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REPORT of the LANDS SERVICE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1975 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1976

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT
Hon. Iames A. Nielsen, Minister W. R. Redel, Assistant Deputy Minister of Lands
REPORT
of the
LANDS SERVICE
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1975
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1976
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  Victoria, B.C., March 1976
To Colonel the Honourable Walter S. Owen, Q.C, LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the British Columbia Lands Service of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources
and Department of Environment for the year ended December 31, 1975.
JAMES A. NIELSEN
Minister of Environment
 Victoria, B.C., March 1976
The Honourable James A. Nielsen,
Minister of Environment,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir: I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the British Columbia
Lands Service for the 12 months ended December 31, 1975.
W. R. REDEL
Assistant Deputy Minister of Lands
 CONTENTS
Pace
Land Management Branch—
Introduction  15
Regional Summaries  16
Policy Division  21
Special Programs Division  22
Surveys and Mapping Branch—
Standard System of Mapping for British Columbia  39
Data Processing  39
Geographical Names  40
Legal Surveys Division  40
Field Operations Division  44
Map Production Division  49
University Endowment Lands  67
Personnel Services  73
Accounting Division  81
Mail and File Room  87
 BRITISH COLUMBIA LANDS SERVICE
Personnel Directory
(As of December 31, 1975)
N. Pearson Deputy Minister of Lands.
W. R. Redel Assistant Deputy Minister of Lands.
D. Borthwick   Special Adviser.
J. Webster Director, Land Developments.
A. E. Raines Co-ordinator of Ski Developments.
K. R. MacKay   Comptroller, Accounting Services.
R. C. Webber Director, Personnel Services.
J. M. MacKinlay   Supervisor, Composite Mapping.
D. S. Preston Supervisor, Mail and File Room.
R. P. Murdoch  .Manager, University Endowment Lands (Vancouver).
G. H. Wilson Director, Land Management Branch.
A. Smith   Assistant Director, Policy Division.
D. Goodwin Assistant Director, Special Programs Division.
A. Rhoades Asssitant Director, Lower Coast Division.
F. Edgell Assistant Director, Northern Division.
A. Paulsen   Assistant Director, Southern Interior Division.
W. J. Long Office Manager.
Vacant Director, Surveys and Mapping Branch.
M. Perks Data Processing and Research.
D. F. Pearson Geographical Research, Geographical Names.
W. A. Taylor Chief, Legal Surveys Division.
R. W. Thorpe Supervising Surveyor.
A. D. Wight  „„..Chief, Field Operations Division.
K. M. Bridge Supervising Surveyor.
E. R. McMinn   Chief, Map Production Division.
E. S. W. Andrews Assistant Chief, Map Production Division.
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ASSISTANT  DIRECTOR
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
DIVISION
D. GOODWIN
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ASSISTANT   DIRECTOR
POLICY DIVISION
A. SMITH
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  LAND MANAGEMENT BRANCH R  15
LAND MANAGEMENT BRANCH
INTRODUCTION
The structure and role of the former Lands Branch was changed substantially
in 1975 in line with new policy directions developed by the Department. The Land
Management Branch was created early in 1975 by restructuring the former Land
Administration, Land Inspection, and Special Services Divisions into five new
divisions each under the supervision of an Assistant Director with headquarters in
Victoria.
One of the five divisions, the Policy Division, is responsible for formulation,
statement, and continuing review of Land Management Branch policies, the Ecological Reserve program, administrative functions of the Green Belt Protection Fund
Act (1972), and for providing, through the Environmental Services Unit, advice on
the biological, ecological, and environmental aspects of Crown land management.
The second division, the Special Programs Division, has, as a first priority, the
provision of unserviced rural residential Crown lots up to approximately 5 acres in
size in subdivision units of about 20 lots. A second priority is to provide subdivisions up to approximately 10 per cent of the total developed, with water, and, if
necessary, sewer systems. Provision of recreational, commercial, and industrial
subdivisions is given the lowest priority. A land status unit of the Special Programs
Division provides land status information for the Lands Service, other Government
departments, Crown agencies and corporations, as well as agencies outside the
Government.
The remaining three, the Northern, Southern Interior, and Lower Coast Divisions, are responsible for regional management. Each of these three divisions takes
in two land management regions with the exception of the Northern Division, which
covers three regions. The boundaries of the land management regions are coterminous with seven newly established resource management regions, namely,
Kootenay, Thompson-Okanagan, Lower Mainland, Vancouver Island, Cariboo,
Skeena, and Omineca-Peace Resource Management Regions. Kootenay and
Thompson-Okanagan Land Management Regions are administered by the Southern
Interior Division; the Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island Regions fall within
the Lower Coast Division; while the Cariboo, Skeena, and Omineca-Peace Regions
are administered by the Northern Division. Each region is divided into land
management districts, of which there are 20 in the seven regions.
These changes have produced a significant shift of emphasis away from what
tended in the past to be a custodial role toward a much broader managerial function
providing for greater concentration on socio-economic factors in Crown land use
and management. Well-qualified personnel were appointed to fill the newly
created positions of Regional Land Manager in each of the seven regional resource
centres. With these new regional staff members the Branch is expected to play a
significant role in the operation of the regional resource management committees
which have been set up in the seven resource management regions. Regional Land
Managers will be responsible, in co-operation with other senior resource managers,
for determining the relative social and economic importance of competing uses for
Crown land, selecting areas suitable for various essential uses such as housing, devising land management plans, and for recommending the best allocation of the Crown
land resource which will have the least negative effect on other resource uses.
 R 16 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
In order to deal with land use matters in a more expeditious and efficient
manner the majority of the support staff now in Victoria will be gradually transferred
to the regions as required to carry out job functions which previously have been
carried out only at headquarters. The new regional structure is designed to facilitate
decentralization of land management responsibilities.
Though decentralization of administration has so far only been on a limited
scale because of the lack of trained staff and an adequate communication and data
exchange system, the effect of having all applications for Crown land processed and
screened through the regional land offices is already evident in that fewer applications
were received in the Victoria headquarters during 1975 and fewer disallowed.
Management of existing tenures continues to utilize a major portion of staff
time; however, increasing emphasis is being placed on management programs in
land-use planning and Crown land development. By the end of the year, regional
resource management committees, regional land management subcommittees, and
co-ordinated resource management committees had been set up and were operating
in most of the regions. Statistical summary tables for the Land Management Branch
may be found at the end of this Report.
Highlights of the three Regional Management Divisions are summarized in
point form under the headings of the seven land management regions as follows:
REGIONAL SUMMARIES
NORTHERN DIVISION
Cariboo Region
A new district office was opened at 100 Mile House on September 1, 1975.
The regional boundary was realigned to include an extensive coastal area west
of Tweedsmuir Provincial Park.
Six residential subdivisions comprising 173 lots are proceeding to development
under the Lots and Sites program.
A management plan was completed for the 10,000-acre Hallis Lake pasture
reserve and management plans are under way in six other areas totalling 158,000
acres.
The Indian land claims issue continued to frustrate land management decisions
in the Nazko-Narcosli, western Chilcotin, and Alkali Lake areas.
Omineca-Peace Region
Management plans were adopted for the Cecil Lake, Beatton-Doig, and
Groundbirch pasture reserves encompassing 180,000 acres. Planning is well
advanced in three others covering 52,000 acres of Crown land.
Phase I development of the Del Rio project was completed. The project will
open 13,000 acres of prime agricultural land for settlement.
An interdepartmental review of the agricultural land reserve within the Peace
River Block recommended boundary adjustments to remove large areas of Crown
land unsuitable for agricultural development.
Five residential subdivisions currently under development will provide 170
homesites.   Another 230 lots are at an advanced stage of planning.
 LAND MANAGEMENT BRANCH
R  17
Installation of water line, Cablecar Subdivision, Kitimat.
.'•'*£-»
Knarston Creek (Superior Road) Subdivision north of Nanaimo, showing paved road.
 R 18 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
CABLECAR SUBDIVISION
Cablecar Subdivision, Kitimat.
-:.;;k) *  .*
i
Cablecar Subdivision, Kitimat, road under construction.
 LAND MANAGEMENT BRANCH
R 19
Skeena Region
Settlement areas for remote homesites were designated in the vicinity of Atlin,
Dease Lake, and Telegraph Creek. Interagency concurrence is being sought for
similar proposals near Ealue Lake and Tsaybahe Creek on the Stewart-Cassiar
Highway. Sites for commercial subdivisions are also being examined in proposed
service centres along the highway.
The Regional Resource Committee processed six park proposals and 23
ecological reserve proposals, including an 82,000-acre ecological reserve near
Cold Fish Lake.
Cablecar Subdivision near Kitimat was leased by public auction and direct
post-auction application. Appraised value of the 118 residential lots exceeds $1
million.
An agreement was concluded with the Department of Housing and the Central
Mortgage and Housing Corporation for a Remote Housing Program in the Crown
subdivision at Dease Lake.
SOUTHERN INTERIOR DIVISION
Thompson-Okanagan Region
The Lac du Bois-Batchelor Hills Land Use Study near Kamloops was adopted
and a management committee was established to oversee its recommendations.
A Crown land management study on the lower Adams River was to be completed early in 1976 and the Bonaparte Plateau study was finished. Action is
pending on the recommendations given in the reports.
The Southern Okanagan Lands Project, which had been administered by
the Water Resources Service for many years, was returned to the Lands Service.
Permits were issued for removal of weed growth in Okanagan Lake. The
weed control program is being carried out by the Water Resources Service.
A review and report were completed on rentals of lake-front lands held under
lease for commercial resort purposes.
Gravel removed under permit from a small designated area in the bed of the
Thompson River in the Kamloops District yielded royalties of approximately
$13,000 in 1975.
Kootenay Region
Preliminary studies have been started on 30 sites considered to have potential
for rural subdivision. Small land use studies on the Lower Arrow, South Slocan,
and Cartwright Lakes areas were also initiated.
A study was initiated and letter of intent granted to the City of Cranbrook permitting a major effluent-disposal project on Crown land east of Cranbrook. Under
controlled conditions this proposal could provide the solution to the local cattle-
growers' demands for a cheap and readily available source of forage.
An evaluation study was made of the Cartwright Lakes area in the East
Kootenay to clarify the needs of the Forest Service under a timber sale application.
LOWER COAST DIVISION
Vancouver Island Region
Action was taken under section 54 of the Land Act in two separate incidents.
One involved removal of logs stored in trespass on a river estuary, and the other,
 R 20
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
removal of a retaining-wall and boat-handling works which had been constructed
on Crown foreshore without authority.
A total of 31 trespass cases of Crown land or foreshore was inspected and
reported on in 1975.
A study of the Campbell River estuary was begun. It will determine optimum
uses that can exist in harmony with the estuary's natural processes.
Of all inspections by the field staff in this region in 1975, 58 per cent were
located on foreshore.
Lower Mainland Region
One Crown subdivision of 32 residential lots was completed, while two more
were initiated and planning is in progress.
A land use study of Gambier Island and the surrounding foreshore was commenced in order to review present use and potential capabilities.
The gravel control program continued during 1975 and permits authorizing
the removal of 469,538 cubic yards of gravel from Crown lands, including the
bed of the Fraser River, were issued yielding $184,940 in royalties and permit fees.
The program was expanded from the Fraser River to include the Howe Sound,
Squamish, and Whistler Mountain areas.
The Whistler Mountain Resort Municipality was incorporated in 1975. The
Regional and District Land Managers were called upon to assist the Co-ordinator
of Ski Developments in getting the municipality operational.
Plans were advanced toward getting the Brohm Ridge-Mount Garibaldi Glacier Resorts into operation.
Log-storage lease, Howe Sound.
 LAND MANAGEMENT BRANCH R 21
POLICY DIVISION
Branch policy is subject to continuing review and in this regard specific mention is made of the following items implemented during the year.
In order to protect potential farm lands, a policy was established that all
agricultural leases over land not currently within an agricultural land reserve under
the Land Commission Act will only be issued under the condition that the lands
may at any time be included within an agricultural land reserve if considered
desirable by the B.C. Land Commission.
In a move to make revenues from rentals and fees more realistic, a general
review of all minimum rentals and fees was undertaken and rates increased to more
realistic levels. Also, a study of the rental structure for easements and rights-of-
way resulted in rental revisions.
A routing procedure was worked out to deal with appeals covering Crown
lands in agricultural land reserves. These now may be made directly to the Land
Commission under section 10 (4) (d) of the Land Commission Act.
The policy memoranda on agricultural leases and grazing leases were revised
and printed for general distribution, while auction and tender notices were changed
to show what services are available in the Crown subdivisions being offered. Land
Series Bulletin No. 11—The Disposition of Crown Lands in British Columbia was
also revised and reprinted.
Policy assistance of a more specific nature included development of a referral
system for Crown land applications when they are within the area covered by the
Islands Trust; development of a new ski-lease policy which is now under way; and
assistance in drafting and reviewing a publication being prepared by the Lands
Directorate, Environment Canada, on the subject of Land Use Programs in Canada-
British Columbia.
The ecological reserves program within the Ecological Reserves Unit had its
best year since the Ecological Reserves Act was promulgated in 1971, largely because the program now has a full-time Co-ordinator. Eighteen new reserves were
gazetted, bringing the total to 74, and the acreage more than doubled to 198,229.
Included in that number were the first marine (underwater) reserves at Victoria
(Ten Mile Point) and Satellite Channel. Following extensive field work in the
Spatsizi Plateau region, a large ecological reserve, 82,000 acres, was created at
Gladys Lake in the Spatsizi Plateau Wilderness Park. The 24,300-acre reserve at
Port Chanal-Hippa Island on the Queen Charlotte Islands was dedicated as the
V. J. Krajina Ecological Reserve in honour of the man who has made the greatest
single contribution to the program.
Regulations for the scientific use of ecological reserves were passed by Order
in Council and gazetted.
Major efforts were made in telling the public about reserves and assistance
was given to the National Film Board, which is doing a feature-length film on reserves in British Columbia.
The Green Belt Unit of the Policy Division administers the Green Belt Protection Fund Act (1972). Since the Fund was established, 88 properties have
been purchased, involving 20,001.66 acres at a cost of $21,108,499. Three properties, involving 336.59 acres, have been "gifted" to the Green Belt land inventory.
A number of purchases have involved a joint program between the Provincial Land
Commission and regional districts for purchase of selected high-priority sites. One
ongoing program which will provide public access to shore land involves purchase
of right-of-way for the Boundary Bay dyke.
The Environmental Services Unit continued to provide advice on the biological, ecological, and environmental aspects of Crown land management.    Areas
 R 22 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
of emphasis include analysis of environmental impacts of development projects,
resolution of conflicts in Crown land use, promotion of integrated resource planning, and development of environmental land management policies.
Staff of the Unit represented the British Columbia Lands Service on several
intergovernmental committees such as the Environment Canada Task Force to
review the Mackenzie Valley pipe-line application, Roberts Bank Expansion Environmental Assessment Panel, and the Haines Highway Reconstruction Environmental Assessment Panel. Staff also serve on the Mines Reclamation Committee,
Outdoor Recreation Co-ordinating Committee, Aquatic Weed Committee, Forest
Pest Committee, and the Salmon Enhancement Review Committee. The Environmental Services Unit also played a review role at the proposal stage of various
projects such as Nicola to Cranbrook electrical transmission-line, Hat Creek Thermal Development Study, Revelstoke-Downie dam development, extensions from
the Mackenzie Valley pipe-line, Westcoast Transmission Ltd. main pipe-line
extension, Meziadin Lake railway assessment, and the Saanichton Bay marina
proposal. The Unit also played a managerial role in determining the environmental
impacts relative to the Oyster River access channel, Prince Rupert Industrial
Park foreshore, Carcross-Skagway Highway, Kitwanga to Meziadin Highway,
Haines Road reconstruction, Lower Englishman River environmental and social
assessment, two bulk terminal sites in the Prince Rupert area, steel mill and cement
plant projects on the Mainland, a site location assessment for spray irrigation of
sewage effluent disposal, and the Batchelor Hills environmental overview.
Planning studies were continued on the Ladysmith Harbour foreshore, Comox
Harbour foreshore, Campbell River estuary, and Shuswap Lake foreshore.
In addition to servicing Departmental requests, the Environmental Services
Unit also provided external advisory services to other Provincial departments,
Crown agencies, and regional districts.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS DIVISION
Seventy-five subdivisions were under study during 1975, of which 15 were
developed or upgraded for auction. A total of 20 subdivisions totalling 434 lots
was auctioned or prepared for auction. Cablecar Subdivision near Kitimat, with
118 residential and three commercial lots, all serviced with a community water
supply, was the largest project worked on in 1975. The District Municipality of
Kitimat assisted in preparation of this subdivision.
Site selection for the commercial core of Whistler Resort Municipality and
possible relocation of the residential section of Ocean Falls were investigated. An
inspection was carried out to pinpoint possible sites for service centres along the
Stewart-Cassiar Highway. Near Quesnel and at Mackenzie, contracts were let for
well drilling and pumping tests to prove groundwater supplies, while a short sewer
extension was designed to serve Crown lots in the Village of Midway. Other
design projects included road construction for the Nazko Road Subdivision near
Quesnel, review of a design contract for a reservoir, pumphouse, and road and
storm drainage for Cablecar Subdivision and water services to the ski cabin area
at Whistler.
During 1975 a total of 23,729 parcels of land was checked through the records
by the Land Status Unit and there was a notable upsurge in the number of status
requests by oil companies in connection with their oil and gas drilling projects.
Preparation of status maps on mylar base transparencies were suspended during
1975 because of the need to recheck and verify the maps previously prepared. It
is expected that production will resume in 1976. Status maps require constant
revision and amendment to keep them up to date.
 LAND MANAGEMENT BRANCH
R 23
Batchelor Hill area north of Kamloops; note trail bike tracks.
 R 24 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
V. J. Krajina Ecological Reserve, Port Chanal, Q.C.I.
Ecological reserve near Cecil Lake.
 LAND MANAGEMENT BRANCH R 25
Information concerning the status of Crown land parcels is recorded in the
Official Land Registers and over the years since the Colonial period a multitude of
entries has been made, in many instances without any systematic method being used.
In 1974 a start was made, experimentally, on rewriting the Official Land Registers
onto loose-leaf forms which were designed to replace the Registers and to be the
source documents for key-punching data for inclusion in a computer system. Though
funds have not been provided yet to code the information for computer use, the
Status Unit is continuing to rewrite the Registers manually in a format which
enables status particulars to be extracted more efficiently.
Recompiling the Registers requires a check of all existing written records,
unravelling complexities, weeding out dead material, rewriting the current status of
each parcel of Crown land, and including relevant past history as required.
Work began on preparing details of Crown leases and easements in a form
suitable for inclusion in an electronic data processing system. Price Waterhouse
Associates, a firm of management consultants, was contracted to design and write
the computer programming for the lease-easement project. To date, over 14,000
leases have been coded and their particulars key-punched onto computer tape or
disks. This project is being regularly updated as new leases are issued and existing
ones amended. The project is designed for fast data retrieval and is to be used as a
basis for billing for lease and easement rental payments. Coding of approximately
2,000 easements was about one-third complete at the end of the year.
Subdivision Lots Auctioned or Ready for Auction in 1975
Land Management Region                     Subdivision Lots
Vancouver Island Superior Road   3
Port Hardy   33
Lower Mainland Powell River  32
Thompson-Okanagan Princeton Airport  7
Kootenay Hosmer (near Fernie)   5
Westbridge   5
Midway   4
Cariboo Sulphurous Lake (recreational)  90
Southwest of Williams Lake  3
Skeena Cablecar (Kitimat)   121
Dease Lake  23
Smithers Landing1   13
Masset1     10
Omenica-Peace Fort Nelson (Mile 307.5)  2
Fort Nelson (Mile 303)  33
Pink Mountain  8
Beryl Prairie1   11
Kenzie (near Dawson Creek)1   3
Lebel (near Dawson Creek)l  11
Summit Lake  7
Bear Lake  10
1 Existing subdivisions which were upgraded by the installation of additional services.
 R 26         DEPARTMENT OF
Parcels Statused
Acreage parcels	
LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Land Status Section
           16.029
Town lots             	
______    7,502
Special statuses	
198
Lake-frontage
Nil
Total	
_    23,729
Register Entries
Total          ft   	
Documents
  6.149
Entries
9,629
Acres
64,584.51
Acreage
12.00
2,351.91
411.59
46.69
16,155.93
337.63
27.84
31,752.38
115.75
113.35
3.13
147.54
0.34
118.69
109.13
29.59
1,854.10
134.46
Nil
1,453.03
NU
679.19
356.04
167.35
319.45
1,521.72
Surveyed 	
Approved Land Sales, 1975
Certificates c
Agency
Atlin	
Burns Lake
f Purchase Issued, 1975
Number
       5
     33
Clinton 	
Cranbrook  _
33
       7
Dawson Creek __ 	
     41
Fernie	
Fort Nelson	
14
     29
Fort St. John	
Golden 	
Kamloops	
Kaslo	
     81
3
16
       3
Nanaimo   	
     32
Nelson	
       1
New Westminster
Penticton	
     20
     26
Port Alberni	
       8
Prince George
     24
Prince Rupert	
     25
Queen Charlotte City
Quesnel 	
Revelstoke	
Smithers 	
Vancouver	
Vernon 	
Victoria 	
Williams Lake	
    Nil
33
_   Nil
-    18
__    18
17
7
     42
Totals   - _ _
  536
58,218.83
 LAND MANAGEMENT BRANCH
R 27
Easements Granted, 1975
Foreshore-
Number
Power-lines   2
Sewer-lines   2
Submarine telephone cable  4
Submarine power cable  1
Land-
Power-lines   30
Radio sites 	
Telephone-lines 	
Sewer pipe-lines 	
TV antenna sites and power-lines
Effluent-disposal site	
Underground telephone cables	
Water pipe-line	
Road and bridge site	
Gas pipe-line 	
Totals  56
Miles
2.573
0.020
15.979
1.469
82.363
.357
7.77
0.186
1.518
0.294
0.492
113.021
Crown Grants Issued, 1975
Number
Purchases (rural lands)   444
Purchases (town lots)  146
Pre-emptions   22
Public Schools Act  4
Veterans' Land Settlement Act  2
Homesite leases  4
Supplementary timber grant  	
British Columbia Railway Company  22
Miscellaneous  24
Totals  668
Certified copies of Crown grants issued, 22.
Crown Grants Issued for Past 10 Years
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
Acres
18.377
0.071
351.261
97.96
1,403.206
62.63
0.06
0.69
194.0
0.566
2.293
0.520
3.72
0.196
2,135.55
Acreage
59,376.45
3,442.35
17.31
160.92
68.30
495.58
990.06
64,550.97
Ten-year average
1,020
115,917
980
117,672
957
129,307
931
81,881
708
38,412
735
74,493
694
59,279
602
42,482
637
66,629
668
64,551
7,932
790,623
793
79,062
 R 28 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Reserves, 1975
Applications Reserves
Received Completed
Use, recreation, and enjoyment of the public     77 34
B.C. Department of Highways (rights-of-way, gravel
pits, bridge-sites, etc.)     75 74
Federal Government (defence purposes, wharf-sites,
etc.)      44 26
B.C. Forest Service (Ranger stations, grazing, radio
sites, reforestation, etc.)     73 78
Miscellaneous (Game Branch, water power projects,
garbage dumps, school sites, cemeteries, etc.)  111 58
Totals   380 270
Free Crown Grants Issued in 1975
British Columbia Housing Management Commission for Residential Development Purposes
Crown Grant No. and Date
Acreage
Estimated Value
Location
6673/1137: May 16, 1975	
49.60
72.20
76.80
$
50,000
216,600
15,500
Elkford.
6696/1137         ...                 	
6619/1137.             	
Totals            -
198.60
282,100
	
