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ANNUAL REPORT For the fiscal year ending March 31, 1976 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1977

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 @|\,       PROVINCE OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
=^^fu£
ANNUAL
REPORT
For the fiscal year ending
March 31, 1976
DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
Hon. Jack Davis
Minister
  Victoria, B.C., December 31, 1976
To Colonel the Honourable Walter S. Owen, Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned takes pleasure in submitting the Annual Report for the
Department of Transport and Communications for the fiscal year ending March 31,
1976.
JACK DAVIS
Minister of Transport and Communications
  Victoria, B.C., December 31, 1976
To the Honourable Jack Davis,
Minister of Transport and Communications
Sir: I have the honour to present for your consideration the report of activities
of the Department of Transport and Communications for the fiscal year ending
March 31, 1976.
Respectfully submitted,
f. a. Maclean
Associate Deputy Minister
(Transport Operations)
  CONTENTS
Page
Organization Ci
Transport Opera     ns
Air Services Brz  ch  9
Engineering     inch  12
Motor Carrie^    -anch  15
Motor-vehiclt      nch  15
Weigh Scale Bra    h   44
Transport Planning, Research, and Development Bureau  46
Ferries Operations
B.C. Ferries  47
Coastal Ferries  51
Communications
Computer and Consulting Services Branch  53
System Development and Regulation Branch  55
Telecommunications Services Branch  57
Administration
Finance  59
Personnel Services  60
 ORGANIZATION CHART
Motor Carrier Commission
B.C. Hydro
B.C. Energy Commissi*
B.C. Steamship (1975) Ltd.
B.C. Harbours Board
Senior Policy Co-ordinalor
Associate Deputy Minister
(Transport Operations)
Motor Carrier
Branch
Air Services
Branch
1
Motor-vehicle
Branch
Engineering Weigh Scale
Branch Branch
Executive Assistant
General Manager
B.C. Ferries
Associate Deputy Minister
(Communications Service)
Computer and Consulting
Services Branch
System Development
and Regulation Branch
Telecommunications
Services Branch
Transport, Planning. Research,
and Development Bureau
Departmental Comptroller
Payroll—Accounts ——   Coastal Ferries
Administration and Personnel
Information Services
ORGANIZATION
The British Columbia Department of Transport and Communications, with
headquarters at 2631 Douglas Street in Victoria, has operations and planning and
policy responsibilities in the transportation and communications fields in the Province of British Columbia.
The Department is comprised of four service areas—Transport Operations,
B.C. Ferries, Communications, and the Transport Planning, Research, and Development Bureau. Following are reports from the various branches which come
under the jurisdiction of these areas.
8
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS F 9
TRANSPORT OPERATIONS
This Division is comprised of five branches—Engineering, Motor Carrier,
Motor-vehicle, Weigh Scale, and Air Services. Reports from these various branches
follow.
AIR SERVICES BRANCH
This Branch is responsible for the provision of aircraft and crews to carry out
air transportation, aerial photography, and air ambulance requirements of the
Provincial departments.
The two Beechcraft A 200's continued to be used for the high altitude photographic role in the summer and for passenger transportation, and air ambulance in
the winter. The three Cessna Citation 500's were used throughout the year for
passenger transportation and air ambulance, and the Turbo Beech 18 filled the role
on the Victoria/Vancouver scheduled flight service in the summer and other
transportation requirements in the winter. The two Beechcraft 18 aircraft were
used for low-level photography, and for lease to the Government of Canada to
undertake survey flying, including flight testing of a data acquisition system.
The Otter aircraft on floats has been used for transportation and support of
survey crews, aerial photography, and numerous other uses. The Beaver aircraft
based at Kamloops was used in a similar role in that area.
There was an increase of 24.596 per cent in the flying-time over the previous
year and a corresponding increase of 81.37 per cent in the number of passengers
carried. These increases were due to the addition of new aircraft and improved
dispatch operation, which necessitated a staff increase of two people, bringing the
total number of employees at year-end to 37.
The new flight simulator was installed in May and became fully operational
in July. A total of 224.6 hours was flown on the simulator, which not only improved the standard of training but reduced the in-flight training and corresponding
costs to a minimum.
The scheduled flight service between Victoria and Vancouver was increased
to seven round trips daily, Monday to Friday. The service continues to be very
popular with a good utilization of crew and equipment. All other flights continue
to be on a non-scheduled basis.
During the past fiscal year the Branch flew over 6,000 hours* in its air
transportation, aerial photography, and air ambulance roles and carried over
23,000 Government employees over 2Vi million passenger miles.
* This figure includes 925.6 hours flown on aerial photography in co-ordination with the Field Operations
Division of the Department of Environment, and 105 air ambulance flights (289.3 hours) in co-ordination with
the Emergency Health Service and Canadian Forces Rescue Centre.
 F  10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Air Services Branch Operations
Aircraft-
miles
April	
May	
June	
July.__	
August	
September	
October	
November*	
December	
January ....
February	
March	
Totals
72,287
77,415
64,799
65,874
52,150
75,989
72,880
41,562
40,040
47,182
61,726
57,743
729,647
Seat-
miles
498,141
509,245
423,068
412,435
342,240
497,372
504,126
302,157
271,846
339,381
405,607
420,703
4,926,321
Passenger-
miles
262.661
263,498
226.380
225,135
178,943
235,939
254,690
162,308
152,009
172,166
223,020
232,635
Number of Passengers
Schcd.
2,589,384
5,624 passengers, fiscal year 1973; 12,977 passengers, fiscal year
1,270
1,196
1,145
1,319
1,242
1,284
1,671
1,452
1,138
1.285
1,344
1,715
Other
958
1,000
716
606
341
738
722
394
350
503
516
632
Total
2,228
2,196
1,861
1,925
1,583
2,022
2,393
1,846
1,488
1,788
1,860
2,347
16.061    I    7,476    |    23,537*
I I
1974.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
F  11
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3
 F  12                                                        BRITISH COLUMBIA
A ir A
mbulance Flights
Number of
AirVacs
Number of
Patients
Flight Time
(Hours)
Mileage
April  _	
May  	
June	
July  	
August  	
September 	
October 	
12
9
8
7
8
8
5
9
6
7
15
11
12
9
8
8
8
5*
5
9
6
8
16
25.9
33.7
26.8
27.6
16.7
17.0
20.3
16.7
25.3
19.9
22.3
37.1
5,626
7,413
6,823
7,416
4,205
3,944
4,260
3,875
5,428
January .	
4,700
4,744
March  _.._	
8,304
Totals 	
105
105
289.3
66,738
: One kidney pickup, one C/X en route, one doctor to Port Hardy re diphtheria patients.
Aerial Photography
Hours
April     28.3
May     89.4
June  123.0
July  213.8
August _.__   139.9
September  243.2
Hours
October ______ ._... 24.9
November  24.7
December  18.7
January  10.7
February  _ 1.3
March   7.7
Total   925.6
ENGINEERING BRANCH
This Branch processes construction applications and inspects oil and natural
gas pipelines, railways, aerial tramways, logging equipment on private roads, and
certifies operating personnel for railways, aerial tramways, and industrial road
equipment.
Inspections carried out during the fiscal year included 228 aerial tramways,
144 pumping-stations, 46 bulk-fuel storage plants, 546 industrial vehicles, 197
locomotives, 27 railway yards, and 375 miles of industrial roads, 700 miles of
railway trackage. In addition, 963 operating personnel were certified for Industrial
Roads and Railways, and 74 accidents were investigated.
The Branch was also involved in processing, inspecting, and testing the
following new projects: 21 aerial tramways, 139 pipelines, 30 miles of railway
trackage, two new air-brake systems implemented for logging trucks and trailers,
plus 334 different types of crossing applications. Older air-brake schedules were
rescinded because their design had become obsolete.
The Branch is represented on two Pipeline Code Committees, the Mobile
Equipment Committee, and the Provincial Emergency Programme and Hazardous
Materials Committee.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS F  13
Engineering Branch Statistics, April 1, 1975, to March 31, 1976
Industrial road industry—
Industrial vehicles inspected  546
Field and office air brake lecture attendance  850
Industrial vehicle driver examinations processed  873
Industrial roads inspected (miles) 375
Industrial road bridges inspected  10
New vehicle applications reviewed and processed  177
Mobile Equipment Committee meetings attended   19
Industrial road accidents investigated  5
New air system implemented for logging trucks and trailers _1_ 1
Railway industry—
Railways under the jurisdiction of the DOTC:
B.C. Railway
B.C. Hydro and Power Authority Railway
B.C. Harbours Board Railway
Vancouver Wharves
Canadian Forest Products Railway
Crown Zellerbach Logging Railway
MacMillan Bloedel Company Railway
and some 21 other industrial railways plus three recreation
railways.
Locomotives inspected  197
Railway yards inspected     27
Railway operating personnel certified     90
New trackage applications reviewed and processed     17
Public crossings reviewed for future automatic signalization
requirements       3
Railway accidents investigated     32
Railway trackage inspected (miles)  700
Bulk fuel storage plants inspected     46
Aerial tramways industry—
Annual inspections  228
Engineering designs reviewed and processed for
(1) new aerial tramway installations   21
(2) major modifications of existing equipment  3
Progress inspections carried out during various stages of construction of the 21 new aerial tramways  60
Pipelines industry—
Number of pipeline projects  reviewed  and  processed  and
endurance tested   139
Total length of pipelines approved for construction ____(miles)  221
Natural gas compressor stations inspected     69
Oil pumping stations inspected     61
Water injection pumping stations inspected     27
Pipeline crossing applications reviewed and processed  319
Pipeline failures investigated      32
 F 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Oil and Hazardous Material Spills for 1975
January 5 Union Oil 20 bbls. oil
•   February 24 Union Oil gas
March 20 Union Oil gas
March 23 Union Oil fresh water
April 22 Texaco Exploration 30 bbls. oil
April 23 Texaco Exploration 5 bbls. oil
May 29 Inland Natural Gas gas
May 7 Union Oil 1 bbl. oil
June 17 Union Oil gas
June 18 Amoco Oil salt water
June 9 Texaco Exploration 1,000 bbls. fresh water
July 7 Union Oil 1 bbl. oil
July 12 Union Oil 15 bbls. oil
July 14 Union Oil 5 bbls. oil
July 21 Union Oil 2 bbls. oil
July 26 Union Oil 15 bbls. oil
July 31 Tenneco Oils 1,500 bbls. fresh water
August 4 Union Oil 1 bbl. oil
August 15 Texaco Exploration 150 bbls. oil
August 17 Union Oil 50 bbls. oil
August 5 B.P.O.G 50 bbls. oil
September 21 Blueberry-Taylor 15 bbls. oil
September Trans Prairie 10 bbls. oil
September 21 Texaco Exploration 1 bbl. oil
September 26 Pacific Petroleums 500 bbls. oil
November 10 Union Oil 1 bbl. oil
November 14 Union Oil 1 bbl. oil
November Blueberry-Taylor 537 bbls. oil
December 5 Union Oil 20 bbls. oil
December 26 B.P.O.G 200 bbls. oil
December 29 B.P.O.G 5 bbls. oil
December 14 Tenneco Oils 500 bbls. fresh water
Fall and winter—
three instances Trans Prairie 10 bbls. oil
EXAMINATIONS
Railway operating examinations were conducted at various railway and plant
sites during the year. Railway personnel who passed examinations and possessed
the required experience and medical qualifications were issued with the appropriate
certificates.
The following certificates were issued in the various categories: Steam locomotive engineer, 40; diesel locomotive engineer, 9; trackmobile operator, 29;
motorman, 4; switchman, 5; conductor, 2; dispatcher, 1.
Industrial transportation: Number of field lectures, 19; number of office
lectures, 4; field lecture attendance, 492; office lecture attendance, 48; field driver
examinations, 340; office driver examinations, 663.
