Ltd _	
Hallcraft Construction Co. Ltd	
Manning Construction Ltd ...	
General.
Awarded.
 CONTRACT STATISTICS
B 91
Bridges—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project 1086—Contract 1: Necoslie River Bridge, Vander-
hoof-Stewart Lake Road:
Manning Construction Ltd. _ 	
Kingston Construction Ltd __	
Kenyon Construction Ltd	
Caversham Construction Ltd	
G. W. Carlson Construction Ltd _	
F. Hedges Construction Ltd	
Ansha Contracting Co. Ltd _	
Dillingham Corporation Canada Ltd. __	
Project 1090—Contract 2: Mamquam River Bridge, Garibaldi
Highway:
Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd.	
Brittain Steel Ltd	
Canron Ltd., Western Bridge Division	
Great West Steel Industries Ltd.
312,000.00
342,094.55
365,088.00
385,318.40
412,844.01
435,309.00
498,155.20
541,928.00
245,300.00
258,229.00
290,454.00
350,540.00
General.
Awarded.
Fabrication and erection of
structural steelwork.
Awarded.
Ferries and Ferry Terminals
Project 1026—Franjois Lake ferry terminals:
Contract 3*—
Highland Electric (1971) Ltd	
J. K. Electric Ltd	
Heal Electric Ltd	
Blackwell and Shively Electric-
Contract 4—
Anvil Construction Ltd	
Antler Construction Co. Ltd...
Contract 5—
Guran Construction Co. Ltd.	
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd...
Mizar Enterprises Ltd.._.__ 	
Ansha Contracting Co. Ltd	
Contract 6—
Demac Engineering Ltd	
Ladner Sand & Gravel Ltd.
Dynamic Installations	
Contract 71—
Bel-Aire Shipyards Ltd.
Zenith Steel Fabricators Ltd. ...
Allied Shipbuilders Ltd.	
Yarrows Ltd 	
Vancouver Shipyards Co. Ltd..
Surrey Ironworks Ltd.
Project  1033—Campbell  River   and   Quathiaski  Cove   ferry
terminals:
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd	
Alert Bay Pile Driving Co. Ltd 	
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd _. 	
Harbour Pile Driving Co. Ltd..
Project 1091—Campbell River ferry terminal:
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd	
D. J. Byrne Construction Ltd	
Dillingham Corporation Canada Ltd	
Project 1092—Little River ferry terminal:
D. J. Byrne Construction Ltd.	
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd	
Ed Sawchuck Contracting Co. Ltd._	
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd	
Dillingham Corporation Canada Ltd.	
39.600.00
42,900.00
58,728.00
117,130.00
164,323.10
195,201.25
109,304.00
112,530.00
119,979.00
142,582.00
128,154.00
142,800.00
259,350.00
463,970.00
538,000.00
582,128.00
596,590.00
642,436.56
736,570.00
61,020.00
62,785.50
62,927.00
81,900.00
40,534.00
42,201.00
59,975.00
47,963.00
49,340.00
50,000.00
51,233.00
105,677.00
North and south banks electrical.
Awarded.
North and south banks sanitary
sewerage system.
Not awarded.
North and south banks terminal
buildings.
Awarded.
North and south banks bubbler
system.
Awarded.
Floating trim dock.
Awarded.
Wingwall   repairs,   dolphin   renewal.
Awarded.
Channel dredging.
Awarded.
Replacement of dolphin.
Awarded.
1 Lump-sum bid.
 B 92
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
Ferries and Ferry Terminals—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project 1094—Passenger and automobile ferry for Gabriola
Island service:
Vancouver Shipyards Co. Ltd.
Vito Steel Boat and Barge Construction Ltd.
Allied Shipbuilders Ltd _ 	
Yarrows Ltd.	
Project 1096—Reaction ferry landings at Marguerite, Usk,
Big Bar, McLure, Lytton, and Isle Pierre and aerial
ferry-landings at Marguerite, Usk, Little Fort, and Big
Bar:
Surrey Ironworks Ltd _ _	
Inlet Metal and Machining Co. Ltd  	
Alpine Steel Ltd	
Project M-82t-—Langdale ferry terminal:
Tideline Enterprises Ltd _	
G. Victor Koran Ltd 	
Fiedler Bros. Contracting Ltd	
Bel Construction Ltd.  _	
Project M-84—Departure Bay ferry terminal:
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd	
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd..
Dillingham Corporation Canada Ltd..—	
Project M-86—Long Harbour ferry terminal:
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd.
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd	
Harbour Pile Driving Co. Ltd _
Project M-88—Otter Bay ferry terminal:
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd.
Dillingham Corporation Canada Ltd	
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd	
Project M-90—Kelsey Bay ferry terminal:
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd  	
Project M-91—Departure Bay ferry terminal:
Harbour Pile Driving Co. Ltd _ 	
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd. _   	
Project T.F. 183—Contract 1: Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal:
Dillingham Corporation Canada Ltd „	
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd. — 	
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd	
Project T.F. 184—Swartz Bay Ferry Terminal:
Contract 2—
Bescor Electric Ltd. _. 	
Commonwealth Construction Co. Ltd.; Hume and Rumble
Electrical Division  	
Ricketts-Sewell Electric Ltd.   _	
Scott Electric Ltd _   	
C. H. E. Williams Co. Ltd   	
E. W. Rees & Sons Ltd.—   	
Contract 3—
Cana Construction Co. Ltd 	
Hunter Construction Ltd.       	
Liddell Construction Ltd _ _ 	
Project T.F. 188—Tsawwassen ferry terminal:
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd _	
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd 	
Dillingham Corporation Canada Ltd  	
Project T.F. 189—Contract 2: Little River and Westview ferry
terminals:
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd. _ _	
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd  	
Dillingham Corporation Canada Ltd. _  	
Project T.F. 192—Langdale ferry terminal:
Dillingham Corporation Canada Ltd.-
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd.	
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd.	
D. J. Byrne Construction Ltd 	
2,292,117.00
2,825,000.00
2,924,000.00
3,090,000.00
196,150.00
202,599.00
205,124.00
6,953.55
14,100.00
15,724.75
16,100.00
77,485.00
98,885.00
117,965.00
25,527.00
28,326.00
29,477.44
131,608.00
163,259.00
178,358.92
69,870.00
171,789.00
199,785.00
2,456,550.00
2,981,000.00
3,083,900.00
Awarded.
Modifications to landings.
Awarded.
Outside services.
Awarded.
26,589.00    | Awarded.
Dredging.
Awarded.
Starboard wingwall repairs.
Awarded.
Repairs to wingwalls.
Awarded.
Replacement    of    dolphin    and
walkway.
Awarded.
Wingwall and dolphin repairs.
Awarded.
Berth 5 and breakwaters.
Awarded.
Electrical.
26,723.00
37,243.00
39,920.00
42,927.00
53,624.00
292,688.00
333,541.00
342,313.00
369,560.00
447,210.00
699,834.00
111,592.00
139,347.80
262,439.00
108,315.00
114,130.00
126,525.00
156,744.00
j Foot-passenger loading facility.
| Awarded.
Berth 1 marine structures.
Awarded.
Dredging,  fill  placing,  wingwall
repairs.
Awarded.
New  turning  dolphin,  walkway
Berth 1.
Awarded.
i Lump-sum bid.
 CONTRACT STATISTICS
Miscellaneous
B 93
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project 2537—Contract 3: Clover Valley Road (176th Street)
and Roberts Bank Overpass approaches at Cloverdale:
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd.
Jack Cewe Ltd 	
H.B. Contracting Ltd..
Goodbrand Construction Ltd.	
Project 2555—Contract 1: Spius Creek Pit:
D.M.J. Construction Ltd _
Construction Cartage Co. Ltd...
Ptarmigan Gravel Ltd	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd 	
F.W.P. Construction Ltd	
Argus Aggregates Ltd 	
Project 2904—Anderson Pit 2835:
Fraser River Contracting Ltd _	
Ptarmigan Gravel Ltd   _.
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd   	
Project 3021—
Contract 1: Pyman and Lewis Pit, Kelowna area:
D.M.J. Construction Ltd  	
Ptarmigan Gravel Ltd...
Peter Bros. Sand & Gravel Ltd.
Midvalley Construction Ltd	
Eagle Rock Construction Ltd	
F.W.P. Construction Ltd 	
Argus Aggregates Ltd..
Contract 2: Baird Pit, Enderby area:
D.M.J. Construction Ltd 	
Ptarmigan Gravel Ltd _.
F.W.P. Construction Ltd	
LeDuc Paving Ltd _ _
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd	
Long Lake Paving Ltd	
Argus Aggregates Ltd. _
Contract 3: Bach Pit, Armstrong area:
D.M.J. Construction Ltd _	
Vernon Paving Ltd.	
Ptarmigan Gravel Ltd. 	
LeDuc Paving Ltd..
F.W.P. Construction Ltd _ _
Long Lake Paving Ltd.     _ 	
Sasges Cement Products Ltd.    	
Argus Aggregates Ltd 	
Contract 4: Hances Timber, Red and Sterling Pits, Chil-
cotin-Bella Coola Highway:
F.W.P. Construction Ltd	
Contract 5: Tacatooly, Graham, McClinchie, and Ana-
him Pits, Chilcotin-Bella Coola Highway:
F.W.P. Construction Ltd.. 	
Contract 6: Atnarko, Mile 253, Burnt Bridge Creek,
Noosgulch and Nusatsum Pits, Chilcotin-Bella Coola
Highway:
F.W.P. Construction Ltd	
Contract 7: King Creek, Tinsley and Horsey Pits near
McBride:
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd     _...
Argus Aggregates Ltd.
Contract 8: Pit on Campbell Road near Cherryville:
D.M.J. Construction Ltd   	
Vernon Paving Ltd 	
Interior Custom Crushing Ltd. _	
Prism Enterprises Ltd  	
Argus Aggregates Ltd. _	
Contract 9: Florence Pit near Boston Bar:
D.M.J. Construction Ltd 	
Ptarmigan Gravel Ltd  	
F.W.P. Construction Ltd _	
177,196.20
193,893.00
238,576.40
260,682.00
37,600.00
39,200.00
41,000.00
54,400.00
71,200.00
104,400.00
31,800.00
37,050.00
53,700.00
72,340.00
78,430.00
78,520.00
98,760.00
98,880.00
122,390.00
157,090.00
44,940.00
45,300.00
48,840.00
58,200.00
65,400.00
67,200.00
99,000.00
49,200.00
50,000.00
51,800.00
55,800.00
59,900.00
76,000.00
92,400.00
137,000.00
Surcharge removal, crushed
granular surfacing, asphalt
concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Crushed   granular   surfacing   in
stockpile.
