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MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS ANNUAL REPORT For the fiscal year ending March 31, 1977 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1977

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
MINISTRY OF ENERGY,
TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
Hon. Jack Davis, Minister
F. A. MacLean,
Associate Deputy Minister
ANNUAL
REPORT
For the fiscal year ending March 31,
1977
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1977
  Victoria, B.C., December 31, 1977
To Colonel the Honourable Walter S. Owen, Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor oj the Province oj British Columbia
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned takes pleasure in submitting the Annual Report for the
Ministry of Energy, Transport and Communications for the fiscal year ending
March 31, 1977.
JACK DAVIS
Minister oj Energy, Transport and Communications
 Victoria, B.C., December 31, 1977
To the Honourable Jack Davis,
Minister oj Energy, Transport and Communications
Sir: I have the honour to present for your consideration the report of activities
of the Ministry of Energy, Transport and Communications for the fiscal year ending
March 31, 1977.
Respectfully submitted,
f. a. Maclean
Associate Deputy Minister
 The Honourable Jack Davis, Minister of Energy, Transport and Communications.
  CONTENTS
Introduction.
Page
.    9
Transport Operations
Engineering Branch____.
Motor Carrier Branch-
Motor Vehicle Branch.
9
11
13
Weigh Scale Branch  39
Transport Research and Planning  40
B.C. Ferries (report to December 31, 1976, only)  41
Communications
System Development and Regulation Branch-
Telecommunications Services Branch	
Administration
Finance	
Personnel Services,
44
46
48
49
  INTRODUCTION
The year under report was one of transition for the Department of Transport
and Communications. On October 28, 1976, all portfolios previously known as
"Departments" were designated "Ministries" and apart from the new Ministry
nomenclature the Department, in addition to its present role, became the Ministry
of Energy, Transport and Communications, responsible for all matters pertaining
to energy in the Province. At the same time the Air Services Branch was
transferred to the Ministry of the Provincial Secretary and Travel Industry, while
subsequent changes included Computer and Consulting Services Branch being
transferred to the Ministry of Finance on November 9, 1976, and B.C. Ferries
becoming a Crown corporation on January 1, 1977.
The Ministry is now comprised of three service areas—Transport Operations,
Communications, and Transport Research and Planning. All energy matters come
under the jurisdiction of the B.C. Energy Commission.*
Under Transport Operations there are four branches—Motor Vehicle, Motor
Carrier, Weigh Scale, and Engineering. Transport Research and Planning, while
related to transport operations, acts as a separate division. In Communications
there are two branches—System Development and Regulation, and Telecommunication Services. Headquarters for the Ministry are located at 2631 Douglas Street,
Victoria.
Reports from the various branches follow:
ENGINEERING BRANCH
This Branch processes construction applications and inspects pipelines, railways, aerial tramways, logging equipment on industrial roads, and certifies operating
personnel for railways, aerial tramways, and industrial road equipment. It is also
the regulatory authority administering the Railway Act, the Pipe-lines Act, and the
Industrial Transportation Act.
Inspections carried out during the fiscal year include 170 aerial tramways, 148
pumping and compressor stations, 41 bulk-fuel storage plants, 807 industrial
vehicles, 249 locomotives, 57 railway yards, 360 miles of industrial roads, and
1,173 miles of railway trackage. Branch personnel were also involved in processing, inspecting, and testing the following new projects: seven aerial tramways; 118
pipelines; 20 miles of new trackage, including sidings and industrial leads; seven
new compressor stations; and 465 crossing applications. In addition, 630 operating
personnel were certified for industrial roads and railways and 51 accidents were
investigated.
The Branch is represented on two Pipeline Code Committees, the Mobile
Equipment Committee, and the Provincial Emergency Programme and Hazardous
Materials Committee.
EXAMINATIONS
During the year, railway operating examinations were conducted at various
railway and plant sites and personnel who passed were issued certificates as follows:
diesel locomotive engineer, 21; switchman and conductor, 25; trackmobile operator,
23; and motorman, 21.
* The B.C. Energy Commission regulates privately owned utilities in the Province, excluding B.C. Hydro
and citv or municipally owned systems. The Commission also monitors the price of oil and oil by-products
and makes studies and prepares reports for the Minister on all matters pertaining to energy. Head office is
located at 1177 West Hastings Street, Vancouver. (The Act authorizing the establishment of the Commission
was assented to April 18. 1973.)
9
 D  10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Industrial transportation: number of field lectures, 14; number of office lectures, 6; field lecture attendance, 291; office lecture attendance, 39; vehicle driver
examinations, 538.
Vehicles inspected: logging trucks, 587; gravel trucks, 125; crummies, 69;
loaders and spars, 26.
Engineering Branch Statistics, April 1,1976, to March 31,1977
Industrial road industry—
Industrial vehicles inspected  807
Field and office air brake lecture attendance  330
Industrial vehicle driver examinations processed  538
Industrial roads inspected  (miles)  360
Industrial road bridges inspected     12
New vehicle applications reviewed and processed  336
Mobile Equipment Committee meetings attended     11
Industrial road accidents investigated       8
Railway industry—
Railways under the jurisdiction of the MOET&C;
B.C. Railway
B.C. Hydro and Power Authority Railway
B.C. Harbours Board Railway
Vancouver Wharves
Canadian Forest Products Railway
Crown Zellerbach Logging Railway
McMillan Bloedel Company Railway
and some 42 other industrial railways plus four recreation railways.
Locomotives inspected     249
Railway yards inspected       57
Railway operating personnel certified       92
New trackage applications reviewed and processed       42
Railway accidents investigated       27
Railway trackage inspected  (miles)   1173
Bulk-fuel storage plants inspected       41
Crossing applications        23
Automatic signalization applications          7
Aerial tramways industry—
Annual inspections   170
Engineering designs reviewed and processed for new aerial
tramway installations        7
Progress inspections carried out during various stages of construction of the seven new aerial tramways     80
Pipelines industry—
Number of pipeline projects reviewed and processed and endurance tested   118
Total length of pipelines approved for construction  (miles) 132.3
Natural gas compressor stations inspected  71
Oil pumping stations inspected  50
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS D 11
Water injection pumping stations inspected  27
Pipeline crossing applications reviewed and processed  442
Pipeline failures investigated   16
New compressor stations approved and tested  7
Oil and Hazardous Material Spills jor 1976
January Amaco Petroleums 2,000 bbls. salt water
January Trans Prairie No oil
April 6 Pacific Petroleums 10 bbls. oil
April 13 Westcoast Petroleum 1.5 bbls. oil
April 28 .Union Oil 120 bbls. oil
May 7 Trans Prairie 50 bbls. oil
May 17 Union Oil 380 bbls. oil
May 18 Tenneco (C.D.C.) 300 bbls. oil
May 31 B.P. Oil & Gas 20 bbls. oil
June 3 Trans Prairie 150 bbls. gasoline
June 7 B.P. Oil & Gas 200 bbls. oil
June 17 B.P. Oil & Gas 20 bbls. oil
June 20 Union Oil 30 bbls. oil
July 8 Pacific Petroleums 5 bbls. oil
September Amaco Petroleums 50 bbls. salt water
September 26 Amaco Petroleums 40 bbls. salt water
MOTOR CARRIER BRANCH
From 1939 until the summer of 1973, the Motor Carrier Act was administered
by the Public Utilities Commission, which was created by the Public Utilities Act.
In 1973 with the passing of the Energy Act, the Public Utilities Commission
was abolished and its functions distributed to various ministries of the Government.
As a result, the Motor Carrier Branch is now part of the Ministry of Energy, Transport and Communications; and a new Commission, the Motor Carrier Commission,
constituted under one of a number of amendments made to the Motor Carrier Act
by the Energy Act, was created to perform regulatory functions under the Motor
Carrier Act.
The Motor Carrier Act and regulations provide for the regulation by the
Motor Carrier Commission of the business of transporting goods or persons by
motor vehicle for compensation on British Columbia highways. Before such for-
hire operations can be lawfully conducted in the Province, the carrier must obtain
a motor carrier operating authority licence from the Commission. The application
is first investigated by the Motor Carrier Branch and, following the investigation,
it is referred to the Commission for a decision. Once the decision has been
rendered, the application is returned to the Branch for processing.
Motor Carrier Inspectors investigated some 3,000 applications for new lor
amended licences throughout the year. In addition, investigations were conducted
into complaints lodged by shippers (or carriers) and, when time permitted, the
Inspectors worked along with the various enforcement agencies, which include the
RCMP, municipal police forces, and the Weigh Scale Operators of this Ministry.
Enforcement of the Motor Carrier Act and regulations by the staff of the respective
Weigh Scale offices throughout the Province is of considerable advantage in the
over-all monitoring of the trucking industry.
 D  12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Appendix A
Total revenue calculated for the licence-year 1976/77 for the period between
March 1, 1976, to February 28, 1977:
1976/77 1975/76
$ $
Passenger (buses)   45,212.50 60,775.38
Passenger (taxi)   42,065.00 39,731.00
Public and limited freight  699,458.08 631,912.73
Permits    _■ 17,545.50 13,349.00
Miscellaneous    19,872.26 14,362.30
Totals   794,153.34    760,130.41
Appendix B
The following table for the licence-year 1976/77 gives the number of licences
for the various classes issued:
Kind of Licence 1976/77 1975/76
Passenger (buses)   938 1,224
Passenger (taxi)   2,070 2,030
Public freight   17,523 16,302
Limited freight   2,179 2,301
Totals   22,710    21,857
TARIFFS AND TIME SCHEDULES
There were 333 tariff applications and 35 time-schedule applications filed
during the licence-year 1976/77.
TEMPORARY PERMITS
(In order to provide flexibility, Part 10 of the Regulations Pursuant to the
Motor Carrier Act provides for the issuing of temporary permits in lieu of or as
an adjunct to motor carrier licences.)
The following is a summary of the number of temporary permits issued during
the licence-year 1976/77.
Class II permits (for temporary operations as a public or limited
vehicle not exceeding 92 days)      3,879
FP permits (for operation of a licensed public or limited vehicle
temporarily in a manner other than is authorized by the
licence, or pending consideration of an application for licence, renewal, alteration, or transfer of licence, etc.)   13,481
Temporary permits (issued for the transportation of household
goods to carriers from provinces having reciprocity agreements with the Province of British Columbia respecting
commercial motor vehicle licences)  1     1,128
Total   18,488
With reference to Appendix B as it relates to licences issued during 1976/77,
it will be noted that there is a reduction with respect to the number of bus licences
issued which was brought about by the increased activities of the Bureau of Transit
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS D  13
Services Ltd. in the Ministry of Municipal Affairs. On the other hand, there was
a substantial increase in the number of public freight licences over the preceding
year. Finally, there was a substantial reduction in the number of temporary permits
issued over the preceding year, primarily with respect to Class III permits which
were reduced from 19,370 during 1975/76 as compared to 13,481 for 1976/77.
