Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

MINISTER OF MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT for the Year Ended… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1976

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0377957.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0377957.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0377957-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0377957-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0377957-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0377957-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0377957-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0377957-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0377957-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0377957.ris

Full Text

 Minister of Mines and
Petroleum Resources
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
for the Year Ended December 31
1974
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1976
Leo T. Nimsick, Minister
John E. McMynn, Deputy Minister
  To Colonel the Honourable Walter S. Owen, Q.C, LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I respectfully beg to submit the Annual Report of the Department of Mines
and Petroleum Resources for the year ended December 31, 1974.
Victoria, B.C.,
August 1975.
LEO T. NIMSICK
Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources
  CONTENTS
Page
1.  INTRODUCTION
     11
Revenue                                                            . 	
           11
Production                                                           	
    12
Organization
           13
Mineral Resources
          13
Prospectors' Assistance	
    14
Coal	
   15
Petroleum Resources 	
.._..__ 15
2.  REVIEW OF THE MINING INDUSTRY
    19
Exploration	
    19
Development and New Production	
  20
Production	
  21
Provincial Revenues	
  23
Commodity Prices	
  23
Major Producing Mines     	
-.   24
Bell   	
24
Bethlehem	
--.  24
Boss Mountain 	
...   24
Brenda	
25
Britannia	
...  25
Bull River (Placid Oil)	
-.  26
Byron Creek	
-  26
Cassiar Asbestos  	
-  26
Churchill Copper	
-  27
Endako	
-  27
Fording Coal	
-  27
Gibraltar.._       	
  28
Granduc  .  	
  29
Granisle	
  29
HB 	
30
Highland Bell      	
  30
Island Copper 	
  30
Jordan River (Sunro)    	
  31
Kaiser Resources (Harmer Ridge, Balmer North,
Balmer South) 31
Lornex   	
  32
Lynx and Myra (Western Mines) 	
—  33
Phoenix  	
-  33
Pinchi Lake	
  34
Pride of Emory (Giant Mascot)	
   34
Reeves MacDonald and Annex 	
...  35
Similkameen	
  35
Sullivan    	
  35
Tasu (Wesfrob)	
-  36
Texada	
  37
Minor Mines, Pits, and Quarries 	
  37
Metal Mines	
--  37
Industrial Minerals	
--  38
Structural Materials	
—  38
A 5
 Processing                     	
Page
39
Safety                                          	
40
Reclamation	
  41
3. REVIEW OF THE PETROLEUM INDUSTRY	
  45
Exploration                                    	
45
Development	
__._       46
Production	
46
Hydrocarbon and By-products Reserves	
  47
Title Holdings	
48
Mediation and Arbitration Board	
  48
4. HIGHLIGHTS OF DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES                        51
Legislation  51
New Legislation  51
Legislative Amendments  52
Organization  52
Economics and Planning Division  54
Mineral Revenue Division  54
Accounts  54
Personnel  54
Mineral Resources Branch...   54
Geological Division  55
Inspection Division    55
Titles Division  56
Petroleum Resources Branch  56
Engineering Division  56
Geological Division  57
Titles Division  58
Appointments and Retirements  58
Departmental Work  59
Administrative Services  59
Economics and Planning Division ,  60
Data System  60
Mineral Studies  60
Mineral Revenue Division  60
Coal Royalty  61
Mineral Act Royalty  61
Mineral Land Taxes  61
Mineral Royalties  62
Petroleum and Natural Gas Royalties  63
A 6
 Departmental Work—Continued
Page
Mineral Resources Branch  63
Geological Division  63
Geological Fieldwork  63
Mineral Inventory  64
Analytical Laboratory  64
Publications and Special Reports  65
Inspection Division <.  65
Certificates  65
Prosecutions and Suspensions  66
Mine Rescue and First Aid  66
Reclamation  66
Aid to Brokers' Office :  67
Environmental Control  67
Mechanical-Electrical   67
B.C. Mining School                                 67
Mining Roads  67
Prospectors' Assistance  67
Titles Division  68
Claim Records  68
Claims Inspection  68
Production Permits     68
Petroleum Resources Branch   69
Engineering Division  69
Development Engineering  69
Drilling and Production Engineering  69
Reservoir Engineering  70
Geological Division  71
Economic Geology  71
Reservoir Geology  72
Titles Division   73
Dispositions   73
Transactions  73
PART B—MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS 75
A 7
  1
1 wm
V%
:^p
*&K
•                "   .
1
Ul        *&&■■ ~  *''■
li             1
j            'I
i ■'    i
j       |    ,
;
;    ";
■;
f»s"™''"7'
►,7V; -•••V-   -"—s'">'-- ' <V>:~'V •■- ;-**#,V
! ^ • i
|i        i    ■ " \-          CO-?
k
* I
.IV'. ■:      ~Ep   '     -»«"^" ;'*'. '        \. ,_ «f "•
...
'.l'    ■        £?,       ':■'
•-- ";. ^^ *       .■-V:■'■-,' '
r
1...
. 1
r
!            ii    '.jM
i •
}*'..
i
\
1 • j
*
1
Ti •;    \
I
.^?*^V   '          \    %,   z   •*>.
. ll
■■■'....._',
HP . ■■ iJP: Ml
,:; ''1                        ^      :';L      '                           ^*^.     "v   *    . '
  Introduction
John E. McMynn, Deputy Minister
This is the first Annual Report of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum
Resources in the second century of its publication. A Departmental report on the
mineral industry has been published annually since 1874. From 1874 to 1959 it
was the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines and since 1960 it has been the
Annual Report of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
Starting in 1969 the Annual Report contained a review of the mineral industry
and chapters dealing with Statistics, Departmental Work, Petroleum and Natural
Gas, and Inspection of Mines. Also commencing in 1969, technical reports on
geology, mineral exploration, coal, metal mines, placer, industrial minerals and
structural materials, formerly included in the Annual Report, were published
separately in a volume entitled Geology, Exploration and Mining in British Columbia. In 1974 a new Departmental publication entitled Geological Fieldwork was
prepared to provide an early summary of exploration activities.
This Annual Report has a new format, so as to permit proper emphasis on the
relationship of its content with developments in the resource industries during 1974.
REVENUE
In 1973 the Department was divided into two branches, namely, Mineral
Resources and Petroleum Resources. The purpose of this division was to give more
appropriate representation to the two major resource industries. A picture of the
returns from each resource follows.
The direct revenue to the Crown from petroleum resources for 1974, exclusive
of the income of the British Columbia Petroleum Corporation, was $83.6 million
compared to $46.5 million in 1973. This was 50 per cent of the value of petroleum
and natural gas production, $166.5 million in 1974, compared to 40 per cent of the
production value in 1973.
Statement of Revenue From the Mineral and Petroleum Resources
Mineral resources—
Claim recording fees, lease rentals, and free $
miners' certificates   1,786,457.07
Coal licences and rentals  215,269.45
Coal royalties  1,642,329.75
Mineral land taxes  2,640,022.84
Mineral royalties  9,521,285.37
Mining taxes  31,805,331.31
Rentals and royalties on industrial minerals
and structural materials  583,371.93
Total  48,194,067.72
A 11
 A  12
MINES AND  PETROLEUM   RESOURCES REPORT,   1974
Petroleum resources— $
Disposition of Crown reserves   22,955,334.00
Natural gas royalties           3,288,296.85
Penalties   649.20
Petroleum royalties                               45,300,184.21
Rentals and fees .. 11,995,664.00
Royalties on by-products  51,181.21
Miscellaneous fees   19,104.00
Total*      83,610,413.47
Total direct revenue from mineral and petroleum
resources   131,804,481.19
* Petroleum resources revenue does not include the revenue or royalty-equivalent value accrued to British
Columbia Petroleum Corporation or any taxes.
The direct revenue to the Crown from minerals, including coal, was $48.2
million in 1974 compared to $8.7 million in 1973. All royalties and mineral land
taxes account for $13.8 million of the revenue in 1974. Total direct revenue from
minerals was approximately 5 per cent of the $1.03 billion value of production in
1974 compared to 0.9 per cent of the production value, $985.3 million, in 1973.
In comparing these resource figures, it must be kept in mind that operating
costs are vastly greater in mining than in petroleum resource production. Hence,
the 5-per-cent revenue contribution by the mineral industry compares well with the
50-per-cent revenue contribution by the petroleum industry.
PRODUCTION
In the 1904 Annual Report of the Minister of Mines, Gold Commissioner
W. G. McMynn (relative of the present Deputy Minister) made the following
comments concerning his annual report of operations:
". . . It is by no means complete, as it has been found very difficult to
obtain from some companies and individuals operating the working
properties any idea at all of what has been done during the year. . . ."
Unfortunately, the above statement is almost as relevant 70 years later. There are
still obscurities in data obtained from various sources for mining operations, as well
as differences due to differing methods of calculation. Attempts are presently made
to provide clearer reporting criteria and standards.
Total Value
Actual Value to
the Province
Metals   764,524,841
Industrial minerals   33,676,214
Structural materials   78,088,393
Coal  154,593,643
Subtotals, mineral resources _ 1,030,883,091
Petroleum     104,827,952
Natural gas to pipe-line  61,298,656
Butane   232,085
Propane   196,742
Subtotals, petroleum resources 166,555,435
Grand totals   1,197,438,526
624,044,874
33,676,214
78,088,393
154,593,643
890,403,124
104,827,952
61,298,656
232,085
196,742
166,555,435
1,056,958,559
 INTRODUCTION
A   13
Copper continued as the major metal and prices ranged from a high of $1.33
per pound to 57.5 cents at year-end for a total production value of $541.6 million.
Coal production was increased to 8.6 million tons valued at $154.6 million in
1974 and, while oil and gas production decreased, values were up due to higher
prices.
ORGANIZATION
There was a major reorganization of the Department in early 1975 and a new
Branch, Operations, was added. It is under H. Horn as Associate Deputy Minister.
This Branch is responsible for Administration, Mineral Development, and Mineral
Revenue. Hence, Operations covers accounts, filing, library, personnel, public
information, mineral statistics and economics, mineral development and evaluation,
prospectors' assistance, resource roads, freehold mineral titles, and mineral revenue.
Resident geologists have been located at Smithers, Nelson, Kamloops, and
Prince George, and major additions have been made to the staff of the Inspection
Division to provide better service, especially in the fields of reclamation and mine
safety. Five rescue co-ordinators are now stationed around the Province to provide
mine-rescue training and co-ordinate rescue efforts in the event of an emergency.
MINERAL RESOURCES
The introduction of the resource management concept in Government disturbed
many members of the mineral industry. Whereas heretofore they held the privileged
position of developing and promoting every and any occurrence they wished, new
legislation established Governmental involvement in the control over what could
or could not be exploited.
There is nothing new in the idea of resource management; forests, a renewable
resource, have been managed for years. Further, the Federal Government is
rapidly working to establish a "Mineral Policy for Canada." Several major
"thinking" companies have already been involved in discussions with the Government on projects that entail mutual faith and understanding. The sooner others
realize that the laissez-faire policy no longer exists, and that real progress can only
be made by working together toward a common goal of maximum reasonable
profits, working conditions, and environmental controls, the sooner will mining
progress to new heights in British Columbia.
In its role as an active participant in resource management, the Department
must ensure optimum resource utilization. To be better able to assess the options
available to the Province in resource development and utilization, the Department
has been involved in several studies on the economics and inventory of our resources.
A Copper Task Force was appointed jointly by the Minister of Mines and
Petroleum Resources and the Minister of Economic Development to carry out a
detailed study of the copper resource. Its members were drawn from Government,
industry, labour, and the university faculties and were under the chairmanship of
the Deputy Minister of this Department. The task force studied the economic,
sociological, and environmental impact of the various strategy options concerning
copper development. Although the Copper Task Force Report was not tabled in
the Legislature until June 1975, the bulk of this investigation was undertaken
during 1974. The professional staff of the Department provided considerable
support work for this study. Changing economic and technological factors will
undoubtedly necessitate intensive studies of other mineral resources in the future.
 A 14 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1974
New awareness of the environment, recognized in recent legislative amendments, has led to renewed and increased efforts in the field of reclamation. Although
much of this effort has to date been directed toward basic reclamation research, both
in test plot trials and greenhouse experiments, there are some very encouraging
examples of large-scale reclamation projects. The techniques, equipment, and manpower that are so vital to this effort have only recently been available. The rugged
and varied topography of British Columbia and the climatic variation have proven
to be difficult but not insurmountable problems. Experience in this relatively new
field indicates that reclamation plans and techniques must be specifically developed
for each minesite. With fertilization and a suitable selection of seeds and native
plant stock, grasses and shrubs can be grown directly on coal waste. The Department's reclamation staff have offered advice and assistance to the industry, especially
small placer and other mining operations where professional expertise is not always
readily available.
In spite of a lull in mining activity there was still a shortage of employees. This
will be a major problem in expansion to come and in the development of northern
regions.
Industry must realize that the miner is a first-class citizen. It will require
major improvements in working conditions, living accommodation, recreational
facilities, and other incentives to lure and retain employees. Miners are now
certified and are continuing to seek greater participation in the determination of
working and living conditions.  This is a right that carries with it a responsibility.
Another first for the Department during 1974 was the sponsorship of a survey
of British Columbia mining communities by two graduate students from the University of Victoria. Their preliminary observations were published in January 1975
and will form the basis for a continuing appraisal of living conditions for those
employed in the industry.
Since a well-trained, stable work force is essential to any industry, it is reasonable that the Department should assist in the training and eventual certification of
miners. Support is now given to the B.C. Mining School at Rossland, where both
open-pit and underground training courses are offered by the Department of Education. This support includes monthly grants to students and the ready availability of
Departmental expertise as required. The result of this training is that the graduates
from the school find immediate employment in the industry.
Other recent legislative changes have allowed women to be fully employed in
the mining industry. It is hoped that many women will avail themselves of the
training offered by the B.C. Mining School and thereby help to minimize employment problems in the industry while they benefit directly from a rewarding career
in the mineral industry.
Regardless xof what Government is in power, resource management is established and progress will only be made when that fact is accepted and management,
workers, and Government co-operate.
PROSPECTORS' ASSISTANCE
The new Prospectors Assistance Act provides greater support for prospectors'
work programs and training requirements. The previous Prospectors' Grub-stake
Act did not provide adequate financial support or recognition of the valuable contributions prospectors are making to the discovery of the mineral resources of the
Province. The revised program was initiated during 1974 when 71 prospectors
received $120,000 in grants under the new Act, and 250 persons attended training
courses.    Departmental professionals were in close contact with prospectors to
 INTRODUCTION
A  15
provide information, consultation, and other professional services in property
evaluation and development. Results of the new program were encouraging and
expansion of this program was planned for 1975.
COAL
Interest in coal resources is intensifying. Both Kaiser Resources Ltd. and
Fording Coal Limited have stabilized, and are expanding operations. The outlook
for 1975 indicates that further exploration and preliminary development work will
be undertaken in both the southeastern and northeastern regions. Most current
production is exported as metallurgical coal to Japan but it may be necessary in
future to index some metallurgical coal for eastern Canadian steel mills. A substantial test shipment of thermal coal was made to Ontario Hydro. European
countries are showing considerable interest and a diversification of exports will be
welcome. With current increases in oil prices, even thermal coal has, on the straight
Btu basis, a value of $40 per ton.   Metallurgical coal is valued considerably higher.
PETROLEUM RESOURCES
Drilling decreased 13 per cent to 760,364 feet, but revenue collected by this
Department increased 79 per cent to $83,610,413, including royalties.
Major production problems decreased the flow of gas from the Beaver River
field to 44,500,000 cubic feet per day compared to 160,000,000 cubic feet per day
in 1973. This caused a gas export shortage. Correction is possible by extending
gas-gathering systems and additional gas plant capacity. These are in progress and
may help during the winter of 1975/76. Total production decreased 15 per cent
to 1.1 billion cubic feet per day.
Oil production decreased 11 per cent to 51,913 barrels per day and this trend
continued into 1975, partly due to real depletion of the petroleum resource.
The sale of natural gas was taken over, retroactive to November 14, 1973, by
the British Columbia Petroleum Corporation, who offered substantial well-head price
increases to participating producers.
While oil companies complained with some reason about their return on a
barrel of oil at well-head, they have not published their net returns on the combination of production and disposition of products.
Oil and gas are used by everyone and are as much a public utility as electricity,
mail service, telephone, and telegraph. Proper management of petroleum resources
for the maximum benefit of all people may only be possible with full Government
control. Any negotiated incentive may prove to be only temporary unless the
industry responds with the necessary activity in exploration and development.
  *Lr;, :>,»'?*
  Review of the Mining Industry
This chapter summarizes the activities of the mining industry in British
Columbia in the production, development, and exploration for metals, coal, industrial minerals, and structural materials during 1974. Technical details about
individual mining properties may be found in the annual publication Geology,
Exploration and Mining in British Columbia, and detailed production and other
statistics are presented in Part B of this Report.
EXPLORATION
Prospecting and the acquisition of mineral title are the first steps in the
discovery of a mine. In 1974, there were 16,971 mineral claims recorded throughout the Province. A total of $29,835,741 was expended by mining companies in
the exploration of mineral claims away from the immediate area of producing mines.
These totals are lower than in 1973 when 35,659 claims were recorded and
$38,087,571 was expended. Exploration expenditures on declared or operating
mines were $4,289,770.
While some exploration was carried out over much of the Province, considerable activity took place in two areas. One of these is a broad northerly trending
belt extending from Tahtsa Reach through the Smithers-Babine Lake area to the
Sustut River-Toodoggone River region. Within this belt, midway between Tahtsa
Reach and Houston, Utah Mines Ltd. optioned a porphyry-copper prospect at
Tagetochlain (Poplar) Lake. By late autumn, over 700 claims had been staked
in that area. The second area of considerable exploration work was in the Cariboo
district, west of Quesnel Lake.
In northwestern British Columbia, Climax Molybdenum Corporation of British
Columbia Limited drilled the Adanac molybdenite deposit near Atlin; Imperial Oil
Limited drilled the Rainbow Lake copper-zinc property northeast of Dease Lake;
Texasgulf Inc. drilled its optioned Red copper prospect near Eddontenajon Lake.
Texasgulf Inc. also completed a major drill program on the Barrier Reef Resources
zinc-lead deposit near Robb Lake in northeastern British Columbia.
In the central and north-central part of the Province, major programs were
completed on the Sustut copper property owned by Falconbridge Nickel Mines
Limited; on a copper prospect in the Duckling Creek area by Union Miniere
Explorations and Mining Corporation Limited; on the Jean copper-molybdenum
prospect south of Nation Lakes by Cominco Ltd.; and on the Kennco-owned Berg
copper-molybdenum deposit near Nanika Lake by Canex Placer Limited.
Significant drill programs in the southern part of the Province included those
at the Carolin Mines gold prospect north of Hope; at Vestor Explorations molybdenum deposit near Carmi; and on the Expo claims adjacent to Island Copper mine
on the north end of Vancouver Island by Utah Mines Ltd.
A limited amount of exploration for industrial minerals was carried out during
the year. Drilling of the limestone on northern Texada Island was continued by
Canada Cement Lafarge Ltd. and by Texada Lime Ltd. Silica deposits were
explored at Easy Inlet, northern Vancouver Island, and in the Rocky Mountains
southeast of Mackenzie. A small amount of work was done on two talc showings
northwest of North Bend in the Fraser Canyon.
A  19
 A 20 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,   1974
Exploration for coal continued in the southeastern and northeastern Cretaceous
coal basins. Kaiser Resources Ltd. carried out an extensive rotary drilling program
on the Hosmer-Wheeler Ridge, as well as exploration in the Michel Creek valley
and on Greenhills Ridge on the upper Elk River. Fording Coal Limited undertook
exploration to prepare for the development of a new underground mine. Crows
Nest Industries Limited drilled and explored the southern end of Coal Mountain
near Corbin and Rio Tinto Canadian Exploration Limited completed a program of
sampling on their property on Cabin Creek in the Flathead Valley.
In the northeastern coalfield, Coalition Mining Limited drilled potential open-
pit areas on their property on the Sukunka River and continued a limited amount
of underground work. Approximately 16,000 long tons of coal was shipped to the
United Kingdom for testing. To the south, Denison Mines Limited continued
drilling and testing of their extensive area of coal licences in the Wolverine River
and Quintette Mountain areas. Considerable drilling was done by Utah Mines Ltd.
on licences on Carbon Creek near Williston reservoir.
In 1974, British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority drilled the Suquash
coal area near Port Hardy. Ten holes totalling 6,266 feet were drilled to test the
thermal coal potential of the Upper Cretaceous sedimentary rocks in that area.
Work done between 1835 and 1922 indicated the occurrence of minor amounts of
coal.  The results confirmed early reports of limited coal potential.
British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority began a major program in the
Hat Creek basin. This included diamond drilling and rotary drilling, geophysical
surveys and logging holes, geological mapping, and preliminary environmental
impact and mining studies. The objective is to determine the extent of the coal
resource and to define reserves of coal for thermal power generation.
DEVELOPMENT AND NEW PRODUCTION
Although the total expenditure by the mining industry for exploration decreased
by $9.8 million, approximately 22 per cent, expenditures for development of
declared and operating mines more than doubled from $59,950,706 during 1973
to $125,900,973 during 1974. This record increase in development work and
capital equipment investment more than offset the decrease in exploration expenditures. The abolition of the three-year Federal tax-free period for new mines
was a major factor in this increased expenditure. Exploration and development
expenditures received equal tax treatment during 1974; hence development work
was a more attractive option to the industry.
During 1974, feasibility studies were carried out at the British Columbia
Molybdenum mine at Alice Arm. This former producing mine was operated by
Kennecott Copper Corporation and is now owned by Climax Molybdenum Corporation of British Columbia Limited. Three properties originally explored and
owned by Kennco Explorations, (Western) Limited, south of Houston in west-
central British Columbia, were further explored and developed by separate companies. They include the Sam Goosly copper-silver property developed by Equity
Mining Capital Limited, the Berg copper-molybdenum deposit by Canex Placer
Limited, and the Huckleberry copper-molybdenum deposit by Granby Mining
Corporation.
At the Baymag Mount Brussilof magnesite deposit, northeast of Radium Hot
Springs, Canex Placer Limited completed an extensive program of exploration and
development. Work included detailed geological mapping, diamond drilling, metallurgical testing, and production feasibility studies.
 REVIEW OF THE MINING  INDUSTRY
A 21
At the syenitic porphyry copper deposit of Afton Mines Ltd., west of Kamloops, further drilling and feasibility studies were undertaken by Teck Corporation
Ltd. Home Oil Limited sank a shaft and did test work on the Mosquito Creek
gold deposit in the Cariboo.
A final feasibility study was made of the Northair gold-silver-Jead-zinc deposit
35 miles north of Squamish. Results of the underground development work warranted a production commitment by Northair Mines Ltd. Considerable underground
development work was also carried out at the OK (Alwin) copper mine in the
Highland Valley by OK Syndicate and the Price copper-silver-lead-zinc mine of
Western Mines Limited at the south end of Buttle Lake.
A new feature of the Mineral Act is the requirement in sections 59, 64, and 72
for an operator to obtain the approval of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum
Resources before production can begin. In addition, limited production permits
for production of a gross value of ore of less than $ 100,000 per year are issued under
section 15.
During 1974, 10 limited production permits were approved and six approvals
for production under section 72 were granted.
On Vancouver Island, approvals were given for production to Zeballos Development Ltd. for the Alice Lake zinc property, and to individuals for production from
three small gold properties in the Bedwell River area. In the Kootenays, production
approval was given to Blue Star Mines Ltd. for the Scranton silver-lead-zinc mine,
and to five individuals and small companies for production from two old properties
south of Nelson, two in the Slocan, one near Christina Lake, and another on
Wildhorse River northeast of Cranbrook. Approval was given to Walter Babkirk
to produce ore from the Ashloo gold mine northwest of Squamish and to Steve
Homenuke and John Sargent for production from their silver-lead property northeast
of Smithers.
PRODUCTION
The total value of mining production in British Columbia in 1974 amounted
to $1,030,883,091. This total was made up of metals, $764,524,841; coal,
$154,593,643; structural materials, $78,088,393; and industrial minerals, $33,-
676,214. The value of metals produced in 1974 was slightly less than that value in
1973 and included the following principal metals in order of decreasing worth:
Copper, $541,644,913; molybdenum, $60,716,942; zinc, $59,582,753; silver,
$28,440,365; gold, $26,981,595; lead, $23,333,016; iron concentrates, $12,742,-
227; and nickel, $2,351,406.
In addition, significant quantities of cadmium, tin, bismuth, antimony, and
cobalt were produced as by-products. The value of asbestos production amounted
to $27,398,900 f.o.b. mine. Other industrial minerals produced include sulphur,
gypsum, granules, fluxes, diatomite, and jade. Of the structural materials, sand and
gravel with a total value of $35,611,346 and cement with a value of $25,828,823
had the highest value. Clay products, riprap and crushed rock, lime and limestone,
and small amounts of building-stone were also produced.
The stated value of metal production, $764,524,841, is calculated in accordance with guidelines established by Statistics Canada and other agencies. The total
volume and total value of production include the quantities paid for to the mines,
and smelter and refinery production that can be attributed to mines but is not paid
for. The value paid for to the mines, excluding outward transportation costs, smelting and refining costs, penalties and deductions, was only $624,044,874. This
constitutes the real value to the Province.
 A 22
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1974
VALUE OF MINERAL PRODUCTION -1974-$890,403,124
Structural
Materials
Industrial Minerals(3.8%)
MAJOR MINERALS PRODUCED IN 1974
(By Value)
Others (8.9%)
Gold (2.5%)
Silver(2.5%L
Asbestos (3.1%),
Cement (2.9%;
Leadd.9%}
Sand and
Gravel (4.0%:
Molybdenum
(6.8%)
Zinc (4.8%?
 REVIEW OF THE MINING INDUSTRY A 23
Details of production values are shown diagrammatically on Figures 1 and 2
in Part B of this Report.
A strike at all Cominco operations at Trail, including the smelter, and at the
Sullivan and HB mines, between July 1 and November 1, reduced the production
of lead and zinc. Production of nickel was lower than in 1973 because the Pride
of Emory (Giant Mascot) mine closed in September. The quantity of copper produced declined as a result of the closing of the Jordan River (Sunro) and Britannia
mines and reduced production toward the end of the year at other mines. A strike
at the Endako mine between October 11 and December 16 was a significant factor in
reducing the production of molybdenum.
The demand for molybdenum remained strong during the year with the quantity
of 30.4 million pounds of contained molybdenum being slightly higher than the 1973
total. Values received for the molybdenum in the sulphides, oxides, and ferromolyb-
denum were all higher in 1974 and totalled $60.7 million compared to $51.9 million
in 1973.
The production and shipments of coal continued to increase with shipments
totalling 8.6 million tons valued at $154.6 million, up from 7.6 million tons valued
at $88 million in 1973. This is a 13-per-cent increase in production and the largest
amount of coal ever produced in British Columbia in any given year. It is interesting
to note that coal production has increased more than tenfold in the last five years.
The greatest part of this production was exported to Japan. Coal contracts were renegotiated, resulting in substantial price increases.
Provincial Revenues
Direct revenue to the Province from mineral resources rose to an all-time high
of $48,194,067.72. As seen in the statement of revenue (on page All), mining
taxes accounted for $31.8 million and mineral royalties and land taxes were $13.8
million.
Commodity Prices
During the early months of the year, copper prices (London, wirebar, cash)
reached an all-time high of $1.33 (Canadian) per pound in April but by December
had dropped to 57.5 cents. However, the average price received by British Columbia producers was 85.44 cents per pound compared to the 1973 average of 83.23
cents. As a reflection of the world economic conditions, the quantity of copper
shipped in 1974 totalled 633.9 million pounds, a reduction of 66 million pounds
from 1973. The five largest copper producers (Lornex, Island Copper, Gibraltar,
Granduc, and Bethlehem) account for 61 per cent of the total copper produced in
the Province.
The Climax price for molybdenum in concentrates rose from $1.72 (U.S.) per
pound in January to $2.43 (U.S.) in December. The Climax price for molybdenum
in oxides (in cans) rose from $1.92 (U.S.) per pound in January to $2.69 (U.S.)
in December.
Average prices for coal sold and used by British Columbia producers increased
from $11.53 in 1973 to $18.08 per short ton f.o.b. mine.
Gold, silver, lead, and zinc all increased substantially in price. The London
Final price for gold fluctuated during the year from a low of $128 (Can.) per ounce
in January to a high of $181 (Can.) per ounce in December.
The U.S. Producer price for silver rose from a low of $3.60 (Can.) per ounce
in January to a high of $5.21 (Can.) in February and fluctuated in the $4 to $5
range until year-end when it was $4.34 per ounce.
 A 24 MINES AND  PETROLEUM  RESOURCES REPORT,  1974
The U.S. Producer price for lead rose steadily from 18 cents per pound in
January to 24 cents (Can.) per pound in the last half of the year.
The U.S. Prime Western price for zinc also increased gradually from 30.9 cents
(Can.) per pound in January to 38.7 cents per pound in December.
Detailed price statistics are presented in Part B of this Report.
Major Producing Mines
Brief descriptions of the major producing mines are listed in alphabetical
sequence. The name used is the most common name by which the mine is known.
All production figures relate to ore milled or shipped in 1974 and tonnage is in short
tons.
Bell—The Bell mine, owned by Noranda Mines, Limited, is at the north end
of Newman Peninsula on Babine Lake. The mine is reached from the village of
Granisle, about 8 miles to the south by road and ferry.
The orebody, discovered in 1962 and placed in production in 1972, consists
of copper mineralization in a stock-like mass of feldspar porphyry. Open-pit mining
continued throughout the year using one electric rotary drill, two electric shovels,
ten 65-ton and two 85-ton trucks. More than 4 million tons of ore was mined and
almost 2 million tons of waste was removed. On the average the mill treated about
12,300 tons of ore per day. Total production for the year was 4,500,998 tons of
ore with gross content: 30,831 ounces of gold and 44,167,559 pounds of copper.
An average of 265 people was employed at the operation, most of them living
at Granisle' Village. Teams participated in the surface mine-rescue and first aid
competitions and competed for both the surface and underground first aid trophies
for the northern district.
Bethlehem—The Bethlehem mine, owned and operated by Bethlehem Copper
Corporation, is on the north side of the Highland Valley, about 30 miles southeast
of Ashcroft. Copper and molybdenum are produced from low-grade zones of mineralization within granitic rocks of the Guichon batholith. Ore mineralization which
is mainly chalcopyrite with minor bornite, chalcocite, tetrahedrite, and molybdenite
is localized within breccias, faults, and fractures. Four zones, the East Jersey,
Jersey, Huestis, and Iona, have been mined; and production in 1974 was derived
from the latter three. Production totals were 6,346,402 tons of ore with gross metal
content: 58,515,975 pounds of copper, 177,807 ounces of silver, and 684 ounces of
gold. The mill has a rated capacity of 16,500 tons per day.
Total ore reserves to year-end were 59 million tons, including 30 million tons
grading 0.45 per cent copper in the Jersey pit extension and about 15 million tons
at an estimated 0.46 per cent copper in the Iona orebody.
The average number of employees in 1974 was 408. Most employees live in
Ashcroft, although a few live in Merritt and Kamloops.
Boss Mountain—This mine, owned and operated by Noranda Mines, Limited,
is at Hendrix Lake, 58 miles by road east of 100 Mile House, at an elevation of
approximately 5,000 feet. The orebodies consist of molybdenite in breccia pipes
and quartz veins in granitic rock. The mine, which began operating in 1965, was
closed in 1971 and reopened late in 1973. The ore was mined underground from
a main adit level and internal shaft below the level. During 1974 the mine produced
493,904 tons of ore, with an average grade of 0.20 per cent molybdenum.
Mining was done by various methods, but mainly by blasting to a slot from
rings of blast holes drilled from sublevels. Recovery was by scram drift and by
mucking machine from drawpoints.
 REVIEW OF THE MINING  INDUSTRY
A  25
The average employment at the mine was 142 during the year. The company
maintains single quarters at the minesite and a townsite at Hendrix Lake, 6 miles
to the east. An active safety program was carried out in 1974. There were 16
graduates from mine-rescue classes and 15 from the St. John Ambulance first aid
class. A mine-rescue team and a first aid team were entered in the northern section
competition. Mine reclamation research on fertilizer trials in test plots was conducted in preparation for revegetation which is planned for 1975.
Brenda—The Brenda mine is about 20 miles west of Peachland, at an elevation
of approximately 5,000 feet, and is reached by an 18-mile road from Peachland.
The deposit consists of chalcopyrite and molybdenite with quartz and feldspar
in fractures in granitic rock. Conventional single-bench mining methods were
employed in which 50-foot lifts were developed. The mill treated an average of
24,000 tons of ore per day having an average grade of 0.186 per cent copper and
0.051 per cent molybdenum.    It is one of the lowest grade ores mined in the world.
Production was 9,549,588 tons of ore with shipments totalling 65,634 tons of
copper concentrate; 4,790 tons of molybdenite concentrate and 1,614 tons of
molybdic oxide, containing 7,086,707 pounds of molybdenum in total. Copper
concentrate was trucked to Kelowna and transferred to railway cars for shipment
via Vancouver to Japan on a contract which terminates early in 1975. Molybdenum
concentrate was trucked to Vancouver and sold on the open market mainly in
Europe and Japan.
The average number of employees in 1974 was 425. They live at Peachland
and other communities in the Okanagan Valley. A very active safety and training
program was carried out. Three mine-rescue teams, one on each shift, were maintained in 1974 and one team reached the Provincial championships in the annual
competitions.
Britannia—This mine, owned and operated by Anaconda Canada Limited, is
located at Britannia Beach, on the east side of Howe Sound, 40 miles north of
Vancouver. The Britannia mine, which began production in 1905 and has been a
leading copper producer, closed in October 1974.
The orebodies consist of more than a dozen discrete lenses of sulphides in a
highly deformed linear belt of volcanic and sedimentary rocks forming a roof
pendant in granitic rocks. The deformed zone trends west-northwest, dips steeply,
and near the mine varies from 300 to 2,000 feet in width. The orebodies have a
vertical extent of 6,000 feet and a horizontal length along the zone of almost 2 miles.
The ore was mined from extensive underground workings and relatively small,
old surface workings. The main haulage is the 4100 level with portal near the mill,
east of Britannia Beach at 300 feet above sea-level. Recent production came from
below the 4200 level although small amounts of high-grade ore were taken from
old surface workings. The No. 10 and No. 8 mines are serviced by vertical shafts
below the 4200 level. Trackless equipment was used in the No. 10 mine. Blast-hole
open stoping and sublevel caving were used to break the ore which was crushed
underground on the 5700 level, hoisted and trammed to the mill. In 1974, 399,164
tons of ore was treated and 16,761 tons of copper concentrates and 581 tons of
copper precipitates were shipped to Japan.
Mining and milling terminated at the end of October and the immediate dismantling of the installations began and continued into 1975.
A total of 250 persons was employed at the end of the year; about half lived
in company accommodation at Britannia Beach and the balance in nearby communities. An active safety program, which in 1972 led to winning the John T. Ryan
regional safety award, was continued throughout 1974.
 A 26 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
Bull River (Placid Oil)—-The Bull River mine is about 15 miles west of Fernie
on Burntbridge Creek, north of the Bull River, between elevations of 3,000 and
3,500 feet. The property, owned and operated by Placid Oil Company of Calgary,
has been mined by open-pit methods since 1971. A 750-ton-per-day plant processed
the copper-silver-gold ore.
The ore consists of siderite-quartz veins containing chalcopyrite as massive
pods and fracture fillings. The veins are in Upper Precambrian argillaceous and
quartzitic sedimentary rocks of the Aldridge Formation at and near diorite dyke
contacts and within diorite dykes.
During 1974 a total of 107,039 tons of ore was processed and yielded 9,178
tons of concentrate with gross metal content: 1,252 ounces of gold, 63,676 ounces
of silver, and 4,425,588 pounds of copper.
In March 1974 the open-pit ore reserves were depleted and the mining operation was suspended. A reclamation program was initiated in 1973 by back filling,
sloping, and contouring the dump areas and the perimeter of No. 1 pit. By May 1
the mined area had been completely reclaimed and seeded to grass (see page A9).
Significant inferred underground mineral reserves remain at the mine, but
attempts to drive an exploration decline into the potential ore zone were frustrated
by bad ground conditions.
The average number of employees was 25. They lived in Cranbrook or
Wardner.
Byron Creek—Byron Creek Collieries Limited operates an open-pit mine on
the northwest slope of Coal Mountain, near the former coal-mining town of Corbin,
about 20 miles east of Fernie. The mine is between elevations of 5,500 and 6,000
feet.
Thermal coal is produced from a complexly folded seam in the Lower Kootenay
Formation. The coal is mined by contract and trucked to a plant at Corbin for
transshipment to the Canadian Pacific Railway spurline at the McGillivray loading
area. The pit was prepared, the road from Corbin to McGillivray was rehabilitated,
and the spurline laid and ballasted during the first half of the year. Mining began
in June and on July 31 the first shipment was made. This shipment went eastward to
Ontario Hydro and was the first trainload of coal mined at Corbin to leave the area
since 1948.  Total coal produced by the plant amounted to 208,670 tons in 1974.
The average number of mine employees was 10.
Cassiar Asbestos—The Cassiar Asbestos mine is on Mount McDame, between
5,870 and 7,000 feet elevation. It is 3 miles north of the town of Cassiar which is
about 100 miles south of Watson Lake. Access from Watson Lake is via the Alaska
Highway, the Stewart-Cassiar road, and a branch road from McDame Creek up
the valley of Troutline Creek, a distance of about 5 miles. The mine is owned and
operated by Cassiar Asbestos Corporation Limited, with operational headquarters
in Vancouver.
The orebody consists of chrysotile asbestos veinlets in a mass of serpentine
which dips steeply to the east and rakes steeply southward. The open pit is roughly
2,000 feet long and 1,200 feet wide. In 1974 a major program to flatten both the
hangingwall and the footwall of the pit was started. The ore is trucked to the
crusher near the pit and transported by aerial tramway and truck to the mill, near
the Cassiar townsite. After concentration the fibre is shipped in bales via Fort
Nelson or Whitehorse to North Vancouver for marketing. In 1974 a total of
91,936 tons of fibre was produced; 1,144,090 tons of ore and 393,991 tons of waste
were mined from the pit. Construction of a new high-capacity tram-line was started
in 1974.
 REVIEW OF THE MINING INDUSTRY
A 27
The 440 people employed at the mine and in the mill in 1974 were housed
mainly in Cassiar. The townsite was established when the mine opened in 1953
and has been enlarged over the years of operation. A major study was undertaken
in 1974 to determine the steps necessary to improve living accommodation in the
townsite. Modifications were made to the waste-disposal system to alleviate dust
problems.
Churchill Copper—The Magnum mine, owned by Consolidated Churchill
Copper Corporation Ltd., is located about 100 miles west of Fort Nelson, in the
northern Rocky Mountains, at elevations between 5,100 and 6,700 feet, on Delano
Creek, a tributary of the Racing River. A 35-mile-long gravel road from Mile 401
on the Alaska Highway is the access to the mine.
The mine is developed on a steeply dipping vein which trends northeast and
transects folded Precambrian sedimentary rocks. The vein is composed mainly of
quartz, carbonate, chalcopyrite, and pyrite.
After a two-year suspension of operations, production resumed in November
1973 and continued throughout 1974 at a rate of approximately 15,000 tons per
month. Milling of 201,450 tons ore yielded 14,256 tons of copper concentrate
containing 8,367,210 pounds of copper. Mining was by shrinkage stoping, and
pillar recovery by longhole drilling. The ore was trucked 12 miles from the mine
to the concentrator on Racing River. Copper concentrate was trucked to Fort
Nelson, shipped by rail to North Vancouver, and sold by contract to Japan.
In the later part of the year, ore reserves were approaching depletion, and
closure in early 1975 was anticipated. Feasibility studies were carried out to
explore the viability of combining the production from this mine with new production from the Davis-Keays property at the head of Yedhe Creek, a few miles to the
north.   No action was taken on this proposal by the end of the year.
The average number of employees for the year was 116. They were housed
in trailers and bunkhouse units at the concentrator on the Racing River and at the
mine.
Endako—The Endako mine, owned by Canex Placer Limited, is 115 miles
west of Prince George, 3 miles northwest of the east end of Francois Lake. It is the
largest molybdenum mine in Canada and the second largest in the world.
The orebody is a stockwork of quartz veinlets carrying molybdenite in granitic
rocks of the Topley Intrusions. The Endako orebody trends northwest and during
the year more than 10,000 feet of diamond drilling was carried out to delineate the
northwesterly extension of the mineralization.
This is a conventional open-pit mine using electric rotary drills, electric shovels,
and 100-ton trucks. During the year, expansion and modification of the mill were
completed, including the installation of a sulphur dioxide scrubbing plant. In 1974,
7,508,000 tons of ore was produced with a total content of 15,981,105 pounds of
molybdenum. It was shipped from the mine as molybdenite concentrate (5,784
tons), molybdenite trioxide (8,156 tons), and ferromolybdenum (201 tons) to
markets in Japan, Australia, and India.
Most of the 444 persons employed at the end of the year live in Fraser Lake.
Between October 21 and December 20 the mine was closed by a strike.
Fording Coal—The Fording Coal mine is operated by Fording Coal Limited,
30 miles north of Sparwood, in the upper Fording River valley between elevations of
5,500 and 7,000 feet.
The coal seams are in the Lower Cretaceous Kootenay Formation which consists of sandstone and shales and, in the area of the mine, includes 10 coal seams of
significant thickness.   The seams lie in two synclines separated by a northerly
 A 28 MINES AND PETROLEUM  RESOURCES REPORT.  1974
trending fault. West of the fault, in the Fording River valley, they are mined in the
Greenhills pit; east of the fault, on Eagle Mountain, in the Clode pit. The coal
preparation plant and loading facilities are located between the two pits.
In the Greenhills pit, approximately 1,000 feet wide and 8,500 feet long, coal
is mined to a max:mum depth of 180 feet by a 60-cubic-yard dragline. The coal is
removed as it is encountered, stockpiled, and trucked to the breaker.
The Clode pit is mined by conventional truck and shovel methods and will
eventually be about 1,800 feet wide by 2,000 feet long, and reach a depth of
1,200 feet. A new truck and shovel pit was started in 1974 at the base of Turnbull
Mountain immediately north of the Clode pit.
Raw coal is trucked to the preparation plant which produces clean coal
products as well as middlings and rejects which are retained. The coal is cleaned
by using dense medium cyclones and flotation. The current yield of clean coal
from raw coal is about 67 per cent. The coal product is high quality, medium
volatile, heavy coking coal which is transported in unit trains to Roberts Bank for
shipment in bulk carriers to Japanese steel-manufacturing companies. The year
1974 was the second of a 15-year contract. Approximately 2,241,784 tons of
clean coal was shipped.
In addition to normal exploration and development, extensive drilling and
trenching were done in the No. 15 seam in preparation for an underground hydraulic
mining project. No. 15 seam, which lies in a relatively gentle syncline, is the highest
coal seam of mineable thickness on Eagle Mountain. The seam thickness varies
from 20 to 50 feet with an average thickness of 31 feet. The elevation at the
proposed portal site is approximately 7,000 feet and the areal extent of the reserves
is about 200 acres.
Although little physical reclamation work has been done to date at Fording,
the company has undertaken laboratory research and some actual reclamation should
be visible in the near future.
Most of the 736 employees live in the village of Elkford, 10 miles south of the
mine.   Employees are transported from Elkford to the minesite in company buses.
Gibraltar—The Gibraltar mine, owned and operated by Gibraltar Mines Ltd.,
a subsidiary of Canex Placer Limited, is about 35 miles north of Williams Lake, at
elevations between 3,000 and 4,000 feet.
The orebodies are stockworks of narrow quartz veins containing copper and
molybdenum sulphides. They form three large zones referred to as the East
Gibraltar, Pollyanna, and Granite Lake ore zones.
Mining is by open-pit methods. During the year, Phase 1 mining in the East
Gibraltar pit was completed and the pit was closed. Production was initiated from
the Granite Lake pit and 13,397,264 tons of ore was milled to produce 151,060
tons of copper concentrate containing 82,158,095 pounds of copper and 235 tons
of molybdenite concentrate containing 282,014 pounds of molybdenum.
Reclamation and testing were continued. During the year, 80 acres were
aerially seeded and fertilized. Research continued on reclaiming overburden dump
slopes.
First aid classes resulted in the issuance of 30 St. John Ambulance certificates.
The Gibraltar surface mine-rescue team won the northern division championship
and competed for the surface Provincial championships.
The average number of employees was 609; most live in Williams Lake.
During the year the trailer accommodation at the mine was discontinued and the
buildings were sold and removed. A dispute over driving trucks on rain-wet pit
ramps caused a 13-day-long strike in May.
 REVIEW OF THE  MINING  INDUSTRY
A  29
Granduc—This mine, owned by Granduc Mines, Limited and operated by
Granduc Operating Company, is in the northern Coast Mountains at the head of
Leduc River, 25 miles northwest of Stewart. The mill and mine portal are at Tide
Camp, at the north end of Summit Lake and access to the mine is by means of a
tunnel which is 11.6 miles long. The road from Stewart to Tide Camp is about 32
miles long and passes through Hyder, Alaska, along the valley of the Salmon River
and above Salmon Glacier.
The orebodies comprise steeply dipping sulphide lenses within a several-
hundred-foot-wide cataclasite zone, and lie between elevations of 1,500 feet and
4,000 feet and extend over a length of 4,000 feet. The orebodies lie within a
northerly trending metamorphic zone which has been derived from the deformation
of mainly sedimentary and volcanic rocks. The mineable orebodies consist of
streaks, lenses, and irregular masses of sulphides. Chalcopyrite is the principal ore
mineral and pyrite, pyrrhotite, magnetite, sphalerite, and galena are present.
Trackless equipment is used underground and mining is by sublevel caving.
During the year an alternative waste backfill method was evaluated. Primary
crushing is done underground and the product is trammed in 50-ton cars to the
secondary crusher and concentrator at Tide Camp.
In 1974, 2,708,731 tons of ore was milled with gross content: 64,055,959
pounds of copper, 617,847 ounces of silver, and 10,134 ounces of gold. At the
end of 1974 ore reserves were estimated at 22,322,000 tons averaging 1.71 per cent
copper before dilution compared with 32,951,000 tons averaging 1.64 per cent
copper at the end of 1973. This reduction includes 1974 mining and the elimination
of about 8,500,000 tons of reserves below the 2,100-foot elevation.
In December 1974, Granduc Operating Company announced the reduction
of the operating rate from a level of up to 8,000 tons per day to approximately
4,000 tons per day, and all exploration and development were suspended.
Total manpower on December 31, including contractors, was 672, down from
876 at the end of November. The majority of the employees live in the village of
Stewart, with single bunkhouse and trailer accommodation near the Tide Lake
concentrator. A daily bus service from Stewart to Tide Lake is provided by the
company because the mine is located in an area where the average snowfall exceeds
1,000 inches per year. Avalanche and road control are mandatory and a staff of
28 is maintained for this purpose. A safety department consisting of six men is in
charge of training, safety, and mine rescue. Mine-rescue teams practise regularly
and one entered the annual competition in Prince George.
Granisle—The Granisle copper mine is on McDonald Island in Babine Lake,
about 40 miles northeast of Houston. It is owned and operated by Granisle Copper
Limited and has been in continuous production since development by Granby Mining
Corporation in 1966.
The orebodies are associated with porphyry intrusions and granitic rocks.
Chalcopyrite and bornite occur with quartz, carbonate, and pyrite in narrow, closely
spaced fractures and as disseminated grains within these rocks.
Mining is by conventional open-pit methods, using two drills and six 100-ton
trucks. About 5 million tons of ore and 7 million tons of waste were removed from
the pit during the year. Total production was 4,373,075 tons of ore with gross
content: 19,863 ounces of gold, 209,084 ounces of silver, and 40,643,225 pounds
of copper. Concentrate is trucked from the mine to the railway at Topley and
from there by rail to Vancouver for transshipment to Japanese smelters.
Regular water-quality and dust-emission surveys are conducted. All reclaimed
areas were fertilized, additional areas of tailings ponds and exposed overburden
 A 30 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
were reclaimed and seeded, and a nursery for the propagation of deciduous trees was
established.
An average of 303 people was employed in 1974. Most employees live in
Granisle and travel to the mine by bus and ferry. An effective safety program is
carried out and teams were entered in the surface-rescue and first aid competitions.
HB—The HB lead and zinc mine, owned and operated by Cominco Ltd., is
on the north side of Sheep Creek, 7 miles southeast of Salmo. The mill, office, and
a few residences are near Sheep Creek. The orebodies consist of sphalerite and
galena with pyrite in highly deformed dolomite within an Early Paleozoic limestone.
In the mine the main haulage is the 2800 level, and is connected to the upper
workings by an internal vertical shaft.
No. 1 orebody is a maximum of 450 feet high and 100 feet wide. The long
axis plunges 20 degrees to the south. It is mined by vertical slices established by
fans of holes drilled from sublevels along the sides of the orebody. Smaller tabular
orebodies with low dip are mined by open stopes and slushers. One orebody
exposed at surface is mined as a small open pit. During the year, 256,121 tons of
ore with an average grade of 0.95 per cent lead and 3.70 per cent zinc was milled.
Concentrate is trucked to the company smelter at Trail. Gross metal content
was 32,923 ounces of silver, 4,607,200 pounds of lead, 17,291,800 pounds of zinc,
and 128,019 pounds of cadmium.
The average number of employees in 1974 was 90, of whom 41 were employed
underground. Most employees live in the vicinity of Salmo. Operations were
suspended by a strike from July 1 to November 1.
Highland Bell—The mine, owned by Teck Corporation Ltd., is at the head
of Wallace Creek, 1.3 miles east of the village of Beaverdell, and has been a significant silver-lead-zinc producer. The Bell, which has operated since 1916, merged with
the Highland Lass in 1930.
During 1974, ore production was mainly from old stopes, dumps, and tailings.
The ore zones comprise quartz-sulphide veins and stringer lodes in granitic rock of
the Westkettle batholith. Ore minerals include sphalerite, galena, tetrahedrite,
polybasite, pyrargyrite, argentite, and native silver. Ore was trucked from the mine
to the concentrator at Beaverdell. In 1974, ore production amounted to 37,184
tons, containing 313,278 ounces of silver, 296 ounces of gold, 278,594 pounds of
lead, 287,813 pounds of zinc, and minor amounts of copper and cadmium.
Nearly all the 39 employees reside in Beaverdell. During 1974, 12 employees
completed first aid and mine-rescue courses.
Island Copper—The Island Copper mine, owned and operated by Utah Mines
Ltd., is on the north shore of Rupert Arm, 10 miles south of Port Hardy. Production,
which began in 1971 at a designated capacity of 33,000 tons per day, was raised in
1974 to 38,000 tons per day. The deposit was officially reported to contain reserves
of 280 million tons of ore with an average grade of 0.52 per cent copper and
0.027 per cent molybdenite (molybdenum sulphide). The ore consists of chalcopyrite and molybdenite as fine disseminations and as fracture fillings in both
complexly altered and brecciated volcanic and porphyritic intrusive rocks.
The ore was mined by open-pit methods using four rotary drills, six electric
shovels, and twenty-five 120-ton and five 170-ton trucks. The pit, axis trending
west-northwest, will ultimately be about a mile long, 1,200 feet wide, and 1,000 feet
deep. It is presently worked with benches at 40-foot intervals, the highest bench
being about 300 feet above sea-level and the lowest 160 feet below sea-level.
 REVIEW OF THE MINING INDUSTRY
A 31
Some 11,200,000 tons of ore was treated to produce 175,200 tons of copper
concentrate and 1,506 tons of molybdenite concentrate containing 1,257,500
pounds of molybdenum.
Ore was trucked to the mill where copper and molybdenum concentrates were
produced by flotation. The copper concentrate was shipped by bulk carriers directly
to Japan. Molybdenite was snipped in 45-gallon drums by barge to Vancouver for
