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annual report of the CORRECTIONS BRANCH MINISTRY OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL for calendar year 1976 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1977

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 annual report
of the
CORRECTIONS
BRANCH
MINISTRY OF THE
ATTORNEY-GENERAL
for calendar year
1976
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY
  Colonel the Honourable Walter Stewart Owen, Q.C, LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Corrections Branch for
the calendar year ended December 31,1976, is herewith
respectfully submitted.
GARDE B. GARDOM
A ttorney-General
Attorney-General's Office, April 1977.
  Ministry of the Attorney-General,
Corrections Branch,
Victoria, B.C.
April 1977.
The Honourable Garde B. Gardom, Q.C,
A ttorney-General,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir:
I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the
Corrections Branch for the 12 months ended December 31, 1976.
Within the Report a Branch Overview is provided for
complete quick reference to the major developments of the
year; it is presented in descriptive and statistical form.
Respectfully submitted,
JOHN W. EKSTEDT
Commissioner
  CONTENTS
Pace
Preface     8
Organizational Chart     9
Administrative Staff  11
Provincial Map: Location of Branch Resources 13
Branch Overview.  15
Reorganization of the Branch  15
Operational Overview  16
Major Issues  19
Statistics  20
A. Comments on Statistics  20
B. Report in Detail  20
Program Priorities  32
The Report in Detail  33
Adult Facilities—Programs and Services  33
Facilities and Capacities  37
Temporary Absence Program  37
Provincial Classification  38
Inspection and Standards  40
Family and Children's Services  41
Juvenile Services (Probation)  42
Youth Detention, Attendance and Containment
Centres  44
Adult Services (Probation)  46
Community Service Order Program  47
Impaired Drivers' Courses  48
Bail Supervision and Pre-trial Services  48
Staff Development  49
Program Evaluation and Data Systems  51
Volunteer Programs  52
Community Resource Funding  54
Religious Programs  54
Information Services  56
Education Services  57
Library Services  58
Appendix A: Goals, Strategies, and Beliefs, Corrections Branch, 1976  59
Appendix B: Regional Operations  64
7
 PREFACE
This Annual Report was prepared in two major parts.
A general overview of Branch operations, some of the
major issues, future program priorities, and detailed statistics
for 1976 are presented as the first part, for quick reference.
The second part, "The Report in Detail," is a comprehensive
description of major programs, activities, policies, and
practices of the Corrections Branch for 1976, both with respect
to Provincial and regional operations.
This Annual Report was prepared by Information Services
on behalf of the Office of the Commissioner.
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 CORRECTIONS BRANCH
Senior Administrative Staff
Dr. Iohn W. Ekstedt
Commissioner
B. G. Robinson
Executive Director
Institutional Services
Division
A. K. B. Sheridan
Executive Director
Community Services
Division
E. W. Harrison
Acting Executive Director
Planning and Development Division
 CORRECTIONS BRANCH
The Honourable Garde B. Gardom, Attorney-General
John W. Ekstedt, Commissioner
Corrections Administrative Staff
E. W. Harrison
Acting Executive Director
Planning and Development Division
A. K. B. Sheridan
Executive Director
Community Services Division
J. W. Lane
Director
Inspection and Standards
D. L. Toombs
Assistant Executive Director
Planning and Development Division
O. E. Hollands
Assistant Executive Director
Community Services Division
D. E. Kent
Co-ordinator, Juvenile Services
Community Services Division
W. E. Schmidt
Supervisor, Provincial Classification
Institutional Services Division
J. Proudfoot
Co-ordinator, Forestry, Farms and
Industrial Programs
Institutional Services Division
D. Bell
Co-ordinator, Administrative Services
Community Services Division
H. Miller
Co-ordinator, Administrative Services
Institutional Services Division
S. A. L. Hamblin
Co-ordinator, Construction and
Maintenance
Institutional Services Division
B. G. Robinson
Executive Director
Institutional Services Division
R. M. Baker*
Executive Director
Finance and Administration
P. H. Clark*
Director
Personnel Services
W. R. Jack
Assistant Executive Director
Institutional Services Division
R. J. Boyle
Co-ordinator, Adult Services
Community Services Division
B. A. Sadler
Co-ordinator, Temporary Absence
Institutional Services Division
W. F. Foster
Executive Assistant to
Commissioner
Ms. D. Schuh
Co-ordinator, Food Services
Institutional Services Division
D. Mathieson
Co-ordinator, Family Relations Act
Services
Community Services Division
Dr. R. Bulmer
Senior Medical Officer
Institutional Services Division
DR. H. Stevens
Senior Psychologist
Institutional Services Division
* The Finance and  Administration,   and  Personnel  Services  Divisions  serve   all  operational  components
within the Ministry of the Attorney-General under the direction of the Deputy Attorney-General.
11
 SECTION HEADS—PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT DIVISION
J. E. Laverock
Director, Staff Development
S. J. Smith
Provincial Co-ordinator
Volunteer Programs
H. C. Mathias
Co-ordinator, Bail Supervision
Project
D. M. Hartman
Director, Program Evaluation and
Data Systems
Rev. E. Hulford
Director, Religious Programs
T. A. Stiles
Director, Information Services
REGIONAL DIRECTORS—COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION
A. E. Jones
Island Region
A. E. Neufeld
Southern Region
R. G. McKellar
Northern Region
J.   KONRAD
Vancouver Adult Region
J. Wiebe
Interior Region
A. Hansell
Fraser Region
J. Gillis
Vancouver Juvenile and Family Region
INSTITUTIONAL DIRECTORS—INSTITUTIONAL SERVICES DIVISION
H. B. Bjarnason
Lower Mainland Regional
Correctional Centre
W. E. Sacho
Haney Forest Camps
B. W. Tate
Chilliwack Forest Camps
G. J. Chapple
Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre
R. E. Burns
Oakalla Women's Correctional Centre
H. McGillivray
Vancouver Island Regional
Correctional Centre
J. L. Allen
Alouette River Unit
J. Graham
Prince George Regional
Correctional Centre
R. J. A. Gobillot
New Haven Correctional Centre
L. C. Hopper
Vancouver Regional Community
Correctional Centres
12
 PROVINCIAL MAP: LOCATION OF BRANCH RESOURCES
Fort Nelson
Fore St. John
Dawson Creek_
Prince Rupert
x Terrace
x Smithers
Kitimat
Mackenzie
pjyvj Greater Vancouver
area includes 25
Probation Offices
and 5 Correctional facilities
z   Probation Office
o   Correctional facility
Port Hardy
croft
jc Williams Lake
O Clearwater
x
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Salmon Arm
loops
X Vernon
Port Alb
Parksvill
x Kelowna
x Penticton
Princeton
Mission  rtl ,__«c   Castl
Oliver
ney \ Chilliwack
Abbottaford
x Nelson-x Kimberye
egar
 \	
Trail
rnle
x'CranbNiok
13
  BRANCH OVERVIEW
REORGANIZATION OF THE
BRANCH
Processes leading to a major
reorganization of the management structures
of the Corrections Branch were
undertaken in 1976, the reorganization
to be effective on April 1, 1977. A
description, history, and rationale for those
changes are important.
The Corrections Branch consists of three
major divisions, with Inspection and
Standards providing a fourth unit of a
very specialized nature.   The
three divisions are
Community Services Division
(Probation);
Institutional Services Division; and
Planning and Development Division.
The Community Services Division
has an establishment of 519, consisting of
Probation Officers, Probation Interviewers,
Family Court Counsellors, Community
Service Order Officers, and support
personnel, located in over 70 locations
throughout the Province.    Probation staff,
including those designated as Family
Court Counsellors, undertake a variety
of work:
Preparing reports: pre-court inquiries,
pre-sentence/disposition   reports,
community investigations for
temporary absence or parole, pay
(fine) reports, and custody and
access reports.
Supervising probationers, parolees, those
on temporary absence (if necessary).
Monitoring maintenance orders;
enforcement work.
Performing a range of family relations
work; counselling, referrals, etc.
Probation staff continue to undertake a
variety of resource development roles,
which in the past few years has seen
the development of Impaired Drivers'
Courses and Community Service Projects in
most larger centres of the Province,
and a variety of attendance programs for
juveniles on probation.
The Division is also responsible for
the operation of the only two youth
detention facilities in the Province, for youth
"at risk" prior to disposition and
placement, and in 1976 was given the
responsibility to bring on-line in 1977 a
facilities and program package for
youth containment, to be provided as a
sentencing options for the Court.
The Institutional Services Division has an
establishment of 1,129 and has
responsibility for eight major correctional
facilities, which includes three specialized
facilities and 10 forest camps, seven
community correctional centres with two
more planned for opening April 1, 1977,
and the purchased use of bed space in
13 community-based residential centres. A
variety of programming is offered for
men and women, from shopwork in some
locations to farm work, a range of
forestry and related work, and high-risk
wilderness programming to regular
employment and the pursuit of education in
the community through temporary
absence and residence at a community
correctional or residential centre.
The Planning and Development Division
is a three-year-old component of the
Branch offering a variety of services: Staff
Development, Program Evaluation and
Data Systems, Volunteer Programs,
Information Services, Bail Supervision,
Religious Programs, Library Services, and
some Purchase of Services Funding.
The Division provides a Secretariat of
services for all aspects of Branch operations
and has run and (or) put in place
experimental projects. The support capacity
of this Division has been significant in
the kinds of development and innovations
which have taken place since its inception.
Each of the three divisions is headed
by a senior correctional manager who
reports directly to the Commissioner of
15
 Q 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Corrections. As senior staff, they
deal with policy issues for the Branch, and
co-ordinate individual efforts with
respect to innovative programs and the
ongoing provision of correctional services.
In addition to the development of new
programs over the past three years, the
traditional scope of institutional and
probation services has expanded so that
institutions are running more community-
based facilities requiring ongoing
liaison and information flow with probation
services, and probation services are
expanding to include more residential types
of programs. In some instances
probationers and parolees have resided
in community correctional centres.
The scope and inter-relationships of the
three divisions had become complex,
with areas of responsibility blurring, and so
in May of 1976 the decision was made
to implement the intention expressed
in a long-range plan commenced in 1974,
i.e., to have one senior correctional
manager in each region responsible for the
complete range of correctional services
in that region.
These senior managers were appointed
in October of 1976, and have commenced
an intensive three-month Development
Course focusing on a wide range of topics—
financial processes of government,
labour relations, relationship to central
government services (such as the
Public Service Commission, Public Works,
Treasury Board, Purchasing Commission,
etc.), management and organizational
principles, and current correctional
theory and practice. Each Regional
Director of Corrections has been responsible
for budget building and preparation for
fiscal year 1977/78, and the development
of regional management structure
models which reflect the long-term intention
of the Branch to integrate services and
decentralize decision-making to the lowest
appropriate level.   In those processes,
each Regional Director has been responsible
for identifying needs and priorities in
his region.   The Regional Directors will be
in place in the field effective April 1, 1977.
With the decentralization process
during 1976, a considerable amount of
energy has been expended in attempting to
define the support capacities which
are required to remain central, as a resource
for both the regions and the Commissioner,
the latter of whom consistently has
a wide number of Ministry and other
Government and jurisdiction demands made
of him, in addition to regular
operational ones.
Specific job functions will be finalized
in 1977, but during this present
Report period decisions have been made
with respect to the following services
remaining as part of the Commissioner's
Office: Inspection and Standards,
Provincial Classification, Program
Evaluation and Data Systems, Staff
Development, Resource Analysis Section,
Program and Policy Analysis Section,
and Information Services.
It is the clear intention that this major
reorganization will facilitate the provision of
the widest range of effective correctional
services throughout this jurisdiction
and Province. It is clear it is only the first
of two phases, which in years to come
will see local reorganization of correctional
services in an integrated way, and one
in which real decision-making is brought
down to the lowest appropriate level.
OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW
In April of 1974 on the advice of the
Corrections Branch the Attorney-General of
British Columbia announced a detailed
planning statement of over-all policy
and programs for Corrections,
which included the following major
emphases:
The confirmation of the commitment to
the dissolution of large, ineffective, and
outdated correctional centres, adult
remand centres, and juvenile
detention homes.
The development and utilization of a
wide range of community-based
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 17
programs as alternatives to
incarceration.
The use of smaller and fully secure
facilities for dangerous or predatory
offenders.
An increased involvement of the
Branch in the areas of prevention and
diversion with both juveniles and
adults.
Correctional programs which stress
the responsibility of offenders to their
communities and allow, where
possible, expression of that
responsibility in direct relation to
the victims of their offence.
A Corrections Branch which is responsive
and in tune with the needs of the
community, and of the justice system
as a whole.
During the development of the plan and
since its adoption in 1974 as an operational
tool, a number of major developments
have taken place—the phase-out of Haney
Correctional Centre and the sentenced
population capacity at Vancouver Island
Regional Correctional Centre; the opening
of Jordan River Camp on Vancouver Island;
the opening of six community correctional
centres and the use of more than a
dozen community-based residential centres;
the provision of bail supervision in
Vancouver, Victoria, and Surrey; expansion
in the use of temporary absences,
particularly for work or educational release;
the development of Impaired Drivers'
Courses in many locations throughout the
Province; and the provision of the
Community Service Order Program in most
major communities throughout the
Province.
In 1976, particular developments have
been:
The opening of a further particularly
innovative community correctional
centre in Vancouver, and extensive
planning for two women's community
correctional centres to be opened
April 1977.
The opening of Cedar Lake Forest Camp
near Haney.
The transfer of juveniles in detention
prior to disposition in Vancouver to
renovated Willingdon facilities in
Burnaby, and the raizing to the ground
of the antiquated building on Yale
Street.
The development of facilities and
programs for a comprehensive youth
containment program to be opened in
late 1977.
Extensive planning and decision-making
with respect to replacement for the
remand facilities at Lower Mainland
Regional Correctional Centre.
The assumption of responsibility for
Pre-trial Services in April 1976.
The assumption of responsibility for
Family and Children's (Family
Relations Act) Services throughout
the Province.
In line with the intention of the 1974
plan, the Corrections Branch has expanded
its traditional focus on the provision of
services on the end processes of the justice
system, to include a wider range of activities
both at the "front end" and throughout the
system. This is seen as a reflection of
the intention to support the resolution of
social conflict as much as possible outside of,
or at the very early stages of, the costly
and stigmatizing process of the formal
justice system where experience indicates
the most likely results are attainable.
What follows is a brief overview of the
places of the justice system where
Corrections Branch now has operational
responsibilities:
Pre-court Services—
Alternative programs ("diversion")
for offenders who do not require full
formal court and corrections
experience; counselling and (or)
referral provided.
Reports on juveniles' (and some
adults') social circumstances, including
those around alleged offences,
provided for Crown counsel with
 Q 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
respect to the decision whether to
proceed with charges into court.
Conciliation counselling for a spouse
approaching Family Courts to seek
possibilities of a legal remedy to
marriage problems; counselling and
(or) referral out if appropriate (civil
jurisdiction).
Pre-trial Services—
Supervision for those persons
requiring some degree of control in
order to ensure attendance at court,
precluding for some the necessity of
full custody remand.
Personal assistance to alleged
offenders and (or) the families of those
held in custody pending the outcome
of their charge.
Provision of secure facilities for
youth at risk, pending disposition and
placement.
Court Services—
Information report for the court on
offender's background and future
plans to assist the court in sentencing.
The availability in court of a Probation
Officer to assist where on-the-spot
information is needed and referrals
must be made.
Detailed reports prepared by Family
Court Counsellors to provide the court
with information which will assist
in the decisions surrounding the
custody of and access to children,
where marital separation and divorce
are concerned (civil jurisdiction).
Community Services—
The supervision in the community
of offenders placed on probation.
Educational courses on the topic of
drinking and driving provided for
offenders convicted of drinking and
driving offences; attended as part of a
probation order.
Facilities and programs which
provide special educational, training,
recreational, community service and
wilderness experiences for juveniles
and young adults on probation.
The supervision of court-ordered
reparative activities, undertaken by the
offender with respect to the victim
of the offence, or to the community.
A range of post-dispositional
residential programs and facilities
for youth at risk, where other
community-based resources are deemed
inappropriate, or ineffective.
(Planning stage only.)
Institutional Services—
Maximum and medium security
custody facilities for persons sentenced
to less than two years, and all
custodial remand for the Province.
Open-setting programs providing
forest or farm work; special
young adult or alcohol abuse
programs; and community correctional
centres in local communities where
inmates on temporary absence
may reside for work or
educational purposes.
Community Re-entry Services—
Permitted (temporary) absence
from a correctional centre in selected
cases for employment, training,
education, medical treatment,
maintenance of family ties,
involvement in Community Service
Programs, and pre-parole/release
planning.
Supervision in the community of
offenders paroled during the latter
portion of their sentence of
imprisonment, in order to assist them
back to full and useful participation
in the community.
Community assessment reports to
provide information to the
administrative bodies making
temporary absence or parole decisions.
Diversion of offenders from the justice
system has become an important focus of
much discussion in the justice system,
and in particular in the Corrections Branch.
It is an area frought with exciting
possibilities and very real concerns about
civil liberties, due process of law, and so on.
The Corrections Branch has been
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 19
involved in diversionary procedures for
years, in its service capacity to Crown
counsel in the form of pre-charge reports on
juveniles, to the Bench with respect to
sentencing options, and in its own service
delivery programs such as the use of
volunteers from the community.   In 1976
the Branch seconded a person to look at
diversion, exemplary programs of the
Branch and in the justice system (e.g.,
police, private agencies, and citizen
volunteers), and to assist in the formulation
of a definitive and clear policy with
respect to Branch involvement in the whole
area of Pre-trial Services. The results of
that person's findings should be known in
1977.
In 1976 the principles of case
management, as an alternative to pure
casework, were annunciated and adopted
throughout the facilities of the Branch,
which gave an institutional application to
such principles adopted with respect to
probation services in 1975. These
principles lend emphasis to the Branch's
view that (1) where possible, community
services should be utilized to lend support to
individual offenders, and those who come
into contact with the system; (2) the
Branch and individual persons must be
accountable for seeing that offenders in the
correctional system are provided with
opportunities for self-development and (or)
constructive use of time within each
corrections program or facility; and (3) a
clearly defined internal accountability
and responsibility system must be in place to
achieve these ends.
Related to the developments in case
management, and the decentralization of the
Branch, it is incumbent upon the Branch
to set minimum standards for the Province
with respect to the range of correctional
services, in order that offenders receive
equality of treatment regardless of
geographical location. In October of 1976
the Corrections Branch put into motion
a process by which such standards can be
developed, while realizing that the
completion of the exercise may take several
years.
Finally, in 1976 a major study of
Corrections Branch goals and objectives was
undertaken and completed. This
extensive document annunciated and
reconfirmed in detail principles in the
original 1974 plan, which are noted
throughout this Report. The recent study
included a range of activities by which
the Corrections Branch can work toward
specific goals and objectives. As a result of
its significance this paper is included
in this Annual Report as Appendix A.
MAJOR ISSUES
Prison facilities—The upgrading or
replacement of facilities for those remanded
in custody awaiting trial or disposition
is a major priority of the Corrections
Branch. Each of the major regional
correctional centres provides this capacity
and all of the present facilities are
deemed inadequate for the task. As well as
ancient facilities (some built circa 1900),
the lack of program recreational space
for those on remand is compounded when
the same space must be utilized for
sentenced populations.
Considerable planning was undertaken in
1976 with regard to a replacement facility
(at 222 Main, Vancouver) for those
held in remand at the Lower Mainland
Regional Correctional Centre, and for
replacement to an alternative location for
Vancouver Island Regional Correctional
Centre. These and other initiatives with
respect to remand have found expression in
1976 in two major presentations to
Cabinet—one on facility requirements of
the Ministry of the Attorney-General as a
whole, and one specifically focused on
the remand requirements of the Corrections
Branch.
The replacement of Lower Mainland
Regional Correctional Centre, due to
significant capital requirements, is not
anticipated for some years. Major present
energies to alleviate the pressure on the
institutions are expressed in terms of the
fullest use of the Community Correctional
 Q 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Centre program in Vancouver, and the
transfer within 24 hours of reception of all
appropriate inmates to forest camps and
other programs.
Youth containment—In late 1975,
several issues with respect to the "hard-core
juvenile delinquent" problem became
particularly urgent. The Corrections Branch
is responsible for two youth detention
centres (Vancouver and Victoria) in the
Province, having assumed responsibility for
them on April 1, 1974. These centres
were designated facilities for holding youths
(male and female) considered "at risk,"
prior to disposition and while placements
were being worked out. On many occasions
the facilities were used as interim measures
for those under disposition, which was
an inappropriate use and which accentuated
over-crowding. In addition, the youth
problems in the community has been
expressed as becoming acute.
As a result of study by the Corrections
Branch, in October of 1976, the Branch
made recommendations for a three-tiered
containment program to the Attorney-
General, and Cabinet approved 111
positions and developmental moneys to
implement the plan in 1977. The plan calls
for security facilities, but in addition highly
concentrated ranch and forest camp
programs and secure group homes. The
Corrections Branch is very concerned about
the potential development of "juvenile jails,"
and is exerting considerable energy to
build in legislative and administrative
safeguards. It is considered extremely
important that each containment program
option maintains the widest possible
community base which is congruent with its
security rating. This includes the
requirements for the fullest co-operation
between Government ministries in the
provision of a continuum of resources for
youth in conflict with the law.
Family and Children's Services—In early
1976 the Corrections Branch was given
responsibility for the provision of family
and children's services. This includes
counselling services, maintenance order
supervision, the preparation of custody and
access reports, and other services related to
the Family Relations Act, i.e., where
families are coming to the courts to seek
resolution of marital problems. In 1976 the
Unified Family Court projects in Surrey,
Richmond, and Delta were phased into
regular Corrections operations, concluding
the work commenced in December 1973
by the Royal Commission on Family
and Children's Law (Berger Commission).
The expectations for service throughout
the Province have placed excessive demands
on staff at present performing these
duties, and fiscal and staff restraints have not
allowed the Branch to provide these
important services in many locations. The
resolution of that issue, and others
arising from an intention in principle to
establish more Unified Family Courts, is
an ongoing one.
STATISTICS
A. Comments on Statistics
Probation Statistics
The information contained in Tables II
and III is from the Probation Caseload
System. This system is based on monthly
reports from Probation Officers
throughout the Province. Tables IV to IX
are derived from the computerized data
file of admissions to the system.
There has been a considerable increase in
admissions to adult probation. This is due
in part to the increase in the use of the
Impaired Drivers' Courses and the
Community Service Order Program. Adults
entering either one of these programs are
given a probation order which indicates
that they must attend the program.
It is interesting to note that the large
increase in adult probation orders for the
Impaired Drivers' Courses affects several of
the probation tables. In Table V on the
length of the probation order, the "5 to 6
months" category for adults has increased
from 40.2 per cent in 1975 to 49.8 per cent
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 21
in 1976. In Table VI on offence groups, the
"drink and drive" category for adults has
increased from 29.3 per cent in 1975 to
40.9 per cent in 1976.
It appears that admissions to juvenile
probation have decreased from 1975
to 1976. This is in fact not so. The 1976
figures do not include admissions from the
Vancouver Juvenile Court, which if
included, would increase the juvenile
probation admissions by a large number.
These cases are now being reported to the
data file.
Data in these tables do not include cases,
mostly juveniles, which are diverted from the
correctional system by Probation Officers
acting with the police and courts. These
.diversion cases constitute a considerable
work load, but they are not technically
admissions to the system.
Institutional Statistics
The information for Table XII is
calculated from weekly institutional count
sheets. Tables XIII to XVIII are from the
computerized data file of admissions to
the System. The intermittent sentencing
information in Table XIX was extracted
from the historical file of admissions.
It appears that the total number of
institutional admissions has almost doubled
from last year. However, a large part of this
increase is due to the development of
more sophisticated techniques which enable
the reporting this year of additional
types of disposition—definite jail, two years
and over; indeterminate only; and most
importantly, remand.
Thirty-seven per cent of admissions to
institutions are in the remand category.
The definite jail under two years and fine
in default categories have increased from
1975 by 18.3 per cent and 10.6 per cent
respectively.
In Table 14 on length of sentence, it is
interesting to note that again almost 40
per cent of the admissions in definite jail
under two years have sentences of one
month.
From the offence information given in
Table XV it is evident that 27.5 per cent of
admissions in definite jail under two
years are for theft offences. For admissions
in the fine in default category, 42.8 per
cent are for drink and drive offences.
Serious and theft offences together
constitute 54.0 per cent of admissions on
remand.
The information on intermittent
sentences given in Table XIX shows that
919 of the total 5,639 admissions in the
definite jail under two years category,
or 16.3 per cent, are intermittent sentences.
General
Perhaps the single most important
observation which can be made about these
statistics is that the total number of
admissions to probation and the total
number of admissions to institutions have
both increased over the last year. Since the
1975 and 1976 figures are not directly
comparable (due to additional categories,
etc.), it is difficult to determine the exact
size of this increase, but it appears to be
approximately 20 per cent for probation and
20 per cent for institutions.
 Q 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
B. Report in Detail
$33,496,093
63/
64
67/
68/
69/
70/
71/
72/
68
69
70
71
72
73
73/
74
74/
75
64/      65/       66/
65        66 67
Fiscal Year
Figure I.   Charting of Corrections fiscal expenditures over 14-year period.
75/
76
76/
77
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 23
Commissioner's Office
(ADM) 0.25%,
T= 33,496,093
IS =20,924,819
CS= 10,576,268
PD=   1,822,633
I&S=        85,877
ADM =       86,496
Inspection and Standards
(I&S) 0.25%
Planning and Develop. (PD)
5.4%
Figure II.    1976/77 official estimates breakdown.
Commissioner's Office
(ADM) 0.22%
N=l,817
IS= 1,129
CS=   519
PD=     49
I&S=       4
ADM=       4
Inspection and Standards
(I&S) 0.22%
Planning and Devel. (PD)
2.6%
Figure III.    Establishment breakdown per estimates 1976/77.
 Q 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
o
Q
40
-
30
20
-
10
e
>.
>, CO
cn
d.S
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a
C        CJ
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Centre
mm
rrec
ntre
a
J-  3
O  O  CJ
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Types of Correctional Resources
Figure IV.   Represents approximated operational costs for different types of resources.
Table I—Temporary Absence Program, Calendar Year 1976
Number of Passes Per Cent
Granted Success
Short term  9,078 99
Education       169 83
Employment  1,254 86
Medical         94 100
Note—Lower success rates are not necessarily due to further offences but include those people who are
brought back into an institution for contravening regulations. During 1976 there were 253 individuals taken off
the Temporary Absence Program: 101 for being unlawfully at large, 28 for committing further criminal offences
while on the program, and a further 123 taken off the program for failing to abide by the conditions of the
temporary absence.
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 25
Work Release Statistics
1,254—Work Releases granted in Province.
$940,000—earned by inmates.
$ 25,698—restitution and fines paid.
$ 51,480—room and board paid at community correctional centre or residential centre.
$152,736—family maintenance paid.
$ 72,918—debts paid.
$179,860—income tax paid.
Note—Moneys returned to the Branch go into the Provincial Government general revenues.
Table II—Average Daily Adult and Juvenile Probation Case Load by Region
Region
Adult
Juvenile
Totals
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per Cent
1.994                 27.4
532                18.0
2,526
1,467
172
1,150
308
958
2,465
1,183
24.7
Vancouver 	
1,206
928
16.6
261
172
222
308
354
724
385
8.8
5.8
7.5
10.4
12.0
24.5
13.0
14.3
1.7
12.8
11.2
3.0
604
1.741
8.3
23.9
9.4
24.1
Northern	
798      |        11.0
11.6
Totals 	
7,271
100.0
2,958
100.0
10,229
100.0
Table III—Total Number of Adult and Juvenile Probation Offences by Type
Types of Investigation
Adult
Juvenile
Totals
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per Cent
i
10,710
452
4,374
66.6
2.8
27.2
10,710
4,280
5,270
412
92
1,534
450
1,370
44.4
3,828
896
412
92
1,534
450
822
47.6
11.2
5.1
1.1
19.1
5.6
10.2
17.7
21.8
B.C. Parole	
1.7
0.4
6.4
1.9
Other... 	
584
3.4
5.7
Totals	
8,034
100.0
16,084
100.0
24,118
100.0
Table IV—Adult and Juvenile Probation Admissions by Region
Region
Adult
Juvenile
Totals
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per Cent
2,230
1,216
1,473
835
2,262
765
130
127
24.7
13.5
16.3
9.2
25.0
8.5
1.4
1.4
548
210
563
292
593
529
27
118
19.0
7.3
19.5
10.1
20.6
18.4
0.9
4.1
2,778
1,426
2,036
1,127
2,855
1,294
157
245
23.3
Vancouver	
Southern..  	
12.0
17.1
9.5
Interior      	
24.0
10.9
2i.
