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DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1973 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1974

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1973
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1974
  To the Honourable Walter S. Owen, Q.C., LL.D., Lieutenant-Governor
of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to transmit herewith the Annual Report of the Department
of Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31, 1973.
IAMES G. LORIMER
Minister of Municipal Affairs
Victoria, B.C., February 14,1974.
 Victoria, B.C., February 14,1974.
The Honourable James G. Lorimer,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir: I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31, 1973.
This Report contains a review of Departmental activities and observations of
the programmes and financial position of the municipalities and regional districts
within the Province. Greater detail with respect to these areas is contained in the
publications Municipal Statistics and Statistics Relating to Regional and Municipal
Governments in British Columbia which are published annually by the Department
from information contained in audited financial and other statements of the municipalities and regional districts.
W. K. SMITH, F.C.I.S.
Deputy Minister
 CONTENTS
Page
Departmental Publications  7
Departmental Activities  8
Legislation  14
Administrative Services  16
Financial Management .  21
Planning Services  29
Transit Services  31
Charts  33
 Z 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
The Honourable James G. Lorimer
Minister of Municipal Affairs
W. K. Smith, F.C.I.S., Deputy Minister and Inspector of Municipalities.
R. W. Prittie, Associate Deputy Minister.
C. H. L. Woodward, F.C.I.S., Deputy Inspector of Municipalities.
G. E. Whelen, F.C.I.S., Executive Officer.
J. P. Taylor, Executive Director.
J. H. Nuttall, Departmental Comptroller.
B. T. Donaldson, Research Officer.
R. T. Cubbon, Research Officer.
Administrative Services
T. F. Moore, F.C.I.S., Director.
A. R. Clarke, Administrative Officer.
J. G. Callan, Administrative Officer.
O. Sylvester, A.C.I.S., Administrative Officer.
N. A. McCrimmon, Administrative Officer.
Financial Management
H. G. Topham, C.A., Director.
W. J. Larter, Administrative Officer.
K. R. MacKay, C.A., Administrative Officer.
F. J. Thompson, C.G.A., Administrative Officer.
W. J. Sommerville, Administrative Officer.
J. S. Dias, Administrative Officer.
Planning Services
W. J. Tassie, M.T.P.I.C., Acting Chief Planning Officer.
B. S. Jawanda, M.T.P.I.C, Senior Planning Officer.
Transit Services
V. J. Parker, M.T.P.I.C, Director.
B. E. Sullivan, Assistant to the Director.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1973 Z 7
DEPARTMENTAL PUBLICATIONS
Annual Report.
Municipal Statistics.
Statistics Relating to Regional and Municipal Governments.
A Guide to Municipal Management.
A Guide to Regional District Management.
Land Use Colour and Coding Guide.
Zoning Colour and Coding Guide.
ACTS ADMINISTERED BY DEPARTMENT OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
Municipal Act.
Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act.
Local Services Act.
Municipal Finance Authority of British Columbia Act.
Mobile Home Tax Act.
Provincial Rapid Transit Act.
 Z 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES
A few years ago it was customary to comment on the various elements contributing to rapid growth in municipalities and other areas of local government
and the problems associated with this growth as if they were some sort of phenomena
which were related to the year under review, had not occurred before and would not
occur again. It is now acknowledged, particularly in the field of local government,
that priorities and proposals must be flexible and, while certain elements of growth
may be influenced and controllable to some extent, there are many others influenced
by such factors as economics and geography which will have substantial effect on
growth in some areas of the Province. In reports of previous years, sewer projects
were indicated as requiring the major portion of over-all capital financing. It
should be noted that municipalities are now anticipating applying approximately
two-thirds of their capital funds to the "general" classification of expenditure.
Further analysis of this category of expenditure reveals that recreational facilities
and public buildings have now become priority items for proposed capital outlay.
This change of priority has partly resulted from the fact that the required capital
funds for sewer and water projects have either been provided by the Municipal
Finance Authority or through recent Federal-Provincial loan programmes. It is
also influenced by the recent change in legislation extending the powers of the
Municipal Finance Authority to provide financing of capital requirements for all
capital works. A further impetus to change has been that capital grants have been
provided by the Provincial Government through the Community Recreational
Facilities Fund Act to assist municipalities and regional districts in constructing
recreational facilities.
The assessed value of taxable properties for municipal purposes in municipalities exceeds $9,000,000,000, an increase of approximately 14 per cent over
the previous year. It is of interest to note that while property taxes are increasing
the level of tax collections continues to rise to the point where approximately 97
per cent of current taxes were collected during the year in which they were levied.
The matter of assessment and taxation is dealt with more fully in that part of the
report relating to financial management.
One of the principal statutory roles of the Department is the supervision of
municipal and regional district long-term borrowing for capital programmes. This
responsibility rests with the Inspector of Municipalities and during the year under
review the total borrowing authorized for a variety of projects amounted to
$94,755,522. The percentage of current revenue expended to service long-term
debenture debt has declined in the cities, districts, and towns, but has increased
slightly in the City of Vancouver. The percentage revenue expended for this
purpose is not considered excessive and is well below the amount expended in other
provinces.
The Minister together with senior staff members of the Department attended
the national meeting of Provincial Ministers of Municipal Affairs held in Charlotte-
town in August. They also participated in the Second National Federal-Provincial-
Municipal Tri-level Conference in Edmonton on the 22nd and 23rd of October.
Such conferences provide a useful forum in exchanging ideas and approaches
to various common problems. For example, at the ministerial conference, it was
decided to undertake a joint provincial study of real property tax exemptions.
The first regional tri-level meeting was held in March with representatives of
the Greater Vancouver Regional District and the Federal and Provincial Govern-
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1973 Z 9
ments. The Department has been involved at the staff level in further Greater Vancouver tri-level discussions. In the future, it is hoped that more emphasis can be
placed upon the Greater Vancouver tri-level mechanism as a means of co-ordinating
the activities of the various levels of government.
Various senior staff members were involved in national conferences such as
the Municipal Finance Officers and the Provincial Planning Officers. The Department has also been represented on the Federal-Provincial Preparatory Committees
on the United Nations Conference—Exposition on Human Settlements which is to
be held in Vancouver in 1976.
Departmental representatives travelled extensively throughout the Province
attending committee, council, and regional board meetings and completing inspections in 181 municipalities, improvement districts, and regional districts; 455 visits
were made in all. Attendance at such meetings as those of the Technical Planning
Committee meets legislative requirements. Others are initiated by councils or
regional boards that may wish to discuss or request assistance on specific problems.
When inspections are undertaken, the visit provides an opportunity for Departmental
staff and local officials to discuss financial and administrative situations that are
directly related to the municipality concerned. Whenever possible, general administrative procedures can be reviewed and recommended; this practice leads to greater
consistency when by-laws and other data are submitted to the Department with
requests for registration or approval.
As the annual edition of Municipal Statistics is an important source of information to investment houses, financial institutions, and others, distribution of the
publication is made as early in the year as possible; Municipal Statistics includes
some 36 different schedules. Prior to publication, the financial and statistical
returns of the municipalities and regions are closely edited to ensure conformity and
adherence to statutory and other requirements.
The Union of British Columbia Municipalities held its convention at Prince
George, and senior members of the staff attended to provide an opportunity for
those interested to discuss local problems. Nelson was chosen as the site for the
annual conference of the Municipal Officers' Association of British Columbia and,
as at similar meetings, Departmental staff participated in the programme. Senior
members of the staff also participated as resource personnel in a number of other
seminars sponsored by the University of British Columbia and the Union of British
Columbia Municipalities.
The annual shield award presented by the Minister of Municipal Affairs as an
incentive to increase turnout at municipal elections open to all municipalities in
three categories was received by the following for the year 1972:
Per Cent
Cities and towns—Merritt  66.17
District municipalities—Kitimat   62.10
Village municipalities—Port McNeill  78.90
Second-place municipalities were Kimberley (cities and towns) with 63.50
per cent, Kent (district municipalities) with 59.82 per cent, and Fruitvale (village
municipalities) with 69.27 per cent.
As part of the continuing effort to standardize procedures and data processing,
the Municipal Officers' Association published the Standard Forms and Procedures
Manual and distributed it to subscribing municipalities, regional districts, and other
interested organizations. Additional sections of the manual will be developed and
distributed.
 Z 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Individual and groups of municipalities have undertaken studies to determine
their present and future electronic data processing system and equipment needs.
As a result, several have acquired new equipment or instituted major changes in
existing systems. In the development of the Standard Form and Procedures Manual
and in the electronic data processing studies, staff members were actively involved
and assisted by attendance at seminars and committee meetings.