sale on a lot basis to customers in Europe and the United States. Minor amounts
of rhenium were recovered from these concentrates at the smelters.
An average of 689 persons was employed at the mine, most of whom were
accommodated in a camp at the minesite. Considerable housing, mainly for company employees, has been provided by the company in Port Hardy.
Jordan River (Sunro)—The Sunro mine is 25 miles west of Victoria, about a
mile north of the mouth of the Jordan River. Until September 1 the mine was
operated by Jordan River Mines Ltd., under management of Pechiney Development
Limited. Between that date and December 3 when the mine closed, it was operated
under lease by Dison International Ltd.
The deposit consists of chalcopyrite and native copper in shear zones in basaltic
rocks of Tertiary age.
The mine is developed by a main haulage known as the 5100 level, at an
elevation of 100 feet above sea-level. The concentrator is underground more than
a mile from the portal. Mining is by longhole stoping, and trackless equipment was
used with a ramp system connecting the 5100, 5200, and 5300 levels. Track equipment is used on the main haulage level to service the concentrator. During the year
a total of 241,504 tons of ore was milled, having a gross content of 1,031 ounces of
gold, 12,309 ounces of silver, and 4,500,337 pounds of copper.
At the time of production termination 70 persons were employed. Prior to
August, an average of 131 persons was employed but the size of the crew was
reduced when development work ceased. Most employees lived in Sooke, a few in
Victoria.
Kaiser Resources (Harmer Ridge, Balmer North, and Balmer South)—The
mines operated by Kaiser Resources Ltd., near Sparwood in the Crowsnest Pass
area, produce mainly metallurgical coal for export to Japanese steel mills. The
coal occurs in the Lower Cretaceous Kootenay Formation in more than a dozen
seams which vary in thickness from 5 to 50 feet. Principal production is from the
Balmer or No. 10 seam which is the thickest and lowermost seam in the area. It is
mined in a number of open pits on Harmer Ridge, a few miles east and northeast of
Sparwood; in the Balmer North underground mine, 4 miles east of Sparwood, on
the north side of Michel Creek; and in the Balmer South hydraulic mine on the
southwest side of Michel Creek near Sparwood.
On Harmer Ridge the coal dips to the southwest as steeply as 20 degrees. Coal
was produced from six pits, the largest quantities being removed from the Harmer 2,
Adit 29, and Adit 40a pits. Mining during the year was all done by shovels, loaders,
and trucks, and the dragline which had been used at the beginning of the project
was removed from the property. A total of 6,247,379 tons of metallurgical coal
and 492,329 tons of thermal coal was mined from the open pits on Harmer Ridge in
1974.
The Balmer North mine uses conventional underground mining equipment.
The coal is mined in panels, in an area where the seam has a low dip, using continuous miners and shuttlecars delivering the coal to a conveyer-belt system. A
total of 107,066 tons of raw coal was produced in 1974.
 A 32 MINES AND  PETROLEUM  RESOURCES  REPORT.  1974
The hydraulic mine is in an area where the Balmer seam dips 25 to 50 degrees
to the northeast. Entry to the mining area is by means of a tunnel about 7,500 feet
long, driven at a slope of no less than 7 degrees. Coal is mined in panels from
sloping sublevels by means of a hydraulic monitor which cuts and dislodges the coal
by a high-pressure jet and sluices it into flumes. Coal is transported from the
working-place in an open flume and is removed from the water by screens and a
thickener before the water is recycled. Output in 1974 was 861,867 tons of raw
coal.
The surface facilities consist of coke-ovens and screening plant at Michel and
the Elkview preparation plant north of Sparwood. The coke-ovens produced
156,388 tons of coke in 1974 which was sold mainly in Canadian markets, including
metallurgical smelters and similar operations.
Coal is transported from the open-pit mine to a breaker station in the pit area
where it is crushed, screened, and delivered to the Elkview plant by means of a
conveyer-belt system, part of which is underground. Raw coal from the underground mines is delivered to the plant by truck. In the Elkview plant the coal is
cleaned by means of screening, heavy medium separation, and flotation to reduce
the ash content, and dried to meet contract specifications. Clean coal is stored in
silos and loaded directly into unit trains for transport to Roberts Bank. Coarse
refuse from the plant is hauled by scrapers to the spoil area where it is layered and
compacted. Fine tailings are fed into lagoons for dewatering. In 1974, 7,297,947
tons of raw coal was input into the plant and 5,579,278 tons of marketable coal was
output.
Extensive reclamation of the mine area was carried out in 1974 as a continuation of a program which was initiated with the Kaiser project. It consisted of
sloping, fertilizing, seeding, and planting in a variety of disturbed areas, including
the hydraulic minesite, the Michel pile, Sparwood slide, a tailings lagoon and
conveyer cut, the Erickson, 7a, Baldy, and other former minesites, former exploration roads and trenches, the Harmer haul road, and parts of the town areas of Natal
and McGillivray. About 400 acres were treated, 70,000 trees were planted, and
experimental work in the nursery and greenhouse continued.
A total of 1,744 persons was employed, including 1,107 in surface mining and
258 in underground mining, 180 in coal preparation, and 199 in administration.
Most employees live in Sparwood or Fernie. A number of mine-rescue teams, both
surface and underground, are maintained at a high standard of training.
Lornex—This large copper-molybdenum mine is on the south side of Highland
Valley, 26 miles southeast of Ashcroft. It is owned and operated by Lornex Mining
Corporation Ltd., whose major shareholder is Rio Algom Mines Ltd.
The orebody is within the Guichon batholith and consists of granitic rock
containing chalcopyrite, bornite, molybdenite, and other minerals in closely spaced
fractures. It is mined by conventional open-pit methods and more than 42 million
tons of rock (ore and waste) was removed during the year. The open pit at the end
of 1974 was about 300 feet below the original surface and has an area of 350 acres.
Benches are at 40-foot intervals. The production equipment used includes three
electric rotary drills, five electric shovels, and twenty-three 120-ton trucks and two
200-ton trucks.
Total production in 1974 amounted to 107,506,225 pounds of copper,
3,937,200 pounds of molybdenum, 435,538 ounces of silver, and 658 ounces of
gold from 16,445,401 tons of ore. The concentrator milled an average of 45,056
tons per day.
 REVIEW OF THE MINING INDUSTRY A 33
The ore reserve definition program was completed and as of December 31,
1974, reserves of 432 million tons, having an average of 0.411 per cent copper and
0.014 per cent molybdenum, were delineated. This is greater than the originally
delineated reserves of 293 million tons.
The average number of employees in 1974 was 731, most of whom live in the
company town of Logan Lake, 11 miles southeast of the mine, or in a camp near
the mine. Others reside in Ashcroft, Merritt, or Kamloops. The whole operation
has an outstanding safety record and in 1974 the mine completed two years of
accident-free work.
Lynx and Myra (Western Mines)—These mines are a mile west of the south
end of Buttle Lake, about 35 miles southwest of Campbell River. They are owned
and operated as one mine by Western Mines Limited. The Lynx mine is on the
north side of Myra Creek and the Myra mine is on the south.
The orebodies are lenses of massive sulphides in a shear zone developed in
andesitic flows, volcanic breccias, and in massive and thin-bedded tuffs. The zone
trends southeast from the mines on Myra Creek almost to Price Creek, south of the
south end of Buttle Lake, where underground exploration is being carried out. The
sulphide lenses are relatively small in cross-section and persistent along strike. Both
open-pit and underground mining have been carried out. In 1974 a relatively small
amount of ore was derived from the Lynx open pit. Most of the underground ore
was mined by cut-and-fill methods using mill tailings as backfill. Production was
297,290 tons of ore with gross content: 25,485 ounces of gold, 1,151,509 ounces of
silver, 8,669,995 pounds of copper, 5,995,424 pounds of lead, 47,360,963 pounds
of zinc, and 189,481 pounds of cadmium.
At the end of 1974, total ore reserves were 1,887,900 tons, an increase of
216,800 tons over the previous year. Most of this new ore was found in the Lynx
G zone, which remains the most favourable area for ore potential.
The concentrator is near the portal of the Lynx mine and, with a capacity of
about 900 tons per day, produced copper, lead, and zinc concentrates which were
trucked to storage at a ship-loading dock in Campbell River. Copper concentrate
was loaded directly into ships for delivery to Japanese smelters. Zinc concentrate
was either shipped to Japan or barged to Seattle for shipment to smelters in the
United States. The lead concentrate was shipped by rail through Courtenay and
Vancouver to the smelter at Trail.
An average of 308 persons was employed at the mine, about half of whom live
in or around Campbell River and commute daily. A camp for single persons is
maintained at the minesite, which is attractively landscaped.
Phoenix-—The Phoenix mine, operated by the Phoenix Copper Division of
Granby Mining Corporation, is 3.5 miles east of Greenwood, at an elevation of
about 4,500 feet. It is one of the oldest mines in British Columbia and produced
direct smelting ore from underground workings in the first decade of the century.
Open-pit mining began in 1959 and the rate was increased from an initial 900 tons
per day to the present rated capacity of 2,750 tons per day in 1972.
The orebodies are irregular zones of chlorite-epidote skarn containing small
lenses and disseminated grains of chalcopyrite. The shape of the orebodies is
controlled partly by the easterly dip of the metamorphosed sedimentary formations,
and partly by faulting; and has resulted in significant variations in the configuration
of the pit as mining proceeds.
In 1974, only 13 per cent of the ore treated at Phoenix was mined from the
Ironsides pit. The balance was rehandled from the low-grade stockpile. The total
ore milled amounted to 1,012,427 tons with an average grade of 0.446 per cent
2
 ~l
A 34 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
copper, 0.017 ounce per ton gold, and 0.134 ounce per ton silver. Concentrate is
transported by truck to Vancouver for shipment to Japanese smelters. At year-end,
ore reserves were 1,110,000 tons, having an average grade of 0.80 per cent copper.
The ore stockpile of 3,072,000 tons averages 0.40 per cent copper.
Experimental seeding of an old tailings pond is continuing.
An average of 149 employees living in Greenwood and Grand Forks worked
at the mine in 1974. Regular courses in mine rescue and first aid were held under
the direction of the safety officer. The mine-rescue team participated in the Provincial competition for surface mines. This mine won a B trophy for the lowest accident
frequency in the Province.
Pinchi Lake—The Pinchi Lake mercury mine, owned and operated by
Cominco Ltd., is on the eastern shore of Pinchi Lake, about 24 miles by road
from Fort St. James. The mine initially operated from 1940 until 1944 when it
was shut down due to adverse market conditions. Production resumed in 1968
at a rate of 750 tons per day.
The orebodies consist of erratic stringers and blebs of cinnabar and stibnite in
dolomite. The dolomite is tightly folded on axes which plunge steeply to the north
and the mineralization forms two lenticular zones plunging with the folds.
During the year ore was mined underground although formerly it was produced
from surface open pits. In the Main zone ore was obtained from two levels using
cut-and-fill mining with trackless equipment.   Fill is hydraulically emplaced tailings.
A total of 172,615 tons of ore was treated and refined to produce mercury.
The toxic nature of mercury necessitates special precautions, including close
monitoring of emissions, particulate and vapour traps, and regular checks on the
health of employees. Reclamation involved the seeding of one waste dump and
continued testing and fertilization of existing plots.
An average of 58 people was employed during the year. Most employees live
in Fort St. James and commute to the mine by bus. The Pinchi Lake mine-rescue
team won the underground Provincial mine-rescue competition and competed in the
Canadian competition in Whitehorse.
Pride of Emory (Giant Mascot)—This mine, owned by Giant Mascot Mines
Limited, is 8 miles north of Hope, in the mountains west of the Fraser River,
between elevations of about 2,500 and 4,500 feet. The mine has operated more or
less continuously from 1958 until the end of August 1974.
The 26 orebodies are irregular, nearly vertical, pipe-like masses of copper and
nickel sulphides within ultramafic rocks. The orebodies were mined underground
with principal access by the 2600 level and an internal shaft inclined at 50 degrees
to the levels above. Mining was done by longhole open stopes and occasionally by
open shrinkage stopes. Broken ore was moved by scraping and tramming to the
main ore-pass system. In recent years trackless equipment was introduced into
part of the mine.
In 1974, copper and nickel concentrates were produced by flotation. Production for the year amounted to 156,733 tons of ore with gross content: 1,170,517
pounds of copper and 1,688,152 pounds of nickel. Nickel concentrate was shipped
to a refinery near Edmonton, Alta., while copper concentrate was shipped to Japan.
The mine closed because the main reserves were depleted and exploration
failed to produce replacements. Until closure about 170 persons, who lived in
Hope or at the mine camp, were employed.
 REVIEW OF THE MINING INDUSTRY A 35
Reeves MacDonald and Annex—Reeves MacDonald Mines Limited owns and
operates the Reeves MacDonald mine and the Annex mine on the Pend-d'Oreille
River, 17 miles south of Salmo.
The Reeves MacDonald mine, on the north side of the river, has produced
almost continuously since 1949. The Annex production began in 1970. At the
Reeves MacDonald the 1900 level is the main haulage and an internal inclined
shaft extends to the 240 level. At the Annex mine the 1750 level is the main
haulage to the portal on the south bank of the Pend-d'Oreille River. A vertical
shaft to the 800 level services the other levels of the mine.
The orebodies are lenses of sphalerite, galena, and pyrite in dolomite in a
highly folded and faulted limestone of Early Cambrian age. The rocks dip 50 to
60 degrees to the south and the longest dimension of the orebodies plunges steeply
to the southwest. Northerly trending faults have displaced the orebodies so that
the same ore zones are repeated several times throughout the two mines. The
orebodies are developed by slashed-out sublevels at vertical intervals of about 25 feet.
The resultant pillars are broken by longhole methods. Ore is scraped to ore
passes in scram drifts and transported by train to ore pockets near the shafts.
In 1974 the Reeves MacDonald and Annex mines were connected. Most
(183,104 tons) of the ore milled in 1974 came from the Annex mine. Diamond
drilling and test holing were carried out on the 800 level which had been extended
westward during 1973 into the adjoining property held by Hecla Operating Company. The results of this exploration and the known reserves were not sufficiently
encouraging to continue the operation and at the end of 1974 a decision was made
to close the mine. Milling continued throughout the year and a total of 197,627
tons of ore was produced with gross content of 84,236 ounces of silver, 3,986,597
pounds of lead, 13,639,870 pounds of zinc, and 131,754 pounds of cadmium.
The average number of employees in 1974 was 104. Limited housing was
available at Remac near the mine, but most employees lived in the vicinity of Salmo.
Similkameen—The Similkameen open-pit copper mine lies 10 miles south of
Princeton, adjacent to Highway 3. It is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Newmont
Mining Corporation of Canada Limited. Most of the known copper mineralization
occurs in altered Nicola Group volcanic breccia near the contact with intrusive rocks
of the Lost Horse plutonic complex.
During 1974, ore and waste mined totalled 23,247,000 tons of which 5,086,088
tons was milled. The ore grade averaged 0.48 per cent copper, giving a concentrate
with gross metal content of 41,226,398 pounds of copper, 28,006 ounces of gold,
and 115,110 ounces of silver. Work continued on the concentrator to permit the
milling of an additional 7,000 tons per day of mined and stockpiled low-grade ore.
Since September 1974, concentrates from Similkameen have been diverted to
United States smelters due to curtailment of smelting and refining capacity in Japan.
Waste removal was also curtailed and at year-end 60 of the 394 employees were laid
off to reduce costs. At year-end, ore reserves at Similkameen were estimated at
61,452,000 tons averaging 0.53 per cent copper compared to 60,454,000 at 0.53
per cent copper to the end of 1973.
Mine reclamation continued during 1974. Final waste-dump slopes were
covered with alluvial materials and seeded with grasses. Further planting was done
around the mine buildings. An extensive pumping system was installed below the
east tailings dam to return seepage to the impoundment area and prevent possible
stream pollution.
Sullivan—The Sullivan mine and concentrator, owned and operated by
Cominco Ltd., are in the city of Kimberley. The mine, on Mark Creek, is 2 miles
north of the centre of the city, and the concentrator is 2 miles south of the centre
 A 36 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1974
of the city at Chapman Camp. The mine is one of the largest lead-zinc-silver mines
in the world. The orebody consists of stratiform layers of galena, sphalerite, and
pyrrhotite in argillaceous Proterozoic sedimentary rocks. The orebody forms a
gently convex, eastward-dipping lens. It is approximately 7,000 feet in diameter
and a maximum of 300 feet thick and lies approximately 1,000 feet below the
surface.
The ore is mined underground from a series of level workings of which the
3900 level is the main adit. Shafts both above and below this level service the other
workings. A long history of mining has resulted in a network of stopes filled with
gravel or mill rejects.
Almost all the production in 1974 was from mining of the large pillars between
the filled stopes. Mining of the pillars has been in progress for several years and is
a complex process. After longhole drilling and blasting, large tonnages of ore are
drawn off by gravity through a series of drawholes and by scraping into raises and
chutes. The ore is crushed underground on the 3700 level and transported by train
to the concentrator, where it is initially upgraded by the removal of waste rock in
the sink-float recovery section. The concentrator produces lead, zinc, iron, and tin
concentrates. The lead and zinc concentrates are shipped to the Cominco smelter at
Trail. The tin concentrate, derived from a very small amount of cassiterite in the
ore, is accumulated and shipped to custom smelters. The iron concentrate, mainly
pyrrhotite, is used for the production of sulphuric acid and fertilizer at the Kimberley
plant.
In 1974, total production was 1,416,489 tons of ore which yielded 77,678 tons
of lead concentrate, 120,937 tons of zinc concentrate, and 145 tons of tin concentrate
containing 165,582 pounds of tin. Gross metal content was 92 ounces of gold,
1,807,597 ounces of silver, 361,600 pounds of copper, 113,010,000 pounds of lead,
124,088,000 pounds of zinc, and 346,199 pounds of cadmium.
Handling of "hot muck" and the control of sulphur dioxide emissions were
continuing problems during the year. Under certain conditions the broken ore,
which is high in sulphide minerals, especially pyrrhotite, oxidizes rapidly in an
exothermic reaction and melts, thereby producing sulphur dioxide. Adequate ventilation, special safety precautions in hot muck areas, and methods for controlling
oxidation are necessary. Emissions of sulphur dioxide from the mine are monitored
and new mining methods to prevent the oxidation are being devised.
First aid and mine-rescue training courses are given regularly and four mine-
rescue teams are maintained. An average of 613 people was employed at the mine
and in the concentrator. Operations were suspended by a strike from July 1 to
November 1.
Tasu (Wesfrob)—This mine, on the west coast of Moresby Island, is on the
south side of Tasu Inlet and is reached by pontoon-equipped aircraft or boat from
Sandspit. It is owned and operated by Wesfrob Mines Limited, a wholly owned
subsidiary of Falconbridge Nickel Mines Limited.
The mine produces iron and copper concentrates from orebodies containing
magnetite and chalcopyrite. The orebodies are of the contact metasomatic type.
They are associated with a folded and tilted panel of limestones and basaltic volcanic
rocks intruded by feldspar porphyries and lying at the north end of a large granitic
batholith.
The orebodies form three zones which are mined in three open pits extending
from near sea-level to an elevation of 3,000 feet. Ore from the open pits is transferred by underground transfer systems to the primary crusher, which is also
underground, and from there by conveyer to the secondary crushing plant and
concentrator.
 REVIEW OF THE MINING INDUSTRY
A 37
The average rate of production was 8,000 tons per day. Treatment of 1,559,960
tons of ore produced 1,043,196 tons of iron concentrate and 9,248 tons of copper
concentrate. These were sold under contract to Mitsubishi of Japan and shipped
directly from the mine by ore carriers.
Underground exploration and development started in 1973 and was extended
in 1974 to prepare for underground mining in 1975.
The mine has an active safety program using the Neil George system. Both
surface and underground mine-rescue training and St. John Ambulance first aid
training are part of the operation.
At the end of 1974, 175 people were employed. The company maintains the
townsite of Tasu on Gowing Island, which is connected by causeway to the mine and
plant. Tasu provides a full range of housing and services for both single and married
personnel.
Texada—This mine, operated by Texada Mines Ltd., is an iron and copper
mine on the west side of Texada Island, 3.5 miles south of Vananda, at Welcome
Bay. The mine has produced intermittently since 1885 and probably has the longest
history of lode-mining in the Province. It has been in continuous production
since 1952. Open-pit mining which commenced in 1952 was phased out in 1966
after initiation of underground stopes in 1964.
The mineral deposits are mainly massive magnetite with minor chalcopyrite.
They are found at the contact between basalt, limestone, and intrusive quartz diorite,
and are characteristic of other such deposits found in the coastal region of British
Columbia.
Selective mining and unique milling methods produce iron and copper concentrates. Mill capacity for treating iron ore is approximately 4,300 tons per day
while the capacity for treating copper ore is about 2,000 tons per day. Because of
inadequate fresh and reclaimed water supplies, salt water has also been used in the
entire milling process.
Underground production is by longhole stoping and trackless mining. Monthly
production is about 100,000 tons. In 1974 the mine produced 926,646 tons
of ore from which 346,500 tons of iron concentrate and 6,874 tons of copper
concentrate were produced and shipped to Japan.
The high safety standards set in the past were continued. In 1974 the Texada
mine was the winner of the John T. Ryan Canada Metalliferous Mine Trophy for
the lowest accident rate of any mine in Canada.
An average of 184 employees work at the mine and live in various communities
on Texada Island and at Powell River.
Minor Mines, Pits, and Quarries
Many small metal mines and large pits and quarries operated in the Province
in 1974. A few of these are described by product category.
Metal mines—Cronin mine is on the east slope of Mount Cronin, 17 miles
northeast of Smithers. It is a small underground mine operated on a seasonal basis
by Hallmark Resources Ltd. Production in 1974 was 600 tons of zinc-lead-silver-
gold ore which was treated in a mill on the property. The zinc concentrate and lead
concentrate were shipped by rail and truck to the Cominco smelter at Trail. Gross
metal content was 3,651 ounces of silver, 2,107 pounds of copper, 51,174 pounds of
lead, 86,673 pounds of zinc, and 680 pounds of cadmium. An average of seven
persons was employed and they were accommodated at the mine camp during the
summer operating season.
 A 38 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
The Horn Silver mine is on the north side of the Keremeos-Osoyoos Highway,
about 10 miles west of Osoyoos. Silver ore was mined underground from a quartz
vein system which cuts a syenitic-dioritic host rock. The average daily production
in 1974 was about 125 tons for a total of 24,351 tons during the year. Milling
produced 912 tons of silver concentrate, which was shipped to the smelter at Trail.
The 38 employees commute to the mine from Keremeos and Osoyoos.
Colt Resources Ltd. produced 726 tons of crude ore underground from the
Denero Grande claim near Jewel Lake, about 7 miles east of Greenwood. The gross
metal content of the ore was 223 ounces of gold, 1,437 ounces of silver, 4,450
pounds of lead, and 1,584 pounds of zinc. At the end of the year six persons were
employed.
The Mineral King mine was reopened for a short period in 1974 by Purcell
Development Co. Ltd., under agreement with the owner, Mountain Minerals Limited. The mine is 26 miles by road southwest of Invermere in the valley of Toby
Creek. Production of silver-lead-zinc ore was 4,600 tons. Twenty-nine people were
employed.
The Susie mine is 3 miles northwest of Oliver. In 1974, this underground mine
produced 3,107 tons of silica-rich gold ore from quartz veins in granitic rock. Gross
metal content was 340 ounces of gold, 6,616 ounces of silver, 834 pounds of copper,
16,313 pounds of lead, and 6,793 pounds of zinc.
Industrial minerals—Barite was produced at the Silver Giant mine, on Jubilee
Mountain, approximately 5 miles northwest of Spillimacheen; and at the Brisco
barite mine operated by Mountain Minerals Limited. The barite concentrate was
shipped to Alberta.
The gypsum quarry and primary crushing plant, operated by Western Gypsum
Limited, is 8 miles east of Windermere. A total of 441,299 tons of gypsum was
shipped to Calgary and Vancouver.
In 1974, jade production was reported by Cassiar Lapidary at Cassiar; Ben
Seywerd on Seywerd Creek, Dease Lake; Continental Jade Ltd. on Mount Ogden;
and Comaplex Resources International Ltd., Marshall Creek.
Structural materials—Clay is quarried at the quarry of Haney Brick and Tile
Limited, on the north bank of the Fraser River at Haney. Clay drain tile, brick, and
other clay products are manufactured in a plant adjacent to the quarry.
Clayburn Industries Ltd. operates a quarry and an underground mine at
Kilgard and a plant for the production of brick and clay products at Abbotsford.
Five men produced about 17,000 tons of fireclay using room and pillar extraction
methods in the underground mine. In the quarry, 10 men produced 78,460 tons of
brick clay.
The Watts Point quarry, owned and operated by CR. Aggregates Sales Ltd.,
is west of Highway 99, 3 miles by road south of Squamish. Twelve men produced
750,000 tons of crushed and sized volcanic rock for construction purposes during
the year.
The Pitt River quarry on the east bank of Pitt River, 4 miles north of Pitt
Meadows, is owned and operated by Dillingham Corporation of Canada Ltd.
During 1974, 25 men quarried, crushed, and screened 546,405 tons of diorite for
crushed rock, riprap, and armour rock.
The Gilley quarry, owned and operated by Construction Aggregates Ltd., is on
the west bank of Pitt River, 7.5 miles by road from Coquitlam. Forty-three men
produced 523,581 tons of quartz diorite for crushed rock, riprap, and armour rock.
On Texada Island four quarries again produced major quantities of limestone
in 1974. They are the Imperial Limestone quarry at Spratt Bay on the north coast,
 REVIEW OF THE MINING INDUSTRY
A 39
2 miles southeast of Vananda; Ideal Cement quarry, 2.5 miles south of Vananda;
Vananda quarry, formerly the Beale quarry, a mile southeast of Vananda; and the
Domtar quarry, a mile from Blubber Bay. An average total of 122 persons was
employed in these quarries and approximately 3.2 million tons of limestone was
quarried. Limestone is used for cement and in the pulp and paper industry, but
some is used for stucco dash, glass grit for the manufacture of glass, fine sand, and
whiting.
Development of a limestone quarry and lime plant on Pavilion Lake Indian
Reserves 3 and 3a by Steel Brothers Canada Limited continued in 1974. The plant
and quarry are on Highway 12 about 25 miles west of Cache Creek. The operation
began production in 1974 and 18 people were employed.
The Harper Ranch limestone quarry is north of the South Thompson River,
11 miles east of Kamloops. It is operated by a contractor, Plateau Construction
Limited, of Kamloops, for the production of limestone for the nearby cement plant
of Canada Cement Lafarge Ltd. An average of six persons was employed and
approximately 288,000 tons of rock was shipped. The Buse Lake quarry, 2 miles
south of the South Thompson River and 14 miles east of Kamloops, was operated
by the same contractor to supply silica to the Kamloops Lafarge cement plant. In
1974, approximately 28,000 tons was shipped.
The Cobble Hill quarry, owned by British Columbia Cement Company Limited,
is 2 miles southwest of Cobble Hill station. Limestone is produced for the company
cement plant at Bamberton. An average of 24 employees produced approximately
840,000 tons of limestone, which was trucked by private road about 10 miles to the
plant.
The Saturna Island quarry and plant on the north end of Saturna Island,
between Lyall Harbour and Winter Cove, is owned by British Columbia Lightweight
Aggregates Ltd. Since 1959 the quarry has produced shale from the Upper
Cretaceous Nanaimo Group, which has been treated to produce expanded shale for
use as a lightweight construction aggregate. Production terminated in November
1974 and the plant was dismantled. Twenty men mined 31,656 tons of shale and
produced 48,265 tons of aggregate.
PROCESSING
Most mines in British Columbia produce concentrates by a flotation process
designed to handle the specific types of ore produced. In 1974, 31 concentrators
processed ores as follows: Ten treated copper, three copper-iron, four copper-
molybdenum, two molybdenum, one nickel-copper, nine silver-lead-zinc, one silver-
lead-zinc-copper, and one treated mercury ore.
The only base-metal smelter in operation in the Province is owned and operated
by Cominco Ltd. at Trail. From mines in British Columbia it received 89,479 tons
of lead concentrates, 137,053 tons of zinc concentrates, and 7,732 tons of crude ore.
The company's own mines (Sullivan and HB) contributed 82,101 tons of lead
concentrates and 136,745 tons of zinc concentrates. In addition the smelter also
treated a large tonnage of ore, concentrate, and scrap iron from sources outside the
Province. The company's own Pine Point mine on Great Slave Lake shipped a
large amount of lead and zinc concentrates to Trail.
Products exported to American smelters were copper concentrates, 60,561
tons; iron concentrates, 276,370 tons; zinc concentrates, 35,757 tons; and lead
concentrates, 3,371 tons. The value of these products was $42.4 million. This
represents about 5.5 per cent of the value of the 1974 metal production of the
Province.
 A 40
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
Products exported to Japanese smelters were copper concentrates, 1,013,510
tons; zinc concentrates, 18,359 tons; and iron concentrates, 1,097,162 tons. The
value of these products was $534.5 million, a decrease of $69.2 million from 1973
and represents about 69.9 per cent of the 1974 metal production of the Province.
Copper concentrates shipped to Germany and Korea totalled 12,144 and 4,772 tons
respectively.
SAFETY
In 1974, active mine safety programs were continued at all mines in the
Province. Authority for the control of safety conditions in mines is given in the
Mines Regulation Act and Coal Mines Regulation Act and covers the whole field
of mining from exploration, through mine development and production, to reclamation after mining. Thus the Department plays a major role in promoting mine
safety. Through the work of the Inspection Division and the co-operation of the
industry, British Columbia has been and continues to be a leader in the development
of mine safety practices and is attaining high standards for safety.
Previous amendments to the Mines Regulation Act and the Coal Mines Regulation Act came into effect in 1974. Through them greater emphasis was placed on
the work of the safety committee at each mine and the responsibility for safety was
given more directly to individual workers as well as to supervisors. Certification of
miners was introduced in recognition of the high qualifications required of skilled
underground miners. A number of amendments were introduced related to hoisting
and hoist equipment, and the operation of vehicular and other mobile equipment.
Extensive on-site testing of the brakes of the very large trucks in general use
in open pits was continued in 1974 and the results were published by the Society of
Automotive Engineers. Studies were made to improve traffic control in open pits.
Roll-over protection structures are now required on all mobile equipment. In
response to an exploration-related accident involving live electrical wires, guidelines
were drawn up to minimize this hazard. Surveys of dust and ventilation at mines
were continued. Recommended improvements were undertaken by several mines.
There was a significant reduction in dust concentrations in assay grinding rooms.
Noise surveys are carried out regularly and the Department is contributing to a
concerted effort being made in Canada and the United States to effect significant
reductions in noise levels. Extensive surveys indicate that 96.6 per cent of workers
were wearing ear protection where required, 100 per cent of drills in use were
muffled, and 79 per cent of operations surveyed were performing audiometric tests
on the workers.
Departmental mine-rescue stations, fully supplied with up-to-date equipment,
are maintained at Fernie, Kamloops, Nanaimo, Nelson, and Prince George. A
sixth station was established at Smithers and is being equipped to the same standard
as the others. Each station is staffed with mine-rescue co-ordinators who are fully
qualified instructors in first aid and mine-rescue training. With the exception of
Fernie, each station is established as a mobile unit to transport equipment anywhere
in that area and to be available for either rescue or training purposes. The district
mine-rescue co-ordinators make periodic visits to the mines to give rescue training
to open-pit and underground employees and to check the local rescue equipment for
satisfactory maintenance. A Survival-Mine Rescue Instructor's Manual, compiled
by the Department, was issued this year. This manual was prepared to assist
operators of underground mines and to instruct all underground personnel in self-
preservation should a fire or similar disaster occur while they are underground.
Courses in both underground and surface mine-rescue training as well as first aid
are presented by the district co-ordinators on an ongoing basis.
 REVIEW OF THE MINING INDUSTRY
A 41
Four mine-safety associations operate in different areas in the Province. They
are sponsored by the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources and the
Workers' Compensation Board and are aided by mining company officials, safety
supervisors, inspectors of mines, mine-rescue co-ordinators, and, in some cases,
local industry. These organizations promote mine-rescue and first aid training as
well as safety education at their various districts, and hold annual competitions at
various centres during late May and June. The Provincial (Underground) Mine
Rescue Competition was held at Nanaimo on June 15. The Pinchi Lake (Cominco
Ltd.) team, captained by P. R. Jones, won the trophy and went on to compete in
the eighth Canadian finals held in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, on June 22. Surface
mine-rescue competitions were held at two centres and, at a Provincial competition
at the Craigmont mine near Merritt, the Brenda Mines team, captained by D. Miller,
won the trophy.
Several awards and trophies are issued by various organizations in recognition
of bravery, safety, and rescue work in mines. In 1974, Mark Cawston, foreman,
and Harry Skoglund, superintendent, received bravery awards from the Workers'
Compensation Board for the recovery of a miner who had fallen down a raise at
the Pride of Emory mine of Giant Mascot Mines Limited. John T. Ryan safety
trophies were established in 1941 by the Mine Safety Appliances Company of
Canada Limited to promote safety in coal and metal mines in Canada. Three
Canadian and six regional John T. Ryan trophies were established and their administration was given to the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. In
1974 the Michel Colliery of Kaiser Resources Ltd. won the Canada trophy for coal
mines. The Texada mine of Texada Mines Ltd. won the Canada trophy for metalliferous mines. For Michel Colliery it was the third win since 1968 and Texada
had won the regional award in 1969 and 1972.
A trophy was donated by the West Kootenay Mine Safety Association in 1951
to promote safety in small mines and, in 1974, it was won by the Pinchi Lake mine
of Cominco Ltd. In 1961 the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources
organized a safety competition for the open-pit and quarry industry, instituted
awards, and donated a trophy for annual competition to be won by the mine having
the least number of accidents. In 1974, awards were won by the Britannia pit of
Construction Aggregates Ltd., the Texada Island quarry of Canada Cement Lafarge
Ltd., the Cobble Hill quarry of British Columbia Cement Company Limited, and
the Prince George gravel pit of Ocean Construction Supplies Northern Limited.
RECLAMATION
Reclamation plans assuring that land disturbed by mining will be restored must
be approved before exploration and mining can begin. Reclamation is administered
by the Inspection Division of the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources
and permits are issued under the authority of the Mines Regulation Act and Coal
Mines Regulation Act. The Chief Inspector is Chairman of the Reclamation Committee, which includes representatives of the Ministers of Lands, Forests, and Water
Resources; Recreation and Conservation; and Agriculture. The Committee reviews
all reclamation plans before permits are approved by Cabinet and the permits are
issued only after a performance bond has been posted. In 1974, 104 reclamation
permits were issued to cover a total area of 30,420 acres, with a total bonding of
just over $3 million.
Amendments to section 11 of the Mines Regulation Act gave authority to the
Chief Inspector to require reclamation plans and bonding for mineral exploration,
 A 42
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1974
thus giving legal status to an administrative practice introduced in 1973. Permits or
approvals are now required for all types of mining and exploration.
The objective of mine reclamation is to restore waste-disposal areas and disturbed land surfaces to useful purposes compatible with the surrounding countryside. Baseline studies are made before mining begins and, from these, reclamation
plans are prepared. In 1973, guidelines for reclamation were established for the
first time. In 1974, they were in general use and will be modified as experience in
this field increases. At the larger mines a continuing program of testing, seeding or
planting, and fertilization is carried out. Cominco Ltd. and Kaiser Resources Ltd.
maintain nurseries, greenhouses, and facilities for testing the growth and survival of
plant species on residual materials available at the minesite (that is, crushed rock,
coal waste, chipped slash).
Seeding and planting cannot be carried out in active mining areas although
many companies have revegetated disturbed areas adjacent to their mines. The Bull
River mine, 15 miles east of Cranbrook, is the first to have completed the cycle of
exploration, mining, and reclamation since requirements of the Mines Regulation
Act came into effect in 1969. Early in 1974, backfilling, sloping, and contouring
of the pit area were carried out and by May it had been seeded to grass. The results
are excellent and the area has been returned to its former use of grazing by wild
animals.  Additional seeding and fertilization will continue in 1975.
   Review of the Petroleum Industry
Exploration and drilling activity decreased considerably during 1974 as compared to 1973. The total number of wells completed decreased 13 per cent to 147,
of which six were completed as oil wells, 51 as gas wells, 84 were abandoned, the
status of three was undetermined at the end of the year, and three were service wells.
Total footage drilled decreased 13 per cent to 760,364 feet, including 140,163
feet of successful exploratory drilling, 159,091 feet of successful development drilling, 424,209 feet abandoned, 16,298 feet as yet unclassified, and 20,603 feet for
service wells. A total of 49 drilling rigs was operated, a decrease of 12 from 1973.
Well authorizations issued numbered 144, 17 less than last year. Of these,
three were cancelled together with six others issued previously. The cancellations
were presumably related to the unstable economic climate that prevailed during the
year.
The number of wells spudded decreased by 26 to 139.
Geophysical exploration decreased considerably as did also the production of
oil, gas, and by-products. Gas exports decreased by 11 per cent to 232,935,935
MSCF, a daily average of approximately 638 million cubic feet.
The total acreage held by companies under permits, leases, natural gas licences,
and drilling reservations decreased slightly to 23,490,564 acres from the 24,528,742
acres in good standing at the end of 1973.
Total revenue collected from the petroleum industry by this Department, including royalties, amounted to $83,610,413, a significant increase over the $46,554,423
collected in 1973. Revenue to British Columbia Petroleum Corporation and taxes
are not included in these figures. Four dispositions of Crown-reserve petroleum
and natural gas rights were held during 1974. Tender bonus amounted to
$22,955,335, an increase of $5,178,894 from the previous year. The average price
per acre of all rights sold was $11.32, an increase of $1.33 per acre over 1973.
The Petitot, Louise, Cabin, East Kotcho, and South Sierra gasfields were tied
in to the Fort Nelson gas-gathering system, and some connections of small fields and
individual wells were made to the Fort St. John system.
Production from the Beaver River field decreased drastically from 58,151,696
MSCF in 1973 to 16,203,477 MSCF. This decrease, together with gas-gathering
pipe-line problems, represented the major cause of the gas-export shortfall during
the year. Production in 1975 could increase significantly if the gas-gathering systems
are extended to the Helmet field northeast of Fort Nelson and to other known, but
unconnected, fields south of Fort Nelson and north of Fort St. John. Additional
gas-plant facilities would also stimulate gas production.
EXPLORATION
A significant decrease in the level of exploratory activity occurred during 1974,
as compared to 1973, in both the number of exploratory wells and the footage
drilled. The number of exploratory wells drilled decreased 18 per cent during 1974
to 85 wells. Total exploratory footage drilled was 455,157 feet, a decrease of 19 per
cent from that drilled in 1973. The 85 exploratory wells drilled included two oil
wells, 24 gas wells, one service well, and 58 abandonments.
Geophysical exploration slackened but considerable work was done in the
regions north and east of Fort Nelson, and south of Dawson Creek in the Grizzly-
Sukunka area.
A 45
 A 46
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
Expenditures in 1974 by companies involved in the exploration and production
of petroleum and natural gas were:
$
Exploration, land acquisition, and drilling     88,180,000
Development drilling     13,316,000
Capital expenditures     18,673,000
Natural gas plant operations       6,836,000
Field, well, and pipe-line operations     19,091,000
General (excluding income tax)      56,380,000
Total   202,476,000
DEVELOPMENT
During 1974, 305,207 feet were drilled at the 60 locations classified as
"development" wells. Development drilling expenditures by the industry were
$13,316,000.   Results of this development drilling activity were:
Number of Development Wells Completed
Area
Gas
Oil
Finished
Drilling
Service
Abandoned
Total
Success
Ratio (Per Cent)
9
17
1
4
3
2
6
18
2
17
42
3
60
Fort St. John	
Foothills	
54
33
Totals
27
4
3
2
26
62
54
Although only 60 development locations were drilled during the year, the
above table shows 62 completions, since two of the gas wells were completed in two
separate zones. Such dual completions are counted as two wells for completed
well-count purposes.
Development drilling activity for gas was most active in the Laprise Creek
(four wells), Clarke Lake (three wells), Gundy Creek (two wells), and Yoyo (two
wells) gasfields.
Single completions for gas production were also made in 12 other fields or
areas. However, reserves developed as a result of this drilling activity were not
significant. Development oil-well completions were made in the Cecil, Inga, Oak,
and Weasel fields. As a result, the reserves in the Weasel field were increased somewhat, and the existence of an oil reservoir in the Oak field was confirmed, resulting
in a substantial reserve addition. Several of the development wells that were
abandoned during the year were follow-up wells to previous discoveries. These
disappointments include wells drilled in the Crush, Fireweed, Jeans West, and Mike
areas.
PRODUCTION
Crude oil and field condensate production decreased 11 per cent to 18,948,064
barrels. Average daily production in 1974 was 51,913 barrels as compared to
58,401 barrels in 1973.  The average for December was 49,005 barrels.
Net gas production, including nonassociated gas and associated gas, less gas
injected, was 412,607,272 MSCF, down 14 per cent from the 477,512,862 MSCF
produced in 1973. Average daily production decreased to 1,100,000 MSCF from
1,300,000 MSCF last year. The average for December was 1,260,000 MSCF.
 REVIEW OF THE PETROLEUM INDUSTRY
A 47
Gas plant production of butane and propane amounted to 663,099 barrels
and 562,121 barrels respectively, as compared to 685,936 barrels and 623,866
barrels last year.
Sulphur production decreased approximately 20 per cent to 58,412 long tons.
The history of oil, gas, natural gas liquids, and sulphur production in the
Province is shown on Figures 17 to 19, Part B, and exports of British Columbia gas
are shown on Figure 21. It is apparent that the decline in oil production evident
since 1970 continued during 1974. No significant change in this trend is anticipated
in the near future. Gas production rate was lower in 1974 than in 1973, the first
such annual decrease. This was due primarily to water production problems in the
Beaver River field. As a result, gas production from this field in 1974 was only
28 per cent of the production obtained in 1973. No solution to these problems was
evident by year-end, and consequently the required gas was not available during the
period of high winter demand.
The most significant activities in the production phase of the industry during
1974 were concerned with connecting several gasfields to transmission systems.
Efforts were made to decrease the shortfall between peak demand and supply by
tying presently known but unconnected reserves into the gas transmission system.
However, due to the long lead-times required for this work, sufficient gas had not
been tied in by year-end to meet total demand. This is the reason for the downturn
on Figure 21, showing gas exports from British Columbia. It is anticipated that gas
production rates from the Province will increase over the next few years as additional
known reserves (and future discoveries) are connected to the transmission system.
By April a line had been built connecting the Louise, Cabin, and Petitot River
fields to the Fort Nelson gas plant via the Yoyo to Clarke Lake line. In addition,
a line was built to tie in one well in the Kotcho Lake East field. These operations
resulted in an additional 30 to 35 MMSCF/D potential supply becoming available
to the transmission system. By November a line had been built to tie to an additional well in the south of the Sierra field. This, together with enlargement of the
dehydration plant in Sierra, made available a further 50 MMSCF/D. Only one
significant oil pool was placed on production during the year. This was the Halfway
B pool in the Oak field. At year-end it was producing some 300 STB/D. The oil
well completed in the North Pine B pool of the Cecil Lake field during 1974 was
also placed on production. However, its rate was only 30 STB/D at year-end. The
Gething oil discovery in d-53-H/94-H-3 had been tested by year-end, and equipment was being installed in preparation for placing the well on production. Construction of a sulphur recovery facility at the Fort Nelson gas plant was under way
at year-end and completion is anticipated during 1975.
HYDROCARBON AND BY-PRODUCTS RESERVES
The reserves, estimated by the Branch, at the end of 1974 were as follows:
Proved crude oil  118.8 million barrels
Residue gas       8.1 trillion cubic feet
Natural gas liquids    44.5 million barrels
Sulphur  3,952 thousand long tons
It is apparent that both oil and gas reserves declined during 1974, due partly
to lack of discoveries and partly to the fact that the reserves discoveries, together
with revisions to previous estimates, were insufficient to offset production during
the year. Oil discoveries during 1974 amounted to some 63 per cent of the average
reserves discovery rates during the last several years, while for gas the figure was
slightly better at 75 per cent.
 A 48
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1974
TITLE HOLDINGS
December 31, 1974
No. Acres
Permits   462 16,227,862
Petroleum and natural gas
leases   3,578 6,405,086
Natural gas leases  117 479,960
Petroleum leases  2 1,284
Natural gas licences  1 15,565
Drilling reservations   37 360,807
Totals   4,197    23,490,564
December 31, 1973
No.
Acres
452
17,410,475
3,525
6,196,570
115
479,754
2
1,284
2
20,781
37
419,878
4,133
24,528,742
MEDIATION AND ARBITRATION BOARD
Chairman: Patrick D. Walsh.
Vice-Chairman: Douglas Pomeroy.
Member: Cecil Ruddell.
The Mediation and Arbitration Board, established under the authority of the
1974 amendments to the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act, 1965, grants right of entry
to oil and gas companies upon alienated lands, and determines conditions of entry
and compensation therefore. The amendments provide for a process of mediation
by the Chairman of the Board, and failing satisfactory agreement between the parties
upon mediation, it provides for final disposition by the Board of entry conditions
and compensation. The Board also is charged with responsibility to review and set
compensation on leases and previous Board orders of more than five years' duration,
and to terminate rights of entry when a company has ceased to use occupied lands
of more than five years' duration.
Since the appointment of the Board effective July 1, 1974, six field inspections
have been carried out, four hearings have been concluded, two pending cases have
been settled, and four hearings are pending. In addition, three entry orders have
been granted and three hearing dates have been set for early determination.
   Highlights of Departmental Activities
LEGISLATION
The start of the Department's second century of operations was marked by an
extensive legislative program, including both new legislation and important amendments to existing legislation.
NEW LEGISLATION
The Coal Act (1974), introduced in the Spring Session of the Legislature, came
into effect August 1, 1974. It provides for the reissue of coal licences and the
introduction of production leases. Licence rentals are $1 per acre, and there is a
work requirement of $3, $4, and $5 per acre for the first, second, and subsequent
years of holding. Royalties are to be determined by the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council, with a minimum of 50 cents per ton of thermal coal and $1 per ton of
metallurgical coal.
The Mineral Royalties Act, introduced in the Spring Session of the Legislature,
came into effect in October 1974, retroactive to January 1. It provides for the payment of royalties on the production of minerals which are designated for this purpose
by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council. Royalties are payable according to two
rates, a basic rate and an incremental rate.
The calculation of royalty involves the basic value, the gross value, and the
net value of a designated mineral. Basic value is determined by Order in Council
and, once established, is adjusted each year by half of any change in the Wholesale
Price Index of Canada. Basic values were established in 1974 for the following
minerals: Asbestos, cadmium, cobalt, copper, gypsum, iron, lead, lode gold, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, silver, and zinc. For most purposes gross value is the net
smelter return paid to the producer of a designated mineral. Net value is calculated
by substracting transportation costs from gross value.
Royalty is payable at a combined rate of 2.5 per cent (5 per cent from 1975)
of the weighted average net value of minerals produced and sold or used during a
year, plus, at high prices, one-half of the difference between 120 per cent of the basic
value and the weighted average gross value during the year. For new mines the
basic value of any mineral produced is inflated during the first three years of commercial production to 115 per cent, 110 per cent, and 105 per cent of the basic value
otherwise in force.
Where the weighted gross value of a designated mineral ranges between 120
per cent and 90 per cent of the prevailing basic value, the basic rate of 2.5 per cent
(5 per cent from 1975) applies. If the weighted gross value is less than 90 per cent
of the basic value, the basic rate is reduced to 2 per cent or 1.5 per cent (4.5 per cent
or 4 per cent from 1975). Regardless of gross value, however, the basic rate is
reduced by one percentage point if a mineral is smelted or refined in the Province.
The Act provides for monthly estimates and royalty payments, with an annual
reconciliation in the year following the year of estimates and payments. In cases of
financial hardships the payment of royalty may be deferred by renewable periods of
up to one year.
The Placer Mining Act, introduced in the Fall Session of the Legislature, was
proclaimed on June 2, 1975.   Replacing the Placer-mining Act (1960), it provides
A 51
 A 52 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
for the designation of placer-mining areas in which leases may be issued upon staking. A free miner may apply for two placer leases during any year.
Placer leases are issued for a renewable term of not more than 10 years. The
holder is liable for the payment of an annual rental of $50, and for the performance
of development work in the amount of $250 per year for each lease. Excess work
may be credited for no more than three years, and leases may be grouped for work
purposes according to regulations.
The Prospectors Assistance Act, introduced during the Spring Session of the
Legislature, came into effect on July 25, 1974. Replacing the old Prospectors'
Grub-stake Act, it provides for the grant of assistance up to $4,000 per year for
training or prospecting. Additional funds may be granted for the exploration or
development of a mineral property. A grant of assistance gives the Crown the right
of first refusal on the purchase or option concerning a property in respect of which
a grant is issued. The Crown also has the first right to negotiate an agreement with
a prospector to develop or bring into production such property.
LEGISLATIVE AMENDMENTS
Several amendments to the Mineral Act were introduced in 1974. An important change is found in the introduction of a new claim-staking procedure effective
March 1, 1975. The new procedure calls for the locating of claims according to
a Modified Grid System. New claims must be in the shape of a square or rectangle
and may contain a maximum of 20 units of 25 hectares (61.78 acres) each.
A further significant amendment was introduced to provide for the updating
of the Department's data base. Effective January 1, 1974, all producers of minerals
were to provide pertinent information on their production operations and facilities.
This allows the Department to make a more meaningful contribution to resource
management in British Columbia.
In keeping with world-wide changes in the field of energy supply and demand
the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act, 1965 underwent significant amendments in
1974.  These amendments came into effect July 1, 1974.
Amendments provided for the renegotiation of rentals payable to surface
owners. The Mediation and Arbitration Board was established to settle disputes
resulting from entry on land. Permit rentals, work requirements, and lease rentals
were doubled while natural gas licence rentals, all fees, and penalties were also
increased.
A new section was added to provide the Minister with authority to require the
holder of a lease to submit a development plan. If the plan is deemed inadequate,
the Minister may order the holder of a lease to drill a well or require the surrender
of all of the location of the lease except those spacing areas on which there is a well
capable of producing petroleum or natural gas.
Provisions for "pooling" and royalties were amended and the authority for
pooling was changed from the Chief Commissioner to the Minister.
ORGANIZATION
The structure of the Department was on the threshold of major changes at
the end of 1974, but the organization during the year was largely that as established
in 1973 and shown on the organization chart on page A 53. The Department in
1974 had a symmetrical organization consisting of two Branches, the Mineral
Resources Branch and the Petroleum Resources Branch, with an Associate Deputy
Minister in charge of each.   Each Branch consisted of three Divisions, Engineering
 HIGHLIGHTS OF DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES
A 53
i
.   m
~ £
/
a
0
■."  O
c/>
*3
>
■• ft
□
U
3
7.
«
UJ
 , <u
>
-~
H
UJ
Q
05
J
<
05
id
7,
s
ffl
z
o
>
3
o
z
z
z
<
>-).
0,
a
z
<
S
o
z
o
o
Id
HHSHI
X
o
z
<
05
m
co
Id
U
05
D
r- O
c/5
UJ
05
Id
■J
C
05
H
UJ
s.
05
id
H
>-
H
O
o.
id
a
id
H
<
o
9?°
«'»
pld
•rt _- W) a
Sill
Mugg
qOiwS
y 00
05 c
*id
2     o
a   1
ri -O-
■ vO      « t/i
 A 54
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1974
(Inspection), Geological, and Titles, directed by a Chief Engineer, etc. The Sections
within the Divisions vary in title, reflecting the special functions of the Branch, and
are mostly in charge of a Senior Geologist, Inspector, or Engineer. In addition two
Divisions, Mineral Revenue and Economics and Planning, reported directly to the
