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SERVICES FOR PEOPLE ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES HON. NORMAN LEVI 1974 With Fiscal… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1975

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
SERVICES FOR PEOPLE
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE
DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES
HON. NORMAN LEVI
1974
With Fiscal Addendum
April 1, 1973, to March 31, 1974
 Victoria, B.C., February, 1975
To Colonel the Honourable Walter Stewart Owen, Q.C, LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Human Resources for the calendar
year 1974, with fiscal addendum April 1, 1973, to March 31, 1974, is herewith
respectfully submitted.
NORMAN LEVI
Minister of Human Resources
Office of the Minister of Human Resources,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
 Department of Human Resources,
Victoria, B.C., February, 1975
The Honourable Norman Levi,
Minister of Human Resources,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir: I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Human Resources for the calendar year 1974, with fiscal addendum April 1, 1973,
to March 31, 1974.
J. A. SADLER
Deputy Minister of Human Resources
    FOREWORD
The Annual Report has been organized to provide information on the most
important programs offered by the Department. An introductory section outlines
administrative and organizational characteristics of the Department. Programs are
discussed under the following four headings:
Services for Families and Children.
Services for Everyone.
Services for Special Needs.
Services for Senior Citizens.
The programs are reported on according to their goals and how these goals are
achieved. Important changes in 1974 are discussed, as is cost-sharing with the
Federal Government. Addresses are provided for the interested reader to obtain
further information on each program.
It is hoped this format will be useful in providing an understanding of what
the Department of Human Resources is attempting to do in co-operation with the
people of British Columbia.
This Report is for the calendar year 1974. Accounting is done on a fiscal
year basis, and it should be noted that tables in the 1973/74 fiscal year are included
in the Fiscal Addendum, at the end of the Report.
A special note on cost-sharing—Municipalities at present cost-share in
Social Allowance programs, day care subsidies, health care programs, and maintenance of Dependent Children. In 1974, municipalities paid $22,217,730, or
approximately 10 per cent of the cost of these programs. This is a drop from 1973
where municipalities paid up to 15 per cent of the costs in these shared programs.
Throughout this Report we refer to cost-sharing between the Federal and Provincial
Governments; it must be remembered that for many of these programs municipal
sharing is part of the Provincial contribution.
  SERVICES FOR PEOPLE
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Highlights of 1974.
Departmental Expenditures, 1974_
Page
9
11
Administration and Organization, 1974
Introduction .  15
Organizational Chart  16
Regional Map  17
Personnel Activities  18
Accounting and Budget  19
Office Administration and Public Information  20
Staff Development  20
Research  21
Services for Families and Children
Introduction  25
Preventive and Protective Services for Children and Their Families  26
DayCare  30
Special Services to Children  36
Youth Hostel Program  3 8
Detached Worker Program  41
Child Care Resources  41
Foster Homes  43
Therapeutic Homes  46
Receiving and Group Homes  47
Specialized Treatment Resources  48
Adoption  50
Community Grants for Families and Children  55
Services for Everyone
Social Allowance  59
Employment Services  63
Repatriation  64
Homemaker Service  65
Counselling  66
Community Resources Boards „  66
Health Care Services  70
Burials.. .  72
Community Grants  73
Services for Special Needs
Mincome (Handicapped Persons' Income Assistance)  81
Activity Centres  8 2
Student Summer Employment, 1974  86
Educational Upgrading and Vocational Training  8 7
Work Activity Projects  8 8
Incentive Opportunities Program  90
 R 8 HUMAN RESOURCES
Services for Special Needs—Continued Page
Hostels for Adults       91
Halfway or Transition Houses     92
Community Grants for Special Needs     93
Services for Senior Citizens
Mincome  101
Senior Citizen Counsellor Service  105
B.C. Hydro Bus Pass for Senior Citizens  106
Adult Care  107
Courtesy Card  109
Pharmacare  110
Community Grants for Senior Citizens  111
Legislation  114
Fiscal Addendum, 1973/74  115
J
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974
R 9
HIGHLIGHTS  OF  1974
By J. A. Sadler, Deputy Minister
As mentioned in the Annual Report last year, there's always a time lag between
the period services are announced and the point they are fully used by all the people
who need the services. In 1974 we experienced quite an increase in the use of
services started in 1973. More people took advantage of the minimum income
guaranteed for those 60 to 64 years of age; greater numbers of families applied for
the day care subsidy; and more children were served through the Special Services
for Children Program. Human Resources services reached a large number of British
Columbia residents as the Department carried out its continuing policy of making
social services available throughout the Province, not just in the larger urban centres.
Some of the most significant efforts made by the Department to improve the
living conditions of British Columbia residents included the following:
• Basic Social Allowance payments increased in July by $20 a month to each
individual or family unit.
• Increases were made to rates paid on behalf of social assistance recipients
in private hospitals or in intermediate or personal care facilities.
• Comfort allowances to persons in need in special care and mental health
facilities increased to $25 a month.
• Foster home rates increased in all categories.
• Mincome benefits to the elderly and handicapped persons increased quarterly
in 1974 from $213.85 a month at the beginning of the year to $234.13 at
year-end.
• Day care subsidies were increased.
• The new Pharmacare Program started in January 1974 provided free prescription drugs to all British Columbia residents age 65 and over.
• 80 projects formerly funded by short-term Federal LIP grants received continued funding from the Department of Human Resources.
• Direct grants for day care, homemaker services, and other innovative social
services were increased.
• A grant was provided to the Burns Lake Development Project to improve
education, housing, and social service development in that community. This
grant was part of a larger agreement for the economic development of that
area made between the Government and the Indians of the Burns Lake area.
• Up to 50 people were involved in subcommittee work in 1974, co-ordinated
by the Advisory Committee on the Needs of the Physically Handicapped, a
committee appointed by Hon. Norman Levi.
• 520 students were hired in the Department through the Province-sponsored
summer employment program "Careers '74."
• The Community Resources Board Act was introduced, providing new opportunities for community representatives to share with the Government in the
planning and administration of community social services, and 51 communities throughout British Columbia started work toward developing local
Community Resources Boards.
 R 10 HUMAN RESOURCES
• Involvement with the Department of Health continued in the setting-up of
Community Human Resources and Health Centres. Projects are now well
under way in the Grand Forks-Boundary area, Houston and Granisle, the
Queen Charlotte Islands, and the James Bay neighbourhood in Victoria.
• An "Integrated Services Project" was implemented in Victoria to provide a
full range of services to children with learning and behavioural difficulties.
This project is jointly funded by the Departments of Education, Health, and
Human Resources.
• Amendments to the Protection of Children Act provided for lay persons to
sit on panels hearing protection cases and strengthened the requirements that
all persons report suspected child abuse.
• Administrative responsibility for Woodlands and Tranquille and services to
the mentally retarded was transferred from the Department of Health to
Human Resources. This change was made because of the Government's
commitment to integrated and community-based services, and allows for
cost-sharing from the Federal Government under the Canada Assistance
Plan.
Administrative changes undertaken to carry out these programs and activities
more efficiently are described in the "Administration and Organization" section that
appears in the body of the Annual Report.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974
R 11
DEPARTMENTAL EXPENDITURES,  1974
($367.4 million)
Figure 1
General
Administration
1.3%
$4.8
Field Service—
Adults
2.9%
$10.7
Field Service—
Children
3.1%
$11.4
Adult Care _
3.6%
$13.1
Other
Programs
4.4%
$16.3
Medical Services
and Pharmacare"
5.5%
$20.1
Social Allowances: Basic allowances, low-income supplement.
Mincome: Handicapped, age 60-64 years, age 65 years and over.
Child Care: Group, receiving, and foster homes; treatment resources;, day care;
special services to children.
Field Service—Children: Direct field staff involvement in the provision of services for children.
Medical Services—Pharmacare: Drugs, dental, optical, medical, medical transportation, emergency health aid.
Other Programs: Burials, transportation, repatriation, special needs, housekeeper,
homemaker, work activity projects, community grants.
Field Service—Adult: Direct field staff involvement in the provision of services
for adults.
Adult Care : Personal, intermediate, and nursing home care.
 R 12
HUMAN RESOURCES
The Department of Human Resources is providing a wide range of needed
services to children and families, to senior citizens, and to the handicapped in this
Province. Total expenditures for the calendar year 1974 totalled $367.4 million.
A comparison of expenditures is illustrated in Table 1.
Table 1—Department of Human Resources Gross Expenditures—A Comparison
of Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1973/74 and Calendar Year 1974
1974
($ millions)
367.4
1973/74
($ millions)
264.6
1972/73
(5 millions)
172.2
1971/72
($ millions)
148.9
in which the Federal Government
Examples of these programs are:
has
The Federal Government contribution to Departmental costs came to 33 per
cent of the total in 1974. This is a decline over recent years and has occurred
primarily for two reasons:
1. New programs have been launched recently and the specific cost-sharing
arrangements are still under negotiation.   The most significant are
(a) expanded day care;
(b) special services to children.
2. New programs are in operation
refused to share or will only share in part
(a) Pharmacare, 16 per cent shared;
(b) Mincome, 13 per cent shared;
(c) community grants, 35 per cent shared.
By far the most significant amount of money involved is with the Mincome
Program. The Federal Government will share only up to $200 per person per
month, increasing to $215, effective January 1, 1975, whereas the Mincome
guarantee, as of January 1, 1975, is $234.13. Also, the Federal Government will
share only in payments to persons with very low asset levels and is not willing to
share beyond Social Allowance levels ($160 for a single person) for those aged
60-64 years. The Provincial Government believes that the Federal levels are at
present far too low and will continue to press for additional sharing.
Another significant program which is not fully shared is Day Care. It is
expected that agreements will soon be finalized whereby the Federal Government
will contribute 38 per cent to the cost of this program. This should take place with
approval of new Social Assistance Regulations. The Federal Government has
indicated, also, that with agreement on guidelines for special services to children
there will be cost-sharing of this program. These negotiations, at present under way,
are expected to increase the Federal share in total Department expenditures for
1975 to approximately 37 per cent.
 ADMINISTRATION AND
ORGANIZATION, 1974
  REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974 R 15
INTRODUCTION
In the field of social services, the present Government has initiated a significant
number of new programs and has brought about changes in many existing programs.
As it is the nature and quality of the administration of these programs which determines in large measure their efficiency and effectiveness, the Department of Human
Resources has over the past year conducted an ongoing and thorough review of its
administration and organization.
Many changes in the administration of the Department resulted from this
review.   What follows are some of the highlights of these changes in 1974:
• Direct administrative control over the Vancouver City Welfare Department
transferred to Human Resources as of January 8, 1974. The cost-saving to
the City of Vancouver as a result of this move was in excess of $2 million.
Similar moves to integrate municipal welfare operations with those operated
by the Department took place in Victoria, Saanich, Kamloops, Kelowna,
Penticton, and Chilliwack in 1973.
• Integration of the services of the Children's Aid Society, the Catholic Family
and Children's Services, and the City Welfare and Rehabilitation Department under the auspices of the new Vancouver Resources Board.
• Takeover of Social Allowance cheque issue from all municipalities outside
the Lower Mainland area, resulting in an approximate savings to these
municipalities of $300,000.
• Reduction in the level of municipal cost-sharing in social assistance programs
from 15 to 10 per cent.
• Transfer of administrative responsibility from the Department of Health
to Human Resources for the two former mental health facilities for the
mentally retarded, Woodlands and Tranquille.
• The creation of four new Departmental regions in the Lower Mainland area
to provide more effective access to and from the community. The new
regions are Vancouver City, the North Shore (including Squamish-Pemberton
and the Sechelt Peninsula), Fraser North (Burnaby, New Westminster,
Coquitlam, Port Moody, Port Coquitlam), and Fraser South (Surrey, White
Rock, Delta, Richmond).
• Staffing of the new Division of Residential and Treatment Programs for
Children, with responsibilities for specialized treatment resources, group
homes, therapeutic foster homes, and Special Services to Children.
• Staffing of the new Special Care Adults Division, with responsibilities for
boarding and rest homes and private hospital care, the New Denver Pavilion,
homemaker services, activity centres, and the Senior Citizen Counsellor
Service.
• Staffing of the new Pharmacare Division.
•Appointment of a Special Budget Co-ordinator to oversee development of the
Department's estimates for the 1975/76 fiscal year and to co-ordinate the
introduction of a new financial and management information system.
• Expansion of the Department's Research Division, with greater emphasis
and efforts being placed on program evaluation.
• Planning for the introduction of a new complex of programs for youth at
the Island Youth Centre.
• Development of joint management teams with the Community Corrections
Branch of the Attorney-General's Department at the local, regional, and
Provincial levels. These teams provide opportunity for joint policy planning
and help to ensure that the resources and services of the two Departments
operate in an integrated manner.
 R 16
HUMAN RESOURCES
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 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974
REGIONAL MAP
R 17
 R 18                                                   HUMAN RESOURCES
PERSONNEL ACTIVITIES
As of December 31, 1974, there were 1,628 staff members in the Department
of Human Resources.  This number includes Auxiliary staff who are employed in
positions that are not permanent, but does not include staff employed at Woodlands
and Tranquille.  The formal transfer of responsibility for personnel administration
in the two former mental health facilities for the mentally retarded does not occur
until January 1, 1975.
In 1974 the number of permanent positions within the Department increased
from 1,206 to 1,485.
Table 2—Permanent Positions Established in 1974
Established positions as of December 31, 1973   1,206
Positions added by Estimates, April 1, 1974      189
Positions added through salary contingency:
"Integrated Services Project-Victoria"         23
Mincome administration ....                .         „           65
General administration          2
Established positions as of December 31, 1974 „    1,485
The Personnel Division carried out the necessary work connected with placing
individuals in 660 vacancies in the Department during 1974. These vacancies arose
from retirements or resignations, new established positions, and appointments to
150 Auxiliary (not of a continuous nature) positions.
Table 3—Promotions in 1974
Deputy Minister       1        Clerk-Stenographer and Typist   30 1
Senior Officer           2        Cook          1 I
Regional Director . _      3        Mechanic      1 ;
Social Worker   25        Nurse      2 1
Child Care Counsellor                     4                                                                             — 1
Personnel Officer                              1                    Total   70 1
1
•
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974
R 19
Table 4—Reclassifications1 in 1974
Senior Officer  2
Senior Social Worker   6
Social Worker  20
Research Officer  1
Personnel Officer   1
Financial Assistance Worker   12
Mechanic   2
Nurse   1
Clerk-Stenographer and Typist
Child Care Counsellor 	
Administrative  Officer  	
Building Service Worker 	
Stockman	
Orderly   	
48
7
1
1
1
2
Total       105
1 Reclassification is the upward movement of staff within a classification series as a result of meeting
experience or educational requirements as set out in position specifications, or as a result of position upgrading after a classification review.
7:
Also, in 1974, there were 358 retirements and resignations from the Department. Of this number, 174 were typists and stenographers, 61 were social workers,
46 were child care counsellors, and 29 were financial assistance workers. The
balance was made up of small numbers of various other job categories. Non-
promotional movement of staff by transfer involved another 127 positions this past
year.