Vehicles inspected: Logging trucks, 459; crummies, 36; gravel trucks, 46;
loaders and spars, 5.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
F  15
MOTOR CARRIER BRANCH
The Motor Carrier Branch serves as the operating arm of the Motor Carrier
Commission, a regulatory tribunal appointed by Cabinet.
The major function of the Motor Carrier Branch is to investigate applications
for permanent motor carrier licence authority to transport goods or persons for
compensation on British Columbia highways. Following investigation, all applications are referred to the Commission for a decision. Once the decision has been
rendered, the application is returned to the Branch for processing.
The Branch also investigates complaints from the shipping or travelling public
regarding the service of licensed carriers. Headquarters is located in Burnaby,
B.C., and there are seven offices throughout British Columbia located at Dawson
Creek, Prince George, Kamloops, Kelowna, Nelson, Nanaimo, and Victoria.
Enforcement under the Motor Carrier Act is undertaken by the RCMP and
by weigh scale operators, who ensure that goods transported by freight concur with
the conditions of licence granted to a carrier or ensure that goods are being transported by carriers adequately licensed under the Motor Carrier Act. Enforcement
is also undertaken under the Motor Vehicle Transport Act (Canada). In this
instance, the Federal Government has delegated authority to the Motor Carrier
Commission. The Federal Motor Vehicle Transport Act applies to those operations
of an extra-provincial nature, for example, an Alberta carrier must obtain authority
not only from the home province of Alberta but from the British Columbia
authorities before operating into and out of the Province of British Columbia.
During the fiscal year the Motor Carrier Branch, through its administration
and field Inspectors, investigated and processed approximately 3,000 applications
for new or amended authorities. In addition to the applications referred to,
investigations were conducted with respect to complaints from shippers and motor
carriers. There were 21,857 motor carrier licences issued consisting of 1,224 bus
licences, 2,030 taxi licences, 2,301 limited freight vehicle, and 16,302 public
freight licences. Revenue collected for the licence-year 1975/76 amounted to
$760,130.41.
In addition to 21,857 licence-plates issued, there were 23,465 temporary
permits issued to authorize temporary services in addition to authorities being held
by licensed carriers or new services of short-term duration.
MOTOR-VEHICLE BRANCH
This Branch is the Provincial agency responsible for vehicle registration and
licensing, vehicle inspection, driver licensing, and vehicle and driver safety programs. In addition, the Branch maintains a Central Registry for the recording
of documents filed under the Bills of Sale Act, the Conditional Sales Act, the
Mechanics' Lien Act, and the Assignment of Book Accounts Act.
This report deals with activities of the Branch during the year 1975 and
provides an accounting for the various aspects of licence issuance for the 1975
licence-year which ended on February 29, 1976.
The volume of transactions completed by the Motor-vehicle Branch in the
1975 licence-year is indicated by the following issuance totals: Motor-vehicle,
motor-cycle, and trailer registrations reached a total of 1,349,382.
 F  16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Original driver licences issued up to December 31, 1975, totalled 104,195,
down from 130,630 during the same period in 1974. The total number of licensed
drivers in British Columbia on December 31, 1975, was 1,571,271, an increase
of 85,716 over 1974. Male drivers numbered 946,189, while there were 625,082
females.
Revenue collected by the Branch from licences, permits, motor-vehicle
inspection, and other services, such as the payment of social services tax, amounted
to $52,078,704.91.
This report deals extensively with motor-vehicle accidents, and includes
statistical tables setting out information gathered from accident reports submitted
by vehicle drivers. The number of persons killed on British Columbia highways in
1975 was 717, compared to 844 in 1974. Deaths per 100 million miles were
5.70, down from 6.80 in 1974 and 7.17 in 1973. Fatal accidents per 100 million
miles were also down 4.71 in 1975, compared to 5.79 in 1974.
Accidents to December 31, 1975, were 85,601, up from the 1974 figure,
84,445. The average property damage in 1975 rose to $1,017.33, up from the
1974 figure of $995.26. Total property damage in 1975 was $87,084,593.59.
Information about the Motor-vehicle Inspection Program is included in the
report. During 1975, there were 515,472 vehicles inspected and the rejection rate
was 27.2 per cent.
The Central Registry, which is carried out as a function of the Motor-vehicle
Branch, is a repository in the Province for documents filed under the Bills of Sale
Act, the Conditional Sale Act, the Mechanics' Lien Act, and the Assignment of
Book Accounts Act, which concerns all types of personal chattels.
The various activities of the Branch are dealt with under the following
headings:
Licences.
Accidents and Convictions.
Driving:
Driver Improvement Program.
Examination of Drivers.
Motor-vehicle Inspection.
Central Registry.
School Buses.
Permits for Flashing Red and Amber Lights, Sirens, and Theft Alarms.
Staff.
LICENCES
The total number of vehicles licensed in the Province during 1975 was
1,349,382, an increase of 15,491 or 1.16 per cent over the 1974 total of 1,333,891.
There were 884,250 passenger vehicles licensed, an increase of 4,499 or
0.51 per cent on the 1974 total of 879,751.
Licensed commercial vehicles totalled 283,198 in 1975, a 4.85 per cent
increase over the 1974 total of 270,101.
There were 19,971 motor-cycles licensed in 1975, down from the 1974 total
of 21,184, a 5.73-per-cent drop.
Licensed trailers decreased 0.55 per cent to a 1975 total of 161,963, down
892 from the 1974 total, 162,855.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
F 17
Comparative Statement of Licences, Permits, Etc., Issued During the
Licence-years 1968—75, inclusive
Licences Issued
Motor-vehicles—
Passenger 	
Commercial	
Total motor-vehicles.
Motor-cycles	
Trailers	
Extra-Provincial prorated trucks	
Extra-Provincial prorated trailers	
Total   of   all   licensed   vehicles  	
Transfer of ownership—
Passenger vehicles -
Commercial vehicles 	
Motor-cycles	
Trailers -	
Total transfer of ownership
Motor-dealers—
Original licences	
Additional licences	
Original   motor-cycle   dealer    licences 	
Additional motor-cycle dealer licences 	
Transporter—■
Original licences 	
Additional licences -	
Manufacturer—■
Original licences	
Additional licences	
Trailer floater—
Original licences 	
Additional licences	
Repairman—
Original licences	
Additional licences	
Permits—
Nonresident    touring    motor-vehicle permits  	
Nonresident     special     motor-vehicle permits	
Nonresident   commercial   motor-
vehicle permits:
Single trip 	
Ouarterly _..	
Totals	
Temporary operation permits-
Passenger  -	
Commercial -	
Totals	
Temporary testing  and  demonstration permits—
Passenger - 	
Commercial	
Totals _.
Interim licence/insurance certificates
All-terrain vehicles—■
Registration 	
Substitution  	
Transfer of ownership	
Totals  	
Air brake manuals	
1968
740,979
177,633
918,612
18,464
102,068
2,713
7,859
1,049,716
351,092
62,370
11,391
9,637
434,490
1,140
1,332
120
85
1969 1  1970 |  1971
1972
790,4931
197,755
811,590| 856,086
207,495] 228,098
988,248] 1,019,08511,084,184
20,905]
114,420]
3,2311
8,009
22,500] 25,339
129,864] 141,978
3,093] 3,699
6,640 7,335
I
1,134,813|1,181,182 1,262,535
I
383,477]
71.858J
13,447].
12,003
I
347,879]
70,522|
15,334|
14.337J
405,928
86,003
17,278
19,167
480,785] 448,072] 528,376
1.173|
1,538]
124
95
30
87
1,204
1,490
141
84
929
32
15,690
2,408
590
19
20,696
3,029
1,205
1,538
148
134
44
141
540
10
21,596
3,156
550
1
33,880
4,488
18,098]  23,725]  24,75,2]
17,599]
42,128|
20,260
49,665
59,727|     69,925
20,805
52,831
23,814
69,648
73,636|     93,462
906,268
256,313
l7i627581
29,372
156,143
4,048
8,090
1,360,234
439,242
101,424
20,044
22,022
"582,732
1,274
1,674
150
158
53
177
1973
961,497
286,925
17248,422
33,495
171,869
5,067
10,714
1,469,567
452,980
112,273
22,279
26,282
~613,814
1,392
2,146
167
207
72
244
496
2
33,443
4,001
~Z1A44
26,600
80,603
17,456
84
908
18,448
1974    [     1975
I
879,751]   884,250
270.101J   283,198
1,149T852|1,167,448
21,184
162,855
9,202
14,024
19,971
161,963
8,625
14,658
1,357,11711.372,665
291,027]   338,878
69,908]     88,012
11,312|      12,214
22,613]     25,890
194,860 [~4 64,994
468
3
40,508
4,900
I
1,408]
2,098
215
93
214|
4891
I
10|
10
58
346]
I
39]
I
266|
39,923]
2,412
1,489
2,334
182
93
191
371
12
9
105
338
290
138
226
34,606
4,881
45,408|      42,335]      39,487
29,402]
75,983]
52,027]
60,2211
41,558
47,674
105,3851   112,248|     89,232
631
11,788
2,231
.|        1,951]      14,019
]4,144l      14,227
6,356]       3,983
141| 89
2,8811       2,580]
3,425
13(1
2,559
9,378]       6,652]
15.0771
6,115
14.339
 f 18 british columbia
Drivers' Licences
Original drivers' licences issued during the 1975 licence-year totalled 104,195,
a decrease of 26,435 from 130,630 issued in 1974.
The number of licensed drivers in British Columbia as of December 31, 1975,
was 1,571,271, an increase of 85,716 over the 1974 total of 1,485,555. There
were 946,189 male drivers, while female drivers numbered 625,082. The analysis
of drivers on record as of December 31, 1975, indicating sex and classification, are
shown hereunder.
Analysis of Drivers on Record as of December 31, 1975
MALE CLASSIFICATIONS
Age
1
1, 6
]       1
2    !2,6|      3
1       1
1
3,6 1 3,4
1
3,4,5
4
4,6
1
5      1 5,6
1
1         1
6    I Total
1
1
77
22
...._..(......        67
23     5]     483
65511901   2.842
7 	
25
807
978
182
85
28
2
1
25,998]   1,301
36,4981 3,418
91 491115783
1
136) 27,510
18-19    „    .
95
788
866
305
5
264
1,003
626
2
103
181
56
27
9
230
3,540
7,836
3,474
2,442
1,385
220
69
 3
 3
 2
176| 41,059
703)119,532
20-24    „    	
1.7491    517
25-34    „
8,226] 1,085|2,754]354| 7,871
7,952]   5062,1671131   6,684
48091    22811.7831   761   5.702
198,350
143,726
126.919
14,623
2,995
1.705
4671244 594
35^(4    ,,
60] 168,864
45-54    „    ....
1781   442
61|144,457
55-64    „    .".
1,496      46
1021        2
1.1811  231  3.170
44
171
14
2
99.7681      638
411108,000
65-69    „    ....
121
19
2
1|     278
11        33
38,393
25,744
14,308
7,630
3,590
1,326
102
39
25
23
10
241  39,259
70-74    ,,        	
10
30|  25,947
18|  14,358
75-79    „    	
2
1
80-84    ,,
1
10|    7,668
85-89    „     	
5]    3,607
90 and over	
8|    1,334
Totals	
24,423)2,506
1
8,705
781|27,133
1
2283)2,527
1
378| 19,204
1
2,107
813,741 [40,662| 1,739)946,189
I            I          I
FEMALE CLASSIFICATIONS
1
 j	
2
7
1
0
2
1
2
1
1
8
3
1
1
30
459
857
528
346
98
7
1
1
1
25
28
6
3
I
16.323|       51
28,504|     142
85,726|     905
177.484    1,190
114,337      252
95,492|        98
67.150)        25
17,999|         7
9,0051         4
4,524]          5
1.794|          2
525          2
116 	
1
9]   16,387
18-19    „   	
5
15
54
33
22
2
2
8
3!..._.