Awarded.
Crushed   granular   surfacing   in
stockpile.
Awarded.
Crushed   granular   surfacing   in
stockpile.
Awarded.
85,000.00
143,800.00
124,400.00
187,000.00
67,200.00
70,500.00
78,349.80
95,100.00
149,400.00
65,000.00
73,500.00
77,500.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
81,200.00    | Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
 B 94                     HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
Miscellaneous—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project 3021—Continued
Contract 9: Florence Pit near Boston Bar—Continued
$
82,500.00
93,500X0
97,000.00
90,400.00
94,400.00
58,750.00
67,500.00
70,750.00
140,300.00
155,300.00
92,500.00
102,200.00
194,000.00
206,300.00
145,800.00
172,620.00
192,493.00
207,911.00
163,900.00
170.800.00
184,125.00
198.238.00
265,011.00
58,000.00
65,500.00
69.000.00
69,500.00
87,500.00
47,500.00
49,000.00
64,500.00
65,500.00
74,200.00
100,500.00
51,600.00
53,400.00
66,000.00
67,200.00
81,600.00
96,000.00
102,000.00
49.500.00
62,500.00
63,000.00
78.500.00
97,500.00
49.000.00    '
57,500.00
72,200.00
106,500.00    |
1
Awarded.
No bids received.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Contract 10: Moha Pit, Lillooet-Bralorne Road:
F.W.P. Construction Ltd.   .               	
Contract 11: Border Pit, near Rossland:
Contract 12: Logan Lake East Pit on Meadow Creek Road:
F.W.P. Construction Ltd	
Contract 13: Jackfish Pit, near Chetwynd and East Pine
Pit, Mile 214, John Hart Highway:
F.W P. Construction Ltd.. .              	
Contract 14: Patnode Pit, near Dawson Creek:
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd -	
Contract 15: Moore, Leahy, and Imperial Pits, near Fort
St. John:
F.W.P. Construction Ltd.    .               	
Contract 16: Carson Pit, near Quesnel:
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd.	
F.W.P. Construction Ltd	
Contract 17: Hangmans Pit, near Quesnel:
F.W.P. Construction Ltd.	
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd. -	
Argus Aggregates Ltd	
Contract 18:  Morris Valley Pit on Morris Valley Road
north of Lougheed Highway:
F.W.P. Construction Ltd -	
Goodbrand Construction Ltd.....   —	
D.M.J. Construction Ltd	
Contract 19: Annis Pit, near Salmon Arm:
D.M.J. Construction Ltd....	
Salmon Arm Products, Division of Wildwood Enterprises
Ltd	
F.W.P. Construction Ltd. ..	
Contract 20: Dumont Pit, Dumont Road off Island Highway:
Butler Bros. Supplies Ltd.    	
W.K. Crushing Ltd	
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd	
Contract 22: Bryson Pit, Lillooet-Cache Creek Highway:
W.K. Crushing Ltd	
F.W.P. Construction Ltd -	
Argus Aggregates Ltd.	
Contract 23: Bundus Pit, Sicamous area:
 CONTRACT STATISTICS
Miscellaneous—Continued
B 95
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project 3021—Continued
Contract 24: Horel Pit, Saltspring Island:
$
46,800.00
58,200.00
59,760.00
65,760.00
83,760.00
23,950.00
30,997.33
41,000.00
54,400.00
59,897.00
68,724.00
25,965.00
33,800.00
48,400.00
90,500.00
26,485.20
35,036.65
36,564.83
36,681.60
43,335.00
47,695.92
67,415.58
87,400.00
6,606.00
Delta Rock Ltd	
W.K. Crushing Ltd	
Webb & Trace Ltd             	
Project 3126—Fort Nelson to Fort Simpson Highway, Mile
19 to Mile 25.5 (6.5 miles):
Disposal   of  material   on   right-
of-way.
Project 3137—Contract 1: Trans-Canada Highway, Pike Road
Interchange to C Street Overhead at Abbotsford:
Jeckway Landscaping Ltd	
Landscape development.
Awarded.
Project E-7654—George Massey Tunnel, Richmond:
Closed-circuit television system.
R.C.A. Ltd	
A.D.T. Security Systems, B.C. District Telegraph Co. Ltd
Creative House Ltd _	
Project M^9—Deas maintenance facility:
Gas piping.
The Dawson Creek Highways District bridge crew in action on the construction of the
Siegart Bridge. The structure consists of two 19-foot pile trestle-timber spans and one 30-foot
concrete box-stringer span. The bridge is constructed over the Tupper River and serves the
farm settlement area of Gundy.
 B 96 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
REGIONAL REPORTS
REGION 1
(P. J. Carr, Regional Highway Engineer, Burnaby)
North Vancouver, Gibsons, New Westminster, and Chilliwack Highway Districts
North Vancouver District
Roads
Maintenance—Unusual weather patterns resulted in maintenance throughout
the year being oriented to what is generally considered summer activities. Precipitation, both in the form of rain and snow, was well below average. Consequently,
winter activities, such as snow ploughing, sanding, and salting were greatly reduced.
Also, flood conditions were experienced, and related drainage problems, to the
magnitude that would normally be expected.
The mild winter allowed diversion of some funds normally spent on snow
removal to general improvements, such as major regravelling of the Upper Squamish
Valley Road, and some shoulder upgrading and paving on Garibaldi Highway 99.
Also, an extensive machine-brushing program was undertaken throughout the district along with a major hand-brushing program to improve sight distance on curves
along Garibaldi Highway 99 between Horseshoe Bay and Britannia.
Through the summer months considerable time was spent on major asphalt
patching on Garibaldi Highway 99 in the Garibaldi to Whistler area in an effort to
preserve the rapidly deteriorating pavement until complete resurfacing is undertaken.
A large rockslide occurred in August on Garibaldi Highway 99 at Windy
Point north of Horseshoe Bay. The highway was blocked for a time and a large
retaining wall was extensively damaged. The wall was rebuilt by the district bridge
crew. During the latter two months of the fiscal year, extensive rockscaling on the
high bluffs was undertaken on the Horseshoe Bay to Britannia section of Highway
99. Also, as an extension to the minor betterment program, several pull-out lanes
for slow-moving vehicles were constructed and paved along this section of highway.
Snowfall was light in all areas of the district, averaging 12 cm total at North
Vancouver, 65 cm total at Squamish, 264 cm total at Whistler, and 132 cm total at
Pemberton.
Construction—The construction season was considerably longer this year than
normal due to mild winter conditions. Work on Garibaldi Highway 99 between
Garibaldi and Mons continued relatively uninterrupted most of the year. This is a
continuing project consisting of widening and grade and alignment improvements
in preparation for paving.
Work also carried on through most of the year on the reconstruction of Pemberton Portage Road, White Creek to Poole Creek section. This is also a continuing
project consisting of widening and minor alignment changes.
Slope stabilization and bin wall construction were completed on the second
phase of the Suicide Hill project on Garibaldi Highway 99 south of Pemberton.
This project, undertaken to resolve a rock-fall problem, will continue in 1977.
Approximately one-half the length of the project of near vertical slopes were stabilized with shotcrete and over the remaining section a catchment area to contain the
slough from the slopes was created by moving the road away from the slope.   The
 REGIONAL REPORTS B 97
work completed to date has effectively resolved the hazardous aspects and greatly
reduced the maintenance that was caused through erosion and the falling of large
boulders onto the travelled surface of the road.
Smaller projects undertaken in the district consisted of base strengthening and
repaving of 1.5 miles of the Pemberton Meadows Road, construction of a right-turn
lane on Taylor Way at Trans-Canada Highway 1, and the installation of a concrete
crib wall at Capilano River to accommodate a future alignment revision west of the
bridge. Also, median barrier was installed from Taylor Way through to Lloyd
Avenue on the Trans-Canada Highway 1 and on Marine Drive from Capilano Road
to the underpass on the First Narrows Bridge approach.
Bridges and Ferry-landings
Several treated timber bridges on Garibaldi Highway 99 between Horseshoe
Bay and Britannia were stripped of their deteriorated asphalt surfaces, the laminated
decks patched and renailed, and new asphalt surfaces applied. These bridges also
had new railing installed.
Ryan Bridge, on the Pemberton Meadows Road, was strengthened on the span
section and completely redecked. On the Squamish Valley Road the Pilchuck
Bridge was condemned and a Bailey bridge installed in its place as a temporary
measure until a new bridge can be built. Deck strengthening of the log-stringer
span on Rubble Creek Bridge, on Highway 99 at Garibaldi, was done as a temporary
measure until it is replaced with a new structure that is currently being planned.
The less severe weather conditions this year did not result in flood situations severe
enough to cause any substructure damage or large log jams that normally can be
expected in many areas of this district.
Buildings
Exhaust fans were installed in the Squamish and North Vancouver maintenance yards and a protective roof to carry heavy snow loads was constructed over
the foreman's mobile home in the yard site at Alta Lake.   No major work was done
on the other facilities in the district this year.
Gibsons District
Roads
Maintenance—Normal maintenance was carried on throughout the district with
the major activities being ditching, brushing, patching, and gravelling. Winter maintenance was below average and few problems were encountered with flooding. About
3.2 miles of side roads were roadmixed in the minor betterment program. Other
minor betterments included a brushing program, extra ditching programs, and a
reshouldering program.
Construction—A very wet summer hampered our construction program to
some extent but the majority of projects were completed. Pratt Road was widened
and paved, Twin Creeks Road, Field Road, and a portion of Browning Road were
reconstructed. Widening of Garden Bay Road was started and eight old wooden
box-culverts were replaced on Highway 101 in the Powell River area.
Bridges
No. 7831 Anderson Bridge and No. 7383 Phillips Bridge were replaced with
pile abutments and timber and steel stringers respectively.   Both have treated timber
decks.
Buildings
A minimum of maintenance was carried out by Public Works.
 B 98 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
New Westminster District
Roads
Maintenance—Winter activities were kept to a minimum owing to the above-
average temperature and below-average precipitation during the winter months,
resulting in very active minor betterment and day labour programs. All roads were
maintained to a reasonable standard with emphasis on bringing the mowing, brushing, signing, and ditching up to a uniform requirement within the district.