The following table summarizes personnel activities in 1974, with comparative
data from 1973:
Table 5—Personnel Activities in 1974 and 1973
Activities 1973 1974 Activities 1973 1974
Vacancies filled   415      660        Retirements and resignations ... 284      358
Promotions      33        70        Transfers (nonpromotional
Reclassifications   152      105 movement of staff) .—     54      127
ACCOUNTING AND BUDGET
Accounting and Budget Services for the Department of Human Resources are
provided by the Departmental Comptroller's office of the Department of Health.
This Division is responsible for all matters pertaining to accounting for Public
Health, Legislation, the Provincial Secretary's Department, the Premier's Office,
and the Minister Without Portfolio, as well as for Human Resources.
In order to provide more effective services to the Department of Human
Resources, this Division undertook the following changes in 1974:
• Staffing of a Canada Assistance Plan Section to oversee the processing of
cost-sharing claims made to the Federal Government.
• Appointment of a Special Budget Co-ordinator to oversee development of
the Department's estimates and to co-ordinate the introduction of a new
financial and management information system.
• Staffing of an Audit Section to examine and evaluate accounting procedures
in all community services funded by the Department.
• Appointment of a Mechanical Superintendent to oversee use and servicing
of Departmental vehicles.
 R 20 HUMAN RESOURCES
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION AND PUBLIC INFORMATION
The Division of Office Administration and Public Information provides a
range of administrative support services to the Department. These include analysis
and consultation on administrative requirements in a variety of program areas;
co-ordinating the purchase of all required supplies and equipment; design and
distribution of forms; planning and co-ordination of office space and buildings; the
preparation, printing, and distribution of program policy, procedures, and administrative information; and providing general information to the public.
The Division is also responsible for headquarters mail services, and for the
issuance of bus passes and courtesy cards to senior citizens.
STAFF DEVELOPMENT
Staff Development services within the Department of Human Resources are
provided through a central division staffed by the Director of Staff Development,
Assistant Director, Librarian, and three administrative support staff.
There are also seven Staff Development Co-ordinators located in regional
offices. It is the job of these Regional Co-ordinators to assist local staff to identify
specific training needs and locate and (or) develop training resources to meet these
needs.
A major objective of the Department has been to develop individualized training programs designed to meet specific local and regional needs. Efforts have been
focused on the Department's regional Staff Development Program, and in 1974 a
total of 1,690 persons participated in 93 regional workshops, seminars, night courses,
and special conferences at a cost of $22,000.
Regional workshops covered a wide range of topics—family law, child abuse
and neglect, day care, Mincome, income assistance, reception training, orientation
of new staff, labour relations, supervision, family counselling, interviewing, communication skills, and needs of the aged. All regions have encouraged participation
by staff of other Government departments and related volunteer services, and
included in the workshops have been teachers, health professionals, probation
officers, judges, police, lawyers, foster parents, and Indian Band welfare workers.
Other Staff Development activities in 1974 included nine in-service training
programs for new financial assistance and service work staff, development of a
course in office management and supervision for administrative support staff, providing assistance in staff training to the Vancouver Resources Board, and assisting in
the training of four Native Indian persons who are employed in a project aimed at
increasing the number of Indian homes available for adoption and foster home
placements.
In December the Staff Development Division introduced the Information Exchange Program. This new program brings together District Supervisors, senior
clerks, and experienced social workers and financial assistance workers from around
the Province. These field staff are able to meet with Headquarters personnel for an
exchange of information and ideas on the full range of Department programs,
policies, and procedures.
Special attention has been given to close liaison with universities and community colleges in an effort to ensure that adequate training programs are developed
to meet projected personnel needs in social services and to provide opportunities for
career advancement for all levels of Social Service personnel.
With the assistance of the Provincial Library, there has been a thorough
reorganization of the Department's library services.  This has involved setting up a
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974
R 21
reference section, establishing inter-library loans, and the development of bibliographies on such topics as management, day care, and child abuse.
Bursaries and training grants in the amount of $55,000 were provided in 1974
to staff on educational leave.
RESEARCH
The Research Division is made up of nine Research Officers and Consultants
drawn from various disciplinary backgrounds which include sociology, economics,
political science, psychology, social work, and planning. They are supported by a
small team of clerical personnel. The Division has officers in both Victoria and
Vancouver.
The central activities of the Division in 1974 have been in the areas of program
and service evaluation, policy analysis, and technical assistance in the design and
introduction of information reporting systems.
In/ the area of program evaluation, staff of the Division have produced reports
which include the evaluation of the Women's Centre and Transition House in
Victoria, the Neighbourhood Services Association Community Development Component in Vancouver, the Provincial Burials Program, services for senior citizens,
and day care services. At year-end the Division was in the process of evaluating a
range of programs and services funded through the Department. These have
included special services for children, services to families and children, information
centres, and youth services.
Research staff have also worked on the design and costing for a large-scale
survey of users' perceptions of, and attitudes to, the social assistance programs.
In the area of policy analysis, the Research Division has concentrated on
Income Maintenance with special reference to Mincome programs.
The Division has been engaged in a review of existing information systems,
and continues to provide technical and statistical help to divisions in the monitoring
of trends in service provision. Particular attention has been given to the design of
a more effective information system for the Department.
Finally, the Division is engaged in liaison for very specific purposes with the
Family Law Reform Commission (study in matrimonial property), Environmental
Land Use Secretariat (northwest British Columbia development), Department of
Education (user of service surveys), Educational Research Institute of British
Columbia and Vancouver School Board (evaluation of alternate educational programs); and Federal Law Reform Commission (delinquency study).
  SERVICES FOR FAMILIES
AND CHILDREN
 Figure 2
Services for Families and Children
($56.9 million)
Other-
Hostels,
Etc.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974 R 25
INTRODUCTION
by J. V. Belknap, Superintendent of Child Welfare
The effectiveness of the child welfare program and the means by which children
and families are supported are indicators of the social well-being of our Provincial
family. A child who is suffering from want or neglect anywhere in the Province is
also a tangible measure of suffering in a family and in a community which seriously
affects us all.
In the last year, at any one time, there were over 9,000 children in the care
of the Superintendent of Child Welfare. These children required necessities of food,
shelter, and clothing. Even more basically, they needed the loving and caring and
nurturing that is essential to life. This was provided by people—mostly ordinary,
loving people. They extend from the natural parents and the foster parents to the
legislators; from the doctors and the social workers; the policemen and the Judges;
and most of all, by all of the child's neighbours, both you and I.
Children grow and flourish amidst people. That is, people who have love,
respect, and concern for their right to be and to become unique and individual.
Children languish and die when they are seen and dealt with as problems; when
they are seen to require solutions or processes or institutions that can shape and
make them into beings that will not challenge us or threaten us or infringe upon us
beyond our comfortable means.
The past year measures up to be a milestone of hope for children. Significantly it opened with the beginning work of the Family and Children's Law Commission, whose major task was to study and make recommendations to improve
the statute law and the systems that exist for the benefit of children and their
families. The Commission listened and heard, in the main, from those most
affected by the laws and the system throughout the Province. They have built a
climate of questioning around the very values and the philosophical bases upon
which many of our approaches to children and parents are founded.
The approach of bringing the courts closer to people through the unified court
experiment in Surrey and Delta has ramifications that have captured the interest
of the whole country. To anticipate the full effect of the Commission's findings
would be presumptive. The very open methods of search that occurred can only
be viewed as encouraging for the future.
Another inquiry respecting the rights of children with equally serious implications is at present being dealt with in the highest court. This is a matter affecting
the adoption of a Native Indian child and points to the serious suffering that exists
among the Indian people of our Province and their courageous struggle to re-establish themselves as a noble and independent people.
The number of children of Indian status and heritage who are cared for by the
Superintendent of Child Welfare is still proportionately the largest group within our
guardianship. These children stand in jeopardy of losing their tribal roots and their
cultural rights. The children stand to lose their Indianhood, that factor which is
inextricably bound to their need to develop a unique personhood.
The Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs and the British Columbia Association of Non-Status Indians have now joined in a venture with the Department of
Human Resources to find and develop homes and capacities whereby the Indian
families and communities can more readily maintain and care for their own children.
There are presently four staff under the direction of these organizations co-joined
with the administration of our own Departmental staff who are involved in this
project.
 R 26 HUMAN RESOURCES
Children and youth who behave in ways that cause them to be called delinquent
continue to pose a dilemma. The attitudes of the community are becoming polarized
into extreme positions that seem at times to defy reason and careful judgment. Our
youth are posed as a menace to the well-being of the community and a cry is heard
to cast them out lest they menace or destroy our neighbourhoods. Fact and reason
indicate that only a very small number of children constitute this apparent group of
individuals who appear to defy measures to help them. This group of children
have existed throughout the history of man.
We remain certain that creating programs or building institutions that are
designed to isolate the child from his communiy, or deprive him of an environment
which provides for growth and personal development, or removes him from his
right to become responsible, will not work to either his or society's benefit. This
approach has not worked in the past; it will not work in the future.
Programs or facilities that are built out of fear become fearsome; those built
out of a sense of vengeance become vengeful. It becomes dangerously simple to
view children who act out violently as most needing violent and vengeful means of
dealing with them. The laws of British Columbia and Canada as they affect children
do not anywhere provide for punishment or deprivation. This is a clear measure
of our society's respect for the fact that children are in a state of development and
that the means by which we care for them in their childhood will be reflected in how
they ultimately behave toward all of us.
PREVENTIVE AND PROTECTIVE SERVICES FOR
CHILDREN AND THEIR FAMILIES
Goal—To provide services for families with children which will help keep
the family unit together and improve the relationships in the home.
Description—In all programs for children, services are designed first to keep
the child in his or her own home if at all possible. Services are sometimes described
as being "preventive" or "protective" in nature. By "prevention" it is implied
that services are made available which will help prevent social breakdown in the
individual or family unit. It is the attempt to create conditions under which problems will not arise. After-school day care is a good example of a preventive program; it ensures that children of school age are not left without supervision during
those hours between the time school closes and the parent returns from his or her
job. Wherever prevention is possible the whole community benefits because there
is less social disruption and personal suffering. As well, preventive services reduce
the potential cost of services that would be needed should a chronic problem develop.
Approximately one-third of the Department's expenditure on children goes to
preventive services.
One of the difficulties faced by Government in funding preventive services is
the difficulty in actually "proving" the effectiveness of these services. For example,
it is difficult to "count" the number of children that were not "abused," did not end
up in the courts, or commit suicide because preventive services are available.
Protective services are those services provided when a problem has already
been identified. This includes supportive services in the child's own home, counselling of families, and, where necessary, protection by the removal of the child from
his or her home either permanently or temporarily. Legislation authorizing preventive and protective services through the Department of Human Resources is
found in the Protection of Children Act, Equal Guardianship of Infants Act, the
Juvenile Delinquents Act (Canada), and the Children of Unmarried Parents Act.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974
R 27
Under the Protection of Children Act, a Department staff member first
investigates complaints that a child is in need of protection. The staff member
attempts to determine what family problems have led to the child's neglect or abuse.
The social worker's first goal is to provide services which will help in the resolution
of these problems within the family. All needed support services are mobilized to
this end. Only if the problem cannot be resolved in the home is the child separated
temporarily from his/her family. Separation of the child takes place through application to the Family Court or through agreement between the parent and the
Department of Human Resources. Services continue which will support the family
and prepare them for being reunited with the child. If the child's return to his or
her home appears inadvisable, plans for an alternative home are made. Such plans
are made on a short-term basis as long as there exists some possibility of the child
returning to his/her natural parents. The number of children presently in care under
the Protection of Children Act is found in the following table:
Table 6—Protection of Children Act Wards as at December 31,19741
Wards
Under Provincial supervision  4,721
Under Vancouver Resources Board supervision  1,412
Totals    6,133
Children Awaiting
Hearing Before
the Courts
290
99
389
1 These figures are actual as of December 1974 and do not take into account movement, that is, children
that come into care and then leave. In 1974, about 900 children appeared before the court and approximately 9,000 were in care under the Protection of Children Act at some time.
Children also come into the care of the Department of Human Resources
under the Juvenile Delinquents Act. These children are placed under the care of
the Superintendent of Child Welfare and services available from the Department
of Human Resources are used to help the child. The wide range of services
available to all children discussed in this Report between pages 27 and 55 help
the child overcome his/her social problem. The number of children who are
charged to the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare is illustrated in the following table:
Table 7—Children Made the Responsibility of the Superintendent of Child Welfare
as a Result of a Finding Under the Juvenile Delinquents Act as at December 1,19741
Under Provincial supervision   615
Under Vancouver Resources Board supervision _   212
Total     827
1 These figures are actual as of December 1974 and do not take into account movement, that is, children
that come into care and then leave. Approximately 1,550 children were in care under the Juvenile
Delinquents Act at some time in 1974.
The Equal Guardianship of Infants Act provides guardianship and assistance
to children who are orphans. The Public Trustee's office retains responsibility for
the child's financial affairs and the Superintendent of Child Welfare is responsible
for the child's "well-being."   Most children in care under this piece of legislation
 R 28
HUMAN RESOURCES
do not require extensive services from the Department of Human Resources. They
usually live with concerned relatives who fill the role of parent. However, should
help be required, these "second" parents have ready access to the services of the
Department,   Numbers are illustrated in the following table:
Table 8—Equal Guardianship of Infants Act
Wards
Under Provincial supervision  360
Under Vancouver Resources Board supervision     28
Total
_____ 388
A further piece of legislation which involves the Superintendent of Child
Welfare in the well-being of children in British Columbia is contained in the
Children of Unmarried Parents Act. Service to the unmarried mother, such as
financial assistance, advice, and counselling is available through local Human
Resources offices. The Department will assist the mother in planning for the child
by bringing to her attention the alternatives of adoption placement or raising the
child herself. If she chooses to raise the child herself, she is told what assistance
is available to help her. The Superintendent of Child Welfare becomes involved in
the situation if action is taken to provide financial assistance to the mother by the
putative father prior to the birth of her child, or to provide maintenance for the
child either through a personal agreement or court order. The Superintendent is
notified of, and acknowledges all, initial court hearings under the Children of
Unmarried Parents Act, and is advised of payments ordered by the court, or
arranged by agreement as payable to the Superintendent of Child Welfare. The
program, therefore, functions in close liaison with Child Welfare Accounts Division,
one person there being responsible for all Children of Unmarried Parents Act
accounts. Approximately 3,000 unmarried mothers and fathers used the services
of the Department of Human Resources in 1974.
The Superintendent of Child Welfare has further responsibility for the provision
of reports to the Supreme Court, at the direction of a Judge of the Supreme Court,
on any matter concerning custody of children under the Divorce Act or Equal
Guardianship of Infants Act.
The order of a Judge of the Supreme Court, directing the Superintendent of
Child Welfare to provide a report to the court, is forwarded to the Child Welfare
Division. Child Welfare Division requests an inquiry by the appropriate district
offices and provides pertinent information and forms. The district office returns
completed forms.
