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REPORT of the BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT of TRANSPORT and COMMUNICATIONS APRIL 1, 1974, TO MARCH 31,… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1976

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
Hon. Iack Davis, Minister
C. M. Dalfen, Deputy Minister
F. A. MacLean,
Associate Deputy Minister
(Transport)
F. G. Nixon,
Associate Deputy Minister
(Communications)
C. Gallagher,
General Manager
(B.C. Ferries)
REPORT
of the
BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT of
TRANSPORT and
COMMUNICATIONS
APRIL 1, 1974, TO MARCH 31, 1975
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1976
  Victoria, B.C., December 31, 1975
To Colonel the Honourable Walter S. Owen, Q.C, LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned takes pleasure in submitting the Annual Report for the
Department of Transport and Communications for the fiscal year ending March 31,
1975.
JACK DAVIS
Minister of Transport and Communications
  Victoria, B.C., December 31, 1975
To the Honourable Jack Davis,
Minister of Transport and Communications
Sir: I have the honour to present for your consideration the report of activities
of the Department of Transport and Communications for the fiscal year ending
March 31, 1975.
Respectfully submitted,
C. M. DALFEN
Deputy Minister
  CONTENTS
Page
Organization	
     8
Transport Operations
Air Services Branch      	
     9
Engineering Branch	
  11
Motor Carrier Branch            	
  13
Motor-vehicle Branch         .___ 	
  14
Weigh Scale Branch   ,
  16
Transport Planning, Research, and Development Bureau	
  18
Ferries Operations
B.C. Ferries    	
  20
Coastal Ferries      _. 	
  22
Communications
Computer and Consulting Services Branch	
  24
System Development and Regulation Branch	
  27
Telecommunications Services Branch                	
  29
Communications Policy	
  29
Administration
Finance              	
  31
Personnel Services                    _                                       .
... 32
Statistical Supplement	
  33
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
Hon. J. Davis, Minister C. M. Dalfen, Deputy Minister
F. A. MacLean F. G. Nixon
Associate Deputy Minister Associate Deputy Minister
(Transport) (Communications)
C. Gallagher
General Manager
B.C. Ferries
ORGANIZATION
The British Columbia Department of Transport and Communications, with
headquarters at 2631 Douglas Street in Victoria, has operations and planning and
policy responsibilities in the transportation and communications fields in the Province of British Columbia.
The Department is headed by a Minister of the Crown who is advised on day-
to-day operations by the Deputy Minister. The Deputy Minister is aided by three
senior officers with Associate Deputy Minister status—one responsible for transport
operations, another for B.C. Ferries, and a third for Communications. There is
also a Transportation Planning, Research, and Development Bureau headed by an
Executive Director.
These senior officials are assisted by Branch directors coming under their
jurisdiction.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS L 9
TRANSPORT OPERATIONS
This Division is comprised of five branches—the Air Services Branch, Engineering Branch, Motor Carrier Branch, Motor-vehicle Branch, and Weigh Scale Branch.
AIR SERVICES BRANCH
This Branch is responsible for the provision of aircraft and crews to carry out
the air transportation, aerial photography, and air ambulance requirements of the
Provincial Government.
During the 1974/75 fiscal year, three additional aircraft were added to the fleet,
two Beechcraft A.200's for aerial photography in the summer and passenger transportation in the winter, and a third Cessna Citation Jet to augment the other two
purchased in 1973 for the passenger transportation and air ambulance role.
The two older Beechcraft 18 aircraft were used for low-level photography,
while the Turbo Beech 18 was engaged on the Victoria/Vancouver scheduled flight
service in the summer and undertook other transportation requirements throughout
the remainder of the year. The Beechcraft (CF-BCC) which was transferred to
Selkirk College on January 14, 1974, continued to remain at the Air Services Branch
due to lack of facilities at Castlegar. With permission of the College, the aircraft
was used on a limited basis for training, and occasionally on the scheduled flight
service to Vancouver.
The Otter aircraft on floats was used for transportation and support of survey
crews, aerial photography, and numerous other uses. The Beaver aircraft based at
Kamloops was used in a similar role in that area.
There was an increase of 127.98 per cent in flying time over the previous fiscal
year and a corresponding increase of 95.90 per cent in the number of passengers
carried. These increases were due to the addition of new aircraft, which also
necessitated a staff increase of 12 people, bringing the total number of employees
at year-end to 35.
A large training program has been undertaken by the Branch in order to qualify
pilots and engineering staff on the new equipment.
The new Flight Simulator scheduled for delivery May 1975 will allow the
Branch to reduce in-flight training to a minimum. The over-all effect will be to
reduce the use of aircraft, with attendant savings in cost, and will also provide a
higher level of training to the pilots.
The scheduled flight service between Victoria and Vancouver has continued at
five round-trips daily, Monday to Friday. This service was proven to be very
popular with a good utilization of crew and equipment. All other flights are on a
nonscheduled basis. Every effort is made to ensure that a maximum number of
seats are filled on each flight.
During the past fiscal year the Branch flew over 5,000 hours in its air transportation, aerial photography,* and air ambulance roles, and carried close to
13,000 Government employees over nearly 2 million passenger miles. Air ambulance flights, completed in co-ordination with the Emergency Health Service and
Canadian Forces Rescue Co-ordination Centre, numbered 53.
* This figure includes 739.9 hours flown on aerial photography in co-ordination with the Field Operations
Division of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources.
 L 10
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS L 11
ENGINEERING BRANCH
This Branch processes construction applications and inspects oil and natural
gas pipe-lines, railways, aerial tramways, logging equipment on private roads, and
industrial roads and bridges. In addition, it certifies operating personnel for railways, aerial tramways, and industrial road equipment.
Inspections carried out during the fiscal year included 203 aerial tramways,
138 pumping stations, 112 bulk-fuel storage plants, 271 industrial vehicles, 170
locomotives, 12 railway yards, 1,800 miles of transportation pipe-lines, and 500
miles of industrial roads. In addition, a total of 629 operating personnel were
certified for industrial roads and railways, and 55 accidents were investigated.
The Branch was also involved in processing, inspecting, and testing the following new projects: 19 aerial tramways, 123 pipe-lines, 15 miles of railway trackage,
two new air-brake systems developed for school buses and logging trucks, plus 281
different types of crossing applications.
The Branch is represented on the Pipeline Code Committee, the Mobile Equipment Committee, and the Provincial Emergency Progress and Hazardous Materials
Committee.
L-
 L 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
B.C. Hydro and Power Authority crew installs a 12-inch gas pipe-line
to bolster gas distribution to Deep Cove, B.C.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS L 13
MOTOR CARRIER BRANCH
The Motor Carrier Branch serves as the operating arm of the Motor Carrier
Commission, a three-man regulatory tribunal appointed by Cabinet.
A major function of the Branch is to investigate permit applications for
transporting goods or persons for compensation on B.C. Highways. Following
investigation, all applications are referred to the Commission for a decision. Once
a decision has been rendered the application is returned to the Branch for processing. The Branch also investigates complaints from carrier operators. Headquarters are in Vancouver and there are seven branch offices throughout the
Province.
Enforcement under the Motor Carrier Act is undertaken by weigh-scale
operators who ensure that goods transported by freight concur with conditions of
licence. Enforcement is also undertaken under the Motor Vehicle Act (Canada).
In this instance the Federal Government has delegated authority to the Provincial
Motor Carrier Commission. The Federal Motor Vehicle Transport Act applies to
drivers operating between provinces; for example, an Alberta carrier has to obtain
a British Columbia authority before operating in this Province.
During the fiscal year, Motor Carrier Inspectors investigated approximately
3,400 applications for new or altered commercial-vehicle licences, as well as complaints from shippers and motor carriers. There were 1,171 bus licences issued,
1,973 taxi licences, 15,927 for public freight, and 2,438 for limited freight for a
total of 21,509 licences.   Revenue collected amounted to $753,828.77.
The new modern office of the Motor Carrier Branch located at
4240 Manor Street, Burnaby.
 L 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MOTOR-VEHICLE BRANCH
This Branch is the Provincial agency responsible for vehicle registration and
licensing, vehicle inspection, driver licensing, and vehicle and driver safety programs. Additionally, the Motor-vehicle Branch maintains a Central Registry for
the recording of documents filed under the Bills of Sale Act, the Conditional Sales
Act, the Mechanics' Lien Act, and the Assignment of Book Accounts Act.
During the 1974 calendar year, traffic fatalities increased to 844 from 825 in
1973, up 2.3 per cent. Accidents amounted to 84,445, an increase of 21 per cent
over 1973; persons injured totalled 28,699, an increase of 3.5 per cent over the
previous year, and property damage loss increased 27 per cent to $84,045,060.61.
The Province's driver population rose to 1,485,555, an increase of 90,632.
There were 130,630 original licences issued, compared to 95,195 in 1973. Male
drivers numbered 903,401 and female drivers 582,154.
A total of 648,869 vehicles were inspected, the rate of rejection was 31 per
cent. Motor-vehicle and motor-cycle registrations amounted to 1,333,891, a
decrease of 119,895 or 8.25 per cent from the 1973 figure.
Traffic violations rose from 242, 657 in 1973 to 284,605 in 1974, and 10,043
motorists had their licences suspended during the year.
Revenue collected from licences, permits, inspections, and other services such
as payment of Social Services Tax, amounted to $76,895,748.45, an increase of
45.6 per cent over 1973.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
L 15
Motor-vehicle Testing Station, Victoria.
Motor-vehicle Testing Station, Burnaby.
 L 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
WEIGH SCALE BRANCH
This Branch has 40 truck weigh-scale stations at various points throughout
British Columbia augmented by 15 portable units. These stations issue permits for
vehicles and loads exceeding the legal limit in weight or size. Another major function is the recording and reviewing of all accidents involving commercial vehicles
having a gross vehicle weight exceeding 40,000 pounds.
Weigh-scale operators are responsible for ensuring that the following Acts
are complied with: Commercial Transport Act, Motor-vehicle Act, Motor Carrier
Act, Motor Fuel Tax Act, and certain aspects of the Brands Act, the Forest Act,
the Social Services Tax Act, and the Motor Vehicle Transport Act (Canada).
During the fiscal year, construction started on new weigh-scale facilities at
Pouce Coupe, Yahk, and Prince George with completion dates set for the spring
and summer of 1975. These new facilities will contain the latest technology in
electronic weighing, including exterior digital readout and electronically controlled
directional signs. The new sites are designed in such a way that although they
have two points of entry to accommodate two-way traffic there is only one exit
which eliminates the confusion created by a two-exit scale.
An additional 26 people were hired during the year in order to allow the
Branch to expand operational hours for better enforcement and better service to
the road transport industry.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS L 17
The weigh-scale station at Pouce Coupe is typical of the new facilities being built in
different parts of the Province. The stations contain the latest in electronic weighing
devices to speed the weighing process and provide excellent working accommodation for
weigh-masters.
In contrast is the old dial springless scale still being used in many areas of the Province.
 L 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TRANSPORT PLANNING, RESEARCH AND
DEVELOPMENT BUREAU
The Transport Planning, Research, and Development Bureau was organized
late in 1974 in order to co-ordinate and rationalize transportation policy development on an intermodal basis.
Provincial railway issues in which the Bureau has become involved include the
Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway passenger service discontinuance application,
Tappan-Notch Hill double-tracking, and the New Denver-Nakusp abandonment.