MOTOR VEHICLE BRANCH
The Motor Vehicle Branch is responsible for driver licensing, vehicle registration and licensing, vehicle inspection, and vehicle and driver safety programs.
A Central Registry is also maintained by the Branch for the recording of documents
filed under the Bills of Sale Act, the Conditional Sales Act, the Mechanics' Lien
Act, and the Assignment oj Book Accounts Act.
Following is a report of Branch activities:
The volume of transactions is indicated by the following issuance totals: motor
vehicles, motorcycles, and trailers licensed reached a total of 1,411,380.
Original driver licences issued up to December 31, 1976, totalled 92,424, a
decrease of 11,771 from 104,195 issued in 1975. The total number of licensed
drivers in British Columbia on December 31, 1976, was 1,634,323, an increase
of 63,052 over the 1975 total of 1,571,271. There were 972,784 male and
661,539 female drivers.
Revenue collected by the Branch from licences, permits, motor vehicle inspection, and other services such as payment of social services tax amounted to
$60,738,240.13.
This report deals extensively with motor vehicle accidents and includes statistical tables setting out information gathered from incident reports.
The number of persons killed on British Columbia highways in 1976 was 630,
a decrease from 717 in 1975 and 844 in 1974. Deaths per 100 million miles were
4.86, a substantial decrease from 5.70 in 1975 and 6.80 in 1974.
Incidents to December 31, 1976, were 84,158, a decrease from the 1975
figure of 85,601. The average property damage in 1976 was $1,047.61, an increase from the previous year's $1,017.33. Total property damage in 1976 was
$88,165,354.44.
This report also contains information about the Motor Vehicle Inspection
program. During 1976 there were 642,895 vehicles inspected, with 27.3 per cent
rejected.
The Central Registry, which is carried out as a function of the Motor Vehicle
Branch, is a repository in the Province for documents filed under the Bills oj Sale
Act, the Conditional Sales Act, the Mechanics' Lien Act, and the Assignment oj
Book Accounts Act, which concerns all types of personal chattels.
The various activities of the Branch are dealt with under the following
headings:
Licences.
Incidents and Convictions.
Driving:
Driver Improvement Program.
Examination of Drivers.
Motor Vehicle Inspection.
Central Registry.
School Buses.
Permits for Flashing Red and Amber Lamps, Sirens, and Theft Alarms.
 D  14                                                   BRITISH COLUMBIA
LICENCES
The total number of vehicles licensed in the Province during  1976 was
1,411,380, an increase of 61,998 or 4.6 per cent over the 1975 total of 1,349,382.
Passenger vehicles licensed totalled 911,622, an increase of 27,372 or 3.1 per
cent over the previous total of 884,250.    Licensed commercial vehicles totalled
308,520 in 1976, an increase of 8.94 per cent over the 1975 total of 283,198.
There were 21,148 motorcycles licensed in 1976, an increase of 5.89 per cent
from the previous total of 19,971.
Licensed trailers totalled 170,090 in 1976, an increase of 5 per cent over
161,963 in 1975.
Comparative Statement oj Licences, Permits, Etc., Issued During the
Licence-years 1968-76, Inclusive
Licences Issued
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972    1    1973         1974
1                1
1975
1976
Motor vehicles—
740,979
177,633
790,493
197,755
811,590
207,495
856,086
228,098
1
906,268    961,497
256,313|   286,925
879,751
270,101
884,250
283,198
911,622
308,520
Commercial	
Total motor vehicles  -	
918,612
988,248
1,019,085
1,084,184
1,162,581|1,248.422
1,149,852
1,167,448
1,220,142
18,464
102,068
2,713
7,859
20,905
114,420
3,231
8,009
22,500
129,864
3,093
6,640
25,339
141,978
3,699
7,335
29,372
156,143
4.048
33,495
171,869
5.067
21,184
162,855
9,202
14,024
19,971
161,963
8,625
14,658
21,148
170,090
9,243
16,703
Extra-Provincial prorated
Extra-Provincial prorated
trailers	
8,090|     10,714
Total  of   all  licensed vehicles
1,049,716
1,134,813
1,181,182
1,262,535
1,360,234(1,469,567
1,357,117
1,372,665
1,437,326
Transfer of ownership—
Passenger vehicles	
Commercial vehicles	
Motorcycles —	
Trailers — -	
351,092
62,370
11,391
9,637
383,477
71,858
13,447
12,003
347,879
70,522
15,334
14,337
405,928
86,003
17,278
19,167
439,242
101,424
20,044
22,022
452,980
112,273
22,279
26,282
291,027
69,908
11,312
22,613
338,878
88,012
12,214
25,890
407,056
122,046
15,171
37,072
Total transfer of
ownership	
434,490
480,785
448,072
528,376
582,732
613,814
394,860
464,994
581,345
Motor dealers—
Original licences -	
Additional licences
Original    motorcycle
1,140
1,332
120
85
1,173
1,538
124
95
1,204
1,490
141
84
1,205
1,538
148
134
1,274
1,674
150
1,392
2,146
167
1,408
2,098
215
93
1,489
2,334
182
93
1,883
2,194
168
49
257
308
20
8
141
421
500
Additional   motorcycle
dealer licences	
Demonstration—
Original licences	
158
207
Original   motorcycle
214
489
10
10
58
346
39
191
371
12
9
105
338
290
Additional   motorcycle
27
68
.1
Transporter—
Original licences	
Additional licences -
Manufacturer—
30
87
38
95
44
141
53
177
72
244
	
—      -
Original licences	
496
2
33,443
4,001
	
Repairman—
	
                17
1381          190
Permits—
Nonresident   touring
motor vehicle permits 	
Nonresident special
motor vehicle per-
929
32
15,690
2,408
18,098
590
19
20,696
3,029
23,725
540
10
21,596
3,156
24,752
550
1
33,880
4,488
38,368
468
3
40,508
4,900
266
5
39,923
2,412
226
69
Nonresident    commercial motor vehicle
permits:
Single trip..	
Quarterly	
34,606
4,881
28,542
1,607
Totals 	
37,4441     45,408
1
42,3351     39,4871     30,149
1                1
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS D  15
Comparative Statement oj Licences, Permits, Etc., Issued During the
Licence-years 1968—76, Inclusive—Continued
Licences Issued
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
Temporary    operation
permits—
Passenger	
Commercial	
17,599
42,128
59,727
20,260
49,665
69,925"
20,805
52,831
73,636
23,814
69,648
93,462
26.600
80,603
29,402
75,983
52,027
60,221
41,558
47,674
59,389
57,070
Totals	
107,203
105,385
112,248
89,232
116,459
Temporary testing and
demonstration   p e r -
mits—
1,888
63
11,788
2,231
46,851
Commercial	
 	
8,174
Totals	
 1  - -1 1	
1,951
14,019
55,025
Interim licence/insurance
17,456
84
908
6,356
141
2,881
14,144
3,983
89
2,580
14,227
3,426
130
2,559
19,379
All-terrain vehicles—
2,744
	
115
Transfer of ownership ...
 	
	
2,003
Totals	
18,448
9,378
6,652
6,115
14,339
4,862
Air brake manuals	
 |  . ...
	
	
15,077
14,899
1
Drivers' Licences
Original drivers' licences issued during the 1976 licence-year totalled 92,424,
a decrease of 11,771 from 104,195 issued in 1975.
The number of licensed drivers in British Columbia as of December 31, 1976,
was 1,634,323, an increase of 63,052 over the previous total of 1,571,271. There
were 972,784 male drivers, while female drivers numbered 661,539. The analysis
of drivers on record as of December 31, 1976, indicating sex and classification,
are shown below.
Analysis oj Drivers on Record as oj December 31, 1976
MALE CLASSIFICATIONS
Age
16-17 years..
18-19 „ ..
20-24 „ ..
25-34 „ ...
35-44 „ _
45-54 „ ..
55-64 „ ...
65-69 „ ..
70-74 „ ..
75-79 ,, ..
80-84 „ ..
85-89 „ ..
90 and over..
Totals....
1
105
1,878
8,639
8,484
5,247
1,689
72
14
I
I       I
1,61   2    I2,6|     3
I
I      I
3,6
20
676
23
583
1,396 2,972
605
276
57
3
2,342|156
1,796
1,139
104
19
1
1
-I- 1-
87
460
2,963
8,254
7,063
6,037
3,514
230
43
4
2
■-!■■
26,130|3,033[8,980|928|28,657
7
96
838
1,192
363
207
64
3, 4 | 3, 4, 6 [
4,6
9
314
1,126
697
491
190
9
5
I
2
116
237
70
33
11
178
3,702
9,264
3,975
2,578
1,520
207
68
7
3
1
1
22
841
1,311
231
93
35
1
2,76712,8411      469121,50412,534
f
5,6   I   6       Total
25,727|  1,329
37,736| 3,107
95,064115,468
202,952|18,063
145,235| 3,556
126,807]   2,004
101,493
39,113
26,881
14,723
7,953
3,639
1,351
I
1801 27331
156
621
526
59
49
44
20
22
14
11
3
7
41,917
123,252
256,391
172,836
145,713
110,570
39,905
27,094
14,772
7,992
3,650
1,361
828,674j44,555|l,712|972,784
FEMALE CLASSIFICATIONS
16-17 years...
18-19 „ ...
20-24 „ ...
25-34 „ ...
35-44 „ ...
45-54 „ ...
55-64 „ ...
65-69 „ ...
70-74 „ ...
75-79 „ ...
80-84 „ ...
85-89 „ ...
90 and over-
Totals...
I I
2|
271
62|
46[
25|.
2|-
1
3|
HI
11
1
56
177
174
%
27
2
-I I-
_'(-:
I-
165)     16]   533]  13]     212
28]
597 j
1,112]
624
378
125
8
3
8
1
....
I
417]
148|
790]
9481
470]
,162]
,9571
479|
1581_
8781
126|
5971
142|..
62
154|
926]
1,4771
312
123
31
7
21
14
77
89
20
16
5
2
4
16,503
30,360
92;538
192,995
121,716
97,853
72,157
19,498
10,163
4,884
2,131
599
142
7|     22| 1| 2,873|     74   654,272] 3,103|   248)661,539
 D 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The following is a general description of driver licence classes:
Class 1—Includes any vehicle except motorcycles.
Class 2—Includes large buses.
Class 3—Trucks and combinations with small trailers.
Class 4—Taxis and small buses.
Class 5—Private cars and small trucks.
Class 6—Motorcycles.
DISTRIBUTION OF MOTOR VEHICLES
The following tables provide information concerning the number of licences
issued throughout the Province. These tables cannot be regarded as an accurate
population count of vehicles in the various parts of the Province since the owners
move frequently from one area to another and vehicles are often sold to new
owners residing in different locations from the previous owners. The table does,
however, provide a guide to the distribution of vehicles throughout the Province.