The court report completed by the Child Welfare Division provides information
on the parents' circumstances and makes recommendations on custody of the
children.
In a few cases the Superintendent may appoint separate counsel to represent
the interests of the children, particularly when the custody dispute is between other
than natural parents.
Similar service is provided for the Supreme Courts and Family Courts in other
provinces and countries.
Abused Children Registry—Another program under the direction of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare is the Registry of Abused Children. Those
involved in this program attempt to make professionals and the general public
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974
R 29
aware of their statutory obligation to report child abuse and neglect. Reports of
abuse are correlated in the registry and information is used to provide needed
services to children and their parents. The age, sex, and numbers of children who
were reported abused are given in the following table:
1974-
Male—Under 3 years   34
3-10 years   44
11 years and older  15
No age reported   ___ 2
Female—Under 3 years   27
3-10 years   29
11 years and older   20
Total cases reported   171
—A
Comparison
d Sex of Children Involved
1973
1972
1971
34
34
27
52
31
8
21
9
6
29
17
22
15
28
16
20
17
11
171
136
90
Switchboard operators in local offices who receive battered-children calls are
alerted to transfer the calls to a social worker in their office without fail, after taking
the name, number, and address of the caller. Social workers are instructed to
follow up immediately any call by getting in contact with the family through a
home visit.
Repatriation of Children—Another service that the Child Welfare Division
is involved in is the repatriation of children, that is, arranging for the return of
children to their province or state of residence. Children under 17 years of age
who are temporarily stranded in British Columbia and children from British
Columbia stranded in other provinces or states are looked after by this program.
Arrangements for transportation, contact with parents, stop-over supervision, escort
where required, and liaison with other child welfare authorities is undertaken. In
difficult cases where the child refuses to return home, workers attempt to help the
child work out his or her anxieties. The number of children repatriated over the
last several years is illustrated in Figure 2.
Figure 2
Repatriation of Children, Fiscal Years 1970/71, 1971/72, 1972/73, 1973/74,
and Calendar Year 1974
822
1970/71
1971/72
1972/73
1973/74
1974
 R 30 HUMAN RESOURCES
This figure includes movement in and out of the Province only. Within the
Province there is, also, substantial movement in returning children to their own
homes.
The number of children repatriated in 1974 is up substantially over previous
years. Recent studies have shown that young people away from home who are
unskilled and unemployed are a high-risk group in the society and likely to get into
trouble. As a result of this knowledge, the Department of Human Resources
actively undertook a program of returning children to their homes outside British
Columbia and in bringing British Columbia children home. This policy was
preventive in that large numbers of young people were removed from "high risk"
involvement with drugs, prostitution, theft, and other criminal activities.
Changing patterns—The general over-riding policy in 1974 has been to
work as much as possible within the community to improve services to children.
Bill 154, the Protection of Children Amendment Act, was passed unanimously by
all members of the Legislature in 1974. The purpose of this Bill was to strengthen
the Protection of Children Act and encourage community involvement in Protection
of Children Act cases. Specifically, the Bill gives protection from liability to
persons reporting battered-children cases, and makes parents responsible witnesses
in any proceedings under the Act.
Another provision of the Act brought into effect in November 1974 in the
South Fraser Judicial District provides that a Judge of the Provincial Court (Family
Division) can sit with a panel of two lay persons in cases arising under the
Protection of Children Act. We think this is entirely appropriate as the issue before
the court necessitates a judgment regarding the standard of care the child is receiving
from his or her parents or guardians. The main issue is whether the child is in need
of protection.
With a mixed panel consisting of judge and lay persons there is a greater
possibility of full understanding of diverse cultures and standards of child-rearing.
In cases where there is disagreement among members of the panel the majority rules.
Federal-Provincial relations—Costs of child welfare programs are shared
between the Federal and Provincial Government 50:50.
DAY CARE—A PREVENTIVE SERVICE
Goal—To provide a support service looking after children during those hours
when parents are unable to care for them. Child care services are designed to meet
the needs of all children and encourage activities which will help children in their
every-day social development.
Description—Approximately 25,000 children in British Columbia are in
day care.   Of these, 12,950 are subsidized by the Provincial Government.
Day care services are used most frequently by families headed by a single
parent. They are used by two-parent families when both parents are working,
attending educational institutions, or during serious illness or family crises. In
British Columbia, seven programs exist to meet the needs of children and give
parents flexibility in choosing the type of care they would like for their child.
Table 10 illustrates the numbers of subsidized children in these programs. At the
present time, 5 per cent of the children under 6 years of age in British Columbia
are receiving Provincially subsidized day care.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974 R 31
Table 10—Children Receiving Subsidized Day Care as of December 31,1974
Program                                                            Half-Day              Full Day Total
Group day care       173                4,017 4,190
Family day care        128                2,943 3,071
Nursery school         633                     31 664
Kindergarten             34                       6 40
Out of school     2,047                   159 2,206
Special needs centre       368                   383 757
In-home day care         190                1,832 2,022
3,573                9,377 12,950
1. Family day care—An intimate small-home atmosphere is the choice of
many parents for their child's care. In 1974, up to 2,800 children were subsidized
in unlicensed family day care homes. These homes are visited by the Department
of Human Resources to ensure that the family day care parent is providing good
service and is aware of any help that may be available from the Department of
Human Resources or from the community. If three or more children are being
cared for by a family day care parent, then he or she is obliged to obtain a community care facilities licence. In many communities obtaining a licence may be a
problem due to diverse zoning, health, fire, and building regulations. These regulations have frequently been developed with large institutions in mind and are quite
inappropriate for some family homes. At present there are 190 licensed family
homes capable of serving up to 900 children. An advantage of family day care is
that the family day care parent can often accommodate children of a wide age
range and in slightly less orthodox hours than group day care centres, for example,
parents working week-end shifts. Similarly, the family day care home may be
situated in a desirable location, close to the child's school or home or parent's place
of employment.
2. Group day care—There are 256 centres which care for 6,000 children
between the ages of 3 and 5 years for up to 10 hours a day. 28 pilot projects
throughout the Province are providing services for children under 3 years of age.
Another 24 centres are being developed for children over 3 years of age, making a
prospective total of 280 centres in the Province. Centres are licensed and staff must
have specialized pre-school training. Parents may use any centre of their choice,
providing space is available. Fee subsidization is available for lower income
groups. Community-based group centres encourage parent involvement and make
it possible for children to remain in their own neighbourhood to make friends with
children with whom they will later be going to school. Group day care has the
advantages of allowing children to mix with other children of diverse backgrounds
and providing the opportunity to learn under the guidance of qualified Child Care
Workers.
3. In-home care—This program allows parents to hire someone to come into
their homes to care for their children. It is most frequently used by families unable
to take advantage of other day care services. Over 2,000 children presently receive
subsidization for this type of service.
4. Out-of-school care—Family and group day care centres accommodate
children of school age during those hours when parents are away. As well, 60
separate "latch key" programs are available for "after school" hours.    Subsidies to
 1
R 32
HUMAN RESOURCES
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 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974
R 33
parents are offered on the sliding scale illustrated in Table 11 to a maximum of
$45 per month. The program offers supervision and enrichment through recreation
activities; all-day care is provided when schools are closed. Subsidization is to
the regular rate for all-day day care.
5. Nursery school and private kindergarten—This program offers part-time
care and education for children who need extra stimulation and preparation for
school. It also provides a short period of relief for those parents who need it.
Supervisors in this program have pre-school training and special programs are
available for children with physical, emotional, or social handicaps. An "only"
child or a child moving from a different cultural background often benefits greatly
from the program. At present, 704 children receive subsidies of up to $40 per
month in this program. Private kindergarten is only subsidized where no public
kindergarten is available.
Changing patterns
Figure 3
Children Receiving Subsidized Day Care, 1971 to 1974
2,000
1971
2,500
1972
1973
1974
In 1974, day care services continued to expand. Figure 3 shows the increase
in numbers of children using day care. Government found, however, that in some
programs such as family day care and in-home day care we have reached a
temporary levelling point where we are no longer experiencing the dramatic
increases of 1973. This might be explained by rising wages whereby fewer parents
require subsidization for day care services and, therefore, we are not made aware
of numbers using family day care or in-home day care services. Group day care
usage continued to expand, but this also is slowing down with some centres reporting
vacancies for the first time. In 1974, 52 new group day care centres opened
throughout the Province. In addition to this, 24 new centres are presently in
various stages of development. This makes a total of 256 centres presently operating
in British Columbia, with 280 centres expected to be operating by 1975. This is an
interesting contrast to 1971 when only 67 group centres existed throughout the
Province.
 R 34
HUMAN RESOURCES
Figure 4
Number of Group Day Care Centres in British Columbia Operating and Being Developed
at Year-end 1966-74
11
1966
35
67
152
1968
1970
1971
1972
250
1973
1974
A Capital Grants Program assists the start-up of nonprofit group day care
centres. This year, $732,256 was spent on a "partnership" basis on capital grants
in communities. "Partnership" is the concept whereby the community matches
donations of the Provincial Government. Often, this is accomplished through a
community land donation, or a long-term lease of a building at nominal rent.
Donations by parents of hard work, materials, and skills are also considered. The
maximum capital grant available to a nonprofit society is $20,000, plus an equipment grant of $2,500.
It was recognized by the Department of Human Resources that inflation has
had a dramatic effect on the Day Care Program. The $20,000 capital grant in 1973
went a long way toward establishing a new day care centre, but today it represents
less than half the amount required. For this reason a special allocation of $527,000
was made to purchase 12 prefabricated units. These units will be owned by
Government and leased to groups in the communities where "partnership" has
been established with municipalities. It should be noted that co-operation with
municipalities has been excellent. The Vancouver area will receive ten units,
Sparwood will receive one, and Kelowna the other. The municipalities are making
land available, offering utility hook-ups, landscaping, and contributing to outdoor
equipment. We see this approach as a possible alternative to the problems now
facing communities in establishing a new centre.
A recent booklet available from the Department of Human Resources entitled
Creative Guide to Developing a Day Care Centre is available to offer assistance to
groups who want to start a day care centre. This booklet may be borrowed from
your local Department of Human Resources office.
British Columbia has also increased the subsidy of day care fees to parents
in the past year so that a parent might maintain some of the benefits derived from
increased Family Allowances.    Family Allowance must be included for Federal
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974
R 35
cost-sharing purposes in calculating a family's net income. Table 11 indicates a
family's contribution toward the costs of day care based on take-home pay.
Government presently subsidizes day care fees up to $120 per month per child for
qualifying parents using group day care.
The British Columbia Government is taking advantage of the temporary
levelling in the demand for increased day care by devoting time to improving the
quality of services.
In 1974 an effort was made to offer more concrete support to the Family Day
Care Program. Home visits were made to family day care givers to make them
aware of services available. In some communities toy libraries and substitute help
for day care givers is available. More attention was placed on services to parents
and children with special needs. It is our hope that in 1975 pre-school consultants
will be available to group day care centres to improve the content of programs and
to advise on new developments and staff training. It is expected 1975 will also be
a "catch-up and evaluation period" to improve supporting services, including training for Day Care Workers. In 1974 the salaries of day care staff substantially
improved.   Further increases are expected in 1975.
We are also facing a great deal of pressure to provide day care services for
children under 3 years of age. At present, pilot projects operating with the approval
of the Community Care Facilities Licensing Board are providing services to approximately 255 children under three years. Fees for this type of service are
running close to $200 per month per child, which is very costly. To date, insufficient
pre-school training has been available to prepare staff to work with this very young
age-group. For these reasons, further expansion of under-3 day care has not been
encouraged until we can resolve these issues.
Another problem faced in 1974 was one of standards to meet licensing requirements. The Ministers of Human Resources and Health recently announced that
the Community Care Facilities Licensing Board will be split into two boards—one
dealing with adult se ices, the other dealing with children's services. New draft
regulations relating to child care will be open for public debate at a series of public
hearings by the new Children's Board once it is constituted in the near future. It
should be remembered that many regulations such as zoning, fire, and safety are
the responsibility of the municipal or Federal Governments and are not superseded
by British Columbia Government legislation. It is important to note that a new
amendment to the Community Care Facilities Licensing Act allows for community
representation .n the Community Care Licensing Board for the first time. Board
membership was previously limited to senior public servants.
In summary, then, 1974 has been a year of continued expansion of services.
As the year drew to a close there was awareness of the need to evaluate services
given the rapid expansion in facilities and costs. A report produced by the Research
Division in the fall of 1974 indicated the diversity of needs of day care users. It
was found that 70 per cent of subsidized users were single-parent families, and that
the average income of all subsidized day care families was only $446. Users interviewed identified a need for more day care, including services for children under
3 years. They also expressed a need for extended hours of service, and more support
services such as recreation facilities, baby-sitters for sick children, and more staff
with specialized training. Parents wanted to have more public information on day
care, more male influence in day care, and a better cross-reference system to indicate vacancies in centres.
 R 36
HUMAN RESOURCES
We realize that these demands are legitimate and must be met. Greater
emphasis will be placed on planning and ongoing evaluation during 1975 so as to
increase satisfaction with the existing system.
Cost-sharing—After considerable negotiation and lengthy delay, the Federal
Government has agreed to share in day care costs. The delay in reaching agreement
has been an obstacle to planning. Further, we are particularly concerned with the
status of cost-sharing on capital grants.
The Federal Government has indicated it will share only to the percentage
point of capital costs that equals the percentage of children on subsidies. That is,
if 40 per cent of the children in a centre are receiving day care subsidies, only 40
per cent of the capital costs will be shared 50:50. We are disappointed with this
approach. We believe group day care should not develop as a program only for
the poor. We would like to see a variety of day care facilities which can be used
by all children in the community and which would encourage the participation
and enrichment of children of mixed economic backgrounds.
Contrary to day care programs in other jurisdictions, there have been no
discriminatory restrictions in the Day Care Subsidy Program in British Columbia
such as enrolment being limited to families who are in receipt of Social Allowance,
working parents, single parents, etc. Our only criteria for eligibility is the need
of the child. British Columbia will continue to negotiate for improved sharing on
capital costs. Table 12 shows total day care expenditures and Federal sharing for
the year 1971 to 1974.
Table 12—Total Day Care Expenditures and Federal Sharing,
Calendar Years 1971-74
Calendar Year
Provincial
Expenditure
Federal
Portion
Claimed1
Percentage That Federal
Sharing Is of
Provincial Expenditure
1974
1973
1972
1971
10,198,000
4,267,000
1,534,000
1.194,000
3,845,000
1,609,000
660,000
518,000
37.7
37.7
43.0
43.4
1 Totals for 1973 and 1974 are estimates as sharing
rangements have not been finalized.
SPECIAL SERVICES TO  CHILDREN—A PREVENTIVE  SERVICE
Goal—To assist the child and family within their home and community in
order to overcome the need to take the child into care because of unusual social or
behavioural difficulties.