These matters have all led to Canadian Transport Commission hearings where the
position of the Province has been developed and presented through the Bureau and
the Attorney-General's Department.
Regarding air transportation the department has participated in the ongoing
development of Vancouver International Airport through its representation on the
Airport Planning Committee, and is also involved in the formulation of a Provincial/Federal strategy for British Columbia third-level (primary) air carriers.
In a local and regional context the Bureau has provided expertise to the
Greater Vancouver Regional District Planning Committee and has advised on
North Shore Lower Level Highway planning and on Prince Rupert Harbour
development.
Maritime coastal trade operations and development of a new Canadian Maritime Code continue to receive considerable attention.
It is hoped the Bureau will continue to expand to meet new problems and
challenges. Growing areas of concern are likely to include Canadian shipping
policy, Provincial trucking regulation, rail-freight rates, remote area access within
the Province, public transit, and manpower requirements for the transportation
industry on a national scale. Involvement will continue on airline pricing, air
transport facility development, and third-level aircraft development.
The Bureau is represented at the technical level on the Federal-Provincial
Committee on Western Transportation (FP-COWT), through which it is endeavouring to influence national transportation policy and is also active in working
with the Western Transportation Advisory Council (WESTAC).
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
L 19
 L 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FERRIES OPERATIONS
B.C. FERRIES
The B.C. Ferries Service was inaugurated in June 1960 to provide service
between Vancouver Island and the Lower Mainland. Today, there are 25 ships
operating on 12 routes to 23 ports, with maintenance shops and refitting and lay-up
berths at Deas Dock on the Fraser River.
During the 1974/75 fiscal year the pattern of continued growth on the main
routes of the system was interrupted for the first time in 16 years. This was evidenced by the fact that in February 1975 the Horseshoe Bay-Departure Bay service
showed a small decline in traffic. Minor routes, however, continued their spectacular
growth pattern.
Service is offered between Swartz Bay and Tsawwassen, Horseshoe Bay and
Departure Bay, Horseshoe Bay and Langdale, Horseshoe Bay and Snug Cove,
Saltery Bay and Earl's Cove, Swartz Bay and Fulford Harbour, an Outer Gulf
Islands service, Tsawwassen and Long Harbour, Crofton and Vesuvius Bay, Kelsey
Bay and Beaver Cove, Kelsey Bay and Prince Rupert, and Brentwood and Mill Bay.
Major construction began in the early spring of 1974 at Tsawwassen Terminal
for three new berths. Dredging was completed in the early part of 1975 for use
commencing October 1975.
Construction at other terminals included paving at Beaver Cove of both the
holding area and approach to the berth, and an enlarging of the holding area and
walkways at the Village Bay Terminal on Mayne Island.
Horseshoe Bay Terminal.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS L 21
The new car-passenger ferry Queen of Coquitlam showing the three decks for car parking.
■■SB ' 1MB
l
Work continues on the new truck ferry still unnamed.
 L 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Plans were developed during the fiscal year to provide an Information Centre
using one telephone number for the Greater Vancouver area and one number for
the Greater Victoria area.
This Information Centre also houses the three reservation systems used for the
Gulf Islands-Mainland, Kelsey Bay-Prince Rupert, and Kelsey Bay-Beaver Cove
runs.
The Island Princess (renamed North Island Princess) had a new engine installed during the fiscal year to increase speed and to ensure a more reliable
schedule. The new ship construction program continued with three new 450-foot
"super-ferries" being constructed in British Columbia shipyards. The target date
for their in-service use is the summer of 1976.
COASTAL FERRIES
During the fiscal year 1974/75, ferry service was provided on 10 salt-water
routes under the jurisdiction of the Department of Transport and Communications
with day-to-day management by the Department of Highways. This was accomplished by a fleet of 11 ferries. In addition, the Queen of the Islands was borrowed
from B.C. Ferries for service on the Comox-Powell River run during the summer
season.   The fleet carried 703,907 vehicles and 2,247,481 passengers.
All ferries were inspected during the year and repairs were carried out where
necessary. In addition, all ferries were dry-docked and overhauled, and relief
ferries provided interim service wherever possible.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
L 23
The MV Comox Queen operates between Little River  (6 miles from the City of
Courtenay on Vancouver Island) and Westview Terminal (Powell River) on the Mainland.
—Photo by Frank A. Clapp
The MV Kulleet operates across Stuart Channel between Chemainus and Preedy
Harbour on Thetis Island, and calls at Kuper Island.   The distance is 3% miles.
—Photo by Frank A. Clapp
 L 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
COMMUNICATIONS
There are three branches in the Communications Division—the Computer
and Consulting Services Branch, Telecommunications Services Branch, and System
Development and Regulation Branch.
COMPUTER AND CONSULTING SERVICES BRANCH
This Branch provides a variety of computer and consulting services to Government departments, agencies, boards, and commissions. Responsibilities include the
design and implementation of computer programs, the operation of three computers,
and the provision of consultative assistance to Government clients on systems,
procedures, method analysis, and program planning and content.
Following are highlights of activities in each division during the fiscal year
under report:
OPERATIONS DIVISION
This Division increased its computer capacity and computer terminal services
substantially by adding a medium-sized IBM computer. Terminal services included
eight high-speed terminals and over 20 other display inquiry terminals. The computer was in operation for over 450 hours a month, 24 hours a day on week-days,
and 16 on Saturdays and Sundays to meet the needs of client departments and
agencies.
INTERNAL SERVICES DIVISION
A major tendering, evaluation, and selection project for a large communications/timesharing/data base computer was finalized in March 1975 with the signing
of a contract for dual Honeywell computers. Tasks of this Division include preparation of software for the new computer and the selection and tendering of terminals
to be used with it. In addition, technical advice will be provided to client departments who intend to use the new computer.
SYSTEM AND PROGRAMMING DIVISION
There were a number of major projects which remained incomplete at the
end of the fiscal year:
(1) An emergency health services radio network.
(2) A more advanced computerization of municipal and teachers' superannuation contribution records.
(3) Major and complex pollution control projects.
(4) Computerization of Cancer Control Agency cytology records.
(5) Computerization of many separate and differing systems for the
Division of Vital Statistics.
Projects were completed during the year for the Liquor Administration Branch,
Highways (Accounting Systems), Water Resources Service, and the Superannuation
Branch.
MANAGEMENT CONSULTING DIVISION
Since the last Annual Report this Division completed four major projects plus
several small projects for client departments.   The major projects were:
(1) Setting up the operation of the Rentalsman's office.
(2) Assisting the Assessment Authority in setting up its operations and
providing interim management assistance.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS L 25
Top photo: Part of the computer-room at Computer and Consulting Services. Bottom
picture shows one of five units in the data entry (key-punch) section. The five units are
comprised of approximately 100 key-punch operators.
 L 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
(3) Setting up the daily operations and providing interim management
assistance for the Rent Review Commission.
(4) Designing a new social assistance payment system for the Department
of Human Resources.
At the end of the fiscal year the Division was carrying out studies and implementing projects in the following areas:
(1) Computerizing Hansard.
(2) Studying the role of the Central Microfilm Bureau.
(3) Studying microfilm publishing of consolidated regulations.
(4) Developing the daily operating procedures for a Government Information Centre.
(5) Implementing computerized Department of Labour systems  and
records.
SPECIAL PROJECTS DIVISION
This Division has continued to be very actively involved in systems development
for the Motor-vehicle Branch to accommodate changes resulting from their interrelationship with ICBC. As well the Division has developed and implemented two
on-line terminal inquiry systems. At fiscal year-end, the Division was developing
the following:
(1) A computerized record-keeping report generation and statistical system for the Department of Municipal Affairs operations.
(2) Computerized Motor Carrier records.
(3) Expansion of the Central Registry of Liens inquiry system.
(4) Conversion of the manual Prince Rupert/Kelsey Bay ferry reservation system to a computerized operation.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
L 27
SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT AND REGULATION BRANCH
Responsibilities of this Branch include the development of policy recommendations and the administration of Departmental programs to facilitate the
effective use of communications systems by the British Columbia public.
In the system development role the Branch tries to find answers to such questions as, what communications services do residents require? how should these
needs be provided? who should provide? and in what order of priority? Another
function is to provide guidance and assistance to people in remote and sparsely
populated areas for the purpose of helping them obtain basic communications
services.
In the regulation role the Branch is concerned with the rates charged and the
standard of service offered by the telephone and cable television companies servicing the Province.
During the year under report a data base was compiled for addressing problems placed before the Branch, as no records were previously available.
Actions of the Federal Government and its agencies have a profound impact
on communications services provided residents of this Province, and it is a function
of the Branch to monitor and react to such activities to ensure that Provincial
objectives are fully taken into account. The licensing of cable and broadcast television undertakings by the Canadian Radio-Television Commission is one such
Federal activity. In this regard the Branch was involved in the preparation of an
intervention by the Province to the CRTC against the licensing of a third commercial television broadcast station to serve the Vancouver area on the last
remaining VHF television channel, Channel 10. Another such Federal activity is
the regulation of the B.C. Telephone Company by the Canadian Transport Commission. In October 1974 the CTC held a public hearing on a rate application by
B.C. Telephone and it was the responsibility of the Branch to develop the intervention to be presented by Counsel for the Attorney-General of British Columbia.
During the fiscal year, the Canadian Transport Commission proposed a telephone rate adjustment formula, to which the Branch developed a position paper
opposing its adoption. As well, participation by the Branch in the CTC Telecommunication Cost Inquiry was continued from the previous year.
There has been no attempt to publicize the service provided by the Regulation
Division to investigate queries and complaints about telephone service. Nevertheless, over 40 such cases were given attention during the year. Some were not
amenable to solution but a significant number were satisfactorily concluded by
direct negotiation with B.C. Telephone Company officials.
Acting as staff for the Motor Carrier Commission in its administration of the
Telecommunications Utilities Act, the Branch processed a small number of complaints received from subscribers of the Okanagan Telephone Company, and a
number of applications by the Company for approval of financing for its construction program.
 L 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS L 29
TELECOMMUNICATIONS SERVICES BRANCH
This Branch is responsible for the provision, maintenance, and operation of
nearly all telecommunications services required by Provincial Government departments.    Services include telephone, teleprinter, facsimile, and data transmission.
A major study of Government telecommunications services was completed
during the fiscal year with the submission of the final report by the Consultants,
Hoyles, Niblock Associates Ltd. Implementation of some of the recommendations
started during the fiscal year, and others are planned to be initiated in future years.
A large project to provide co-ordinated mobile radio communications for
several departments was initiated during the year. First priority was given to
meeting the requirements of the Emergency Health Services Commission ambulances, and Sheriff's Service vehicles. The system will also provide service for the
Parks Branch, the Fish and Wildlife Branch, and others. This is a continuing
project which will be phased over two or three years at an estimated total cost of
approximately $3 million.
A study was initiated in the East Kootenay Regional District to determine the
technical and economic feasibility of providing a co-ordinated emergency reporting
telephone facility as a public safety measure. The study is being co-ordinated with
the B.C. Telephone Company and the Regional District, and is based on the "911"
concept which is now in use in some urban centres in Canada and the United
States. The report on this project will be used as the basis of the formulation of
Provincial policy regarding cost-sharing and implementation of such systems, possibly on a Province-wide basis.