Weeding, replanting, and bark mulching were continued at Knight Street
Bridge.
Construction—The grade construction was completed on Westminster Highway
from Knight Street to No. 5 Road and turned over to the Construction Branch for
completion.
Reconstruction and paving of Sunnyside Road was completed after a three-
year program.
Reconstruction of Belcarra Bay Road was undertaken with intersection to
Salish Road and Turtle Head Road.
One mile of curb and gutter was constructed on Marine Drive at UBC.
Road base repair and repaving of Sprott Street and Highway 1 were completed.
Fifty-one miles of shoulder on Highway 1, 22 miles of shoulder on Highway 99,
and 16 miles of shoulder on Highway 99a were reshaped and stabilized by flush
coating.
Intersection improvements were carried out at Highway 1a and 144th Street,
Highway 1a at 216th Street, Highway 10 and King George VI Highway 99a,
Highway 7 and Dewdney Trunk, Highway 7 and Gaglardi Way, Sea Island Way
and No. 3 Road, St. John's Street and Moody, Steveston Highway and Highway 99,
Highway 10 and Cloverdale Bypass, Highway 1a and 232nd Street, Highway 1a
and 264th Street.
Traffic signals and lighting were installed at Highway 1a and Highway 15,
Highway 1a and Highway 13, Highway 10 and Highway 15, Highway 15 and 60th
Avenue, Highway 99a and 80th Avenue, Highway 15 and 96th Avenue (red flasher),
Gaglardi Way and Broadway Extension, Kensington Avenue and Sprott Street.
Installation of 27-inch and 30-inch guardrail and inertial barriers was continued
on Highway 1 at bridge piers between Cassiar Street and the Port Mann Bridge.
Television cameras were installed in the George Massey Tunnel for complete
visual surveillance of the tunnel roadway by the Control Tower operators.
Bridges
Major concrete redecking was undertaken on Highway 1 at First Avenue,
Sprott Street, Deer Lake, and Willingdon. Also on King George VI Highway at
Bear Creek. Concrete slope stabilization was completed under Knight Street Bridge.
Expansion joint repairs have been initiated on the Oak Street Bridge. Weigh-scale
pit and approaches were rebuilt at the Port Mann and Massey Tunnel weigh-scales
for the Ministry of Energy, Transport and Communications.
A large quonset hut was moved from Mission to Cloverdale and re-erected
for centreline paint storage. A 50-foot lunchroom trailer was provided at Cloverdale
for mechanics.
A number of small out-buildings in the Oak Street yard were demolished and
the yard cleared of debris.
Ferries
Both the Albion and Barnston Island ferries operated as per their schedule.
The Mainland landing of the Barnston Island ferry was rebuilt. Redecking of four
spans of the south approach ramp to the Albion ferry was completed.
 REGIONAL REPORTS B 99
Chilltwack District
Roads
Maintenance—District roads were well maintained throughout the year. Approximately 21 miles of ditches were cleaned. Roadside areas were brushed and
mowed to the required standard. Daily pickup of litter and clean-up of rest areas
was carried out during the summer months, and as necessary for the remainder of
the year. Oil was applied to 15 miles of gravel road to control dust, and sign
maintenance was of a good standard.
Construction—Reconstruction of 1.6 miles of Sylvester Road was completed
and an additional 1.4 miles started. Hemlock Valley Road reconstruction continued.
Construction of 0.7 mile of frontage roads was undertaken in Abbotsford Municipality, and a revision to Highway 11 Interchange on the Trans-Canada Highway 1
was completed. Left-turn slots were constructed on Yale Road West at Hocking
Avenue and Airport Road. Left-turn slots were completed on the Lougheed Highway 7 at Manson Road and Sylvester Road. Reconstruction of 0.60 mile of Sumas
Mountain Road was completed.
Surfacing
District crews paved over 6 miles of road, recapped 1 mile, and paved 2.45
miles of shoulder. In addition, approximately 5 miles of pavement were recapped
under a district contract.
Snow Removal
Snowfall was considerably below average. District roads were sanded and
ploughed when necesary, and kept in good condition.
Bridges
The district constructed a 120-foot-long bridge over the Sumas River as part
of the Trans-Canada Highway 1 frontage road system in Abbotsford Municipality.
A district contract was called for driving the piles, and the remainder of the bridge
was erected by the district bridge crew. Cooper Bridge and Sharp Bridge were
completely reconstructed. Hemlock Valley Bridge 3 was widened, and several
timber bridges were redecked.
REGION 2
(R. G. White, Regional Highway Engineer, Kamloops)
Kamloops, Salmon Arm, Vernon, Penticton, Merritt, Lillooet, 100 Mile House,
Williams Lake, and Kelowna Highway Districts
Kamloops District
Roads
Maintenance—Severe spring break-up on the older paved surfaces of the
Yellowhead Highway 5 and Westsyde Road required an above-average amount of
hand and machine patching. Shoulder gravelling on the first 2 miles of the Kamloops to Merritt section of Highway 5 was a priority item as was the resurfacing of
two pieces of the Lac Le Jeune Road.
Extensive flooding was encountered in the early summer and resulted in the
loss of minor bridges and some gravel road in the Leone Creek area of Barriere.
 B  100 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
The Thuyea Creek slide caused the loss of approximately 200 feet of the Yellowhead Highway 5, 17 miles north of Barriere, and several minor slides in the district
required immediate attention by the maintenance crews.
Winter snowfall was less than average and no major problems arose in snow
clearing operations.
Construction—Upgrading of the Trans-Canada Highway 1 by the addition
of truck passing lanes at Cherry Creek and Six Mile Hill was the main undertaking
of the major day labour program; however, reconstruction work was carried out
on the Bridge Lake Road, the Clearwater Valley Road, and the McLure Flats area
of the Yellowhead Highway 5.
Bridges
An above average run-off in early summer required the constant attention of
the bridge crew in clearing debris from bridge piling. Extensive repairs were
required on the Vavenby Bridge, and the Candle Creek 2 and Spahats Creek
bridges were eliminated.
Ferries
No major problems were encountered in the operations of the McLure and
Little Fort ferries; however, the landings required excessive maintenance mainly
due to the high-water encountered.
Salmon Arm District
Roads
Maintenance—Routine maintenance was carried out in all areas of the district.
Major improvements to note are 26.4 miles of road regravelled, 55.8 miles of road
oiled (dust control), 9.1 miles of drainage ditch improvements, and 4.6 miles of
road widened.
Construction—Reconstruction of 66.51 miles of road was carried out with
the following breakdown: 18.9 miles of road sealcoated; 23.5 miles roadmixed;
22.1 miles of road widening, diversion, guardrail, gravelling, and ditching; and 2.0
miles of road right-of-way cleared.
Snow Removal
Normal snow conditions prevailed throughout the district. All roads in
district were kept open and good driving conditions prevailed.
Bridges
General maintenance was carried out on all bridges. A total of three bridges
was reconstructed. Sicamous Bridge 606 had two 40-foot-long spans replaced by
one 80-foot steel span. Simm's Creek Bridge 6722 was relocated and reconstructed
after being destroyed by flood.
This year saw the introduction of the Maintenance Management Materials
system which is showing control on our stock system. Also introduced was the
Equipment Management system which is progressing as planned. Maintenance
Management system is progressing well with some good results.
Vernon District
Roads
Maintenance—Spring break-up resulted in an extensive patching program,
particularly on Highway 97 and the Vernon-Slocan Highway 6 east of Lumby.
 REGIONAL REPORTS B  101
Two minor paving contracts supervised by the district restored comfortable driving
to the above roads.
A cool, wet summer prevailed, particularly the month of August when heavy
rains caused minor flooding and washouts in the Enderby-Mabel Lake area. High-
water on the Shuswap continued well into the month of September.
Increased day labour and minor betterment projects kept district forces very
active throughout the late summer, fall, and winter.
Subdivision activity in the North Okanagan-Shuswap continued. The Vernon
office processed 171 tentative subdivisions, 134 final subdivisions, 39 land use
contract and rezoning applications, as well as 582 permits were issued for work
on Crown land.
The roadside development plant in Vernon, operated by the district, produced
2,520 lineal feet of 18-inch no-post guardrail and 7,024 lineal feet of 27-inch
no-post guardrail. Fifty-four terrazzo-finished concrete picnic tables and 18 toilets
were manufactured for various roadside rest stops throughout the Province. A
total of 8,220 lineal feet of binwall was manufactured to be utilized on Highway 97
between Vernon and Oyama.
Construction—Reconstruction continued at Mile 9.5 on the Enderby-Mabel
Lake Road. Rock and poor soils resulted in a considerable expense to bypass a
dangerous section of the road to Mabel Lake. Reconstruction of the Westside
Road resulted in the section from Whiteman Creek (Mile 12.45) to Ewings Landing
(Mile 17.95) completed and ready for paving, and Ewings Landing to the Fintry
Delta Road (Mile 21.15) reconstructed. Clearing was completed from Fintry to
Nahun at Mile 24.5. A new route through the Nahun Bluffs is being surveyed for
reconstruction in late 1977. Reconstruction of the Sugar Lake Road in the Upper
Shuswap Valley continued. A new gravel pit at Mile 1.9 was cleared and grubbed
for the new construction. Many narrow sections of the Creighton Valley Road east
of Lumby were widened and improved. Rock work to widen poor sections of the
Lumby-Mabel Lake, Trinity Valley, and Inch Logan Roads was completed. A
number of side roads in the Enderby, Vernon, and Cherryville area were extensively
gravelled.
New intersections of Highway 97a northeast of Armstrong and at Larkin in
the Spallumcheen Municipality were completed.
District forces commenced widening for three- and four-laning sections of Highways 97 and 97a at Oyama, O'Keefes, and Armstrong. Widening and improving
of Highway 97a from Grindrod to Mara Lake was carried out by district forces in
preparation for a resurfacing contract from Grindrod to Sicamous.
Surfacing
A small contract was called to pave Herry and Cools Roads in the L and A
area north of Vernon. District forces undertook a sealcoating program completing
4.42 miles in the Enderby and East Vernon areas.
Snow Removal
Snowfall throughout the district was well below average. Milder than nomal
temperatures tended to create icing conditions, requiring a high use of salt.