Description—This is an innovative program first initiated in November of
1973 with a minimum of restrictions to provide flexibility. A three-stage evaluation
of this program is at present being undertaken. As a result of this research, guidelines are being drafted which will focus on the goals and limits of the program.
The Special Services to Children Program is presently available to all children
in need. Family earnings may be considered in contributing to costs. The program
functions by contracting with individuals on a fee-for-service basis to work with
children and their families under the supervision of our social work staff. The
amount of time spent with the child is determined by the needs of the child.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974 R 37
The program responds to the needs of children in a variety of situations,
whether that need be at home, in school, in day care centres, in probation services,
or in any other situation. The workers in more than 70 offices of our Department
throughout the Province can be approached by any professional from any discipline
who is working with families and children to arrange assistance for a particular child.
These are a few examples of the services provided:
A mentally retarded and emotionally disturbed child, age 16, is helped to cope
with society by having at first a male and later a female project worker as a companion, mainly using recreational activities as the approach. The use of the second
project worker was to allay the child's fear of females. The Department administers
and pays for this program ($330 monthly plus transportation and materials).
Another example: A project worker was hired to give academic education and
behaviour-modification education to an autistic boy, age 6, in the school as well as
in his home. The Department administers and pays for this program ($264.89
monthly).
We made the program open-ended and requested the field to be aware of cost,
but to have as their main concern the needs of the child. Staff were authorized to
engage appropriate personnel on short-term renewable contracts (up to three
months).
Staff hired were found in the communities, and every community has a "pool"
of people with special skills who are consulted. For instance, there are many men
and women who were teachers, social workers, nurses, psychologists, or volunteer
workers with agencies, who were available for a few hours a day to do a range of
jobs as described in the examples given. These people were paid at the same rate
as Departmental staff, based on the hours worked. One basic rule applies—no
special services program worker shall receive more money than Departmental staff
members.
The project worker co-operates with a teacher, social worker, or probation
officer, but no proprietary control is exercised by the Department unless the work
involves a Departmental case. The concept of teamwork is operative, and at all
times the needs of the family and the child are the prime consideration.
Total costs of the program in 1974 were $4.3 million.
It has been noted that admissions to care in British Columbia have not increased
in proportion to other provinces within Canada. In areas where special services
have been utilized extensively there has been a corresponding decrease in the rate
of juvenile delinquency and other problems associated with troubled youth.
Education support services—One portion of this program which has been
very effective is the education support services. Reaching approximately 1,400
children, it enables school districts to serve a wider range of children with special
needs through the provision of supplementary staff and services. Under this
program we are tackling the problem of the school "drop-out" or school "stop-out."
This, of course, deals not only with those children in high schools but also those in
elementary grades who have social or learning problems or for various reasons are
not attending school. Children referred for educational support services arc
identified by schools, the Corrections Branch, Mental Health, and other agencies
as well as by the Department of Human Resources. Education support services
account for approximately one-quarter of the expenditure on special services to
children. In 1974 this totalled $1.1 million, with the majority of funds going to
alternative school programs. The School Board matches this sum of money, and
supplies the teachers, while Human Resources provides the Child Care Workers.
 R 38 HUMAN RESOURCES
There is already strong indication of the success of this program. Children
being served are involved in fewer delinquent acts. A recent sample showed that,
at the time of referral, 27 per cent had committed juvenile delinquent acts or were
in trouble with the law. At the completion of service, 14 per cent of those 294
children were no longer in that behavioural category. Tabular analysis of the survey
data also indicated academic improvement among children participating in the
Special Services program.
Federal-Provincial relations—This program has not received approval for
cost-sharing from the Federal Government. We are at present looking at the program to determine whether modifications can be made to increase the likelihood of
cost-sharing.
YOUTH HOSTEL PROGRAM
Goal—Youth hostels are provided to make low-cost accommodation available
for Canadian youth travelling in British Columbia.
Description—Youth are referred to hostels for a maximum stay of three
days and are asked to pay $1 per day in Vancouver and 50 cents per day outside
Vancouver. This entitles them to a bed and two meals for a maximum stay of
three days. The average age of travellers was around 20 years, but ages ranged
from 16 to over 25 years.
This year, the Summer Youth Hostel Program involved 23 hostels, most of
them temporary, in 16 communities across British Columbia. These hostels
provided 69,293 bed-nights to 20,475 individuals between June 1 and the end of
September.
As in past years, financial responsibility for the program was shared between
the British Columbia Department of Human Resources and the Office of the Federal
Secretary of State. Secretary of State, through grants to community groups, funded
most of the salary and operational costs of the hostels. Human Resources, through
a grant to the Association of British Columbia Hostels, funded the food costs not
met by user fees for the hostels outside Vancouver. This year's experience re-
emphasized the fact that the costs of the hostel program need not be exorbitant.
Hostel users contributed $30,000 toward the costs of the program. The hostel
program also provided shelter and food for several thousand destitute travellers.
Total expenditures for the program are broken down in the following table:
Table 13—Breakdown of Provincial Expenditures for Youth Hostels
Association of British Columbia Hostels (includes food moneys $
to hostels outside Vancouver)      35,000.00
Vancouver Hostels and Youth Referral Centre     85,502.55
Total i      120,502.55
i Of this, $62,816.28 is CA.P. cost shareable.
The Association of British Columbia Hostels, funded through the Department
of Human Resources, administered the moneys for food which were not met by
the user fees to the hostels outside Vancouver. That Association also provided
$4,000 operating costs for the Kamloops hostel. Two training sessions in the spring
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974 R 39
were sponsored by ABCH under their Provincial grant, as well as one general meeting. The ABCH played a significant role in bringing hostel operators from across
the Province together to share ideas and experiences as well as developing new
hostels. In the current negotiations between the Provincial hostel associations and
the Canadian Youth Hostel Association sponsored by the Secretary of State, the
ABCH has shown real leadership.
Vancouver continues to play an important role in the program. This year,
14,255 of the 20,475 persons using the hostels in the program passed through
Vancouver. The number of bed-nights was down in Vancouver by about 10,000.
This is primarily due to the fact that the length of stay was reduced from the
four-day limit of former years to a three-day one as it is elsewhere in the Province.
Vancouver provided six temporary hostels and a home placement program
for travellers this year. Five of these hostels were in public school gyms. Vancouver hostels were sponsored by the YMCA, the YWCA, Canadian Youth Hostel
Association, and the Lower Mainland Youth Succor Society. Overflow from
these hostels were referred to available beds at the Bridge YWCA, Tribal Village,
and Catholic Charities, all year-round hostels.
The Youth Referral Centre, sponsored by the Crisis Centre, served as the
central clearinghouse for hostel referrals and information.
Changing patterns—Some programs attempted in 1974 were the following:
Employment Services—This summer, Canada Manpower came up with a
program to provide detached Manpower workers for the hostels throughout the
Province. With few exceptions this program was ineffective. In Vancouver, in
1973, the Youth Employment Committee, with the same number of staff as
provided by Manpower this year, placed 609 young persons in temporary and
permanent jobs. This year, the student Manpower workers placed 185. It is hoped
that in 1975 the Province will re-establish the Youth Employment Committee,
possibly as a contract grant with Canada Manpower or expansion of the Youth
Employment Service.
French Information Project—This was funded by the Secretary of State. The
goals of the project were never very clearly defined and the project itself suffered
from lack of direction because of this. Staff were helpful in the referral centre
for translation and contact with francophones who came through, but the French
Information Project was not of much assistance to the other hostels in British
Columbia.
Wayfarers Guide—This year there were two information publications called
Wayfarers Guides, one for Vancouver and another for the rest of British Columbia.
The British Columbia Wayfarers Guide was distributed to all the hostels in the
Province. Those remaining copies of the Vancouver Wayfarers Guide are still
being used by the Single Men's Unit of the Department of Human Resources, in
Vancouver, as resource guides for new arrivals to Vancouver.
Total numbers of people who used the Summer Hostel Program are illustrated
in Table 14. As a result of the Hostel Program, some young people, who in the
past may have ended up on social assistance, have been encouraged to remain off
assistance and to return home, using the temporary help of hostels where
necessary.
 R 40
HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 14-
—Summer Hostel Program
Statistics
Number
First Stay
of Indi
United
in B.C.
viduals
Male
Female
Canadian
States
Other
Hostel
Fort St. John	
458
360
98
208
168
82
230
Hope	
...     3,299
2,508
791
2,149
862
287
2,446
100 Mile House	
471
359
112
311
96
64
226
Kamloops	
...     1,619
1,241
378
1,132
362
125
1,575
Kelowna	
...    2,551
1,768
753
2,033
293
225
1,065
Nanaimo	
.._    4,107
2,928
1,179
2,712
968
429
1,277
Nelson	
357
256
101
271
70
16
222
Port Alberni	
2,259
1,658
601
1,647
429
183
764
Prince George	
..     1,506
1,197
309
999
336
171
570
Prince Rupert	
666
463
203
273
279
114
353
Revelstoke	
...     1,361
1,026
337
853
387
121
737
Salmon Arm    	
1,165
449
916
342
249
107
737
348
286
85
142
16
523
214
Trail	
Williams Lake	
415
333
82
289
81
45
161
Subtotals
_._  20,683
15,355
5,300
13,962
4,702
2,020
10,363
Vancouver:
Home placement-
....    3,215
1,845
1,370
1,171
1,002
502
2,498
Nightingale	
923
923
600
260
63
512
Queen Mary	
..     1,434
1,434
721
545
168
804
Fraser	
...     1,178
1,178
869
228
81
690
Lord Roberts	
...     1,659
1,659
1,173
324
162
389
3,361
3,361
2,370
619
372
1,069
YWCA	
Subtotals..
...    2,485
...   14,255
2,485
3,855
1,301
8,205
904
280
1,754
7,715
10,400
3,882
1,628
Totals
Victoria	
...   34,938
...    5,466
25,755
6,221
9,155
3,115
22,167
3,087
8,584
1,850
3,648
18,078
2,397
530
Provincial totals	
....  40,404
31,976
12,270
25,254
10,434
4,178
20,476
Federal-Provincial relations—The following amounts are contributed to
the Youth Hostel Program:
Table 15—Expenditure of the Federal Government on Youth Hostels
$
Federal contribution   155,302.00
Provincial contribution   120,502.55
Total expenditure  275,804.55
Provincial recovery because of cost-sharing     62,816.28
Total Federal contribution   212,988.27
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974
R 41
DETACHED WORKER PROGRAM
Goal—To provide extra staff, with genuine interests in the problems of adolescents, to work with troubled youth outside the setting of local officers of the Department of Human Resources.
Description—In Victoria and New Westminster the Department helped in
1974 to fund special programs and resource people for youth with difficulties.
In the Capital Region the program was administered by the YM-YWCA. Six
full-time and one part-time worker were available through the Y. These workers
\vere experienced in relating easily with "acting-out" youth and knowledgeable of
community resources which could be used by the youth with whom they became
involved.   The municipalities of Victoria and Esquimalt shared in the costs in 1974.
Departmental expenditures for the Capital Region Project came to $11,813 in
1974.   The expenditure was cost-shared with the Federal Government.
Grants to the New Westminster Detached Worker Program totalled $9,468 in
1974. The municipality of New Westminster also shared in the cost of the program
(75 per cent Federal and municipal, 25 per cent Provincial).
In addition, the Department of Human Resources has a Youth Services Section
in the Capital Region, which has one detached youth worker as part of its staff.
In New Westminster two full-time and four part-time youth workers were
funded by the Department in 1974, to work out of space donated by the YMCA.
The Y also assumed the cost of paying a co-ordinator for the program. The
detached workers were involved in community development work—working in the
schools in co-operation with school counsellors, with youth referred from the police
and probation, and through a Family Services Committee (made up of personnel
from the various social service agencies).
In both the Capital Region and New Westminster, activities with youth were
group-oriented, often working with natural groupings of teenage friends. At least
200 youths in New Westminster participated in activities supervised by detached
workers; 250 youths were worked with in the Capital Region on a day-to-day basis,
another 150 to 200 youths were involved on a less regular basis.
Detached workers in New Westminster and the Capital Region saw themselves
as functioning as a liaison between youth and the social service agencies.
As one of the young people getting help from the detached youth work service
in Victoria said, "I think it's a good idea to have youth workers here." The worker
asked why and the boy replied, "You're the only people us kids can talk to, most
people don't understand us, I can't talk about these things with my parents. I can't
stand being around someone who doesn't listen 'cause I feel like I'm exploding
inside."
For further information on programs for youth in British Columbia communities, contact your local office of the Department of Human Resources.
CHILD CARE RESOURCES
The Department of Human Resources attempts to provide the best individual
care for children who, for whatever reason, cannot remain in their own homes.
In placing children in outside resources, all efforts are made to help the children
lead as natural and normal a life-style as possible.
 R 42
HUMAN RESOURCES
Figure 5
Children in Care by Type of Care as at December 31, 1974
Under the discussion of protective and preventive services for children we
underlined the Government's intent of keeping children in their own homes and
communities. In keeping with this philosophy, social workers attempt to place
children as close as possible to their families for visiting and to make easier their
transition back home. This has meant that many communities have had to develop,
for the first time, a variety of suitable child care resources within their own communities. This is a great improvement over the previous situation where children
were often sent some distance to a large institution or other resource.
The resources most frequently used by the Department of Human Resources
are illustrated in Figure 5. Figure 6 gives a comparison of total numbers of children
in care over the last several years. This is followed by a brief description of each
of the resources.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974
R 43
FOSTER HOMES
Foster homes first emerged in British Columbia in the 19'30's as an alternative
to institutional care. In 1974, as the above figure illustrates, foster homes were
the most frequently used resource for children not in their own homes. Of the
approximately 9,800 children in care at December 31, 1974, 6,130 were in foster
homes.
Children placed in foster homes come into care with the voluntary consent of
parents, as temporary or permanent wards under the Protection of Children Act, as
Equal Guardianship of Infants Act wards, or because of a conviction under the
Federal Juvenile Delinquents Act.
The goals of those working with foster children are many. Most important
is the good substitute care which foster parents offer to the child to meet his or her
physical, emotional, and social needs. Foster parents provide a home and family
relationship which is supportive and serves as a model for the child's future.
Figure 6
■.■:i:::.-'i-^-'i¥.;\:->.ii^-.,-, .. .-,■;:■ iiaa	
Number of Children in Care as at March 31, 1971, Compared to December 31, 1974
9,975
10,274
9,913
9,584
9,799
March 31,
1971
March 31,
1972
March 31,
1973
March 31,
1974
December 31,
1974
Social workers involved in foster placements attempt to find a family for each
child that is most suitable to the child's individual requirements. The over-riding
goal is, if at all possible, to reunite the child with his or her natural family at some
future date. Human Resources staff work, therefore, with the child's natural
family as well as the child. If it is demonstrated that it is not possible to reunite
the child with his/her family, then the social worker attempts to provide an alternative permanent plan at the earliest possible date. Usually this alternative plan is
adoption, particularly in the cast of younger children. In some circumstances,
however, especially with an older child, adoption may not be possible. Many
older children are ready for independence and sometimes have strong ties with the
 R 44 HUMAN RESOURCES
original parents or present foster parents. Usually in these cases the child is placed
in a resource that best meets his/her needs, such as a group home, an independent
boarding-home, or a foster home which has been approved for permanent placement.