A start has been made in the organization of a co-ordinated teleprinted (Telex
and TWX) network throughout the Province. This will be followed by the addition, where justified, of facsimile facilities for the transmission of documents.
The requirement for data communications has shown an expanded trend, and
it is expected that growth will accelerate during the coming fiscal year. This Branch
is responsible for the provision of communications lines and equipment which
permit computers to function with remote terminals, and continuing co-ordination
is effected with the Computer and Consulting Services Branch of the Department.
During the year the demands on telephone staff and facilities have been
extensive. Growth has been well above predictions and the lead time required to
provide new circuits and equipment has resulted in a number of instances where
service temporarily fell to unacceptable levels. Greatest difficulty was experienced
in the overloaded Victoria Centrex and with some parts of the intercity network.
COMMUNICATIONS POLICY
Talks continued during the year with the other provinces and the Federal
Government on jurisdiction in the field of communications. Provincial Communications Ministers' Conferences were held in Victoria in May and Toronto in
October, and meetings of officials were held in Toronto in September and February.
The Department was active during the fiscal year in promoting public and
educational broadcasting with emphasis on programming which would reflect the
character and history of the Province. In this connection, discussions were held
with the CBC with the object of gaining a prime time-slot on its British Columbia
network for airing TV programming to be produced under the auspices of the
department. Talks were also held with CBC on a major expansion of the Corporation's British Columbia network to cover the smaller and more rempte communities in the Province.
 L 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
:-z,'.v..
Telephone operations, Victoria Division.
In the area of assistance, a sum of money was included in the Department's
budget for assisting communications development. It is expected this program
will be developed during the forthcoming fiscal year. Extending the CBC service
through assistance to community groups could be an important segment of this
program.
In November 1974 the Department supported and participated in a Community Communications Conference sponsored by the Community Planning
Association of British Columbia. It served to identify a wide range of concerns
on the part of groups who felt there should be Government encouragement and
support for more extensive use of a wide range of communications techniques for
enhancing community cultural awareness, information exchange, and social
services.
Of continuing concern is the ability of the economy to keep pace with the
rapidly growing demand for more and better communications services. This
demand results from both the high population growth rate in the Province and
the attractiveness and utility of the services themselves. The difficulty in financing
this growth applies equally to telephone, broadcasting, and cable TV development.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
L 31
ADMINISTRATION
FINANCE
HOW THE TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS DOLLAR IS SPENT
Fiscal Year 1974/75
o\o    .
1. General Administration and Engineering Branch.
2. Weigh Scale Branch.
3. Motor-vehicle Branch.
4. Motor Carrier Branch and Commission.
5. Computer and Consulting Services Branch.
6. Telecommunications Services Branch and System Development and Regulation Branch.
7. Ferries Operations (including B.C. Ferries Service).
8. Air Services Branch.
 L 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES
Fiscal Year 1974/75
$
Vote 235—Minister's Office  119,763.23
Vote 236—Administration  397,842.31
Vote 237—Engineering Branch  163,674.02
Vote 238—Weigh Scale Branch  1,416,392.21
Vote 239—Motor-vehicle Branch  6,801,968.18
Vote 240—Motor Carrier Branch  475,653.10
Vote 241—Data Processing Centre  3,636,372.32
Vote 242—Communications Branch  5,015,779.62
Vote 243—B.C. Ferries  81,079,523.00
Vote 244—Motor Carrier Commission  83,305.28
Vote 245—Aircraft Maintenance and Operation 4,105,564.66
103,295,837.93
Bill (No. 7)—Revenue Surplus Appropriation
Act, 1969     36,123,550.17
139,419,388.10
PERSONNEL SERVICES
With the passing of the Public Service Labour Relations Act in the fall of
1973, collective bargaining in the British Columbia Public Service proceeded at a
rapid pace".
The first contract to be finalized was the British Columbia Government Employees' Union Master Contract, which was signed on June 28, 1974.
The Department, with its multiplicity of services, is involved with eight of the
13 Component Agreements covering a broad scope of marine, administrative,
technical, and professional classifications.
The enlarged scope of classification variations contained in the revised Departmental structure has presented a challenge in the area of personnel administration.
In addition to the two personnel officers in the general administrative offices of the
Department, one officer works exclusively with the Motor-vehicle Branch and seven
are assigned to B.C. Ferries.
As was anticipated, the transition from the former system to a collective bargaining controlled system of operation has resulted in a number of grievances being
initiated. Most of the grievances can be attributed to misinterpretation of contract
provisions or the fact that changes in administrative procedures have not kept pace
with the detailed provisions of the respective agreements.
The personnel area of administration has proven to be a most useful educational process for management, union, and employee alike, and as experience is
gained at all levels it is anticipated that the number of grievances will diminish.
An accelerated program of recruitment was initiated in an effort to meet the
immediate needs of the various branches of the Department. Recruitment problems arose in some sectors during the fiscal year due to not yet finalized component
wage negotiations.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
L 33
STATISTICAL SUPPLEMENT
The following pages contain statistics for Air Services Branch, Motor Carrier
Branch, Engineering Branch, Motor-vehicle Branch, Weigh Scale Branch, B.C.
Ferries Service, and Coastal Ferries.
 L 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
L 35
Total
Aircraft
Miles
April  49,627
May  59,755
June   44,216
July   42,437
August  52,777
September   45,838
October   59,047
November  47,805
December  31,304
January   51,777
February   52,110
March     60,574
Total
597,267
Total Number
of
Passengers
716
1,355
1,008
1,144
842
766
1,034
1,150
884
1,109
1,449
1,520
12,977*
•6,624 passengers were carried in 1972/73.
 L 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MOTOR CARRIER BRANCH STATISTICS
REVENUE
Under Appendix A, revenue has been calculated for the period March 1,
1974, to February 28, 1975, the analysis being broken down for the licence-year.
NUMBER OF LICENCES
Appendix B outlines the number of licences issued for the licence-year
1974/75. Records continue to show a yearly increase ranging from 8 to 10
per cent.
TEMPORARY PERMITS
In order to provide flexibility, Part 10 of the Regulations Pursuant to the
Motor Carrier Act provides for the issuing of temporary permits in lieu or as an
adjunct to motor carrier licences.
Statistics will show a reduction in the total number of permits issued during
licence-year 1974/75. The reduction is a result of a restricted policy enunciated
by the Motor Carrier Commission with respect to the granting of such permits.
In addition, as a result of the labour situation during the licence-year 1974/75,
there were periods when transportation was greatly reduced, particularly in respect
to the Forest Industry.
The following is a summary of the number of temporary permits issued during
licence-year 1974/75.
Class II Permits (for temporary operations as a public
or limited vehicle not exceeding 92 days)     3,941
FP Permits (for operation of a licensed public or
limited vehicle temporarily in a manner other
than is authorized by the licence, or pending consideration of an application for licence, renewal,
alteration, or transfer of licence, etc.)   10,037
Temporary Permits (issued for the transportation of
household goods to carriers from provinces having reciprocity agreements with the Province of
British Columbia respecting commercial motor-
vehicle licences)      1,782
APPENDIX A
1974/75 LICENCE-YEAR
(March 1, 1974, to February 28, 1975)
$
Passenger (buses)   57,967.25
Passenger (taxi)   38,741.00
Public and limited freight  619,655.27
Permits  20,674.50
Miscellaneous   16,790.75
Total   753,828.77
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
L 37
APPENDIX B
The following table for licence-year 1974/75 gives the number of licences for the various
classes issued:
Kind of Licence
Passenger (buses)
Passenger (taxi)
    1,171
  1,973
Public freight   15,927
Limited freight   2,438
Total
21,509
 L 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ENGINEERING BRANCH STATISTICS
Industry
Period
April 1,
1974,to
March 31,
1975
Industrial Road Industry._
Railway Industry..
Aerial Tramways Industry..
Pipe-lines Industry-
Industrial vehicles inspected  _	
Field and office air-brake lecture attendance.	
Industrial vehicle driver examinations processed..
Industrial roads inspected   :___
Industrial road bridges inspected...
..(miles)
New vehicle applications reviewed and processed_
Mobile Equipment Committee meetings attended_
Industrial road accidents investigated.
New air system developed for school buses and logging trucks
Railways under the jurisdiction of the DOTC:
• B.C. Railway.
• B.C. Hydro and Power Authority Railway.
• B.C. Harbours Board Railway.
e Vancouver Wharves.
• Canadian Forest Products Railway.
• Crown Zellerbach Logging Railway.
• MacMillan Bloedel Company Railway.
and some 21 other industrial railways plus three recreation railways.
Number of locomotives inspected.. j _	
Number of railway yards inspected  	
Number of railway operating personnel certified	
Number of new trackage applications reviewed and processed
Number of public crossings reviewed for future automatic
signalization requirements     	
Number of railway accidents investigated „  	
Annual inspections-
Engineering designs reviewed and processed for
(1) new aerial tramway installations  _
(2) major modifications of existing equipments _	
Progress inspections carried out during various stages of
construction of the 31 new aerial tramways.
Number of pipe-line projects reviewed and processed and
endurance tested  _ _	
Natural gas compressor stations inspected .
Oil pumping-stations inspected..
Water injection pumping-stations inspected _	
Pipe-line crossing applications reviewed and processed .
Bulk fuel storage plants inspected. 	
Transmission pipe-line inspection	
Pipe-line failures investigated _	
..(miles)
271
800
454
500
4
142
27
10
170
12
175
15
6
20
203
14
5
123
65
45
28
225
112
1,800
25
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS L 39
Pipe-line Failures and Oil Spills for 1974
January 1 B.C. Transmission Company.
March 14 Trans-Prairie Pipelines Ltd.
May 5 Westcoast Petroleum Company Ltd., 7,000 barrels.
May 24 Scurry Rainbow.
June 9 Westcoast Transmission Company Ltd.
July Pacific Petroleums Ltd.
August 30 Pacific Northern Gas Ltd.
September 11 Tenneco Company Ltd., 200 barrels.
September 21   Texaco Exploration Ltd.
November 9 B.P. Explorations Canada Ltd., 800 barrels of crude.
November 2 Texaco Exploration Ltd.
November 2 Texaco Exploration Ltd.
December 4 Union Oil Company Canada Ltd., 10 barrels.
December 16 Union Oil Ltd., 70 barrels.
Examinations
Railway operating examinations were conducted at various railway and plant
sites during the year. Railway personnel who passed examinations and possessed
the required experience and medical qualifications were issued with the appropriate certificates.
The following certificates were issued in the various categories: Steam Locomotive Engineer, 3; Steam Crane Engineer, 1; Diesel Locomotive Engineer, 37;
Trackmobile Operator, 77; Motorman, 11; Switchman, 44; Conductor, 1; Dispatcher, 1.
This represents a continuing increase in the number of railway-operating
personnel certified.
Industrial transportation: Number of field lectures, 20; number of office lectures, 7; field lecture attendance, 690; office lecture attendance, 110; field driver
examinations, 280; officer driver examinations, 174.
Vehicles inspected: Log trucks, 220; crummies, 36; gravel trucks, 15.
 r
L 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MOTOR-VEHICLE BRANCH STATISTICS
The various activities of the Motor-vehicle Branch during the year 1974 are
dealt with in this section under the following headings:
Licences.
Accidents and Convictions.
Driving.
Driver Improvement Program.
Examination of Drivers.
Motor-vehicle Inspection.
Central Registry.