Deputy Minister as did Accounts and Personnel Sections. The functions of the
units of the Department are outlined in the following discussion, starting with units
reporting directly to the Deputy Minister.
Economics and Planning Division
The Economics and Planning Division, under the direction of J. S. Poyen, is
primarily involved in research and analysis of the mineral industry and the ongoing
maintenance of a statistical base for the Department. As such there is a staff
complement of 12 persons in two sections, Economics and Statistics. The Statistics
Section is responsible for the collection and tabulation of mineral statistics for the
Department and to support the research projects of the Economics Section. The
Economics Section is responsible for studies on questions of policy, legislation, and
the economy in general for the Department.
Mineral Revenue Division
The Mineral Revenue Division, under the direction of Hart Horn, is responsible for the assessment and collection of mineral and petroleum royalties and taxes
imposed under the provisions of the Coal Act, Mineral Act, Mineral Land Tax Act,
Mineral Royalties Act, and Petroleum and Natural Gas Act, 1965.
The Mineral Revenue Section, under B. A. Garrison, is responsible for the
assessment and collection of mineral land taxes and royalties.
The Petroleum Revenue Section, under A. R. Lockwood, is responsible for the
collection of petroleum and natural gas royalties.
The Titles Section is responsible for the establishment of a Province-wide inventory of privately owned mineral rights. Part of the work of this group is directed
to the maintenance of land records for the Mineral Land Tax Roll.
Accounts
The Accounts Section, under S. G. Bone, is responsible for the preparation
and control of Departmental estimates, payroll, the costing and facilitation of
Departmental purchases, the acquisition and maintenance of Departmental vehicles,
equipment, and space throughout the Province, and maintains the filing and mail
service for the Department.
Personnel
The Personnel Section, under R. E. Moss, handles all matters pertaining to
staff recruitment, classification, staff training, and labour relations.
Mineral Resources Branch
The Mineral Resources Branch, under the supervision of Associate Deputy
Minister James T. Fyles, administers the laws and regulations pertaining to the mineral resource with the exception of mineral revenue and development. The Branch
is divided into three divisions whose function and organization are as follows:
 HIGHLIGHTS OF DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES
A 55
Geological Division
The Geological Division was directed by Chief Geologist Stuart S. Holland.
Its function is to provide information on the quantity, quality, and distribution of the
coal and mineral resources of the Province and to assist in the orderly discovery,
exploration, development, and use of these resources. To achieve these objectives
the Division conducts the following major programs:
(1) Conducts field mapping and requisite laboratory and office studies
of areas of high and moderate mineral potential at detailed scales
commensurate with the identification of geological parameters with
which mineral deposits are associated.
(2) Examines and studies mineral and coal deposits.
(3) Collects, collates, stores, and disseminates geological and statistical
data recording the activities of the industry in exploration and production.
(4) Makes mineral evaluation assessments of land and produces maps
showing these evaluations for land use and planning purposes.
(5) Provides chemical analyses for Departmental studies and for bona
fide prospectors.
(6) Supplies both general and specific information regarding mineral
deposits, mineral resources, and the mineral industry to Government,
the general public, and to the industry.
Information produced or gathered by the Division is made available through
a series of publications and also through public access to open files.
The Resource Geology Section, under N. C. Carter, undertakes office and
field studies concerned with resource appraisal, including an inventory of mineral
resources, monitoring its activity, and appraising its potential.
The Economic Geology Section, under E. W. Grove, undertakes geological
mapping and related office and laboratory studies of areas of moderate and high
mineral potential to provide maps and ideas for successful exploration and
prospecting.
The Analytical Laboratory, under W. M. Johnson, provides chemical analyses
and assays of a wide variety of samples for prospectors and for detailed Departmental studies related to genesis and distribution of ore deposits.
The Publication and Technical Services Section, under A. Sutherland Brown,
produced and published maps and reports prepared by geologists of the Division
and assisted in the same process for the Department. The section also provided
technical services for the Division and Department such as library, equipment,
photographic, and lapidary.
Inspection Division
The Inspection Division, under the direction of Chief Inspector J. W. Peck,
is separated into four sections, the largest of which is the Mine Inspection, which
is assisted and advised by specialized personnel in Mechanical-Electrical, Environmental Control, and Reclamation Sections.
Mine Inspection by resident engineers is a continuing program to ensure the
health and safety of miners and the safe and efficient operation of mines and the
equipment used in them. Inspectors also may examine prospects, mining properties,
roads and trails, and carry out special investigations under the Mineral Act.
Mechanical and Electrical Inspection, under V. E. Dawson, and Environmental
Inspection, under S. Elias, is conducted by specialists in these fields with the assistance of engineering technicians.   The environmental control inspectors conduct
 A 56 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
dust, ventilation, and noise surveys at all mines and quarries and, where necessary,
make recommendations to improve environmental conditions.
Reclamation Inspection, under J. D. McDonald, is increasing both in scope and
responsibility. All operations related to mining, including exploration activities, must
have an approved reclamation plan. The inspectors ensure that approved plans are
strictly adhered to, give assistance and advice to the industry concerning improvements in this field, and make recommendations to the Chief Inspector as required.
All mining sites are visited by the reclamation staff as often as possible.
Titles Division
The Titles Division of the Mineral Resources Branch is under the direction of
Chief Gold Commissioner E. J. Bowles and Deputy Chief Gold Commissioner
R. Rutherford. It is responsible for the administration of the Provincial laws relating
to the acquisition and holding of mineral rights, including coal.
Gold Commissioners, Mining Recorders, and Sub-Mining Recorders are appointed for the 24 mining divisions throughout the Province and their duties are laid
down in the Mineral Act and Placer Mining Act. They also administer other Acts
relating to mining. The recording of locations and of work on mineral claims as
required pursuant to the provisions of the Mineral Act, and upon placer mining
leases as required by the Placer Mining Act, is made at the office of the Mining
Recorder for the mining division in which the claim or lease is located.
The Vancouver Mining Recorder's office is under the direction of Gold Commissioner J. Egdell, who reports to the Chief Gold Commissioner in Victoria.
The routine operation of the Central Records office in Victoria is supervised
by T. Mitchell.
The Claims Inspectors at Smithers and Kamloops report directly to the Chief
Gold Commissioner. They are responsible for checking the location and proper
staking of mineral claims, and investigate any disputes concerning title or use of
claims.
The Administrator for coal, A. Corner, receives and reviews applications for
coal licences and leases and applications for extensions to the terms of licences.
He also co-ordinates the evaluation of all reports of exploration and development
work pertaining to coal.
Petroleum Resources Branch
The Petroleum Resources Branch, under the general direction of Associate
Deputy Minister J. D. Lineham, administers the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act,
1965 and the regulations made thereunder, including the Drilling and Production
Regulations, the Geophysical Regulations, the Drilling Reservation Regulations, and
the Development Road Regulations. It also administers the Underground Storage
Act, 1964. Therefore, the Branch is responsible for all matters related to the disposition of Crown-owned petroleum and natural gas rights as well as the regulation
of the exploration, development, and production phases of the oil and gas industry.
The Branch is divided for administrative purposes into three main divisions,
namely, the Engineering Division, the Geological Division, and the Titles Division.
Engineering Division
The Engineering Division, under the direction of Chief Engineer A. J. Dingley,
is responsible for all engineering activities of the Petroleum Resources Branch.
There are three main functions:
 HIGHLIGHTS OF DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES
A 57
(1) Enforcement of the Drilling and Production Regulations under the
Petroleum and Natural Gas Act, 1965, together with provision of
advice to the Minister with respect to applications made by industry
under the Act.
(2) Collection, filing for Branch and public use, and publication of drilling and production statistics, production and disposition data, reservoir and pool performance data.
(3) Reservoir analysis of all oil and gas pools in the Province, including
maintenance of current production rate forecasts together with data
concerning reserves discovered to date and estimates of potential
reserves growth.
The Reservoir Engineering Section, under the Senior Reservoir Engineer B. T.
Barber, is concerned with all reservoir engineering aspects of the Division's activities.
The section is responsible for determination of reservoir and production characteristics of oil and gas pools in the Province. This involves interpretation of reservoir
pressure, rock and fluid properties, and production data. These parameters are used
to forecast ultimate recoveries obtainable from oil and gas accumulations in the
Province, and the rates at which these volumes will be produced. The section maintains files of reservoir data, obtained from both industry and Branch sources, and
reviews such data for quality. Oil and gas allowable rates are set by the section,
and recommendations concerning proposed improved recovery and produced fluid
disposition schemes are made. The section is concerned with technical aspects of
matters affecting conservation and correlative rights.
The Drilling and Production Engineering Section, under the supervision of
District Engineer D. L. Johnson, is located at the Field Office at Charlie Lake and
is primarily responsible for enforcement of the Drilling and Production Regulations
in the field. It also collects reservoir and other data as required, acts in a liaison
capacity with industry at the field level, and maintains core and drill sample storage
and examination facilities.
The Development Engineering Section, under the supervision of Senior Development Engineer W. L. Ingram, licenses drilling and service rigs, issues well authorizations, and maintains detailed records pertaining to all drilling and production
operations.
Geological Division
The Geological Division, under the direction of Chief Geologist W. M. Young,
consists of three sections and is responsible for all geological and geophysical activities of the Petroleum Resources Branch.
Data resulting from the drilling of wells, geophysical surveys, and other related
sources in the Province in the search for and development of accumulations of oil
and gas are supplied to the Branch. These data are used by staff geologists and geo-
physicists as a basis for reports on, and maps and cross-sections of, the economically
important sedimentary rocks of the Province. The Division is responsible for providing data and opinion to attract, assist, and encourage the exploration and development of the petroleum resources of the Province. The Division directs and provides
all draughting services required by the Geological and Engineering Divisions and
also directs, through the District Engineer, the work of the Core and Sample Laboratory, located at Charlie Lake.
The Economic Geology Section, under G. R. Morgan, is primarily concerned
with those matters related to exploration and economic geology.
 A 58 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
The Reservoir Geology Section, under R. Stewart, is primarily concerned with
the detailed knowledge of the geology of oil and gas reservoirs. Other divisions and
departments frequently make use of the knowledge possessed by the section geological staff to assist in the framing of development procedures that ensure the best
returns from these reservoirs.
The Geophysical Section, under a senior geophysicist yet to be appointed, is
concerned with exploration and geophysical investigations related to the search
for and development of oil and gas reserves.
Titles Division
The Titles Division consists of two sections, under the direction of Commissioner R. E. Moss, and is responsible for administering those parts of the Petroleum
and Natural Gas Act, 1965 relating to and affecting title to Crown petroleum and
natural gas rights.
The Division administers the disposition of Crown petroleum and natural gas
rights and, in consultation with the Engineering and Geological Divisions, approves
and selects parcels for posting, and accepts or rejects the tenders received.
The Titles Section is responsible for all transactions involving petroleum and
natural gas permits, all leases, natural gas licences, drilling reservations, geophysical
licences, notices of commencement of exploratory work, affidavits of work, unit
agreements, and miscellaneous recordings.
The Revenue Section, under W. J. Quinn, is responsible for the collection of all
petroleum and natural gas revenue, except royalty, payable to the Crown under the
provisions of the Act.
Appointments and Retirements
John S. Poyen (Jr.) was appointed Director of the newly established Economics and Planning Division on January 7, 1974. He came to British Columbia
from Calgary, Alta., where he had been employed by a major petroleum company
during the previous 10 years. His position at that time was that of Marketing
Economist. He graduated with a B.A. degree from the University of Colorado in
1964. His major subject was economics and minor subjects were geology and
history.
Dr. Stuart S. Holland retired as Chief of the Geological Division, Mineral
Resources Branch, on December 31, 1974, after 35 years of service. He was born
in Vancouver where he received his early schooling. He attended the University
of British Columbia and graduated in 1930 with a B.A.Sc. in geological engineering.
He spent three years at Princeton University and was awarded an A.M. in 1932
and a Ph.D. in geology in 1933. He worked five summers with the Geological
Survey of Canada as an undergraduate and as a graduate. He was employed as a
field geologist by the late Col. H. H. Yuill, Dr. Victor Dolmage, and R. H. Stewart,
chiefly on lode gold properties and gold placers in the Bridge River, Cariboo, and
Omineca areas. He joined the Department of Mines as an Associate Mining
Engineer on January 1, 1939, and was appointed Mining Engineer in 1943 and
Geologist in 1950. In December 1966 he became Deputy Chief of the Mineralogical
Branch and in 1970 became Chief of the Branch. While with the Department he
devoted his time to reconnaissance geological mapping and detailed geological work
in mining areas with considerable emphasis on lode gold properties and gold placers.
At times he gave special attention to tungsten, uranium, and beryllium occurrences.
Incidental work included special geological studies for the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway on unstable ground; for the Fraser River Board on the Moran damsites;
and for the British Columbia Power Commission on diversion tunnels in the Chilko-
 HIGHLIGHTS OF DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES A 59
Homathko area. The list of his publications includes geological studies relating to
lode and placer properties, a bulletin on landforms of British Columbia, and a
mineral appraisal of northern British Columbia. He is a member of the Association
of Professional Engineers of British Columbia and the Canadian Institute of Mining
and Metallurgy.
Harry Bapty retired as Senior Inspector on September 30, 1974. Mr. Bapty
was born in Victoria. He received his early education in Victoria and later attended
the Idaho College of Mines, the University of Colorado, and the University of British
Columbia. He received both a B.Sc. degree and a B.A.Sc. degree, the latter being
in mining engineering. His employment varied from being a seaman with a whaling
fleet, a powder worker at an explosives plant, a surveyor's assistant, and eventually
being Chief Surveyor for The Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting and Power
Company Limited at Copper Mountain mine and at the Bromley Vale coal mine.
He then spent four years in the Canadian Army in Canada and Europe during
World War II, retiring as a captain. Subsequent to that and prior to joining the
Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources in 1963, he was employed as a
mining engineer in placer-mining in the Yukon Territory, with Torbrit Silver Mines,
Ltd. at Alice Arm, with Cowichan Copper Co. Ltd. at Jordan River, and again at
Torbrit silver mine as manager.
His first Departmental appointment was as Inspector of Mines and Resident
Engineer in Prince Rupert, from whence he was transferred to Victoria in 1970 to
become Senior Inspector in charge of the Prospectors' Grub-stake Act and the
Department's mine road program. He is a member of the Association of Professional Engineers and of the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, which
organization he served as secretary of the Victoria branch for several years.
DEPARTMENTAL WORK
Administrative Services
An extensive review of Departmental accounting and filing procedures was
undertaken with the assistance of G. Currie of the Department of Transport and
Communications. This has resulted in a reorganization of the Accounts Section.
Likewise, Departmental publications and library services were scrutinized with a
view to improving the dissemination of information.
The personnel statistics for the Department for 1974 are:
Number of permanent employees  218
Number of temporary employees (continuous)      20
Number of appointments     90
Number of resignations     28
Number of retirements       4
Number of in-service transfers       5
Number of promotions and reclassifications     54
Temporary employees under "Careers '74"     41
Temporary employees     16
The most significant change during 1974 was the signing of a first Master
Agreement with the British Columbia Government Employees' Union and subsequent signing of 13 component agreements. This Department is involved in five
component agreements, namely:
Administrative Support—clerks, clerk-typists, and clerk-stenographers.
Administrative, Fiscal and Regulatory—administrative officers, and audit
accountants.
 A 60 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
Environment, Resource, and Conservation—laboratory technicians.
Educational and Scientific Services—laboratory scientists, economists,
and research officers.
Engineering, Technical, and Inspectional—draughtsmen, mapping assistants, technicians, engineering aides, engineering assistants, and
co-ordinators (rescue training).
Economics and Planning Division
The Economics and Planning Division came into being in January 1974 with
the appointment of the Director, J. S. Poyen (Jr.), and the Assistant Director, L.
Sivertson. The priorities established at that time were staffing and organization,
development of a data system, and commencement of mineral studies.
All positions were filled by May 31, 1974. The Division was organized in two
sections. The Statistics Section was responsible for the collection and tabulation of
mineral statistics for the Department. The Economics Section undertook specific
economic research projects as support for management decisions on policy, legislation, and the economy in general.
Data system—The second priority was the establishment of a data system that
would be accessible for economic reviews and analyses. The holdings of the
Departmental library were expanded to include over 900 publications pertaining to
mineral studies, and statistics and economics. These publications are on extended
loan to this Division for the convenience of the research staff.
The Division acquired a mini-computer to supplement the information system
and provide computing capability for programs in the fields of statistics, engineering,
economics, and finance. Division personnel revised several regression analysis
programs for economic forecasting. In addition the Division developed programs
for data management (series generation and storage programs for annual and weekly
data, updating programs, and plotting programs) and financial Discounted Cash
Flow series.
In the area of statistics, emphasis has been on the collection and tabulation of
pertinent information and assembly of that data into an easily accessed retrieval
system.
Mineral studies—During 1974 the Division completed two major mineral
studies. One project involved considerable support work for the Copper Task
Force. Another project was a survey of the sand and gravel industry. Both
projects have set the basis for ongoing work in the general area of resource management and planning.
Interdepartmental studies during the year included a study of mining claims in
parks, and cost-benefit studies in co-operation with the Environment and Land Use
Secretariat. Work was completed with the Department of Economic Development
on higher value added studies as well as regional studies with the Department of
Regional Economic Expansion.
The Division provided short- and medium-term economic reviews and forecasts to other divisions in the Department to assist in the decision-making process
concerning mineral development. Feasibility studies and surveys for mineral
development were examined and recommendations made.
Mineral Revenue Division
The Mineral Revenue Division completed its initial year of operation in 1974.
This first year was a trying period marked by extreme work pressures caused by
recruitment and training of new staff, preparation of new regulations, and the over-
 HIGHLIGHTS OF DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES
A 61
all logistics required when starting up a new division and co-ordinating its activities.
Considering the difficulties and pressures encountered, the results of the past year
have been quite satisfactory. Administration of the royalty and tax provisions of
these statutes during the year is summarized below.
Coal royalty—In July 1974 the administration of coal royalties was transferred
from the Surveyor of Taxes of the Department of Finance to the Director of Mineral
Revenue. The Coal Act was proclaimed August 1, 1974, and new Coal Royalty
Regulations were approved effective August 1, 1974. Under the new regulations,
metallurgical coal was subject to a royalty of $1 per long ton, while thermal coal
was subject to a royalty of 50 cents per long ton during the 1974 calendar year.
Details of coal royalty collection for the calendar year are as follows:
Producers
Tons of Coal
Royalty Paid
Surveyor of Taxes    .. 2 993,019.00 281,248.50
Director of Mineral Revenue ______ 3 799,613.25        1,361,081.25
Totals   3        1,792,632.25        1,642,329.75
Mineral Act royalty—Royalty assessed under the Mineral Act is for iron ore,
and the details of this collection are summarized as follows: Producers, 2; tons of
iron concentrates, 311,850.03; royalty paid, $155,925.04.
Mineral land taxes—On May 1, 1974, the first assessments were made under
the provisions of this Act. Records of Crown-granted mineral claims formerly
taxed under the Taxation Act, together with considerable freehold acreage acquired
through railway land grants, formed the basis for the initial tax roll. A new computer program and files were required within a two and one-half-month period, and
credit for the development of these instruments is due to B. Garrison and his staff,
and to P. Hayles and his associates from the Department of Transport and Communications. During 1974, coal was the only mineral to be designated, and two
production tracts were established. Details of assessments and tax collections
for the year are as follows:
Classification of Mineral Land
Number of
Folios
Acreage
Tax Assessed
Tax Collected
6,333
23
2
1,008,368.51
30,071.48
6,085.00
$
481,262.36
60,142.96
2,309,317.19
$
270,665.99
Production areas  	
60,039.66
2,309,317.19
Totals    	
6.358         1     1.044.524.99     I     2.850.722.51     I    2.640.022.84
In lieu of paying the tax assessed against his mineral land, an owner may surrender his mineral rights unto the Crown, or allow his mineral lands to be forfeited
to the Crown. During 1974, eight companies indicated intention to surrender mineral rights. Six of these surrenders involve mineral lands granted under former
railway land grants covering extensive land holdings on Vancouver Island and in
the Kootenay Land District. Due to complexities in title and Land Registry Office
requirements, only one of these major surrenders was completed during the year.
The difficulties with the remaining five should be resolved during 1975 and, when
 A 62
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
registered, several million acres will be available for exploration.   Details of mineral
lands formally surrendered during the year are as follows:
Company Acreage
Attwood Copper Mines Limited  47.01
Canadian Pacific Railway  5,161,269.00
Canex Placer Limited  1,111.95
Total  5,162,427.96
The five surrenders pending completion are as follows:
Company Approximate Acreage
CanPac Minerals Limited      135,639
Crows Nest Industries Limited      245,300
Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway Company        30,346
Pan Canadian Petroleum Limited  2,200,000
Weldwood of Canada Limited        32,639
Total  2,643,924
During the summer the Titles Section commenced a program to establish an
inventory of mineral land, and to identify those freehold mineral lands which are
subject to taxation under the Act. For this purpose district titles offices were located
in New Westminster, Kamloops, Nelson, Prince Rupert, and Prince George. The
permanent staff was assisted by the employment of 17 casual employees under the
Department of Labour's "Career '74" program. A total of 4,869 searches was completed with 3,854 designated for inclusion on the mineral land tax roll; however,
only 703 parcels were actually added to the rolls. New control procedures and the
practical experience gained by staff during the past year will further improve the
utility of title searches performed.
Due to nonpayment of taxes, 314 parcels of mineral land covering 11,357.84
acres were forfeited to the Crown.
Mineral royalties—The Mineral Royalties Act was proclaimed on October 1,
1974, and provides for the assessment of royalty on designated minerals produced,
retroactive to January 1, 1974, from title held under the provisions of the Mineral
Act, Placer Mining Act, or Coal Act. Royalty was collected on the following designated minerals: Copper, lode gold, molybdenum, silver, and zinc. Eleven major
producers were subject to the provisions of the Act in the initial year, and the results
of the royalty assessment during this period are as follows:
Designated Mineral
Production Subject
to Royalty
Gross Value
Royalty Collected
._ (lb.)
260,363,858
48,847.47
10,495,023.80
797,490.61
1,728
$
234,343,235.28
7,545,683.87
21,288,361.56
3,601,648.68
387.30
$
8,246,674.07
 (oz.)
653,423.03
. ..(lb.)
348,551.69
Silver 	
Zinc    - _     —
Overpayments -	
...... (oz.)
 (lb.)
116,705.50
6.04
3,613,738.19
Totals   , -
266,779,316.69
12,979,098.52
Because of the significant decline in the price of copper, initial copper royalty
assessments were determined with a substantial surcharge, but, by the end of the
year, the average gross value had declined to such an extent that the surcharge was
reduced significantly, or was no longer applicable. This resulted in large overpayments of copper royalties. Also an overstatement of gross values and royalties
resulted when several producers failed to report production and values in conformance with the royalty regulations.
 HIGHLIGHTS OF DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES A 63
Petroleum and natural gas royalties—The administration of petroleum and natural gas royalties was transferred from the office of the Chief Commissioner of
Petroleum and Natural Gas to the Division in January of 1974.
The price of oil was increased effective April 1, 1974, by $2.70 per barrel from
the previous month's well-head price of $3.53 per barrel. This increase was a result
of the First Minister's Conference in the spring of 1974.
The sale of most of the natural gas within the Province was contracted to the
British Columbia Petroleum Corporation retroactive to November 14, 1973. In
these contracts the Corporation undertakes to satisfy all royalty owing to the Crown
in right of the Province. These contracts increased the average net value of natural
gas sales by producers from 10.58 cents to 17.88 cents in the first months of the
contracts.
New Petroleum and Natural Gas Royalty Regulations were approved effective
July 1, 1974, with provision for retroactivity to April 1, 1974, for royalties on
crude petroleum. These regulations provided for increased royalty rates on crude
petroleum and field condensate production, and increased royalty rates on natural
gas and by-products not sold to the British Columbia Petroleum Corporation.
Sales to the Corporation, under contract, were exempted from the payment of
royalty.
The economics of several individual operating units were studied by the
Petroleum Revenue Section. Some of these studies indicated a reasonable profitability with prevailing Provincial and Federal royalty and tax rates; some studies
indicated unfavourable economic results, and some showed that by decreasing
production rates the operators could improve economic returns.
The actual royalty collections under the Act for the 1974 year were as follows:
$
Gas      3,288,296.85
Oil   45,300,184.21
Products   51,181.21
Penalties   649.20
Total  48,640,311.47
Additional statistics concerning production, disposition, value, and royalties
are in Part B.
Mineral Resources Branch
Geological Division
Summaries of the work and special projects undertaken by the Division follow.
The work of the Division results in publications, maps, and reports which are also
listed.
Geological fieldwork—The geologists worked on the following major projects:
G. L. Bell studied all active coal properties in the Province.
P. A. Christopher started work on a project related to ultramafic intrusions
and magmatic ore deposits at the Giant Mascot (Pride of Emory) mine.
B. N. Church completed mapping the volcanic rocks and the stratiform copper
deposits of the Sustut area.
G. E. P. Eastwood investigated several prospects and properties on Vancouver
Island.
 A 64 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
E. W. Grove carried out detailed studies of the Liard Copper deposit and
mapping of the Schaft Creek area. Underground mapping of the Granduc copper
mine was also completed.
J. A. Garnett completed mapping of the southern Omineca intrusions and their
copper and molybdenum deposits and carried out other duties for the Department.
T. Hoy started work in regard to lead and zinc deposits of southeastern British
Columbia.
W. J. McMillan completed mapping the Guichon Creek batholith and the
porphyry copper and molybdenum deposits of the Highland Valley.
J. W. McCammon completed an appraisal of all sand and gravel pits on the
Lower Mainland.
K. E. Northcote mapped the northern half of the Iron Mask batholith.
A. Panteleyev continued mapping the volcanic rocks, syenitic intrusions, and
copper deposits of the Stikine area.
D. E. Pearson started a mapping program related to precious metals in the
Bridge River area.
V. A. Preto continued mapping volcanic and intrusive rocks that are noted for
their abundant copper prospects in the area between Princeton and Merritt.
In addition, E. W. Grove and N. C. Carter carried out supervisory tasks and
property visits. A. F. Bowman was engaged in initiating computer programs as an
aid to the field projects.
G. G. Addie and G. H. Klein were appointed District Geologists in Nelson and
Prince George late in the year, adding to the program initiated with the appointments
of T. G. Schroeter in Smithers and G. P. E. White in Kamloops.
Mineral inventory—The Mineral Inventory group of geologists, with temporary
help from the Careers '74 program and the Incentives program of the Department
of Human Resources, contributed to the Departmental mineral inventory file of
maps and data cards which now contains data on 7,800 mineral deposits. They
assisted in the compilation of the annual publication Geology, Exploration and
Mining in British Columbia from assessment reports and exploration forms.
Special projects included a study of copper production and reserves and
similar studies of other metals were initiated. Data on 25,000 surveyed mineral
claims were filed on computer.
Evaluations of the mineral potential of selected areas, mainly those to be set
aside for park, recreation, or forest yield studies were made. An additional number
of properties were evaluated for purposes of the Mineral Act.
Analytical laboratory—During 1974 the laboratory made significant progress
in developing rapid analytical methods and statistical data-handling techniques for
both trace and major element analyses. As a consequence, the output of the
laboratory increased substantially over that of previous years.
Renovations began in October and will be continued well into the new year.
These include installation of new fume hoods, bench tops, storage area, comminution
machinery, and dust-control equipment.
The wet laboratory reported 23,473 results on 1,763 samples to Departmental
geologists, 319 results on 113 samples to prospectors, and 213 results on 93 samples
to grubstaked prospectors. In addition, five samples were analysed for the Honourable Gordon Dowding, Speaker of the House, and 407 results were reported on five
samples as a part of our participation in the Standard Reference Material Project.
This represents a total of 24,417 results on 1,979 samples.
The emission spectographic laboratory reported 601 semiquantitative results on
601 samples and 2,689 quantitative results on 352.
 HIGHLIGHTS OF DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES
A 65
The X-ray diffraction laboratory reported on 260 mineral identifications, 433
quartz determinations, and a 321-sample clay mineral alteration study.
In addition, 292 refractive index determinations were made and 23 mineral
separations were performed.
Publications and special reports—The following publications and maps were
produced in 1974: Geology, Exploration and Mining in British Columbia, 1973;
Geological Fieldwork, 1974—a new publication to bring the preliminary results of
the field season to the interested public as quickly as possible; Preliminary Map
No. 14—Petrochemical Overlays, Copper Mountain Area (two sheets); Preliminary
Map No. 15—Geological Map of Aspen Grove Area (five sheets plus descriptive
notes); Preliminary Map No. 16—Geological Map of the Riondel Area; 35 Mineral
Deposit-Land Use maps.
Special reports on mines, copper reserves, policy proposals, and ecological
reserves were prepared for Departmental use. A large number of reports were prepared for the Environment and Land Use Secretariat as well as a number of reports
on mining claims in parks.
Inspection Division
One of the principal functions of the Inspection Division is the investigation of
all fatalities and dangerous and (or) unusual occurrences in the mining industry.
In 1974, there were 12 fatalities. Of these, one occurred in an underground coal
mine, one in a shaft at a placer mine, one at a granite quarry, and the remainder
were at metal mines. Of the nine fatalities at the metal mines, six occurred underground, two in concentrators, and one at an open pit.
Fatal and compensable (more than one working-day lost) injuries were as
follows in comparison to 1973 and 1972:
1972
1973
1974
Fatal
Compensable
Fatal
Compensable
Fatal
Compensable
6
16
227
771
1
6
294
817
1
306
1,225
Totals  	
22
998
7
1,111
12
1,531
Details of the above fatalities and dangerous occurrences will be published in
the Report of the Chief Inspector.
Certificates—All persons working underground and in open-pit workings must
be under the supervision of a person qualified as per the Mines Regulation Act or
the Coal Mines Regulation Act. In 1974 the Board of Examiners issued 54 permanent underground shiftboss certificates, 70 open-pit shiftboss certificates, and eight
gravel pit shiftboss certificates. The total number of all these permanent and
provisional certificates at the end of 1974 was 1,336.
Four first-class and two second-class certificates of competency in coal-mining
were issued. It became evident by the end of 1974 that there would be a shortage
of men holding third-class certificates for the proposed underground coal mines.
Therefore, arrangements were made between this Department and the Department
of Education, together with Canada Manpower, for training courses for these
certificates.
In August 1974, Rule 316 of the Mines Regulation Act was put into effect,
making it mandatory for miners to have a miner's certificate before they could be
3
 A 66 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
employed at a working-place in an underground mine. Rule 316 provides for three
types of certificates—provisional, conditional, and permanent. The conditional
certificate is issued to miners who were employed in underground mines for at least
six months prior to August 1974. The permanent certificate is issued to underground miners who have first aid, mine-rescue, and blasting certificates, as well as
three years' experience, and who have passed a test. Provisional certificates are
issued to miners for a limited time until they acquire a permanent certificate.
By issuing a miner's certificate, the Department of Mines and Petroleum
Resources recognizes that a miner has acquired training and skills that will make
him a better and safer miner. Approximately 500 provisional certificates and around
700 conditional certificates were issued in 1974.
Prosecutions and suspensions—There were four successful prosecutions in
1974 under the Mines Regulation Act. Three companies held as a corporate group
were fined a total of $3,000 covering a series of charges—failure to dispose of
explosives on shutdown; failure to dispose of cyanide on shutdown; storage of
explosives without permit; failure to notify District Inspector on closure; failure to
file reclamation report. A placer operator was fined $50 each on two charges—
failure to notify an Inspector on opening of a placer mine, and use of a gasoline
engine underground. One prosecution was pending against the operator of an
underground locomotive for driving without due care and attention.
There were five suspensions of blasting certificates ranging from one week to
an indefinite period. These involved such instances as carrying a lit fuse with
explosive; inadequate examining of face of previous blast; failure to guard a blast;
and drilling within 3 inches of a hole containing explosives.
Mine rescue and first aid—There are six rescue co-ordinators stationed at
Fernie, Kamloops, Prince George, Smithers, Nelson, and Nanaimo. They give
courses in mine rescue and first aid at various mines as well as at the University of
British Columbia and the British Columbia Institute of Technology. The number
of rescue certificates issued in 1974 totalled 203 for underground, 305 in open-pit
rescue, and 31 in gravel-pit rescue. A total of 242 also received training in first aid.
All mines are required to have a certain number of trained men on site to
handle emergencies. It has been found that the best way to stimulate interest in
mine rescue and first aid is by having competitions and for this the Department
provided $24,000 in grants to mine safety associations. It is estimated this amount
was more than matched by the mining companies in payment of wages and other
support. The competitions were held in May and June at Nanaimo, Nelson, Kimberley, Kamloops, Prince George, and Fernie.
A highlight of the Department's training program was the printing of a manual
on Survival-Mine Rescue compiled by the rescue co-ordinators and inspectors.
Reclamation—By year-end, 51 metal mines, 69 quarries, 4 coal mines, 24 coal
exploration properties, and 68 mineral exploration properties were under permit.
All permits require bonding to be posted and the total amount on hand by the end
of 1974 was about $3,000,000. The highest bond is $300,000 (Kaiser Resources
Ltd.) and the lowest is a few hundred dollars on a gravel pit. By year-end, more
than 30,000 acres of mineral land had been approved for mining and exploration
activity which was covered by reclamation permits.
All mines are required to do testing and research to determine the best use of
mined land. Results are variable and the Department hopes to help in this program
in 1975 by co-ordinating research.
One example of successful reclamation is the Bull River copper mine of Placid
Oil Company, east of Cranbrook. It operated from 1969 to 1973. The ground has
now been resloped and seeded to the satisfaction of all departments.
 HIGHLIGHTS OF DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES
A 67
Aid to brokers' office—Since February 1969, A. R. C. James has been assigned
as Mining Engineer Adviser to the Superintendent of Brokers' office. His duties
are mainly to advise the Superintendent and his staff in regard to engineering reports
submitted in support of prospectuses by mining companies as required by Regulation
17 of the Securities Act. Engineering advice is also required from time to time by
the Superintendent in connection with programs financed by rights offerings; on
the assessment of reports on work done on mining properties; on prices paid for
mining properties; conditions of option agreements; and in approval of company
press releases.
In 1974, 131 reports submitted by 102 companies were examined.
Environmental control—This section of the Inspection Division conducts ventilation and dust surveys throughout the mines to determine if any environmental
hazard from dust, noise, or gas exists or might develop.
There is evidence that the incidence of silicosis can be controlled if mining
operations do not produce dust in excess of 300 particles per cubic centimetre of air.
Departmental surveys indicate this objective was achieved in most instances and
where not, corrective action was taken.
The Department has stressed that all workmen exposed to undue noise be
given audiometric tests. Surveys show this was done in 1974 at most operations.
All drilling machines have been muffled for several years and hearing protection
by ear muffs is also standard practice.
Mechanical-Electrical—Mining in the last decade has become increasingly
machinery oriented. Huge trucks and shovels are used in open pits; and underground, trackless diesel equipment is in common use. The hazards are thus changing. The Department held an electrical seminar at Utah Mines Ltd. in September,
a meeting on use of nonflammable hydraulic fluid in November in Victoria, and a
meeting on the dangers of induced polarization prospecting in October. All were
well attended. V. Dawson represents this Department on a committee which
includes representatives from the Workers' Compensation Board, Department of
Transport and Communications, and Motor-vehicle Branch to study the use of off-
highway vehicles.
The administration of programs concerned with the B.C. Mining School,
mining-roads, and prospectors' assistance were largely the responsibility of the
Inspection Division.
B.C. Mining School—In the 1974/75 fiscal year, 19 students were granted
$155 per month living allowance. Twelve were in the open-pit and seven in the
underground course.   Four were female and 15 male.
This program, run on a test basis in 1974/75, was highly successful and is
being continued in 1975/76.
Mining-roads—A bridge was constructed across the Omineca River at Ger-
mansen Landing to replace the old Omineca bridge, built in 1952, wfrch was
dangerous and beyond repair. The Omineca road was repaired and extended northward to facilitate access to an area currently under fairly intense exploration. The
road will be useful for future exploration in this area and could provide access to
the British Columbia Railway via the Sustut Valley (40 miles).
In addition, several small grants were also made to build and maintain mining-
roads around the Province.
In 1974, bridge construction and maintenance costs totalled $708,000; road
construction and maintenance costs totalled $332,027.
Prospectors' assistance—In August of 1974 the Prospectors Assistance Act
was proclaimed and the Prospectors' Grub-stake Act was repealed.   The response
 A 68 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1974
to this change was immediate and gratifying with moneys allotted to the new Act
being applied for very quickly. As a result, 71 prospectors were in the field by late
1974 compared to 22 prospectors in the previous year. The new Act also provides
for training assistance to train as well as upgrade prospectors. Around 250 persons
were trained under this program at a cost of around $20,000. Most of these people
are expected to apply for grants to prospect in 1975.
A review of activities by prospectors in 1974 shows that several new discoveries were made and many old prospects were re-examined. These mineral
deposits will be assessed by Departmental geologists in 1975. A review of activities
of prospectors in 1974 also shows that new prospecting methods and expertise were
used to explore many parts of the Province. It is expected that this program will
be expanded in the 1975/76 fiscal year, thus demonstrating the willingness of the
Provincial Government to play an expanding role in mineral exploration.
Titles Division
In 1974, there were 16,971 mineral claims staked throughout the Province. In
addition, four investigations resulted from complaints pursuant to section 80 of the
Mineral Act.
Claim records—Amendments to the Mineral Act in 1974 gave legislative
authority to the introduction of a new system called the Modified Grid System of
staking mineral claims. It is to come into effect on March 1, 1975. Regulations
governing the Modified Grid System were prepared and in these regulations the
metric system of measurement is used. In addition, a booklet was drawn up for the
information and use of prospectors dealing with the procedure to be followed in
the staking of mineral claims under the new system. Public lectures to describe the
new system were held at a number of places throughout the Province and copies of
the regulations and booklet were mailed to all holders of Free Miners' Certificates.
An extensive ongoing program of redrawing maps has been continued and
during the year 623 new mineral titles reference maps were completed. In addition,
five new placer titles reference maps and 34 new coal maps were also completed.
Approximately two-thirds of the Province is now covered by new mineral maps.
New regulations pertaining to the acquisition of placer leases under the new
Placer Mining Act have been prepared and they also reflect the metric system of
measurement. More than 300 maps showing placer leases are being redrawn at a
scale of 1 inch equals one-half mile.
Claims inspection—Mineral Claims Inspectors were based at Kamloops and
Smithers during 1974. Their duties include checking the locations of mineral claims
to correlate them with the plotted position of claims, determining the validity of the
staking under the Mineral Act and the Placer Mining Act and regulations, investigations of the use of mineral claims and investigations of disputes. The activities
of the inspectors will increase in order to fulfil the objective of providing claim
holders with firm title, and maintaining accurate and up-to-date records.
Production permits—A new feature of the Mineral Act is the requirement in
sections 59, 64, and 72 for production approval. In addition, limited production
permits are issued under section 15. In 1974, 21 applications for production
permits were received and, after appraisal by the professional staff of the Branch,
10 were approved. Four were rejected on the grounds that the property was in the
exploration stage and seven were pending.
 HIGHLIGHTS OF DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES
A 69
Petroleum Resources Branch
Engineering Division
The Division was formally recognized during 1974, following approval of the
Branch reorganization by the Public Service Commission. All engineering activities
of the Branch are the responsibility of this Division. Principal areas of interest are
enforcement of the Drilling and Production Regulations, collection and dissemination
of technical information and reservoir analysis of all oil and gas pools in the
Province.
Major projects undertaken during 1974 included preparation of a report entitled
Petroleum Resources Supply From British Columbia, Review and Forecast Through
1995, compiled at the request of the British Columbia Energy Commission. In
addition, a report of forecasted future natural gas supply from British Columbia was
prepared. This was filed as a supplement to the submission of the British Columbia
Attorney-General at hearings held by the National Energy Board into the supply
and demand situation with respect to Canadian natural gas. A report detailing
estimated pool by pool petroleum resource reserves in the Province was also
prepared for publication.
Development engineering—During 1974, well authorizations were issued for
the drilling of 144 locations.
The Development Engineering Section was involved in several projects during
1974. Revisions to the Drilling and Production Regulations were drafted. The
most significant change involves conversion to the Lahee System of well classification.
In addition, a first draft of regulations under the Geothermal Resources Act was
prepared.
Present plans call for the petroleum industry to be operating with metric
measurements by the end of 1978. Conversion to the metric system for all British
Columbia legislation pertaining to the exploration and production phase of the
industry is under review and discussion with other regulatory bodies. This is being
done through representation on Metric Commission Sector Committee 4.2 and this
committee's legislative subcommittee. The objective is to provide standardization
within the Canadian petroleum industry when the change to metric is realized.
Toward the end of 1974 an investigation was started into the appropriate
method to be used to compile industry exploration and production expenditures in
British Columbia. Contacts were made with Statistics Canada and with industry
organizations, and the work was still in progress at year-end.
During 1974 a new comprehensive Petroleum Resources Branch filing system
was designed, with the object of improving retrieval efficiency and to provide greater
security for the various documents retained. This is expected to be implemented
during 1975.
Drilling and production engineering—During 1974, in excess of 200,000 miles
was driven by staff members in the course of fulfilling the Section's primary responsibility, which is enforcement of the Drilling and Production Regulations in the field.
Oil production facilities were inspected on 564 occasions and 3,593 routine inspections were made at producing, potential, or abandoned well locations. A total of
519 inspections of active drilling sites was made. During the course of the year,
one oil well was tested and 64 gas well absolute open-flow potential tests were
witnessed. A total of 947 calibration checks on production and sales gas-meters
was made, and 734 bottom-hole pressure bomb elements were calibrated. Measurements were made of the down-hole pressure in 102 wells during the year, and, in
addition, 27 well-bore segregation tests were witnessed.    Some 71 man-days were
 A 70 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1974
spent ensuring that seismic exploration activities were being carried out in compliance with the Geophysical Regulations.
An important aspect in the enforcement of the Drilling and Production Regulations is the investigation of any spillages of petroleum products that occur. The
British Columbia Oil Spill Contingency Plan was initiated by the petroleum industry
in 1971. Under this plan, equipment is located at strategic places in the producing
area of the Province to assist personnel in the containment and rapid clean-up of
any spillages. The Section co-operates with this organization by providing liaison
and communication with various Government agencies that become involved.
During 1974, no major spillages occurred, and only two man-days were spent
inspecting oil-spills.
Inspection of salt-water disposal systems required five man-days of effort during
1974. At the end of the year an investigation was under way to ensure that segregation between the tubing and casing was being maintained in all water disposal and
injection wells.
One major blowout occurred during the year at the well located in a-85-G/93-
1-15. This well had been completed as a Halfway gas well and the blowout occurred
while operations were under way to repair down-hole equipment. The original gas
blow was estimated at between 10 and 25 MMSCF/D, but this rapidly diminished
to an estimated 1 MMSCF/D during the first day. It took 10 days to completely
stop the gas flow and developments at the site were continuously monitored by the
Section during this period.
Reservoir engineering—This Section is concerned with all reservoir engineering
aspects of the Division's activities, including the estimation of Provincial petroleum
resource reserves, the rates at which these reserves will be produced, and such
regulatory items as approving production schemes and setting allowable rates of
production for oil and gas.
Several requests were approved during 1974 for modification to existing production schemes. These included modifications to the waterflood schemes in Crush
Unit No. 1, Inga Unit No. 5, Peejay Unit No. 2, and Weasel Unit No. 2. Other
production schemes approved during 1974 were a good engineering practices
project for most of the gas wells in the Kotcho Lake field, and a similar project for
one well in the Yoyo field.
A concurrent production scheme has been operating in the Inga field since
April 1971. Gas-cap gas is produced by Inga Unit No. 3 under strictly controlled
conditions with partial replacement of withdrawals by water injection along the
gas-oil contact in Inga Unit No. 1. On the basis of mathematical model study
results, approval in principle was granted in 1974 to cease the partial replacement
of gas-cap withdrawals and to increase the off-take rate from 10 to 15 MMSCF/D.
Pending a decision by the operators concerned to either enlarge the unit or to
produce the allowable rate under competitive conditions, the increased rate had
not been put into effect as of year-end.
Early in 1974 an application was received for assignment of the full waterflood
MPR to Inga Unit No. 4. This was denied initially, on the basis that water injection
capacity appeared insufficient to permit the balancing of reservoir withdrawals.
Following further application, the operator's proposal to base the withdrawal rate
on the previous period's injection rate was approved, with a maximum limit equivalent to the waterflood MPR.
Applications to produce an oil well in the Cecil Lake Halfway B pool without
MPR and without gas-oil ratio penalties, and to produce the Fort St. John Pingel
Unit No. 1 without gas-oil ratio penalty, were rejected.    However, approval was
 HIGHLIGHTS OF DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES
A 71
granted for the well in Cecil Lake to be assessed under Schedule 2000 for gas-oil
ratio penalty purposes. Fort St. John Unit No. 1 was already operating under this
schedule. Approval in principle was granted for a concurrent production scheme
from the Halfway pool, Peejay West field. Implementation was awaiting unitization
of the pool at year-end. During the course of 1974, seven applications were
approved to flare gas while testing gas wells, and seven water-disposal schemes were
approved.
Detailed reservoir analyses were made for 12 pools. These ranged in scope
from investigation of the optimum production scheme for Cecil Lake Halfway A
pool to attempts to determine the reasons for the adverse performance of the
Nahanni pool Beaver River field to determination of the interconnection of wells
and the producing mechanism in the Halfway pools in the Oak field. During the
course of the year, production rate forecasts were prepared for all known oil and
gas accumulations. In addition, forecasts were made of the production rates that
might be anticipated from future discoveries.
Several requests for advice were received from the British Columbia Petroleum
Corporation. These were generally concerned with requests for estimates of the
gas supply potential for various unconnected fields and the additional supply
potential from presently producing fields. At the request of the Department of
Transport and Communications, a review was made of the oil supply forecasts
included in an application seeking tariff rate increases on the pipe-line from Taylor
to Kamloops. During the course of the year the Titles Division was advised concerning the disposition of 57 lease renewal and extension applications, the proposed
unitization parameters in two fields, and the evaluation of bids for lease rights at the
various Crown reserves dispositions held during the year.
Geological Division
Economic geology—The Economic Geology Section was responsible for
initiating, organizing, and carrying through to publication regional mapping projects
within the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. To this end, a comprehensive
regional mapping project was established which resulted in the completion to publication of a total of 20 subsurface structure, isopach, and formation test maps on
several key horizons. In addition to and concurrently with the latter work, a
number of special studies were made of the reserve potential of certain horizons
utilizing geological trends.
Regional Subsurface Mapping Projects Completed
Geologic Horizon
Map Type
Area (NTS)
Scale
Structure
Isopach
Structure
Structure
Formation test
94-1, J, O, P
94-1, J, O, P
94-A, B, G, H
94-A, B, G, H
94-1, J, O, P
1:125,000
2. Fort Simpson-Middle Devonian  	
1:125,000
1:125,000
1:125,000
1:125,000
Special mapping and related projects were as follows:
Mississippian Project Study—Foothills Belt—The area of study lies within the
Foothills Belt to the northwest of Fort St. John between Prophet River on the
north and Peace River on the south. Primary objective of the project was the
evaluation of the hydrocarbon potential within an area known for its complex
variations in stratigraphy and structure.
 A 72 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1974
Mississippian Subcrop and Cretaceous Bluesky Project—Thetlaandoa-Kotcho
area—Area of interest is approximately 60 miles to the northeast of Fort Nelson.