In certain situations, particularly when a child is orphaned, a relative or close
friend of the parents assumes the foster parent role. This is often a voluntary
arrangement, with the Department providing advice or assistance if called upon.
An additional 978 British Columbia children are looked after in this way.
Foster parents are paid different rates according to the age of the child. These
rates cover basic maintenance and clothing but include no fee for service. In
special instances where the child requires extra care or special management, a
reasonable fee for service is paid to foster parents based on the extra amount of
their time that is required. Service fees take into consideration tasks of preparing
special diets, special routines, discipline, tutoring, and arranging the child's visits
with family and social workers. Standard fees for foster care are outlined in
Table 16.
Table 16—Regular Foster Home Rates as of July 1,1974
Basic Clothing
Age-group                                                                  Maintenance Allowance Total
$ $                       $
Birth to 5 years     80 9                 89
6-11 years      95 17 112
12-13 years    116 21 137
14 years and over    128 24 152
Foster parents are usually very dedicated and actively involved in child care
interests. The Foster Parent Federation, a registered society which brings together
foster parents, social workers, and other interested people, works actively at improving and enhancing the care of foster children in British Columbia. Approximately
20 per cent of all foster parents are active in the 43 Foster Parent Federation councils
throughout the Province. In 1974 the federation received funds totalling $43,000
from Government and it utilized a total of 34 social work consultants, including
local liaison people, in each Department of Human Resources office. Despite the
close inter-relationship with Government, they maintain an independent watchdog
role, providing valuable feedback to Government on the effectiveness of child
welfare policies.
A regular newsletter is sent to all foster parents, and the Government uses the
federation as a way to notify foster parents of policy changes as well. For those
wishing to find out more about the Foster Parent Federation, please write to B.C.
Federation of Foster Parent Associations, Room 207, 800 Cassiar Street, Vancouver,
B.C. (telephone 299-9131).
Changing patterns in fostering—During the last several years, expenditure on foster care has increased while the actual number of children in foster homes
has remained about the same. A comparison of the number of children in foster
care and the average cost per child over the last several years is shown in Table 17
and Figure 7. Total expenditure on foster care in 1974 was slightly over $12
million.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974
R 45
Table 17—Number of Children in Foster Home Care and Total Costs of Foster
Home Care for Years 1971/72 to 1973/74, and Calendar Year 1974
As at
Dec. 31.
1974
Number of children     6,129
Total costs in million of dollars      12.3
As at
Mar. 31.
1974
6,140
11.6
As at
Mar. 31.
1973
6,471
10.3
As at
Mar. 31.
1972
6,762
9.5
Figure 7
Average Cost per Child in Foster Home Care, Years 1971/72 lo 1973/74 and 1974
MM
$1,400
1971/72
$1,600
1972/73
$1,900
1973/74
$2,000
1974
Increased expenditure has resulted from higher basic rates being paid to foster
parents, particularly for older children. As we can see from Table 17, though,
these rates are certainly not excessive.
In 1974, approximately 4,500 foster homes were available in British Columbia
and emphasis was on placing children within their own communities. Social
workers at the regional level were given more discretion over some decisions.
Decisions involving special purchases, homemaker, or baby-sitting services to foster
parents in cases of illness or training are now being made with the approval of the
District Supervisor of the Department. This has speeded up what was formerly an
excessively lengthy process resulting in the loss of some excellent foster homes.
Despite many improvements in the Foster Home Program, it should be pointed
out that this program is not yet working at an optimal level. There continues to be
differences between regions in the numbers of resources and, therefore, continued
pressures in some regions to find foster homes. As well, staff in local offices have
been faced with increased work pressures because of the many other new programs
being made available to children.
One area where more effort is being directed is in services for Indian people.
For the past few months, two teams of Native Indians have been trying to recruit
foster and adoption homes of Indian origin. Operating on a mandate from the
Superintendent of Child Welfare and the British Columbia Association of Non-
 R 46 HUMAN RESOURCES
Status Indians, two Indians are working in the Courtenay region. Two more are
working in the Kamloops area, supported by the Superintendent of Child Welfare
and the Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs.
It is hoped that, through their efforts, more homes of Native origin will be
found for Indian children in those areas.
One of the problems experienced in finding Indian foster homes is the shortage
of adequate housing on the Reserves. In Lytton, B.C., for example, a survey indicates there is an average of 12.5 people per home. At present, an extended family
is overwhelmed when a relative's child is placed with them for a few days. Until
there is a solution to the housing shortage it is unlikely more people will wish to foster
on the Reserves. On the basis of the Lytton experience, there is definite need to
communicate to and co-ordinate our child welfare programs with the programs of
the Federal Department of Indian Affairs and the Federal Department of Regional
Economic Expansion. Better housing is needed as well as more jobs on or near the
Reserves.
It has been suggested that regular educational programs should be given to
provide non-Indian foster parents with knowledge of the Native cultures in British
Columbia. An initial assessment indicates that to initiate such an educational
program could be a major task because of the number of separate Native cultures.
This means that a cultural educational program would have to be tailored to each
region in the Province. The Department of Human Resources feels that the best
solution is still to keep Indian children in their own homes and within their own
cultural environment, where possible. Energy will continue to be directed in
this way.
In 1975, continued emphasis will be placed on resolving some of the inequities
in standards and improving availability of foster homes. A thorough program
analysis will be undertaken to look for alternative solutions to some of the remaining
problems.
Federal-Provincial relations—Foster care is cost-shared 50:50 by the
Federal and Provincial Governments.
The Federal Government is not sharing in Foster Parents Federation costs.
Another recent change in Federal-Provincial relations deals with administration
policy which has resulted in less emphasis being placed on charging back foster care
costs to the province of the child's origin.
Federal policy under the Canada Assistance Plan has discouraged charge-backs
to the point where British Columbia is no longer doing this. We feel this a reasonable policy, as changes in residency between provinces tend to be fairly even.
THERAPEUTIC HOMES
A therapeutic home is a residential resource, usually for one child, operated by
a person with child care worker skills in his or her own home. The resource is
selected when a child requires intensive treatment and would benefit from receiving
it in a family setting in his/her own community rather than a treatment institution.
It is frequently used in communities where no treatment institutions exist.
A contract is drawn up between the therapeutic parent and the Department of
Human Resources for three months, and, where necessary, for further three-month
periods up to a maximum of one year. The contract outlines treatment goals,
methods to be used, and a date when progress will first be reviewed.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974 R 47
The therapeutic home is a short-term placement with the goal of resolving
specific behavioural or emotional problems and with a view to returning the child to
to his/her home or to a less intensive community resource within one year. This was
a new program in 1974 and is in line with Government philosophy of getting away
from institutional placements for children, of solving children's problems in their
own community, and of creating an appropriate resource for a particular child rather
than always expecting the children to adapt to existing institutions.
There are at present 55 children in this program. In 1974 the program cost
$500,000, or approximately $25 per day per child. While this compares favourably
with the cost of institutionalized programs, it is expensive, and for this reason, until
further evaluation takes place, will be used cautiously.
Federal-Provincial relations—The program is cost-shared 50:50 with the
Federal Government.
RECEIVING AND GROUP HOMES
A receiving-home is usually the basic group resource in a community. These
homes provide short-term care for children who, for whatever reason, cannot
remain in their own homes. This short-term placement provides a period of time
during which the child can be observed and the child and his situation assessed so
that future plans can be appropriately worked out.
Receiving-homes are for four to eight children; they are always seen as
temporary residences for children taken into care. Some are private homes, others
are run and managed by the Department. Sometimes these homes are used as a
resource for children who remain in care for only a few days while a "crisis" in the
home situation is resolved.
Receiving-home staff are for the most part highly skilled in child care and
personally suited to handle the variety of situations they encounter. Observations
and recommendations made by staff are taken into consideration when future plans
are made for the child. In British Columbia there are usually about 150 children in
receiving-homes at any one time.
Group homes provide longer term care in a family setting for four to eight
children, usually teenagers, who cannot remain in their own families and for whom
foster home placement is not suitable. Programs in group homes vary from
substitute parental care only, to short-term intensive-treatment programs. Progress
of each child is reviewed regularly and appropriate future planning carried out.
Most group and receiving-homes are staffed by two houseparents, with occasional relief staff. In homes where very disturbed children needing intensive care
are placed, extra staff are hired and, in a few of the newer resources, a system of
rotating shifts is used. At present, in British Columbia, there are 115 group homes
and 30 receiving-homes, which have up to 1,000 beds available.
Fees for service on a contractual basis are paid to long-term group home parents
and range from $505 to $594 a month. For receiving homes, short-term treatment-
oriented group homes and therapeutic homes, fees range from $614 to $727. As
well, contractual payments to group home parents include amounts for food and
clothing and personal supplies for children as well as an amount to include relief
help, care and maintenance of the facility, planned programs of activity, recreation,
and transportation.
Total costs for group homes and receiving-homes and a comparison of these
costs over the last several years is illustrated in Table 18.
 R 48 HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 18—Costs of Group and Receiving Homes for Years 1971/72 to 1973/74,
and Calendar Year 1974
($ millions)
Jan. 1 to Dec. 31,        Apr. 1, 1973 to Apr. 1, 1972, to Apr. 1, 1971, to
1974 Mar. 31, 1974 Mar. 31, 1973 Mar. 31, 1972
$5.1 $3.54 $1.94 $1.55
Changing patterns—During the last two years the numbers of children in
care have levelled off, yet during this same period the population of children under
19 in British Columbia has increased by 15,000. This levelling off, despite increased
population, is reflective of the Government's philosophy of attempting to keep
children in their own homes and working with them in their own environment
wherever possible.
The Group Home Program is one program, however, that has expanded during
this period. This is the result of an increasing need for resources which are able
to meet the needs of older children, and of children with more serious emotional
problems and behaviour difficulties. Group home programs are also being used for
some mentally retarded children.
The need for more resources suitable for teenagers is attributable to the large
adolescent population as a result of the "postwar baby boom." It is estimated
that numbers of children in the 10 to 14 years age-group will peak in 1975 with the
15 to 19 years age-group peaking in 1980. We can, therefore, expect continued
pressure for services to teenagers until the late 1970's. In attempting to meet the
needs of adolescents, more sophisticated programs are being introduced and
others are being experimented with on a pilot program basis. The group home has,
by and large, moved from a large foster home (with a nominal subsidy to compensate houseparents) to a programmed resource which often has two full-time house-
parents who are fully employed in the operation of the group home.
Renewal of agreements and continued funding of group homes will depend
upon the ongoing ability of houseparents and of the resource to meet the needs of
the children within their communities and adapt to changing circumstances. Because
of the demanding nature of the work, the average length of time a houseparent
remains with the Department is two to three years.
Extensive evaluation of the program is now being undertaken, with certain
trends becoming apparent. It is apparent, for instance, that group homes are fairly
successful in holding children, particularly teenagers who would not stay in a
regular foster home. For these young people a group setting of peers is often most
appropriate for talking-out individual difficulties.
Federal-Provincial relations—This program is shared 50:50 with the
Federal Government.
SPECIALIZED TREATMENT RESOURCES
The Department of Human Resources presently funds some 35 nonprofit
societies which provide residential care for children in need of specialized child
care services because of emotional or behavioural difficulties, or because of physical
and mental handicaps. As Figure 5 illustrates, approximately 10 per cent of
children in care are in these resources. The goal of this program is to provide
specialized care and treatment to restore the child to as normal a life-style as
possible. The efforts of Government have been to reduce the size of institutions and
the numbers of children placed in institutions wherever possible.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974 R 49
At present, long-term institutional care is used only for severely handicapped
children whose special needs cannot be met in a home-centred or community-based
facility. Children who are severely retarded or with physical handicaps requiring
continuing special medical attention or children who suffer from extreme mental
disturbances and cannot, as yet, be served in an open community-oriented setting
are usually placed in these institutions.
The largest institutions in which mentally retarded children are placed are
Glendale Hospital, in Victoria; Woodlands School, in New Westminster; and Tranquille Lodge, Kamloops. Over 550 children can be accommodated in these three
resources at any one time. Some of these children are not yet under the care of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare because Woodlands, which accommodates 340
children, and Tranquille, which accommodates another 100 children, are just in
the process of being transferred to the Department and only about one-half of the
children have as yet come into care.
Other institutional placements, which are usually more short-termed, result
when children have emotional and behavioural difficulties so extreme that they
require a high level of professional care and large numbers of staff to deal with
their problems. There are approximately 500 children in British Columbia in this
position and they are in institutions which have an average capacity of 15 to 20
children. The largest is Island Youth Centre in Nanaimo with a capacity of 40
children. The goal of short-term institutional placement is to work toward a
clearly defined treatment which will help the child adjust to living again in his/her
community or in another child care resource with less intensive treatment. Often,
a child remains only for a short period in these specialized treatment resources until
a program can be worked out for him or her and the child's future assessed.
The resources we are discussing are generally highly staffed, having an average
staff-resident ratio of 1:1. A number of resources have more than one staff member
to every child in residence. Approximately $8.7 million of the budget goes directly
toward salaries. Needless to say, an increase in salaries reflects very directly on
the over-all increase in costs.
Many programs are operated through independent community-based societies
and vary in philosophy and treatment method. We are finding that shorter term
residential care with a greater degree of community involvement and family support
is proving more effective than the former emphasis on long-term care.
Expenditures on institutional programs during 1974 were as follows:
Table 19—Costs of Specialized Treatment Resources in 1974
$
Residential treatment centres (including special programs)      8.1 million
Residential training programs for the mentally retarded, including Glendale1     5.2
Total     13.3
1 Cost includes approximately 100 adults who fall under the jurisdiction of Human Resources and use the
facilities of Glendale Hospital.
Changing patterns—There has been considerable change in the last two
years in this program. As mentioned earlier, the main change in emphasis is from
long-term  institutional treatment to  shorter term treatment  whenever possible.
 R 50 HUMAN RESOURCES
Emphasis has also changed from highly specialized, centralized resources to a more
community-oriented regional approach with more direct community and family
involvement.
Another trend has been greater community and family involvement. Communities are developing resources in their own regions capable of responding to
immediate emergencies that formerly necessitated taking a child into institutional
care. Many resources are now providing day programs and working directly with
the family to whom the child returns each evening.
The cost of this program has increased regularly over the past few years. This
is illustrated in Table 20.
I
■HMinnH-HniMBHHHHHHI
Table 20—Costs
of Specialized Treatment Resources for
Years 1971/72 to
1
1973/74 and Calendar Year 1974
9
1
1
($ millions)
1
Jan. 1 to
Dec. 31, 1974
Apr. 1,1973 to                          Apr. 1, 1972, to
Mar. 31,1974                          Mar. 31, 1973
Apr. 1, 1971. to
Mar. 31, 1972
I
$13.3
$8.8                                        $4.7
$4.4
1
Much of this increase is attributed to increased staff costs. Because these
resources provide the most intensive treatment and highly trained staff, the Department believes the resources should be used by those children needing help most
urgently. With the development of alternative child care programs, children who
remain in institutions tend to require this high level of care.