City of Prince George for Residential Redevelopment
Crown Grant No. and Date
Acreage
Estimated Value
Location
6735/1138: June 17. 1975	
TLs
$
11,640
Prince George.
Crown Grants Issued Under Chapter 34, Statutes of British Columbia, 1912, to the
British Columbia Railway Company for Right-of-way Purposes
Crown Grant No. and Date
Acreage
Estimated Value
Location
65.62
$
5,000
East of Fort St. James.
3.46
1,730
Snyder Creek.
32.45
1,600
South of Pinchi Creek.
6.96
3,480
Fort Nelson River.
29.51
1,200
South of Pinchi Lake.
TL
3,000
Whiskey Creek.
4.25
6,000
Whiskey Creek.
69.99
3,500
Pinchi Creek—Stuart Lake.
2.20
3,200
Cuisson Creek.
1.23
1,845
Naver and Pedley Creeks.
4.22
6,000
Whiskey Creek.
12.30
8,400
Alexandria Station.
6.50
6,500
Alexandria Station.
1.01
3,000
Menyinger Creek.
2.40
3,500
Menyinger Creek.
14.00
9,000
Williams Lake.
4.30
4,300
Alexandria Station.
15.00
9,500
Dragon Station.
34.56
26,280
Chetwynd Village.
96.79
3,900
Stuart and Pinchi Lakes.
6.39
7,000
Whiskey Creek.
413.14
117,935
6614/1137: April 2, 1975	
6615/1137: March 27, 1975.
6618/1137: March 27, 1975.
6790/1138: July 7, 1975	
6707/1138: June 4, 1975	
6843/1139: August 29, 1975
6844/1139: August 21, 1975
6853/1139: August 29, 1975
6854/1139: August 29, 1975
6855/1139: August 29, 1975
6856/1139: August 29, 1975
6857/1139: August 29, 1975
6858/1139: August 29, 1975
6859/1139: August 29, 1975
6860/1139: August 28, 1975
6861/1139: August 28, 1975
6862/1139: August 28, 1975
6863/1139: August 29, 1975
6864/1139: August 29, 1975.
6826/1139: August 6, 1975..
6834/1139: August 1, 1975...
Totals	
 LAND MANAGEMENT BRANCH
Summary
Acreage
R 29
Estimated
Value
British Columbia Housing Management Commission..  198.60 282,100
Municipalities and Regional Districts         TL 11,640
British Columbia Railway Company  413.14 117,935
Totals   611.74 411,675
Exchanges, 1975
Crown Grant
No. and Date
Name of Grantee
Acreage
Remarks
6599/1136: Mar. 17,1975....
The Corporation of the City
2.43
The Department of Highways required
of Cranbrook
an area for a future storage yard and
the City of Cranbrook used the exchanged area for recreational purposes.
6667/1137: May 8, 1975
John Philip Stanley Harper
1.04
The exchange was effected to provide
the Crown with a dyke right-of-way
within the Oak Hills Subdivision.
6722/1138: June 10, 1975....
TL's
property for a Provincial Courthouse
site within the Town of Smithers and
provided land to the Town of Smith
ers for park purposes.
7002/1141: Nov. 7, 1975	
Morningside   Beach   Proper
36.10
This   exchange   was   made   to   provide
ties Ltd.
Morningside with required access to
their property and the Parks Branch
to set aside an area for Green Belt
Study purposes.
In addition to the volume of work shown in the statistical table which follows,
the Branch also
converted 472 leases to purchase;
issued 576 certificates of purchase;
replied to 3,374 written general inquiries;
answered inquiries concerning 484 specific parcels of Crown land;
received 29,036 pieces of mail;
consented to construction of 35 access roads;
offered 529 lots for lease by public competition, of which 283 were taken
up at a total bonus bid of $140,437;
issued 36 leases at the nominal consideration of $25 per lease for purposes in the public interest over Crown land with an estimated market value of $911,250.
 R 30 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
General Summary
10-year Average,
1975 1966-75
Certificates of improvements issued                      12 29
Crown grants issued                    668 794
Total acreage deeded by Crown grants               64,551 79,052
Number of new land sales                    536 448
Value of new land sales  $1,225,161.77 $885,289
Number of leases issued                    867 1,577
Total acreage leased               75,755 214,719
Licences of occupation issued        321
Easements issued                      56 125
Reservations established                    270 396
Land Act collections  $5,526,502.68 $3,950,338
1 Average is for nine years.   Record for 1975 incomplete as a result of restructuring.
New Leases Issued, 1975
Land—
Agriculture	
Hay and grazing (pasture and hay-cutting)_
Quarrying (sand, gravel, limestone, etc.)	
Residential	
Acreage
19,180.58
50,251.72
299.34
655.28
60.77
99.23
2,266.36
Foreshore—
Booming, log storage, log-dumping, etc     1,748.58
Oyster	
Recreational cottage-site (inland)	
Recreational cottage-site (waterfront)	
Miscellaneous (resorts, service-stations, campsites)	
Industrial (canneries, millsite, wharves, etc.)	
Quarrying (sand, gravel from sea or river beds)
Commercial   (boat   rentals,   marinas,   marine
service-stations, etc.)	
Miscellaneous (private wharves, boat-houses,
etc.)	
Totals	
120.35
585.47
Nil
52.315
424.62
No.
72
138
14
238
80
98
78
81
8
7
Nil
29
24
  75,754.615      867
Assignments approved—
Leases, land use permits, licences of occupation, certificates of
purchase  695
 LAND MANAGEMENT BRANCH
R 31
Analysis of Inspections Completed and Inspections Outstanding at Year-end
for the Years 1971 to 1975, Inclusive
Land Management Regions and
Examinations Completed Durir
g Year
Examinations Outstanding at Year-end
Land Inspection Districts
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
Vancouver Island Region
551
230
469
215
385
146
432
272
416
199
115
32
103
29
91
50
69
67
90
82
Subtotals  ..
781
684
531
704
615
147
132
141
136
172
Lower Mainland Region
240
223
324
289
216
334
267
161
183
188
176
185
192
165
192
33
63
87
6
29
59
45
13
40
72
25
79
64
67
124
Subtotals  	
787
839
611
549
549
183
94
98
176
255
Thompson-Okanagan Region
702
249
412
486
209
378
402
193
390
546
225
605
501
195
259
64
37
86
30
42
69
39
47
166
45
21
50
93
Kelowna	
62
25
Subtotals	
1,363
1,073
985
1,376
955
187
141
252
116
180
Kootenay Region
372
191
763
425
243
603
417
195
597
347
157
514
320
235
570
50
48
46
59
59
18
62
37
15
111
53
60
227
	