School Buses.
Permits for Flashing Red and Amber Lights, Sirens, and Theft Alarms.
Staff.
LICENCES
The report deals with the activities of the Branch during the year 1974 and
provides an accounting for the various aspects of total motor-vehicles licensed in
the Province for the 1974 licence-year which ended on February 28, 1975.
The volume of business transacted by the Motor-vehicle Branch in 1974 is
indicated by the following breakdown of vehicles licensed in the Province.
The total number of vehicles licensed in the Province during 1974 was
1,333,891, a decrease of 119,895, or 8.25 per cent on the 1973 total of 1,453,786.
Passenger-type motor-vehicles licensed were 879,751, a decrease of 81,746,
or 8.50 per cent on the 1973 total of 961,497.
Commercial vehicles licensed were 270,101, a decrease of 16,824, or 5.86
per cent on the 1973 total of 286,925.
Motor-cycles licensed were 21,184, a decrease of 12,311, or 36.75 per cent
on the 1973 total of 33,495.
Trailers licensed were 162,855, a decrease of 9,014, or 5.24 per cent on the
1973 total of 171,869.
The decrease in the number of vehicles licensed in 1974 is attributed to the
licence-plate with owner concept, whereby used vehicles on motor-vehicle dealer
sales lots are not required to be licensed.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
L 41
Comparative Statement of Licences, Permits, Etc., Issued During the
Licence-years 1967 to 1974, Inclusive
Licences Issued
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
Motor-vehicles—
Passenger (new)	
Passenger (renewal)	
Total passenger	
Commercial (new)	
Commercial (renewal) _	
Total commercial	
Total motor-vehicles	
Nonresident touring motor-
vehicle permits	
Nonresident special motor-vehicle
permits	
Nonresident   commercial   motor-
vehicle permits—
Single trip	
Quarterly permits _
Totals _	
Extra-Provincial  prorated  trucks
Temporary operation permit!;—
Passenger _	
Commercial	
Totals	
Transporter—
Original	
Additional	
Motor-cycles—
New _	
Renewal..
Totals.
Trailers	
Extra-Provincial prorated trailers
Motor dealers—
Original licences	
Additional plates.
Original motor-cycle dealer licences	
Additional motor-cycle dealer licences 	
Salesmen's licences _	
Transfers—
Passenger-
Commercial.
Motor-cycle.
Trailers	
A.T.V	
Total transfers.
Chauffeurs—
Original Class A	
Original Class B	
Original Class C	
Searches	
89,817      94,333
612,186|   646,646
107,504
682,989
90,262
721,328
702,003|   740,979|   790,493|   811,590
20,3291
142,8851
25,171|
152,462
30,5641     26,727
167,1911   180,768
163,214|   177,6331   197,7551   207,495
865,217|   918,612|   988,248|l,O19,085
1,067
34
13,209
1,912
929
32
15,690
2,408
590
19
20,696
3,029
540
10
21,596
3,156
15,121
18,098
23,7251
24,752
2,775
2,713
3,2311
3,093
15,717
37,057
17,599
42,128
20,260|
49,6651
20,805
52,831
52,774|     59,727|     69,925|     73,636
4,063        3,780
13,166      14,684
30
87
5,181
15,724
38
95
6,083
16,417
17,229|     18,464|     20,9051     22,500
91,627
6,743
1,086
1,306
118
92
1,196
341,859
57,193
10,872
8,654
102,068
7,859
1,140
1,332
120
85
1,191
351,092
62,370
11,391
9,637
114,420|
8,0001
I
1,173
1,538|
124]
I
95
1,163
383,477
71,858
13,447
12,003
129,864
6,640
1,204
1,490
141
84
1,246
347,879
70,522
15,334
14,337
108,584    119,031
747,502    787,237
129,549
831,941
856,086|   906,268|   961,497|   879,751
32,973|     41,095
195,125|   215,218
46,999|..
239,926|..
228,098| 256,313| 286,925[ 270,101
1,084,184|1,162,581|1,248,422|1,149,852
418,578|   434,490|   480,785|   448,072
I
Safety responsibility insurance certificates filed  	
All-terrain vehicles—
Registrations	
Substitutions 	
7,0651
6,876|
83,0911
1,692,128
13,459
7,972
7,078
83,323
,701,655
15,884
8,324
7,768
90,476
12,908
8,714
8,459
91,723
550
496
468
1
2
3
33,880
4,488
33,443
4,001
40,508
4,900
266
5
39,923
2,412
38,368|     37,444|     45,408|     42,335
3,699        4,048        5,067        9,202
23,814
69,648
26,600
80,603
29,402
75,983
52,027
60,221
93,462|   107,203|   105,385|   112,248
44
141
7,749
17,590
53
177
9,543
19,829
72
2441
I
10,5421..
22,9531.
214
489
25,339|
141,978
7,335
1,205
1,538
148
134|
1,130
405,928
86,003
17,278
19,167
29,372
33.495J
156,372
8,090
171,869
10,714
1,274
1,684
1,392
2,146
150
167
158
207
1,051
951
439,242
101,424
20,044
22,022
900
452,980
112,273
22,279
26,282
2,881
21,184
162,855
14,024
1,408
2,098
215
93
394,860
2,580
528,376| 583,640| 616,6951 397,440
8,433
7,658
82,506
I
17,456
84
6,356
141
3,983
89
 L 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
DRIVERS' LICENCES
Original drivers' licences issued during the 1974 licence-year totalled 130,630,
an increase from the 1973 total of 95,195.
Licensed drivers in British Columbia at the end of 1974 totalled 1,485,555,
up from the 1973 total of 1,394,923, an increase of 90,632. Male drivers comprised the major portion, numbering 903,401, while females numbered 582,154.
The analysis of drivers' licences on record as of December 31, 1974, indicating sex
and classification, is shown hereunder.
Analysis of Drivers on Record as of December 31, 1974
MALE CLASSIFICATION
Age
1,6
I      I
1    |2,6|     3
I I
3,6 1 3,4
3,4,6
4,6
5,6
6    1
1,419
188
3,930
308
15,717
795
11,131
403
2,431
64
1,419
63
507
48
77
23
34
31
28
21
18
12
10
6
6
Total
16-17 years.
18-19 „ ..
20-24 „ _.
25-34 „ _
35-44 „ _
45-54 „ ..
55-64 „ ...
65-69 „ ..
70-74 „ ..
75-79 „ _
80-84 „ ...
85-89 „ _.
90 and over..
Total..
2
82
1,642
7,899
7,449
4,370
1,326
99
5
15
532
820
439
169
38
1
22
597
2,466
1,947
1,700
1,078
145
13
2
22,875|2,014|7,970
I   I
89
462
2,764
7,245
6,140
5,110
2,764
351
18
4
1
10
95
658
646
246
128
34
1
9
237
861
539
402
145
12
1
571|24,948
1,818(2,206
I
2
85
130
45
20
4
2
216
2,976
6,407
3,017
2,236
1,243
211
56
1
3
2
39
666
680
153
66
19
3
24
33
87
191
142
125
96
36
23
12
6
3
,090
,882
251
,732
292
135
,087
,209
726
631
962
052
979
25,800
39,066
114,076
230,654
164,860
140,876
103,313
37,132
23,885
12,687
6,997
3,070
985
286|16,370| 1,626
784,028 36,7211,9581903,401
 1    I I	
FEMALE CLASSIFICATION
16-17 years	
3
1
15
46
33
17
2
1
2
6
17
48
38
35
6
4
1
1
20
339
656
448
268
81
5
1
1
2
16
16
4
2
14,906
25,903
78,948
164,364
108,525
92,692
62,072
15,806
8,026
3,853
1,503
397
74
53
147
848
931
191
79
23
6
4
5
3
2
12
23
95
83
21
14
3
1
3
14,977
18-19    „    	
20-24    „
7
1
28
118
123
80
24
1
1
5
2
1
6!	
26,104
80,308
25-34    „    	
1
2
166,281
35-44    „    	
2
1
109,389
45-54    „    	
	
	
93,188
55-64    „   .....   	
62,211
65-69    „    	
15,823
70-74    „    	
8,034
75-79    „    	
1
3,859
80-84    „    	
—-
1,507
85-89    „    	
399
90 and over	
74
Total	
118
7
375
8
156
4
10
1,820
40
577,069
2,292
2551582.154
MOTOR DEALERS' LICENCES
Motor dealers' licences issued by the Branch are required by individuals or
firms whose businesses involve the buying and selling of motor-vehicles, motorcycles, or trailers. During the 1974 licence-year, 1,048 motor dealers' licences
permitting the sale of motor-vehicles and trailers and 215 motor-cycle dealers'
licences permitting the sale of motor-cycles and trailers were issued. Also issued
were 209 licences without plates permitting the sale of motor-vehicles, motorcycles, and trailers.
A prerequisite for the issuance of a motor dealer's licence or the retention of
such a licence is that an insurance bond be supplied to the Superintendent of Insurance in the amount of $5,000 or security be filed with the Minister of Finance
in a similar amount. The insurance bonds are filed with the Branch on behalf of
the Superintendent of Insurance and in 1974, 505 dealers' bonds were filed of
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
L 43
which 315 were original bonds for new motor dealers and 190 were replacement
bonds. There were 433 bonds cancelled during 1974. Security was filed with the
Minister of Finance by 17 motor dealers.
A process of investigation is carried out for each new motor dealer. Information in connection with the proposed operation, previous businesses, corporate
formation, business intentions, premises, and compliance with municipal zoning
regulations are considered before a licence is authorized.
DISTRIBUTION OF MOTOR-VEHICLES
The distribution of motor-vehicles in the various centres of the Province is
always of interest. The following table gives information concerning the number
of licences issued through the principal licence offices. Since vehicle-owners move
frequently from one area to another, and vehicles are often sold to new owners
residing in different locations from previous owners, the table cannot be regarded
as an accurate population count of vehicles in the various parts of the Province.
However, the table does provide a guide as to distribution of vehicles throughout
the Province, and it is of use to groups concerned with community planning projects
and development.
Name
District
Passenger
Commer
Commer
Utility
Motor
Code
cial
cial Trailer
Trailer
cycle
190
12,916
4,353
225
2,312
466
Agassiz	
036
1,186
590
12
256
48
Alaska Highway	
510
4,544
2,843
58
1,145
217
Aldergrove	
191
3,393
1,438
75
616
101
Atlin	
514
085
3
1,398
Armstrong	
829
41
325    -
29
Ashcroft _
042
1,291
816
23
379
45
Barriere  	
159
575
468
22
163
13
083
161
044
307
124
260
420
121
177
14
15
4
44
32
35
5
2
Boston Bar 	
13
046
103
43
52,957
54
12,172
9
6,315
5
3,506
52
129
972
048
010
1,262
6,969
1,134
2,994
482
2,065
63
Campbell River ...	
271
Cassiar Mines 	
182
265
241
4
52
29
Castlegar 	
123
3,112
1,312
34
755
98
Chase  	
050
1,510
1,004
41
422
44
017
038
1,399
14,262
649
4,879
18
251
403
2,871
40
Chilliwack   	
570
052
028
431
20,901
425
5,967
28
290
153
3,857
13
Cloverdale.	