The number of children in specialized treatment resources have remained at a
minimum, given increased population figures. A comparison of the number of
children in specialized treatment resources is illustrated in Table 21.
.-.;
Table 21—Comparison of the Number of Children in Specialized Resources,
March 31,1971, to December 31,1974
Dec. 31,       Mar. 31,      Mar. 31,      Mar. 31,      Mar. 31
1974 1974 1973 1972 1971
Treatment and educational centres   1,019 996 1,049 1,031 1,131
Group homes     483 428 330 384 217
Receiving-homes, assessment and planning 232 213 198 168 135
Therapeutic foster homes  55 45 9                   	
1,789        1,682        1,586        1,583        1,483
Federal-Provincial relations—Agreement has been reached with Federal
Government for sharing on a 50:50 basis in residential programs for mentally
retarded children, resulting in a saving of approximately $6 million to $7 million to
the British Columbia taxpayer. This is one reason the program is in the process of
being transferred to the Department of Human Resources from the Department of
Health. Other residential treatment programs are also cost-shared with the Federal
Government on a 50:50 basis.
ADOPTION
Adoption is primarily a service to the child. It is the legal placement of a
child in a permanent home. During 1974, close to 1,000 children were adopted
in British Columbia.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974
R 51
The wishes of natural parents are not overlooked in choosing a home for their
child. Services to natural parents remain an integral part of the Adoption Program,
as do services to adopting parents.
A normal adoption case goes through four stages. First, a home is found and
prospective parents are interviewed by a field worker. Second, a suitable child is
found and matched to the parents and placed by the adoption placement worker.
A third step involves supervising and visiting the home during the six-month
probation period, until adoption is completed with the assistance of the Adoption
Completion Section of the Child Welfare Division.
All children available for adoption are planned for as soon as sufficient information is available to do so. Resources are reviewed to enable the best possible plan
to be made for each child or family group. Should there not be a suitable home in
British Columbia, the Adoption Resource Exchange of Ontario and the Adoption
Resource Exchange of North America are explored. Every effort is also made
to plan an appropriate placement with adopting parents should there not be a child
available in British Columbia. Usually this is done through the co-operation of
International Social Services and a number of children from Hong Kong, Korea,
Japan, and Vietnam have been placed in Canada.
Infant placement directly from hospital continues to be an objective of the
Adoption Program. With the diminishing number of infants, though, the focus of
the program over the past few years has shifted to the older child and family groups.
The following table gives a breakdown on the age-range of children placed
during 1974. As we can see, the majority of children placed are still under one
year of age.
Table 22—Ages of Children Placed for Adoption by Department of Human
Resources and Vancouver Resources Board During Calendar Year 1974
Number
of
Age Children
Birth up to but not including 15 days __ 257
15 days up to but not including
1 month   114
1 month up to but not including
3 months  84
3 months up to but not including
6 months     34
6 months up to but not including
1  year   34
1 year   38
2 years   33
3 years   27
4 years   19
5 years   15
6 years   12
Number
of
Age Children
7 years       18
8 years        6
9 years        8
10 years   6
11 years   7
12 years   13
13 years   5
14 years   1
15 years   2
16 years   4
17 years   4
18 years   5
Total    746
A comparison over the last several years of the number of children placed for
adoption is shown in Figure 8.
 R 52
HUMAN RESOURCES
Figure 8
Adoption Placements, Fiscal Years 1970/71 to 1973/74, and Calendar Year 1974
1,741
836
746
1970/71       1971/72       1972/73       1973/74
1974
The actual number of adoptions legally completed in 1974 is much higher,
as illustrated in Figure 9.
Figure 9
Number of Children Legally Adopted by Fiscal Year
1,920
1970/71
1971/72
1972/73
1973/74
 REPORT OF THE_DEPARTMENT,  1974 R 53
This is because not all children who are adopted are placed by the Department
of Human Resources. Other adoptions include adoptions by step-parents, relatives,
and private placements not made through a social agency. Numbers are illustrated
in Table 23.
Table 23—Adoption Completed by Category of Adoption
Category 1973/74   1972/73   1971/72   1970/71
Placed by Department of Human Resources or
Vancouver
Resources Board     1,004 965 1,445 1,955
Step-parent   _ 807 745 763 7421
Other relative     55 76 65 69
Private   54 34 33 38
Total adoptions completed    1,920        1,820        2,306        2,804
As we can see, much of the decline has been the result of fewer placements
by the Department of Human Resources. Fewer infants being available for placement, better birth-control methods, abortion, and the larger numbers of single
mothers and fathers raising their own children explain this decline.
Changing patterns—There are still large numbers of adopting parents
awaiting children. For the most part these are parents who wish only a healthy,
newborn infant. Because of the dearth of infants, many adopting parents are now
adopting children who are older, or who bring with them emotional or physical
problems. These difficulties do not rule out adoption, but constant consultation with
medical consultants, the child's worker, the adopting parents, and the social worker
has to be carried out both before and after placement.
Greater skill is also needed in aiding parents who have adopted an older child.
Demand for postadoption service for families who adopt ah older child is increasing.
This demand must be met to enable the child and his/her adopting family to become
a cohesive unit. Stresses on established families are common because the child
has usually had many different and sometimes difficult life experiences prior to
placement. This creates new strains and pressures and many families need help
during this transition period.
The movement of children from abroad to homes in British Columbia has
continued. At the suggestion of British Columbia, the 10 provinces and the
Federal Government have looked at the question of how best to accommodate
completion of international adoptions. Agreement on procedure is close to being
resolved. In addition, a National Adoption Resource Exchange is in the planning
stages which will broaden our intercountry use of homes for special children.
Another area that is undergoing rapid changes concerns the adoptions of
Native Indian children. Until May 1973, Native Indian children were adopted in
British Columbia in the same way as other children. The majority were adopted by
non-Indians, as there were not enough Native Indian adoption homes known to the
Department.
Up to 1973, the only special step taken in adoptions of registered Indian children has been the procedure whereby the adopting parents have been advised of the
children's Indian status and a letter advising them that any inquiries concerning
the children's rights and privileges as Indians or concerning enfranchisement should
be directed to the Registrar, Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Ottawa. When the adoption was completed, the Superintendent of Child
Welfare notified the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, who
 R 54 HUMAN RESOURCES
keep a record of the child's original home, his name by adoption, and the names of
his adopting parents. Under this procedure, if the child or the adopting parents
contact the Registrar, the Registrar can identify the child by his/her original name
and Band. This system of notification has been based on the belief that Provincial
adoption legislation applied to Indians but that Indian status, as defined by the
Federal Indian Act, was not affected by adoption; thus an adopted status Indian
child retained his status, even though adopted by non-Indians.
In 1972 the natural parents of a registered Indian child contested his adoption
because they wanted the child to be brought up by Indian relatives. The parents'
lawyer argued that the Provincial Adoption Act did not apply to status Indians,
as it would deprive them of rights bestowed by a Federal Act. In May 1973 a
Supreme Court Judge in Victoria ruled that the Adoption Act did not apply to
registered Indians or those eligible to be registered.
The result was that all adoption services to registered Indian children had to
be suspended. No adoptions of registered Indian children already in adoption
homes could be completed, and for a time no registered Indian children were placed
for adoption. No child already placed on adoption probation was removed as a
result of the judgment.
Through the Attorney-General's Department, the Superintendent of Child
Welfare appealed the Supreme Court decision. The British Columbia Court of
Appeal unanimously reversed the decision, but, as there was a possibility that the
natural parents would in turn appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada, adoptions
of status Indian children were still not proceeded with. The parents did launch
an appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada and the hearing took place at the end
of October 1974. Judgment has not yet been handed down, and the would-be
adopting parents of registered Indian children, over 100 families, continue to wait
anxiously.
In the summer of 1974, placement of Indian children was resumed on a "free"
foster home basis (no financial support provided by the Department), with a view
to adoption if this becomes possible. When no suitable Indian homes are available,
Indian children are placed in non-Indian homes. The foster parents are told that
it may never be possible to complete a legal adoption.
In order to place more Indian children for adoption in status Indian homes,
more action is being taken to find such homes. Over the past three or four years
there has been evidence of more interest and participation on the part of Indian
people. Native workers have been assigned as case aides and social workers on
many Reserves.
In Duncan two Native Indian case aides were assigned in January 1974 to
work on a project based in the Cowichan area to recruit Indian homes for adoption;
four such homes have been located. In these homes four children have been
placed for adoption and another is to be placed shortly.
As a result of the findings of a Special "Task Force" on the adoption of Indian
children, an experimental program is under way whereby four Native Indian people
are working in the Kamloops and Campbell River areas, recruiting Indian homes
for Indian children. This program is a one-year pilot project; recommendations will
be made to the Superintendent of Child Welfare at the end of that time.
The Department would also like to see more homes available among non-status
Indian families and the families of status Indians living off-reserve.
There are many problem areas which need resolution in the future. The
Adoption Act as it exists provides that a single unmarried adult or a married couple
may adopt.  This does not allow for unions which have been established through
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974 R 55
Native ritual or custom. We have been able to circumvent this in the case of Native
Indian adoption applicants by having one parent, who is legally free to marry, submit
notification of his/her intention to adopt. Protection of the child's future and
guardianship is then guaranteed by both adopting parents completing reciprocal
wills. At present the child of Indian origin is easier to plan for than in the 60's
because of changing attitudes and greater awareness on the part of the adopting
public. Many resources still need to be recruited, however, to ensure that the
Indian child requiring a permanent home is placed at the earliest time. We also
need to continue our commitment to children of Native Indian origin to ensure
that they do not lose sight of their heritage.
COMMUNITY GRANTS FOR FAMILIES AND CHILDREN
Community grants (described elsewhere in this Report under "Community
Programs") were made to 20 projects in 1974 that offer services primarily for children and families.   The projects funded were:
City and Grant
Organization in 1974
Burnaby:
Citizens Development Fund—Follow-up services for children in specialized        $
treatment         58,018
Cranbrook :
Sparkling Grannies  (CMHA Visiting  Mothers  Aid)—Family  support  on
continuous counselling basis      48,193
Nanaimo:
Nan Wah Kawi Treatment Camp Program—For children with emotional and
learning disabilities          7,000
Nelson and District :
Child Care Society—Day program for children with special needs and learning disabilities        41,607
Family Day Care—Support and information services to families providing
day care     14,245
Homemaker Society—Grant to assist with transportation        1,720
New Westminster:
YW/YMCA—Support for detached worker program       9,468
North Shore:
Day Care Information Centre—Family Service Agency       6,605
Port Alberni:
Family Guidance Association—Counselling, information       2,400
Surrey:
Emergency Shelter—For families in distress     18,516
Vancouver:
Riley Park Youth Project       4,000
Children's Furniture Workshop—Support grant   _. —_ 500
Dunbar-West Point Grey Youth Project—Program of youth activities—social,
cultural, recreational       45,450
The Toy Library—Preparation, distribution of toys     21,264
Urban Design Centre—Salary of workers in plans for day care         6,041
Volunteer Grandparents Society—Relating children to potential grandparents    22,500
YWCA Big Sisters         16,173
Victoria:
Boys' Club of Victoria and YW/YMCA—Support for detached worker program      11,813
Children With Cameras—To assist a summer program for youth  419
EFECT Research Centre—Rent for centre which makes appliances and toys
for handicapped children         600
Victoria Society for Autistic Children—Tutoring, support services     31,950
Williams Lake:
Elkroy Benevolent Society—Development of a children's group home     16,700
Total   385,182
  SERVICES FOR EVERYONE
ITftVt
mm*
in
  REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974 R 59
SOCIAL ALLOWANCE
Goals
• To provide a substitute income sufficient to maintain a basic standard
of living for those unable to provide for themselves through employment
or other resources.
• To provide financial help in such a way that the dignity of the individual
is maintained. This is of critical importance if the individual or family
is to maintain their capacity to care for themselves and their dependents,
and become self-reliant again.
• To provide services to assist recipients in becoming employed wherever
possible.
• To provide information, counselling, referrals, specialized help, and
other forms of supportive services which assist individuals and families
in solving the problems they are facing.
Description—Social Allowance recipients are comprised of the following
groups of people:
1. Mothers with children—This is the largest group of recipients. The program attempts to provide a degree of security which will permit a mother to concentrate on raising her children and, when possible, to supplement her income by part-
time employment and eventually, when feasible, full-time employment.
2. Persons unable to be employed for physical or mental health reasons—
Occasionally a health problem is a temporary one, and a recipient is able to return
to employment after a period of convalescence. In other instances, employment is
restricted to particular forms of light employment that are simply not available
because of the preference of employers for more able-bodied employees. Intensive
supportive efforts can sometimes overcome these obstacles with rewarding results
to both employer and employee.
3. Children with relatives—Encouragement and assistance are given to relatives caring for children whose parents are unable to care for them. When possible,
this arrangement is preferable to bringing a child into the care of the Department,
since it maintains a more normal relationship with the child's family. Assistance
is provided at the same rate as for foster children.
4. Persons who are employable—This is ordinarily a short-term recourse for
the unemployed, temporarily without means, or to supplement Unemployment
Insurance benefits, which are sometimes not enough to support a large family.
Many of these recipients lack the requisite skills for easy placement in employment
and are only marginally employable. There is a large turnover in this group and
many recipients require assistance for only a month or two. Less than 15 per cent
of the entire case load consists of people who are considered potentially employable.
Applying for social assistance—The applicant contacts the local Human
Resources office and a social worker assesses the application on the basis of the
established eligibility criteria for social assistance. This includes an examination of
need on the basis of assets, income, and housing costs. Assets of the applicant may
not exceed $500 in the case of a single person and $1,000 in the case of a family.
A family home, occupied by the applicant, or family car, are not considered assets
for this purpose.
Income available from any other source is calculated, with the exception of
Family Allowances.   The amount of assistance that can be paid is then dependent
 R 60
HUMAN RESOURCES
on family size and shelter costs. If there is no shelter cost, assistance is provided
at the support rate and does not include the shelter allowance. Basic rates for
shelter and support are illustrated in Table 24.
Table 24-
Number of Persons
(Family Size)
1   	
-Basic Social Assistance
Rate Schedule a
Support
$
     85
s of December 1974
Total
Basic
Shelter          Maximum
$                      $
75              160
120              270
135              320
150              370
160              420
170              465
180              505
HBj.Jj^J.JjJjJjJjJjJjJjHHHjHBHjHBjHjHjK''
2   	
.....  150
3   	
.....  185
4   	
..... 220
5   	
._ 260
6   	
...... 295
7   	
..... 325
In the case of a family, where the shelter costs exceed the amount of the
Department's rates for shelter, additional assistance may be provided in an amount
of 75 per cent of the extra shelter cost.
