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Annual Report of the DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER SERVICES FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1975 PROVINCE OF… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1977

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 Annual Report
of the
DEPARTMENT OF
CONSUMER SERVICES
FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1975
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
  To Colonel the Honourable Walter Stewart Owen, Q.C, LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour, Sir, to respectfully submit herewith the Annual Report of the
Department of Consumer Services for the year ended December 31, 1975,
pursuant to the provisions of the Department of Consumer Services Act, the
Trade Practices Act, and the Debtor Assistance Act.
K. RAFE MAIR
Minister of Consumer Services
April 27, 1976.
  Honourable K. Rafe Mair
Minister
Department of Consumer Services
Parliament Buildings
Victoria, B.C.
Honourable Minister: I have the honour to submit for your consideration the
Annual Report of the Department of Consumer Services for the year ended
December 31, 1975.
The Report is delivered in accordance with the reporting provisions of the Department
of Consumer Services Act, the Trade Practices Act, and the Debtor Assistance
Act.
Respectfully submitted,
William A. W. Neilson
Deputy Minister of Consumer Services
April 27, 1976.
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  TABLE OF CONTENTS
HISTORICAL NOTES
INTRODUCTION
STATUTES ADMINISTERED
BRITISH COLUMBIA PRICE FREEZE
TRADE PRACTICES BRANCH
LEGAL SERVICES BRANCH
COMMUNITY PROGRAMS BRANCH
RESEARCH DIVISION
DEBTOR ASSISTANCE DIVISION
COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION
INFORMATION
EDUCATION
TRADE LIAISON
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES BRANCH
ORGANIZATION CHART
TABLE OF STATISTICS
ENFORCEMENT ACTIVITIES, 1975
LIST OF FUNDED GROUPS
LIST OF PUBLICATIONS
OFFICE DIRECTORY
9
13
15
17
19
23
25
26
27
29
29
30
30
33
35
37
51
71
73
77
  Some
Historical Notes
The first consumer law in history was an unwritten one—caveat emptor,
Let the Buyer Beware.   Self-protection worked pretty well in the old marketplace.
Shoppers usually bought goods directly from the producer, from the farmer or from
the local craftsmen.   Most travelling merchants were well known and built their
success on the goodwill developed over many years with their regular customers.
In the old marketplace customers could carefully evaluate what they were about
to buy.   Most products were familiar ones which the shoppers could usually
see and touch.
The Industrial Revolution, however, changed the marketplace for everyone.
With mass-produced merchandise came mass marketing and mass advertising.
Consumers increasingly faced a new kind of marketplace with more and more
unfamiliar and sometimes complicated goods. And these things were no longer
produced or sold by people known to the consumer. The old rule of caveat emptor
no longer worked as well.   Important legal cases led to a new principle: goods
had to be of a reasonable quality, especially when buyers did not actually see
what they were buying.
The courts also established the principle that new, untested goods must do
whatever their seller claimed they would do.
These first laws after the Industrial Revolution largely reflected businessmen's
interests. The British Sale of Goods Act passed in 1893 combined many of the
legal precedents of past centuries into one single code.   But this law, copied soon after
by most Canadian provinces including British Columbia, did not protect ordinary
consumers largely because sellers were permitted to exclude rights guaranteed under the
law simply by attaching special clauses to sales contracts.   Most consumers were
not in a position to challenge the legal complexities of sales agreements.
Important inroads, however, were being made in other areas of the marketplace.
In 1874, for example, the Canadian government passed the first nationwide food
and drug legislation in North America. As health scandals began to receive greater
public notice, more legislation followed, including the comprehensive Food and
Drug Act, passed in 1890.
The Prairie provinces were the scene of the second major breakthrough in
consumer protection.   Chattel credit was practically unheard of until the early 1900's
when farmers first began to buy mechanized equipment and to make the heavy
financial commitment necessary—debt.
The problem was that a farmer could still be forced to make installment payments
even if the equipment proved faulty.   Farmers in Alberta demanded action, and in
1913 an act was passed that required dealers of farm machinery to guarantee that the
equipment they sold would work properly or they would repair or replace it at
their own expense. This soon became a model law for other provinces.
 W  10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The twentieth century has seen a vast increase in the number of new goods and
the amount of advertising in all the media.   But the media have also been the
setting for a number of scandals about unsafe products. The result has been several
waves of consumerism which have in turn resulted in several phases of new
government action and legislation.
In 1936, for example, the need for new consumer legislation was recognized and
strongly recommended by a federal Royal Commission co-ordinated by Lester Pearson,
later the Prime Minister.
During World War II, citizen groups throughout Canada were organized
to help monitor retail prices, and in 1947 these groups joined together to form what is
now the Consumers' Association of Canada.
The next twenty years brought many new laws affecting credit disclosure,
itinerant sales, labelling, advertising, and motor vehicle safety.
Automobiles were the most expensive and just about the most complicated of the
new consumer goods. And, when a new wave of consumerism appeared in the
sixties, it focused on the inadequate safety features of automobiles. At this time,
Ralph Nader became famous as a leading consumer advocate after he published his
book "Unsafe at Any Speed."
The consumer movement soon addressed itself to many other issues and
became a significant organized force in North America. This was reflected by
governments in the creation of special departments to develop and administer new
legislation and programs to protect consumers.
In 1967, the Government of Canada established the Department of Consumer
and Corporate Affairs to create and administer new laws, including those regulating
textile labelling, packaging and labelling, hazardous products, and weights
and measures.
The British North America Act, however, leaves many consumer situations
under the legal jurisdiction of the provinces; this is especially true for transactions
between buyers and sellers.
The British Columbia legislature passed its first Consumer Protection Act
in 1967. Among other things, this Act required that the actual and percentage cost
of borrowing must be made clear to consumers.   It also allowed consumers to cancel
door-to-door sales contracts within a few days if they have changed their minds.
In 1970, an amendment to the 1897 Sale of Goods Act finally made it clear
that retailers could not legally exclude rights guaranteed in the Act.   Before this, it
had been common for consumers to give up many of their legal rights when they
signed a sales contract.
In late 1973, the Department of Consumer Services Act was passed. The law
set up the legal framework for the development of the department and specifically,
it declared:
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975 W 11
Sec. 4
The duties, powers, and functions of the minister extend to and include all
matters relating to consumer affairs that are assigned to the minister under this
or any other Act or by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council and are not,
by law, or by order of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, assigned to any other
minister or department, branch, or agency of the Government of the Province.
Sec. 5
The purposes and functions of the department are, under the direction
of the minister,
(a) to have general supervision of consumer affairs and report to the minister
from time to time on matters related to consumer affairs;
(b) to examine consumer affairs legislation both in Canada and elsewhere, and,
upon the basis of such examination on a continuing basis, to make
recommendations to the minister with regard to consumer affairs legislation.
(c) to investigate complaints received by the department and to carry out
inquiries into alleged contraventions of consumer legislation or respecting
practices that are alleged to be contrary to the interests of consumers ;
(d) to disseminate information and educate the consumers with respect
to consumer affairs matters; and
(e) to perform such other duties and functions as may be assigned to it by
any Act or by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
Soon after the passing of this Act, the Department of Consumer Services opened
its first offices.   Its progress since then forms the basis for this second Annual Report.
  REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT, 1975 W 13
Introduction
The British Columbia Department of Consumer Services was established in
November, 1973. This first year was largely one of organization, pulling together
existing consumer legislation, developing new programs and statutes, and setting up the
machinery to administer this legislation.
By the end of 1974, several significant events had occurred :
• The omnibus B.C. Trade Practices Act received the full backing of the Legislature
in June and was proclaimed in July, 1974.
• Soon after, the department undertook and won its first court case on behalf of a
consumer under the Trade Practices Act.   Other enforcement activities followed.
• Between October 1974 and January 1975, four regional offices were opened—plus
a second Debtor Assistance office in Vancouver.   These offices began receiving
hundreds of inquiries and specific complaints, mediating buyer-seller disputes,
and offering specialized counselling to over-indebted consumers.
• A province-wide information campaign was started to publicize new consumer
laws and the services offered by the department.
The department's second year, 1975, has been one of continued growth in
contact with the general public.   By the beginning of the year, the department's offices
were in full operation and services were being provided for all regions of the province.
Generally, 1975 witnessed a doubling of activities over 1974, including inquiries
received from the public and formal cases opened and closed.
In the area of enforcement, however, the 1975 increase was .in excess of
tenfold over 1974.
Most important was the growing awareness by the business community and
the consumer public at large of their rights and responsibilities in the marketplace.
This has resulted not only from media coverage of enforcement activities, but also from
the department's initiatives in the area of consumer education and liaison with
business groups and individuals.
The consumer movement in British Columbia is no longer in its infancy. Trade
associations pay serious attention to consumer legislation.   Many large businesses
have set up consumer sections within their own firms. And more people than ever have
joined consumer groups whose branches have opened throughout the province.
The department has increasingly served as a public focus for the consumer
movement.   On the large and small scale, the department serves as a bridge between
consumers and businesses.   Every day, staff deals directly with buyer-seller
disputes, settling the vast majority on a mutually helpful, mediatory basis. At the
same time, senior staff meet with representatives of consumer and trade groups
J
 W 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
as well as other provincial consumer departments and the federal government.
Immediate problems are dealt with in these meetings and new policy and legislative
initiatives are also developed.