Unknown	
Totals	
9,038
100.0
2,880
100.0
11,918
100.0
 Q 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table V—Adult and Juvenile Probation Admissions by
Length of Probation Order
Adult
Juvenile
Totals
(Months)
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per Cent
1 to 3	
450
4,497
2,453
489
918
17
147
67
5.0
49.8
27.1
5.4
10.2
0.2
1.6
0.7
250
690
879
94
116
15
16
820
8.7
24.0
30.5
3.3
4.0
0.5
0.6
28.5
700
5,187
3,332
583
1,034
32
163
887
5.9
4 to 6   .
43.5
7 to 12...
28.0
13 to 18	
4.9
19 to 24	
8.7
25 to 30	
0.3
31 to 36	
1.4
Unknown   	
7.4
Totals	
9,038
100.0
2,880
100.0
11,918
100.0
Note—The "unknown" category includes continued and indefinite orders, which cannot be ranked by length
of disposition.
Table VI—Adult and Juvenile Probation Admissions by Offence Group
Offence Group
Adult
Juvenile
Totals
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per Cent
403
87
620
3,700
123
2,321
5*
443
522
115
131
384
173
11
4.5
1.0
6.9
40.9
1.4
25.7
0.1
4.9
5.8
1.3
1.4
4.2
1.9
0.1
126
10
201
64
96
1,877
42
42
131
14
56
145
69
7
4.4
0.3
7.0
2.2
3.3
65.2
1.5
1.5
4.5
0.5
1.9
5.0
2.4
0.2
529
97
821
3,764
219
4,198
47
485
653
129
187
529
242
18
4.4
0.8
6.9
31.6
1.8
Theft	
35.2
Returned to court/Juvenile	
0.4
4.1
5.5
1.1
Breach/Failure to appear	
Common   assault/Breach   of   Govern-
1.6
4.4
Other persons/Community order	
2.0
0.2
Totals	
9,038
100.0
2,880
100.0
11,918
100.0
Notes—For Tables VI and XV, the following are examples of the types of offences included in each
category:
Serious: Pointing a firearm, perjury, rape and attempt, negligence causing death, murder(s), kidnapping, etc.
Sexual and moral: Incest, indecent exposure, procuring, bigamy, contributing to juvenile delinquency, etc.
Community order: Causing a disturbance, vagrancy, mischief, etc.
Drink/Drive: Impaired driving, about 0.08, etc.
Other motor-vehicle: Failing to stop at an accident, driving while disqualified, etc.
Theft: Theft over/under $200, breaking and entering, possession of stolen property, etc.
Other property: False pretences, fraud (public), forgery, and uttering, etc.
Other persons/Community order: Unlawful assembly, riot, bribery of officers, harassing and threatening,
habitual criminal.
* Admissions who have become adults, i.e., turned 17, during the course of the court process.
Table VII—Adult and Juvenile Probation Admissions by Sex
Sex
Adult
Juvenile
Totals
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per Cent
7,785
1,177
76
86.1
13.0
0.8
2,510
358
12
87.2
12.4
0.4
10,295
1,535
88
86.4
Female   	
Unknown	
12.9
0.7
9,038
100.0
2,880
100.0
11,918
100.0
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Table VIII—Male and Female Probation Admissions by Age-group
Q 27
Age-group
Male
Female
Unknown
Totals
(Years)
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per Cent
9
2
9
23
69
179
486
756
984
3,588
900
932
629
450
705
581
3
2
9
24
77
211
563
889
1,102
4,046
1,077
1,123
744
551
831
666
3
10     	
0.1
0.2
0.7
1.7
4.7
7.3
9.6
34.9
8.7
9.1
6.1
4.4
6.8
5.6
0.1
11    	
2
8
29
77
130
112
435
163
179
105
96
121
78
0.1
0.5
1.9
5.0
8.5
7.3
28.3
10.6
11.7
6.8
6.3
7.9
5.1
0.2
12	
0.6
13	
14     	
3
1.4
1.8
4.7
15	
16  ....	
17 to 21    ..
3
6
23
14
12
10
5
5
7
3.4
6.8
26.1
15.9
13.6
11.4
5.7
5.7
8.0
7.5
9.2
33.9
22 to 24 .
9.0
25 to 29    .. .
9.4
30 to 34	
6.2
35 to 39	
4.6
40 to 49
7.0
50 and over	
5.6
Totals	
10,295
100.0
1,535
100.0
88
100.0
11,918
100.0
Table IX—Adult and Juvenile Probation Admissions by Racial Origin
Racial Origin
Adult
Juvenile
Totals
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per Cent
Native Indian _ 	
826
7,905
307
9.1
87.5
3.4
402
2,408
70
14.0
83.6
2.4
1,228
10,313
377
10.3
86.5
3.2
Totals	
9.038       1       100.0
2,880
100.0
11,918
100.0
Table X—Community Service Order Program Adults and Juveniles
by Corrections Regions, January 1975 to May 1976
Corrections Regions
Juveniles
Adults
Totals
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per (Sent
388       1         47.8
284
43.9
672
74
111
134
103
365
46.0
Vancouver.	
Interior 	
Northern	
Fraser	
Southern  	
3
69
57
68
227
0.4
8.5
7.0
8.4
28.0
71
42
77
35
138
11.0
6.5
11.9
5.4
21.3
5.1
7.6
•9.2
7.0
25.0
Totals 	
812             100.0
1
647
100.0
1,459
100.0
 Q 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XI—Community Service Order Program Juveniles and Adults
by Offences, January 1975 to May 1976
Offences
Juveniles
Adults
Totals
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per Cent
Causing a disturbance	
Public mischief 	
3
8
3
58
233
244
20
56
41
36
15
82
13
0.4
1.0
0.4
7.1
28.7
30.0
2.5
6.9
5.0
4.4
1.8
10.1
1.6
18
20
26
21
165
82
37
68
57
18
5
125
5
2.8
3.1
4.0
3.2
25.5
12.7
5.7
10.5
8.8
2.8
0.8
19.3
0.8
21
28
29
79
398
326
57
124
98
54
20
207
18
1.4
1.9
2.0
Theft over $200	
5.4
Theft under $200	
27.3
22.3
3.9
Mischief 	
Breach N.C.A. possession	
Breach G.L.A.
8.5
6.7
3.7
Breach M.V.A.
1.4
14.2
Unknown	
1.2
Totals 	
812             100.0
1
647
100.0
1,459
100.0
Note—In 1976 there were 1,174 Juvenile Orders and 998 Adult Orders for Community Service, which
represented a 261-per-cent increase from 1975. Service to the community represented 94.8 per cent of all work
done, with 4.3 per cent of service directed for the victim. With an average hours per order of 39.5 in 1975 and
1976, 109,421 hours were completed.
Table XII—Average Daily Inmate Count in Correctional Facilities
Facility
Sentenced
Unsentenced
Totals
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per Cent
Count
Per Cent
360
63
156
150
97
36
77
126
134
125
53
25
25.7
4.5
11.1
10.7
6.9
2.6
5.5
9.0
9.6
8.9
3.8
1.8
263
23
68.5
6.0
623
86
156
152
97
36
121
151
161
125
53
25
34.9
Oakalla Women's CC 	
4.8
8.7
Alouette River Unit/Twin Maples	
2
0.5
8.5
5.4
New Haven CC
2.0
44
25
27
11.4
6.5
7.0
6.8
Kamloops RCC	
Prince George RCC	
8.4
9.0
7.0
CBRC's Provincially
3.0
1.4
Totals	
1,402
100.0
384
100.0
1,786
100.0
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 29
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P
 Q 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XIX—Number of Institutional 4. Pre-trial Services.
Admissions With Intermittent 5   Natives.
Sentences Admissions with 6. Drug and Alcohol Services.
Intermittent .   .
Year Sentences 7. Training and Education.
1973   252 8. Custodial Programs for Juveniles
1974   323 and Adults.
1975   517 These priorities do not reflect, necessarily,
1976   9191 an order of priority but rather a range of
NoiB-tatennlttent sentences are served at regular areas wi*jn the administration of justice for
intervals, i.e., usually on week-ends, so that the individual priority initiative.     Program activities will
can continue his education or employment. ^ .^^ ^ some       .^      ^^ than
1 These admissions with intermittent sentences are ...__,.
included in the institutional admissions reported in Others at any point in time.   For instance,
the other tables i.e   in 1976, of the 5,369 admissions in the the program for juveniles is nOW requiring
definite jail under 2 years   category, 919 were . .      .
intermittent sentences. and will continue to require in the next
fiscal year a specific commitment of energy
and resources to get the programs under way.
PROGRAM PRIORITIES These priorities are seen as a reflection of
the intention to support the resolution of
Branch program priorities for 1977/78 sociai conflict outside the justice system, and
are framed within the over-all Ministry where the intervention of the justice system
priorities identified by the Policy Committee, js required, they reflect an intention to
administration of justice, for the Ministry of provide for the safety of the public,
the Attorney-General. These are: tne provision of consequences for unlawful
.   p . behaviour which can benefit both the
offender and the victim, and to have these
2. Family and Children's Services. consequences carried out in the context
3. Diversion. 0f reasonable and humane circumstances.
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH, 1976
Q 33
THE REPORT IN DETAIL
ADULT FACILITIES-
PROGRAMS AND SERVICES
Under the separation of Federal/
Provincial jurisdiction relating to
the imprisonment of convicted (adult)
offenders specified in the British North
America Act, the Corrections Branch in
British Columbia is given the responsibility
for providing appropriate facilities for
four categories of individuals.
The Institutional Services Division is the
component of the Branch with specific
responsibilities for the staffing,
operation, and administration of Provincial
correctional facilities for
(1) all persons on remand in custody
pending the resolution of
charges before the courts;
(2) all offenders being held in custody
pending appeal of their
convictions;
(3) those offenders for whom the
conviction and (or) appeal process
has been completed and who
are awaiting transfer to a Federal
penitentiary, i.e., those
offenders who have received
sentences of imprisonment of two
years and over;*
(4) those offenders who have received
sentences of imprisonment of
less than two years.*
Branch facilities are designated by the
level of security they afford. A custody
facility is described as maximum-
medium security and includes reception
and remand centres. Reception and
remand centres are areas within the major
correctional centres which are separated
from the sentenced inmate population
for such purposes. Open (or minimum)
security settings include forest camps,
community correctional centres,
and specialized facilities (for alcohol- or
drug-dependency problems).
The incarceration of offenders has
always been closely identified with
Corrections and suffers the most intense
form of public criticism, myths, and
stereotypes. Few people would argue with
the notion that some types of institutions
will always be needed to isolate
dangerous and predatory elements from the
community. But in the past, people
who were never a threat to public safety
were put into maximum (or medium)
security institutions because the courts had
no alternatives.   Even with the more
liberal use of probation supervision for
appropriate offenders, there is still
a large percentage of our institutional
population serving time for offences
involving Motor-vehicle Act infractions,
drunkenness, or the inability to pay a fine.
It is the position of the Corrections
Branch that only persons clearly requiring
secure custody should be held in these
settings. Based on extensive experience, and
in consultation with the police, courts, a
variety of community resource agencies, and
interested citizens, Corrections follows
the policy that sentence management which
is community oriented, and requires
continued participation in and responsibility
to the community, is the most appropriate
and effective for many offenders.
Within the over-all framework, increased
emphasis has been placed on the following
developments—more intensive
programming at forest camps; more
community correctional centres; increased
use of community service activities
carried out by inmates; temporary absences
for work or education; and special
impaired drivers' programs for those with
alcohol or related problems. The year
1976 has seen continued development in
* Exceptions to this rule are offenders transferred between jurisdictions under the Federal/Provincial Exchange of Services
Agreement.
 Q 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
each of these areas. The above direction has
included a commitment to phase out
the large and antiquated custodial facilities,
to be replaced by smaller units. However,
the excessive costs of capital construction
have made impossible the ability to
replace most of these facilities, and the
Branch has been undertaking a program of
facilities upgrading in 1976:
Lower Mainland Regional Correctional
Centre: East Wing fire exit will be
completed in early 1977, with
four additional ones for the end of
fiscal year 1976/77. The design for a
records office extension was
completed and construction will
commence in 1977.
Oakalla's Women's Correctional
Centre: Window security grills were
installed to assist in the security of the
building.
New Haven Correctional Centre:
Ground was broken in October 1976
for a new dormitory to replace
that burned in 1971. Electrical and
sewage-disposal systems are being
upgraded.
Haney Forest Camps: Design was
completed for the new administration
building and maintenance shops.
It is expected that construction will
commence in early 1977. Approval
was received for the installation
of new communication lines from the
Golden Ears School where a new
base radio station and antenna will be
installed. This will serve the Haney
Forest Camp administration,
the Alouette River Unit, and Pine
Ridge Camp. A contract was awarded
for the construction of a new
power-line to the facility and Pine
Ridge Camp. Arrangements were
made with the Purchasing Commission
for a new trailer unit which
was located at the Cedar Lake Camp.
Kamloops Regional Correctional
Centre: Renovation and addition to
the administration building, and
the installation of perimeter lighting
commenced in 1976; and the design
for a visiting area at cell block
was completed. Cost studies were
completed by Public Works to relocate
Clearwater Camp to Bear Creek
site; and studies also were done by
Public Works and Corrections on
trailer accommodation to replace the
present condemned buildings at
Rayleigh Camp.
Prince George Regional Correctional
Centre: The power-line to Hutda Lake
Camp was completed in order to
provide sufficient electrical
power for the camp. Two thousand
feet of chain-link fencing was
transferred from the phased-out Haney
Correctional Centre. Emergency
lighting for the area used as a
gymnasium is about to be installed.
Chilliwack Forest Camps: The
communications system was greatly
enhanced with the installation of an
additional telephone-line. The
electrical wiring of the Chilliwack
Forest Camps was upgraded
and brought up to Code standard.
In addition, there was a great deal of
energy spent in planning alternate facilities
for the remand capacities at the Lower
Mainland Centre, and with respect to
Branch facilities designated for
Youth Containment. During 1976 an
additional community correctional centre
was opened, and extensive planning
completed for two more, for women, which
will see operation in 1977. At the end
of 1976, further purchase of service
contracts were concluded in order to have
the availability of a wider range of privately
owned community-based residential centres.
Community correctional centres and
community-based residential centres form
an important aspect of program and
facilities utilized by the Corrections Branch.
A typical community correctional centre
is a large house or converted motel.
It is the home base for the resident and
he/she must return to it immediately after
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 35
work or school. Dinner is usually
communal, and each person has assigned
chores. After hours there is time for
studying, hobbies, and social events. Some
residents spend their evenings and
week-ends on community service projects,
worth-while causes, and on volunteer
work with local community organizations.
Those earning an income are charged room
and board at the centre. The rest of their
money may go toward paying off debts,
making restitution, supporting their
family, or to bank savings for the time
when they are released. Community-based
residential centres offer essentially the
same kind of service, but are not
Corrections staffed, and are run by a myriad
of private agencies. Inmates attend
community correctional centres
or community-based residential centres
through the authority of the Temporary
Absence Program.
The type of programs offered at the
various correctional facilities is
circumscribed by the security needs and
correctional goals of each offender. Over
the years, camps have focused on bushwork,
slash and burning, road clearance,
nursery work, land clearing, fire suppression,
millwork, and so on, to provide the older
inmates with a healthy and vigorous
way to do their time, plus providing the
opportunity to pick up some employable
skills and good work habits.   In custody
facilities the emphasis has been on
shopwork, carpentry, machining, tailoring,
sewing, bootmaking, and so on, with farming
available on a supervised gang basis.
Some of the results of that kind of work
in 1976, on a Province-wide basis, are
the following:
For the period from September 1, 1975,
the four sawmills shipped 559,391
fbm, having a net mill value of
$77,048.74. In addition, minor
products shipped such as cordwood,
posts, stakes, shingles, and shakes
were valued at $41,125.50, making a
total value (wood products shipped)
of $118,174.24.
In addition to the foregoing values
received, other work accomplished
included 165,074 man-hours
or 23,600 seven-hour man-days spent
in nursery pallet construction,
tree-planting, juvenile tree-spacing,
fencing (pastures and nurseries),
lake clean-up, nurseries, access roads,
and firefighting.
Prince George Regional Correctional
Centre continued to manufacture
inmate clothing for themselves and
romeo slippers for themselves and
other centres.
Twin Maples' tailor shop had a busy,
productive year.   They were, however,
only able to produce about half
of the estimated 6,000 pants
and 6,000 shirts required by the
Branch.
Oakalla Women's Correctional Centre
furnished all of the clothing
requirements for that centre as well as
a number of white shirts and pants
for other centres.
The farming operations throughout the
Province generally operated
satisfactorily, though in a holding
pattern pending regionalization of the
Branch. Farming operations will
require close examination in 1977, as
in 1976 the very rough dollar and
cents value picture of the various
farm operations, though not conclusive,
seems to indicate costs in excess
of what most products can be
purchased for on the open market.
The appropriateness of these kinds of
corrections programs has been subject
of an examination in 1976, which will
continue in 1977. Such an examination is
important not only with respect to
correctional goals, but the quality and
appropriateness of program can be indirectly
linked to escapes from correctional centres.
In 1975 there was an increase in the
number of escapes from correctional
facilities. Although all unlawful absences
directly from a centre are considered
escapes, it is important to qualify the word
 Q 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
by pointing out that the largest number
of these are in fact walkaways from open
settings, particularly forest camps.
With the increased use by the courts of
probation supervision, and with the phase-
out of Haney Correctional Centre for
young offenders, the camps are receiving a
much more troublesome, though not
necessarily dangerous, type of offender.
Young offenders generally are more
spontaneous, impulsive, have more energy,
and require a more intense kind of
programming than the older offender
previously received by camps. As a result of
efforts directed toward reducing escapes,
such as more screening and intensity
of programs, in 1976 escapes did drop 20
per cent, from 460 to 359.
Escapes are usually individual,
spontaneous actions, and while they may be
simply the expression of the desire to
"get away," many times escapes occur as
a result of an individual need to deal with
something on the outside, such as a
family problem. Sensitive staff can often
pick up on feelings of anxiety of an inmate
and provide that person with the assistance
required to overcome the problem
without adding the problem of having
escaped. Sometimes a referral for
counselling services is indicated.
The Branch has one full-time Senior
Psychologist who is responsible for
the delivery of all psychological services
throughout the Corrections Branch.
In addition to providing direct psychological
services, the Senior Psychologist has
liaison with psychologists in other
community agencies who will, where
possible, provide service to the Corrections
Branch within their community.
While the various community agencies
have been most co-operative, it is clear
that these community facilities have
severe personnel and program limitations
which preclude their being as helpful
as they might like to be. The continued
use of these facilities is therefore dependent
upon careful selection of referrals to
ensure that they fit the services the
community is willing to offer. It has become
clear that the community is not willing
to provide services to deal with presenting
correctional problems—an individual's
ability to handle a forestry camp placement,
education or work release, probation,
parole, etc. While this undoubtedly does
depend upon a number of psychological
characteristics, these are considered
correctional matters, and not mental health
matters. The Branch must continue to
provide its own expertise in these
and related areas.
Medical services throughout the Branch
are co-ordinated by the full-time
Senior Medical Officer. Each correctional
complex has the availability of local
doctors and dentists who visit the facilities
at regular intervals. Where security
is not an issue, and hospital services are
required, inmates use community facilities.
Where security is an issue, Corrections
has the availability of limited hospital
capacities at Lower Mainland Regional
Correctional Centre, and Alouette
River Unit. LMRCC hospital has a capacity
of 40 and one full-time and one half-time
doctor, and trained staff. The ARU
hospital has trained staff and is visited by a
doctor. It has a capacity of approximately
10. In addition, the Corrections Branch
has the availability of a specially designated
13-bed ward at the Vancouver General
Hospital. Ninety per cent of all
medical problems are handled locally.
The Branch remains thankful for the
excellent co-operation offered by the many
general hospitals whose services are
utilized.
In conclusion, it is apparent that the
operation of adult facilities is a complex and
multifaceted one with virtually every
aspect potentially emerging as an issue of
quality of services. A major portion
of operational budget is spent on food and
it is only in the last two years that
positions have come available for qualified
Food Services Officers for each complex,
and some upgrading of kitchens has
occurred. But basic issues with respect to
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 37
medical and health services, program
availability, and facility renovation and
replacement all focus on the need for
operational capital moneys.
FACILITIES AND    CAPACITIES
MAIN CENTRES
1. Lower   Mainland   Regional   Correctional
Centre   567
2. Oakalla Women's Correctional Centre .... 103
3. Vancouver  Island  Regional  Correctional
Centre   60
4. Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre .. 86
5. Prince   George   Regional   Correctional
Centre  (male) 113
(female) 26
6. New Haven Correctional Centre  40
7. Alouette River Unit  (male) 151
(Twin Maples Unit)  (female) 60
8. Chilliwack Security Unit    30
FOREST CAMPS
1. Boulder Bay Camp (Haney)   51
2. Pine Ridge Camps (Haney)   60
3. Stave Lake Camp (Haney)   48
4. Cedar Lake Camp (Haney)   41
5. lordan River Camp (Vancouver Island).... 48
6. Rayleigh Camp (Kamloops)   30
7. Clearwater Camp (Kamloops)     30
8. Hutda Lake Camp (Prince George  60
9. Ford Mountain Camp (Chilliwack)   60
10. Mount Thurston Camp (Chilliwack)   60
COMMUNITY CORRECTIONAL CENTRES
1.
Marpole.
5.
Snowdon.
2.
Burnaby.
6.
Kamloops.
3.
4.
Southview.
Victoria.
7.
Chilliwack.
COMMUNITY-BASED RESIDENTIAL
CENTRES
(Utilized by Branch for placement, bed space
purchased)
1. AIMS House.
2. Anchorage House.
3. Elizabeth Fry.
4. Kinghaven.
5. Haney Treatment Centre.
6. Narconon.
7. Hatfield House.
8. Shilo House.
9. Tricon Halfway Society.
10. Welcome Guest Lodge.
1 I. X-Kalay (closed in November 1976).
12. Activator's Society House.
13. Kiwanis House.
TEMPORARY ABSENCE
PROGRAM
Since 1973 the Temporary Absence
Program (TAP) has become a significant
sentence management tool and provides the
mechanism for major community re-entry
programming undertaken by the
Corrections Branch. Community re-entry
provides opportunities to participate
in community life while serving sentences
(for appropriate inmates) and is an
effective means to facilitate good pre-release
planning.
Temporary absences are granted for
three distinct purposes:
1. Short term—The use of temporary
absence to allow an individual to leave
a correctional centre for a specific
period of time up to a maximum of
15 days. These are granted for
maintaining contact with the family, or
the event of the death of a family
member, for other socialization
purposes, and for other
defined reasons.
2. Employment/Education—The
authority by which an inmate resides
at a community correctional centre
or community-based residential centre
while undertaking work, education,
or training.
3. Medical—Absence granted for the
purpose of obtaining medical
attention in community hospitals,
when it is not available within
correctional centres.
The crucial factor in temporary absence
programs is that the program or activity
the applicant plans to pursue in the
community must be as likely to benefit
him/her and the community as would any
program offered within the centre.
The inmate must pose no threat to the
community and be unlikely to go
unlawfully at large. Apart from the
community involvement made possible for
the inmate, the program avoids waste
of the community's own resources
 Q 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
and avoids costly duplication of resources
in institutions.
Although a total of 10,595 absences
was granted,* the 1,423 for ongoing
employment/education purposes are the
backbone of the program. On the average,
16.3 per cent of the sentenced
populations in 1976 partook of TAP,
with the high in May at 20 per cent and the
low of 13.1 per cent occurring in
February. All three figures are increases
over 1975, where the average was
12.9 per cent of the sentenced population.
An increase is also represented in the
approximately $1 million earned this year
by inmates on a temporary absence,
a doubling of previous years' earnings.
It should be noted that 50 per cent of the
money earned is returned to support
of families, payment of fines and restitution,
income tax, and room and board.
The balance is available for the inmate
upon release and can be important in
the inmate getting a good start.
Increases in revocations of temporary
absences over 1975 figures signal that
the granting of temporary absences requires
continuous vigilance in screening, and
exacting community investigations before
an absence is granted. The decentralization
of decision-making with respect to all
temporary absences, from the
Commissioner's office to the regions, which
occurred in November 1976, should
see itself expressed in fewer revocations.
In support of these moves, research
and evaluation of the program are being
undertaken by the Program Evaluation
and Data Systems section of the Branch.
Ongoing staff training and development
continues to be a need for Corrections
staff involved in this important program,
as well as continuous liaison with
police and other information systems.
PROVINCIAL CLASSIFICATION
Provincial Classification provides
services to all regional corectional centres
(reception) for sentenced inmates.
At admission, each inmate is seen by the
reception centre's own Classification
Officer for classification either to one of the
satellite programs of the particular
centre, or for interview by Provincial
Classification for transfer to another
institutional complex in the Province.
All decisions regarding transfer, or in
cases where placement plans are not clear,
are made by one of the nine Provincial
Classification Officers. It has been
the practice of the Provincial Officers to
work from the Lower Mainland area,
visiting outlying facilities from there.
In 1975 a full-time Provincial Classification
Officer was appointed at Vancouver
Island Regional Correctional Centre and,
in December of 1976, officers were
similarly appointed to the Prince George
and Kamloops Centres. These latter officers
are in fact the institutional Classification
Officers, and will be performing both roles.
The classification of an inmate is an
important first step in an over-all case
management plan for the individual inmate,
and is made out of an assessment of the
information available (pre-sentence
reports, previous institutional records,
police reports, interviews) and with the
participation of the inmate.
The Provincial Classification Officer then
places him/her in an available
Branch facility best suited to assist in
working through the plan. Where security
and control are indicated, placement
is made accordingly.
Provincial Classification was integrally
involved in the development of the
refined case-management system
implemented in 1976, referenced previously
in this Report.
In 1976 the number of classifications
undertaken by staff showed a 20-per-cent
increase from 1975, which in turn had
been a 51-per-cent increase from 1974.
(Refer to Table XX for a breakdown
of classifications by institutions.)  Although
this does not reflect any significant
changes in classification policy, there
* Refer to Statistics section of this report for more detail on temporary absence statistics.
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 39
has been a slightly less liberal policy in the
use of minimum security, and this has in
fact resulted in the reduction of escape
rate referenced previously.
The lack of adequate and humane
security facilities continues to be a source of
concern, particularly with respect to
young offenders. A survey by Provincial
Classification of young offenders held
at Lower Mainland Regional Correctional
Centre in December 1976 found the
following:
Of 234 sentenced inmates at LMRCC,
100 were young offenders, half of them
serving definite/indeterminate
sentences.
Half were held at LMC for security
and management problems which at
least temporarily precluded minimum
security placement.
The other half included medical and
psychiatric problems, some inadequate
or requiring protective custody,
some sentenced but waiting trial on
more serious charges, some awaiting
parole and temporary absence
decisions, or awaiting transfer
elsewhere.
Fifty-one had escaped once during their
present sentence, 38 twice or more.
Twenty-five had been admitted
under the age of 18.
The wide range of types and problems
and differences in degree of criminal
sophistication did indicate that a single
resources for these young offenders would
be neither appropriate nor manageable.
Resources for these inmates, the lack of
drug treatment programs, and the lack
of a resource in the Kootenays referenced
in the 1975 report have not yet been
resolved. It is anticipated that
regionalization over a period of time will
deal with some of these local and
Branch needs.
Table XX—Initial and Reclassifications, Calendar Year 1976,
With Comparative Totals for 1975
Institution
1976
1975
Total
Per Cent
Total
Per Cent
1,811
890
86
614
212
30
604
183
157
560
5
417
394
260
186
159
115
137
133
19
...
26.0
12.8
1.2
8.8
3.0
0.4
8.7
2.6
2.3
8.0
0.0
6.0
5.7
3.7
2.7
2.3
1.6
2.0
1.9
0.3
l,586i
652
88
577
54
4
504
186
22
307
2
306
340
238
244
165
139
109
129
30
131
27.3
11.2
1.5
9.9
Chilliwack Security Unit	
0.9
0.0
Stave Lake/Pine Ridge Camps	
8.7
3.2
Cedar Lake Camp	
0.4
5.3
0.0
5.3
5.9
4.1
4.2
Prince George Regional Correctional Centre	
2.8
2.4
1.9
Twin Maples Unit	
Prince George Regional Correctional Centre (female)
2.2
0.5
2.3
6,972
100.0
5,813
100.0
1 Included 217 (3.7 per cent) classified to LMRCC for temporary absence screening. The more accurate
comparative percentage of classifications to LMRCC would thus be 23.6 per cent, revealing an additional 2.7 per
cent classified to LMRCC in 1976.
 Q 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Provincial Classification processes all
applications with respect to the Corrections
Branch and the Federal/Provincial
Exchange of Services Agreement, whereby
inmates receiving sentences for either
jurisdictions may apply to spend
their sentence in the alternate jurisdiction.