For other items of need the recipient similarly contacts the social worker for
a review of eligibility. Frequently, a recipient suffering hardship is reluctant to
seek further help and it is a common occurrence for the local office to receive
referrals from private citizens or from other interested community sources. The
social worker then follows this up with the recipient and provides the appropriate
help available under Departmental policy. An example of special needs would be
a mother with a young baby in need of a crib, or perhaps a large family with many
children who are without a washing-machine or adequate bedding. In case of an
emergency a family is entitled to a maximum of $500 to meet special needs,
although each request is carefully reviewed by the social worker in charge of the
case.   Expenditures on special needs are illustrated in Table 25.
Table 25—Departmental Expenditure by Fiscal Years 1970/71 to 1973/74,
and Calendar Year 1974, Items of Special Need
Year Amount Year Amount
$ $
1974    2,007,095 1971/72      158,921
1973/74    1,097,095 1970/71     323,885
1972/73         281,555 	
Other help available includes assistance with transportation and moving costs
when it is necessary to move from one accommodation to another, or to take
advantage of a confirmed job opportunity in a distant locale. Special help is given,
where necessary, for the purchase of tools or clothing necessary for employment;
dietary allowances to a maximum of $20 per month on recommendation of the
family physician; pre-natal allowances to a maximum of $25 per, month on confirmation of pregnancy; school start-up fees of $15 per year for children under the
age of 12 and $25 per year for children over the age of 12. Also, as a matter of
practice, a Christmas bonus of $10 for a single person and $20 for a head of a
family is given to those receiving social assistance. To encourage part-time earnings,
when full-time employment is not possible, an exemption on earnings of $50 per
month is allowed for a single person, and $100 per month for a family.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974 R 61
The number of recipients of Social Allowance is illustrated in Figure 10.
Figure 10
Average Number of Recipients per Month: Basic Social Allowance
133,200
1970/71
1971/72
105,300
1972/73
1973/74
1974*
• During 1974 Social Assistance recipients consisted of the following people. On the average there were
26,000 heads of families of which many were single parents, 62,000 dependents, mainly children, 18,000 unemployable single people and 13,500 single people who are classified as employable.
Total expenditures on Social Allowance is illustrated in Figure 11.
1970/71
Figure 11
Annual Cost: Basic Social Allowance
million million million
II       [
1971/72
1972/73
1973/74
j*-;;:;^
$145.5
million
1974
 R 62 HUMAN RESOURCES
Payment of regular social assistance is normally by cheque at the beginning
of the month. Vouchers are used in emergencies, or when administration of funds
is necessary to ensure the individual or family is looked after. In these instances,
it is attempted to return control of family spending to the recipient as soon as
possible through counselling or other means of improving budgetary planning.
It is policy to encourage individuals to handle their own affairs.
The program has been basically effective in achieving its purposes. The most
serious difficulty has been in obtaining access to sufficient job opportunities suitable
for the relatively unskilled levels of many social assistance recipients. This problem
is likely to increase because of economic decline and increased unemployment
throughout North America. While the majority of recipients are managing to cope,
many are experiencing difficulty in meeting escalating shelter and food costs.
Changing patterns—Expenditure on basic Social Allowance has continued
to increase. In July 1974 the rates of social assistance were increased by $20 for
each single person and family. This amount, combined with the increase in rates
of Family Allowance to $20 per month per child, resulted in an approximate 15
per cent increase in the income available to each social assistance recipient. This
increase has helped social assistance recipients from falling further behind the rest
of society, but it is recognized that inflation has absorbed much of the real impact
of this increase. Low-income people who spend most of their income on consumption have been most seriously affected by inflation.
Higher social assistance rates have had some effect in extending eligibility to
borderline income recipients not previously eligible. Often, these recipients are
men and women who work full time but at less than adequate wages. A wage-
earner is eligible for income supplementation if the family's net income after taxes
and other payroll deductions is less than that family would receive in basic Social
Allowance and if other eligibility criteria such as assets are within allowable ranges.
This supplement insures that people in the labour force receive at least as high an
income as they would if they were on social assistance. Full benefits, including
health and dental benefits, have been extended to this group.
A further increase in expenditure has resulted from greater numbers on social
assistance over the last year as a result of increasing unemployment and marriage
breakdown. As a result the Department has placed increased emphasis on ensuring
that employable recipients understand and carry out their obligation to obtain
employment as quickly as possible. In support of this the Department has increased
the amount of time available for counselling and for location of employment
opportunities.
Special job-placement staff are now available to a number of offices to assist
in locating jobs and placing recipients in these jobs. Their endeavours are coordinated as closely as possible with the Department of Manpower. In Vancouver
City, as an example, there is a special Job Finder Section. A representative of the
Department of Manpower is located in this section to ensure the availability of
Department of Manpower resources, including lists of all available jobs.
Many of those presumed to be employable, on assessment by rehabilitation
officers, are simply not job-placeable because of serious physical or mental health
problems, or limited capacity to learn and perform.
Federal-Provincial relations—Costs for this program are shared 50 per
cent with the Federal Government and 10 per cent with the municipalities. Our
major difficulty with the Federal Government has been their slow response to meeting people's needs through Unemployment Insurance benefits. As a result, Provincial social assistance has become for some people, out of necessity, a gap-filler
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974 R 63
while they are waiting for their Unemployment Insurance benefits. Often delays
of seven or eight weeks are not uncommon. British Columbia is presently negotiating with the Federal Government on this matter.
EMPLOYMENT SERVICES
Goal—To ensure that the full range of employment services provided through
Canada Manpower Centres and related community resources are made available
to assist employable social assistance recipients in their efforts to secure employment.
Description—In every Human Resources office one staff member is assigned
special responsibilities as the liaison worker with the local Canada Manpower Centre
and Unemployment Commission office for the purpose of examining and developing
methods for assisting unemployed persons. These liaison workers are also responsible for making other Human Resources staff aware of current job opportunities and
any other local resources that may be required by an unemployed person. With
the assistance of Canada Manpower, several of the larger Human Resources offices
have set up job banks, providing applicants for social assistance with immediate
and direct access to the current Canada Manpower Job Vacancy Listing for the
local area.
All employable persons who make application for social assistance are required
to actively seek work of any type within their capabilities. Prior to social assistance
being granted, an applicant for assistance who is considered to be job-ready is
referred directly to any known job vacancies or to the local Canada Manpower
Centre. With the exception of emergencies requiring immediate financial aid,
social assistance is only granted after there has been a full exploration of available
employment opportunities. Also, when a person is referred to a confirmed job,
assistance may be granted for bus fares, working clothing, and other essentials.
In the Capital Region the Department supports a special unit providing job
finding, employment counselling and job referrals, liaison with Canada Manpower,
and related employment services. This unit consists of a Co-ordinator, four
Employment Counsellors who service the neighbourhood offices on a rotating basis,
one job finder who is in direct contact with potential employers, and one full-time
liaison officer at the Canada Manpower centre.
In Vancouver a team of job finders focus their efforts on helping the new
applicant for social assistance to find full-time employment. These job finders have
direct access to all job vacancies listed through Canada Manpower. Similar services
are provided through the Job Finder Unit in the Surrey Municipal Office.
The following table shows the number of single individuals and families who
have been removed from the social assistance rolls in 1974 as a result of their
having found gainful employment:
Table 26—Number of Social Assistance Cases Closed During 1974 as a Result of
Persons Obtaining Gainful Employment
Single
Persons            Families Total
January/February/March       3,434            2,069 5,503
April/May/June       4,193             1,974 6,167
July/August/September        5,214            2,585 7,799
October/November/December       5,309            2,227 7,536
18,150           8,855 27,005
 R 64 HUMAN RESOURCES
Changing patterns in 1974—With the general decline in job opportunities
experienced throughout North America in 1974, job-finding and employment-
counselling services have become more extensive and intensive. Special projects
were undertaken in major population centres to ensure that all employable social
assistance recipients were aware of their responsibilities to be actively seeking jobs
and to help them make full use of all available community employment services.
In October 1974, Canada Manpower agreed to a project whereby Vancouver
Resources Board staff can make direct referrals to jobs from the Canada Manpower
Job Vacancy Listing. The local Canada Manpower Centre also seconded the
services of a full-time Manpower Counsellor to work out of the Howe Street office
in downtown Vancouver.
Also, this past year, the Capital Region special unit, assisted by Canada Manpower, embarked on a program of exploratory and mobility grants to assist employable social assistance recipients to move to areas where employment was more
readily available. As a result of these efforts, 95 single persons and 40 families
were helped to move to full-time jobs outside the Victoria area.
Cost-sharing status—Most costs are shared on a 50:50 basis with the
Federal Government; Canada Manpower programs are fully financed by that
Federal Department.
REPATRIATION
Goal—To assist Social Allowance recipients in returning to other provinces
and, occasionally, other countries, when indicated, because of social reasons.
Description—This program is available to social assistance recipients who
demonstrate a social need for this type of help. Often this is because of health
reasons, having a family in another province, finding employment in another
province, or wishing to return permanently to one's homeland in another country.
Repatriation ordinarily involves a social assistance recipient or family who has
recently arrived in British Columbia, and who is unable or has difficulty finding
employment. The cost of return transportation is usually much less than continued
assistance, so that, in addition to positively assisting the recipient, it also reduces
costs to the Province.
The recipient approaches the local Human Resources office, where each
situation is reviewed by a social worker. If assistance is recommended, the information is relayed to the Income Assistance Division, Department of Human
Resources, which then obtains the approval of the other province. In the case of
occasional requests for return to another country, the possibility of help from the
Department of Immigration is reviewed, and the Department of Immigration is
otherwise notified of arrangements made. It is the recipient's responsibility to
assure he will be accepted by the country of his destination. Transportation costs
are available directly to the social assistance recipient. This may include assistance
in relocation of personal effects and household belongings. Generally, the program
is effective in achieving its objective.
Total costs of this program and a comparison over the last several years are
illustrated in Table 27.
Table 27—Departmental Expenditure by Year: Repatriation
Year                                     Amount Year Amount
$ $
1974    20,960 1971/72    21,369
1973/74   .... 11,951 1970/71     27,292
1972/73       9,224 	
»mmmm«iiiubim^^ :mmm
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974
R 65
Changing patterns—In 1974 more people wished to return to other provinces because of difficulties in locating accommodation and employment. Expenditures were up for this reason.
Cost-sharing status—The program is shareable on a 50:50 basis with the
Federal Government.
HOMEMAKER SERVICE
Goal—Homemaker services are provided to ensure adequate care of children
during the absence or incapacity of the parent and to enable care of the elderly,
infirm, or handicapped persons in their own home rather than in an institution.
Description—Homemakers offer a service of household management. They
provide temporary care for children, the ill, and the elderly. Their duties involve
household cleaning, laundry, shopping, preparation of meals, assistance in teaching
household routines to families, as well as working with other health and social
service professionals.
Qualities of a good homemaker include warmth, maturity, sympathetic
personality, good physical and mental health as well as adaptibility, flexibility, and
an ability to co-operate in many different situations. There are approximately 1,500
people working in the homemaker field throughout British Columbia on either a
full- or part-time basis.
Eligibility for homemaker service is determined by social and health needs.
Anyone unable to cope with the day-to-day operation of his/her home and who has
no one to help on a temporary basis may be eligible for the service.
The service is subsidized on the basis of a family's net income and individual
needs.  Total expenditures on homemaker services is illustrated in Figure 12.
:
Figure 12
Departmental Expenditure by Fiscal Years 1970/71 to 1973/74
and Calendar Year 1974, Homemaker Service
1,187,49
2,812,704
3,840,824
1970/71
1971/72
1972/73
1973/74
hBhESuh 1
1974
 R 66 HUMAN RESOURCES
The major problems facing homemaker services have been the lack of available
funds for the program and the resulting low wage for homemakers. Also, there is
a lack of training facilities for homemakers and services have not been standardized
throughout the Province. Because homemaker services are delivered through such
a wide variety of ways, such as through nonprofit community groups, LIP and OFY
projects, commercial agencies, and directly through the Department of Human
Resources, it is unlikely that all these problems will be resolved at once, although
more has been done in 1974 to standardize operations and funding.
Federal-Provincial relations—Subsidized homemaker service is cost-
shared on a 50:50 basis by the Federal Government.
COUNSELLING
Goal—To assist in the resolution of personal and family problems.
Description—This service is available to any social assistance recipient or
member of the public who feels he or she would benefit. Referrals are made to the
local Human Resources office by private citizens, community professionals, and
community agencies and organizations. Often, the individual himself seeks the
Department's help.
The service includes the provision of information, referral to other health and
social service agencies where necessary, and direct help in working out a problem
with the individual. Provision of this service is part of the social worker's training.
It requires a good knowledge and understanding of human behaviour, skill in human
relationships, and a thorough knowledge of the availability of other services.
Counselling often involves working with couples who are experiencing marital
stress. Frequently a family is already separated by the time the social worker is
involved, and cannot be reunited. The staff member is then called upon to help
resolve conflict regarding financial maintenance and custody of and (or) access to
children. Part of the social worker's responsibility in this situation may include
giving advice in relation to the Family Relations Act, liaison with Family Court,
and seeking a court order for maintenance.
Federal-Provincial relations—Counselling services are shared by the
Federal and Provincial Governments 50:50.
COMMUNITY RESOURCES BOARD
Goal—The intent of Community Resources Boards is to provide a reasonable
and equitable level of social services to all people of British Columbia. Such
services should be decentralized, integrated where appropriate, and accountable to
the people they serve. Community Resources Boards offer a means for citizen and
Government to work together to resolve social service needs as partners.
Description—The Community Resources Board Act was passed in the spring
session of the Legislature, 1974.
Three types of Community Resources Boards have seen development in the
past year:
1. Community Human Resources and Health Centres—These five centres,
jointly supported and financed by the Department of Health and the Department
of Human Resources, are responsible for the integration of social services, as well
as for the provision of some public health and physicians' services.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974 R 67
These centres were given continued support by the Development Group, a
working committee of seven professionals from the fields of health and social
services.
The Department of Human Resources provided grants to interim Community
Human Resources and Health Centre Boards as follows: $
(a) James Bay, Victoria—James Bay Community Association __ 19,700
(b) Houston, B.C.,  The Houston Diagnostic  and Treatment
Centre   16,900
(c) Granisle, B.C., The Health Committee     2,000
(d) Queen Charlotte Islands, The Q.C. Islands Regional Human
Resources and Health Centre  12,900
(e) Grand Forks-Boundary Community Services     5,000
2. Community Resources Boards (outside Vancouver)—Thirty-one groups
were provided with either start-up grants or continuing staff and core budget grants.
No Community Resources Board elections took place in 1974, outside of Vancouver, although many developing Community Resources Societies acted in a
recommending capacity on nonstatutory social services grant applications from
their communities.