132
Cariboo Region
43
297
100 Mile House*	
113
Subtotals	
954
846
792
671
855
105
72
7
64
12
80
126
287
453
Omineca-Peace Region
Fort St. John	
439
282
362
155
459
150
435
169
533
198
294
101
690
386
385
219
771
376
406
255
209
84
33
5
85
92
65
57
35
46
108
67
135
68
94
46
Subtotals 	
1,238
1,213
1,126
1,680
1,808
155
331
299
256
343
Skeena Region
200
182
227
153
199
115
164
222
174
158
302
192
102
269
170
34
54
13
101
34
40
23
69
78
76
50
76
116
Smithers	
106
65
609
467
560
652
541
74
170
202
287
6,104
5,547
5,022
5,979
5,643
926
911
1,123
1,226
1,822
i Office opened September 1, 1975.
 R 32
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Analysis of Requests for Inspection Processed by Land Management Branch
for Years 1971 to 1975, Inclusive
Land Management Regions and Land Management Districts
New Requests Received During—
1971    I     1972    I     1973    1     1974
1975
Vancouver Island Region
Courtenay	
Victoria... ——	
581    |       457    |       373    |       410
212    |       212    |       167    j       289
436
215
Subtotals....--	
793    |       669    |       540    |       699
651
Lower Mainland Region
182
249
271
I
I
261    1       305
182            145
214
188
194
209
306    1       164           224
245
Subtotals   	
702    |       749    |       614    |       626    |       648
Thompson-Okanagan Region
664
224
351
452
214
361
411
198
487
552
199
489
549
236
234
1,239
1,027
1,096    |    1,240    |    1,019
Kootenay Region
385
205
619
436
209
603
395
187
645
1
1
363    |       399
Cariboo Region
1
1
200    1       219
628    |       642
100 Mile Housei—                  	
	
