Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

Department of Labour ANNUAL REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1973 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1974

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0376318.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0376318.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0376318-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0376318-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0376318-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0376318-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0376318-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0376318-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0376318-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0376318.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Labour
ANNUAL REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1973
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY
  The Honourable William S. King, Minister of Labour.
  To the Honourable Walter S. Owen, Q.C, LL.D.,
Lieutenant Governor oj the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year
1973 is herewith respectfully submitted.
WILLIAM S. KING
Minister of Labour
Office of the Minister of Labour,
May 1974
 The Honourable William S. King,
Minister of Labour.
Sir: I have the honour to submit herewith the Fifty-sixth Annual Report on the
work of the Department of Labour up to December 31, 1973.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
JAMES G. MATKIN
Deputy Minister of Labour
Department of Labour
Victoria, B.C., May 1974.
 O
ca
<
rt-.
<
a.
m
3
-1
O
u
X
1/1
X
I-
  Department' of Labour
Hon. William S. King, Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
B. Adair, Executive Assistant, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
Miss M. E. Higgs, Secretary to the Minister, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
James G. Matkin, Deputy Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
Secretary to Deputy Minister, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
J. Kinnaird, Associate Deputy Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
R. S. Azad, Associate Deputy Minister of Labour, 4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre,
Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
OFFICIALS
B. Anderson, Assistant Director of Apprenticeship and Industrial Training, 4211
Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby,
V5H 1Z5.
G. D. Bishop, Director, Research and Planning Branch, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
•P. Devine, Compensation Consultant, 4211
Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby,
V5H 1Z5.
J. R. Edgett, Director of Legislation, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
J. D. Forrest, Chief Inspector of Factories
and Elevators, McLaren Centre, 4240
Manor Street, Burnaby.
C. Gilmour, Assistant Director, Mediation
Services Branch, 4211 Kingsway, Burnaby
Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
W. S. Haddow, Administrative Officer, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
W. J. D. Hoskyn, Director, Labour Standards Branch, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
J. A. Laffling, Supervisor, Labour Standards Branch, 4211 Kingsway, Burnaby
Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
G. Leonidas, Assistant Director, Mediation
Services Branch, 4211 Kingsway, Burnaby
Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
R. A. Macdonald, Director, Mediation Services Branch, 4211 Kingsway, Burnaby
Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
J. Melville, Director of Manpower Training and Development; Administrative
Officer, Trade-schools Regulation Act;
and Chairman, Provincial Apprenticeship
Committee, 4211 Kingsway, Burnaby
Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
G. H. O'Neill, Director of Arbitration,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
R. S. Plecas, Acting Supervisor, Employment Programme Section, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
F. A. Rhodes, Executive Officer, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
Ms. K. Ruff, Director, Human Rights
Code, Parliament Buildings, Victoria,
V8V 1X4.
S. W. Simpson, Director of Apprenticeship
and Industrial Training, 4211 Kingsway,
Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
R. P. Sollis, Assistant Director, Labour
Standards Branch, Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, V8V 1X4.
L. A. Stadnyk, Compensation Counsellor,
4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
Mrs. C. K. Waddell, Director, Women's
Employment Bureau, 4211 Kingsway,
Burnaby Centre,  Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
R. J. Weir, Administrative Officer, Employment Programme Section, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
OFFICE LOCATIONS
Burnaby—4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre,
V5H 1Z5; 4240 Manor Street.
Cranbrook—Courthouse,   102  South   11th
Avenue.
Dawson Creek—B.C.  Vocational  School,
Box 899.
Kamloops—220, 546 St. Paul.
Kelowna—Courthouse.
Mission City—32818 Seventh Avenue.
Nanaimo—Courthouse.
Nelson—Courthouse, Box 60.
Prince George—Provincial Building, 1600
Third Avenue.
Terrace—Provincial Building, 4506 Lakelse
Avenue.
Vancouver—411 Dunsmuir Street,
V6B 1X7.
Victoria—880  Douglas   Street,  V8V1X4;
Parliament Buildings, V8V 1X4.
Williams Lake—317, 540 Borland Avenue.
 BB 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
(Headquarters: Parliament Buildings, Victoria V8V 1X4)
James G. Matkin, Chairman, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
J. R. Edgett, Vice-Chairman and Secretary,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
C. Murdoch, Member, 4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
R. K. Gervin, Member, 4211 Kingsway,
Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
R. S. S. Wilson, Member, 4211 Kingsway,
Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
Angus Macdonald, Member, 4211 Kings-
way, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
Mrs. Emily Ostapchuk, Member, 4211
Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H
1Z5.
LABOUR RELATIONS BOARD
(Headquarters: 1620 West Eighth Avenue, Vancouver, V6J 1V4)
Paul C. Weiler, Chairman, 1620 West
Eighth Avenue, Vancouver, V6J 1V4.
E. R. Peck, Vice-Chairman and Chief Administrative Officer, 1620 West Eighth
Avenue, Vancouver, V6J 1V4.
J. A. Moore, Vice-Chairman, 1620 West
Eighth Avenue, Vancouver, V6J 1V4.
Ms. Nancy Morrison, Vice-Chairman, 1620
West Eighth Avenue, Vancouver, V6J
1V4.
Angus Macdonald, Member, 1620 West
Eighth Avenue, Vancouver, V6J 1V4.
Arnold J. Smith, Member, 1620 West
Eighth Avenue, Vancouver, V6J 1V4.
John  M.   Billings,   Member,   1620  West
Eighth Avenue, Vancouver, V6J 1V4.
John Brown, Member,  1620 West Eighth
Avenue, Vancouver, V6J 1V4.
Herbert L.  Fritz,  Member,   1620  West
Eighth Avenue, Vancouver, V6J 1V4.
Mike   L.   Kramer,   Member,   1620   West
Eighth Avenue, Vancouver, V6J 1V4.
Graham D. M. Leslie, Member, 1620 West
Eighth Avenue, Vancouver, V6J 1V4.
Ken R. Martin, Member, 1620 West Eighth
Avenue, Vancouver, V6J 1V4.
HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION
(Headquarters: Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4)
Bishop Remi J. De Roo, Chairman, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
Larry Ryan, Member, Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, V8V 1X4.
William Black, Member, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
Gene Errington, Member, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
Rose Charlie, Member, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
PROVINCIAL APPRENTICESHIP COMMITTEE
(Headquarters: 4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5)
John Melville, Chairman, 4211 Kingsway,
Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
Thomas McGibbon, Member, 4211 Kings-
way, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
T. A. Turnbull, Member, 4211 Kingsway,
Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
C. Stairs, Member, 4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, V5H 1Z5.
S. W. Simpson, Member, 4211 Kingsway,
Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
J. W. Thompson, Member, 4211 Kingsway,
Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION ACT ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
(Headquarters: 4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5)
John Melville Col. J. W. Inglis
Mrs. C. K. Waddell
 Contents
Introduction.
Apprenticeship and Industrial Training-.
Board of Industrial Relations	
Compensation Consultant	
Factory and Elevator Inspection-
Human Rights	
Labour Relations	
Labour Standards—
Report of Labour Standards Branch-
Control of Employment of Children Act.
Employment Agencies Act	
Legislation—List of Acts Affecting Labour
Mediation Services	
Research and Planning	
Trade-schools Regulation..
Page
. 13
. 21
. 29
. 31
. 32
. 36
. 42
. 48
. 50
. 50
Women's Employment Bureau..
_Inside front cover
  53
  54
  56
  63
11
  Introduction
A    Personnel Changes
In order to increase the effectiveness of the Department, a number of important staff changes were instituted.   Chief among these were the following:
James G. Matkin was appointed Deputy Minister of Labour. Mr. Matkin
received B.A. and LL.B. degrees from the University of Alberta, graduating as a
Silver Medallist in Law in 1968. He subsequently attended Harvard University
after obtaining the Frank Knox Fellowship and was granted the LL.M. degree from
Harvard Law School. Prior to joining the Department, Mr. Matkin was Associate
Professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of British Columbia.
James Kinnaird was appointed Associate Deputy Minister of Labour. Mr.
Kinnaird served on various bargaining committees for the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers for a number of years and became a full-time representative in 1965. He served for seven years as Business Manager of Local 213 IBEW
and as Vice-President of the B.C. and Yukon Building and Construction Trades
Council for three years. Mr. Kinnaird has also been President of the Building
Trades Council and Vice-President of the B.C. Federation of Labour.
R. S. Azad was appointed Associate Deputy Minister of Labour. Mr. Azad
received his Senior Matriculation in Punjab and a Bachelor of Science degree in
Economics from the University of London. He acted on the Board of the B.C.
Federation of Labour in the mid-1950's. Prior to joining the Department he was
Senior Consultant, Canada Manpower Consultative Service, Pacific Region.
W. H. Sands, who was previously Deputy Minister of Labour, was appointed
a Special Consultant.
B    Organization and Legislative Changes
During 1973 a number of significant changes were introduced in the organization of the B.C. Department of Labour, in redefining the Department's role in both
the manpower and industrial relations areas, and in the area of legislation administered by the Department. While many of these changes were instituted during
1973 a number of these new initiatives will not be fully operational until 1974.
In the area of organization a more explicit definition was made between the
Department's responsibilities in both the area of manpower and industrial training
and industrial and labour relations. This more precise division is apparent in the
revised organization of the Department as illustrated in the foreword to this report.
The organization does not merely represent a split of the traditional responsibilities
of the Department but moreover, is indicative of revised or new priorities for the
Department and particularly a redefinition and strengthening of the Department of
Labour's role in the manpower area.
The role and responsibility of the Manpower Division of the Department of
Labour is, broadly, to formulate and implement a comprehensive manpower development and utilization policy in British Columbia. The fundamental parameters
of this policy are basically two-fold:
(a) To assist individual citizens of this Province to develop their maximum capabilities and potentials and thereby to share justly in the
benefits wrought by economic growth in the Province.
13
 BB  14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(b) To meet the manpower needs of the Provincial economy, thereby
ensuring that the real and attainable goals of growth in British Columbia are realized.
At the present time the Department is actively involved in the development of
manpower resources through pre-apprenticeship, apprenticeship, journeyman upgrading and refresher courses, and other technical and skill-development programmes. In addition, considerable effort is expended in establishing Provincial
training priorities and the formulation of training courses as well as the development
and implementation of special Provincial employment programmes. Considerable
research effort has, and will continue to be, expended in the areas of demographic,
manpower, occupational, and general economic research aimed at avoiding or overcoming disequilibrium in the labour market. The Department actively assists labour
and management groups with manpower planning with the view to realization of its
attendant benefits of labour market stabilization. The Division has also established
strong liaison with the Federal Government with the view to co-ordination of basic
manpower programmes.
In the area of industrial relations, the Department of Labour undertook a major
reassessment and revision of Provincial labour legislation during the year. In summary, the Labour Code of British Columbia Act (which replaced the previous
Labour Relations Act, the Mediation Services Act, the Trade-unions Act, and the
Human Rights Code of British Columbia Act) was the major product of this legislative review.
Early in March 1973 the Minister of Labour appointed three special advisers
to review existing legislation and recommend revisions based on the needs of an
ever growing and changing labour-management community. The advisers appointed
were Dr. Noel A. Hall, Director of the Institute of Industrial Relations, University
of British Columbia; James G. Matkin, Assistant Professor of Law, University of
British Columbia; and D. E. McTaggart, barrister and solicitor. The task of review
and revision was accomplished through extensive research and the holding of public
and private hearings throughout the Province during which labour and management
representatives and the public were encouraged to make their views known. In
addition, the special advisers travelled to other jurisdictions to study their legislation and administration. The Government accepted the recommendations of the
special advisers and rescinded the Labour Relations Act, the Mediation Services
Act, and the Trade-unions Act, replacing them with the new statute known as the
Labour Code of British Columbia Act.
Under the Labour Code a new Labour Relations Board, with much-broadened
jurisdiction, was created. It is an independent body with jurisdiction over all aspects
of labour-management relations, including the formation of trade unions, unfair
labour practices, certifications, bargaining in good faith, picketing, strikes and lockouts, first collective agreements, technological change, and arbitration. The structure of the Labour Relations Board was made flexible by the provision that the
Board may sit singly to hear routine applications and by panels consisting of a vice-
chairman and a representative of labour and management which may hear matters
coming before the Board. By these means the Board may handle more than one
case at a time, if need be.
The new structure makes appeals from decisions meaningful in that such
appeals are not merely a rehearing by the same people but an appeal to the whole
Board. The Board will give written reasons in cases where it is felt necessary to
explain the basis of a decision and to provide guidance to those who may encounter
a similar problem in future.
 INTRODUCTION BB 15
Provision has been made for the appointment of an ombudsman who will have
power to investigate fully any decision of the Board. The ombudsman may recommend that a decision be cancelled or varied and may publicize a report setting forth
an opinion as to the wisdom of a Board decision. The ombudsman may also investigate administrative complaints relating to trade unions, employers, branches,
or agencies of the Department of Labour and other administrative tribunals.
Among the other important changes in the legislation are:
(1) Dependent contractors may be included in a certification and when
so included are deemed to be employees for purposes of the Act.
(Section 1 (1) and (48))
(2) The use of professional strike breakers is prohibited. (Section 1
(1) and 3 (1) (e))
(3) National agreements are invalid unless bargaining in good faith
takes place in the Province.    (Section 6)
(4) A duty of fair representation is imposed on bargaining agents.
(Section 7)
(5) The Board may freeze terms and conditions for 30 days as an
unfair labour practice deterrent.    (Section 8 (4)  (d))
(6) The Board may certify or refuse to certify as unfair labour sanction.
(Section 8 (4)  (<?))
(7) The burden of proof lies on the employer that he did not discharge,
suspend, lay off, or discipline an employee for union activities.
(Section 8 (7))
(8) The corporate veil may be pierced to determine the real employer.