Bridges
District bridges were inspected and maintained as required. Baxter Bridge
over the Shuswap River on Trinity Valley Road was redecked, including the replacement of floor beams on the twin-howe trusses.    The Cherryville Bridge on the
 B  102 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
North Fork Road was reconstructed, replacing the last King Truss in the district
with a pre-stressed precasted box-stringer span. Butters Bridge on the Lumby-
Mabel Lake Road was redecked. Bridge site plans were prepared for Jones Creek
and Lumby Bridges within the Village of Lumby on the Vernon—Slocan Highway 6.
Penticton District
Roads
Maintenance—The year 1976/77 was a relatively uneventful one with the
exception of increasing construction activity at the end.
The 1976 spring freshets on the Similkameen and Okanagan Systems was
nominal and only minor bank protection work was carried out.
Very light snowfalls during the 1976/77 winter permitted a high level of
normal maintenance activities which is something not usually experienced, particularly in the Allison Pass and other mountainous areas.
The Maintenance Management system was fully integrated into district maintenance during the year and many benefits are anticipated.
Construction—Work was accelerated in the latter part of the year and significant progress was made in major construction work between Hedley and Keremeos and on the Hope-Princeton Highway. Highway 3a between Highway 97
Junction and Yellow Lake was also placed under four-lane construction.
Highway 3a from Yellow Lake to the Highway 97 Junction was also well
advanced in three- and four-lane construction.
The minor betterment program resulted in many additional maintenance improvements in all foreman areas.
General maintenance concentrated on improving drainage and ditches in all
areas and regravelling of shoulders as required.
Bridges
District bridge crews completed construction of a bridge at Allison Creek on
Highway 5. This was the last of the structures to be repaired after the 1972 floods.
Buildings
Alterations commenced to the existing personnel building at Allison Pass to
provide a proper assembly area for road crew.
Merritt District
Roads
Maintenance—Considerable emphasis was given to upgrading district side
roads, with many minor relocations and a heavy gravelling program being carried
out. Notable among these were sections of the Silver Skagit, Tunkwa Lake, Penask,
and Coalmont Roads. Pavement deterioration resulted in an above-average patching requirement on Highway 3 and Highway 5, south of Merritt.
Considerable machine brushing was undertaken, particularly in the Fraser
and Thompson Canyon areas and the rocksealing program to reduce the danger
from fallen rock in the Fraser Canyon continued.
Despite a wetter than normal summer, the demand for dust-control measures
increased.   Knapweed control spraying was given a good deal of emphasis.
Due to an exceptionally light winter, considerable savings were possible in
snow removal costs.
 REGIONAL REPORTS
B  103
i
1 Constructing four-laning Trans-Canada Highway 1, Project 3026, winter 1976, Gladwin section.
2 Gabion Wall installed at Mile 197, Trans-Canada Highway, Fraser Canyon. Wall was
installed for protection to the traffic from falling rock and also to act as a storage area for an
avalanche path zone.
3 Removal of the king truss No. 6556 Stein Bridge by the Merritt District bridge crew.
4 No. 6556 Stein Bridge 110 feet of standard width double-single Bailey.
 B  104                   HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
A washing program was initiated in the Fraser Canyon tunnels to improve
the level of illumination and aesthetics.
Construction—A large program of passing lane construction was undertaken
in the Fraser and Thompson Canyon sections of Highway 1.   Six lane-miles were
completed, including paving, and a further 17 miles were constructed ready for
paving.   A similar program of shoulder widening and passing lane construction
was carried out on Highway 3 east of Hope.
Upgrading of Highway 8, Spences Bridge-Merritt continued as did 17 Cold-
water Road.   Upgrading and pulvimix paving of 173 Highland Valley Road was
completed.
Bridges
A comprehensive program of bridge maintenance was undertaken.    Stein
River Bridge, an old king truss, was replaced by a double-single Bailey bridge.
Repair work to Nicomen Creek Bridge on Highway 1 was completed.
Ferries
Normal service was maintained throughout the year on both the North Bend
aerial ferry and the Lytton reaction ferry.   A contract was awarded for fabrication of new towers and accessories for the Lytton ferry and this work is to be completed next year.
'■>...                                                                                     '   *=|- '■ - %f*r
Minor betterment on 65 Petit Creek Road, Merritt Highways District.   Blasting of 800 feet
of rock to widen existing road from 10 feet to 20 feet in width.
 REGIONAL REPORTS
B  105
Before blasting on 65 Petit Creek Road.
After the blast and cleanup on 65 Petit Creek Road.
 b 106 highways and public works report, 1976/77
Lillooet District
Roads
Maintenance—In the Lillooet foreman area, over 10 miles of the Lillooet-
Pioneer Road 40 had catch roads and embankments cleaned up prior to a surfacing
project. Three miles of the Texas Creek Road were straightened out to facilitate
large house trailer moves in this area. One mile of the Lillooet-Cache Creek Highway 12 was also straightened out, along with brushing out and reditching of back
roads.
In the Ashcroft foreman area, 2 miles of the Hat Creek Road were widened
and straightened along with 1 mile of the Loon Lake Road having ditching done
through a heavy rock cut. The old Cariboo highway within Cache Creek had
several rock points taken out. Reshouldering and reditching were carried out on
some 14 miles of the Cariboo Highway 97.
In the Goldbridge foreman area, reditching, clearing of catch roads, and
brushing out were carried out. Several hundred feet of guardrail were placed on
narrow spots on the Bralorne Road 40.
Construction—Two miles of the Lytton-Lillooet Highway 12 were reconstructed 4 miles south of Lillooet to straighten out some sharp curves, 3.5 miles of
the Lillooet-Cache Creek road were reconstructed in the vicinity of Pavilion Lake,
along with a further mile near Sallus Creek. An extensive regravelling project was
carried out on a 10-mile stretch of road near Mission Dam on the Lillooet-Pioneer
Road 40.
Five miles of the Gun Lake Road were reconstructed which necessitated some
rock work adjacent to summer homes, making for careful blasting.
In the Ashcroft-Loon Lake foreman's area, 3 miles of the Loon Lake road
have been reconstructed, 2 miles of this over completely new territory, the other
mile being along Loon Lake, which included widening the present road. One-half
mile of new connecting road was built to a subdivision road at Cache Creek, along
with another mile of subdivision road at the southeast end of Barnes Lake Road in
the Highland Valley.
Surfacing
One-half mile of hotmix was placed on a Cache Creek subdivision road, with
blademix being placed on 1 mile of the Loon Lake Road and also 1 mile of the
Lillooet-Cache Creek Road.
One mile of blademix was laid on the Lytton-Lillooet Highway 12, 4 miles
south of Lillooet.
Snow Removal
Snow amounts were approximately half the average throughout the Lillooet
District. However, a fair amount of chemicals were used on the Trans-Canada-
Cariboo Highway, and Highland Valley roads, due to sudden icing conditions in
these areas.
Bridges
Bridges throughout the Lillooet District were kept in good repair, with a comprehensive paint program being maintained.
Ferries
The reaction ferry at Big Bar was taken over by 100 Mile House District,
although temporarily under maintenance by the Lillooet bridge crew.
 REGIONAL REPORTS B 107
100 Mile House District
Roads
The 100 Mile House Highway District was enlarged by the addition of the
Clinton foreman area, which was formerly in the Lillooet Highway District. The
area included 492 miles of road, eight bridges, and a reaction ferry across the Fraser
River at Big Bar. The Clinton yardsite consists of a four-bay equipment shed and
a 12 by 60-foot Atco rental trailer which is used for an assembly room and foreman's office. There is also one regular and one auxiliary mechanic that are under
the direction of the mechanic foreman at 100 Mile House. The district office at
100 Mile House also was relocated to new premises in the Provincial centre, within
the Village of 100 Mile House, the former general office, located at the yardsite, was
converted to a foreman's office and assembly room for the maintenance crew.
Maintenance—Normal maintenance on all roads was carried out with emphasis being placed on ditching, brushing, culvert installations, and gravelling on numerous side roads. A below-normal snowfall and above-average temperatures
throughout the winter permitted minor betterments and improv r .>♦« to be carried
out throughout the winter; however, in 1976, due to inclement (n. .er which
resulted in above-average moisture content and high-water tables, spring break-up
in 1977 has been severe.
Construction—Major reconstruction under day labour programs continued on
Highway 24, 93 Mile to Little Fort for 7 miles; 371, Horse Lake for 2.5 miles and
89, Green Lake North for 6 miles. Also, base gravelling was completed on Highway
24 from Mile 6.9 to Mile 13.85 and on 371, Horse Lake from Mile 11.05 to Mile
12.3. About 20.5 miles of roads were upgraded under a minor betterment program
as follows: Road 221, Watch Lake, 3.5 miles; 104, Green Lake South, 1.0 mile;
162, North Bonaparte, 1.0 mile; 355, Lone Butte-Horse Lake, 1.4 miles; 332,
Eagle Creek, 2.0 miles; 386, North Bonaparte, 0.4 mile; 7, 70 Mile Frontage,
0.4 mile; 620, Hendrix, 1.5 miles; 551, Eagan Lake, 2.5 miles; 319, Mahood Lake,
5.3 miles; 547, Judson, 1.0 mile; and 457, Knight Lake, 0.5 mile. Sealcoating of
Cariboo Highway 97, south of 100 Mile House, was completed to 61 Mile by the
regional sealcoating crew; also 13 miles of Cariboo Highway 97, north of 100 Mile
House to Lac la Hache, was repaved under contract by H. R. Williamson Blacktop
and Landscaping Ltd.
Bridges
Two timber bridges were replaced; McNeil, on the Cabbage Road, and Red
Creek, on the Mahood Lake Road; also two new timber bridges were constructed;
Muskrat, on Mahood Lake Road, and Pressy, over man-made channel, on Rayfield
Road. Repairs were also carried out on Buffalo Creek, Houseman, and Ladoucier
Bridges.
Ferries
The Big Bar ferry was in continuous operation to December 22, 1976, at which
time it was taken out of service for winter storage. The ferry was again relaunched
on April 28, 1977. Also, a new aerial cage was installed on December 21, 1976,
for use during winter and high water.
Williams Lake District
Roads
Maintenance—The beginning of the fiscal year was a busy time for the Williams
Lake District crews, as many of the creeks and streams were full to overflowing.
 B 108 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
Emergency Bailey bridging and log-stringer bridging was required on five different
roads. A repeat of the same performance was experienced in the first week in
August when another four roads required emergency bridging as a result of continued
heavy rainfall. Considerable riprap was required to protect the highway where the
Bella Coola River was washing away embankment materials.
Summer maintenance was routine, as wet weather was predominant so that
surface grading was more profitable than in dry years with smoother road surfaces,
as a result. It was dry enough though, at times, to require dust layer applications to
over 20 miles of road.