476
Courtenay 	
012
9,328
3,577
79
3,115
294
Cowichan	
018
1,792
711
5
503
65
Cranbrook	
125
5,930
3,162
636
1,368
220
Creston 	
127
3,176
1,977
91
841
75
Dawson Creek	
167
4,770
3,614
364
1,438
165
Duncan	
019
9,761
3,928
306
2,213
330
Elkford	
516
1,405
832
21
324
105
Enderby 	
087
1,231
906
55
309
34
Fernie	
131
3,267
1,961
86
662
132
181
185
969
731
1,023
619
90
41
277
204
22
Fort St. James	
38
Fort St. John	
169
4,591
4,262
326
1,365
187
Ganges    	
023
1,634
654
20
257
47
Golden	
133
2,087
1,261
92
444
116
Gold River   .
016
089
539
2,230
206
1,156
1
84
179
443
24
Grand Forks	
121
Greenwood	
091
748
616
42
152
30
Haney	
032
11,846
3,490
82
2,241
248
Hazelton	
054
668
559
47
145
26
Hope  	
040
1,843
1,061
108
385
64
 L 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
District
Passenger
Commer
Commer
Utility
Motor
Name
Code
cial
cial Trailer
Trailer
cycle
Houston	
056
931      |
671
50
233
48
186
841
820
45
322
14
135
157
1,717
21,405
1,315
10,012
80
506
425
4,765
45
Kamloops	
612
Kaslo	
137
567
303
13
170
27
Kelowna	
093
25,381
8,883
446
5,313
708
Keremeos	
095
813
597
15
188
45
Kimberley	
139
2,993
1,338
18
817
113
Kitimat	
058
3,886
1,187
40
875
108
Ladysmith ,	
021
2,166
875
17
591
63
Lillooet	
059
813
617
25
201
43
061
171
063
252
450
2,273
203
424
1,456
4
28
65
58
105
699
8
24
Merritt	
63
034
141
5,520
677
2,058
624
89
22
1,053
264
152
27
Nanaimo	
006
16,629
5,418
208
3,798
535
Natal   —
Nelson	
143
49
41
1
7
150
6,412
2,371
61
1,298
251
145
003
329
50,610
213
9,303
7
526
98
7,013
16
New Westminster area -
1,042
Northern Vancouver Island
515
2,557
1,728
12
419
108
North and West Vancouver
004
55,802
6,209
612
4,916
973
183
119
58
4
15
18
Oliver	
099
1,937
937
26
401
51
100 Mile House	
065
2,364
1,800
105
672
79
100
1,473
717
28
290
37
Parksville	
014
2,078
798
22
640
52
Penticton	
112
12,374
4,280
186
2,589
406
Point Roberts, U.S.A.	
512
1,263
779
29
197
49
008
9,396
3,523
48
2,759
241
Powell River	
175
5,926
1,973
34
1,752
127
067
20,963
11,296
726
5,217
530
069
4,287
1,412
63
667
145
Princeton	
114
1,409
905
40
356
62
Qualicum	
015
1,276
547
5
351
20
520
1,008
674
12
186
60
Quesnel  „	
071
5,226
3,634
201
1,401
226
Revelstoke	
116
2,408
1,260
74
588
127
102
147
148
118
53,846
109
650
4,739
8,817
54
400
2,659
313
6,723
46
170
1,311
873
25
108
30
Salmon Arm	
150
513
935
467
4
104
19
Sechelt	
173
3,753
1,711
25
735
130
Sidney	
025
4,990
1,261
31
843
107
Slocan 	
155
498
370
14
75
14
Smithers	
073
2,265
1,632
89
623
81
026
177
1,437
2,340
736
1,080
38
54
303
398
43
117
Surrey	
029
39,677
10,416
357
7,138
882
075
180
152
4,809
278
8,231
3,168
139
2,408
164
3
114
1,245
43
1,900
126
Tofino	
17
Trail  -	
263
Ucluelet	
179
479
272
7
119
26
002
077
170,198
2,045
29,411
1,692
3,800
107
12,013
554
2,692
Vanderhoof	
88
163
429
[            325
20
111
20
165
1,091
829
42
316
47
121
12,944
6,018
345
3,041
398
001
079
081
84,515
79
4,793
21,751
44
4,001
1,451
1
191
12,617
25
1,220
1,750
Wells                   	
4
Williams Lake —	
185
Out of Province -
529
366
720
646
57
4
Totals	
879,751
270,101
19,860
|      142,995
21,184
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS L 45
Licensed motor-vehicle populations by area as obtained from reports prepared on behalf of the Superintendent of Motor-vehicles by the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia. These reports were compiled from verified transactions processed through the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia Data
Centre on behalf of this Department.
Passenger vehicles      873,227
Motor homes   6,524
879,751
Total passenger vehicles  879,751
Total commercial vehicles  270,101
Total commercial trailers  19,860
Total utility trailers  142,995
Total motor-cycles  21,184
Total licensed vehicles  1,333,891
REVENUE
Revenue received by the Motor-vehicle Branch from licences, permits, motor-
vehicle inspection, and other services, and in payment of social services tax, increased 45.60 per cent from $52,812,085.33 to $76,895,748.45, an increase of
$24,083,663.12.   Social Services Tax collections amounted to $518,348.22.
Insurance premiums collected by the Motor-vehicle Branch on behalf of the
Insurance Corporation of British Columbia amounted to $27,017,219.66.
Revenues, Source of 1974 Licence-year
$
Revenue Collected by Motor-vehicle Branch  33,020,609.18
Revenue collected by the Insurance Corporation of British
Columbia on behalf of the Motor-vehicle Branch for fees
collected pursuant to the Motor-vehicle Act and Department of Commercial Transport Act for the 1974 licence-
year   43,875,139.27
Grand total  76,895,748.45
 L 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Summary of Revenue Statement
Motor-vehicle Act fees and Department of Commercial Transport Act fees
prepared for the Superintendent of Motor-vehicles by the Insurance Corporation
of British Columbia for fees deposited in the "General Revenue Account" for the
1974 licence-year.
Motor-vehicle Act fees—
$ $
Passenger vehicles  19,587,995.00
Motor-cycles        108,024.00
Notice of transfers        570,996.00
Duplicate certificates   24,871.00
Total Motor-vehicle Act fees  20,291,886.00
Department of Commercial Transport Act fees—
Commercial vehicles  21,270,511.00
Total Department of Commercial  Transport Act
fees   21,270,511.00
Combined fees of Motor-vehicle Act and Department of Commercial Transport
Act—
Trailers         707,176.00
New vehicles        448,580.00
Substitution plates   97,229.00
Decal replacements  9,981.00
Total combined fees—Motor-vehicle Act and Department of Commercial Transport Act     1,262,966.00
Total of other revenues deposited in the General
Revenue Account by the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia on behalf of the
Motor-vehicle Branch     1,049,776.27
Grand total  43,875,139.27
Refunds
Legislation provides for refunding of licence fees paid in instances where the
licence-plates are surrendered to the Superintendent of Motor-vehicles. A person
who was allocated motor-vehicle licence-plates for use on a vehicle registered in his
name, can upon disposal of the vehicle, retain, destroy, attach the number-plates to
a substitute vehicle, or surrender them to the Superintendent, together with an application for remission of fees in the prescribed form.
Refunds for motor-vehicle licence-plates are granted on the basis of the
unexpired portion of the licence-year, but no refund is made of an amount less
than $5.
On reassignment of motor-vehicle licence-plates to a substitute vehicle, if the
combined licence and insurance fee is less than $5 no refund is granted.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
L 47
The fee for the unexpired full years of the five-year driver's licence is refundable
under the following circumstances upon surrender of the licence to this Branch:
(a) The licence has been suspended due to the failure of the licensee to
qualify in a driver's examination.
(b) The licensee has taken up residence outside the province.
(c) The licensee is deceased.
(d) The licensee has voluntarily surrendered his driver's licence.
The following table sets out the amount of money refunded for the 1974
licence year:
Refunds, 1974
General refunds—
Motor-vehicle Act— $
Passenger      1,692
Drivers      	
Department of Commercial Transport Act—Commercial       491
Relinquishment refunds—
Motor-vehicle Act
Passenger      	
Drivers   3,191
Dealers   51
Department of Commercial Transport Act—Commercial     	
2,183
990,747
6,906
1,633
1,251,982
2,251,268
ACCIDENTS AND CONVICTIONS
MOTOR-VEHICLE ACCIDENTS
The following table gives a summary of the accident frequency during the
period 1965 to 1974:
Motor-
Number
Accidents
per 1,000
Deaths
per
10,000
Vehicles
Registered
Average
Deaths
per 100
Million
Miles
Fatal
Fatal
Accidents
Year
vehicles
of Acci
Vehicles
Injuries
Deaths
Property
Acci
per 100
Registered
dents
Registered
Damage
dents
Million
Miles
1965	
764,353
40,262
52.68
17,574
500
6.5
$
561.96
8.00
421
6.73
1966   	
817,348
44,177
54.05
19,449
520
6.4
592.91
7.60
445
6.51
1967	
864,34-8
49,750
57.56
19,500
559
6.5
565.58
7.67
461
6.33
1968	
917,872
58,300
63.51
20,945
574
6.2
570.87
7.36
460
5.90
1969	
989,196
70,624
71.39
22,535
542
5.4
586.29
6.39
467
5.50
1970	
1,024,738
60,778
59.35
22,568
559
5.5
731.63
6.70
471
5.64
1971	
1,087,992
59,745
54.91
22,340
636
5.8
775.60
6.51
538
5.54
1972	
1,164,749
59,996
51.51
23,316
716
6.1
863.44
6.90
602
5.80
1973	
1,248,422
69,564
56.00
27,709
825
6.7
969.00
7.17
698
6.07
1974
1,333,891
84,445
63.30
28,699
844
6.3
995.26
6.80
718
5.79
 L 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA
While there is an increase in the number of fatal accidents from 1973 to 1974,
the ratio of deaths per 100 million miles driven has dropped from 7.17 in 1973 to
6.80 in 1974. Fatal accidents per hundred million miles have also dropped from
6.07 to 5.79.
Property damage in 1974 was $84,045,060.61, up from $66,372,052.42 in
1973. With inflation it is difficult to make cost comparisons. The average property
damage figure in 1974 was $995.26 compared with the 1973 figure of $969.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
L 49
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 L 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province for
the Year 1974—Continued
2.                    HOUR OF OCCURRENCE
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
2,915
3,252
2,348
1,260
608
620
1,002
2,634
3,192
2,838
3,059
3,519
3,579
4,313
5,078
6,588
7,690
6,064
4,098
4,554
4,039
3,947
3,566
3,661
21
54
45
31
21
9
12
9
14
11
12
14
15
24
22
37
38
42
52
43
47
45
49
39
33
671
835
563
300
151
168
212
553
692
571
631
750
785
890
1,089
1,421
1,693
1,466
963
1,130
932
875
843
779
7
2,190
2,372
2 to   3 a.m	
1,754
939
448
440
781
7 to   8 a.m	
2,067
8 to   9 a.m	
2,489
9 to 10 a.m	
2,255
10 to 11 a.m                   	
2,414
11 to 12   m	
2,754
12 to   1 p.m            ...                	
2,770
3,401
3,952
5,129
5,955
4,546
3,092
3,377
8 to   9 p.m         	
3,062
9 to 10 p.m	
3,023
10 to 11 p.m	
2,684
11 to 12 p.m.               	