(Section 37)
(9) An employee may be exempted from having to join a trade union
because of his religious beliefs, but he must pay an amount equivalent to union dues to the union and also loses the right to be counted
for purposes of certification and decertification and cannot participate in a strike vote.    (Section 11)
(10) A trade union may apply for certification with a claim of not less
than 35 per cent membership, but a representation vote must be
held and show that a majority wish certification. (Sections 39 (1),
43 (2), and 45)
(11) A council of trade unions may be certified (Section 1(1) and 57),
and provision is made for the formation of such council. (Section 58)
(12) A unit of employees of two or more employers may be certified
where a majority of the employees in the unit are members of the
trade union and a majority of the employers consent to such representation.    (Section 40)
(13) A trade union may request a representation vote be taken prior to
determination of the appropriate bargaining unit and procedures
for validating such votes are provided.    (Section 44)
(14) Units of supervisors alone or supervisors together with other employees may be certified if they do not exercise primarily management functions.    (Section 47)
(15) Where there is a sale, lease or transfer of a business or part thereof,
the Board may determine the appropriate unit or units, the bargaining agent, and may amend certificates.    (Section 53)
 BB 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
:'.'   (.1.6) Both parties are obliged to begin bargaining 60 days before the
conclusion of a collective agreement.    (Section 62)
(17) Mediation officers may be directed to make recommendations for
the terms of settlement for a collective agreement.   (Section 69 (4) )
(18) The Board may settle the terms and conditions of a first agreement
where the parties fail to do so. Such agreements to be for a period
not exceeding one year.   (Sections 70, 71, and 72)
(19) Fire-fighters, policemen, and hospital unions may opt for binding
arbitration of contract settlement.    (Section 73)
(20) Every collective agreement must contain provisions for arbitration
of technological change disputes, and where not provided may be
prescribed by the Minister.   (Sections 74 and 75)
(21) Technological changes introduced by an employer may be referred
to arbitration. The Arbitration Board has power to decide if there
is an actual or intended technological change and may make orders
to regulate, stop, or alleviate the effects of such change and may
refer the matter to the Labour Relations Board who may ask that
a special officer be appointed or order the parties to commence
collective bargaining regarding the technological change. Failure
to conclude an agreement allows the parties to exercise their strike
or lockout rights.    (Sections 76 and 77)
(22) Picketing is defined and the places where such picketing may occur
are clearly set out and include the place of business of another
employer who is an "ally" of the employer being struck or locking
out.    (Sections 1 (1) and 85)
(23) Persuasion other than picketing is permitted for organizational purposes.   (Section 84)
(24) Where two or more employers share a common site or place, the
Board may restrict or confine the picketing to the employer being
struck or locking out.    (Section 86)
(25) An arbitration clause for settlement of contract disputes is provided
where such is not contained in a collective agreement. (Section
93 (2))
(26) The Board may overcome delays in settling differences under a collective agreement and may request the Minister to appoint a special
officer whether the difference is arbitrable or not.   (Section 97)
(27) An Arbitration Board may set out penalties for improper dismissal,
suspension, or discipline of an employee where the collective agreement does not contain such penalty.   (Section 98)
(28) The Minister may issue an order to ensure that an arbitration decision will not be unreasonably delayed.   (Section 100)
(29) The Court of Appeal may only set aside an arbitration award where
an arbitrator has misbehaved or is unable to fulfil his duties properly,
where there was an error of law or an error of procedure in denial
of natural justice.   (Section 108)
(30) A special officer may be appointed to investigate disputes relating to
collective agreements and make an order binding on the parties, and
where the order differs from the collective agreement or concerns a
matter not provided by the collective agreement, the order is binding
for a period not exceeding 30 days.   (Sections 113 to 116)
 INTRODUCTION
BB 17
(31) A provision for ministerial appointment of special advisers to the
Minister and for the establishment of a Construction Industry Advisory Council to examine labour-management relations in that
industry and to recommend measures to improve such relations.
(Sections 123 and 124)
(32) An ombudsman may be appointed to investigate administrative
complaints relating to trade unions, employers, branches, or agencies
of the Department of Labour and other administrative tribunals.
(Sections 128 to 137)
During 1973 an extensive study was made of the human rights legislation of the
Province. Many recommendations were made for improvement and as a consequence the Human Rights Code of British Columbia Act was enacted at the Second
Session of the Legislature. The Human Rights Code is based on the principle that
every person shall be free and equal in dignity.   It establishes the following:
(1) No person shall publish or display before the public any notice, sign,
symbol, emblem, or other representation indicating discrimination or
intention to discriminate against any person or class of persons in
any way prohibited by this Code.
(2) (a) No person shall deny to any person or discriminate against any
person with respect to any accommodation, services, or facility customarily available to the public unless reasonable cause exists for
such denial or discrimination.
(b) The race, religion, colour, ancestry, or place of origin of
any person shall not constitute reasonable cause.
(c) The sex of any person shall not constitute reasonable
cause unless it relates to the maintenance of public decency.
(3) No person shall deny to any person or discriminate against any person with regard to the opportunity to purchase any commercial unit
or dwelling unit, land or interest in land because of race, religion,
colour, sex, ancestry, place of origin, or marital status of that person.
(4) No person shall deny to any person or discriminate against any person with regard to the right to occupy as a tenant any space that is
advertised or otherwise in any way represented as being available for
occupancy because of the race, sex, marital status, religion, colour,
ancestry, or place of origin of that person, except where a person
advertises that space is available for occupancy by another person
who is to share with him the use of any sleeping, bathroom, or cooking facilities in the space.
(5) Men and women doing similar or substantially similar work shall
receive an equal rate of pay from their employer.
(6) No person shall use any form of application for employment, publish
any advertisement in connection with employment, or make any
written or oral inquiry of an applicant that
(a) expresses, either directly or indirectly, any limitation, specification, or preference as to the race, religion, colour, sex, marital
status, age, ancestry, or place of origin of any person; and
(b) requires an applicant to furnish any information concerning race, religion, colour, ancestry, place of origin, or political belief.
(7) (a) Every person has the right of equality of opportunity based
upon bona fide qualifications in respect of his employment and no
 BB  18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
employer shall discriminate against any person unless reasonable
cause exists.
(b) The race, religion, colour, age, marital status, age, or
place of origin of any person shall not constitute reasonable cause.
(c) The sex of any person shall not constitute reasonable
cause unless it relates to the maintenance of public decency.
(..) A conviction for a criminal or summary conviction charge
shall not constitute reasonable cause unless such charge relates to the
employment of a person.
(8)   (a) No trade union shall exclude any person from membership or
discriminate against him on any of the grounds listed in (7).
(b) No trade union shall negotiate on behalf of a person an
agreement that would discriminate against him contrary to this Code.
C    Major Developments in British Columbia, 1973
Increased world demand combined with higher world prices for many commodities, especially metals and wood products, helped stimulate a rapid rate of
growth in British Columbia's economy during most of 1973. The improved and
expanding business outlook had a beneficial effect on the Province's labour scene,
where, in spite of continued rapid growth in population and labour force, the
average rate of unemployment was the lowest since 1969. Despite these positive
notes, the emergence of the energy crisis and the gradual slowing down of the
economy toward the end of the year has tended to increase final quarter unemployment and reduce previously high expectations for 1974.
During 1973 British Columbia saw its total population grow to 2,315,000
persons, up 68,000 over 1972. This 1973 population figure represents a 3.0 per
cent yearly rate of increase in the Province, a rate over twice the national average
of 1.2 per cent. The major component of British Columbia's population increase
was net in-migration, which was 6,000 persons or 12.0 per cent higher than 1972.
This year net in-migration reached 51,661 persons and provided 75.8 per cent of
British Columbia's total population increase.
Although population changes are of interest, labour force information is of
more critical concern to the labour market since this provides some indication of the
supply of labour in the Province. During 1973 British Columbia's labour force
averaged 1,002,000 persons, the highest level ever. This figure represents an increase of 52,000 persons, or 5.4 per cent increase over the average 1972 labour force
Women were entering the labour force at a faster rate than men. During 1973
the number of women in the labour force increased by 5.7 per cent to 333,000. This
compares to a 5.2 per cent increase in men for a total male labour force of 669,000.
The higher than average expansion of the female sector of the labour market reflects
the increased opportunity and desire of women to become more directly involved in
the economic life of the Province.
One very favourable characteristic of British Columbia's 1973 labour market
was that for most of the year over-all demand for labour increased at a faster rate
than supply. The Province's total employment averaged 936,000 persons (up
57,000 over 1972). The yearly rate of employment expansion (aggregate labour
demand) was 6.5 per cent, which compared favourably to the 5.4 per cent yearly
increase in supply (labour force). Increased employment was especially rapid
during the period March through June.
 INTRODUCTION BB 19
Although employment and its rate of increase gives a fairly good indication of
over-all demand for labour, several shortcomings of the labour market should be
noted. Indications from some areas suggest that disequilibrium between supply
and demand exist in the more isolated areas of the Province and among some
specific trades and professions. Many of the problems that arise are a result of
inadequate labour market information and the need for expansion and flexibility of
the training facilities of the Province. It is expected that the burden of both these
problems will be reduced as the new Manpower Training potential of the Department of Labour becomes more operational.
During 1973 the high rate of employment expansion helped bring British Columbia's unemployment to its lowest level since 1969. Almost 5,000 persons fewer
were unemployed during 1973 than in 1972. The rate of unemployment fell from
7.5 per cent to 6.5 per cent. Although unemployment fell during the year, an
average of 66,000 persons were still without work during 1973, representing almost
one out of every 16 persons within the labour force. High participation rates and
rapid in-migration to British Columbia might be used as part explanation for high
unemployment, but this entire area will require a critical look in 1974.
The Consumer Price Index raises another important area for British Columbia.
During the period December 1972 to December 1973 both the Vancouver and
Canadian Price Indices (based 1961=100) rose approximately 8.9 per cent. This
is an incredibly high rate when we consider that in 1972, which was considered an
inflationary year, an increase of the Canadian Consumer Price Index of only 5.0 per
cent was experienced. Increases in prices can have an important effect on both the
pattern of wage settlements and the change in real wages.
During the year negotiated wage settlements were high relative to past years and
to the Canadian and United States averages. The preliminary average annual
increase for 1973 was 10.3 per cent. The greater portion of these wage increases is
expected to be taken up by inflation which, as mentioned above, is currently 8.9 per
cent per year, leaving "real income increases" of an estimated 1 to 2 per cent. The
unskilled job classes will be receiving slightly larger real income increases as the
average annual compound percentage increase for the unskilled job classes was
11.3 per cent.
The number of British Columbia employees belonging to a labour union increased over the year and several new unions were formed. The 10 largest labour
unions in the Province and their labour congress affiliates were as follows (as of
January 1973):
(1) International Woodworkers of America (AFL-CIO/CLC) 44,505
(2) B.C. Teachers' Federation (Independent)  22,363
(3) B.C. Government Employees' Union (CLC)  17,930
(4) International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of America (Independent)  16,329
(5) Canadian Union of Public Employees (CLC)  15,450
(6) Registered Nurses' Association of British Columbia (Independent)  14,400
(7) Public Service Alliance of Canada (CLC)  13,542
(8) United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners (AFL-CIO/
CLC)  13,055
(9) United Steelworkers of America (AFL-CIO/CLC)  12,334
(10) Hospital Employees' Union (CLC)  10,531
 BB 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Of the 858,000 paid workers in the Province, 350,175 workers belonged to a
labour union in 1973. This was an increase of 18,084 people or 5.45 per cent over
the 1972 total of 332,091 workers. The 5.45 per cent growth rate was slightly
higher than the average prevalent over the past 10 years.
There were a total of 131 unions operating within the Province. These unions
had a combined total of 1,129 locals in British Columbia in 1973 compared to 1,079
locals in 1972 and 1,041 in 1963. Twenty unions had a membership greater than
5,000. The largest union, the International Woodworkers of America, had a total
membership of 44,505. As of January 1973 the second-largest labour organization
was the B.C. Teachers' Federation, but as the year ended it was estimated that B.C.
Government Employees' Union had more members. The total membership of the
largest 20 unions was 60.7 per cent of the Province's total union membership.
During 1973, labour-management breakdowns resulted in 705,525 man-days
lost in British Columbia. The number of lost working days in 1973 was only one-
third of the 1972 figure but was still somewhat higher than the average over the
past decade.
Of the 142 disputes involving 96,000 employees, the major difficulties were
witnessed in the manufacturing and transportation sectors with their combined loss
estimated at over 500,000 man-days.
 INDUSTRIAL TRAINING BRANCH
BB 21
Report of the Apprenticeship and
Industrial Training Branch
Head office
Branch Offices:
Department
Department
Department
Department
Department
Department
Department
Department
4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre,
Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
of Labour, Courthouse, Kelowna.
of Labour, 1600 Third Avenue, Prince George.
of Labour, Courthouse, Nelson.
of Labour, Box 899, Dawson Creek.
of Labour, Courthouse, Nanaimo.
of Labour, 4506 Lakelse Avenue, Terrace.
of Labour, 546 St. Paul Street, Kamloops.
Provincial Apprenticeship Committee
Chairman:
J. Melville       -
Members:
T. McGibbon
S. W. Simpson
C. Stairs
T. A. Turnbull
J. W. Thompson
4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre,
Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre,
Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre,
Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre,
Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre,
Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre,
Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
Administrative Officials of the Branch
Samuel W. Simpson-
Blair S. Anderson
Director of Apprenticeship and Industrial Training.
Assistant Director of Apprenticeship
and Industrial Training.
Apprentices in Training
On December 31, 1973, there were 10,630 apprentices registered on the
records of the Apprenticeship and Industrial Training Branch. This is an increase
of 1,547 apprentices over the 1972 total, an increase of 14Vi per cent. Registrations have increased again, considerably more than was projected for 1973.
 BB 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Apprenticeship Technical Training
The Apprenticeship and Industrial Training Branch is continuing to expand
the in-school Technical Training Programme for indentured apprentices. Four
hundred and forty-six classes in the 38 trades where technical training is arranged,
accommodated 6,479 apprentices in day classes during the year.
These classes are operated at the B.C. Vocational School, Burnaby; Malaspina
College, Nanaimo; Camosun College, Victoria; Okanagan College, Kelowna, Cariboo College, Kamloops; and the Vancouver Vocational Institute, Division of Vancouver City College. The technical training programmes conducted in evening
classes are continuing to be operated where necessary and accommodate an additional 525 apprentices.
Again in 1972 a small number of apprentices in the Yukon and the Northwest
Territories were assigned to the apprentice classes operated by the Apprenticeship
Branch. In addition several apprentices from Saskatchewan were accommodated
through arrangement with the Apprenticeship Branch, Canada Manpower, and the
appropriate officials of the Province and the territories concerned.
The operation of the Technical Training Programme of the Apprenticeship and
Industrial Training is assuming a growing importance involving development of
suitable courses of study and continual upgrading and revising of the established
programmes in order to assure that the apprentices in the trades are receiving the
best possible training. The assistance and co-operation of the employers and labour
organizations in the development of courses and revisions through their representatives on the various Trade Advisory Committees is much appreciated.