A number of shallow gas pools associated with the Mississippian Subcrop and overlying Cretaceous sand developments were expanded through a fairly extensive shallow drilling program. Resulting subsurface data were evaluated and subsequent
mapping has more or less defined the over-all areal extent of the discovered reserve.
The reserve data have been made available to British Columbia Petroleum Corporation in substantiating the construction of transmission facilities to tie in established
gas reserves at Helmet, situated to the east of Thetlaandoa.
Permo-Carboniferous Project ■—■ Windflower-Tattoo area — The Windflower-
Tattoo area, situated approximately 60 miles to the northwest of Fort Nelson, is a
Permo-Carboniferous shallow gas play. The integration of available geological and
geophysical data has resulted in the preparation of composite maps of the over-all
gas trend. It is noted that the structure of the area is very complex and that a considerable amount of additional drilling will be required to evaluate the full potential.
Triassic-Jurassic Project—Sukunka Grizzly area—The area, situated approximately 100 miles to the south of Fort St. John, has generated a considerable
amount of interest in potential gas recovery from deep-drilling plays in the Foothills
Belt. Maps resulting from the integration of available surface and subsurface data
will provide the basis for a realistic appraisal of the area's potential.
Prospect evaluation of the Quasar Petroleum participation proposal to British
Columbia Hydro and Power Authority—The Quasar proposal covered land, geological, drilling, and economic considerations on nine exploratory and semiexplora-
tory prospects in which a multimillion dollar joint venture participation was offered
to British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority. Participation by British Columbia
Hydro and Power Authority on the package deal was not recommended on the basis
of high risk, high cost, and lack of factual prospect definition on proposed drilling
plays.
Reservoir geology—The Reservoir Geology Section was primarily directed to
evaluating the oil and gas potential of wells completed during the year. The results
of this work, including supporting subsurface mapping, were utilized by the
Reservoir Engineering Section in order to determine reserves in place and recoverable reserves. In addition, the Section handled certain economic evaluations of
Crown reserve lands posted during the year as well as a number of special study
projects.
Pool subsurface mapping and related projects were:
Net oil and gas pay evaluations—A total of 57 oil and gas pay intervals
penetrated by the drill in 1974 was evaluated for their hydrocarbon potential. Net
oil and gas pay maps constructed on the basis of the latter information were used by
the Engineering Division for reserve determinations.
Underground gas storage project—Lower Mainland area—An appraisal of
the underground gas storage potential within the general Lower Mainland Fraser
Valley area was completed for British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority.
Existing data in the form of drilled well information and geophysical surveys were
used to delineate subsurface reservoir areas favourable for gas storage. A report
with supporting documentation and recommendations was finalized and presented
to British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority and British Columbia Petroleum
Corporation.
Oak field—Fort St. John area—Information resulting from extension-type
development drilling resulted in the revision of the previously known Oak field
single-pool gas accumulation into two separate pools, one of which is oil bearing.
 HIGHLIGHTS OF DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES
A 73
Pingle oil pool—Fort St. John field—Defined limits of gas cap and oil leg
were extended on the basis of production history which inferred a larger reservoir
areal extent than previously mapped.
Thetlaandoa producing zone characteristics—Core data recovered from completed Mississippian gas wells in the Thetlaandoa area were used in conjunction with
Sonic and Density Log calculations to determine reservoir porosity.
Paddy-Cadotte gas pool—Sunrise field—An operator of the field reported
live-oil staining within the established gas-bearing reservoir. However, the indicated well samples were checked with negative results.
West Peejay Halfway oil pool—Subsurface geologic data submitted to the
Branch in an application recommending concurrent production from the West Peejay
Halfway pool were evaluated upon request by the Reservoir Engineering Section.
Peejay Halfway oil pool project—A comprehensive geologic subsurface study
on the Halfway reservoir of the Peejay field was initiated in November and will be
finalized in 1975. The purpose of the project is to ascertain the feasibility of the
secondary or enhanced recovery scheme currently in partial operation.
Titles Division
Dispositions—There were four dispositions of Crown reserve petroleum and
natural gas rights held during 1974. These resulted in tender bonus bids amounting
to $22,955,335, an increase of $5,178,894 from the previous year. A total of 366
parcels was offered, with bids acceptable on 226 parcels covering 2,028,212 acres.
The average price per acre was $11.32, which is an increase of $1.33 per acre over
1973. The average bonus price per acre was respectively, permits $8.84, leases
$63.87, and drilling reservations $13.30.
Transactions—During the year, 17 geophysical licences were issued or renewed,
an increase of seven over 1973.   One unit agreement was approved.
A total of 83 notices of commencement of exploratory work was recorded, a
decrease of 35 from the previous year. These notices are required prior to the
commencement of any geological or geophysical exploration for petroleum and
natural gas.
As of December 31, 1974, 23,490,564 acres or approximately 36,704 square
miles, a decrease of 1,038,178 acres under the 1973 total of Crown petroleum and
natural gas rights issued under the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act, 1965, were held
in good standing by operators ranging from small independent companies to major
international ones. The form of title held, total number issued, and acreage of each
case were as follows:
Form of Title Number Acreage
Permits  462 16,227,862
Natural gas licences  1 15,565
Drilling reservations  37 360,807
Leases (all types)   3,697 6,886,330
Total  4,197 23,490,564
During 1974 the following transactions were completed:
Permits—
Issued   64
Renewed  350
Converted to lease  32
Cancelled  65
Placed in default  61
Transferred (assigned)   56
 A 74 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
Drilling reservations—
Issued  25
Renewed  15
Converted to lease  14
Cancelled  25
Transferred (assigned)   9
Leases—
Issued  392
Annual rental paid  3,081
Renewed for 10-year term  50
Extended under penalty  291
Extended not under penalty  102
Cancelled  351
Placed in default  356
Transferred (assigned)  : 423
Natural gas licences—
Issued   nil
Renewed  1
Converted to lease  1
Cancelled  1
Transferred (assigned)   nil
CrOWn Sales  Number Advertised    Number Scld
Permits      83 62
Drilling reservations     34 25
Leases  249 139
Totals  366 226
Geophysical licences (issued)   17
Notices of Commencement of Exploratory Work   (approved)   83
Affidavits of Work (approved)—
Permits   103
Leases  19
Miscellaneous recordings (mergers, grouping notices, etc.)
(approved)    54
Certificates prepared for Inspection Division, Mineral Resources Branch  250
Unit agreements (approved)   1
Title Transaction Statistics, 1974
Permits
Leases
Drilling
Reservations
Natural Gas
Licences
No.
Acres
No.
Acres
No.
Acres
No.
Acres
64
65
350
56
1,837,256
3,028,736
392
351
3,524
423
41
139
935,568
627,683
25
200,727
1
Cancelled or surrendered	
25
15
9
....
25
259,798
1
1
5,216
5
154.081
84,451
75,964
62 1  1.751.521
200,727
 Part B —Mineral and Petroleum Statistics
CONTENTS
Introduction.
Page
79
Methods of Computing Production  79
Metals  79
Average Prices  79
Gross and Net Content  80
Value of Production    80
Industrial Minerals and Structural Materials  81
Fuel  81
Notes on Products Listed in the Tables  81
Table 1—Mineral Production: Total to Date, Past Year, and Latest Year  93
Table 2—Total Value of Mineral Production, 1836-1974  94
Table 3—Mineral Production for the 10 Years, 1965-74      96
Table 4—Comparison of Total Volume and Value of Production, and Volume and Value of Production Paid for to Mines  98
Table 5—Exploration and Development Expenditures, 1973 and 1974  99
Table 6—Production of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc,  Molybdenum,
and Iron Concentrates, 1858-1974  100
Table 7A—Mineral Production by Mining Divisions, 1973 and 1974, and
Total to Date  102
Table 7B—Production of Lode Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc by
Mining Divisions, 1973 and 1974, and Total to Date  104
Table 7C—Production of Miscellaneous Metals by Mining Divisions, 1973
and 1974, and Total to Date  106
Table 7D—Production of Industrial Minerals by Mining Divisions, 1973
and 1974, and Total to Date  110
Table 7E—Production of Structural Materials by Mining Divisions, 1973
and 1974, and Total to Date     112
Table 8A—Production of Coal, 1836-1974  113
Table 8B—Coal Production and Distribution by Colleries and by Mining
Divisions, 1974 T______ 114
Table 9—Principal Items of Expenditure, Reported for Operations of All
Classes  115
Table 10—Employment in the Mineral Industry, 1901-74  116
Table 11—Employment at Major Metal Mines and Coal Mines, 1974  117
Table 12—Metal Production, 1974  118
Table 13—Destination of British Columbia Concentrates in 1974  122
Table 14—Hydrocarbon and By-products Reserves, December 31, 1974  123
Table 15—Exploratory and Development Wells Completed, January to
December 19 74 '_  124
Table 16—Project and Individual Well MPR Data at December 31, 1974 _____ 125
A 75
 A 76 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1974
CONTENTS—Continued
Page
Table 17—Gas-well Test and Allowable Data, December 31, 1974  128
Table 18—Wells Drilled and Drilling, 1974  156
Table 19—Oilfields and Gasfields Designated at December 31, 1974  160
Table 20—Monthly Crude Oil Production by Fields and Pools, 1974  168
Table 21—Monthly Nonassociated and Associated Gas Production by
Fields and Pools, 1974  170
Table 22—Summary of Drilling and Production Statistics, 1974  174
Table 23—Monthly Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Consendate/
Pentanes Plus, 1974  175
Table 24—Monthly Supply and Disposition of Natural Gas, 1974  177
Table 25—Monthly Supply and Disposition of Butane and Propane, and
Sulphur, 1974  179
Table 26—Crude-oil Pipe-lines, 1974  181
Table 27—Crude-oil Refineries, 1974  182
Table 28—Natural Gas Pipe-lines, 1974  183
Table 29—Gas-processing Plants, 1974  186
Table 30—Sulphur Plant, 1974   186
Table 31—Natural Gas and Processed Products, Sales and Values to Producers, Comparison 1974 and 1973  187
Table 32—Petroleum, Sales and Values to Producers, Comparison 1974
and 1973  188
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Drawings
Figure Page
1. Value of Mineral Production, 1887-1974  190
2. Production Quantities of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, and Molyb
denum, 1893-1974  191
3. Metal Prices .  192
4. Development Wells Drilled (by Year, 1952-74)   193
5. Exploratory Wells Drilled (by Year, 1948-74)  194
6. Total Wells Drilled (by Year, 1948-74)  195
7. Development Footage Drilled (by Year, 1952-74)  196
8. Exploratory Footage Drilled (by Year, 1948-74)  197
9. Total Footage Drilled (by Year, 1948-74)  198
10. Total Wells Drilled (by Month, 1971-74)  199
11. Total Footage Drilled (by Month, 1971-74)  200
12. Rigs Operating at Month-end (by Month, 1971-74)  201
13. Oil Wells Completed (by Year, 1955-74)  202
14. Gas Wells Completed (by Year, 1948-74)  203
15. Oil Wells Completed (by Month, 1971-74)  204
16. Gas Wells Completed (by Month, 1971-74)  205
17. Daily Oil Production (by Year, 1955-74)  206
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS A 77
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS—Continued
Drawings—Continued
Figure Page
18. Daily Gas Production (by Year, 1954-74)  207
19. Daily Sulphur Production (by Year, 1958-74))  208
20. Daily N.G.L. Production (by Year, 1957-74))  209
21. Daily Volume of B.C. Gas Exported (by Year, 1958-74)  .   210
22. Proved Oil Reserves History (1952-74)  211
23. Established Residue Gas Reserves History (1948-74)____      212
24. Footage Drilled in British Columbia, 1947 to 1974, inclusive  213
25. Oil and Gas Fields, Northeastern British Columbia, 1974  214
26. Oil Production in British Columbia, 1955 to 1974, inclusive  215
27. Gas Production in British Columbia, 1955 to 1974, inclusive  216
28. Pipelines of British Columbia, 1974.  217
29. Annual Production and Values—Oil (1960-74)  218
30. Annual Production and Values—Natural Gas (1960-74)   219
220
Map
1. Union Oil Project, Gething Pool, Aitken Creek Field   page
2. Monsanto Project, North Pine Pool, Bear Flat Field  221
3. BP Oil Project, Halfway Pool, Beatton River Field  222
4. BP Oil Unit 1, Bluesky Pool, Beatton River West Field______  223
5. Amoco Project, Nahanni Pool, Beaver River Field  223
6. Pacific Petroleums Project, Baldonnel Pool, Beg and Beg West Fields  224
7. Pacific Petroleums Project, Halfway Pool, Beg Field  225
8. Pacific Petroleums Project, Debolt Pool, Blueberry Field  226
9. Boundary Lake Pool Projects, Boundary Lake Field  227
10. Union Oil Project, Baldonnel Pool, Bubbles Field  228
11. Union Oil Project, Halfway Pool, Bulrush Field  229
12. Pacific Petroleums Project, Slave Point Pool, Clarke Lake Field  230
13. Union Oil Unit 1, Halfway Pool, Crush Field  231
14. Pacific Petroleums Unit 1, Halfway Pool, Currant Field  232
15. Pacific Petroleums Unit 1, Pingel Pool, Fort St. John Field  233
16. Inga Pool Units, Inga Field  234
17. Pacific Petroleums Projects, Baldonnel and Halfway Pools, Jedney 235
Field	
18. ARCo Projects, Baldonnel and Halfway Pools, Julienne Field _  236
19. Pacific Petroleums Project, Halfway Pool, Kobes-Townsend Field  237
20. Pacific Petroleums Project, Slave Point Pool, Kotcho Lake Field  238
21. Baldonnel Pool Project, Laprise Creek Field  239
22. Union Oil Units, Halfway Pool, Milligan Creek Field  240
23. Texaco Exploration Project, Baldonnel Pool, Nig Creek Field  241
24. Pacific Petroleums Project, Halfway Pool, Osprey Field  242
25. Pacific Petroleums Project, Wabamun Pool, Parkland Field  243
26. Halfway Pool Project, Peejay Field  244
 A 78 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1974
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS—Continued
Drawings—Continued
Map Page
27. Pacific Petroleums Project, Slave Point Pool, Petitot River Field  245
28. Dunlevy Pool Project, Rigel Field  246
29. Monsanto Conservation Projects, Dunlevy Pool, Rigel Field  247
30. Halfway Pool Units, Weasel Field  248
31. Wainoco.Unit 1, Halfway and Belloy Pools, Wilder Field 249
32. Union Oil Project, Halfway Pool, Wildmint Field  250
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS A 79
INTRODUCTION
The statistics of the mineral industry are collected, compiled, and tabulated
for this Report by the Economics and Statistics Section of the Mineral Development
Division.
In the interests of uniformity and to avoid duplication of effort, beginning
with the statistics for 1925, Statistics Canada and the Provincial departments have
co-operated in collecting and processing mineral statistics.
Producers of metals, industrial minerals, structural materials, coal, and
petroleum and natural gas are requested to submit returns in duplicate on forms
prepared for use by the Province and by Statistics Canada.
As far as possible, both organizations follow the same practice in processing
the data. The final compilation by Statistics Canada is usually published considerably later than the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum
Resources for British Columbia. Differences between the values of production
published by the two organizations arise mainly because Statistics Canada uses
average prices considered applicable to the total Canadian production, whereas the
British Columbia mining statistician uses prices considered applicable to British
Columbia production.
Peat, classified as a fuel by Statistics Canada, is not included in the British
Columbia statistics of mineral production, being regarded as neither a fuel nor a
mineral.
The statistics of the petroleum industry are collected, compiled, and tabulated
for this Report by the Petroleum Resources Branch.
METHODS OF COMPUTING PRODUCTION
The tabulated statistics are arranged so as to facilitate comparison of the
production records for the various mining divisions, and from year to year. From
time to time, revisions have been made to figures published in earlier reports as
additional data became available or errors become known.
Data are obtained from the certified returns made by producers of metals,
industrial minerals and structural materials, and coal, and are augmented by data
obtained from custom smelters. For petroleum, natural gas, and liquid by-products,
production figures supplied by the Petroleum Resources Branch of the Department
of Mines and Petroleum Resources are compiled from the monthly disposition
reports and the Crown royalty statement filed with the Department by the producers.
Values are in Canadian funds. Weights are avoirdupois pounds and short tons
(2,000 pounds), and troy ounces.    Barrels are 35 imperial gallons.
Metals
Average Prices
The prices used in the valuation of current and past production of gold, silyer,
copper, lead, and zinc are shown in the table on page A 92.
Prior to 1974 the price of gold used was the average Canadian Mint buying-
price for fine gold.
The price used for placer gold originally was established arbitrarily at $ 17 per
ounce, when the price of fine gold was $20.67 per ounce. Between 1931 and 1962
the price was proportionately increased with the continuously changing price of fine
gold.    Since 1962, Canadian Mint reports giving the fine-gold content have been
 A 80
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1974
available for all but a very small part of the placer gold produced, and until 1973
the average price listed is derived by dividing ounces of placer gold into total amount
received. Starting in 1974 the price used for the valuation of gold, lode and placer,
is the amount received by the producer.
Prior to 1949 the prices used for silver, copper, lead, and zinc were the average
prices at the markets indicated in the table on page A 92, converted into Canadian
funds. The abbreviations in the table are Mont.=Montreal; N.Y.=New York;
Lond.=London; E. St. L.=East St. Louis; and U.S.=United States.
Latterly the prices of silver, copper, lead, and zinc are average United States
prices converted into Canadian funds. Average monthly prices are supplied by
Statistics Canada from figures published in the Metal Markets section of Metals
Week. Specifically, for silver it is the New York price; for lead it is the New York
price; for zinc it is the price at East St. Louis of Prime Western; for copper it is the
United States export refinery price. However, commencing in 1970 the copper
price is the average of prices received by the various British Columbia shippers.
For antimony the average price for the year and for cadmium, the New York
producers' price to consumers are used. For nickel the price used is the Canadian
price set by the International Nickel Company of Canada Ltd. The value per ton
of the iron ore used in making pig iron at Kimberley is an arbitrary figure, being the
average of several ores of comparable grade at their points of export from British
Columbia.
Gross and Net Content
The gross content of a metal in ore, concentrate, or bullion is the amount of the
metal calculated from an assay of the material, and the gross metal contents are the
sum of individual metal assay contents. The net contents are the gross contents less
smelter and refinery losses.
In past years there have been different methods used in calculating net contents,
particularly in the case of one metal contained in the concentrate of another. The
present method was established in 1963 and is outlined in the following table. For
example, the net content of silver in copper concentrates is 98 per cent of the gross
content, of cadmium in zinc concentrates is 70 per cent of the gross content, etc.
Commencing in 1974 the quantities represent the actual net quantities or metals paid
for.
Lead
Zinc
Copper
Copper-Nickel
Copper
Concentrates
Concentrates
Concentrates
Concentrates
Matte
' Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
Percent
Per Cent
Silver...	
98
98
98
98
Copper.	
Less 26 lb./ton
Less 10 lb./ton
85
Less 10 lb./ton
Lead	
98
50
50
Zinc 	
50
90
Cadmium 	
70
88
Value of Production
For indium, iron concentrate, mercury, molybdenum, rhenium, and tin the
value of production is the amount received by the shippers.
For gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, antimony, bismuth, cadmium, some iron
concentrate, and nickel the value of production was calculated from the assay
content of the ore, concentrate, or bullion less appropriate smelter losses, and an
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS A 81
average price per unit of weight. The 1974 values represent the settlement values
received by the producers for the respective metals.
Prior to 1925 the value of gold and copper produced was calculated by using
their true average prices and, in addition, for copper the smelter loss was taken
into account.
The value of other metals was calculated from the gross metal content of ores
or concentrates by using a metal price which was an arbitrary percentage of the
average price, as follows: Silver, 95 per cent; lead, 90 per cent; and zinc, 85 per cent.
It is these percentages of the average price that are listed in the table on
page A 92.
For 1925 to 1973 the values had been calculated by using the true average
price (see page A 92) and the net metal contents in accordance with the procedures
adopted by Statistics Canada and the Department of Mines and Petroleum
Resources.
For 1974 the total volume and value of metal production include the quantities paid for to the mines, and the smelter and refinery production that can be
attributed to the mines but is not paid for. The volume and value paid for to the
mines, excluding outward transportation costs, smelting and refining costs, penalties and deductions, are shown separately for comparative purposes.
Industrial Minerals and Structural Materials
The values of production of industrial minerals and structural materials are
approximately the amounts received at the point of origin.
Fuel
The value of production of coal is calculated using a price per ton which is
the weighted average of the f.o.b. prices at the mine for the coal sold.
The values of production of natural gas, natural gas liquid by-products, and
petroleum including condensate/pentanes plus are the amounts received for the
products at the well-head.
NOTES ON PRODUCTS LISTED IN THE TABLES
Antimony—Antimony metal was produced at the Trail smelter from 1939
to 1944; since 1944 it has been marketed alloyed with lead. The antimony is a
by-product of silver-lead ores. In 1907 the first recorded antimonial ore mined
in British Columbia was shipped from the Slocan area to England. Since then
other out-of-Province shipments have originated in the Bridge River, North Lar-
deau, Slocan, Spillimacheen, and Stuart Lake areas. In Table 7C the antimony
assigned to individual mining divisions is the reported content of ore exported to
foreign smelters; the antimony "not assigned" is that recovered at the Trail smelter
from various ores received there.   See Tables 1,3, and 7C.
Arsenious oxide—Arsenious oxide was recovered at foreign smelters from
arsenical gold ores from Hedley between 1917 and 1931, and in 1942, and from
the Victoria property on Rocher Deboule Mountain in 1928. No production has
been recorded since 1942.   See Tables 1 and 7D.
Asbestos—British Columbia has produced asbestos since 1952 when the
Cassiar mine was opened. All British Columbia production consists of chrysotile
from the Cassiar mine near the Yukon boundary. This deposit is noted for its
high percentage of valuable long fibre and for the low iron content of the fibre.
The original claims were located at Cassiar in 1950, and the first fibre was shipped
 A 82 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
two years later. The fibre is milled from the ore at Cassiar, shipped by truck to
Whitehorse, and then moved by rail to tidewater at Skagway. From 1953 to 1961
the fibre was valued at the shipping point in North Vancouver, but beginning in
1962 it has been valued at the mine, and values for the preceding years have been
recalculated on that basis.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7D.
Barite—-Barite production began in 1940 and has been continuous since then,
coming from several operations in the upper Columbia River valley. Some barite
is mined from lode deposits and the rest is recovered from the mill-tailings ponds
of the former Silver Giant and Mineral King silver-lead-zinc mines.   See Table 7D.
Bentonite—Small amounts of bentonite were produced between 1926 and 1944
from deposits in the coal measures near Princeton. There has been no production
since 1944.   See Tables 1 and 7D.
Bismuth—Since 1929 the Trail smelter has produced bismuth. It is a byproduct of lead refining and thus the production cannot be assigned to specific
properties or mining divisions.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7C.
Brick—See Clay and shale products.
Building-stone—Dimensional stone for building purposes is quarried when required from a granite deposit on Nelson Island and an andesite deposit on Hadding-
ton Island. Other stone close to local markets is quarried periodically or as needed
for special building projects.   See Tables 1,3, and 7E.
Butane—Butane is recovered as a by-product at the gas-processing plant at
Taylor and at oil refineries.   See Table 25.
Cadmium—Cadmium has been recovered as a by-product at the Trail zinc
refinery since 1928. It occurs in variable amounts in the sphalerite of most British
Columbia silver-lead-zinc ores. In Table 7C the cadmium assigned to individual
mining divisions is the reported content of custom shipments to the Trail and foreign smelters; that "not assigned" is the remainder of the reported estimated recovery at the Trail smelter from British Columbia concentrates. See Tables 1,3,
and 7C.
Cement—Cement is manufactured from carefully proportioned mixtures of
limestone, gypsum, and other mineral materials. It has been produced in British
Columbia since 1905. Present producers are British Columbia Cement Company
Limited, with a 540,000-tons-per-year plant at Bamberton, and Canada Cement
Lafarge Ltd., with a 525,000-tons-per-year plant on Lulu Island and a 210,000-
tons-per-year plant at Kamloops.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7E.
Chromite—Two shipments of chromite are on record, 670 tons from Cascade
in 1918 and 126 tons from Scottie Creek in 1929.   See Tables 1 and 7C.
Clay and shale products—These include brick, blocks, tile, pipe, pottery,
lightweight aggregate, and pozzolan manufactured from British Columbia clays and
shales. Common red-burning clays and shales are widespread in the Province, but
better grade clays are rare. The first recorded production was of bricks at Craigflower in 1853 and since then plants have operated in most towns and cities for
short periods. Local surface clay is used at Haney to make common red brick,
tile, and flower pots. Shale and fireclay from Abbotsford Mountain are used to
make firebrick, facebrick, sewer pipe, flue lining, and special fireclay shapes in
plants at Kilgard, Abbotsford, and South Vancouver. A plant at Quesnel makes
pozzolan from burnt shale quarried south of Quesnel. Several hobby and art
potteries and a sanitary-ware plant are in operation, but these use mainly imported
raw materials and their production is not included in the tables. See Tables 1,3,
and 7E.
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS A 83
Coal—Coal is almost as closely associated with British Columbia's earliest
history as is placer gold. Coal was discovered at Suquash on Vancouver Island
in 1835 and at Nanaimo in 1850. The yearly value of coal production passed
that of placer gold in 1883 and contributed a major part of the total mineral wealth
for the next 30 years.
First production, by mining divisions: Cariboo, 1942; Fort Steele, 1898;
Kamloops, 1893; Liard, 1923; Nanaimo, 1836; Nicola, 1907; Omineca, 1918;
Osoyoos, 1926; Similkameen, 1909; and Skeena, 1912.
The Nanaimo and Comox fields produced virtually all of the coal until production started from the Crowsnest field in 1898. The Crowsnest field contains
coking-coal and prospered in the early years of smelting and railroad-building.
Mining started in the Nicola-Princeton coalfield in 1907, at Telkwa in 1918, and
on the Peace River in 1923. The Nanaimo field was exhausted in 1953 when the
last large mines closed, and only small operations on remnants were left. The
colliery at Merritt closed in 1945 and at Coalmont in 1940. The closing of the
last large mine at Tsable River in 1966, and of the last small one, near Wellington
in 1968, marked the end of production from the once important Vancouver Island
deposits.
Undeveloped fields include basins in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains
north and south of the Peace River, the Groundhog basin in north central British
Columbia, the Hat Creek basin west of Ashcroft, basins on Graham Island, and
Sage Creek basin southeast of Fernie.
The enormous requirements for coking-coal in Japan created great activity in
coal-prospecting in various areas of British Columbia since 1968. The signing of
large contracts with the Japanese resulted in preparations for production at several
deposits in the East Kootenays. First shipments to Japan via special port facilities
at North Vancouver and Roberts Bank began in 1970.
All the coal produced, including that used in making coke, is shown as primary
mine production. Quantity from 1836 to 1909 is gross mine output and includes
material lost in picking and washing. From 1910 the quantity is the amount sold
and used, which includes sales to retail and wholesale dealers, industrial users, and
company employees; coal used under company boilers, including steam locomotives;
and coal used in making coke.   See Tables 1, 3, 7A, 8A, and 8B.
Cobalt—In 1928 a recovery of 1,730 pounds of cobalt was made from a shipment of arsenical gold ore from the Victoria mine on Rocher Deboule Mountain.
From 1971 to 1973, cobalt was shipped from the Pride of Emory mine at Hope.
See Tables 1 and 7C.
Coke—Coke is made from special types of coal. It has been produced in
British Columbia since 1895. Being a manufactured product, its value does not
contribute to the total mineral production as shown in Table 1. Up to 1966, coke
statistics had been included in the Annual Report as Table 9, but this table has been
discontinued.   The coal used in making coke is still recorded in Table 8B.
Condensate—(a) Field—Field condensate is the liquid hydrocarbons separated and recovered from natural gas in the field before gas processing, (b) Plant—
Plant condensate is the hydrocarbon liquid extracted from natural gas at gas-
processing plants.   See Table 23.
Copper—Most of the copper concentrates are shipped to Japanese, Eastern
Canadian, and American smelters because no copper smelter has operated in British Columbia since 1935.   Small amounts of gold and silver are commonly present
 A 84 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
and add value to the ore, but some ores contain important amounts of gold (as at
Rossland), silver (Silver King mine), lead and zinc (Tulsequah), or zinc (Britannia mine). Most of the smelting in British Columbia in early years was done on
ore shipped direct from the mines without concentration, but modem practice is to
concentrate the ore first.
Ore was smelted in British Columbia first in 1896 at Nelson (from Silver
King mine) and at Trail (from Rossland mines), and four and five years later at
Grand Forks (from Phoenix mine) and Greenwood (from Mother Lode mine).
Later, small smelters were built in the Boundary district and on Vancouver and
Texada Islands, and in 1914 the Anyox smelter was blown in. Copper-smelting
ceased in the Boundary district in 1919, at Trail in 1929, and at Anyox in 1935.
British Columbia copper concentrates were then smelted mainly at Tacoma, and
since 1961 have gone chiefly to Japan.
Most of the production has come from southern British Columbia—from
Britannia, Copper Mountain, Greenwood, Highland Valley, Merritt, Nelson, Rossland, Texada Island, and Vancouver Island, although a sizeable amount came from
Anyox and some from Tulsequah. During recent years, exploration for copper
has been intense, interest being especially directed toward finding very large, low-
grade deposits suitable for open-pit mining. This activity has resulted in the
establishment of operating mines at Merritt (Craigmont) in 1961, in Highland
Valley (Bethlehem) in 1962, on Babine Lake (Granisle) in 1966, near Peachland
(Brenda) in 1970, Stewart (Granduc) and near Port Hardy (Island Copper) in
1971, near Babine Lake (Bell), McLeese Lake (Gibraltar), Highland Valley
(Lornex), and Princeton (Ingerbelle) in 1972. See Table 12 for a complete list
of copper producers.
After a lapse of many years, copper has been produced comparatively recently on Vancouver Island at Jordan River, Courtenay, Benson Lake, Quatsino,
and also at Buttle Lake, together with zinc and silver. At Tasu Harbour on
Moresby Island and at Texada Island copper is produced as a by-product of iron-
mining.
Copper is now the most valuable single commodity of the industry. Production in 1974 was 633.9 million pounds.   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7B.
Crude oil—Production of crude oil in British Columbia began in 1955 from
the Fort St. John field, but was not significant until late in 1961, when the 12-inch
oil pipe-line was built to connect the oil-gathering terminal at Taylor to the Trans
Mountain Oil Pipe Line Company pipe-line near Kamloops. In 1974, oil was
produced from 31 separate fields, of which the Boundary Lake, Peejay, Milligan
Creek, and Inga fields were the most productive.
In Tables 1, 3, and 7a, quantities given prior to 1962 under "petroleum, crude"
are total sales, and from 1962 to 1965 include field and plant condensate listed
separately.
Diatomite—Relatively large deposits of diatomite are found near the Fraser
River in the Quesnel area, and small deposits are widespread throughout the Province. Small amounts of diatomite have been shipped from Quesnel periodically
since 1928.  A plant to process the material is located in Quesnel.   See Table 7D.
Fluorite (fluorspar)—Between 1918 and 1929, fluorite was mined at the Rock
Candy mine north of Grand Forks for use in the Trail lead refinery. From 1958 to
1968, small quantities were produced as a by-product at the Oliver silica quarry.
See Table 7D.
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS A 85
Flux—Silica and limestone are added to smelter furnaces as flux to combine
with impurities in the ore and form a slag which separates from the valuable metal.
In the past, silica was shipped from Grand Forks, Oliver, and the Sheep Creek area.
Today, silica from near Oliver and Sheep Creek and limestone, chiefly from Texada
Island, are produced for flux. Quantities have been recorded since 1911. See
Tables 1, 3, and 7D.
Gold, lode—Gold has played an important part in mining in the Province.
The first discovery of lode gold was on Moresby Island in 1852, when some gold
was recovered from a small quartz vein. The first stamp mill was built in the Cariboo
in 1876, and it seems certain that some arrastras (primitive grinding-mills) were
built even earlier. These and other early attempts were short-lived, and the successful milling of gold ores began about 1890 in the southern part of the Province. By
1900 the value of gold production was second only to that of coal. At the start of
World War II, gold-mining attained a peak yearly value of more than $22 million,
but since the war it has dwindled.
In the early years, lode gold came mostly from the camps of Rossland, Nelson,
McKinney, Fairview, Hedley, and also from the copper and other ores of the
Boundary district. A somewhat later major producer was the Premier mine at
Stewart. In the 1930's the price of gold increased and the value of production
soared, new discoveries were made and old mines were revived. The principal gold
camps, in order of output of gold, have been Bridge River, Rossland, Portland
Canal, Hedley, Wells, and Sheep Creek. In 1971 the Bralorne mine in Bridge River
closed.
With the closing of the Bralorne mine, most of the lode gold is produced as a
by-product of copper, copper-zinc-silver, and other base-metal mining. See Tables
1, 3, 6, and 7B.   See Table 12 for a complete list of current producers.
Gold, placer—The early explorations and settlement of the Province followed
rapidly on the discovery of gold-bearing placer creeks throughout the country. The
first placer-miners came in 1858 to mine the lower Fraser River bars upstream from
Yale.
The year of greatest placer-gold production was 1863, shortly after the discovery of the placer in the Cariboo. Another peak year in 1875 marked the discovery
of placer on creeks in the Cassiar. A minor peak year was occasioned by the
discovery of placer gold in the Granite Creek in the Tulameen in 1885. A high
level of production ensued after 1899, when the Atlin placers reached their peak
output. Other important placer-gold camps were established at Goldstream, Fort
Steele, Rock Creek, Omineca River, and Quesnel River. The last important strike
was made on Cedar Creek in 1921, and coarse gold was found on Squaw Creek in
1927 and on Wheaton Creek in 1932.
Mining in the old placer camps revived during the 1930's under the stimulus
of an increase in the price of fine gold from $20.67 per ounce to $35 per ounce in
United States funds. Since World War II, placer-mining declined under conditions
of steadily rising costs and a fixed price for gold but is showing signs of revival in
response to a freely floating gold price since 1972. Since 1858, more than 5.2
million ounces valued at almost $97 million has been recovered.
A substantial part of the production, including much of the gold recovered
from the Fraser River upstream from Yale (in the present New Westminster, Kamloops, and Lillooet Mining Divisions) and much of the early Cariboo production,
was mined before the original organization of the Department of Mines in 1874.
 A 86 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1974
Consequently, the amounts recorded are based on early estimates and cannot be
accurately assigned to individual mining divisions.
The first year of production for major placer-producing mining divisions was
Atlin, 1898; Cariboo, 1859; Liard, 1873; Lillooet, 1858; Omineca, 1869.
In 1965, changes were made in the allocation of placer gold in the New Westminster and Similkameen Mining Divisions and "not assigned," to reconcile those
figures with data incorporated in Bulletin 28, Placer Gold Production of British
Columbia.   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7A.
Granules—Rock chips used for bird grits, exposed aggregate, roofing, stucco
dash, terrazzo, etc., have been produced in constantly increasing quantities since
1930. Plants operate in Burnaby and near Grand Forks, Sirdar, Vananda, and
Armstrong.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7D.
Gypsum and gypsite—Production of gypsum and gypsite has been recorded
since 1911. Between 1925 and 1956, more than 1,000,000 tons were shipped from
Falkland and some was quarried near Cranbrook and Windermere. Since 1956,
all production has come from Windermere.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7D.
Hydromagnesite—Small shipments of hydromagnesite were made from Atlin
between 1904 and 1916 and from Clinton in 1921.   See Tables 1 and 7D.
Indium—Production of indium as a by-product of zinc-refining at the Trail
smelter began in 1942.   Production figures have not been disclosed since 1958.
Iron—Iron ore was produced in small quantities as early as 1885, commonly
under special circumstances or as test shipment. Steady production started in 1951
with shipments of magnetite concentrates to Japan from Vancouver and Texada
Islands.
Most of the known iron-ore deposits are magnetite, and occur in the coastal
area. On the average they are low in grade and need to be concentrated. Producing
mines have operated on Texada Island, at Benson Lake and Zeballos on Vancouver
Island, and at Tasu and Jedway on Moresby Island. At Texada Island copper is a
by-product of iron-mining, and in the Coast Copper mine at Benson Lake iron was
a by-product of copper-mining. The latest operation, and to date the largest, is
that of Wesfrob Mines Limited at Tasu, begun at the end of 1967; copper is
produced as a by-product.
From January 1961 to August 1972, calcined iron sulphide from the tailings
of the Sullivan mine was used for making pig iron at Kimberley. This was the first
manufacture of pig iron in British Columbia. The iron occurs as pyrrhotite and
pyrite in the lead-zinc ore of the Sullivan mine. In the process of milling, the lead
and zinc minerals are separated for shipment to the Trail smelter, and the iron
sulphides are separated from the waste rock. Over the years a stockpile has been
built containing a reserve of about 20 million tons of iron ore.
The sulphur was removed in making pig iron and was converted to sulphuric
acid, which was used in making fertilizer. A plant built at Kimberley converted the
pig iron to steel, and a fabricating plant was acquired in Vancouver. The iron
smelter at Kimberley closed in August 1972. The entire production, credited to
the Fort Steele Mining Division in Table 7C, is of calcine. See Tables 1, 3, 6, and
7C.
Iron oxide—Iron oxide, ochre, and bog iron were mined as early as 1918 from
several occurrences, but mainly from limonite deposits north of Squamish. None
has been produced since 1950.   See Tables 1 and 7D.
Jade (nephrite)—Production of jade (nephrite) has been recorded only since
1959 despite there being several years of significant production prior to that date.
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS
A 87
The jade is recovered from bedrock occurrences on Mount Ogden and near Dease
Lake and as alluvial boulders from the Fraser River; the Bridge River and its
tributaries, Marshall, Hell, and Cadwallader Creeks; O'Ne-ell, Ogden, Kwanika, and
Wheaton Creeks.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7D.
Lead—Lead was the most valuable single commodity for many years, but it
was surpassed in value of annual production by zinc in 1950, by copper in 1966,
and in total production by zinc in 1966. Lead and zinc usually occur together in
nature although not necessarily in equal amounts in a single deposit. Zinc is the
more abundant metal, but lead ore usually is more valuable than zinc ore because
it contains more silver as a by-product. For a long time British Columbia produced
almost all of Canada's lead, but now produces about 18 per cent of the total. Most
of the concentrated ore is smelted and the metal refined at Trail, but some concentrate is shipped to American and Japanese smelters.
Almost all of British Columbia's lead comes from the southeastern part of
the Province. The Sullivan mine at Kimberley is now producing about 93 per cent
of the Province's lead and has produced about 89 per cent of the grand total. This
is one of the largest mines in the world and supports the great metallurgical works
at Trail. Other mines are at Pend-d'Oreille River, North Kootenay Lake, Slocan,
and southwest of Golden. In northwestern British Columbia less important parts
of the total output have come from Tulsequah, the Premier mine, and several small
mines in the general region of Hazelton. See Table 12 for the current lead producers.
A small amount of high-grade lead ore is shipped directly to the smelter, but
most of the ore is concentrated by flotation and the zinc content is separated from
the lead. All output from the Sullivan and other mines in British Columbia owned
by Cominco Ltd. goes to the Trail smelter, but part of the output of other mines
goes to American smelters. Lead was first produced in 1887, and the total production amounts to approximately 8.3 million tons.
In 1958, revisions were made in some yearly totals for lead to adjust them for
recovery of lead from slag treated at the Trail smelter.   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7B.
Limestone—Besides being used for flux and granules (where it is recorded
separately), limestone is used in agriculture, cement manufacture, the pulp and
paper industry, and for making lime. It has been produced since 1886. Quarries
now operate at Cobble Hill, near Prince George, at Kamloops, and on the north
end of Texada Island.   See Tables 1,3, and 7E.
Magnesium—In 1941 and 1942, Cominco Ltd. produced magnesium from
magnesite mined from a large deposit at Marysville.   See Tables 1 and 7C.
Magnesium sulphate—Magnesium sulphate was recovered in minor amounts
at various times between 1915 and 1942 from small alkali lakes near Basque,
Clinton, and Osoyoos.   See Tables 1 and 7D.
Manganese—From 1918 to 1920, manganese ore was shipped from a bog
deposit near Kaslo and from Hill 60 near Cowichan Lake, and in 1956 a test
shipment was made from Olalla.   See Tables 1 and 7C.
Mercury—Mercury was first produced near Savona in 1895. Since then
small amounts have been recovered from the same area and from the Bridge River
district. The main production to date was between 1940 and 1944 from the Pinchi
Lake and Takla mines near Fort St. James. In 1968 the Pinchi Lake mine reopened and continues in operation.   See Tables 1 and 7C.
Mica—No sheet mica has been produced commercially in British Columbia.
Between 1932 and 1961, small amounts of mica schist for grinding were mined
 A 88 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
near Albreda, Armstrong, Oliver, Prince Rupert, and Sicamous.    See Tables 1
and 7D.
Molybdenum—Molybdenum ore in small amounts was produced from high-
grade deposits between 1914 and 1918. Recently, mining of large low-grade
molybdenum and copper-molybdenum deposits has increased production to the
point that molybdenum now ranks second in importance in annual value of metals
produced in British Columbia. The upswing began when the Bethlehem mine recovered by-product molybdenum from 1964 and 1966. In 1965 the Endako and
Boss Mountain mines, followed by the Coxey in 1966, and British Columbia Molybdenum mine in 1967, all began operations as straight molybdenum producers.
The Boss Mountain mine closed in 1971 and reopened late in 1973. In 1970 the
Brenda mine, a combined copper-molybdenum producer, started operating, and
Island Copper in 1971. Large-scale combined metal deposits at Lornex and
Gibraltar mines were brought into production in 1972.   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7C.
Natro-alunite—In 1912 and 1913, 400 tons of natro-alunite was mined from
a small low-grade deposit at Kyuquot Sound. There has been no subsequent production.   See Tables 1 and 7D.
Natural gas—Commercial production of natural gas began in 1954 to supply
the community of Fort St. John. Since the completion in 1957 of the gas plant at
Taylor and the 30-inch pipe-line to serve British Columbia and the northwestern
United States, the daily average volume of production in 1974 was 1.14 billion
cubic feet. In 1974, there were 58 producing gas-fields producing both associated
and nonassociated gas, of which the Clarke Lake, Yoyo, and Laprise Creek were
the most productive.   See Table 21.
The production shown in Tables 1, 3, and 7A is the total amount sold of
residential gas from processing plants plus dry and associated gas from the gas-
gathering system; that is, the quantity delivered to the main transmission-line. The
quantity is net after deducting gas used on leases, metering difference, and gas used
or lost in the cleaning plant. The quantity is reported as thousands of cubic feet
at standard conditions (14.4 pounds per square inch pressure, 60°F temperature,
up to and including the year 1960, and thereafter 14.65 pounds per square inch
pressure, 60°F temperature).
Full details of gross well output, other production, delivery, and'sales are given
in the tables.
Nickel—One mine, the Pride of Emory near Hope, shipped nickel ore in 1936
and 1937 and began continuous production in 1958. From 1960 to 1974, bulk
copper and nickel concentrates have been shipped to Japan and Alberta respectively
for smelting. The mine closed in August 1974.   See Tables 1,3, and 7C.
Palladium—Palladium was recovered in 1928, 1929, and 1930 as a by-product
of the Trail refinery and is presumed to have originated in copper concentrates
shipped to the smelter from the Copper Mountain mine.   See Tables 1 and 7C.
Perlite—In 1953 a test shipment of 1,112 tons was made from a quarry on
Francois Lake.   There has been no further production.   See Tables 1 and 7D.
Petroleum, crude—See Crude oil.
Phosphate rock—Between 1927 and 1933, Cominco Ltd. produced 3,842
tons of phosphate rock for test purposes, but-the grade proved to be too low for
commercial use. More test shipments were made in 1964, but there has been no
commercial production.    See Tables 1 and 7D.
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS A 89
Platinum—Platinum has been produced intermittently from placer streams
in small amounts since 1887, mostly from the Tulameen and Similkameen Rivers.
Placer platinum also has been recovered from Pine, Thibert, McConnell, Rainbow,
Tranquille, Rock, and Government Creeks; from Quesnel, Fraser, Cottonwood,
Peace, and Coquihalla Rivers; and from beach placers on Graham Island. Some
platinum recovered between 1928 and 1930 as a by-product at the Trail refinery
is presumed to have originated in copper concentrates shipped to the smelter from
the Copper Mountain mine.   See Tables 1,3, and 7C.
Propane—Propane is recovered from gas-processing plants at Taylor and
Boundary Lake, and at oil refineries.   See Table 25.
Rhenium—Rhenium occurs in significant quantities only with molybdenite
associated with porphyry copper deposits. It was first produced in 1972 by the
Island Copper mine and is extracted as rhenium oxide from fumes produced during
roasting of the molybdenite concentrate.
Rock—Production of rubble, riprap, and crushed rock has been recorded
since 1909.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7E.
Sand and gravel—Sand and gravel are used as aggregate in concrete work.
The output varies from year to year according to the level of activity in the construction industry.   See Tables 1,3, and 7E.
Selenium—The only recorded production of selenium, 731 pounds, was in
1931 from the refining of blister copper from the Anyox smelter. See Tables 1
and 7C.
Silver—Silver is recovered from silver ores or as a by-product of other ores.
Most of it is refined in Trail, and some is exported in concentrated ores of copper,
lead, and zinc to American and Japanese smelters. Silver bullion was produced
by the Torbrit mine from 1949 to 1959.
Invariably some silver is associated with galena, so that even low-grade lead
ores, if mined in quantity, produce a significant amount of silver. Some silver is
recovered from gold ores and some from copper ores, and although the silver in
such ores is usually no more than a fraction of an ounce per ton, even that amount
is important in a large-tonnage operation.
Production of silver began in 1887 from silver-copper and silver-lead ores
in the Kootenays and has continued in this area to the present. Now, most of the
silver is a by-product of lead-zinc ores and nearly all is refined at Trail, although
some is exported with concentrates to American and Japanese smelters. Today
the greatest single source of silver is the Sullivan mine, which has been in production since 1900. By 1974 the Sullivan mine has accounted for 47 per cent of the
total silver production of the Province. A significant total amount is contributed
by the Lynx, Silmonac, Phoenix, Bethlehem, Granisle, Brenda, and Granduc mines.
Table 12 details the current silver producers. The only steady producer that is
strictly a silver mine is the Highland Bell mine at Beaverdell, in operation since
1922. A former important mine, the Premier near Stewart, produced more than
41 million ounces of silver between 1918 and 1968.   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7B.
Sodium carbonate—Sodium carbonate was recovered between 1921 and 1949
from alkali lakes in the Clinton area and around Kamloops. There has been no
further production.   See Tables 1 and 7D.
Stone (see Building-stone)—Cut stone for building purposes is prepared from
rock produced at quarries in various parts of the Province when required.   Two of
 A 90 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1974
the most productive quarries have operated on Haddington and Nelson Islands.
See Tables 1, 3, 7E.
Structural materials—In Table 7E the value of $5,972,171 for unclassified
materials is the total for structural materials in the period 1886-1919 that cannot
be allotted to particular classes of structural materials or assigned to mining divisions, and includes $726,323 shown against 1896 in Table 2 that includes unclassified structural materials in that and previous years not assignable to particular
years. The figure $3,180,828 in Table 7E under "Other Clay Products" is the
value in the period 1886-1910 that cannot be allotted to particular clay products
or assigned to mining divisions.   See Tables 1, 2, 3, 7A, and 7E.
Sulphur—The production of sulphur has been recorded since 1916. From
1916 to 1927 the amounts include the sulphur content of pyrite shipped. From
1928 the amounts include the estimated sulphur content of pyrite shipped, plus the
sulphur contained in sulphuric acid made from waste smelter gases. The sulphur
content of pyrrhotite roasted at the Kimberley fertilizer plant is included since
1953. Since 1958, elemental sulphur recovered from the Canadian Occidental
Petroleum Ltd. plant at Taylor has been included.   See Table 25.
Talc—Between 1916 and 1936, talc was quarried at Leech River and at
Anderson Lake to make dust for asphalt roofing. There has been no production
since 1936.   See Tables 1 and 7D.
Tin—Tin, as cassiterite, is a by-product of the Sullivan mine, where it has been
produced since 1941. Tin is also produced in a lead-tin alloy at the Trail smelter.
See Tables 1,3, and 7C.
Tungsten—Tungsten, very largely as scheelite concentrates, was produced
from 1937 to 1958, first from the Columbia Tungstens (Hardscrabble) mine in the
Cariboo in 1937 and during World War II from the Red Rose mine near Hazelton
and the Emerald mine near Salmo. The Red Rose closed in 1954 and the Emerald
in 1958. Small amounts of scheelite have been produced from the Bridge River,
Revelstoke, and other areas where demand was high. In 1970, production began
from the Invincible mine near Salmo, which closed in 1973.
A very small amount of wolframite came from Boulder Creek near Atlin. See
Tables 1, 3, and 7C.
Volcanic ash—The only recorded production of volcanic ash is 30 tons from
the Cariboo Mining Division in 1954.   See Table 7D.
Zinc—Zinc was first produced in 1905. For many years lead was the most
valuable single metal, but in 1950 the annual value of production of zinc surpassed
that of lead and in 1966 the total value of zinc production exceeded that of lead.
In 1972 the annual production of zinc is exceeded by that of copper, coal, and crude
oil. Zinc is invariably associated with lead, and most ores are mined for their
combined values in zinc, lead, and silver, and rarely for their zinc content alone.
Some zinc ores contain a valuable amount of gold, and zinc is associated with
copper at the Lynx mine. Modern practice is to concentrate and separate the zinc
mineral (sphalerite) from the lead mineral (galena). Most of the zinc concentrates go to the zinc-recovery plant at Trail, are roasted, and are converted electro-
lytically to refined metal. Some concentrates are shipped to American or Japanese
smelters.
About 86 per cent of the zinc that has been mined in British Columbia has
originated in southeastern British Columbia, at the Sullivan mine, and at mines near
Ainsworth, Invermere, Moyie Lake, Riondel, Salmo, Slocan, and Spillimacheen.
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS
A 91
Other production has come from mines at Portland Canal and Tulsequah and is
coming from Buttle Lake. The greatest zinc mine is the Sullivan, which has contributed about 73 per cent of the total zinc production of the Province. See Table
12 for details of current zinc producers.
Records for the period 1905 to 1908 show shipments totalling 18,845 tons of
zinc ore and zinc concentrates of unstated zinc content. In 1918, revisions were
made to some yearly totals for zinc to adjust them for recovery of zinc from slag
treated at the Trail smelter.   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7B.
 A 92
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
Prices1 Used in Valuing Production of Gold, Silver, Copper,
Lead, Zinc, and Coal
Year
Gold,
Placer,
Oz.
Gold,
Fine,
Oz.
Silver,
Fine,
Oz.
Copper,
Lb.
Lead,
Lb.
Zinc,
Lb.
Coal,
Short
Ton
1901	
$
17.00
$
20.67
Cents
56.002 N.Y.
49.55      „
50.78 „
53.36     „
51.33      „
63.45      „
62.06      „
50.22     „
48.93      „
50.812   „
50.64 „
57.79 „
56.80 „
52.10      „
47.20     „
62.38      „
77.35     „
91.93      „
105.57      „
95.80     „
59.52      „
64.14      „
61.63      „
63.442    „
69.065 „
62.107    „
56.370    „
58.176    „
52.993    „
38.154    „
28.700    „
31.671    „
37.832    „
47.461    „
64.790    „
45.127    „
44.881    „
43.477    „
40.488    „
38.249 „
38.261    „
41.166    „
45.254    „
43.000    „
47.000    „
83.650    „
72.000    „
75.000 Mont.
74.250 U.S.
80.635    „
94.550    „
83.157    „
83.774    „
82.982    „
87.851    „
89.373    „
87.057    „
86.448    „
87.469    „
88.633    „
93.696    „
116.029    „
137.965    „
139.458    „
139.374    „
139.300    „
167.111    „
231.049   „
192.699    „
184.927    „
155.965    „
166.324    „
256.620   „
486.847* „
Cents
16.11 N.Y.
11.70     „
13.24    „
12.82     „
15.59 „
19.28     „
20.00     „
13.20     „
12.98     „
12.738   „
12.38     „
16.341   „
15.27 „
13.60 „
17.28 ,.
27.202   „
27.18     „
24.63     „
18.70     „
17.45     ,,
12.50     „
13.38     „
14.42     „
13.02     ,.
14.042   „
13.795   „
12.920   „
14.570   „
18.107   „
12.982   „
8.116   „
6.380 Lond.
7.454   „
7.419   „
7.795   „
9.477   „
13.078 „
9.972   „
10.092  „
10.086   „
10.086   „
10.086   „
11.750   „
12.000   „
12.550   „
12.800   „
20.390   „
22.350 U.S.
19.973   „
23.428   „
27.700   „
31.079 „
30.333   „
29.112   „
38.276   „
39.787   „
26.031   „
23.419   „
27.708   „
28.985   „
28.288   „
30.473   „
30.646   ,.
33.412   „
38.377   „
53.344   „
51.022   „
54.216   „
66.656   „
58.6982
46.6962
44.8392
83.2342
85.442°-
Cents
2.577 N.Y.
3.66 „
3.81     „
3.88     „
4.24     „
4.81     „
4.80     „
3.78     „
3.85     „
4.00     „
3.98     „
4.024   „
3.93     „
3.50     „
4.17     „
6.172   „
7.91     „
6.67 „
5.19     „
7.16     „
4.09     „
5.16     „
6.54     „
7.287   „
7.848 Lond.
6.751   .,
5.256   „
4.575   „
5.050   „
3.927   „
2.710   .,
2.113   „
2.391   „
2.436  „
3.133   „
3.913   „
5.110   „
3.344   „
3.169   „
3.362   „
3.362   „
3.362   „
3.754   „
4.500   „
5.000   „
6.750   „
13.670   „
18.040   „
15.800 U.S.
14.454   „
18.400   „
16.121    „
13.265   „
13.680   „
14.926   „
15.756   „
14.051   „
11.755   „
11.670   „
11.589   „
11.011 „
10.301   „
12.012 ,.
14.662   „
17.247   ..
16.283   „
15.102   „
14.546   .,
16.039   „
16.336   „
13.950   „
14.876   „
16.285   „
19.155^ „
Cents
$
2.65
1902	
1903	
1904	
	