In 1976, 33 applications for transfer
to the Provincial system were processed, of
which 15 were approved, while 11
applications were processed for transfer
to the Federal system, of which five were
approved. In the latter part of the
year up to 40 Federally sentenced inmates
were held at the Lower Mainland
Regional Correctional Centre in order
to give temporary relief to the B.C.
Penitentiary, when serious incidents had
diminished their capacity.
The move of the Branch in 1977 to
regionalization will have significant
implications for the operation of Provincial
Classification. Details with respect to
inter-region transfer and the variables with
respect to an emphasis on each region
developing its own range of resources will
not be available until later in 1977.
INSPECTION AND STANDARDS
In the fall of 1973 the office of the
Director of Inspection and Standards was
established, with two Inspectors appointed
in July of 1974 to work under his
direction. The responsibilities of this
specialized unit are
(1) to co-ordinate the development of
standards and procedures for the
operation of all facilities of
the Corrections Branch, including
custodial institutions, remand
centres, camps, attendance centres,
juvenile detention centres, and
community correctional centres;
(2) to act when complaints are
received from offenders under the
supervision of the Branch (inmates,
probationers, and parolees) who
consider that they have cause
for grievance;
(3)  to organize and develop an adequate
program to provide for regular
and special inspections of the
operation of all facilities in order to
monitor the quality of service
delivered, and to make inquiries and
investigations on behalf of the
Commissioner of Corrections.
In late 1975, Inspection and Standards,
with the Institutional Services Division,
commenced work on the preparation of a
Manual of Operations for the Division,
based on Corrections Branch regulations.
During 1976 the format was defined
and the first group of procedures, plus the
manual binder, were produced, and
distributed in early 1977. Work is
continuing on this massive task. The
revision of Gaol Rules and Regulations
required considerable energy from this
section during 1976. Work on Regulations
for the Youth Containment Program
to be implemented by the Branch in 1977
also consumed the time of this small unit.
Continuing with ongoing responsibility
for standards of high-risk wilderness
programs and activities, the Director was
involved in an Inter-Ministry Committee
which was established during the year
to evaluate such programs either operated
or funded by the Ministries of the
Attorney-General and Human Resources.
The Ministries of the Provincial Secretary
and Travel Industry, Recreation and
Conservation, and Forests were also
represented on the Committee.   Of the
programs examined during 1976, one was
closed down until facilities were upgraded
and staff met required qualifications, one
was refused funding, and another was
required to meet certain standards.
A number of reports from correctional
centres are monitored each year—
staff accidents, safety and health committee
meetings, inmate accidents, boards of
inquiry, statements of punishment and
escapes. There was a 21-per-cent decrease
in the number of escapes and walkaways
this year, though the number still
occasions some concern. Staff were involved
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 41
in 97 accidents, which was a decrease
in number from 1975, but an increase in
time lost. There were 462 accidents
concerning inmates, which is a
slight increase over the previous year.
Eleven Boards of Inquiry were held relative
to these accidents.
With the co-operation of Corrections
Staff, B.C. Police College members, and the
RCMP Ballistics Section members,
Inspection and Standards was able to
complete work commenced in 1975 on
fire-arms selection, standardization, and
redistribution in the Branch. In 1977, it is
anticipated that older firearms will
be replaced with newer models, thus
completing this exercise.
Verbal or written grievances were
received during 1976 from or on behalf of
202 inmates, listing 230 complaints.
This represents a 41-per-cent increase over
1975, which in turn had represented
a 100-per-cent increase from 1974. It is
clear that this service is recognized
by inmates as an objective arbiter, and even
though it places considerable strain on
the time of the personnel from this
unit, it is obviously an effective component
of Branch operations.
A total of 38 investigations was carried
out during 1976—special investigations,
investigations of accidents, fires, escapes,
staff misconduct, assault, and suicide.
Some of these arose from inmate grievances.
Finally, during 1976, a total of 18
inspections of various Corrections Branch
facilities was carried out in order to
monitor health standards, facility standards,
and so on.
FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S
SERVICES
During 1975, issues relating to family
and children's matters and specifically
with regard to the Branch's relationship
with the Family and Children's Law
Commission were explored and clarified.
During 1976 that work was virtually
completed.
In December 1973 a Royal Commission
on Family and Children's Law was
established to inquire into and make
recommendations with respect to all aspects
of family and children's law in force in
British Columbia, the administration
of justice relative to such laws, and ancillary
services to Courts in family law matters.
The Commission was not only given a
mandate to recommend changes in the laws
relating to families and children, but also
was authorized to undertake projects
to implement and test proposals for reform.
As a result, the Commission established
a pilot project to test the concept of a
Unified Family Court. In addition, the
Commission produced 13 reports which
recommended both structural reform of the
Courts operating in the family law field
and major changes in substantive family and
children's law.
The Commission's Fourth Report entitled
"The Family, The Courts And The
Community," dealt with the expansion of
the Unified Family Court concept throughout
the Province, the delivery of Family and
Juvenile Court counselling services, and in
particular, the delivery of services to
young people in conflict with the law—
one specific focus of the Corrections Branch.
In late June 1975 the Provincial Cabinet
accepted the recommendations of the
Fourth Report in principle. On July 7,
1975, an Implementation Team was
appointed to bring about a phased
implementation throughout the Province of
the recommendations.
During 1975 the Branch had continued
to maintain Family Relations Act services in
most other areas of the Province by
providing maintenance order supervision
and preparing custody and access reports,
constrained only by manpower resources.
The end of 1975 saw the issuance of a
jointly prepared policy statement of
respective responsibilities of Corrections
Branch and the Implementation Team.
As a result of a further Government
decision in early 1976 it was decided that,
effective April 1, the Corrections Branch
 Q 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
would assume full responsibility for the
Unified Family Court Project and
for further development of services in the
Family Court area throughout the Province,
in order to locate such services under
one umbrella organization.   Specifically,
the Implementation Team of the Royal
Commission on Family and Children's Law
(Berger Commission) was disbanded
and the Unified Family Court pilot project
was transferred to within the Community
Services Division of the Branch.
The completed phasing-in of operations
was to have been completed by the end of
1976, but will be extended to March 31,
1977.
It is the stated position of the Branch that
unification of the courts where possible
should continue to be undertaken.
The priority given Family Relations Act
services has been raised in the Branch with
the over-all objective being the provision
of full services throughout the Province
at some time in the future. One aspect of the
phasing-in of the UFC Project has been
to define and utilize the innovative
procedures and practices implemented in
the project, and take advantage of these with
respect to the rest of the Province.
A major aspect of this was a handbook on
Family Relations Act services for field
*taff, which was produced in late 1976 and
will be distributed in early 1977.
The major issues now, with respect to
expansion of the services, rest within a
context of general Government fiscal
restraint. At present all new Probation
Officers as part of their training are given
training in family court counselling
techniques and related family law and
procedures, in order that eventually, through
additional in-service training, officers
throughout the Province are in a position to
provide Family Court Counselling
Services, when designated. It is seen by the
Branch as absolutely important that those
persons approaching the justice system
to seek resolution to marital problems have
available the necessary personal support
services, and that personnel employed in this
area are well trained and qualified.
However, with the many other heavy
demands made on the time of Probation
Officers, the need for further personnel
becomes paramount.
JUVENILE SERVICES
(PROBATION)
Under the authority of section 7 of the
Corrections Act, juveniles in conflict with
the law are referred to a Probation Officer
by the Crown for a pre-court inquiry.
An investigation is done on the young
person, and his/her behaviour in the home,
at school, and in the community is assessed.
Based on the findings, a recommendation
for no further action (if the matter has
resolved itself), diversion, or court action
is made. On the strength of that
recommendation, the Crown may end its
involvement, or refer the matter to court.
During 1976 a total of 10,710 such inquiries
was carried out by probation staff across
the Province.
Although a child can be brought into
Family Court and charged from the age of 7
on, it is the general practice in this
Province, if possible, to deal with children
under the age of 14 on an out-of-court basis.
Corrections planning related to juveniles
involves attempts to formalize this
practice administratively.
Five areas of activity and responsibility
are identified in the delivery of Juvenile
Services.
Diversion programs—Probation Officers
attempt to provide effective intervention
for juveniles prior to a charge being laid and
the court process being entered into by
(a) making full use of appropriate
community resources and agencies
on a referral basis, e.g., the
use of volunteers;
(b) engaging in short-term intervention
processes with the child and
his/her family.
Activities under (a) often involve the
Probation Officer becoming an educator
and catalyst in the development and
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 43
operation of programs, particularly in the
areas of prevention and diversion.
Supervision in the community—In those
cases where an element of supervision
is necessary, more so than can be agreed
upon on an informal basis, or there
is no admission of guilt relating to the
charge, the matter is referred to court. If
supervision is ordered, a number of
conditions of supervision may be applied,
and the juvenile must live up to the order
or be held accountable before the
court. The Probation Officer will attempt
to utilize all the necessary community
resources in attempting to assist the juvenile
to meet these responsibilities. This
requires close liaison at the local level
between the officer and appropriate
Government ministries, particularly the
Ministries of Education, Human
Resources, and Health.
Probation supervision and special
corrections programs—In those cases where
the community and other agencies are
unable to supply support services, or the
available services are not suitable or
available at the local level, the Corrections
Branch has developed programs which
fall under the general rubric of "attendance
centres." Juveniles may be committed
to such programs by the court as a condition
of probation.
There are three categories of attendance
programs:
(a) Daily attendance, i.e., after school
or work, a program where there are
specific activities to be undertaken.
(b) Week-end attendance, i.e., where
the probationer must attend
and reside at the program from
Friday night to Sunday afternoon,
until successful graduation.
(c) Full residential attendance.
These programs offer the court the option
of ordering supervision in structured
settings of a specific kind of program for
those persons unable to respond to
supervision in the community. The actual
program varies from educational training,
recreation, and community service activities
to involvement in wilderness "outward
bound" types of experiences. The
Corrections Branch operates, staffs, and
(or) funds these programs, and a close
relationship with schools, child welfare
services, mental health programs, and other
community agencies is maintained.
Youth detention centres—Are operated
by the Corrections Branch and are to
provide secure facilities on a temporary
basis for juveniles at risk at the time of their
arrest, and for purposes of secure remand
as authorized by an order of the court. In
1976 the Branch issued a set of policy
guidelines with respect to the use of
private remand homes throughout the
Province as a most effective alternative to
this kind of detention.
The need for secure pre- and post-
dispositional facilities for some juveniles
has been a continuing controversy.
The Corrections Branch is committed to
developing effective resources, and in
1976 undertook an examination of different
program approaches, including methods
for holding children before the courts who
may be disturbed, chronically addicted
to drugs, or dangerous to themselves
or the public. In October of 1976, Cabinet
approved the allocation of additional
staff and resources for the implementation of
a "Youth Containment Program."
Prevention—The Probation Officer
has a responsibility to encourage the
community and other Government
departments to develop programs that will
reduce the probability of children
coming into conflict with the law. This
requires ongoing involvement with schools,
particularly at the junior-high level, and
contributing to the planning of
appropriate programs to keep children
involved in school and constructive
community activities.
For those who do come to the attention
of the Probation Officer, formally or
informally, the emphasis is always
on referral to private or community
 Q 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
agencies. The Branch establishes or utilizes
its own special programs only when no
other appropriate alternative can be found.
In 1976 a total of 16,084 reports
(pre-court inquiries, pre-sentence reports,
verbal reports, and others) were prepared
by Probation Officers throughout the
Province with respect to juveniles, a role
which is integral to effective intervention
with youth in conflict with the law.
In this regard the further refinement of the
Court Resource Officer's role in both
juvenile and adult probation contexts, in
1976, found itself an accepted and
important operational practice. The
availability of a Probation Officer in court
to facilitate information flow and do
referrals, short reports, and so on, is central
to the court support role of the Probation
Officers.
YOUTH DETENTION,
ATTENDANCE AND
CONTAINMENT CENTRES
The Corrections Branch operates a
number of special programs for youth in
coftflict with the law, and as indicated
previously in the Report is in the process of
implementing a facilities and programs
package for the containment of youth (male
and female) for whom no other resource
is effective. The following is additional
detail with respect to these important
areas of Branch operations:
In 1974 the Administration of Justice Act
gave the Province, in particular the
Corrections Branch of the Ministry of the
Attorney-General, responsibility for the
detention of youth (male and female)
awaiting trial, disposition, or placement.
This included the only two detention
facilities in operation—in Vancouver and
Victoria. These responsibilities had
previously been apportioned to
municipalities, under the Family and
Children's Act (1963) and later the
Provincial Court Act (1969). However,
with the exception of these two facilities,
there had been little other development, and
the two centres had been providing the
major detention capacities throughout the
Province, with attendant problems of
dislocation from communities where
placement plans are worked out, travel, and
so on. The alternative for short stays had
been police cells in local communities.
With the assumption of responsibility
the Branch took to phase out the antiquated
Vancouver facility, upgrade the more
recent Victoria facility, and set
policies with respect to remand throughout
the Province.
In June of 1976, after an eight-month
delay where juveniles were housed
at the former Haney Correctional Centre,
juvenile detention facilities at Willingdon,
Burnaby, replaced the outdated centre
in Vancouver City, which was bulldozed to
the ground. The Vancouver JDH was
a constant source of concern to the Branch
and although the move out, forced by
a heating failure, was sooner than planned,
it was welcome. The Willingdon facilities
and program possibilities are quite
adequate, though programs for those on
remand in both centres (Willingdon
and Victoria) are a perennial problem due
to the short average length of stay mixed
with some longer remands. In 1976
the average length of stay at Victoria YDC
was five days, with a total of 985 admissions
and an average daily count of 12 (boys
and girls) in the course of the year.
In August of 1976 the Community
Services Division (Probation) authorized
a set of comprehensive guidelines and
policies for the development and funding
of private remand homes throughout the
Province in an attempt to facilitate the
development of local resources as a more
appropriate alternative than local police
cells, or transfer to Vancouver or Victoria,
and $76,000 of funds were allocated for
spending on this area to the end of the
1976/77 fiscal year.
The Corrections Branch continues to
provide an emphasis on attendance
programs for youth on probation, requiring
slightly more control than that offered
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 45
through regular probation supervision.
These programs (as defined previously) range
from daily attendance through week-end/
residential attendance at special programs
focusing on educational, recreational,
and in particular wilderness experience
activities. DARE (Vancouver), Metchosin
Camp (Victoria), Victoria Attendance,
Porteau Camp (Vancouver), and DASH
(Chilliwack) are the major such programs
operated by the Branch.
The Youth Attendance Program in
Victoria had an average monthly enrolment
of 33 during the course of the year, with
eight of those on the school program,
and a total enrolment over the year of 79.
The three major residential attendance
programs run by the Branch—Porteau,
Metchosin, and DASH—provided services
for 125 (juvenile boys), 124 (juvenile
and young adult, boys and girls), and 126
(boys) respectively. The DASH
program anticipates offering a program for
girls in 1977. The DARE program saw
a total of 48 boys and 16 girls in its
programs for 1976.
House of Concord Attendance (Langley)
is funded now by the Corrections Branch,
transferred in 1976 from Human Resources.
The Branch also provides major funds for
a variety of other attendance programs
throughout the Province, often developed
through the efforts of local staff—Joss
Mountain (Vernon), Step-Up (Vancouver),
Port Alberni, Project Adventure, Hunter
Creek (Hope), Santa Rosa Ranch (Trail),
Grand Forks, One Way Adventure (Surrey),
Fort St. John, and Fraser Regional Adult
Diversion (Burnaby). In 1976/77 the
Branch supplied some $636,500 of funds
to the latter group, with the exception
of Concord, on a purchase of service basis.
The development in 1976 of the
framework of a containment package
for youth requiring special secure programs,
which will see implementation in 1977,
is the result of a continuing lack of
appropriate resources for "hard core
delinquent" youths and is the result
of considerable study prior to the Cabinet of
Government decision in October 1976.
The containment package being developed
is a three-levelled one which at the most
secure level provides strict custody
for those juvenile offenders whose behaviour
is deemed to be dangerous to others.
The present two youth detention centres
in Victoria and Vancouver will provide the
additional capacity to hold juveniles at
the post-disposition stage in strict custody.
Victoria is to have a capacity of 10
secure beds and Burnaby of 20. The
program in security facilities will focus on
work or school and supervised
recreation activities. Use of the full range
of community services will be encouraged to
include the involvement of volunteer
services wherever possible.
A second level of containment package
will be forest camps, which will provide
the option of a more definitive and active
program for juveniles, which will be
centred in the wilderness program concept.
Centre Creek Camp at Chilliwack and
Lakeview Camp at Campbell River have
been identified to have a capacity of 60 each.
The third level will be secure group homes
which will provide residential placement and
close staff supervision. The security
facilities and the forest camps are anticipated
as being operational in late 1977 with the
opening of the secure group homes
anticipated for 1978.
The principle in containment is to continue
to use the variety of resources available
through other Government ministries and
private agencies. The Corrections Branch is
concerned that it not be involved in
building mere "juvenile jails." Though the
details are not concluded at this time,
it is clear that there will be checks and
balances, both legislative and administrative,
on access to the containment'facilities.
It is considered absolutely important that
each containment program option maintains
the widest possible community base which
is congruent with its security rating, and the
highest level of co-ordination and
co-operation between existing resources
offered by the different Government
ministries—Human Resources, Health,
 Q 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
and Education. In order to facilitate such
co-ordination, a Committee of Deputy
Ministers responsible for those ministries,
including the Commissioner of Corrections,
was formed in late 1976. The three-level
range of programming within containment
also will mitigate against the possibility
of containment becoming mere
"juvenile jails."
ADULT SERVICES
(PROBATION)
Probation services for adults (17 and over)
have placed emphasis on the formal
responsibilities of offenders, as virtually all
such persons supervised by a Probation
Officer have come to him/her via the court,
with specific conditions to be met.
A wide range of community resources have
always been utilized, but the major
element of the supervision has been the
formal reporting responsibility. The
emphasis on the use of diversion in the
juvenile sphere has spread to application
with adult offenders where appropriate.
Probation Officers' involvement in
diversion initiatives with adults, as with
juveniles, is sanctioned and encouraged, and
there has been extensive involvement with
local police, lawyers, courts, and private
community agencies to attempt to make the
court process only one of a number
of effective alternatives for those over 17.
Some jurisdictions have been experimenting
with a pre-court inquiry for certain adult
offenders in an atempt to divert persons who
clearly do not require the full, formal
court process.
Increased involvement of Probation
Officers as available resources to the court,
to provide an input related to the social
aspects of the sentencing process, has been
a priority.   The Court Resource Officer role
has continued to be developed in 1976,
with verbal assessments and reports being
carried out on the spot for the court,
assisting in making the sentencing process
a rational and responsive process, and
to do away with the need to prepare a
full written report where such is not
necessary.
Several different types of adult programs
are available or are being developed to fill
the gap between supervision in the
community and total incarceration.   The
Community Service Order Program is
used specifically as an alternative to
incarceration.   Attendance programs for
young adults are available in some locations
and services are purchased by the Branch
to fill in some gaps.   Community
correctional centre programs have been
used in some instances for those who
require residence in addition to regular
community supervision and for whom there
are no appropriate community resources.
The development of effective programs
for adults under probation supervision,
or under voluntary diversionary
supervision, is still in its infancy, but
is a priority of the Corrections Branch.
With the continued high level of use of
Temporary Absence (TAP) from
institutions in 1976, Probation Officers
have been required to do more community
investigations on adults being considered
for release.   A significant element in
any decision to grant a temporary absence
where the applicant wishes to return for
any length of time to a certain area is
the findings of the Probation Officer/
Probation Interviewer with regard to the
proposed living or work situation.
The average daily case load of adults for
Probation Officers during 1976 was 22
out of a total of 30.   In addition in the
course of the year Probation Officers
completed 3,828 pre-sentence reports on
adults, 1,534 community investigations
for temporary absence, 896 verbal reports to
the court, 412 reports for B.C. Board of
Parole, 92 reports for the National
Parole Board, 450 reports to the court with
respect to an offender's ability to pay a
fine, and 822 other kinds of reports, for a
total of 8,034 reports on adult offenders.
The preparation of such material continues
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 47
to require a high level of energy in order
to have available enough time to carry
out supervision of probationers and
parolees and maintain an involvement
in developing community resource for such
offenders.
COMMUNITY SERVICE ORDER
PROGRAM
The requirement that juvenile offenders
perform work for the benefit of the
community or the victim goes back many
years in this Province.   It was usually
arranged informally under the initiative
of individual Probation Officers (during the
pre-court process) or judges (at the time
of making a disposition).   It was not
until the 1970's that its use was first
proposed on an organized basis for both
juveniles and adults.   Significant dates in its
development are as follows:
From June 1970 to March 1972 the
concept of community service as a
sentencing alternative was discussed
under the auspices of the B.C.
Corrections Association with a wide
variety of people in the justice system,
with business and union leaders,
and with community agencies in the
Province.
In March 1972 the Ministry of the
Attorney-General supported the
provisions for community service as a
condition of probation under the
Criminal Code, and the Provincial
Cabinet passed an Order in Council
which provided that probationers who
were engaged in unpaid work
programs as a sentencing alternative
would be considered eligible for
benefits under the Workmen's
Compensation Act (1968), in case
of injury.   In March 1973 the B.C.
Task Force on Correctional Services
formally recommended that community
service be developed as a noncustodial
sentence in the Province.
From March 1973 to November 1974
a number of discussions were held
as to implementation, and on the
latter date a pilot project was started
by the Branch in nine locations
in the Province, with specialist staff
hired to develop activity banks of
information, and to supervise
those given probation orders including
community service.
In late 1975 the decision was made to
expand the program to all parts of the
Province and, in the 1976/77 fiscal
year, budget allowances were made for
20 Community Service Officers
in the following locations: Victoria
(2), Duncan, Nanaimo, Courtenay,
Vancouver (2), Vancouver North
Shore, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam,
Maple Ridge, Burnaby, New
Westminster, Abbotsford, Surrey,
Delta, Kamloops, Kelowna, Williams
Lake, Nelson, Cranbrook, Prince
George, and Prince Rupert.   At the
time of writing, 24 officers are located
around the Province.
During 1976 a total of 2,172 community
service orders were made throughout the
Province, 1,174 for juveniles and 998
for adults.   This total represents an increase
in orders from 1975 to 1976 of 261
per cent.   The total number of hours
work completed for 1975 and 1976 has
been 109,241, with the average hours per
order approximately 40 hours.
Approximately 94 per cent of all orders
are with respect to community work as
opposed to service to the victim.   The
percentage of orders successfully completed
for 1975 and 1976 for juveniles and
adults is 93.3.   For a more detailed
breakdown of statistics for the period
January 1975 to May 1976, refer to the
Statistics Section in this Report.
The Community Service Order Program
continues to be a priority of the Branch,
and many Probation Officers continue to
operate the program in locations where
Community Service Officers are not
available.   More than many correctional
programs, it epitomizes a sense of justice
as not only a clear response to crime
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 Q 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA
and delinquency, but also a program
which allows humane and effective
consequences for offences; consequences
which are economical to operate,
which avoid the unnecessary use of
prison, and which are available to the
many offenders who are unable to pay a fine.
IMPAIRED DRIVERS' COURSES
Impaired Drivers' Courses are designed
as an informative and educational
program for convicted impaired drivers,
and its operation represents an important
area of operations for the Corrections
Branch.   The idea had beginnings in
Salmon Arm, B.C., in 1973 but gained
momentum after the Province-wide
showing by the British Columbia
Automobile Association of the Film "DWI"
(Driving While Intoxicated), which
focused on a program in Phoenix, Ariz.
In the spring of 1973 a group of local
citizens, including Nanaimo Probation,
gathered together information from
Phoenix and from Alberta and developed
a four-evening, 2 V2 -hour per evening
format in consultation with the courts and
community resource people in the area.
Funding was obtained from the Alcohol and
Drug Commission.   Funds were received,
a moderator was subsequently appointed,
and the Nanaimo IDC became a
formal pilot project.   On the initiative
of the local Probation Officers and
the ADC, a manual was produced and
distributed Province-wide.   The response
was tremendous, with Probation personnel
instigating projects in many locations
throughout the Province, which were
then funded by local community groups,
or the Alcohol and Drug Commission. In
September of 1974 a consultant was
hired by the Corrections Branch to
facilitate continued development and
evaluation of IDC's and to process funding
applications.   The Insurance Corporation
of British Columbia offered funds for
Impaired Drivers' Courses.
In April 1975 a Provincial Joint
Advisory Committee was formed to exercise
general control over the development
of IDC's, maintain standards and
consistency, ensure wide community
involvement and interest, and make
recommendations on options for solving
drinking and driving problems.   This
committee was composed of a representative
from the Corrections Branch (Ministry
of Attorney-General), the Alcohol
and Drug Commission, the Insurance
Corporation of British Columbia, and the
Motor-vehicle Branch.
In the 1976/77 fiscal year the
Corrections Branch has assumed a more
integral funding role, with $142,000
being allocated to operate IDC's in 33
locations throughout the Province.
Problems in administration procedures
for these funds to the wide number of
community service people which the
courses utilize (i.e., doctors, judges, Crown
counsel, coroners, ambulance drivers,
alcoholism counsellors, Motor-vehicle
Branch and Insurance Corporation of British
Columbia representatives, and Probation
Officers), who may also be Government
employees, has caused some concern
in 1976, but has been resolved.
Impaired Drivers' Courses are unique in
the justice system as they have sprung
from, and only continue as a result of,
wide-ranging community participation in a
formalized sentencing option for the
court. The Branch is concerned,
however, that IDC is not a final solution
to stem the tide of injury, death, property
damage, and human grief which arises from
this particular form of alcohol and driving
abuse.
BAIL SUPERVISION AND
PRE-TRIAL SERVICES
Prior to the Bail Reform Act of 1972,
it was customary for persons who had
been charged with an offence to be
released on either a promise to reappear
by posting bail, or to be remanded in
custody, usually into maximum-security
remand facilities.   Indications were that a
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 49
large number of those remanded into
custody probably did not need to be
incarcerated, and that such incarceration
brought with it a whole host of other
related problems.
However, after the implementation of the
Bail Reform Act, which allowed increased
discretion to the police and courts in remand
arrangements, there were a large number
of abuses by persons who entered into an
agreement to appear in court but who
did not appear, or who committed further
offences during the time they were released
on bail. This indicated that, for some
offenders, a more organized method of pretrial supervision was required. To that end,
in September of 1974 the Bail
Supervision Pilot Project was implemented
in the Provincial Courts in Vancouver as
an experimental program of the Corrections
Branch, jointly funded by the Branch,
the Justice Development Commission, and
the Federal Government. Bail Supervisors
were subsequently appointed by the
court as Probation Officers. By the end
of 1974 there were four Bail Supervisors,
increasing to eight in 1975. They
supervised a total of 752 persons during
ihe year. During 1975 the program
expanded to provide services for Victoria
(in September) and Surrey (in November).
During 1976 a total staff of 12 (nine
Supervisors) for those locations each had
an average case load of 50, with
approximately 1,400 cases supervised
during the year. The Vancouver staff also
initiated service in North Vancouver
during 1976.
Bail Supervision is perceived as a
supervising agent for the courts with a dual
responsibility, first to the court, and
second in providing direction to the accused
which will enable him/her to meet the
commitment and appear for trial. It is not
presumed that staff must intervene with the
accused except where it is deemed necessary
by the court. Clients are accused, not
convicted, persons. However, Bail
Supervisors will not ignore personal
problems where they perceive they can assist
the accused by mutual agreement. Much
of the assistance granted clients is through
referral to Government or private
agencies for legal, employment, financial,
residential, psychological, and social or
health services.
In April 1976 the wider area of pre-trial
volunteer program responsibilities was
assumed by the Corrections Branch
(Planning and Development—Co-ordinator
of Bail Supervision). This service
involved 10 volunteers and one staff person
(located at Lower Mainland Regional
Correctional Centre) who becomes
responsible to the co-ordinator of Bail
Supervision for co-ordination of volunteers
and direct service to remandees at LMRCC.
A small grant funding capacity and
responsibility was assumed with respect to
pre-trial (also known as diversion) projects
in the private sector. The extent of
resources of the Branch available to become
more comprehensively involved in the
pre-trial area is limited at the time of
writing. The policy implications surrounding
Government versus private sector
responsibility with respect to funding, the
use of volunteers, and so on, require
continued clarification.
STAFF DEVELOPMENT
The training, education, and development
of staff has continued to be a high
priority in the Corrections Branch in 1976.
The quality of service provided by staff
in a service-oriented field such as
Corrections is directly related to the
quality of staff. This quality can be
enhanced and promoted through timely and
meaningful staff development programs.
Reorganization within the Staff
Development Section, which consists of 14
training staff and four clerical support staff,
resulted in a realignment and reclarification
of all roles to ensure a capability of
responding to all priority training needs
while maximizing the expertise and training
manpower available.   A matrix style of
organization was initiated in April 1976,
and proved effective in allowing a high
 Q 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA
degree of flexibility in responding to
training needs as determined by Branch
managers. An ongoing committee of
Institutional Directors was set up to enhance
the identification of training needs for
institutional staff.