Licences Issued
Name
(1976 Licensed Vehicles)
District
Code
Passenger
Vehicles
Commercial
Vehicles
Commercial
Trailers
Utility
Trailers
Motorcycles
190
036
510
191
514
085
042
159
083
161
044
046
103
048
010
182
123
050
017
038
052
028
012
018
125
127
167
019
516
087
131
181
185
169
023
133
016
089
091
032
054
040
056
186
135
157
14,300
1,365
2,621
4,699
3
1,673
1,314
648
285
116
298
46
54,757
1,308
7,057
318
4,038
1,767
1,355
15,578
428
22,292
10,045
1,718
6,097
3,384
4,651
10,535
1,659
1,326
3,399
929
784
4,628
1,928
1,898
551
2,342
795
13,215
718
1.908
904
987
1,724
21,810
4,774
668
2,113
2,109
1
1,126
957
582
473
108
194
50
13,463
1,368
3,320
304
1,695
1,297
702
5,401
478
6,686
4,259
777
3,633
2,177
4,003
4,556
1,095
1,070
2,205
1,077
746
4,992
778
1,285
256
1,326
679
4,233
693
1,111
724
1,071
1,454
10,951
263
32
108
112
2,216
261
971
889
396
51
148
105
Armstrong	
43
35
35
18
12
445
385
178
63
33
59
12
5,841
504
2,105
65
999
557
396
3,166
158
3,393
3,194
532
1,594
938
1,448
2,391
496
325
778
298
260
1,518
314
484
189
521
190
2,396
184
388
262
339
435
4,894
57
35
12
12
2
20
8
Burnaby	
3,194
86
167
11
47
86
19
241
31
353
110
6
713
82
339
344
17
80
104
103
56
421
26
81
3
103
38
113
45
74
78
112
112
707
875
54
Campbell River	
251
24
Castlegar....	
111
54
Chemainus	
25
588
9
404
Courtenay 	
Cowichan	
441
57
204
Creston  	
127
150
Duncan	
Eikford           	
281
55
Enderby	
38
95
34
50
Fort St. John	
Ganges	
Golden 	
Gold River
198
55
101
36
88
Greenwood	
Haney 	
45
314
40
38
53
Hudsons Hope  	
Invermere 	
32
72
561
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS         D  17
Licences Issued—Continued
Name
District
Passenger
Commercial
Commercial
Utility
Motorcycles
(1976 Licensed Vehicles)
Code
Vehicles
Vehicles
Trailers
Trailers
Kaslo	
137
402
281
14
141
37
Kelowna	
093
28,294
10,441
627
6,059
732
095
139
942
2,981
681
1,559
18
33
240
898
44
140
058
3.461
1.374
50
859
119
021
2,643    j            1,144
34
721
69
Lillooet	
059
783    1              644
24
210
44
051
255
229
4
53
22
171
063
471
2,324
464
1,693
24
105
143
693
22
Merritt	
57
034
6,482
2,451
71
1,131
132
Nakusp...	
141
719
571
23
302
48
Nanaimo	
006
17,721
6,488
226
4,057
583
Natal	
143     1                   21
15
2,327
1
68
2
1,225
150
5,829
172
145
003
358
50,074
242
10,441
3
725
93
6,725
17
New Westminster area 	
990
Northern Vancouver Island
515
4,787
3,387
48
990
203
North and West Vancouver
004
57,133
7,061
615
4,662
1,046
183
134
67
32
14
099
2,044
1,202
51
443
46
100 Mile House	
065
2,559
2,170
122
747
65
Osoyoos    _	
100
1,578
800
33
320
35
014
2,544    ]             1,042
25
720
59
Penticton	
112
13,464    |            5,309
255
2,836
382
Point Roberts, U.S.A	
512
1,360    |                893
30
239
51
008                   8.896
3,963
61
2,769
237
175
5,898
21,871
2,241
45
1,951
5,592
116
067
12,932
922
588
069
4,209
1,641
70
674
106
Princeton   	
114
1,398
992
43
459
67
Qualicum	
015
1,555
682
14
446
28
520     1              1.013
854
18
225
51
071
5,303
4,072
256
1,464
229
116
2,393
1,506
94
603
99
Richmond 	
102
58,370
10,666
373
6,969
881
147
148
105
690
58
436
33
191
Salmo	
30
23
118
5,157
1,079
3,173
140
1,502
147
513
639
10
152
29
Sechelt	
173
4,302
2,006
33
846
150
025
5,992
1,538
38
1,040
124
155
448
343
10
96
13
073
2,300
1,779
107
641
86
026
1,878
997
44
365
66
Squamish	
177
2,529
1,269
66
432
165
029
43,460
12,668
3,124
461
7,526
863
075
4,561
143
1,257
169
Tofino	
180
268
155
4
51
8
Trail 	
152
8,435
2,833
126
2,020
286
Ucluelet 	
179
449
362
13
122
17
Vancouver	
002
165,980
31,672
3,959
10,615
2,493
Vanderhoof	
077
2,089
2,056
154
656
109
Valemount	
163
449
403
37
119
29
Vavenby	
165
1,096
905
61
346
54
Vernon   _	
121
14,065
6,984
412
3,177
416
001
86,499
24,191
66
4,605
1,325
1
297
12,392
20
1,358
1,813
2
Wells   . .                       	
079
081
73
5,044
148
529
999
200
4
706
7
971
1
46
2
1
Total licensed vehicles
Total registered vehicles...
1,411,380
911,622
308,520
22,328
|        147,762
21,148
2,290,405    |     1,458,260
1
453,351
22,697
285,389
1
70,708
1
The difference between total licensed vehicles and total registered vehicles is d
Je to the licen
ce with owner
concept, e.g., vehicles on dealers' sales lots are not required to be licensed.   Some
vehicles have
>een destroyed
or removed from the Prov
2
nee but rem
ain registered
for six years
or until notic
: is received.
 D  18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REVENUE
Revenue received by the Motor Vehicle Branch from licences, permits, and
motor vehicle inspection amounted to $53,763,817.96. Funds collected under the
Motive-juel Use Tax Act, All-terrain Vehicles Act, social services tax, and the
Insurance Corporation of British Columbia premiums amounted to $6,974,422.17.
A further $53,550,011 in insurance premiums was collected by Motor Vehicle
Branch offices and accounted for directly to the Insurance Corporation.
Source oj Revenue, 1976 Licence-year
Revenue collected by the Motor Vehicle Branch pursuant to:
$ $
Motor-vehicle Act     4,201,931.89
Commercial Transport Act     2,533,127.07
    6,735,058.96
Revenue collected by the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia on behalf of
the Motor Vehicle Branch:
Motor-vehicle Act fees—
Passenger vehicles   19,372,184.00
Motorcycles   96,054.00
Notice of Transfer        558,602.00
Duplicate of Registration Certificate of Insurance   22,273.00
 20,049,113.00
Commercial Transport Act fees—commercial vehicles 21,789,092.00
Combined fees under Motor-vehicle Act and Commercial Transport A ct—
Trailers    729,595.00
New vehicle registration  378,032.00
Substitution plates   53,147.00
Decal replacements   4,658.00
    1,165,432.00
Other fees     4,025,122.00
Total revenue, Motor-vehicle Act and Commercial Transport Act  53,763,817.96
Other revenue collected by the Motor Vehicle Branch—
Motive-fuel tax   38,519.95
All-terrain Vehicles Act  14,297.00
Social services tax        561,300.77
Insurance   Corporation   of   British   Columbia
premiums      6,360,304.45
 6,974,422.17
Insurance Corporation of British Columbia premiums collected by
Motor Vehicle Branch and accounted for directly to the Insurance Corporation  53,550,011.00
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS D  19
Refunds
Legislation provides for the refunding of licence fees where the licence-plates
are surrendered to the Superintendent. A person who was allocated motor vehicle
licence-plates for use on a vehicle registered in his name can, upon disposal of the
vehicle, retain, destroy, or attach the number plates to a substitute vehicle, or
surrender them to the Superintendent, together with an application for refund of
fees.
Refunds for motor vehicle licence-plates are granted on the basis of the
unexpired portion of the licence-year, but no refund is made of an amount less
than $5.
On reassignment of the motor vehicle licence-plates to a substitute vehicle,
no refund is granted if the combined licence and insurance fee is less than $5.
The fee for the unexpired full years of the five-year driver's licence is refundable under the following circumstances upon surrender of the licence to this Branch:
(a) The licence has been surrendered due to the failure of the licensee
to qualify in a driver's examination.
(b) The licensee has taken up residence outside the Province.
(c) The licensee is deceased.
(d) The licensee has voluntarily surrendered his licence.
The following summary sets out the amount of money refunded for the 1976
licence-year:
Refunds, 1976
General refunds—■
Motor-vehicle Act— $ $
Passenger     57                 509.44
Mid-term endorsements  31,537 176,931.00
Drivers  24                 646.00
Commercial Transport Act—
Commercial   64 1,663.71
Mid-term endorsements  9,869 140,422.00
Supplementary fees  1 33.00
Other   1 2.00
Total      320,207.15
Relinquishment refunds—
Motor-vehicle Act—
Passenger          345 4,320.00
Cancellations    100,935 1,283,797.00
Drivers       1,556 4,345.00
Mid-term endorsements  129,162.00
Commercial Transport Act—
Commercial             11 1,367.50
Cancellations      11,163 435,851.00
Mid-term endorsements  53,929.00
All-terrain Vehicles Act—Cancellations   2 10.00
Total  1,912,781.50
Total refunds  2,232,988.65
 D 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ACCIDENTS AND CONVICTIONS
Motor Vehicle Accidents
The following table gives a summary of the incident frequency during the
period 1967 to 1976:
Motor
Number
Incidents
per 1,000
Deaths
per
10,000
Vehicles
Registered
Average
Deaths
per 100
Million
Miles
Fatal
Fatal
Incidents
Year
Vehicles
Registered
of
Incidents
Vehicles
Registered
Injuries
Deaths
Property
Damage
Incidents
per 100
Million
Miles
1967	
864,348
49,750
57.56
19,500
559
6.5
$
565.58
7.67
461
6.33
1968	
917,872
58,300
63.51
20,945
574
6.2
570.87
7.36
460
5.90
1969	
989,196
70,624
71.39
22,535
542
5.4
586.29
6.39
467
5.50
1970	
1,024,738
60,778
59.35
22,568
559
5.5
731.63
6.70
471
5.64
1971	
1,087,992
59,745
54.91
22,340
636
5.8
775.60
6.51
538
5.54
1972	
1,164,749
59.996
51.51
23,316
716
6.1
863.44
6.90
602
5.80
1973	
1,248,422
69,564
56.00
27,709
825
6.7
969.00
7.17
698
6.07
1974...	
1,333,891
84,445
63.30
28,699
844
6.3
995.26
6.80
718
5.79
1975	
1,349,382
85,601
63.44
25,003
717
5.3
1,017.33
5.70
593
4.71
1976
1,411,380
84,158
59.65
25,239
630
4.5
1,047.61
4.86
541
4.17
Reportable incidents are those where the aggregate property damage exceeds
$200 or a person is injured or killed.