2.63
2.67
2.62
1905
2.70
1906	
1907.     ...
4.60E.St.L.
4.90     „
5.90     „
4.80     „
4.40     „
11.25     „
10.88     „
7.566   „
6.94 „
6.24     „
6.52     „
3.95 „
4.86     „
5.62     „
5.39     „
7.892 Lond.
7.409   „
6.194   „
5.493   „
5.385   „
3.599   „
2.554   „
2.405   „
3.210   „
3.044  „
3.099   „
3.315   „
4.902   „
3.073   „
3.069   „
3.411   „
3.411   „
3.411   „
4.000   „
4.300   „
6.440   „
7.810   „
11.230   „
13.930   „
13.247 U.S.
15.075   „
19.900   „
15.874   „
10.675   „
10.417   „
".2.127   „
13.278   „
11.175   „
10.009. „
10.978   „
12.557   „
11.695   „
12.422   .,
13.173   „
14.633   „
15.636   „
15.622   „
14.933   „
14.153   „
15.721   „
16.006   „
16.286   „
17.579   „
20.657   „
34.768? n
2.61
3.07
1908	
3.11
1909	
  '
3.19
1910   	
1911
1912	
3.35
3.18
3.36
1913	
3.39
1914  __.
1915
	
	
3.46
3.43
1916	
3.45
1917
	
3.48
1918
4.99
1919	
4.92
1920           	
4.72
1921        	
4.81
1922    	
1923..
1924 	
	
4.72
4.81
4.89
1925        	
	
23.47
28.60
34.50
35.19
35.03
34.99
35.18
36.14
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
36.75
35.00
35.00
36.00
38.05
36.85
34.27
34.42
34.07
34.52
34.44
33.55
33.98
33.57
33.95
35.46
37.41
37.75 i
37.75
37.73
37.71
37.76
37.71
37.69
36.56
35.34
57.52
97.41
166.362
4.79
1926	
4.84
1077    	
4.81
1928	
4.71
1929	
1930	
4.74
4.73
1931          	
4.35
1932	
1933. _ 	
1934 	
1935
19.30
23.02
28.37
28.94
28.81
28.77
28.93
29.72
31.66
31.66
31.66
31.66
31.66
31.66
30.22
28.78
28.78
29.60
31.29
30.30
28.18
28.31
27.52
28.39
28.32
27.59
27.94
27.61
27.92
29.24
29.25
29.31
29.96
28.93
29.08
28.77
29.21
29.37
28.89
26.25
38.94
81.32
160.13^
4.04
3.90
4.00
3.95
1936
1937
1938
1939	
1940
4.02
1941 . ..
1942               	
1943
4.15
4.13
1944	
1945 	
1946
4.25
4.24
1947
1948	
1949  	
1950	
1951
6.09
6.51
6.43
1952             	
1953
6.94
6.88
1954
7.00
1955	
1956	
1957...       _    ....   .
1958	
1959              	
6.74
6.59
6.76
7.45
7.93
1960	
1961	
1967
6.64
7.40
7.43
1963 	
1964	
1965
7.33
6.94
7.03
1966	
1Qfi7
7.28
7.75
1968	
1969
7.91
8.00
1070
7.40
1971 	
1972
10.03
10.96
1973  	
1974
11.53
18.08
i_?ee page A 79 for detailed explanation.
2 See page A 80 for explanation.
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS
A 93
Table 1—Mineral Production: Total to Date, Past Year,
and Latest Year
Products t
Total Quantity
To Date-
Total Value
To Date
Quantity
1973
Value
1973
Quantity
1974
Value
1974
Metals
Antimony    lb.
Bismuth     lb.
Cadmium lb.
Chromite  tons
Cobalt  -._-. lb.
Copper - lb.
Gold—placer .oz.
iode, fine  oz.
Iron concentrates tons
Lead     lb.
Magnesium    lb.
Manganese    ..tons
Mercury2   lb.
Molybdenum   lb.
Nickel lb.
Palladium   oz.
Platinum _ ..—  oz.
Selenium  lb.
Silver   oz.
Tin  .... _ lb.
Tungsten (W03)  lb.
Zinc  _ lb.
Others   _ 	
Totals  	
Industrial Minerals
Arsenious oxide  — ... lb.
Asbestos  — ...tons
Bentonite  tons
Fluxes _ tons
Granules tons
Gypsum and gypsite _._ tons
Hydromagnesite tons
Iron oxide and ochre . tons
Jade _   —lb.
Magnesium sulphate  tons
Mica _  _ _ lb.
Natro-alunite   ...tons
Perlite     tons
Phosphate rock  .....tons
Sodium carbonate  tons
Sulphur — tons
Talc     tons
Others  ...._ 	
Totals
Structural Materials
Cement    _ — ...tons
Clay products  	
Lime and limestone  tons
Rubble, riprap, crushed
rock _  tons
Sand and gravel tons
Building-stone -tons
Not assigned 	
Totals	
Coal-
Coal
-sold and used
tons
Petroleum and Natural Gas
Crude oil bbl.
Field condensate  bbl.
Plant  condensate bbl.
Natural gas to pipeline   MSCF
Butane   bbl.
Propane  bbl.
Totals	
Grand totals 	
55,717,587
6,999,967
42,396,715
796
311,921l
6,341,444,556
5,241,559
17,580,663
32,498,214
16,580,358,119
204,632
1,724
4,171,110|
230,378,9211
51,451,273)
7491
1,407
731
513,322,987
19,476,813
20,040,128
15,469,106,879
19,615,884
15,157,228
80,582,019
32,295
376,661
2,576,997,431
97,532,985
558,709,132
294,212,245
1,465,359,402
88,184
32,668
10,447,358
397,185,336
51,698,754
30,462
135,008
1,389
424,655,815
18,842,214
48,068,016
1,608,950,938|
51,511,420|
1,660,331
2,851
810,779
40,907
700,198,538
3,831
185,968
1,565,467
187,153,430
30,391,463
2,467,472
7,619,436
304,727
1,411,800
302,874,331
7,720,222,844| .
22,019,420
1,319,034
791
4,226,875
525,109
5,624,949
2,253
18,108
1,169,.
13,894
12,822,050
522
1,112
3,842
10,492
8,425,458
1,085
273,201
266,604,484
16,858
8,045,996
9,169,499
18,969,614
27,536
155,050
1,288,641
254,352
185,818
9,398
11,120
16,894
118,983
107,243,924
34,871
6,423,192
108,966
46,228
34,321
365,249
154,251
316,035
418,849,431| .
16,683,697
307,216,257|
101,142,5351
68,032,876
950,772
2,153,936
67,489,6611 2,843,010
383,095,134| 33,963,934
1,165,217|          9,258,709| 804
 __._. I         5,972,171 j
942,207,343|
171,864,9521     990,685,4391       7,633,251
248,384,580]
845,518|
15,191,474|
I
3,359,110,663]
6,991,0811
5,510,838|
I
I
651,860,681
2,476,929
7,432,161
374,119,274
2,247,622,
1,770,489]
21,189,758
126,509
1,132,701
427,586,208
685,936
623,866
1,192,118
13,058
2,951,236
117,403
582,803,251
311,524
18,117,268
12,906,063
30,477,936
487,748|
74,320|
432,062!
879,897
680,771
1,532,096
633,936,038
1,452
160,791
1,440,651
121,811,971
541,644,913
232,512
26,749,083
12,742,227
23,333,016
51,851,509
3,775,232
19,552,997
597,265
4,224,062
62,564,751
4,161,923
30,426,216
1,518,234
5,841,750
317,061
60,716,942
2,351,406
28,440,365
1,150,722
171,374,439]
59,582,753
4,488,138
795,617,596] _ |   764,524,841
21,102,892]
91,936
106,371
857,643
1,114,009
306,808
37,976
34,774
441,299
7,738
27,398,900
206,049
1,025,615
1,412,157
18,613
4,187,387
----- —I -
294.554J
227,789
3,068,507
546,373
27,969;664| _|     33,676,214
24,935,624]
5,590,290]
3,633,870]
981,472
2,312,561
25,828,823
6,615,128
4,297,547
4,160,009j 2,966,857 5,715,219
35,379,5901 34,657,850 35,611,346
21,448| 498 20,330
I- —
73,720,8311
78,088,393
1,039,907,156] ..
.111,111,872,213].
I I
I I
I I
87,976,105)       8,551,159|   154,593,643
i
68,306,032
407,8071
222,463]
I
46,688,9121
212,64o|
193.398J
18,948,0641
104,165|
1,122,925|
I
368,125,947
663,099
562,121
103,335,328
568,075
924,549
61,298,656
232,085
196,742
116,031,252] I   166,555,435
1,101,315,448] ]1,197,438,526
i
I
1 See notes on individual products listed alphabetically on pages A
2 From 1968, excludes production which is confidential.
I to A 91.
 A 94 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
Table 2—Total Value of Mineral Production, 1836—1974
Year
Metals
Industrial
Minerals
Structural
Materials
Coal
Petroleum
and
Natural Gas
Total
1836-86	
$
52,808,750
729,381
745,794
685,512
572,884
447,136
511,075
659,969
1,191,728
2,834,629
4,973,769
7,575,262
7,176,870
8,107,509
11,360,546
14,258,455
12,163,561
12.640,083
13,424,755
16,289,165
18,449,602
17,101,305
15,227,991
14,668,141
13,768,731
11,830,062
18,218,266
17,701.432
15,790,727
20,765,212
32,092,648
27,299,934
27,957,302
20,058.217
19,687,532
13.160,417
19,605,401
25,769,215
35,959,566
46,480,742
51,867,792
45,134,289
48,640,158
52,805,345
41,785,380
23,530,469
20,129.869
25,777,723
35,177,224
42,006,618
45,889,944
65,224,245
55,959,713
56,216,049
64,332,166
65,807,630
63,626,140
55,005,394
42,095,013
50,673,592
58,834,747
95,729,867
124,091,753
110,219,917
117,166,836
$
$
43,650
22,168
46,432
77,517
75,201
79,475
129,234
$
10,758,565
1,240,080
1,467,903
1,739,490
2,034,420
3,087,291
2,479,005
2,934,882
3,038,859
2,824,687
2,693.961
2,734,522
3,582,595
4,126,803
4,744,530
5,016,398
4,832,257
4,332,297
4,953,024
5,511,861
5,548,044
7,637,713
7,356,866
8,574,884
11,108,335
8,071,747
10,786,812
9,197,460
7,745,847
7,114,178
8,900,675
8,484,343
12,833,994
11,975,671
13,450,169
12,836,013
12,880,060
12,678,548
9,911,935
12,168,905
11,650,180
12,269,135
12,633,510
11,256,260
9,435,650
7,684,155
6,523,644
5,375,171
5,725,133
5,048.864
5,722,502
6,139 920
5,565.069
6,280,956
7,088,265
7,660,000
8,237,172
7,742,030
8,217,966
6,454,360
6,732,470
8,680,440
9,765,395
10,549,924
10,119,303
$
$
63,610,965
1887	
1,991,629
1888 	
-      	
2,260,129
1889	
2,502,519
1890	
2,682,505
1891 	
3,613,902
1892	
3,119,314
1893 	
3,594,851
1894	
4,230,587
1895	
5,659,316
1896	
726,323
150,000
150,000
200,000
250,000
400.0CO
450,01.0
525,000
575,000
660,800
982,900
1,149,400
1,200,000
1,270,559
1,500,000
3,500,917
3,436,222
3,249,605
2,794,107
1,509,235
1,247,912
1,097,900
783,280
980,790
1,962,824
1,808,392
2,469,967
2,742,388
2,764,013
2,766,838
3,335.885
2,879,160
3,409,142
3,820,732
4,085,105
3,538,519
1,705,708
1,025,586
1,018,719
1,238,718
1,796,677
2,098,339
1,974,976
1,832.464
2,534,840
2,845,262
3,173,635
3,025,255
3,010,088
3,401,229
5,199,563
5,896,803
8,968.222
9,955,790
10,246,939
8,394,053
1897 ._.	
10,459,784
1898	
10,909,465
1899	
12,434,312
1900	
16,355,076
1901	
19,674,853
1902 	
17,445.818
1903.....	
17,497,380
1904..	
2,400
18,955,179
1905.	
22,461,826
1906 	
24,980,546
1907	
25,888,418
1908 	
-      -
23,784,857
1909	
24,513,584
1910	
26,377,066
1911.	
46,345
17,500
46,446
51,810
133,114
150,718
174,107
281,131
289,426
508,601
330,503
251,922
140,409
116,932
101,319
223,748
437,729
544,192
807,502
457,225
480,319
447,495
460,683
486,554
543,583
724,362
976,171
916,841
1,381,720
1,073,023
1,253,561
1,434,382
1,378,337
1,419,248
1,497,720
1,783,010
2,275,972
2,358,877
2,500,799
2,462,340
23,499,071
1912	
32,458,800
1913	
30,194,943
1914	
26,382,491
1915 	
29,521,739
1916	
42,391,953
1917	
37,056,284
1918    	
41,855,707
1919    	
33,304,104
1920	
35,609,126
1921	
28,135,325
1922	
35,207,350
1923	
41,330,560
1924..	
48,752,446
1925	
61,517,804
1926	
67,077,605
1927	
60,720,313
1928 	
65,227,002
1929     ___...
68,689,839
1930   	
55,763,360
1931	
35,233,462
1932	
28,806,716
1933    ....    ..
32,639,163
1934	
42,407,630
1935	
48,837,783
1936	
54,133,485
1937
74,438,675
1938	
64,416,599
1939	
65,711,189
1940...
75,028,294
1941
77,566,453
1942
76,471,329
1943
67,151,016
1944
54,742,315
1945    -.
62,026,901
1946
72,549,790
1947
112,583,082
1948
145,184,247
1949
133,226,430
1950
139,995,418
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS A 95
Table 2—Total Value of Mineral Production, 1836—1974—Continued
Year
Metals
Industrial
Minerals
Structural
Materials
Coal
Petroleum
and
Natural Gas
Total
1951 ...    .
$
153,598,411
147,857,523
126,755,705
123,834,286
142,609,505 '
149,441,246
125,353,920
104,251,112
105,076,530
130,304,373
128,565,774
159,627,293
172,852,866
180,926,329
177,101,733
208,664,003
235,865,318
250,912,026
294,881,114
309,981,470
301,059,951
372,032,770
795,617,596
764,524,841
$
2,493,840
2,181,464
3,002,673
5,504,114
6,939,490
9,172,792
11,474,050
9,958,768
12,110,286
13,762,102
12,948,308
14,304,214
16,510,898
16,989,469
20,409,649
22,865,324
29,364,065
26,056,782
20,492,943
22,020,359
21,909,767
25,764,120
27,969,664
33,676,214
$
10,606,048
11,596,961
13,555,038
14,395,174
15,299,254
20,573,631
25,626,939
19,999,576
19,025,209
18,829,989
19,878,921
21,366,265
23,882,190
26,428,939
32,325,714
43,780,272
44,011,488
45,189,476
55,441,528
46,104,071
59.940.333
$
10,169,617
9,729,739
9,528,279
9,154,544
8,986,501
9,346,518
7,340,339
5,937,860
5,472,064
5,242,223
6,802,134
6,133,986
6,237,997
6,327,678
6,713,590
6,196,219
7,045,341
7,588,989
6,817,155
19,559,669
45.801.936
$
$
176,867,916
1952	
171,365,687
1953    	
1954  ___
1955 -      	
6,545
18,610
319,465
1,197,581
4,806,233
5,967,128
9,226,646
11,612,184
27,939,726
36,379,636
36,466,753
44,101,662
54,274,187
67,096,286
75,281,215
86,756,009
90,974,467
99,251,158
105.644.978
152,841,695
152,894,663
173,853,360
1956  	
1957 .
188,853,652
170,992,829
1958 	
1959...... 	
1960	
144,953,549
147,651,217
177,365,333
1961  _
1962	
179,807,321
229,371,484
1963	
255,863,587
1964 	
1965	
267,139,168
280,652,348
1966 	
1967...    	
335,780,005
383,382,498
1968......	
405,028,488
1969  	
1970  	
1971 ..	
464,388,749
488,640,036
527,963,145
1972  _	
66,745,698 |     66,030,210
73,720,831 1     87,976,105
78,088,393  1    154,593,643
636.217.776
1973.        	
1974  .„
116,031,252 | 1,101,315,448
166,555,435  |  1,197,438,526
Totals      	
7,720,222,844
418,849,431
942,207,343  1   990,685,439
1,039,907,156
11,111,872,213
 A 96
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
I
Tl
Ov
3
K
•2
^.
o
s
ts
p
^_1
-C_
73
>
■^or-;
Oo'cO SO
-OOO —
*m<N o
rl oo rn
r-icom
vC O
Tt r-
OvfN 00 — vO
OTf mTf o Ov m
in oo w~)Tf (N Tf —
iM^rtOvvDOO
nriooovovovor^-
Tf r-voovm —Tt
-"ON-HTtmr-OTfr-
-.Ovootnvor- enenn
t m Tt oo m Tf —iy>Tf
■> r-'Tt rir-'ov'ooo'
- — r-r-ov r- vo oo
t     — o OunO\ r-c-1
-novr-nmimn
- Tt vo in n n Ovc©
-. n m n r-n r- oo
Tfovnr--nnninr-
oo — r-moounr-t^ov
n      vo Tf r- m en Tf Tf
—<Tf    vo
MM    (N
— o o
m, Os 'Ov
m CN   O
Ocn<~-
vo oo m
ovr^Tf^
oCr-^"-
— nm
OOOvOT.OomOvO'-1
mr^ovTf-HowovooN
rovooorior-r-oo —
en rnTf'r-^ov'r^o oo'
Ov       MO\MO\HMm
o^    i-h orvq_r-^cn — en
o"m"r-
•^
mr
cn
- i— rN in m —
h omm Ov m
jNt^ovo w^.r-_
- Tf Tt (NTf rn
0 in vo Tf (N in
vo t—      00 rl
oo tNvoTtnrJ
ooTf Tf ovmtN
m rn r- oo m —<
— Ov
ovr-
oo so
oo f-omn  cN
nTt r- oo oo co
Ov 00 vO fNTf   t>
- vc av >n o ri vo'
-i moo o m, oo in
-Tf vo —vo-— O
t^ On r— Tt m —
vcu-i m r- — n
vO CN CN MO >n
Tf'rJ Ovo'ov O
r~ Tf mrf rt n
n     m
oo vo ri — ovM
co Tt m tH on un
vc in OtN von
Tf O t~- vo m Ov
O m m in in m
vom rtTf m
vCTf rn Tf'vo
— n
! oo in vo r—
oomm —i
i-i vd riri
— mm
ovr- —
vomr-ovmvo vo
vcormrivo  r--
Tf'ootV'-:f._'
moo mn r-
vc m mm r-
IrKNi—Tt
i ov- vom
I oo r-ov^vq
i vo m'm'—■
i — oo vo
! O mvo
m o co m m o ■
— n r-oo — o  '
n in cn in vO oo_
voomr- m-Tf
r— oosoa, en o
— —(N00 ——   I
vo r- i-HTt o i-
mTf —Tf Tf o
©T"j*"",*T U\'/~l
ov oo-Tt f^r-r-
or-Tfri-cs
m      OvcSTf en
r-oommTfvo'm ■
en om Tf —i in  ■
00 Tf Tf_Tf 00 CS
(N(Nr^— 00 00
OOtNTf m VOCN
Oi-<(N m — —
mmcN mvo o
mvomCTf o
m — cs_cn ^oo
— Tt'o'm'r~-*o'
m m vo mn o
— Ovn mTt
(S
cs
Tt oc n
r^ r-n
oo co n
rjnoomONTtmmn
r-rnoovor^-vO'—'Onoo
—I VO.VC t^o o r- vOVO
m'lnmorimvooo-
mnvonmooTfncs
—     r-ccTt — ovrnvo
OO'
Tf o — *— en O
vo r-m
oo ovo
vo m m
a
oo — r-m Tt mn On Tt
TfOvmTfONTtTfmO
mcoi—iTfoomoor-oo
n Qcr~-Tf vo
ov m
oc
m m
cn
iv.
rim
00
m
n
O    !
Ov
©    :
00     '■
ri   ■
vo    1
n
O "Nm n i—m n
n — inONTf OTf
n n vo m m vo Tf
m — m'— Tf Tf en
r~-n o ovnm Ov
ne^ienso      vc —'
O r~-oo m m m
mO mov t- <N
oon — — so Tf
— >nn t^ m -
ooTt n voTf u
mOvooo^vq
mmn n o
i inf" o m
. Tf oo —
! vo n n
r-r-- — vo r~-oo
Mnitmovh
Tf m on — — —
oon r~-*r^oo'ri
Tt ov vovo oocn
r-     csvo — —
on o m r- oo oo
os r-Tt r- — m
e- m o — — o
vo o'vovo oo m
mTt — n oo —
vq     o_ vo m Tf
as     — oo
— Ov
— 00 —
— Tf OV
OOOTf
mnvoTfTt-— ososso
mmTtmmvovomOv
CS vq, vq o\ Ov C. oo_ ov_ o_
oo* Tf" vc oo'vo sc —■'as o
mTtor^momnm
Tf      m t^ Tf vo r~-1-~ —
ot . .
TfTf O
ir.r "
vo'ri ,
vO en vo
vo vC vc
oomooTtr~-t^n — n
vomooon—'mm
mm m oo — Ovr-—i C-
o' — ov* — o' Tt r-' oT o'
o —movovooTf-
oo — r-tto — m C-
m n—'t-^rn'm'
>
c-r-o
Tf O —
OsO^^
,Ov'vo'r-'
^00Tf Ov
voTt n
vOmOvooovmoovm
osri — ovTtoovnm
vD      Tf Tf — Tf t— 0\ r-
mO m
vO —' —'
vc m o
vO c*» »--
od —' f-
r-vo m
— Tf'vO
O Tf vD
mvoTtmmmOTtr-
r-vcnornnoooo
o^oo — tt vq i— o o n
r- r-mrnovnnr~-
o\ — voooocnr^r-
— >— i-h — CS Cl ov m
m ri O r-' m Tf
—■'rt
Tf   I"1
r~ m
00 Ct
r^ mmm •—■ ITt
vo r-<N n co ' tN
vq cc r< m Os \ m
Tf   VC' m Tf Tf
n f- —'c*i oo
00 —
— en vo vo m oo
r- — in n m r-
r- Ov o\ o vq Tf
oo m ms6*—n
OOfv!nO'"''f
mvOTt oooni^o
ov r- m oo Tt — r- Tf
t-O0>MNvCr-_ vO
— O r- ri 0> co On Os
oviJ Tt o     r oo o
Tf n Tf VO Tj
— — moo ov m
in m m m n r—
oon o oo — co
— n — cn m m n
oo\ — on mTt i>
m — qoNt^q cn
obovo'oov'm o
— o Ov Ov m — oo
ov —i vc oo ov n ■ c>
OvOvmO
Tt oo — n
ov — p r~-_
m'o'o'vo"
oo Ovn t—
Tt mm
— — Tf
n
r-Tt —ooov
ommcomr- —i
vc vo Tt p Ov ov, r^
oCcjvnoovooo in
c Oioo m oo
— cOTtovsqr-1 m
HtffcS
m
m — Tt n
co — Ov m,
pTt ov n
om von
n — m
Tf t— Ov
— no"
n
m mor~-n o
0O vo vo CO —00
vo nm in mo\
oc'vorfovo'vo*
vo oo — m vo o
n m m rn —
vo" K
m i-h
—■—TfTf mm
oo t^-vc m r~- —•
— m mm on rn
oo'ov'Tt t'oV
mmr- vc o m
vo     Ovn m m
vo' —'
— vO
nTf t~~ mvo oo
vo r- o m m o
vo co — nov oo
n —
r^nov Tf ovo
m oo nTf ov r-
t-^r-^rt*-* Ovr-
o—'r-'Tf'r-'oo
r- mTf — r- m
Tt     ovooTf m
jD^jD^jD N N g jd jfi jO N _D £ jD
S 3
<CQ
S  !
3
•3J3
cl 0
u
fl o u
3Sz
C tn
O u
1=2
N aj OJj
M <_"2
g a
y, <A vr in
C c C C
OOOO
— -_ -_! EL —' __;
JD J_! £ rj X) X5
X1JDX1>X^£1
T
a s ■
.'—  QhnO
tflPf-SO
! = .?S1
aaaj
-■5
<Ebb'5-_o
_3 I
Uj
■SS3
*a"o ra
—j c c be
'"Hoc
32S3 § S
S S JH « 3 £
73 B
■otj-i
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS
A 97
r- — vo
Ovr-ov
oor-^O
oCorf
, r-oo m
r oovo m
mcNmr-vonvomn
—i-Qo^HttovON
;o\mocN oovTS-ff^r^
!Tj"fNoCcicovo- oo
TtmTtTfrnT-.mTfm
.voNM^mt^n.'TH
nco
oc oc
m Tf
OOOCN
Tt rtso
r-mo
oon—"i-i—ivotJ-O^
mmONmr-i-'cnmvo
OTtr- vqov cscn t-;0
". .' ..,". "vo'oo—'r^
VO Tf — n !-■ Tf —I
Tt co Tt m oo m
i-T^'o'i-Hin
'vo 1-"
vo—"OOi-
oooovom—'TtoomvoONnr-mcN
—im mom n vovo momowcvo
i-^onTt Nm nooM^csovno
n n>-"r-."m — r-vo" t— <-"in n r-Tt
«jOv —m—io—i—'Or-w^r-movn
i-h     ov^—(oocn —ONTt oor-mmcN
H     (v|     ri     oo'cs o i-1 cn on     Tt
oo     —i — m"^     —i
vC VO
riV"
'i'
— — Ovt-oo — vot-oc-nvor-o—'
cninc-ocnmoovomvqr-mnocn
moo r-ov moo ov Tf tj -rt Tt Tt r» com
ocsoooomm'm'm—i r--OVTf* — Tf
vo — TtOv oo vo m Ov vo —i o rt r—
vq oo —i — «n —im TtvqmTf oo
rn q        —"t—*o'n"r-    rt cs"
O oon o
r- i-h m
O ov *n t—m t-m
OTf —<m-or-
on o vq rt vq "n m
oovo in rioo'oo' vo
OvOn —i —ivoTt
cn cn O t* o m
r-    rHi-t    m
vovOTt OvOOOv
mr-t-ovmoo
ovovr-n r-t-
n —irnov cot- Tt
ONt-Ttoocom _
oq m vo o oq m in vo
n'vqr-Tt'vor-Tt as
O O in I-1 o oo On vo
rt—(OOrtm—n
— -__T        Tt"
cs
vooo—ion—>m
votNtNvt mm
OX (Sen CSCS©
oo'vo' Tt'm" Tt vo'
Cvtrnvom—i
i-h cn—<m
m oo c- owe o
cscSTt —iTt m
oo^rt mcNmm
co'in'r'in— o
n—iovrt — n
oovont-vo
rt t-OOO
vo mmov
mooooTf
n'vo'r-
— vom
enow©
n'cNTt"
Tt OOOvOOO
noNr-poNTt
V0 CN OO © VVrt
mo" en o Ov'—"
movmvot-n
Ov ift»OH m
Ttm mTt m
n
m
VOOTfTf
m rH(f)0
ONOOvOO
m'mcn
m Tf vo
nes'm
oom ovvomn
(St-TtmooTt
cnpmvqo^t-;
in'ooTt'oorivo
m so c-l Os m os
en m On n n -1
m th
O vo
Smmr-ON—i
vOCNTt OvcN
O^OVONOrt
ooTt'rfmm'cN
Tt onnvpvo
Os — r-< t-h vo m
00       rt Oo"
—i VO
nt-mcsooo cn i
mOVO—'Tf On  m  •
pooTtONvqm r'
vor-n oocNm
o on co — os
mTt nvocsrt
00 Ov—I oovo vo
v-Ooomvo
t-^m r-csovoo
Ov vc" rf vo »n m
conmoooon
— —i —< m vovo
rH        rHtr?
nr-movninooovvoovvoooomTtr-
Tt—lONmnoTtr-voTfoovoovoovov
vpvqoNt-^ooovTj- mm enTt voowooon
trt.OvTtovinmvomcNvoO'—'Ovmr-nn
—inmmotNovTtOvvoo—ir-vor-rt
Tt m o.rt Tt     OvvooonvomTfrtrtn
—iooovTt—iTfoo—immvomvovo
onmrnovONnor-ooomTfovov
vooovor-vovovommvOTtoo — ov
Ovm mmn
t-Ovovin—i
VO      vo —O
—ivoON—<ovo—icnt-
nmTtTtTrnmt-Tt
—innonoNmnm
rtvOTfvooomno
TtTtnONrtcnvolcN
n CS 0\ rt CN Ov CJ, rt
o ov r— r-m vo r- ' t*
r-mmoomo1^" vo
oo  t- o n m Tf ■-
p"     rH        ri
oo vo t-h m t-r—
m i— r-oom't-
ommooTf ctv
rn        mnn
not-oovovo
—i Tt n Tf o\vo
rn r~;o^in rtrt
Tf m r- ri vo'—"'
—.vein en r-
Otsmoo
i-hmmTf m
OVTf 00 Tf
so-^-^C
ncNn
O moo
t-OvOTt mm oo «
—Ivonnm—i t- '
t- qoo oo in q ov
vo"r-'r-"vo'vc oi t*
vor-n —o •-
—in mvor-
vo
Tf r-l novTtr-
Tt m—.ovOTt
rt,mp.^tONO,
rt" Tf OO'OVOO*
mOrtvoTt oo
oo —'oONmTt
m     rtOv
TfTtmovoor-TtnoovoovoovoovcN
—ir-nov —TfTt—>OTtnTtr-Tfooov
vo vp n oov vo oo vcrtooTtoo^r--
«,mco —mr-Tf — m'—'Tt" t-oo*rt CN m'Tt
■"■* ooriom mm—'mowocNrtTfr-
nmo—io    o i~" r-ov Tt ov Tt o r-r-
1—rnmor- <■
-in- Ttin r-o_ _
1 **"> t^" ^rt rt foonr-
mcAsomos
noomrt—i
m    o —'vo
oo—|OvoovooNOom
 ' ~"  TfOvO-""
">ovoq<
"n Ov r-Tt mm*oo"m'—i
ooncNoOTtr-—imm
Ov oo oq m vo m cn Tt
— oo'—'rvlV      rtio
OvOTt
Tf COTf
©.TfO^
&Tf oo cn
—i oom
oOinvornrtvoOi-
moor-oonovno
ONrtTtooot-m*-
t-Tt m* rt vo i-Tm i-
mrtOOONOWOOT
vo     vomomr-c
in on
m t~~
o —
Tt mo
r- cn—i
Tt —<m
a
—i—lovmmr-mvovo
movovonovoi—'rt
t-Tt oo o «">Tt n c^r-
i-t o'ov"oovooo'— en
t- ot-mt^Ortvo
m —icooonTfmn
n" rt Tt rt m" vo
n
n
vo vonoon com
onovTtmt-oo
Tt Tt rn mr m r-; n
o coovo'vo't- t-
oov — m o\Tt —i
oo m ov —i rt cn
r- ri
coo com ot-
t-i Tf rnov vovo
^ r-^cs r-^r^Tt
r-vo'oTTt't-'oo
ooncNTt vooo
m—in
r-m—'mvonm ov
cNmoNmmTtr- m
oqm^Ttvq^nm^p^ cn
mvovovoo't-Ov" o
fnonmmmo cn
'  ir-noNTf o
CJ_rt i/
vo'
cn
OvoovVOCN O
rnnTfvoon
t~^vor m n voTt
vo"rt'n"ocNvo*
oo mn r-voco
nnm
m»ncNmvon
OOOOn OOONVO
mt^nm mov^
as 'H t-"o' n" oo'
n oo mt- —i
vo ovr o vo vo
— mm mm"
ONTt Tft-
TtTtOVO
mnrt rs
ov'ooo'n
00.*_O m^
r^mos
CN
ovoovont-ov . .
Tt vor-Tt ooTt  t-
m c^o cN m -rt o
m Tf Tf co oTrf Tt-'
ooi-HO — r-
Tf t-^n o vq,
m ■* en m'rt'
rt n
vo novm
co oooo t-
t-n m
vo ovm
co vq-—
rtrim'
n
vo—T-CNCNO
moooot-nTt
co_ r-t cs cn oo o
rt'r-'cnvq —O
t-ooovTt om
Tt CN CN Oy—I rH
vo en
cnoo on—im vo
n omcoovt—
rtO,rtTt — oq
Tf ON Tf oo* oo'co
moTt oo—ivo
rH^ rt rt cnTf
m"
n
Ov
—iovON—in>n
Tt r Ortr-o
OvOOOTtt-;«n
m"r-m-^-oo"Tt
Ot-moovm
Tf nnoo     —.
OTfOO—iTf t-
mm mn von
»n cs —cNvom
mt-*mTf ooo
moomon
cn—'ommTt
n
— n
£i£i£>£ijj N N cX)£J2 N^p£)X1
rt- —-— 00S--rt0rt„rt
II
<P3
8 «JS
WO cj
U2 S
■ax) ftS
rt o o o
UUU0
-•a_>?i_!
n rt O U
lal
0.^-5-5 3.SS
Q) o
!&"__
«_!->, VJ-— w
<fcOOi?iaO
! S n c S
■oooo
22-3oSS
13 -a 'i
-_ 2 c
J rt c  $S
'.rttlbS 5
rt rt "oj
toga
McoW
its"
I u O «1
•a-o ca
a E B m
o 0 ow     aj
„»»..-
w__ __ l_ B M
■52 b3 « a
2 2^ rt « 3 £
uESZmph
3 S
O    H
H 0
 A 98
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
Table 4—Comparison of Total Volume and Value of Production,
and Volume and Value of Production Paid for to Mines
Metals
1974
Total Production
Quantity
Value
1974
Production Paid for to Mines
Quantity
Value
Antimony
Bismuth __
Cadmium
Copper
Gold—placer 	
lode, fine ~
Iron concentrates
Lead  	
lb.
...lb.
..lb.
...lb.
..oz.
. oz.
Molybdenum
Nickel 	
Silver	
Tin   	
Zinc 	
Others  	
 tons
 lb.
 -..lb.
 lb.
 oz.
 _.Ib.
 lb.
487,748
74,320
432,062
633,936,038
1,452
160,791
1,440,651
121,811,971
30,426,216
1,518,234
5,841,750
317,061
171,374,439
1
541
26
12.
23,
60.
2
28
1
59
4
$
879,897
680,771
,532,096
,644,913
232,512
749,083
742,227
333,016
716,942
351,406
440,365
150,722
582,753
,488,138
204,542
633,852,204
1,452
158,748
1,431,831
120,606,766
30,426,216
1,518,234
5,479,959
165,582
164,160,930
Totals
764,524,841
525,983
440,490,965
232,512
22,027,877
12,661,965
17,144,823
60,716,942
1,994,439
21,839,235
264,565
42,289,883
3,855,685
624,044,874
Note—For metals, the total volume and value of production include the quantities paid for to the mines,
and the smelter and refinery production that can be attributed to the mines but is not paid for. The volume and
value paid for to the mines, excluding outward transportation costs, smelting and refining costs, penalties and
deductions, are shown separately for comparative purposes.
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS A 99
Table 5—Exploration and Development Expenditures, 1973 and 1974
Physical
Work
and Surveys
Administration,
Overhead,
Land Costs,
Etc.
Construction,
Machinery and
Equipment,
Other Capital
Costs
Totals
A. Exploration on Undeclared Mines
Metal mines—
1973  -.
1974   	
Coal mines—
1973 . _..	
1974  	
$
27,664,885
18,773,326
406,497
3,450,746
124,164
42,706
28,195,546
22,266,778
2,436,436
2,652,243
1,749,497
488,308
$
7,613,314
6,525,878
179,315
884,849
40,123
11,134
7,832,752
7,421,861
854,885
762,224
491,327
104,259
$
2,059,273
128,144
$
37,337,472
25,427,348
585,812
18,958
4,354,553
Others—
1973
164,287
1974  	
Totals—
1973..	
1974	
B. Exploration on Declared or Operating Mines
Metal mines—
1973	
1974	
Coal mines—■
53,840
2,059,273
147,102
338,854
278,500
38,087,571
29,835,741
3,630,175
3,692,967
2,240,824
592,567
Others—
1973
4,236
4,185,933
3,144,787
4,236
Totals—
1973     	
1974  __...
C. Development on Declared Mines
Metal mines—-
1973
1,346,212
866,483
338,854
278,500
5,870,999
4,289,770
1974 ....	
Coal mines—
1973
1,280,513
320,098
23,242
1,028,199
256,055
1,985,000
4,293,712
1974...	
Others—
1973
111,500
665,000
2,883,584
665,000
4,980,084
29,614,419
46,732,326
10,068,568
16,607,506
4,473,657
16,606,229
44,156,644
79,946,061
687,653
665,000
1974	
Totals—
1973
37,988
2,944,814
665,000
1974	
D. Development on Operating Mines
Metal mines—■
1973	
1,623,853
7,835,776
20,933,501
1,303,000
9,027,818
4,553,036
6,198,552
13,691,812
36,159,871
1,322,242
1,412,760
1,722,680
7,926,179
38,862,955
1974	
69,388,507
Coal mines—
1973
11,371,568
1974
25,635,324
Others—
1973    ....
1974._	
Totals—
1973     	
1974  	
24,490
146,182
1,437,250
1,868,862
9,051,183
22,950,963
59,285,706
117,974,794
 A 100 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
Table 6—Production of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, Molybdenum, and
Iron Concentrates, 1858-1974
Year
Gold (Placer)
Gold (Fine)
Silver
Copper
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantitj
Value
Oz.
$
Oz.
$
Oz.
$
Lb.
$
1858-90 -..
3,246,585
376,290
55,192,163
6,397,183
221,089
22,537,306
214,152
13,561,194
1891-1900-	
632,806
12,858,353
35,416,069
4,365,210
1901-10
507,580
8,628,660
2,322,118
47,998,179
31,222,548
16,973,507
379,957,091
56,384,783
1911
25,060
426,000
228,617
4,725,512
1,892,364
958,293
36,927,656
4,571,644
1917.
32,680
555,500
257,496
5,322,442
3,132,108
1,810,045
51,456,537
8,408,513
1913
30,000
510,000
272,254
5,627,595
3,465,856
1,968,606
46,460,305
7,094,489
1914
33,240
565,000
247,170
5,109,008
3,602,180
1,876,736
45,009,699
6,121,319
1915
45,290
770,000
250,021
5,167,934
3,366,506
3,301,923
1,588,991
56,918,405
9,835,500
1916
34,150
580,500
221,932
4,587,333
2,059,739
65,379,364
17,784,494
1917
29,180
496,000
114,523
2,367,191
2,929,216
2,265,749
59,007,565
16,038,256
1918
18,820
320,000
164,674
3,403,811
3,498,172
3,215,870
61,483,754
15,143,449
1919
16,850
286,500
152,426
3,150,644
3,403,119
3,592,673
42,459,339
7,939,896
1920
13,040
221,600
120,048
2,481,392
3,377,849
3,235,980
44,887,676
7,832,899
1071
13,720
233,200
135,765
2,804,197
2,673,389
1,591,201
39,036,993
4,879,624
]9?7
21,690
368,800
197,856
4,089,684
7,101,311
4,554,781
32,359,896
4,329,754
1973
24,710
420,000
179,245
3,704,994
6,032,986
3,718,129
57,720,290
8,323,266
1924
24,750
420,750
247,716
5,120,535
8,341,768
5,292,184
64,845,393
8,442,870
1925   	
16,476
280,092
209,719
4,335,069
7,654,844
5,286,818
72,306,432
10,153,269
1926.
20,912
355,503
201,427
4,163,859
10,748,556
6,675,606
89,339,768
12,324,421
19?7
9,191
156,247
178,001
3,679,601
10,470,185
5,902,043
89,202,871
11,525,011
1928
8,424
143,208
180,662
3,734,609
10,627,167
6,182,461
97,908,316
14,265,242
1929
6,983
118,711
145,223
3,002,020
9,960,172
5,278,194
102,793,669
18,612,850
1930   .
8,955
152,235
160,836
3,324,975
11,328,263
4,322,185
92,362,240
11,990,466
1931
17,176
291,992
146,133
3,020,837
7,550,331
2,254,979
64,134,746
5,365,690
1912
20,400
395,542
181,651
4,263,389
7,150,655
2,264,729
50,608,036
3,228,892
1933
23,928
562,787
223,589
6,394,645
7,021,754
2,656,526
43,149,460
3,216,701
1914
25,181
714,431
297,216
10,253,952
8,613,977
4,088,280
49,651,733
3,683,662
1935.
30,929
895,058
365,343
12,856,419
9,269,944
6,005,996
39,428,208
3,073,428
1936-
43,389
1,249,940
404,578
14,172,367
9,547,124
4,308,330
21,671,711
2,053,828
1937 _
54,153
1,558,245
460,781
16,122,767
11,305,367
5,073,962
46,057,584
6,023,411
1938.
57,759
1,671,015
557,522
19,613,624
10,861,578
4,722,288
65,769,906
6,558,575
1939	
49,746
1,478,492
587,336
21,226,957
10,821,393
4,381,365
73,254,679
7,392,862
1940
39,067
1,236,928
583,524
22,461,516
12,327,944
4,715,315
77,980,223
7,865,085
1941-
43,775
1,385,962
571,026
21,984,501
12,175,700
4,658,545
66,435,583
6,700,693
1947
32,904
1,041,772
444,518
17,113,943
9,677,881
4,080,775
50,097,716
5,052,856
1943	
14,600
462,270
224,403
8.639,516
8,526,310
3,858,496
42,307,510
4,971,132
1944
11,433
361,977
186,632
7,185,332
5,705,334
2,453,293
36,300,589
4,356,070
1945 	
12,589
398,591
175,373
6,751,860
6,157,307
2,893,934
25,852,366
3,244,472
1946	
15,729
475,361
117,612
4,322,241
6,365,761
5,324,959
17,500,538
2,240,070
1947-	
6,969
200,585
243,282
8,514,870
5,708,461
4,110,092
41,783,921
8,519,741
1948	
20,332
585,200
286,230
10,018,050
6,720,134
5,040,101
43,025,388
9,616,174
1949...
17,886
529,524
288,396
10,382,256
7,637,822
5,671,082
54,856,808
10,956,550
1950    	
19,134
598,717
283,983
10,805,553
9,509,456
7,667,950
42,212,133
9,889,45*
1951	
23,691
717,911
261,274
9,627,947
8,218,914
7,770,983
43,249,658
11,980,155
1952._      ....
17,554
494,756
255,789
8,765,889
8,810,807
7,326,803
42,005,512
13,054,893
1953	
14,245
403,230
253,552
8,727,294
8,378,819
7,019,272
49,021,013
14,869,544
1954
8,684
238,967
258,388
8,803,279
9,826,403
8,154,145
50,150,087
14,599,693
1955          ~ -
7,666
217,614
242,477
8,370,306
7,903,149
6,942,995
44,238,031
16,932,549
1956          	
3,865
109,450
191,743
6,603,628
8,405,074
7,511,866
43,360,575
17,251,872
1957	
2,936
80,990
223,403
7,495,170
8,129,348
7,077,166
31,387,441
8,170,465
1958.. . .
5,650
157,871
194,354
6,604,149
7,041,058
6,086,854
12,658,649
2,964,529
1959...    _	
7,570
208,973
173,146
5,812,511
6,198,101
5,421,417
16,233,546
4,497,991
1960	
3,847
107,418
205,580
6,979,441
7,446,643
6,600,183
33,064,429
9,583,724
1961	
3,416
99,884
159,821
5,667,253
7,373,997
6,909,140
31,692,412
8,965,149
1962	
3,315
96,697
158,850
5,942,101
6,189,804
7,181,907
108,979,144
33,209,215
1963	
4,620
135,411
154,979
5,850,458
6,422,680
8,861,050
118,247,104
36,238,007
1964	
1,842
55,191
138,487
5,227,884
5,269,642
7,348,938
115,554,700
38,609,136
1965	
866
25,053
117,124
4,419,089
4,972,084
6,929,793
85,197,073
32,696,081
1966 	
1,535
44,632
119,508
4,506,646
5,549,131
7,729,939
105,800,568
56,438,255
1967.            	
891
25,632
126,157
4,763,688
6,180,739
10,328,695
172,739,548
88,135,172
1968	
670
19,571
123,896
4,672,242
7,130,866
16,475,795
160,993,338
87,284,148
1969	
399
11,720
117,481
4,427,506
5,760,534
11,100,491
167,415,411
111,592,416
1970  -
491
14,185
100,809
3,685,476
6,511,316
12,041,181
212,371,731
124,657,958
1971
177
4,647
85,781
3,031,844
7,673,546
11,968,046
280,619,150
131,037,918
197?
691
26,905
121,624
6,995,448
6,926,036
11,519,660
467,012,694
209,403,822
1973 	
3,831
311,524
185,986
18,117,268
7,619,436
19,552,997
700,198,538
582,803,251
1974 _ 	
1,452
232,512
160,791
26,749,083
5,841,750
28,440,365
633,936,038
541,644,913
Totals	
5,241,559
97,532,985
17,580,663
558,709,132
513,322,987
424,655,815
6,341,444,556
2,576,997,431
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS
A 101
Table 6—Production of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, Molybdenum, and
Iron Concentrates, 1858-1974—Continued
Lead
Zinc
Molybdenum
Iron Concentrates
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
1858-90
Lb.
1,044,400
205,037,158
407,833,262
26,872,397
44,871,454
55,364,677
50,625,048
46,503,590
48,727,516
37,307,465
43,899,661
29,475,968
39,331,218
41,402,288
67,447,985
96,663,152
170,384,481
237,899,199
263,023,936
282,996,423
305,140,792
307,999,153
321,803,725
261,902,228
252,007,574
271,689,217
347,366,967
344,268,444
377,971,618
419,118,371
412,979,182
378,743,663
466,849,112
456,840,454
507,199,704
439,155,635
292,922,888
336,976,468
345,862,680
313,733,089
320,037,525
265,378,899
284,024,522
273,456,604
284,949,396
297,634,712
332,474,456
302,567,640
283,718,073
281,603,346
294,573,159
287,423,357
333,608,699
384,284,524
335,282,537
314,974,310
268,737,503
250,183,633
211,490,107
208,131,894
231,627,618
210,072,565
214,838,525
248,827,301
194,249,571
187,153,430
121,811,971
$
45,527
7,581,619
17,033,102
1,069,521
1,805,627
2,175,832
1,771,877
1,939,200
3,007,462
2,951,020
2,928,107
1,526.855
2,816,115
1,693,354
3,480,306
6,321,770
12,415,917
18,670,329
17,757,535
14,874,292
13,961,412
15,555,189
12,638,198
7,097,812
5,326,432
6,497,719
8,461,859
10,785,930
14,790,028
21,417,049
13,810,024
12,002,390
15,695,467
15,358,976
17,052,054
16,485,902
13,181,530
16,848,823
23,345,731
42,887,313
57,734,770
41,929,866
41,052,905
50,316,015
45,936,692
39,481,244
45,482,505
45,161,245
44,702,619
39,568,086
34,627,075
33,542,306
38,661,912
42,313,569
34,537,454
37,834,714
39,402,293
43,149,171
34,436,934
31,432,079
32,782,257
33,693,539
35,096,021
34,711,408
28,896,566
30,477,936
23,333,016
Lb.
$
Lb.
$
Tons
29,869
13,029
19,553
$
70,879
1891-1900
45,602
1901-10
12,684,192
2,634,544
5,358,280
6,758,768
7,866,467
12,982,440
37,168,980
41,848,513
41,772,916
56,737,651
47,208,268
49,419,372
57,146,548
58,344,462
79,130,970
98,257,099
142,876,947
145,225,443
181,763,147
172,096,841:
250,479,310
202,071,702
192,120,091
195,963,751
249,152,403
256,239,446
254,581,393
291,192,278
298,497,295
278,409,102
312,020,671
367,869,579
387,236,469
336,150,455
278,063,373
294,791,635
274,269,956
253,006,168
270,310,195
288,225,368
290,344,227
337,511,324
372,871,717
382,300,862
334,124,560
429,198,565
443,853,004
449,276,797
432,002,790
402,342,850
403,399,319
387,951,190
413,430,817
402,863,154
400,796,562
311,249,250
305,124,440
262,830,908
299,396,264
296,667,033
275,590,749
305,451,243
268,347,996
302,874,331
171,374,439
894,169
129,092
316,139
324,421
346,125
1,460,524
4,043,985
3,166,259
2,899,040
3,540,429
3,077,979
1,952,065
2,777,322
68,436
1911
1912
1913
1914
1,987
3,618
12,342
6,982
960
662
2,000
20,560
11,636
1,840
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1,000
1,230
1,472
1,010
1,200
243
5,000
6,150
1920	
7,360
1921
5,050
1922
3,600
1923—
3,278,903
4,266,741
7,754,450
10,586,610
8,996,135
9,984,613
9,268,792
9,017,005
5,160,911
4,621,641
6,291,416
7,584,199
7,940,860
8,439,373
14,274,245
9,172,822
8,544,375
10,643,026
12,548,031
13,208,636
13,446,018
11,956,725
18,984,581
21,420,484
28,412,593
37,654,211
38,181,214
43,769,392
67,164,754
59,189,656
40,810,618
34,805,755
52,048,909
58,934,801
50,206,681
43,234,839
44,169,198
'    50,656,726
45,370,891
51,356,376
53,069,163
58,648,561
48,666,933
47,666,540
39,248,539
43,550,181
46,639,024
44,111,055
49,745,789
47,172,894
62,564,751
59,582,753
1,337
1924	
1975
1926
1927
1928	
20
1929
1930	
1931
1932    -
1911
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
	
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
679
5,472
	
3,735
1949	
27,579
1950
1951
113,535
900,481
991,248
535,746
610,930
369,955
357,342
630,271
849,248
1,160,355
1,335,068
1,793,847
2,060,241
2,002,562
2,165,403
2,151,804
2,154,443
2,094,745
2,074,854
1,879,065
1,929,868
1,256,308
1,565,467
1,440,651
790,000
1952	
1953
—
	