During the calendar year the training
needs tended to far exceed the response
capacity of the training section's
manpower, and therefore priorities had to
be set. Fiscal restraints by Government
early in the year led to a reduction in the
Staff Development Section establishment by
six positions.
During the year a total of 567 Branch
staff was involved in a total of 1,575
man-weeks of training courses which ranged
from one-week workshops to an 18-week
Probation Officer course. A total of 115
Security Officers completed the four-phase
recruit training, and 18 Probation Officers
received a comprehensive basic training
orientation program.
As the Branch did not undergo any
expansion during this year, the training
of recruits in both institutions and
community services was carried out only to
replace positions vacated through attrition.
Other courses carried out during the year
included the following:
Correctional Officer Development
Courses (six courses of two weeks,
106 participants).
Correctional Officer Tutor Course (one
course of one week, eight participants).
Group Leadership Program, Twin Maples
(eight participants).
Community Service Officers Course (one
course of two weeks, eight
participants).
Probation Officer Refresher Courses
(three courses of one week,
51 participants).
Probation Supervisors' Workshop (one
course of one week, 22 participants).
Introductory Management Programs.
(two courses of two weeks, 41
participants).
Senior Management Workshop
(one course of one week,
23 participants).
Deputy Directors' Workshop (one
course of one week, 30 participants).
Senior Management Training Program
(First three weeks of a 12-week
program, 10 participants).
Collective Agreement Workshop
(two days, 10 participants).
Staff Trainers' Workshop (three days,
14 participants).
Conflict Management/Hostage Situation/
Crisis Intervention Workshops
(two days, 32 participants).
Crisis Intervention Workshops—Youth
Detention Centre (two workshops,
16 participants).
In addition to the preceding, 52 Branch
staff participated in courses run by
colleges, universities, and private agencies
and were funded by the Public Service
Commission Staff Development
Appropriation Fund in the amount
of $11,669 for course fees.
A further 104 individuals were financed
in special courses and conferences
through the Branch Staff Development
Budget in the amount of $5,251.
Five Branch staff were approved for
educational leave with 75 per cent pay
to pursue graduate studies in various
master's degree programs and a further
six Branch staff were assisted in fees for
undergraduate training.
In spite of considerable resources being
allocated to the training of new Security
Officers, the problem of catching up
on the backlog of untrained officers was
not overcome.   Shortages of manpower in
institutions and lack of availability of
training relief staff has caused serious
problems regarding the timing and
effectiveness of recruit training.   It would
appear that new policies will have to be
adopted to ensure a more effective process
of recruitment, selection, and training of
new institutional staff.
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 51
As a result of the Government policy
decision to place Family Relation Act
services under the jurisdiction of the
Corrections Branch, a major emphasis
during the calendar year has been
the upgrading of skills of Community
Services staff in the area of family
counselling, conciliation counselling, and
administration of the Family Relations Act.
Management training programs for all
levels of staff continued to be a high
priority and included Introductory
Management courses for first- and
second-line supervisors, a workshop for
institutional directors, regional directors,
and deputy directors, and a workshop for
Community Services supervisors.   As
a result of the reorganization of the
Branch from a divisional structure to a
regional management structure, a major
undertaking in the latter part of the
year was the development of a Senior
Management Training Program for the six
new Regional Directors of Corrections and
Senior Managers in the Commissioner's
Office.   This course commenced in late
November and focused on the areas
of organization and management theory,
contemporary correctional theory, and team
effectiveness development.
Further planning was carried out during
the year toward the development of a
justice institute which will provide an
opportunity for the sharing of training
resources and expertise between all justice
system components.   Lack of adequate
training facilities was the recurring
problem during the year, and a need still
exists for better ventilated, larger classrooms,
in a centralized facility which will allow
for better integration of training staff.
PROGRAM EVALUATION AND
DATA SYSTEMS
During the past year the Research
Section of the Planning and Development
Division underwent continuing development
of its structure, objectives, and output.
The name of the section was officially
changed from Research to Program
Evaluation and Data Systems.   This new
title reflects a change in emphasis from a
more formalized academic stance to
one concerned with actively supporting and
evaluating ongoing Branch programs,
as well as aiding in the planning and
development of new programs and policies.
Evaluation has been defined as a
procedure for ascertaining whether an event,
process, or situation (real or conceptualized)
is "better" than another.   This procedure
may include steps for measuring "how
much better" and for explaining the
reasons for the difference.   The procedure
includes at least four elements—formulation
of the objective(s), identification of the
proper criteria to be used in measuring
success, determination and explanation of
the degree of success, and recommendations
for further program activity.
In 1976 the unit became involved in
the evaluation of a variety of programs
and in several cases this involvement led to
the production of formalized reports:
Analysis of the data on women offenders
throughout the Province led to a
report specifically dealing with the
Vancouver Island Region.
Involvement with the Courts Planning
and Facility Group led to the
production of remand information to
aid in the planning of new remand
facilities.
Analysis of the data on the native
population led to a published report
entitled Native Indians in the B.C.
Correctional System.
Analysis of the data on the Community
Service Order Program has been
completed and a formal report is being
written.
Preparation of the data for a second Bail
Supervision report was started as
well as analysis of data for the
B.C. Board of Parole cases and the
use of definite and indeterminate
sentencing.
 Q 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The design of a report dealing with the
Temporary Absence Program and
a research design to evaluate
Impaired Drivers' Courses were under
way by the end of the year.
A variety of on-demand reports have
been produced.   A good example was
the development of data to evaluate
the feasibility of utilizing the
Chilliwack Forest Camp Complex
as an admission centre handling the
complete range of institutional cases
(including remand).
Data for nonevaluative reports (such as
the Annual Report, Cabinet
presentations) as well as information
requested by external researchers
have also been major activities.
A variety of research and program
evaluation tools was developed in 1976.
These tools are basically investments
in computer software that allow for the
continued monitoring and analysis of
correctional programs.   One of the key
developments in this area was a computer
simulation model which shows the flow
of offenders through the B.C. Correctional
System.   The model is of value both for
analyses of historical processes as well as
projections of future populations and work
loads.   It can be used to dynamically
analyse policy decision, and questions of
the "what if" nature.
Another development is the restructuring
of the computerized Master Offender File
into a format acceptable to SPSS (Statistical
Package for the Social Sciences).   This
package allows the use of a wide
variety of statistical techniques to analyse
large volumes of data.   A further
development in this area was the inclusion
of information which was program specific,
such as Community Service Order
Assessment Forms, onto the program
evaluation computer subfiles.   This is
information which was not previously stored
in computerized form.   A development
commencing in early 1977 is the acquisition
of computerized census data which are
organized along the boundaries of the
Corrections Branch regions, and the
creation of an evaluation module to
analyse recidivism in terms of population
trends.
In addition to improvements in the
research and evaluation area, major
progress also was made in the area of
design of an operational information
system.   A feasibility study carried out
between December 1975 and May
1976 pointed out several areas in which the
duplication of effort by field staff could be
eliminated.   This report received both
technical approval, and approval of the
Corrections Branch Senior Staff, in June
of 1976. By October of 1976 the plan
had also been officially approved by the
Treasury Board.
After having been approved by the
Corrections Branch senior staff, a Steering
Committee was formed to focus on the
training needs of the Branch and the best
means of implementing the plan.   As well
as focusing on training and education, a
demonstration model was developed.
This demonstration model utilized the last
10,000 active records from the computerized
file.   The purpose of this demonstration
was to act as an information vehicle to
show managers and staff how an on-line
operational information system could be of
benefit.   The time period between
September and December 1976 was
absorbed in training staff and giving
demonstrations to various groups throughout
the Province.   As well, during this time,
initial plans for the definition stage of
systems development took place, which is
the first stage of implementing the
directions given by the feasibility study.
Information terminals will be in place in
1977 in selected locations throughout
the Province.
VOLUNTEER PROGRAMS
Corrections has taken the position that
criminal justice solutions lie at least in
part in the community itself, as it is the
community by its legislation which sets the
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 53
limits on acceptable modes of social
behaviour.   Not only does the solution
lie in the community but the most effective
resources are provided by members of the
community and their involvement in seeking
solutions to the problems. The Volunteer
Program involves the continued search
by the Branch for a variety of ways for
concerned individuals in the community to
make an effective contribution by supervising
community service activities, supervision
of offenders on probation, and so on.
The Corrections Branch has hired
Volunteer Co-ordinators as an expression
of that search.
One of the most significant developments
in volunteer programs throughout 1976
has been the increasing acceptance
throughout the Branch of the use of this
resource. Options for volunteers to work
in pre-trial services (particularly in custody
remand), youth detention facilities,
community correctional centres, and
custody facilities are increasing. The first
full-time institutional position for a
Volunteer Co-ordinator was advertised in
late 1976 and a person will be on the job in
February 1977 to co-ordinate and
develop volunteer activities in the
Chilliwack Forest Camps. The impact of
already existing agencies such as Elizabeth
Fry, W-2, M-2 in the provision of
volunteers in institutions is significant and
requires augmenting throughout the
Province, to build on a basis of community
involvement in institutional corrections.
The presently existing options, including
involvement in Impaired Drivers' Courses
and Community Service Orders, also have
provided volunteers with a range of
potential experiences not usually available
in regular probation sponsor roles.
In some areas of the Province it has not
been possible to provide full-time
Volunteer Co-ordinators. However,
volunteer programs continue to be
developed in communities through the local
initiative of regular Corrections personnel.
In other instances, programs have
been initiated by community organizations.
Under these latter circumstances,
assistance from volunteer programs of
the Corrections Branch has been given in
the form of orientation material, financial
assistance, and the payment of tuition
for relevant courses. In late 1976, volunteer
programs staff reworked orientation
material for publication in manual form,
in addition to preparing a manual for
Corrections personnel regarding the use of
volunteers. Volunteer Program staff
have been active both Provincially and
nationally in the promotion of the
concept of citizens' involvement
in justice.
The Volunteer Program staff at the
year's end numbered six Regional
Co-ordinators (North Shore and Vancouver
Family & Juvenile, Vancouver Adult
Region, Fraser and Southern Regions,
Unified Family Court, and Vancouver
Island Region) and a Provincial
Co-ordinator. These persons are involved
full time in going to the community for
the recruitment and orientation of
volunteers. Effective December 31, 1976,
there were 332 (162 men and 170 women)
registered volunteers, with 218 assigned.
A 60 to 70-per-cent assignment rate
is desirable in order that a pool of volunteers
is always available, and selection and
matching can be undertaken.
In December alone the volunteers
provided almost 2,000 hours of service, an
important extension of the reach of
Probation Officers on tight schedules. It
should be said, however, that statistics above
are inadequate to convey the personal
aspects of the services provided by
volunteers working in Corrections.
It is significant to note that the trend
to involve volunteers in Corrections
programs is spreading across Canada.
Five provinces now have full-time
co-ordinators to provide direction for
volunteer activities on a Provincial basis.
The Corrections Branch continues to be in
the forefront of this trend.
 Q 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA
COMMUNITY RESOURCE
FUNDING
In the past five years the Corrections
Branch has allocated considerable moneys
for funding and purchase of service
from private agencies and organizations
which provide services for offenders under
Branch jurisdiction. In 1974/75,
$ 100,000 in grant and purchase of service
funds was available; in 1975/76, $1,411,831
was made available. In this present
report period, $1,126,446 was allocated
for purchase of service only. In 1975
a Ministry decision had been taken to place
all grant funding for the Ministry in a
centralized body called the Justice
Development Fund.
The moneys allocated for purchase of
services in 1976 were allocated in the
following way (by Corrections Branch):
Community Services Division
Rose-Blanshard Project (Victoria)
Port Alberni Attendance Centre ....
DARE (Vancouver) 	
Step-Up (Vancouver) 	
Employment Co-ordinators
(Vancouver)   	
Project Adventure (Coquitlam) ...
Fraser Region Adult Diversion
Program	
Hunter Creek (Hope) 	
One Way Adventure (Surrey) 	
Joss Mountain 	
Santa Rosa Ranch	
Prince George Attendance Centre _.
Fort St. John Attendance Centre ...
Grand Forks Resource Centre	
Total
2,000
20,000
160,000
38,000
37,500
80,000
80,000
56,000
75,000
7,000
26,000
26,000
26,000
6,000
639,500
Institutional Services Division
Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre
(community resource centre)         20,000
Prince George  Regional Correctional
Centre (community resource centre)..     106,775
Vancouver Region Community Correctional Centre (community resource
centres)       130,131
Total
257,706
Planning and Development Division
(Pre-trial Services)
Lower Mainland Regional Correctional $
Centre   3,000
Vancouver Island Regional Correctional
Centre   1,500
Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre 1,500
Prince  George  Regional  Correctional
Centre   2,000
Workshop   2,000
Nanaimo   17,240
Impaired Drivers' Courses (administered
by Community Services Division)   142,000
Vancouver SW Job Placement  7,500
Task Force on Role of Private Agencies 5,000
Joss Mountain  1,500
Educational Counselling Services
(LMRCC)  .  46,000
Total      229,240
Aggregate total   1,126,446
RELIGIOUS PROGRAMS
In December 1975 the senior chaplain
of the Branch was named the Director of
Religious Programs, and this function
became a separate autonomous section of the
Branch consisting of two full-time
and 15 part-time Protestant and Catholic
chaplains and the Director. The
establishment of one senior position with
over-all responsibility for all chaplaincy
functions and programs, instead of the
services being broken up as part of
each correctional centre, has been beneficial
in terms of consistency and
comprehensiveness of policy, efficiency
in administrative matters, more effective
relationships inter and intra Government
branches and ministries, and with the
churches. It is a reinforcement of
the spirit of ecumenical co-operation which
is evident in the ways in which the
chaplains function within various centres.
Religious Programs has played an
ever-increasing and wider role in the
emphasis of the Corrections Branch in
involving the community in the correctional
process. Chaplains are taking individual
clients and groups of clients into the
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH, 1976
Q 55
community for religious and social functions
at an ever-increasing rate and have
engaged community church groups in the
development of various volunteer sponsor
programs. Chaplains have also assisted
in job placement, locating accommodation,
and contacting community resources for the
inmate who is re-entering the community.
One strong recommendation of the
chaplains is that their role in treatment
and program decisions be expanded to give
recognition to their extensive
involvement with inmates. This may
be particularly important in matters
pertaining to temporary absence or parole
release decisions.
During the past few years the chaplains
have attempted to respond to the
spiritual needs of a number of inmates
involved in religions or philosophies other
than the Christian religion. An example
is that, in 1976, the chaplain at the
Lower Mainland Regional Correctional
Centre arranged a visit for an
American medicine man for one of the
American Indian inmates. Similarly, there
are the beginnings of a move away from
having both Catholic and Protestant
chaplains evident at each correctional
centre. Last year a Catholic priest was
appointed half-time chaplain to the Haney
Forest Camps. Chaplains have reported
in 1976 a growing interest in Bible study
groups, prayer groups, sacramental
ministrations, and church services. The
developing trend of inmates feeling free to
express their interest in spiritual concerns is
very much an indicator of the credibility
chaplains have with both staff and
inmates.
Program highlights for 1976 have
included:
The Director of Religious Programs has
continued in his capacity as
consultant to the Inter-faith Council
on Justice and Corrections and
appeared with a Federal chaplain on
a local TV program in the series
"Pressure Point" dealing with the
Church's responsibility in Corrections.
The chaplain at Alouette River
Unit initiated the establishment of a
12-member Inter-denominational
Council on the Church and Corrections
in the Haney area which is studying
the scriptural, theological, and
historical relationship of the Gospel
and the Church to the field of Justice
and Corrections, and is attempting
to find new and practical expressions of
Christian concern in that area.
The Chaplain's Annual Workshop was
held in March 1976 at Westminster
Abbey. There were two firsts at
this event—(a) nine Federal
chaplains participated in most of the
sessions and (b) five resolutions
were passed which dealt with favouring
(1) the abolition of capital
punishment in Canada (pertinent
at that time);
(2) consideration of giving
permission for incarcerated persons
to marry;
(3) the provision of facilities for
legally married couples separately
incarcerated either in federal
or provincial institutions, to enable
them to live together in order
to maintain and reinforce the marriage
relationship, and to enable them
to continue to be responsible for the
care of their children;
(4) a study concerning conjugal
visits between legally married coupls;
(5) a review of all part-time
chaplain's positions with a view to
increasing their designations.
Federal/Provincial chaplains' relations
have progressed extremely well
in the lower area of Vancouver Island.
The chaplains have held joint
meetings every six weeks for spiritual
reinforcement and mutual support.
The two chaplains at the Vancouver
Island Centre were involved in
a six-day retreat held at William Head
Institution. A layman conducted
the retreat and was joined by
 0 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA
other lay people, clergy, sisters, and a
bishop. There were 26 inmates
present for the whole time of this very
intensive spiritual experience.
The two chaplains at the Vancouver
Island Centre also arranged for
a week-end Marriage Encounter Session
which took place in the centre.
Nine inmates and their wives attended.
The report states "it brought couples
to a greater understanding of each
other."
The chaplain at Alouette River Unit
expanded the Life Skills Course
considerably over the past year.
Approximately 90 residents took part
in eight Life Skills Courses, each
lasting about 40 hours. Eight
community volunteers participated in
one or more of the courses.
The chaplain recommends the
appointment of a full-time life skills
coach at A.R.U. or the utilization
of skilled volunteers on a regular basis.
The chaplain at the Snowdon Camp was
instrumental in converting an
unused dormitory into a lounge for
inmates. This particular chaplain is a
qualified carpenter and worked with
the inmates in the conversion of
the dormitory and was successful
in encouraging merchants in Campbell
River to provide materials and
furnishings.
The part-time chaplain responsible for
community correctional centres
attended a consultation in Toronto
arranged by the United Churches
Division of Mission—Task Force on
Penal Reform. The aim of the
task force is to redefine and reshape
the United Church of Canada's thinking
and practice as it is related to
the criminal justice system in Canada.
He presented the current thinking
and goals of the B.C. Chaplaincy
Service to the conference, which was
well received by those present and
as part of the record, written into the
Task Force Report. The
recommendations of this consultation
will be presented to the next
General Council of the United Church
in the summer of 1977.
Chaplains report their involvement in a
wide variety of agencies and services
throughout the year, including temporary
absence, community resource centres,
community correctional centres, parole,
probation, lawyers, immigration, diversion,
and classification. This important
contribution to effective corrections
operations has required a high energy level
for a relatively small staff who are
ministers to a wide range of offenders
within the jurisdiction of the Corrections
Branch.
INFORMATION SERVICES
In May of 1975 a Director of Information
Services was permanently appointed within
the Branch. Information Services
became responsible for the design and direct
implementation of a progressive
communications function for the Corrections
Branch, with specific responsibilities and
accountability in the following areas—
internal staff information, formal publication
for and of the Branch, public information
materials, which include press releases and
information kits, and finally to provide
initiative direction and expertise in the whole
area of staff information, news media
relations, and public information for all
Branch personnel.
The activities of this small section in 1976
have been diverse, from the preparation
and distribution of the Corrections Branch
Annual Report, additional preparation
and distribution of a manual on
Adult Correctional Facilities—Classification
Criteria, additional pamphlets for the
information kit developed in 1976, display
materials, a slide/tape presentation of
Volunteers in Corrections, to the editing
and printing of a range of documents
for field personnel—Family Relations Act
Handbook, Probation Reporting Cards,
map of decentralized Vancouver
offices, and so on.
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 57
This section has also handled a number
of internal tasks such as the putting-together
of a presentation on Corrections to
Cabinet on behalf of the Commissioner,
letters for signature for a variety of senior
Ministry persons, the provision of
internal information on behalf of the Branch
to other justice components, and quite a
number of tasks related to the preparation
of material and communications with
respect to Branch reorganization.
Public information initiatives were taken
in the form of soliciting exposure to the
Temporary Absence Program on Vancouver
Island, and presentations to and
involvement on behalf of the Branch in
local career days at schools in Vancouver
and Victoria. The Director has been
required to make statements to the news
media on a number of occasions and
has been consulted by staff of all levels with
respect to a variety of information-related
issues. The Director played an integral
role in the Public Information Subcommittee
of the Attorney-General's proposed
initiative in 1977 with respect to drinking
and driving.
The section generally provides an
information centre for all staff and persons
from inside and outside the justice system
who require information on any topic,
or referral to appropriate sources.
The increased interest in Corrections is
shown by approximately 400 written
requests for information which were
responded to in 1976, almost double that
of 1975, in addition to numerous telephone
inquiries.
During 1977, considerable priority will
be placed on the development of a
comprehensive policy for the Branch on
information sharing, both internally
and externally, the development of a
complete prototype set of information
materials with respect to Branch activities,
and the development of a mechanism
by which the Branch can communicate to a
variety of public sectors, both inside and
outside the justice system. However,
activities in these areas will be limited by the
very small resource allocations available
for these functions.
EDUCATION SERVICES
Several of the Branch's correctional
facilities offer inmates the availability of
educational programs in addition to
correspondence courses. A specific
example is the community correctional
centre at Kamloops, which has the
availability of a certain number of seats at
the local community college. During 1976,
funds were made available on an ad hoc
basis for tuition fees of inmates at
other locations, where attendance at a
particular course was considered
appropriate. However, the major formal
educational program provided for inmates
by the Branch is that carried out in the
Lower Mainland area on a contract basis
with the British Columbia Institute
of Technology, called the Educational
Counselling Service (ECS).
Funded in 1974, and focusing at that time
on Lower Mainland Regional Correctional
Centre, the purpose of the program
is to assist interested inmates in readjusting
to the community through academic and
vocational training. In addition to a
generally low level of formal education and
lack of job skills, many inmates have
alcohol and (or) drug problems.
The service provided by ECS attempts to
deal with these in conjunction with
the formulation of short- and long-term
goals for education or on-the-job training.
The latter is often achieved under the
Temporary Absence Program, and also can
be a significant factor in pre-release
parole planning and application. During
1976 and 1977 the service has expanded its
operations to include a wide number of
correctional facilities. Since July 1976,
when statistics were first kept, 221
identified inmates sought information on
education, for which services were
provided, in addition to a number of
persons for whom service was carried over
from the previous year.
 Q 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA
During 1976, some $46,000 of funding
was allocated by the Branch for this
program, which sought and received
additional funds from other appropriate
Government bodies in order to extend this
important service. The funding of this
program is consistent with the closure of
Haney Correctional Centre, the major
Branch centre offering vocational training,
which was premised on the need to
utilize more fully existing community
programs as a more appropriate context
for inmate education.
LIBRARY SERVICES
With the maintenance of a part-time
librarian in 1975, for the first time
in the history of the Branch an upgrading
of this important resource was possible.
Some $7,000 was spent in the purchase of
technical and professional books, for
staff use, with some assistance being given to
inmate libraries. Further, a complete
cataloguing and indexing of the
material was carried out using the United
States Library of Congress system,
which is used world-wide and by all libraries
in Canada. Liaison was developed with
other libraries in the Attorney-General's
Ministry in order to develop an
inter-library loan system.
During 1976 the library developed into
the second most complete facility in
the Ministry, having acquired over 350 new
volumes. These books represent the most
recent material published in the fields of
penology, correctional sciences, as well as
works in sociology, psychology, and training
and management. The library also
received 36 different journals covering
all areas of concern to the correctional staff.
This represents, through new acquisitions
and the take-over of Haney Library,
an increase in inventory of 40 per cent
during the year.
The library is located at the Lower
Mainland Head Office and is open for the
use of all staff. Materials have been
sent throughout the Province when
requested. The librarian has performed
topical research when asked.   During 1976,
circulation increased by 15 per cent,
in spite of the limited availability
of the librarian due to funding constraint.
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 59
Appendix A: Goals, Strategies, and Beliefs, Corrections Branch, 1976
PART I—INTRODUCTION
Many forms of resolving social conflict
exist in society. The family, church, and school
are well-known institutions which, among other
functions, attempt to mediate and deal with
various types of social conflict.   Governmental
interventions (such as social welfare) and
privately operated programs are also aimed
at the resolution of various forms of social conflict.
The justice system, on both the civil and
criminal side, has been used to deal with more
serious forms of social conflict and to act as a
"back-up" to those institutions and agencies
previously mentioned.
In essence then, the justice system has been
used to mediate, resolve, or otherwise respond to
those forms of social conflict which have
been defined, by legislative process, as
unacceptable; the conflict stemming from behaviour
which violates the rights of others and cannot
be tolerated without some form of formalized,
state intervention.
Although general and wide acceptance is
lacking, the basic purpose of the justice system
in Canada is to protect social institutions
and individuals in society, including the offender
himself, by preventing crime and delinquency,
by reducing the negative effects of crime
and delinquency, and by fairly and humanely
dealing with social conflict which comes within the
context of law.
Thus, the purpose of the Corrections Branch
is to provide a range of services which vary
in level of supervision, control, and security, and
which collectively contribute to the achievement of
the justice system purpose.   In working toward
this purpose the Corrections Branch has
established as principles
(i)  a statement of goals and objectives
(see Part II) which outlines what it is we
want to attain;
(ii)  a statement of strategies and activities
(see Part III) which indicates the means
employed in reaching those goals
and objectives; and
(iii)  a statement of beliefs (see Part IV) which
serves as guidelines in determining
how we implement those strategies and
guidelines.
Corrections is an integral part of the justice
system, initiating a number of programs which, it
is hoped, will contribute to the over-all
purpose of the justice system and thus serve
society by playing a significant role in the
protection of society and the mediation
and resolution of social conflict.
Corrections must then be seen as an integral
and essential part of a co-ordinated and
interdependent justice system. Thus, it has a
relationship and interdependence with police,
courts, prosecution, and legal services as well as
numerous community agencies contributing
their services and advice in the justice area.
Actions taken by police frequently result in
required Corrections involvement. To a great
extent, the courts dictate the level of Corrections
involvement in custodial and community
programs. And conversely, actions taken in the
Corrections area have substantial impact on
police, courts and, indeed, society itself.
In summary, Corrections is part of a justice
system, has a purpose and goals compatible with
the larger system, provides a continuum of
services which collectively contribute to the
achievement of the purpose of the justice system,
and the results of correctional programs
affect the basic protection of society.
PART II—STATEMENT OF GOALS AND OBIECTIVES
Goal A
In co-operation with personnel in all components
of the justice system, to participate actively in
promoting reform throughout the justice system.
Objectives:
Al. Increased awareness and understanding of
police, courts, legal and corrections personnel
si.
A3.
of the present state of correctional
knowledge and the effectiveness (results) of
existing correctional programs.
Increased public awareness and understanding
of the state of correctional knowledge and
the effectiveness of correctional programs.
Devise and implement specific strategies of
reform within contemporary correctional
theory, practice, and legislation.
 Q (>C
BRITISH COLUMBIA
a4   Identify possible strategies of system-wide
reform, e.g., decriminalization, depenalization,
and diversion, and communicate these to
appropriate decision-makers.
Goal B
To assist the family in resolving those disputes
in which direct court intervention is being
considered.
Objectives:
b1. Provide counselling and referral services to
the family in response to applications for
assistance in resolving, without direct court
intervention if possible, disputes involving
family and child maintenance, custody, and
access arising from marital separation.
b2. Provide opportunities for out-of-court
resolutions of family-related criminal matters,
e.g., assault, threat, and nonsupport.
b3. Provide information when requested by the
Family Court to assist in making a finding on
maintenance, custody of, and access to
children.
b4. Assist in the administration of orders made by
the Family Court in the above disputes,
as provided for by statute or court directive.
Goal C
To provide information which will assist the
court in determining disposition.
Objectives:
cl. Advise the court on available and suitable
dispositional alternatives and resources,
both within and outside the Corrections Branch.
c2. Supply the court with relevant information on
the offender, as provided for by statute
or court directive.
Goal D
To administer those dispositions and orders
imposed by the court which fall within the
jurisdiction of the Corrections Branch.
Objectives:
d1. Identify, develop, and maintain a wide range of
correctional programs and facilities which
provide graduated levels of control,
supervision, and security.
d2. Provide to offenders program opportunities
which are conducive to active, self-determined
participation.
d3. Provide opportunities for offenders to exercise
responsible decision-making.
d4. Assist the offender in understanding that the
imposed sanction is a result of his infringement
upon the rights of others.
d5. Encourage the court to specify the purpose
and intent of the sanction imposed.
Goal E
To increase community and individual awareness
of joint responsibility in preventing crime,
delinquency, victimization, and family breakdown.
Objectives:
El. Provide information on social conditions
contributing to crime, delinquency,
victimization, and family breakdown.
e2. Encourage and participate in the development
of programs which contribute to improvement
in those social conditions.
e3. Encourage the reduction of opportunities
for criminal behaviour, e.g., Neighbourhood
Watch.
e4. Encourage the development of effective
mechanisms for community mediation and
resolution of social conflicts/disputes
without necessitating referral to, or
intervention of, the justice system.