As the department has begun to fulfill its mandate, a more precise picture has
emerged. With this new precision, the department is better able to focus its own
energies and to continually identify and more closely define those aspects
where improvement is necessary.
Consumer legislation is part of an evolutionary process. The new laws in
British Columbia and the new role fulfilled by the Department of Consumer Services
are the result of this process.   Future activities will depend on today's
marketplace trends.
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT, 1975 W 15
Statutes Administered by the
Department of Consumer Services
Blind Persons' Rights Act
Cemeteries Act
Closing-Out Sales Act
Consumer Protection Act
Cremation Act
Debtor Assistance Act
Department of Consumer Services Act
Motor Vehicle Act (ss. 34-34H)
Municipal Cemeteries Act
Pawnbrokers Act
Personal Information Reporting Act
Pyramid Distributors Act
Trade Practices Act
Trading Stamp Act
 N -'2i#*i
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975 W 17
British Columbia
Price Freeze
On October 24, 1975, the Government of British Columbia declared a price
freeze on food, beverages, provincial transport and energy rates, prescription drugs,
patent and proprietary medicines, and petroleum products. The freeze was imposed on
these essential items to allow the federal government's anti-inflation monitoring
program time for implementation. The freeze was originally scheduled to end
January 1st, but was extended in late December to February 1st, and later to
February 16th.
The Department of Consumer Services was primarily responsible for
co-ordination of public and inter-departmental information, price monitoring, and
the enforcement of price freeze regulations.
An extensive public information program was waged through the print media
to explain what goods were covered by the freeze, and to encourage consumers
to monitor prices in their own areas. A complaint form was provided in most
newspapers throughout the province for consumers to investigate and report any
violations.
Response to this information program indicated an interest and a large degree
of co-operation on the part of both business and consumers. Total inquiries received
through storefront offices reached 2,840 by December 31st.   The final total was
in excess of 4,200 inquiries.
Most inquiries were resolved through explanation of price freeze regulations,
however, 298 registered complaints requiring further investigation had been received
and processed by December 31st.
Usually, in cases where stores and other businesses were found to be offending
price freeze regulations, an explanation of the regulation resulted in price rollbacks.
In one instance, an independent grocery chain was found to have raised prices on
twenty-seven items covered by the freeze.   Enforcement activity by the department
resulted in a public apology by the store manager, and a donation to a local charitable
institution, in an amount equal to the gross revenue generated by the surcharged goods.
Further results on the price freeze will be reported in next year's Annual Report.
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 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975 W 19
Trade Practices
Branch
1975 marked the first full year of Trade Practices Act enforcement and, with
the opening of the Prince George office in January, four storefront offices were
open to serve the public.
Amendments were made to the Trade Practices Act and the Personal Information
Reporting Act. The "Fair Sales Practices Act" became the "Pyramid Distributors
Act."   Late in the year, responsibility for Motor Vehicle Dealer Licensing was
assumed by the department, for administration by the Trade Practices Branch.
The branch continues to deal with all forms of consumer complaints and is
responsible for the enforcement of those statutes which are regulatory in nature. The
investigations arising from complaints or suspected breaches of the statutes are
carried out by branch personnel. The department is also able to provide general advice
or assistance in areas which are not associated with complaints or which serve to
resolve complaints at a very early stage.
In addition to their existing duties, storefront office staff were called upon to
deal with complaints arising from the price freeze and in nearly every case, price
increases falling within the jurisdiction of the price freeze regulation were immediately
rolled back. The staff received excellent co-operation from the retailers who
were contacted.
TRADE PRACTICES ACT
Enforcement—Section 15: Assurance of Voluntary Compliance
Significant amendments were made to the Act during the spring session.
From the enforcement activities which took place during the year, it became obvious
that suppliers of all kinds, after some initial reservations, took fairly readily to the
concept of the Assurance of Voluntary Compliance. Twenty-four Assurances
were negotiated to completion during the year and in many cases it was possible to
build consumer redress into the settlements which were reached.
Section 16—Injunctions
In three cases, interim injunctions were sought.   In one case, (Colliers
Encyclopedia), the injunction was granted and although this has now expired, the
supplier has given a firm undertaking not to repeat the acts or practices complained of
until the matter has been dealt with by court action or otherwise.   In another
case (John's Tax Services), the injunction application was unsuccessful and an appeal
of that decision also failed.  The matter is still before the courts.    In the third
instance (MacLean Hunter), the application was not ruled upon but adjourned and
once again the supplier has given a firm undertaking to the court that the acts or
practices will not be repeated until the matter has been settled by court action
or otherwise.
 W 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
In a further case (Household Finance), an interim injunction was not
applied for, but the courts are being asked to rule upon certain acts or practices by
means of declaratory judgment and it is anticipated that this case will be heard
early in 1976.
Section 24—Substitute Actions
A further enforcement option available to the Director of Trade Practices
is to institute or defend proceedings on behalf of a consumer or class of consumers.
Twelve cases were initiated during the year and nine have been brought to a successful
conclusion. The remaining cases are still before the courts.
In one of these cases (Budget Freezer Foods), what amounts to a class action
is being taken by the Director on behalf of consumers who did not receive orders
of food for which they had paid in advance and, as in most enforcement precedents
which are being established under this Act, this is breaking totally new ground
in Canadian consumer law.
Section 25—Prosecution
In only one case during the year 'was it found necessary to apply the prosecution
powers contained in the Act and a warrant was issued for the arrest of an
itinerant home repair man who left the province.
Publication of Enforcement Activities—Section 4
The Public Record of all enforcement activities, maintained at each storefront
office, is readily available to any interested persons. There have not been many
requests to inspect the Public Record this year. A series of Enforcement Reports was
circulated during the year which gave details of current enforcement activities.
In some cases where court proceedings had been initiated and some interim settlement
was reached, the department issued a press release providing details.   Some
considerable interest in the application of the statute has been expressed outside the
province and by other countries.
Investigations—Sections 8 and 9
The formal investigation powers contained in the Act are only used when it is
suspected that there will be a lack of co-operation and/or that evidence or records
will not be made available if the supplier receives prior knowledge of the investigation.
Trade Practices Branch staff have not met with any sustained objection to the use
of these powers and it has been possible in most cases to use the less formal investigative
powers contained in the Act due to the co-operation which we have received
from suppliers.
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975 W 21
Freezing Orders—Section 13
It has been necessary to issue a "freezing order" in five cases. To illustrate the
need for such powers, a manufacturer had removed a significant number of
mobile homes for which a British Columbia supplier had received full or partial
payment from British Columbia consumers, to the Canada/U.S. border with the
intention of taking them out of British Columbia's jurisdiction. The order prevented
their removal and allowed a subsequent bankruptcy proceeding to vest clear title
in the affected consumers who would otherwise have suffered considerable loss.
The case is still under investigation on other points.
In another case, a food supply firm was found to be in financial difficulties.
It had not supplied food orders to British Columbia consumers who had already paid
the company in advance.   By freezing the assets which would otherwise have
accrued to the benefit of the company, these assets are still potentially available for
distribution to consumers who are now being joined by the Director to the
class action mentioned previously.
PYRAMID DISTRIBUTORS ACT
The Fair Sales Practices Act was amended by repealing the title and substituting
"Pyramid Distributors Act." Twenty complaints were received during the year
under the Act and in one instance, the inspector obtained a 90% refund for returned
goods. There were applications for exemption from the Act but none has been granted.
PERSONAL INFORMATION  REPORTING ACT
During the year the Act was amended by Bill 79.   One of the main amendments
changed the definition of a reporting agency.   Besides the regular credit bureaus,
other credit granting agencies such as department stores and oil companies, and
other retail outlets that furnish reports on a routine, nonprofit basis as an
ancillary part of a business carried on for gain or profit, are now classed as "reporting
agencies." Although exempt from registration by regulations, the other provisions
of the Act apply.
At the end of 1975, there were 41 reporting agencies registered under the Act.
According to credit bureau statistics, 9,144 consumers took advantage of the
provision in the Act which permits them to examine their file.
REMAINING STATUTES
There were no amendments during the past year.   Complaints and investigations
were handled pursuant to the provisions of the Act as indicated in the statistical
appendix.
 W 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
CEMETERIES ADMINISTRATION
The services of Professor Richard Gosse, Q.C. were obtained during the year
to undertake a study of the Cemeteries Administration, and related statutes.
His report, which will include recommendations, will be received during the coming
year. Activity under the statutes related to the cemetery administration may be
found in the statistical appendix.
Presently, there are 544 cemeteries, 3 mausolea, 4 columbaria and 11 crematoria
under regulation in British Columbia. These establishments are governed under
the terms of the Cemeteries Act, the Cemetery Companies Act, the Municipal
Cemeteries Act and the Cremation Act.
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALER LICENCES
Effective November 20, 1975, the Minister of Consumer Services became
responsible for the administration of Section 34 to 34H of the Motor Vehicle Act,
being that part of the Act related to dealers licences.   Staff of two was transferred to
the department.   Norman Manning, Assistant Director of Trade Practices, was
appointed Registrar of Motor Vehicle Dealers. The department was immediately
involved in the drafting of new regulations and dealer licencing application forms.
GENERAL
During the course of the year the Director of Trade Practices had occasions
to enter into correspondence with those suppliers who were importing motor vehicles
for retail sale in British Columbia in regard to their warranty programs and,
more particularly, whether all consumers receive the benefit of extended warranties
where inherent faults or defects are known or become known to the manufacturer.