The number of incidents in 1976 decreased to 84,158, down from 85,601 in
1975. In 1976 there were 541 fatal incidents and 630 deaths, a reduction from the
1975 figures, 593 incidents and 717 deaths. The ratio of deaths per 100 million
miles dropped once more from 5.70 in 1975 to 4.86 in 1976. Similarly, fatal incidents per 100 million miles in 1976 were 4.17, down from 4.71 in 1975.
Property damage rose to $88,165,354.44, up slightly from $87,084,593.59 in
1975. The average property damage in 1976 was $1,047.61, up from $1,017.33
the previous year.
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
D 21
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 D 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor Vehicle Incidents in the Province for
the Year 1976—Continued
2.                    HOUR OF OCCURRENCE
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
12 to   1 a.m	
395
430
269
149
123
100
142
260
343
266
296
342
367
386
546
668
659
525
437
425
381
496
414
479
75,260
24
92
279
48         1               99
283
21
13
11
11
9
16
12
18
8
21
19
23
28
35
23
32
19
32
23
29
35
30
1
69
29
22
14
30
52
75
54
47
60
82
64
111
140
158
122
101
89
107
99
85
116
14 956
179
107
4 to   5 a.m.     ~  	
90
75
103
7 to   8 a.m.	
8 to   9 a.m	
192
256
9 to 10 a.m.               	
194
10 to 11 a.m —   	
11 to 12   m	
12 to   1 p.m             	
241
261
266
299
2 to   3 p.m.   _ —	
407
493
478
371
6 to   7 p.m - _     —
7 to   8 p.m   .
8 to   9 p.m.                   	
317
304
251
9 to 10 p.m.   .          _ 	
368
10 to 11 p.m.  .
11 to 12 p.m — -	
294
333
60,296
Totals               	
84,158
541        |      16,873
66,737
DAY OF OCCURRENCE
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Sunday	
2. Monday	
3. Tuesday	
4. Wednesday-
Thursday..
Friday 	
Saturday.	
Not stated	
Totals .
1,173
1,095
1,148
1,153
1,212
1,647
1,473
75,257
90
65
52
52
71
93
118
271
250
242
246
242
353
314
14,955
812
780
854
855
899
1,201
1,041
60,295
84,158
16,873
66,737
4.             TYPE OF VEHICLES INVOLVED
Number of Vehicles Involved
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
10,044
2,420
53
54
23
161
4
27,261
1
524         1         2038
7,482
1,796
28
2. Truck -- -   -	
3. Bus   	
204
9
2
2
32
1
420
16
14
3
97
2
24,933
38
18
6. Motorcycle	
32
2
8. Not stated                 	
2,317
Totals. —  -. -	
40,020
774              27,523
1
11,713
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS D 23
Statistical Summary of Motor Vehicle Incidents in the Province for
the Year 1976—Continued
RAILROAD CROSSINGS
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Unguarded crossing	
2. Automatic signal -
3. Driver disregarded signal..
4. Signal not given	
5. Not stated 	
Totals — 	
4
3
2
1
89
99
21
1
66
23
69
6.                    MANNER OF COLLISION
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
3,510
1,582
1,277
386
387
77,016
122
249
18
2
4
146
765
373
287
8
25
15,415
2,623
960
972
376
5. Side-swiped other vehicle going same direction	
6. Not stated	
358
61,448
Totals  	
84,158
541
16,873
66,737
7.                        DRIVERS INVOLVED,
Number of Drivers
DESCRIPTION OF
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Male	
8,755         |           643
2,579                     108
28,686                      23
1
1,903        |        6,209
650                1,821
24,970        |        3,683
3. Not stated	
Totals	
40,020        |           774
1
27,523        |      11,713
Age of Driver
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. 16 to 17 years	
2. 18 to 19 years	
3. 20 to 24 years	
4. 25 to 34 years —
5. 35 to 44 years	
6. 45 to 54 years	
7. 55 to 64 years	
8. 64 to 69 years	
9. 70 years and over..
1,088
1,276
2,305
2,775
1,514
1,196
755
283
143
65
83
153
178
116
60
53
32
11
239
284
567
624
324
265
158
60
34
784
909
1,585
1,973
1,074
871
544
191
98
Driving Experience
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Less than 3 months.
2. 3 to 6 months	
3. 6 to 12 months	
4. 1 to 4 years	
5. 5 years and over	
6. Not stated.	
401
216
317
2,951
7,428
28,707
34
10
19
185
501
25
84
46
83
670
1,663
24,977
283
160
215
2,096
5,264
3,695
 D 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor Vehicle Incidents in the Province for
the Year 1976—Continued
Condition of Driver
Total
Fatal
Personal Property
Injury        Damage Only
1. Normal..
2. Extreme fatigue	
3. Physical defect  	
4. Confused by traffic-
5. Ability impaired	
6. Not known 	
7. Not stated 	
10,615
183
37
53
409
483
28,240
629
12
4
1
95
17
16
2,357
55
14
12
101
17
24,967
7,629
116
19
40
213
449
3,247
Licence of Driver
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Licensed in British Columbia	
10,755
131
444
28,690
656
27
68
23
2,410
29
114
24,970
7,689
75
262
3,687
ACTION OF DRIVER CONTRIBUTING
TO ACCIDENT
Number of Drivers
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
No longer driving	
Driving off roadway	
Did not have right-of-way—	
Car standing in roadway (not parked) .
Following too close	
On wrong side of road .	
Failing to signal.
Through street—did not stop..
Passing at intersection	
Exceeding speed limit   	
Careless driving	
Cutting in — —
Car ran away .
Passing on curve or hill	
Passing on wrong side	
Hit and run	
Railroad—did not stop	
Cutting left corner —
Parked legally.
Driving through safety-zone.
Totals	
4,781
2,659
961
543
592
287
67
169
32
173
763
117
126
19
19
472
10
43
919
4
309
153
26
7
3
98
47
83
12,756
5
6
3
16
1,061
635
196
148
136
55
13
46
8
42
160
10
20
1
1
10
12
28
4
3,411
1,871
739
388
453
134
54
115
24
84
520
107
102
13
18
457
4
28
875
773
2,586
9,397
TRAFFIC CONTROL
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. No control present —
2. Police officer—-	
3. Automatic traffic signal	
4. Stop signs	
5. Warning signs, slow signs, etc
Totals	
6,862
186
850
674
326
457
17
27
39
1,420
64
224
140
68
4,985
122
609
507
219
540
1,916
6,442
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS D 25
Statistical Summary of Motor Vehicle Incidents in the Province for
the Year 1976—Continued
10.                 PEDESTRIANS INVOLVED, ACTIONS OF
Number of Pedestrians
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
1,223
38
44
35
20
26
38
8
9
6
2
5
8
2
15
1
6
6
16
5
5
11
22
4
1
2
2
1
4
1,217
32
28
30
15
15
16
8. Playing in street 	
4
9
5
2
3
6
1
15. In pedestrian crosswalk	
11
1
Totals      	
1,480
85
1,395
Condition of Pedestrian
Number of Pedestrians
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
1. Apparently normal—
2. Extreme fatigue.	
3. Had physical defect-
4. Confused by traffic.—
5. Ability impaired	
6. Not known	
7. Not stated	
Totals	
223
1
4
6
12
17
1,217
75
I
148
1
4
5
10
12
1,215
1,480        |
85
1,395
11.
CLASSIFICATION OF VICTIMS
Number of Victims
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
1. Passengers ~
2. Drivers	
3. Pedestrians..
4.
5.
6.
7.
Bicyclists	
Motorcycle drivers-
Others (persons in horse-drawn .vehicles, etc.)..
Motorcycle passengers 	
Not stated  _ 	
Totals   	
10,990
11,694
1,480
654
820
15
199
17
210
288
85
15
24
4
4
10,780
11,406
1,395
639
796
15
195
13
25,869
630
25,239
12.                                  NATURE OF INJURIES
Number of Victims
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
644
229
40
374
1,378
455
77
417
151
31
8
6
22,059
175
24
7
30
348
1
31
8
6
644
54
16
367
1,348
107
76
417
151
10. Drowned....	
12. Asphyxiated	
13. Not stated       —	
22,059
Totals ,    	
25,869
630
25,239
 D 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor Vehicle Incidents in the Province for
the Year 1976—Continued
13.
LIGHT CONDITIONS
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Daylight...
2. Darkness..
3. Artificial light—good—
4. Dusk or semi-darkness..
5. Artificial light—poor.	
6. Not stated	
4,736
2,993
418
562
170
75,279
248
233
19
29
11
1,001
653
89
129
32
14,969
3,487
2,107
310
404
127
60,302
Totals..
84,158
541        |      16,873
66,737
14. Amount of property damage for period covered by this report, $88,165,354.44; amount for same period
last year, $87,084,593.59. Amount of property damage this year to date, $88,165,354.44; amount for same
period last year, $87,084,593.59.
15.     CONDITION OF VEHICLES INVOLVED
Number of Vehicles
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
12,021
133
134
80
15
145
13
12
5
8
176
27,278
728
3
8
8
1
6
1
1
3
14
1
2,423
19
27
25
3
42
4
1
1
1
40
24,937
8,870
111
99
47
11
97
8
8. Tail-light out or obscured   	
10
4
10. Head-light out (one light)  -	
4
122
2,330
Total*
40,020
774
27,523
11,713
16.
DIRECTION OF TRAVEL
Number of Vehicles
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
6,036
534
1,337
4,165
1,526
62
345
1,119
845
30
158
657
699
9
184
506
345
3
15
327
929
64
201
664
140
3
13
124
24
4
20
62
15
13
34
308
4
95
209
45
6
6
33
131
12
27
92
715
16
159
540
28,215
16
24,966
3,223
1. Going straight  	
2. Turning left	
3. Turning right  _ —	
4. Slowing down or stopping._	
5. Backing (not to or from curb)  —
6. Skidding ...       	
7. Leaving curb (including backing)	
8. Making U-turn   	
9. Overtaking   	
10. Stopping (not at curb or off paved strip)
11. Overtaking on right side  	
12. Overtaking on left side 	
13. Avoiding object or pedestrian	
14. Not stated	
Totals	
40,020
774
27,523
11,713
17.                         ROAD SURFACE
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Dry surface 	
4,863
2,323
978
401
285
48
75,260
361
103
41
15
18
2
1
1,111
512
159
94
34
6
14,957
3,391
1,708
778
4. Loose sand or gravel 	
292
233
40
60,295
Totals               	
84,158
541         I       16873
66,737
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
D 27
Statistical Summary of Motor Vehicle Incidents in the Province for
the Year 1976—Continued
18.                         ROAD CONDITION
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
7,657
170
155
97
60
702
75,317
518
7
4
2
9
1
1,666
41
23
24
15
139
14,965
5,473
122
3. Obstruction in road  	
4. Road under repair... 	
128
71
45
6. Other      	
554
7. Not stated             	
60,344
Totals          	
84,158
541
16,873
66,737
19.                            TYPE OF ROAD
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
7,998
662
100
98
8
33
75,259
494
35
6
3
2
1
1,765
113
19
9
3
7
14.957
5,739
514
2. Gravel                                  —            	
75
4. Earth                                  	
86
5. Brick or cobble                      	
6. Other    	
5
24
60.294
Totals                        	
84.158         1             541
16,873
66,737
20.                   WEATHER CONDITIONS
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Clear.	