Assessment
It is known that certain inequalities occur under the present assessment system
which are attributable to the multitude of assessment jurisdictions. It is believed
that the assessment function could be more effectively and more equitably performed
on a multiregional basis and studies are continuing in this area. This would provide
uniform assessment for all municipalities, and assessment information on a common
programme would be readily available for use in determining the application of
various grants and cost-sharing programmes such as regional district cost-sharing,
regional hospital district grants, home-owner grants, grants in lieu of taxes, health
services, parks, and recreational grants.
Building Code
Under an amendment to the Municipal Act, a building code for the Province
took effect on September 1, 1973. This building code includes parts 2 to 6, inclusive, and parts 8 and 9 of the National Building Code of Canada, the British
Columbia Plumbing Code, and the Building Regulations of British Columbia. The
legislation also established a Building Code Appeal Board, whose members are
appointed by the Minister. This Board will determine any question respecting
the interpretation or application of these codes. An Advisory Committee will
assist the Board. Decisions have already been made by the Board on the several
appeals received, and many inquiries have been answered concerning the interpretation of the codes.
Metric Conversion
The initial investigation phase of the Metric Conversion Programme has started
with the establishment of a Provincial Government Metric System Conversion Committee with representatives from all departments. Meetings of this committee and
discussions with Federal representatives have been held. As all municipalities and
regional districts will be affected by any conversion, liaison is being maintained and
information collected to assess the effects of such changes on local governments.
Municipal Commercial Vehicle Licensing Programme
A total of 139 municipalities participated in the Municipal Commercial Vehicle
Licensing Programme during the 1972/73 licence-year. Sales of vehicle plates
under this programme, which is administered by the Department on behalf of the
municipalities, generated $853,802 in revenue during the year. After payment of
incidental expenses, these funds were distributed to participants on a per. capita
basis. The municipalities issued 72,148 licence-plates and 83,045 exempt plates
during the year under review.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1973 Z 11
By-law Approvals
All village and town by-laws must be submitted to the Department for registration in the office of the Inspector of Municipalities. In addition, many by-laws
for all classes of municipalities require approval from certain governmental agencies
before adoption can proceed or become effective. Included in this category are bylaws which establish consumer or user charges for water and sewer services. Such
by-laws, together with supporting background material, are fully reviewed before
any suggestions or recommendations are made and before being advanced to the
approving authority. While many of the initial submissions may be found satisfactory, others require the exchange of considerable correspondence. A total of
980 by-laws was examined and subsequently registered—13 were district by-laws,
307 town by-laws, 599 village by-laws, 32 regional district by-laws, and 29 improvement district by-laws.
For a variety of purposes, 639 Minutes of Council were prepared and subsequently approved by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council. Seventy-eight authorized the abandonment and vesting of portions of highway; 93 approved municipal
rates by-laws for water, sewer, and electric power; 55 authorized appointment of
members of municipal Boards of Variance and Boards of Commissioners of Police;
227 were for regional district purposes of which 154 approved subdivision and
zoning by-laws and 14 authorized appointments of members to regional Boards of
Variance; and the balance of 186 met other legislative requirements.
In addition, 33 rezoning by-laws applicable to land in the flood-plain area of
the Lower Mainland were reviewed and recommended for approval by the Minister
under section 187 of the Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act. Eight building
by-laws from various regional districts were also reviewed and recommended for
approval by the Minister, pursuant to section 798d.
Debenture Approvals
Certification by the Inspector of Municipalities of debenture issues of municipalities and regional districts may be completed on request. Before such certification can be completed, certificates of approval to the by-law or resolution are
issued authorizing the issuance of debentures. A total of 316 certificates of approval
was issued in 1973 compared to 356 in 1972. In 1973, 94 debenture issues were
examined and certified, which consisted of 194 debentures with a total par value of
$27,728,000. This is in addition to those debentures or agreements that were issued
by municipalities and regional districts to secure undertakings financed through the
Municipal Finance Authority.
Special Courses
During 1973 the Board of Examiners, on which the Department is represented,
granted 12 certificates of proficiency. The following table shows the classifications
of these certificates, together with the total number which have been issued:
Certificates 1973 To Date
Junior  5 92
Senior Administration  2 109
Senior Finance  4 110
Property Appraisal  1 71
Totals   12 382
 Z 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Twenty-nine persons employed in the municipal field enrolled in courses
offered by the Chartered Institute of Secretaries for the 1973/74 academic year.
In addition to the professional degree "A.C.I.S." (Associate of the Chartered Institute of Secretaries) which may be granted to a graduate of the course, applications
may be made for a certificate of proficiency in municipal administration or finance,
depending upon experience and office held.
Applications for enrolment in the special undergraduate course offered by the
Certified General Accountants' Association were received in the 1973/74 academic
year from 26 persons employed in the municipal field. As the student completes
various phases of this course, he receives recognition toward a certificate of proficiency in municipal finance. At the same time, in completing the mandatory subjects which form part of the course, he has the opportunity of continuing his studies
to meet the full academic qualification requirements leading to the professional
designation "C.G.A." (Certified General Accountant).
A New Course
After extensive investigations which followed the announced phase-out of the
Municipal Administration Course, a short-term course in selected subjects for those
employed in smaller municipalities has been introduced. It was first offered in the
fall of 1972 by Malaspina College in Nanaimo. Successful completion of this two-
year course will satisfy the academic requirements for the junior certificate in municipal administration issued by the Board of Examiners. Of particular interest to the
student is the fact that course material will be completely portable as between the
C.I.S. and C.G.A. courses.
Ten students associated with the field of local government are at present
enrolled in this course. It is anticipated that arrangements will soon be made to
ensure that a similar course will be available from other British Columbia educational institutions so that a greater number of prospective students will be able to
gain academic qualifications in this field.
Continuing Education
During the year, seminars sponsored by the University of British Columbia,
the Municipal Officers' Association of British Columbia, and the Municipal Finance
Officers of the United States and Canada, on the subjects of municipal administration
and management development were attended by a number of senior members of the
Department.
Improvement Districts
The Department, in 1973, assumed the control and administration of 27
improvement districts which do not have as one of their objects of incorporation
the supply of water service. These improvement districts were formerly administered
by the Water Resources Service of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water
Resources.
Local Government Restructuring
The local government in the Kelowna and Kamloops area was restructured
during 1973. The primary consideration in this restructuring was the future of the
community at large.  The aim was to include within the boundaries of the new
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1973 Z 13
cities all potential growth areas. Planning for the future of the communities will
now be undertaken by single planning authorities. These new cities were achieved
by co-operation and through the exchange of ideas between the Provincial Government and local governments in the cities. The advice and council of the advisory
committees in each area was of great assistance to the Provincial Government.
The restructuring of the City of Nanaimo and the City of Prince George is
currently under consideration and advisory committees have been established and
are actively examining all aspects of restructuring.
 Z 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
LEGISLATION
A number of progressive amendments were made to the Municipal Act during
the 1973 Sessions of the Legislature. The main areas of amendment are outlined
below.
Regional Elections
A new system of electing rather than appointing the municipal directors to
regional boards was enacted.
Electors
New procedures for the compilation of municipal lists of electors were established creating one class of electors, with residence being the prime criteria. The
procedures parallel those of the Provincial Elections Act and the new single class
of electors is entitled to vote on all matters, including those formerly limited to
owner-electors, such as borrowing by-laws. The distinction between owner, tenant,
and resident electors thus disappears. After January 1, 1974, every election or
vote must be held on the basis of a list of electors prepared under the new system.
This requires that initially the list of voters be based on a house-to-house enumeration. Subsequently a register of electors will be maintained to produce an up-to-
date list for every election.
Electoral Consent
Another significant amendment reduced the plurality required to adopt by-laws
requiring electoral consent from 60 per cent to a simple majority.
Annual Elections
The date of the annual municipal elections was set back approximately one
month to the third Saturday of November, and provision was also included for
councils to adopt a ward system.
Public Notice
Provision was included to require councils to mail notices of public hearing
to occupiers of any real property subject to a zoning by-law or land-use contract
and to occupiers of real property within a distance from the area specified in the
by-law.
Heritage Buildings
The enactment of section 714a empowered councils to designate heritage
buildings and create a Heritage Committee.
Regional Hospital Tax Base
Municipalities are now empowered to tax the regional hospital tax base for
regional district purposes, thus broadening the tax base of the regions as a whole.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1973
Investments in Credit Unions
Z 15
The permitted investments of municipal sinking and reserve funds were extended to include credit unions.