Further discussions are to be held.
Similarly, correspondence took place with those suppliers who issue credit cards
to British Columbia consumers in respect to their interest policy during the post strike.
SUMMARY
In addition to the responsibilities conferred by other regulatory statutes, the
year provided some indication of the results which can be expected from the
enforcement of Trade Practices legislation.
This Act was used with considerable success to halt or condition misleading,
deceptive or unconscionable acts or practices, and, where these acts or practices
occurred, consumers were significantly assisted to obtain redress. There are firm
indications that many suppliers consider that this Act will not harm the honest and
reputable trader but will serve to discourage or discredit the less reputable competitor.
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975 W 23
Legal Services
Branch
The practical work of the Legal Services Branch covers a wide spectrum, since its
purpose is to act, in effect, as a law firm for the rest of the department.
It contains two full-time lawyers, seconded from the Attorney-General's
Department, two contract lawyers working full-time out of the Vancouver office,
lawyers who are retained to act on specific cases, and a group of law students who work
full-time during the summer and part-time during the school year.
Consumer law is an embracing term covering a wide variety of topics from
basic contract law to the finer details of secured transactions and product liability.
Law in these areas is in a constant state of flux.   One of the jobs of the branch is to
keep aware of these changes and to communicate them to other members of the
department whose activities might be affected.   Extensive consumer law libraries are
maintained in both the Vancouver and Victoria offices, for the use of staff lawyers
and law students employed by the department. These resources are also available
for use by outside members of the legal community.
Specialized legal research is undertaken and briefing materials on legal policy
matters are prepared for the Deputy Minister and the Minister on aspects of
inter-provincial and federal/provincial relations in the consumer law field.
Much of the initial drafting of departmental legislation is undertaken by the
branch.   Branch staffs are able to research or co-ordinate research on various
topics, develop concepts for new legislation on the basis of this research, and draft
legislation to a fairly advanced state, drawing on the considerable experience and
data available in other branches of the department. This legislation is then submitted to
the Office of the Legislative Counsel where it is further refined and put into
proper legislative form.
Day-to-day functions include advising personnel in Trade Practices, Trade
Liaison, Information and Education and the store-front offices on legal
questions encountered in their own work.
The branch lawyers make frequent community speaking engagements, alone or
with other members of the department.   Liaison is also maintained with professional
groups whose interests touch on consumer law.
A large proportion of time is spent on assisting development of Trade Practices
Branch enforcement matters.   Assistance is given both in development of Trade
Practices investigations and in preparation of all necessary documentation.
Further assistance is given in negotiation of Assurances of Voluntary Compliance
under the Trade Practices Act, and in ensuring that the documents are properly
executed in accordance with the requirements of the legislation.
 W 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAJOR PROJECTS
The full list of enforcement activities undertaken by the Trade Practices Branch
with assistance from the Legal Services Branch during 1975, is appended.
Major projects of a non-enforcement nature undertaken during 1975 include:
1 Transfer of Motor Vehicle Dealer Licensing to the Department of Consumer
Services from the Department of Transport and Communications and the
development of new regulations and licence application forms;
2 Research and legal policy analysis with regard to Electronic Fund Transfer
Systems proposals by the federal government;
3 Review of proposed new federal bankruptcy legislation;
4 General involvement and policy assistance in the review of warranty law; also
the national anti-inflation program ;
5 Major involvement in the development and administration of the B.C. Price Freeze;
6 Development of suggested standard clauses and formats for conditional sales
agreements, chattel mortgages and other consumer contracts ;
7 Analysis and legal research regarding extended automobile warranty programs.
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975 W 25
Community Programs
Branch
RESPONSIBILITIES
The Community Programs Branch is responsible for the development and
administration of most of the non-regulatory activities of the department. The major
thrust of most programs is to inform the consumer and business community of
market forces, consumer protection law, and rights and responsibilities in
the marketplace.
The branch is comprised of three divisions as well as special programs administered
out of the Director's office.
The Debtor Assistance Division, described separately, offers a full range of
counselling assistance, from simple budget arrangements through a range of programs
for the reorganization of financial affairs (including the repayment of all or portions
of personal debt). This division administers Part X of the federal government's
Bankruptcy Act (Orderly Payment of Debts).    By virtue of the Debtor Assistance
Act, it also provides assessment services to courts which choose to refer persons
for assessment of ability to pay debts before judgements are made.
Within the Communications Division there are three sub-divisions: Information,
Education and Trade Liaison (described in detail separately). While information
and education staff conduct activities and programs directed towards the public
sphere, trade liaison personnel direct their energies more towards the business
community. The staff answer queries about legislation and develop guidelines for
assistance to various trades in conduct of their day-to-day business.
The Research Division maintains the capacity of the department to analyze
and develop responses to various consumer problems as well as weigh the impact of
services performed by the department.
The Director's office, in addition to the above mentioned divisions, administers
the community funding program, community training seminars, the summer
student program, and sundry special projects. Through the assistance of a special
projects officer, direct contact is maintained with interested consumers and community
organizations to develop and maintain complaint-handling and debt counselling
services in communities not adequately served by the department's four storefront
offices. Training seminars are offered to develop consumer awareness and counselling
skills among professionals, paraprofessionals, and community organizations which
come in contact with consumer concerns.
DIRECTOR'S OFFICE—ACTIVITIES
During the past year, the funding program assisted eight consumer and/or
community service organizations around the province. The grants were approved to
maintain full or part-time staff, and provide minimal operating expenses. Two
additional grants were provided for educational purposes, one for a series of
 w 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
consumer-oriented video programs to be used on the Victoria community cablevision
system, the other a donation towards a Victoria lecture series. A list of funded
groups is appended to this Annual Report.
In 1975, community training seminars were held in Vernon and Terrace.
Participants represented departmentally-funded groups, social agencies, and community
law centres from surrounding areas.   Staff from storefront offices and the Victoria
head office conducted lectures and discussions on a range of consumer legislation,
techniques for dealing with consumer complaints and debt counselling.   Following
these training seminars, many of the participants in turn conducted consumer
awareness sessions in their local communities.
In conjunction with regional storefront personnel (primarily consumer service
officers and debt counsellors), the special projects officer maintained contact with
funded groups and with other community groups handling consumer problems, for the
purpose of keeping them well abridged of legislation and departmental services.
Other special projects included administration of the department's summer
student program; arrangement for specific product-testing research ; preliminary
investigation and organization of a departmental staff-training program; contact with
the Inter-Departmental Grants Committee, and reporting on various subjects as
requested by the Deputy Minister.
RESEARCH  DIVISION
The Research Division undertakes short and long-term projects designed to
present facts, figures and interpretations to facilitate planning. The division aids other
sections of the department both by undertaking specific projects on request and
by designing procedures to fit individual sections' needs.
Staff are also required to keep the department informed of activities and trends
which influence the marketplace.   In 1975, these studies included work in computer
based check-out systems for supermarkets, consumer credit, and aspects of a
cashless society.
In 1975, specific consumer interest areas which wTere investigated and
reported on included "home renovations", "mobile homes", "cable television", "moving
and storage", "new house warranties", "automobile retailing and repairs", "food
preservation", "broiler chicken prices" and "sugar prices".
In a joint project with Alberta and Saskatchewan, the division investigated the
incidence, desirability and potential of consumer education in elementary schools.
The provincial price freeze, implemented on October 24th, provided a major
food price monitoring project for the division.   In line with the present federal
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975
W 27
anti-inflation program, the division is undertaking a continuing monitoring program
based on average B.C. family food consumption patterns.
DEBTOR ASSISTANCE DIVISION
The Debtor Assistance Division was established with the interests of the
credit-consuming public in mind. The services provided fall generally into two
categaries.
(a) remedial; counselling, rehabilitation; includes protection for debtors while
repaying their legal obligations through plans suggested by our office.
(b) preventative; education, information and budget advice; generally to help
consumers by teaching good money management habits.
The Debtor Assistance Act gives certain powers to aid in providing these
services. The division is empowered to do the following:
Sec. 5
(a)
(*)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(/)
(ff)
(*)
(i)
Advise and assist debtors in working out arrangements for the settlement
of debts.
Arrange meetings between creditors/debtors.
Advise and assist a debtor in the preparation of any plan or scheme before
the courts.
Aid a debtor in obtaining postponements, adjustments, or extension of
time for the payment of debts.
Act as an intermediary.
Generally to render service and advice and assistance to a debtor who is
unable to meet his liabilities and, who through the courts or otherwise
is being pressed for payments or harrassed by his creditors.
To enter into agreements for the purpose of studying, researching,
counselling, or providing for the improvement of problems facing debtors.
Provide financial or other assistance to a person referred to in (g).
Conduct, or arrange and finance programs for the dissemination of
information respecting problems affecting debtors.
 W 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(j)   With the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, enter into
agreements with any department of the Government of Canada or
of a province for any purpose referred to in clause (g).
Section 7 of the Debtor Assistance Act gives the division the authority to receive and
disburse funds from debtors to their creditors and is very helpful in establishing
plans of repayment or settlement of debts.   Debtor Assistance Pool Account programs
have been set up under the provision.