5,224
1,663
1,144
398
451
18
75,260
358
63
77
21
20
1
1
1,134
366
248
95
64
9
14,957
3,732
1,234
3. Cloudy— 	
819
282
367
8
60,295
Totals                                         	
84,158
541
16,873
66,737
Convictions
The receipt of notices of convictions for driving infractions under the Criminal
Code (Canada), Motor-vehicle Act, Motor-vehicle Act Regulations, and the reports
of violations of any law known as a "Traffic Rule," continued to supply information
for the inclusion in the individual driving records of each licensed driver in this
Province. Access to these records is available by means of the driver's licence
number or by the name of the driver. The retaining of these records and the
furnishing of information which is invaluable for the driver control is the main duty
of the Driver Licence Records Section. The control which is made possible by
these records is the responsibility of the Driver Safety and Improvement Section.
 D 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Convictions Under Motor-vehicle Act and Criminal Code (Canada) 1973—76
Offences
973        1974        1975        1976
Under Criminal Code (Canada)—
Causing death by criminal negligence, sec. 203..
Causing injury by criminal negligence, sec. 204..
Criminal negligence in operation of motor vehicle, sec. 233 (1)..
Failing to stop after accident, sec. 233 (2) _ 	
Dangerous driving, sec. 233  (4) ._  	
Driving while ability impaired, sec. 234       -
Breath sample not provided, sec. 235..
Driving with more than 80 mg of alcohol in blood, sec. 236-	
Driving motor vehicle while driver's licence under suspension, sec. 238 .
Under Motor-vehicle Act—
Driving without obtaining driver's licence, sec. 18 (1,2)  	
Driving without subsisting motor vehicle liability policy, sec. 18 (2a)—
Driving motor vehicle otherwise than as restricted on driver's licence,
sec. 18 (6-8)            	
Driving without having driver's licence and liability card in possession
at time, sec. 19 (as amended, 1970). _   _ 	
Driving while right to obtain licence is under suspension, sec. 20	
Using licence belonging to another, refusing to show licence, sec. 56	
Failing to obey emergency instructions of a peace officer, sec. 124	
Failing to obey traffic-control signal legend, sees. 127, 128, 152 	
Failing to obey special signs re highway construction, sees. 134, 135, 137
Careless driving, sees. 138, 139 —   —
Exceeding speed limit (maximum), sec. 140  	
Exceeding speed limit passing schools and playgrounds, sec. 141-
Passing stopped school bus, sec. 142.   	
Failure to drive on the right, sec. 143	
Infractions of "lane" driving, sees. 144-146 	
Infractions of "passing," sees. 148-151, 153, 154  	
Infractions of turning, starting, and directional signals, sees. 155-162..
Failure to yield right-of-way, sees. 163-167  	
Not exercising due care re pedestrians, sees. 168-172	
Failure to stop at railroad crossings, sees. 174-176	
Failure to stop at intersections, sec. 177  	
Leaving vehicle improperly parked, sec. 182	
Backing vehicle illegally, sec. 184 .	
Operating motorcycle with more than one person, sec. 185..
Requirements of safe driving on highway, sees. 186, 187	
Fire vehicle safety, sees. 189, 190 	
Driving on sidewalk, sec. 191. _ 	
Opening door requirements, sec. 194-
Illegal depositing of articles on highway, sec. 195 ...
Riding motorcycle without safety helmet, sec. 207-
Miscellaneous    	
13
23
736
409
6,699
938
6,275
853
7
1
31
564
452
7,190
914
7,254
933
8
2
31
564
452
10,514
969
6,285
1,102
23
538
500
8,726
1,187
8,675
1,048
15,946 |   17,346 [  19,927 | 20,701
1,937
1,373
1,019
Under Motor-vehicle Act Regulations..
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
Traffic Violation Reports, 1973-76
D 29
Offences
1973
1975        1976
Under Motor-vehicle Act—
Driving motor vehicle otherwise than as restricted on driver's licence,
sec. 18(6-8) 	
Failing to obey emergency instructions of a peace officer, sec. 124	
Failing to obey traffic-control signal legend, sees. 127, 128, 152— 	
Failing to obey special signal signs re highway construction, sees. 134,
135, 137       	
Careless driving, sees. 138, 139  	
Exceeding maximum speed limit, sec. 140..
Exceeding speed limit passing schools and playgrounds, sec. 141..
Passing stopped school bus, sec. 142.. 	
Failure to drive on right, sec. 143 _ 	
Infractions of "lane" driving, sees. 144-146 	
Infractions of "passing", sees. 148-151, 153, 154	
Infractions of turning, starting, and directional signals, sees. 155-162..
Failure to yield right-of-way, sees.  163-167 _   	
Not exercising due care re pedestrians, sees. 168-172    	
Failure to stop at railroad crossings, sees 174-176 _ 	
Failure to stop at intersections, sec. 177 	
Leaving vehicle improperly parked, sec. 182  	
Backing vehicle illegally, sec. 184 _  	
29,779
579
7,998
125,545
6,456
178
1,364
5,718
5,565
3,762
5,332
1,512
240
8,544
53
34,201
Operating motorcycle with more than one person, sec. 185-
Requirements of safe driving on highway, sees. 186, 187..	
Fire vehicle safety, sees. 189, 190   _ _
Driving on sidewalks, sec. 191 _	
Opening door requirements, sec. 194 	
Miscellaneous   -
1,212
5
10
34
84
35
9
204,023
Under Motor-vehicle Act Regulations .
4,816
310
1,752
9,250
9,100
148,237
189,158
6,634
9,550
223
226
1,539
1,552
6,156
5,880
6,230
6,107
3,795
3,724
6,009
5,392
1,448
1,419
198
445
8,746
10,592
1,533
1,678
10
3
60
72
44
29
93
95
44
39
11
^
17 | 53
79 55
35,949  40,413
508
10,418
222,575
11,320
247
1,633
6,005
6,093
4,154
5,508
1,342
441
11,389
361
1,871
6
54
28
124
36
19
234,832 |282,865 |324,653
9,960 I
5,269
Notices of Juvenile Offence, 1973-76
Offences
1973
1974
1975
1976
Under Motor-vehicle Act—
Driving without obtaining driver's licence, sec. 18 (1, 2)	
Driving motor vehicle otherwise than as restricted on driver's licence,
sec. 18 (6-8) —	
19
18
42
60
5
3
408
2
427
2,659
153
3
53
110
183
70
165
30
4
275
5
38
1
1
4
1
13
3
26
13
29
53
4
1
687
6
735
4,341
228
4
96
152
281
112
256
31
8
418
4
77
1
4
1
3
1
5
8
11
14
29
17
37
2
2
705
32
888
5,189
300
7
77
177
290
113
226
33
6
470
3
102
1
3
4
7
6
15
9
26
22
Driving without subsisting motor vehicle liability policy, sec. 18 (2a)....
Driving without having a driver's licence and liability card in posses-
18
44
Using licence belonging  to   another, refusing  to  show  licence,  etc.,
2
Failing to obey emergency instructions of a peace officer, sec. 124 	
3
730
Failing to obey special signal signs re highway construction, sees. 134,
135, 137              	
3
1,004
5,656
322
7
86
Exceeding speed limit passing schools and playgrounds, sec. 141	
Passing stopped school bus, sec. 142. 	
147
Infractions of "passing," sees. 148-151, 153, 154	
Infractions of turning, starting, and directional signals, sees. 155-162
287
87
278
38
5
518
7
97
1
5
2
4
8
12
6
4,755
7,596
8,764
9,425
265
944
767
826
 D 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
SUMMARY
Offences
1973
1974   I     1975
1976
Criminal Code (Canada) _
Motor-vehicle Act  	
Motor-vehicle Act Regulations-
Traffic Violation Reports 	
Notices of Juvenile Offence	
Total infractions .....
15,946
12,572
5,361
204,023
4,755
17,346 I  19,927
10,417 |    8,643
14,414 j  13,771
234,832 |282,865
7,596 |    8,764
20,701
10,502
16,788
324,653
9,425
242,657
284,605  1333,790 1382,069
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
D 31
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BRITISH COLUMBIA
DRIVING
Driver Improvement Program
During the year, Branch personnel took part in Impaired Driving Programs
throughout the Province, screened unsatisfactory driving records which resulted in
many suspensions of drivers' licences, and continued to make progress into driver
safety and improvement, which involves the controlling of drivers whose actions
become hazardous on the highways as a result of alcohol involvement and other
dangerous driving practices.
In addition, Defensive Driving Courses were conducted throughout British
Columbia by the B.C. and Vancouver Safety Councils. Also, new legislation effective July 15, 1976, under section 86d of the Motor-vehicle Act, requires a minimum
three months' mandatory suspension of a person's driving privileges upon conviction
of a driving offence under the Criminal Code (Canada).
Summary of Action Taken Under Driver Improvement Program, 1976
Age 16-17
Age 18 and
over
Total
1         	
59,196
Notices of intent to suspend—
724
6
926
21
264
472
2
27
8,325
284
33,439
1,993
17,143
7,471
114
709
11
18,610
9,049
290
Results of notices to suspend, interviews, and hearings—
Licence suspensions—
Male	
34,365
2,014
17,407
Previously warned	
7,943
Previously on probation	
Drivers' licences placed on probation—
116
736
11
49
18,659
382,715
10,315
	
27,524
9,587
Total drivers' licences suspended—
Court suspensions, 5,728; Superintendent's suspension, 30,648; Total, 36,376.
EXAMINATION OF DRIVERS
During the year the Drivers' Examination Section of the Driver Licence Division examined 117,508 drivers, of which 92,424 were original licences.
It will be noted from the table below that 22 per cent of the drivers given
examinations indicated on their application that they had taken formal training,
either under the High School Driver Training Program or from commercial schools.