Pre-apprenticeship Training
The Apprenticeship and Industrial Training Branch has been involved in providing basic training in the skilled trades on a continuous basis since 1957. The
main purpose of the training is to provide young people who are leaving the secondary school system with an opportunity to obtain basic training in a particular trade
so that they have some skills to offer a prospective employer when they are seeking
employment. It also provides a source of young people who have some experience
and exposure to a particular trade for employers who are looking for suitable
employees.
Since the establishment of the Federal Department of Manpower and Immigration in 1967 the pre-apprenticeship programme has also been used as a vehicle for
retraining of workers who may have been underemployed or their jobs have become
obsolete due to developing technology. Canada Manpower arranges to purchase a
percentage of the spaces in the pre-apprentice classes for their clients each year.
In 1973 training was offered in 22 trades. The courses offered are basically
either 22 weeks or 26 weeks of training, five days per week. A total of 97 classes
was offered and 1,698 students were provided with basic training.
The Apprenticeship and Industrial Training Branch paid all tuition costs for
the students who attended under the sponsorship of the Department, paid a subsistence allowance to the students, and travel allowance to those who attended school
away from their homes. Clients who were sponsored by Canada Manpower were
similarly provided income replacement and travel allowance by Canada Manpower.
At the request of the trade, two new pre-apprenticeship programmes were introduced during the year. These courses were Glazier pre-apprentice, offered at the
B.C Vocational School, Burnaby, and Dental Technician, offered at the Vancouver
Vocational Institute, Division of Vancouver City College.
 INDUSTRIAL TRAINING BRANCH
Summary of Apprentices in Trades
BB 23
Term
in
Years
Year of Apprenticeship Being Served
Total
Number
of
Apprentices in
Training
Trade or Occupation
First
Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth
pleted
in
1973
Automotive—
Automatic-transmission repair.	
4
4
4
4
3
4
4
2
3
4
4
4
4
4
3
2
4
4
3
2
4
3
2
4
3
4
4
4
3
3
4
5
3
2
3
3
4
4
3
3
3
4
4
5
4
5
4
5
4
4
5
5
4
5
3
2
4
5
2
4
4
4
82
2
2
6
315
22
4
1
2
8
1
2
10
2
6
27
2
4
51
20
5
50
6
383
11
36
27
32
61
4
3
8
113
40
1
214
3
15
3
3
23
5
1
4
11
77
19
35
64
399
301
3,434
2
74
3
1
2
10
346
23
3
11
1
4
2
5
39
8
27
7
21
40
4
366
16
17
15
49
1
13
82
30
2
257
3
17
3
8
1
1
7
2
1
4
5
56
3
22
45
109
21
268
2,839
2
70
1
2
3
3
244
1
1
13
1
1
3
6
3
28
11
4
48
23
7
256
2
23
21
20
1
"~16
74
21
2
218
2
18
1
8
1
1
8
8
44
15
26
13
225
2,187
1
44
3
3
8
254
2
9
1
4
1
1
20
1
251
20
2
	
9
270
9
8
5
27
1,159
45
8
4
2
41
2
6
6
14
11
14
94
2
45
1
1
5
150
15
Radiator manufacture and repair.
4
1
Front-end  alignment and frame
2
Front-end  alignment and brake
3
Marine engine mechanic	
1
Tire repair 	
Truck-body building- 	
2
23
78
32
74
133
18
1,256
13
75
85
2
67
110
6
3
45
380
91
4
1
871
8
56
3
10
50
2
1
14
3
4
21
30
177
22
91
179
508
45
1.014
5
43
15
18
6
197
Cement mason._	
rnok
6
13
1
1
12
Electrical—
' 8
111
182
2
3
11
1
2
5
3
19
27
11
220
22
4
1
3
17
1
Domestic radio and TV. servicing
1
73
30
Operator
Work-
1
149
1
7
1
Community antenna TV	
Industrial	
11
1
1
Telecommunications	
Floorcovering 	
Funeral directing and embalming	
1
21
9
35
336
159
14    1          87
19
 BB 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Summary of Apprentices in Trades—Continued
Term
in
Years
Year of Apprenticeship Being Served
Total
Number
of
Apprentices in
Training
Com
Trade or Occupation
First
Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth
pleted
in
1973
3
4
4
4
1
4
1
2
1
5
4
3
4
4
4
4
3
4
5
4
5
3
5
4
4
5
4
5
4
4
4
1
5
40
9
12
4
13
39
18
59
6
6
198
6
5
6
38
6
99
4
25
32
104
8
10
13
34
53
19
17
53
6
37
2
5
36
59
22
6
144
4
12
7
33
2
111
8
20
20
80
2
6
11
44
19
14
7
68
5
15
2
1
49
12
8
128
5
11
4
37
5
98
16
18
17
67
3
4
12
46
20
5
8
3
21
2
39
25
121
1
10
3
5
70
t
9
69
2
3
5
47
32
1
1
73
100
12
91
20
107
122
19
113
15
12
10
13
75
18
279
65
20
591
16
38
20
108
18
478
35
84
69
411
15
23
61
278
124
39
33
43
Jewellery manufacture and repair
5
7
Lathing
3
Lumber manufacturing industry—
3
1
29
Maintenance mechanic, pipe-line .	
12
4
Millwright
89
1
4
4
7
Plastering
1
66
6
11
Roofing, damp and waterproofing	
5
84
3
6
3
1
37
33
Welding  ..           	
12
9
Total-
3,434
2,839
2,187
1,728
442
10,630
1,892
Apprenticeship Advisory Committees
The Provincial Apprenticeship Committee met six times during the year to
consider and approve new contracts of apprenticeship, the cancellation of apprenticeship contracts, the transfer of apprentices between employers, the extension of
apprenticeship contracts, and the issuing of apprenticeship certificates to apprentices
who satisfactorily completed their training. Approval was also granted to enroll
selected students in the pre-indentured apprenticeship training.
During 1973 the Provincial Apprenticeship Committee held four public hearings regarding the designation for apprenticeship and tradesmen's qualification for
the trade of boilermaking, shortening of the length of apprenticeship for the trade of
sheet-metal work, and compulsory certification for the trade of automotive mechanical repair.
Trade Advisory Committees representing 50 different trades met 63 times
during 1973 to receive recommendations for new courses, revision of existing
courses, and the examining of draft copies of trade-analyses and examinations.
These committees are of inestimable value to the Apprenticeship and Industrial
Training Branch, and I would like to thank the members who gladly gave their time
to attend and offer advice.   Their help was greatly appreciated.
 INDUSTRIAL TRAINING BRANCH BB 25
Designation of Trades
Recommendations by the Provincial Apprenticeship Committee to the Honourable Minister with respect to the designation of certain trades for apprenticeship and
the amendment of other trades for the purpose of voluntary or compulsory tradesmen's qualification resulted in the following Order in Councils being passed:
The trade of boilermaking was amended by definition under Schedule A
of the Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act for the
purpose of apprenticeship by Order in Council 635 on February
23, 1973.
The trade of boilermaker (erection) was added to Schedule A of the
Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act for the purpose
of voluntary tradesmen's qualification by Order in Council 3976 on
December 6, 1973.
Federal-Provincial Co-operation
Co-operation and mutual understanding between the Government of Canada
and the Province of British Columbia in all areas of training has been excellent.
The Department of Manpower and Immigration, which administers the Adult
Occupational Training Act, initiated several meetings with the Directors of Apprenticeship and the Examination Co-ordinators from the various provinces and territories to discuss interprovincial examinations, trade analyses, course outlines, new
testing procedures, development of standard trade names, and many other items
related to apprenticeship training and tradesmen's upgrading. These meetings
provide a forum whereby the Directors and Canada Manpower can discuss items
of mutual interest and formulate policy relative to apprenticeship training in
Canada. Canada Manpower participates, from a financial standpoint, with this
Province in the development and implementation of apprenticeship technical training programmes.
The Apprenticeship and Industrial Training Branch, in co-operation with
Canada Manpower and Immigration, has arranged for apprentices from the Yukon,
Northwest Territories, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba to attend technical training
classes in British Columbia. The above provinces and territories, because of small
numbers of apprentices, have been unable to establish technical training classes in
certain trades. Canada Manpower has been able to give financial support to enable
the apprentices to attend technical training classes in British Columbia. This cooperation has provided an opportunity for apprentices to obtain training which
would not have otherwise been available to them.
Representations made by the Apprenticeship and Industrial Training Branch
to Canada Manpower and Immigration relative to various aspects of administration
which are common to both departments, has resulted in a considerable saving of
manpower and has increased our mutual efficiency.
The Apprenticeship and Industrial Training Branch has worked very closely
with the Unemployment Insurance Commission to establish new procedures relative
to the granting of unemployment benefits to apprentices and pre-apprentices when
they are attending school. The Apprenticeship and Industrial Training Branch was
designated by the Unemployment Insurance Commission as an official training
agency.
 BB 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Supervision and Promotion
Although legislative control exists respecting apprenticeship, much promotion
is needed and a great deal of the counselling staff's time was consumed in this area.
As an integral part of their work, the counselling staff of the Branch visited
employers of registered apprentices to deal with problems associated with wages,
on-the-job training, job performance, attitudes, and matters allied to the formal
indenture itself. Relative to these same items, Joint Training Committees and
unions were also visited for those apprentices indentured to them.
Providing information, both written and oral, to counselling staff, teachers,
and students in the secondary schools has always been a major role of the Apprenticeship and Industrial Training Counsellors, but this past year, with the emphasis
swinging more to vocational training, the requests for the counsellors' time in this
regard were greatly increased.
With the concern for training increasing, particularly in the skilled areas, so
has the number of apprentices increased and in direct consequence many extra
classes had to be added to the technical training schedule. The enrolment of all
apprentices attending these prescribed classes was done by the counselling staff
and, in addition, each and every class was visited once or twice during the four-week,
six-week, or eight-week training session. Added to this was the invigilation of
interprovincial examinations for fourth-year and fifth-year classes. It should be
noted that with the exception of the University of British Columbia, the Apprenticeship and Industrial Training Branch has the highest enrolment of all training institutions in the Province.
Another important role of the Apprenticeship and Industrial Training Counsellor, in which a great deal of time was spent, was the selection of persons for pre-
apprenticeship training and their counselling while in training.
Canada Manpower's "Training-On-The-Job"—Job Creating Programme was
a great incentive for employers to hire apprentices. Many employers took advantage of the scheme and both they and the apprentice benefited. The programme
was conducted in close liaison with the Branch and, in fact, a visit was made by an
Apprenticeship and Industrial Training Counsellor in every case that was applicable
to an apprenticeable situation.
Every effort was made by our counselling staff to contact, as often as possible
apprentices, unions, Joint Training Committees, and other government agencies, all
of whose involvement is imperative for a successful apprenticeship programme.
Examination Development
The Branch is responsible for establishing, conducting, and evaluating examinations to ensure the qualifications of persons seeking certification in the trades to
which the Act applies. Certification is attainable in most of the trades through either
apprenticeship or examination following prescribed experience.
The demands for certification outside of the apprenticeship programme have
required that most of the effort be in that direction. Six examinations were placed
in operation for the first time and revisions were made in nine tradesmen's qualification examinations. Two more examinations are being developed for introduction
in the coming year.
The examination of indentured apprentices has been done, mainly, upon completion of their final in-school training period. For that purpose, in 16 trades,
apprentices in British Columbia are examined with interprovincial examinations
that have been agreed upon by every apprenticeship jurisdiction in Canada.  Three
 INDUSTRIAL TRAINING BRANCH
BB 27
of the interprovincial examinations currently in use were developed in British Columbia and the Branch has undertaken the responsibility to revise two others for 1974.
The foregoing development and revision has required the full time of the Coordinator of Examinations and the available part time of the Apprenticeship and
Industrial Training Counsellors. There has been no opportunity to develop much-
needed examinations for evaluating the progress of apprentice and pre-apprentice
students in the large number of classes sponsored by the Branch in the vocational
schools and regional colleges throughout the Province. This shortcoming in the programme has become increasingly acute with the expansion and dispersion of classes.
To facilitate the programme of examination development and revision, a
reorganization of staff assignment was begun this year. Provision was made for the
appointment of Technical Programmes Officers whose primary function initially will
be developing of examinations with the assistance of the Apprenticeship and Industrial Training Counsellors and appropriate persons from industry. Two members
have been transferred to this position from the counselling staff and are handing over
their previous duties to other persons. When that transition is complete, it is expected
that the examination development section will be able to function more effectively to
ensure that examinations are available for whatever purposes they are needed and
that they are brought and kept up-to-date and relevant to the requirements of the
trades.
Tradesmen's Qualification
The scope of the Tradesmen's Qualification Programme was expanded during
the year to include examinations for six more trades for which voluntary certification had previously been authorized. Those trades are:
Cook.
Industrial instrumentation.
Lumber Manufacturing Industry—Benchman, circular saw filer, sawfitter.
Roofing, damp and waterproofing.
The trade of boilermaker (erection) was also added to the schedule late in the
year.
There are now examinations for 24 of the 39 trades designated in the Act and
preliminary work has been done for two others, ironwork and the trade of joinery
(benchwork). There were 1,855 certificates of qualification issued in the year as
indicated in the following table:
Trade
Certificates
Issued in
1973
Exemptions
Issued in
1973
50
320
25
255
16
237
128
67
13
7
1
4
1
55
205
5
55
165
O**
Lumber manufacturing industry—
Const™. Hon millwright
Oil-hnrner merhamr.
Painting and decorating..             .     ..                         .    _ _
Phimhing
24
 BB 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Trade
Certificates
Exemptions
Issued in
Issued in
1973
1973
8
24
3
38
112
2
10
.	
54
11
Radio and television servicing, domestic-
Refrigeration_
Roofing, damp and waterproofing..
Sheet-metal work	
Sprinkler-fitting-
Steamfitting and pipefitting-
Totals	
1,855
40
Conclusion
Nineteen seventy-three was a year of spectacular growth, caused by an expanding economy and a shortage of tradesmen. The trades of carpenter, electrician, automotive mechanical repair, heavy-duty mechanic, millwright, and plumbing have
shown the largest growth factors.
The continued success of our apprenticeship training programme requires the
whole-hearted co-operation of government, employers, trade unions, joint training
committees, trade advisory committees, and educational authorities, who must work
in complete harmony with the Apprenticeship and Industrial Training Branch if
young persons are to obtain employment as apprentices. Before a young person
can obtain employment, an employer must provide the job opportunity; we have
hundreds of young people who are looking for work, can we provide jobs for them?
The staff of the Apprenticeship and Industrial Training Branch wishes to thank
the many people who have given unstintingly of their time in the development of
worth-while training programmes.
 BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
BB 29
Report of the Board of Industrial Relations
Head office     - Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
Members of the Board
Chairman:
James G. Matkin, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
Vice-Chairman:
J. R. Edgett, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
Members:
C. Murdoch, 4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
R. S. S. Wilson, 4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H
1Z5.
Mrs. Emily Ostapchuk, 4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
Angus Macdonald, 4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby,
V5H 1Z5.
R. K. Gervin, 4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
Secretary:
J. R. Edgett, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
Meetings
During the year the Board held 43 meetings in Vancouver, two meetings in
Victoria, one meeting in Nanaimo, and one meeting in Cranbrook.
Regulations Made Pursuant to the Minimum Wage Act
After due inquiry, the following regulations exempting certain employees from
the operation of the said Act were made:
Regulation 39 (1973)—Exempts camp counsellors employed by members of
youth camps of the B.C. Camping Association.
Regulation 41 (1973)—Exempts handicapped employees of the Nanaimo Vocational Rehabilitation Workshop for the Handicapped.
Regulation 42 (1973)—Exempts mentally retarded trainees of the Nanaimo
Association for the Mentally Retarded.
Regulation 3 (1973)—Rescinds regulation granting total exemption for all
employees of the B.C. Railway and exempts yardmasters, assistant yardmasters,
locomotive engineers, locomotive firemen (helpers), hostlers, train conductors, train
baggagemen, brakemen, yard foremen, switch tenders, and car retarder operators.
At the regular Board meetings numerous applications for overtime permits
were considered and, where the requirements of the legislation were satisfied, permits
were issued. In addition, the Board considered requests for scheduling hours under
section 11 (3) of the Hours of Work Act, and requests for exemptions under section
12 of that Act.
 BB 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Under section 6 of the Order Requiring Employers to Give Their Employees
a General Holiday With Pay, the employer may, under certain circumstances, substitute another designated holiday for any general holiday under the order, and
numerous applications were dealt with by the Board in this connection.
The Board confirmed many certificates made under section 5 of the Payment of
Wages Act. For detailed information in this connection, reference should be made
to the report of the Labour Standards Branch.
Conclusion
D. H. Chapman resigned from the Board and Angus Macdonald was appointed
a member in July 1973.
The Board at this time expresses its appreciation to all organizations, employers, employees, trade unions, and other persons for the co-operation it has
received during the year 1973.
 COMPENSATION CONSULTANT BB 31
Report of the Compensation Consultant
Head office   -    -    4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5
Paul Devine      -    - Compensation Consultant
L. A. Stadnyk   ---------    Compensation Counsellor
It is the function of this office to give guidance to a workman with regard to
the best method of proceeding with his claim under the Workmen's Compensation
Act. Where necessary, representations are made to the Board of Commissioners,
the Board of Review, the Medical Review Panel, and the Rehabilitation Department
on behalf of claimants.
During the year, interviews were given counselling and advising claimants as
to the disposition of their claims and their rights under the Workmen's Compensation Act. Of those assisted, 461 were referred to the Board of Review, 133 to the
Board of Commissioners, and 92 to the Medical Review Panel under section 55
of the Workmen's Compensation Act. Three field trips were undertaken and visits
were made to clinics and hospitals.
At least 122 workmen assisted by this office received benefits totalling $115,543
as retroactive time-loss payments, transportation refunds, subsistence allowance or
prescribed medications, or first permanent partial disability pension payments in
1973. Various costs of hospitalization, physiotherapy, operations, and rehabilitation retraining courses are not included.
Following representations from this office the Commissioners of the Workmen's
Compensation Board revised the method of assessing pensions for back disabilities
on loss of function basis only. They have instituted a more realistic "Dual System"
of permanent partial disability awards under which they use the higher of the
following:
(a) The degree of physical impairment, modified by age;
(b) A projected loss of earnings method.
The Board is presently reviewing many back disability awards to allow greater
benefits, where so indicated, in accordance with the new formula. It is hoped that
in future the Board will extend this dual system of assessing disability pensions to
disabilities other than back injuries.
Recently, there have been a number of important and very beneficial changes
made in the adjudication of injured workmen's claims in the claims department. No
longer will employer protests delay payments of compensation benefits for unlimited
periods while investigations proceed, as in the past.
Time-loss compensation benefits will be paid on reports received in the claims
department from the employer, the workman, and the doctor indicating that a workman has a legitimate claim. Employer protests will be considered and should the
Board find that a claim is not legitimate, efforts will be made to recover benefits
paid.
 BB 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Report of the Factory and Elevator
Inspection Branch
Head office     -     McLaren Centre, 4240 Manor Street, Burnaby, B.C.
James D. Forrest    -     -     Chief Inspector of Factories and Elevators.
Branch offices:
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
Courthouse, Kelowna.
Elevator Division
Acting upon directions issued from this Branch last year, owners of passenger
elevators have responded exceptionally well by installing approved "emergency fighting" in practically all such elevators to meet a 1973 deadline. This is an important
safety measure for the protection of both passengers and firemen, in particular where
fire emergencies arise.
Close collaboration with senior Vancouver Fire Department officials took place
to determine the modifications necessary to passenger elevators, to safely permit their
use by firemen under fire-fighting conditions on high-rise buildings of over 12 floors
in height.
Amendments to the National Building Code invisions all elevators being automatically returned to the street entrance floor, where they will be retained with the
exception of the elevator designated for "the use of firemen." This elevator will be
key-operated by firemen, in order that it can be under their control on a continuous
basis, until returned to normal service. In due course our regulations would require
to be amended to cover all the necessary changes needed to permit this new use of
elevators.
Another area involving "time limits" in which case elevator company managers,
architects, and building inspectors were notified, concerning our requirement that
laminated-wood hoistway would not be acceptable for elevator hoistway contracts
negotiated after October 1, 1973. Henceforth a minimum of concrete-block structure is required.
This year saw the first Polaris passenger elevator installed in the Province on
the downtown Hyatt Hotel. The Polaris is an armoured glass enclosed elevator
which travels on the outside of this building, and in this case gives express service to
the top floor.
The services of the Branch were extended to a local drydock in response to a
request for the inspection of 14 elevators on the passenger liner S.S. Arcadia. Their
request was understandable for the reason that many repairs were necessary. Indeed,
the elevators were of European manufacture and varied in many ways from Canadian
elevators which made the inspections challenging to the inspectors involved.
Another unusual inspectional assignment relates to the installation of a personnel hoist on the Mica Dam site for the purpose of allowing maintenance work to be
conducted after completion of the project. The design will permit the one cab to
operate in six different hoistways.
The upsurge of new elevator work during the year 1973 grew. The addition of
three inspectors to the staff this year has permitted us to keep abreast of annual
inspections during the year under review.
 FACTORY AND ELEVATOR INSPECTION BRANCH       BB 33
The Canadian Standards Association Standard Z 185-1972, Safety Code for
Workmen's Hoists, Tower and Cantilever Types, was adopted by Order in Council
this year. This code was designed for national application, and our counterparts in
other provinces participated in the compilations, as well as hoist manufacturers and
ourselves. Workmen's hoists are designed for the transportation of both construction
workers and materials and are erected on the exterior of buildings under construction, in order to alleviate extra work and energy loss to trades involved with high-
rise construction.
The volume of elevating devices in service on Vancouver Island reached a level
to merit the feasibility of locating one additional elevator inspector in Victoria. This
decentralizes inspections for all of the Island from the Vancouver-based staff, and
will permit the inspection of all elevating devices on the Island to be inspected by
the staff located in Victoria.
Factory Division
The year under review has continued the upward swing from 1972, and has set
an all-time high for this Province, in the industrial and commercial construction
fields. Our involvement with these sectors also reveals a noticeable trend toward
bigness as well as larger volume. This applies particularly to major factory buildings,
huge warehouses, sprawling retail complexes and office buildings, which also include
inside retail malls.
This trend while becoming more concentrated in Vancouver, is not confined to
that city. Having to work closely with the firms involved with these large developments, from drawing-board to the operational stage, we would be remiss, were we
not to acknowledge the co-operation given in following our requirements relating
to the working environment in these major buildings.
To conform with our requirements in the areas of illumination, heating, air-
conditioning, air contamination, employee services such as lunchrooms, locker
rooms, washrooms, the systems required are very elaborate, and the areas vast. They
are also the places of heavy employment, and employees are our chief concern.
To cope with the ever-increasing problem of rapid growth in many parts of the
Province, new Departmental policy developed in 1973, has permitted decentralizing
of the inspectional functions relative to the inspection of factories, stores, and offices.
Factory inspectors were assigned inspection responsibilities in the Metropolitan Victoria area and the Okanagan. Additional inspectors will be hired this year to be
assigned to the Nelson, Prince George, and Kamloops areas.
Since the objective of this programme is to attain a comprehensive inspectional
coverage throughout the Province, it is expected this can be achieved by 1975. It
will be the first time in the history of the Branch, that we will have achieved such
widespread coverage. As this enforcement vacuum is filled many thousands of industrial and commercial workers will benefit from improved working conditions
previously mentioned.
Our main concern is with existing places of employment rather than new,
because we already have effective control concerning new construction. The Act
requires the submission of plans and specifications relating to construction of new
factories and additions.
In course of the past year most of the Vancouver staff have been periodically
involved with the inspection of sawmills, wood-mills, and plywood plants located
along the Fraser River from Hope to its lower reaches. Although the number of such
factories involved was volumous, the task was finished and the many directives issued
to rectify discrepancies were completed.
 BB 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
This inspectional assignment served to reveal in most cases the total absence
of any form of heating, exceptionally poor lighting, the absence of lunchrooms or
where provided, far below standard, and in the case of workers' washrooms, many
were deplorable, and were replaced with new washrooms. There is no doubt that
many millworkers will derive a great deal of benefit from improved lighting, heating,
and exhaust systems installed as a result of this inspectional effort.
In course of the year the inspectors participated at seminars to keep updated in
the areas of ventilation, exhausting, and illumination technologies both locally and
at the University of Washington. A good input was achieved dealing with the same
subjects at meetings that were held with contractors involved with the installation
of this equipment in Metro-Vancouver, and in cities in the Okanagan area.
As a result of several years, study of the problems associated with the growing
practice of retailers installing "strip-lighting" in major stores, a new direction was
found necessary this year, in upgrading such lighting applications, by requiring
adequate shielding on this type of fixture. It will serve to eliminate the glare problem to which employees are subjected when working under high-density unshielded
lighting systems.
In conjunction with this measure to upgrade our lighting standards, it has also
been found necessary to require that lighting fixtures are designed to maintain an
adequate cut-off angle. The application of this requirement takes in factories, stores,
and offices, whereas the application of shielded lighting was an existing requirement
for factory and office lighting.
Again this year our inspectional coverage on behalf of the Federal Government
in applying their legislation throughout the Province, continued with the inspection
of hundreds of places coming under Federal jurisdiction. The agreement calls for
the inspection of factories, offices, and elevating devices as applied to Federal buildings and firms coming under Federal jurisdiction.
During the year there were 39 employers and 55 homeworkers authorized by
permit, to conduct homework in accordance with the provisions contained in the
Factories Act. The employers were duly informed of the new minimum wage of
$2.25 per hour which became effective December 3, 1973.
Technical Services Division
Throughout the year under review other departments of the Government
availed themselves of our consultative services, which is conducted on an in-service
basis. As a consequence, we were involved with the engineering sections of the
Department of Public Works, B.C. Hospital Insurance Services, and B.C. Hydro
and Power Authority, relating to projects in the planning stages and under way.
These services are pertinent to elevating devices, and the technologies associated with heating, air-conditioning, exhaust systems, and illumination and are
undertaken on a continuing basis.
Summary of Inspections and Plan Approvals
The following itemization lists the number of inspections conducted during the
year 1973, relating to factories, stores, and offices, elevating devices, and the number
of directives issued to owners and employers pertinent to these inspections. The
number of engineering plans and specifications approved for construction are also
stipulated.
 FACTORY AND ELEVATOR INSPECTION BRANCH
Inspections
Factories, offices, stores     6,232
Elevating devices      5,697
Total
11,929
BB 35
Directives
Factories, offices, stores     2,971
Elevating devices      4,783
Total
7,754
Engineering Plans and Specification Approvals
Factories 	
Elevating devices
Total —
919
298
1,217
Conclusion
In concluding this report the Branch would like to take this opportunity to
acknowledge the assistance given to it during the year by the other departments of the
Government, the Canada Department of Labour, Building Inspectors, Public Health
Inspectors, employers, employees, trade unions, architects, and engineers.
 BB 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Report of the Human Rights Branch
Personnel, Human Rights Commission
Headquarters
Chairman:
Bishop Remi J. De Roo
Members:
Larry Ryan -
William Black    -
Gene Errington -
Rose Charlie
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4
Director, Human Rights Code:
Kathleen Ruff   -      -    Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4
Number and Nature of Complaints
The Human Rights Branch has been extremely active in the past year. The
Director received 440 formal complaints and over 1,000 complaints and inquiries
by letter, telephone, and personal visit. All possible help was given to people,
regardless of whether it fell within the wording of the Human Rights Act or not.
There has been a great increase in the volume of work handled by the Branch,
with the number of formal complaints more than doubling since 1972. The following tables indicate the number and nature of complaints received by the Branch
during the year.
Table I—Number of Complaints Investigated by Section of the
Human Rights Act, 1973
Section
Total
Complaints
Settled
by
Officers
Without
Merit
Before
Human
Rights
Commission
Held Over
to 1974
Withdrawn
4
171
8
8
1
5  	
58
22
15
4
13
4
6      —
2
2
7.	
5
3
	
1
1
8  _
6
3
2
1
9	
10
5
1
1
2
1
10 	
-
_
....
98
41
18
14
19
6
Section 4—Pay discrimination prohibited.
Section 5—Employment discrimination prohibited.
Section 6—Discrimination by trade union prohibited.
Section 7—Discrimination in application for employment forms and employment ads prohibited.
Section 8—Discrimination prohibited in accommodation, services, or facilities.
Section 9—Discrimination prohibited in tenancy.
Section 10—Publishing or displaying discriminatory signs prohibited.
i Excluding the 342 complaints covered by the agreement between the Minister of Health and the Hospital
Employees Union.
 HUMAN RIGHTS BRANCH
BB 37
Table II—Number of Complaints Investigated Under Human Rights Act
by Nature of Complaint, 1973
Nature of Complaint
Total
Settled
by
Officers
Without
Merit
Before
Human
Rights
Commission
Held Over
to 1974
Withdrawn
23
3
48
3
1
9
11
11
1
20
2
2
5
4
2
6
2
4
1
8
i
3
1
5
10
1
2
1
2
Religion	
Sexi.    ..