Section 8 provides for courts to refer debtors to Debtor Assistance for the
determination of ability to repay debts and other obligations. This section, in
practice, provides for close co-operation and assistance with the Family Court, to
give adequate protection to all members of a family going through a marital breakdown
or other type of family conflict.   Often this time is hard on the pocketbook as
well as the emotions.
Further authority is given to two Clerks of the Court within the division to
administer Part X of the federal Bankruptcy Act [pursuant to Section 5 s.s. (j)].
One result of action under the Bankruptcy Act can be the consolidation order.
The result of such an order may be (a) a judgment of the court in favour of each
creditor named in the register for the amount claimed; or (b) an order of the
court for payment by the debtor of the amounts stated in the order over a stipulated
period of time.
With the authority given through the above legislation, and, with the
approach taken by Debtor Assistance of maintaining contact with both the credit
industry and the debtors, an effective first year of operation has been experienced. The
Debtor Assistance Division directly helped debtors pay back $791,410.00 in debts
which otherwise would have been largely written off.
Approximately 7,000 counselling sessions took place in 1975, with the assurance
of increased response from the public in future. The seven counsellors not only
helped clients with budgeting and overdue debts, but also kept in frequent contact with
the credit industry—finance companies, loan companies, banks, and other credit
agencies. They made frequent visits to communities such as Terrace, Prince Rupert,
Williams Lake, Nelson, and Kelowna, to cover areas which the storefront offices
in Prince George, Kamloops, Victoria and Vancouver could not handle.
In these outlying areas, some help is provided by community groups, a few
of which receive some funding by the department.   In Kitimat, Nelson, Abbotsford
and Surrey funds are paid towards the salary of a debt counsellor or toward
referral services, so that many problems can be handled on the spot by local agencies.
In other cases, these agencies arrange appointments for the travelling debt counsellor,
for maximum use of his or her time when travelling.
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975 W 29
The average debt burden of Debtor Assistance clients last year was between
$7,000 and $9,000. The average income was approximately $11,000 per year.
The total debt burden of all people counselled in 1975, including Orderly Payment
of Debt, pool account, and general counselling clients, was over $20,000,000.
Additional information can be found in the statistics section.
COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION
The Communications Division consists of three sub-divisions: Information,
Education, and Trade Liaison, described below.   Staff of the division assist
the department with creation of written and visual materials for use in all forms of
public contact, and undertake direct public contact on behalf of the department.
CONSUMER INFORMATION
This section has developed means of providing information on consumer
legislation and other concerns to consumers and the business community in British
Columbia.
Various approaches were used. These included display easels for business
offices, mailed flyers, radio advertisements, shopping-centre and bus cards.   Information
kits, with collected materials from various branches of the department, were
compiled for special instructional seminars and to brief new staff and visiting
delegations.
A major audio-visual project was developed and completed in 1975. This is
a slide-tape program, entitled "Law and the Marketplace", which reviews the history
of consumer legislation and the consumer movement in Canada generally and
British Columbia in particular. This program is now available through the
department's Consumer Resource Centres, located in each regional office.
The information section was responsible for overseeing the creation and
distribution of information on the provincial price freeze, to all areas of the. province.
Day-to-day news stories, consumer warnings, and enforcement announcements
were written or edited by this section before release to the press.    Special interest
items highlighting aspects of the department such as the opening of a regional
office or features on the work of specific staff members were also developed and
distributed from time to time, either through news releases or in the departmental
newsletter, "Consumer Aware".
 W 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The information section contains the comprehensive departmental distribution
system, which aids in the distribution not only of Communications Division materials,
but also in compilation and distribution of items for other branches. The two
part-time distribution clerks maintain a special computerized mailing list covering a
wide range of interest groups.   Names are added to the mailing list on request.
A list of publications is appended to the Report.
CONSUMER EDUCATION
A major consumer education project in 1975 was the production of a reference
kit, designed to assist those involved in consumer education in secondary schools.
Among the items in the kit are an annotated bibliography of books on consumer topics,
notes on audio-visual material in the field of consumerism, and a teacher's guide to
advertising. The department also purchased the rights to a series of films on
advertising which have been made available through the Provincial Educational
Media Centre (Department of Education). The consumer education reference kit
was approved for use in the schools by the Department of Education and has
received a very enthusiastic response from teachers. After an initial distribution of
approximately 200 copies, requests for the kit poured in, and by the end of 1975 over
1700 consumer education kits had been distributed.
Another consumer education project in 1975 was the preparation of a Directory
of Consumer Resources.  This booklet lists consumer-oriented groups and organizations
in British Columbia and describes their activities.    It will be revised annually to
provide the most up-to-date information available on consumer resources.
An integral part of the department's consumer education program is the
consumer resource centre located in each storefront office. These special collections
of consumer books, magazines, newsclippings and reference material are open to
the public, and many items can be borrowed on loan.   Each collection contains over
200 books and reports, and about 65 consumer periodicals.
These provide, among other things, the latest information on product testing,
hints on wise buying habits, and advice on money management.
TRADE LIAISON
The Trade Liaison Division was established to keep the business community in
touch with consumer-oriented legislation and other programs administered by
the department.
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT, 1975 W 31
This section gives advice to business people on departmental policy, contributes
to new policy, interprets legislation and regulations and generally helps business
to be fully aware of the ambit of consumer legislation.
Communication is by letter, telephone and personal contact with individuals
and groups.
Trade Liaison has published and distributed policy letters on extended auto
warranties, use of the word "free" and "manufacturer's list price" in advertising and
has circulated trade bulletins on auto servicing and repairs and deceptive practices
in sale events.
The staff was heavily involved in administering and interpreting the price freeze
program, begun October 24th. All inquiries regarding business community
requirements were met by this section.
The section's main projects, fast approaching completion stage, are two sets of
comprehensive guidelines.   One deals with acceptance standards for the
general advertising industry; the other deals with auto retailing and advertising.
Both sets of guidelines are offered as a service to the husiness community, to assist
its members in observing the general purpose and intent of B.C. legislation.
SEMINARS FOR BUSINESS
In April 1975, the Department of Consumer Services presented a seminar on
the Trade Practices Act in co-operation with the Faculty of Commerce and Business
Administration at the University of British Columbia.  The seminar provided
an opportunity for business leaders to learn more about the legislation.
An overflow crowd packed the ballroom of the Hotel Georgia to hear:
Professor R. R. Lot]mark, "Setting the Scene: The Law as it Was"
William A. W. Neilson, Deputy Minister, "The Department of Consumer Services
and its Legislation"
Professor F. H. Siller, "The Trade Practices Act"
Three Views from Business, "Living with the Trade Practices Act"
Ben Wosk, President, Wosk Ltd.
Ken Dale, Automobile Dealers Association of Greater Vancouver
Jack Biggs, Eaton's
Professor Allen Zysblat, "A Lawyer's View of the Trade Practices Act"
Ronald I. Cohen, "Consumer Protection Legislation: A Comparative View"
In that same month, similar programs were presented in Nanaimo, Prince
George, and Kelowna, with approximately 35 people attending each seminar.
  REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT, 1975 W 33
Administrative
Services Branch
This branch, the smallest within the department, meets various important needs:
1. Personnel—The Branch administers the personnel needs for the whole department,
which, at the present time, has a total staff component of 98 full time positions.
Its responsibilities cover the areas of recruitment and selection, staff training,
periodic assessment of the organizational structure of the department,
and related aspects.
2. Budget—The Branch Director acts as Departmental Comptroller and has input
in budget planning and preparation and exercises budget control.
3. Accounts—Branch staff are responsible for the accounts and payroll function
for the department.
4. Premises and Supplies—The Branch assures that adequate supplies of office
materials and equipment are at hand at any time.   It also evaluates the space needs
of the department.
 ■ji * *
1
r\ ..^..
m* #i*
#M
»i
mm m ■ — i mfrm       ■   ***«^*
m  ■■■•>■■
Ms'-       'Kb-
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975 W 35
Organization Chart
MINISTER'S
OFFICE
DEPUTY
MINISTER
EXECUTIVE
COMMITTEE
LEGAL
SERVICES
TRADE
PRACTICES
|COMMUNITY|
PROGRAMS
ADMIN
SERVICES
GISTRATIONl
and
.ICENCING
STOREFRONTB   j I   ffl      DEBTOR
■communications!    !     OFFICES     !    .     RESEARCH   II ASSISTANCE
 f i
/T;
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT, 1975 W 37
Statistics:
Charts & Tables
STATISTICS: CHARTS AND TABLES
1 Consumer complaints received, 1975
2 Consumer complaints received in each region
Rebates obtained for consumers
3 Increase in complaints received 1970-1975
4 Rebates obtained for consumers
5 Ten major categories of consumer complaints
6 Complaints registered under provincial statutes.
7 Cemeteries Administration Statistics
8 Debtor Assistance Division new client caseload
9 Debtor Assistance Division new clients by region
10- Debts repaid under Pool and Orderly Payment of Debt Programs
11 Clients Debt Burden statistics
12 Distribution mail request statistics
  REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT, 1975 W 39
TRADE  PRACTICES  BRANCH   COMPLAINT CASELOAD
1974 vs 1975
8000
7000
6000
5000
4000
'
3000
2000
!vX;Xv!v!;
1000
0
8,027
(1975)
(1974)
Jan       Feb       Mar       Apr      May      Jun        Jul       Aug      Sep       Oct      Nov      Dec
1974
1975
1975
1974
Jan
859
155
Feb
1649
342
Mar
2-370
560
Apr
3077
670
May
3797
844
Jun
4477
1008
Jul
5201
1287
Aug
5799
1645
Sep
6393
1881
Oct
7083
2408
Nov
7528
2898
Dec
8027
3839
Cumulative Totals
 W 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TRADE PRACTICES BRANCH Rebates to consumers by region
(Does not include exchanges or other non-monetary settlements)
Complaints received by region
Total cases, all regions: 8,027
$225,542.00
2,138
o
>
°    3
<D        O
O
.O
E
TO
Total rebates, all regions: $372,571.00
1974 Total      $56,709.00
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975
W 41
TRADE PRACTICES BRANCH Complaints Received 1970-75*
* Between 1968 and late 1973, a Consumer Affairs office was
maintained in the Attorney-General's department. The Department of
Consumer Services was formed in November, 1973. The totals shown on
this graph therefore cover consumer complaints received under the previous
system as well as under the present one. All regional offices were opened
through summer and fall of 1974, and began full operations in early 1975.