Goal F
To encourage effective co-operation among
justice system components.
Objectives:
Fl. Identify and recommend to police and (or)
Crown counsel appropriate alternatives to
court action.
f2. Increased communication and information
sharing among justice system personnel at all
levels.
f3.  Ensure that goals and objectives of each
justice system component are mutually
compatible and complementary.
f4. Participate in joint planning for more
effective service delivery.
Note—Goals do not necessarily appear in order of priority.
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 61
PART III—STATEMENT OF STRATEGIES AND ACTIVITIES
Strategy I
Investigation and reporting.
Activities:
1a.  Provide information as required by the court.
1b. Provide prosecutor and (or) police with
information on persons referred for possible
diversion or screening before court action.
Ic. Provide information to institutions and
parole boards on incarcerated offenders before
their re-entering the community.
Id. Provide relevant information and (or)
reports to other related agencies as
appropriate and with due regard for the
confidentiality of the information.
Strategy 2
Mediation and conciliation.
A ctivities:
2a. Where appropriate and in co-operation with
other agencies, attempt to mediate
mutually acceptable resolutions of conflict as
an alternative to court resolution.
2b. Identify situations and make referrals for
intervention by social agencies other than those
of the justice system.
2c. Collaborate with police, Crown counsel, and
court administration to develop guidelines
for determining which conflicts should
be resolved through outside mediation.
Strategy 3
Imprisonment.
Activities:
3a. Provide a range of custodial facilities to
(1) separate dangerous and hard-core
offenders from the community;
(2) provide graduated levels of control for
those serving sentences of
denunciation and sentences resulting
from wilful noncompliance with a
previously imposed court order;
(3) provide separate containment for
juvenile offenders; and
(4) provide graduated levels of control for
those remanded in custody.
3 b. Provide standards and procedures for gradual
re-entry and supervision of offenders
released from custody.
3c. Provide a classification process to determine
the level of control required for each
offender sentenced to a period of incarceration.
3d. Provide programs and activities in which
the inmate is encouraged to exercise personal
decision-making skills in areas of work,
recreation, spiritual development, education,
and life skills.
3e. Ensure that rights and responsibilities of
staff, inmates, and the community as a whole
are upheld and that the respective
responsibilities of each are identified and
communicated.
3f. Ensure the availability of suitable medical,
dental, and psychiatric services to those
incarcerated.
Strategy 4
Community supervision and control.
Activities:
4a. Provide supervision, counselling, and (or)
referral to other agencies, thus ensuring
that the spirit and intent of the disposition is
achieved.
4b. Provide a range of community-based residential
and nonresidential attendance facilities
and programs.
4c. Develop and maintain mechanisms for
communication and information-sharing with
justice and social agencies concerned with
surveillance and control.
Strategy 5
Alternatives to imprisonment.
Activities:
5a. For some offenders, where sentences or
orders of imprisonment have traditionally been
indicated, to recommend alternatives to
imprisonment such as the following:
(1) good conduct order;
(2) reporting order;
(3) residence order;
(4) performance contract order;
(5) community service order;
(6) counselling order;
(7) restitution and compensation order;
(8) absolute discharge;
(9) conditional discharge;
(10) day fines;
(11) bail and remand supervision.
5b. Co-operate with other agencies in the search
for other alternatives to imprisonment
by providing incentive and opportunity for
innovative demonstration projects.
 Q 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Strategy 6
Legislative review.
A ctivities:
6a. .Review legislation and recommend appropriate
revisions in order that laws remain consistent
with, and responsive to, changing standards
and values in society.
6b. Interpret existing legislation in view of the
goals and objectives of the Branch.
6c. Develop and communicate rationale for
existing legislation and for possible changes.
6d. Support system-wide research to study
society's views on different crimes and to
assess appropriateness of existing sanctions
provided for in legislation.
6e. Assess social costs of criminal activity and
trends to identify those offences that need not
be processed through the justice system.
6f. Where appropriate, develop and communicate
to the Minister Branch positions on selected
controversial issues related to justice.
6g. Provide opportunities for joint criminal
justice personnel training, development, and
education concerning issues of legislative
change.
Strategy 7
Community involvement and public awareness.
A ctivities:
Ik. Communicate information on Corrections
Branch activities generally, including those
which are unrelated to criminal behaviour,
such as services to families and
individuals.
7b. Communicate information and statistics
on type of offenders, offences, sentences,
expenditures, expectations, and results
achieved.
7c. Co-operate with and encourage public and
social service agencies to assist
offenders.
7d. Encourage and provide opportunities for
voluntary participation of citizens and
community groups in correctional programs.
7e. Provide resources to community and private
agencies which assist in the achievement
of Corrections Branch goals and objectives.
7f. Provide training opportunities for Corrections
staff to equip them to work with community
organizations.
7g. Use existing community organizations,
e.g., Justice Councils and Family Division
Committees, in promoting and facilitating
public awareness and communication.
Strategy 8
Staff management.
A ctivities:
8a. Provide adequate compensation and
benefits consistent with the level and
complexity of responsibilities assigned.
8b. Ensure that staff are provided with adequate
support services to effectively carry out
their assigned duties.
8c. Maximize opportunities for personal and
professional growth and development through
education and training.
8d. Provide opportunities for job rotation,
lateral and vertical career mobility, job
enrichment, and improved working
environment.
8e. Periodically review and clarify job roles
and relationship to organizational goals.
8f. Provide consistent standards of performance
and policy guidelines.
8o. Encourage staff participation in professional
associations.
8h. Promote an atmosphere in which staff
feel free to evaluate current correctional and
personnel practices.
8i.   Consistent with good labour management
practice, encourage co-operation
between management and union components
to more effectively achieve the common
purpose.
Strategy 9
Management of resources.
A ctivities:
9a. Reduce the fragmentation and duplication
represented by the current division of
correctional responsibilities between
the Federal and Provincial Governments.
9b. Provide an information system which will
ensure monitoring and evaluation of
correctional programs.
9c. Determine the need for resources, secure
adequate resources, and establish a set
of priorities (Provincial, regional, and local)
to ensure the most effective use of those
resources.
9d. Integrate resource management and delegate
decision-making to the lowest appropriate
level.
9e. Develop and maintain appropriate correctional
standards and policies.
Note—Strategies  do  not necessarily appear in order of  priority,
or more goals.   Thus, there is no simple one-to-one relationship implied.
Any strategy may relate to the achievement of one
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 63
PART IV—STATEMENT OF VALUES AND BELIEFS
Society has an interest in upholding values and
has developed many forums for the resolution
of social disputes arising from a conflict of values.
The justice system exists as a "back-up" to
deal with the more serious forms of conflict which
have not been or cannot be resolved in other
forums.
Correctional services exist as an essential part of
a co-ordinated and interdependent justice system.
Corrections Branch activities contribute to
the realization of the goals of the justice system
generally.
Personnel of the Corrections Branch bring to the
performance of their duties a set of values
which predisposes them to carry out their mandate
within a certain framework of beliefs.
These beliefs, which include the following, serve
as guidelines in determining how we, as
correctional personnel, implement strategies and
activities and work toward our goals:
1. Offenders must be held accountable for
their acts.
2. All offenders, regardless of their offence,
remain members of society, are to be treated with
the basic respect and dignity accorded all
members, and should not be subjected to cruel and
unusual forms of treatment.
3. Within the limitation of the court-imposed
sanction and considering the risks for the
community, the offender has a right to exercise
self determination and personal decision-making.
4. Although a minority reflect a consistent
pattern of criminal behaviour, offenders are
capable of responsible decision-making and of
changing their behaviour.   Therefore, some
correctional programs ought to be designed to allow
for, and indeed, encourage behavioural change.
5. The majority of offenders, with the exception
of the commission of a specific act, function
daily within acceptable societal norms,
and therefore should be subject to only simple
sanction and not to programs designed
for behavioural change.
6. Every opportunity should be provided
for offenders to "make amends" to society generally
and (or) to the victim.
7. Offenders should not receive greater
opportunities or rights than those generally
available to other members of society.
8. The term "offender" is reserved for those
persons who become identified through the
lock-step process of being observed, reported,
apprehended, charged, tried, convicted, and
sentenced for committing an act which is defined
as illegal. The term is not applied for those
persons who commit a similar act and are not
processed through the justice system;
thus offenders within the justice system represent
an unknown percentage of those persons
engaged in any given illegal activity.
9. Society must accept responsibility for those
conditions which contribute to criminal
activity and must work toward their improvement.
10. Social institutions and individual members
of the community have a right to protection
from victimization by an offender.
11. While the justice system is charged with the
responsibility of upholding certain values
through the imposition of sanction, we believe that
law should generally reflect current values held
by the community, though at times legislators in
their role as "law makers" should lead in the
formulation of community values.
12. Sanctions imposed by the court should be
influenced by the total circumstances leading to the
commission of the offence.
13. While the offender retains many of the rights
of other citizens, he does forfeit certain rights
as dictated by the explicit "limitation of
freedom" imposed by the court and the implicit
limitations dictated by the conditions and degree of
custody, security, and supervision.
14. The Branch has a responsibility to hold in
secure custody those offenders so sanctioned
until the expiration of sentence, or until such time
as there are reasonable indicators that the
risk they present to the community has been
reduced to the degree that less secure,
community-based programs can be made available
to them.
15. Since the community is the natural
environment and the environment to which
offenders will eventually return, as many
Correctional Branch programs as possible should
operate in the community in order to increase
the effectiveness of those programs.
16. We recognize that members of society are
entitled to a basic level of subsistence (food,
shelter, and care), and we recognize that we do not
have the right to force people to work or
participate in correctional programs, but we also
believe that offenders must be helped to understand
the consequences which resulted from their
action, and how their behaviour resulted in the
violation of the rights of others.
17. There must be a perceived balance of rights,
responsibilities, and respect between the offender,
the community, the victim, and the staff
responsible for administering the sentence of the
court.
18. Some conflicts are best resolved through
mediation and conciliation of the conflict
with referral to the court only when other attempts
at resolution fail.
19. In attempting to meet its objectives, the
justice system should avoid excessive and
unnecessary intervention in the lives of members of
the public generally and specifically in the
lives of offenders.
20. Within the justice system, due regard for
confidentiality of information is essential.
 Q 64
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Appendix B: Regional Operations
Note—For the purpose of this 1976 Report, the
amalgamation of Corrections Branch Divisional
operations, i.e., Community Services and
Institutional Services, into Corrections Regions has
been made, even though the complete
regionalization of the divisions is not effective
until the end of fiscal 1976/77. Regionalization will
be in effect at the time of the availability of the
Report, and does not effect the integrity of
the individual reports offered by each component
and facility presently operating within
the Branch divisional and regional structures.
VANCOUVER REGION
I. Vancouver Adult Probation (Community Services Division)
Offices:
North Vancouver (adult)
North Vancouver (juvenile and family)
Porteau Cove Camp
West Vancouver
Sechelt
Squamish
Vancouver Court Office
Vancouver West End
Vancouver Southwest
Vancouver Southeast
Vancouver Northeast
This regional administration has responsibility
for the delivery of all adult probation services
in the city of Vancouver, and adult and juvenile
services for the North Shore and Howe Sound areas.
A major progression in 1976 has been the
refinement of the decentralized service system
initiated in mid-1974, with the concomitant
continued development of the Court Team—Court
Resource Officer concepts. Until decentralization,
all adult probation services for the city were
carried out from the main office.
The Vancouver Court Office continues to keep
the courts informed about the availability of
programs and the criteria for admission, do short
on-the-spot reports for the court, and go over
pre-sentence reports with offenders before court.
They arrange referrals to legal aid or other
services, if necessary, do reports on transients in
the Vancouver area, or inter-Provincial
report requests, handle courtesy supervision in the
city from other provinces or the United States,
may become involved in diversionary activities at
the request of Crown counsel, and perform a
myriad of other functions which help streamline
the court process.
Where pre-sentence reports are requested by the
courts, the team refers them to the decentralized
probation offices covering the areas in which
the offender resides.   The Court Team may also
handle court appearances for other Probation
Officers, thus freeing up the officers from waits for
court.   In addition, this decentralization has
facilitated the commitment of local Vancouver
offices to a major police initiative which has
involved many social services—the Police
and Community Services Project.
The Police and Community Services Project is
outstanding for its scope and intensity of
interagency co-operation and involvement,
and is one to which other jurisdictions are looking
as a model which they might develop.
Both the Vancouver adult and Juvenile Regions
are involved in this project which got under
way in 1975.
The project has been focusing on four
inter-related but separate specific areas of
development—informal family conflict resolution,
adult diversion, the juvenile situation, and
emergency support services to police (i.e., the
existence and accessibility of social and mental
health services during regular and extended
hours). Apart from the subcommittees consisting
of operational and senior personnel from
probation, police, and a variety of other agencies,
which are focusing on these individual areas,
the operationalization of the project has come in
the form of the development of a team-policing
concept in six areas of Vancouver Police Region 3
(Southeast Vancouver). The development
of a social agency referral system for police in
both emergency and nonemergency social
problem situations which come to the attention
of police in response to calls for service and (or)
as a result of patrol, and development of a
case conference mechanism between police and
probation and other social services have
also been operationalized.
A key thrust of the project is to involve the
community at the local level in establishing its own
priorities and its patterns of service delivery
needs (of the justice system) within the limits
defined by law. That includes, of course,
the optimum use of all community resources and
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH, 1976
Q 65
facilities at the neighbourhood level. In 1976
the commitment of time and energy to the
project of the region's staff at all levels was as
extensive as in 1975.
In August 1976 the Court Team assumed
responsibility for co-ordinating and processing
definite/indeterminate and jail plus probation cases
in co-operation with the Lower Mainland
Regional Correctional Centre and the B.C. Parole
Board. A Probation Officer has been assigned
to achieve liaison with each correctional
centre and methods are being worked out for
providing better service and communication.
During the year the 64A Program for alcoholics
was reactivated and a Correctional Officer
from ARU (Alouette River Unit) was provided to
operate it.
In 1976 the Court Team obtained the services
of two Job Finders who are supported by
Canada Manpower Outreach. Clients include
the hard-core, unmotivated types and results are
extremely positive. The Job Finders seem
to possess unique ways of creating motivation. It is
noted that two staff members have enrolled in
sign language courses in order to equip
themselves for better communication with the deaf.
The West End Adult Team has concentrated
on liaison with the police and office visits
by police constables are frequent. Probation
Officers occasionally "cruise" and "walk the beat"
with area police constables. Police recruits
spend observation days at the office. As a result of
the police and Community Services Project
Program in operation in the Southeast
Sector of Vancouver, team policing may be
introduced into Police District 1 (the West End
office has been involved in planning with
police in this regard).
Members of the West End office also were
involved in 1976 in planning and implementing two
Job Placement Programs designed for the four
decentralized offices—one financed by LIP and the
present program supported by Corrections and
sponsored by the Corrections Association.
The project included client placement in jobs,
on-the-job training, vocational training,
education training, and assistance to find their own
employment. The first program (six months)
resulted in over 120 placements and the present
program (through December, four months) over 80
placements. So far it has been a valuable
resource to Probation Officers. The Community
Service Order (CSO) Program in Vancouver
City has its roots in the West End, and a
second CSO Officer was provided for Vancouver
Adult Probation Officers and was assigned to cover
the West End, Northeast, and Court Teams.
Several clients have been hired by agencies
following completion of their original hours and
others have continued on a volunteer basis.
The West End Team has attempted as much
community involvement as possible and early
in 1976 set up a "Community Approach Model"
in which all relevant agencies in the West End
were personally contacted and a resource file
was set up.   An Impaired Drivers' Program for
Vancouver was begun in 1976 at the initiative of
members of the Northeast office in co-operation
with the Central City Mission.   Problems of
co-ordination, case management and the breakdown
in the payment of bills (felt by all IDC's
throughout the Province) resulted in the
termination of the program in December 1976.
This is a needed and much wanted program, but
difficulties regarding authority, manpower, and
payments need to be worked out before an
IDC can be undertaken in that area again. The
IDC in North Vancouver was similarly
terminated in November 1976.
Staff members of the Southeast office continued
to be active with local schools and community
groups, involving themselves in the slow and
ongoing process of both raising the Branch and
division profiles in the community as well as
participating in an ongoing dialogue regarding the
criminal justice system and the many troubling
issues that they encompass.   Staff members
also took advantage of a wide variety of in-service
and fee-for-service skill development and
upgrading programs.
For Vancouver City, the use of Volunteer
Sponsors for adult probationers continues to grow,
expanding from an assignment rate of 49 to 66.
On the North Shore, 65 Volunteer Sponsors
are available and active.
The past year has seen a significant change in
personnel in the West Vancouver office with
the transfer out of the region of one of
the Probation Officers, the educational leave of
absence of another Probation Officer, the addition
of a Family Court Counsellor from North
Vancouver, a Community Service Officer covering
West Vancouver, Squamish/Pemberton, and
Porteau Camp, and the filling of the Volunteer
Co-ordinator position for the whole North Shore
and Vancouver Juvenile/Family Region.   The
Chief Instructor of the Porteau Cove Attendance
Program also carries out his administrative
functions through this office.   The addition of the
Family Court Counsellor has once again
situated this service in West Vancouver.
The office continues to be involved with an active
Family Court Committee and was particularly
involved in 1976 with regard to discussions
around court facilities for North and
West Vancouver.
The North Vancouver Diversion Program
continued to receive a great deal of attention from
within the justice system over the past year,
primarily because of its simplicity and seeming
 Q 66
BRITISH COLUMBIA
effectiveness.   An average of four to five diversion
cases are handled per month and are diverted out of
the justice system within a three (approximate)
to six-month time span.
Both the Sechelt and Squamish offices
continued a high level of community involvement,
which facilitates the optimum use of scarce
resources in these smaller communities, and the
smooth running of such programs as the
CSO, which became more difficult in larger
centres.
The Porteau Cove Camp Program for juveniles
and young adults continues to operate
effectively with an enthusiastic staff under the
general direction of the Regional Director of the
region.  Porteau provides a summer and
winter outdoor attendance program for male
probationers ranging in age from 13 to 17.
The summer program is a four-week camping
experience involving canoeing, mountain-climbing,
and sailing, as well as group and
individual counselling. The winter program
involves attendance every week-end, using the same
facilities and techniques.   The aim of the
program is to develop a sense of responsibility to
others as well as of personal self-confidence
through recognized achievement in overcoming
natural obstacles in the out-of-doors.
Including the week-end and 28-day SALT
summer program, 125 boys successfully
completed their respective courses in 1976.
There continues to be a waiting list for admission
to the program.
II. Vancouver Juvenile and Family (Community Services Division)
Offices:
Intake Office
South District
East District
North District
Burrard District
West District
DARE
The juvenile and family probation services
and Detention Home formerly operated by the
City of Vancouver became a part of the
Corrections Branch in April 1974. The
organization was absorbed as a separate region
known as Vancouver Juvenile and Family
Region, to operate side by side with the Vancouver
Adult Region, under the direction of respective
Regional Directors. The Juvenile Detention
Home responsibility was assumed by the Assistant
Executive Director of the Division.
Of foremost importance in this region in 1976
was the decentralization of service into the five
district offices noted above. The first office
to be decentralized was in September and the
final one in late November. This process will
certainly permit the provision of an increasingly
qualitative service to clients.   Additionally, staff
morale has been improved considerably by this
process. The five decentralized teams meet
regularly in order to co-ordinate overlapping areas
and to refine the procedures stemming from
intake from the Yale Street office, which
remains a focal point comparable to the Court
Team in the Vancouver Adult Region.
In keeping with the Branch's philosophy of
diverting juveniles from the court process
where indicated, a total of 2,678 juvenile cases
processed by the Vancouver Police Department,
1,563 (or approximately 59 per cent) were
handled without the necessity of court involvement.
Hopefully this figure can be improved upon
next year.
A total of 1,336 cases was processed under the
Family Relations Act in 1976, although not
all of these were officially processed through the
court. This figure does not include show
cause or application to vary processes, but does
include maintenance applications, custody and
access reports, assaults, conciliation counselling,
and so on.
With the implementation of decentralization
of offices, the region has been able to improve
working relationships with other social agencies
in the community (such as the Ministry of
Human Resources, Vancouver Resource Boards,
Metropolitan Health, Vancouver Adult Probation
offices, Family & Children's Services Agency,
Mental Health, Neighbourhood Services, Parks
and Recreation, school counsellors, etc.).   Liaison
with these agencies has resulted in several
communication workshops being presented for
mutual staff benefit.
Staff of the region have been involved in a
considerable and diverse number of community
liaison and program development activities.
Members of the South, East, and Burrard Teams
have been involved in two special projects—
one a Youth Accountability Project and the
other a Shoplifting Accountability Program. The
North Team were successful in their application
for a LIP funded hockey project.   In total
this involves 36 probationers and involves
additional participants, including a Family Court
Judge, a lawyer, several Probation Officers,
social workers, and DARE workers. The total
budget for this project is almost $18,000.
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 67
The Burrard Team in conjunction with the
Drug and Alcohol Commission and the
Vancouver School Board has been instrumental in
establishing a special program for juveniles
who have learning disabilities and (or)
drug-alcohol problems themselves, or within
their families. The West Team is at present
involved in establishing a Demonstration Project
for a duty Probation Officer to be provided
at the Oakridge Police Substation. This may
well be the forerunner in the provision of
the availability of a Probation Officer several
days a week, 24 hours a day.   Additionally,
through the efforts of the West Team, a Job
Finder service for juveniles has been established
in that area.   Consideration is being given to
expanding this service into the other four
districts.
The Community Service Order Program
blossomed toward the end of 1976, and although
only in operation with a CSO Officer for the
latter half of the year, saw 113 juvenile and
young adult offenders involved in the provision
of 3,615 hours of work.   More than 25 agencies
assisted in effecting the service. The Volunteer
Program did not see the development anticipated
in 1976, due to the lack of a Co-ordinator. With
his present availability, 1977 operations for
this important resource looks encouraging.
The Detention and Recreation Extension
Program (DARE) has been providing intensive
personal supervision for selected juveniles on
probation in the City of Vancouver since
February 1973. The focus of the program is the
provision of a low worker/client supervision
ratio in the carrying-out of vocational and
recreational activities.   DARE utilizes the
resources which are generally available in and
around the city.   During 1976 a total of 48 boys
and 16 girls participated in the program, a
particularly good example of community-based
programming, which has been developed to
deal effectively with "hard-core" delinquents.
It is the kind of program which will assume
greater importance as an alternative to the
youth containment facilities which are to be
operative by late 1977. The Corrections
Branch funds and operates the DARE Program.
The Branch also partially funds and is integrally
involved with the Vancouver City School
Board in the provision of a special educational
program known as Step-Up, which is
utilized extensively for school drop-outs on
probation.   Sixty students (47 boys and 13 girls)
benefited from the program in 1976.
Perennial staff shortages in this region
continue to require of existing staff high levels
of energy in the carrying-out of an effective
service.
III. Vancouver Community Correctional Centres (Institutional Services Division)
The year 1976 was the second full year of
operation for the Vancouver Community
Correctional Centre Program, which is the
only such program in the Province which does
not exist as a satellite of a major institution and
which is unique on many counts. The Vancouver
operation is under a separate directorship in
order to provide an effective level of
program delivery in a complex urban area.   A
major difference from other community
correctional centre (CCC) programs run by
the Branch is that Vancouver CCC's utilize
a myriad of community-based residential
resources other than the four CCC's which are in
the Vancouver area.
The Vancouver CCC Re-entry Program
provides a complete facilities and
program package.
A. Facilities
1. Four community correctional centres:
(a) Marpole—highest degree of supervision,
point of entry to complex, a gazetted
institution.
(b) Burnaby—high degree of supervision,
another point of entry, gazetted
property as part of Lower Mainland
Regional Correctional Centre (old
Warden's House).
(c) Southview—specialized, at present for
selected women only, self-containing, low
staff supervision (to be constituted
as a self-sustaining (fiscal) operation
run by residents).
(d) Surrey (CCC-CBRC)—a hybrid resource
run by a private organization, but jointly
staffed with the Corrections Branch
(like Activator's House in Prince George).
Offers a degree of supervision between
the Marpole-Burnaby level and the
straight CBRS level.
2. Contracted services with 13 community-
based residential centres (CBRC's) with two
more pending; a range of programming
for men and women throughout Vancouver,
Lower Mainland, and out towards the
Fraser Valley; supervision provided per contract
requirements by CBRC's and by four Corrections
CCC staff (Co-ordinators) on an on-going basis.
B. Programming
1. Inmates serving sentences, not granted
temporary absence, can be transferred to the
 Q 68
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CCC operation, but must reside at gazetted CCC's
(a difference between the Vancouver operation
and other CCC's).
2. Regular resources for inmates on temporary
absence for work, education, social, or medical
reasons.   If a higher degree of supervision, or
further assessment is required, inmates
reside at Marpole or Burnaby.
3. Inmates on temporary absence for work,
or education, requiring minimal supervision
may reside at an appropriate CBRC.   Contracts
have been established with a range of these
operations to allow proximity to family or
work, and to provide specialized programming.
In 1976, those on temporary absence for work
earned almost $338,000, with approximately
$200,000 of that directed toward individuals'
room and board, restitution, family maintenance,
debts, and income tax.
4. Home supervision is utilized for those
who require minimal supervision, who might be
on short sentences where parole is unlikely to
be processed before expiry of sentence, or
those on temporary absence requiring
minimal supervision, who live or work in outlying
areas not near a correctional centre, e.g.,
Kitimat. When in Greater Vancouver area,
supervision is undertaken by the four
Co-ordinators on staff.   In outlying areas, the
inmate may have to check in with a Probation
Officer or the police. In either case, a
special permit has to be initialled at set
intervals, and returned to the Vancouver operation
once a month in order that another one can be
issued for the ensuing month.
5. Parolees and probationers, usually for short
periods of time, while the person is establishing
him/herself in the community are eligible
for acceptance at a residence.
The progression from high supervision to home
supervision is possible for an inmate as he/she
indicates greater degrees of responsibility,
as detailed through Commitment Programming.
Any one of the options also may be
utilized in the first instance under appropriate
circumstances.
The idea is that the range of programming
allows Lower Mainland Regional Correctional
Centre, Oakalla Womens' Correctional
Centre, Alouette River Unit, and Twin Maples,
and Haney Forest Camps a flexible resource
in a large urban centre where many of the
opportunities for employment are found, and the
widest variety of social services are available.
The count of the Vancouver Lower Mainland
CCC operation ranges around 100 (30 to 35
at CCC's; 45 to 50 at CBRC's; 20 on
Home Supervision), with 621 offenders
participating in the Re-entry Program for 1976.
In September 1976, arrangements with the
Provincial Co-ordinator of Volunteers
have seen the introduction of volunteers to the
program, as a valuable personal resource
for inmates.
The utility of the model developed in the
Vancouver Community Centre Program
is in both economics of operation and
effectiveness of re-entry.   Costs per inmate-day
are approximately the following: Community
correctional centres, $24; community-based
residential centres, $16.50 per diem rate set by the
Government); and Home Supervision, $1.50 to
$2.   Regular institutional costs per inmate
are estimated at $30 to $35 per diem.   Proper
evaluation is required to determine if long-term
success on re-entry is enhanced by the
program, but the experience of staff involved
suggests that it is.  It is felt that larger numbers of
appropriate inmates could utilize this kind of
re-entry programming, which is limited,
as are other correctional programs, by fiscal
constraint.
IV. Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre (Institutional Services Division)
This institution is the largest Provincial centre,
and is the Branch's main custody resource.
Located in Burnaby, it serves as the receiving
centre for persons from the Lower Mainland area
as well as providing custody for remand and
appeal cases. LMRCC is also utilized as a
final back-up to all facilities in the Province.
Physically and administratively, Lower
Mainland Regional Correctional Centre is very
large and inadequate, and a constant source
of concern to the Branch.   Although difficult to
manage, the staff have handled desperate situations
with poise. As a result of staff action,
1976 was a year without any major disturbances,
as opposed to 1975, but there was a significant
increase in escapes, which has required a
close re-examination of procedures, and has
pointed up the need for more staff.   Suicides
and attempts were notably down in 1976, which
suggests a reasonable degree of effective
staff/inmate relations.
The age-old problem of overcrowding in two
of the main cell blocks continued to be a serious
problem during the year.   Having to place
two prisoners in a cell barely adequate for one
person created many problems in terms of
personal cleanliness, housekeeping, frustration,
and lack of any privacy. This creates
difficult living conditions not only for inmates
but also working conditions for staff.
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 69
The almost 10-month stay of an American
Indian Movement leader, the housing of
penitentiary inmates, and a series of
demonstrations outside the centre on a variety
of issues tended to make the smooth operation of
the facility even more difficult.   In spite of all
this, staff morale is reported as fairly high.