Many other amendments of a technical nature were also made to the Act.
Municipal Finance Authority of British Columbia Act
At the 1973 Spring Session of the Legislature, the objects of the Municipal
Finance Authority were expanded, and the restriction on financing only water,
sewer, and pollution control and abatement facilities, was removed, and power given
to provide financing for all capital works undertaken by municipalities and regional
districts.
In addition to this the cash contribution portion of the Debt Reserve Fund was
modified to require that 1 per cent of the issue be held as a cash investment, with
the remainder being noninterest bearing demand notes.
 Z 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES
NEW INCORPORATIONS AND CHANGES IN STRUCTURE
The Cities of Kamloops and Kelowna were each incorporated with their surrounding areas to form new municipalities under the provisions of section 229 of
the Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act. These enlarged municipalities
have now been operational since May 1, 1973, and are functioning smoothly.
The Minister, at the request of the Councils of Castlegar and Kinnaird, directed
that a vote be held on the question of amalgamation. The vote was held on December 8, 1973, with the majority favouring amalgamation. Letters Patent were issued
incorporating the new City of Castlegar Kinnaird on and from January 1, 1974.
MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY EXTENSIONS
Supplementary Letters Patent authorizing extensions in boundaries for 15
municipalities were issued during the year; the municipalities affected together with
the resulting adjustments in areas and changes in population are indicated in Table
1. A local census is taken in the extended area and added to the original population established under the 1971 census in order to arrive at the new municipal
population after extension.
Table 1—Municipal Boundary Revisions, 1973
Municipality
Area (Acres)
Before
Added
After
Population
Before
Added
After
Cities
Armstrong,
Courtenay..
Grand Forks..
Kelowna	
Kimberley	
Penticton	
Vernon	
Districts
Spallumcheen..
Towns
Quesnel..
Cache Creek-
Elkford	
Fort Nelson...
Hazelton	
lillooet	
Lumby	
Osoyoos	
Port McNeill-
Villages
1,151.00
1,922.04
2,531.62
5,292.00
8,023.20
8,558.70
3,505.17
65,300.00
3,493.22
477.81
389.74
2,000.00
74.29
677.66
951.87
452.74
1,062.00
100.00
6.02
181.42
28.54
6,547.20
286.49
355.68
100.00
1.97
67.00
170.20
185.60
1,197.66
71.18
40.72
195.37
636.14
1,251.00
1,928.06
2,713.04
5,320.54
14,570.40
8,845.19
3,860.85
65,200.00
3,495.19
544.81
559.94
2,185.60
1,271.95
748.84
992.59
648.11
1,698.14
1,648
7,155
3,173
19,412
7,641
18,146
13,406
2,302
6,258
1,013
605
2,289
351
1,514
940
1,285
934
23
4
7Vi7
Nil
2
Nil
246
23
Nil
6
60
28
89
Nil
Nil
408
136
1,671
7,159
3,173
19,412
7,643
18,146
13,652
2,279
6,258
1,019
665
2,317
440
1,514
940
1,693
1,070
Source of base population figures is the 1971 census.
REGIONAL DISTRICT ACTIVITIES
Regional government in British Columbia has, since its inception in 1965, been
reviewed and discussed in previous annual reports and is now recognized in our
Province and elsewhere as an important contributor to the local government system.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1973 Z 17
As in the past, further expansion of local government services was undertaken
by regional districts.
Some 34 new functions were granted the 28 regional districts in 1973; Table 2
summarizes those assigned, while Table 3 sets out all functions undertaken to date.
For services required by the greater community, the regional approach has
provided an acceptable solution. Provision of sewage disposal, garbage disposal,
and ambulance facilities are particularly appropriate to this concept, and such functions as joint computer operations, fire protection, transit, and construction equipment-pools could conceivably be handled for the greater community by regional
districts. Services can be provided by regional districts to municipal and non-
municipal areas, either directly or by contract.
Supplementary Letters Patent were issued in several instances for purposes
other than to authorize the granting of functions. Revision of the internal and
external boundaries is continuing and amendments have been made to cost-sharing
formulas and other changes in corporate structure.
Specified Areas
Thirty-three specified areas were established by by-law in 1973; of these areas
eight were established by petition method, and 25 after the property-owners voted
favourably on the proposal. Before regional government was introduced, community services administered locally in nonmunicipal areas were provided through the
incorporation of improvement districts, either under the Water Act as administered
by the Water Rights Branch of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water
Resources, or under the Municipal Act. In some other instances, local areas were
established under the Local Services Act. The latter two Acts, it should be noted,
are administered by this Department. New local service needs in nonmunicipal
areas, with the exception of water, irrigation, and dykes, are almost all provided
and financed through the facilities of regional districts.
Many of the specified areas have been established adjacent to municipal
boundaries. As the demand for further services develops, the trend will be toward
the incorporation of these areas within present municipal boundaries. Those specified areas in more isolated situations will probably retain their nonmunicipal status.
An Increasing Role
Regional districts are local government structures that provide services to
people. As the population of the Province increases, the demands upon Regional
Boards will grow. Municipalities are becoming aware of possible economies of
scale where a common service is required, and the regional district is the obvious
vehicle through which many of these services can be provided. The regional districts can provide such services to municipal and nonmunicipal areas alike, with
those people that benefit sharing the costs on a more equitable basis.
Growth of regional districts continues to be reflected in the increase in expenditures from those over previous years. Some of these are a result of assuming new
functions, while others reflect the cost of new services to nonmunicipal areas.
Provincial grants of $6,000 are made annually to assist in meeting the administrative costs of regional districts and an annual grant of 15 cents per capita with a
minimum of $5,000 and a maximum of $25,000 is made to assist in the cost of
development of an environmental management programme. The question of grant
structures applicable to regional districts is under review.
2
 Z 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 2—Functions Assigned to Regional Districts During 1973 (Unless Otherwise Indicated,
all Member Areas of the Regional District Participate in This Function).
Alberni-Clayoquot—Garbage disposal (Port
Alberni and Electoral Areas B, D, E, and
F).
Capital—Garbage disposal.
Cariboo—
Arena-community hall complex (100 Mile
House  and  defined   parts  of  Electoral
Areas G and H).
Library grant—(Williams Lake and defined
parts of Electoral Areas D and E).
Recreational programmes (100 Mile House
and defined parts of Electoral Areas G
and H).
Arena improvements—(Williams Lake and
defined parts of Electoral Areas D and
E).
Central Kootenay—
Ice arena (Kaslo and a defined part of Electoral Area D).
Swimming-pool (Nelson, Electoral Area F
and a defined part of Electoral Area E).
Garbage disposal.
Central Okanagan—■
Mosquito control (Kelowna and Electoral
Areas A and I).
Community parks (Electoral Areas G and
H).
Recreation complex and senior citizen facility (Electoral Area H and a defined
part of Electoral Area G).
Columbia-Shuswap—Garbage disposal (Revelstoke and Electoral Area B).
Comox-Strathcona—
Arena swimming-pool recreation complex
(Comox, Courtenay, Cumberland, and
Electoral Areas A, B, and C).
Recreation grant (Comox, Courtenay, Cumberland, and Electoral Areas A, B, and
C).
Garbage disposal operating deficit (Campbell River and Electoral Areas D, E, and
F).
Operation of wharves (Campbell River and
Electoral Areas D, E, F, and J).
Refuse disposal (all electoral areas).
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1973              Z 19
Table 3—Regional District Functions as of December 31,1973
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£
'A
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0
a,
d.
CO
vt
CO
H
P
X
p
p
p
P
P
p
X
P
p
P
p
X
Air pollution  	
X
X
X
Bus transit 	
p
Y
Y
Control of gatherings ■  .
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Elderly citizens' housing	
P
p
X
X
P
X
p
p
X
X
X
p
X
p
p
V
p
X
X
P
P
X
X
Fireworks 	
Health regulation and centre ____.
p
X
H
p
p
p
Y
p
p
p
p
P
X
p
p
P
X
X
p
Okanagan Basin Water Board-
p
Park and green belt land ac
quisition
p
P
p
Y
P
P
p
Y
p
Public use area lighting	
P
p
p
p
p
p
P
P P
p
p
p
ip
P
p
P
P
p
p
V
P
p
p
IX
J?
v
Refuse disposal-	
X
X
X
p
X
P
P
p
P
p
p
P
p
P
P
p
X
p
V
p
X
p
X
P
P
p
X
X
X
p
1
p
X
X
X
P
Sewers _  .