4
Colour
Nationality
Place of Origin	
98
41
18
14
19
6
1 Excluding the 342 complaints covered by the agreement between the Minister of Health and the Hospital
Employees Union.
Equal Pay for Equal Work
A significant development can be observed over the past year in that the
Branch has succeeded in breaking through to deal with fundamental issues and
widespread practices rather than only the single individual complaint. This was
certainly the case in regard to the hospital industry. Three hundred and forty-two
complaints were received from female hospital workers. Most of the complaints
came from female practical nurses, who maintained that they were doing substantially the same work as male orderlies, while being paid a lower wage. Rather
than dealing only with the individual complaints, the Director sought to come to
grips with the total problem and ensure the elimination of all aspects of discrimination against women in the hospital industry. Meetings were held between the
Minister of Health, the Hospital Employees Union, the Director of the Human
Rights Act, and an agreement signed in August 1973. Under the agreement, all
hospital employees earning less than the base male rate of $669.50 per month were
given a raise of $37.50 per month retroactive to January 1973. In this way, $5
million was paid to over 8,000 female hospital employees throughout the Province.
The agreement further included a commitment that in the lifetime of the new collective agreement (January 1, 1974, to December 31, 1975) all forms of discrimination against female employees, whether in pay, training, or promotion opportunities,
be eliminated and a thorough study of all job classifications to ensure equity be
undertaken.
This agreement represents a major breakthrough for all female workers in
British Columbia. A whole industry, with the support and commitment of the
union and the Minister of Health, has achieved a major step forward in ensuring
equality in employment for female workers. This was, perhaps, the first "class"
action in the field of human rights in Canada. The settlement did not go only to
those women who could prove under the letter of the law that they were doing
"substantially the same work" as men, but also to those thousands of women in
segregated "female" occupations where the wages are the lowest and opportunities
the poorest. Thus, not only practical nurses benefited from the agreement, but also
housekeeping maids, dietary aides, clerical workers, cooks, nursing aides, and
laundry workers.
 r
BB 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Under the equal pay section of the Act, settlements of $278.76 and $272.56
were made to two female students working on a summer project who had been paid
at a lower rate of pay than male students. Complaints were received under the
same section from women in a retail store alleging that female clerks were paid less
than male clerks for substantially the same work. Separate job classifications based
on sex—general male sales clerks, general female sales clerks, special sales clerk
(male), special sales clerk (female)—had been written into the union contract.
After the employer had held a time and motion study, it was still not possible to
settle the matter. The case was therefore referred to the Human Rights Commission, who found that the employer was in contravention of the equal pay section
of the Human Rights Act and ordered $3,223 back pay for the five women who had
filed complaints. The adjustment in pay also meant that all other female clerks at
that store and another branch in Victoria would receive a raise in pay.
Discrimination in Employment
Under section 5 of the Act, which deals with discrimination in employment,
one complaint concerned a person who applied for a job as a store clerk and alleged
that she was refused employment because of her colour. Investigation showed that
the position had been filled a week earlier, but that the Canada Manpower office,
who had handled the opening, had no record of this. The complaint was settled
to the satisfaction of all sides with the offer of a job when the next opening
occurred.
Complaints were received from two East Indian Canadians alleging discrimination in employment on the part of a railway official. Investigation revealed no
evidence of discrimination, in that all employees had been treated according to
seniority; however, a bad work climate did appear to exist. A further meeting was
therefore held with senior officials at the company's Vancouver head office to discuss the problem and work out positive measures to deal with it. The company
employs a great cross-section of all nationalities, including many East Indian Canadians, and indicated its concern to uphold the provisions of the Human Rights Act.
Action was taken to bring about better work relationships at the location in question
and an undertaking was given that all personnel throughout the Province would be
made fully aware that discriminatory conduct would not be tolerated.
Two complaints alleged discrimination in employment on the basis of age as
a result of telephone conversations with employers. The provisions of the Act
were fully explained to the employers and apologies were received, together with
an offer for one complainant to attend for an interview and an invitation to the
other complainant to complete an application for employment form.
A complaint was received from a young woman who, on applying for a job at
a garage as a front-end attendant, was told that they "would not hire a woman."
The Officer investigating the case found that a young man was hired, although he
had no experience or qualifications, and had already quit. The complaint was
settled with the employer offering the job to the young woman who had a year's
experience in this kind of work in Ontario. A letter was later received by the
Director from the woman saying how well everything had worked out. She had
already received a bonus, was getting a raise in pay, and had become assistant
manager.
 HUMAN RIGHTS BRANCH BB 39
Discrimination in Application for
Employment Forms
and Job Ads
Five formal complaints were received under section 7 relating to publications
and inquiries. Three concerned application forms which included questions relating
to place of origin and religion; one job advertisement required a photo to accompany
the application; and one complaint concerned a remark relating to place of origin
during the course of a job interview. After discussions with the companies involved, good co-operation was received, all application forms were changed, and the
requirement to submit a photo was dropped.
Dozens of other application for employment forms were checked out by the
Branch, and in all cases co-operation was received from the companies in carrying
out any suggested changes.
The Director had a number of meetings with the Public Service Commission
to discuss hiring practices in relationship to the Human Rights Act. The Commission agreed to eliminate from its application for employment form all questions
relating to sex, marital status, or dependents, and questions on place of origin and
length of residence in Canada. On the new application for employment form that
will be printed, a new section will be included concerning experience in community
work. Volunteer work in the community frequently represents worth-while and
important experience which should be recognized as a valid criterion in assessing a
job applicant. This change will be particularly relevant in bringing about equal
opportunity for women and was a recommendation of the Royal Commission Report on the Status of Women. In addition, the Commission agreed to place on all
job advertisements a heading stating, "This position is open to men and women."
Such a clear commitment to equality of opportunity is a necessary and encouraging
measure to overcome past barriers whereby women were not readily accepted in
certain occupations.
During the year the Director made strong efforts to have newspapers drop the
traditional "Male Help" and "Female Help" wanted system of classifying job
advertisements. While the present Human Rights Act does not prohibit classifying
job advertisements according to sex, it is the Director's conviction that such a practice is contrary to the spirit of the Act, reinforces traditional prejudices, and denies
equality of opportunity. The Director met with the publishers of the Vancouver Sun
and Province and the Victoria Times and Colonist, and sent letters to all other publishers of daily and weekly newspapers throughout the Province to recommend that
job ads be classified by occupation, not sex. The Director wishes to commend the
four major Vancouver and Victoria newspapers and many other newspapers around
the Province who voluntarily complied with this request. It is a far more worthwhile achievement to win voluntary co-operation in advancing the principles of the
Human Rights Act than to force compliance by the letter of the law.
Discrimination in Accommodation, Services,
and Tenancy
A number of complaints were received under sections 8 and 9 alleging discrimination on the basis of race and colour in tenancy or accommodation. Thorough
investigations were undertaken and the provisions of the Human Rights Act care-
 BB 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
fully explained to the landlords. In some cases no evidence of discrimination was
found. In all other cases apologies were received, together with a commitment to
fully comply with the purpose of the Act.
Although no complaints were received by the Branch, the Director became
actively involved in dealing with problems of harassment being experienced by East
Indian Canadians in Vancouver and other parts of the Province. The Director
formed a special committee in Vancouver which included representatives of the
East Indian Canadian Community, Vancouver City Police, School Board, and City
Hall. The dialogue engendered by this Committee proved extremely valuable. It
not only led to a number of practical measures being implemented, but also brought
about better communication and understanding for all concerned. The Director also
travelled to Fort St. James and helped set up a public meeting and a special committee to deal with similar problems in that area.
New Directions
In 1973, British Columbia became a member of the Canadian Association of
Statutory Human Rights Agencies, which is composed of the official human rights
agencies from across Canada. At the Association's Annual Meeting, in Halifax, in
May, Kathleen Ruff was elected President. British Columbia is now fully participating in activities and plans on a national level to promote human rights.
During 1973 the Director travelled thousands of miles to speak at human rights
meetings and conferences. Trade unions, employers' associations, personnel officers,
service groups, social workers, students, employment agencies, and many other
groups were addressed by the Director. On frequent occasions the Director has
appeared on hot-line shows, and television and radio programmes to promote understanding and support for the provisions of the Act. Sincere thanks go from the
Human Rights Branch at this time to the many organizations and individuals around
the Province who have made such an active and valuable contribution to the advancement of human rights.
There have been a number of new developments over the past year. Jack
Sherlock, Director of the Branch since the Act was proclaimed in 1969, retired in
March and was succeeded as Director in April 1973 by Ms. Kathleen Ruff. We wish
to take this opportunity to extend our best wishes to Mr. Sherlock and express our
appreciation for his work in the human rights field over the past four years.
During the summer, for the first time, the Branch was able to initiate an educational project with the co-operation of civil liberties and native Indian groups.
Four community workers were hired to carry out educational programmes in human
rights at the grass-roots level in outlying parts of the Province.
In October a new, stronger Human Rights Code was passed in the House and
in December a new Human Rights Commission was named. The five members of
the Commission have a wide background of active involvement in community work
and will play an independent and significant role in carrying out the responsibilities
of the new Code.
The Human Rights Branch looks forward to the new year with great anticipation. For the first time there will be staff and a budget to effectively carry out the
provisions of the Human Rights Code. Under the new legislation new issues will
come forward, such as discrimination because of marital status, life-style, sexual
orientation, political belief, and criminal conviction. British Columbia will be
breaking new ground in Canada in these areas.
 HUMAN RIGHTS BRANCH
BB 41
The Branch does not consider its role to be a narrow, passive one of only
investigating complaints that are submitted. Our responsibility is to take the
initiative and play a positive and energetic role in forwarding equality of opportunity
for all. Our commitment at all times is to uphold the principle that all are born
free and equal in dignity and rights.
 BB 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Report of the Labour Relations Branch
Personnel, Labour Relations Board
Chairman:
Paul C. Weiler,  1620 West Eighth Avenue, Vancouver, V6J 1V4.
V ice-Chairmen:
J. R. Edgett, 880 Douglas Street, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
John Melville, 4211  Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby,
V5H 1Z5.
J. A. Moore, 1620 West Eighth Avenue, Vancouver, V6J 1V4.
Ms. Nancy Morrison, 1620 West Eighth Avenue, Vancouver,
V6J 1V4.
E. R. Peck, 1620 West Eighth Avenue, Vancouver, V6V 1V4.
Members:
R. K. Gervin, 4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
Angus Macdonald, 4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby,
V5H 1Z5.
Charles Murdoch, 4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby,
V5H 1Z5.
Mrs. Emily Ostapchuk, 4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
R. S. S. Wilson, 4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby,
V5H 1Z5.
Chief Administrative Officer:
E. R. Peck, 1620 West Eighth Avenue, Vancouver, V6V 1V4.
Chief Executive Officer and Registrar:
Gerald H. O'Neill, 880 Douglas Street, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
Deputy Registrars:
H. E. Stennett, 1620 West Eighth Avenue, Vancouver, V6J 1V4.
R. J. Weir, 880 Douglas Street, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
Secretary:
Frank B. Hilton, 1620 West Eighth Avenue, Vancouver, V6J 1V4.
Applications for Certification
During the year 1973 there were 1,122 applications for certification received
by the Labour Relations Board. This is a decrease of nine from the number which
was received in 1972. The Board granted 876 certifications, compared to 811 in
1972, and rejected 114 applications, while in the previous year 212 applications
fell into this category.
There were 84 complaints filed with the Labour Relations Board under section
7 of the Act.   This is a decrease of four from the number which was filed in the
 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH BB 43
previous year. Sixteen orders were issued by the Labour Relations Board pursuant
to this section of the Act. In 17 instances, settlements were effected by an Officer
of the Department.
The Labour Relations Board met on 120 occasions and held 45 hearings,
compared with 116 meetings and 42 hearings in 1972.
Settlement of Grievances
Provisions of section 22 (4) of the Labour Relations Act continued to be used
by employers and trade unions on a number of occasions. The section provides
that, at any time prior to the appointment of a Board of Arbitration or other body,
either party to the collective agreement may request the Registrar in writing to
appoint an Officer of the Department of Labour to confer with parties to assist
them to settle the difference. The Officer, after conferring with the parties, shall
make a report to the Registrar, and the report may be referred to the Labour Relations Board. The Board may, if in its opinion the difference is arbitrable, refer the
matter back to the parties or inquire into it and, following such inquiry, make an
order for final and conclusive settlement of the difference.
Of the 289 applications which were submitted under section 22 (4) of the
Act, 167 settlements were effected by Officers of the Department. This is an increase of 15 over the number of settlements arrived at in 1972. The Board issued
76 orders; in 41 instances the differences were referred back to the parties and in five
cases it was found that the differences were not arbitrable.
Questions Considered by the Board
Under section 65 of the Labour Relations Act questions were placed before the
Board for consideration in 890 instances. This is an increase of 459 over the number that were dealt with by the Board in 1972.
Arbitration Boards
During the year under review the Minister of Labour appointed a chairman to
an Arbitration Board on 16 different occasions and eight appointments were made
to one-man Boards. The Labour Relations Board was called upon to make nine
appointments during the year.
Accreditations of Employers' Organizations
In 1972, accreditations of employers' organizations were ordered in three
instances. One accreditation was cancelled by the Labour Relations Board, while
two applications were withdrawn. Four applications to vary accreditations were
rejected and two applications to vary were withdrawn. Sixteen applications to vary
were granted by the Board.