	
     1       114
Subtotals...	
824    |       812    |       832    |       828    |       975
Omineca-Peace Region
Fort St. John  	
397
188
299
135
583
200
386
152
398
163
316
148
633    1       868
301            373
422    1       386
221    |       234
Subtotals    —	
1,019    |    1,321    |    1,025    |    1,577    |    1,861
Skeena Region
1
1
185    1       153
148    1       145
172    |       142
153
1
211    |       102
291
211
283    |       269
190    |        170
Subtotals- -	
505    |       440    |       655    |       684    |       541
5.467     !     5.454    1     5.157     1    6.017     I     6.094
1 Office opened September 1, 1975.
 LAND MANAGEMENT BRANCH
R 33
DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT
The development group was established in early 1975 to undertake special
development projects for the Lands Branch. The activities of the group were to
include the early stage of the Crown lot program, preliminary development strategies for the Victoria Inner Harbour and Songhees lands, development advice to
smaller communities, and concept plans and development strategies for the Whistler
area. Other projects included preliminary planning of a UN demonstration project,
setting up the return of the Princess Marguerite to the Victoria-Seattle steamship
service and initial route and refurbishing of the SS Prince George for a return to
the B.C. Coastal-Alaska run.
While some of these undertakings are still in a preliminary stage, several were
very active during the year. The Princess Marguerite was refurbished and returned
to service. Preparation of a conceptual plan for development of a townsite at
Whistler was initiated. Adoption of the plan could provide the catalyst for development of a viable winter resort community at this location.
CO-ORDINATOR OF SKI DEVELOPMENT
This office is part of the land development unit. The development of ski
facilities and related land-use policies are presently under review and the new policies should be documented by mid-1976.
The development of ski facilities necessitates good interdepartmental communication. Proposals require thorough resource assessment and sometimes integrated
management planning. This office is providing the service of assessing and assisting
in the development of the present areas, as well as potential new areas.
The first area of concern has been Whistler Mountain where a townsite has
been proposed on Crown lands. Additional ski potential on neighbouring Black-
comb Mountain has been assessed for a proposed call for development. The
Whistler development has problems in the area of land use and sewage disposal.
This office has been working with other departments to seek the answers and programs to expedite development through a community plan.
Plans for new ski villages and new ski lifts have been reviewed in 16 British
Columbia ski areas. Several proposals for new ski areas are also under study. This
office has worked closely with the Forest Service, Parks Branch, Department of
Municipal Affairs, Department of Transport and Communications, Pollution Control
Branch, and the Department of Highways.
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  SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH R 39
SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
STANDARD SYSTEM OF MAPPING FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA
During the year, consideration was given to amending the Standard System of
Mapping instituted by Order in Council 2884 in 1974. The principal purposes of
the amendments are to give the Director, Surveys and Mapping Branch, the authority
to exercise general control over all mapping supported by public funds and to make
compulsory the use of standard scales, sheet lines, and map numbering for all plani-
metric, topographic, and thematic mapping. Both the existing system and proposed
amendments are in line with metric conversion. The advantages to be gained for
a standard system of mapping may be summarized as follows:
(a) Restriction to the use of a limited number of "round figure" ratio
scales will breed familiarity with map users, make the "arithmetic"
and the physical processes involved in both map use and map compilation as simple as possible, and will reduce to a minimum the
number of measuring scales required.
(b) Standard scales, sheet layouts, and numbering will mean that different
classes of information (themes) displayed on different maps of the
same area can be correlated by the simple process of overlay; and
further, that the numbers of maps of a given area will be identical,
irrespective of theme or production agency.
(c) The Universal Transverse Mercator rectangular grid required to be
shown on all standard mapping will provide a precise and simple
method of referring to geographical location and in the future will be
the basis for the organization and correlation of computerized data
bases.
(_/)  Standard scales and sheet layouts are designed to permit all map
sheets to be printed on, or trimmed to, a single paper size (metric
Al)  and thus greatly assist in the problems of map storage and
permit map series to be assembled in atlas-type binders.
At year-end a "final" draft of the amended Order had been prepared.   However, a limited distribution of this draft produced a good deal of comment, mainly
concerning mapping at very large scales, and some further amendment will be
necessary.
DATA PROCESSING
In the Surveys and Mapping Branch continued wide use has been made of the
general purpose Surveying and Mapping program LSM139, to which a number of
routines have been added or modified. The modifications are mainly concerned with
the use of the program, in the process of map compilations, by the Map Production
Division and the Water Resources Service.
In the Land Management Branch during the summer months a team of eight
extracted from files, leases, and other documents all the information necessary to
form a computerized information system for Crown leases. This information was
written on specially prepared forms which were subsequently key-punched. The
information now resides on magnetic tape awaiting the completion of design of the
computerized data base and the necessary programming.
Price Waterhouse Associates (management consultants) were engaged to design
the computerized Information, Accounting, and Billing system and to do the programming. A good deal of delay resulted from uncertainties regarding the type of
hardware, and associated software, that will be available. At year-end it was decided
 R 40 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
that design should be for a stand-alone mini-computer system, but designed to permit
subsequent connection with the computer and Consulting Services' Honeywell 6600
computer, either to permit the use of its large storage, processing, and high-speed
printing capabilities or simply to use it as a switching terminal for the dispatch of
data, screen displays, and reports between offices in different parts of the Province.
When in operation, hopefully by mid-1976, the system will enable inquiries to
be made regarding any lease, licence of occupation, or easement at one of several
cathode-ray tube (CRT) terminals in the Land Management Branch or Accounting
Division. The inquiry will be followed by more or less instantaneous display of the
required information. The terminals will also be used to enter accounting and other
information. Printed reports, balance sheets, and billings will also be available
either for a single lease or for a number of leases in a specified area or with specified
characteristics.
Perhaps the greatest benefit expected to be derived from the computerized system will be a marked decrease in the handling and circulation of files.
GEOGRAPHICAL NAMES
Work continued on processing names for entry in the Gazetteer of geographical
names for British Columbia and 141 decision lists were approved by the Provincial
representative on the Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical Names.
During the latter part of the year a questionnaire was circulated to 60 historical
societies, universities, colleges, and others known or believed to be active in geographical names research. The results of the returns will be summarized as part of
a continuing effort to familiarize the toponymy section with research being done
outside the Government and to establish contacts with possible sources of names
for a names bank. Establishment of a names bank would provide toponymists and
cartographers with an immediate and convenient source of names which could be
drawn on for application to previously unnamed features.
There were three notable retirements in the Surveys and Mapping Branch during 1975.
The Surveyor-General and Director of Surveys and Mapping, A. H. (Bert)
Ralfs, retired in August following a career spanning 46 years of service to the Province. Starting in 1930 as a junior draughtsman, Bert Ralfs earned his B.C.L.S.
commission in 1947 and D.L.S. in 1951. After serving in various positions in the
Topographic, Legal Surveys, and Geographic Divisions, he was promoted to Assistant Director in 1956. In 1968, following the retirement of G. S. Andrews, he
became Director and Surveyor-General. Mr. Ralfs also held the position of Boundaries Commissioner.
Tom Hinton was another long-term employee who retired in 1975. Mr.
Hinton's service began in 1936 in the Geographic Division. Latterly, as Supervisor
of Map Distribution, he was responsible for maintaining and distributing the Branch's
collection of maps and air photos.
Evelyn Rhodes also served in Geographic Division throughout most of her
36-year career in the Public Service. As toponymic clerk, she was primarily responsible for maintaining records pertaining to the 40,000 geographical names in British
Columbia and compiling a record of geographical statistics.
LEGAL SURVEYS DIVISION
The trends in activities of the Division and the proportionate amount of effort
devoted to servicing our own Lands Service activities as opposed to demands of other
departments are apparent from the Production Table and Function Table accom-
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
R 41
panying. Approximately 27 per cent of the office effort is expended on direct functions for other departments requiring survey services. There is a slight decrease
apparent on the surveys of Crown land and in new applications being cleared, whereas existing contracts and instream applications culminated in an increase in final
purchase and lease documents to be prepared. There was also a notable decrease
in surveys processed for mineral and wellsite activities.
An improved work flow and minor reorganization was aided by the reclassification of 11 technical positions in the office, allowing more specialization of duties and
better supervision.
It was quite apparent from several important requests to supply historical and
constitutional survey data that the present indexes of survey material based on geographic location and alphabetic titles are inadequate for a thorough quick determination of what is on file. Several different indexes have been commenced and abandoned in the years since the 1850's. Whereas all surveyed parcels are well indexed,
there are innumerable miscellaneous surveys for reports, explorations, and statutory
boundaries, etc., which are not. An attempt must be made to compile a comprehensive index of this material.
In the interests of general improvement in the knowledge of Government
employees working in the business of land disposition and for students of survey
history, two papers were written in this Division and printed in the Map Production
Division.  The subjects were
(1) Survey Systems within the Crown Domain, Colonies to Confederation.
(2) Esquimalt and Nanaimo Rly. Land Grant, the Railway Belt and
Peace River Block.
NONRECURRING SPECIAL PROJECTS OF INTEREST
In connection with the Commission on Redistribution of Electoral Boundaries,
metes and bounds descriptions of 62 electoral districts, which totalled 111 typed
pages, were produced in a 10-day period.
Resource Management boundary descriptions of the seven new areas were
written for the Environment and Land Use Committee to be used by all resource
departments and subsequently Land Management areas were defined on maps for
the Lands Service.
New assessment areas adopted by the Assessment Authority necessitated revision of former boundaries and annotation on the complete Reference Map series.
The 103 new reference maps produced and taken into use all conform to the
new metric size and scale of maps.
Increased activity in the Indian land question and cut-off land disposition generated considerable map making, and description.
Special maps were produced in support of the Government position on the
determination of ownership of the Strait of Georgia and adjacent waters and in
regard to the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway hearing on maintenance of service.
A stock of official survey posts is maintained in all offices of Government
Agents, for use in Crown land surveys and replacement of original survey corners.
A resume of activity in this service appears in the tables accompanying this report.
FIELD WORK
The field staff of the Legal Surveys Division, at present consisting of five professional land surveyors and 11 field assistants, undertook 38 assignments in 1975,
together with several repostings, revisions, and continuance of work commenced in
1974.
 R 42 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
A Crown Lot and Site program initiated by the Lands Branch involved the use
of our field staff in the preliminary determination of feasibility of several proposed
subdivision sites, and the preparation of subdivision designs for the consideration of
the Special Services Division. Hopefully, our role in this regard will increase in the
future.
Again this year it was not possible to assign a Government survey crew to a
specific project of corner restoration. The important task of restoring the survey
structure in many needful areas of the Province, commenced in a modest way last
year through private contract, had to be suspended in 1975 due to the withdrawal
of budgeted funds. The already monumental problem of obliterated corners worsens
with the passage of time, and can only be overcome with an escalated restoration
program.
A summary of 1975 assignments follows:
Lands Branch Surveys
A five-lot residential subdivision was completed at Westbridge, and at Wardner
a 35-acre parcel was surveyed to accommodate an owner affected by the Libby
pondage flooding. A survey was required of the present banks of the Brunette River
near its mouth to determine filled areas, and at the mouth of French Creek an investigation was requested to determine if an area of gravel removal was in trespass. At
Nanaimo, a parcel was surveyed to enable a land exchange, with the Crown receiving
a desirable beach and headland near Departure Bay, and at Campbell River a subdivision was made in order that private land fronting the river could be purchased.
The boundary of titled ownership fronting Mill Bay was defined to assist the Lands
Branch in assessing the extent of a foreshore trespass. An 80-acre ecological reserve
was surveyed at Whipsaw Creek off the Hope-Princeton Highway, and boundaries
of the Tow Hill and Rose Spit Ecological Reserves were posted with appropriate
signs at access entry points. Minor subdivision amendments and a reposting of all
missing corners was necessary on a previously completed 105-lot Crown subdivision
at Kitimat to enable an auction to be held in the fall.
In the northern part of the Province, a nine-lot subdivision of 4- to 10-acre lots
was created at Pink Mountain, and near Fort Nelson a 3 3-lot subdivision was completed late in the year. In the vicinity of Fort St. John, four sections were surveyed
by agreement with the present lease-holders to delineate the arable benchland portions from the steep eroded areas. Near Kiniskan Lake, a 104-acre lot was posted
for disposition as an addition to a lease of present adjoining holdings, and considerable work was completed at Dease Lake, including a 13-lot industrial sites subdivision, the survey of a cemetery site, a 10-acre school lot and community hall site,
wellsite and water-line rights-of-way, and the subdivision of two existing lots into
eight small parcels for possible commercial lease purposes.
The sites of previously referred to proposed Crown subdivisions for which preliminary surveys were made and subdivision designs submitted included 17 acres at
Powell River, two areas in the vicinity of Egmont, land at Pemberton, and an area
west of Quesnel, all with residential-type lots in mind. Recreational-type lot subdivisions were similarly planned fronting Little Lillooet Lake and on Burrell Creek
north of Grand Forks.
Miscellaneous surveys were conducted at Blue River where a resurvey of a part
of Lot 3281 was needed, at Cranbrook where a survey tie was required to locate
correctly an existing lot, and at Roberts Bank to monument a B.C. Harbours Board
foreshore lot.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
R 43
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 R 44 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Interdepartmental Surveys
Although the Lands Branch receives priority for the services of our survey
section, several other departments were able to be accommodated to a limited extent.
For the Department of Public Works, a small subdivision at Nanaimo created two
lots for lease from the Hospital District, and in Burnaby a lot was surveyed fronting
Willingdon Avenue to provide for an extended-care hospital. In Victoria, confirmation of the location of a "party wall" between Crown and private interests was required, and a site and legal survey of property behind the Douglas Building was made
for architectural planning purposes. The Parks Branch required a survey to receive
6.5 acres of private land for park use, and for the Attorney-General's Department
a boundary survey was conducted in Esquimalt District for court purposes to determine if the location of trailers in a mobile home park contravened zoning restrictions.
Two surveys were made for the Secretariat—an investigation in the Comox area
concerning improvements relative to boundary lines of property acquired and a subdivision on Saltspring Island to permit conveyance of a 5 5-acre portion of private
land for public use. At Port McNeill, the corners of a 56-lot subdivision carried out
in 1974 for the Department of Housing needed reposting following road and servicing construction, and for the Department of Human Resources, a 7-acre block was
surveyed out of "cut off" lands of the Capilano Indian Reserve for transfer to the
Squamish Indian Band. Relatively few of the numerous surveys required by the
Forest Service could be undertaken by this office. Those that were undertaken included a right-of-way survey of Wi miles of the Kettle River East forest access road
in the Christian Valley, two surveys of forest road through single private lots in the
Grand Forks and Christina Lake area, a subdivision for consolidation of parcels for
use of the ranger station at Grand Forks, and a posting survey of several lots reserved
for public recreation fronting Mabel Lake. The large undertaking commenced last
year for the Water Rights Branch to enable the purchase of private land along
Boundary Bay for dyke improvement and public purposes is continuing, and involved
the drafting of numerous subdivision plans for registration early in the year. Considerable work remains to be completed when dyke design details are resolved.
In the course of the year's work, 46 district lot corners were renewed with permanent monuments.
FIELD OPERATIONS DIVISION
FIELD SURVEY SECTION
The Field Survey Section operated six parties for the main field season. One
party was engaged in the propagation of primary Provincial control in the northern
part of the Province, two parties worked on the integrated control program, two
parties were used for miscellaneous large-scale mapping projects, and one party continued the boundary maintenance program on the 60th parallel.
The primary control party extended the Provincial control grid in the uncontrolled areas of Map-sheets 94N, O and K, and in Map-sheets 104F and K. The
initial base of operations for the season was at Fort Nelson, and it then moved to
Liard River Crossing. From the two bases, Map-sheets 94 N/1, 2, and 7 to 16,
94 0/4, and 94 K/15 and 16 were controlled. A final base camp was established
at Chutine Lake, from which Map-sheet 104F and the southerly portion of 104K
were controlled. The crews were transported to the mountain stations by helicopter,
and the Government's Otter aircraft provided back-up transportation and base camp
supply. A total of 78 stations was occupied during the field season, which is below
the normal accomplishment for this type of operation. The low production is attrib-
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
R 45
uted to a combination of poor weather throughout the summer and the extremely
rough terrain of the north coastal mountains in Map-sheets 104F and K. The survey
of this rugged ice and snow-covered terrain had been deferred for several years,
awaiting minimal snow conditions for ease of access and availability of open rock
necessary for establishing and photo-identifying survey control points. The completion of the survey of this area was itself a major accomplishment. Supplementary
survey ties were completed in two locations, within reach of the operating bases, to
strengthen the existing network in preparation for the adjustment of the Provincial
network to the new Geodetic framework established in northern British Columbia
during the past two years.
In the Integrated Survey program, a part of the District of Coquitlam was
declared as Integrated Survey Area 14. In addition, a revised plan of Integrated
Survey Area 8 (District of Mackenzie) with U.T.M. grid and co-ordinates was
deposited in the Land Registry Office.
Helicopters have been used to transport survey crews for over 25 years.
Landing, 5,000-foot elevation, 1949.
""___>- ViSfcw-* "  - ^1f~t\ _/-
'■&.... ft
Landing, 8,800-foot elevation, 1975.
 R 46        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
During the field season, one survey crew worked in the City of Kelowna expanding the control in that area toward an eventual integration of the whole city. The
party established horizontal and vertical positions for 234 control monuments, and
established nine permanent and 18 temporary bench marks in the area. The second
crew made a start on the integrated control network in the District of North Vancouver and completed the easterly portion of the district. Horizontal and vertical positions were established for 291 control monuments in the area. In addition to the
two main programs, the survey crews established horizontal and vertical positions
for 33 additional monuments in the District of Matsqui and eight additional monuments in the District of Coquitlam. A reconnaissance was also carried out in the
District of Squamish to design a control network for a proposed integrated survey
system covering the area.
Field compilation of large-scale engineering plans or control for photogram-
metric compilation, or a combination of both systems, were employed to complete
the following projects: Winter Harbour, Lot 20 (Ucluelet), two areas in the vicinity
of Logan Lake, three areas adjacent to Quesnel, Chatsworth Road property by
Cameron Lake, Pink Mountain (Mile 143, Alaska Highway), Fraser River gravel
bars, and Fitzsimmon Creek at Whistler Mountain. These projects were requested
by the Land Management Branch of the Lands Service.
In addition, five site plans were completed for the Public Works Department,
two hospital site plans for the Hospital Services Branch, one mapping control project
at Wells for the Water Resources Service, and mapping control at Gwillim Lake for
the Department of Recreation and Conservation. Also, small control surveys were
carried out at Vernon and Terrace at the request of the regional districts.
The British Columbia-Yukon-Northwest Territories Boundary Maintenance
Program on the 60th parallel continued eastward from last year's termination point
at Tropical Creek. The crew cleared 54 miles of boundary line through the headwaters of the Crow River and the Beaver River valley. Forty-two boundary monuments were inspected and the reference markers were restored between Monuments
552 and 593. After three years of activity, the joint Federal-Provincial Boundary
Program has restored the boundary from Teslin Lake east to within 20 miles of the
Liard River north of Nelson Forks.
A calibration base for electronic measuring devices was installed at Royal Oak
beside the Patricia Bay Highway. The base consists of six reinforced-concrete columns surmounted by forced centring plates. The angles and levels between the
columns were observed by the Division, and the distances between the columns were
measured by personnel from the Geodetic Survey of Canada, using a Mekometer.
The Royal Oak base will be used for the calibration of electronic distance measuring
devices and will be the Provincial Standard for linear measure.
In preparation for metrication, two 75 m tape calibration bases were established
—one in the City of Kelowna and the second in Penticton.
AIR SURVEY SECTION
The photographic program for the season produced 53,609 new photographs
covering 74,500 square miles with block vertical photography in 21 areas of the
Province, and completed 240 special projects requested by 18 branches and agencies
of the Government. Aircraft hours totalling 701 hours were flown, with 50 per cent
used on block vertical cover and the balance on special projects.
Block vertical cover comprised 14,770 square miles at a photographic scale of
1:31,680, 4,270 square miles at a scale of 1:15,840, and 55,430 square miles at
1:20,000.   The special projects produced 12,950 line-miles of photography on
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
R 47
Kates Needle, Boundary Peak 70, B.C.-Alaska Boundary, from Station "Rist."
Ice fall, Patmore Creek, Coast Range.
 R 48 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Chutine Lake from Station "Tytea."
Coastal glacier north of Chutine Lake from Station "Meme."
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH R 49
23,909 photographs. Of this total, 3,889 photographs were in colour and 632 in
infrared false colour. Of the special projects completed, 40 per cent were photographed in colour and (or) infrared false colour.
The two new Beechcraft Model 200 aircraft completed the first full season on
photographic operations. Photographic specifications were modified to maximize
productivity and utilize the capability of the aircraft. A change in photographic scale
for the primary vertical cover from 1:15,840 to 1:20,000 increased the net gain
from 1.18 square miles per photograph to 2.25 square miles. At the smaller scale,
24,110 photographs covered 55,430 square miles, which produced an increase of
40 per cent in the area covered, with a decrease of 30 per cent in the number of
photographs related to the comparable portion of the 1974 accomplishment.
SURVEY CONTROL SECTION
The Survey Control Section completed the calculations and final adjustments
on all new control surveys and readjusted existing networks affected by the new surveys or by changes in the Federal Primary system. The Survey Data Bank was
completed and now contains all significant survey control established in the Province
to date. The data bank now contains 36,817 points, as 3,707 points were added to
the bank during the year.
MAP PRODUCTION DIVISION
During the year, 143 mapping projects were requested of the Division, ranging
from a single orthophoto map for Forest Research to the plotting of 45,000 spot
heights on the Mud Bay project for the Fish and Wildlife Branch or the planimetric
compilation of 226 map-sheets of Tree-farm Licence 1 for Forest Inventory. Some
projects are completed by one section, others move progressively from Compilation
to Cadastral Plotting to Draughting.
Staff was reduced from 115 to 111 by the process of not filling vacancies; these
vacancies were utilized elsewhere in the Lands Branch where priorities are higher.
A massive reclassification of mapping assistant and draughtsman grades was finalized, resulting in job descriptions and salaries equivalent with our Federal counterparts and similar to those in industry. One grievance is being processed and two
more are pending; the most interesting involving the rights of existing workers with
respect to rotation when shift work is introduced.
This year it became apparent that the planimetric program for Forest Inventory,
a major undertaking for 27 years, will change to a revision task and this will be combined with a conversion to the new standard scales more useful in the metric world.
The graphical system of template laydowns will be eliminated by using a computer adjusted analytic process, but only when an automatic plotting table is available to plot the output co-ordinates of grids and points. Likewise, a serious conversion program involving scale changes and reassembling to the new U.T.M. sheet
indexing system will require a second 105-mm camera and staff to use it on shifts.
This year also saw the completion of the major field survey control for 1:50,000
mapping, the compilation of which the Federal Government expects to complete by
1979. The Annual Report of 1950 estimated this program would take 60 years to
complete.
A nonevent of the year concerns composite mapping, the organization of which
again failed to materialize. Because of reduced work loads in the Planimetric Section, some eight staff were assigned late this year to undertake a conversion and
 R 50        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
updating of composite mapping in the Fraser Valley and on Vancouver Island. It
is hoped that a new look at Government responsibilities in providing funds or services
for surveys and mapping for regional districts and Crown corporations will take place
in 1976.
During the year the Photogrammetric Section brought into use a sophisticated
system of producing plotted co-ordinates from a sequence which starts with a Kern
PG2 instrument and ends at the Cal-Comp plotter. The Zeiss orthophoto was purchased jointly with other departments and 34 projects have been completed. The
mini-computer can handle input from other plotters as soon as they can be digitized
and additional data storage is acquired; in particular the orthophoto terrain model
could be automatically contoured when an automatic table is available for plotting.
The Planimetric Section handled 29,000 airphotos in the production of 447
new 20-chain map-sheets and 592 revised sheets. Mosaics totalling 57 sheets were
made in response to 18 requests. The Draughting subsection prepared 835 manuscript sheets and completed fairdrawing of 391 sheets. The great task before this
Section in the future will be the conversion of those existing 20-chain and 40-chain
map-sheets to the new 1:20,000 scale, which will be accomplished as areas are
revised. Some 74 sheets of composite mapping were produced, half of them as
overlays for topographic mapping projects. District lot assemblies for Federal
1:50,000 mapping totalled 51 sheets.
The Draughting Section completed 298 sheets of large-scale mapping, nine
lands folio projects completed or in hand, and compilations for 17 new lithographed
maps. Eighteen maps were published, 16 maps were reprinted, eight general map
series, IS, were reprinted, administrative boundaries were plotted on 90 Federal
Government 1/50,000 maps, and miscellaneous draughting was done on sketches,
indexes, charts, maps, and mosaics.
A major undertaking was the draughting for the Recreation and Conservation
B.C. Atlas, of which 30,000 are now published. A new catalogue of indexes for
maps and airphotos has also been completed.
The Map and Air Photo Sales office, with the Air Photo Processing Section and
the Reprographics Section, handled 41,000 requisitions covering 417,000 airphoto
prints, 194,000 lithographic maps, 320,000 whiteprints, 97,000 items of photocopy,
and 2.5 million offset prints. Since April 1, all requisitions were priced and totalled
$813,491. The second Versamat enabled airphoto production to be maintained during the flying season when 194 rolls of air film were also processed. Considerable
departmental work is refused in the Reprographics Section; only 5,000 105-mm
negatives were added to the control file because the operators are busy recovering
copy from the 90,000 negatives now stored. If the Section moves to a new location,
the present shift of three persons should be increased to make most economic use of
all equipment. Storage of maps and particularly of irreplaceable air film is a continuing problem; film is being stacked in corridors, over one million maps are stored
below ground in the old Topaz vaults, and the 80,000 colour posters have been
moved from the Princess Marguerite dock to the Field Survey warehouse.
Our airphoto rental service was discontinued this year, excepting for departments in Victoria, who borrowed 37,000 prints. Regional Airphoto Libraries are
being considered and this idea will require acquisition of microfilm and reader/
printer equipment for instant viewing and printing of photos and maps.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
STATISTICS
R 51
LEGAL    SURVEYS     DIVISION
FUNCTIONS
.............ii DENOTES WORK FOR OTHER DEPARTMENTS
SURVEY INSTRUCTION
PREPARATION
DESCRIPTIONS
AMENDMENT
OF OFFICIAL
PLANS
COMPUTER AND
REGULATION
EXAMINATION
LAND ACT SURVEY
INDIAN
RESERVE
SURVEYS
PLANNING,
CROWN GRANT
AND LEASE
TRACINGS
PARK
RESERVES
LAND
REGISTRY
COMPUTER
CHECK,
INTEGRATED
SURVEY
PLANS
COMPUTER AND
REGULATION
EXAMINATION
RIGHTS OF WAY
HIGHWAYS
CROWN LAND
SUBDIVISIONS
MINERAL
CLAIMS,
P&N.G.
WELLSITE
SURVEYS.
CLEARANCES
REFERENCE
MAP
COMPLETION
 R 52
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
LEGAL SURVEYS DIVISION
Production Totals for the Years 1974 and 1975
1974
Field books prepared	
Lots surveyed	
Survey plans examined
Lots confirmed	
Lots cancelled	
Lots amended	
  277
  389
  253
  330
  1,599
  50
  68
  298
  5,417
  698
  1,089
  917
  614
  667
  3,463
Examination sketches  1,672
Crown grant and lease tracings made  6,257
Wellsite plans recorded	
Reference maps compiled or renewed.
Applications for purchase cleared	
Applications for lease cleared	
Reserves cleared	
Timber sales cleared	
Crown grant applications cleared	
Cancellations from maps	
Inquiries
Letters received and dealt with.
  208
  337
  61
  12
  133
  22
  101
  337
  297
  41,704
Crown land subdivision and right-of-way plans  432
Plans checked for the Land Registry Office  1,603
Descriptions written  439
Draughting (Divisional projects), number of hours   	
Money-mail and verbal request forms    	
Number of customers (1,136 hours)    	
Survey instructions issued	
Mineral claims lots created	
Mining leases cleared	
Mining claims plotted	
Mineral claims gazetted	
Mineral claims cancelled	
Placer leases plotted	
Placer leases cancelled	
Documents from vault examined.
Distribution of Survey-posts
1975
226
274
250
320
272
65
103
147
3,863
420
1,297
1,030
744
375
3,342
1,544
8,297
111
324
3
13
40
54
34
297
522
40,131
365
1,671
266
369
249
274
B.C.L.S.
Bar
Standard
Pipe
Rock
Post
Drive-
able Pin
Post Cap
Anchor
Plate
Drive-
able Pipe
2V."
Alum.
Bolt
Amount on hand, Jan. 1,
1975	
2,465
3,000
1,147
100
1,333
2,000
3,760
2,130
3,193
1.778  I           498
1,776
New stock	
Totals   	
5,465 |       1,247 |       3,333 |       3,760
5,323
1,778
498
1,776
852
10
100
1 291
108
1,728
566
—
20
180
24
774
Public surveyors	
185 1          317 |            42
218
100
Total used in 1975......
852 |          317 |       1,091 |       1,433
2,402
	