8,000
'%
7,000
6,000
5,000
4,000
J>.
3,000
2,000
1,000
G>
O
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
 W 42
BRITISH
COLUMBIA
GENERAL COMPLAINTS
CATEGORIES IN
ORDER OF
VOLUME
1
1975
1974
Total
%
Total
%
Automotive
1,918
26.4%
710
19.9%
New 361
Used 540
Services 986
Other 31
Appliances
Doorstep Sales
Mobile Homes
Home Building
Travel
Cleaning, Dyeing, Laundry, Clothing
Home Furnishings
Credit, Finance
Moving and Storage
All other complaint categories made up less than 2% of the total number of
complaints received.
609
8.4
237
6.7
433
6.0
238
6.7
383
5.3
284
8.0
375
5.2
205
5.8
283
3.9
53
1.5
269
3.7
103
2.9
240
3.3
127
3.6
208
2.9
208
5.9
168
2.3
85
2.4
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975
W 43
CONSUMER COMPLAINT TOTALS BY STATUTE
Trade Practices Act
Personal Information Reporting Act
Consumer Protection Act
Pyramid Distributors Act
Closing Out Sales Act
Blind Persons Rights Act
Pawnbrokers Act
Trading Stamp Act
*General
Totals
Totals
Totals
1975
1974
603
234
38
19
91
26
20
5
3
2
2
7,270
3,553
8,027
3,839
* Note:  Most complaints are not handled or pursued under a specific statute,
but are handled in a 'general' category, often through mediation or other
direct action by Consumer Services storefront staff.    In these cases, no further
legal action involving a specific statute is required, though the legislation backs up
the complaint handling process.   Some of the above statutes handled by the
Department were, however, involved during 1975.
 W 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CEMETERIES ADMINISTRATION
Crematorium Licences Issued
Certificates of Public Interest Granted to Establish a Cemetery
and Mausolea
Transfer of Cemetery Operation and Ownership
The Sale of Surplus Cemetery Land Approved
Cemetery Trustees Appointed
Cemetery Rules and By-laws Approved
Cemetery Rate Schedule Approved
Care and Maintenance Trust Fund Examined and Passed
Installation of Crematorium Reports Approved
Exhumations Approved
Complaints Dealt With
Cemetery burial areas approved for use
Cemetery board members appointed
Cemetery and Crematorium rate schedules rejected
Use of "contingent" trust funds approved
Conversion of "headstone" cemetery to lawn type operation
approved
Public hearings
197S
1974
11
11
4
4
7
5
1
2
5
2
8
11
63
29
1
1
1
30
23
12
7
4
3
3
1
1
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975 W 45
DEBTOR ASSISTANCE DIVISION, New Clients, 1975, by Region.
1,865
748
470
350
.
o
u
 W 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
4000
3000
2000
1000
Cumulative Figures
Jan
249
Feb
576
Mar
954
Apr
1,230
May
1,735
Jun
1,999
Jul
2,259
Aug
2,468
Sep
2,721
Oct
2,973
Nov
3,201
Dec
3,433 (Total for year
New clients are given a file on
first visit.
They may return for several
subsequent visits or for regular
budget counselling. Therefore the
total number of interviews was closi
to 7,000 in 1975.    However, the
number of clients on file as of
Dec. 1975, was 3,433.
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975 W 47
Disbursements through Debtor Assistance Pool Accounts and
Orderly Payment of Debt Programs, by region.
400,000
300,000
200,000
100,000
DAD
Vane
OF
ouver
>D
DAD
Vict
OPC
oria
)
DAD
Kami
OPD
oops
DAD
Pr. Ge
OPD
orge        J
Total OPD, 1975, $556,136.
Total DAD, 1975 $160,235.
Total OPD Clients, files, 1975:      936
Pool Accounts 158
Self-administered Pools 750
Settlements 52
Straight Counselling 1,537
Total New Cases, 1975        3,433
 W 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEBTOR ASSISTANCE DIVISION
Orderly Payment of Debt Program*
Total clients in program, 1975: 936 (representing 5,405 individual debts,
or an average of 5.8 debts per client)
Total Debt owed
Total paid back to creditors in 1975
$4,624,865.00
$556,136.00
*Note: New OPD orders are usually amortized over 3 to 5 years.
In some cases, however, amortization was extended over a longer period
of time.
It should also be noted that disbursements on many of the orders were
not begun until late 1975. Therefore, the total figure of $556,136.00
does not signify an entire years' disbursement on the 936 orders.
Debtor Assistance Pool Account Program
Total Pool Accounts—158
Total Debt owed
(figure includes approximately 20%  pending settlements,  agreements for terminating debts with single lump-sum payments)
Total disbursed to creditors in 1975
Total self-administered pools—750 (approx.)
(necessitating budget counselling and mediation assistance only)
$1,421,603.00
$160,235.00
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975
W 49
MAIL REQUESTS RECEIVED 1975
JAN-DEC  1975
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
Acts
390
263
648
1,701
1,087
203
121
106
819
1,341
2,032
1,490
Brochures
Annual
Report
5,471
8,157
4,944
13,052
9,056
5,361
3,321
2,365
1,080
15,163
69
42,582
13
3,749
37
6,218
43
Educational
Materials
372
1,371
60
136
220
815
2,942
145
1,647
Total items sent
10,201
119,439
1,242
7,708
 HIIlWlIi
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 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975
W 51
Enforcement Activities,
1975
ASSURANCES OF VOLUNTARY COMPLIANCE
Airclub International, Inc.
Imperial Oil Limited
Texaco Canada Limited
The Traders Home Furnishings & Appliances Ltd., and Capital Broadcasting
System Limited
Kingsway Plymouth Chrysler Ltd.
Westminster Chevrolet-Oldsmobile Ltd.
Inter-Provincial Pest Control Ltd.
Kingsway Fiat Ltd.
Chrysler Credit Canada
Midway Distributors (1974) Ltd.
Glenmore Egg Ranch
Vernon Funeral Home Ltd.
Tuffy Muffler Ltd.
Lo-Cost Transmission Rebuilders Ltd.
Davidson's Colour Television Repair Centre Ltd.
Brown Bros. Ford Sales and Service
Comor Sports Centre Ltd.
APT Distributors Ltd.
INJUNCTION APPLICATIONS
P. F. Collier and Son Ltd.
John's Tax Service Ltd.
Household Finance Corporation of Canada
Maclean-Hunter Ltd.
SUBSTITUTE ACTIONS
Better Value Furniture
Acme Home Care Service
Belmont Sales
Budget Freezer Food Processors Ltd.
Barney's Auto Sales and Service Ltd.
Victoria Automatic Transmission Service Ltd.
PROSECUTION
Murriton Ideal Maintenance and Repair
 W 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA
BANKRUPTCIES
T.I. Travellers International Tours Ltd.
Kent Mobile Homes Ltd.
Kamloops Health Spa
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975
W 53
ASSURANCES OF VOLUNTARY COMPLIANCE
Airclub International, Inc. and A.C.
International Services Ltd.
An Assurance of Voluntary Compliance was signed by the above companies in
January 1975. Advertising on behalf of these companies was alleged to show
charges without disclosing certain additional costs and fail to adequately disclose
points of departure for air flights.
The companies agreed to comply with the terms set out by the Director and to
ensure that their representatives and employees made the proper disclosures to
member clients and prospective members. They also agreed to use all due care and
speed in responding to and dealing with customer complaints.
On March 1, 1975, after the signing of this A.V.C., the department expressed
further doubts about these companies' financial ability to meet their obligations
to both past and future customers.
Special Note
For months the department had warned B.C. consumers about the potential
insolvency of this Seattle-based company and had tried to negotiate protection
measures for its customers.   The company finally filed for bankruptcy in
Washington state, leaving thousands of consumers in British Columbia and
Washington with nothing to show for the money they had already paid.
Final details of the bankruptcy have yet to be worked out, but it seems unlikely
that consumers will recover much of their investment.   The major secured
creditors already have claims which exceed the available assets.
The Minister advised Airclub's owners to keep out of British Columbia.
If they return under any name, they will be held answerable to past customers of
Airclub who lost money in the bankruptcy.
Imperial Oil Limited
February 9, 1975
The department alleged that Imperial Oil Limited mailed a sales catalogue
to its credit card holders in which the monthly payments were shown in much
larger print than the full price.
Imperial Oil agreed to abide by the requirements of the Trade Practices Act
and Regulations, and not to give greater prominence to monthly payments than
to single-payment prices.