Programs at this facility are limited.   Recreation
capacity is inadequate for both sentenced and
remanded populations and when possible
incarcerates have been taken to Bonsor
swimming-pool in Burnaby. There were 671
inmates who participated in that during the year.
The closure of all shops in 1975 in a pre-phase-out
move has ceased a major programming aspect
and any form of vocational training. The
emphasis is to transfer out to more appropriate
facilities all those sentenced inmates who
are not considered security risks.
Lay counselling is continued through utilizing
the small case load system for staff in all units.
A number of volunteer groups provide an
important aspect of this work: Alcoholics
Anonymous, Narconon Society, M-2 Job Therapy,
Teen Challenge, Allied Tribes, Douglas
College students in Criminology, Simon Fraser
University students, and Pre-trial Services.
Limited academic education is carried on by
correspondence.   LMRCC has the availability
of the Educational Counselling Service.
The negative aspects of this kind of correctional
centre have been utilized with effect with
respect to the community. Tours from 14
various agencies with a total of 270 participants
were conducted through this centre.   A
juvenile program has produced favourable results.
During the past year there were 70 juveniles
sent to the centre (on a court order from a
Judge) for a tour, as part of the court sentence.
These tours are conducted on a one-to-one
basis for full effectiveness.   Follow-up
has indicated that of the 70 juveniles taking part
in this program only five are reported as
having been in trouble again with the law.
Most of these juveniles have gone back to school
or to a job.
During 1976 the daily average count for the
centre was 623, registering a very slight downward
trend from 1974.   Forty per cent of the
average daily count during the year was awaiting
trial. The massive movement in and out of
the institution for transfers, court appearances,
etc., continued in 1976 to place a severe
strain on the records office, with an average
daily movement through the office of 256.
It has become clear that, although plans are
under way to build a replacement facility for
the remand population, the use of the facilities
at LMRCC for both sentenced and remanded
persons will continue for some time.   A
number of recommendations have been made
regarding several aspect of operations, and these
will be given close examination in 1977.   No
report on the centre would be complete without
a commendation to the staff of the facility,
which presents some of the most challenging
work experiences within the Corrections Branch.
V. Oakalla Womens' Correctional Centre
Report not available.
NORTH FRASER REGION
I. Fraser Region (Community Services)
Offices:
Burnaby Central
Burnaby South
Burnaby North
Coquitlam/Port Coquitlam Adult
Coquitlam/Port Coquitlam Juvenile
Maple Ridge
New Westminster
Youth Detention Centre, Willingdon
The Regional Director and his three
supervisors are responsible for the operation of all
adult and juvenile probation and Family
Relations Act services in this region.   Fraser
is the first region in the Province to successfully
complete functional specialization among
Probation Officers and professional staff.   Since
mid-1975, all officers and professional staff are
working in either the adult, juvenile, or the
family (Family Relations Act) areas. The
region's supervisors are each responsible for
supervision of one of these areas, rather than
for a subregion or geographical area.
Management of the region in 1976 continued
in that manner. The benefits of specialization
have been catalogued before—economy of effort,
uniform standards of practice and methods,
etc. This year, however, one disadvantage
of the model was demonstrated. This is the lack
of flexibility in covering work loads, particularly
during periods of acute staff shortages.   So
 Q 70
BRITISH COLUMBIA
far the advantages outweigh the disadvantages,
but if staff shortages continue, the specialization
model might have to be modified.
The Regional Volunteer Co-ordinator has
offered service to both juvenile and adult services,
and is in the process of developing a program
for "FRA" volunteers, as well as a vigorous
program at the youth detention centre. This
year some 71 volunteers will have been
used in the various programs to supervise 83
clients.
The youth detention centre was transferred
from Haney Correctional Centre to Willingdon,
former site of the Willingdon Girls' School,
in June of this year and came under Fraser
Region administration. The building is
shared with Justice Education Division, although
the recreation facilities (gymnasium and pool)
are under the sole jurisdiction of the YDC
Director. This move has not been without its
problems.   Despite efforts on the part of
field staff to use the detention centre only
as a last resort, the centre is chronically overfull
with boys and clearly is not of sufficient
capacity, unless the demand for custodial remand
diminishes with the proposed development of
post-dispositional containment facilities. This is a
matter that will have to be closely monitored
during next year, with firm action taken if
the daily counts do not show a decrease.   On
the positive side, under the leadership of
the newly appointed Director, a strong emphasis
is being placed on a child-care philosophy by
all the staff, as opposed to a juvenile jail
concept, with the custodial experience being
made as humane and beneficial as possible under
the circumstances.   Again, the staffing shortage
has been acute.   Administrative support
services must be increased to maintain an
acceptable level of functioning.
Efforts have continued in order to co-ordinate
delivery of community services in a manner
consistent and compatible with other services
within and without the justice system.   Apart from
the everyday effort of line staff and supervisory
personnel in their contacts with judges, social
workers, prosecutors, mental health teams,
and community-based groups, two formal
structures which have developed have been the
Justice Liaison Group and the Regional Support
Team.
The Justice Liaison Group is comprised of
Chiefs of Police, Regional Director (Community
Services), Regional Crown Counsel,
Administrative Judge, Regional Director (Sheriffs),
Regional Court Administrator, and the Justice
Council Co-ordinator.   Although this group
has considerable potential in the area of
developing cross-systems regional policy and
initiatives, the group has not lived up to this
potential. There is a need to reappraise
its function and direction in the coming year.
The Regional Support Team comprised of local
management teams of the Ministry of Human
Resources and Community Services, and the
respective Directors of the two services,
met regularly throughout the year to identify
and attempt to solve problems in service
delivery to those who are involved with both
services. The balance of this report focuses on
highlights within the three functional areas
of operations.
Family Services—This region is relatively well
staffed to provide a family court counselling
service. With the addition of another
family court counsellor position, service is
now being given to Maple Ridge, so that each
area within the region is now covered.   Case loads
remain high, reflecting a need for this
valuable conciliation/mediation process.
Juvenile Services—Although on paper, juvenile
case loads remained constant, and seemingly
manageable, the vast amount of diversionary work
is not reflected in these statistics. The
pressure on individual officers working with
juveniles has become intense, caused by the crisis
nature of many of the problems and the lack
of resources for severely acting-out children. This
takes a heavy toll on the physical and mental
well-being of some staff and the need for
a good variety of resources, including
containment, for chronically acting-out children
is paramount.
Community alternatives continue to be
emphasized and used for those who can benefit
by them.   Project Adventure, a community-based
attendance program, funded by the Branch,
has been used for 43 difficult multi-problem
juveniles, with considerable success.   In 1976
the region also made a start in using private
remand home funds. The demand was not
great, for any juvenile who is not dangerous
or who has shown no propensity for running
away can usually be placed in his own home or
that of a relative. One remand home was
used, however, in the latter part of the year,
for five boys who would otherwise have been
remanded in the detention centre. This was a
very worth while and useful resource for
Probation Officers and the juveniles concerned,
and the remand home program will continue
to be developed next year.
Adult Services—During 1976, emphasis was
placed on keeping offenders out of prison
if a viable community-based program could
be offered as an alternative. These programs
have included Impaired Drivers' Courses,
community service orders, temporary absence,
adult attendance centres, and alternatives
to prison in default of payment of fines.
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 71
Based upon operating experience, these programs vary in effectiveness and are worthy of
further note.
Impaired Drivers' Courses have suffered
from the same administrative problems as
referenced previously in this Report, and
Provincial procedures with Finance and other
Government bodies were set up to alleviate
the problem late in 1976.   In this region,
as in others, there is some diversity of opinion
as to whether Community Services should
be running the program, and this issue will have
to be resolved in 1977.
The Temporary Absence Program has been
functioning well. There is good co-operation
and communication between probation and
institutions within the region, resulting in
speedy processing of applications.   One
subprogram of the Adult Attendance Program
run by the Fraser Correctional Resources Society,
involving TA's, has not been so successful.   In
theory, the project is attractive in that it
seeks to release resourceless offenders to a
program offering intensive supervision and a
comprehensive lifeskills program, organized by
skilled and experienced people, operating on
a funding from the Attorney-General's Ministry.
In practice the project has been beset with
problems of selection, staffing, and processing.
The project is in a pilot stage and efforts will
be made to improve its functioning during the
balance of this fiscal year to determine its
suitability for continued funding.
The rest of the society's program is seen as a
valuable resource by Probation Officers, and
Judges, particularly in the Burnaby area.   A
consistent effort has been made this year
to refer offenders who would otherwise have
received a prison sentence.   Some 41 offenders
in this category have been referred with a
success rate of about 45 per cent. This figure
is more impressive than it appears when
one considers the history of offenders referred
to the program, and the fact that a significant
number of those who offended again did
so within two weeks of the referral, so that the
program had barely time to make any impact
upon their behaviour.
In 1976, this region indicated to the Bench its
willingness to undertake reports under section
646 (10) (nonpayment of fines) on the premise
that it would be a good investment of time
and manpower to avoid prison sentences,
whenever possible, for this category of offender.
The offer was well-received by the Bench,
but apart from a flurry of activity to clear up
a backlog of cases, few requests continued
to be received. The conclusion being drawn
is that of the seemingly large numbers serving
sentences in default of payment in 1976,
few came from the courts in the Fraser Region.
In summary, 1976 saw progress in some
areas, with some false starts in others.   Programs
that were costly in terms of manpower with a
disappointing return were the IDC programs,
and the Community Service Order Program. The
latter holds great potential and one of the
goals for 1977 will be to make more effective
use of this program in both the adult and
juvenile fields.
II. New Haven Correctional Centre (Institutional Services Division)
This correctional facility, located on the
southeast edge of Vancouver, serves as a
specialized open-setting resource for young male
offenders between the ages of 16 and 23.
Accommodating 40, its style of functioning is
suited to the young, emotionally immature, and
somewhat irresponsible young man who needs
simple instruction by way of example on
developing acceptable behaviour patterns and
assuming responsibility, and who is normally
serving his first jail sentence and is not overly
identified with criminal activities.
Most trainees are under a definite-indeterminate
sentence, and under the New Haven Program
there are stages of demonstrated responsibility
and constructive activity through which he must
pass before becoming eligible for temporary
absence and parole.   In addition to a course
of study which all trainees must undertake,
each trainee is given work exposure in the
major locations—kitchen, laundry, metalwork,
a woodwork shop, and the farm.   Training
and education are emphasized, and
outside academic and vocational programs
carried out on temporary absence have seen
trainees attending Vancouver City College,
the Vancouver Vocational Institute, the
B.C. Institute of Technology, and The University
of British Columbia. Team sports and
community involvement are also stressed. The
B.C. Borstal Association is an integral part
of the program, and is particularly involved in
pre-release planning, parole supervision,
and parole residency, if required.
A major highlight of the year was the
commencement in October of 1976 of the
construction of the new dormitory, to replace
the facility which burned down in 1971.
Construction should be completed in 1977, and
represents the culmination of planning and
promises for several years, and which will take
the strain off existing facilities, allowing the use of
 Q 72
BRITISH COLUMBIA
the gym for recreational activities. The
woodwork shop at New Haven has taken on
the construction of all the lockers and partitions
for the living areas, thereby reducing the direct
construction costs.
New admissions to the program increased
slightly over the previous year.   Escapes
decreased slightly. The number of transfers
from the New Haven Program to other
centres increased considerably.   A large portion
of those reclassified to other centres occurred
as a result of case management decisions.
In many instances the sentence plan had called
for completion of the New Haven program
to be followed by a transfer either to a
community correctional centre or to a centre
located in, or near, the offender's community, under
temporary absence, prior to parole.   New
Haven continues to see temporary absence
as an important part of the over-all program.
Across all categories temporary absence
went up, with the total of 189 in 1975 increasing
to 325 to 1976.   Educational release in
particular went up from 5 to 16. The internal
school program, in which all trainees must
take prior to any kind of release, continued
satisfactorily in 1976.
New Haven utilizes volunteers as much as
possible and such people participated in most of
the variety of physical and recreational
activities during the year—soccer, volleyball,
Softball, youth groups, Rover Scouts, Leather and
Model Aero Clubs, voluntary group counselling,
and public speaking courses.   In 1976,
recognition was given to New Haven by the
Surrey Canadian Baseball Association in the
form of a Certificate of Appreciation as a
result of trainees' sponsorship of a baseball team
in that area.
The farm produced approximately 7,000
pounds of vegetables in 1976 for the use of
New Haven and other local correctional centres.
Eleven head of cattle are kept on a regular
basis, received from Alouette River Unit, and
"fattened" for later exchange. Weaner hogs are
purchased locally and raised for slaughtering,
with the meat being utilized at New Haven.
Twenty hogs were slaughtered during the year.
The chickens produced almost 43,000 eggs
for internal use, with the surplus being made
available to the Lower Mainland Regional
Correctional Centre. The kitchens at
New Haven served approximately 45,000 meals
in 1976, in addition to providing training for
inmates in the area of food services.
During the year a total of 71 trainees
underwent training in the metalwork and
woodwork shops, an increase of seven over the
record total of the previous year, and no
less than 27 more than the 1973 total of 44.
Primarily as a result of the endeavours of the
woodshop instructor and his crew, the dust
extractor was installed during the year and this
has made for an over-all improvement in
working conditions in both shops.
A considerable amount of outside maintenance
work also was undertaken by the woodshop
trainees during the year.   At the Dick
Bell-Irving Home a bathroom was remodelled
as well as much repainting undertaken. A new
tractor shed was started on the farm, shelving
was fabricated for the Burnaby Probation Office,
and at Porteau the ablution facilities were
remodelled and a new chimney built,
as well as refinishing the dining-room
tables.   In preparation for construction of the
new dormitory, the outside storage sheds
were demolished by the shop trainees.   Some 200
angle fixtures were fabricated for Public Works
by the metalwork shop, as well as a drill jig
for the Public Works carpenters.   As a
community service, two juvenile soccer and
baseball teams in Surrey were sponsored with
money raised by the sale of lawn furniture
manufactured in the shops.
In summary, New Haven experienced another
good year.   Growth in certain areas of the
program did occur and staff involvement in
expanding the program was noticed.   With
the completion of the new dormitory, it is hoped
that full use of the gymnasium will once
again add a much needed recreational capacity
for the young offenders of the centre.
III. Haney Forest Camps (Institutional Services Division)
The major phase-out of large institutions
planned by the Branch went ahead of schedule in
1975 with the closure of Haney Correctional
Centre in July.   It had provided the major
custody resource for young offenders in
the Province.
The inmates were dispersed, inventories and
supplies were relocated, and staff were
transferred.   In November the Ministry of
Education officially took over the facility as a
vocational school and classes started that month.
The Director of Haney Correctional Centre
was also responsible for the operation and
administration of Pine Ridge Camp, Stave Lake
Camp, and Boulder Bay Camp.   Now known
as Haney Forest Camps (complex), an
additional camp was opened and has provided
for inmates since late 1975.   Named Cedar
Lake Camp, it officially opened in 1976.
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 73
When the centre was phased out, the
administration of the camps was continued from
that facility, which was renamed Haney
Educational Centre by Education.  In 1976,
approval was obtained for the development of an
administrative and management unit, in order
to enable the camps' administrative personnel to
vacate the Haney Educational Centre entirely.
Planning is at the pcint where final blueprints
are available and a tender is being let for the
initial construction stage. The target date
for completion has been set for March 31, 1977.
The closure of the Haney Correctional Centre
also led to a review of the manner in which
business services to both Haney Forest Camps
and Alouette River Unit, in the same
Corrections region, should be organized.   A
committee was formed in 1976 to examine the
feasibility of shared services.
Pine Ridge Camp accommodates short-sentence,
generally younger offenders whose criminal
record is not substantial and who are appropriate
for open settings and participation in community
educational and vocational training programs.
Trainees from Pine Ridge continue to use
the training facilities at Haney Educational
Centre, and the average number so involved
since the closure is approximately six per day.
Pine Ridge Camp continues to be basically
involved in the work release (temporary
absence) program in the Maple Ridge area.
During the course of 1976, 75 such passes were
approved, out of a total TA Program
approval of 182 (including 88 short-term, 19
for educational release). There were three
revocations out of that total.
The sawmill operations, including edger, planer,
resaw, power-saw operating, and silvi-culture
were still the primary work areas of 1976.   At
the mill, 275,639 board feet were produced,
with an excess of 200,000 of that delivered to
various locations.   In addition, 74 squares
of shingle and 67 cords of wood were produced;
1,793 logs were hauled to camp, with 85,437
man-hours of work being expent with respect
to all of these aspects of camp operations.
Leisure-time activities included considerable
involvement in community projects, such as
assisting the Kiwanis Club at Maple Ridge
to build a camp for retarded children at
Alouette Lake, the Maple Ridge Pony Club in the
building of jumps and fences, the painting
and cleaning of the fairgrounds at Maple Ridge
and Pitt Meadows, and participating in the
construction of adventure playgrounds for a
number of local schools. The field house at the
camp, built by the trainees, was available
for recreational and leisure pursuits in 1976.
Stave Lake Camp is essentially a land-clearing,
wood-producing resource for those serving
their first jail sentences and who are not
particularly identified with a criminal orientation.
It is more isolated than Pine Ridge, and the
fewer escapes are an indication of that,
as well as of the structure of the program.
The work program involves a basic week-day
work program with those eligible being
granted leaves for some week-ends.   A total
of 395 (1-5 day) such temporary absences
were granted during 1976, with a 97.9-per-cent
rate of success.   In addition to those releases,
nine educational, 80 work releases, and five
medical temporary absences were granted
for a grand total of 489 temporary absences
being granted in 1976 for all categories.
As a result of the camp's isolation, the
work program is geared to production, and the
following was completed during 1976.
Wood products production:
1,133.5 cords of firewood supplied to the
Parks Branch.
362 sawlogs shipped to the Pine Ridge
Camp mill.
Stave Lake clearing:
89 acres cleared of stumps and debris
(yarded and piled).
17 acres of drift cleared from the spit area.
15 acres of drift towed to the spit area
from the bag boom.
12 stump piles burned (six by work crews and
six larger piles with the aid of a 45-ton
crane).
Road construction:
0.5 mile of access road for the steel spars
constructed along Devils Creek/Rockwell
Creek.
0.1 mile of road relocated (79 Creek Hill).
Leisure-time program continued to be
generally similar to that provided in other
similar camps. Trainees are often tired from the
day's work and prefer quieter activities.
Boulder Bay Camp continued to be a
successful high-risk wilderness program for
young offenders, primarily on definite indeterminate
sentences. The concentrated four-month
program includes mountain-climbing, wilderness
survival, search and rescue, and firefighting.
Through these experiences, self-reliance and
community service are stressed. The camp, in
spite of its isolation, continually has visitors
interested in the program, from as far away as
Australia, observing and learning about the
course. Visitors from Alberta, Saskatchewan,
Washington, and 11 newly appointed Judges
in British Columbia added to the guest
list in 1976.
 Q 74
BRITISH COLUMBIA
As a part of a feasibility study conducted
regarding a possible co-educational program, two
female staff members spent a month at
Boulder Bay Camp. The general feeling was
that a number of adjustments would have to be
made in order to accommodate the females
both in terms of facilities and program.
There are no immediate plans to proceed in this
direction at this time.
During 1976, 90 trainees successfully
graduated from Boulder Bay Camp, with 23
removed for disciplinary or medical problems.
There were 15 escapes during the year.
Each group going through the four-phased
program must complete a project for the
camp.   In 1976 the projects were a new float for
landing at North Beach and a new ramp for
Boulder Bay were built, porches were constructed
on two living units, and two living units
received new chimneys.   A new system to
pump fuel from the storage tanks at the landing
to the main camp area was installed.
Each group must also be involved in work
programs—448 cords of firewood were cut,
split, and delivered to the Parks Branch; 300
cords of firewood were cut for camp use; 174
bundles of barn shakes were sent to Alouette
River Unit; 16 squares of shakes went to the
Parks Branch, with an additional 10 for
camp use; and 310 fence-posts were cut for
Riverview Hospital.
Community projects included
an adventure playground built at the
Alexandra Robinson School;
a Rod and Gun Club project;
Panorama Ridge, Maple Ridge Park—building
a rescue shelter for the Parks Branch;
working a new church in the Maple Ridge area;
landscaping at the new Eagles Hall;
rebuilding a burma bridge for the Parks
Branch;
landscaping at Yennadon Hall;
building an adventure playground at
Yennadon Hall.
During 1976, staff noticed a significant change
in the trainee population and spent many more
hours on individual and group counselling
sessions. However, Boulder Bay continues to
have a high staff morale and sense of purpose
and high trainee satisfaction emerging out
of handling a tough and rigorous program.
Cedar Lake Camp, as noted above, is the
newest addition to Haney Forest Camps, and to
the Corrections Branch. The program is
designed for inmates who have some marginal
security needs (the camp is isolated) and
who are generally without resources personally
and in the community. The year 1976 saw
the completion of initial camp construction
(by inmates) and the camp now has a capacity
for 40.
The work program has been established with
the co-operation of the District of Mission
with regard to their tree-farm licence area;
under municipal supervision, inmates cleared
and pruned approximately 70 acres of
reforested land;
116.75 squares of shakes were shipped to
various locations throughout the Province,
both to Corrections and the Forestry
Ministry;
approximately 200 squares of shakes were
produced for Cedar Lake buildings;
at Stave Lake project, inmates cleared
approximately 10 acres and burned
approximately 10 acres of debris.
To date the leisure program has consisted
mostly of hikes on week-ends. The camp
is currently attempting to develop facilities for
recreation and arts and crafts. Week-end leaves
were started in December 1976, with five
inmates being approved; all returned to camp.
In addition, during the latter part of 1976, 32
inmates were granted work or educational
release under temporary absence.   During 1976,
147 inmates were received at camp, from
which there were 33 escapees, attesting to the
still rather rudimentary facilities and program
being developed at this location, which is
one of the most rugged settings utilized
by the Branch.
In sum, for the Haney Forest Camps, 1976
was a year of continued adjustment to the
phase-out of Haney Correctional Centre.   Some
staff who had spent many years in a secure, inside
setting continue to have to adjust to an
outdoor work environment.   It is hoped that
1977 will see the completion of the process.
IV. Alouette River Unit (Institutional Services Division)
The Director of this unit is also responsible
for Twin Maples.   The latter facility is dealt with
separately below.
Alouette River Unit provides the Branch's major
resource for the chemically dependent male
inmate.   It has a maximum capacity of 153, in
three houses, each under the direction of a
housemaster.   Residents arriving at Alouette River
Unit (ARU) fall into three basic categories:
(a)  Persons on definite sentence with interrelated chemical abuse problems.
The chemical of prime use is alcohol.
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH, 1976
Q 75
(b) Persons on definite sentence for motor-
vehicle offences, primarily impaired drivers.
(c) Persons on detaining orders under section
64 (a) of the Summary Convictions Act,
i.e., that section relating to chronic
inebriates.
During the past year, persons admitted under
section 64 (a) of the Summary Convictions Act
totalled only five, the last of these being admitted
on March 26.   This brought the total year's
population of 64 (a)'s to 14 (including those
admitted during 1975), down sharply from 1975.
Once again, those admitted were those whose
severe medical deterioration demanded some form
of protective environment and immediate medical
attention.   Of the 14, four completed their
Detaining Orders at the Alouette River Unit, eight
were released through Order of Discharge, two
were released through walkaway.   Three of the
persons under 64 (a) accounted for a total of 12
walkaways from ARU during the year.   Since
November 24, there have been no persons on
Detaining Orders at Alouette River Unit.
The program at the Alouette River Unit is one
which is designed to deal with those persons
having behavioural problems inter-related with
chemical abuse. Residents arriving at the
unit are offered program alternatives, and although
there is no compulsion, residents are expected
to choose and actively participate in one or
more of the programs offered in order to qualify
for placement at the unit. Alouette River
has shown leadership in the development and use
of a number of intensive programs.
During 1976, 90 residents took a 40-hour
"life skills" communications course, which is an
eight-day course for groups of approximately
12 inmates.   Community volunteers are utilized
and the course focuses on communication
skills, group process, assertiveness training,
problem-solving, and personal development.
The methods used include films,
discussions, structures experiences, lectures, and
video tape recordings.   In order to avoid the
interruptions that are a part of institutional
life, the course is run at Haney Central School.
This also takes inmates out of the institutional
atmosphere, in order to provide learning
possibilities in a more neutral setting.
The Impaired Drivers' Education Program
continued to be one of the most significant
contributions to the unit's program in the last year.
In 1976, of the 814 intake of the entire unit,
430 (53 per cent) were impaired drivers.
There were a total of 501 impaired program
participants, including 121 residents who
volunteered to take the course.
Alcoholics Anonymous and Novalco (a similar
program to that offered by AA) were active
during the year.
With respect to health, physical education and
recreation, the location of the unit provides
for some much enjoyed "good weather" activities
such as swimming, hiking, mountain climbing,
baseball, soccer, miniature golf, horseback riding.
Lack of shelter severely curtails these activities
during inclement weather, and proper facilities are
indicated as a continuing need.
One of the main features of the Alouette River
Unit programs is the involvement of community
volunteers and resource persons in the planning and
implementation stages of the various programs.
The unit utilizes the services of community
volunteers to advise in program planning, run
programs within the unit and the community, and
sponsor residents during the time of
incarceration, and on until after release, for
continued support and guidance.
The unit regularly sends residents into the
community to perform voluntary work.
Industries
Main areas of institutional employment
were
Alouette River Unit proper, including the main
kitchen operation;
B.C. Forestry Tree Nursery, Haney Education
Centre;
laundry, Haney Education Centre;
Ruskin Farm (cattle, chickens, general
maintenance);
Glover Road Farm, Langley (cattle, haying,
general maintenance);
greenhouse operation supplying local
institutions;
tailor shop, Twin Maples; and
manufacture for sale of garden furniture, soft
drink cases, etc.
Community Activities
Haney Alliance Church (general building and
grounds maintenance);
Golden Ears Provincial Park (general
maintenance);
Harold E. lohnson Centre (work with the
mentally handicapped);
Pitt Meadows Day Care Centre (renovations);
Rolley Lake Park (general maintenance);
house demolition in Maple Ridge for
service club;
Haney Fall Fair (clean-up, trim lawns, paint,
and whitewash buildings);
Maple Ridge Rod and Gun Club (slashing
and clearing);
municipality, 248th Street and Alouette River
Road (brush clearing and ditch cleaning);
old age pensioners (repairing roof, painting
home);
LIP Project, Rieboldt Park
(reconstruction of Wildfowl Reserve).
 Q 76
BRITISH COLUMBIA
In December of 1976 the Alouette River Unit
was granted a $25,000 LIP grant to be used
for the reconstruction of a wild life sanctuary.
A tract of land had been donated to the
municipality and considerable clearing, draining,
dyking, and levelling was necessary.
Five residents are being employed a total of
30 weeks, earning approximately $3.50 per hour.
Moneys earned will be used for payment
of fines, restitution, specialized optometric care,
specialized dental care, and family support.
In 1976, Alouette River Unit took a lead role
in the Shared Services Program with Haney
Forest Camps with the storing and distribution of
foodstuffs, drygoods, and inmate canteen. The
unit's infirmary also provided medical services for
all local correctional facilities, in addition to
providing in-unit hospitalization for 159
Haney Forest Camp inmates during 1976.
Twin Maples Unit—This facility is a satellite
of Alouette River Unit, and is the administrative
and operational responsibility of the Director
of the Alouette River Unit. Twin Maples
is the female counterpart for ARU, though as one
of three Branch facilities for women it takes
more inmates convicted for nonalcohol offences
than ARU. With a capacity of 60, it
provides an open setting, with a tailor shop, a
farm, and general maintenance and kitchen work
as the major activities.
Alcoholics Anonymous continues to be a major
treatment program offered. In addition, the
Elizabeth Fry Society, John Howard Society, W-2,
the Seventh Step Drug Program, and the
Native Fellowship Group provide important
resources. The level system was established at
Twin Maples in 1976 to bring about a more
consistent method of case management. The level
system requires that residents and their
counsellors develop a close working relationship
where residents can show positive progress
through one level before attaining the next. The
level system demands also that each resident
is reviewed on a regular basis at least once
a month. The case review involves senior staff as
well as counsellors and residents. The level
system has been well received by staff
and residents as it gives all concerned constant
knowledge of where they stand and what
is expected of them.
The tailor shop, which was transferred
from ARU in February 1975, produced 6,089
garments during 1976. Approximately 10 to 12
residents (both male and female) were
employed on a daily basis. Pay is on piece-work
basis with residents earning from $6 and up,
and this incentive has been important. The major
garments produced were pants, shirts, jackets,
and so on. In the kitchen the Food Services
Officer and the five residents working with
her continued to produce excellent meals at a
reasonable cost for the unit. They have
also catered to banquets and showers in the unit,
and two weddings in the community. They
also participated in a Christmas Bazaar and
bake sales.
Another innovative development at Twin Maples
is the housing of male offenders from ARU,
initially undertaken to ease the crowding problem
at ARU. It was started toward the end of
1975. Male residents have been instrumental in
changing the general atmosphere of the unit.