Soil removal 	
X
p
P
p
P
P
P
Television rebroadcasting	
P
p
P
P
Water _	
p
l!p
The functions of regional planning, community planning, building inspection, contract services, local works
and services, and grants-in-aid are assigned by statute to all regional districts.
X =indicates function.
Pi
=m
die
at£
s a
pp
ica
tioi
1 o
ffl
nc
tioi
lr
i ps
rt <
)£i
eg]
on
il<
list
rict
on
ly.
 Z 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 4—Regional District Specified Service Areas Established During 1973
Alberni-Clayoquot—
Fire protection (Sproat Lake).
Arena (Alberni Valley).
Capital—
Fire equipment (South Galiano).
Recreation (Sooke).
Central Kootenay—
Garbage disposal (Electoral Area H).
Street lighting (Ymir).
Street lighting (Robson Street).
Columbia-Shuswap—
Water (Sicamous Creek).
Comox-Strathcona—
Water (part of Electoral Area A).
Cowichan Valley—
Fire protection (Sahtlam).
Street lighting (Youbou).
Fraser-Cheam—
Street lighting (Summer Road).
Street lighting (Boston Bar).
Garbage disposal (Boston Bar).
Fire protection (Popkum).
Fraser-Fort George—-
Sewer (Airport Hill-Blackburn).
Fire protection (Buckhorn).
Kitimat-Stikine—
Fire protection (Thornhill).
Recreation (part of Electoral Area C).
Cemetery (part of Electoral Area C).
Kootenay-Boundary—
Recreation (part of Electoral Area C).
Recreation (part of Electoral Area D).
Fire protection (Christina Lake).
Nanaimo—
Fire protection (Nanoose).
Water (Madrona Point).
Water (East Wellington).
Fire protection (Errington).
Street lighting (Breakwater).
North Okanagan—Fire protection (Lumby).
Okanagan-Similkameen—Community   centre
(part of Electoral Area D).
Powell River—Fire protection (part of Electoral Areas B and C).
Sunshine Coast—Water (West Sechelt).
Thompson-Nicola—Recreational facilities
(Clearwater).
Cowichan Valley—
Housing numbering (all electoral areas).
Arena and curling rink (Electoral Areas A,
B, C, andD).
Park and green belt land acquisition (all
electoral areas).
Incinerator and garbage disposal  (Lake
Cowichan and Electoral Areas F and I).
Activity centre (Duncan, North Cowichan,
and Electoral Areas D and E).
Fraser-Cheam—Refuse disposal (Electoral
Area C and a defined part of Electoral Area
B).
Greater Vancouver—Labour negotiations.
Kitimat-Stikine—Garbage disposal (all electoral areas).
Kootenay-Boundary—Recreational facilities
(Fruitvale, Montrose, and Electoral Area
A).
Nanaimo—
Ice arena (Qualicum Beach, Parksville, and
Electoral Areas H and I).
Recreation complex (Nanaimo and Electoral Areas A, B, D, E, F, and G).
North Okanagan—Swimming pool (Lumby
and Electoral Area D).
Okanagan-Similkameen—Ice area (Princeton
and Electoral Area H).
Peace River-Liard—Garbage disposal (all
electoral areas).
Squamish-Lillooet—Television rebroadcasting
(Electoral Area A and a defined part of
Electoral Area B).
Sunshine Coast—Park and green belt land
acquisition (all electoral areas).
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1973
Z 21
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
ASSESSMENT AND TAX COLLECTION
The major single revenue source for municipalities in British Columbia continues to be the real property tax. The growth in assessed values of real property
and revenue from taxation of these properties over the past 10 years is illustrated
in the following table. It will be noted that revenue from this source of taxation
in 1972 totalled $390,368,418. Of this total, $209,251,194 represented taxation
for general municipal purposes, and $181,117,224 represented taxation for school
purposes.
Table 5—Growth in Combined Assessed Values and Taxes in Municipalities
of British Columbia
Year
Gross Assessed Values
Assessed Values Actually
Taxed
Tax
Revenue
All
Properties
Taxable
Properties
School
Municipal
1964  ....
1969 	
1970    	
1971 	
1972	
(Millions)
4,188
6,3521
8,3292
6,9721
9,1922
7,6201
10,0762
8,2921
11,6772
8,8691
12,8552
(Millions)
3,534
5,4001
5,6182
5,9051
6,2262
6,4561
6,8172
7,0421
7,950
7,5391
9,0232
(Millions)
2,878
4,402
4,835
5,279
5,753
6,171
(Millions)
2,295
5,404
6,072
6,632
7,744
8,612
(Thousands)
154,074
286,239
323,925
349,845
390,368
1973	
430,0003
i School values.
2 Municipal values.       3 Estimated.
The following table (Table 6) provides a further analysis of the assessed value
of real property and indicates the distribution of 1973 assessed values by class of
municipality, with the percentage increase over 1972 shown in parentheses.
Table 6—Assessed Values by Class of Municipalities
General Municipal Gross
Assessed Values
Assessed Values Actually
Taxed
All
Properties
Taxable
Properties
School
Municipal
(Millions)    (%)
$
2,383    ( 9.71)
5,093    (10.72)
251    (13.06)
235    ( 8.29)
(Millions)    (%)
$
1,583    (11.09)
3,577    (15.65)
163    (16.43)
146    ( 4.29)
(Millions)    (%)
$
1,408    ( 6.10)
2,794    ( 8.93)
203    (22.29)
184    ( 7.60)
(Millions)    (%)
$
1,435    ( 9.54)
3,397    (11.45)
154    (14.07)
Villages    	
139    (10.32)
Subtotals	
7,962    (10.41)
4,893    ( 9.59)
5,469    (14.15)
3,554    (12.54)
4,589    ( 8.51)
1,582    ( 3.87)
5,125    (10.95)
3,487    (11.66)
Totals 	
12,855    (10.10)
9,023    (13.51)
6,171    ( 7.28)
8,612    (11.24)
As a result of the continuing rapid growth in the urban communities, it is
anticipated that proceeds from real property taxation for school and general municipal purposes in 1973 will reach $430,000,000. This would represent an increase
of approximately 67 per cent over the revenue of five years ago. The total assessed
3
 Z 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
values actually taxed for school purposes in the Province in 1973 amounted to
$8,181,393,477, an increase of approximately $643,000,000 over 1972. Of this
amount, $6,170,782,780 or approximately 75 per cent, represented assessed values
in the city, district, town, and village municipalities.
Tax Collection
The tax collection picture in municipalities is considered to be the primary
indicator, not only of the efficiency of the administration, but also of the ability of
the taxpayer to meet the municipal tax levy promptly. In the year under review, tax
collections have shown an increase over the collections of 1971 and continue to
maintain a very high level. During this period, collection in districts and towns
exceeded 96 per cent of the levy, and cities and villages collected in excess of 97
per cent. We have established a practice of communicating with any municipality
where the arrears of taxes are in excess of 10 per cent of the current levy in an
effort to determine the cause and what steps may be taken to improve the position.
The collection of current taxes in British Columbia continues to be the highest
among the provinces in Canada publishing statistics of a comparable nature, while
the percentage of arrears is the lowest. Economic factors may have contributed
substantially to the favourable position indicated in the property taxation field; however, municipal treasurers and collectors are to be congratulated for their continued
efforts in maintaining this high rate of tax collection.
Chart 1, to be found at the back of this report, shows the percentage of tax
collection for the period 1962 to 1972, inclusive, and Tables 7 and 8 reveal further
information relative to tax collection by class of municipality for the years shown.
Table 7—Percentage Tax Collections
Percentage of
Current Levy
Collected
Total Collections
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
Outstanding Taxes
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
Cities (Except Vancouver)
1939    	
1946 ..    .. - -	
81.10
94.13
96.28
96.61
96.65
96.82
99.46
96.79
97.05
91.00
95.74
96.03
96.36
95.67
96.11
95.80
96.29
96.20
77.60
92.32
96.51
96.69
97.00
96.85
96.37
96.80
96.88
99.10
100.46
100.40
100.30
100.20
100.32
99.69
100.41
100.62
103.10
100.57
100.20
100.15
98.87
99.96
99.12
100.17
99.79
95.80
99.28
100.67
100.17
100.29
100.08
99.48
100.54
100.39
40.16
7.85
1966    •'     -	
1967 _  ~  	
1968 _          -	
1969                            ._     -       .             	