15| 28,707
20-24    „
40
144
144
93
27
3
11        24
87| 87,287
25-34    „    	
5
3
1
48
45
40
7
76] 179,903
35^14    „    	
17(115,370
45-54    „    	
16| 96,113
55-64    „    	
3|  67,312
65-69    „     _.
 |	
2]   18,018
70-74    „    ._	
1
4)    9,015
75-79    „    	
1
 1 ____.. .
 |    4,530
80-84    „    	
     |    1,797
85-89    „    	
- 1	
 1—
527
90 and over. _____
 I -
 |       116
Totals 	
1321      101   454
101      174
71      13
2,328
63
618.9791  2.683
229|625,082
	
1
The following is a general description of driver licence classes:
Class 1—Includes any vehicles except motor-cycles.
Class 2—Includes large buses.
Class 3—Trucks and combinations with small trailers.
Class 4—Taxis and small buses.
Class 5—Private cars and small trucks.
Class 6—Motor-cycles.
Motor Dealers' Licences
Motor dealers' licences were issued by the Branch for the 1975 licence-year
only to November 24, 1975, at which time the issuance, required by individuals or
firms whose businesses involve the buying and selling of motor-vehicles, motorcycles, or trailers, became the responsibility of the Department of Consumer Ser-
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
F  19
vices. During the 1975 licence-year to November 24, 1975, 1,489 original, 2,334
additional, and 544 substitution motor dealers' licences permitting the sale of
motor-cycles and trailers were issued. Three hundred and five licences permitting
the buying and selling, but not demonstration of motor-vehicles and trailers, were
also issued.
A prerequisite of the issuance of a motor dealers' licence or the retention of
such a licence is that an insurance bond be supplied to the Superintendent of Insurance in the amount of $5,000 or security be filed with the Minister of Finance in a
similar amount. The insurance bonds were filed with the Branch on behalf of the
Superintendent of Insurance and, in 1975, 407 dealers' bonds were filed of which
250 were original bonds for new motor dealers and 157 were replacement bonds.
There were 307 bonds cancelled during the 1975 licence-year. Security was filed
with the Minister of Finance by nine motor dealers.
DISTRIBUTION OF MOTOR-VEHICLES
The distribution of motor-vehicles in the various centres of the Province is
always of interest. The following table gives information concerning the number
of licences issued throughout the Province. Since vehicle owners move frequently
from one area to another, and vehicles are often sold to new owners residing in
different locations from previous owners, the table cannot be regarded as an
accurate population count of vehicles in the various parts of the Province. However, the table does provide a guide to the distribution of vehicles throughout the
Province.
Licences Issued
Name
District
Passenger
Commer
Commer
Utility
Motor
Code
cial
cial Trailer
Trailer
cycle
Abbotsford	
190
12,547
4,204
213
2,120
424
Agassiz 	
036
1,281
611
22
272
39
510
2,765
2,004
62
967
160
Aldergrove	
191
4,441
1,886
81
804
93
Atlin
514
3
Armstrong	
085
1,513
969
37
379
48
Ashcroft	
042
1,263
869
26
372
40
Barriere	
159
659
534
22
168
12
Bella Coola   ..
083
161
308
145
439
115
14
14
58
42
14
Blue River	
5
Boston Bar	
044
294
167
3
45
9
046
51
50
15
4
Burnaby.	
103
53,674
12,429
2,865
5,996
919
048
1,289
1,198
54
467
44
010
6,710
3,092
130
2,036
228
Cassiar Mines	
182
269
265
4
61
25
Castlegar	
123
3,943
1,582
34
928
111
Chase	
050
1,719
1,109
48
515
54
Chemainus	
017
1,404
668
18
371
27
Chilliwack _- _ 	
038
14,380
4,918
240
2,946
558
Clinton	
052
442
435
21
145
10
Cloverdale 	
028
21,004
6,188
284
3,218
365
Courtenay	
012
9,388
3,756
79
3,090
350
Cowichan  _....
018
1,720
747
4
488
59
Cranbrook	
125
5,706
3,180
632
1,435
200
Creston	
127
3,233
2,084
95
899
82
167
4,498
3,603
335
1,433
154
Duncan	
019
9,963
4,095
308
2,204
273
Eikford	
516
1,667
1,006
23
453
114
Enderby	
087
1,295
948
70
335
33
Fernie 	
131
3,253
2,003
61
736
140
Fort Nelson	
181
904
962
79
273
30
Fort St. James	
185
753
654
37
225
37
Fort St. John	
169
4,571
4,394
325
1,426
I
185
 F 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Ganges  	
Golden —_	
Gold River 	
Grand Forks	
Greenwood 	
Haney  	
Hazelton 	
Hope  ...
Houston  	
Hudson's Hope 	
Invermere —	
Kamloops  	
Kaslo	
Kelowna        	
Keremeos —	
Kimberley    ._ 	
Kitimat     	
Ladysmith __.
Lillooet _        	
Lytton      	
McBride	
Merritt - 	
Mission      	
Nakusp 	
Nanaimo	
Natal       	
Nelson	
New Denver 	
New Westminster area ...	
Northern Vancouver Island
North and West Vancouver-
Ocean Falls —	
Oliver _	
100 Mile House __	
Osoyoos	
Parksville -	
Penticton __
Point Roberts, U.S.A...-.	
Port Alberni 	
Powell River.. — —	
Prince George     	
Prince Rupert 	
Princeton „ — 	
Qualicum	
Queen Charlottes    	
Quesnel    	
Revelstoke         	
Richmond	
Riondel  	
Salmo  	
Salmon Arm      	
Saltspring Island — 	
Sechelt  	
Sidney -	
Slocan —-	
Smithers  -	
Sooke	
Squamish —	
Surrey     —
Terrace -	
Tofino   —
Trail	
Ucluelet — - -	
Vancouver  - —
Vanderhoof   	
Valemount     .._
Vavenby —-  - -
Vernon - -	
Victoria	
Wells 	
Williams Lake 	
Out of Province 	
Miscellaneous —	
Totals	
District
Code
023
133
016
089
C91
032
054
040
056
186
135
157
137
093
095
139
058
021
059
061
171
063
034
141
006
143
150
145
003
515
004
183
099
065
100
014
112
512
008
175
067
069
114
015
520
071
116
102
147
148
118
513
173
025
155
073
026
177
029
075
180
152
179
002
077
163
165
121
001
079
081
529
999
Passenger
1,760
1,955
525
2,270
806
11,930
743
1,837
863
885
1,699
20,686
405
26,042
902
2,903
3,528
2,481
723
255
464
2,225
5,821
704
16,604
31
5,539
355
48,975
4,501
56,256
130
1,979
2,386
1,495
2,237
12,434
1,404
8.793
5,799
20,676
4,239
1,360
1,451
983
5,058
2,309
55,130
108
739
4,839
1,020
4,059
5,591
510
2.088
1,684
2.239
41,698
4,464
274
8,227
467
171,842
1,993
418
1,061
12,964
83,116
106
4,697
369
86
Commercial
Commercial Trailer
884,250
694
1,235
197
1,196
665
3,754
607
1,081
609
889
1,332
10,063
243
9,261
637
1,412
1,220
989
585
224
419
1,485
2,114
553
5,764
22
2,248
236
9,699
2,830
6,740
66
1,016
1,911
727
876
4,642
838
3,616
2,096
11,565
1,514
913
620
747
3,626
1,330
9,728
58
417
2,824
555
1,775
1,323
359
1,670
861
1,136
11,556
2,958
137
2,627
304
32,050
1,770
347
824
6,169
22,645
47
4,090
588
110
~283,~198~
21
82
3
85
31
83
48
90
63
50
70
595
11
490
19
21
33
27
17
4
26
77
72
21
195
2
51
3
581
28
563
3
40
98
17
19
214
26
40
34
771
65
40
10
10
223
57
318
Utility
Trailer
23
100
5
28
29
10
88
35
58
360
152
3
99
8
3.775
104
13
44
354
1,311
1
226
526
4
298
440
177
496
157
2.225
174
371
233
329
436
4,750
110
5.618
212
804
876
708
201
52
108
720
1.034
277
3.827
3
1,137
91
6,749
923
4,701
22
418
713
296
662
2,693
260
2,636
1,827
5,389
681
389
419
187
1,415
548
6,658
39
177
1.392
134
769
969
93
592
337
396
7.644
1,189
47
1,903
128
11.391
589
114
292
3,025
12,011
24
1,230
56
7
Motorcycle
57
94
37
102
43
258
30
56
32
22
53
520
29
745
53
108
119
76
31
18
23
50
135
38
534
200
17
898
190
860
17
49
63
30
47
394
62
227
117
517
135
65
27
59
200
112
804
28
166
24
130
113
12
75
55
108
853
109
10
272
23
2.451
99
18
47
374
1.658
4
138
19,043  |  142,920  |   19,971
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS F 21
Licensed motor-vehicle populations by area as obtained from reports were
prepared on behalf of the Superintendent of Motor-vehicles by the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia. These reports were compiled from verified transactions processed through the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia Data
Centre on behalf of this Department.
Passenger vehicles  876,119
Motor homes       8,131
  884,250
Commercial vehicles  283,198
Commercial trailers  19,043
Utility trailers  142,920
Motor-cycles  19,971
Total licensed vehicles  1,349,382
Registered vehicles totalled 2,073,322, an increase of 11.77 per cent over the
1974 licence-year.
Passenger vehicles  1,320,664
Motor homes        10,802
  1,331,466
Commercial vehicles  402,401
Commercial trailers  35,386
Utility trailers  241,699
Motor-cycles  62,370
Total registered vehicles  2,073,322
The discrepancy between vehicles registered and vehicles licensed is created
by licensed motor dealers being allowed to hold unlicensed motor-vehicles for sale
and vehicles registered that have not been activated for the 1975 licence-year.
REVENUE
Revenue received by the Motor-vehicles Branch from licences, permits, and
motor-vehicle inspection amounted to $52,078,704.91. Funds collected under the
Motive-fuel Use Tax Act, All-terrain Vehicles Act, social services tax, and the
Insurance Corporation of British Columbia premiums, amounted to $10,730,-
861.65. A further $31,290,786.00 in insurance premiums was collected by Motor-
vehicle Branch Offices and accounted for directly to the Insurance Corporation.
Source of Revenue, 1975 Licence-year
Revenue collected by the Motor-vehicle Branch pursuant to
Motor-vehicle Act     3,707,788.62
Commercial Transport Act     2,586,482.29
$
6,294,270.91
 F 22 BRITISH  COLUMBIA
Revenue collected by the Insurance Corporations of British Columbia on behalf of the Motor-vehicle Branch—
Motor-vehicle Act fees— $ $
Passenger vehicles  18,625,547.00
Motor-cycles  89,502.00
Notices of Transfer        422,730.00
Duplicates   of   Registration/Certificate     of
Insurance  129.00
 19,137,908.00
T
Commercial Transport Act fees—commercial
vehicles  19,775,041.00
Combined fees under Motor-vehicle Act and
Commercial Transport Act—
$
Trailers  686,801.00
New vehicle registration  294,608.00
Substitution plates     82,355.00
Decal replacements       6,441.00
 1,070,205.00
Other fees     5,801,280.00
  45,784,434.00
Total   revenue — Motor-vehicle/Commercial
Transport Acts  52,078,704.91
Other revenue collected by the Motor-vehicle Branch—
$
Motive fuel tax  70,255.15
All-terrain Vehicles Act  17,671.00
Social services tax        448,370.36
Insurance  Corporation   of  British   Columbia
premiums   10,194,565.14
Total  10,730,861.65
Insurance Corporation of British Columbia premiums collected by Motor-vehicle Branch and accounted for
directly to the Insurance Corporation  31,290,786.00
Refunds
Legislation provides for refunding of licence fees paid in instances where the
licence-plates are surrendered to the Superintendent. A person who was allocated
motor-vehicle licence-plates for use on a vehicle registered in his name can, upon
disposal of the vehicle, retain, destroy, or attach the number-plates to a substitute
vehicle, or surrender them to the Superintendent, together with an application for
refund of fees.