The women have become neater in appearance and
are displaying more feminine behaviour, and
the men are polite and more relaxed. The men are
generally involved in various maintenance or
farming activities where more physically
heavy work is required.
During 1976, several children lived with their
mothers in the unit for periods of time of from one
month to nine months. Twelve other children
spent occasional week-ends with their
mothers. This program has been considered
extremely important, particularly for new mothers,
encouraging the appreciation of one of the
most significant relationships of all,
parent and child.
Twin Maples also has a large number of women
admitted under the Federal/Provincial
Exchange of Services Agreement. The only
Federal women's prison is in Kingston, Ont, and
transfer there always makes re-establishment
in the community upon release difficult.
Fourteen women were housed under the agreement
in 1975, and
eight were transferred to community
correctional centres for educational or
work release;
three were reclassified to Kingston Penitentiary;
and
three remained at Twin Maples at end of year.
The residents at Twin Maples benefited
from the Temporary Absence Program in many
and varied ways in 1976. Short-term absences from
one to five days were used frequently (841), in
most cases to enable the residents to re-establish
family relationships that had been broken
because of incarceration. Recurring absences
were used mainly for ongoing programs, usually
one or two days per week allotted for
educational purposes; night school in Maple
Ridge for upgrading; 7-Steps, a program for drug-
dependent persons; Community AA functions
for those residents whose offences indicate
an alcohol problem, native culture for our native
people within the institution, and Life Skills
Programs.
In 1976, there were six educational temporary
absences granted, which gave residents the
opportunity to learn a trade on an on-the-job
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 77
training program, with cost-sharing through
Manpower and the employer, and also with the
financial aid of the Education Counselling Services.
Residents also did volunteer work at the
Harold E. lohnson Centre, a school for retarded
people, assisting the teachers and other
professional employees.
There were 52 work release temporary absences
granted. Suitable residents were transferred
into community correctional centres for
employment and educational programs not
available in the Maple Ridge area.
Twin Maples Unit is looking forward in 1977
to another progressive year of activity.
SOUTH FRASER REGION
I. Southern Region (Community Services)
Offices:
Hope
Chilliwack
Mission
Abbotsford
Langley
DASH
House of Concord
Surrey Adult Office
Delta Adult Office
Richmond Adult Office
Surrey, Richmond, and Delta (UFC)
The Regional Director and his supervisors have
the adminstrative and operational
responsibilities to oversee the delivery of adult
and juvenile probation and family services in all of
of the above-noted areas, with the juvenile and
family matters in Cloverdale (Surrey),
Richmond, and Delta, those locations comprising
the pilot project of the Unified Family Court
(UFC), being phased back into the
region in June of 1976.   Branch staff in these
areas, plus staff from other locations, had been
seconded to the UFC from its outset,
and had had reporting relationships directed to
the Berger Commission instead of the region.
During the past year, significant administration
changes were noticeable in the South Fraser
Region.   In December of 1975, Southern Region
comprised 54 staff and administered approximately
$55,000 in operating costs. By December 1976
the region had grown to 117 staff and management
of a budget of approximately $2.9 million.
The process had a significant influence in changing
the nature of a supervisor's job from one of
quality and quantity control, which is increasingly
shifting to the Senior Probation Officer,
to that of a Program and Business Manager.
By the end of 1976, administrative responsibility
for the Unified Family Court had been
integrated into the Southern Region, with plans
being completed for the Unified Court staff
to come under the administrative responsibility
of the South Fraser Regional office.
In addition to the ongoing regular service
delivery to clients, the following outlines
the development of the various programs and
services within the region during 1976.
Two programs have been instituted in the past
year to enhance communication and integration
between Institutional and Community Services.
Firstly, Probation Officers visit the
Chilliwack Forest Camps on a weekly
basis to sit on Temporary Absence Panels.
This process was begun last year as an experiment
to develop better understanding of this program
and was so successful it has been maintained and
expanded.   The other area of integrated
service has been the placement of probationers
in the Chilliwack Community Correctional Centre.
This has provided more intense supervision
to probationers with special needs.
During 1976, Court Resource Officers were
active in five offices in the South Fraser Region
(Chilliwack, Richmond, Langley, Abbotsford,
and Surrey).   At a workshop in November 1976,
all five offices agreed that the program was
worth while and, for the most part, was achieving
its objective of being a resource to the court
by providing up-to-date information and details
regarding correctional programs, and as an aid to
the court in sentencing.   It was felt, however,
that in some courts the program could be
improved and some specific recommendations
were put forth for action in 1977.
The Community Service Order Program
continued to expand in 1976 due to the program's
popularity with the courts, the community,
and with staff.   CSO staff expanded from two to
five during 1976, to accommodate the 387 persons
who provided 19,786 hours of work service to
the communities within the region.
This represents a significant increase from 1975,
when a total of 7,850 hours of service was
given to all communities.
During 1976 the Impaired Drivers' Program
almost tripled in the number of persons attending,
with a total of 970 persons being referred to
the 42 courses offered in Chilliwack, Abbotsford,
Surrey, and Richmond.   Reaction to the
program continues to be mixed in some areas.
 Q 78
BRITISH COLUMBIA
In the eastern portion of the region,
declining referrals by the courts led to negotiations
with Fraser Valley College to undertake the
program as a public education course which would
also accept court referrals.   In the western
portion of the region (Surrey and Richmond),
interest remained high with continued commitment
by the courts to utilize the programs.
The use of volunteer sponsors in the region
continued to grow.   In October 1976 an additional
Co-ordinator was hired on a six-months' grant
to develop a program for the Surrey/White Rock
areas.   The numbers of trained and assigned
volunteers rose in 1976 to 44 and 24 respectively.
The establishment of Provincial remand
home guidelines by the Division in August resulted
in putting into operation three juvenile remand
homes at Abbotsford, Langley, and Richmond.
During the year a formalized Adult
Diversion Program was implemented in part of
the region (Delta, Richmond, Surrey, White Rock,
and Langley) and over the past year a marked
increase in diversion cases have been processed.
During 1976, 65 adults were dealt with on
the Diversion Program.   Offences ranged from
BE & T, theft under, fraud, shoplifting,
assault, wilfully injuring animals, to minor sexual
offences.
On April 1, 1976, the administration of the
DASH program, a wilderness experience
residential program for hard-core probationers,
transferred from the Institutional Services
to Community Services Division of the Branch.
The administration of an "institutional" type
program presented a major learning experience
for all regional probation staff. In addition,
the program relocated from Centre Creek Camp
to Pierce Creek. Demand for DASH continued in
1976 to be about double its capacity,
consequently much of the year's efforts were
geared toward doubling the program's capacity
for 1977. Ten new staff were hired and
trained. The Variety Club of Vancouver donated
$8,000 worth of equipment and CFB
Chilliwack donated in excess of $12,000 in
labour to rewire Dunbar Camp on Harrison Lake,
which is utilized as a satellite camp to Pierce
Creek. During the year, nine courses of
5'/2 weeks' duration, each with 14 participants,
were offered. In January 1977, courses will
commence every three weeks, with the first female
course occurring at the end of March 1977.
The House of Concord, funded by the
Ministry of Human Resources, but which has
been used primarily by Corrections since its
establishment, was transferred into Corrections
funding during 1976. The program continues to
provide a major complete residential resource for
young males, 15-19 years, who present
acting-out behaviour and for whom a structured
residential living experience is necessary. The
program has also developed a specialized
educational component to accommodate a high
proportion of residents who have identifiable
learning problems. Efforts were made during the
summer to provide special staffing to improve
the relevancy of Concord's program for the
high proportion of native residents and
it is hoped funding will be provided to continue
this program.
The Unified Family Court ceased to be a
pilot project in December 1976 and became the
responsibility of the Corrections Branch
(see Family and Children's Services, this Report).
A model Family Court had been developed
which was acceptable to the Family and Children's
Law Commission, as outlined in their Fourth
Report. Incorporated into this model was
the philosophy of conciliation counselling. The
counsellors in this service saw themselves as being
primarily responsible to the clients, using the
court as just one of the resources available to
them. A number of innovative projects and
programs were started up from its inception in
1973. In addition to transfer to the Branch, it has
become apparent that fiscal constraints have
begun to seriously limit its operation at
these locations, as the emphasis by the Corrections
Branch on Family Court Counselling has seen
the spread of the service to some other
parts of the Province in 1976. The following
concerns are registered with regard to the project
area:
The Police-Counsellor Project, while embraced
and supported by all agencies involved,
had to be discontinued at the end of the
year for want of funding.
The day-care/child-care program was shut down
because of lack of funding.
Scarcity of training and back-up services to new
or isolated staff became a reality.
Filing fees at the Supreme Court had to be
reinstated.
The Ministry no longer has an arrangement
with the Legal Aid Society to continue counsel
to both parties of a dispute.
There was a curtailment of travel funds for
conducting custody and access investigations.
In spite of the extremely high levels of energy
required to effectively carry out the variety
of services offered in this region, with
some frustration 1976 was registered as exciting,
with a note of optimism for 1977.
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 79
II. Chilliwack Forest Camps (Institutional Services Division)
These two minimum-security camps (Mount
Thurston and Ford Mountain), set in the
Chilliwack Valley, serve primarily as resources
for the Lower Mainland area. The Chilliwack
complex is under one Director, and includes the
fully secure Chilliwack Security Unit and a
Community Correctional Centre in downtown
Chilliwack. The camps each have a capacity of 60
for a work program, with the sawmill,
logging, and planing operation the emphasis at
Mount Thurston Camp, and forest management
activities at Ford Mountain Camp. During
1976 the logging, sawmill, and planing operation
absorbed a total of 1,720 man-days, and
as a result 255,360 fbm of lumber was produced
from 273,515 fbm of logs. This was an increase
of 154,844 fbm from the 1975 cut. A total
of 216,786 fbm of lumber was supplied to
various areas over the past year—Ranger,
Engineering, Reforestation and Parks Division
(111,523), and internal Branch use (105,263 ).
In addition, a total of 10,207 man-days
was made available for Forest Service projects
during 1976. This is an increase of 884 man-days
over 1975, and
5>/i acres of stand improvement were slashed
and burnt;
V/i miles of slashing and burning was
completed along various roads;
1,000 fence-posts were cut;
75 cords of firewood were cut for parks;
1,785 storage pallets were manufactured for
Reforestation Division;
15,000 18-inch split cedar stakes were cut
and bundled;
5 acres of nursery land were cleared;
185 man-days were expended on clearing
debris from the 4-mile log jam for the Federal
Department of Fisheries;
66 bushels of cones were picked (mixed species);
the usual annual clean-up of camp-sites was
carried out along the Chilliwack River;
200 litter barrels and some signs were painted
for Forest Service parks;
27,000 trees were planted;
64 man-days were spent on culverts and
drainage;
14 man-days were expended on a forest fire
suppression; and
497 man-days were expended on work release
for the B.C. Forest Service.
The Chilliwack Security Unit is a 30-bed,
medium security unit, used for assessing and
motivating inmates until disposition by Provincial
Classification, and as a back-up facility for
Chilliwack Forest Camps and other open-setting
Provincial centres as a result of discipline
and behavioural problems there. The Chilliwack
Security Unit is not considered a resource
for total sentence but rather as a temporary holding
unit to house inmates for a period of assessment
and observation.
Inmates housed at the unit who are medically
cleared are required to take part in the
unit's work program. Nearly all work projects
are forestry oriented and consist of building
nursery pallets, cutting stakes, painting and
lettering litter barrels, and sawing and splitting
wood for use in the camps and parks. These work
projects are carried on in a small fenced
compound adjacent to the main building. Those
inmates in protective custody and any inmate
who is unable to carry on a full work program are
employed in cleaning and maintaining the
building and carrying out housekeeping duties
within the unit. The unit's work program forms an
integral part in assessing the readiness of
inmates to enter an open camp setting, and is
particularly useful as a result of the generally more
difficut type of offender received at the forest
camps, in the continued effort to decrease
the population at Lower Mainland Regional
Correctional Centre. Counselling services are
available from unit staff.
The Chilliwack Community Correctional Centre
(CCC) opened in late 1974 with eight residents.
During 1975, 84 were received, mostly from
the Chilliwack camps as part of the phased re-entry
program.   Attending under the authority of the
Temporary Absence Program, most residents
are under work release and are involved in a
variety of jobs—cooking, general labour,
construction, retail sales, farm labour, janitorial
work, logging, body shops, service-stations,
and so on.   Most of those who relocated after
release benefited not only from the money they
earned while on work release but also
from a regular pattern of work and constructive
use of leisure time developed while at the CCC.
During 1976, 124 residents were received at
the centre.
In 1976, six residents lived in a community-based
residential centre or in their own homes in
Chilliwack, Abbotsford, Sutherland, Mission,
Boston Bar, and Langley while maintaining their
jobs or taking advantage of a program in
their particular area.   These live-out residents are
required to report to the Chilliwack Community
Correctional Centre staff or to probation personnel.
Although the emphasis is on finding
employment, a part of the program revolves
around leisure activities.   Generally, these are
unstructured and are limited only by the facilities
available in the community and the activity
being approved on the resident's program outline.
Most residents became involved in hockey,
 Q 80
BRITISH COLUMBIA
weight-lifting, attending movies, bowling, library,
swimming, fishing, and the like.
Some residents do handicrafts in the centre.
Volunteer community work plays a very important
part in the leisure program of the centre.
In 1976, residents were called upon by the local
community services centre to help whenever
a needy individual or family required some work
to be done.   The residents also played a major
role in getting the property and buildings of
the SPCA into shape so that it could reopen during
the year.   Some residents provided labour in
erecting an adventure playground at a school,
some did painting at the Airport Club, and some
worked at what was the Windsor Street
Juvenile Receiving Home.   Other volunteer work
included restoring the St. Mary's Church Cemetery
and helping maintain the Community Par 3 Golf
Course.   The residents also helped the
centre's neighbours and instructed in handicrafts
for a Mentally Handicapped Adults Group.
Also in 1976 a large number of probationers
were supervised by the staff of the Chilliwack
Community Correctional Centre as the
probationers worked toward completion of their
Community Service Orders.
The Chilliwack Community Correctional Centre
is naturally the major focus of community
participation for the camps' complex.
However, it is also felt that community
participation with the camps could be expanded.
The community is receptive to the concept of
community-involved corrections, and the need for
positive inmate community participation is
academic.   The need for planning of voluntary
programs, and the implementation of such
programs, is most usually hampered by the use of
existing staff in supervisory roles.
This will be solved in 1977 by a newly appointed
position of Principal Officer in charge of
volunteer programs.   It is hoped that with the
planning of such programs the inmate population
of the area will enjoy new and more widely
varied community participation for 1977,
and that the present leisure-time programs in
the camps can be augmented in this important way.
The Temporary Absence Program continues
to provide a most effective sentence management
tool for a wide variety of programming,
and both the number of applications received
and granted increased in 1976 across the board
from all facilities in the complex; 2,357 total
absences were granted in all categories,
with 2,260 of those being short term.
With respect to the latter, there were no
incidences of being unlawfully at large in the
short term absenced, and generally the program
has worked very well in 1976.
The major concern for 1977 will be the fiscal
restrictions which place limits on effective
program development.   However, during 1976,
this complex, with consideration, worked
very effectively within a maintenance budget,
and this is a credit to all the staff of the complex.
INTERIOR REGION
I. Interior Region (Community Services Division)
Offices:
Kelowna
Oliver
Penticton
Revelstoke
Vernon
Salmon Arm
Cranbrook
Creston
Castlegar
Fernie
Golden
Kimberley
Nelson
Trail
Kamloops (adult)
Kamloops (family)
Ashcroft
Lillooet
Merritt
100 Mile House
Williams Lake
The Interior Region encompasses a vast and
diverse geographic area which is divided
into three supervisory units. These parallel Justice
Regions 5 (Okanagan), 6 (Kootenay), and
7 (Mainline). There are a total of 21 offices
with nine one-person and five as two-person
units. Staff count is 56, excluding clerical.
Administratively, each subregion has a
supervisor for case-management quality control
in the most generic sense, while each office
remains directly responsible to the regional office
on housekeeping and routine administrative
matters. There are still anomolies in this model,
but the Probation Officer 3 and 4 Study Group
which was formed during the year has
addressed itself to some of these issues on a
Provincial basis. Their report is due early in 1977.
A good level of co-ordination has been
developed between Community and Institutional
Services whereby the line Probation Officer
has direct case-management contact with
appropriate levels in institutional programs. Over
the past two years, Community Services
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH, 1976
Q 81
Regional Director and supervisors have met
periodically with the Kamloops Regional
Correctional Centre Director and his senior staff.
The Annual Regional Conference is planned to
involve up to 10 institutional staff.
Okanagan Subregion—During 1976,
approximately 555 pre-sentence reports and
1,225 pre-court inquiries were prepared; 923
Probation Orders involving supervision were made,
an increase of 82 (10 per cent) over 1975; 282
applications were processed under the Family
Relations Act with 746 orders or agreements on
file on December 31, an increase of 78
(12 per cent) over December 31, 1975; 107
Orders for Community Service were made during
the year.
The year under review saw a general increase
in the level of service under the Family Relations
Act (FRA). Both officers in Revelstoke are
offering intake service and conciliation counselling.
In Vernon the Family Relations Act load
is being shared between three Probation Officers
on a pilot-project basis, with the expectation
that each will be spending approximately 30 per
cent of their time doing FRA matters, and the
remainder the broad range of probation services.
In Kelowna a fully trained Probation Officer
was appointed in November to be the second
Family Court Counsellor. All communities in the
Okanagan subregion, with the exception of
Grand Forks, now have access to skilled
Family Court Counsellors.
The year 1976 also saw the beginning of a
special project in Grand Forks involving
a "Community Service Worker" funded jointly by
Community Services Division and the
now-defunct Boundary Health and Human
Resources Board. The worker began his duties
in May under direction of the Oliver probation
office and in co-ordination with the social
service team (Family Counsellor, Ministry of
Human Resources Social Worker, Special School
Counsellor, Public Health representative).
One half of the worker's time has been spent
developing community-based Corrections programs
and the other half has been spent developing
programs of a preventive nature designed
to provide activity for children generally, and
pre-delinquent children in particular. In addition
to the benefit derived from increased corrections
programming at Grand Forks, the close
co-operation/co-ordination between agencies that
this project has provided has had a significant
positive effect in the growth over-all of
social programming in the area.   It is hoped the
project can be continued in 1977 with joint
Human Resources and Corrections Branch
funding.
Impaired Drivers' Courses were in operation
in Penticton, Kelowna, and Revelstoke throughout
the year and began in Oliver in December.
Courses are scheduled to begin shortly in Grand
Forks and Vernon. The subjective feeling of
officers involved with the courses is that they are
worth while, extremely so in a number of
cases, but that a thorough and comprehensive
evaluation of the courses is needed.
The Community Service Order Program is now
established in Grand Forks, Oliver, Penticton,
Kelowna, and Revelstoke, with full-time
CSO officers working at Penticton (since October
1976) and Kelowna (since August 1976).
The inability to replace the CSO officer who had
been employed at Vernon on a pilot project
basis until November 1975 has meant a severe
curtailment of the program in that area and
is seen by the courts as a significant loss.
The closing of the Choin Ranch resource
for male probationers due to a fire in January
of this year was a major loss in terms of
planning for severely delinquent youths in the
Okanagan. The Joss Mountain Wilderness
(Vernon) Program ran three- to 10-day courses
this year. A valuable addition to this year's
program was a contractual agreement with
Outward Bound (Keremeos) which supplied two
fully trained staff members and equipment on
a per diem basis with Community Services
supplying co-ordination, assistant staff, and
vehicles. Each course was geared for 10
participants (two courses for boys, one for
girls) and was completely mobile. Total cost of
the program (excluding vehicles which were
borrowed from Institutions Services Division) was
$9,118.
In the area of liaison with private agencies
and other community groups, highly effective
co-operation continued between Kelowna probation
office and Elizabeth Fry Society, with the
society sponsoring again this year a girls' summer
camp and a week-end girls' attendance program,
both receiving referrals directly from the
probation office. In Vernon, co-operation between
Probation, Kamloops Regional Correctional
Centre, National Parole Board, the John Howard
Society, and the courts has resulted in a day
parole program now operating out of Howard
House, receiving selected offenders sentenced to
incarceration in the Vernon area, and
considered appropriate for fairly immediate
day parole. Also in Vernon, probation office
initiative has been key to the establishment of a
Boys' and Girls' Club- In Penticton, liaison
with co-operative Community Services resulted
in a youth worked funded by LIP being
assigned to the probation office for detached
street work (November 1975 to 1976) and, at
present, a further LIP funded project providing one
female staff person to work at the street level,
with girls referred by probation staff.
In regard to Volunteer Sponsor Programs, a
formal program is occurring in Revelstoke where
 Q 82
BRITISH COLUMBIA
approximately 15 sponsors were available
for matching with probationers. Penticton is
using the program on a limited basis at this
time, with expansion planned as soon as staff can
be freed to thoroughly co-ordinate the
program. Grand Forks also has been moving
into this area. It is noted that Vernon, although not
having a formal sponsors' program, has made
use of a large number of volunteers in the
past, most particularly in connection with the Joss
Mountain program and various Community
Service projects.
Kamloops Subregion—During the calendar year
1976, work loads increased in all offices in
the subregion.   The most noticeable example was
at Kamloops Adult Probation Office.
In January 1976 the average case load at
Kamloops Adult Probation, exclusive of Impaired
Drivers' Course cases and investigations, was
62 per officer.   In November 1976 that figure was
91 per officer.   The increase in probation
cases throughout the subregion appears to involve
generally appropriate use of probation by the
courts.
Impaired Drivers' Courses have been operating
in Kamloops, Salmon Arm, Merritt, Lillooet,
Ashcroft, 100 Mile House, and Williams Lake.
Ashcroft, Lillooet, and Merritt courses have
been operated with volunteer moderators and
resource people and involve minimal cost.
A new course, based on volunteer involvement and
backed by a service club, will be operating
in early 1977 in Valemount.   There is a need to
develop courses at Clearwater and Lytton.
A special employment preparation program for
chronically unemployed persons who were
also criminal offenders was developed in 1975 and
operated in Kamloops during part of 1976.
A Kamloops Probation Officer was instrumental
in the development and management of that -
program along with other agencies such as
Institutional Corrections, National Parole,
Elizabeth Fry Society, and RCMP.   The program
operated for several months with a $40,000 LIP
grant.   Funding through justice-related
departments, Provincial and Federal, may be
further pursued in 1977.
A formalized procedure for processing certain
suitable cases for adult pre-court diversion was
established in Kamloops in July 1976.
Referrals come to Probation from Crown counsel
with Probation further assessing the case,
developing a diversion plan where appropriate,
and supervising the plan.  Crown counsel make the
actual decision to divert.   The program has
proved to be very low volume with only eight
cases processed in six months with four of these
having written agreements involving divertee
and victim.   There continues to be a need for a
high-level policy decision to apply Province-wide as
to whether Probation Officers should have
a formalized role in adult pre-court diversion
procedures.
Kamloops Probation Subregion had no paid
co-ordinators for Community Service Order
program development in 1976.   However,
the program has been developed on a small scale
throughout the subregion.   An interesting
model was developed at 100 Mile House with a
co-ordinator working on a volunteer basis
organizing Community Service Order tasks and
seeing that probationers completed their obligations.
In Merritt the Probation Officer utilized the
Family Court Committee as a selection
committee for Community Service Order candidates
as well as locating projects.   He found that use
of a group in these functions was somewhat
cumbersome and moved toward use of a single
volunteer individual as a co-ordinator.
In Kamloops there is a great need for a full-time
paid co-ordinator to develop and co-ordinate
a Community Service Order Program and utilize
the very considerable potential for Community
Service Orders in this urban community.
A service under the Family Relations Act
and related statutes is offered by Corrections in
Kamloops, Salmon Arm, and Ashcroft as has been
the case for many years.   Such service is not
being offered by any other offices in the subregion
nor it is being offered up the North Thompson
or in Chase.   Court administration is handling the
service in those areas where Corrections is not.
However, the work-load situation for Corrections
is such that the service cannot be offered with
present staffing without other parts of the
work load suffering considerably.
Arden Park Ranch group home, near Clinton,
in 1976 became an important resource in
dealing with difficult juvenile male probationers.
Referral procedures, program, and funding
status were firmed up.   Eleven difficult
juvenile male probationers were placed in this
resource during 1976 from various parts of
the region.   The current capacity of eight at Arden
Park is expected to be doubled in early 1977.
Probation Officers in the subregion were
very active in the area of prevention during 1976,
particularly with respect to the development
of alternate education projects and youth activity
centres and hostels.   This kind of involvement
is important because of the kind of case
management implications it has for the work of
officers, but, as important, these activities have
a significant impact on an increased credibility of
Probation Officers in the community, and with
offenders who are personally assisted through such
resources.
Kootenay Subregion—All but five of the eight
offices in the subregion are one-person offices
and all but two of the 13 professional staff
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH, 1976
Q 83
are carrying generalized case loads.   There are
two specialists doing Family Relations Act (FRA)
work, with a full-time Community Services
Officer covering two offices.
The work load in every office has been steadily
increasing, although over the past several
years considerable emphasis has been placed on
the development of new programs.
The normal ongoing supervision of adults and
juveniles, both parolees and probationers, has been
going on at a steady pace.   Each office
maintained a steady work load conducting
the various investigations, including pre-sentence
reports, pre-court inquiries, temporary absence
reports, and the various parole reports.
As a result of offices being located in small towns,
Probation Officers frequently become the
contact person for many people when relating to
the justice system.
Impaired Drivers' Courses are under way
and working well in several communities. There
has been good response to the program. In
the community of Fernie-Sparwood, both the
police and news media credit the course
with reducing the 1976 conviction rate by
approximately 30 per cent from the previous
year. A frequent request is that Impaired Drivers'
Courses should be available to the general
public, and various efforts are being made by
local Steering Committees to make the program
more accessible. The Community Service
Program also has been an excellent program from
the standpoint of agency-community relations
in 1976 and, moreover, it has been considered to be
a valuable program from a Corrections
standpoint in its dealing with the offender. A
number of case histories which reflect major
changes in the lives of offenders involved in
community service were recorded during the year.
The increase in Family Relations Act services
during 1976 are noteworthy. For most of the
calendar year 1976, one staff member provided
regular family counselling service for the
communities of Cranbrook and Kimberley.
Effective December 1, 1976, one additional staff
member was appointed to work exclusively
in the area of Family Court counselling in the
West Kootenays, to cover the offices of
Nelson, Trail, and Castlegar. Also, the Probation
Officers in Fernie-Sparwood undertook to
provide family counselling service in addition to
their regular adult and juvenile work load.
This leaves the communities of Creston and Golden
where there are no services. One additional
staff member to augment the service in the
East Kootenay has been requested.
Recently, two resources for juveniles which
had been used fairly extensively for children were
closed in the East Kootenay. The Kimberley
Group Home was closed in August and
the Loewen Ranch was closed in December.
At year's end there are no residential programs
available for juveniles in the East Kootenays,
although the Cranbrook Justice Council has for
some time been examining the possibility
of starting a ranch-type program at the Steeples
Ranch near Cranbrook. In the West Kootenays,
the Santa Rosa Ranch was operational for
the last four months of the year.
As in other Interior subregions, officers have
been very active in the development of
alternate schools (eight) and youth liaison
committees, which epitomize the quality
of dedication and commitment exhibited by staff
through the whole region during 1976.
II. Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre (Institutional Services Division)
This facility, located on the outskirts of
Kamloops, serves both as a remand centre and a
facility for sentenced persons from the
Interior of the Province.   Rayleigh Camp,
Clearwater Forest Camp, and Kamloops
Community Correctional Centre, as satellite
facilities, provide different program alternatives for
those sentenced to the centre. The centre and
the forest camps have existed for many
years; the Community Correctional Centre joined
their ranks officially on April 1, 1975.
The Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre
and satellite units operated at a 108.75-per-cent
capacity during the 1976 calendar year.
The total bed space for the Kamloops Correctional
Centre and satellite units during 1976 was as
follows: Main Centre, Dorm (60), Remand
Unit (26); Rayleigh Camp (30); Clearwater Forest
Camp (30); Community Correctional Centre
(20), for a total of 166. The actual average
daily inmate count was 180, which reflected a
25-per-cent increase in admissions during the year.
The Main Centre was a bomb storage house
for the Armed Forces when taken over in 1957 as
an interim facility. There are some serious
difficulties with the inadequate facilities
and there are needs to upgrade the custodial
unit, and particularly the cell block and segregation
areas. This is of particular concern with
respect to supplying adequate custody facilities
for those on remand. At the end of the Report
period, it is apparent that an extension to
the remand unit has been approved by Public
Works, which will help to relieve some of
the problems. A completely new remand unit is
still considered an urgent priority.