2,849
14
Totals _	
84,445
718
18,970
64,757
3.                      DAY OF OCCURRENCE
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
10,365
10,732
11,340
10,669
11,659
14,925
14,748
7
125
85
81
68
92
117
150
2,641
2,389
2,435
2,402
2,492
3,249
3,361
1
7,599
8,258
8,824
8,199
9,075
11,559
11,237
8. Not stated                           	
6
84,445
718
18,970
64,757
4.             TYPE OF VEHICLES INVOLVED
Number of Vehicles Involved
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
119,675
18,975
504
702
148
1,481
44
19
35
784
208
7
4
1
46
1
1
25,644
4,068
181
185
33
991
8
3
6
93,247
2. Truck	
14,699
316
3. Bus ■        	
513
5. "Drive Yourself"	
114
6. Motor-cycle	
444
35
16
9. Not stated	
28
141,583
1,052
31,119
109,412
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
L 51
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province for
the Year 1974—Continued
RAILROAD CROSSINGS
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Unguarded crossing 	
2. Automatic signal	
3. Guarded crossing—man on duty..
4. Driver disregarded signal...	
5. Signal not given	
6. Not stated	
Totals	
64
20
1
6
13
16
40
11
1
3
7
15
120
36
77
MANNER OF COLLISION
Number of Accidents
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Angle collision	
2. Head-on-collision or head-on side-swipe	
3. Rear-end collision	
4. Backed into other vehicle	
5. Side-swiped other vehicle going same direction .
6. Not stated ...	
Totals	
34,818
11,933
19,239
4,469
4,779
9,207
205
289
27
5
9
183
7,390
3,513
4,677
160
390
2,840
I
27,223
8,131
14,535
4,304
4,380
6,184
84,445
718
18,970
64,757
7.                        DRIVERS INVOLVED,
Number of Drivers
DESCRIPTION OF
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Male                                  	
98,246
27,193
16,144
885
145
22
23,299
7,019
801
74,062
2. Female             ....         ..   	
3. Not stated                                  	
20,029
15,321
141,583
1.052         1       31.119
109,412
Age of Driver
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. 16 to 17 years.	
2. 18 to 19 years                    .....    .
11,290
13,847
24,853
29,477
17,844
14,223
8,955
2,471
2,520
104
114
240
213
137
112
51
21
38
2,610
3,457
6,195
7,232
4,239
3,404
2,054
517
621
8,576
10,276
18,418
3. 20 to 24 years            	
22,032
13,468
10,707
6,850
8. 65 to 69 years     	
1,933
1,861
Driving Experience
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
4,359
2,026
5,306
29,649
84,047
16,196
75
9
6
286
653
23
1,067
460
1,241
7,311
20,227
813
3,217
1,557
4,059
4. 1 to 4 years 	
22,052
63,167
6. Not stated	
15,360
 L 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province for
the Year 1974—Continued
Condition of Driver
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
121,376
838
174
339
2,788
4,638
11,430
888
16
3
5
120
8
12
28,990
306
78
88
850
101
706
91,498
516
93
4. Confused by traffic	
246
1,818
4,529
7. Not stated	
10,712
Licence of Driver
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
117.543
906
28,115
616
1,573
815
88,522
2,003                     47
5,809                     77
16.228                       22
1,340
4,159
15,391
-
ACTION OF DRIVER CONTRIBUTING
TO ACCIDENT
Number of Drivers
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13
14
15
16.
17.
18
19
20
21
No improper driving 	
Driving ojf roadway 	
Did not have right-of-way...  	
Car standing in roadway (not parked)..
Following too close 	
On wrong side of road —
Failing to signal.
Through street—did not stop-
Passing at intersection 	
Exceeding speed limit	
Careless driving _.
Cutting in   	
. Car ran away..
Passing on curve or hill..
Passing on wrong side ...
Hit and run	
Railroad—did not stop..
Cutting left corner	
Parked legally.
Driving through school zone-
Driving through safety zone..
Totals..	
44,906
9,954
17,649
13,404
11,930
3,459
572
2,411
382
2,370
14,893
2,246
750
173
260
4,848
87
482
10,725
15
12
382
157
70
21
10
130
2
13
1
67
153
5
1
3
2
14
8
1
12
10,572
2,610
3,889
3,845
3,009
859
86
709
81
690
3,500
224
54
50
27
137
28
71
653
6
7
33,952
7,187
13,690
9,538
8,911
2,470
484
1,689
300
1,613
11,240
2,017
695
120
231
4,697
51
410
10,060
9
5
141,528
1,052
31,107        |    109,369
9.                         TRAFFIC CONTROL
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
60,818
141
11,238
9,238
3,010
601
34
31
52
13,167
37
2,809
2,100
857
47,050
104
3. Automatic traffic signal	
8,395
7,107
5. Warning signs, slow signs, etc	
2,101
84,445
718
18,970
64,757
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
L 53
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province for
the Year 1974—Continued
10.                PEDESTRIANS INVOLVED, ACTIONS OF
Number of Pedestrians
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
14
337
276
241
109
133
157
73
65
39
14
20
42
24
141
5
1
19
20
18
1
16
39
2
2
6
1
3
4
2
7
13
2. Crossing at intersection—no signal	
318
256
223
5. Crossing at intersection with signal	
108
117
118
71
63
33
13
12. Riding or hitching on vehicle	
17
38
22
134
5
Totals	
1,690
141
1,549
Condition of Pedestrian
Number of Pedestrians
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Apparently normal...
Extreme fatigue	
Had physical defect .
Confused by traffic.
Ability impaired	
Not known	
Not stated.. -	
Totals	
1,492
115
1,377
1
	
1
10
3
7
31
3
28
90
17
73
42
2
40
24
1
23
1,690
141
1,549
11.                          CLASSIFICATION OF VICTIMS
Number of Victims
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
12,950
13,003
1,690
682
964
17
237
265
377
141
11
40
1
9
12,685
12,626
1,549
671
924
6. Others (persons in horse-drawn vehicles, etc.)....	
16
228
Totals	
29,543
844
28,699
12.
NATURE OF
INJURIES
Number of Victims
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
1
12,673
343
125
2,776
5,558
913
311
6,501
265
26
34
8
10
	
212
46
25
503
3
1
26
20
8
	
12,673
?
131
3
79
4
2,751
5.
fi
Other injuries (sprains, distortions
etc.)	
5,558
410
7
308
8.
9
Severe general shock with bruises and cuts	
6,500
265
1(1
11
14
1?
Asphyxiated	
13.
Not stated	
10
Totals  	
29,543
844
28,699
 L 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province for
the Year 1974—Continued
13.
LIGHT CONDITIONS
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Daylight	
2. Darkness	
3 Artificial light—good...
4. Dark or semi-darkness
5. Artificial light—poor...
6. Not stated	
Totals ....-	
49,859
22,675
5,199
4,924
1,692
96
305
329
21
47
14
2
11,120
5,133
1,195
1,076
428
18
84,445
I
718
38,434
17,213
3,983
3,801
1,250
76
18,970 64,757
14. Amount of property damage for period covered by this report,
last year, $66,372,052.42; amount of property damage this year to date,
last year, $66,372,052.42.
4,045,060.61;  amount for same period
4,045,060.61;  amount for same period
15.     CONDITION OF VEHICLES INVOLVED
Number of Vehicles
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
137,099
1,014
973
386
157
612
138
124
14
107
925
34
1,018
1
4
2
6
5
2
14
30,017
187
267
122
54
174
29
20
5
22
213
9
106,064
826
702
262
97
438
7. Head-lights out (both)	
104
102
9
10. Head-light out (one light)        	
85
11. Other defects	
698
12. Not stated   	
25
Totals      	
141,583
1,052
31,119
109,412
16.                   DIRECTION OF TRAVEL
Number of Vehicles
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
70,454
17,602
7,637
8,276
3,789
7,111
1,387
266
762
7,943
499
1,530
3,490
10,837
717
80
38
17
6
108
2
2
16
8
2
25
18
13
17,229
3,896
1,319
2,236
175
1,645
92
49
180
2,338
58
373
858
671
52,508
13,626
6,280
6,023
3,608
5,358
1,293
215
566
5,597
439
1,132
2,614
14. Not stated	
10,153
Totals   	
141,583
1,052
31,119
109,412
17.
ROAD SURFACE
Number of Accidents
Total
1. Dry surface.	
2. Wet surface	
3. Icy surface	
4. Loose sand or gravel..
5. Snowy surface	
6. Muddy surface	
7. Not stated	
Totals	
48,909
24,034
5,522
2,578
3,156
229
17
Fatal
467
179
38
14
19
1
Personal
Injury
11,363
5,408
1,017
618
514
46
Property
Damage Only
37,079
18,447
4,467
1,946
2,623
183
12
84,445
718
18,970
|      64,757
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
L 55
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province for
the Year 1974—Continued
18.
ROAD CONDITION
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
82,242
512        1
418        [
517        |
240        I
501
15        ]
689
9
12
2
1
1
18,447
131
93
117
62
117
3
63,106
2. Defect in roadway ..- ■  —	
372
321
388
5. Obstruction not marked or lighted	
6. Other    	
176
383
7. Not stated                  .     	
11
84,445         |
1
718
18,970
64,757
19.                           TYPE OF ROAD
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
79,646
3,798
508
339
27
113
14
676
35
2
2
1
1
1
18,086
695
100
59
4
22
4
60,884
3,068
3. Concrete   	
4. Earth  	
406
278
22
6. Other    	
90
7. Not stated	
9
84,445
718         1       18.970
64,757
20.                   WEATHER CONDITIONS
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Clear.- - - -	
2. Rain    	
50,873
18,586
9,563
1,260
3,936
207
20
1
458        |      11,546
121        1        4.193
38,869
14,272
3. Cloudy	
97
15
2,212
311
7,254
934
25
1
1
654
48
6
3,257
158
7. Not stated                	
13
84,445
718        1       18.970
64,757
Convictions
The receipt of notices of convictions for driving infractions under the Criminal
Code (Canada), the Motor-vehicle Act, the Motor-vehicle Act Regulations, and
the reports of violations of any law known as a "Traffic Rule" continued to supply
information for the inclusion in the individual driving records of each licensed
driver in this Province. Access to these records is available by means of the driver's
licence number or by the name of the driver. The retaining of these records and
the furnishing of information which is invaluable for driver control is the main duty
of the Driver Licence Records Section. The control which is made possible by
these records is the responsibility of the Driver Safety and Improvement Section.
 L 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Traffic Violation Reports, 1971-74
Offences
1971        1972        1973        1974
Under Motor-vehicle Act—
Driving motor-vehicle otherwise than as restricted on driver's licence,
sec. 18 (6-8).
Failing to obey emergency instructions of a peace officer, sec. 124	
Failing to obey traffic-control signal legend, sees. 127, 128, 152	
Failing to obey special signal signs re highway construction, sees. 134,
135, 137 _.	
Careless driving, sees. 138, 139 - _ _..
Exceeding maximum speed limit, sec. 140  _	
Exceeding speed limit passing schools and playgrounds, sec. 141..
Exceeding speed limit overtaking stopped school bus, sec. 142	
Failure to drive on the right, sec. 143.
Infractions of "lane" driving, sees. 144-146	
Infractions of "passing", sees. 148-151, 153, 154  	
Infractions of turning, starting, and directional signals, sees. 155-162.
Failure to yield right-of-way, sees. 163-167..