Refunds for motor-vehicle licence-plates are granted on the basis of the
unexpired portion of the licence-year, but no refund is made of an amount less
than $5.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
F 23
On reassignment of motor-vehicle licence-plates to a substitute vehicle, no
refund is granted if the combined licence and insurance fee is less than $5.
The fee for the unexpired full years of the five-year driver's licence is refundable under the following circumstances upon surrender of the licence to this
Branch:
(a) The licence has been suspended due to the failure of the licensee to
qualify in a driver's examination.
(b) The licensee has taken up residence outside the Province.
(c) The licensee is deceased.
(d) The licensee has voluntarily surrendered his driver's licence.
The following summary sets out the amount of money refunded for the 1975
licence-year:
Refunds, 1975
General refunds—
Motor-vehicle Act— $ $
Passenger  37 229.00
Drivers  5 66.00
Commercial Transport Act—Commercial 53 1,291.00
Total general refunds  1,576.00
Relinquishment refunds—
Motor-vehicle Act and Commercial Transport Act—
Cancellations  1,614,222.00
Mid-term endorsements      161,711.00
Drivers  1,756 4,354.50
Dealers         89 1,287.00
Total relinquishment refunds   1,781,574.50
Grand total  1,783,150.50
ACCIDENTS AND CONVICTIONS
MOTOR-VEHICLE ACCIDENTS
The following table gives a summary of the accident frequency during the
period 1966 to 1975:
Year
Accidents
Motor-
Number
per 1,000
vehicles
of Acci
Vehicles
Registered
dents
Registered
817,348
44,177
54.05
864,348
49,750
57.56
917,872
58,300
63.51
989,196
70,624
71.39
1,024,738
60,778
59.35
1,087,992
59,745
54.91
1,164,749
59,996
51.51
1,248,422
69,564
56.00
1,333,891
84,445
63.30
1,349,382
85,601
63.44
Injuries
Deaths
Deaths
per
10,000
Vehicles
Registered
Average
Property
Damage
per 100
Fatal
Acci
Miles
dents
7.60
445
7.67
461
7.36
460
6.39
467
6.70
471
6.51
538
6.90
602
Fatal
Accidents
per 100
Million
Miles
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973.
1974.
1975
19,449
19,500
20,945
22,535
22,568
22,340
23,316
27,709
28,699
25,003
$
520
6.4
592.91
559
6.5
565.58
574
6.2
570.87
542
5.4
586.29
559
5.5
731.63
636
5.8
775.60
716
6.1
863.44
825
6.7
969.00
844
6.3
995.26
717
5.3
1,017.33
7.17
6.80
5.70
698
718
593
6.51
6.33
5.90
5.50
5.64
5.54
5.80
6.07
5.79
4.71
 F 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Reportable accidents are those where the aggregate property damage exceeds
$200 or a person is injured or killed.
The number of accidents in 1975 increased to 85,601 from 84,445 in 1974.
In 1975, fatal accidents numbered 593 and fatalities were 717, a reduction from
the 718 accidents and 844 fatalities in 1974. The ratio of deaths per 100 million
miles dropped from 6.80 in 1974 to 5.70 in 1975. Similarly, fatal accidents per
100 million miles in 1975 stands at 4.71, down from 5.79.
Property damage rose in 1975 to a total of $87,084,593.59, a slight increase
over the 1974 figure, $84,045,060.61. The average property damage in 1975 was
$1,017.33, up 2.2 per cent from $995.26 in 1974.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS               F 25
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 F 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province for
the Year 1975—Continued
2.                    HOUR OF OCCURRENCE
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
12 to   1 a.m. .          .                                                     	
385
375
236
149
95
82
105
294
328
292
350
393
441
445
540
668
763
597
441
468
418
418
391
357
76,570
44
45
25
17
13
7
6
15
12
13
67
68
50
22
14
12
23
47
66
40
274
262
161
110
4 to   5 a.m  	
68
63
6 to   7 a.m   	
7 to   8 a.m                                                           	
76
232
8 to   9 a.m.
250
9 to 10 a.m                                                           	
239
10 to 11 a.m. -                                                             	
13
63
274
11 to 12    m.
21          1               64
308
12 to   1 p.m.
26
27
20
25
26
35
38
36
27
38
40
24
........
74
80
96
131
153
111
87
99
80
59
72
71
14,686
341
1 to   2 p.m.
338
2 to   3 p.m.
424
512
584
5 to   6 p.m  -..- -	
6 to   7 p.m  	
7 to   8 p.m                                  	
451
316
333
8 to   9 p.m.                                                           	
311
9 to 10 p.m  	
10 to 11 p.m.
321
279
11 to 12 p.m..
262
61,884
Totals  ...	
85,601
593
16,335
68,673
DAY OF OCCURRENCE
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Sunday	
2. Monday	
3. Tuesday	
4. Wednesday.
5. Thursday	
6. Friday	
7. Saturday 	
8. Not stated _
Totals
1,121
1,137
1,211
1,119
1,210
1,684
1,566
76,553
99
61
79
48
75
92
139
226
199
232
206
199
307
285
14,681
796
877
900
865
936
1,285
1,142
61,872
85,601
593
16,335
68,673
Number of Vehicles Involved
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
12,533
2,527
52
71
17
140
7
3
30,489
1
630        1        2.173
9,730
2. Truck  	
3. Bus    	
198
4
5
32
439
12
13
4
63
1,890
36
53
13
45
-----        1                -1
2
         |      24,535
4
8. Ambulance	
1
5,954
45,839
869         1       27.244
17,726
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
F 27
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province for
the Year 1975—Continued
5.                       RAILROAD CROSSINGS
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Unguarded crossing	
7
2
1
95
2
1
1
2
24
3
1
1
70
Totals    	
105
4
26
75
6.                    MANNER OF COLLISION
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
3,739
1,531
1,741
496
527
77,567
171
253
21
5
5
138
680
340
354
17
24
14,920
2,888
938
3. Rear-end collision 	
1,366
474
5. Side-swiped other vehicle going same direction	
6. Not stated     	
498
62,509
85,601
593
16,335
68,673
7.                       DRIVERS INVOLVED,
Number of Drivers
DESCRIPTION OF
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Male	
10,296
2,924
32,619
1
744                1,951
107                   638
18        |      24,655
7,601
2. Female     	
2,179
3. Not stated	
7,946
45,839
869
27,244
17,726
Age of Driver
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. 16 to 17 years	
2. 18 to 19 years	
3. 20 to 24 years	
4. 25 to 34 years	
5. 35 to 44 years	
6. 45 to 54 years	
7. 55 to 64 years	
8. 65 to 69 years	
9. 70 years and over..
1,208
1,543
2,623
3,082
1,857
1,442
925
292
256
62
103
180
201
120
93
46
24
23
236
296
539
611
361
273
167
57
52
910
1,144
1,904
2,270
1,376
1,076
712
211
181
Driving Experience
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Less than 3 months
2. 3 to 6 months	
3. 6 to 12 months	
4. 1 to 4 years 	
5. 5 years and over	
6. Not stated  ...
421
815
365
3,416
8,772
32,050
43
4
6
231
568
17
82
114
71
668
1,722
24,587
296
697
288
2,517
6,482
7,446
 F 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province for
the Year 1975—Continued
Condition of Driver
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Normal     	
12,566
117
33
57
356
582
32,128
730
6
6
1
105
5
16
2,452
31
9
12
70
14
24,656
9,384
80
18
44
5. Ability impaired  	
181
563
7. Not stated          	
7,456
Licence of Driver
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Licensed in British Columbia 	
2. Unlicensed  	
12,646
103
467
32,623
763
24
65
17
2,474
28
86
24,656
9,409
51
316
4. Not stated  	
7,950
8.        ACTION OF DRIVER CONTRIBUTING
Number of Drivers
TO ACCIDENT
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. No improper driving   	
2. Driving off roadway  	
3. Did not have right-of-way  	
5,531
1,734
1,476
665
920
457
76
262
59
221
1,332
182
107
21
35
580
11
54
1,278
7
318
155
43
14
5
103
2
5
2
61
126
1
3
6
1
8
2
10
1,085
349
266
161
202
96
10
67
11
44
251
13
13
4
2
7
3
5
55
5
4,128
1,230
1,167
490
713
6. On wrong side of road   	
258
64
190
46
116
955
12. Cutting in    	
13. Car ran away ," 	
14. Passing on curve or hill   	
168
91
11
32
16. Hit and run '.   	
565
6
49
1,213
20. Driving through safety-zone 	
2
Totals...	
15,008
865
2,649
11,494
TRAFFIC CONTROL
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. No control present	
2. Police officer	
3. Automatic traffic signal	
4. Stop signs	
5. Warning signs, slow signs, etc
Totals 	
6,750
46
1,068
846
323
506
31
15
39
1,130
11
265
159
82
9,033
591
1,647
5,114
35
772
672
202
6,795
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
F 29
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province for
the Year 1975—Continued
10.                PEDESTRIANS INVOLVED, ACTIONS OF
Number of Pedestrians
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
1. Not known 	
1,185
47
51
32
8
31
36
7
12
12
3
1
4
1
17
5
14
26
12
2
15
24
2
3
3
8
1,180
33
25
4. Coming from behind parked or moving vehicle	
5. Crossing at intersection with signal 	
20
6
16
12
7
10
9
11. Getting on or off another vehicle	
12. Riding or hitching on vehicle	
13. Working on car or roadway.. 	
3
1
1
9
Totals	
1,447
114
1,333
Condition of Pedestrian
Number of Pedestrians
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
219
3
3
18
10
1,194
88
3
2
12
5
4
131
1
6
5
6. Not stated             	
1.190
Totals  	
1,447
114
1,333
11.                          CLASSIFICATION OF VICTIMS
Number of Victims
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
11,554
11,205
1,447
549
709
16
192
48
233
329
114
14
24
3
-----
11,321
10,876
1,333
535
685
6. Others (persons in horse-drawn vehicles, etc.)	
16
189
8. Not stated -	
48
Totals...	
25,720
717
25,003
12.
NATURE OF INJURIES
Number of Victims
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
1. Slight shock and shake-up	
2. Fractured skull  ._	
3. Fractured spine 	
4. Other fractures	
5. Other injuries (sprains, dislocations, etc.) .
6. Internal injuries	
7. Concussion of brain  ._. 	
8. Severe general shock with bruises and cuts .
9. Cuts by glass (only)   	
10. Drowned  	
11. Burned 	
12. Asphyxiated	
13. Not stated ...._  	
Totals.
791
218
35
294
959
576
52
594
90
46
30
5
22,030
25,720
166
22
10
462
27
25
5
717
791
52
13
284
959
114
52
594
90
19
5
22.030
25,003~
 F 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province for
the Year 1975—Continued
13.
LIGHT CONDITIONS
1. Daylight.	
2. Darkness	
3. Artificial light—good ....
4. Dark or semi-darkness .
5. Artificial light—poor —-
6. Not stated	
Totals .- 	
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
5,211
260
959
3,992
2,673
267
454
1,952
485
27
101
357
499
25
95
379
155
11
31
113
76,578
*
14,695
61,880
85,601
I
593
16,335
68,673
14. Amount of property damage for period covered by this report, $87,084,593.59; amount for same period
last year, $84,045,060.61. Amount of property damage this year to date, $87,084,593.59; amount for same
period last year, $84,045,060.61.
15.     CONDITION OF VEHICLES INVOLVED
16.
DIRECTION OF TRAVEL
17.