Analysis of Annual Input, 1976
Male Female Total
Original licences  48,627 43,797 92,424
Examinations taken—
High school driver training.. 2,726 1,968 4,694
No professional training _„_ 32,538 21,778 54,316
Commercial school training 9,821 11,438 21,259
Unknown   26,038 11,201 37,239
Totals   71,123 46,385 117,508
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS D 33
Driver Training School Statistics, Licence-issuing Period
of March 1, 1976, to February 28, 1977
Issuances March 1, 1976, to February 28, 1977
Schools Operators     Instructors
Licences issued   96 92 303
Terminations     8 13 96
Suspensions      1   4
Total  active  licences  as  of
February 28, 1977  87 79 203
Examinations Conducted, March 1, 1976, to February 28, 1977
Written examinations—
Passed  68
Failed   26
Total  94
Practical examinations—
Passed  77
Failed  - .  20
Total  97
Temporary Permits
Original permits issued  76
Temporary instructors as of February 28, 1977     3
$500 Security Bonding, 1976
Bonded by surety 61 X $500 = $30,500
Security on deposit (parity bond) . 30 X $500 = $15,000
Security on deposit (cash)   5 X $500 =   $2,500
Total surety and security value $48,000
March 1, 1976, to February 28, 1977, Revenue
School licences ($25)   $2,400
Operator's licences ($10)         920
Instructor's licences ($5)      1,515
Total  $4,835
Inspections Conducted
Driver training schools  150
Driver Education Incentive Program   114
Driver Education Incentive Program Certificates
Received  10,450
Approved   10,43 8
Rejected   12
During the fiscal period ended February 28, 1977, there were 55 secondary
schools and 64 driver training schools approved to conduct Driver Education
Incentive Program courses.
 D 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Driver Examiner Staff Training, March 1, 1976, to February 28, 1977
Phase I—
Part 1 (basic two weeks)   1
Part 2 (intermediate one week)   4
Part 3 (advanced one week)   __..
Phase III—
Parti (Hydro, one week)    13
Part 2 (air and Class 1 and 3 operation)  32
Part 3 (Examining Class 1 and 2)   __
Total  50
Certification Program
With the introduction of the classified driver's licence system in 1971, a Driver
Certification Program was offered to persons, schools, firms, and businesses involved
in the transportation and trucking industry.
The privilege of certifying drivers is granted to those companies who meet the
standards of the program.
There are 109 recognized authorities currently under the certification program
in the Province.
In 1976 there were 52 liaison visits to recognized authorities conducted by
supervisory examiners and members of the special programs staff.
Five such authorities were cancelled or withdrawn, and four new companies
were accepted into the program.
MOTOR VEHICLE INSPECTION
During 1976 the compulsory program of motor vehicle inspection continued
in the Victoria area, the Lower Mainland, and the Nanaimo area. These areas are
served by five inspection stations, with a total of 15 lanes. The stations are located
in Victoria, Vancouver, Richmond, Burnaby, and Nanaimo.
The number of inspections completed at each inspection station is listed below.
Inspection Station
Approved
Rejected
Percentage
Rejected
Inspections
Conducted
Victoria—
1975 - -
1976	
100,253
106,542
89,458
109,420
57,486
78,116
105,132
145,703
22.449
27,452
32,005
36,558
37,947
48,560
17,391
22,339
41,781
56,848
11,570
11,357
24.1
25.5
29.7
30.7
23.2
22.2
28.4
28.1
34.0
29.3
132,258
143,100
Vancouver—
1975                       .  	
127,405
1976
157,980
Richmond—
1075
74,877
1976  	
100,455
Burnaby—
1975                          	
146,913
1976                                      .          	
202,551
Nanaimo—
1975 -
1976 -	
34,019
38,809
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
D 35
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BRITISH COLUMBIA
Notices requiring the owner to present his motor vehicle for inspection were
mailed to 446,025, of whom 160,330 required a second notice.
During the inspection of motor vehicles it was found that 175,662 did not
meet the standards and were rejected. The total number of defects found was
372,403, or 2.1 defects for each rejected vehicle. There were also 362 vehicles
condemned, their licences suspended, and they had to be towed away from the
inspection station.
Causes of Rejection
Code
Age 1
Age 2
Age 3
Age 4
Total
Motor vehicle licence.
Number-plates.	
Plate-lamp.	
Tail-lamps	
Stop-lamps	
Turn-signals 	
Reflectors  	
Horn 	
Windshield-wipers	
Left window-raiser	
Doors, body hood	
Bumper, mudfiaps	
Headlamps1	
Identification lamps..
Spot-lamps	
Fog-lamps	
Auxiliary lamps	
Wheel alignment	
Steering mechanism..
Tires, wheels 	
Fuel system	
Exhaust system	
Service brakes.	
Pedal reserve	
Brake connections	
Air or vacuum	
Tell-tale _	
Parking brake	
Visibility..
Driver seat-belts..
Miscellaneous	
652
949
486
469
.154
,400
235
,580
943
313
683
821
.099
,643
,686
492
996
874
345
537
255
,893
021
530
,102
458
581
,738
,638
,068
,633
115,774
1,155
1,906
9,307
4,225
6,381
7,637
1,082
2,003
2,550
750
2,418
1,095
23,373
1,081
736
1,115
599
4,400
13,395
11,941
362
16,243
9,843
1,820
4,979
493
826
4,481
4,308
1,234
1,998
361
972
5,028
2,562
4,270
5,896
570
1,676
2,126
368
2,866
1,125
13,453
491
285
1,204
392
3,349
9,988
6,878
350
8,843
4,889
1,441
3,283
215
468
2,595
2,224
983
1,094
143,736
90,245
192
456
1,266
830
1,596
1,528
412
403
660
207
988
461
2,483
160
101
86
97
624
2,662
1,244
77
1,961
1,197
496
581
40
95
618
524
191
412
22,648
3,360
5,283
22,087
10,086
17,401
19,461
3,299
5,662
6,279
1,638
6,955
3,502
58,408
3,375
2,808
2,897
2,084
13,247
35,390
30,600
1,044
38,940
25,950
5,287
11,945
1,206
1,970
10,932
11,694
3,476
6,137
372,403
i Headlamps adjustments, 47,506.
Vehicle Age Code: Age 1, 1972 and later; Age 2, 1971 to 1967; Age 3, 1966 to 1962; Age 4, 1961 and earlier.
Twenty-nine Authorized Fleet Inspection Stations have been established.
Three of the stations inspect all types of vehicles, and 26 are authorized to inspect
regular (commercial) trailers only. Vehicles inspected and approved at these
stations totalled 4,285.
Another service provided by inspection stations is the mechanical inspection
of salvaged vehicles. In all, 1,359 salvaged vehicles were inspected and those
approved were issued a Certificate of Mechanical Condition. The average time
taken to inspect a salvage vehicle is 1.9 hours.
SCHOOL BUSES
Control over the use and operation of school buses engaged in transporting
students to and from schools in the Province is the responsibility of the Superintendent of Motor Vehicles. The control extends to the setting of minimum
standards for construction and maintenance, as well as provide for periodic inspection. Such inspections are carried out on behalf of the Superintendent by Mechanical Inspectors of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the Motor Carrier Branch,
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS D 37
and senior Motor Vehicle Inspectors of the Branch. School buses in the Victoria
area, Greater Vancouver area, and Greater Nanaimo area are inspected at the
inspection station in the area or by an inspector from a station.
From April 1, 1976, to March 31, 1977, the number of permits issued for
vehicles to be used as school buses was 1,246 renewal permits and 236 permits
for new vehicles for a total of 1,482, as compared to the period from January 1,
1975, to March 31, 1976, of 1,711. Of these permits, 50 were cancelled as the
result of the sale and transfer of vehicle or because of poor mechanical condition.
From April 1, 1976, to March 31, 1977, school buses were involved in 39 accidents.
PERMITS FOR FLASHING RED AND AMBER LAMPS, SIRENS,
THEFT ALARMS, AND ALLEY LIGHTS
The Superintendent may, under the provisions of the Motor-vehicle Act Regulations, issue permits to allow a vehicle to be equipped with a flashing lamp. The
regulations specify that certain emergency vehicles, tow cars, and pilot cars may
be equipped without obtaining a permit. The permits are required for vehicles
such as public utility vehicles which must stop on a highway to repair power or
telephone lines. In each case the permit is issued where a hazard exists and only
with the approval of the local enforcement agency.
From April 1, 1976, to March 31, 1977, 355 permits for flashing amber
lamps and 21 permits for flashing red lamps were issued. In addition, nine permits
were issued to allow the installation of sirens and red flashing lamps on vehicles.
These vehicles were usually ambulances or the personal vehicle of the chief of a
volunteer fire department in a small community.
Ten permits were issued for the installation of theft alarms in vehicles.
CENTRAL REGISTRY
The Superintendent of Motor Vehicles is also the Registrar General responsible
for the operation of the Central Registry. Documents are searched and recorded
in accordance with the Bills of Sale Act, Conditional Sales Act, Mechanics' Lien
Act, and Assignment of Book Accounts Act, and are registered in connection with
the Companies Act when the chattels refer to motor vehicles. A certificate issued
in respect of a grant made under the Provincial Home Acquisition Act describing a
mobile home situated in a mobile home park is also registered in the office of the
Registrar General. In the case of corporations, personal goods or chattels, other
than motor vehicles, are recorded with the Registrar of Companies.
In October 1976, amendments were made to the statutes administered by the
Central Registry and certain registration and search fees were increased and all
fees for discharging documents registered on or after October 15, 1976, were
eliminated.
In comparing the total number of documents discharged between the fiscal
years 1975/76 and 1976/77, there is an increase of 3,787 documents discharged,
which indicates that amendments to the various statutes administered by the Registry will allow staff to provide up-to-date search information as well as eliminate
obsolete information from the files.
To provide a more efficient service to the citizens of British Columbia, an
individual may now visit a Government Agent's office, pay the required search fee,
and have the request sent to the Registry via TWX. The search information is then
transmitted to the originating agency via TWX at no extra charge to the applicant.
 D 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Central Registry administers approximately 3,000 search fee accounts
which allow an account holder immediate access to search information from the
Motor Vehicle Division or Drivers' Licence Division of the Motor Vehicle Branch
as well as regular lien searches. Search fees for the year amounted to $369,147.95,
an increase of $108,324.25 over the 1975/76 fiscal year; documents registered
came to 417,166, a decrease of 1,278; registration fees totalled $2,158,706, an
increase of $1,011,210 over the previous fiscal year; and 571,051 entries were
added to the records.
A statistical comparison with the 1975/76 fiscal year follows and provides a
detailed report of the various activities carried out by the Registry.
Statistical Comparison, 1975/76 and 1976/77 (April 1 to March 31)
T-.                  ,.   ci   A       A 1975/76 1976/77
Documents filed Under  Fiscal Year Fiscal Year
Conditional Sales Act  87,252 89,944
Bills of Sale Act  265,116 257,979
Mechanics' Lien Act  35,565 33,622
Assignment of Book Accounts Act  1,392 1,508
Companies Act  697 644
Provincial Home Acquisition Act  2,067 2,334
Late order filings under Conditional Sales
Act   4,563 4,658
Late order filings under Bills of Sale Act  14,476 15,344
Late order filings under Assignment of Book
Accounts Act    Nil 30
Documents discharged under—
Conditional Sales Act  1,293 1,931
Bills of Sale Act  2,650 5,603
Mechanics' Lien Act  2,907 2,783
Assignment of Book Accounts Act  72 76
Companies Act -  176 292
Provincial Home Acquisition Act  218 418
Total documents accepted   418,444        417,166
Number of records added to file—
Serial file  442,268        430,686
Alphabetical file  153,278        140,365
Total number of entries added to
Central Registry records  595,546        571,051
Total value of—                                                     $ $
Documents accepted   1,147,496.00 2,158,706.00
Search fees      260,823.50 369,147.95
Photographic copying fees           6,668.00 8,345.05
Total revenue  1,414,987.50    2,536,199.00
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
D 39
WEIGH SCALE BRANCH
This Branch operates 38 permanent weigh scales throughout the Province,
located at strategic points along the main highway system. Thirty-four of the
scales are manned on a regular basis with some Border scales being operated on a
24-hour seven-day-week basis.