Not exercising due care re pedestrians, sees. 168-172.
Failure to stop at railroad crossing, sees. 174-176	
Failure to stop at intersections, sec. 177	
Leaving vehicle improperly parked, sec. 182	
Backing vehicle illegally, sec. 184..
Operating motor-cycle with more than one person, sec. 185 .
Requirements of safe driving on highway, sees. 186, 187	
Fire-vehicle safety, sees. 189, 190	
Driving on sidewalk, sec. 191 _
Open door requirements, sec. 194 _	
Miscellaneous _	
21
27,787
450
5,848
106,110
5,103
146
1,156
4,806
4,594
4,387
4,135
1,661
254
8,085
1,589
1,164
10
100
36
64
41
32
30
27
25,366
554
6,787
111,443
5,725
230
1,286
4,965
5,135
3,485
4,577
1,258
309
8,294
451
1,306
6
73
27
55
38
26
14
48
29,779
579
7,998
125,545
6,456
178
1,364
5,718
5,565
3,762
5,332
1,512
240
8,544
1,212
5
10
34
84
35
9
8
53
34,201
310
9,250
148,237
6,634
223
1,539
6,156
6,230
3,795
6,009
1,448
198
8,746
1,533
10
60
44
93
44
11
Under Motor-vehicle Act Regulations .
177,579 |181,453  |204,023 [234,832
10,791  | 10,963  |    4,816 |    9,960
Notices of Juvenile Offence, 1971-74
Offences
1971
1972
1973
1974
Under Motor-vehicle Act—■
Driving without obtaining driver's licence, sec. 18 (1, 2)..
Driving motor-vehicle otherwise than as restricted on driver's licence,
sec. 18 (6-8)
Driving without subsisting motor-vehicle liability policy, sec. 18 (2a)	
Driving without having driver's licence and liability card in possession
at time, sec. 19
Using licence belonging to another, refusing to show licence, etc., sec. 56.
Failing to obey emergency instructions of a peace officer, sec. 124	
Failing to obey traffic-control signal legend, sees. 127, 128, 152	
Failing to obey special signal signs re highway construction, sees. 134,
135, 137  .....     	
Careless driving, sees. 138, 139
Exceeding maximum speed limit, sec. 140 	
Exceeding speed limit passing schools and playgrounds, sec. 141-
Exceeding speed limit overtaking stopped school bus, sec. 142	
Failure to drive on the right, sec. 143	
Infractions of "line" driving, sees. 144-146
Infractions of "passing," sees. 148-151, 153, 154  	
Infractions of turning, starting, and directional signals, sees. 155-162.
Failure to yield right-of-way, sees. 163-167
Not exercising due care re pedestrians, sees. 168-172.
Failure to stop at railroad crossing, sees. 174-176	
Failure to stop at intersections, sec. 177	
Leaving vehicle improperly parked, sec. 182	
Backing vehicle illegally, sec. 184 .
Operating motor-cycle with more than one person, sec. 185-
Requirements of safe driving on highway, sees. 186, 187.	
Fire-vehicle safety, sees. 189, 190	
Driving on sidewalk, sec. 191	
Opening door requirements, sec. 194	
Illegal depositing of articles on highway, sec. 195	
Riding motor-cycle without safety helmet, sec. 207	
Miscellaneous	
72
221
1,020
19
885
5,489
309
12
89
275
387
174
311
65
14
596
94
1,980
62
1
455
4
416
2,548
148
5
55
93
148
74
151
23
4
269
42
~~2
2
3
5
8
27 |
18
42
60
5
3
408
2
427
2,659
153
3
55
110
183
70
165
30
4
275
5
38
26
13
29
53
4
1
687
6
735
4,341
228
4
96
152
281
112
256
31
8
418
4
77
1
4
1
3
1
5
8
11
12,695 |    4,623 |    4,755 |    7,596
Under Motor-vehicle Act Regulations.
I-
265 |       944
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
SUMMARY
L 57
Offences
1971
1972
1973
1974
16,734
31,319
6,571
188,370
12,695
14,939
10,454
1,344
192,416
4,623
15,946
12,572
5,361
204,023
4,755
17,346
10,417
14,414
234,832
7,596
255,689
223,776
242,657
284,605
 L 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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1
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS L 59
DRIVING
Driver Safety and Improvement
In addition to the screening of unsatisfactory driving records which has resulted
in many suspensions of drivers' licences, we have made continued progress in driver
safety and improvement during 1974 in controlling drivers whose actions become
hazardous on the highway as a result of alcohol. The Motor-vehicle Branch personnel have been actively participating in Impaired Driving Programs throughout the
major part of British Columbia. The people who attend these programs have been
ordered to do so by a Provincial Judge after they have been convicted of impaired
driving. These programs consist of four 2-hour class sessions and, although they
have only been in operation for a short period, they appear to have reached the
value of expectation. Defensive driving courses are still being conducted throughout
British Columbia.
Summary of Action Taken Under Driver Improvement Program, 1974
Age 16-17
Age 18 and
over
Total
5,326
737
10
351
1
35
275
3
20
42,918
8,190
159
6,100
145
2,287
3,537
137
490
8
42,918
5,326
Notices of intent to suspend—■
8,927
Female	
169
Results of notices to suspend, interviews, and hearings—
Licences suspended—
6,451
146
Previously suspended         	
Previously warned	
2,322
3,812
Previously on probation	
Driver's licence placed on probation—■
Male    _         	
140
510
Female	
8
Impaired, 14,444; total infractions received, 284,605; special restrictions, 798; juvenile offences, 8,588.
Examination of Drivers
The statistics of 1974 reveal there is a slight percentage increase in the number of drivers that have partaken of a driver training course from either a high
school or a commercial driving school. The number of people participating in
driver training programs have been steadily on the increase over the last few years
and this is most encouraging. Continued interest in driver education is bound to
be reflected in improved driving practices and fewer accident involvements.
Analysis of Annual Input for Year 1974
Male Female Total
Original licences   63,035 47,969 111,004
Examinations taken—
High school driver training..    4,195 2,859 7,054
No professional training  46,899 29,236 76,135
Commercial school training 11,926 12,657 24,583
Unknown   17,939 4,919 22,858
Totals
80,959      49,671    130,630
 L 60 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Driver Training School Statistics, Licence-issuing Period March 1,1974, to
February 28,1975
Issuances
Schools Operator Instructor
Licences issued  86 85 313
Terminations  2 10 102
Suspensions         2
Reinstatements        1
Total active licences as of
February 28, 1975     84 75 210
Examinations Conducted
Written examinations (first, second, and third)—
Passed   153
Failed     74
Total   227
Practical examinations—
Passed   125
Failed   64
Total   189
Temporary Permits
Original permits issued  223
Temporary instructors as of February 28, 1975     11
$500 Security Bonding 1974 $
Bonded by surety (60 X $500)  30,000
Security on deposit (parity bond) (21 X $500)  10,500
Security on deposit (cash) (5 X $500)     2,500
Total surety and security value  43,000
Revenue $
School licences ($25)   2,150
Operator's licences ($10)   850
Instructor's licences ($5)   1,565
Total      4,5 65
Inspections Conducted
Driver training-schools   104
Driver Education Incentive Program  204
THE DRIVER EDUCATION INCENTIVE PROGRAM
(Sponsored by the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia)
The purpose of this program is to promote highway safety. An incentive
bonus is available to new drivers, 16 years of age or older, who are obtaining their
first British Columbia driver's licence of Class 5 or 6.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
L 61
The grant is up to $50 to assist in the tuition fees paid by the student completing an approved driver education course. These courses consist of 25 hours
of theoretical instruction and eight hours of "behind-wheel" instruction.
The Superintendent of Motor-vehicles is responsible for the approval of the
courses, inspection of the school records, and monitoring the instruction. All
applications for the rebate are processed through the Driver's Examination Section.
Driver Education Incentive Program Certificates
Number of DEIP certificates received  10,443
Number of DEIP certificates approved   10,417
Number of DEIP certificates rejected   26
During the fiscal period ending February 28, 1975, there were 53 secondary
school and 72 driver training-schools approved to conduct Driver Education
Incentive Program Courses.
Driver Examiner Staff Training, March 1, 1974, to February 28, 1975
Phase I  Examiners Trained
Part 1     37
Part 2  13
Part 3  12
Phase Ill-
Part 1   11
Part 2  10
Total
83
MOTOR-VEHICLE INSPECTION
During 1974 the compulsory program of motor-vehicle inspection was continued in the Victoria area, the Lower Mainland, and the Nanaimo area. These
areas are served by five inspection stations with a total of 15 lanes. The stations
are located in Victoria, Vancouver, Richmond, Burnaby, and Nanaimo.
The following is the number of inspections completed at each station:
Inspection Station
Approved
Rejected
Percentage
Rejected
Inspections
Conducted
Victoria—
1973 ...	
106,359
38,156
26.4
144,515
1974	
105,866
33,305
23.9
139,171
Vancouver—
1973   .      	
153,389
74,401
32.6
227,790
1974	
103,933
50,393
32.7
154,326
Richmond—
1973	
75,318
37,549
33.3
112,867
1974	
71,883
32,574
31.1
104,457
Burnaby—
1973	
160,588
83,892
34.3
244,480
1974	
139,179
66,743
32.4
205,922
Nanaimo*—
1973	
12,515
11,423
47.7
23,938
1974	
26,349
18,644
41.4
44,993
* Commenced operation September 14, 1973.
Notices requiring the owner to present his motor-vehicle for inspection were
mailed to 293,106 owners during 1974, of whom 114,258 required a second
notice.   Notification of suspension were given to 8,752 owners.
The following is a summary of vehicle inspection:
 L 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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During the inspection of motor-vehicles, it was found that 201,659 did not
meet the standards and were rejected.   The total number of defects found were
407,301, or 2.02 defects for each rejected vehicle.
When conducting the inspection at the inspection stations, 118 vehicles were
found to be in such a condition that they could not be allowed to return to the highway.  The vehicles were condemned, their licence suspended, and they were towed
from the inspection stations.
The following are the causes of rejection:
Causes of Rejection, April 1,1973, to March 31,1974
Code
Age 1
Age 2
Age 3
Age 4
Total
1. Motor-vehicle licence	
4,196
1,689
6,688
2,543
5,110
4,163
1,120
1,224
1,167
236
631
719
44,658
1,731
647
296
1,062
3,715
7,229
9,094
333
9,180
9,869
1,074
1,912
561
957
3,040
3,371
289
4,373
2,241
1,614
9,527
4,672
7,200
8,092
1,121
2,164
2,396
671
1,756
1,380
36,595
1,227
321
557
742
4,780
15,268
12,329
457
18,056
11,108
2,027
4,796
552
1,393
4,001
4,361
702
2,599
827
1,012
4,325
2,200
3,762
4,734
549
1,381
1,733
506
2,269
1,101
14,195
403
136
296
244
2,660
9,587
6,814
434
9,382
4,602
1,841
2,572
292
453
1,912
1,785
511
1,114
294
509
1,069
772
1,239
1,383
669
519
800
199
1,177
470
3,564
334
103
112
89
536
2,889
1,626
131
2,347
1,716
609
757
68
243
725
533
136
469
7,558
4,824
21,609
10,187
17,311
18,372
3,459
5,288
6,096
1,612
5,833
3,670
99,012
3,695
1,207
1,261
2,137
11,691
34,973
29,863
1,355
38,965
27,295
5,551
10,037
1,473
3,046
9,678
10,050
1,638
8,555
8. Horn	
10. Left window-raiser	
11. Doors, body, hood	
12. Bumper, mudflaps	
14. Identification lamps	
16. Fog-lamps	
18. Wheel alignment	
22. Exhaust, muffler        	
24. Pedal reserve	
25. Brake connections	
27. Vehicle noise  .
28. Parking brake	
29. Visibility	
30. Driver seat-belts	
Totals	
132,877
164,705
83,632
26,087    |    407,301
1
Vehicle Age Code: Age 1, 1971 and later; Age 2, 1970 to 1966; Age 3, 1965 to 1961; Age 4, 1960 and earlier.