ROAD SURFACE
Number of Vehicles
Total
1. Apparently good	
2. No chains (slippery road)	
3. Brakes defective	
4. Steering mechanism defective
5. Head-lights dim 	
6. Puncture or blow-out	
7. Head-lights out (both)....	
8. Tail-light out or obscured	
9. Glaring head-lights	
10. Head-light out (one light)	
11. Other defects 	
12. Not stated	
Totals	
14,286
315
125
42
16
78
16
19
8
14
92
30,828
Fatal
843
7
1
3
2
1
Personal
Injury
2,515
48
33
13
3
21
1
2
1
1
12
24,594
Property
Damage Only
10,928
267
85
28
10
55
14
17
6
13
72
6,231
45,839
869
27,244
17,726
1. Going straight _. 	
2. Turning left 	
3. Turning right	
4. Slowing down or stopping	
5. Backing (not to or from curb) 	
6. Skidding 	
7. Leaving curb (including backing)	
8. Making U-turn	
9. Overtaking	
10. Stopping (not at curb or off paved strip)
11. Overtaking on right side _	
12. Overtaking on left side	
13. Avoiding object or pedestrian	
14. Not stated	
Totals	
Number of Vehicles
Total
Fatal
7,248
1,692
823
1,010
516
1,058
156
39
73
438
£9
164
421
32,132
613
64
28
12
9
82
2
2
9
7
6
16
6
13
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1,483
343
108
213
25
168
11
3
20
106
9
26
78
24,651
5,152
1,285
687
785
482
808
143
34
44
325
54
122
337
7,468
45.839
869
|       27,244
17,726
Number of Accidents
Total
1. Dry surface 	
2. Wet surface	
3. Icy surface 	
4. Loose sand or gravel
5. Snowy surface 	
6. Muddy surface	
7. Not stated	
Totals	
4,770
2,258
1,065
266
640
34
76,568
Fatal
Personal
Injury
371
143
47
910
440
156
59
79
3
14,688
Property
Damage Only
3,489
1,675
862
199
543
28
61,877
85,601
593
16,335        |    ' 68,673
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
F 31
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province for
the Year 1975—Continued
18.                         ROAD CONDITION
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Normal - ...:  	
2. Defect in roadway   	
8,167
113
73
81
40
564
76,563
572
10
1
4
4
2
1,508
25
12
15
10
77
14,688
6,087
78
60
4. Road under repair -	
62
26
6. Other-   	
7. Not stated _._._	
487
61,873
Totals   —- - - -  	
85,601
593
16,335
68,673
19.                           TYPE OF ROAD
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
8,306
562
71
66
4
30
76,562
549
37
2
2
1
2
1,535
85
12
8
1
6
14-688
6,222
2. Gravel 	
3. Concrete	
4. Earth                	
440
57
56
5. Brick or cobble - —- -	
6. Other     	
7. Not stated                                    .. .„	
3
23
61,872
Totals..                                   	
85,601
593        |      16,335
1
68,673
20.                   WEATHER CONDITIONS
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Clear 	
2. Rain  _..	
3. Cloudy    	
5,338
1,682
1,016
126
859
14
76,566
372
100
84
8
25
2
2
976
321
212
22
111
5
14,688
3,990
1,261
720
4. Fog or mist - — —  	
5. Snow  - - - -— - -	
96
723
7
7. Not stated                                         	
61,876
Totals.:..._                   	
85,601
593
16,335
68,673
CONVICTIONS
The receipt of notices of convictions for driving infractions under the Criminal
Code (Canada), the Motor-vehicle Act, and the Motor-vehicle Act Regulations
and the reports of violations of any law known as a "Traffic Rule" continued to
supply information for the inclusion in the individual driving records of each
licensed driver in this Province. Access to these records is available by means of
the driver's licence number or by the name of the driver. The retaining of these
records and the furnishing of information which is invaluable for driver control is
the main duty of the Driver Licence Records Section. The control which is made
possible by these records is the responsibility of the Driver Safety and Improvement Section.
 F 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Convictions Under Motor-vehicle Act and Criminal Code (Canada), 1972—75
Offences
Under Criminal Code (Canada) —
Causing death by criminal negligence, sec. 203 —	
Causing injury by criminal negligence, sec. 204—	
Criminal negligence in operation of motor-vehicle, sec. 233 (1)	
Failing to stop after accident, sec. 233 (2)-—	
Dangerous driving, sec. 233 (4)	
Driving while ability impaired, sec. 234 -	
Breath sample not provided, sec. 235 	
Driving with more than 80 mgs of alcohol in blood, sec 236	
Driving motor-vehicle while driver's licence under suspension, sec. 238 ....
Under Motor-vehicle Act—
Driving without obtaining driver's licence, sec. 18 (1, 2)	
Driving without subsisting motor-vehicle liability policy, sec. 18 (2a)	
Driving motor-vehicle otherwise than as restricted on driver's licence,
sec. 18 (6-8)  - -  	
Driving without having driver's licence and liability card in possession
at time, sec. 19 (as amended 1970) —- 	
Driving while right to obtain licence is under suspension, sec. 20 -	
Using licence belonging to another, refusing to show licence, sec. 56	
Failing to obey emergency instructions of a peace officer, sec. 124	
Failing to obey traffic-control signal legend, sees. 127, 128, 152— -
Failing to obey special signs re highway construction, sees. 134, 135, 137 .
Careless driving, sees. 138. 139	
Exceeding maximum speed limit, sec. 140 — -	
Exceeding speed limit passing schools and playgrounds, sec. 141	
Passing stopped school bus, sec. 142 -	
Failure to drive on the right, sec. 143  -
Infractions of "lane" driving, sees. 144-146 -	
Infractions of "passing" sees. 148-151, 153, 154-	
Infractions of turning, starting, and directional signals, sees. 155-162.	
Failure to yield right-of-way, 163-167- —
Not exercising due care re pedestrians, sees. 168-172   ....
Failure to stop at railroad crossings, sees. 174-176   -
Failure to stop at intersections, sec. 177—	
Leaving vehicle improperly parked, sec. 182 	
Backing vehicle illegally, sec. 184 -	
Operating motor-cycle with more than one person, sec. 185	
Requirements of safe driving on highway, sees. 186, 187 	
Fire-vehicle safety, sees. 189, 190 - _	
Driving on sidewalk, sec. 191 - — -	
Opening-door requirements, sec. 194 - 	
Illegal depositing of articles on highway, sec. 195 -	
Riding motor-cycle without safety helmet, sec. 207 ~~ -	
Miscellaneous -	
Under Motor-vehicle Act Regulations -	
1972
1973
6
2
28
757
439
5,607
842
6,246
1,012
14,939
1,295
2,080
761
3,364
11
163
5
166
8
98
504
18
22
15
50
16
36
31
12
2
40
274
9
4
9
4
4
4
185
289
975
10,454
13
23
736
409
6,699
938
6,275
853
15,946
1,544
4,118
1,019
3,320
11
167
5
173
2
81
532
15
14
12
38
29
28
14
13
2
56
585
15
2
72
4
2
3
156
377
163
12,572
1974
7
1
31
564
452
7,190
914
7,254
933
17.346
1,311
2,778
882
2,587
12
202
7
185
82
501
13
11
6
32
28
26
24
19
2
47
566
2
4
8
3
5
219
311
544
10,417
3,510
1975
2
31
564
452
10,514
969
6,285
1,102
19,927
1,275
1,273
762
2,417
9
115
3
156
7
80
396
26
20
4
30
34
24
24
8
2
52
537
14
5
19
3
10
3
196
313
646
8,463"
7,335
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
Traffic Violation Reports, 1972—75
F 33
Offences
1972
1973
1974
1975
Under Motor-vehicle Act—
Driving motor-vehicle otherwise than as restricted on driver's licence,
sec. 18 (6-8)                                 	
30
27
25,366
554
6,787
111,443
5,725
230
1,286
4,965
5,135
3,485
4,577
1,258
309
8,294
451
1,306
6
73
27
55
38
26
14
48
29,779
579
7,998
125,545
6,456
178
1,364
5,718
5,565
3,762
5,332
1,512
240
8,544
8
53
34,201
310
9,250
148,237
6,634
223
1,539
6,156
6,230
3,795
6,009
1,448
198
8,746
17
Failing to obey emergency instructions of a peace officer, sec. 124	
Failing to obey traffic-control signal legend, sees. 127, 128, 152 	
Failing to obey special signal signs re highway construction, sees. 134,
135, 137	
79
35,949
1,752
9,100
Exceeding maximum speed limit, sec. 140	
Exceeding speed limit passing schools and playgrounds, sec. 141	
189,158
9,550
226
1,552
5,880
Infractions of "passing", sees. 148-151, 153, 154 	
Infractions of turning, starting, and directional signals, sees. 155-162
Failure to yield right-of-way, sees. 163-167 	
Not exercising due care re pedestrians, sees. 168-172  	
6,107
3,724
5,392
1,419
445
Failure to stop at intersections, sec. 177	
10,592
1,212
5
10
34
84
35
9
1,533
10
60
44
93
44
U
1,678
3
Requirements of safe driving on highway, sees. 186, 187	
72
29
Driving on sidewalk, sec. 191	
95
39
7
181,453
10,963
204,023
4,816
234,832
9,960
282,865
	
Notices of Juvenile Offence, 1972
-75
Offences
1972
1973
1974
1975
Under Motor-vehicle Act—
Driving without obtaining driver's licence, sec. 18 (1, 2)	
Driving motor-vehicle otherwise than as restricted on driver's licence,
sec. 18 (6-8)                                                            	
14
14
50
62
19
18
42
60
5
3
408
2'
427
2,659
153
3
53
110
183
70
165
30
4
275
5
38
26
13
29
53
4
1
687
6
735
4,341
228
4
96
152
281
112
256
31
8
418
4
77
1
4
1
3
1
5
8
11
14
29
Driving without subsisting motor-vehicle liability policy, sec. 18 (2a)
Driving without having driver's licence and liability card in possession
at time, sec. 19 -	
Using licence belonging to another, refusing to show licence, etc., sec. 56 -
Failing to obey emergency instructions of a peace officer, sec. 124	
17
37
2
455
4
416
2,548
148
5
55
93
148
74
151
23
4
269
2
705
Failing to obey special signal signs re highway construction, sees.  134,
135, 137                                                                     	
32
888
5,189
Exceeding speed limit passing schools and playgrounds, sec. 141 	
300
7
77
Infractions of "line" driving, sees. 144-146	
177
290
Infractions of turning, starting, and directional signals, sees. 155-162
113
226
Not exercising due care re pedestrians, sees. 168-172 	
Failure to stop at railroad crossing, sees. 174-176 —
33
6
470
3
42
102
1
2
2
3
1
1
4
3
4
7
Illegal depositing of articles on highway, sec. 195	
Riding motor-cycle without safety helmet, sec. 207	
5
8
27
1
13
3
6
15
9
4,623
4,755
265
7,596
944
8,764
767
 F 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
SUMMARY
Offences
1972
1973
1974
1975
Criminal Code (Canada)	
Motor-vehicle Act —
Motor-vehicle Act Regulations
Traffic Violation Reports	
Notices of Juvenile Offence	
Total infractions	
14,939      15,946
10,454 j  12,572
1,344 |    5,361
192,416 [204,023
4,623  4,755
17.346
10,417
14,414
19,927
8,463
13,771
234,832 1282,865
7,596 I 8,764
223,776 |242,657 |284,605 |333,790
I      I      I
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
F 35
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 F 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
DRIVING
Driver Improvement Program
In addition to the continued screening of unsatisfactory driving records which
has resulted in many suspensions of driver's licences, the Driver Safety and Improvement Section made continued progress in 1975 in controlling drivers who have
become hazardous on the highway as a result of alcohol. The Motor-vehicle
Branch personnel have been actively participating in Impaired Driving Programs
throughout the major part of British Columbia. The people who attend these
programs have been ordered to do so by a Provincial Judge when they have been
convicted of impaired driving. These programs consist of four two-hour class
sessions and, although they have only been in operation for a short period, they
appear to have reached the value of expectation. Defensive Driving Courses are
still being conducted throughout British Columbia.
The Insurance Corporation of British Columbia has made an increased demand
on suspending a person's driver's licence through failure to pay the driver insurance
premium as required by law.