5,474,924
6,763,105
1954
3,733,891
1955
3,228,756
1956
2,190,847
1957
2,200,637
1958
4,193,442
1959
6,363,848
1960	
1961
5,414
9,500
10,292,847
12,082,540
1962
18,326,911
1963
20,746,424
1964
1965
1966
1967	
1968
1969 .
28,245
7,289,125
17,094,927
17,517,543
19,799,793
26,597,477
31,276,497
21,884,729
28,041,603
30,391,463
30,426,216
47,063
12,405,344
27,606,061
31,183,064
32,552,722
47,999,442
52,561,796
36,954,846
43,260,349
51,851,509
60,716,942
20,419,487
21,498,581
20,778,934
20,820,765
21,437,569
19,787.845
1970	
1971	
1972	
1973	
17,391,883
18,153,612
11,642,379
I 12,906,063
1974	
12,742,227
Totals
16,580,358,119
1,465,359,402
15,469,106,879
1,608,950,938
230,378,9211397,185,336
32,498,214
294,212,245
L
 A 102 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
Table 7A—Mineral Production by Mining
Division
Period
Placer Gold
Metals
Industrial
Minerals
Structural
Materials
Quantity
Value
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
Oz.
$
$
21,420,321
25,132,336
191,057,879
$
$
269,777
426,416
Atlin	
1,617
33,253
9,398
4,984,899
1,210
737,090
194,162
17,585,122
7,437
38,054,644
102,763,548
75,446,970
284,194,415
20,325
9,526
32,600
477,401
338,241
3,257,752
231
2,611,237
36,598
54,224,090
3,166,865
30,135,681
265,564
137,548
10,171
243,069
848,377
81,813,892
69,625,441
2,442,044,516
694,430
146,196
64,313,305
11,485,998
8,578,568
214,977,935
138,215,893
147,508,550
499,226,739
162,427
1,335,105
836,022
21,649,811
1,114,009
1,412,157
16,832,741
3.978,598
549,098
510,688
20,531
468,450
10,226,769
144,956
172,470
3,881,712
153.914
469
11,268
5,074
115,662
2,327,897
2,650,818
5,879,052
7,306,243
41,760,070
1,356,571
1,553,474
14,674,241
87,709
27,595
604,785
6,540,538
21,464,462
28,237,794
283,757,110
7,200
7,920,059
19,156,498
50,296
1,251,883
11
92,957
1,752
1,927,440
148,167,256
102,993,184
94,728,693
453,193,022
15,104,842
11,119,941
380,559,295
5,222,754
3,073,121
63,751,805
32,086,041
36,834,594
293,880,137
96,317,741
106,967,919
491,331,232
48,486,539
42,451,307
232,107,684
489,380
39,181
15,489,918
37,320,864
39,345,102
206,845,817
74,483,155
473,095
137,379
208,364
2,161,095
719,592
947,024
3,885,044
3,415,018
5 072,086
5,457,971
866
19,300
79,038.131
723,622
715,164
3,586
89,026
8,915,203
18,729,144
18,909,769
212,579,325
130,386
31,355
595,910
	
1,611,625
234
4,764
10,050
295,101
17,812
761,820
73.678
73,581
6,660,241
2,228,584
811,027
830,029
14,463,024
56,431
1,503,680
253,290
4,474,120
308,G98
240
5,406
357,663
7,582
164,477
3,574,678
90,986
45,507
878,204
18,558
4,349,840
1,801,043
4,603
105,569
537,982,045
1,063,873
1,318,389
277,173,539
61,209
125,627
90,472,693
12,495,830
8,565,798
297,516,291
4,046
1,240,215
20,603,496
238,592
	
138,283
2,396.293
366
9,397
53,506
851
24,260
3,687,145
11,918,387
13,664,969
159,366,162
955,658
182
5,306
7,066,964
32,584
1,359,344
2,732
72,885
339,159
3,701,997
3,955,255
24,726,778
9,074,535
12,235,936
355,278,880
88,062
495
285
190,651
2,780.533
1,910 575
62,904,363
10,175,987
17,184,268
18,035,302
628
3,831
15,680
311,524
249,805,369
3,336,803
2 654,432
1,529,359
17,574,03.
50,503,939
1973
1974
To date
3,831
1,452
5,241,559
311,524
232,51?
97,532,985
795,306,072
764,292,329
7,622,689,859
27,969,664
33,676,214
418,849,431
73.720,831
78,088,393
942,207,343
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS A 103
Divisions, 1973 and 1974, and Total to Date
Petroleum and Natural Gas
Coal
Crude Oil and
Condensates
Natural Gas Delivered
to Pipe-line
Butane and
Propane
Division
Total
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Tons
$
Bbl.
$
MSCF
$
Bbl.
$
$
21,690,098
25,558,752
196,085,429
201,599
55,998,332
106,030,826
78,683,033
369,032,687
290
1,100
265 564
137,548
5 232 471
7,632,983
87,972,889
154,279,961
054,290,348
171,670,984
8,533,081
225,252,112
89,345,518
3,128,679,894
1,730,823
85,039,026
11,639,912
8.888,814
220,072,312
144,094,945
154,814,793
548,191,897
138,852,285
204,575,762
1,359,872,279
94,909
80,198
153,982,809
108,202,649
100,395,028
835,556,292
 I
15,087
59,765
22,448,968
20,175,154
264,421,572
68,936,302
104,827,952
661,769,771
427,586,208
368,125,947
3,359,110,663
46,688,912
61,298,656
374,119,274
1,309,802     406,038
1,225,220     428,827
12,501,91914,018,111
       j
17,700
128,820
309,000
1,125,391
                 1
74,324,471
301,144,744
16 548 056
12,782,129
393,448,568
23,951,898
278,538,665
32,216,427
37,018,378
307,204,371
2,929,5841   11,080,836
268|              3,216
|
97,427,085
378               4,682
 I._.
502,582!     3.424.406
511,484 162
48,962,449
1,122
5,008
243,252,519
19,229,073
4,617,442
19,553,725
231 646,144
70,966,952
559 931,441
36
116
1,302,465
1,456,672
163.645
94,184,098
24,414,217
22,230,767
 I	
1,359,344
10,676,093
20,886,760
21,990,842
274,738,478
15,503,395
16,800,943
486.261.221
1
ZZZZ
7,633,251
8,551,159
171,864,952
87,976,105
154,593,643
990,685,439
22,448,968|   68,936,302
20,175,154 104,827,952
264,421,572|661,769,771
1
427,586,2081  46,688,912
368,125,947|   61,298,656
3,359,110,6631374,119,274
1
1,309,8021    406,0381   1,101.315,448
1.225,220;    428,827    1,197,438,526
12,501,91914,018,111111,111,872,213
1                     1
 A 104
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
■g
E-.
K
On
~^
13
e
a
R
0\
s
•2
•3
c
S
-Ci
S
N
3
o
-a
5
s
•2
s
■«
03
Cs
Cl N 10
h» m © rs co  :
t-C0CDCOt-CDt-COC*|COCS0>to
ro ©  :
t-oointot-rco©in©p;ciOcOTfCioco
eo tf ©
ct cm rn in cd   :
1- — cm t- r. t- t- ~ t-» r. 7i 1^. -t-
inn  :
to©00Cl©©©HrHHCM©©tf©
0
CO tf ©
^w-^rst-   :
Tt*Tt*CTOSQClflMrHOt-rHrorH
0 Tf  :
H©00©t-CDtor
ir*0O©rOO©h«Q0
^c
3
iooj cs
|C MOO CD rH     1
t-t-tfCDCOlDrHrHtft-Or'rH
0 ©   :
H©tftM©M©©r©©eMtot-COCi
"Z
"ooffleo
OS t- N CO
Tt*Tt*tfCO--tfCOCOr«>t^rH'i-CO
CM to    :
COTfO©cOCT©eOCMt-HtftoMtfM
!           ">
0
Tt* CS O_co
COCS<nCDCDT-rHT^mt-Tt*r^CO
m h   :
©OOOH©©HCOr^©TfOHHrCM
3
H
©"tf 00"
t*"rlr©     i
C5C0C.                CO rH 00 rf* CO r 00
r- ©   :
QOCoroto©OCOH       HrnCDHHCTt-
Cl CJ CO
coo rs Tt*   :
l-CDCS                CDrH        rHCOtfOO
Tf © 00©         t-tH
rt co ro © tr- Is Tf*
*"'
rH        M     I
CO                                    M rH f Tt*
M*
h          eo          co
M            M
tr- 00 rH
t-rH
0  :
cor©cir©i>rotoeo
00
©  :
M
OOh- Tf
: rH
t-M Ifl to
CD 00 Cl
CS
m  :
Hcococor«icoiotfTfto
0
co   :
© © ©
: co
Ir- © tf CB
CO CTC.
■*
h 00 co •* ro rt 00 ro 0 o\
M
M    j
i> r to
i "*
© io in Tf
0
t-" as" h
Tj*"
M Ifl h" m" Ifl m" h" CM Tf" m"
«
CO tf" ©
©"ciifl ©*
p
Wt-CD CO
CO
©COtoHtfHlr-rco
OS
©   00   Tf
h M CM fc-
rt
00
Tf r cd M      l-      r Tf
CO-NO0
CO      rH
>
cs"« co"
r to
0"
rH
t- ifl ©"         m"         Cl"
CO CO ©            CO
©
t-"oo"co"
©
tH       ©"
u
.a
h"
0 in co
OS CO
x   ;
eoCTH©tfto«_ocDX
t>
cc   :
to
© ro t-
: to
©©CD ©
N
cd en >h
Tt*
0   ;
t-NCOHCMcOtoWO©
©
t-   :
rH
t~tf H
: to
CO M CM M
H CD ©_^
t-
to   :
CO CD H © CO^to O0 CD © ©
CO
t-   :
© tf H
: t~
00© CM ©
>>
to'r 00
t-"
CO* Ifl Tf" co" 0" © t-" r Ir-" ©"
©"
h   :
©" ro" t-*
i m"
CC Tf"tf"Tf
5
CC O CD
CD
©COtoClCDHTfCOHH
tH
© ro 00
: rH
M toffl 00
9
3
a
^ m in t-
O^
Tfh,©©r©cortto
tJ*
Cl tf H
eooo     h
ti i> tf" 0"
rH
H CM" © H         CC               Tf"
1- ui ©"
t-"     eo"
Tf  CO ©
CS
00 0 ci          co          m
CO CM Cl
Tf
Cl
h r to           eo
Tf
©"
rt
10 in co
CD COrH
co   :
t-coNwofflt-ooinTfto
l>
©   :
00
1- O M
: ©
M t- OOO
Tf CT ci
tf to M
cs  :
HMMtoCOCOrHO-CSCO
1C9
co   :
Tl*
© t*©
co© ro©
o«ci
tf COM
os   ;
Tt*<JJClCStfCDrHCDtot-
M
t-   :
U3
CO Ifl H
! rH
M toO ©
m'isqo"
00"
co"  :
rn co OTt* r>" to ci m" m" m"
00"
m"  :
m"
©"tf"H*
■ (-J"
H M' O ©"
WH 00M
CO
OOOOrHlflCOt-lflt-
Tf
© M H
©Or rt
rt
Tt*
M tf O M       00             to
t- tf t-
H       OS
>
rH       «
co"
00 O Cl            to"           m"
rH^ZD
eo"
2
m N cs          ci
©
OS r t-
|S 00CO
eo   :
COMr^MMOOrHh-OTt*
©
to   :
CO
to 10 h
: id
© ©O Tf
© CM rt
N CO 10
CSCDCDCOMI^MtotftoO
CD
t-   :
H
CC CO t-
:w
©© CM ec
£.
Ol ffl>*
t- CO CO
m   :
rHrHStoCSroOCOCDCOrH
rt
co   :
1A
co 01 cc
: **.
TfTf CD Tf
tJ*00O
CM t-"rt"
co" :
•I)? y_. rH CS" ^ rH Cl CT CO" t-"
00
©* i
M
CC <D CC
i 00*
H©" Ifl OS
1- 0 -
CD
m   :
t-CDt-rHQ0rHTt*OTf*rH
W3
©
t- in ©
iw
Tf m in 00
i
3
_q O CM tJ*
t-
H (15 ■* 03 N t-1* CT CS
IO
Tf   tf   t-
cm ©     ec
h" tr-" CO*" ©
co"
CO* 00 Tf*" rH       t-"           Tt*"
ONt-"
m"         ©"
a
M
t- O Cl            to            M
CO
Hr©          M
eo"
to
ITS O OS
CD rH O CD     I
IOCS tf CS
h© 0 m © r^ ©
ron   ;
H t- tf ©
©©ifltoccooTf©roH
Tf CO 00
CD CO tf rH     I
O O h_ Tt*
CD © O Tf H CO IO
in cd   ;
Tf   ©   tf   ©
© r-
r-©HO©tor©
u
tHUJOO
moo in w   :
CS to_ 0) rH
M to© to t- <f <o
0 co   ;
O CM_ H
H t-
>t*H©rtoHrTt*
3
©"ct fc-
01-" n" cd"  ■
to" Tf  00 Tl*"
t-" CD tf" ©*H 00 rt
oV"   ;
co r* 00
©"c
rcc©WtotoMCD
wOhiO
WTfHTjO
co i> ro m  :
co N co
© Tf 00 © CD O ©
CM Tf   ;
t-roo
COCCWtoHrocOMOOCO
>
rH OS tf M
oo r* in
eo h ro 00 © in to
ffl rH      j
© ro in
©cct-toTfroto©inTf
Tftf"©"
qo rH 0 10   ;
totfM"
00" tf" ©" h 00" 00"
r-"©" i
M"r"oo
rH r-
h hw © ec tf ©
rt co CO © CD CD©
tJ.
oi>o   ;
CO CO CO »
H
© 00 t-
u
<u
a
a
rH        M     I
H h r Tf
M
M            M
Tf ffl to
doifli-   :
00 X 00 OS
to t- O H cc 00 CO
0 ©   :
© to 00 M
toxinTfMcoootoin©
6
Tt* tf CS
co Tt* ro Tt*   ;
rt* eo qo t-
to I- IN QC Tf tf CO
ro Tt*   :
©t- CT CO
©TfroeceooOHcoCM©
>»
O Ol CO
cd^ Tt<_ 00 m   ;
to CO Ifl CD
Tf Tf CO to © r ©
ot-_  :
Tf to r to
Tf©(DTftoCMTft-CMec
■S
TptCb
i> cs" co co"   ;
t-"os"lfl co"
h" t-" n" ©" cc h." to"
tyt-^  i
©*00 to"
toooOtoooro-ifH CD©"
c
■ CS tf ©
r- i-h ct Tt*
toco CM cs
t-QOr to Tf CO t-
00 h   :
H h- ©
rHO
rcOTftfCD©00H
rt
3 ci 0 ci
i> to t- oo   :
O tf t-
H t- tf © to hi »o
0 ©   :
© Ifl t~
a ir
r©t-lfl©ooooco
3
tO tfl  rf
rt* m ro Tt*   :
t-tf 10
H C. IN t-COO Cl
00 ©   :
© CO to
Tf r-
^Tfl-_^CS©rTf
00
MClht-
t- to CD Tf
ci   :
H 00 CO
Cl eo IO Ci t- 00 h
rH       M     !
to h r t-
H            Tf
to         co
IO 00 CO
hOi-hcO    !
t-OOtfr-llMCDrHt-COt-OT-M
: cd   :
to Tf h-i M cc w Tt*
: ©
ci t~- r-> Tf
QO t- rH
CT m io r Tt*   ;
coosT-ooJOOcstfeotolrco
h   :
cc CO CM © H 00 Tf
;m
COM tf rt
CJ
CD tf 00
00 to co CM cs    :
MMffltoCOfr-torHOtoO-N©
Tf   :
©_ ©_ CM t~_ Tf «_ CO
: t-
©_M_CMTf
3
t£ T" CD
com"    tf"co"  i
Tt*" CO" CJ CD" rH OJ rH rH ffi CC Cs"c»0"
h   i
©* Tf r CO 00" tf" co
i tr-"
to" ©"CM"©"
"^
«©Tf CS   CO
0     tf to   :
rHTt*00toTt*tftorHC0O:CO00t-
H Tt* 00 00 © O ©
co Tf in ©
>
co ro iq
cs     co t-   :
rHC0t-Cl         HH-hHTOOH
c- 00 0 to to tf co
H MOO to
H
U
>
TA
co' ct" cf
m*               :
00 00 CO               VrH T-t- rH CM b-"
cs                       eo
r •<**"         co"
H        H
rH COrH
in rH csin cs   :
cDCSMt-coroiDt-CMCDeot-©
tr-    :
t-Tf W h h r co
: ©
CC CO © 00
CO
>,
CD h- rH
h> rH CO CO Tt*     ;
coectfCscocOtorHiflcDcsOCl
00  :
© © tf   Tf M O Tf
to © tf ©
CO r ©
in t- rn tf^ 10   :
toMtfOrHOOt-CSOOTt*OCO
°» i
cs © r © h w rt
: h
Tf   M_ tf_ ©^
rt
N co" 00 Cl
f   OO            1"*   Tt*
rH*toinCOTt*OCSCs"NrHCOCMCD"
h"   '.
t-" CC Ifl rt CO tf M*
! to*
©" ro in ©"
nOtJO
w»h"0
t-    cm t-   :
COtr-OCOCST-ClTfffitoCOinCJ
cCMnciClht-
tr- 00 ro ©
3
co    r m   :
t-h r^ ci        Tt* to rt m to in cs
© CO W © H       CO
MTf r CO
a
H      itl"
co"
co"i-oo           Tt*           co           m"
Tj*                                                   Tf*
M
m"          ©"
H
C CD ©
tf CD
co   :
CC to in r-i CO
00 to in to to r ©
©   1
h t- tf t- Tf r M
; ©
O HM Is©
M Is H
in co
cs   :
NNMt-t-
© M 00 t- M tf CO
m  ;
co co r M co tf to
; t-
CM HM tf CO
u
00 (P OD
T-00
m   :
CO rH CD Tf t-
© rf CO© CO h- ©
h   :
© © tf tr- H CD ©
: eo
0 rf Tf r* ©
3
—co" tj.
cd"
t-"  i
fc-^H   N   Tt*   Tf"
Tf ©"cmoo'thcth
Tt*   i
CO* CC CD to" CO 01 rH
i Tf
Is M* t-" co ©*
"rt
>
«_>t-r O
M
Tt*   :
M M t- Tt*
h t- in t- t-r eo
to M 00© M r Tf
: h
tf CO CO N ©
2
rt ©to
'"i
co   :
00 CM 011-
t-. 55 ©    w so
nnhO           ©
: h
CO M CD ©
"3
cicj os"
m"
co"  ;
rt r to"         ci
t-" to CD m"          M*
tj* rs ©"
O
0
•a
rH
H
Tt*      !
CO
Tf                      M                      Tf
H
CO eo O
t-CO
rn   :
00 0) © CS
© I- !«■ H CO 00 Cl
Tf        !
QC M O Tf 00 CM M
: m
tf to © ron
0
£.
Cl 00 Cl
0
to   ;
cs t- in cc Tf
© © 00 © © O l>
© to r © co r ec
: t-
ro m © 0 ©
_)
CO tf <M
rH
c*   :
co m ro 10
CC M CT CO t- CM Tf
h   :
to © t^WCI r CO^
i "*
CM M to©©
q
ij ciin t>
Tt*"
m" :
co" Cl r m"
00 O CO     r co"
to" ci r Cl"           rH
: Tt*
©"cOCDt-"
rt
Onr »-i
T*
0   :
M              rH
r-l ^ tD             ©
00 to tf t-         Tf
rt Tj* tf ©
3
tJI
CO
m   :
CO
H              CC             CO_
a
H"  :
W'
<4                               H
1
3
D
CO tf -" d"
tf H-) co ^ +J eo fl
-t^eotf+jcotf-tjco^-^co^+jc
tf +J CO tf
a;            a)            a
+_>cotf+jectf+jec
<t-2cctf-£eotf+j
"
t-N-Sts
Is 31- h* *2 t- Is
d^-r^rt|>j>rft_^_,di>h,rtt-
t* i§ t-N
2 t-N.2 l>hi t-
~©ro w©ro w©
|s_5t-N_gt-Nrf
i
os ro ^ ©
m^C-ffl ° © ro
^©ro ^©ro^oro ^©m^3©
ro ° © ro
ro^ttro"2©© v
!         c
Hr   Or
r  OHr  OHr
OHr OHr Onr OHr Or-
r 0 h r
OHr OHr Ch
r Onr OHr O
k
Eh
EH          H
H          EH          H          EH          EH
Eh
Eh           H           EH
EH           EH           H
1
>
3
3
a
t:
a
p
1
I
5
'I
a
_£
c
c
c
1
fl
qj
to         §
■*"        x
I
9          r_3          t3
__        S        f
a.
0
0
C
j
e
c
c
a
*
ti
"c
0
.9
a         a
0            0            fi            ra           ,S
aS
<D               9
s
<
-fl
c
O
t-
O
c
h.
H
J5
K
z
K
C
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS
A 105
© tf *c c-
r
HTf C
ricDooMecx©©r*©©ooco©
; tr- t-
IT
H H h> ©
cc O X
tr-roTfCC00O©Oc000rtr-00OTf©CMC0C0rocDTt
: m © in Tf h r ©
©COH
©CTHtorHOOr©t-00eCtofflTfM©©cor-©c
: h © cm ec Tf ro ©
M r tr
»rstr-corotr-cDin©Tfn©©tfTt*HinMtoinMTt
: ©"h in hh"cmm*
ee O m
--©tf©COCTCOMtfHHC0eCCCroO0©CMCl©©H
"oOtfTf             HCOCO t-M tf M © CM CC       r©TfmcO
: m © in ©to in ©
h in tr
: cc t- cs© to oo co
ials ©
CO rs ©              rt t-m © © O t-H r H             CO M 00 CD
;     cc ro Tf co tf ©
coO Tf"
MCM©            rt CO CT ©©© rH            tr-            00 rt      ©
:            m        ci
H |s CO
rH                               M             Tf             M                               M
:                       N
t- ©©
©"
to in t-eceo rt co
Q0X©t-t-CMt-Mtft-
|S COr-
: Tf
co Tf m 10
HC0X
oo O oo co tf ci to
toMOco©ojooccin©
OOt-Ci
: co
M t- 00 to
torn co
t- ro Tf ©©_m
MHCM©©C0TfTflflOO
COTf
: *f
©©O to
tr- Is©
CO ©"m"t-CD
to           h h" © ©" ©" r ©
CO
ics
co'm'os©"
TfCM*"©*
«r       M       rt
■* toCM tortr co
tr-
XTf m co
© 00 to
CO
to_M « ec
©
MTf tf   t-
10 in ©
CO*
m"         ©"
©"
to"eM©"
ci ro x"
©
eo
to
© Ifl o
1-1
1-1
©
© © to t- tf tr- t-
to©rocot-tfMMOOTf
00 co o-
: h
© h ro cc
h ro ©
© m © co ffl to to
toH00M©OCD©CMtr-
CM CO c
: ci
©   Tf   O   Tf
CC CO tr-
t- tf M © © I- M
Tf©mtoTftft-torCD
|s_© O
i "*.
[-_ © in h
CO tf X
eo" in oo" m tf Tt*"
©       ©" io in rf* ©" o co"
rM_
i ©"
x" ^ ro ©"
Tf"tf"©'
r  toH          Tf
co           © rt CO to to ifl Tf
Tf
: ©
©Tf r ©
t- Is ©
-d         w         1
H M Is LO             M
00
to ec CM ©
CO CO H
r-1                                    l-
t-H       m"
oo"
co ©* rs ©"
cir ©"
M
h          to
CO
M      t-
©Is©
©
M
Tf
Mr ■*
to"
© O to to CM ©©
Ir-HOOMHNM©©©
©C-
:t-
co^-© ©
©©M
© 00 ©© 00 tr- to
COCOtfOOCOOTf©tf©
: »o
TfTf m ©
Mr ©
coin ©© © eoM
HCO       t-CO Is M Tf CO CO
in*
jlO
co © in oo
© OTf
M*r ©■*CM to*
to"        co"©"ox"ccrs Tf"
CO*
isf"
©* """1,0 M*
t- CO ©"
«B          t-      r t-
**                               00
H             CC to O ©             M
CO
; m
rt© CO 00
t- CO to
Tf M CM CO
CO
co CM to
Tf CO CO
co"
w"         tr-"
©
H
N.     oo"
TH          Tf
30.
23
1,465,
1
rt 00© t-r© oo
t-MtfTfCOOtocOOM
t- Tt
: ©
t-^m rH
© r ©
co rs tr- Tf ro Tf ec
ccTfWM©coHcoin©
Cl c
; cc
©©O to
MhH
rH tf_Tf © C0 © to
©COCMCOHiflcOMO©
©_Cf
: h
© rt CM co
Tt* ro h
Tf* oo m"x"o ©" H*
co" m"    co" t-" ro" m" h" ui co"
©V
isf"
o*°°in©*
M r oo"
tH          ©M © ©
©          ©ccrcoMtfH
tr-
: ©
H© O X
to r to
^               to               rH
co          © to 00 eo           M
to
: h
M© CM M
H 00_M
r-}                     ©"
©" H      ©"
CO
^-rec"
t-r ©"
CO
©           M
t-     cc
—     to
X CM X
h r to
©*
H
Tf ffl M
t- ©ro CO M tf M
H
Tf © 00 t-
: © t- eo h co tf co
rt CO H
© in co
cc o m t- © in ©
©
©rt tf rH
: © coin© © tf co
to r M
M 0_M
© tr- Is M © Is©
00
Tf   ©   O©
: h Tf co_H h in cc
M^ffl   Tf
to" Is"©"
H t- © GO M* CD ©"
rH
to" t> CO Tf*
I       Tf" CM m" h r Tf"
eotf'tr-*
„ to CM CO
to to m co co r t-
Tf eo Is©
;    a. in © h rs h
© tf ©
X CD©
^co 00_to
h CM to © CO to
Cl M o ©
:    to is to ©    m
t-"tf"©"
Tf tf"x*M CD rt"
cc"cf oo"m"
;     cc" ro m"         to"
M*r ©*
M CM ©
CC rt CO © Ifl ©
T-H                      M
rHrH       Tf
M
M            H
X tf t-
to in to
M*	
to CM ec
© CO 00 © © ffl OO
Ct
Cl Tf |n CO
; Tf QC |S © M tf ©
X 00©
Tf rt ©
co © is © Tf oo ec
©
COTf O ©
: to to is co Tf ro co
co co to
M CD ©
© H CM t- M CM H
©
t-© in co
:© Tf oo © t-<o ©
to o to
©" rs rt
cc" co" tf" H cs" co co"
eo"
rH H r CO*
i    ©* oo ec rf ro oo"
x'co Tf"
_r.©0©
3 ■*").©
to CON © © O M
rH
© © 00 CO
© r M © 00 rt
© CO Tf
H© ©© CD tf 00
to ir-00 rt
;     cc tf to ©     ©
H ffl Tf
CO ffl ©
rt OS M to IS ©
ci ■** m" r-
-f tf to H       CD
o"co h"
COM ©
Tf « © Ir- © tr-
M rt      rH
:              ©          to
©   CO   Tf
l>            ©
rt"
L-CDCO
©"
©©©Tf©COCDCMClcOOrtMOOtr-MfflTfTfCM©t-
: tr- © CM Tl* —■ Is ©
i- in >-
©rs©©inooTfCM©TfroMQoiscc©inTfrtrrHc
; M © ifl co co ifl t-
© © H
coroooTfoOTftors©torcccoftiM©roeooorscotr-
1 t-tr- CM rH © CO tr-
© CO X
t-oo©TfooMcc©tocDoooo©rstr-©rocccoro©r-
; Tf io oo co*ia, oo ©"
Cl O to
•>©00©MrrtCCCMtortrst-CO©rtrt|s©toro©
: h m tf toco © h
to tf to
©rooo        cocctnto©©cotoisrH        Mcieoto
roo*          Cl"          eCrtCMrt"          tr-"          M*          Tf
: h
© Tf h. to
to tf ©
M-rX
©   00   Tf
to               IO
rH   CM   Cl
;               ■—'
Tf
corsOcctfTf_cWeOrt©tocor-r-co©cciorrHCi'
: h to « © -^ r Tf
; h h © cd io ro t-
© O tr
t— tfrHcorTfMtftoTfhitortOcccitfTftoCTcit-
ee in X
©roMtoisto©©©ooCTrH©eMi-^rsMooooooc:
:oooH*t-hc
Tf   IS   ©
[j©inrtC!tfeortroto©ocD©rsiot~rsc:©roTf
itoc'CM't-'^.rl-"
©" r" m"
^ © r M            MCCOciTf©0CO'*Tt*      r©©©rt
^Mtfci           rtrtrtot-©©MrM           cdh      ©
: cd h r Tf co © t-
h tf M
i              © m rt ©
© 00 M
Tf             Tf             Tf              m             oo             co             to
:                 !f3.    eo
t-"in «
l-           t-
IO
©tfccrtOrt(__;rCDMO©ccrM©00CD
r © cc
: © © o to ---ifl io
X«M
00_st-MOQ0©00©c0CMMtoOMTf©Tf
in Tf Tt
: © cd in co© is ©
© 00 CO
Mtftotr-0©Ccmcirt©cCt-©©MCM©
<Dr*<Z
: cc oo © cc © is co
M O rt
©©MCD©rt©rO]toXrtrt        ©CO©©
ro toe
; ©" h" tf" m" °_ cm x"
tr- ro ©
€^©CMTf               X M © to © CO ©               rtMCM©
00 CO
: oo © ifl co m w co
r-i^O
CO©©            ©comtocotftr-            to            Tf
Cl
: H      r M M CO tr-
rt Is t-
Cl           rt m tf Tf rt r to                         ec
©"
:            h w
x'CDx"
to                                    rt               CD                                    ©
|H
rHtslia
to
rt©ci©0©toCMCDTf|siMcctf©©rt©
CMTf r-
: Tf co r © >--. ro co
© r M
©rsTf©tf©torooorttftorH    m©©©
m t-c
: o Tf « co© tf ©
X ffl ©
t-00©            Tf©CMt-©NcO            M M r Tf
in©
: co © o h cc © io
© rs ©
JS cc" CO H            l~" ©" 10 Cl Tf" r oo"           t-"           to"
©"
; to"     rVc!siH
to" O ©*
C           co           coMCMtoHrco           h           co
©
!                 Tf M      M
X© X
©                                    M                Tf                                    ©
to
*—
rHy-lCl
H                                                 M*                               M*
H
qj              qj              ci              QJ              o              CJ              QJ
COtfH-'CCtf+JCCtf+J©fl'-^'COtf-4JCCtf-uCC«*+J0'
tf+JCOtf-t^COtf+:'
 .    QJ
M tf +f
t-Nr^t-Ni5t-NiSt-rsrtt-|>1«i-h.rtl_i>,rtt-
Is _g t- |s  <* |> N  «
t-|s_2
©ro"3©ro^©roT;©ror=©ro^©mn:,©ffl"clc
ffl"3©©^©©^
©ro^
rtr onr onr onr OHr Onr o h r Or-
r onr O Hi" C
Hr O
tH          EH          EH          EH          EH          H          EH
H           EH           EH
EH
i      3
a.            oj
jx          d
c           c-
S            o
soyoo;
evelst
imilkit
keen a.
locan.
rail C
ancon
ictori;
ot ass
C
PS
EC
V.
a
_-
>
r*
Y.
B3
0
i)
d
>
c
u
rf,
:
7,
H
fi
 A 106
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
a
o
E-.
"g
s
Tr"
lx
Os
~<
T3
K
<3
<*.
r-v
On
>-i
s
0
:g
2
00
S
§
p.
-a
a
o
w
s
'—a
o
^_
s_:
•2
o
3
I
8
rt
3
O
O
a
o
3
•a
>
«•
in
CS
Is;
in
: ■*
:©
: co
I rH
: ■*
cs
to
©*
©
<*
©"
1
a
a
S
fr-
00
©
©
rH
! rH
: ec
:m_
i ©"
M
©
X
©"
to
Tf
8
i
§
a
>
«r>
^ _*
3 5
a
o
CA
i>
rt
u
c
a
0
G
O
U
fl
o
o
3
•a
>
«ft
rt
rt
fc»
Tf
CO
©
05
© CM X
t- © io
©^CM_Tf
©"o"to"
© 00 to
rt       rt
Tf
00
IO
©
© oo X
© O M
M_tf_rH
Tf" rr"©"
© CT ©
X r X
MOT Tf*
Tf
<X)(DrH
M © t~
Tf tf M_
©"CM Tf"
© m m
©h. t-
m"
■a
3
a
fl
O
IH
t-
00
M
ro
fr- O©
© CM©
M 00 rt
•*00 Tf
rH        fc-
CO
t-
©
Cl
t-in ©
fr-O X
to w m
©"©Tf
rHt eo
toCT fr-_
©"
© o ©
©CO t-
tr-r eo
x" CM rt
CO tf ©
—
i
o
6
>
6©
:©
; ©
: ©
in
cs
CO
CC
__ _.
3'J3
a
c
o
EH
: ©
; m
: rH
o
©
e
3
J
c.
U
3
73
>
to 00©
© 00 to
,-Tf~ro co
WXCM©
to CM H
m"
M
O
t-
rH
CO
IO
Cl
to
©
©CCOMMCDfr-fr-
XCC00M©©TfM
Tfto©rtXtft-M
Tf"©*       t-*Tf*tf"x"
© M       ©             ©
©             r-i             rH
©"              tH
tr-
ro
COO M
X»Tf
© CM tr-
MhTto"
Tf  00 Tf
© tf ©_
©*
M© M
MNTf
rH CO M
Tf"r x"
to       M
CD
•3
3
3
a
m in ©
©ro x
t- 0)00
Hi©"©'*
P© in ©
rt   ©
M
Cl
©"
ro
CO
M
O
©"
00
CO
torttf©TfC0toto
©TftfMTfCMrt©
to © © rtM CM fr-
©* to"      M* rt r fr^
©           ©           free          to
M*
X
1-i
© N ©
M CM M
M tf Tf
© rs eo"
to (0 M
M r CD
x"
© CM©
© tf ©
OCl tf rH
Tf        OO
rH       ©
M
5
3
1
«
3
•a
>
e*
-
§
3
a
rQ
s
o
a
q
<
o
a
>
«fc
CD
©
©
tJ*T
:m
: w
M
X
X
M
•3
3
a
rt
Cl
©
o
©
Tit
:©
:©
|Tf
;m"
M
X
CO
x"
rH
•a
o
u
o
a,
oajQ)CJC3ocJiiJ<i)o©<_jfljaJ©
MtfrtM*^MtfHJMtfrtMtf^Mtfrtectf^Mtf^M^^M*+JMtf^eCtf+->ec*---'MtfrtectfH->
tr-|s_2t-rs_wt-^di-h,rtt-|si5l>t>,cd[, ^rtl_.^rti>|sldi>f*dI>,^rti>f,rtt_h,tst^|s,d|>r>,rt
©ro^©ro"a©CT^©ro"3©m^©m"3©m^©ro^©ro^©ffl^©ro"=©rord©©^«o.^c:ro^
rH^ OHr OrHr Ortr Ortr Ortr Ortr OHr OHr OHr O rH r OrHr Ortr Ortr O rt ^ o
H          EH         H          H          H          H          EH     *B          EH          EH          EH          H          EH          EH          H
i
0
>
3
i
■<
z
-
-
i
p
o
p
a
c
f
"r
c
c
--
r
c
c
i
2
5
c
c
5
p.
0
P
C
~z
y
a
z.
j
a.
Is
"p
a
c
a
P
i
c
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS
A 107
00
to
M
t-
Tf
Tf
©"
"©
H
H
fr-
rH
Tf
-
©
rt
GO
00
o
in
Tt*;"
Cl
X
©
©
m"
M
©
rt
Tf
C-
©
T-'
Tf
M
t-
rH
Ci^rH
© ©©
M O ©
x"CM©"
© CO©
M Is fr-
x'« m"
X
Cl
cs
rors io
© CM Tf
© CM M
©"cm m"
©tf H
©r* m
M'eM Tf"
rt r ©
M
Tf   ©Tf
© © M
© r X
to* CO CO
© tf   Tf
©OTf
r ©"
©
to
to
1,565,467
1,440,651
32,498,214
to
©
M.
m"
M
CD
©
ir-
Cl
©
rH
©
fr
316,764
24,290
23,481
5,772,797
o
r-i
M
«
Cl
ro
M
©
M
Cl
CO
to
10,929
(86,905)
784,944
38,361,286
zz
V
0
tc
c
©
t-
fr-
c
a
© ©
©H
OO
OJ m"
rox
in io
r ©"
X
et
©
eo"
o
141,890
6,673
4,811
2,699,751
in
rH
rH
©
©
©
©
to
o
©
© — O
© to CM
© c-in
CO CM
M CM
©
©
©
M*
©
to
Tf
M
X
M
M
1st
to
to
CM to
© H
O fr-
cj"©"
ro ©
tf M
M*
Tf
X r
i- ts
©is
CO o
rt8
13,058
680,771
15,157,228
rt O tr-
to CM ©
X CO©
Ol"^ ©
|s CS
©
©*
HO l-
to CM ©
X CT ©
M tf ©
Is CS
©
cd"
to
in
eo"
CO
w
00
CC Is
rt ro
rt 00
ci'ro
© ts
r-  CC
rH
fr-
»
T-i
co"
©
to
©
X
Tf
Tf
O
to
in"
to
1,192,118
879,897
19,615,884
©
eo
©"
to
©
X
r-.
M
rtOC
cc tf
CC Is
© fr"
w     GO
© tf
r-.
1973 1   1,660,331
1974 |       487,748
To date    [55,717,587
MtfjJM^-t-?cc^rtCOtf-^CO'*-H>Mtf+JMtf-tJMtf-£M«d
r-N^t-ls^t-lsrtt^r^rtt-S^^rsrt,, iN^l-lN^t-i*.
csro~©m °©ro ° © m -©ro ° © ro ^©©^©©^cs©
t->r ortr,Cnr Ortr Ortr Ortr Ortr OHr onr
EH           H           H           Eh           H           H           EH           H
To date
1973
1974
To date
c
o
c
—
c
a
£
zZ
'=
X
zc
CO
X
C
a
U
rt
£
o
c
5
C
a
c
b
0
o
C
_-
p* p
ci
i- rt
33 i
 A 108
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
S^
©   ©Tf
to 00 rt
©OOM
TffflX*
s*X CM M
to CM fr-
MX CT fr-
M Mr Tf
rH H CM ©_^
m"io"o m"
©x h- ©
to t- cox
©©WMMOCOMCDMTfrTf
©MrTfM0OM©fflTf©^.©
©Tfrtoto©©Xtfrtt-into
©*rfr*"©"      M'Tftf ©"to" COM"
© CO to M      X © © ffl Tf
X©M th MXIsX
h"    m"       h" Tfin©"
©©00fr-toOfr-to©tox©rtfr-i
©HO©Tf«©ccO©MWtr-ccr
©H00M©CM©©tf©TftfMC^-
Tftfoo'to      MMOJM m" to" c
© to M (
u
3
.g
c
o
o
a
"*3
c
«
tP
*-H
0\
■2
•3
S
-c_
"3
"3
o
S
o
O
ft
o>
to CT to
M ifl h
Tt*"0©~
toO Tf
co©©_
x"
MCM©
X 00 ©
t-iq m
©"ifl h"
X© ©
Hr ci
©"
>
a
■3
M ©  Tf
CO O to
M tf fr-
tor X
tr-lfl ©
t-CO ©
M tf M
tr- CO t-
Tf CM M
t-" 00* H
too x
X Is M
t- ro x
M Is tr-
to Ifl to
to" CD©"
©©Tf
x rs t-
Tf" in©*
OOO©
tJ* M O©
Tt*X_tf_M
M" M." CD rt"
X CM ©
©rrn
to © H
CC O M
to O to
toCM M
MOM
to CM tr-_
to Is ©"
XCO rt
m m Tf
m"ct t-"
© ©   O   Tf
© o o CC
Tf io in m
rH ©" |s" CO
l>© X
© CM to
r m"
Tf io t-
H tf ©
t-_00 to
to© ©"
Mr to
■h oq_eo
to'efx"
M COM
M
© r M
rH OM
to_ OO^Tf
Tfiflco
MO to
H O©
Tf CDx"
t-i
, «.
©
a>
. CC * +^ -O «tf   .
CO^+-M*+-CC^+JCO*4-C0^4-0.^+-CO^^__-«+;p-^^0.«+^fQ^+-CO^-*2CO^,'
t-r^_3^-h"i2t-^^^-N^t-N^t^Nrf_-h.^t-hi<=t-l>.^r_hiJ3t-h.^i-l-^l-l>«i.i_..^;._._-.
a>ai'aaa>'acaavc>a^aai^a-.isivcjia^aa^c'.m^c-.avam^aa>v'^avc-.aivcr,is>'°
r* r OHr OHr Onr o H r onr OHr OHrPrtr O r. T" O r. r Onr Onr OHr OHr o
_. _. _.EhHHHBH-H_H-HEh_h_h
<
c
c
c
+-
e
C
c
fc.
1
c
£
c
c
1
i
rr
*
1
c
|
c
o
a.
2
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS
A 109
19,591,463
15,003,913
71,610,538
450,847
fr"
r-l.
QC
c:
in
cc
rt
129,186
8,268,369
8,732,091
120,751,673
24,290
23,481
5,789,090
CO
O
o
to
Ifi
CD
cc
Cl
cc
cc
©
M
M
eo
©
e
35,437
5,523,124
7,383,619
125,385,920
81,789,869
84,542,199
988,017,141
CO
©   :
x   :
CO     j
M 00 ©
M CO M
© r rt
rt"oo"rt*
© 00 rt
h tf_to
Tf" tf" H
to
4,279,326
4,488,138
51,977,654
fr-
X
©
in
H
m   :
M    i
4
-i
eo-.
o
©
o
x"
CD
©^
x"
Tf
Tf
X
t-
t-"
©   :
©
CO
o
c
00
H
H
X
M
H
©"
Tf
©_
©"
M
© © ©
cc © ©
© 00_t-
m"©"m"
Tf   tf   ©
M Ifl t-
597,265
1,150,722
18,842,214
Tf   ©   CO
Tf h. m
© tf Tf
M r to"
m in t-
H r M
304,727
317,061
19,476,813
©
X
OS
M
ri
t-
H
X
©
©
to
M
H
L-
X
M
rH
eo
to
fr-
©
Tf
©
©
eo
Ct
CD
Tf
©"
M
:©
rt
t-
©
3,775,232
2,351,406
51,698,754
2,467,472
1,518,234
51,451,273
19,591,463
15,003,913
71,610,538
450,847
:co
: t-
:in
:i>
:©
Irt
JTf
X
X
CM
CJ
CO
l>
CO
: ©
: x
:m
!•*
im
:©"
: ©
: ©
: in
; »
owo
© ^ OO
ire ci oo
h cc ire
ire r o.
OChH
riot-'
ire CD cs
OO
11,105,912
7,086,707
42,794,121
301,471
: x
: x
!©
i in"
: ci
:©
;m
X
; to
H*
'. X
;©
:m
:m
: cc
: ©
! rH
: ■*"
IT*
: ©
: co"
: rt
i "t.
iin
1973 t   30,391,463
1974 j   30,426,216
To date    1230,378,921
1
.     ®                   QJ                    QJ                    fl)                    QJ                    <D                    OJ                    CJ                    O                    ID
MtfrtMtf+->Mtf+J«tfrtcOtfrtMtf--->cCtf--->COtfH-1Mtf-t-1Mtf-t->
fr-|s_2fr-is^t>rs^t>rs_2i--srft>is^i-is^i>rsi3i>isrt(^f_,K
©©"=©ffl^©©'^©©'c'©©'^©ron=i©ro"d©roT:!©ro':'©roT=
rHT-prH^prHr   Ortr   OHr   OHr   OrHr   OHr   OHr   Ortr   O
EHEHEHEHEHEHEHEhBH
(
c
>
c
c
c
7
3
et
r-t
a
X
i
d
£■
J
<
c
c
>
:
z
c
>
t
i
c
J?
1
co      as
<m   ,
oco<
rt ^*. tso
G  rt    „
1 n§
&
"3
Sou
Sow
H   M   »
 A 110 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
Table 7D—Production of Industrial Minerals by
Division
Period
Asbestos
Baritel
Diatomite
Fluxes (Quartz
and Limestone)
Granules (Quartz,
Limestone, and
Granite)
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
Tons
$
Tons
$
Tons
$
Tons
$
Tons
	
$
	
	
	
565
1,756
14,064
9,526
32,600
333,921
48
168
8
80
439,150
4,489,227
3,259
12,612
 I	
1,790,502
1,540,319
200
4,000
625
12,230
108,966
91.936
21,102,892
27.398.900
1.319.0341266.604.484
42,986
37,958
1,018,394
75,476
205.764
3.068
61.903
1291         2.600
1.701.3931   26.0061    459.702
26,799|    719,592
30,0611    947,024
139.49613.820.969
7,601
8.174
 |	
 1	
109,669 1,611,625
31             286
361         2,410
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
	
39!         2.696
4,283
4,548
207,929
73,678
73,581
802,611
3,699,031
2,628,739
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
601,019
1,050,722
29,692
168
418,606
3,200
30,400
2,184
To date
3,200
42
18
289
30,400
495
285
3,345
1,800
53,684
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
9,605
157,080
	
	
1973
1974
To date
108,9661   21,102,892
91.9361   27.398.900
565
1,756
14,064
9,526
32,600
333,921
46,228
37,976
4,226,875
106,3711   34,321(    857,643
206.0491   34.77411.025.615
1,319,034
266,604,484
439,158
4,489,307
8,045,996
525,109
9,169,499
1 From 1972, excludes production which is confidential.
Other: See notes of individual minerals listed alphabetically on pages A 81 to A 91.
2 Natro-alunite.
3 Hydromagnesite.
4 Volcanic ash.
5 Magnesium sulphate.
0 Sodium carbonate.
7 Phosphate rock.
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS A 111
Mining Divisions, 1973 and 1974, and Total to Date
Gypsum and
Gypsite
Jade
Mica
Sulphur
Other,
Value
Division
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Total
Tons
$
Lb.
$
Lb.
$
Tons
$
$
$
1
9,3982
20,3253
20,325
9,526
32,600
10,013,800
143,012
3004
873
6,236
89,007
63,096
1,301,235
1,335,105
836,022
21,334,013
1,335,105
836,022
21,649,811
1,114,009
1,412,157
1R 839 741
	
298,824
1,114,009
1.412.157
16,8947
365 249
441.299
	
A 961   62..!. 2 329.626
 „_:_.:      \ — ' ...
783,57810         1     2,327,897
1,246,918
6,323,178
424,700
2,075
	
3,444
1,838
60,579
28,050
4,793
3,211
73,011
7,200
60,661
59,274
932,042
356,777
835,683
17,079,615
21,464,462
28,237,794
283,757,110
7,200
	
	
558,634
467,966
5,1299
473,095
208,364
 1 1	
	
947,024
55,9018
1,611,625
2,407
10,050
10,050
295,101
17,812
761,820
73,678
73,581
122,757
5,900
560,655
294,815
15,402
747,664
11,46011 12
 1	
::;::::;::;:::.:i	
 i	
1,588,800
25,938
 i	
                       1
250|            1,700
 1	
16,85813
18,558
 |	
 |	
 |	
,.|	
634,2501   10,815
 |	
41,624
178,678
1,240,215
 I	
 |	
 |	
 |	
 1	
687,596
6,550,969
 1	
 1	
32,584
 |	
 |	
 |	
160.5001      3.978
88,062
 |	
 |	
 |	
30,2269
285,028
190,651
2,780,533
 |	
166,367
105.419
2,495,505
1.396.802
 |	
 |      	
 |	
 |   	
5,462,9611  62,100,649
803,714             |  62,904,363
365,2491   1,114.0091    154,251
306,808
18,613
316,0351     4,187,387
227.7891      3.068.507
285,028
513,773
2,518,227
27,969,664
33,676,214
441.2991   1.412.1571          7.738
  	
 |	
5,624,949
18,969,614
11,169,868
1
1,288,641
12,822,0501185,818
1
8,425,458
107,243,924
418,849,431
8 Iron oxide and ochre.
9 Talc.
19 Fluorspar.
11 Arsenious oxide.
12 Perlite.
13 Bentonite.
 A 112
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
Table 7E—Production of Structural Materials by Mining Divisions, 1973 and 1974,
and Total to Date
Division
Period
Cement
Lime and
Limestone
Building-
stone
Rubble,
Riprap,
and
Crushed
Rock
Sand and
Gravel
Clay
Products
Unclassified
Material
Division
Total
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
1973
1974
To date
t
*
$
$
6,136
867
346,513
$
263,641
425,549
4,638,380
$
$
$
269,777
426,416
4,984,899
Atlin	
1,108
235,229
489,237
1,738,260
102,453
350,433
607,890
3,914,718
70,124
5,247
1,859,156
49,260
144,503
2,770,092
36,723
234,680
2,672,090
2,069,738
24,150,246
195,440
132,301
2,119,442
499,838
366,185
7,324,345
100,648
172,470
3,456,050
140,114
301,362
2,047,481
1,453,023
1,148,604
15,671,003
1,100,474
1,463,916
12,873,082
54,214
78.446
2,312,515
1,697,781
1,448,989
12,452,265
424,200
338,012
6,511,135
11,921,903
10,470,813
104,906,975
130,386
183,544
2,032,590
688,002
703,585
11,904,990
384,547
236,698
4,041,979
236,854
172,336
2,797,355
90,986
26,486
3,633,117
1,741,428
1,524,011
15,205,1819
218,135
133,020
2,122,827
51,100
38,018
3,187,732
4,832,852
6,483,145
58,735,826
955,658
1,350,099
9,466,733
2,267,915
3,689,587
31,750,337
3,258,355
2,654,432
39,518,854
338,241
3,257,752
3,166,865
332,457
30,135,681
265,564
137,548
3,978,598
549,098
510,688
43,873
71,941
15,918
7,585
10,226,769
144,956
172,470
1,000
50,840
13,800
8,884
161,020
245,663
128,159
3,881,712
153,914
310,246
42,560
278,474
602,509
1,241,695
11,233,853
256,097
89,558
1,801,159
33,495
121,283
2,650,818
3,823,520
4,915,944
14,737,968
5,879,052
7,306,243
25,067
19,800
72,379
41,760,070
1,356,571
1,553,474
14,674,241
87,709
78,446
100
2,976.915
3,359,771
58,249,240
293,802
345,546
1,367,185
102,523
76,000
3,394,910
2,000
1,100,403
397,390
649,211
3,706,899
3,172
28,680
577,971
1,515,500
2,318,484
20,302,781
3,415,018
5,072,086
5,457,971
3,450,735
2,448
2,926
436,938
1,178,992
79,038,131
723,622
715,164
21,974
5,189,218
6,044,472
83,953,685
8,915,203
18,729,144
18,909,769
20,974
212,579,325
130,386
240
187,994
119,450
1 21,738
2,532,012
17,685
16,592
355,349
66,644
176,807
757,028
183,784
8,000
2,228,584
3,575
4,706
20,748
811,027
5,274
14,463,024
402,232
253,290
43,774
33,018
5,200
8,520
19,295
4,474,120
308,698
357,663
1,000
3,574,678
90,986
450
657,297
59,615
277,032
3,595,758
20,457
5,263
157,323
2,400
26,936
10,500
11,571
24,000
13,355
4,349,840
1,801,043
1,801,043
1,645,300
144,000
13,249
20,603,496
238,592
138,283
1,000
115,143
2,396,293
53,506
38,018
32,500
85,520
381,393
466,271
19,522
8,679,115
3,687,145
Vancouver	
6,619,264
7,162,302
86,809,184
11,918,387
13,664,969
40,885
4,012,560
1,088,592
159 366,162
955,658
9,245
403,649
8,200
2,195
530,438
78,448
1,359,344
46,499
21,826
22,287
1,010,798
97,852
161,254
303,487
570,656
10,855,136
10,175,987
14,492,840
13,750,577
205,658,605
17,184,268
18,035,302
55
249,805,369
3,336,803
2,654,432
315.498
505,018
	