 O 84
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The purpose of the Main Centre, which is
designated as medium security, remains the same as
in the past—to employ inmates in tasks for
a period of time to evaluate their ability to function
in a camp setting, to utilize and expand their
skills in the shops, and to ensure appropriate
security is provided for those who require
it. The work program consists of placements in
the following areas: Kitchen, general maintenance,
garage, carpenter shop, and gang work.
Academic and vocational programs at the Main
Centre, as at the camps, are limited, where
much of the focus in that area for the complex as
a whole is at the community correctional centre,
through temporary absence and the availability
of Cariboo College. A lay counselling
program has been traditional, but with the
introduction of a more refined case management
system in the Branch, this is being implemented
at the centre and throughout the complex.
Both the sentenced and remand population
receive physical exercise once a day in the
Multi-use Building where volleyball, floor hockey,
badminton, and other sports are played. Both
units are stocked with library books from the
Thompson Nicola Library System and this
service appears well received. In better weather,
sentenced inmates participate in outdoor
sports in the evening. In addition to sports there
are hobby crafts, feature films, TV, and
indoor games to occupy the leisure hours. There
were 36 special events throughout the year,
including
eight AA meetings consisting of some outside
guests;
12 ball games against outside teams, including
the Kamloops Chiefs Hockey Club;
seven visits by the Enderby Choir;
five visits by other choirs and bands;
four sessions of group therapy conducted by
instructors from Cariboo College.
The purpose of Rayleigh Camp is to employ
inmates serving short sentences, who have
a minimum security classification, in a farm
program consisting of a beef production activity,
the growing of vegetables, and a forestry
work program. The production objective is to
produce sufficient beef and vegetables for the
Kamloops Complex's own use. The correctional
objective is to teach proper work habits,
implant farm knowledge, and encourage team
work.
With the incorporation of the camp area
into the new Kamloops City boundaries, it was
found and reported in the 1975 Report that
the buildings did not meet city fire regulations.
During 1976 a study and proposal by Public Works
for trailer accommodations was completed,
and recommended a trailer complex to take the
place of existing buildings. It would appear that, as
a result of fiscal restraints, this plan is not
going ahead in the near future. Another problem
which surfaced at Rayleigh was that the entire
sewerage system was inadequate, and was
condemned by the Health Department. Provincial
Public Works is now in the process of drawing
up plans to install a new system. It is recommended
that the trailer complex proposal receive top
priority and a start on same be initiated
during 1977.
During 1976, approximately 100 tons of
potatoes and 300 tons of corn silage were
produced, including an array of vegetables—■
peppers, carrots, cucumbers, lettuce, etc.
Approximately 15,000 bales of hay were reaped
and stored. The vegetables were utilized by
the complex, in addition to sending potatoes to the
Prince George Centre and the Chilliwack
Camps. The hay was utilized for the cattle, where
an average of six beef per month were shipped
for slaughter, and 12 head of finished steers
were shipped to Prince George for their use. The
farm appears to be in a position to increase
the herd from 235 to 255, thus making it
self-sufficient in beef.
Forestry projects undertaken in 1976 for
Rayleigh Camp included the construction of a
fire break at Paul Lake, the cutting and removal of
dead trees along a portion of Heffley Lake
Road, and the construction of 2,000 pallets for
Forestry.
During 1976, 58 employment release temporary
absence applications, 17 educational release
applications, and 53 short-term passes were
processed by camp staff. The opportunity to leave
camp for specific reasons for set periods of
lime provided an important sentence management
tool to augment other programs and the
normal leisure-time pursuits.
The purpose of Clearwater Forest Camp
is to employ minimum security inmates in a logging
and sawmill operation, and to provide living
facilities for those on work release temporary
absence in the local area. Originally located
to open up Wells Gray Park as a public
recreation area, it remains relatively isolated and
is therefore utilized for inmates serving longer
sentences at the complex. The wood produced is
provided for several Government ministries,
including the Branch itself, and as well provides
inmates with the opportunity to learn some
skills and good work habits. Activities include
falling and bucking trees, sawmilling logs
and planing lumber, cutting fence-posts and stakes,
and cutting firewood. In conjunction with
that work, there are opportunities to take a
power-saw course, a scalers' course designed by
the B.C. Government, and Industrial First Aid.
All inmates entering the Sawmill Program
start at the general work level regardless
of experience and have to demonstrate progress
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 85
in attitude, deportment, work habits, safety
practices, and related areas to be considered for
one of the technical mill jobs.
Inmates demonstrating progress at the general
work level are given the opportunity to learn
a skill in the technical job level. Activities at this
level consist of power-saw operator, cat
operator, or one of the machine operator jobs on
the sawmill or planer mill.
Inmates demonstrating progress in either the
general work area or technical area are considered
for the community work crew or fire
suppression crews (in season) to work in the
community under supervision, or with the
Forestry or temporary absence.
Other programming for special needs and
leisure time is similar to that at other camps
throughout the Province. The availability of local
employment was more limited this last year
than previously, and so most inmates remained
on the camp work program.
The adequacy of the facilities at Clearwater
have been a source of concern to the Branch for
some years, and in 1975 an initiative to phase out
the camp was reversed due to local citizen
opinion regarding the services the camp had
provided the local town of Clearwater.
Therefore, during 1976 an extensive camp repair
program was carried out at Clearwater Forest
Camp to upgrade the living conditions.
This included the purchase and installation of
oil-fired furnaces for all the cabins.   A fire-safe
furnace room was constructed.   The ablution area
was upgraded by the purchase and installing
of new toilets.   All buildings received additional
braces and general reinforcing to ensure a
greater degree of safety.   The recommendations for
this camp are still the same—for relocation to
the Bear Creek Sawmill site and the
construction of a new camp.
The Kamloops Community Correctional Centre
(CCC), as with other CCC's, provides an
exemplary model of staff involvement
and programs.   During the latter part of 1975
the officers in charge spent a total of 158 hours in
making presentations to community groups,
service clubs, schools, and so on, and the
excellent community acceptance and co-operation
the operation has received has been an
indication of their success.   During 1976, this
extensive community involvement was continued,
and many organizations participated in programs at
the centre—Elizabeth Fry Society, John Howard
Society, Carpideum (Youth Resource Centre),
Kiwanis, Community "Y", Indian Friendship
Centre, and Government agencies.
The Kamloops CCC has a particularly good
relationship with Cariboo College, where there is
the availability of a set number of seats for
the following types of course: Basic Training Skills
Development, Academic Studies, Vocational, and
Store Front Services.   There were 40 education
temporary absences granted via the CCC for 1976,
with most of the population focusing on
employment absences (101).
The over-all review of Kamloops Regional
Correctional Centre and Satellite Units during 1976
showed a relatively stable operation which was
due, in most part, to the effort which was
displayed by all staff in making the operation
effective and efficient even though working with the
handicap of outdated, limited facilities.
Unfortunately, there was a noticeable increase
in organized inmate demonstrations, and this places
additional strain on staff.   The 1977 operational
year is looked forward to in the hopes of
achieving some of the recommendations in this
Report, and with satisfaction of doing the best one
can.
NORTHERN REGION
I. Northern Region (Community Services Division)
Offices:
Prince Rupert
Terrace
Kitimat
Smithers
Vanderhoof
Prince George
Quesnel
Mackenzie
Dawson Creek
Fort St. John
Fort Nelson
The Northern Region co.vers a large
geographical area, and the Regional Director and
his supervisors are responsible for the
administration and operation of all adult
and juvenile probation and Family Relations Act
(FRA) services.
No new offices were opened during 1976.
The officer in Burns Lake office was moved to
Smithers, enabling the region to equalize case loads
and also provide better living conditions for
the Probation Officer and his family.
The office accommodation at Burns Lake is being
used as a reporting office; the telephone is
monitored and messages taken by the Court
 Q 86
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Clerk's office there.   Since April 1, 1976, the
establishment of Probation Officers in the North
has increased by three, with the placement of three
additional officers to Prince Rupert, Dawson
Creek, and Prince George.   The new
Probation Officers in Dawson Creek and Prince
George have been employed full time as
Family Court Counsellors handling FRA matters.
There was to have been a fourth addition to go
to Prince Rupert to handle FRA matters,
but that posting was postponed.
The new Probation Officer in Prince Rupert
has taken over direction of the office as a Probation
Officer 3, and handling of juveniles.
Most of the major problems of the North
revolve around lack of program resources, and this
has necessitated the most active initiatives of staff
working in the region, in the setting-up and
directing of programs which in larger centres
might be undertaken by larger community
organizations or by specialist staff.   In 1976 the
region operated the following such programs:
Fort St. John Attendance Program—
This program is run by two attendance workers and
serves both as an attendance program and
community service program.   It has received
many commendations from the community.
Prince George Attendance Program—
This is run by two attendance workers serving
juvenile attendance only.
Impaired Drivers' Courses—Two courses per
month are run in Prince George whereas
single courses are offered in Fort St. John,
Dawson Creek, and Vanderhoof.
Community Service Program—This is being
offered in all communities. Prince Rupert
has an interviewer to handle this work exclusively,
whereas a similar position has been posted
in Quesnel but not yet filled.
A number of other programs which are
utilized but not funded by the region are
Prince Rupert Attendance Program;
Camp Trapping for juveniles in Prince George
(funded by Human Resources);
Indian Friendship Centre in Fort Nelson; and
Miracle Valley at Hazelton (funded by
the Salvation Army).
Programs in various stages of development
include Weewanee Creek juvenile program in
Kitimat, a shoplifting diversion program in Prince
George, and Impaired Drivers' Courses in
Prince Rupert, Terrace, Smithers, Quesnel, and
Fort Nelson.
Areas of increased responsibility in the region
include family court counselling in Dawson
Creek and Prince George, the preparation
of custody and access reports throughout the region
by Probation staff, and nonpayment-of-fine
reports for the Provincial Court.
Staff training in the region has been facilitated
by three annual conferences and by several
subregional meetings during the year.   In
addition, Corrections-related workshops have been
put on by the Inter-departmental Education
Committee in Prince George and were well
attended by Probation Officers.
The administration of the region has been
greatly enhanced by the decentralization
of the budget and the appointment of a person to
handle business matters.
II. Prince George Regional Correctional Centre (Institutional Services Division)
The centre provides facilities for those on
remand or awaiting trial, and a facility for both
male and female sentenced offenders from
the North. It is considered as a maximum-security
centre, second most secure Provincial institution
to Lower Mainland Regional Correctional
Centre (LMRCC). The complex includes Hutda
Lake Forest Camp and direct staff involvement
in the Activator's House, a community-based
residential centre.
The Main Centre continued to offer a wide
variety of programming, but under considerable
conditions of constraint. There are no
facilities for inmates requiring protective custody,
and therefore those persons are housed in
the hospital facilities. The centre lacks proper
visiting facilities, and use of the gymnasium for
those purposes makes more difficult the
control of contraband entering the centre. The
shoe shop was open for a limited time as supplies
were not available until the last three months
of the year. Lack of supplies was similarly
a problem in the tailor shop. Unseasonable wet
weather made the farming operations adjacent
to the Main Centre less than successful.
These latter programs are being reviewed in the
context of cost-benefit to both the centre and
the inmates and with a view toward developing
programs more in line with work opportunities in
industry.
The carpentry shop had a particularly
worth-while year with both morale of the staff
and production by the inmates registered as good.
Some of the activities included
42 picnic tables built and sold;
all tables and benches in the living units
repaired and painted;
ceiling in one of the units redone;
a new skating-rink built;
a 12-foot security fence installed around
the exercise yards.
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH, 1976
Q 87
The Community Service Program under
Temporary Absence Program supervision
continued to be a major success for the year.
Some of the activities completed during the year
were
clearing and landscaping around Ness Lake to
provide better facilities for tourists;
building of six pads for picnic tables, six fire
pits, and two outhouses;
clearing and firewood chopping around
West and Berman Lakes;
clearing up and road widening of the
Cummings Road and Mud River garbage
dumps;
clearing of 25 acres of land for the
B.C. Forest Service.
The work of the Community Service crew is
held in very high regard by the District Parks
Branch.
In April of 1974 a unit in the main centre was
set aside for females and at that time made
the facility the first co-educational correctional
centre in Canada.   This unit continued to provide
these facilities in 1976, avoiding the transfer of
women from the northern part of the
Province, allowing them to stay closer to
their homes.   Some program and work activities
are carried out by men and women together;
an example is in the tailor shop, where
men are available to do heavy lifting.
While not without its problems, and a need
for reassessment, the unit does have advantages.
Of particular concern is the consistently low count
in the unit, which could well accommodate 20
inmates, but in 1976 had a daily average count of
eight. During 1977 the use of female bed space
across the Province will be included
in this reassessment.
Finally, at the Main Centre, a number of
physical plant improvements were possible through
the excellent response of Public Works.
Washroom facilities in three of the four units
received a much needed remodelling.   Painting of
a number of the units was completed and
improvements were made to the lighting system
in parts of the buildings.   Co-operation in the
resolving of a host of ongoing problems
was excellent.
Hutda Lake Forest Camp is located some
30 miles from the City of Prince George.
It provides minimum security facilities for the
northern parts of the Province for up to 60 inmates
who have been classified through the Main Centre
as eligible for forest work.   This camp has a
particularly close liaison with the B.C. Forest
Service and Highways in the carrying-out of many
activities—log salvage, reforestation, land
clearance for nursery projects, road maintenance,
slash-burning, snag falling, fire suppression
(training and fire-fighting), manning
weather stations and look-out towers, and hose
washing and repairing (after a fire).
As an example of this work, in 1976 inmates
from the camp on work release planted
247,000 seedlings, up 60,000 from 1975. The
survival rate of planted seedlings from camp crews
is much higher than from crews hired by Forestry.
Although the inmates work a little more slowly,
the outcome shows advantage. Further, the
camp is always able to supply regular manpower,
and this has ready advantages to Forestry.
In addition to forest work, Hutda Lake operates
a small saw and planer operation.
Unfortunately it had been burned down in 1974,
but did resume operation in 1976. As a result
of the excellent co-operation between the
camp staff and the Forest Service, the latter
provided some funds for rebuilding.
In addition to a variety of health and physical
education, recreation, and special interest
activities, a repainting of the exteriors of all
camp buildings was completed. The need for a
proper recreational facility on site is stressed
as a priority for 1977. This would be a
multi-purpose building for visiting during poor
weather, special meetings (i.e., AA), and so on.
Plans have been put forward to Public Works.
In general, morale and program at Hutda
Lake Camp are registered as good. The camp
serves as an important first step for inmates who
have been reclassified from the security of
the Main Centre, to the possibilities of temporary
absence to the Activator's House, a
community-based residential centre (jointly
staffed by Corrections and the Activator's Society).
The Prince George Activator's Society House
is a privately funded and operated community-
based residential centre which has the
assignment full time of two of the Main Centre's
staff. They supervise inmates residing there
for educational or work release under temporary
absence. The house provides accommodation
on a guaranteed basis of 15 beds for male or
female offenders, and for an extra five beds, if
needed. The residence is also used by the
National Parole Service and the Ministry of
Human Resources. The Activator's staff provide
in-house counselling and out-of-doors recreational
and social activities.
 Q 88
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ISLAND REGION
I. Vancouver Island Region (Community Services Division)
Offices:
Port Hardy
Campbell River
Courtenay
Powell River
Port Alberni
Parksville
Nanaimo
Duncan
Sidney
Victoria (adult)
Victoria Family Division
Victoria Court Services
Victoria Detention Home
Victoria Attendance Centre
Metchosin Camp
Island Region has responsibility for all adult
and juvenile probation and Family Relations Act
services on Vancouver Island, including
responsibility for the Metchosin Attendance
Program, the Victoria Youth Detention Centre,
and the Victoria Youth Attendance Centre.
The North Island Subregion Offices all noted an
increase in case loads and referrals for
pre-sentence reports and pre-court inquiries in
1976. In addition to the above court-related
responsibilities, Probation Officers had to spend
more of their time in developing and providing
ongoing support to community-based programs
(i.e., Impaired Drivers' Courses, Attendance
Centre, Community Work Service, etc.),
and increasingly officers are expected to act as
consultants to various boards and societies in their
communities (i.e., Justice Councils, Family
Division Committees, Youth Societies, Street
Worker Programs, Halfway Home for Alcoholics,
etc.). This has placed a severe strain on
staff and it has been suggested that during 1977
some of these latter activities may have to
be curtailed lest such involvement adversely affect
the quality of regular services delivered.
Impaired Drivers' Courses continue to be under
way in Courtenay, Campbell River, Port
Hardy, Port Alberni, and Powell River and
referrals from the court are on the increase. The
Community Service Order Program in Courtenay
and Campbell River has seen a significant
increase in use, and it is being used more as a
diversion initiative. Port Alberni, Powell River,
and Port Hardy have all used Community
Service on a limited basis, using volunteers as
supervisors. This program has proven to be one of
the most effective programs initiated by
Community Services, and officers for the Port
Hardy, Port Alberni, and Powell River areas have
been requested.
Initial steps have been taken to locate a
suitable remand home facility to be used
by Campbell River and Courtenay. The Family
Division Committee is interested in locating such a
resource. It is difficult to predict the number
of juveniles that would be placed in an
open remand home in any given period of time.
The Port Hardy Probation Officers have
continued to accompany the Court Team every
two months to Ocean Falls, Bella Coola, and
Bella Bella. The service provided the courts by
the Probation Officers has been much appreciated.
There is a great need for a resident Probation
Officer for this area, as there are an increasing
number of juveniles and adults who would benefit
from the services of a Probation Officer.
The Port Alberni Attendance Centre and the
Street Worker Programs in Comox and Campbell
River continued to provide important services.
In the Central Island Subregion, Nanaimo
continued to be a hub of activity, in spite
of changes in staff and vacant positions, with the
smaller offices of Duncan and Parksville following
suit. The Nanaimo Diversion Program funding
was stabilized during 1976; a special Youth
Service Committee and interagency facility for
juveniles was developed; the Impaired Driver's
Course continued; special diversion procedures for
juveniles on Motor-vehicle Act and
Government Liquor Act infractions were
successfully developed and adopted; and the
Community Service Order Program received an
average of 60 cases per month. Probation
Officers are also involved in the Justice Councils,
Family Division Committees, and a myriad
of community agency activities.
In the South Vancouver Island Subregion
there also has been an increase in work load,
particularly focused on the Victoria Adult Office.
Coupled with heavy involvement in the
Impaired Drivers' Program, the Victoria Adult
Office case loads averaged in excess of 100
per Probation Officer, and when this is in addition
to seven to ten pre-sentence reports per month
per staff member, the work load is obviously too
great. On the regional statistical count for
the month of November 1975, the total case load
for the Victoria Adult Office came very close
to 30 per cent of the load for the entire region.
Some preliminary steps to deal with this
were undertaken.
At any given time during the year the
Impaired Drivers' Program accounted for between
175 and 200 probation cases. In 1976 a total
of 566 individuals completed the course.
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 89
The Victoria Office saw a substantial increase
in completed Community Service Orders over
1975. When the program was launched in 1975,
166 juvenile and adult CSO's were completed.
In 1976, there were 506 completed community
service orders, with approximately half
of these relating to juvenile offenders. At this
writing there are approximately 100 active
community service orders under supervision in the
Victoria Office, with each one averaging about
60 hours. Some orders are showing as much as
75 to 150 hours and there seems to be a tendency
toward a longer community service order
being issued by the courts.
Since the appointment of the Regional
Co-ordinator of Volunteers in November 1976,
there has been an active involvement in the
orientation of the program with the various offices
in the Victoria area, including Sidney. A short
newsletter has been prepared, some feedback
sessions held, and assistance given in the
development of the Juvenile Detention Home
Volunteer Program. Effective December, a total
of 45 volunteers has been recruited (26 male
and 19 female), with only 10 of this 45 as yet
unassigned to work specifically with a probationer.
A Saanich suboffice located adjacent to the
Saanich Police Office in the municipal complex
was opened late in 1976 and is being covered off
on a rotational basis by two Probation Officers
from the Adult Office and one from the
Family Court staff. The objective is to increase
the working relationships between the police
agency and Probation, with a view to becoming
involved in some diversionary processes as
well as increasing the communication between
the two agencies.
The Court Service Office in Victoria and the
Sidney Office continued to offer excellent service.
Prior to 1976 the youth detention centre,
the youth attendance centre, and Metchosin Camp
were separate programs each with its own
administrative structure. To reduce administrative
overlap the three programs were placed within
one management unit called "Juvenile Programs."
The youth detention centre in Victoria is a
co-educational remand facility with a capacity of
approximately 20 residents. Due to the short
length of stay for most residents and the
lack of space and facilities, the internal program is
limited to passive recreational activities such as
TV and reading, light arts, and crafts work.
In 1976 an educational program designed
to meet the unique needs of the youth involved
a half-time teacher. That program consisted
of small group interaction through the use
of VTR, educational instruction and counselling,
and planning educational placements for
appropriate residents. Outside recreational
resources such as local gymnasiums and pools are
utilized when adequate staff coverage is
available. During 1976 a full-time nurse was added
to the detention home to provide a much needed
medical service, and the half-time services of
a liaison Probation Officer to relate directly to
Family Court, handle issues with respect
to out-of-town youth, and to organize psychiatric
services for residents was made available. An
active volunteer program has been developed
and a staff member has been assigned to coordinate this activity on a quarter-time basis.
During 1976, there were 895 admissions to the
centre (714 boys and 181 girls) of an average
age of 15 years for an average length of stay
of approximately five days. The youth detention
centre has been identified as one of the two
facilities in the Branch which will provide an
additional capacity for secure post-dispositional
stay of juveniles.
The Attendance Centre Program continued
with a staff of three counsellors and a full-time
teacher. Youth (male and female) are placed on
the regular program through a probation
order. Probation Officers make direct referrals
to this diversion program, which consists of
academic training, life skills training, group
counselling, and week-end wilderness activities.
The normal program averages three months in
duration. In late 1976 a life skills component was
incorporated into the centre's program to meet
a wider spectrum of needs as identified by
the field probation staff. A total of 79 young
persons was involved on the program during the
year, with the average monthly enrolment
being 33 (eight on the school program).
Metchosin Camp continues to provide a
co-educational "outward bound" type program
for juveniles and young adults in 1976, with the
program for females starting into its second
year. The various aspects of the program include
wilderness survival, marine survival, search
and rescue, first aid training, mountain climbing,
physical fitness, group and individual counselling,
and other activities. In 1976, in addition to
the week-end programs of 16 weeks' duration
and the one-month summer program, an
experimental three-week residential camp was
run at Lakeview (near Campbell River) for the
upper Island area. A total number of 124
probationers (24 adults and 100 juveniles) were
involved in programming in 1976: 60 on week-end
programs, 24 on week-end residential programs,
12 on the experimental Lakeview program, and
22 on the one-month summer course. Metchosin
and the attendance centre relate closely on
the provision of complementary services for
probationers and both are considered exceptional
programs.
 Q 90 BRITISH COLUMBIA
II. Vancouver Island Regional Correctional Centre (Institutional Services Division)
Vancouver Island Regional Correctional
Centre at the end of 1976 provided maximum
security for all those awaiting classification and
those on remand in the Island Region. Its
Director is also responsible for all other Branch
facilities on the island—Jordan River Forest
Camp, Snowdon Community Correctional Centre,
and Victoria Community Correctional Centre.
During the previous year (1975) the Vancouver
Island Complex had undergone some significant
developments:
(1) A new forest camp at lordan River
was officially opened on February 28, 1975.
(2) Corresponding with that opening, the
Vancouver Island Regional Correctional
Centre was phased into a unit for
classification and remand only, with no
sentenced inmates to be housed at
the facility.
■ (3)  In May the Redonda Bay wilderness camp
was established on West Redonda Island,
situated approximately 25 miles east
of Campbell River.
(4) Snowdon Forest Camp at Campbell River
was reclassified to a community
correctional centre in August.
(5) The responsibility for the Vancouver
Island Community Correctional Centre
(CCC), as a separate administration
similar to that operating out of Vancouver,
was transferred back to the Director of
the Main Correctional Centre.
(6) For the first time female offenders were
accepted at the Victoria Community
Correctional Centre.
The year 1976 saw a consolidation of those
changes, and it is noted that staff morale has
increased over all during the year. As in index of
this, the complex won the Provincial Safety
Award.
As a result of its emphasis on remand, the
Main Centre saw a large turnover of inmates.
Programs are limited to recreation, hobbies,
reading, etc., and counselling is undertaken
as requested. Such counselling is usually focused
on obtaining legal aid, interviews with the
John Howard Society, Salvation Army, and other
outside agencies. Once inmates are sentenced,
if they are to remain on the Island, then they are
transferred out.
Jordan River Camp has a capacity of 48. Much
of the year has been spent in continuing
construction of the camp. Considerable
advancement was made on the construction of the
recreational hall, office, and stores complex in 1976.
The building is now completely framed with
electrical work, plumbing and heating partially
completed. Depending on the availability of
materials, the building should be completed in
1977. This will add immeasurably to the facilities
and potential programs for the camp.
In addition to internal work programs which
required 75 per cent of the available man-days,
lordan River has been involved in quite a number
of community service projects during 1976,
which consumed a total of 2,675 man-days. In the
Port Renfrew District, 13 miles of creek beds
were cleared, three log jams were removed, and
considerable work completed to redirect two creeks
(to facilitate fish migration). The San Juan River
and its tributaries provide some of the main
salmon spawning streams on the West Coast. In
the Sooke area, 40 man-days were spent clearing
the De Manser Creek. Other programs from
the camp included cedar stake production for
test plots, road clearing and slashing, developing a
heliport on Empress Mountain for B.C. Forest
Service, and road clearing for Highways on
the West Coast Road.
Two major operational problems were dealt
with in 1976, with the completion of a new water
system for the camp, which has had a perennial
water-supply problem, and contracts were let
for the installation of a relatively maintenance-free
gravity sewerage system to augment what at
present exists.
Due to its relative isolation, the camp is
minimally involved in community activities. After
hours, inmates spend time at hobbies, sports, and
recreation, reading, and so on. Correspondence
courses are available if requested and staff
members each have a counselling case load.
Snowdon Community Correctional Centre
(CCC) provides primarily a work-release program
for inmates under the authority of the Temporary
Absence Program. Local industry is mainly
logging and other forest work. During 1976,
Snowdon had a daily average count of 40, with a
total of 7,569 man-days of outside employment
being registered. Snowdon maintains a close liaison
with Redonda Bay, and Snowdon is often
utilized for rest periods for inmates involved in
the rigorous Redonda program.
In addition to work, inmates at CCC's on
Vancouver Island are the focus of much of the
community interaction that takes place in
institutional corrections on the Island, where the
fullest use of existing community recreation and
other types of programs exist. During 1976,
inmates at Snowdon participated in the following:
Assisting in preparation for the salmon festival
and dismantling same.
Clearing debris from around the home
of an elderly couple who had been flooded out
 REPORT OF THE CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1976
Q 91
Carrying out general maintenance projects
at the Campbell River Youth Centre.
Cutting and supplying firewood for senior
citizens and the Extended Care Unit of the
Campbell River General Hospital.
Inmates from the Victoria Community
Correctional Centre were similarly involved at the
Glendale Hospital;
YMCA;
Community Diversion Centre;
Swan Lake Nature Society.
The Victoria CCC provides the major focus
for educational temporary absence, although
employment absence is the most frequent use. The
centre had a daily average count of 23 during 1976,
with 215 inmates working 2,777 man-days for a
total remuneration of $83,390. Much of this
is returned to the community in fines and debts
paid, room and board, and so on. During 1976,
it was calculated that 60 per cent of all inmates in
the two CCC's were steadily employed.
Employment availability has been a problem
during the year, and that high figure is partly as a
result of the full-employment program operated
under the Temporary Absence Program at
Redonda Bay.
The Redonda Bay Program provides an exciting
and unique initiative. It is not a Branch facility
and is staffed and run by the B.C. Forest Service.
The objectives of the program is to employ
inmates at the basic rate of $3 per hour to carry
out special forestry programs. The camp is a
trailer complex and is designed to accommodate
20 inmates and up to four Forest Service personnel.
There are no Corrections Branch staff involved.
With the exception of Jordan River Camp,
the state of the correctional facility plants on the
Island are a source of concern. The replacement
of the Main Centre facilities continues to be
a priority for the Corrections Branch.   It seems
apparent that capital funds will not be available,
and during 1976 steps were taken to develop a
kitchen and dining-room complex. In 1976
the bases were laid, and modular units are expected
early in 1977. That will be a tremendous
improvement over the old facility. Regular
maintenance and development of the old facilities
at Victoria and Snowdon CCC's also continues
to be a source of concern.
VIRCC has been subject in the past few years
to a number of sensational escapes. In 1975
a closer screening of inmates to various parts of the
complex (units, camps, and CCC's) has resulted
in 17 fewer escapes during 1976.   Continued
energy will be directed to decreasing the number
of escapes in 1977.
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1977
1,280-577-9231
 

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