During the 1975 year, we have also undergone a major change in the Driver
Safety and Improvement Section in the filing system. There are now 100,000
manual files which have been made into a microfiche filing system. This was
necessary to conserve a much needed commodity—space.
Summary of Action Taken Under Driver Improvement Program, 1975
Age 16-17
Age 18 and
over
Total
Warning letters - -	
Notices of intent to suspend—
Male	
Female  '. 	
Results of notices to suspend, interviews and hearings-
Licences suspended—
Male   	
Female  _ ._	
Previously suspended.	
Previously warned -  	
Previously on probation ._.
Driver's licence placed on probation—
Male	
Female —- 	
983
604
7
99
519
6
20
51,224
9,303
225
9,377
192
3,200
6,290
140
540
23
51,224
10,286
233
9,981
199
3,299
6,809
146
560
23
Impaired,  16,799; total infractions received, 333,790; special restrictions, 992; juvenile offences, 9,611
EXAMINATION OF DRIVERS
During the year 1975 the Drivers' Examination Section of the Drivers' Licence
Division conducted the examination of 123,070 drivers, and 104,195 of this total
were original licences.
It will be noted from the table on next page that 23.7 per cent of the drivers
given examinations indicated on their application that they had taken formal driver
training, either under the High School Driver Training Program or from commercial schools. The increase in the number of new drivers being exposed to High
School Driver Training Programs and Commercial Training Programs is encouraging and reflects the growing interest in proper driver training courses.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS F 37
Analysis of Annual Input for Year 1975
Male              Female Total
Original licences  55,993      48,202 104,195
Examinations taken—
High school driver training    3,322        2,595 5,917
No professional training  46,799      33,052 79,851
Commercial school training 10,652      12,611 23,263
Unknown  12,506        1,533 14,039
Totals   73,279      49,791    123,070
Driver Training School Statistics, Licence-issuing Period
March 1,1975, to February 29, 1976
Licences issued _.
Issuances
Schools
  97
Operator
92
12
80
Instructor
328
Terminations 	
  10
96
Suspensions	
Reinstatements  ■„.
Totals ..
  87
232
Examinations Conducted
Written examinations (first, second, and third)-
Passed  _ __ 	
133
Failed 	
___    83
Total  216
Practical examinations—
Passed  124
Failed   39
Total  163
Temporary Permits
Original permits issued  124
Temporary instructors as of February 29, 1976       5
$500 Security Bonding, 1975
Bonded by surety  60
Security on deposit (parity bond)   29
Security on deposit (cash)   8
Revenue
School licences ($25)   $2,425
Operator's licences ($10)   920
Instructor's licence ($5)   1,640
Total    $4,985
Inspections Conducted
Driver Training Schools  218
Driver Education Incentive Program  203
 F 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE DRIVER EDUCATION INCENTIVE PROGRAM
(Sponsored by The Insurance Corporation of British Columbia)
The purpose of this program is to promote highway safety. An incentive
bonus is available to new drivers, 16 years of age or older, who are obtaining their
first British Columbia Driver's Licence of Class 5 or 6.
The grant is up to $50 to assist in the tuition fees paid by the student completing an approved driver education course. These courses consist of 25 hours of
theoretical instruction and eight hours of "behind-wheel" instruction.
The Superintendent of Motor-vehicles is responsible for the approval of the
courses, inspection of the school records, and monitoring the instruction. All applications for the rebate are processed through the Drivers' Examination Section.
Driver Education Incentive Program Certificates
Received  9,732
Approved   9,703
Rejected         29
During the fiscal period ending February 29, 1976, there were 54 secondary
schools and 76 driver training schools approved to conduct Driver Education Incentive Program courses.
Driver Examiner Staff Training, March 1,1975, to February 29,1976
Examiners Trained
Phase I—
Part 1 (Basic, two weeks)  14
Part 2 (Intermediate, one week)   28
Part 3 (Advanced, one week)   12
Phase Ill-
Part 1 (Hydro, one week)   16
Part 2 (Air and Class 1 and 3 Operation)   20
Part 3 (Examining Class 1 and 2)      	
Driver Training School Instructor Examination Seminar
(Examiner II)   8
Wicket Clerk (Driver Examinations)    9
Total  107
MOTOR-VEHICLE INSPECTION
During 1975 the compulsory program of motor-vehicle inspection continued
in the Victoria area, the Lower Mainland, and the Nanaimo area. These areas are
served by five inspection stations with a total of 15 lanes. The stations are located
in Victoria, Vancouver, Richmond, Burnaby, and Nanaimo.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
F 39
The following is the number of inspections completed at each inspection
station:
Inspection Station
Approved
Rejected
Percentage
Rejected
Inspections
Conducted
Victoria—
1974	
105,866
100,253
103,933
89,458
71,883
57,486
139,179
105,132
26,349
22,449
33,305
32,005
50,393
37,947
32,574
17,391
66,743
41,781
18,644
11,570
23.9
24.1
32,6
29.7
31.1
23.2
32.4
28.4
41.4
34.0
139,171
1975 	
Vancouver—
1974 ._.	
1975	
Richmond—
1974                                	
132,258
154,326
127,405
104,457
1975    ..                                         	
74,877
Burnaby—
1974	
205,922
1975 	
Nanaimo—
1974 	
1975	
146,913
44,993
34,019
Notices requiring the owner to present his motor-vehicle for inspection were
mailed to 78,335, of whom 14,520 required a second notice.
The lower number of inspections conducted this year was the result of the
unavailability of inspection notices.
During the inspection of motor-vehicles, it was found that 140,694 did not
meet the standards and were rejected. The total number of defects found were
299,499, or 2.13 defects for each rejected vehicle.
The following is a summary of vehicle inspection:
 F 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
F 41
The inspection stations found 156 vehicles to be in such a condition that they
could not be allowed to return to the highway. The vehicles were condemned, their
licences suspended, and they were towed away from the inspection station.
The following are the causes of rejection:
Causes of Rejection
Code
Motor-vehicle licence .
Number-plates 	
Plate-lamp - -
Tail-lamps	
Stop-lamps	
Turn-signals 	
Reflectors	
Horn  	
Windshield-wipers	
Left window-raiser	
Doors, body hood	
Bumper, mudflaps	
Headlamps.
Identification lamps..
Spot-lamps 	
Fog-lam ps	
Auxiliary lamps	
Wheel alignment	
Steering mechanism.
Tires, wheels	
Fuel system	
Exhaust, muffler	
Service brakes —
Pedal reserve —	
Brake connections....
Air or vacuum	
Tell-tale 	
Parking brake	
Visibility 	
Driver seat-belts	
Miscellaneous	
Totals.
Age 1
.014
.617
,742
,243
.458
,384
916
,049
,229
294
639
666
,140
,378
744
346
988
,824
,483
,956
272
,381
,330
,009
,673
389
628
,554
,058
326
,348
Age 2
Age 3
1,443
1,835
8,544
3,518
5,403
6,775
741
1,592
2,711
699
1,751
1,291
20,719
834
533
694
654
4,293
11,227
9,833
392
14,282
7,826
1,393
3,424
390
956
3,720
3,619
696
1,793
90,078    |     123,581
439
1,080
4,113
2,236
3,722
4,369
395
1,160
1,511
513
2,134
901
10,794
338
152
643
165
2,169
7,723
5,266
203
7,291
3,543
1,140
2,144
145
243
1,581
1,567
511
833
~697024~
Age 4
83
259
842
547
776
1,076
313
420
613
171
862
392
1,861
124
61
97
69
379
1,816
881
104
1,458
982
439
454
43
193
520
543
112
326
Total
3,979
4,791
19,241
8,544
14,359
15,604
2,365
4,221
6,064
1,677
5,386
3,250
48,514
2,674
1,490
1,780
1,876
10,665
27,249
23,936
971
31,412
20,691
3,981
7,695
967
2,020
8,375
8,787
1,645
5,300
16,816    ;    299,499
 I
Vehicle Age Code: Age 1, 1972 and later; Age 2, 1971 to 1967; Age 3, 1966 to 1962; Age 4, 1961 and earlier.
Twenty-eight Authorized Fleet Inspection Stations have been established.
Two of the stations inspect all types of vehicles and 26 are authorized to inspect
regular (commercial) trailers only. Vehicles inspected and approved at these
stations totalled 4,233.
Another service provided by inspection stations is the mechanical inspection
of salvaged vehicles. A total of 1,073 salvaged vehicles was inspected and those
that were approved were issued a Certificate of Mechanical Condition. The average
inspection takes two hours.
CENTRAL REGISTRY
The Superintendent of Motor-vehicles, who is also the Registrar-General, is
responsible for the operation of the Central Registry. Documents are recorded
and searched under the Bills of Sale Act, Conditional Sales Act, Mechanics' Lien
Act, and the Assignment of Book Accounts Act. A certificate issued in respect
of a grant made under the Provincial Home Acquisition Act in respect of a mobile
home situated in a mobile home park is also registered in the Office of the Registrar-
General. In the case of corporations, personal chattels other than motor-vehicles
are recorded with the Registrar of Companies.
 F 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Central Registry accepted for registration a total of 418,444 documents
during the 1975/76 fiscal year, an increase of 15,968 documents over the preceding
fiscal year, while revenue totalled $1,147,496. For comparison purposes, there
were 196,906 documents registered in 1965 and revenue totalled $568,903, less
than half the registrations and revenue for the past fiscal year. The request for
search information also shows a similar increase. In 1965 the revenue amounted
to $112,777, compared to $260,823.50 in the 1975/76 fiscal year.
The Central Registry administers approximately 2,500 Search Fee Accounts
which may be used to obtain information from the Motor-vehicle Branch records
regarding particulars concerning vehicles and driver records as well as regular lien
searches.
In order to cope with the increase of document registration and requests for
search information, the majority of documents are microfilmed to save filing space,
while all records are placed on computer. When a search request is received by
either Telex, TWX, telephone, mail, or personal inquiry, the appropriate information is typed upon a computer retrieval terminal and the master file is then checked
by computer. If an encumbrance is recorded, information such as document number and date of registration is printed upon the CRT screen and the proper microfilm cartridge is placed in a microfilm reader in order that the complete document
may be viewed. Photocopies of documents on file are also available. At present,
Central Registry has approximately one and one-half million records on computer.
A statistical comparison with the 1974/75 fiscal year follows and provides a
detailed report of the various activities carried out by this Registry.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS F 43
Statistical Comparison With Fiscal Years 1974/75 and 1975/76
(April 1 to March 31)
Documents filed under—                                           fSi Y.L Filcai Year
Conditional Sales Act     92,915 87,252
Bills of Sale Act  242,691 265,116
Mechanics' Lien Act     40,054 35,565
Assignment of Book Accounts Act       1,160 1,392
Companies Act          602 697
Provincial Home Acquisition Act       2,639 2,067
Late order filing under Conditional Sales Act      3,908 4,563
Late order filing under Bills of Sale Act     12,356 14,476
Documents discharged under—
Conditional Sales Act       1,408 1,293
Bills of Sale Act       2,238 2,650
Mechanics' Lien Act       2,169 2,907
Assignment of Book Accounts Act            40 72
Companies Act          191 176
Provincial Home Acquisition Act           105 218
Total documents accepted  402,476        418,444
Number of records added to file—
Serial File  387,650        442,268
Alphabetical File  163,458        153,278
Total number of entries added to
Central Registry records  551,108        595,546
Total value of— $ $
Documents accepted  1,093,938.00 1,147,496.00
Search fees   213,841.75 260,823.50
Photographic copying fees  5,833.75 6,668.00
Total revenue    1,313,613.50    1,414,987.50
SCHOOL BUSES
Control over the use and operation of school buses engaged in the transportation of students to and from schools in the Province is the responsibility of the
Superintendent of Motor-vehicles. Such control extends to the setting of minimum
standards for construction and maintenance and provides for periodic inspection
carried out on behalf of the Superintendent by mechanical inspectors of the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police, the Motor Carrier Branch of the Motor Carrier Commission, and senior Motor-vehicle Inspectors of the Branch. Motor-vehicle Inspectors at the five inspection stations operated by the Branch are appointed mechanical
inspectors for the inspection of school buses. School buses in the Victoria area,
Greater Vancouver area, and Greater Nanaimo area are inspected at the inspection
station in the area or by an inspector from a station.