5.12
4.57
4.44
4.15
1970    -	
1971            —   -
4.64
4.34
1972                          	
3.88
Vancouver
1939               	
30.06
1946 -	
5.90
1966                	
5.80
1967 - - -	
1968   ,     .'
1969 .                           	
5.04
5.75
5.22
1970                                                 ..            —    . .
5.87
1971 -	
5.28
1977.
5.19
Districts
1939                              	
34.81
1946
9.45
1966                                                	
4.64
1967    _ -	
1968             -   ...
1969           	
1970
4.22
3.90
3.95
4.54
1971            :	
1977.
4.15
3.96
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1973
Z 23
Table 7—Percentage Tax Collections—Continued
Percentage of
Current Levy
Collected
Total Collections
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
Outstanding Taxes
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
Towns
19S«
89.55
88.69
92.81
93.21
93.98
93.45
93.56
94.59
96.25
76.50
92.45
95.21
95.64
95.45
95.70
94.85
96.08
97.11
97.06
98.00
98.90
99.75
100.20
99.46
99.36
101.03
102.05
98.30
99.90
99.08
100.07
99.97
100.27
100.72
101.21
101.01
13.62
1950
15.18
1966
10.16
1967
9.84
1968
9.06
1969
9.08
1970
9.35
1971                        	
1972
7.96
5.37
Villages
19*>
38.71
1946
11.90
1966                        _      	
6.48
1967
6.16
1968   . ..             	
6.15
1969
6.39
1970
7.00
1971
1977.
5.53
4.09
Table 8—Collections, 1972 (With Comparative Figures for 1971)
Percentage of
Current Taxes
Collected
Arrears as a
Percentage of
Adjusted Levy
Cities
1972
97.05
96.88
96.25
97.11
1971
96.79
96.80
94.59
96.08
1972
3.88
3.96
5.37
4.09
1971
4.34
4.15
Tmral
7.96
5.53
Total   ....
96.92
96.20
96.70
96.29
3.99
5.19
4.39
5.28
Orand total
96.74
96.59
4.30
4.62
It is interesting to note that, notwithstanding the fact that property taxes are
increasing, the level of tax collections continues to rise, and the percentage of
arrears continues to decline.
School Assessment and General Municipal Assessment
It should be noted that the difference between the school assessment and the
general municipal assessment is the result of a number of municipalities using a
dual roU, i.e., general assessments are based on 100 per cent of market value, while
the school assessments are on 50 per cent of value.
This dual roll had the following effect in 1972:
School assessment	
Less—Landlord and tenant, machinery and equipment
General municipal assessment _.
Less adjusted school assessment
Millions
■$
5,753
793
~4~960
7,744
4,960
2,784
 Z 24 ; . BRITISH COLUMBIA
The figure of $2,784,000,000 represents in part the effect of the dual roll on
the general assessment. This roll is in effect in the following municipalities: Pen-
ticton, Vancouver, Burnaby, Peachland, Summerland, West Vancouver, Kamloops,
City of North Vancouver, District of North Vancouver, City of Langley.
The balance of the difference is represented by B.C. Hydro values included in
the school assessment roll, but not included in the general assessment roll. The
Provincial total for B.C. Hydro is $518,000,000, but no breakdown is available at
this time of the amount applicable to the incorporated areas.
REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES
The 1972 audited financial statements indicate that British Columbia municipalities continued to maintain a favourable financial position. Gross revenues from
all sources during 1972 exceeded $640,000,000, which represents an increase of
$60,000,000 over the previous year.
The major revenue sources, with comparative figures for 1971, were as follows:
1972 1971 Increase
(Millions) (Millions) (Millions)
$ $ $
General municipal taxation  210 185 25
School taxation  180 165 15
Transfers from other governments  130 120 10
Revenue from own sources  120 110 10
640 580 60
The home-owner grant payments increased by $10,000,000 in 1972 to a total
of $67,000,000. When this is offset against the school tax levy of $180,000,000, a
balance of $113,000,000 remains of this levy to be borne by the property owner.
The major expenditure items incurred during 1972, with comparative figures
for 1971, were:
1972 1971 Increase
(Millions)        (Millions) (Millions)
•    $ $ $
General government  31 28 3
Fire protection   28 24 4
Administration of justice 1 42 37 5
Public works . .: 1 -- 42 36 6
Sanitation and waste removal ___.  19 17 2
Social welfare  89 92 (3)
Education   180 167 13
Debt charges   41 38 3
Capital expenditure from revenue  43 37 6
Other*     125 104 21
640 580 60
* Includes recreation, public health, environmental development, utilities, and contributions to reserves and
other funds.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1973             Z 25
Table 9—Trends in Financial Aspects of Municipal Government Compared to
Population and Income Expressed as Indexes
Year
Population
Total Revenue
(Excluding
Utilities)
Building
Permits
Debenture
Debt
Maximum
Values
Taxable
Total B.C.
Personal
Income
1961  .... 	
100.00
104.91
107.20
110.71
114.63
116.65
122.44
127.14
133.02
138.35
136.55
143.60
100.00
110.76
113.31
121.60
138.66
156.62
180.90
207.52
234.38
266.95
306.45
337.75
100.00
114.24
130.47
173.67
203.57
206.83
252.27
269.74
316.20
291.26
384.97
414.34
100.00
100.72
107.20
109.60
114.30
125.04
127.48
127.46
130.62
132.10
137.00
145.75
100.00
110.03
111.03
114.32
122.02
131.68
145.10
156.88
174.83
192.06
209.69
252.93
100.00
1962.  .       ..   .
109.19
1963	
116.85
1964	
1965	
127.27
142.22
1966	
160.41
1967	
178.09
1968.
194.37
1969	
221.58
1970	
239.33
1971
270.56
1972	
303.03
RESERVES AND SURPLUSES
The total of statutory reserves and operating reserves and surpluses held in all
accounts of the municipalities at the end of 1972 was $157,758,127. This represents
an increase of $25,040,550 over the amount held at the end of 1971.  This total
includes $54,000,000 held in statutory reserve funds for a variety of purposes and
is $6,000,000 higher than the total for 1971.   Of this total, $103,829,545 is held
in liquid form or in investments authorized by statute, and a portion of the surplus
is represented in arrears of taxes and other receivables.
During 1972, approximately $14,000,000 was expended from the statutory
reserves for capital works. The balance held in the statutory reserves has increased
over the last seven years from $30,000,000 to $54,000,000, an increase of 80
per cent.
CAPITAL PROGRAMMES
The value of capital projects  undertaken during  1972  by municipalities
amounted to $215,000,000.    Of this total programme, $200,000,000 was completed during the fiscal year, leaving a balance of works in progress of $15,000,000
at year-end.    In the total capital programme, municipalities were able to provide
$43,000,000 out of current general revenue and utility revenue funds, $14,000,000
from reserve funds, and approximately $6,000,000 was obtained from grants-in-aid
from the Provincial and Federal Governments.   The balance of the amount expended was financed by debenture loans, temporary bank loans, and other methods
of financing. The activity in this area over the past five years is indicated in Table
10 following.
Table 10—Capital Programmes, 1972
Year
Projects
Undertaken
Works
Completed
Works in
Progress
Source of Funds
Revenue
Reserve
Funds
Grants
196(1
101
118
118
166
215
$
87
102
96
153
200
$
14
16
22
13
15
$
34
36
33
37
43
$
5
7
8
10
14
$
3
1969
5
1970
3
1971
7
1972   -                 -    .-    --   .
6
Figures shown above are millions.
 Z 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Five-year Capital Expenditure Programmes Summary
The programmes submitted by municipalities and regional districts during
1973 and covering the five-year period ending 1977 continued to provide meaningful information and guidance, not only to the local government bodies involved,
but also to the Department, other levels and departments of government, and
various financial institutions. Departmental review of each of these submissions
and the offering of constructive criticism, where necessary, has achieved maximum
consistency in the format of these programmes and has proved beneficial to all
concerned.
A summary of the Capital Expenditure Programmes by year is provided in
Table 11. Included in the "General" heading under "Classification of Expenditures" are all capital expenditures for roads, sidewalks, public buildings, recreational
facilities, land, and other capital projects not related to either water or sewage
systems. As in the past, municipal councils are attempting to finance a large
portion of their capital works out of current revenue and reserves, although the
availability of Federal-Provincial loans and the infusion of capital funds via specific
purpose grants have had a direct effect on this policy.
Table 11—Five-year Capital Expenditure Programmes Summary
By Year for All Municipalities (Including Vancouver)
CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENDITURES
Year
Water
Sewer
General
Total
1973                                               ...    	