 BB 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table I—Analysis of Certifications Issued to December 31, 1973
Industry or Occupation
Construction—
Boilermakers 	
Carpenters 	
Electrical 	
Total Number of
Number of       Employees Affected
Certifications by Certification
Issued
Ironworkers
Labourers _
Miscellaneous 	
Painting        6
Pile-drivers 	
Plumbing 	
Sheet-metal workers	
Totals, construction	
Totals, manufacturing
Mining
Service—
Building maintenance
Education 	
Health	
Hotels 	
Labour organizations
Laundries	
Other services	
4
15
150
656
10
59
52
249
78
360
52
286
6
24
1
3
22
181
25
124
400
Logging, lumbering, and sawmill	
Manufacturing—
Automotive repairs and garage  10
Bread and other bakery products  2
Distilled liquor  3
Furniture and fixtures  9
Iron and steel products  7
Machinery   7
Miscellaneous   49
Printing and publishing  7
Pulp and paper  1
Scientific and professional equipment  1
Shipbuilding   4
Concrete products manufacturing  6
19
11
35
11
5
5
73
Restaurants, cafes, taverns, and catering     14
Totals, service	
46
67
48
221
159
114
91
1,356
104
24
20
169"
35
106
5
106
980
988
465
14
191
729
260
Public administration and defence
173
12
1,957
2,538
2,408
711
3,733
237
 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH BB 45
Table I—Anaylsis of Certifications Issued to December 31, 1973
—Continued
Total Number of
x-.i..rtf.w ..h r\ ..-H.*;.*-. Number of        Employees Affected
Industry or Occupation Certifications by Certification
Issued
Trade-
Automobiles and accessories  10 188
Building materials and supplies  16 373
Drugs  3 32
Groceries and meats  21 569
Machinery and equipment  3 89
Retail trade   14 341
Wholesale trade  7 59
1,651
Totals, trade     74
Transportation, storage and communications—
Bus transportation   3 32
Storage and warehouse  13 133
Truck transportation  42 497
Taxi   1 12
Water systems   1 6
Totals, transportation, etc.     60
Grand totals   876 13,915
680
Table II—Comparison of Cases Dealt With by Labour Relations Board,
1972 and 1973
Applications for certification—
Certifications ordered	
Applications rejected	
Applications withdrawn	
Total applications  1,131
Votes ordered        46
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31
1972
1973
811
876
212
114
108
132
Variance of certification—
Certifications varied  605
Applications rejected  48
Applications withdrawn  19
Totals  672
Declaration of successor status-
Declarations given
435
Declarations rejected        33
Withdrawn  2
Totals      470
1,122
42
628
82
12
722
132
3
735
Votes ordered
 BB 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II—Comparison of Cases Dealt With by Labour Relations Board,
1972 and 1973—Continued
Cancellation of certification—
Certifications cancelled	
Applications rejected	
Applications withdrawn	
Totals	
Votes ordered
Applications to alter rates of pay, etc.—
Applications granted	
Applications rejected	
Totals	
Complaints under section 7-
Orders issued	
Complaints rejected	
Settlements effected by Officer of Department
Complaints withdrawn	
Totals	
Appeals from decisions—
Appeals granted	
Appeals dismissed	
Appeals withdrawn	
Totals	
Appointments,  Arbitration  Board  chairman — appointments made	
Appointments, member to Arbitration Board-
Applications rejected
Applications withdrawn	
Appointments made by parties following application to Board	
Disputes resolved by Officer of Department	
Totals	
Requests for decisions under section 65—
Decisions made	
Requests withdrawn
Totals	
Applications for an Officer under section 22 (4)—
Settlements effected by Officer of Department.
Orders issued	
Referred back to parties
Questions not arbitrable
Totals	
Dec. 31,
1972
Dec. 31,
1973
142
43
44
54
7
1
193
98
1
2
6
8
4
10
8
42
35
15
14
10
17
21
18
88
84
19
16
77
85
3
4
99
105
3
9
6
1
8
6
8
6
6
10
28
23
431
890
13
16
444
906
152
167
95
76
21
41
4
5
272
289
 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH BB 47
Table II—Comparison of Cases Dealt With by Labour Relations Board,
1972 and 1973—Continued
Applications for accreditation-
Accreditations ordered	
Applications rejected
Dec. 31,
1972
Dec. 31
1973
2
3
1
Applications withdrawn      2
Accreditations varied  24 16
Applications to vary rejected  3 4
Applications to vary withdrawn  2 2
Accreditations cancelled  1 1
Totals        33 28
Hearings held        42 45
Number of times the Board met .      116 120
During 1974 there will be a change in the location of the Labour Relations
Branch of the Department of Labour and consequently, there will also be some
changes in the administrative staff of this office. The Registrar wishes to acknowledge
the co-operation and assistance which has been afforded him and his staff during the
year 1973.
 BB 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Report of Labour Standards Branch
Head office    -      -      -      -    Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4.
W. J. D. Hoskyn, Director.
R. P. Sollis, Assistant Director.
J. A. Laffling, Supervisor, Labour Standards Branch, 4211 Kingsway,
Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
W. D. Purdy, Assistant Supervisor, Labour Standards Branch, 4211
Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
Branch Offices
4211  Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, 32818 Sevenuth Avenue,
Burnaby, V5H 1Z5. Mission.
Courthouse, Cranbrook. Courthouse, Nanaimo.
B.C.  Vocational  School,  Dawson Courthouse, Nelson.
Creek. Courthouse, Prince George.
220, 546 St. Paul Street, Kamloops. Courthouse, Terrace.
Courthouse, Kelowna. Courthouse, Williams Lake.
Industrial Relations Officers made 48,893 calls and investigations in performing the duties imposed by legislation administered by the Branch, including those
necessitated by functions performed under the provisions of the Labour Relations
Act and the Human Rights Act.
Routine inspections completed during the year revealed in many instances that
employers were not conversant with the requirements of the legislation. These
resulted in adjustments being made to employees, both to their wages and conditions
of employment. Additional Industrial Relations Officers have been obtained and
are presently under training. These additional officers will enable the Branch to
increase routine inspections being made, not only to ensure that employees are
receiving that to which they are entitled, but that the employer is familiar with our
legislation.
The major area of complaints registered with the Branch concerned the nonpayment of wages. Investigations resulting from routine inspections and registered
complaints resulted in adjustments being made to 9,095 employees from 4,603
employers and amounted to $1,203,779.74.
Where officers were unable to obtain satisfaction for employees, the Board of
Industrial Relations was requested to issue certificates under the provisions of the
Payment of Wages Act. Five hundred and forty-five certificates were issued from
which emanated 249 demand notices to persons indebted to the employer named in
the certificate.
The problem of an employee being paid his wages is still of the greatest concern
to the Branch. The increased use of certificates and the increase in the amount of
wages collected reflects that this function of the Branch is of significant importance
to employees.   Amendments to the Payment of Wages Act have increased the effec-
 LABOUR STANDARDS BRANCH
BB 49
tiveness of the Branch in securing payment for employees. They also have increased
the work load of our officers and the knowledge that they must have to perform
their duties.
Eighty-three registrations were issued to employment agencies subsequent to
investigations being made to determine compliance with all legislation.
Two hundred forty-seven permits were issued to employers allowing children
under the age of 15 years to be employed. Each application was investigated to
determine that the employment was not detrimental to the health of the employee
nor that it would adversely affect their schooling.
The following tables provide information on various factors of the Branch's
activities for 1973.
Payment of Wages Act
1972
Certificates made under section 5(1) (c)  433
Certificates confirmed under section 5 (2) (a)  334
Certificates cancelled under section 5 (2) (b) (ii)  8
Certificates cancelled and remade under section 5 (2)
(b) (i)   17
Certificates paid before confirmation  30
Certificates paid before filed in Court  39
Certificates confirmed under section 5 (2) (a) and made
under section 5 (2) (b) (i) filed with Registrar of—
County Court  260
Supreme Court  35
Appeals under section 5 (4)  1
Demands made under section 6(1)  156
1973
545
427
11
28
38
47
364
44
249
Comparison of Investigations and Wage Adjustments 1972 and 1973
1972
48,611
1,378
2,426
Arrears paid ..   $119,468.79
Inspections and investigations	
Annual and General Holidays Act-
Finns involved 	
Employees affected	
Minimum Wage Act-
Firms involved .
Employees affected
Arrears paid	
Payment of Wages Act—
Firms involved	
Employees affected _
Arrears paid	
262
620
$48,022.51
2,810
5,803
$794,406.84
1973
48,893
1,234
1,943
$108,476.58
348
1,089
$92,596.76
3,021
6,063
$1,002,706.40
Total adjustments
$961,899.14     $1,203,779.74
 1
BB 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Court Cases of the Year 1973
Name of Act
Number of
Employers
Charges
Convictions
Dismissals
6
1
1
6
1
1
6
1
1
Control of Employment of Children Act
Summary of Permits Issued for The Year 1973
District
.M
u
to
^
O
o
u
&
u
ri
OS
o
i-i
Total
a
o
1
a
o
0
1
a
1
0
a
o
—1
s
a
s
o
55
0
a
u
Oh
Q
C3
H
H
>
3
O
o
9
>
u
1
1
1
3
1
2
5
2
15
Automobile service-stations	
2
i
2
1
4
4
2
1
17
S
3
7?
9
7
7
4
8
1
36
8
4
117
1
1
7
1
1
6
1
1
14
T.anndry, cleaning, dyeing
1
2
2
5
10
3
i
8
1
1
14
1
1
7
1
1
1
7
5
14
Mercantile        	
2
1
1
2
6
5
3
15
5
1
41
1
1
1
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
3
4
Totals   	
14
6
28
13
16
20
4
28
12
80
19
7
247
Employment Agencies Act
Registrations Issued 1973
A.B.C. Employment Services, 100, 395 West Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Able Personnel, 1956 West Broadway, Vancouver.
Accounting Personnel Services (Division of H.S. Services Ltd.), 509, 1200 West
Pender Street, Vancouver.
Accounting Placements, 819 East Seventh Street, North Vancouver.
Acme Personnel Service Ltd., 402, 1111 West Georgia, Vancouver.
Active Personnel & Business Services Ltd., 4, 2571 Shaughnessy Street, Port Coquitlam.
Anderson's Baby Sitting Agency, 412 East 16th Street, North Vancouver.
Associated Employment Services (Division of Associated Training Centre Ltd.),
203, 395 West Broadway, Vancouver 10.
A-l Personnel, 136 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3.
B.C. Central Credit Union, 885 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 1.
B.C. Management Recruiters Ltd., 309, 1111 West Georgia Street, Vancouver.
B.C. Personnel (Pacific Personnel Ltd.), 1250 Toronto Dominion Bank Tower, Box
10050, Vancouver 1.
Beacon Employment Service, 876 Commercial Drive, Vancouver 6.
Betterstaff Business Services Ltd., 670a No. 3 Road, Richmond.
Brockton Employment Agencies Ltd., 714, 1281 West Georgia Street, Vancouver 5.
 LABOUR STANDARDS BRANCH BB 51
H. V. Chapman & Associates Ltd., 1495 Two Bentall Centre, Vancouver 1.
Campbell River Woods Employment Agencies, 150 St. Ann's Road, Campbell
River.
Career Personnel Ltd., 117, 543 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2.
Centennial Personnel, 5487 Kingsway, Burnaby 1.
Chinese Employment Bureau, 529 Gore Avenue, Vancouver 4.
Computech Consulting Canada Ltd., 1009, 1177 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 1.
Contact Personnel Ltd., 837 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 1.
Copeman Employment Agencies Ltd., 3107, 1733 Comox Street, Vancouver 5.
Daisy Lake Personnel (Division of Daisy Lake Enterprise Ltd.), 1374 Park Drive,
Vancouver 14.
Dave Body's Service Ltd., 207 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3.
Dimension Personnel, 581 Hornby Street, Vancouver.
Dot Personnel Services (Division of Dictaphone Corporation), Box 10082, Pacific
Centre, Vancouver.
Drake International Ltd., Royal Centre, Suite 812, 1055 West Georgia Street, Vancouver.
Drake International Ltd., 1175 Douglas Street, Victoria.
Duffus Personnel; see Jobfinders.
Dumaresq Loggers Agency Ltd., 328 Carrall Street, Vancouver 4.
Dunhill Personnel Recruitment Ltd., 220, 1155 West Georgia Street, Vancouver.
Dunhill Personnel of Kamloops Ltd., 204, 611 Lansdowne Street, Kamloops.
Elan Data Makers Ltd., 205, 814, Richards Street, Vancouver.
Fast Action Placement Service, Suite 33, 448 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
John Fleury & Associates Ltd., 220, 1155 West Georgia Street, Vancouver.
June Whitehead Personnel, 32 Begbie Street, New Westminster.
Girl Friday Service Ltd., 806 Granville Avenue, Richmond.
Girl Friday—Vancouver, 618, 510 West Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Godfrey Chowne & Associates, Box 10025, Pacific Centre, Vancouver 1.
Greater Vancouver Nursing Services Bureau Ltd., 828 West Broadway, Vancouver 9.
Hannah, Turner & Associates Ltd., 612 East Broadway, Vancouver.
Helpful Aunts Bureau, 4049 West 31st Avenue, Vancouver 8.
Helping Hands Agency, 2206 Haversley Avenue, Coquitlam.
Hospitality Personnel, 1015 Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Jobfinders (a Division of Bigsby Education Services Ltd.) (Duffus Personnel), 440
West Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Kates, Peat, Marwick & Co., 1101, 900 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 1.
Lamond, Dewhurst, Westcott & Fraser Ltd., 1112 West Pender Street, Vancouver 1.
Lee Career Counselling Services, 301, 3307—32nd Avenue, Vernon.
Loggers' Agency Ltd., The, 415 Carrall Street, Vancouver 4.
Mennonite Bethel Agency, 5825 Sherbrooke Street, Vancouver 15.
Mis-Jo Office Services Ltd., 402, 535 West Georgia Street, Vancouver.
McKay Systems Corporation Ltd., 2151 Burrard Street, Vancouver 9.
Office Assistance Vancouver Ltd., 540 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1.
P. S. Ross & Partners, 1500, 1177 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 1.
Personnel Service, 114 Sixth Street, New Westminster.
Philcan Personnel Consultants, 5022 Victoria Drive, Vancouver 16.
Physicians Replacement Service, 870 Wildwood Lane, West Vancouver.
Professional Personnel, 510 West Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Progressive Personnel, 2406 Main Street, Vancouver.
Ramona Beauchamp Model Agency, 708, 1666 Pendrell Street, Vancouver.
I
 BB 52 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Reliable Baby Sitting Agency, 214 Harper Street, Prince George.
Ric-Ron Agencies Ltd., 19, 2112 Cornwall Street, Vancouver.
Ruby's Baby Sitting Bureau, 3038 East 59th Street, Vancouver.
Sampson Belair Reddell Stead Incorporated, 1960, 505 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1.
The 500 Selection Services (Western) Ltd., 2500, 1177 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 1.
Select Office Services Ltd., 5722—176A Street, Surrey.
Snelling & Snelling Personnel, 104, 2590 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Stevenson & Kellogg Ltd., Ninth Floor, 1112 West Pender Street, Vancouver 1.
Technical Service Council, 1199 West Pender Street, Vancouver 1.
Thorne Gunn & Co. (The Thorne Group Ltd.), 2400, 1177 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver 1.
Thorne Gunn & Co., 305, 645 Fort Street, Victoria.
Toner's Hiring Service, 912, 207 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3.