 F 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
From January 1, 1975, to March 31, 1976, the number of permits issued for
vehicles to be used as school buses was 1,416 renewal permits and 295 permits for
new vehicles for a total of 1,711 as compared to the 1974 calendar year figure of
1,255. Of the permits issued, 39 were cancelled as the result of the sale and
transfer of vehicle or of poor mechanical condition. From January 1, 1975, to
February 29, 1976, school buses were involved in 77 accidents of which 62 resulted
in property damage only. Six students and 19 persons other than students were
injured in 15 injury accidents. There were no fatal accidents involving school buses
during this period.
PERMITS FOR FLASHING RED AND AMBER LAMPS, SIRENS,
AND THEFT ALARMS
The Superintendent may, under the provisions of the Motor-vehicle Act
Regulations, issue permits to allow a vehicle to be equipped with a flashing lamp.
The regulations specify that certain emergency vehicles, tow cars, and pilot cars
may be equipped without obtaining a permit. The permits are required for vehicles
such as public utility vehicles which must stop on a highway to repair power or
telephone lines. In each case the permit is issued where a hazard exists and only
with the approval of the local enforcement agency.
From January 1, 1975, to March 31, 1976, 351 permits for flashing amber
lamps and 53 permits for flashing red lamps were issued. In addition, 29 permits
were issued to allow installation of sirens and red flashing lamps on vehicles. These
vehicles were usually ambulances or the personal vehicle of the chief of a volunteer
fire department in a small community.
Nine permits were issued for the installation of theft alarms in vehicles.
STAFF
In 1975 the staff of the Motor-vehicle Branch consisted of 598 regular established positions, while 81 persons held regular continuous positions.
An in-house staff training program was established, as well as increased direction and encouragement offered to staff. The result has been increased requests for
training assistance.
WEIGH  SCALE  BRANCH
This Branch has 38 truck weigh scale stations at various points throughout
British Columbia, of which 34 are manned on a regular basis, augmented by 15
portable units. These weigh scale stations and portable patrols monitor commercial vehicles that are licensed in excess of 12,000 pounds gross vehicle weight. In
addition to commercial vehicle monitoring, the Weighmasters issue various permits,
such as non-resident, temporary operating, motive-fuel, etc., and the regular oversize and overweight permits. Another major function of the Branch is the recording
and reviewing of all accidents involving commercial vehicles having a gross vehicle
weight exceeding 40,000 pounds.
Weigh scale operators are responsible for ensuring that the following Acts are
complied with: Commercial Transport Act, Motor-vehicle Act, Motor Carrier Act,
Motive-fuel Use Tax Act, and certain aspects of the Brands Act, the Forest Act,
the Social Services Tax Act, and the Motor Vehicle Transport Act (Canada).
During the fiscal year, new facilities were opened at Pouce Coupe, Yahk, and
Prince George.   These new facilities contain the latest technology in electronic
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS F 45
weighing, including exterior digital readout and electronically controlled directional
signs. The new sites are designed in such a way that, although they have two points
of entry to accommodate two-way traffic, there is only one exit, which eliminates
the confusion created by a two-exit scale.
Statistics show that, during the fiscal year, 1,869,950 commercial vehicles
were checked by the Weigh Scale Branch. This resulted in 6,064 prosecutions and
2,275 violation notices being issued.
Permit Issuance
Single trip and short-term  72,00c1
Non-resident  36,875
Temporary operating  27,586
Motive-fuel (permits and (or) emblems)   13,894
Restricted route  3,536
Term oversize  450
Highway crossings  358
Term overweight  110
Total  154,809
i Approximate.
 F 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TRANSPORT PLANNING, RESEARCH,  AND
DEVELOPMENT BUREAU
Organized in late 1974, the Transport Planning, Research, and Development
Branch comprises a range of capabilities which enables the Government to be
kept abreast of the expanding knowledge involved in the variety of modes in
transportation.
Participation in the Federal-Provincial Committee on Western Transportation
and the Western Transportation Advisory Council permits the Province to make
its views known, and influence felt, relative to national transportation policy.
This research and liaison function, together with the many project-oriented
studies, reports, and interventions, qualifies the Branch to co-ordinate and rationalize Provincial transportation policy development on an intermodal basis.
Provincial and Federal railway issues have formed an important aspect of the
Branch's efforts. Liaison with the Railway Transport Committee, Canadian Transport Commission, involving issues relating to abandonments, revisions, and reconstruction of portions of CPR, CNR, and E&N Railway is an ongoing activity.
Consultation with Federal and other provincial government officers continues
on such issues as extra-provincial motor carriers, railway passenger rationalization,
and aid to urban transportation.
Project-oriented involvement includes:
Transportation planning and operations analysis for feasibility of commodity
development related to Northeast Coal Development.
Transportation study of raw materials and finished product for the BC/NKK
Steel Mill Study. The Branch also maintained a technical overview of the Federally
constructed Fairview Terminal at Prince Rupert.
The interests of British Columbia in the coastal shipping and inter-coastal
trade provisions of the Maritime Code (Bill C-61) were concerns in Branch liaison
with the Federal D.O.T. Activity continues relative to water transport services to
British Columbia coastal points. Efforts to improve Provincial air services were
continued. A full report, which identified problem areas and made improvement
recommendations, was submitted to the Federal Minister of Transport. An
expanded Federal commitment to small airport facility development is being sought
in a draft Remote Access Policy.
Interests of the Branch comprise Provincial and interprovincial truck regulations, freight rates, remote area access, public transit, third-level air carriers,
industry-oriented transport development.
The Branch is expanding to meet new challenges and to engage growing areas
of concern. It is the purpose of the Branch to add to its staff expertise in the area
of tariff analysis and economic evaluation.
The multi-modal and inter-governmental aspects of transportation present a
continuing challenge and require a constant vigil in the interests of the Province.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS F 47
FERRIES  OPERATIONS
B.C. FERRIES
British Columbia Ferries was inaugurated in June 1960 to provide service
between Vancouver Island and the Lower Mainland.
Service is offered between Swartz Bay and Tsawwassen, Horseshoe Bay and
Nanaimo, Horseshoe Bay and Langdale, and Horseshoe Bay and Snug Cove on
Bowen Island. Also between Saltery Bay and Earls Cove on the Sechelt Peninsula,
Swartz Bay and Fulford Harbour, Crofton and Vesuvius Bay on Saltspring Island.
There is an Outer Gulf Island service for Pender, Saturna, Mayne, and Galiano
Islands, together with a direct route to those islands from Tsawwassen. From
northern Vancouver Island there are routes from Kelsey Bay to Beaver Cove, Bella
Bella, and Prince Rupert. Finally, the shortest run is from Brentwood across the
Saanich Inlet to Mill Bay.
Major construction continued at Tsawwassen Terminal with the result there
are now two new berths in use while a third, together with a breakwater on the
northern approach, will shortly be completed. Upper-level ramps were constructed
at both Departure Bay and Horseshoe Bay terminals to assist in loading for the
super vessels.
The three new super ships have now joined the Dogwood Fleet with two in
service on the Horseshoe Bay/Nanaimo run, and the third, the truck ferry, sailing
between Tsawwassen and Swartz Bay. The aging Langdale Queen was retired
during the year and replaced by the Queen of Tsawwassen. The Queen of New
Westminster has also joined the Horseshoe Bay to Langdale route.
 F 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The new MV Queen of Alberni, which entered service during 1976, carries commercial
and overheight traffic between Tsawwassen and Swartz Bay.
The MV Queen of Cowichan and her super sister, the MV Queen of Coquitlam,
epitomize the economies scale in modern ferry transport with their three car decks and
licensed capacity to carry more than a thousand passengers.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS               F 49
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 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
F 51
COASTAL FERRIES
During the fiscal year 1975/76 a fleet of 11 ferries coming under the jurisdiction of the Department of Transport and Communications, with day-to-day
management by the Department of Highways, provided a ferry service on 10 saltwater routes. In addition, the Queen of the Islands was borrowed from B.C.
Ferries for service on the Comox-Powell River run during the summer season.
The fleet carried 789,046 vehicles and 2,343,369 passengers.
All ferries were inspected during the year and repairs effected where necessary.
In addition, the ferries were all drydocked and overhauled, and relief ferries provided interim service wherever possible.
Coastal Ferry Revenue, 1975/76
$
Comox-Powell River  637,392.02
Cortes Island  68,887.55
Denman Island  55,118.20
Gabriola Island   151,223.90
Hornby Island  20,791.20
Nimpkish   142,005.50
Quathisaki Cove   167,227.20
Queen Charlotte Islands1  30,782.25
Texada Island  161,597.70
Thetis Island  26,879.60
Woodfibre   9,823.00
1,471,728.12
i Commenced September 1975.
 F 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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1?
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS F 53
COMMUNICATIONS
There are three branches in the Communications Division—Computer and
Consulting Services, System Development and Regulation, and Telecommunications
Services.
COMPUTER AND CONSULTING SERVICES BRANCH
This Branch provides a variety of management support services to Government departments, agencies, boards, and commissions. Responsibilities include
ongoing provision of data entry services and computer time; analysis, design, programming, and implementation of computer projects; management consulting assistance on organization, systems, procedures, project planning, work study, and
methods analysis; consulting assistance on technical aspects of computer operations
such as communications, information storage, and retrieval.
OPERATIONS DIVISION
During the period under report, this Division increased productivity substantially by replacing key-punches with two major data entry key to disc to tape systems. This increase helped to offset a steady reduction in data entry staff numbers.
The two systems were 32 Keyboard Univac CADE (Computer Assisted Data
Entry) systems.
Usage increased on all computer systems, with service to users every day of
the year—24 hours per day on normal workdays and 16 hours per day on weekends and statutory holidays. There was a noticeable swing to terminal use by
clients, providing improved service to these clients and necessitating changes to
many operating procedures.
INTERNAL SERVICES DIVISION
Since the last Annual Report this Division has
(1) completed the tendering, evaluation, and selection process for a
variety of computer terminals located in various Government offices
in Victoria, Vancouver, and other parts of the Province; these terminals are used by client departments to send information directly to
computers in the Operations Division and in return receive information from the computer either in the form of a visual display or
printed output;
(2) made arrangements for and presented educational courses to users
from most client departments on terminal use, techniques used in
storing, and the retrieving of large files of information and other
computer-related subjects;
(3) provided ongoing technical advice on the above subject to most
client departments.
SYSTEMS AND PROGRAMMING DIVISION
Work continued on the following major projects during the fiscal year:
(1) An emergency health services radio network.
(2) Major environmental projects for the Water Resources Service.
(3) Computerization of Cancer Control Agency cytology records.
 F 54 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(4)  Computerization of many separate and differing systems for the
Division of Vital Statistics.
Projects were completed for the Liquor Administration Branch, the Superannuation Branch, and the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
MANAGEMENT CONSULTING DIVISION
Major projects included
(1) implementing a work-load reporting procedure for the Department
of Consumer Services;
(2) recommending changes in the role of the Central Microfilm Bureau;
(3) designing and implementing procedural changes in the Personnel
Office of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources;
(4) designing and implementing procedural and organizational changes
in the Personnel and Finance and Administration offices of the
Department of the Attorney-General;
(5) implementing the social assistance payment system in Vancouver
Resources Board of the Department of Human Resources;
(6) designing and implementing a computerized student referral system
for the Department of Labour's student summer employment
program;
(7) implementing the computerizing of apprenticeship records for the
Department of Labour.