1974
$
26,558,100
15,766,068
10,336,312
11,286,121
11,297,713
$
46,037,705
26,360,525
24,885,645
12,780,515
12,006,395
$
179,689,694
119,468,893
95,819,543
88,252,119
79,565,266
$
252,285,499
161,595,486
1975 .   .
1976                                                         ...
1977  -	
131,041,500
112,318,755
102,869,374
Totals	
75,244,314
122,070,785
562,795,515
760,110,614
PROPOSED SOURCE OF FUNDS
Year
General
Revenue
Grants
Reserve
Funds
Prior Years'
Surplus
Debenture
Sales
Total
1973	
1974	
1975	
1976	
1977	
$
47,509,552
43,709,021
43,630,354
42,919,024
42,600,052
$
20,476,039
6,410,413
5,248,905
4,426,405
3,557,655
$
31,937,245
20,036,319
13,452,450
11,444,190
9,510,047
$
9,289,614
768,100
645,600
207,000
154,000
$
143,073,049
90,671,633
68,064,191
53,322,136
47,047,620
$
252,285,499
161,595,486
131,041,500
112,318,755
102,869,374
Totals
220,368,003
40,119,417
86,380,251
11,064,314
402,178,629    ]    760,110,614
Borrowing
During 1973, councils and regional boards continued to meet a substantial
demand for municipal services, and 154 term-borrowing by-laws were approved
by the Inspector of Municipalities and subsequently adopted by the local governing
body that provided the service.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1973
Z 27
A greater portion of this authorized borrowing consisted of financing for
sewers, parks, and recreation projects. Funds for water facilities, civic buildings,
and road improvements also constituted a substantial portion.
It should be noted that most borrowing by-laws were submitted to the owner-
electors for assent until the legislation enacted at the Fall Session of the Legislature
in 1973 became effective; now these by-laws are submitted to the electors for assent.
However, many by-laws financing water and sewer services are advertised pursuant
to statutory provisions and are only voted on when a petition is submitted requesting
that a vote be held.
Borrowing of $94,755,522, as summarised in Table 12, is $23,164,615 more
than was authorized in 1972; the increase is attributable to the fact that Federal-
Provincial programme funds were again available. Completion of the various
projects authorized will be phased over a number of years, and the demand for
funds will follow the pace of construction. Included in the authorized borrowing
is $2,362,106 in short-term loans which, under the Municipal Act, are subject to a
per capita limitation.
The Inspector of Municipalities is not required to approve the borrowing of
the City of Vancouver or the Metropolitan Water and Sewer Boards. Such borrowing is therefore not included in Table 12.
Preliminary borrowing of an estimated amount of $6,361,216 was approved
for local improvement works. A number of municipalities have established special
improvement funds to finance local works; these have not been included in the
figure for preliminary borrowing approval.
Table 12—Borrowing Authorization, 1973
Purpose
Regional
Districts
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Total
Waterworks-	
$
448,000
1,464,000
10,144,000
563,250
$
5,186,000
2,847,750
3,643,720
2,135,090
$
2,695,200
29,373,500
12,911,500
7,793,675
$
644,600
965,000
160,000
235,000
382,000
93,800
$
335,000
1,283,000
145,000
309,850
$
9,308,800
35,933,250
27,004,220
11,036,865
Consolidated local improvements....
2,367,273
85,000
7,802,315
191,500
191,323
113,176
10,742,911
729,476
Equipment (including fire protec-
246,000
Totals   .                  	
12,865,250
16,264,833
60,767,690
2,480,400
2,377,349
94,755,522
Debentures
Details of debenture issues and other securities that have been approved in
principle at the time of adoption of loan authorization by-laws are specified in
security-issuing by-laws; 169 security-issuing by-laws authorizing the issue of debentures and other terms of indebtedness in the total amount of $67,483,855 were
approved.
In 1973, no municipal debenture issues were guaranteed by the Province
under the Municipal Assistance Act. Details of the issues guaranteed as at December 31, 1973, are shown below in Table 13.
 Z 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 13—Outstanding Debentures Guaranteed, 1973
Village
Municipalities
Assistance Act
Municipalities
Assistance Act
Total
Cities (excluding Vancouver) _
Districts	
Towns	
Villages	
258,500
285,000
462,000
227,000
9,684,706
9,107,192
1,683,000
3,775,117
Totals	
Vancouver 	
Greater Victoria Water District.
1,232,500
Greater Nanaimo Sewer and Drainage District-
Greater Nanaimo Water District	
Greater Vancouver Water District	
Grand totals	
23,250,015
9,687,000
514,000
1,374,000
48,000
16,540,000
1,232,500
52,413,015
9,943,206
9,392,192
2,145,000
4,002,117
25,482,515
9,687,000
514,000
1,374,000
48,000
16,540,000
53,645,515
In addition to the totals shown in Table 13 of $53,645,515 as debenture debts
guaranteed by the Province, a total amount at the end of the year of $22,295,000
was guaranteed under the Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District Act.
Total debenture debt as at December 31, 1972, of all municipalities, including
the City of Vancouver, is shown in Table 14 following. The debenture debt of the
Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District and the Greater Vancouver
Water District is not included.
Table 14—Total Debenture Debt, December 31,1972
Sold
Unissued
and
Unsold
Total
Cities-
Districts	
Towns     . .
Villages	
	
$
74,820,471
119,709,600
10,981,581
10,966,768
13,749,880
$
33,210,412
79,699,423
7,677,197
4,029,913
28,934,561
$
108,030,883
199,409,023
18,658,778
14,996,681
42,684 441
Subtotals
230,228,300
160,021,748
153,551,506
383,779 806
160,021,748
Totals	
390,250,048
153,551,506
543,801,554
Debenture sales for all municipalities amounted to $61,354,728 for the year
1972. This resulted in an increase of $30,279,961 to the total outstanding debenture debt of all municipalities for 1972, after giving effect to the retirement of
debentures maturing during the year.
The percentage of current revenue expended to service debenture debt (excluding utilities) in cities, districts, and towns declined in 1972, and increased
slightly in villages and in the City of Vancouver. These figures for 1972 are shown
below, with the 1971 figures in parentheses:
Cities 	
Vancouver
Districts 	
Towns 	
Villages —
Per Cent
5.99 (6.0)
8.49
6.18
7.87
6.55
(8.1)
(6.4)
(8.2)
(5.7)
The debenture debt of utilities is serviced almost entirely by revenues derived
by consumer charges and frontage taxes.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1973 Z 29
PLANNING SERVICES
For our planning officers the year 1973 could be best described as the year of
farm land preservation. Wherever possible, staff at all levels have collaborated
with, aided, and assisted those charged with the accomplishment of the desired goal.
More than one and one-half person-years have been devoted to this. Staff technicians have spent over seven person-months helping in the preparation and
checking of maps showing the Provincially proposed agricultural land reserves
boundaries along legal lines, and assisting in the processing of appeals to Order in
Council 157/73.
Planners have reviewed land-use contracts and zoning by-laws to see that the
intent of Order in Council 157/73 was upheld. A staff member visited most of the
regional district boards with the Land Commission during its tour of explanation
and discussion. Another was responsible for much of the processing of appeals
under Order in Council 157/73. Some have aided regional districts in the explanation of agricultural land reserves to the public and have prepared land reserve plans
for those regional districts. Others have been members of the ad hoc committee of
senior public servants recommending on appeals to Order in Council 157/73 to
the Environment and Land Use Committee.
Other Achievements
During the year, two planners have transferred to other departments. Despite
this, and besides the considerable staff involvement with the farm-land preservation
programme, planning services staff have achieved much. Over 500 by-laws from
municipalities and regional districts were processed. There was as great attendance
at Technical Planning Committee meetings as possible. The staff continued to
work with other departments on special studies of highway location in the Sunshine
Coast and also through the Northern Vancouver Island Study Committee. Work
was done on residential expansion areas for Trail. Assistance was and continues
to be extended to other Departmental staff members in specialized tasks. Comment
is being made on changes to all boundaries considered by the Department.
The comprehensive resource mapping of the Queen Charlotte Islands has been
completed and has been turned over to the Environment and Land Use Secretariat.
The study was initiated by the Environment and Land Use Committee at the
request of Skeena-Queen Charlotte Regional District. A study of Texada Island
resources and capabilities requested by the Lands Branch has been completed and
turned over to them.