Imperial Oil also agreed to mail a notice to all of its credit card holders in
British Columbia telling them that, in future, single-payment and deferred-payment
prices will be displayed with equal prominence.
 W 54 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Texaco Canada Limited
March 6, 1975
The department alleged that, in a sales catalogue mailed by Texaco to their
credit card customers, the monthly payments for catalogue items were shown
in larger print than the cash or full price.
The supplier agreed to comply with the requirements of the Trade Practices Act
and to send a letter to Texaco Travel Card account holders in British Columbia
advising them that in future Texaco will give equal prominence to the total
purchase price and any credit terms or instalment payments.
The Traders Home Furnishings & Appliances Ltd. and Capital
Broadcasting System Limited
March 25, 1975
The department alleged that Traders Home Furnishings and Appliances of
Victoria sent a letter to past customers announcing a sale of surplus inventory that
would be open exclusively to them and their friends for three days in January, prior
to the opening of the sale to the general public.   On the other hand, Capital
Broadcasting System Limited, (CKDA) of Victoria is alleged to have announced
the sale to be open to the general public.
Traders and CKDA agreed not to repeat this act and a public announcement
to this effect was made in a Victoria newspaper and on AM and FM radio
stations operated by Capital Broadcasting.
Kingsway Plymouth Chrysler Ltd.
April 1,1975
The department alleged that Kingsway Plymouth Chrysler Ltd. of Vancouver,
placed an advertisement in the newspaper where less prominence was given to the
full price of the automobile than to the amount of the down payment and the
monthly payment.
The supplier agreed to give as much prominence to the full price of a car as to
any part of the price in future advertisements.
Westminster Chevrolet-Oldsmobile Ltd.
April 17, 1975
An advertisement on behalf of this New Westminster firm was alleged to give
less prominence to the full price of the automobile than to the omnthly payment.
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975 W 55
Westminster Chevrolet-Oldsmobile agreed to give as much prominence to the
full price of a car as to any part of the price in future advertisements.   They also
agreed to comply with the disclosure provisions of the Consumer Protection Act
relating to the advertising of credit terms.
Inter-Provincial Pest Control Ltd.
April 17, 1975
The department alleged that this Penticton-based firm issued and displayed in
hotels and public buildings certificates containing a large heading, "Public Health
Certificate".
Contrary to the impression given by this certificate, no government body had
authorized the use of this certificate or the service.
The firm withdrew the certificates and agreed not to issue or display them in
future.
Kingsway Fiat Ltd.
May 9, 1975
It was alleged that this Vancouver car dealer advertised demonstrator automobiles
for sale and less prominence was given to the full price than to the monthly payment
in the advertisement.
The supplier agreed not to do this in future advertisements and also agreed to
comply with the disclosure provisions of the Consumer Protection Act relating to the
advertising of terms of credit.
Chrysler Credit Canada
June 17, 1975
The department alleged that this consumer finance company set "Notice of
Intention to Sell" forms to consumers with whom it held Conditional Sales Contracts
and stated that the consumer would be liable for any deficiency balance resulting
from the resale of a motor vehicle financed by Chrysler Credit.
Under the Conditional Sales Act, a creditor may sue for the outstanding balance
or seize the goods, but not both.   The Director therefore alleged that the notice
was deceptive under the Trade Practices Act.
Chrysler Credit agreed to send a letter of correction to all consumers who had
received "Notice of Intention to Sell" forms.   The company also agreed to have
contract forms altered to comply with provincial laws.
 W 56 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Midway Distributors (1974) Ltd.
July 23, 1975
This firm, which engages in sales and servicing of motorcycles, advertised a sale
of 1974 motor cycles.   The department alleged that the prices quoted in the
advertisement were approximately the same as regular prices for 1974 models.   The
advertised saving was in fact the price difference between 1974 and 1975 models.
Midway Distributors agreed to refrain from the practice and to supply the
Director of Trade Practices with a copy of all media advertisements for the next
12 months.
Glenmore Egg Ranch
August 7, 1975
Glenmore Egg Ranch, the department alleged, packaged eggs labelled with
"B.C. Fresh", "Okanagan's Finest", "produced and packaged by Glenmore Egg Ranch,
Kelowna, B.C." and exhibiting the dogwood floral emblem.   The department alleged
that any or all of these labels would lead consumers to believe that the eggs were
produced in British Columbia when in fact the eggs were from Manitoba.
Glenmore gave an assurance that such packaging had ceased and would not be
repeated in future.
Vernon Funeral Home Ltd.
September 23, 1975
The Director alleged that Vernon Funeral Home, located in Vernon, sold a
steel casket for use in the cremation of a deceased person.
Steel caskets could not be accommodated by the cremation facilities used by the
funeral home so the body was transferred to a suitable casket and cremated.
It was alleged that the steel casket was repainted and resold to a second consumer.
The department alleged that Vernon Funeral Home represented the casket as new
or unused and that it was the property of the funeral home when it was not.
Vernon Funeral Home Ltd. agreed to reimburse the estates in the amount of
$995.00 each and, in future, not to engage in any practices similar to the one
described.
Tuffy Muffler Ltd.
September 24, 1975
This firm formerly operated a Midas Muffler shop, and was in the business of
repairing and replacing mufflers.
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT, 1975 W 57
A consumer wished to have a muffler replaced under the "Midas" guarantee.
The Director of Trade Practices alleged that Tuffy Muffler replaced not only the
muffler but also a clamp and connecting pipe which were in good working order.
Tuffy Muffler returned the consumer's money and agreed, in future, not to say
that parts were needed when they were not.
Lo-Cost Automatic Transmission Rebuilders Ltd.
October 9, 1975
In this case, the department assisted a consumer, Mr. W. V. Nykodym, who
alleged that Lo-Cost Automatic Transmission Rebuilders Ltd. of Victoria had made
deceptive representations about the condition of his car's transmission and the extent of
repairs required.
On May 30, 1975, the Director of Trade Practices commenced a substitute action
in the Small Claims Court in Victoria.
The court action was subsequently settled, and Lo-Cost paid Mr. Nvkodvm
$376.72.
Lo-Cost, which operates transmission repair shops in Victoria and Vancouver,
also signed an AVC agreeing not to:
1 offer a free transmission inspection service when the real purpose is to attract
customers, not to provide the service;
2 use demonstration techniques involving a magnet and metal particles represented to
be the result of serious and abnormal wear when such is not the case ;
3 present the consumer with a choice of a dismantled auto, a costly repair bill or a
charge for reassembly of the transmission without having repairs made ;
4 perform repairs on autos without customer's authorization ;
5 add the words "repair as per estimate" after the work order has already been signed
by the consumer;
6 obtain the signature of a consumer on a work order by inferring that the work order
was a warranty card.
In addition, Lo-Cost Automatic Transmission Rebuilders compensated two other
consumers as a result of the Assurance of Voluntary Compliance.
Davidson's Color Television Repair Centre Ltd.
October 23, 1975
Davidson's Color Television, a Vancouver firm, is in the business of selling and
repairing television parts and sets.
 W 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Director of Trade Practices alleged that Davidson's installed a new picture
tube in a consumer's television set when a new tube was not needed.
Davidsons' Color Television agreed not to say that a part, service, replacement or
repair is needed if it is not and returned money to the consumer.
Brown Bros. Ford Sales and Service
November 26, 1975
The Director of Trade Practices alleged that a salesman with this Vancouver
firm sold a 1974 Mustang to a consumer, representing the car as a new "demonstrator".
According to the department, the salesman did not disclose that the Mustang had
actually been sold previously, and had been traded in by the previous owner.   It was
in fact a 'used car', but it was sold as a "demonstrator" having a "new car" warranty.
Brown Bros, agreed not to represent a car as a "demonstrator" if it has been
previously sold, and agreed to ensure that employees of the firm are aware of this.
The consumer returned the car, and was refunded $5,145.00.
Comor Sports Centre Ltd.
December 31, 1975
This firm, which has its registered office at 700—925 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver, sells sporting goods, ski equipment and clothing.
Comor Sports Centre advertised three-day sales of ski equipment on a number of
occasions.   The Director alleged that this "sale price" had been in effect for almost
five months and that the "regular" price had not been in force for a reasonable length
of time prior to the advertisement. The Director also noted that the "three-day"
or "week-end" sale continued after the limited time period had expired.
The advertisements also represented that certain prices were "regular" prices
when in fact, it was alleged, the price was higher than the actual "regular" prices.
Comor Sports agreed not to advertise a sale to be of limited duration if it is not,
and to refrain from referring to "regular" prices if the price has not been in force
for a reasonable time prior to the sale.
APT Distributors Ltd.
December 16, 1975
Consumer redress in the form of a public apology, refunds to those who applied,
and investigation costs were obtained by the department in this case.
APT Distributors, operating under the name Scotty's Furniture Mart in
Vancouver, began a "closing out sale" with goods obtained from Sterling Furniture
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT, 1975
W 59
Co. Ltd., another Vancouver firm.   The merchandise included dining room, bedroom,
and living room furniture.
The Director of Trade Practices alleged that APT Distributors, in the sale of
the Sterling Furniture inventory, assigned and advertised "former" prices and "sale"
prices where no such "former" price existed, and advertised these "former" and "sale"
prices to infer a 10% saving on the old Sterling prices.   In one instance, for example,
Sterling had offered a 3-piece suite for sale at $589.00.   APT acquired two identical
suites from Sterling at inventory costs of $345.88 each, then advertised them as
"formerly" priced at $875.00, now at a "sale" price of $699.00.   Other items were
also treated in the same manner.