Other work included
(1) continuing to assist the Rent Review Commission;
(2) assisting the court services unit of the Attorney-General's Department with procedural and organization matters;
(3) starting a major review of court reporting and court recording practices and alternatives for the Department of the Attorney-General;
(4) assisting the Legal Services Commission in establishing its budgeting
and accounting functions;
(5) assisting the Public Service Commission in developing procedures
for the Management Exempt Group Benefits Plan.
SPECIAL PROJECTS DIVISION
This Division has been actively involved in systems development for the
Premier's Office, Department of Transport and Communications, and the Municipal
Affairs Department.
Significant projects completed:
(1) Established a computerized mail list system for all departments of
Government.
(2) Implemented expanded on-line Central Registry lien inquiry system.
(3) Implemented on-line terminal inquiry system for ferries' information..
(4) Transferred complete control of vehicle file operation to ICBC.
(5) Assumed total responsibility from the Motor-vehicle Branch and
ICBC for operation of the Driver Records system.
In addition, all staff within the Division received the required training in
information storage and retrieval techniques and computer/communications
concepts.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
F 55
At fiscal year-end the Division was developing the following major projects:
(1) Computerized motor carrier licensing system.
(2) Computerized record-keeping and statistical analysis of municipal
debt for Department of Municipal Affairs.
(3) A new system for recording and statistically analysing motor-vehicle
accidents.
(4) Automated processes for reporting and recording B.C. Ferries Service revenue.
SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT AND REGULATION BRANCH
The function of the System Development and Regulation Branch is to promote
the orderly development of communications appropriate to the needs of all sectors
of the British Columbia public, and to see that the quality is adequate and the price
reasonable.
Responsibilities include development of policy recommendations, the administration of programs to facilitate the effective use of communications systems, and
the study of technological evolution as well as that of initiatives taken by other
agencies in order to determine the probable impacts of these on the Province. This
Branch is also the focal point for comments, complaints, and concerns regarding
communications addressed to the Government by the British Columbia public.
During the year, this Branch participated in an inter-departmental committee
examining the prospects of developing coal deposits in the northeast region of the
Province. Since the area is remote from existing settlements, services of all kinds
would be required to support the population which would establish there as a consequence of the mining activity. Radio, television, and telephone service are
essential to a modern community, and the contribution of this Branch has been
directed toward identifying the various types of these communications services
which would be required, determining means of furnishing them, and estimating the
costs involved.
With a view to extending coverage of radio and television, particularly in the
more remote areas, meetings were held with Telesat Canada to discuss possibilities
for more extensive usage of satellite channels and development of low-cost earth
receiving-stations. In the same vein, meetings were held with officials of the
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in connection with its Accelerated Coverage
Plan under which special attention is being given to provide radio and television
reception to communities of over 500 people which are not at present served.
A series of changes at the ministerial level in the Federal Department of Communications, and a protracted delay in the introduction of Federal legislation which
was anticipated to have a major effect on national communications policy, contributed to a sharp decline in discussions on communications policy matters between
the provinces, as well as between the provinces and the Federal Government. Continuity of relations between the provinces was also affected during the year by the
change in ministers responsible for communications in many of the provinces, and
it is now expected that attention will again be directed toward the role of the
provinces vis-a-vis the Federal Government respecting different aspects of communications and mechanisms for consultation and participation.
A sum of money was included in the Department's budget for assisting communications development. Priorities for a project took into account local support,
remoteness from alternative services, and the indicated financial viability. A grant
was made to Sandspit and District Television Society for rehabilitation of a rebroad-
 F 56 BRITISH COLUMBIA
cast transmitter to provide an acceptable quality of television reception to approximately 1,500 people at Sandspit, Queen Charlotte City, and Skidegate. A sharp
curtailment in Government expenditures imposed in the latter half of 1975 caused
deferment of action on any other request for assistance.
The Department of Communications, Ottawa, has been spearheading a drive
to foster competition in the furnishing of telephone system terminal devices, such as
message recorders. In the past, the telephone companies have been very restrictive
in allowing "foreign attachments" (i.e., those which the utility does not supply)
and have, as a minimum, required subscribers to rent an additional coupler unit
from the telephone company to protect the utility's system from a terminal device
made by an outside manufacturer. The Federal department's initial objective was
to eliminate the requirement for a coupler by introducing a program of standardization and certification, and so encourage free competition in the supply of a
number of devices. While the change is attractive from some points of view, it
raises important questions as to maintenance responsibility, uniformity of service
offerings in more remote, as compared to large urban areas, and potentially could
upset the balance between business and residential rates to the ultimate disadvantage of the basic residential subscriber. Members of this Branch have participated
with opposite numbers from other provinces to focus attention on possible dangers
to be avoided when designing the program.
Some satisfaction can be taken from a decision of the Canadian Radio-
television and Telecommunications Commission rejecting a proposal to adopt a
rate-adjustment formula. Had the proposal been accepted, telephone companies
under Federal regulation, such as B.C. Telephone Company, would have been
permitted to increase their rates according to their increases in costs without
explicit examination by the regulatory body, or the opportunity for public hearing.
This Branch developed and submitted a position paper on behalf of the Province
strongly opposing the adoption of a rate-adjustment formula. This paper, together
with submissions from two other provinces, evidently influenced the Commission's
decision.
The year 1975 set a precedent in that two public hearings dealing with
increased rates for B.C. Telephone Company were held. The first, in June, was
confined to the question of urgent financial need for an interim increase averaging
10 per cent. The second was in September, and dealt with issues arising from the
application as a whole, and approval of the remainder of the average 20-per-cent
increase originally requested. It was the responsibility of this Branch to ensure
that all relevant aspects of the company's request for higher rates were questioned
at the public hearing. It is to be noted that in recent years the burden of intervention in B.C. Telephone rate cases has been left almost entirely to the Provincial
Government. Appearances, or even attendance at the hearings, by organizations
or interested members of the public are the exception rather than the rule.
This Branch also provides staff support on telecommunications matters to the
Motor Carrier Commission, which is responsible for the regulation of telecommunications utilities under Provincial jurisdiction. During the year, when it was known
that Okanagan Telephone Company would be applying for a major rate increase,
an extensive inquiry into the property and operations of the company was started,
using outside consultants. Other tariff revision applications and subscriber complaints during the year were processed by Branch staff.
Introduction of the Federal Government's Anti-Inflation Program had important implications for telecommunications businesses both with Federal and Provincial jurisdictions.    Intensive  study was required during the  early weeks  after
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS F 57
October 14, 1975, to determine what the effects would be. Later, as the legislation
was amended and regulations were published, it became clear that application of
the Anti-Inflation Guidelines with respect to the pricing structure of utilities
devolves upon the utility regulatory body, not the Anti-Inflation Board. The
Branch has therefore to interpret the guidelines both in its role as intervener before
the Federal regulatory body and as adviser to the Motor Carrier Commission.
Having personnel experienced in utility regulation, the Branch was also called
upon during the year by the Transport arm of the Department to study and make
recommendations on applications for oil pipeline carrier rate increases by West-
coast Petroleum Ltd. and Pacific Petroleums Ltd.
TELECOMMUNICATION SERVICES BRANCH
This Branch is responsible for the provision, maintenance, and operation of
nearly all telecommunications services required by Provincial Government departments and some agencies, with the two exceptions of the radio systems operated by
the Department of Highways and the Forest Service. The major activities of the
Branch are concerned with telephone, radio, data communications, and various
types of auxiliary services involving local communications systems.
The necessity for restraint in expenditures resulted in some slow-down for a
number of projects under way prior to the beginning of the year. Examples of
such projects are the mobile radio systems planned on a co-ordinated basis for the
Ambulance Service, the Sheriff's Service, and others; the development of a comprehensive Provincial Telephone Directory; a co-ordinated control system for audio
and visual effects in the Provincial Museum; video recording and transmission of
legislative sessions; assistance in the provision of emergency telephone reporting
systems for municipalities; and assistance in the development of various audio/
visual communications systems throughout the Province.
The Telephone Systems Division and the two Telephone Operations Divisions
experience continued activity at a high level and were affected by the generally
lower personnel levels resulting from staggered working-hours and restricted
employment. In many instances a reduction of staff in an office necessitated an
extra-cost improvement in the telephone system in that office to assist the remaining
staff to do their work. Continued expansion of the inter-city network was required,
both in the number of lines and centres served, in order that long delays and
excessive overflow long-distance calling could be reduced. As in the past, decisions
concerning telephone installations were based on absolute necessity or maximum
over-all cost-effectiveness, rather than convenience or modernization for its own
sake.
The principal radio activity was concerned with various land mobile systems
for several departments and agencies on a reduced scale because of budget
restraints. Progress is being made on a radio paging system which will permit
major economies in the employment of ambulance personnel. A study was initiated
for the improvement of long-range radio communications for the Air Services
Branch to assist in air ambulance function.
In the Data Communications Division, continued progress was made in the
development of the Province-wide teletype network using both Telex and TWX
systems. At the end of the fiscal year there were 47 teleprinter locations providing
general access and the network was processing an average of over 16,000 words a
day. There was also a major increase in the number of remote computer terminals,
each of which involved a specialized telecommunications link.
 F 58 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Branch continued to provide many services in the category of auxiliary
communications. These included numerous radio paging services and systems,
office intercommunications, sound systems, video and cable TV services and systems, and telephone-answering systems.
A continuing project was the study of costs and feasibility of a telephone
emergency reporting system for municipalities. Such a system, using the digits 911,
was installed in the City of Vancouver, but a detailed study iri the Regional District
of East Kootenay by this Branch and the B.C. Telephone Company indicated that
the telecommunications costs in a semi-rural area could be prohibitive. Means
of reducing costs to municipalities is the subject of continuing study and discussion.
 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
F 59
ADMINISTRATION
FINANCE
HOW THE TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS DOLLAR
IS SPENT
Fiscal Year 1975/76
80.56 %
52?<
1. General Administration, Engineering Branch, and Planning and Research
Bureau.
2. Weigh Scale Branch.
3. Motor-vehicle Branch.
4. Motor Carrier Branch and Commission.
5. Computer and Consulting Services Branch.
6. Telecommunications Services Branch and System Development and Regulation Branch.
7. B.C. Ferries Service (including minor coastal ferries).
8. Air Services Branch.
 F 60 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Summary of Expenditures, Fiscal Year 1975/76
Vote $
250—Minister's Office  119,164
251—Administration   536,908
252—Engineering Branch  386,659
253—Weigh Scale Branch  2,290,082
254—Motor-vehicle Branch  9,799,952
255—Motor Carrier Branch _   645,988
256—Computer and Consulting Service  4,751,880
257—Communications Branch  7,678,267
258—B.C. Ferries  97,366,843
259—Motor Carrier Commission  187,077
260—Air Services  1,649,313
261—Transport Planning and Research Bureau 278,842
125,690,975
Bill   (No.   23)—Special Fund Appropriation Act, 1975, chapter 72     20,000,000
145,690,975
PERSONNEL SERVICES
Restraints placed on initial and replacement hiring in early 1975 resulted in a
significant decrease in recruitment activity over the previous year, with only 21
established positions processed and the majority of these filled on a temporary
limited basis.
Despite a cutback in funds by the Department of Labour under the summer
Work-in-Government Program (W.I.G.), this program continued to account for
a large percentage of the Department's short-term hiring program.
Predominant among changes in the area of established positions was the
creation of a position of Operations Manager in the Air Services Branch, and the
appointment of a new Deputy Superintendent of Motor-vehicles.
Department personnel officers and line management staff on the management
team spent considerable time during the year in negotiations for the Engineering,
Technical and Inspectional, the Environment, Resource and Conservation, and the
Administrative Fiscal and Regulatory Component Agreements.
In the area of employee grievances there was a significant decrease in the
number initiated, due in part to greater staff knowledge of terms and limitations of
the respective contracts, and the fact that conflicting interpretations (the basis of
many initial grievances) have now been clarified. Out of the number of grievances
processed, only two were carried to the ultimate level of procedure prior to
settlement.
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1977
1,230-177-4300

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