A total of 29 Authorized Fleet Inspection Stations has been established.  Two
of these stations inspect all types of vehicles and 27 are authorized to inspect
regular trailers only.  A total of 4,146 vehicles were inspected and approved at
these stations.
The Vancouver Inspection Station operated at a reduced capacity due to
major alterations which commenced in August and continued through the balance
of the fiscal year.
Early in the year a new computer program was introduced and vehicle records
were transferred from one system to another.    Because of the high volume of
errors produced in vehicle records the notification of vehicle  suspensions to
registered owners had to be cancelled and production of inspection notices to
owners to present their vehicle for inspection had to be reduced.
 L 64 BRITISH COLUMBIA
CENTRAL REGISTRY
The Superintendent of Motor-vehicles has been appointed to the position of
Registrar General and is responsible for the operation of the Central Registry.
Documents are recorded and searched under the Bills of Sale Act, Conditional
Sales Act, Mechanics' Lien Act, Assignment of Book Accounts Act, and the
Provincial Home Acquisition Act (mobile homes). Documents are also registered
and searched in connection with the Companies Act when the chattels refer to
vehicles.
The Central Registry accepted for registration a total of 402,476 documents
during the 1974/75 fiscal year for a decrease of 13,319 documents when we
compare this figure with the total number of documents registered during the
1973/74 fiscal year. During the 1974/75 fiscal year, 551,108 new entries were
added to the records maintained by the Central Registry.
Search information may be obtained by way of telex, TWX, telephone, mail,
or personal attendance. All encumbrances pertaining to mobile equipment (automobiles, trucks, trailers, motor-cycles, mobile homes, etc.) are filed by the serial
number and encumbrances pertaining to other goods or chattels are recorded in
the name of the purchaser or mortgagor. The value of search fees for the 1974/75
fiscal year amounted to $213,841.75, a decrease of $5,097.25 over the previous
year. The fees for photocopies and certification of documents on file with the
Central Registry amounted to $5,833.75, an increase of $1,945.25 over the
previous fiscal year.
The Central Registry administers approximately 2,500 search fee accounts
which may be used to obtain information regarding motor-vehicles and drivers'
records in addition to the regular lien searches.
The Central Registry accounted for $10,253 concerning requests for drivers'
abstracts and this amount was a decided decrease when we compare this total from
the revenue received in previous years. This service was used mainly by the private
insurance companies doing business in British Columbia and when the Province
of British Columbia entered the automobile insurance field then naturally this type
of search request decreased. The total revenue accounted for by the Central
Registry in 1974/75 fiscal year was $1,323,866.50.
In order that the Central Registry could improve their service, all records
pertaining to liens placed against motor-vehicles were transferred to computer and
eight computer retrieval terminals were installed. Therefore, when a search request
is received pertaining to a motor-vehicle the serial identification number is typed
on the computer retrieval terminal and an immediate response is received indicating
whether or not a lien has been placed against the vehicle in question. The records
pertaining to encumbrances other than motor-vehicles will be placed on computer
in the fall of 1975.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
L 65
Statistical Comparisons for Year Ended April 1, 1974,
With Year Ended March 31,1975
Documents filed under—
Conditional Sales Act 	
Bills of Sale Act	
Mechanic's Lien Act 	
Assignment of Book Accounts Act	
Companies Act 	
Provincial Home Acquisition Act	
Late order filings under Conditional Sales
A ct 	
Late order filings under Bills of Sale Act	
Documents discharged under—
Conditional Sales Act 	
Bills of Sale Act	
Mechanic's Lien Act 	
Assignment of Book Accounts Act	
Companies Act
Provincial Home Acquisition Act
1973/74
Fiscal Year
1974/75
Fiscal Year
99,069
246,486
46,459
1,028
545
92,915
242,691
40,054
1,160
602
926
2,639
3,685
10,674
3,908
12,356
1,553
2,372
2,773
39
1,408
2,238
2,169
40
185
191
1
105
Total documents accepted  415,795        402,476
Total value of— $
Documents accepted  1,126,818.00
Search fees      218,939.00
Photographic copy fees   3,888.50
$
1,093,938.00
213,841.75
5,833.75
Total revenue  1,349,645.50      1,313,613.50
Lien cards key-punched or information
added to computer re document
registration—
Serial information	
Alphabetical information 	
Total number of entries to
Central Registry records 	
410,856
200,436
611,292
387,650
163,458
551,108
SCHOOL BUSES
Control over the use and operation of school buses engaged in the transportation of students to and from schools in the Province is the responsibility of the
Superintendent of Motor-vehicles. The control extends to the setting of minimum
standards for the construction and maintenance of school buses and provides for
periodic inspection of school buses. This inspection is carried out on behalf of
the Superintendent by mechanical inspectors of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police,
the Motor Carrier Branch of the Motor Carrier Commission, and senior Motor-
vehicle Inspectors of the Branch.   Motor-vehicle Inspectors at the five Inspection
 L 66 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Stations operated by the Branch are appointed Mechanical Inspectors for the inspection of school buses. School buses in the Victoria area, Greater Vancouver area,
and Greater Nanaimo area are inspected at the Inspection Station in the area or by
an Inspector from a station.
In 1974 the number of permits issued for vehicles to be used as school buses
was 1,107 renewal permits and 148 permits for new vehicles, for a total of 1,255
as compared to the 1973 figure of 1,273. Of these permits issued, 43 were cancelled as the result of the sale and transfer of vehicle or of poor mechanical condition. In 1974, school buses were involved in 51 accidents of which 32 resulted in
property damage only. Three students and 15 persons other than students were
injured in 16 injury accidents. There were two fatal accidents involving school
buses in the year 1974.
PERMITS FOR FLASHING RED AND AMBER LAMPS, SIRENS,
AND THEFT ALARMS
The Superintendent may, under the provisions of the Motor-vehicle Act
Regulations, issue permits to allow a vehicle to be equipped with a flashing lamp.
The regulations specify that certain emergency vehicles, tow cars, and pilot cars
may be equipped without obtaining a permit. The permits are required for vehicles
such as public utility vehicles which must stop on a highway to repair power or
telephone lines. In each case the permit is issued where a hazard exists and only
with the approval of the local enforcement agency.
In 1974, 88 permits for flashing amber lamps and six permits for flashing red
lamps were issued. In addition, eight permits were issued to allow the installation
of sirens and red flashing lamps on vehicles. These vehicles were usually ambulances or the personal vehicle of the chief of a volunteer fire department in a small
community.
One permit was issued for the installation of a theft alarm in a vehicle.
STAFF
The staff of the Motor-vehicle Branch increased by 19 in 1974 for a total of
443 permanent positions. This increase includes the addition of 11 clerical positions, seven Driver Examiners, and one Motor-vehicle Inspector. In December of
1974, a full-time Personnel Officer was added to the staff.
In addition to the permanent position the Branch also employed 80 temporary
employees during 1974.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
L 67
WEIGH SCALE BRANCH STATISTICS
Prosecutions
Total number of prosecutions entered by Weighmasters during the fiscal year
1974/75 as compiled from monthly returns on Form T-70 are as follows:
Commercial Transport Act and regulations -.  4,945
Motor Carrier Act and regulations  664
Motor-vehicle Act and regulations  336
Miscellaneous statutes    42
Total prosecutions  5,987
Types of prosecutions laid under the Commercial Transport Act and regulations were broken down as follows:
Overloaded    2,991
Oversize  1,364
Miscellaneous       590
Vehicle Checks—Motor Carrier Act and Regulations
Number of vehicles checked _, 26,806
Accidents, Commercial Vehicles, G.V.W. 40,000 Pounds or More
Fatal accidents	
Persons killed	
Personal injury accidents _
Property damage accidents
Total accidents	
21
24
66
172
259
Revenue and Statistics Statement
Type of Permit
Trucks checked  1,901
Nonresident permits	
Temporary operations 	
ICBC (TOP) 	
Restricted route	
Motive-fuel emblems	
ICBC Highway crossing	
Special temporary permits	
Number
Issued
Revenue
901,116
$
37,261
1,012,752.62
39,316
92,494.75
38,086
87,281.20
4,614
156,427.28
14,557
185,763.58
932
16,917.70
1,754
5,246.00
Totals   2,037,636
1,556,883.13
 L 68
BRITISH COLUMBIA
B.C. FERRIES STATISTICS
Total passengers carried during the year ending March 31, 1975, was
9,592,425; total vehicles carried reached 3,538,622. This was an increase over
fiscal year 1973/74 of 12.34 per cent for passengers and 11.64 per cent for vehicles.
British Columbia Ferries Service Traffic, April 1,1974, to March 31,1975
Route
Total
Automobiles
Trucks1
and Motor
Carriers
Buses
Recreation! Vehicles and
Towed
Trailers
Adult
Passengers
(Including
Driver)
Children
Total
Number
Travelling
as
Organized
Party
Tsawwassen-Swartz Bay	
Horseshoe Bay-Departure Bay.
1,006,372
729,280
456,698
111,118
97,328
81,148
79,809
113,269
75,958
48,322
24,778
12,137
51,818
50,823
25,016
7,408
3,426
3 102
27,720
12,467
3,356
1,664
48
225
178,798
180,311
57,460
13,206
11,356
12,211
1,564
2,690
1,363
1,843
2,893
3,456
3,534,417
2,314,370
1,176,050
266,618
267,418
324,693
165,653
285,358
163,493
125,396
65,440
48,119
261,032
193,771
102,048
24,578
19,738
31,556
5,632
3,302
132,777
41,996
23,815
3,484
Horseshoe Bay-Snug Cove
2,584
8,329
Swartz Bay-Outer Islands	
Swartz Bay-Fulford    	
10,436    |         33
10,331    |       138
8,829    |       102
12,495    |         38
4,673    j       663
338    |       105
429
Kelsey Bay-Prince Rupert	
329
Totals	
2,836,217    |   188,695    | 46,559
1
467,151
8,737,025
641,657
213,743
i Motor-cycles, drop trailers, and recreational vehicles under 6 ft. 6 in. were included by error in 1973/74
truck totals.   In the 1974/75 report, these vehicles have been included in the applicable column.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
L 69
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 L 70 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Coastal Ferry Revenue
Revenue from the coastal ferries for the fiscal year under report is broken
down as follows:
$
Comox-Powell River  590,238.09
Cortes Island  62,512.85
Denman Island  49,268.20
Gabriola Island  129,576.48
Hornby Island  18,413.90
Quathiaski Cove  167,979.80
Nimpkish   126,306.83
Texada Island  147,919.35
Thetis Island  23,890.80
Woodfibre  18,641.25
1,334,747.55
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
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 Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1976
1,230-376-5970

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