In addition, several television sets were advertised as part of the "closing out sale"
but were not, in fact, on the registered Closing Out Sale inventory list and were not
a part of Sterling's inventory.
APT Distributors signed an Assurance of Voluntary Compliance with the
Director of Trade Practices under the Trade Practices Act.
While not admitting any violation of the Trade Practices Act, the firm agreed as
part of the undertaking to -publish quarter-page announcements of apology, including
restitution terms, in the Vancouver Sun and Province newspapers. This apology
appeared in the Saturday, December 20th edition of the Vancouver Sun and Vancouver
Province.
The firm offered compensation equal to 10% of the purchase price of any item
purchased during the "close out sale", to those customers who applied to the
Department of Consumer Services Vancouver office, within 60 days of publication of
the apology.
The firm also compensated the Department of Consumer Services up to $2,000.00
for investigation costs incurred in the matter.
 ^1
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 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975
W 61
INJUNCTION APPLICATIONS
P. F. Collier and Son Limited
January 28, 1975
The department intervened in support of an action brought against P. F. Collier
and Son Limited, publishers of Colliers Encyclopedia, by Walter Stubbe on his own and
in his capacity as chairperson of the Kelowna branch of the Consumers' Association
of Canada.
It was claimed that several sales practices used by the Colliers sales force were
deceptive.   The Consumers' Association of Canada and the Director of Trade
Practices applied for an interim injunction to halt these practices pending a full trial.
On March 26, 1975 the British Columbia Supreme Court sitting in Kelowna granted
the interim injunction.
Specifically, the Court prohibited the following practices:
1 The failure to disclose at the outset that the purpose of the door-to-door call was to
sell an encyclopedia set;
2 The failure to disclose the full and complete price of the encyclopedia as well as
any instalment prices.
The injunction expired on September 30,  1975, however,  P. F. Collier and Son
Limited, through their solicitors, gave the Director an undertaking to comply with the
language of the interim injunction as granted, notwithstanding the fact that it had
expired.
As of this writing, the case is proceeding to trial and it is expected that
Eraminations for Discovery will be held early in 1976.
John's Tax Services Ltd.
February 13, 1975
The department launched an action in court against John's Tax Services Ltd. of
Vancouver, seeking to establish that certain of its practices were unconscionable under
the Trade Practices Act.   The company is in the business of buying consumers'
rights to their income tax refunds.
On March 10, 1975, the British Columbia Supreme Court refused the
department's application for an interim injunction to stop the practice pending a full
trial to be held in the near future.   The Director appealed the decision.
On April 8, 1975, the British Columbia Court of Appeal refused the
department's appeal against the March 10th decision by the Supreme Court.   The
department is currently considering its position in this action.
 W 62 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Household Finance Corporation of Canada
April 1,1975
The department alleged that this firm engaged in a plan that was purposely
designed to prevent consumers from learning that sales finance agreements were held
by Household Finance rather than the retailer.   This scheme, the department
alleged, was set up to provide finance facilities to several retailers in British Columbia.
The department is seeking a declaration and a permanent injunction against
these practices.   The trial is scheduled to take place on February 12 and 13, 1976.
MacLean-Hunter Limited
September 23, 1975
The Director commenced legal action against Maclean-Hunter Ltd. of Ste. 890
—777 Hornby Street, Vancouver, seeking an interim injunction in the Supreme Court
of British Columbia to halt certain door-to-door practices used in the selling of
magazine subscriptions.
The department had received a number of complaints from consumers in northern
B.C. who had been visited by sales representatives claiming to be engaged in surveys
or educational projects.   Pending a full trial of the matter, Maclean-Hunter gave an
undertaking to the Court that its representatives would disclose that the purpose
of the call was to sell magazine subscriptions and that they represented Maclean-
Hunter.
The department and Maclean-Hunter are currently involved in negotiations
which are expected to lead to a settlement of the action by way of Assurance of
Voluntary Compliance.   The hearing for the interim injunction has been adjourned
indefinitely pending outcome of these negotiations.
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975 W 63
SUBSTITUTE ACTIONS
Better Value Furniture
February 14, 1975
The Director undertook the substitute defence of a consumer, John Diomis, who
was being sued by Better Value Furniture of Vancouver.
Mr. Diomis alleged that Better Value Furniture made deceptive representations
about the quality and character of household furnishings sold to him.
Shortly after the Director intervened in the law suit, Better Value Furniture
discontinued the action against Mr. Diomis.
Acme Home Care Service
June 23, 1975
The department alleged that this Vancouver firm made roof repairs that were
not necessary, subjected the consumers to undue pressure to enter into a contract and
overcharged them for the job.   On behalf of the consumers involved, the department
asked for the return of their money and an award by way of punitive damages.
The action was commenced on June 23, 1975 when a summons was issued
in the Small Claims Court in Vancouver.
On August 7, 1975, the department announced that the action had been
settled. Acme Home Care, without admitting liability, agreed to pay the sum of
$1,000 to the consumers. The Director of Trade Practices, in turn, agreed to
discontinue the action.
Belmont Sales Ltd. (operating as Belmont Motor Co.)
August 5, 1975
The department alleges that this firm sold a used car to a consumer and took
advantage of him by reason of his inability to protect his own interests.
On behalf of the consumer, the department is asking the Court to rescind or
cancel the contract and order the return of the consumer's money on his returning the
car. The Director is also seeking a permanent injunction to prohibit the supplier
from engaging in any similar practices in the future.
The trial is scheduled for Mav 26, 1976.
Budget Freezer Food Processors Ltd.
September 18, 1975
A Class Action was commenced in the B.C. Supreme Court on September 18,
 W 64 BRITISH COLUMBIA
1975 when the Director of Trade Practices launched a suit on behalf of consumers who
had paid money for food or freezers to Budget Freezer Processors Ltd.,
5709 Kingsway, which formerly operated from 7011 Kingsway in Burnaby.
Budget Freezer failed to supply either the bulk frozen food or the freezers.
The department is asking for the return of consumers' money or, alternatively,
damages for breach of contract and obtained default judgment when Budget failed
to defend itself.
The department has written to all consumers to identify claims and will ask the
court to distribute the remaining assets of the company on an equitable basis to
those customers.
Barney's Auto Sales and Service Ltd.
September 23, 1975
The Director commenced legal proceedings on behalf of a consumer who
purchased a used truck from this Penticton firm. The Director alleged that the
original odometer, showing about 82,000 miles, was replaced by one showing
42,000 miles.
It is alleged that the consumer was told that the replacement odometer recorded
approximately the same mileage as the original.  The Director also claimed, that
the truck price was higher because of the allegedly deceptive act.
A write was filed in the County Court of Yale at Penticton, and is expected
that the trial will be held at Penticton in the Spring of 1976.
Victoria Automatic Transmission Service Ltd.
November 6, 1975
A substitute action on behalf of a consumer, was entered in Small Claims
Court on October 3 to recover the consumer's property.
The consumer had taken an automobile transmission in to Victoria Automatic
Transmission Service and received a repair estimate of $50.00.   Some repairs, although
not authorized, were allegedly carried out by Victoria Automatic Transmission
Service and the consumer received a bill for $150.00.   Mr. Brooks contested
the bill and the repair firm kept possession of the transmission unit.
Unable to resolve the dispute about the unauthorized repairs, Mr. Brooks
went to Small Claims Court on August 27. The Court ruled in favour of the
consumer and awarded him $100.00 and costs. Victoria Automatic Transmission
promptly raised the price of the repair job to $300.00 and kept the automobile
transmission.
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975 W 65
The consumer contacted the department and after attempts to resolve the
matter by mediation had failed, the Director commenced a substitute action for replevin
in the Small Claims Court.   On October 3 the Court ordered that the sheriff
seize the transmission and return it to the consumer who'had paid $150.00 into Court
to cover the expected repair bill.
An interlocutory judgment was obtained on November 6, 1975. A further
hearing was scheduled for January 5, 1976, to deal with the Director's claim for
punitive damages.
PROSECUTION
Murriton Ideal Maintenance and Repair
July 22, 1975
The department alleged that Daniel Murriton, who formerly operated a
home repair service from 425 Culduthel, Victoria, committed unconscionable acts by
overcharging two Victoria residents.   On July 22, 1975, a warrant was issued
for the arrest of Daniel Murriton.   His present whereabouts are unknown.
  REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975 W 67
BANKRUPTCIES
T. I. Travellers International Tours Ltd.
January 20, 1975
This Victoria-based firm was in the business of providing package bus tours to
Nevada and California. The firm went out of business just prior to Christmas in 1974
and was not able to provide promised tours for several hundred consumers who
had already paid their fares.
On January 20, 1975, the firm was formerly declared bankrupt after five
consumers filed a petition under the federal Bankruptcy Act. The department was
instrumental in putting this company into bankruptcy by providing legal services to the
petitioning creditors; the federal Department of Consumer and Corporate Affairs
provided an extensive clerical and investigative assistance to the Trustee in an effort to
reduce his costs so that the consumers could recover a greater amount of their loss.
Kent Mobile Homes Ltd.