The need for litter pick-up has again increased, as has the repair and replacement of signs damaged by vandals.
Winter maintenance was the least problematic that could be remembered for
many years. There was little precipitation and minimal snow accumulation so that
the roads were kept in good travel condition all winter.
Construction—It was a busy and a profitable year in this district for construction and reconstruction of roads. Over 52 miles were completed on the Chilcotin-
Bella Coola River and on Likely, Dog Creek, Valley, Beaver Valley, Horsefly,
Upper Horsefly, Chimney Lake, Kinglet, Grant, Brothen, Dorsey, Lehman, and
Bond Lake Roads.
Another 117 miles of roads were cleared, widened, and gravelled. Some of
these roads were Big Creek, McKenzie Avenue South, Canoe Creek, Knife Creek,
Moon, Chezacut, Taseko, Spokin Lake, Alexis Lake, and Walker Park Roads.
Plantmix asphalt was applied to the Chilcotin, Soda Creek, and Dog Creek
Roads; also, on McKenzie Avenue, Second Avenue, Maple Street, and Pine Street
in Glendale, for a total of 7.9 miles of new surface.
Bridges
This year's bridge construction program included the construction of five new
bridges, namely, Pigeon, Pelican, Holtry 2, Egolf, and Holt Creek. The following
nine bridges were completely rebuilt: Bambrick 2, Big Lake, Blenkinsop, Choate
Creek, Morrison, Patenaude, Grant 1, Grant 2, and Low.
Several other bridges in the district were repaired or redecked during the year.
Two problematic bridges were removed and replaced by constructed road
this year. One of these, being the old boardwalk between Shearwater and New
Bella Bella, the other a 322-foot-long pile trestle between Martin Valley and Ocean
Falls.
Kelowna District
Roads
Maintenance—The Ministry of Highways and Public Works was once again
providing maintenance to all roads within the new boundaries of the City of Kelowna.
Complaints from residents with regard to maintenance problems on the whole are
decreasing. Those complaints that are received are investigated and appropriate
action taken.
Continual growth on the west side of Okanagan Lake and in the Faulder area
near Summerland has put additional strain on our Westbank crew who try to meet
the residents' demands.
Due to the extremely wet summer, many area roads did not get treated with
a dust palliative. However, in the warm autumn, approximately 28 miles of road
surface were treated.
 REGIONAL REPORTS
B  109
Flooding did not present an appreciable problem to the district in 1976/77.
However, during the freshette period, routine patrols of all creeks were activated.
The district constructed a trash rack on Rabbit Creek and did some channel work
on Mission Creek to attempt to alleviate future flooding problems.
Construction—The year 1976/77 was an active one for the district, constructing or reconstructing a total of 19 miles of road and, at the same time, placing
190,132 square yards of bituminous surfacing on 20 miles of road. The major
projects involved were paving of Okanagan Centre and Lodge Roads in the Winfield area; reconstruction and paving of Anderson Road in the Ellison area; reconstruction and paving of McCulloch Road in the City of Kelowna. In the Westbank,
area, sundry urban roads were paved along with reconstruction of Westside Road,
Fish Lake Road, and Bald Range Road. Boucherie and Gellatly Roads were completely reconstructed and paved with hotmix asphalt. Along Route 97, the district
added 8-inch shoulders on the Summerland Hill section and paved the centreline
median on the four-lane divided section within the boundaries of the City of Kelowna.
Snow Removal
The winter of 1976/77 was an extremely mild winter. However, all district
roads were maintained on a three-shift basis from December 1, 1976, to March 1,
1977. Due to the mild winter, the district was able to stock a considerable amount
of winter sand for future use. In general, the district received very few complaints
with regard to our winter maintenance program.
Bridges
The district bridge crew carried out routine maintenance on all district bridges
and also reconstructed three bridges, two of which were paid for by district funds:
No. 6019 McDougal Creek and No. 6184 Canyon Creek. One bridge No. 7802
Trout Creek was done by capital funds. Okanagan Lake bridge continues to be
the large expenditure for district funds.
REGION 3
(W. M. Sproul, Regional Highway Engineer, Nelson)
Nelson, Rossland, Grand Forks, New Denver, Cranbrook, Fernie, Golden,
Revelstoke, and Creston Highway Districts
Nelson District
Roads
Maintenance—Spring run-off was moderate, creating no flooding problems.
Dust control again was carried out on district side roads using liquid calcium
chloride, oil, or M & F stabilizer. Sand screening took place throughout the spring
and summer. Weather was very wet until late August, severely hampering district
paving activities. An open fall and winter followed, allowing considerable side road
improvement work to be carried out, ditching, and gravelling. Snowfall was very
light, reflected in a low demand for snow ploughing and sanding, with greatly
reduced quantities of material being used.
Construction—Work continued on reconstruction of the road access to Whitewater being completed to a pit-run gravel grade.  About 0.4 mile of Highway 3a
 B  110 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
at Longbeach Bluffs was widened and the alignment improved. A total of 4.0 miles
of Pass Creek Road terminating at the district boundary was prepared for paving
in 1977. An existing fill at Taghum was widened and brought up to grade to provide better access to Blewett area. Two miles of district side road were reconstructed. Shoulder widening was commenced on Highway 3 west of Salmo. Two
thousand feet of type A guardrail were installed on Highway 3a at Beazley.
Bridges
A number of truss members were replaced in Winlaw Bridge, bringing it up to
legal highway loading. A new bridge was constructed over Cedar Creek to allow
new access to Winlaw yard. The bridge over Cedar Creek on Highway 6 was
replaced by a multiplate culvert, and a new concrete deck was placed on the Pedro
Creek Bridge. The king truss over Erie Creek at Salmo was replaced with a double-
single Bailey bridge.
Buildings
Extension and modification of the district office building was commenced in
January.
Ferries
Glade, Harrop-Longbeach, and Kootenay Lake ferries ran throughout the
year, traffic increasing on all routes. A major program of upgrading was carried
out on MV Balfour, during the spring and fall. The West Creston ferry barge was
brought into Nelson for modification, including provision of new steel aprons.
Three dolphins at Kootenay Bay landing were replaced with new timber piling.
Rossland District
Roads
Maintenance—Subdivision activity, permits, rezoning application, and similar
activities continued to place a heavy work load on technical and administrative
personnel, with a diminishing amount of time available for supervision, planning,
and preparing surveys and estimates for upcoming projects or minor betterments.
There is also an increasing demand for meetings with the many groups and
organizations that go hand in hand with the growth of small communities—improvement districts, municipal councils, etc.
Employees in the operational component were also busily engaged in trying
to meet the pressures applied by an ever increasing demand for services. Some
difficulty was experienced in endeavouring to meet maintenance management standards and stay within the budget for some activities. We still feel that a little more
consideration should be given for establishing unique planning values as opposed
to regional and Provincial values.
Construction—A crew was kept busy during the summer months constructing
14,000 lineal feet of 27-inch no-post guardrail for use within the region. A total
of 6,500 feet of this material was used to replace 18-inch guardrail and on other
high index areas within the district. Concrete bases were also poured for davit
and lamp standards for use within the region.
Two miles of Pass Creek Road were reconstructed to a high standard in preparation for paving next year. Several short roads were roadmixed and 6 miles of
Casino Road were pulvimixed in conjunction with the Headquarters crew.
 REGIONAL REPORTS B  111
Bridges
One new bridge was constructed on a new site and many bridges received
normal repairs but the bridge maintenance program suffered to some extent as
the crew were required to construct a two-bay equipment building in the Rossland
yard, thereby occupying the four-man crew for many hours.
Ferries
It was rather disappointing to encounter several difficulties with the new power
train in the Castlegar ferry and also to find that measures taken to secure the ramps
proved unsatisfactory. Serious consideration must now be given to replacement
of the ramps using a totally different design to accommodate rapidly fluctuating
water levels.
Grand Forks District
Roads
Maintenance—Under the minor betterment program, brushing and landscaping
was continued along Highway 3 improving visibility. Minor roads were widened
and gravelled under the program in all foreman areas. Shoulders were widened
on 5 miles of Highway 3 east of Christina Lake. Various portions of Highway 3
in the Grand Forks foreman area and Highway 33 required extensive patching.
Shoulder widening continued on Highway 33. Snowfall was light over the winter
with no run-off problems.
Construction—Reconstruction and gravelling were completed on approximately 15 miles of side roads with Headquarters crews pulvimixing approximately
12 miles. Highway 3 east of Grand Forks was widened to three lanes for 6 miles,
while at Kerr Creek east of Midway, a dangerous rock corner was removed to
improve alignment. Some 18-inch guardrail was replaced by 27-inch where warranted west of Grand Forks on Highway 3.
Bridges
All bridges in the district were washed and railings on some bridges were
painted. Structural members and decking were replaced on numerous bridges as
required. Carson Bridge, which was closed in 1975, was demolished. It is expected
both Westbridge and Wilkinson Creek Bridges on Highway 33 will be replaced in
1977. These have been restricted to legal loading since 1975. The deck system
of the Washington Street Bridge in the City of Greenwood was renewed. The bridge
has now been turned over to the City of Greenwood.
New Denver District
Roads
Maintenance—The New Denver Highway District in 1976/77 experienced a
very mild spring break-up period followed by a wet summer and then a drier and
warmer than average winter.
The year saw the district maintenance crews move fully into the Maintenance
Management System with all areas participating in total budget control and work
scheduling.
Rest areas within the district were continually upgraded and a tree-planting
program was initiated which should add to the Esthetics of many of them.
 B 112
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
BEFORE
Highway 33, Mile 39.
Looking south.
AFTER
 REGIONAL REPORTS
B  113
BEFORE
Project C3130—Kerr Creek corner, Highway 3—Source of material for project mile.
AFTER
 B 114
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
BEFORE
Project C3124—Three lanes, east of Grand Forks, Highway 3.
AFTER
I
 REGIONAL REPORTS
B 115
BEFORE
Highway 3—Alpine to Lafferty. Shouldering, Daylighting, third lane, Mile 92.64 to 97.64.
AFTER
 B  116 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
Construction—The construction season got off to a slow start as a result of the
wet summer weather. However, all of the district construction projects were successfully completed later on in the year. Six miles of the Monashee highway (Highway 6) was constructed and paved and guardrail was installed and shoulders were
widened in many areas of Highway 6 between Nakusp and the southern district
boundary. Reconstruction and realignment work was undertaken on Highway 31a
between New Denver and Kaslo and shoulder widening and guardrail installation
work was undertaken on Highway 31 between Coffee Creek and Lardeau.