The Branch also has 17 portable scales to monitor commercial vehicles which
are working in areas where there are no permanent scales, for, e.g., gravel trucks,
asphalt-mix trucks, etc., hauling for a highway construction project.
In addition to monitoring and checking commercial vehicles, Weighmasters
are responsible for issuing various types of permits such as temporary operation,
nonresident, motive-fuel user, highway crossing, overweight, and oversize.
Weighmasters are also required to enforce the various statutes pertaining to
the operation and movement of commercial vehicles and are empowered to lay
charges under the Commercial Transport Act, Motor Carrier Act, Motor-vehicle
Act, Highway Act, Motive-fuel User Tax Act, and Motor Vehicle Transport Act
(Canada).
As a result of a policy change in May 1976, accomplished through an arrangement with the Ministry of Forests and various lumber mills throughout the
Province, log haulers are now permitted to bypass weigh scales in British Columbia.
The gross vehicle weight of each load of logs is now recorded at the mill scale and
the Portable Weigh Scale Operator, who has access to these records, compiles the
statistics and submits a return. Since the policy change, 520,915 loads have been
monitored.
Statistics for this Branch for fiscal year 1976/77 are as follows:
Commercial vehicles checked    1,947,950
  5,329
Prosecutions entered	
Violation notices (warnings) issued
2,877
Permits Issued
Single trip and short term (oversize and overweight)
Nonresident 	
Temporary operation 	
Motive fuel (permits and/or emblems) 	
Restricted route 	
Highway crossing	
Term overweight and oversize	
ICBC (temporary permits) 	
66,734
30,344
34,414
11,288
______    ■    4,764
1,277
599
32,533
Total permits issued      181,953
Revenue Collected, 1976/77
Nonresident permit   855,032.00
Temporary operating permit  97,800.48
Temporary operating permit (ICBC)   181,130.43
Restricted route permits  155,248.88
Motive-fuel tax  133,059.50
Highway crossing permits  37,777.15
Special temporary permits  3,585.10
Total revenue  1,463,633.54
Total vehicles checked, 1,947,950
Total prosecutions, 6,299
 D 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TRANSPORT RESEARCH AND PLANNING
This Division comprises a range of capabilities which enable the Ministry to
keep informed of expanding developments related to transportation.
The research and planning function, which encompasses specific project concerns, qualifies the Division to review and rationalize Provincial transportation
activities and policy development.
With respect to the air mode, the Division is developing an air transportation
assistance program for the support of communities and regional districts in construction and upgrading of small airports in the Province. This has resulted from
previous investigations of ways to assist improvement of subregional air services to
small and remote communities. The Provincial Air Service Requirement Study
carried out by this Division outlined other prospective means of helping improve
these essential services which the Division will examine in the coming months.
The Energy Transportation Task Force, an inter-ministerial group established
in December 1976, is reviewing major gas and oil pipeline proposals that may affect
British Columbia. The Task Force considers such elements of concern as energy
demand, environmental constraints, social objectives, labour and financial impacts,
and port requirements.
Proposed oil pipelines include a new Kitimat-Edmonton line, a northern tier
development, and flow reversal of the existing Trans-Mountain pipeline from
Cherry Point to Edmonton. The Alcan project is designed to transport natural
gas from Alaska north slope to the lower 48 states. This proposal will transit
British Columbia from a point south of Watson Lake to the Alberta/British Columbia boundary east of Fort St. John. The Research and Planning Division concentrates its attention on the logistics of supply services during the construction and
operation phases, plus tanker and navigational considerations in the area of oil
port terminals. Participation by members of the Division is supplemented by a
consultant with expertise in coastal navigation.
Project involvements also include transportation and feasibility planning studies for coal development in northeastern British Columbia. Of prime interest are
rail and road accessibility to mine sites and ports.
Railway issues, as they relate to Provincial interests, have formed an important
aspect of the Division's attention. During the fiscal year, Division officials participated in hearings before the Railway Transport Committee of the Canadian Transport Commission which dealt with applications by Canadian Pacific and Canadian
National for abandonment of service in the southern Okanagan and Vancouver
Island. Background information was also prepared for the Province's submission
to the Commission of Inquiry into "Grain Handling and Transportation" conducted
by Justice E. M. Hall. And, as an ongoing project, the Division is co-ordinating
various interests in development of rail right-of-way disposal policy which will
embody land-use transport objectives. Further, it is engaging in review of rail
costing methods with other Federal and Provincial agencies.
Representation on the Federal-Provincial Committee on Western Transportation has permitted the Province to participate in development and implementation
of regional and national transportation policy. Federal/Provincial items include
amendments to the National Transportation Act, domestic air policy, inter-modal
passenger study, Maritime Code, remote community access, rail cost disclosure,
and rail freight issues. Liaison continues with all levels of government—municipal,
Provincial, and Federal.
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS D 41
The new Canadian Ports Policy, intended to decentralize decision-making in
the Canadian ports system, had active participation during development from
Research and Planning representatives. Further, investigation in the marine mode
relates to coastal transportation services in British Columbia, including the adequacy
of service to small coastal communities and financial arrangements between Federal
Government and private companies providing service.
Consultation with Federal and other provincial Governments continues on
issues such as inter-provincial motor carrier regulations and provincial involvement
in supply of air services.
The Division also has frequent contact with other B.C. Government agencies
for the purpose of information exchange on a wide variety of transportation-related
subjects.
The importance of multi-modal transportation planning in the context of
Canada's present economic, social, and environmental factors provides the guidelines of the transport policy in British Columbia. The Research and Planning
Division has an important role to continue development along these guidelines in
the expanding field of transportation.
B.C. FERRIES
The British Columbia Ferry Authority service was inaugurated in June 1960
to provide an alternative ferry link between the Lower Mainland and Vancouver
Island. In 1961, 2,040,000 passengers and 697,000 vehicles were carried on two
routes. During the nine-month period in 1976 ending December 31, the total number of passengers carried was 6,906,388, while vehicles numbered 2,486,070.
Service has been constantly improved and expanded and today 23 ferries
operate on 12 routes. Service is offered between Tsawwassen and Swartz Bay,
Departure Bay and Horseshoe Bay, Horseshoe Bay and Langdale, Horseshoe Bay
and Bowen Island, Saltery Bay and Earls Cove, Swartz Bay and Fulford Harbour,
Outer Gulf Islands, Tsawwassen and Long Harbour, Crofton and Vesuvius Bay,
Kelsey Bay and Prince Rupert, Brentwood and Mill Bay, and Langdale to Gambier
and Keats Islands.
B.C. Ferries operates its own maintenance and repair shops and refit and
lay-up berths at Deas Dock on the Fraser River near the Massey Tunnel.
Three new-generation vessels were added to the fleet in 1976 to improve efficiency and service—the MV Queen of Cowichan and MV Queen of Coquitlam
operating on the Horseshoe Bay-Departure Bay route, have a car-carrying capacity
of 350, whereas the MV Queen of Alberni, an over-height vehicle ferry connecting
Swartz Bay and Tsawwassen, can handle up to 58 semi-trailer units or 160 automobiles. Other changes include the MV Queen of Surrey, phased out of the Mainland to Vancouver Island operation and placed in reserve; the MV Sunshine Coast
Queen and 73-year-old MV Langdale Queen were surplus to requirements and both
were put up for sale; and two ferries—MV Sechelt Queen and MV North Island
Princess were transferred to the Ministry of Highways and Public Works.
On June 1, 1976, vehicle and passenger fares increased by approximately
100 per cent on most routes—the first fare increase in the fleet's 16-year history.
Traffic decreased by approximately 20 per cent for a period of time; however,
later reports indicate that a recovery to pre-1976 demand figures will occur in
1977/78. The cash operating deficit was reduced as a result of operating efficiencies from an estimated $64 million to an actual operating deficit of $15.3 million.
 D 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
December 31, 1976, marked the end of the B.C. Ferries role as part of the
Ministry of Energy, Transport and Communications. On January 1, 1977, a
Board of Directors was appointed, the British Columbia Ferry Corporation was
formed, and entered 1977 as one of the world's largest ferry fleets.
Statement of Income and Expenditure for the Nine Months Ended
December 31,1976
(Unaudited)
Revenue   48,357        37,828
1976 1975
($000) ($000)
Expenditure—
Vessels—
Salaries and wages  18,800 28,252
Operating   7,587 7,642
Catering   4,171 4,653
Maintenance and refit  1,811 1,019
32,369 41,566
Terminals—
Salaries and wages  12,169 5,831
Operating and maintenance     3,529 1,517
15,698 7,348
Other-
General administration     2,329 1,762
Employee benefits and insurance     2,076 1,909
Deas Dock maintenance depot      2,299 2,198
6,704 5,869
Total operating expenditure  54,771 54,783
Net loss      6,414 16,955
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
D 43
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 D 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
COMMUNICATIONS
SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT AND REGULATION BRANCH
The function of this Branch is to deal with what is often referred to as the
"public interest" aspects of the Government's involvement with communications.
In other words, it deals with the impact which technological developments will have
on people of the Province, the need for extension and improvement of service, and
rates which will be charged for service. Since communications services are provided
mainly by companies under Federal jurisdiction, many of the Branch activities are
by way of liaison, negotiation, and intervention before Federal boards.
Throughout the year the Branch continued its participation in an ihter-depart-
mental committee examining development of coal deposits in the northeast region
of the Province. This involved estimating requirements and cost of providing communications facilities such as radio, television, cablevision, and telephone within
the townsite, and for communications facilities outside the townsite to supply mining
operations, logging operations, mobile facility users, and private radio systems.
Discussions on the proposed Kitimat pipeline included considerations of
whether or not suitable facilities for oil tankers are or will be available on the West
Coast. Branch personnel assisted in compiling the requisite information by carrying
out a study of existing and planned navigational aids and communications facilities.
Investigations were carried out on complaints received about cablevision, radio,
and television services in the Province. Work done by the Branch resulted in a
number of these complaints being satisfactorily resolved.
Discussions with CBC and BCTV continued throughout the year with a view
to encouraging and co-ordinating the orderly development of communications services in British Columbia. In particular, attention was focused on developments in
the East Kootenays and on improvement of communications facilities to remote
areas. Preliminary work was carried out relating to communications services along
the Alaska Highway. In two specific instances the CBC made positive moves in
areas which were subjects of discussion in previous meetings — these were the
announcement in August 1976 of an agreement between CBC and Skeena broadcasters which will result in improved service to the northwest coast area, and the
indication received during the spring of 1976 that a program will be undertaken
to provide assistance to community-owned rebroadcasting undertakings after the
Accelerated Coverage Plan is completed.