Contract Work
The Department contracted with or is continuing its contract with a number
of municipalities and regional districts. These include:
Squamish-Lillooet Regional District—where a community plan is to be
prepared for Lillooet-Bridge River subregion;
Regional District of Kootenay Boundary—where by-laws for the implementation of previously established planning concepts are being
prepared for the area east of the Monashee Range height of land;
Village of Lake Cowichan—where a community plan is being prepared;
Village of Port Edward—on a study of residential development and
subdivision design;
 Z 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Village of Port Alice—on a zoning by-law;
Regional District of Mount Waddington—where work has begun on the
final phase of the regional plan;
Fraser-Cheam—where the first-phase regional plan for the entire regional
district has been completed;
A community plan for the Cultus Lake-Chilliwack River Valley was also
being completed.
Technical Work
The technical staff have prepared presentation maps for reports and studies
as needed. In addition, information maps required for the consideration of new
municipal boundaries have been made. Where specified areas, defined areas,
municipal boundary extensions, and regional district boundary redefinitions are
concerned, the required maps and legal descriptions have been prepared.
The Department's building inspector continued his work in Community Planning Area 23 (Shawnigan Lake) where permits to a value in excess of $420,000
were issued.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1973
Z 31
TRANSIT SERVICES
Perhaps the most significant new activity of the Department is the programme
of the Bureau of Transit Services established in February. The Provincial Government has assumed responsibility for programmes in establishing new transit services
in rural and urban communities. The Bureau is charged with responsibility for
determining public transportation requirements within and between the various
regions, for advising the Provincial Government on policy matters related to the
provisions of public transportation, and for implementation of public transit programmes in British Columbia.
The objective of the Bureau programme is to provide British Columbians with
an alternative to automobile travel. Public transit is defined to mean the transporting of persons as passengers by carriers other than private automobile, and at
this time is principally concerned with various forms of bus and commuter rail
services.
Publicly owned and operated transit systems with which the Bureau is now
involved are detailed in Table 15.
Table 15—Publicly Owned and Operated Transit Systems, 1973
Number
of
Buses
Number
of
Drivers
Passengers
Carried
Service
Greater Vancouver Transit System
B.C. Hydro and Power Authority	
Pacific Stage Lines-
West   Vancouver   Municipal  Transportation 	
Capital Region Transit System
B.C. Hydro and Power Authority	
Nanaimo Regional Transit System-
Nelson Transit System..
Powell River Transit System..
625      |      1,360    | 81,000,000
95
27
98
12
38
162
20
2,778,000
1,758,000
7,893,000
342,000
7    |       242,000
4    I       143,000
Urban bus service to Vancouver,
Burnaby, Coquitlam, Port Coquit-
lam, North Vancouver, Port Moody,
Richmond, New Westminster.
Ferry bus service to Nanaimo, Victoria, Town and Country service,
east to Hope, south to White Rock.
Urban bus service, Horseshoe Bay to
downtown Vancouver.
Urban bus service to Victoria, Oak
Bay, Esquimau, and Saanich.
Urban and school bus service to Nanaimo City and 7 miles north.
Urban bus service in City of Nelson.
Urban bus service in District of Powell
River.
The B.C. Hydro and Power Authority transit buses carried 6 million more
persons in 1973 than in 1972. Of this number, 1.6 million persons were transported by new services inaugurated by the Bureau in September and October of
1973.
In addition to its role in the planning and marketing of transit services, the
Bureau has a monitoring function to ensure that service standards are maintained
and to make recommendations to the Minister of Finance that subsidy requests be
paid subject to the regulations of the Provincial Rapid Transit Subsidy Act. Subsidy
payments approved in 1973 for the nine months for which there was entitlement
are shown in Table 16.
 Z 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 16—Subsidy Payments for Year 1973
$
West Vancouver Municipal Transportation    82,266
Nanaimo Regional Transit System  60,667
Nelson Transit System  17,049
Powell River Transit System   25,465
Total   185,447
Operating deficits and capital expenditures for the transit services of B.C.
Hydro and Power Authority are funded from the general revenue of B.C. Hydro
and Power Authority and through grants from the Province of British Columbia.
As a result of efforts in public transit in British Columbia, there are a number
of social benefits, together with greater mobility for persons of all ages and incomes,
and more efficient use of existing roads by enabling more people to move over the
same road system. In setting new "people-first" objectives for transit services,
transit planning acts as a positive tool to help shape the future development of
communities in directions suited to the needs of present and future residents. To
this end, the Bureau has been participating in the planning process with municipalities and regional districts.
During 1973 the main thrust of the work of the Bureau of Transit Services
has been in planning new services in the Greater Vancouver Regional District. New
bus services were provided in the eastern section of the District of North Vancouver,
and in the District of Coquitlam, City of Port Moody, and City of Port Coquitlam.
As a result of these activities, 99 new buses were placed in service in 1973
and equipment orders have been placed for 225 new buses for delivery in 1974.
The latter represents the largest single equipment order ever placed in Western
Canada. In addition, 37 used trolley coaches have been purchased from Kitchener
and Saskatoon, some of which are now being refurbished and placed in service in
Vancouver.
In addition to operating equipment, two new bus interchanges have been built
in Greater Vancouver. One of these, in east Burnaby, provides an interchange
point for all new bus and fastbus services in the Coquitlam area; the other is Phibbs
Exchange, named after the first Reeve of North Vancouver, situated at the north
end of the Second Narrows Bridge and provides a major interchange point for all
bus services to the City and District of North Vancouver using the Second Narrows
bridgehead.
At year-end, the Transit Services Division was pursuing plans for immediate
improvements to the B.C. Hydro bus services in the Capital Region area, to place
10 new buses in urban service in early 1974.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1973
TAX       COLLECTIONS
Z 33
PERCENTAGE
CHART 1
LEGEND
 Cities
—— Districts
 Towns
 Villages
 Vancou ver
7.
98
PERCENTAGE    OF    CURRENT    LEVY   COLLECTED
—^T-
•«■
.•1-"*
•»
,.'•'"
.'•'
 >
**-
***.,
/
94
93
<^
'■*».
•
•■
..•
,.*
""-■
f,*
0
%
OUTSTANDING    TAXES    AS   A    PERCENTAGE  OF    CURRENT     LEVY
14
12
/'
\
*
'•.
\
10
9
■■•-.
"*,
~~- —
	
\
•
Ni
>
	
	
•**
\
*♦.
\
^fcT**
..♦♦• ^
■>»
■N»
,1^
^
1     ..
4
3
L«ta»wA_*»^A
*~*-^*-*-*-*.
A-^K_*^^«_*
II
1962 63 64 65 66 67 66 69 70 71 1972
 Z 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TRENDS    IN     FINANCIAL    ASPECTS   OF   MUNICIPAL    GOVERNMENT
COMPARED     TO    POPULATION   AND      INCOME
CHART 2
LEGEND
-~"-^^^ Population in   millions 	
 Total   revenue   in   millions  of  dollars
Building   permits   in    millions  of dollars       	
 Debenture    debt     in     millions   of    dollars
1 Maximum values taxable in
hundreds of millions of dollars
Personal   income in hundreds
of  millions of dollars
900
,-^==^
y
600
y
"S^r"
J. -~'
-.""
300
200
^""
^^^^
90
80
70
60
,•**
...
.«•-
.••••""
50
40
	
	
.••''
	
	
	
	
20
mxz^
mmzz
10
9
8
7
6
S
4
3
2
1
1962                6
3                       6
4                         6
5                      6
6                      6
7                       6
8                      6
9                      7
0                         1
1                  1972
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1973
Z 35
MUNICIPAL   REVENUES
BY   MAJOR   SOURCE    1978
CITIES   (EXCLUDING   VANCOUVER)
CHART 3
UTILITIES0'
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER   PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE   GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION'2'
PROVIDED  BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
% OF   REVENUE
100%
$ PER CAPITA
S358.59   (326.79)
SCHOOL TAXATION
2.38 (2.49)
18.68 (18.29)
.80 (  .79)
10.82 (11.86)
8.38 (8.01)
31.95 (30.86)
16.62(15.53)
26.99 (27.69)
$  8.54 (8.15)
66.69 (59.78)
2.86 ( 2.56)
38.32 (38.78)
30.00 (30.00)
114.58 (100.86)
96.80 (90.48)
1971  FIGURES   SHOWN   IN  PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$156,223,818    TOTAL  POPULATION   435,654
DISTRICTS
% OF   REVENUE
100%
$  PER CAPITA
$311.71   (275.66)
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER   PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION'2'
PROVIDED  BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
14.59 (14.24)
.43 ( .63)
6.82 ( 7.53)
9.62 ( 8.98)
35.59 (35.01)
19.48 (18.31J-	
32.95 (33.61)
ftamrmtttxm
$45.48 (39.25)
135 ( 1.74)
21.26 (20.76)
30.00 (30.00)
110.93 (96J0)
102.68( 92.66)
1971   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN  PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$252,315,379   TOTAL POPULATION-809,409
NOTE:-   (1) Utilities   represents   amount   appropriated   from   utility   operations   for   General   Municipal   Purposes,   is   not   Major
Source of   Revenue   for   Districts, Towns, Villages  and  Vancouver, included   in 'Licenses  and  Other'  for 1970  and  1971.