Tulk Personnel Ltd., 1620, 700 West Georgia Street, Vancouver.
Van-Isle Placement Personnel, 206, 235 Bastion Street, Nanaimo.
Van Isle Personnel Ltd., 4 Church Street, Nanaimo.
Vancouver World of Personnel Ltd., The, 102, 1644 West Broadway, Vancouver 9.
Victoria Babysitting Agency, 2301 Victor Street, Victoria.
Walker-Davies Personnel Consultants Ltd., 470 Granville Street, Vancouver.
West Coast Buy & Sell Ltd., 7844 Butler Avenue, South Burnaby.
Woods, Gordon & Co., Box 10101, Pacific Centre, Toronto Dominion Bank Tower,
700 West Georgia Street, Vancouver 1.
XCS Management Ltd., 119 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3.
Zee-Jay Accounting Machine Operators Ltd., 1905 Mathers Avenue, West Vancouver.
During the past year there has been a significant increase from employees,
unions, employers, and other interested parties in the activities of the Labour Standards Branch. This interest has been reflected in the numerous speaking engagements
conducted by Industrial Relations Officers.
It is becoming increasingly obvious that the Labour Standards Branch is
assuming a much greater importance in the community.   Consequently, there exists
a need to develop a concerted advisory service to the public in order that they may
be thoroughly familiar with our legislation.
We wish to express our sincere appreciation for the co-operation from various
groups, including other departments of the Government.   This assistance has contributed to the effectiveness of the Branch in the administration of the Labour
Standards legislation.
 MEDIATION SERVICES BRANCH BB 53
Report of the Mediation Services Branch
4211 Kingsway, Burnaby, B.C.
R. A. MacDonald ----------   Director
Mediation Officers:
G. C. Leonidas P. G. Dowding
C. M. Gilmour E. C. Sims
K. E. Albertini C. Stewart
During the year, Mediation Officers were appointed in 254 disputes involving
419 employers, 449 bargaining units, and 38,308 employees.
Settlements With the Assistance of a
Mediation Officer
Of the 228 disputes completed by the Mediation Officers during the year, settlements were reached by the parties in 169 disputes with the assistance of a Mediation Officer.
Analysis of Mediation Services for 1973
Appointments continued from 1972  35
Appointments made in 1973        254
No official appointment  6
Total        295
Appointments rescinded     9
Appointments continuing  58
-67
Total appointments completed in 1973   228
Settlements:
During term of Officer's appointment  154
Following report of the Officer  9
No official appointment  6
Total settled         169
Number of employers involved       419
Number of bargaining units involved       449
Number of employees involved  38,308
 BB 54 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Report of the
Research and Planning Branch
Head office     - Parliament Buildings, Victoria, V8V 1X4
G. D. Bishop -----------     Director
The Research and Planning Branch is the primary source of research information concerning the labour sector of the British Columbia economy. The Branch is
continually involved in the collection, analysis, and dissemination of wage settlement
and labour force statistics, pay-rate information, and a variety of reports covering
virtually all aspects of labour. This material has many uses, but is of primary importance at the bargaining table and, within the Department, as background information to the problems encountered as the Department administers the many statutes
under its jurisdiction.
Research within the Branch roughly falls into two broad divisions—labour
relations research and manpower research. The thrust behind our work in the area
of labour relations has been our desire to see that the Province's need for a recognized and unbiased source for such research is satisfied. Beginning with the
Branch's first fringe-benefit study in 1967, our efforts in this field have been very
well received. Over the years we have developed considerable expertise in the area
of industrial relations research, and with the dissolution of the research section of
the now defunct Mediation Commission we are embarking on an expanded programme for industrial relations research which we feel will meet the data requirements of the Province.
Briefly, the programme now operating covers, amongst other items, the
following:
Fringe Benefit Analysis—Research in this area is designed to show the incidences of particular fringe benefits and the trends in the whole area of working
conditions.   These studies are of great use to those involved in collective bargaining.
Settlement Reporting Programme—This programme results in the publication
of virtually all the major settlements covering British Columbia employees, on a
monthly basis.
Wage Settlement Analysis—Quarterly reports of the Province's wage settlements are published in an effort to supply current bargaining, wage, and salary
increase information. This most important statistic is utilized in most major
negotiating situations.
Wage and Salary Information—The Research and Planning Branch publishes
information regarding the base labour, journeyman, and clerical pay rates in order
to supply information of use to those involved with collective bargaining. The
Research and Planning Branch is also involved with conducting wage and salary
surveys in order to supplement the information gleaned from labour contracts.
Labour Disputes Data—The Branch monitors the work stoppages that occur
in the Province.
Labour Union Membership Information—The Branch, in co-operation with
the Federal Government, collects comprehenshive information regarding each local
in the Province and prepares a number of summary tables from this data describing
various characteristics of the trade union movement.
 RESEARCH AND PLANNING BRANCH BB 55
The Branch has recently become more highly involved in the area of manpower
research and planning. This area relates both to the study of present occupational
manpower requirements and projections of future manpower needs. Together with
this, increased research is going into the understanding of manpower related problems such as labour turnover, seasonal fluctuations in employment, and specific
regional problems.
A new area of concentration for the Branch is the co-ordination of the Provincial thrust toward special employment programmes of the Federal Government.
By chairing the Provincial Government's interdepartmental committee on Federal
grants the Branch is increasing its rapport and co-operation with other government
agencies, both at the Federal and Provincial levels. Not only are Federal programmes co-ordinated, e.g., LIP, LEAP, OFY, but they are also evaluated in
terms of overall Provincial input and benefits. Special contingency plans are now
being developed to deal with various seasonal employment fluctuations through
specifically developed Provincial employment plans.
As a vehicle for bringing to the attention of the public the work within the
Branch a monthly Labour Research Bulletin is widely distributed.
During 1973 staff turnover in the Branch was limited and we were also fortunate in securing three more professional people. This has given us an opportunity
to develop our work in the manpower area, although not nearly to the extent to
which we would like.
As is customary, the Research Branch maintained its many contacts with
labour associations, both in British Columbia and in the rest of Canada. The undersigned attended a conference in Geneva entitled the Second Tripartite Technical
Meeting for the Timber Industry (Forestry), as a representative of the Canadian
Government. Frank Rhodes and the undersigned also attended the Eighth Federal-
Provincial Conference on Economic Statistics at Montebello, Quebec, and the
Statistics and Research Committee meetings of the Canadian Association of
Administrators of Labour Legislation held in Ottawa. Other members of the
staff represented the Department at short conferences held during the year dealing
with occupational forecasting and related seminars. L. D. Collingwood participated
as a principal speaker at a seminar conducted in Regina, at which time he explained
to the other western provinces the programme of work functioning in British Columbia in the area of collective bargaining analysis.
One of the more active committees in which the Branch participated during
1973 was the Woods Labour Supply Study Committee. This committee was set up
to help solve some of the problems of labour shortages and turnover which the
forestry industry of British Columbia, in common with other parts of Canada has
been experiencing. The committee representing industry, unions, the Provincial
Department of Labour, and Canada Manpower, commissioned a private consulting
firm to conduct a more intensive investigation on possible remedies to manpower
problems in the woods.  Work by this committee is continuing at this time.
The analytical and statistical supplement which is prepared by the Research
and Planning Branch has not been included in this year's annual report. It is felt
that much more complete figures of the past year can be issued in separate publications which will be forthcoming in the spring of 1974.
 BB 56 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Report of the Trade-schools Regulation
Administrative Office
Head office     -     4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5.
Administrative Officers:
Mrs. C. K. Waddell        Col. J. W. Inglis John Melville
The Trade-schools Administrative Officers met 12 times during the year for
consideration of all matters requiring their attention. Recommendations were made
to the Honourable the Minister in regard to registration, re-registration, requests for
changes in tuition fees, requests for approval of new courses, and the general conduct of private trade-schools together with other matters regarding the administration of the Act.
As of December 31, 1973, 105 schools were registered in accordance with the
Trade-schools Regulation Act in British Columbia to offer correspondence courses,
practical courses, or combined correspondence and practical training.
Ninety-one schools were re-registrations from the year 1972 and 14 new
schools were considered and recommended to the Honourable the Minister and
approved for Certificate of Registration during the year. Fifteen schools discontinued operation in British Columbia in 1973.
All schools offering practical training in British Columbia were visited and
inspected at least twice during the year. Visits were also made to new schools
applying for Certificate of Registration to operate in the Province in regard to the
facilities for training and the suitability of premises.
Special visits were made to schools to attend to specific problems and complaints. In instances where complaints were received from students wishing to discontinue training and who had moneys owing to them by way of prepaid tuition
fees, refunds were effected in accordance with the regulations.
The following is a list of schools re-registered for 1973, and the new schools
registered during the year, indicating the courses each school offers. The schools
which discontinued operation during the year are also listed.
Schools Whose Registrations Were Renewed for 1973
Alexander Hamilton Institute Ltd., Box 272, Islington, Ont.: Modern business
course, seven-subject elective programme of modern business.
Art Instruction Schools, Inc., 500 South Fourth Street, Minneapolis, Minn. 54415,
U.S.A.: Advertising art, cartooning.
Canadian Executive Counsel, The, Suite 311, 85 Sparks Street, Ottawa, Ont. KIP
5A7: Marketing management.
Canadian Institute of Science & Technology Ltd., 263 Adelaide Street West, Toronto,
Ont.: Engineering science and technology careers; industrial, business, and
sales management careers; business, commercial, management and office careers; practical arts and science.
Canadian Property Managers Association, Suite 311, 85 Sparks Street, Ottawa, Ont.
KIP 5A7: administration of property, property law, buildings.
Canadian School of Tax Accounting, Suite 206, 69 Eglinton Avenue East, Toronto,
Ont.: Personal income tax.
 TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE BB 57
Career Training, 3, 113—16 Avenue, Calgary 41, Alta.: Medical receptionist.
Columbia School of Broadcasting, 1606, 10160—115 Street, Edmonton, Alta.:
Radio and television announcing.
DeVry Institute of Technology of Canada, Ltd., 970 Lawrence Avenue West,
Toronto, Ont. M6A 1C5: Electronic engineering technology (practical and
correspondence), electronics technician (practical and correspondence), television communications and electronic instrumentation (practical and correspondence), electronics communications (correspondence), home entertainment electronics systems (correspondence), electronic operations technology
and computer control (correspondence), electronic operations technology
(correspondence).
H. & M. Professional Training Institute Ltd., 204, 1501—17th Avenue Southwest,
Calgary, Alta. T2T 0E2: Medical receptionist.
International Career Academy of Canada Ltd., 8 King Street East, Toronto 1, Ont.:
Broadcasting, medical assisting, dental assisting.
International Correspondence Schools Canadian, Ltd., 7475 Sherbrooke Street West,
Montreal 262, Que.: Architecture, art, business training, chemistry, civil engineering, draughting, electrical engineering, general education, mechanical engineering, plumbing, heating and air-conditioning, railroading, textiles, traffic
management, mining, domestic engineering, navigation, pulp and paper making, other courses as listed in the Guidance Manual.
Lewis Hotel-Motel School (a wholly owned subsidiary of International Career
Academy of Canada Ltd.), 8 King Street East, Toronto 1, Ont.: Hotel-motel
management (practical and correspondence).
LaSalle Extension University, 417 South Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. 60605
U.S.A.: Accounting, basic computer programming, draughting, law, secretarial,
interior decorating, restaurant/club and food management, business management, stenotype, traffic and transportation, hotel/motel executive training.
Management Training Institute, 1S-06, 1733 Comox Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.:
Apartment house managers training, motel management.
McGraw-Hill Continuing Education Center, 330 Progress Avenue, Scarborough,
Ont., M1P2Z5: NRI Courses—Automotive tune-up and electrical systems,
master technician; TV., radio servicing, master and advanced course; electronics, communications, servicing electrical appliances. CREI Courses—
Electronics engineering courses, nuclear engineering technology, computer programming, CATV 501, solid-state theory 280 and 281.
National College of Home Study, 3300 Cavendish Boulevard, Montreal 261, Que.:
Business management and accounting, secretarial science.
National Institute of Broadcasting, The, 410 Hart Building, 216 Fort Street, Winnipeg, Man. R3C 1E7: Radio and television announcing.
National Meat Packers Training, Inc., 3435 Broadway, Kansas City, Mo. 64111,
U.S.A.: Principles of American meat packing.
Spectrum Academy of the Arts Ltd., 1906 Dublin Street, New Westminster, B.C.:
General art.
A.B.C. Dress Designing School, 4009 Cambie Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Dressmaking and designing.
Adette School of Fashion, 624 Berry Street, Coquitlam, B.C.: Fashion designing,
patternmaking, and tailoring.
 BB 58 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Advance Business College, 136 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.: General
office training (clerical), secretarial, junior management, powereading, executive secretarial, legal secretarial, medical secretarial, Gregg Shorthand Home
Study Courses.
Associated Training Centre Ltd., 203, 395 West Broadway, Vancouver 10, B.C.:
Service-station salesman.
Autolec National Educational Program, 1025 Howe Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.:
Automotive electrical and tune-up.
Beauty School of Elegance, 103 Fourth Avenue South, Port Alberni, B.C.: Hair-
dressing.
Beauty School of Northern Interior, 3671—15th Avenue, Prince George, B.C.:
Hairdressing.
Blair's School of Hairdressing Ltd., 3203—31st Avenue, Vernon, B.C.: Hair-
dressing.
H. & R. Block Basic Income Tax School, 3716 Oak Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Basic
income tax.
H. & R. Block Basic Income Tax School, 2651 Douglas Street, Victoria, B.C.: Basic
income tax.
British Columbia Academy of Fashion Design, 611 Rogers Building, 470 Granville
Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.: Fashion design (certificate course), Fashion designing (diploma course).
B.C. Safety Council Diving Safety Section, 1477 West Pender Street, Vancouver
5, B.C.: Scuba diving.
B.C. Telephone Plant Training Centre, 768 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.:
Toll and exchange plant courses, customer service courses, outside plant
courses.
Barbers' Association of British Columbia Advanced Barbering School, The, Room
411, 207 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.: Advanced barbering.
Capilano Business College, 132 West 15th Street, North Vancouver, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Construction and General Labourers Training Trust Fund, 705 East Broadway,
Vancouver 10, B.C.: Foremen and prospective foremen; transit and level;
rigging, slinging, and signalling; concrete placement; trenching and pipelaying;
steel-burning; construction equipment operation.