Discussions on requirements of Third Level Air Carriers in the Province also
involved the Branch, in conjunction with representatives of the Transport Research
and Planning Division of this Ministry.
Implications of the introduction of Pay-TV in Canada were the subject of
extensive examination by both Federal and provincial agencies during the year.
Discussions are continuing both at staff level and between provincial ministers
responsible for communications. An Inter-provincial Task Force on Pay-TV has
been established, and this Branch has been active in work connected with this force.
A responsibility of this Branch is to provide staff support to the Motor Carrier
Commission in its regulation of Okanagan Telephone Company. In May 1976 the
company filed with the Commission an application for a tariff increase, to obtain
uniform rates with its parent, the B.C. Telephone Company. Branch staff followed
up results of a consultant's inquiry into the Okanagan Telephone Company, and
prepared material to assist the Commission in its review of the company's applica-
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS D 45
tion. The decision, while granting virtually all of the tariff amendments requested
by the company, also included five orders, requiring Okanagan Telephone Company
to
(a) include in its tariff the rates applicable to out-of-Province calling;
(b) submit a proposal for establishing and maintaining a Continuing
Property Record which will provide greater detail on the cost and
location of units of telephone plant;
(c) conduct a study with a view to revising its depreciation rates;
(d) provide the Commission with advance information concerning its
construction program;
(e) furnish to the Commission regular reports of a specified list of service
standard indices.
In its role of administrative support to the Commission, Branch staff has been
following up on work consequent to these orders.
During the year, discussions also took place with Okanagan Telephone Company officials on toll-sharing agreements between B.C. Tel and OK Tel.
While the B.C. Telephone Company is regulated federally (previously by the
Canadian Transport Commission and now by the Canadian Radio-Television and
Telecommunications Commission), the Government of British Columbia, through
the Attorney-General, intervenes on behalf of the B.C. Tel subscribers when that
company applies for rate increases, for the purpose of closely scrutinizing the
material which the company advances to support its case. Branch staff works with
counsel from the Ministry of the Attorney-General to prepare the Government's
case and to advise counsel during the public hearings.
As a result of an application of the anti-inflation guidelines to telephone companies, Branch personnel were reported to become familiar with Federal legislation
and regulations respecting this matter, and to meet with representatives of B.C.
Telephone Company, Okanagan Telephone Company, and Federal and Provincial
regulatory bodies.
In December 1976, B.C. Telephone Company applied to the CRTC for further
rate increases, following applications in both 1974 and 1975. Again staff members
were heavily involved in research and preparation for the hearings held in March
1977. Emphasis in this intervention was on examination of B.C. Tel's service
standards and proposed construction program, with particular reference to incorporation of latest switching technology in plans for new central offices.
Over the year many complaints were received from British Columbia residents
about telephone service provided by both B.C. Tel and OK Tel. While primary
responsibility for dealing with complaints about B.C. Tel service rests with the
CRTC, this Branch nevertheless provides assistance to any resident of British
Columbia who seeks it in the resolution of problems with service. B.C. Telephone
Company officials have been most co-operative with Branch staff, with the result
that many cases have been satisfactorily resolved. In the process, an indication is
obtained of areas where service standards may be deficient. Since OK Tel is within
Provincial jurisdiction, any complaints respecting that company are handled directly
by Branch staff on behalf of the Motor Carrier Commission.
Telephone rates and service in some northern British Columbia communities
came under scrutiny at a CRTC hearing held to consider an application by CN
Telecommunications to increase the rates in its northern service area. Branch staff
members were involved in preparation of the intervention against the proposed
increase. The resultant decision on the application reflected many of the Province's
concerns on the subject, and rate increases that had been asked for were not put
into effect.
 D 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Branch personnel experienced in utility regulation continued to be called to
make recommendations on oil pipeline tariffs submitted to the Minister for consideration under the Pipelines Act. Applications were reviewed from Westcoast
Petroleum Ltd., Norcen Pipelines Ltd., Pacific Petroleums Ltd. (for Blueberry/
Taylor pipeline only), and CDC Oil and Gas Ltd.
The CRTC, having been recently reconstituted, called a hearing in Ottawa in
January 1977 to consider procedures it should use in the conduct of cases to come
before it. The Branch prepared a submission dealing with a wide range of related
concerns, which was presented at the hearing through the Ministry of the Attorney-
General on behalf of the Province.
Discussions took place on several occasions during the year with officials from
CN/CP Telecommunications regarding a number of common concerns.
The Branch was also called upon to make recommendations regarding changing the amounts of security deposits required by the Prince Rupert Telephone
System. This is a small system owned by the City of Prince Rupert, and regulated
under both the Municipal Act and the Telecommunications Utilities Act.
On March 15, 1977, the Motor Carrier Commission received an application
from a company to be incorporated to provide telecommunications service in the
northwest area of British Columbia. Therefore, work began in the Branch on a
detailed examination of the proposal, and it is anticipated that public hearings will
be held to consider authorization to construct facilities.
TELECOMMUNICATIONS SERVICES BRANCH
This Branch is responsible for the provision, maintenance, and operation of
nearly all telecommunications services required by Provincial Government ministries
and some agencies, with the exception of two radio systems, one operated by the
Ministry of Forests and the other by the Ministry of Highways and Public Works.
The major activities of the Branch are concerned with telephones, radio systems,
data communications, and a variety of local communications systems.
The continued necessity for restraint in expenditures prevented the completion
of a number of projects. Cost-effective telephone service and data communications
were provided for all Government offices, but assistance to various ministries in the
fields of radio and auxiliary communications was limited for budgetary reasons.
In the Telephone Systems Division, service requests ranging in size and complexity from simple location changes to major switchboard installations continued
to be processed at an average rate of 240 each month. The private line inter-city
network was necessarily augmented from time to time, and the number of direct
telephone lines in use between Vancouver and Victoria reached 140. Planning was
completed and a contract signed for a new system of providing long-distance telephone communications to be installed by 1980. This system, to be known as
NETCOM, will be more economical than the present private line network and
improve over-all service. Planning was also completed for the transfer of Government telephones in downtown Vancouver to a new "Centrex" system for improved
efficiency.  This change was scheduled for May 1977.
In the Radio Division a contract was signed to provide radio paging systems
for the Ambulance Service of the Emergency Health Services Commission at 75
locations throughout the Province. These systems will enable offices to contact
part-time standby personnel without those persons remaining near a known telephone, thus effecting very significant savings in standby wages. The systems will
form part of a much larger essential mobile communications system for the Ambulance Service which it is hoped will be approved when funds become available.
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS D 47
In the Data Communications Division a new message centre to handle the
increasing requirements for teleprinter (Telex and TWX) and facsimile traffic was
completed. In March 1977 the number of words handled by the message centre
and the associated machines throughout the Province reached a new high of half a
million. For the 12-month period, the number of documents handled on the small
facsimile network was 5,390. In addition to message handling, there was increasing
activity in the provision of telecommunications for data processing, co-ordinated
with the planning for the new B.C. Systems Corporation.
The Auxiliary Communications Division continued to provide intercom systems, paging systems, sound systems, and a variety of other local communications
facilities. Considerable assistance was also provided in the development of an
extensive and complex audio and visual system to complement the exhibits in the
Provincial Museum.
The two Telephone Operations Divisions, one in Victoria and the other in
Vancouver, continued to provide effective service for Government personnel and
for the public.
 D 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ADMINISTRATION
FINANCE
HOW THE ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
DOLLAR IS SPENT
Fiscal Year 1976/77
70.12 %
1. General Administration, Engineering Branch, and Planning and Research
Branch.
2. Weigh Scale Branch.
3. Motor Vehicle Branch.
4. Motor Carrier Branch and Commission.
5. Computer and Consulting Services Branch.
6. Telecommunications Services Branch and System Development and Regulation Branch.
7. Air Services.
8. British Columbia Energy Commission.
9. British Columbia Ferries and Lease Payments on Ferry Vessels (excluding
minor coastal ferries).
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS D 49
Summary of Expenditures, Fiscal Year 1976/77
Vote $
198—Minister's Office  121,315
199—General Administration  402,433
200—Engineering Branch   397,197
201—Weigh Scale Branch  2,177,734
202—Motor Vehicle Branch  9,302,852
203—Motor Carrier Branch  717,765
204—Computer and Consulting Service   6,456,194!
205—Telecommunications Services Branch   8,532,987
206—Communications System Development and Regulation Branch  335,496
207—Motor Carrier Commission  135,742
208—Air Services  1,853,5622
209—Transport Research and Planning Branch  260,452
210—British Columbia Energy Commission  922,096
211—British Columbia Ferries   76,518,2573
Statutory—Motor-vehicle Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap.
253, sec. 120)   1,653,549
Special Warrant No. 4 — Lease Payments on Ferry
Vessels   1,566,661
111,354,292
1 Funds administered by Ministry, effective November 1, 1976,
2 Funds administered by Ministry of the Provincial Secretary and Travel Industry, effective November 1,
1976.
3 Expenditures cover period April 1, 1976, to December 31, 1976. Effective January 1, 1977, the British
Columbia Ferry Corporation assumed all expenditures for the B.C. Ferries previously under the jurisdiction of
this Ministry, except for ferry subsidy payments, and lease payments of the ferry vessels, which remain the
responsibility of the Ministry.
PERSONNEL SERVICES
A continuing program of restraint during the year resulted in initial hiring being
kept to a minimum and limited only to the branches of the Ministry where difficulties
were encountered in meeting the ongoing demand for service. Staff replacements
were also affected and filled only on a Ministry-wide priority basis.
Total employees hired (regular and auxiliary)   273
Employees hired (auxiliary, limited)   172
Employees promoted  5 2
Employees receiving lateral transfers   18
Resignations   93
Retirements   17
Deaths   6
Voluntary demotions  1
Deputy Minister Charles Dalfen resigned April 15, 1976, to become Vice-
Chairman of the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission.
The position remained unfilled during the balance of the fiscal year.
 D 50 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The addition of an Assistant to the Personnel Officer, and the emphasis placed
upon decentralization of routine personnel functions to working-level supervisory
staff, contributed significantly to the efficiency of the day-to-day administration of
the Motor Vehicle Branch Personnel Office. Historically, this Branch has always
been a high-volume staff change area, particularly in the junior and intermediate
clerical classifications.
The reorganization of the centralized personnel services in the Treasury Board
and Government Employees Relations Bureau organizations will place greater
emphasis and a much increased work load on the Ministry's personnel offices,
which will require appropriate staff increases to meet this expanded role.
It is also becoming increasingly evident that ministries will be faced with the
need to provide personnel services in the areas of classification, employee relations,
and staff training on a specialized basis and to a far greater extent of involvement
than they have been in the past.
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1977
1,230-1277-5485

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