Many sideroads were upgraded during the summer in continuing programs
and survey work was completed on the Argerita-Johnson's Landing road, Red
Mountain Road, Bonanza Road, and Crescent Bay Road in order to establish right-
of-ways prior to upgrading.
Slope stabilization was undertaken on Highway 6 north and south of Burton
and 0.5 mile of new alignment was constructed in order to bypass some less stable
areas.
Bridges
The bridge crew constructed four new bridges this year; three of them were
log stringer, and one, Cascade, a 50-foot concrete box-stringer bridge. A 450-ton
salt shed was constructed at Nakusp.
Ferries
The Arrow Park ferry was operated on schedule throughout the year and
operated on schedule except for the month of January when it was taken out of
service in order to service the propulsion units. While the MV Needles was out of
service a tug and barge were used to provide ferry service.
While the Arrow reservoir was at low water, maintenance work was undertaken
on the ferry ramps at Needles and an encroaching sandbar was removed.
Cranbrook District
Roads
Maintenance—Major emphasis was placed on maintenance activities using the
Maintenance Management System for scheduling and accomplishment. The results
were very successful as maintenance items, which previously received low priorities
or neglected, were undertaken in all areas. An extensive ditch-cleaning program
(90,000 lin. ft.) and spot regravelling on numerous side road systems will benefit
future maintenance programs. Minor betterment programs carried out were as
follows: 16 Mission-Wasa Road; reconstruction complete with double flushcoat
(2.0 miles); Wilkes-Kahn subdivision roads; reconstruction complete with double
flushcoat (1.34 miles); 72 Pighin Road; reconstruction (2.70 miles) and 9.15 miles
of surface treatments.
Construction—Reconstruction and new construction programs were undertaken as follows: 51 Cranbrook-Wycliffe Road (3 miles); Cranbrook area streets
(4.29 miles); 95a Kimberley Highway, shoulder widening (4.65 miles); 95 Kootenay Columbia Highway, east approach to Wasa Bridge (1.05 miles).
Bridges
All bridges in the district were inspected and necessary maintenance undertaken as required. Complete deck renewal of 48 Wycliffe Bridge commenced late
in year with completion by April 30, 1977.
 REGIONAL REPORTS B  117
Snow Removal
Snowfall was well below average throughout the district. Shift systems were
in effect and all roads were kept open and in good condition.
Buildings
Trailers were located at the Cranbrook yard to accommodate foremen offices
and assembly rooms for the crews.
Fernie District
Roads
Maintenance—Maintenance on all district roads was carried out to maintain
them in good repair. Hand-patching was normal on all roads except the Elk Valley
Road. Hand-brushing was done on Southern Trans-Provincial Highway 3 between
Fernie and Sparwood and on other side roads in the district. Oiling in front of
residences was done as required with MCO asphalt. Signs were maintained and
replaced where necessary.   Culverts were cleaned and repaired as necessary.
Winter maintenance—Because of the extremely mild winter and low snowfall during the 1976/1977 winter, costs were below normal. Stockpiles of screened
sand put up during the year in the Tunnel, Elko, and Monsoon Pits remain quite
large because of the unusual winter. Winter shifts were maintained in all areas
within the district from November 15, 1976, to April 1, 1977.
Construction—Construction of the Corbin Road was started with the clearing
being mostly completed. The Eikford Bypass was constructed but will not be
usable until a bridge is constructed over Boivin Creek. Reconstruction of Cokato
Road, Tie Lake Road, Jaffray-Baynes Lake Road, Highway 93, near Grasmere,
Mount Fernie Park Road, part of Morrissey Road, Lower Elk Valley Road was
carried out. Shoulder widening with left-turn slots was done on Southern Trans-
Provincial Highway 3 from Wardner to Elko in preparation for paving next year.
Shoulder widening with weak sections being raised on the Elk Valley Road 4 was
done in preparation for paving next year. Shoulder widening on Highway 3 from
Olsen to Natal was done.
Bridges
Reconstruction of the Cummings Creek Bridge at Rosen Lake was completed
by the Cranbrook bridge crew. Minor repairs and cleaning were carried out on all
other bridges. Repairs required from accidents were performed on Wilson Bridge
and Sand Creek Bridge.
Buildings
Construction of a salt silo at the Jaffray yard was completed. Removal of the
salt shed on Dickens Road and reconstruction of same was done at Tunnel Pit.
Asphalt tanks were placed at the New Fernie yardsite. Fencing and landscaping
of the Fernie yard was about 80 per cent completed. Sparwood yardsite was
partially landscaped.
Surfacing
Coldmix paving was done on 0.90 mile of Highway 93, near Grasmere, Elk
Valley Road 4 in Sparwood for 1.30 miles, and West Fernie streets for 1.10 miles.
Inverted prime was put on Tie Lake Road for 0.80 mile, Tie Lake South Road for
1.40 miles, Jaffray-Baynes Lake Road for 2.40 miles, Stephenson Road for 0.22
mile, Front Street for 0.29 mile, Sixth Avenue for 0.05 mile, and the Lower Elk
Valley Road for 1.20 miles.   Sand seals were done on Cokato Road for 1 mile,
 B 118 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
Fernie Coal Creek Road for 0.57 mile, Fernie Ski Hill for 0.73 mile, and the Lower
Elk Valley Road for 3 miles.
Miscellaneous
Riprap was placed along Southern Trans-Provincial Highway 3 from the
Tunnel to Fernie (1 mile). This was to strengthen existing riprap.
Golden District
Roads
Maintenance—Constant rain and wet weather prevented extensive machine
pavement patching, but hand-patching was continuous. Ditching was a major
item, more especially in the Kicking Horse Canyon section of the Trans-Canada
Highway 1 due to numerous rock falls. Grading of side roads was carried out
more frequently than usual.
Guardrail removed the previous year for paving purposes was replaced on the
Trans-Canada Highway 1. Eight thousand and ninety-six (8,096) lineal feet of
new 27-inch no-post concrete guardrail were installed in areas with an index of
100 and over.
Numerous vandalized signs were replaced on all roads.
Standard channelization and lighting of the intersection of the Trans-Canada
Highway 1 with the Golden Donald Upper Road and the Golden View Road was
completed.
Dust control, using liquid calcium chloride, was carried out on 12 miles of
well-used side roads.
The northerly entrance to Canal Flats from the Kootenay-Columbia Highway
95 was channelized.
A 1,500-foot section of the Kootenay-Columbia Highway 95 was cleared of a
blockage caused by flooding of Braisher Creek which closed the road for 14 hours.
Very little snow ploughing was required, but ice control was a problem due to
constant light snowfalls, thawing, and freezing cycles. All main roads were kept
bare and dry most of the winter season.
One hundred litter barrels were cleaned up, red leaded, painted green, and
marked with the Ministry logo.
Various damaged light standards on Arterial 528r were replaced.
A freezing situation of an irrigation ditch at Castledale on the Kootenay-
Columbia Highway 95 created major problems and required a great deal of expenditure in man-hours and equipment. This matter has been referred to the Water Rights
Branch.
Many of the operators have enrolled in the Maintenance Management course
and are showing greater interest in the over-all operations.
Sand was screened in Waitabit, Golden Hill, Seven Mile, Kelly, Harrogate,
and Kimpton Pits.
Kimpton, Brisco, and Vermilion Pits were landscaped.
Bridges
South concrete abutment on Waitabit Bridge was rebuilt.
Approaches to Spillimacheen Bridge rebuilt in the previous year were completed and the new bridge opened to traffic.
 REGIONAL REPORTS B 119
Driftwood was cleared away from all bridges over the Columbia River.
Hospital Creek Bridge, destroyed by flood waters, was replaced. Repairs were
carried out to abutments and approaches to Oster Bridge destroyed by the same
flood.
Riprap was placed at Campbell and Oster Bridges.
Bridge railings on Donald, Quartz, Yoho, and Park Bridges were replaced
where damaged by vehicle accidents.
Bridge panels were removed, sand blasted, red leaded, repainted, and replaced
on Mount Hunter Bridge. Panels from Park Bridge are now undergoing similar
treatment.
Concrete deck repairs are being carried out on the Blaeberry and Yoho Bridges.
All bridges received routine maintenance. Drains, etc., were cleaned as
required.
Buildings
Yards at Golden and Invermere received intensive clean up and restockpiling
of materials.
A trailer was added at Invermere to provide more efficient room for road
foremen and for proper washroom facilities.
Cabinets for avalanche and first aid equipment and a new sign rack were constructed in the Golden shop.
A shed capable of storing 360 tons of salt was constructed in the Golden yard.
Construction—Reconstruction, widening, and gravelling were completed on
the following roads: Thomas, Sanborn, Oberg-Johnson, Moberly School, Windermere Loop, and Columere Subdivision.
Coldmix paving was completed in the Columere Subdivision, 1.3 miles of
Canal Flats streets, 0.2 mile of Golden Donald Upper and Anderson Roads.
An unopened section of Quartz Street at Windermere was constructed and
gravelled.
Shoulders were widened on Trans-Canada Highway 1 east of Golden.
Relocation and reconstruction of Westside Road 2 south of Invermere has
been completed.
Shoulders were widened on Kootenay-Columbia Highway 95 from Mile 39.4
to Mile 57.4 (18 miles).
One mile of Toby Creek Road was widened and improved and 2 miles gravelled
with three-quarters of an inch minus crushed gravel.
Extensive exploration was carried out in Radium Hill Pit for possible gravel
source, without success.
Site survey was carried out for Upper Blaeberry Bridge for right-of-way
purchase.
Adami Road was widened and improved to standard and gravelled with three-
quarters of an inch minus crushed gravel.
We constructed 0.5 mile and also gravelled 1.5 miles on Neave Road.
Culverts were installed under Edgewater streets.
Note—The "Athalmer Establishment" has now been incorporated within the
new village boundaries of Invermere and in the future will be known as the "Invermere Establishment."
 b 120 highways and public works report, 1976/77
Revelstoke District
Roads
Maintenance—General maintenance was carried out on all highways and side
roads in the district.
Shoulder widening and guardrail installation of 1.4 miles was completed on
the Trans-Canada Highway 1 at Three Valley and 1 mile east of Revelstoke.
On the Trans-Canada Highway 1, creek channels were cleaned out at Victor
Lake and Albert Canyon Creek.