1,011,570
3,180,828
5,972,171
50,503,939
Totals
1973
1974
To date
24,935,624
25,828,823
307,216,257
3,633,870
4,297,547
68,032,876
21,448
20,330
9,258,709
4,160,009
5,715,219
07,489,661
35,370,590
35,611,346
383,095,134
5,590,290
6,615,128
101,142,535
	
73,720,831
78,088,393
	
5,972,171
942,207,34*
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS
Table 8A—Production of Coal, 1836-1974
A 113
Year
Quantity!
(Short Tons)
Value
Year
Quantity1
(Short Tons)
Value
1836-59 	
1
1
41,871
15,956
15,427
20,292
23,906
32,068
36,757
28,129
34,988
49,286
40,098
33,424
55,458
55,458
55,459
91,334
123,362
155,895
172,540
191,348
270,257
299,708
255,760
315,997
238,895
441,358
409,468
365,832
462,964
548,017
649,411
759,518
1,152,590
925,495
1,095,690
1,134,509
1,052,412
1,002,268
999,372
1,263,272
1,435,314
1,781,000
1,894,544
1,838,621
1,624,742
1,887,981
2,044,931
2,126,965
2,485,961
2,362,514
2,688,672
3,314,749
2,541,698
3,211,907
2,713,535
2,237,042
2,076,601
2,583,469
2,436,101
$
149,548
56,988
55,096
72,472
85,380
115,528
131,276
100,460
124,956
176,020
143,208
119,372
164,612
164,612
164,612
244,641
330,435
417,576
462,156
522,538
723,903
802,785
685,171
846,417
639,897
1,182,210
1,096,788
979,908
1,240,080
1,467,903
1,739,490
2,034,420
3,087,291
2,479,005
2,934,882
3,038,859
2,824,687
2,693,961
2,734,522
3,582,595
4,126,803
4,744,530
5,016,398
4,832,257
4,332,297
4,953,024
5,511,861
5,548,044
7,637,713
7,356,866
8,574,884
11,108,335
8,071,747
10,786,812
9,197,460
7,745,847
7,114,178
8,900,675
8,484,343
1918..	
1919 _
2,575,275
2,433,540
2,852,535
2,670,314
2,726,793
2,636,740
2,027,843
2,541,212
2,406,094
2,553,416
2,680,608
2,375,060
1,994,493
1,765,471
1,614,629
1,377,177
1,430,042
1,278,380
1,352,301
1,446,243
1,388,507
1,561,084
1,662,027
1,844,745
1,996,000
1,854,749
1,931,950
1,523,021
1,439,092
1,696,350
1,604,480
1,621,268
1,574,006
1,573,572
1,402,313
1,384,138
1,308,284
1,332,874
1,417,209
1,085,657
796,413
690,011
788,658
919,142
825,339
850,541
911,326
950,763
850.821
908,790
959,214
852,340
2,644,056
4,565,242
6,026,198
7,633,251
8,551,159
$
12,833,994
1860
11,975,671
1861    ..
1920	
1921	
13,450,169
1862
12,836,013
1863
1922	
12,880,060
1864
1923 	
12,678,548
1865 _.._...
1866...	
1867
1924	
1925-.. 	
1926 _	
9,911,935
12,168,905
11,650,180
1868
1927 	
12,269,135
1869
1928	
12,633,510
1870
1929   	
11,256,260
1871	
1930 	
1931 	
1932  	
1933	
9,435,650
1872 	
7,684,155
1873	
1874
6,523,644
5,375,171
1875
1934...	
5,725,133
1876	
1877
1935   	
1936 	
5,048,864
5,722,502
1878	
1937..  	
1938...	
6,139,920
1879
5,565,069
1880 	
1881    ....
1939	
1940	
1941.. 	
1942	
1943.. ___
6,280,956
7,088,265
1882	
7,660,000
1883	
8,237,172
1884
7,742,030
1885
1944 	
8,217,966
1885  	
1887
1945	
1946	
6,454,360
6,732,470
1888
1947..	
8,680,440
1889...._ 	
1890
1948	
1949	
9,765,395
10,549,924
1891
1950	
10,119,303
1892	
1893	
1951  .._..	
1952	
1953	
1954    ._	
10,169,617
9,729,739
1894 	
1895
9,528,279
9,154,544
1896
1955	
8,986,501
1897 __ 	
1956	
1957 	
1958	
9,346,518
1898	
7,340,339
1899
5,937,860
1900	
1959  	
1960_  	
1961	
1962..	
1963.	
5,472,064
1901	
5,242,223
1902 	
6,802,134
1903	
6,133,986
6,237,997
1905.	
1906  	
1907  	
1908.___ _  -
1909	
1910 -	
1911 	
1912_  ....
1913        	
1964 	
1965  	
1966                 	
1967 _  	
1968 	
1969  	
1970	
1971	
1972.	
1973  	
6,327,678
6,713,590
6,196,219
7,045,341
7,588,989
6,817,155
19,559,669
45,801,936
66,030,210
1914
87,976,105
1915	
1916 __.
1917  _
1974   _	
Totals	
154,593,643
171,864,952
990,685,439
1 Quantity from 1836 to 1909 is gross mine output and includes material lost in picking and washing.
1910 and subsequent years the quantity is that sold and used.
For
 A 114
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
■a
VO  O Tt   tH
©
cs
rn
u
in oo r- v
©
00
Tt
3
4>
Tf   Cr)[-C*l
OsvSoo in
©
vq
Tt"
SO
cn
■a
*rt
>
... r~~ in T-. cs
w in q r-v 0\
cs" cn" co" Os
©
cn
»n
Tt"
■a
■Kf as
in
o
1-1
w
CS
*j
Tt vs rf co
©
OO
Ov
o
0
_, VO VO  CO  SO
©
r-
m
U
3
O
o p^ t* f-T in
m
H>oto
in
*j
<
^rtrt^O,
in
o
H
cs"vo"
oo"
** in Tt vo
O
cn
cs
R
*c3 •*
,0"rt
VO vo CO vo
o
r-
»n
C. "^. °V **■_.'"I,
O r^" t-- rH oo"
r-"
cn
cn
On
H r- o Tt vo
1-1
cn
■~-.
CS V
CO
1
■3
en
co cs    : vo
o
1
vo
cfl O Ov      ! CO
©
:
CO
|
ci rn m   jo
O oo O.     ! tS
l>
Tt
K
o
H cs cn    i ov
r-
2
rH               '  (S
Tt
§
i m rn m
!
Ov
a
C
r- m u-
in
00
<a
m v. t-
1
\D
■5
n,
o
oovoin
©"
el
H
vo <S m
cn
e
h">
cs m
j
VO
§
[fl
0)
cs «n
1
i>
OT
•O ca
Tt
Tf
;>.
4> O
a   \
V-
I
vi
*!3
ptfl
o    :
H    !
©"
i
©"
K
a
m
&_
C
«
•a
CQ
a
t-i o
gfi
Oo
Oh
VO
cn o
m Tt
rl0-
in cn"
rH OO
j
Ov
Tt
vo
0
O
ca
U
•933
t-
m
|
^
•Be
a
r^
cn
-Q
'2 =3
o
vo"
t-^
K
e-o
u
H
Tt
Tt
O
3
rg
DO
a 8
VO
Tt
VO
Tt
C
ffl o
fl
m
m
<3
■a
m
o
H
cn
cn
cs
m"
cn
cs
s
re
—
13
"tfl
K
o
vo
Q
u
U C u    .
Cfl
VO
■o re d o
a
o
H
Tt"
Tt"
o
U
s
.= c
4:
§|
o m as t—
O VO t-h CO
CO
Ov
US
c 3
j3  VO  OV OO  TT
§ co" r-^ in av"
rZ <0 <D th as
PP-MHO
cn
rn
cs"
_> C
cn
Dp.
tSvo"
oo"
o
g
~ e
C3 O
i
vo "n VO r-
cn
oo cn in oo
m
Ov
rfl r-t ro m l>
Tt
Ov
S
oo
5 Ov Tt" m C
r° T-. in © cn
'
rH
a o
Q
cs
-__>
«£
rn r-
rH
~Q
a
h.
C
O
.* *j
3 ^
M    tfl -o
-c
!^5
s
H
5
-0
M
U_>
«
CO
U
c
s
o 9 ll
z
4
U
u
=
C
sr
Ik
a
a
bo
C
rJ
w
c
c
§
fi
o
c.
c
s
g
15
o
u
>»
g
>
>%
ea
S
tfl
re
0
>. o o «
Q
3
CQ
u
[L
w
0
CO
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS
A 115
Table 9—Principal Items of Expenditure, Reported for Operations
of All Classes
Class
Salaries and
Wages
Fuel and
Electricity
Process
Supplies
$
143,693.349
63,459,902
35,118,277
7,025,278
9,700,616
13,947,656
$
27,116,651
$
119,720,332
Coal _.  _ _	
5,703,689
9,662,982
Petroleum and natural gas (exploration and production)	
2,437,466
7,123,452
3,621,290
6,998,081
Totals, 1974
272,945,078
221,877,595
199,351,449
179,175,692
172,958,282
123,450,327
113,459,219
94,523,495
93,409,528
74,938,736
63,624,559
57,939,294
55,522,171
50,887,275
52,694,818
49,961,996
48,933,560
56,409,056
57,266,026
51,890,246
48,702,746
55,543,490
62,256,631
52,607,171
42,738,035
41,023,786
38,813,506
32,160,338
26,190,200
22,620 975
23,131,874
26,051,467
26,913,160
26,050,491
23,391,330
22,357,035
22,765,711
21,349,690
17,887,619
16,753,367
42,381,258
36,750,711
31,115,621
23,166,904
19,116,672
14,554,123
13,818,326
13,590,759
12,283,477
11,504,343
10,205,861
10,546,806
9,505,559
8,907,034
7,834,728
7,677,321
8,080,989
8,937,567
9,762,777
9,144,034
7,128,669
8,668,099
8,557,845
7,283,051
6,775,998
7,206,637
6,139,470
5,319,470
5,427,458
7,239,726
5,788,671
7,432,585
7,066,109
3,776,747
3,474,721
3,266,000
3,396,106
3,066,311
2,724,144
2,619,639
140,002,685
Totals, 1973      	
103,840,649
1972	
77,092,955
1971 	
1969  	
1968   .   ....      ._ _.
68,314,944
59,846,370
43,089,559
38,760,203
1967                              	
34,368,856
1966      _ 	
28,120,179
1965               _    _          	
30,590,631
1964 _   _        _	
27,629,953
1963
12,923,325
1962 	
14,024,799
1961           .                                 	
17,787,127
1960    _	
1959 _...	
1958               	
21,496,912
17,371,638
15,053,036
1957            	
24,257,177
1956          _	
22,036,839
1955 	
1954 _    _	
21,131,572
19,654,724
1953	
20,979,411
1952     _	
1951	
27,024,500
24,724,101
1950	
17,500,663
1949         	
17,884,408
1948    .     	
1947	
11,532,121
13,068,948
1946                  	
8,367,705
1945       	
1944    	
5,756,628
6,138,084
1943	
6,572,317
1942	
6,863,398
1941 	
7,260,441
1940                    	
6,962,162
1939 	
1938       	
6,714,347
6,544,500
1937.. 	
1936   _ _	
6,845,330
4,434,501
1935	
4,552,730
Note—This table has changed somewhat through the years, so that the items are not everywhere directly
comparable. Prior to 1962 lode-mining referred only to gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc. Prior to 1964 some
expenditures for fuel and electricity were included with process supplies. Process supplies (except fuel) were
broadened in 1964 to include "process, operating, maintenance, and repair supplies . . . used in the mine/mill
operations; that is, explosives, chemicals, drill steel, bits, lubricants, electrical, etc. . . . not charged to Fixed
Assets Account . . . provisions and supplies sold in any company operated cafeteria or commissary." Exploration and development other than in the field of petroleum and natural gas is given, starting in 1966.
 1
A 116 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
Table 10—Employment in the Mineral Industry, 1901—74
u
5
u
s
Metals
Coal Mines
Structural
Materials
rt,_3
'C2
t_j re
as
•a
a
rt    ..
IZ o a
Z. o »
a a>
QJ  X OJ
o«Q
<o rt _,
Year
Mines
1     I
re     a
3   1
§13
U
O
C3
C
U
O
G
O
u
<_>
75
s
"rt
O
H
u
u
•a
fl
D
H
p
>
o
<
rt
o
H
£ rr2
I53
Oirtl
fl
J3
P.
0>
a
>
o
<
o
H
1901	
2,736
2,219
1,662
2,143
2,470
2,680
2.704
2,567
2,184
2,472
2,435
2,472
2,773
2,741
2,709
8,357
3,290
2,626
2,513
2,074
1,355
1,510
2,102
2,353
2,298
2,606
2,671
2,707
2,926
2.316
1,212
1,126
1,088
1,163
1,240
1,303
1,239
1,127
1,070
1,237
1,159
1,364
1,505
1,433
1,435
2,036
2.198
1
3,948
3,345
2,750
3,306
3,710
3,983
3,943
3,094
3,254
3,709
3,594
3,836
4,278
4,174
4,144
5,393
5.48S
4,399
4,259
3,679
2,330
2,749
3,618
4,033
5,138
7,610
8,283
8,835
8,892
7.605
6.035
4.S33
6.088
8.040
7.915
8,197
9,616
10,192
10.138
10,019
9,821
8,939
7,819
7.551
7,339
7,220
9,683
10,582
10.724
10,832
12,831
13,730
11,006
9,412
9.512
9,846
9.000
7,434
7,324
7,423
7,111
8,228
8.264
8,681
9,051
10.804
10,151
12.537
13,101
15,300
14,165
114,584
14,885
13,715
3,041
3,101
3,137
3,278
3,127
3,415
2,862
4,432
4,713
5,903
5,212
5,275
4,950
4,267
3,708
3,694
3,760
3,658
4,145
4,191
4,722
933
910
1,127
1,175
1,280
1,390
907
3,974
4,011
4,264
4,453
7,922
1902	
7,356
1903	
7,014
7,759
1904	
4,407
4,805
3.769
8,117
1906	
8,788
7,712
1907	
1.04110.073
9,767
1,705
1,855
1,661
1,855
1,721
1,465
1,283
1,366
1,410
1  769
6,418
7,758
6,873
7,130
0,071
5,732
4,991
5,060
5,170
5.427
9,672
11,467
10,467
10,966
10,949
9,906
1915 	
299
415
355
341
425
9,135
10,453
10,658
1,764
1,746
1,605
975
1,239
1,516
1,680
2,840
1,735
1,916
2,469
2,052
1,260
834
900
1,335
1,729
1,497
1,840
1,818
2,266
2.050
2,104
1,823
1,504
1,699
1,825
1,750
1,817
2,238
2,429
2,724
9,817
1,821|5,966
2,15816,340
2,163 6,885
1 932 6.644
10,225
10,028
	
9,215
9,393
4 34211.80716.149
9,707
3,894
3,828
3,757
3,646
3,814
3,675
1,52415,418
1,61515,443
1,56515.322
1,57915,225
1,520|5,334
1,353 5,028
1  256 4.645
493
647
412
492
843
460
536
376
377
536
931
724
900
652
827
766
842
673
690
921
827
977
1,591
2,120
1,916
1,783
1,530
1,909
1,861
1,646
1,598
1,705
1,483
1,357
1,704
1,828
1,523
909
1,293
1,079
1,269
1,309
1,207
1,097
740
846
1,116
898
895
324
138
368
544
344
526
329
269
187
270
288
327
295
311
334
413
378
326
351
335
555
585
656
542
616
628
557
559
638
641
770
025
077
484
557
508
481
400
444
422
393
372
380
549
047
794
800
802
782
9,451
1925	
808
851
2,461
2 842
124
122
120
268
170
380
344
408
300
754
825
938
10 581
14,172
14,830
91112,748
96612,948
832|3,197
581|3,157
54212,036
531 2,436
63112,890
90712,771
720]2,678
1,168 3,027
91913,158
990|3,187
1,04812,944
15,424
15,565
14,032
688|1,463
87411,355
1,184 1,786
1   12212796
2.95711.12514.082
12,171
10,524
1932	
1933	
2,028
2,241
2,050
2.145
2.015
2,286
2.OSS
853
843
826
799
867
874
3,094
2,893
2,971
2,814
3.153
2.962
2,976
2,874
2,723
2.360
2,851
2,839
2,430
2,305
2.425
2,466
2,306
2.261
11,369
12,985
1,291
1,124
1,371
1,303
1,252
1,004
939
489
212
255
209
2,740
2,959
3,603
3,849
3,905
3,923
3,901
2,920
2,394
1,896
1.933
	
	
13,737
14,179
10,129
369
	
16,021
2 1671    809
561
647
422
262
567
628
586
679
869
754
626
15,890
2,175
2,229
1,892
2.240
2.150
1,927
1.773
699
494
468
611
689
503
532
15,705
15,084
960
891
849
822
672
960
1,120
1,203
1.259
3,555
2.835
2,981
2,834
2,813
3,461
3,884
3,763
3 759
13,270
12,448
12,314
1945
11,820
34711 .918
11,933
1947
360
348
303
327
205
230
132
199
103
105
67
3,024
3,143
3,034
3,399
3,785
4,171
3.145
1,094|    731
1.5941    872
14,899
16,397
1949 .
1,761
1,745
1,462
1,280
1.154
545
510
16,621
1950
2,415
3.695
3,923
2.589
660
	
16,612
1,30714,044
1,51614,120
1,37113,901
1,12913,119
1,09113,304
1.04313.339
463|1,925
40111.681
491
529
634
584
722
854
474
440
459
17,863
1952    ..
18,257
1953	
396
1,550
1,434
1,478
1.366
15,790
1954
2 644I2 529
1.0761    358
14,128
1955     .
2,564
2,637
2.393
2,553
2,827
2,447
1,809
1,761
1.959
1.5S2
1,976
2,012
1,907
2,019
2,296
2,532
2,369
2,470
3,167
3,058
3,403
4,005
4,239
1,100
968
1,020
820
765
894
705
54S
501
440
405
347
260
195
245
242
444
214
265
207
378
398
14,102
1950	
14,539
1957	
838
625
618
648
626
949
3,328
3,081
3,008
3,034
3,118
3.356
30011.380
13,257
1958
7511,919
9911,937
8611.782
	
260
291
288
237
228
247
207
244
267
197
358
455
1,033
1,013
1,771
1,951
2,255
1,086
1,056
1.182
942
776
748
713
049
614
457
553
700
1,275
1,457
11,985
2,216
2,522
11,201
10,779
1900
589
571
517
11,541
1901....
74
35
43
5
2
1,785
1,677
1,713
1,839
1.752
	
11,034
1962	
270
4S0
772
786
1,894
1,264
3,990
4,270
4,964
4,040
4,201
3,392
2,848
	
11,560
1963
85013 239
528
509
639
582
584
582
567
627
666
527
667
646
10,952
1904
822
965
1,014
992
1,072
1,099
1,331
1,513
1,734
2,394
2,352
3,281
3,529
3,054
3,435
3,283
3,468
3,738
3,481
|3,353
3,390
2,767
11,045
19 65	
441
478
507
400
416
437
495
458
454
509
12,283
1966	
2 2.006
14,202
1967	
196S	
1969	
7
1,928
1,823
1,794
2,160
2,073
1,833
1,704
1,509
13,380
15,659
16,437
1970	
1971	
1972	
1973	
1974	
19,086
18,423
19,470
19,922
19,069
1 Commencing with 1967, does not include employment in by-product plants.
Note—These figures refer only to company employees and do not include the many employees of contracting firms.
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS
A 117
■a a
w     _-
lis
£ rt _„--
5 J. C,S
.S
i
© co m Tt ©
—  © CS Tt  rH
Tt   Tt   Tf
s
3 m vo © oo Ov Os ov t~- cn t^* r-i r,.
^  —   -—  rr.  rr. ."-i r—i t+  i/-. r*^i ^r} cn en VO  Tt CS
rH t-  CS   —        '
incsinvDTtTtovTtovOvooo
V0TtCSrH©O\m00C0rHO\0
—' *n  rn vo CS cn
rH <s Os en
cs Tt r- cn
rH rH fS
do vo av t— in Tt ov .
r-coor-minco©Ttoocoo\vOoor-
cn       rHcnts h>       csrHOcn
m rH CS rH
CS VO
m m
cn Tt
cn"cs"
© Tt 00 VO Tt
r- in
© rH
m cn
vo rn os r- <n Os ©
Tt r- vo m t-h Tf
Mcoa
OS oo
© cn
m Tt
! VD © VO CS VD -
[ O Tf 00 rH l
I CS rH
© m rH *-I  in rH
cs oo r- vo co
rH    CS
vo O Tt co t- ! t-'
© Tf rn    : th <
^csvir^viinrHinr^int^O\TtrHCSooTtOcnrHooovt--Ttrn'—iTt^-i
.       csincs       rHcr)cnrS©vo       cs       hcowh       hw       csmOvvocS
H rH rH (S rH
Ttmmvo icsovincncsovin<ninmmrHininviinoovivoinoooo»nV-\o
©vOvoOv !Tft-vOTtov\OvovOvovocSOvovovOTtcnTt«nvomcnO\vOcn
cSmcncS,    icSrHcnmrHrHcncncncn      m cn cn m cn rH      cscncncncScncn
Tf cS co ©
vo © co ©
rH Tf_ m^ ©_
Ov vpoCoo
OV  Tf   Tf   ©
cn cn in «n
vo" as r-"
r-iov©cS'-'cno\r~rHin©Ttt-rHcoTtov©r~-ooTtvo©©©
csoomO\incnov(Smr-©©csvoovomocSooooTtovoov
rHTf^vornc^inTt^t^OvoinOvTtOv^Ov^cDVOvoOrHVOOOvcS
vd vo" rn vo" Tt" vo" Tt" cs oo" cn" rn" co vT © cn r^ Tt r-" vo r-^ vo" ©" oC r^"
©ovcsinvqrHor^      Tt      Si0?.0.      °^ 22 ^ C* P _0 91
cs Tt_ cs r-^  rn csi^ ©^ t-; m^
rn"   TH CO rn" CS" Tf
VO Tt
T-H   Q
in
Os  CS »
OOOOOOnOiCiOfl\nOHHHOTt'MJ\r.fiOOhOONO\OV.H
OvTt©©©cSoor-csovcnovominoocsooTtcorHOcSooTtin©(S(S
Ttt-^©©vo rnxt qn in h- O^vo r- vo ^ m q^o^x^'t o^voo r. cc o cs Tf
r_n .v. r—\ r^, _^ ^r.  ./■. r^ #-.i  *+  ^r. r_r. rv.   r_-. .—. —__ r_*. r-*»  r--.  r-^.  r^i »_-.  r-* vr.  rtv  ._*-.   —  .^ j-"".
ooooocnrHVOvor-csTtvococooo©
ovinc-vo in-HOOmcsmTroo©vo
cn Tt r~ tr-      cs Tt rn r-      rn rn rn r^co
Vo"Ov"co" -h rn" oo"        eS?Tf
rn oo r- r- r- cn i
Tf   OO   VO   Tf
rH   in   Tt
r- vo Ov m rn © ©
0\ oo m cs r- m Tt
n ©       ov © © cn
Tf Ov oo r— t—
C- cn
vO oo
CS cs
!S3
l cn cn
in   VD   rH
cn >n oo
Tt" vC cs"
v. © cs
rH rH  t>
>
t-
c
£
■s c
c
=
c
£   U.   Ih   C3
DOOM
Sm J.3S
v. I .9 J .1.
W o « ,g ,g <
|i g I -
^J2;zi
!5»S
; S   ft>   « -
:Si££o
>, o O o «
BUOP.K
3 *
W..C.
re
s.
1
■a
s
re
H
W
s
 A 118
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
Jg.
OK
in      vo
1\
—<
t>
3
TS
0
-a
Eh
3.9
m vo £
rH OS   O
tr- *^
->•""" 8
a »-«
re <u o
a j_   - _>
9S t_ W __
0 g u o
.28.
M8|
u    a
o
c ■__.
2 ~
+- a.      w a
0   "> i_    O    N,
8 3   l 8 I
§*.
c_ *-
2  M
'I 'I
. S c
■oaEh
>° _; 5 ->
_? c £. D.
2 u
a. <d 're S
o§IS
E2E
cs 2
rH    C
cs o
ai j2»
V   °- Ui **
6-&o3
_.   H
§3
3
o
■a
3
a i_l
S  <D
Z
o  CJ
-P.
00,
re rt _D
EG
MX) ,
5 fl o
<\   <D   CJ
x B.S
o ° o
S5     "
§3
.2 5
si
o2
•5 a
H o
M)S
S
0>
o
fiS wa
zz & a
•SO
gs
Cl
60 :
•S i-.
•5 A
Q .5
§ 1
is w
^ 5
I a
&. Q
U|
2 §
fflD     X
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS
A 119
©  Tt
m C\
Tt m
m vo
cs OS
ts cs
,-h"  °
t-l    Ui    X    *H
C ■*-• ** o
H «© fl
0^-  -
■h cn jd
oo
oo   af©
CO   ai ©
S gi>"
th -P cn
e ovn
w o cn
« C
H82
a     S -
8 S3 1
si a 1
O   fll   O   <U
u S o •a
Si ad
o, o g o
&S2S
U
1
o "i . 8
1
fl
N
"£ E
200
00
ship
C
O
OS
fl
o
G
Q
0-
fl
8 H
©
o
in
**
.«  c
fl
&
C 2 r-» fl
vo  o
fl CS   9
fl
ncentrates,
nite   conce
ntaining  1,
num;   rheni
VO'
cs"is
Tt o
-■-
.1
(8
cn
c/.
<u
re
u
re
H
fl
0J   i-H
re   „
i-   <y_
§ s
tH    CO
"2
o
P,
i
B
TJ
fl
a>
O-D   Utj
fl
u
fl
§1
18
Ti    A
T3 °
fi   o
opper
molyb
tons,
molyb
CJ
■—
fi
c
o
c
o
CJ
o
o
0)
TJ
a
u    u
VD tt
CS oo
C-.   T-H
rH t^- CS
o o>
o a,
go
h-l
i _.
ee t
si
85
>. o
Be
Granb
1,  Ph
vision
Q  u
_£
OH
H
T
OB
o  «
5= r1
•s
V
fl
'.J
is Is
un o
ffl rJ
S -a
O   Ch
la
u
D
•ri
rt
h-
i
0
u_
'_>
a
<U
►j
fa
^
U
^     a> >
Ob
a &a &
3   £
•§3
1-1
c
<1>
$
TJ
fl
■:■:
0
03
O
-rf
O
a
fl
a
a
s
2
6j>
£        <_•
,°    *
X     2
0
bo
■S   a g
§ 1 s
2  3 2
«   fl -2
I a
£ O
'3 -P
ca     Qffi
S  * 3
(5
-0
*l
TJ
fl
ti    cj
ill
o o.'S
am
 A 120
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
■si
"1
s
5
a
o
g
On
S
• 2
+-.
o
s
TS
£
CM
~^
Eh
3S
aS °
W     _M
VO
a, '
J 00
C oo
„ 8 VO
3 8-
28 l
§ si
•_ "3   -13
_,    U    Crt  ^J
d. _> a o
a- 'S 2 c
U
«5 i/T rt .a
a a ■£ >,
£gSo
s.. 2 -a
c S
o a
S'Ej
. a;
•fl a
2 a ;
ESI
Pfc'
oj   O
TJ   fl
a fl
B I
fl  C
cj *C
O    »_S t_!
in e3      _;
Jig
rt O      vo
M   O   O 00
e     .q
oS-S^"
a-a * m
o a. o a
"■S-'e-
>o     "re 9
'      Uu     H tH
ao'a B g
Se o 9-2
o c
O
I   O T_
rt
H
fl   m
«> a
H o
.5    u
o~° u
•a    __
__    H
0
5 u
Si
o *
ffl     1
W a
"'      hJ
w.9
-_.___. M
+-;  fl  o
3>
j-J o h
cn '3.   A
►JQ
11.H      O
fl E s
o <u
re eo *£
(J c
re a
SS
tj ft re
§3
rt-°
fl o, fl
re o _S
z   a
u
n i4 "J c "" c
U,_l       o       o
o> o HJ_t;     fi
-h O hH OJ (D <L>
.23   fl N   OD  N
c 'r-t «- ca in re
2 pK g»
ouS   a
.5
S
JS»-S I
3<^ a
.5*2 »
«2S N
rt .5  " «
s= - J- K
a
^
2
a. c
t5 o
o
c "5
>,
I.&
u
o.
|q
o
fe
£
3.
01
»;
5 b  £
Q
bo   1)
H I
5? B
•S S
c <_
S Z
8 |
•S  B
S .S
S  B
ti .3 --j      _fl
O CL ffl        CO
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS
A 121
cn r- ©
cn cs tt
OV rn m
cs r- ov
cs oo ©
oo in r-
n © r-
vo >ft ©
cn
>n  OS  <r*
Ov
t- © m
CS Ov cn
P-
cn oo c-
©
OV IT)   rH
Tt       cn
i> cs" vo"
VD"
Ov en
OV            rn
Ov
rH  TT
VO
°* rn
Tft"
r- ov CS
Tt r- v.
oo rH oo
r-Too"
I-H   VO
HO
in Os t—
OV   T)   rH
t- CS
Tt  00  rH
rn r- r-
vo r- m
s
u
1
'                     c „
1!            c- 8
5             o     2
£                     <-■ vd
..                  cn Ov oo
3                              CS   rH   Tt
>                              r-^-N
*                             lft   Tt   OV
fl
^                          rH  ©_
H   H    «"
0
-                                     4>
fl                           Wl           ■*-<
Oi
j                 a>    - re
J                          •*->    W    ti
4)
3              re w ti
«H    -H    fl
h              3 " o
3             fl h S
>                        OJ  ti   r-
a d cj
C h u u u
a> tj <u
G    (h    Jh
O     C     1-      H     H
1- re n
OOO
(j oj  o  o o
O   u   0
{J
CJ
DO
<U   CJ
C  aj <d  o
TJ   q TJ TJ TJ
^   O   3   3   fl
o      a
tj *a tj
TJ-fl T3
rt   fl   3
3   0D 3
__   B
UA    o
hJOO
umu
m   !
aj o    :
~ta rt    i
c 'a.   '
a " °
8a5
(.Si?
Q,   ft   _,
-■   in
o
00
— o
cn
■.,'.-.
cn ^D
CS
o
r- ov
VC
oo Ov
oo
© ift
©
CNrn"
6
u
6   i
J
u.
u ;
fi
.5
MTJ
■S
'c
•IS
OJ
§
rt ca
w
fl
8,1
-fl
E
rt
3 -6
11
o
fl
u
ffl
is
fi   -^
Ih >*
t^ Hlnft
Q_ &
P. o
I
&°
s 8"
■g b a
g fa
E
0»E    Z
J«*g   -
z gsls
rt <    . rt
_    , w  i,       H
CQ
T_   CJ
CO    Ih    A
:    «
OJ     QJ    O
S.°53
•ri-o°
to *S w
*8tf
OJ    tn
fl   c
b _r S°
5*    .
<h     ,TJ TJ
w I ■g 2 a
I >h a * 0
sx.8 2 '
.s
1
fe 3
re ■** £
j_.
fl
Ih
0
!  cj *_>.
-C
: > -^
!    M
•M    ^
rJ     A  M
rt -u
■SQg
fl
9
fi
H
:
4
lis
OJ
O
o g_s §
2 § «JH
a a a
ooo
IH    u
*Q
■* a
e.2
-5
ll
^ 5?
a
§ E _>
a u a
c J_ a
** a -t
p< rt S
Co u rt
OH
» S^a&
S o   tu a w
.2 .-oc
> CQ cq n
rt > •
ow
5>£
00
'5
5(5
.a    •a
a y S
6
0
Z
g
•o
 A 122
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
fi)
u
1
o
On
S
•2
a
1
<5
«5
ii
.O
"S
t-l
u
C
43
N
l-J
a
QJ
a
TJ
o
re
JD
U
<D
rl
r-J
"rt
QJ
s
cn
t>
6a
Ih
m
O
OJ
cn
O
ft
ft
J?
r-J
©
©
O
v>
O
Tt"
Ov
OJ
>■
N
©
cn
o
cs"
CO
~~^H
TJ
N
©^
"o
o
fH
O
c
o
TJ
vo
Hi
Tt
ft
ft
00*
js
cA
UJ
CJ
rt
3
TJ
c
O
ffl
fl
o
o
OJ
ft
ft
o
o
TJ        Tj
Tt
©
Ore
hippe
or
reate
Cfl
lft
c
Tt
CM
CO      H
TJ
^j
t-l
H
u
CJ
00
c
<
1
6
Ih
<0
oj
>
fl
3
o
fl
TJ
tH
o
0
c
rt
C a)
.2i
TJ
O
O
t-J
U
>
2
s
e
■2
o
flj
ji
§
fl
>
n
a
s
Q
|M
be
6fl
o
•S
5
S
u
ft
0
§
§
o
fl
B
o
•2
1
ffl
e
ft)
O
Ih
C
3
W
"H.
a
u
s
o
CJ
,g
-5
£
a
i—■
o
O
.53
-_
a
K
tr,
3
fl
O
a
o
H
54,070
276,370
1,097,162
13,049
1/
VC
C
3
pit    tH
OJ  Hi
o ft
iz8
tfl     It*
fl     ! ©     !
0    i •*    i
Tt
OJ
ft
ft
O
0
fl
o
H
69,181
60,561
1,013,510
16,916
00
vo
©
vo
N
cn
Cfl ift
fl Q,
0 r~
H cn
O Ov     !
ift ift     !
P-O     |
ift"oo"    1
cn th    |
Ov
VO
Ov
TJ
3
Ov
cfl r—
s*tf
Oov
r-
cn
cn
O
OO
cs"
Os
fl
Cl
•h
H
fi
a
re
0
t-
0J
4=
5
I
«
c.
TJ
a
5
Hi
d
.3°
"5
0
i
O
V
*fi
c
h
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS
A 123
OV
Q
-3
50
as
s
TS
o
cq
a
s
o
--
o
5
"I
.
Tf
©
r~
cn cs
cn
cn
Ov
■St.
_—,             !>OvOvOvOvvD©©rH
IT           o.r-cniftoovocn|tft
O               CSrHVO_l_cnT-._l_lo\
w
rt
CO
--S
©©IftTtrHTtOC^Ov
-_.           cs*rHcn'r~-csvoo6iftod
Ih  S.C/J
rtJ^
IT           oo©ooTtcncorHTtTt
0\"(s"vD+ + CS          '   Tt"
r- m Tt            t           Tt
■a
Z
a>
J-
f.
ifl     o
N
ot
VOTtr~;OOCSOrHcnO\
w
__.                 OOOVt~-'_'Ov©rH|^(ri
it           voooTtcno.r-i    io
5w.2n
C-         c> cs^ i-h *-h Tt <n 1   1 Tt^
55      c*3 fl
cs"cnov"-{-  |    1            oo"
g    »oq
«    ^
Cfl"
rt
Oil,
QJU
(fl
U
©lftO\rH©CSOV\Ot-;
_                iftr-OOOvOOlftr-i-^c--
H                    CS  rH  <-J CS Tt  Ift     t       ITt
C-               ViT^,°illM Ift cn     1     1   rH
rHfOOeT-J-    j                            OO"
PJ
u
VD
s
III
rt
u
tfj
j5
o
cn
TJ
QJ
n
£
•9
Cn          OVVO©l>i-(rHVO
CS  VO  OV lft VO*  rH Tt lft  OO
rt
	