418 |          124
Balance of hand, Dec. 31,
1975	
Selling price of one post
Selling value of posts used
in 1975  .
1,                  1
4,613              930 |       2,242
$0.60 |       $7.00 |       $2.50
1                  1
$511.20 l$2.219.00 1S2.725.50
2,327
$2.50
$3,582.50
2,921
$0.75
$1,801.50
1,778
$0.25
	
80
$9.00
$3,762.00
1,652
$0.50
$62.00
Total selling value, $14,663.70.
 SURVEYS AND M.A.PPING BRANCH
R 53
FIELD OPERATIONS DIVISION
Accomplishments of Air Survey Section
Number of
Photos
Lineal
Miles
Square
Miles
A. 1/63,360 vertical cover 	
B. 1/31,680 vertical cover—
Forest Surveys and Inventory Division PSYU's:
930
765
5,300
Taku                                            	
4,360
Subtotals	
1,695
9,960
Lands Branch:
640
300
3,650
_
1,160
940
4,810
2,635
14,770
C. 1/20,000 vertical cover—
Forest Inventory Division PSYU's:
620
1,750
1,090
1,320
2,970
220
250
50
115
200
925
3,835
1,530
3,380
1,880
2,085
1,890
1,425
4,025
2,505
3,035
6,830
505
Chilko	
Edgewood 	
575
Kettle	
	