Spring run-off was normal with some riprap required at Silver Creek on the
Trans-Canada Highway 1 and minor erosion repairs at 12 Mile and Downie Creek
on Nakusp-Mica Creek Highway 23.
Landscaping continued at Three Valley Lake, Revelstoke Intersection, and
Revelstoke yard, including the planting of trees and shrubs.
Snowfall was less than normal throughout the district with all roads kept in
good winter condition.
An avalanche in the spring of 1976 on 520 Airport Way demolished Green
Slide Bridge, which was replaced with two 48-inch culverts.
Construction—Fencing was completed on the eastern access to Revelstoke
and traffic islands were constructed at the Trans-Canada Highway 1 and Oscar
Street intersections.
Reconstruction continued on the Balfour-Kalso-Galena Bay Highway 31
with 2 miles of grade being constructed.
Other reconstruction and improvements amounting to 2.74 miles were completed throughout the district.
Bridges
Routine bridge maintenance was carried out throughout the district.
A new bridge was constructed to replace 6757 Bridge Creek Bridge on 6 Revelstoke East Road. A new bridge was also constructed over Albert Creek to provide
access to Albert Canyon Gravel Pit and construction of a salt unloading structure
was 90 per cent completed in the Revelstoke yard.
Buildings
In the Revelstoke yard a grader blade storage bay was constructed and the old
salt storage bay was converted into a carpenter shop.
Ferries
MV Galena maintained a regular schedule throughout the year with the
following exceptions:
(a) Ran off schedule July 19, 1976, to July 25, 1976, while repairs were
being made to propulsion unit,
(ft)  The ferry ran on one motor with the assistance of a tug from
March 15, 1977, to March 31, 1977, while propulsion units were
being repaired.
Concrete slabs were poured on either side of the Shelter Bay ferry dock to
prevent erosion.
 REGIONAL REPORTS B 121
Creston District
Roads
Maintenance—Spring run-off was normal with only minor erosion problems
at Bayonne Creek Culvert on Highway 3.
Some maintenance activities had to be rescheduled due to a very wet spring and
summer. Although most spring clean-up activities were completed on schedule,
pavement patching, weed and brush control, dust control, and winter sand production
and stockpiling were delayed until late summer. Maintenance of roadside rest areas
continued but landscaping and other improvements had to be cancelled due to
inclement weather.
Improved delineation and guardrail installation on Highway 3 continued.
Paving program was limited to roadmixing 1 mile of Riondel Street; 0.65 mile of
the Duck Creek Road; sandsealing 0.4 mile of the Elsie Holmes Road and 3.1 miles
of the Creston-Summit Creek Road.
Snowfall was the lightest in the area's history being only 30 per cent of the
normal average. However, black ice and frosty surfaces kept crews busy sanding
and salting throughout the winter.
Kootenay Pass Camp crews worked a 24-hour schedule and helped many
travellers with summer tires out of trouble. Only two voluntary avalanches were
recorded that blocked the highway for short periods. All other avalanches were
brought down by the Avalanche Co-ordinator using the avalanche gun or hand
placed charges.
Closing Highway 3 and detouring traffic via Highway 3a to Kootenay Lake
ferry was not required this winter.
Construction—Preparatory work for paving by contract was carried out on
26 miles of Highway 3a between Kootenay Bay ferry-landing and Sanca Creek.
Work involved drainage correction, shoulder widening, and reconstruction and
surface repairs. Also completed was the 5-mile long major construction project
between Destiny Bay and Lockhart Creek involving several thousand cubic yards
of solid rock.
Major reconstruction of 1.5 miles of the Canyon-Porthill Road was 30 per
cent completed; 0.3 mile of reconstruction of the Leach Road in Canyon was
completed.
New roads opened and constructed at Kitchener and Lakeview totalled 0.8 mile.
Reshaping and gravelling of 3.75 miles of roads in the Arrow Creek and
Riondel settlements were completed.
Widening and gravelling to a 30-foot-wide standard were carried out on 6 miles
of the Creston-Wynndel Road (Lower Wynndel Road) during the winter months.
Bridges
General maintenance, including extensive cleaning and deck repairs, was
carried out as required. Deck surface treatment and painting programs were
uncompleted due to wet weather.
Buildings
Routine maintenance was carried out on the salt silo and winter equipment
sheds in gravel pits.
New winter equipment sheds were constructed at a 6-mile stockpile on
Highway 3 at Crawford Pit on Highway 3a.
Construction commenced on a 180-ton capacity salt-storage shed at Creston
to replace an inefficient 60-ton capacity salt silo.
 B 122 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
REGION 4
(L. A. Broddy, Regional Highway Engineer, Prince George)
Prince George, Quesnel, Dawson Creek, Fort St. John, Vanderhoof, and
McBride Highway Districts
Prince George District
Roads
Maintenance—A heavy snowpack and mild winter in 1976 resulted in high-
water problems and a severe spring break-up. Many local roads were soft well into
summer.
The above-average rainfall during the late spring and summer gave rise to
some maintenance problems on the side roads in the district. A great amount of
extra time and effort went into grading of the side roads.
Side road improvements were difficult to undertake because of the extremely
wet conditions.
Construction—Major improvements were made to 16.7 miles of miscellaneous
school-bus routes and side roads in the district. These improvements involved
ditching, widening, and gravelling of the various roads.
Shoulders were constructed on 36 miles of Highway 16 west and Highway 97
south and north in preparation for paving in 1977.
Foothills Boulevard was 70 per cent completed and should be finished and
paved in early 1977.
As part of a continuing project more ditching and gravelling were carried out
on the Giscome Highway between Giscome and Upper Fraser. Ultimate plans call
for more improvements and pavement.
Left-turn slots and intersection improvements were made to two intersections
on the John Hart-Peace River Highway 97.
Bridges
Routine maintenance was carried out on all bridges in the district.
Two new prestressed-concrete stringer bridges were erected replacing two
older timber bridges.
Buildings
Improvements were made to the Bear Lake shop and the Prince George foreman's office. A recreation hall was built at Honeymoon Creek for the use of the
employees at this isolated area.
The 18 th Avenue yard-site at Prince George was cleared and levelled in preparation for the new shop complex to be built in the near future.
The salt sheds at Prince George, Honeymoon Creek, and Bear Lake were
extended to increase capacity. A new salt shed was built at Slim Creek.
Ferries
The Isle Pierre ferry was out of service in June and part of July because of
extreme high water.   Otherwise the ferry operated normally.
 REGIONAL REPORTS B 123
Quesnel District
Roads
Maintenance—Fifty-four miles of road were treated with oil and 40 miles of
road were treated with calcium chloride for dust control, although the summer was
very wet.
Gradal ditching continued along the Barkerville Highway and Cariboo Highway as first priority. Approximately 6 miles of the Red Bluff area were also ditched.
Winter damage repair was extensive in most areas and will continue to be very
extensive due to the wet summer, which did not allow the base to dry out before the
frost set in.
Construction—Unseasonably warm temperatures and the lack of snow has
enabled the district to reconstruct 41 miles and regravel 17 miles of roads throughout the district.
Shoulder widening has been completed from Plete Road to Stoner, approximately 21 miles.
Bridges
Udy Creek Bridge is complete and in use. Asphalt will be put on the deck this
year.
First Creek multi-plate structure is in place.
Meadow Creek multi-plate structure in place.
Hamilton Bridge was replaced due to washout.
Trout Creek Bridge is about 50 per cent complete and the deck will be on this
year.
Various smaller building projects were completed throughout the year.
Ferries
The aerial ferries were reconstructed and were in use in November at Soda
Creek and Marguerite.
Ferries operated manually throughout the year. Both were pulled out in
November.
Dawson Creek District
Roads
Maintenance—Spring break-up was again better than normal; however, heavy
rain during June, July, and August was about three times above normal causing
considerable damage to ditches and drainage structures and hampering normal
maintenance. September, October, and November were, however, dry and road
conditions improved considerably enabling day labour projects to be completed.
Winter was late arriving resulting in much higher temperatures than normal.
Several storms, however, with wet snow resulted in normal use of chemicals but
snow ploughing activities were few.
Construction—A heavy construction year was experienced, when projects for
the Northeast Coal were added. The accomplishment results were as follows:
New construction, 29.1 miles; reconstruction, 85.26 miles; new gravelling, 104.66
miles; regravelling, 108.5 miles. In addition, during winter (hauling on frozen
ground), 202,510 cubic yards of gravel were produced in inaccessible areas during
summer and were stockpiled near all-weather roads for future use. Also, 28,000
cubic yards of sand stone were ripped and piled up for use as base construction and
erosion control in the future.
 B  124
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1976/77
Dawson Creek Highways District project work for N.E. Coal, 11 miles of new construction
from the end of the logging road, across Flatbed Creek and connecting to contractors road
in the Quintette, Babcock Coal and the Grizzly Valley gas. Note the heavy logging and
clearing, the wet ground and the final result.
Clearing right-of-way.
 REGIONAL REPORTS
B 125
Grubbing and preparation of original ground for road-bed.
Granular fill applied to form road-bed.
 B 126
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
Completed road-bed.
Gravelled surface suitable for traffic.
 REGIONAL REPORTS B 127
The road over the major earth slide on Highway 97, Peace River Hill, was
satisfactorily reconstructed and the highway surface was paved with pulvimix
material.
On the Hart Highway 97, Wabi Hill, the district completed 25 per cent of the
truck passing lane widening and realignment project.
Bridges
Four new bridges (284 linear feet) were completed. One bridge was replaced
with a 16-foot 7-inch by 10-foot 11-inch multi-plate pipe and three new bridges
(182 linear feet) were commenced and will be completed during 1977/78 season.
Also, 27 district bridges received varying amounts of maintenance and repair.
Buildings
The district continued to develop the Mile 22 Alaska Highway maintenance
yard. An office, tool-oil shed, loader garage, plug-in electrical services and yard
lights were added.   Also, the yard was gravelled.
Trailer units, foreman office, and assembly rooms were set up at the Rolla and
Progress maintenance yards and serviced with water and sewer.
Ferries
Due to the warm winter, the Clayhurst ferry operated 12 months during 1976/
77 with only short interruption mainly due to river water levels.
Fort St. John District
Roads
Maintenance—Spring run-off was average with no major problems encountered.
Road restrictions were imposed March 29, 1976, and rescinded on May 14, 1976.