(2) General  Municipal  Taxation  includes Ad Valorem Tax,   Business Tax, Sewer  and Water   Frontage  Tax  and  Special
Assessments.
 Z 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
MUNICIPAL  REVENUE!
BY   MAJOR   SOURCE    1972
VANCOUVER
CHART 3
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER   PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE   GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL  GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION'1'
PROVIDED  BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
%  OF   REVENUE
 100%
16.04 (15.42)
.38 (    .31)
17.14 (17.35)
7.15  ( 7.50)
34.09 (33.56)
13.49 (12.70)	
25.20 (25.86)
S  PER  CAPITA
S 419.63 (385.23)
$ 67.32 (59.43)
1.60 ( 1.18)
71.93 (66.83)
30.00 (30.00)
143.04(129.29)
105.74 (99.61)
1971   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN  PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$178,871,887    TOTAL POPULATION-426,256
NOTE:-  (1) General  Municipal  Taxation includes  Ad Valorem Tax,   Business  Tax, Sewer and Water   Frontage Tax  and   Special
Assessments.
REVENUE   SHOWN   FOR   ALL  CLASSES   OF   MUNICIPALITIES    INCLUDING    VANCOUVER    DOES    NOT    INCLUDE
APPROPRIATION    OF    PRIOR   YEARS     SURPLUS.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1973 Z 37
MUNICIPAL  REVENUES
BY   MAJOR   SOURCE    1979
TOWNS
CHART 3
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER   PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION'1'
PROVIDED  BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
°L  OF   REVENUE
100%
18.58 (18.94)
.41 (   .88)
7.78 ( 9.62)
10.71 (10.53)
29.40 (28.35)
20.78 (20.02)
33.12 (31.68)   L
. ii 111111111111111
$  PER CAPITA
S279.90 (253.16)
■«rrrwiv»miouxi
$52.00(47.95)
1.15(2.24)
21.75(24.35)
30.00 (30.00)
82.28 (71.78)
92.72(80.20)
1971   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-516,625,663     TOTAL POPULATION-59,397
VILLAGES
1 gag?
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL MUNICIPAL TAXATION"'
PROVIDED  BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
23.06 (26.10)
.70 (    .56)
13.59 (15.40)
25.86 (23.97)
38.49(23.81) —
36.79 (33.97)
S PER CAPITA
$231.21   (191.20)
53.33 (49.90)
1.(2 ( 1.08)
30.00 (30.00)
59.80 (45.82)
85.06 (6446)
1971   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$14,272,467    TOTAL POPULATION-61,728
NOTE'-  (1) General  Municipal  Taxation includes  Ad Valorem Tax,' Business  Tax, Sewer and Water   Frontage Tax  and  Special
Assessments.
 Z 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REVENUE   EXPENDITURES
BY    MAJOR   FUNCTION   1979
TOWNS
CHART 4
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
FIRE
OTHER PROTECTIONS
TRANSPORTATION  SERVICES
ENVIRONMENTAL   HEALTH
SOCIAL WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT   CHARGES    (NET)
CAPITAL  EXPENDITURE   FROM   REVENUE
OTHER
% OF  EXPENDITURE
100%
S PER  CAPITA
$276.74  (251.52)
7.48   (7.59)
1.78
1.25
10.32
4.36   (4.18)
11.94  (14.82)
(10.52)
sazmxaaz!
33.48 (31.91)
7.87( 8.16)
9.35 ( 6.95)
12.17(13.47)
$20.83 (19.08)
4.95 ( 3.92)
3.48 ( 2.10)
28.76 (2648)
12.16  (10.51)
33.23(37.23)
93.34 (80.25)
21.95 (20.53)
26.06 (17.49)
33.92(33.88)
1971   FIGURES   SHOWN  IN  PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$16,556,138     TOTAL   POPULATION-59,397
VILLAGES
% OF EXPENDITURE
100%
$  PER CAPITA
$231.14   (176.56)
GENERAL     GOVERNMENT
FIRE
OT
OTHER PROTECTIONS
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
ENVIRONMENTAL  HEALTH
EDUCATION
DEBT  CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL  EXPENDITURE  FROM   REVENUE
OTHER
1971   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN  PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$14,267,819     TOTAL  POPULATION-61,728
NOTE-  Expenditures   for   Health   included   in    'Other'.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1973
Z 39
REVENUE    EXPENDITURES
BY    MAJOR    FUNCTION    1979
VANCOUVER
CHART 4
GENERAL  GOVERNMENT
FIRE
ADMINISTRATION   OF JUSTICE
OTHER  PROTECTION
TRANSPORTATION   SERVICES
ENVIRONMENTAL   HEALTH
SOCIAL WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT  CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL  EXPENDITURES  FROM  REVENUE
OTHER
% OF  EXPENDITURE
100%
$  PER   CAPITA
$414.04   (364.72)
2.92 ( 2.62)
6.14 ( 5.96)
9.53 ( 9.33)
1.22 ( 1.06)
3.69 (4.10)
2.12 (2.38)
21.29 (22.32)
25.86   (26.23)
8.49   ( 8.10)
5.26   ( 4.84)
13.48   (13.06)
saasffnma
bmmzm
12.05 (10.06)
25.43 (22.93)
39.44 (35.90)
5.07 ( 4.06)
15.30 (15.79)
8.78 ( 9.15)
88.14 (85.88)
107.08 (100.90)
35.16    (31.17)
21.77   (18.61)
55.82   (50.24)
1971   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$176,487,077    TOTAL   POPULATION - 426,256
NOTE>- Expenditures    for    Health    included   in   'Other*.
 Z 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
VENUE   EXPENDITURES
BY    MAJOR    FUNCTION    1979
CITIES
CHART 4
EXCLUDING  VANCOUVER
% OF   EXPENDITURE
 100%	
$ PER   CAPITA
$353.24   (325.91)
GENERAL  GOVERNMENT
FIRE
ADMINISTRATION   OF  JUSTICE
OTHER  PROTECTION
TRANSPORTATION   SERVICES
ENVIRONMENTAL   HEALTH
SOCIAL WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT  CHARGES  (NET)
CAPITAL  EXPENDITURES  FROM  REVENUE
OTHER
5.60 ( 5.90)
4.55 ( 4.28)
7.08 ( 6.52)
.93 ( .85)
8.26 (8.16)
4.22   ( 3.73)
14.38   (16.41)
28.03   (28.33)
5.99   ( 6.00)
5.87   ( 5.84)
15.09   (13.98)
gZZZBZZZZBj
$19.80 (19.22)
16.08 (13.95)
25.00 (21.23)
3.28 ( 2.78)
29.20 (26.61)
14.89 (12.17)
50.82   (53.49)
99.00   (92.34)
21.15   (19.55)
20.72   (19.05)
53.30   (45.56)
1971   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$15i\892,193     TOTAL   POPULATION-435,654
DISTRICTS
% OF  EXPENDITURE
H0%
GENERAL   GOVERNMENT
FIRE
ADMINISTRATION  OF  JUSTICE
OTHER   PROTECTION
TRANSPORTATION   SERVICES
ENVIRONMENTAL   HEALTH
SOCIAL  WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT   CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL EXPENDITURES   FROM   REVENUE
OTHER
$  PER CAPITA
$307.34  (273.67)
5.81 ( 5.74)
3.82 ( 3.58)
5.82 ( 5.42)
1.35 ( 1.22)
7.89 ( 7.37)
2.98 ( 3.13)
10.85 (12.94)
33.45 (33.88)
6.18    (6.35)
6.51 ( 5.94)
15.34 (14.43)
(15.72)
( 9.81)
(14.84)
( 3.34)
(20.16)
(8.58)
33.36   (35.40)
102.80 (92.71)
18.96   (17.39)
20.01    (16.26)
47.15    (39.49)
1971  FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$248,762,056   TOTAL   POPULATION-809,409
NOTE:- Expenditures   for   Health   included  in 'Other'.
 Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1974
1,530-474-4973

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