115
Monkman 	
265
460
North Thompson 	
2,125
8,800
Ootsa   ...
Raft-Adams-Barriere-Nisconlith	
3,520
7,775
4,325
4,795
4,350
Stum     ....  	
Yalakom  	
Subtotals _	
24,110
2,945
55,430
B.C. Assessment Authority: E. and N. lands	
	
4,270
27,055
59,700
D. Special projects—
Agriculture Department: Chilliwack.—	
10
269
80
224{C)
6
19
12
56
B.C. Hydro and Power Authority:
Pend-d'Oreille River	
Subtotals 	
583
87
112(C)
81
125
Subtotals                        	
193
125
ELUC Secretariat: Langley 	
3
78
10
52
37
61
12
197
6
22
23
21
Finance Department: Fort Nelson                             	
Forest Engineering Division:
Fraser River debris	
Glacier-Forester-Bremner Creeks 	
Stone Creek   	
	
Subtotals                      	
160
72
	
Highways Department:
Barnett-Ioco.._.              	
63
76
172
332
55
244
23
235
32
41
6
95
24
20
137
93
275
41
188
34
50
24
66
1
32
8
Campbell River-Courtenay                 	
Cassiar Highway 	
Columbia River.                	
Elk River	
Garibaldi-Rubble Creek        	
Goat River	
Golden-Kicking Horse	
Hells Gate	
Highway 15                       	
Hope Slide	
 R 54 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Field Operations Division—Continued
Accomplishments of Air Survey Section—Continued
Number of
Photos
Lineal
Miles
Square
Miles
Highways Department—Continued
60
80
62
45
177
20
30
33
30
95
137
41
29
160
12
82
5
49
13
50
56
36
127
5
8
24
48
54
248
71
32
131
8
15
3
35
-
Meagre Creek - —
2,545
1,933
Lands Branch:
285
8
14
14
113
22
51
75
1,170
98
517
9(C)
21
17
185
37
2,750
144
6
149
355
22
20
12
154
70
149
125
67
6
22
15
34
4
60
17
756
57
554
2
5
17
42
38
1,410
21
8
85
215
5
13
3
31
43
55
75
Atlin         ...                              	
Back Valley (Pass Valley)	
Deadman Creek—	
	
100 Mile House   	
Port Alberni	
Quatsino ... _ 	
Sandspit-Masset...	
Sheridan Creek	
Skagit Valley _ ._ _.
Spahats Creek	
Squamish	
Terrace 	
6,592
3,660
Land Commission:
Gilford Ranch	
12
93
22
8
14
7
28
15
6
8
Langley  	
Pearce Ranch	
Point Vee Bar Ranch 	
Subtotals	
149
64
Mines Department:
Bradina Joint Venture	
21(C)
65(C)
25(C)
69(C)
32(C)
20(C)
29(C)
57(C)
55(C)
85(C)
12
24
11
43
18
13
18
37
34
57
Brenda Mine	
Bull River Mine  	
Byron Creek ...	
Craigmont Mine	
Endako Mine..	
Gibraltar Mine   	
Hudsons Bay Mine (Cominco)	
Phoenix Mine 	
Subtotals	
458
267
	
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Field Operations Division—Continued
Accomplishments of Air Survey Section—Continued
R 55
Number of
Photos
Lineal
Miles
Square
Miles
Municipal Affairs Department:
483
60
370
20
Highway 99_,_ _ ~~ - -	
Subtotals _ -— — —	
543
390
	
Public Works Department:
BCIT  	
12
9
4
4
4
7
3
7
3
143
3
98
15
8
16
46
15
5
2
2
Nelson _	
Vancouver  _	
Victoria Industrial Reserve __  _	
Woodlands School   _ _—
Subtotals _ _ -	
336
85
Recreation and Conservation:
234
14(C)
9(C)
8(C)
12(C)
7(C)
21(C)
16(C)
33
15(C)
46(C)
22(C)
15
15(C)
22(C)
10(C)
10(C)
9(C)
5(C)
18(C)
9(C)
14(C)
10
5(C)
22(C)
25(C)
8(C)
13(C)
15(C)
8(C)
17(C)
55(C)
8(C)
9(C)
31(C)
14(C)
14(C)
15(C)
17(C)
10(C)
26(C)
8(C)
28
24(C)
194
2
4
1
6
2
4
4
28
1
18
4
27
2
5
1
2
2
1
11
2
11
3
2
17
2
1
3
6
2
2
11
1
1
4
8
3
2
6
2
5
4
20
4
Chilko River       „.                                                 _    „
Cypress Bowl _  	
Gold River                                                 	
Malksope    	
Orford Bay               	
Stump Lake _ __ _	
Whitetail Lake       	
946
441
 R 56
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Field Operations Division—Continued
Accomplishments of Air Survey Section—Continued
Number of
Photos
Lineal
Miles
Square
Miles
Reforestation Division:
26
80
216
51
83
20
8
64
88
41        |
72        |
14
White River                                            	
476        |             287        |
Water Resources:
40
45
11
53
15
36
46(C)
8
5
116
78
12
40
10
229
99
90
12
12        1
5
28
17
34
12
3
4
40
36
4
38
3
195
57
81
Duncan    	
Elk River-Elko   .          	
Fraser River low water  	
659        |             390
7        |                2
29        |                9
78(C)                 54
59        1               50
Kamloops orthophoto	
257         1               112         1
Langley Lake	
166
117
46
160
65
362
129
28
36
24
149
64
131
124
Nanaimo River and Haslam Creek-—.	
Nechako River.....         	
Nicola orthophoto	
Nicola River	
Okanagan aquatic weeds.      	
393         1                 93
Okanagan Floodplain	
1,667
384(C)
455
780
705
95
91
109
73
53
212
36
88(C)
94
5
24
609
101
392
485
224
43
88
41
24
56
100
8
50
27
10
8
Okanagan Lake..            	
Okanagan orthophoto	
Peace River 	
Pitt Meadows-Coquitlam  _	
Shuswap-Mabel Lake...	
Shuswap River          	
Silver Lake	
Skeena orthophoto	
 -
Snohoosh Lake	
Vaseux-Osoyoos Lake	
	
Vinsula	
Wells..	
Willis Lake	
Subtotals _	
8,331                  4,113
Water Resources-Pollution Control:
Afton Mine.	
82(C)
107(IR)
13(C)
8(C)
37(C)
12(C)
9(C)
19(C)
10(C)
7(C)
104.C) 1
67
BCFP (Crofton) 	
BCFP (Victoria)	
Blueberry River	
5
2
35
6
4
7
3
.::::
Britannia Mines	
Canadian Forest Products (Port Mellon)	
Cancel (Castlegar)...	
Cancel (Prince Rupert)           	
Cariboo Pulp and Paper          ..    ..
1           [
	