Extremely wet weather during July and August and part of September caused many
of our maintenance activities to be well behind schedule; however, a beautiful fall
followed, lasting well into November. By the time freeze-up arrived, the road
system was in good shape.
A massive landslide occurred on August 21, 1976, severing Road 117, the
only road link with the Upper Halfway River area. A temporary route was established by using old oil exploration roads and the construction of a Bailey bridge
across the Cameron River. Construction of a permanent bypass of the slide area
consisting of 6 miles of new construction commenced in late October and was
completed for traffic by December 3.
Winter was late arriving and treated this district well with moderate temperatures and very little snow and no wind.
Construction—Twenty-one miles, including the 6 miles on Road 117, were
completed as well as 105 miles of gravelling and regravelling.
A machine-brushing project was undertaken on Highway 29 using a Kershaw-
Clearway cutter. Forty miles of the right-of-way were cut with very acceptable
results and average cost of $75 per acre.
Bridges
Fifty-three of the district bridges received attention from major deck repairs to
painting of the side rails. Three major projects were completed: Siwash Bridge
Q7237 replaced with 13 foot multi-plate; Roseland Bridge Q7234 replaced with
 B 128 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
12 foot multi-plate and a major riprap project was completed. Due to the landslide on Road 117, a 100-foot Bailey bridge was also constructed over Alexander
Creek on the new route.
Vanderhoof District
Roads
Maintenance—Vanderhoof Highway District experienced a long break-up due
to a 100 to 150 per cent snowpack, together with an unusually wet spring and
summer. Severe flooding occurred in the Fraser Lake and Endako areas, with the
Endako River exceeding the deck level of the Endako Bridge on Yellowhead Highway 16.
The excessive rainfall kept most side roads soft, resulting in a prolonged road
base repair program.
The "rest stop" at Bednesti was equipped with toilets and tables, while that at
Dry William Lake was enlarged with considerable new railing constructed.
The dust control program was carried out using flake calcium chloride with
retention value only fair as any road with coarse gravel did not retain the material.
Fencing of Yellowhead Highway 16 was continued for another year.
Construction—The Stellako Overhead Bridge approaches were completed
and paved with roadmix. Francois Lake Road had 2.5 miles reconstructed, and
the Dog Creek Road was improved under the minor betterments program.
Numerous culverts were replaced with larger pipes within the district resulting
from cultivation of additional land.
A total of 3.3 miles of the Loop Road had a 6-inch lift of three-quarter-inch
crush gravel applied. A total of 10.4 miles of road was reconstructed, and 16.8
miles of major gravelling were completed in the Vanderhoof area. The Fort St.
James area completed minor realignment on the Tachie Road; however, 11 miles
of gravelling were completed on other roads.
On Yellowhead Highway 16, a total of 6.5 miles of shouldering was completed.
Bridges
Fourteen Mile Bridge on the Germansen Landing Road was widened by the
district bridge crew to 32 feet.
Endako Bridge 1 was strengthened to accommodate B.C. Hydro transformers,
and major repairs (piling) under the approach span of Endako Bridge 2 were
necessary due to scouring at extreme high water.
Canyon Creek Bridge was replaced with a log-stringer structure after high-
water scoured the west abutment of the old structure which was eventually washed
out.
Mining Roads and Trails
Once again this Ministry supervised the opening "snow removal" of the
Omineca Mines Road to Germansen Landing during the spring.
Big Creek culverts were replaced with a three-span pile trestle structure,
removing the threat of flooding each spring.
McBride District
Roads
Maintenance—Again this year, McBride District received more-than-average
precipitation during the summer months and, as a result, considerable effort was
 REGIONAL REPORTS B 129
expended on drainage maintenance and washout repair. Frequent rain-storms
necessitated extensive grading of the feeder road system and as a further result of
excessive water, a major slide, in fill material on the Yellowhead Highway 16 at
Lamming Mills, had to be repaired. As part of the district's minor betterment
program, district crews carried on extensive regravelling work in the McBride and
Tete Jaune foreman areas.
Construction—During the summer construction season, 4.5 miles of gravel
feeder roads were reconstructed and gravelled; while in the winter, 8 miles of right-
of-way along Yellowhead Highway 5 north of Avola were cleared to remove the
many danger trees standing in that section. At Clemina, district crews installed an
extensive underground drainage system to reduce heavy spring frost heave action.
Materials—Columbia Bitulithic were awarded crushing Project M-3021-7 to
crush and stockpile 20,000 tons of crushed granular surfacing aggregate in each of
King Creek, Tinsley, and Horsey Creek Pits, McBride District. The material will
be used during the coming fiscal year for patchmix, crushed granular surfacing,
and winter sand purposes.
Bridges
Swift Creek Bridge 6840, an old timber tressel located near Valemount was
demolished and replaced by a 100 foot span of double-single Bailey bridging.
Beaver Bridge 7779, a king truss on Hinkelman Road, 8 miles east of McBride,
was reinforced and redecked, and new wheel guards and hand railings were
installed.
The bridge crew also installed an 80-foot cattle underpass, two cattleguards,
and a trash-rack system at various locations throughout the district.
REGION 5
(L. A. Broddy, Regional Highway Engineer, Prince George)
Prince Rupert, Terrace, Dease Lake, Smithers, and
Burns Lake Highway Districts
Prince Rupert District
Roads
Maintenance—A major riprap river and tidal production program was undertaken in the three major foreman areas. Riprap material was quarried near Stewart
and placed along the Bear River and on the foreshore between Stewart and Hyder.
Riprap was also placed along the Yellowhead Highway 16 and in several locations
on the Queen Charlotte Islands.
A hand- and machine-brushing program was instituted in the Prince Rupert
area and on the Queen Charlottes, which improved the appearance of our rights-
of-way considerably.
A major paving and right-of-way clean-up program was carried out in Prince
Rupert and Port Edward during early spring 1977.
Traffic volume is steadily increasing on the Kitwanga to Stewart and Watson
Lake Road but the Stewart and Meziadin crews were able to maintain an adequate
level of public service on these roads.
 B 130 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
Construction—(a) Meziadin and Stewart areas: The major part of a 3- to
5-mile realignment project was completed through the worst avalanche areas in the
Bear Pass with the remainder to be completed in 1977.
Many areas along the highway were widened, using air-tracs and explosives
to allow for more effective ploughing and snow storage.
(b) Queen Charlotte Islands: Two miles of the Towhill Road were ditched
and upgraded to a superior standard.
Snow Removal
Snowfall was moderate in the Stewart and Meziadin area and light in the
Prince Rupert and Queen Charlotte areas. Very few problems were encountered
in Stewart and Meziadin and the highway remained open to the public all winter
with few avalanches and interruptions to travel.
Bridges
(a) Prince Rupert area: The McBride Street footbridge was replaced with a
Bailey pedestrian bridge on wooden and Bailey towers with concrete and aluminum
stairs.
(b) Stewart and Meziadin areas: Four log-stringer spans were constructed
in conjunction with the Bear Pass realignment.
The Axnegrelga Bridge, south of Meziadin, was replaced with a new log-
stringer span.
The Bell Irving Bridge, north of Meziadin Lake, was decked with a wooden
superstructure, laid within the steel-arch span and to one side to allow for the
placement of a permanent deck.
Ferries
(a) Prince Rupert area: The Ministry continued to subsidize Prince Rupert
Ferry (1967) Ltd. operating between Prince Rupert and areas within the harbour.
(b) Queen Charlotte Islands: The MV Kwuna continued to operate without
interruption.   The ferry is very popular and is well-used by the island residents.
A new concrete ramp was installed on the Skidegate landing side incorporating
steel rails to replace asphalt ramps badly deteriorated by wind and propeller action.
Terrace District
Roads
Maintenance—The normal general maintenance was carried out on all highways and side roads.
The side roads required more gravelling and grading than usual because of
the wet summer.   Student crews were very helpful on the building program.
Construction—Day labour was continued at the following locations:
(1) Yellowhead Highway 16—Mile 20 to Mile 27.5 west of Terrace.
This involved widening of existing highway and new alignment.
(2) Kalum Lake Road—construction of Lean-to Creek and Deep Creek
bridge approaches and improve alignment and base at sundry
locations.
(3) Kitamaat Village Road—prepared 2 miles of road base for a paving
contract.
L
 REGIONAL REPORTS B  131
(4) Sixteen miles of shouldering were done on the Terrace-Kitimat
Highway 25.
(5) Old Remo Road—improved grade and alignment.
Snow Removal
Snowfall was well below average throughout the district. There was no
avalanche activity on Highway 16 west of Terrace.
Bridges
Normal maintenance was carried out on the many wooden bridges throughout
the district.
A new bridge was constructed at Lean-to Creek.
The Terrace bridge was redecked.
Buildings
Salt shed was relocated adjacent to the sand shed.
Ferries
The reaction ferry and cable car at Usk were operated on a double-shift
schedule seven days each week.
Dease Lake District
Maintenance—Snowfall, particularly in the Bob Quinn area, was exceptionally
light with very mild temperatures and roads in all areas were good with no major
storm damage.
Native crews did considerable hand-brushing along the right-of-way in the
Bob Quinn, Totogga, and Telegraph Creek areas.
Clearing and minor road repairs continued on the O'Donnell River Road south
of Atlin.
Construction—Under day labour, 3 miles of Highway 37 was reconstructed
north of Cassiar Junction. Fifty-eight wood-stave culverts were replaced with
C.I.P., in conjunction with ditching, along Highway 37 in the Dease Lake area.
Four culverts were replaced and considerable hand-brushing was done along the
Atlin Highway, while three culverts were installed and two subdivision streets were
cleared in the Atlin Townsite. On the Telegraph Road, 11 culverts were installed
and 15 miles regraveiled, as well as 2Vi miles of widening on the Tuya River Hill.
Bridges
Three bridges were replaced by multi-plates under new construction on
Highway 37.
Two small wood bridges were built in the Atlin area, one structure on the
Telegraph Road was reconstructed, and one culvert on the Glenora Road was
replaced with a bridge.
Under day labour on Highway 37, two double-single two-span Baileys, and
one double-single with two approach spans were converted to triple-single, chord-
reinforced single spans.
The bridge crew also worked several months for the Prince Rupert District in
the Stewart area.
 B 132 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1976/77
Buildings
Construction of a dry storage building was started at the Dease Lake yard, and
a dam and reservoir were built to supply water for the Totogga Lake Camp.
Smithers District
Roads
Maintenance—Routine maintenance was conducted throughout the season