January 29, 1975
Following an investigation carried out under provisions of the Trade Practices
Act, the department retained a law firm to act for a petitioning creditor to take
proceedings which resulted in an order of bankruptcy against Kent Mobile Homes Ltd.
Through the bankruptcy procedure and a series of negotiations between the
major trade creditors, solicitors for the department were able to clarify title to many
of the mobile homes purchased from the company by consumers.    Previously,
title to these homes had been in question because the manufacturer had a substantial
number of unsatisfied claims against the dealer.
While the Trustee has not submitted his final report on the bankrupt,
representatives of several government Attorneys-General are maintaining careful
scrutiny over this company.
Kamloops Health Spa
March 24, 1975
The department assisted creditors in petitioning this firm into bankruptcy
after information was received that pre-paid memberships and long-term contracts
were being sold when it appeared that the Spa would not be able to provide services
because its lease was expiring and no alternative premises were available.
On March 24, 1975, the British Columbia Supreme Court in Vernon granted
the bankruptcy petition and a trustee was appointed.  The meeting of creditors was held
on April 22, 1975, and proceedings are continuing.
 ^mx rcliiiicicci
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 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975 W 69
GLOSSARY
ASSURANCE OF VOLUNTARY COMPLIANCE
If the Director has reasonable grounds to suspect that a contravention of the
Trade Practices Act has occurred, then an undertaking called an AVC may
be negotiated under section 15 of the Act.
Without acknowledging any wrongdoing the supplier can agree not to repeat
the actual practices that have been called into question. The AVC takes the form of
a legal document signed by the business and accepted by the Director of Trade
Practices.
If a supplier signs on AVC and then fails to comply with the undertaking, the
supplier is liable to prosecution under section 25 of the Trade Practices Act.
INJUNCTION APPLICATIONS
Interim Injunction
Under section 16 of the Trade Practices Act the Director or any other person
can seek a temporary injunction from the Supreme Court stopping a supplier
from engaging in a practice which is claimed to be deceptive or unconscionable. The
injunction stops the practice until the matter can be brought to Court.
Permanent Injunction
A permanent injunction is similar to an interim injunction but it is granted only
after the Court has ruled that an act or practice is deceptive or unconscionable.
PROSECUTION
Section 25 provides that in addition to or instead of a civil remedy, charges may
be laid for violations of the Trade Practices Act.   Conviction carries a penalty
of a fine, or imprisonment, or both.
SUBSTITUTE ACTION
Under section 24 of the Trade Practices Act the Director may take a case to
Court on behalf of a consumer or defend a case brought against a consumer by a supplier
in order to protect the consumer's rights when it is in the public interest to do so.
 W 70
BRITISH COLUMBIA
DECEPTIVE ACT OR PRACTICE
Any act that has the capability, tendency, or effect of misleading a person may
be labelled deceptive.
UNCONSCIONABLE ACT OR PRACTICE
High pressure tactics, harsh or unreasonable terms or conditions, or generally
unfair business practices may be unconscionable.   For example, the court might
rule that a supplier took advantage of a consumer who was unable to protect himself
or herself because of physical or mental infirmity, ignorance, illiteracy, age, or
the inability to understand the nature or language of the consumer transaction.
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975
W 71
Funded Groups
These groups received funds for projects described below.
Consumers' Association of Canada
(B.C. Branch), Vancouver—$32,500
Expanded consumer complaint handling services in its Vancouver branch. This
provincial office also supports activities by 17 local branches and action committees
throughout the province.
Consumer Action League, Vancouver—$21,300
Expanded previous function of counselling to include consumer complaint handling,
public information programs and education courses.
Community Action Group, Victoria—$6,100.00
Developed a debt counselling service.
Kitimat Community Services Society,
Kitimat—$3,240
Developed an extensive debt counselling service.   Consumer complaints are also
handled through this office.
Matsqui, Sumas, Abbotsford (MSA)
Community Services, Abbotsford—$12,000
Consumer complaint handling, development of community education courses, and,
most recently, debt counselling are some of the services provided by this organization.
Mission Community Services, Mission—$14,556
Settles credit problems, participates in the resolution of consumer complaints, and
provides debt counselling services.
Surrey Inter-Section Society, Surrey—$11,000
This group's primary service is debt counselling, although they do participate in
the resolution of occasional consumer complaints.
 W 72 BRITISH COLUMBIA
West Kootenay Consumer Action League,
Nelson—$15,800
This organization offers consumer complaint-handling and debt counselling services
to a rather isolated section of the province.
Menie Brereton Lectures Series, Victoria—$1,000
Funds were forwarded to a series of organizers in order to share in the cost of
sponsoring lectures with consumer content.
Community Video, Victoria—$1,500
Funds were used to cover production costs for 10 programs on community cablevision
channel, covering a range of consumer topics.
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975 W 73
Publications &
Educational Materials
PERIODICALS
Consumer Aware Volume I (1975, 3 issues)
A newsletter of relevant consumer issues, departmental services, enforcements,
and other activities.
Enforcement Report
A monthly publication describing recently-signed Assurances of Voluntary
Compliance, Court Actions, and other publishable enforcement proceedings.
First issue published in June, 1975.
Trade Bulletin
Outlining guidelines in business practices with reference to departmental legal
proceedings.   Purpose is to provide guidance to the business community on
specific issues as well as general business practices.   Issued as required; first
December 1975; second circulation limited to topic-related industries scheduled
for February 1976.
Annual Report (1974 and 1975)
Departmental activities over the year.
BROCHURES
The Trade Practices Act and You (Third edition, April 1975)
Deals with the Trade Practices Act legislation in detail, with examples of
unconscionable acts and deceptive practices.   Contains helpful hints on rights,
obligations and complaint procedures.
Debt Problems? We Can Help (February 1975)
A checklist of credit and budgeting danger signals with some solutions. A
description of Debtor Assistance Division services to the debtor and contact
phone numbers.
Personal and Confidential (April, 1975, 1st edition)
The Personal Information Reporting Act as it applies to the individual.
Describes rights of access to personal information, explains full disclosure of
individuals' files by credit reporting agencies, and briefly outlines types of
information most often collected by reporting agencies.
 W 74 BRITISH COLUMBIA
BOOKLETS
An Introduction to the Department of Consumer Services (April 1975)
Background to establishment of the department in November 1973 ; general
explanation of legislation administered by the department, description of services
offered in the branches, and regional office locations.
Advertising: A Teacher's Guide to a Unit in Consumer Education
A booklet designed to accompany three films which deal with various aspects
of advertising, "Buy, Buy"; "Ways of Seeing: Advertising"; and "Consumer
Power: Advertising".   Provides a basis for discussion of patterns of consumption,
advertising in Canada, and consumer legislation.   (Films or videotapes are
available from the Provincial Educational Media Centre in Burnaby.)    Part
of the Teacher's Kit.
Consumer Education Audio-Visual Notes (Spring 1975)
A collection and description of recent audio-visual material in the field of
consumer education, together with names and addresses of distributors.   Part
of the Teacher's Kit.
Consumer Bibliography (Spring 1975)
An introductory bibliography of publications of consumer interest, with
brief descriptions.
Consumer Resources Directory (Summer 1975)
A comprehensive list of consumer-related organizations in British Columbia.
Includes government departments, non-profit organizations, and agencies,
with contact names, addresses, and descriptions of services.
AUDIO-VISUAL
Law and the Marketplace (August 1975)
A slide-tape program outlining the history of the marketplace, development
of trade consumer legislation, and, finally, development of the British Columbia
Department of Consumer Services.   Cites precedent-setting cases in history,
and general trends in recent years.   (25 minutes.)
 REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT,  1975 W 75
MINISTER
The Honourable K. Rafe Mair
Deputy Minister
Mr. William A. W. Neils on
Trade Practices Branch
Director of Trade Practices
Mr. Michael Hanson
Assistant Director of Trade Practices
Mr. Norman Manning
Consumer Service Officers
Mr. David Nicholls, Victoria
Mrs. Gladys Johnsen, Vancouver
Ms. Bernadine Rudichuk, Kamloops
Mr. Richard Clements, Prince George
Community Programs Branch
Director of Community Programs
Mr. Ken Murdoch
Assistant Director for Consumer Information
Ms. Dorthea Atwater
Assistant Director for Consumer Education
Ms. Annette Bridgman
Assistant Director for Trade Liaison
Mr. Archibald Snow
Director, Debtor Assistance Division
Mr. Harry Atkinson
Senior Officer, Research Division
Mr. Ian Slater
Legal Services Branch
Acting Director
Mr. Eric Milligan
Administrative Services Branch
Director
Mrs. Eleonore Beyer
  REPORT OF THE CONSUMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT, 1975
W 77
Department of Consumer Services
Offices Directory
MINISTER
Parliament Buildings 387-3302
Victoria, V8V 1X4
DEPUTY MINISTER
AND BRANCH HEADS
DEBTOR ASSISTANCE DIVISION
HEAD OFFICE
838 Fort Street
Victoria, V8W1H8
535 Thurlow Street
Vancouver, V6E 3L2
REGIONAL STOREFRONT OFFICES      838 Fort Street
Victoria, V8W1H8
204—370 E. Broadway
Vancouver, V5T 4G5
124 Seymour Street
Kamloops, V2C2E1
395 Victoria Street
Prince George, V2L 2J6
387-6831
689-8721
387-6831
873-4721
374-5676
562-9331
 

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