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Field Operations Division—Continued
Accomplishments of Air Survey Section—Continued
R 57
Square
Miles
Water Resources-Pollution Control—Continued
Castlegar	
Champion Lakes 	
Crestbrook Forest Products (Skookumchuck)..
Crown Zellerbach    	
Eurocan Pulp and Paper	
Fording Coal...	
Fort Nelson	
Hanson Lake (WASA)— _.	
Intercontinental Pulp and Paper —~	
Island Paper (New Westminster) 	
Kamloops Pulp and Paper 	
Kimberley..
Kitimat     	
MacMillan-Bloedel (Harmac)	
MacMillan-Bloedel (Powell River)..
MacMillan-Bloedel (Port Alberni)..
Mackenzie..	
Michel Creek 	
North Kamloops  	
North Okanagan	
Northwood Pulp.	
Prince George Pulp __ 	
Prince George	
Rayonier Canada (Woodfibre)	
Scott and Burnaby Paper.....	
Sparwood	
St. Mary River.
Tahsis Co. Ltd..
Taylor	
Trail.
Subtotals	
Totals	
Grand totals.
2,516
23,919
53,599
1,224
12,963
12,950
74,470
3.889(C) = Colour.   632(IR) =r Infrared.
MAP PRODUCTION DIVISION
Map and Air Photo Sales
Public sales	
Government departments     5,194
Litho Map Distribution
Requisitions
     8,890
Provincial
92,249
18,578
14,084   110,827
White Print Maps
Requisitions
Mail and counter sales       1,337
Government departments     15,190
Federal
40,880
42,899
83,779
194,606
Prints
13,705
306,262
16,527   319,967
 R 58
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Map Production Division-Continued
Offset
Number	
214
2,465,403
Photo Reproduction
Mail and counter sales                            .
7
2,051
337
47,284
Government departments	
2,058
97,621
Air Photo Distribution
Requisitions               9X9
Public sales  3,567          78,850
Enlarged
1,528
2,214
Colour
1,542
9,888
Government departments  2,492        319,073
6,059        397,923
3,742
11,430
Diapositives
Number    —_        	
Requisitions
122
Number
4,282
Air Photo Rentals
Requisitions Publicl Departments Total
Number
1,871
i Being phased out, effective April 1975.
Total requisitions  40,935
Letters inward     9,570
6,122        31,279        37,401
Total counter sales $36,784.57
Planimetric Compilation Section
A total of 13,570 photographs was used in our basic Forest Inventory Mapping Program that resulted in the completion of 447 laydown map-sheets, of which
423 have been detail-plotted. Revision mapping projects utilized a further 15,818
photographs and resulted in the updating of 592 map-sheets.
Basic Forest Inventory Mapping Accomplishment
Project No.
PSYU
Number of
Laydown
Map-sheets
Number of
Map-sheets
Detail-plotted
74-114P    	
TFL 1	
236
12
199
212 (20 chain)
75-14P	
12 (80 chain)
199 (40 chain)
75-15P	
Taku-Boundary-Dease	
447
423
 SURVEYS AND  MAPPING BRANCH
Map Production Division-Continued
Revision Mapping Accomplishment (20-chain Map-sheets)
R 59
Project No.
PSYU
Number of
Map-sheets
Detail-updated
74-103P    .     --..	
91
74-104P 	
Kett'e       	
Big Bar         	
46
74-105P     .....   -.-    --	
43
74 110P  	
53
74-115P     	
65
75-91P                   	
67
75-114P           	
157
75-130P  	
70
592
Special Mapping Projects
Project No.
Name
Number of
Map-sheets
Originator
Scale
75-33T
1
1
3
2
3
1/15840
75-34T 	
Raft River	
1/15840
75-42P
1/15840
75^»9T   ..
1/15840
75-53P
Spius Creek "Mate" Fire	
1/15840
Photo Mosaic Accomplishment
Project No.
Name
Number of
Map-sheets
Originator
Scale
72-23M    	
1
1
1
1
1
17
1
22
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1/20000
75 24M
Whites Landing Folio	
Meziadin Lake  	
Kamloops area  	
1/20000
75-27M
1/31680
75-29M
Forest Service	
1/63360
75 30M
1/31680
75-43M
1/4800
7544M
1/4800
75-52M
Forest Service	
1/15840
75 75M
1/31680
1/20000
75 79M
1/12000
Tahsis Townsite 	
1/12000
75-82M   .
Department of Lands...	
Department of Recreation and
Conservation
Department of Recreation and
Conservation
Department of Lands 	
1/10000
75-115M	
1/15840
75-124M...
Junction Wildlife Management area
1/15840
75-142M	
1/18000
75-144M
1/7200
75-145M
Gibraltar Mines  	
1/15840
75-146M
1/12000
The total man-hours expended by this Section amount to over 26,400, of which
90 per cent of the capability is directed toward the Forest Service.
 R 60 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
MAP PRODUCTION DivisiON-Con«'/.t.ec.
Forestry Mapping
FINISHED SHEETS
Project No. 40 Chains to 1 Inch Number of Sheets
75-14P Alsek     39
(Also at 80-chain)      12
20 Chains to 1 Inch
Salmon Arm   54
Big Bar  88
Soo  83
Okanagan  9 7
TFL 1  30
Total   352
GRIDS AND CONTROL
75-15P Boundary (Op. 7)  16
Taku (Op. 7)  94
Dease (Op. 9)  90
Nechako (Op. 10) :  119
TFL 1 (Op. 27)  196
Total  .  515
GRIDS ONLY
Kluskus (Op. 14) .  50
West Lake (Op. 16)  34
Kettle (Op. 27)   46
Granby . 20
Dean (Op. 19)  170
Total  .  320
Six employees—1,284 man-days.
Composite Mapping
Quadra Island	
NEW MAPPING
Number of Sheets
   ....    9
Lac la Hache	
    9
Base Flats to Royston	
     7
Queen Charlotte Islands ...
  18
Muncho Lake	
OVERLAYS
 .     2
Fort Nelson	
....    __   21
Elk Lake Park	
     2
Cape Scott Park	
     6
Total 	
  74
1:50,000 Federal National Topographic A Program: Lot detail.
Cadastral information prepared for 51 sheets.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
R 61
Map PRODUCTION Division-Continued
Topographic Mapping
No.
Project
For
Scale
Contour
Interval
Status*
74-2T
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
Highways
Rec. & Con.
Rec. & Con.
Rec. & Con.
Rec. & Con.
Rec. & Con.
Rec. & Con.
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
Parks
Parks
Parks
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
Lands
W.I.B.
Lands
Lands
Mines
Lands
Lands
Dunhill Corp.
W.I.B.
Highways
Lands
Lands
Cap. Reg. Dist.
W.I.B.
Highways
Highways
Highways
Hydro
Mines
Lands
Lands
Highways
Lands
Lands
W.I.B.
Lands
Forests
Forests
Secretariat
Secretariat
Secretariat
Mines
W.I.B.
Lands
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
Forests
Lands
Lands
Lands
Forests
Lands
Forests
Forests
Forests
Forests
Forests
Forests
Lands
Highways
Econ. Develop.
Forests
Forests
Forests
Forests
Forests
Forests
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1200
6000
1200
2400
12000
2400
12000
12000
12000
6000
4800
12000
12000
12000
1200
5000
2500
2500
2500
5000
5000
25000
20000
5000
2400
2500
7200
7200
20000
12000
2400
4800
4800
4800
2400
15840
20000
2400
4800
2500
2500
5000
31680
31680
31680
10000
20000
50000
6000
5000
20000
5000
6000
20000
2500
2500
2500
15840
10000
20000
20000
20000
20000
20000
20000
5000
4800
12000
20000
20000
20000
20000
20000
20000
2'
10', 20', 100'
5'
5'
10'
5'
10'
20'
1'
10'
5', 10'
20'
20'
20'
2'
Spot
1 m
2m
1 m, 5 m
2m
2m
20 m
20 m
5 m
5'
2 m
20'
10'
10 m
5'
20'
20'
20'
5'
50'
10 m
5'
10'
10'
10'
5 m, 10 m
100'
100'
lm
100'
1 m
10', 20'
100'
10'
5', 10'
10'
25', 100'
25', 100', 200'
100'
100'
100'
100'
100'
10'
10'
20'
100'
100'
100'
100'
100'
100'
IP
74-5T
IP
74-17T
C
74-45T
C
c
74-46T
c
c
74-47T
IP
74-50T
IP
74-77T
c
74-81T-0
c
74-4T
c
74-6T
c
74-9T
Wells Gray Park...	
c
74-37T
IP
74-28T
74-67T
Fraser River Floodplain (Chilliwack).....
Fraser River Floodplain (Chilliwack)
IP
IP
IP
74-109T-O
IP
74-116T
c
74-117T
c
75-6T
c
75-10T
c
75-13T
c
75-17T
75-18T
Langford-Metchosin	
c
c
75-20T
c
75-22T
c
75-23T
c
75-25T
c
75-28P
W.R.S. Lakes 	
c
75-35T
Highway 3 (Mile 20-28)     ...
IP
75-36T
Highway 3 (Mile 54-71) 	
IP
75-37T
IP
75-39T
c
75^11T
c
75-45T
c
75-16T-0
c
75-50T
c
75-54T
c
75-55T
c
75-60T
75-63-0
Wells	
Peace DL 2222         	
c
c
75-64TO
c
75-65TO
c
75-68-O-T
c
75-69-O-T
c
75-70-O
92 P/l	
IP
75-72-0
IP
75 73T-0
IP
75-76-O-T
c
75-77T
c
75-78T
c
75-8 lT-O
c
75-86T
c
75-87T
c
75-88T
c
75-89T-0
c
75-92-0
IP
75-94T-0
IP
75-95T-0
c
75-96TO
c
75-97TO
IP
75-98T-0
Skelly Creek	
IP
75-99TO
IP
75-100T
c
75-101T
c
75-105T
c
75-106T-O
Brook McPhail	
IP
75-107T-O
IP
75-108T-O
IP
75-109T-O
IP
75-110T-O
IP
75-lllT-O
Hihium Creek.—  	
IP
1 C—Complete.    IP—In progress.
 R 62 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Map Production Division-Continued
Topographic Mapping—Continued
No.
Project
For
Scale
Contour
Interval
Statusi
75-112TO
Forests               1
Forests               1
Forests               1
Forests               1
Forests              1
W.I.B.                1
Secretariat             1
Lands                1
Lands                1
Lands                1
Highways             1
Public Works          1
Public Works          1
Lands                1
20000
20000
20000
20000
20000
2400
50000
7920
20000
12000
4800
480
240
20000
100'
100'
100'
100'
100'
2', 5'
100'
10', 20'
100'
20'
10', 25', 50'
5'
1'
5m
IP
75-113TO
IP
75-U6T-0
IP
75-117T-0
75-118T-0
Hackney Hills 	
IP
IP
75-122T
C
75-123T-0
C
75-125T
c
75-126T-0
c
75-132T
IP
75-135T
c
75-140T
Spahats   	
c
c
75-143T-0
IP
1 C—Complete.   IP In progress.
Lithographed Maps Printed in 1975
Map No.
Name
Edition
Scale
Contour
Interval
Remarks
82G/SE
Flathead	
Second
1:125,000
50 m
Complete revision.
82G/SW1
Elko	
Second
1:125,000
200'
Complete revision.
92B/NW-SW
Victoria  	
Second
1:125,000
50 m
Complete revision.
92C/NE-NW-SE
Nitinat Lake 	
First
1:125,000
50 m
Seven colours, contoured.
92F/SW
Kennedy Lake	
First
1:125,000
50 m
Seven colours, contoured.
92G/SW
Vancouver	
Second
1:125,000
50 m
Complete revision.
921/NWi
Ashcroft	
Third
1:125,000
50 m
Complete revision.
82M1
Seymour Arm	
Second
1:250,000
500'
Complete revision.
83D-C1
McNaughton Lake  	
Second
1:250,000
500'
Complete revision.
93 M
Hazelton ...	
Fourth
1:250,000
150 m
Partial revision.
94A
Fort St. John      	
Second
1:250,000
50 m
Seven colours, contoured.
94B
Halfway River  	
First
1:250,000
150 m
Seven colours, contoured.
94H1
Beatton River 	
First
1:250,000
50 m
Seven colours, contoured.
94H
Fontas River  _ __.
First
1:250,000
50 m
Seven colours, contoured.
94J1
Fort Nelson 	
First
1:250,000
150 m
Seven colours, contoured.
94K.1
Tuchodi Lake	
First
1:250,000
150 m
Seven colours, contoured.
94N1
First
1:250,000
150 m
Seven colours, contoured.
9401
Maxhamish Lake  	
First
1:250,000
50 m
Seven colours, contoured.
94P1
Petitot River	
First
1:250,000
50 m
Seven colours, contoured.
103F1
Graham Island	
Second
1:250,000
500'
Complete revision.
103I-.1
Prince Rupert-Terrace —	
Third
1:250,000
100 m
Complete revision.
1E2
Third
Third
1:600,000
1:600,000
1F2
West central B.C	
Partial revision.
1G2
Third
1975
1:600,000
1:2,000,000
1J1
1JW1
Administrative    Boundaries
1975
1:2,000,000
1:600,000
(!)
B.C. Recreational Atlas	
1975
IJ.
Seven colours.
(!)
B.C. Air Facilities ..._ _...
1975
1:30 miles
Complete revision.
REPRINTS
82L/SE
1:125,000
1:125,000
100'
82L/SW
Vernon	
Second
100'
No revision.
82L/NE
Revelstoke	
First
1:125,000
100'
No revision.
82L/NW
1:125,000
1:125,000
100'
92G/SE
Langley     .—	
Second
100'
No revision.
92H/NW
Yale	
Second
1:125,000
100'
No revision.
92I/NE
1:125,000
100'
92J/NE
Bridge River	
First
1:125,000
100'
No revision.
92M
Rivers Inlet  	
Second
1:250,000
500'
No revision.
92P
Bonaparte River  	
Third
1:250,000
500'
No revision.
93A
Quesnel Lake   ..
First
1:250,000
500'
No revision.
93 B
Quesnel  	
First
1:250,000
500'
No revision.
93J
McLeod Lake 	
First
1:250,000
500'
No revision.
93K
Fort Fraser	
Third
1:250,000
500'
No revision.
93 L
Smithers	
Third
1:250,000
500'
No revision.
1JR
B.C. Relief         	
Second
1:30 miles
	