3
cn rn m tj oo t-h   i   i  as
cn »ft^cs Hin*   1   1  cn
•a
rH
re
tfi
cn"cn"©+ I    I            Ov
u
cn
m
rt
>
«
0
OV
lft
u
■*
cn
es    | cn
Tt
s
vo         r-
rH
Tt       !  ©
t>
ca
rt
ift              VO
Ift          ©^
O
lft          lft
VO
H
o
r"i
1         +
©^
CO
l>         ©"
cn
cn
©"
2
Ph
OO                «ft
•ft
1   !
ift
Ov
o
»ft
00
QJ
•a
cn                © rH lft VO rH m cs
rH    i^j
3
V
2S          od ov r-" vd vi vo ov
"i                 cn OV CS f- rH Tt rH
cs   cs
>
Ov
u
o
Ph
1,255
367,1
229,4
131,2
+6
+5,7
— 18,8
+
CO
1-1
c
r^
ov
c
H>
cn 2
<v
**  r-T
fi
fl     tH
5J   OJ
X -0
o
£
Tt
u
i
u e
p g
Ov
ft
c
o Sri
.s     t
*=    jS
t-
a
i cn
fl            3 0 ti
5
if. oj
o        o *a «
C
■p-e
V3 H
1!
•ll
Tj    OJ
O   »
iginal hydrocarb
timate recovery,
mulative produc
serves estimated
..liner in 1074
Tt
a
S
'1
Tt
r-
o
C
c
t
t:
c
E
c
c
ft
-S
%
__
in           —isajiHajc-Gi-oj
0
£
L
p
C
PC
p.
L
,a
p.
-- fr
^^
rt a>
_C  "M
w-a
c x.   .
S 3 eg
+"■  CJ   c
-^tj2
o re oo
511
Tj    CS   rH
H
fi"
ft
J
u
-.
s
re
S
fl
OJ
0-
1ft
TJ
S
re
0.
c
re
p
re
-fl
CD
u
H
s
rn
■»
re
r-
s
0
'H
•"t
OJ
__;'
cn
fl
c
Ul
ffl
o
H
. ■
-^
-fl
_.
z
5
OJ
s
i)
^
*
u
o
M
o
ffirH
vD
-fl
03
-a
3
CT
a
p
■in
3
5
(S
o
0>
re
0)
3
re
TJ
o
ft
re
I-"
H
o
OJ
fl
am
E
.
-.
o
-rt
S
Q>
0>
re
CO
.
TJ
Tt
;:
rs
C
^
.,,
tH
|
fl
"re
X)
o
ft
fl
Ih
o
.9
a
re
fl
TJ
-1
fl
o
TJ
6
-fl
3
TJ
CO
fi
St p
•s
ft
h
rX   &
-3
re
-fl
ft
a
OJ
re   hj
-a
3
(fl
<D
cd'^;
o
S
fl   %
HH
n  fl
■■
ID'S
»
re
cn
is
re
OV
S  cd
-S  U
3.
X)
O
<
TJ
T3 Aj C   fl *C
cj re ca 5 h
s a a g g
s y qj
•a < p. t_ a
T)   rt
PS.
fc   *   O
3-a
Tt    rr ^J
© -3  re
5 o -h .
-fl fl-    _
II   i H
3 2 S
Si3
o a a
».»
3 S  •
rt -i __ w
J        wi S   IJ
ffl
ftJJ «!
m S pa )§
o re rt
H  M   CJ
■K cj<.S3
8 a* -5
 A 124
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
N
On
►H
-.
5_
-a
5
a
S
3
TS
to
0
1
S
1
1
£>
o
2
f
Eh
OJ
r- o*
Tt
©
Tt
OD
r—  VO   CO   rH
VD
vO
re
OV_ |H- Tt   Tt
vo r-
cn
cn
o
oo"vd"r^oT
cs t-
©
o
«
o
osso      r-
ift o
VO
VO
Ph
■rt cn
tH
t-
o
H
o"
z
r. cn cn Ov
VD Ov
lft
1ft
i-h cn      cn
00 lft
Tt
Tt
m
cn
OJ
i    :    : in
lft 00
00
»n
Ift  Tt
©
©
a
re
00^
CO l>
vc
VD
OJ
z
o
vo"
vo"cn"
©'
©"
o
r-l
CS
O
Ph
t0
o
o"
Z
rH (S
m
cn
p
oo    i:    i
00      !
00
oo
TJ
OD
ON
Ov     !
Ov
Ov
V
re
°l
cS    :
<N
CS-
c
o
vo"
vo     !
vc'
vo"
§1
o
Uh
en z>
wi*
TJ
c
D
6
cn    i    |    |
cn
rt
rt
o
Ov © Ov ©
00  rH
Ov
OS
00
rH ^f  GO  Ov
cn t—
©
o
a
at
r-_ cs Tt_ oo
cn oo
ts
cs
a
O
o" oo" t> ri
Ov Tt
Tt"
§"
o
t>   OS            rH
oo cn
IS
a
o
TJ
fl
a
Uh
CS  rH
Tt
Tt
JO
6
r^ cs cn oo
r- t-
s
Tt
<
cs      cs
m cs
00
Cfl
ft
O Ov     ! Tt
cn rH
Tt
Tt
8
00
VO CS
r-
VO Ov
re
CT\..ift
vo
rH  O
N„
cs
3
o
rH  oo"
Ov"
© Ov"
Ov'
Os
TJ
o
rH  VD
Tt   lft
OV
OV
o
Ph
<s
cs
th
*c3
o
d
rH cn    ! ©
Tt   rH
•ft
lft
cS cn
«ri
lft
H
u
O t-     ! Tt
rH   ^O
r-
r-
00
vo cn
t*-
r- r-
5*
Tt
OV  "tt
VO
© oo
o\
°\
o
rH   O
Ov
cs o
cs"
cs"
Cfl
0
o
rH   VO
•ft
cn Tf
t-
r-
Ph
cs
cs
d
Z
HH       [  ©
cs r-
Ov
Os
<S CS
Tt
Tt
9
! CS      !      I
CS  Ift
r-
l>
00
Ov
OS   rH
©
o
re
CD
© cs
rt
cn
o
oo"
oo oo
so"
vo
o
n
CS
13
Ph
o
d
; cs   !   1
CS   Tf
IO
VO
z
A3 "u
h \
>> 9    i
in cj     ;
S S    j
rt ft     :
w o
(fl    W3
22?
2Z    S
ft 5   M
•h ■-!   ty
SS  3
"e
*-■    IH      Si
u o 2 IS  H H  o_
c
H
<c a v o
js *&&
UJ   1)   QJ   3
£
z
c
0
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS
A 125
rt
0
'o
u_
z
■4-t
o
u
i
3
o
tj
CJ
*0
f-H
OT
rt
o
-
-
-
i
i
i
<s
■
1
«
VO
: r- cs r- cs
j          cn cs
1
1
CA
V
CJ
3
T3
o
OT
rt
o
Tt                  !
-
l
o
VO        CS
O
cs
t-
! ift vo Tt ©
f CS        "ft cs
Tf
j
fl
6
o
'fl
u
rt
3
s
3
u
ft
O
CO
s
cn       o
OO         VD
rH          00
cn
cn
vo
VO
r-
oo
oo
ri
r-
cn
00
i
1
1
1
i
cs
cs
VO
[
:
|
5:
1       i
i
*<t © as t—
00 00 OO Os
i OV^QO  M  ©
1 cn Tf" ift" ©"
1 rH          r-~ VO
1
i
1
1
1
1
rt S
OJ f*
*3
Ov        CS
©        VO
O      rt    1
Ov
Tt
00
|
Ov
VO
cs"
rs
Ov
ift'
: cS © cn ift
! lft ift Tt cs
; cn vo t> ©
' cn"      vo Tt
CS  rH
!   i
i   i
cn
1
1
rn      cs    ;    ;    ;      cn
Tt             :    : oo
|             ! Ov Ov Ov Ov
IS     iii
§1
TJ*                          T)
IftWvOTtTtOOW©
cslJoooooor-jir-
_ __: r.| --. r^.      c cs
<H  p,                           O.CS
(O                                   tfl
3                         3
VD
l>
cs"
vo      ii vi cn ©
cn      75 Tt in ©
<S          CrH         SO
rH           ft                 Tt
to
3
W
'co
Ov
Tt"
oeo vo
t^ ift 00
Tt
Tt
Suspended.
155
Suspended.
20
4,919
1,484
38,657
22,723
CO
Ift
Os
l>
vc
TJ
cn rn m Os 00 &
00 © 00 Ov Tf ^a
1-1                   OJ
ft
3
CO
Tf
Tt
TJ
Tt Ov  *j vo Tf lft
r-lrt    CrHrH
ft
3
ift
cn
cn
■h fl
3 O o    •
CJ fl-S O
5 3 rtZ
: o    i ov »ft cs ov
! Tt      ! © rH © vo     :
! 00      ! Ov Ov © 00      ;
! rn    ; cs cs cn
cn © cn    1
ift cs cn    !
vo Tt cn    :
rH (S  T-l       :
©  f-  rH
r- r- cn
CS Ov ov
cs cs
rH © © CS
av cn cs oo
os as tr- Tt
CS   rH   t-H
r- r- \d •* o\ Tt
Ov   VO  Tf   lft  rH  Tf
©  VD  VO Tt  CS  rH
rH                  rH m  rH
O     ! cn 0 Vi cS
©        '  Tf   Tf   Tt   VD
lft          !   00   TH   O   Tf
rH       !H(C|(fl(fl
!
q>
g
p-
o
Z
a
c
c
3
J
rl
ffl
Tf
OV
tr
t-
3
|
pa
c
c
•a
o
0
t
a
'c
c
c
3
0
I
c
S
E
t
d
"fl
C
c
e
a.
PC
t:
P
-
<
C-
1
"c
c
c
c
5
t
z
es
&.
*c
3
C
e
a.
PC
"S
4
1-
c
c
1—
c
a
T
|
s
,5
_
|
j
1
o
U
&
a
o
pa
"re
0
*o
o
Ph
C
C
p.
S3
vo
3
o^
rJ
GO
cn
TJ
£
a
X
a
2
«
i
53
H
i
cc
>
t
UJ
a
3
PC
*E
"5
c
s
5
i
h
t-
ir-
•3
>
_
X
s
ffl
1
J
j
o
<D
'o
*
o
B
u
rt
3
o
"o
o
Ph-
Tf
lft
ex.
in
ol
>
•c
3
3
C
PC
CJ
tp
X
R
ft
Tt
4
Of
vi
r;
■ft
>
e
I
3
c
PC
•«
c
|
cn
in
00
6
cn
ob
<!
•a
1
ffl
ts
o
CJ
c?
V
H
*re
p
"3
o
ft,
tr
z
0
r
c»*
ol
>
t:
p
5
cc
t
P-
c
1
ift
CC
r
\
i
E
C
c
C
K
H      ^
\%
sc
a
r
>
«
1
<
ft
2
c
K
i-
C
h
f
GC
c
tr
> >
t-
«
TJ
3
3
C
PC
<
ft
2
c
cc
X
:_
h
t
t
3
QJ
E
1
C4
a
1 c
c
3
CJ
E
c
C
r-
!
_
1
a
q
0
re
-  X
S
3
0
■3
0
Ph
d 3
•A ^
s^
6 2
rt ~
co "-
13
ffl   K
< c
Hi  5
ZH
S u
x c
CJ   .
HP.
Tt
O
er
VC
4.
E
«
c
B
=
I
j
ss
53
*J.S
&"*
CQ c
■si
S3?
SE
_.
oc
ri
•i
1
3
O
Ph
<
ft
2^
0
0
re
X
3
0
"o
c
Ph
Tt
<
4
o-
<
C^
U
z.
"E
PC
<
p.
Z
c
R
!«
h
0
"c
p
3
c
I
vO
i
a
TJ
-3
V
3
t~
P2
P
c
c
0
c
>
c
l-
Ph
«_
E
c
C
oc
5
5
<
>
1
E
OC
T
OC
i
=
r-
1
c
ti
5
. >
E
t
CO
°?
CM
3
&
1
3
!
>,
B
3
O
CO
s
O
*o
O
Ph
1
j     ]     ;
1   6
j     |   fl
is 3 ft S
oj re o  ct
OB EH
tt
a
=
1 1
is
■s
*C
X
4.
e
>
s
c
=
C
'c
CJ
at
hJ
>.
•h                                                                                                     &
3                                      ,£
3                                                                                   r=
O                                                   re
P2                                   En
C
fi
1
5
PC
I
0
0.
-
s
t
c
2
c
0
I-
L
c
(
<
I
c
_
B
0
(-
1-
>
<
(
a
.
h
1
>
5
c
c
0.
PC
C
ffl
>
t
i
_
1
>
(
T
c
c
cc
4
a
1-
L
cc
E
cc
t7
K
I
i-
1
ffl
1
R
H
_.
L
 A 126
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
i
-t w rH VO
■q- *■*■ in    l co
T3
13
g
§
g
I
Q
■«■*_
I
I
41
'►HI
I
VO
»S_
1—«
Eh
u
-.
S
Z
m
S
-H 00
i i
VO CS 00 ©
cn CS lft rH
th Tf rt en
VO ift"
1
CO
T?
cn
1
1
1
m
oo
io
Tt"
«o
i
I CS  rH Q       ] CS
i OO  rH VD       ! rH
j © Tf tr-    \0\
_> CJ
<<
Hi   3 T-
11,057
12,703
1,510
2,913
© ©
r-   rH
cn oo
cn
j
vd vd vd vo
I
cs cs
cs cs
. © Tf ift (-- r-
rH       j       | rn CO  ©  rH  rH
VO ioo_ooTf_o.cn
en"vo ift      rn
*irtWr-Ttmovr-oo
T^cosc^viOTfiftcn
fl cn C vo      Tt      (n cn
SOv cn cS ©
cn Tf © r-
m cs ift ift cn
cn cn cS cs cn
TJ TJ TJ TJ
iicnTf^^i^vDOv©©
^ ift rt^ ^ ^ ** °o ^ cn
5J QJ   v   4J   ' »_*-
ft    ftft &» r-
01
3 3 3
KW»_
vo cs I rn vo cn
in in : r- oo rn
00 CO \ t-h Os Os
cs cs : rn
o
© 00
lYI
vo rt
OV
"-,
© t-
r-
vn
©"
ov cn
cs cs
•fl
ii Tf _£ lft t^Tf
3 t~- T5 vo cs ©
fl    C rH rn CS
©oviftoovtncsr-
cniftcscnnvOTfrH
rn    Tf_ cs^ oo^  r^
Tt" oo" vo  es"
Ov CO cS P- Os
ri r» t-h m ov Tf
cn oo © rn rn ui
rn ^h cs cs cn cn
rH cn
lft cS
oo ©
< I
4    44
CO oo
cj t^.
Cjl CS
O   (JH
I  «  B?
ittlWOv
rt goi
.PjE.2
! S c 3
« rt  rt  rt
1UUB
& & s
u 5.9
:_■  .-...33 3
4
00
4
cn
2vi
4 __
«p «>
Ov   ^
crim
2 n. -j
oo rj i
-s_,.
ills
■t_     2
,- H  o  r_
x nw
44S
Ov Ov?^
<<<
r- oo 55
VD VD ^
CC __   »\
I?"'
«E o -
oo s   "
M a i
wu
M   >v
Mm
la
lis
l«B.
B « 5 S c x o
P >c 5  rt  C qj  cd
,5 ? K U < f-n<
3 vs
S 24
r)  7!   >. >v
55
SD
ft
CJ   U
Xi X)
o o
J zzz
3 oua
S OOpj
o**«
£ddd
c a c
ooo
555
t>?4
*T ^A M
-rt   rt  a
?oo
< -o -o
ii a a
"° "w "w
Zoo
^ u o
<.s.s
ft re re
Zs-5-
0 w m
O TJ TJ
floo
K o o
£££
.2,7-
*c3   a*" 2>
o o & o ,
iS'SS ;
o q _> a 'jj
rt rt _.  rt M
_. i. C - -J :
■S B
t; oj —
_?'o
" " « rS  1
^ .t: -jj U   o
- y O o
Too'5
_; re re re
J ft ft ft
oo 5? S?
ri re re
III
tu ra re
! M
M
i >.
>l"4
i-  3
OJ  C
JJ  C
£ a «
8
re
T
y-r.
cu
c
Wffl B-
cc
P3 PQ
re re
| £ S
i k
re ra re rare
4)
rH1
ra
ft
4>
^
i-
ra
UO
u
ft
_<l   .
lis
tti a. w
H rt
rt M
0
"•5_
rn   rt
Zo
ft'57
io  jj
Oph
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS
A 127
1
1
i   i
i   i
!
" i
i
1
i    i
i
i
CS
j      1
1   i
1
i
j
1
; c- vo
-
i   i                               ^
j
1
; Ov vo
i
| ;                      s
':    i
i
1
!
i
|   i
! VO     !
i vo    :
: oo    !
i
iiii
!
i i                 *
i i                 ^°"
\     MM:
iiiii
j
i
1
|   i
i    ;
i     |
!
!   !   !
1
!  Tf  00
! rn cn
j ift rt
i tn" Tt
iii!
j
VD
i     j                                                    vo'
'     '                                                    CN
|
MINI
i
1 ! i
1
: r- cn
!  Tf   Tf
; co Ov
1
I
1!!!
!     i                                                    VO
oo
1   1                               __*•
I  !  ! 1  !
—
1
1
1
1
!
1
i
: O cn
!         ; cn Tt
Ov
llll
1     1                                                    rl
!     !                                               cn
Suspended.
149
65
47
100
46
34
98
©
Ov
cn
OV CS  lft  rH
VO cn Tf VO
CO
cn
•fl     *d
jy VO   <_} VO rn m
75   ©   3   «   lft   Tf
g^g   ni
ft           ft         CS  rH
3         3
CO        CO
vD
ift
Ov_
cn"
VO CS © lft
Ift Tf  VO  CS
rn
00
CS
TJ TJ                -O TJ TJ TJ TJ TJ TJ TJ
aj0Jr-,r^.OQja>a)<ijajiijajw-1  0
TJTjgC'OTjTJTjTJTJTJTj'-    O
OQJ            ojonjajcjajoju    *•
ftft             ftft&ftftftft&cncc
33              33333333
COCO              CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO
cs oo r- ov vi
cs rn cn cs ©
^    HH            rH   rH
Ov
CO
cn
TJ
CS Ov rH   <0 0
Tf   OV  Tf   ^  Ift
OJ
ft
3
CO
CS
CO
©
Tt
m
OOVOCSvocSTfiftOv
©IftOvrHTfrHVO©
oovvovoovr-iftrH
rH          rH  rH rH  rH  CS  cn
oo oo ov r—
ift CS lft o
CS  CS  rH  CS
Tf  IT)  rH  Tf
Tf ift cn cn
© © "ft r-
Cn CN  rH  rH
Tt   CO   Tt   lft
cn r- tj- rn
00   ©   rH   rH
cm cn cn m
j
VOt--OvrHr-ITf©r~-TtTfVDCn        !
VOTt00OvCS00lftVO00©©VD      !
IftOVCSrHrHrHt—lftOVCnCSOV        1
Ov VD (S ift Ov
Tf  rH  t—  rH  t—
Tf Ov ov oo cn
tr- 00 cs cn 00
lft   OV   Tf  CS   Tf
rH © CN rt 0O
cn rt cn CS cs
CS
cs
cn
Ift *s
p
4 Ov
OV~>.
4 °ot-
f .«
* >>i
rt '5?^-
_»^&
fl K tt
CO CO £
cj O e
fP
ftft ^
i
rH
00
6s
THJ
rH
0 00   i
gs
jgvi
H S
22
o c
11
w w
fl c
O  O
r-
t-
cc
cn
vi
"l
CI
£
0
1
c
o
2
c
o-
4
2
a
Cl
15
ft
C
©
4
OO
i
«  §
i-l
o
2
5
Ov
■r
oc
m
ts
t
0
X
X
c
i-
c
A
fl
P
c
a
•5
:
C
<
?
ir
a
5
vi
r.
X
X
c
a
•d
a-
C
c
Ov
lft <3
00<^
rH VI
rt°?
«vi
)H    jj
ra u
tj ra
TJ TJ
O TJ
wS
rH W
2*
CJ   -u
x «
OJ   QJ
H .0
O  as
a o.
5<
"S
o
o
o
ft
2
■J
o-
c
oc
1
TJ
B
fl.
c
c
&
c
c
t
a
&
L
CP
"C
a
ft
V
CM
OC
-c
1
j r
|
i
<-
ft
a
t
0
ft
ift
<!
Tf
OV
\CS
3^
CTV  „J
TJ O
7S P
9-5
jp
« £
« ex
u „
s|
*
1
g
*
p
r-
'5
5
1
u
re
ft
•5
o
*3
o
ft
cs
rt
4
a
C
r
X
*Q_
cc
e
4
&
&
7
a.
c
c
t
E-
4
o
C
r-
r-
■c
0
B
C
a.
c>IU
S3S.
.u
■3 S3
2^
__  rt
||
s ■
§ «
S c
c a
aj aj
HH
3
O
o
o
Ph
lft
Ov
■*■».
4
00
Z7
O E
s .
o  c
cn  _
IT
i
4
d
•i
c
E
i
n
R
C
X
a.
H
<
O
\
%
I
X.
r
P
c
6
h
4
0
1
ir
■0
5
1
-
z
C
c
4,
h
4
a-
<
•c
1
_
i
c
c
<L
r-
a
o
<
r
I
i
X
I
\
r-
CN
•J
a
<
«
1
i
c
c
C
3
o
<
ir
T
c
I
a
I
CV
3
<
vc
TJ
c
I
z
c
a
z
0
s
5
o
<
P
2
1
T.
i
c
C
A
a
S
C;
j
<
vi
•?
,g
E
X
z
ct
J
c
r—
r-
! 1
;   c
s &
c
O
'3
V
cs<
CTff
rp «
"i;_
S3
^ _
«.E
H"
-- c.
§s
|
»ft V
<!<
4^J
Ov o*
cs c^-
ov o>
&x\
*o *c
^^
H  t-
J"e
4*
V)V
*o T
«  w
>. >
re e
PQ cc
r-l
<
4
O
«?
JO
Sh
O
O
9
<
"flj
I
O
"o
c
ft
Tf
£<?
^?
CN   rH
El
%i
•=§
~pq
sz
eZ
TJ   O
0 0
Ort
oh
T*
r-
CO
cn
CO
>
s
TJ
P
fl
O
ft
cZ
>
D
—
fl
VC
<
4
a
ft
CN
VC
t:
=
P
y
"e
t
P
«
X)
s
Q
Q
a
a
0
a
*o
0
ft
0.
4
CO
cn
CS
i
0
r-l
to
0
ft
0
CJ
c
'ra
z
>
c.
1     >
>
1
c
>
5
Q
a.
U
>
c
*oj
CP
g
t
0
s
B
rt
£
■a
a
>v
r.
i
"rt
a
CD 5
C   S
O   r
OS
1
i >
as
O   rt
ua
O
*CJ
Ph
1
1
I
1
ft
s
I
X
X
C
K
fl
:.
C
--
B
Z
!
1
'flj
S
Z
T_
is
0 ^_
3 0
ra
OJ
__
re
0
.fl
0
 A 128
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
$
<-.«
btt,
ou
TJ
TJ TJ
flj
flj
CJ
fl
C
fl
O
O
o
TJ TJ TJ
C
c
c
ra
re
.;
£> jj Jd
re
re
re
OJ
OJ
u
c
fl
fl
o
o
c
N NN
ift
CO
t-
r-l
Ov VO
cs tr- co i © r-
rH   SO   V-        I OV ©
O rt t—■  I CO rH
rH VD O © ! O 00
Ov CS © © I © CS
VD lft lft Ift ] lft lft
©" o © o' '• © ©
© t> VO
t— (S ift
Ift.Tf  rH
lft  r»  rH
vi Tf r-
VCi vo VD
.     • TJ
TJ TJ   C
n> oj re
TJ TJ _Q
&& 8
a 3 o
co« N
00©©Tf©VlTf00OOO0CS»ftTf
lftrH(S^HlftCnCN©r—   OOHHff)
Tt^ cn^ Tt_ Tf vo »n i-h \q vq vo ift_ vo^ ©
rH(NCScs"      rn rn en t-h      rt"cn«"
O'   ©   ©   ©   O   ©   T
R
Ov
I
i
5
■^3
s
a
*-»
Eh
■
a
CJ
K
-S.
ft.fi
r— cn ©
oo r- vo
cn ift ov
rn Tf ift cs : cn cn
oo ov cs o : cs oo
cs      cs Tt cn ■
rH CS  © ©
ojjj.fl O
Os rn vo cs cncnvoTtP-cs
OOVO Tf© VOrHrHcnTfOO
oooo r-oo m m t-h ■*$ m so
rn ri rn t-h cscscscncs
Tf   rt   rH
CS CS lft
rn lft © ©
r-lft©cnrHTfCO0O©rHVDcnrH
VOCSa\lftrHCSCSrHrH(MTtOvlft
IftCSlTflftVDIftOcnOOOOrHrHCS
©TtTfTfOVOTfCSTtTfTfCSCS
r-r-r-r-r-vor-r-r-r-r—r^r-
oo©^t^t^r^c»vDcocooovovo
CTvTfVDIftrHOOcnrHr-rHOOvOv
IftlftOOvrHTtcnTfTfTfTfCnTr
cnrHoo©c~-r-r-r-r-iftr*iftr-
oo a\ t
<<<
CS (S
Ov OV
aa
vo r-
"ft r—
M TJ
§e
rt  rt
"(9 "rt
mm
mm
aa
a c
as
Ov     i
^4?
^i- s ■"*■
Jt Ov Ov
•6-H
fl °v
fl rn
-K/<
7-K/
5-K/
n -r_
T3 TJ
OV   (M   Tt
g>   S
2"° °
>  re
V.   U   U
re tj
S>   >   >
OJ      (H
Pj  ra rt
CQ P
c re
oco Be
AmB
AmB
CO CQ
fl fl
fl fl
OJ    OJ
H   rt   rt
<fi«-<
-,3
g^i_j -o
W4 S
-i- ^ >
■?-. 3
6 TJ ^
.-   u, OJ
0)  aj >
>  > rt
rt  rt OJ
OJ   OJ 03
mm"
o o 3
O CJ <
O  O J
-Eg
< <&,
44<J|_i
»»4 1
■O T3 DV ttl
dd u4
rt    rt  fln  _Q
t. tl « ■"
aj oj ■£ s
> > S 2
re re > -fl
OJ oj cs cj
mpq u 3
__.[_. PP 3
.3 .3 7 i-.
re re o j
c fl pd Ej
co co < Z
CJ   (J ~U   M
re re re cj
ft ft ft H
OV -H   "H  -H   -H
u 6666
A 4444
tr- Os Os Os Os
^ PQ03PQCQ
7^ 4 v. vo r1-
2 cs cn tj- ift
Jh o tJi tj tj
>; 00 00 00 M
re oj  oj  oj  oj
£ PQ PQ pQ pp
OOO
444
-v. w
ft ft ft
rHCN4
cs tj- vi
di _D TJ
66o
Os Os &^
ft fcO
433
Tf  CTv  Ov
Ov   --.  "*■.
x. -D tJ jd jd re
0 oo oo oo
)   OJ   OJ   OJ
1 PP PQ PQ
00  00  00
OJ     QJ     OJ
PQPQCQ
ft ft ft ft
SSSS
rararererererare
CO I—IHHH    u    CJ   OJ
oooo
U   U   V   U   u   u
OOOOOOO
tC cfl tfl cfl eg cfl tfl
"o 'o 'o 'o "o *o  o
.1"
o B   I •£  i tj S
TJ *j  S u ^ h SI
•^ rt  rt  3  rt  ^  rt
mB ~ma ga
cq        m
QJ ^
m
> aJ
so
a   I  Tj
a ffm
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS
A 129
P,   C-c
.a w
0 o
! cn Ov ©
I r- cs ©
: cs vo vo
ft  ft
ft  ttl
o o
CS©TfOCScnVDrHCTv©OOOvOv-TfTfTf
lft00CSrHrHTfrHTfO©CSOvTtlftOO
lft   CS   Ift   Tf   CM   C<->ftCSVD^Cnr-^Tft~lftrH
Tt cn Tf" vo" oo" h cs cn Tf cs cs rn cs Tf Tf cn"
ft ft ft
3 r r
CO CO CO    O
tt i as
cs, j »>
cs"   ! rf
© tj tj
O T3 tj
! © © ©
:ooo
jo^ijq
1 cs" es cs"
I r~ ift o
l t- cs ©
: ift vo vo
o©iftiftiftr-©Tt©csoooOrHc;cs
©ocscsr-cn'-,v^©Tt©©corn©Tt
iftiftt^^c^iftVOvoiftoqOt/^^ifti/nvD
©©©"©©'©'©"©"©"©'-'©©O1©©
© ift o
o r- o
© vo o
ift©©>-HVDvco©r^voTtvotscnavvD
©vorHrsovcnt^iftOvcnovcs©Tr©oo
coCTvooovr~-csooovcniftvo©r-iovCTvcs
VD (S VD l
oo cn vo Ui
t-r-t-00
TfCSCSTtTtTtTfCSCSrH^J-CSCSCSCSCS
r-r-r^t--r-r-r~t~-t--vot~~-r-t^r~-t-~t--
v0vdvd©OV000V0V00000V0vdvdvdvd
00 Ov Tf VD lft m
'" ift m  © ov m
•n rn oo © cs
©CTsrHOOCnrHr-rHOr—   VD
iftcn"—'TtmTtTtTfTroooo
rtfH-r-t*-t-l--tH«ftr-rtI>
1,477
1,570
1,496
CS CS CS
r- r- tr-
so VO VD
cs CS o
CS r- cs
vo r- vo
ll      Tt cn vo    :
1 vo O
l     1       vo cn rH    j
! O O
rn      cn cn
8-72
8-72
11-74
I    Tf   CS
rH   00
r- r-
rn ©
rn cn
_Oh
(N n t*5
__
O   Tf   rH
tr- Ov co
ift
193
Tf  OV
6613
4 4 m oo
OV ctv   °j   CJ
*r^     (J     J)
OV CS   P   g
i*-i c_f_   3   3
oooooo
1 oo
o o
j- x> Dp
60 00 - -.
flj   QJ   g   g
m m <c<
*rt "rt C C
^_ ^j ra rt
QJ qj CU pL|
CJ   CJ   O   CJ
cc tc cn cd
^O
ph m m mpo4
| 4 "■ vo ri -i ov
H <N 2 "t "
-ij   cj TJ TJ 7
ftn 00 0U M t
rr QJ   QJ   QJ   (
rnHPing
_ ra ra •= ■= - w
■00!
r 4 -
■707*77 7 T"? J07
' O O 0 0 .1 4 O
vj Ov     I
4^3;
SW\-sWs,>*Ovp-iss
PP o^ft ft ft ft O^ri -4
» l 13 *
T-. vo <q m
T3 X) X. X>
Zi  rH CS
<!   CS   TJ-
jd re x)
00 00 00
OJ    OJ    OJ
CQ CQ PQ
T3 JD _Q
00 00 00
QJ   Q   OJ
CQ CQ CQ
00 M 00 M
QJ OJ 4J <U
CQ CQ CQ PQ
ft ft ft t
SSEf
» o j> o
j tc <fl eg j
1 "o o "cj '
1 ra •« re ■
.PhPhPhC
rarerererarererera
flJflJOJOOOJOJQJOJi
000
os as os
o cj re
od 00 00
OJ    OJ    OJ
PQ PQ CQ
CO
4
TJ
rt
L
u
y
1-
vc
oc
m
—
ra
7<7
<4<
^4?:4
£^*^
4^g¥
cs ov L- 00
so <?  7 *?
rn  re TJ TJ
>.>.>.>.
H    Ih    Ih    Ih
)h     Ih     Ih     Ih
0 oj  cj  o
X X X X
"    OJ   QJ   QJ
<4<
OriD
cn " Ov
6 TJ TJ
E? & £*
U.     Ih     Ih
OJ   QJ   QJ
XXX
QJ    QJ    OJ
O   3   3   D   3J   3
S cq S 5 S 3 ca
I I'
eo
QJ
ou
re re re re re re re
o oj qj qj qj flj oj
re re re re ra ra ra
zzzzzzz
QJ    OJ    QJ    QJ    QJ    0J    0J
a -a
* -a
» .2
a *
1 "aJ
I 9
Z'i
WJnfl
QJ  "
CQ
o
TJ
3 1
m  I >,
_3 » " o
TJ   QJ   CO   2
S3 3u
ra
K «
0 fl
x §
H -^
fl r-l
ffl
el)
CO
qj ra
 A 130
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
T3
1>
3
a
a
O
u
<n
§
*J
O
*J
Q
53
<5
TS
C
<3
£
I
3
a
ftl__
ttitt,
OO
w ra
c£"5_
ftft
—"5 e
■S_§.2c
TJ TJ TJ "
QJ   W   OJ
TJ TJ TJ 1
r- ift cn ©
© cn © ©
m Ov Ov vo
o t-* i> ©
© r- r- ©
© ift ift o
r-. © © rH*
TJ TJ
OJ o
TJ TJ
TJ TJ
QJ OJ
TJ TJ
CO CO       CO CO
© ©     o o
cs ©        © ©
00 © © ©
CS lft Ov
OV cs vo
©   Tf    00
cn oo
cn Tf ov
r- ift r-
© © y. © © ^ *
o © « © © <S ift
©„ q 'g o,q^ Tt,
cs" cs* § cs" cs" oj cs"
vo ift c-j cs r- Tf cn
OV CS © © CS rH lft
C^ © tN_ Vl ©^ Tf^ rH
CS" Tf rH    th" rt f-
OV Ov (S lft Tf lft t—
cn cn cs © t-H cS vo
OO 00 CO VO VO t-; t>
© © ©' o" ©' ©* ©
H
•d
Tf
o
<u
o
fl
Tf
o
o
00
cs*
•fl
fl
ra
<
00
©
rt
vo
tj^
rt
©
p
©
ift
Ov
o
d
cn cS cS cn CN
tr- tr- Os Ov © ; rn
r-   rH  ^f  rH  IT.   rH  \D
lft   t-   VO   CO   CS   ©   Tf
cn     ift ift vo Ov
00 © lft Ov
t- oo r- oo
tr- m       cS rn
cn Ov Tf <N
r- ift t— tr-
oo oo  tr- Ov
Ics cn cs
\-7 s" T
Ov CO OV
1ft lft OO Ov VO Tt rH VD
Tfvovornr-Tfift     |rH
voiftTtvooocnoo     it—
O        !rHrH©OvOv(_JVOs        I   Ov
©iftiftcsovt--r-©cSTtc-
[^■cSiftiftOvcnvDr^iftiftco
CSrHVOcnt--rHVDCSVOTtVX;
TfVOrH
vd cn ©
Ov 00 ift
Y rt rt
< V T
4<:<:
w
CTv Ov
gag
T,   \£)   M
TJ   tj TJ
■-■-■-.
rt pj cn rt
OJ    OJ    OJ
XXX
O    QJ    QJ
i> u S u
x x x X
QJ 01   QJ   OJ
tt flj   fl H 33   =
ffl fflfflffl fflfflffl
ra re re ra re re re
QJ   <a   o   QJ QJ   OJ  QJ
zzz
£££
zzzz
QJ   OJ   QJ   QJ
££££
^3
Ov Ov
uo
__■_>
>» >>
— —
QJ   QJ
£> J-
QJ    QJ
3 3
mm
WW
rt  tri
ZZ
vi -i.
<n s
CN T-
&£•
OJ    OJ
X X
QJ    OJ
3   fl
ffl ffl
at at
ZZ
%Z   Uz
" *£ <_
7   4  Tf
Tt Ov Ov
>HH
re tj tj
QJ   OJ   OJ
XXX
QJ    flj    flj
fl 3 fl
CQ ffl ffl
CQ ffl ffl
000
VO 00
°?4
!"S
>■*><:!
' &«j>
i S ._'
> a J .
,§..
m|,
!< S
l LL   3
i a o
i*««
I    X   CJ
I  QJ  at
iHOil
o "? fr o '
"7 oo re M \
(j-a I £?b
j C ffl ra re
j   fl 'T TJ TJ
: o < fl fl
' ffl ft fl 3
v HH ____   O   ft
oj  re .fl .fl
fl  x  o o
R  oj  re re
<Hft ft
lft °f
■3
CO  Tt
cn<7
Ol \C
1 >
cc <
! «
O   b-.'0
m a c
re re fl
JTJ   O
fl ffl
re o <d
TJ ffl ft
s <*z
3 TJ
0  re o
ffl      *H      CJ
"  oj  re
fl   c
3 5
CO <
Tt   ^ ,
*7 oo cn
VI   rH   V
oo cn r-
>.&t
& rt b
« "O  re
TJ C TJ
A    3    fl
fl o g
0 ffl  o
2<™
ra t-< "ra
*. 7 *_
QJ "^ tj
E Is
o x -2
ra c. 3
Pi H ffi
•  -i W 1
m    M
_. 8 <- _. ■
H   ^ —i   v-   QJ
1-    O   o    Vh  „
QJ T- ^  QJ c!
■8 "alls
Q
i-l   !
■31
c 3
0    Om
m a
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS
A 131
cn (S rH
ov ift r~-
oq,© Ov
Tf" lft  rH
I   ©   Tf   ©
!  © O ift
!  © OO CO
©?J©lft ©  ^  rH  O
-h   O    flOTtr-©**rHO
reoooov^rec^^rHO^
o cs""2 cs" cs" o c^' <u ift cs"
fl-      re &      ft
.53       X ■« 3
Q     <        Q     co
rt o
CO  Ov
r-l so
; rn i cn ift
I rn : cn ov
I cs
f-   VO   Tt   rH
cn ift oo do
vd © r- cs
00 ©
rH O
Ift  lft
' vo © lft ©
CO © (S ©
! VD ift Ov ift
! ©TJ
!°-a
1 rM  ir.
© o
o o
© ©
X
<
Ov O
cn in
t> r-
: r- ©
1 vo O
1 Ift Ift
Tf   ©        i        1
fS ©      1      1
Ov ©    i    :
' o ©
©   T-H         '          '
SSS
© © Ift
Ift OV rH rH ©
CTV CS lft 00 CN
cn ift Tt co ift
CSr- !OrHift©OvVOTtOvVOTt
t-rH !©o4l^00cniftcsiftt-
r~ ©    :Tf©Tfvoiftcnr-ovr-vo
©CSrH-Hj-TfCTvrH(H-)TtTt
r-r-r--r-r-vor-r--r~r-
ClO©©0©rHO©VDVO
Ttvovr_.'-H-^-r-~rHVOCTvOcocSift
vO(S©ovc^vDiftvor-oor~vDrH
Tflftlftt—   VOTt^-TfTtTfTfTrVD
Ift  rH  in
lft   OV   Tf
»r>o
! rn (M      :     !
-_^
'  rH  rH       '       '
oo cn vo
vo r- vo
rH  Tf        :        !
t> r-    :
ovovt^.
cn  rH
© ift cn
in ift ift
tr-   ©   rH
rn cn
oovor-iftcnf-cSOv
OOOOOOVOVOC-rHCC
©tSOCSOOrHCSCS
rHrHrHcncSrtcncn
■ Tf Tf
Tf Tf rH rn
i"* *7 r^ r^~    '•■
t- t—  00 OO Tf
^^c^viA V
cn oo -_. rn r-
>i >i >. X (M
rt re re ra tj-
tjtjtj tj rn
fl fl c c -
fl 3 3 fl £
O   O   O   0   rt
m m cn m -o
zzzz I
< < < <n m
ft  ft  ft  ft  r,
o O O O _c
O   O   O   U   q,
ra ra re re tr
x x x x fl
QJ   QJ   QJ   V u
HhhhS
) 00 oo
)66
- 4 4
v CTv Ov
. 6 o
O J„
1S66
;i344
_f4*e
|CN li
I .Q C*. 4
VjrHrn6
►? i i ^^r
,H Jil^_ ^ x
QJ    QJ
i x x
- X Xi
I   3   3
) ffl ffl
. o o
)   >   o
. o i
. in re
1 ft ffl
)    QJ    QJ
I E E
) o o
100
AXwj[/-,Xcotf__/J"o
X   Hi   ojX   QJ ^QJ JD 7;
' K 3 "^  o m X X X fl
-j ffl X X X PQ
3   ft 3   3   fl _
2 •£ c ffl ffl  g ffl CQ ffl ra
■DraHr-HMnr-iH+J
.. *™       rare       ra  ra  re oi
* s
3°
QJ   O
EO
12
OSi
a s'B ■
rt ra rt qj
' 'C 'C °C   QJ
OJ   QJ   QJ   fi
o. d. a c
'CJCJCJCJCJCJCJCJ
CC cc JC cc cc CC £ eg
QJ   QJ
a c_
E E
iOO
699
5.13 ci
<?«s
in X) -h
_3_
">mm
OJ   ►-,    "
m so
ft£u
Soo
W cfl tfl
o "o 'o
ft ft ft
I-I '
co S*
°* Z:
_Q
O H
'3 'a
m -i-
fem
Z_
Km
Ov <
rJ   00   OV
<4»2
Q__^^
i.a.2n
oo  c  c 7
obbS
^ a d. ra
.h s 3 ™
3 "} °? o
m c b •=
_, T3 TJ  E,
<oua
fe o oO
<. ,_* ,-C Ph
g rt rt <
.* ra ra ^
g d d O
<<
Ov VC
■d rt
OO
Ph Ph
<<
oo
tfi tfi
QJ
i.
hJ
>. rt
S3 £
TJ S3
C  rt
3 tfi
pa
a *
So
Is
<:   mo   o
U
J.  c
X   s
*5cq
d
c
d
3
I
0
G   O
A
1      °
C   O
TJ
TJ
p.
Oh Ph
■a
m
9>
ih  ra
en   &
_treek
sky—
oject
CJ   CJ
QJ    QJ
X  re
Al   3 P<
PhPh
m
0
"o
v_
It
TJ
c
E3
.■-
(IJ
ft   rH
 A 132
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
T3
O
3
I
a
o
R
Ov
"H
•H
tr,
v.
SO
-C.
§
So
-S.
1
"^3
e
Eh
V.J
K
Q
c
OOCOOVO^OOQ^  ©©iftOv
Ph_.
S
rH         ©0©0©OVlft©TJoTJ
Ift
O rt © .2 © O ©
cn
-.-,
rH        l©OO©OTf00©_^©_2i
Tt
0 r- 0 *■> 0 0 0
r^
OOM^tO^OOp^  ©Oiftrt
P-
Ov     j ©, © ©, © ©^ cn ctv 0_ ^ © ^
•ft"    ' cs" cs" cs" cs" cs" rt en cs* § cs" 8
r-l
r-'
©^ -> O « ©^ © ©,
cs"cs"cs" v- cs"es rf
r.
©, ©^ Ov^ OC; ©^ TJ O ©, ©^ XJ   5 0 Ift^ lft
cs cs" Tt" cn* cs" § cs cs" cs" n> cs" cs* es* cn"
00^
'"",            &ft
cn
QJ
ft                 ft
rt
"^
3         3
X
W                            OT
3                      fl
CO      to
0
to              w
B,l
CS     [iftr-f-VDvDiftOOiftrHCTvift
OV Ift  CS       !  VD  VO  rH
|
©0©Ttr-iftVOOOCTvt--vD(Sift'-H
BhOh
oo
Tt    !iftcscnTfvor~-cnrHOcnvo
VO        IOvrH(H^iri00rHrHlftCSC-00
•ft Tt r-    : Ov rn cv)
IftOOVOvlftrHCMOOcnrHOOt-OVlft
00 rH lft       cs^ t- r-
cncniftOOOiftcncnrHC— vdvovO'-h
cn      csiftvor-iftooovcS      rn
cs                                cs
r- i-h"    ' cn cn cs
rHrH00r-rH          -HrHrH                   CMTft~-
***
©    !cn©oo©cnr-©©vocso
VO rH 0 Tf OO OO CS
OOflOOOr-iNOvt-OOOOOOVO
CS     !Ov©rHvovovD©OOOrHcn
VD  VO   ©   OV   Tf   rH   QO
©©OvmcnvovovD©Tf ottoOv
C
oo    it— ovovoovoor~-ovifti>vo
•ft vo © vo_ r- >ft vo
©r-COOvOVOOOqr-;©OvOOOOvOv
O      '©"-.©©OO©©©©©
©  O'  rH*  ©'  ©  ©  d
rH©"©©'©0©©rHO   r-^O©©'
w re
CS     ICCSOvOOiftOvTfrHCTviftcn
ts cn en rn 00 rn m
VD   H   rl   t".  CO   HI VD  O  CO   h    CnrHVDCO
Tf    ivDrtTtt—csr-csvDOvoor-
rn Tf r» 00 ts 00 ift
HO\r-Hh  CSr-©rH^O-ftlftrHlo
rn    !rHCTvOvo\r-invDvoa\r-Ov
t— VO  r- r-if■ OO lft
cnTrcnTfTtiftiftvoiftiftOvt-iftift
ft, p.,
rH       '  rH
-_!■
QJ
CS        ,rHTfcnrH(MTfrtTtTtTtTt
!
Tf Tt -rf Tt cn cn Tt
j
cncnTtcnTtTfcncnrncn cncncncn
ra
trr    i r- r- t-- r- r- r- r- t-^ i> r- r-
1
rp r- r- r- rp rj- t—
rpt^rprprpr-~rprprj-t--- rpr-rj-o
p
©        !CMrHfM0000C-VOt—   IftrHVO
r- t— cn vo vo t- r-
OOVDt^-yjVDIftt—  VDVOVO   rHrHVOVD
Well
uthori-
:ation
No.
iftvoTfcnOviftrncnr-iftiftvooo
00 ift en vo ift un r-
cn©vDoor-ovO\TtvDmovr-oo©
vovDOvcnvooocMOvooTtvOcn©
OO   OV   O   Tf   OO   lft   00
t^—lOVCSIftt-VDTtlftrH    OOlT-rHy^
rHcnr-iftrH[—rnvor-           mm
© cs cn cn rn cs ©
cs^h      r-TfrHTtr-r~-cscs-—.oocn
CncnCSCnrtCSrHCM                                rH   rH
i
rH            HHHCI.H
cn                      rn                 vh m cn       rn
<"
j
Tt
j
© ©' _
■k<
<^
T     1    rH  rH
42
*J
44
V
<<<.<
&■*.*
_
4
<
- c
*
Tl
m
in
'ft
<
HC
9
Ov OV
VD  Tt  r-
Tf
T.
Tl
Tt
B
ra
Z
OvCJ.CN-.
c*. cn cN cn
at T_ £1   o
■rj. . ■* 4
<5§vS3^
<
a-
:
.-
rt
i
4   Tf   _L   Tf
OvOvIov
-*ac-   ?■<    1
tt- <*> 4 4 3
<
Tl
a
<22
•v,T>vt
Tf
<3
*0J
3 3 3 3 < a 4 £ <? 2 £ < <
oi
0
c!
^ov<:pq9
rt <f Ov H £ 00       j
rt  fM  TJ    6  J,    6
•a a s s 4 d
3    U     U   ^   H*   r-
BUOTUi
«Tj
Tt *7
3?
Tf   ffl   OV   OV   Tf      I
'T © co cq i *
'.^""'fo
MM*? M M ^M      \
,y ,cj _o _o 0 7? 0
aJ4 ii Jd ^ M ^ CT
3333^^,1,-^0006"
c_   O    O   O   O   CJ   O -^ —^   0                 I—- v'
"? °? °? "? v_> *? °? -c '3 '3 '3 a '3    !
iccco.t«rt=mmmom
oooou^phCSI:-.,:
J_S^J_JJ_i3PQpqa-rHrC,rC7^rH
'fl 'fl M 'fl "3 'fl '3
PQ CQ 0 pq n g pq
cmmmOmOvoovm-g-g^;^    i
U<<<'_<o-Ti<Bnij'3    i
ft ft m ft ft fl ft
^ZAZpqrHfflOOZftft.O-H
J3000cj0u330<<3™       1
0 0 x10 0 "3 0    !
rerarereffli-ioooooxo     |
-n-n fl -n       ^ <C u O U  u  u   u
S«^«!^o^flrtrerere.'flre     :
H"t"c^v.(1f--lUOCO
<<<<co^ftHHHh^H     |
O   O   4J   CJ   0 jA   0        l
re ra .fl ra re **i ra     :
•O ra ra raS g S m m | »_J rJ m w     '
2xxKoxoccxr.nflfl
< H H H Pm H ft co co H ft ft co c/a
x x x ^ x o__ ^     i
QJ   OJ CT   OJ   OJ H   QJ        1
*rt
*ra
73
OJ
O
0
0
o
ft
Tf
ift
vo
TJ
O
o
ft
2
a
3,                                                                                                                                              ^,                  lft                                                                           -_H      VO                                                                                                                                                            _«
5                           fi   2              £H                             fi
ft
vj
1
I                           8   |              ?|                              1
1   Pc                                                                        ■-.    ,   Ph                                     ■_■> Ph                                                                             •—
M
hj                                                                         O        "                                      O   „                                                                              O
QJ
OJ
£-.8                                                                        £    frg                                     SS                                                                             £
u
C    Ih                                                                                                                  rn    Ih                                                                 »h
§ft                                                                                §0h                                            ft
■fl
ffl
P
Q
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS
A 133
Ov
OO
oo
vo"
CO
© cn o
© © O
© r- ©
©   rH   r-   -^
fS ts cs Si
OO   tS   l>  W
Tf" VD   rH
! cn vo © -
I o cn © '
!  VD t- t- v
§■5 ■sR.
lft O^Tf^cM
cn'cn vo rt
© vo ift t—
ov © c— cn
r- ov ov oo
oo0 w
2°o o
°„ °, © ©
CS" CS (M? QO"
30
1,35
1,78
3,9H
ts
o © VO
goto
© ©_ VD
-OH
o ©
TJ ©
c°.
CJ CS   QJ     Zi
ft        p,   CS
3 3
CO      to
iov^
: ov £
1 VD ->
'©©
©  Ift  U-j  CS  O
o cs £ -ft ©
©^ CS^ so °1 oo
cs" r-" (m" Tf" r-"
O rt\ OV ©
© £ © o
CJ\lft oo^cs
VO ^ OV lft
r^ ^ tr- ift
rH   Tf   (S   '
Ift Ov vo "
tr- ift vo v
cnovcocnCTvTfvocnOvcnooo
v.OvTtr-vor-CSiftCTvC-Ttr'^
t~~l>cncn©rH©r-r~-cncnc-.
rHrHCncntSCSCSrHrHcnCnrH
|  |
VD VO ift CO
Tf Ov rH ©
cn cn vo Tt
V- tr- tr- t—
rH   t-   lft ©
oo t-h m  o vd
OO Ov VD ift Ov
Tf Ift VD Ift Tf
Tf Tf CS CS Tf
r- r- t— r- r-
ft r- r- vo
OV rH 00 lft ov
co vo vo ift cn
ts CS ts CS
© © Ov
o Ov ov
Tf ift vo
! [-. rH rH Ift
| © rH cn Tf
! VO^ ID VD vo
1 cn" cs" cs" cs"
O Ift Ift Ift VD 00
00 Tf tS VD O Ift
Tf CS Tf VD Tf ©
Cn rH CS CS rH CM
1
rH   rH   ^
i.    _i*   **>
OV OV    ..
vo Oiu
rtt-Jj
J- ^ -3
H u 3
SB"
mm <;
OOfe
PhPhZ
<< o
ZtZlai
OO g
xx#
SS
<!<:■-
^i_i:
Ov Ov <*
-» —■   I
(id, 4
ci4?_
f? T Hh
o^J vi
i- M VO
.H .y i>
5 3 M
m m o
zzm
TJ TJ
P ° z
ft ft "3
ot to G
QJ   OJ   G
ZZd
'o   o   «
ra rt o
PhPhQ
S~-
H 00^
<  rtO
4 *i -
Ov   O Ov
i m a
■° "o m
3 - <:
m w rr
4^3
Ov -^">
>ft &H
ft i A
i   tS .5
cs cs s;
Si   6 Si
ZZZ
TJ TJ TJ
*3
.< SI'S:11"
H-S^vi
H r-  00
< vo*
4 *?.*
Ov ji  o
i o m
"l '3 k.
_,  o P<
flflS
rt       ti
•i_l<3
Si 8
OOPh
w  o   X
O  rt   QJ
OPhH
O   O   '_
rt  rt  rt
p. o. Ph ;
H SS"
-_" "^~ ^- '"v
Cjv  lft  rH  rH
TJ   6   O TJ
M M MM
1>    flj    QJ    QJ
QJ    QJ    QJ    flj
'_   :_   i-   ■_
oooo
3 "3 "3 "3
ffl ffl ffl ffl
OT    OT    OT    OT
OJ    QJ    QJ    QJ
££££
OOOO
9V99§
OO  O OV  rH rM
r- oo oo Ov (M
.O u TJ Xl   tl)
J_J M M M M
QJ OJ   QJ   QJ   QJ
QJ OJ   QJ   QJ   QJ
Cuuufi
MMMMM
ooooo
3   3  3   3   P
£££££
ooooo
cfl tfl ic cc eg
'o 'o 'o  o 'o
os ^f as
CO   CTV   rH
Sow
oo oo cn
v. tr- cs
TJ    cll JJ
J- J4 Jh
OJ QJ OJ
QJ QJ O
Ih    Ih    Ih
OOO
M MM
ZZZ
CC (fl cfl
re
ra
r.
ft ft ft
<I
So
O  rt
oZ
CC    HH
J,
"•US".
4. -5 ^4
Sr30^
p?<-)£o
r-  C   a Ov
u-> ra *T Tt
■vi .H .3 I
•a p ^ -9
xi c o _-
« •< -_ ra
o_ So
o £Z o
S S «<§
s _; « ,u _: «
j i
QJ   >,
U "^
o
^4  3
•S3
1
Q
S -a
P 3
QJ *^
•a 3
g oj
Q ft
1 <
OT r-|
Sit
o i o
Oi 5
3 H
co
<
hh   cn
2 i
rt   w
a
QJ
.J
2 9
P °
Ph P<
< m
a c
'So
PhPh
QJ QJ
>    >
— Z
o_ i75
Mt35
 A 134
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1974
T3
<u
5
a
o
y
Th
IX
0\
vU
So
Tj
«
■k_
Eh
i
&_
Eh
a
rJ[T.
Pncn
2
Ph^.
t-.ll.
OO
<*c/j
,8
CTv   ft ft©
o" 3 3 w
OT    1/1
e<t re
OO
vo ift cn Ov
tt vo <S vO
vo cn^ift ift
cn" Tf" rn vo"
rH © O  O  ©
lft  TJ  0  O   "A  *°
-J Ift   « © ©   CJ   QJ
ra O^TJ ©^3 TJ TJ
o ©** § es cvf § §
ftCS   Q, a ft
S   Si
3   3
CO __
10,400
75,243
8,400
4,435
33,187
13,740
53,470
r- r^
Tf cn
cs o
VD  rH  00  Ov  Ift  00
VD CS Ov cn Tf Ov
CS Ift oo vo VO ift
tS  CS   tr-  t-H VO  rH
Tt Tt r- ift oo ©
ift © © © vo r*
o VO ©
r- oo ©
vj t- vi
: t-^ o —i ts
!  t-H   o  CO  lft
i ift ift r- v.
I r- »ft
!  cn  rH
j VD VO
© o o
■ © © © ©
' © ©
OV © Tf rH o r-
rH CS lft CS © Tt
t^ vo co vo o vq
O* © 0 © rH ©
lft   lft   Tf   ©   f-  Ift
r- ov r- © vo cn
ift VD  VO ift lft lft
© © © ci © d
£.3
ftft
> n reA
cn vo vo Tf Tf in o
OV   TJ-   rH CTV   OV   CTV  CS
cs ov Ov r- oo oo Ov
CN  rn" rn" rH*H  rn" rn"
OV   Tt   © Tf   Tf   -*   Tf
v<p t-p r-      t— tr- tr- tp
rH cn CO t> VD VD Ift
t-r-cnt-cn TtTfrH-rf
vovdcsvocs oo ov r- oo
iftrtTfrnTf i-HcnCTvrH
tScncScncS cnmtscn
cnor^cs r- r— oo r-
tsr-r-vovoesovTt
oo vo oo r- ift vo v\rn
cs" cs" cs" cs" cs" cs" cs" ts"
lOVTfTfOOrHrHt^rtlftTfCSr^O
llftt-rHCSr-OVVDrHCS   CS©OOTf
! cs" cs" cs" cs" cs" cs" cs" cs" cs" cs" cs" cs" cs"
oocsovOTteScSTt
vo rp vo r- t- r^ r- r-
ofacncncsiftooooift    i un r~-
vfTj-'t'tTft'fTt^'fO'*^
r- r- r- tp tj* tp tptp tp tp rp rp t-
t^iftiftvoiftvoiftiftiftiftcnviift
■ftoovDovvocSTtcncn©©r-rtTtTfiftrHr-rHoofSoo rH \d vo r-
ootsr^ift©iftr---rHcnTfTfrHvo©Ttoo'-HOvvocsrnr-- r- vo *-h o
lftlftrH^lftTftSCTvOOtSlftlftrHrH(T-.lr,OrtrtCSOVlft    O  O0   1*1   H
■-icStscScnrHrHrHfMCScncncn cn       mmrtHHriiNiN
g
re
z
cs
es cs cs cs cs
o^ ts es es es
00 OO OO CO oo
q  OO  00  00  CO
cs cs oo es co
,Jj ts es cs es
rn VD VO VO VD
QJ    OJ    QJ    QJ    QJ
XA J3 J= JJ M
OOOOO
ra ra ra re re
ooooo
c c c g c
re re re re re
ooooo
X X X X X
OJ   OJ   QJ   QJ   QJ
HHHHH
*7 °° op x*
°? 2 cn °?
rn © yJj rt
vo rfl ,fj vo
flSJwfl
O r j O   O
O cj s o
M  q"   -O   rJ
< rt « <
oops o
-.&_.£■
Ih    Ih    Ih    Ih
3 3 3 3
OOOO
co to CO CO
Tt 7
^^Oo^OTfvOv^Ovc^crv
^.JrJ   JrJ
© vo Ov (M cn
ift u-i vo r- r-
otij-j-ii
w   CO   flj   o   OJ   QJ
~      J*      -*     _^      ^      M
hH
°^ °^ oo
°s
rl OV
Ov Ov
S rtO r- c
°V m
-ft M
Ds<?^S3c.o
Imp
Cdn
ICla
alCI
alCI
IOE
2  o2wO  oZ
aj  0  H  n  c.
?ft ffi Oft
O   <u
ra £;
ft >
OO
cc ec cc tg cfl
'o 'o 'o "o 'o
re re re re re
T
O-
_-0,h__fv*-J,-^,T»S^^-i^h_hi
■a-a 4 04^^(1,0544
«j qj^ <_??.?4vi?-ov5
_
h-
••S^j^jtt.(i,>?trffit;i
M
r-.JhJcNi-lrl.cN4 M-°ovooci
tj ra^^ 0 _j. .c  ra o-*-*tj^ 0
ajajbi-.Qj!JajCjQjrareocjQj
-.-■nn^OlH-'h'vJvJlHhlH
a rt1-1^ du d «« 0 0 es « «
DD ||G |0vJOj3^000
ftft^rn ftM ftrere S Srarera
iSS vi re£ ra»q o'aj<!<1fljQj'aj
cctC 4J weCj-ieCCCtceceCecentC
0-
a
P!Sfl,!Sp.p,fi,fl<P.P.pH(-,
D a
3 o
iO
all
goz
o
rt   w
S  rt _rt
- I-H 5.
 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM STATISTICS
A 135
r 1
rts
VO
' r^
00
cr,
Tt
cn
::
Ov Ov cs o Tf r~
r— Ov cn © cn ift
in ift^ von vo Tf ift^
rn" vo" vo" rs" O rt
cS 00 cS © vo t-
th CS
I ift vo ift ©
1 © O O rH
: ov ©
!    Tf lft iPlHv,
i vo ift : tr- tr- ift © t"; '
' © d l©ddr-.o©
; ro "ft © © vo ■
1   p")   rH   ©   O   C**   OV
I  t- t-_  '"   *      ' '
T3 TJ TJ
OJ OJ CJ
TJ TJ TJ
o5
o °„
of es
TJ0TJ
QJ S QJ
TJ  §  TJ
C   rS   C
QJ  CS    qj
ft ft
OT OT
3 3
CO        CO
© tS VD
©  rH  OO
fS   rH  Ift
rH  (S
CO  Tf       !
OCN      i
!5S 1
i t- cs    :
rH  (ft  O
rH  lft       '
'  rt  rH       '
Ov ift vo
vo cs r~
vO so vo
Ov vo
r- vo
CTvr-iftrHooests©ov
oocnc—rHoesoocnift
Tf  Cn rt f> rt rt rH cs^ t*H
es" es" cs" ts" cs" es" es" ts cs"
COOCSCTvOOvOTfr-
lft©lftrHOOeMCTVcnrH
Tt   lft_ VO^ Tfn Tf_ rH   rH^ rH   C^
es" es" es" es" es" es" es" es" es"
TfTfCSTfTfTfTfTfcn
C-t-t—   t-tHf-t—fpt-
lftVO00lftlftlftvoVj£)l>
cno\coooiftOTtcnvovoovtSrH\Dvo©cnTtCTv
cnTroor-©rHiftr~-CTvr-cnvDrHmvDesovo©
Ovesvortiftcnift©r-t-ts-HeScoovooiftesift
-"NW rn cm       cn cs
O O 00
VD VO TT
so as
Tf   Tt
Ov OV
rnr-.© ov vo t- oocsr~-iftOvr-es
cs©rH cnescn cs cs ift t^- Tt in Tf
cnvDTt cn cn r- vDVDTfTfOOTfvo
cnrHcn rn —
ts ts cn cs rn cs es
vo es
rH ©
cs cn
©■-^©r-I,©.^0^;
Tt   Tt   H^ Tt   ^J -
JOVOV
CN 2v Ov OV Ov Ov 17
__      ,-. *° _2
2 vo Q -p -h
-1 .*■   ot 17 17
1 4 4
00 Ov S3 °°   O
-_^r- cn
r t qj qj
i ^ .* .*
' c3 ''
? »
0 o « o "3 0 'C
cn cc ,_ cc m
00 ^ Ov CN c
c_ a c.x>,
J3 0 J3 S S -2 -5 S 3
a-a asssauu
o^ouuuu««
bIs212?h!H!!s=sI
HH   „£   HH     O     QJ     O     OJ     ra     ra     OJr-H     re   hH   -H
oZZocjZoo
:ti-i*_*_ccicfl^ca(5
■   — T. •« ot "ri *r.
Tf   u CTV Ov
107 Joo
lft   VO rH   rH
I        I      O      I       1
ra _q _^ re ,d
QJ    OJ    IS    QJ    OJ
Ih    h r V    Ih    Ih
re a w re re
00 &0O
-1   Cm   & P.
OOOO
cc eg eg cc c
.-*        v^        /-j        '_,        rj,       -j        ,j        w        vj
rera,~i.re'-a.rererere
PhAh^PhSSPhPhPhPhI
2S»»22*!2
*-     re  re ^,  ra  ci
ft, ft, f> ft ft
\S.ZZ
?o
av
m^
cA « u
r- ±3 a
1 3 2
mmm
ov ov _^
4 tfi
av
JgS   "V?   o9^
o2s
h-T 5
Mi
CTv TJ J3 1
I ■aZg
« "li
1 |h|
Ph Shis
ft ft ft
OOO
P. PC P3
- - -
.0
£t av
3
rt
0
s,
8 -.
., o O O o
-   °   !Q   -    -O
•?    4
CN Jd
« c
i 1
09 Q
Qo
o<o
9 u
,g «
S. «
iS a
3 Ph
H O
QJ r^
*oi op
CC! rrj
ft
.£ .5
0   O
Ih    n,
5« I
•S rt a
,£ -5 o
Pi
QJ
•a Al
,3    QJ
ct
7>
_    filM
S 2 «
p< gtfi
o
c
o
Tj     I    —' C-
•S    ^    ^   "S   -S      A   HH
S   3   re  « 7u    I    ra
|QU  ^PQ   SK
ft1     W
 A 136
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1974
T3
ID
d
c
o
U
ON
I—I
Prj
vu
O
TS
C
<3
Eh
■
to
CJ
IX
a
Eh
Q
Ph__
g
o ©
© ©
©„©,
ts"cs"
©
<_?
©■
Tf
tj
<L)
TJ
Q
qj
ft
3
cn
9 S
o  c
©   =
es" ^
_
S
>
© © c
o ts 5
CS rt cv
'
© c
O  C
©,C
es"es
!    O
!   es
i   *t
1    Ov
Suspended.
2,000
13,420
Suspended.
cs
so
VD
CT
c
5
c
©
C
©   rH
O   lft
cs"es"
en
rt
TJ
QJ
TJ
C
OJ
c
c
CO
AOFP
(MSCF/D)
Tf    00
VO 00
OO^cn
wes
1
©
©
vo
V?
o\
cn
es"
r- oo oo    : Tf oo
© t- cn    i ov ©
tt vo ift     ; tr- rn
cn cn Tf     ' cS cn
© 00
ift vo     !
ej^vB    |
es"rt     ;
©
1        en
vq_
1        cs"
rH 00     :
Tf ©    :
t-^cn    |
oo"t-    '
00
©^
00"
00     !
rt    !
Tf          j
00
rt
©      !
©    :
0    :
__;    1
~G
in ©
CO r-
VO 00
© ©
CTV
cn
OO
©
cn
oo
©
© Ov Ov
rH  tS  lft
r- r^ ift
© © ©
© Ov     1
© ift     1
o r-    |
h d   •
ift ©     !
es ©    !
vo ©     |
O h     !
!             t-^       !  lft  rH       !
I        cn    I Tf es    :
OO    1 Ov t-_
1        ©    ; © ©    ''
Ov
0
w rt
S '.5
o-o.
Ov t—
OO  CTV
—
Tf
rt
cs"
r-
Ov
ift
1
OV   Tf   Tt
CS rt O
rt rt cn
oo Ov
oo rt
cn en
F3   !
cn
rH       '
;
: es cn    i
1    t-   Tf
! Tt,CS_     !
1 es"cs