Delmar School of Beauty, 1134 Third Avenue, Prince George, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Dorothy Dean School of Beauty, 22421 North Street, Maple Ridge, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Duffus College Ltd., 440 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental), legal secretarial.
Elizabeth Leslie Ltd., 1102 Hornby Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Personal development and modelling, fashion merchandising.
Ernest Charles School of Hairdressing Ltd., 736 Granville Street, Vancouver 2,
B.C.: Hairdressing.
Finning Tractor & Equipment Co. Ltd., 555 Great Northern Way, Vancouver 10,
B.C.: Basic mechanics, tractor hydraulics, tractor powershift transmissions,
wheel loader hydraulics, wheel loader powershift transmissions, cost control
conference, diesel fuel injection, electrical systems, engine tune-up (diesel),
hydraulics, hydraulically operated powershift transmissions, supervisory development (Part I), supervisory development (Part II).
 TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE BB 59
Glamour School of Hairdressing, 1106 Broad Street, Victoria, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Dave Gordon Systems Ltd., 101, 395 West Broadway, Vancouver 10, B.C.: Electric
typewriter instruction in conjunction with dictating equipment and shorthand.
GTE Lenkurt Electric (Canada) Ltd., 7018 Lougheed Highway, Burnaby 2, B.C.:
Electronic assembly.
IBM Education Centre—Vancouver, 1445 West Georgia Street, Vancouver 5,
B.C.: DOS A/L LPI (learner pace instruction), OS PL/I LPI, DOS PL/I
LPI, OS COBOL LPI, DOS COBOL LPI.
International School of Hairdressing Ltd., 705 Johnson Street, Victoria, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Kandel Instructional Course by Contemporary Sewing Materials Ltd., Suite 210,
1084 Homer Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.: Kandel Knits Inc. Teacher's Training
Course, Kandel Knits Advanced Tailoring Couturier.
Kinman Busines University (owned by Lear Siegler, Inc.), Bon Marche Building,
North 214 Wall Street, Spokane, Wash.: Business education, including accounting and business administration; secretarial science; fashion merchandising;
general accounting; business administration (accounting major); datamation.
Kitanmax School of Northwest Coast Indian Art, Hazelton, B.C.: Two-dimensional
design and wood-engraving, wood-carving.
Lithographing & Photoengraving Training Institute of British Columbia, 101, 33
East Eighth Avenue, Vancouver 10, B.C.: Lithography (stripping), lithography (camera).
Local Joint Executive Board of the Hotel & Restaurant Employees & Bartenders'
International Union, Bar School, Room 409, 402 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.: Mixerologist.
The Lydia Lawrence Fashion Institute, 974 West Broadway, Vancouver 9, B.C.:
Professional dressmaking, patternmaking, drawing (illustration), embroidery.
Maison Raymond Beauty School Ltd., 4865 Kingsway, Burnaby 1, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Metropolitan Ambulance Training School, 483 West 16th Avenue, Vancouver 10,
B.C.: Ambulance driving and attending.
Moler School of Barbering, 376 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.: Barbering.
Moler School of Hairdressing, 4242 East Hastings Street, Burnaby 2, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Moler School of Hairdressing, 710 Columbia Street, New Westminster, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Moler School of Hairdressing, 1754 Lonsdale Avenue, North Vancouver, B.C.:
Hairdressing.
Moler School of Hairdressing, 14853—108th Avenue, Surrey, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Moler School of Hairdressing, 6407 Fraser Street, Vancouver 15, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Moler School of Hairdressing, 317 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Moler School of Hairdressing, 1104 Douglas Street, Victoria, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Montrose School of Hairdressing, 2481 Montrose Avenue, Abbotsford, B.C.:
Hairdressing.
Arthur Murray School of Dancing, 695 Smythe Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.: Professional dancing.
 BB 60 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Blanche Macdonald School of Modelling, 964 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 1,
B.C.: Professional modelling (male and female), preparation to modelling,
fashion merchandising.
McKay Career Trainings Ltd., 2151 Burrard Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Computer
operating and programming, IBM key-punch operation, mini computers and
machine accounting, hotel and motel accounting (IBM 4200 poster), general
secretarial.
Nanaimo School of Hairdressing, 41 Commercial Street, Nanaimo, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Nanaimo School of Advanced Hair Design, 41 Commercial Street, Nanaimo, B.C.:
Advanced hairdressing (limited to persons holding a B.C. Hairdressers' Association Certificate).
National Life Guard Service (Division of Royal Life Saving Society of Canada),
2556 Highbury Street, Vancouver 8, B.C.: Life-saving (instructors and candidates).
New Westminster Commercial College, 622 Royal Avenue, New Westminster,
B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Northwestern School of Deep Sea Diving Ltd., 145 Riverside Drive, North Vancouver, B.C.: Deep-sea diving.
Office Skills Training Programme, Suite 201, 540 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1,
B.C.: Corporate legal stenography, upgrading typing, conveyancing, Pitman
shorthand, litigation legal course, estate law, accounting, basic business English
and spelling.
Operating Engineers Apprenticeship & Journeyman Upgrading Plan, 4333 Ledger
Avenue, Burnaby 2, B.C.: Industrial electrician, millwright (mine), heavy-
duty mechanics (upgrading for tradesmen's qualification, electrical and hydraulic), heavy-equipment operator (Gradall and mobile crane).
Orchid School of Floristry, 1806 Lonsdale Avenue, North Vancouver, B.C.: Flower
designing.
Pitman Business College Ltd., 1490 West Broadway, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Realm Personnel Training School, 1391 Pemberton Avenue, North Vancouver,
B.C.: Supermarket cashier.
Roggendorf School of Hairdressing (1969) Ltd., 13625—105A Avenue, Surrey,
B.C.: Hairdressing.
Rossella Studios, 1455 Marine Drive, West Vancouver, B.C.: Self-improvement
and modelling.
Louise Ruddell School of Floral Design, 14567—72nd Avenue, Surrey, B.C.: Floral
design.
Russell's School of Mixology, 209, 475 Howe Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Mixology.
Simtex Training Institute Ltd., 213, 198 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.:
Service-station attendants.
Sprott-Shaw College of Business (Victoria) Ltd., 1012 Douglas Street, Victoria,
B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental), accounting.
Patricia Stevens Career College & Finishing School, 470 Granville Street, Vancouver
2, B.C.: Professional modelling, secretarial, upgrading typing, fashion merchandising, key-punch training.
Sunnyslope Dog Grooming School, 4696 Marine Drive, Burnaby 1, B.C.: Dog
grooming, kennel attendants' course.
 TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE
BB 61
Taxaid (a Division of Capital Management Ltd.), Suite 2, 337 West Broadway,
Vancouver 10, B.C.: Basic income tax.
T. W. Thorfinnson & Associates, 2029 West 42nd Avenue, Vancouver 13, B.C.:
Sales course.
Trail Business College, 625 Victoria Street, Trail, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental), practical accounting (correspondence).
The Valle School of Beauty, 14 Princess Avenue East, Chilliwack, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Wesley's Academy of Hair Design, 3012 Granville Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.:
Advanced hair design (limited to persons holding a B.C. Hairdressers' Association Certificate).
Wesley's School of Hairdressing, 3012 Granville Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Hairdressing.
New Registration of Schools for 1973
Broadway Driving School Ltd., 10 East Broadway, Vancouver 10, B.C.: Driver
training, licence upgrading.
Canadian Travel College, 302, 100 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.: Travel
agent's course (correspondence instruction only).
Coneducor Limited, Suite 905, 11 King Street West, Toronto, Ont.:  Successful
investing and money management (correspondence instruction only),
elan Keypunch School, 826 Homer Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.: Key-punch training.
Fraser Valley Secretarial Refresher Course, 11961—88th Avenue, Delta, B.C.:
Commercial refresher course.
Hughes School of Retailing Ltd., 4873 Main Street, Vancouver 10, B.C.: Sales
training and cashiering.
McKinley Driving Schools, Ltd., 1840 West Georgia Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.:
Air brakes, truck-driver training (Class 3 and Class 1), refresher courses (Class
3 and Class 1).
Primary School of Design, 906 West Seventh Avenue, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Introduction to interior design.
Professional Driver Centre, A Division of the British Columbia Safety Council, 3750
—80th Street, Delta, B.C.: Upgrading course, Class 3 driver's licence (B.C.);
upgrading course, Class 1 driver's licence  (B.C.); motor-cycle course for
novice riders.
Ramona Beauchamp School of Modelling Ltd., 2033 West 42nd Avenue, Vancouver
13, B.C.: Personal development and modelling.
Russ Reid's Scuba School, 1347 Kingsway, Vancouver 10, B.C.: Introductory scuba
diving.
Vansec Sales Training and Personal Development Course, 103, 1237 Burrard Street,
Vancouver 1, B.C.: Vansec Sales Training and Personal Development Course.
Washington School of Art, 145 Main Street, Port Washington, Long Island, New
York 11050, U.S.A.: Complete art training (correspondence instruction only).
Wayne School, 417 South Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. 60605, U.S.A.: Basic air-
conditioning and refrigeration service, basic diesel mechanics, dental office
assistant (correspondence instruction only).
Registered Schools That Discontinued During 1973
Adette School of Fashion, 624 Berry Street, Coquitlam, B.C.
Associated Training Centre Ltd., 203, 395 West Broadway, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Atlantic School, Inc., Canada Building, 374 Ouellette Avenue, Windsor, Ont.
 BB 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Canadian Institute of Science & Technology Ltd., 263 Adelaide Street West, Toronto,
Ont.
Capilano Business College, 132 West 15th Street, North Vancouver, B.C.
Delmar School of Beauty, 1134 Third Avenue, Prince George, B.C.
Fashion Design Methods, 306,1024 St. Andrews Street, New Westminster, B.C.
International Accountants Society (one of the Bell & Howell Schools, Inc.), 209
West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, 111. 60606, U.S.A.
Knit Knack of Canada Ltd., Suite 11, 636 West Broadway, Vancouver 9, B.C.
National Life Guard Service (Division of Royal Life Saving Society of Canada),
2556 Highbury Street, Vancouver 8, B.C.
Northern Institute of Technology operating Radio College of Canada, 461 King
Street West, Toronto 2B, Ont.
Palmer Writers School, Inc., 500 South Fourth Street, Minneapolis, Minn. 55415,
U.S.A.
Rossella Studios, 1455 Marine Drive, West Vancouver, B.C.
Simons Technical Institute, 425 Carrall Street, Vancouver 4, B.C.
Tech-Aids Company (Canada), 2675 Oak Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.
 WOMEN'S BUREAU BB 63
Report of the Women's Bureau
Head office -      -    4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre, Burnaby, V5H 1Z5
Mrs. C. K. Waddell    Director
Mrs. Y. M. McCully   -------   Assistant Director
During 1973 the total labour force in British Columbia continued its spectacular growth. In the month of June there were 325,000 women working compared to 304,000 in June 1972. At the same time the number of women looking
for work increased from 20,000 to 22,000.
Throughout the Province in the last year there were 31,456 inquiries from
employees and employers concerning employment of women, and in this regard
2,303 interviews were conducted by the Women's Bureau.
Several thousand Departmental pamphlets were distributed, also material from
the Women's Bureau library and newspaper-clipping files was provided upon request.
The Director fulfilled a number of speaking engagements in various parts of the
Province, including women's clubs, and organizations and special programmes for
women at YWCA's, schools, colleges, and Simon Fraser University. Attended the
Canadian Association of Administrators of Labour Legislation Conference in Prince
Edward Island, plus a seminar sponsored by the Canada Department of Labour.
Continued to serve on the Tourist Service Training Advisory Committee and as a
Trade-schools Administrative Officer.
A survey was carried out in conjunction with the Apprenticeship and Industrial Training Branch at the request of the Board of Industrial Relations to ascertain
the reaction of beauty salon owners to a request by the Hairdressers' Association
for an increase in the minimum wage order for that trade.
The Bureau continued the educational process of informing girls and women
about their rights under labour legislation, and in addition studied the legislation of
other jurisdictions.
Women have felt encouragement by the announcement by the Minister of
Labour in November 14, 1973, of the repeal of weightlifting regulations under the
Factories Act respecting female employees. Since 1945, women have been prohibited by the regulations from lifting more than 35 pounds in the course of their
work and felt they were being barred from employment and promotion opportunities
in some industries. Employers are now indicating that their hiring practices will
reflect the removal of these restrictive regulations. The women who do not wish to
follow the more traditional occupations may find it easier to obtain training and
employment in other areas.
Due to the retirement of the Human Rights Director, J. Sherlock, the Director
of the Women's Bureau also carried out duties under the human rights legislation
until the new Human Rights Director was appointed. However, the Bureau does
not function as an enforcement agency for human rights. Once the revised Human
Rights Act is promulgated and fully operative, the assistance provided by the
Women's Bureau in explaining and assisting people who have suffered from discrimination will diminish.
 BB 64
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Western Conference/Opportunities for Women in Employment, Education Training, Counselling, was held in Vancouver on May 11, 12, and 13. The
objective was to make decisions and proposals for action to be presented to governments, agencies, institutions, and women. The 250 participants represented delegates from Manitoba, Alberta, Saskatchewan, British Columbia, the Yukon, and
Northwest Territories. Geographic and socio-economic representation was used to
select participants, augmented by 75 resource people. Funding to assist British
Columbia delegates was provided by the Provincial Government. Major funding
was made by the Department of Manpower and Immigration, with supplementary
funds from the Secretary of State. The co-sponsors were the Vancouver Status of
Women and the Daytime Programme. The Director served as a member of the
planning committee, along with 10 other enterprising women. The report of the
conference has been published and is available for a fee. Interested women should
contact the Daytime Programme, Centre for Continuing Education, University of
British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C.
A survey carried out by the Bureau of agencies in the Vancouver area, coupled
with reports of women's conferences, reiterated the need to develop new training and
employment opportunities for women and more avenues for vocational and on-the-
job training, so that women will be able to develop and add to their special skills,
to advance their careers, and to ensure their integration and active participation in
the economy.
The Bureau, with the co-operation of the Department of Labour's Manpower
Training and Development Division, the Apprenticeship and Industrial Training
Branch, the Research Branch, Canada Manpower, employers, trade unions, and
women's advisory groups, will pursue the setting up and establishment of training
courses as a priority and assure that the necessary counselling is available, especially
to those who are seeking to re-enter the labour force.
In concluding this report, the Bureau wishes to express its sincere appreciation
for the assistance provided by all the branches within the Department of Labour and
the co-operation of both Federal and Provincial Government departments and
women's organizations throughout the Province.
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1974
4M-873-7514

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0376318/manifest

Comment

Related Items