1 Lithographed during 1975.
2 Will be lithographed between January 1, 1976, and March 31, 1976.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
MAP PRODUCTION Division-Continued
R 63
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    UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS R 67
UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
Erosion of the bluffs along Spanish Banks continues to be a problem requiring
attention. The winter storms cause the sea to gnaw away at the base of the cliffs,
resulting in undercutting and subsequently sloughing along the cliff face. In addition to the erosion taking place at the base of the cliffs, surface water from heavy
winter rains spills over the cliffs just west of No. 1 Ravine and to a lesser extent
in No. 2 Ravine, causing extensive slippage areas to develop above Marine Drive.
During the year under review a program was commenced to replace boulevard trees in some of the roads in the University Endowment Lands. The project
is 50 per cent completed on Acadia Road north of Chancellor and fully completed
on Allison Road. The recapping program of roadways is also continuing and,
during 1975, West Sixth and West Seventh Avenues and Drummond Drive were
resurfaced.
The report for 1974 mentioned that the University Endowment Lands ambulance service has been brought under the provisions of the Ambulance Service Act
and, during 1975, there was an increase of over 24 per cent in emergency calls
responded to by our staff.
On December 1, 1975, an announcement was made by the Minister that 1,066
acres of the University Endowment Lands had been set aside as a park to be known
as Dr. Frank Buck Memorial Park. Included in the 1,066 acres is an ecological
reserve of 221 acres. By comparison this area set aside for park purposes is
slightly larger than Vancouver's Stanley Park. The attached map shows the area
involved. Contained in the 221-acre ecological reserve is the largest heronry in
the Lower Mainland. There are two areas on the edge of the park south of 16th
Avenue that have not been included in the park. It has been suggested that these
two areas may be suitable for recreational, social, and senior citizen development
over the years.
Renovation of the University Endowment Lands Golf Course is progressing.
Four holes remain to be done to complete the renovation program. A new clubhouse also has to be built. The revenue for the golf course during 1975 was
$22,000 more than in 1974, which suggests that the increase in play is a result of
the improved condition of the golf course.
Interest in the Endowment Lands as a residential area continues high with
sales of single-family dwellings reaching up to $350,000.
The attached table, showing comparison of revenue over the last 10 years,
records that for the third consecutive year our total has exceeded $1 million. The
comparative summary of building permits issued for the last three years is also included.
 R 68 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
 UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
R 69
Number and Value of Building Permits Issued for the Calendar Years
1973, 1974, and 1975
1973
1974
1975
Number
Value
Number
Value
Number
Value
18
2
1
2
1
$
1
17
3
3
$
150,000
195,230
18
1
2
1
1
$
106,480
44,300
6,000
5,000
7,000
272,300
5,000
107,000
9,000
24,500
3,600
45,000
Totals -	
24
168,780
24
378,730
23
432,900
University Endowment Lands Revenue, 1966 to 1975, Inclusive
Year
Water
Lease and
Sundry
Rents
Garbage
Misc.
Revenue
Taxes and
Grants
Golf
Course
Total
Revenue
1966	
$
114,098.68
135,870.74
160,610.25
157,368.01
180,441.79
169,911.07
179,199.93
208,491.67
206,338.11
225,987.44
$
34,799.64
49,745.23
36,148.37
42,476.19
39,658,85
51,975.47
39,614.37
39,967.69
40,070.57
46,516.97
$
11,355.11
14,964.45
10,814.88
5,859.42
10,736.60
7,377.70
7,971.25
9,349.54
11,199.10
10,508.25
$
9,360.86
20,755.71
19,502.85
6,535.36
30,064.18
14,167.37
30,944.39
39,936.88
22,591.92
28,449.46
$
325,689.97
349,242.55
386,105.36
416,081.90
667,722.12
515,615.58
515,797.59
630,092.29
642,072.04
1,213,187.24
$
$
495,304.26
1967        	
570,578.68
1968	
613,181.71
1969	
628,320.88
1970
928,623.54
1971	
1972 	
1973	
1974...	
1975	
78,398.93
147,056.71
95,313.48
157,511.32
179,361.22
837,446,12
920,584.24
1,023,151.55
1,079,783.06
1,704,010.58
1,738,317.69 1 420,973.35 |  100,136.30 | 222,308.98
1                      1
5,661,606.64 1 657,641.66 1 8,800,984.62
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  PERSONNEL SERVICES
R 73
PERSONNEL SERVICES
This office provides personnel services to the Water Resources Service and
the Secretariat to the Environment and Land Use Committee as well as to the
Lands Service.
Activity during the year continued at a rapid pace despite a downswing in
recruiting activity over previous years. It is felt that the main reason for this was
the continuing high demand from union negotiations and classification plus an
increase in union grievances and contract interpretations as a result of the new
contracts, as well as an increase in statistical reports and staff transfers required
due to Treasury Board's cut-back in hiring.
Organization of the Personnel Services Office
Personnel Adviser
K. H. Knight
Cleric
C. I. Dye
Director
R. C. J. Webber
Office Manager
H. A. Cote
Stenographer
M. A. Sledz
Personnel Adviser
R. M. Renaud
Clerk/Typist
C. Wong
SUMMARY OF PERSONNEL SERVICES ACTIVITIES, 1975
Recruitment of Continuous Staff
In early 1975 the Government placed restrictions on the number of vacant
positions that could be filled; this resulted in a decrease in recruiting activity
from the previous year.
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1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
 R 74 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Seasonal and Short-term Appointments
Short-term hiring was down slightly in 1975 in comparison with 1974. The
main reason for this was a reduction in the funds made available to the Service by
the Department of Labour under the summer Work in Government program
(W.I.G.). Additionally fewer students could be hired with the Departmental
and the Department of Labour funding available as salaries had increased while
total funds had not.
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59
139
117
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
Reclassifications
A very substantial increase in reclassifications occurred during 1975. A
major reason for this increase was the implementation of a new Technical Assistant
Classification Series; as a result many draughtsmen and mapping assistants were
reclassified to higher levels in the Technical Assistant Series.
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54
1972
54
1973
1974
1975
 PERSONNEL SERVICES
R 75
Labour Relations
The Government signed its first contract with the British Columbia Government Professional Employees Association on June 20, 1975. As this contract
covers a significant number of the Services employees, much of the Director's time
was spent in providing management input into these negotiations. Separate component negotiations covering salaries for engineers, surveyors, and land officers
also occupied the time of our staff, and as of the year-end we had not reached
agreement with the land officers.
The second master contract with the British Columbia Government Employees' Union, the union representing the majority of our employees, was signed
on November 14, 1975. Only a limited amount of this office's time was devoted
to this contract, but we have become very much involved in developing greater
Departmental involvement at the line level, in component negotiations. To date
this new system seems to be working quite well in the Trades and Craft component
with R. P. Murdoch, Manager of the University Endowment Lands, representing
the Service at the bargaining table.
Reorganization
A major reorganization occurred in 1975 with the formation of the Land
Management Branch, which consolidated the Land Inspection Division, the Lands
Administration Division, and the Environmental Services Division into one unit.
G. H. Wilson was appointed Director of this new Branch, concurrent with the
appointment of W. R. Redel as Assistant Deputy Minister.
Principal Promotions, Appointments, and Transfers Within the
Lands Service During 1975
In addition to the above-mentioned promotions, the following major changes
occurred:
K. R. MacKay, promoted to Departmental Comptroller.
A. Paulsen, promoted to Assistant Director, Southern Interior Division.
F. Edgell, promoted to Assistant Director, Northern Division.
A. Rhoades, promoted to Assistant Director, Lower Coast Division.
A. Smith, promoted to Assistant Director, Policy Division.
D. Goodwin, promoted to Assistant Director, Special Programs Division.
R. N. Bose, promoted to Regional Land Manager, Skeena Region.
H. K. Boas, promoted to Regional Land Manager, Omineca-Peace Region.
D. I. Snider, promoted to Regional Land Manager, Thompson-Okanagan
Region.
H. L. Wenschlag, promoted to Regional Land Manager, Kootenay Region.
Establishment
Dec. 31, 1975
Number of established positions  460
Number of vacant established positions     40
Number of temporary employees on staff     37
Total number of employees on staff  457
 R 76 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Turnover
It is suspected that the higher wages brought about through collective bargaining and the relatively high levels of unemployment in the country contributed to
the continued low turnover in 1975.
20%
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
Percentage
Government-wide average (1975 figures not available)
17.2
17.1
16.3
12.2
11.0
12.4
""---^.^11.4
Lands Service average
; ■ :     ::    : : '■: ' I   j
1972
1973
1974
1975
Staff Training
Executive Development Training Plan 1975 graduates:
L. G. Smith, Technician, Map Production Division.
L. M. Warner, Land Officer, Land Management Branch.
Correspondence Course in Public Administration 1975 graduates:
T. Chow, Draughtsman, Map Production Division.
H. A. Crawford, Fire Captain, University Endowment Lands.
Additionally, employees received financial assistance on 40 courses that would
aid them in developing their skills and increase their potential within the British
Columbia Government.
Sick Leave
An analysis of sick leave taken in 1975 shows that approximately one quarter
of the sick leave total was taken by only 15 employees (3.3 per cent) who were on
leave for prolonged periods due to major illnesses. Although this may account for
a significant portion of the sick leave taken, it does not fully explain the reason for
the increase over the immediately preceding years; however, the Personnel Office
 PERSONNEL SERVICES
R 77
is currently in the process of introducing major changes in the administration of
sick leave in the Department and it is felt that this will have a significant positive
impact in the future.
Percentage
10%
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Government-wide average (1975 figures not available) -.-.
6.2
5.9
6.7
5.3
Lands Service average
___J L__
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
Retirements
The following employees retired in 1975:
Thomas Hinton, Supervisor of Map Distribution, Surveys and Mapping
Branch, after 39 years service.
Clarence House, Land Management Branch, after 12 years service.
A. H. (Bert) Ralfs, Surveyor-General, Surveys and Mapping Branch,
after 46 years service.
Evelyn Rhodes, Clerk, Surveys and Mapping Branch, after 36 years
service.
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  ACCOUNTING DIVISION R 81
ACCOUNTING DIVISION
This Division provides accounting services for the Water Resources Service
and the Environment and Land Use Committee Secretariat as well as the Lands
Service. These services include assistance with the preparation of estimates, budgetary control, the preparation and distribution of payroll data, the processing of
accounts payable and purchase requisitions, the billing and collection of Water
Rights, Lands Branch, and Surveys and Mapping revenue, and the preparation of
various reports and summaries for other Provincial and Federal Government
departments.
Because of staff turnover, increased expenditures, and numerous complexities
and adjustments arising from the collective bargaining process, it has been a very
hectic year for the payroll and accounts payable sections. Serious delays in payments which occurred during the year were somewhat alleviated in October when
we were permitted to add one temporary employee to each section. The staff
additions also made it possible to focus more attention on expenditure control.
During the year the Division lost to the Emergency Health Services Commission its Comptroller, Bruce Maclean, who had been with us for 22 years, and Ron
Bowes, from the accounts payable section, who had been with the Division for 10
years.
It is anticipated that during 1976 the accounting for Lands Service revenue
will be computerized and the Accounting Division has been assisting in the development of an efficient lease records system.
As at December 31, 1975, there were 15,275 lease accounts.
Summary of Lands Service Net Revenue Collections for the Year
Ended December 31, 1975
$
Land leases, rentals, fees, etc.  4,218,372.53
Land sales  1,200,350.84
Sale of maps and air photos      291,921.88
Net revenue collections  5,710,645.25
Comparison of Revenue Collections for 10-year Period, 1966—75, Inclusive
$
1966 Et3ftftft*____-_MH-___Mm._____SH 3,343,672.46
1967 enf«_(_H______i._______ft_____n____H 2,985,996.61
1968 __KH__H_______________M.-_i__._____________l 3,367,912.14
1969 ii...H________Hft________________ftft_-i 3,999,273.13
1970 ^Km^mami^m^mm 3,025,000.24
1971 ■ftft_____RM_ftM_Hniill.__ft____B_ft_9n-M.___H 4,580,312.19
1972 M__MHM_IM_H.iiM-Mi 4,878,666.29
1973 M_H__MMBBDHBHI 4,729,570.85
1974 i.M__MM___MM_______l 4,658,818.52
1975 MM-_M__H_BI---H---M_--B 5,710,645.25
 R 82 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Classification of Revenue Collections for the Year Ended December 31, 1975
Land sales— $ $ $
Country lands       999,931.86
Town lots      221,745.16
Surface rights  1,505.30
Indian reserve cut-off  500.00
  1,223,682.32
Land leases, rentals, fees, etc.—
Foreshore leases—
Booming and log storage  890,285.22
Commercial (marinas, etc.)  564,100.41
Oyster     17,893.20
Miscellaneous (foreshore protection,
etc.)   130,396.34
  1,602,675.17
Land leases—
Grazing and (or) agriculture  444,442.15
Quarrying   (limestone,  sand,  and
gravel)      75,022.00
Camp-site (lodge, fishing)   435.00
Home-site       1,429.38
Residential   719,513.12
Miscellaneous  210,801.62
  1,451,643.27
Land use permits  1,337.00
Licences of occupation        88,908.00
Royalty collections       707,766.93
Bonus bids (lease tenders and auctions)       128,075.00
Easement collections—
Annual rentals      52,781.74
Outright considerations   112,684.22
      165,465.96
Fees—
Crown grant  29,734.84
Assignments   20,010.00
Miscellaneous (lease, search, etc.)  52,678.82
Sundry collections (occupational rental, survey charges,
etc.)         54,525.37
102,423.66
4,302,820.36
Sale of maps and air photos—maps, air photos, survey posts, etc.
(includes composite mapping) ,      317,188.03
Gross revenue for year  5,843,690.71
Less refunds and taxes      133,045.46
Net revenue for year  5,710,645.25
 ACCOUNTING DIVISION R 83
Comparison of Land Leases, Rentals, Fees, Etc., Revenue for
10-year Period, 1966-75, Inclusive
$
1966 HHMM 1,514,749.69
1967 MHMMMMBMB 1,917,435.31
1968 MnMM-Mii 2,189,055.75
1969 MH_._HM_IMMBIB___HB_.__B 2,553,351.23
1970 MMMBBBBMMMMB 2,283,719.11
1971 BB__.____BBBBB__MBBBMB--.-M-H 3,093,281.59
1972 BBBBBBBBBEBBBMBBBBBBB 3,268,205.08
1973 MMBBBBMBM 2,906,536.84
1974 MMMBMMMBBBBBBMBMBBB 3,501,138.48
1975 BflBBBMMMMBBBM 4,218,372.53
Comparison of Land Sales Revenue for 10-year Period,
1966-75, Inclusive
$
1966 IMMMMMMMMMBMMMMBBM 1,692,861.14
1967 MMMMBBBMMBM 916,098.98
1968 BBBBBBBMBM 1,024,410.93
1969 BMMBBBBBBBMMMMMM 1,251,111.88
1970 BBBBMBM 518,015.63
1971 BBBBBBBBMMMMMMMBB 1,297,075.28
1972 BBHBBBBBMBBBBM 1,411,178.27
1973 MMMMMMMBMB 1,615,079.10
1974 BBBMMMBBBBM 915,420.38
1975 MMMBBBHHBBM 1,200,350.84
    MAIL AND FILE ROOM
R 87
MAIL AND FILE ROOM
Letters received in the Department during 1975 amounted to 218,041, compared to 246,199 in 1974, a decrease of 28,158 pieces. This reduction can be
attributed to the six-week Federal Post Office labour dispute during the latter part
of the year.
The colour coding of the less active "O" files was completed during the year,
which places the major portion of the Departmental files in folders, affording better
protection for stored correspondence.
Mail and File Room Work Load
letters inward
Microfilm reference, 1,337.
1975
1974
10-year
1966-75
Average,
Branch—
62,401
101,644
37,921
16,075
66,094
116.614
44,024
19,467
64,189
120,999
Water.. _ 	
36,906
Surveys— _ 	
22,453
Totals	
218,041
246,199
244,547
LETTERS OUTWARD (R
ECORDED)
Branch—■
Lands	
10,366
1,866
13,366
1,400
13,539
1,866
Totals  	
12,232
14,766
15,405
MISCELLANEOUS REPORTS
Designation—
Forest-fire reports	
2,708
3,549
5,440
2,555
13,077
5,979
2,609
8,182
5,838
Totals	
11,697
21,611
16,629
NEW FILES CREATED
Designation—■
"O" files	
2,946
1,367
430
6,359
1,711
554
6,761
1,500
Timber sale files	
918
Totals  	
4,743
8,624
9,179
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1976
1,030-376-6527
 

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