The following grants for start-up and (or) staff and core budgets were made
in 1974:
(Table 28—Resources Board Development
Grant
City and Organization in 1974
Burns Lake: $
I
Lakes District Community Resources Society—Start-up grant  500
Campbell River:
Community  Resources  Society—Support  staff  for   Community   Resources
Board      10,572
I   Castlegar:
Community Resources Board Development   200:
Chetwynd:
Community Resources Board Steering Committee—Start-up grant   200
J   Courtenay :
Community Resources Board Steering Committee—Start-up grant   200
J   Dawson Creek:
Area Resources Society        6,359
Fort St. John:
North Peace Community Resources Society      24,848
Fraser Lake:
Community Resources Group—Start-up grant   500
Hazelton :
Area Community Services Association—
Start-up and part-time secretarial help (Resources Board development) ..      1,591
100 Mile House:
South Cariboo Resources Board—Start-up grant   200
Kamloops:
Community Resources Society      25,272 j
 R 68 HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 28—Resources Board Development—Continued
Grant
City and Organization in 1974
Kaslo: $
Community Resources Board Steering Committee  150
Kitimat:
Community Resources Society        2,838
Langley:
Community Services Council—Resources Board development       8,600
Lillooet:
Resources Council—Start-up and core funding        2,000
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows:
Community Services Council—Resources Board development ._     7,533
Merritt :
Community Resources Board Planning Committee     50
Nelson and District:
Community Resources Board Society      14,910
New Denver:
Nakusp and District Community Resources Society   300
North Shore:
Resource Board Development Society—Interim funding         4,950
Port Alberni:
Interim Community Resources Board        11,640
Powell River:
Interim Community Resources Board   400
Prince George:
Community Resources Board Society      20,397
Prince Rupert:
Community Resources Association—Start-up grant         1,000
Quesnel and District:
Community Resources Board Committee—Start-up grant  200
Smithers:
Community Services Association          9,003
Sunshine Coast:
Community Resources Council—Start-up grant     300
Terrace and District :
Community Service Council        18,382
Victoria:
Saanich Peninsula District Community Resources Society—Start-up grant ._. 850
Saltspring Citizens Advisory Committee—Start-up grant  150
Williams Lake:
Resources Board Development Committee—Start-up grant   200
Total   174,295
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974
R 69
Planning committees in 16 other communities in British Columbia were meeting in 1974 to discuss the possibility of working toward the development of CRB's.
3. Vancouver Resources Board and Community Resources Boards in the City
of Vancouver—During 1974, public elections were held for Community Resources
Boards in four areas of Vancouver—South Vancouver, Kitsilano, Dunbar-West
Point Grey-Southlands, Hastings-Sunrise. In November 1974 the Vancouver
Resources Board was legally recognized by Cabinet Order in Council.
The Vancouver Resources Board has responsibility for the management and
delivery of both statutory and nonstatutory social services in Vancouver through
the community boards. During 1974 the Vancouver Resources Board has been
setting priorities for services and planning the decentralization of statutory services
into 14 local areas.
The following list of some of the services available through the Department of
Human Resources illustrates the distinction between statutory and nonstatutory
services. Generally, statutory services are those defined by law or statute and
which the Government is obligated to provide to all citizens of British Columbia.
Nonstatutory services are those social services which may be provided by Government fundings, local voluntary organizations, or service clubs.
Table 29—Services Provided by, or Funded Through, the Department of
Human Resources
Statutory Services
Protection of children as authorized by the Protection
of Children Act, Equal Guardianship of Infants
Act, the Juvenile Delinquents Act, and the Children of Unmarried Parents Act—
Maintenance of children in care.
Adoption services.
Specialized child-care treatment.
Resources.
Social Allowances—Health care services to recipients
of Social Allowance.
I Pharmacare.
Mincome—Guaranteed income of $234.13 (as at January 1, 1975) to all citizens over 60 years of age
and to handicapped persons over 18 years of age.
Boarding, rest home, and private hospital care costs
paid for recipients of social assistance.
Rehabilitation services—■
Educational upgrading.
Vocational training.
Work Preparation Program.
Incentive Opportunities Program.
Nonstatutory Services
Day care.
Homemaker Service.
Youth hostels.
Activity centres for handicapped
people and senior citizens.
Half-way houses for alcoholics
and people released from
prison, mental patients.
Meals on Wheels.
Information centres.
Transportation services for the
handicapped and the aged.
Drop-in centres and crisis lines.
Community-based treatment resources for children.
Sheltered workshops.
 R 70 HUMAN RESOURCES
The following expenditures were made for resources board development in
Vancouver:
(a) Election expenses for South Vancouver, Kitsilano, Dunbar-      $
West Point Grey-Southlands, Hastings-Sunrise  20,000
(b) Resource Board Development staff  35,000
(c) Workshops for elected Community Resources Boards     3,000
Future developments—Regulations to the Community Resources Board
Act will be available in 1975.
During the 1975/76 fiscal year it is expected that a number of Community
Resources Societies outside Vancouver will sponsor public elections in their communities. The Department of Human Resources will be providing a limited number
of staff to assist in the resource board development and election process.
Elections for the five Community Resources Boards governing the Human
Resources and Health Centres will be held in those communities in 1975.
The Vancouver Resources Board will assist community groups in the remaining 10 areas in the City of Vancouver to hold public Community Resources Board
elections in 1975.
Cost-sharing—Social services administered through Community Resources
Boards are eligible for the same cost-sharing arrangements with the Federal Government as those administered directly by the Department of Human Resources. For
information on specific cost-sharing arrangements, refer to the sections in this Report
on each individual service.
For further information on CRB development, contact your local office of the
Department of Human Resources, or the Co-ordinator, Community Resources
Boards, Department of Human Resources, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
A newsletter entitled Sources is available free to anyone interested in CRB
development, by writing to the Division of Office Administration and Public Information, Department of Human Resources, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
HEALTH CARE  SERVICES
Goal—The goal of health care services is to provide quality health care for
persons in need at a reasonable cost. The Health Care Division offers consultation
to social service and paramedical personnel and ensures that people are aware of
the available services.
Description—Eligibility: The Health Care Division is, in fact, a small replica
of the entire health care system in that people who are covered by British Columbia
Medical Plan benefits are not left unaided in case of an emergency. The number
of persons eligible for health care services is illustrated in Figure 13.
Figure 13
Total Number of Persons Eligible for Health Care, Calendar Years 1971 to 1974
116,239
jj^HHHn
1971 1972 1973 1974
• Estimated figure.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974 R 71
In addition, the Division provides for the health needs of all recipients of Social
Allowance, Mincome, Handicapped Persons Income Allowance, and Children-in-
Care.  An estimated 120,000 people were eligible for the Division's services in 1974.
A. Medical Services—This section of health care services provides payment
for various medical services, including medical and hospital accounts. The services
of doctors, nurses, chiropractors, and physiotherapists are included. Payment is
made for examinations that are required by the Department in order to qualify for
Handicapped Persons Income Allowance (Mincome) or "unemployable" Social
Allowance benefits. The Health Care Division also covers examinations for eligible
persons requiring medical clearance for activities such as camp attendance and
sports involvement.
B. Pharmacy—The Pharmacy Section of health care services provides drugs
and medical supplies to holders of the B.C. Medical Plan "W" cards, i.e., cards
issued to unemployable social assistance recipients. It also provides drugs to Government institutions such as Haney Correctional Institute and Government-financed
operations such as Community Health Clinics, Downtown Health Clinic, and the
Kinsmen Foundation.
The advent of Pharmacare in January 1974 brought changes in the types of
requests the Provincial Pharmacy was asked to handle. As drugs became more
available through Pharmacare, other nondrug supplies such as ulcer lotions and
surgical dressings were being met through the Provincial Pharmacy.
In 1974, 36,190 prescriptions were handled; 60,000 items supplied to nursing-
homes, and 44,000 items supplied to persons in their own homes or in boarding-
homes.
C. Dental—Service authorizes basic dental care for all eligible persons. Special dental care, such as partial dentures, root-canal treatments and crowns, are
approved on the recommendation of a dental consultant.
The last few months of 1974 saw considerable debate between the Government
and the British Columbia College of Dental Surgeons over the rates dentists were
to receive for professional services. In the course of events, dentists in some areas
refused to treat social assistance patients except in a serious emergency. However,
the Government and the British Columbia College of Dental Surgeons reached
agreement on an increase from 75 per cent of the 1971 fee schedule to 80 per cent
of College's 1974 fee, effective December 1, 1974; 90 per cent of College's 1974
fee, effective April 1, 1975; 90 per cent of College's 1975 fee, effective October 1,
1975.   This agreement has been accepted by dentists.
D. Optical—Standard single-vision and bifocal glasses are provided when
prescribed by an ophthalmologist or optometrist. Special needs such as special
lenses, trifocals, and contact lenses may also be provided with prior approval of the
Division.
Negotiations with the optometrists have resulted in a change in payment procedures. A registered optometrist is now paid a professional fee of $10, while
optical laboratories are paid a service charge of $2.50 to $5, depending on service.
E. Ancillary services—The Department provides nontransferable medical
needs such as braces, artificial limbs, wheel-chairs, surgical supports, and colostomy
supplies where such services are prescribed by the client's physician and where such
services will assist in the client's rehabilitation.
When the cost is less than $25, the local office authorizes purchase. Over $25,
prior approval of the Division is required.
The only exception to the above procedure is the purchase of wheel-chairs.
In this case, the individual needs of each client are carefully assessed.  The Canadian
 R 72
HUMAN RESOURCES
Paraplegic Association provides the assessment and the wheel-chair is then purchased according to specifications which will meet the person's requirements.
F. Transportation—Transportation to and from clinics, nursing-homes, rehabilitation centres, and hospitals is provided for clients and low-income persons.
This service is totally at the discretion of the local office, except where out-of-Prov-
ince transportation is requested, in which case prior authorization by the Division
is required.
Total health care expenditure and a comparison of these expenditures are
illustrated in Table 30. The decrease in total expenditures in the last two years is
a result of the Pharmacare Program, which decreased the pharmacy cost of the
Health Care Division.
Table 30—Gross Costs of Medical Services for Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1973/74
and Calendar Year 1974
Year
Medical
1971/72   614,365
1972/73   677,194
1973/74   634,136
1974   735,546
Provincial
Pharmacy
3,334,160
3,626,268
3,256,259
980,205
Dental
$
2,403,257
2,429,538
2,655,573
2,560,068
Optical
$
290,116
304,387
322,489
383,418
Ancillary
Services
165,979
264,522
328,510
290,014
Transportation
$
342,712
367,888
419,451
450,609
Total
$
7,150,589
7,669,797
7,616,420
4,933,448
Federal-Provincial  relations-
Federal Government 50:50.
-This   program   is   cost-shared   with   the
BURIALS
Goal—To provide for burial in those instances where there is no family or
estate that can assume responsibility.
Description—Burials are provided for deceased social assistance recipients
and other deceased persons who have not left a sufficient estate to provide for
burial and where family resources are not sufficient.
A relative, friend, agency, or funeral parlour contacts the local Human
Resources office for help. Appropriate arrangements are then made by the local
social worker in accordance with standard arrangements, and a schedule of costs
negotiated with the Funeral Directors' Association. The arrangements include
provision for a casket, funeral plot, and funeral service.
The average cost of burials in 1974 was $310 per person. A comparison of
expenditures over the last several years is outlined in Table 31.
Year
1974 ......
Table 31—Departmentc
Amount
$
  172,500
(/ Expenditures: Burials
Year
1971/72  	
1970/71   	
Amount
$
187,513
. 168,663
1973/74
1972/73
  158,109
   166,212
Cost-sharing—The Federal-Provincial-municipal relationship is 50:40:10.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974 R 73
COMMUNITY GRANTS
Goal—To provide encouragement to nonprofit agencies and groups that are
providing community-based, innovative social services for needs that are not
guaranteed by statute.
Description—Individuals and groups all over British Columbia submit
proposals for community grants. Recognizing an unmet need, citizens submit
proposals to local offices of the Department. In locales where Community Resources Boards are developing, proposals are reviewed by the developing boards.
In this way, local citizens, knowledgeable of the unique needs in their community,
can determine what nonstatutory services are needed. Where no Community
Resources Boards are developing, project proposals are taken and considered by
local Human Resources offices. Staff check to see that proposals do not duplicate
existing services. Each project proposal is then forwarded to the appropriate
Regional Director, who reviews the proposal and sends it to the Community Programs Division in Victoria. Applications must be received by December 1 for
funding the following April 1, or by June 1 for funding commencing October 1 of
each year.
In 1974, 291 approved grants to community projects provided 650 jobs. Of
course, a much larger number of community volunteers were involved in these
programs. Lists of projects funded appear throughout this Annual Report under
the headings: Services for Families and Children, Services for Everyone, Services
for Special Needs, and Services for Senior Citizens. Grants given to developing
Community Resources Boards are also mentioned in the section on Community
Resources Board development.
By and large, the grants program has provided the means whereby the Government can make a swift response to emerging problems. Innovative programs and
pilot projects that try out new techniques may receive Government funding through
this vehicle. Where projects have proven their worth on a pilot basis, they may be
funded so that the services will be available throughout the Province.
Changing patterns in 1974—Departmental expenditures on community
grants in 1974 almost doubled the amount reported for calendar year 1973. Expenditures in 1973 (calendar year) were $2,843,082, while in 1974 $5,663,816 was
expended on community grants, including grants made to developing community
resources boards. The figure following shows the dollars spent on community grants
in 1974 and the fiscal years 1971/72, 1972/73, and 1973/74.
1
Figure 14
Calendar year 1974
1 Fiscal year 1973/74
Dollars Spent on Community Grants: A Comparison
$5,663,816
■■
$2,871,707
Fiscal year 1972/73
$737,850
•
Fiscal year 1971/72
$242,678
sdlHHR
m^^^:^^^<^n\--:-^:Pk^
 R 74 HUMAN RESOURCES
The dollars spent on community grants continue to expand as the response
steadily grows from communities that want to have a hand in developing their own
nonstatutory services tailored to local needs.
The Provincial Government's decision to provide ongoing funding to community projects initiated under the Federal Local Initiatives Program represented a
large portion of the budgeting increase in 1974. Some 80 projects were provided
with ongoing funding at a cost of $2.4 million dollars.
COMMUNITY GRANTS
Following is a list of community grants that were made in 1974 to projects in
communities offering services available to everyone:
City and Grant
Organization in 1974
Abbotsford:
Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford Community Services Society—Program funding including Volunteer Bureau, Family Life, youth services, cloth- $
ing  depot         57,750
Armstrong-Spallumcheen :
Community Service Centre—Home aid, transportation, information        30,868
Burnaby:
Family Life Institute   3,800
Campbell River:
Community  Resources Society—Family  Life  counselling  services,   crisis
centre, services to women, related community services        65,171
Chilliwack:
Community Chest and Services—Volunteer Bureau, information centre —.       15,589
Coquitlam :
SHARE Society—Community services program, including crisis and information centre, goods exchange, workshop, volunteer bureau, transportation for handicapped and seniors           77,913
Courtenay:
Crossroads Crisis Centre—Joint program of counselling, training, information, crisis line             16,085
Cowichan Lake :
Community  Activity and Resources Centre—Community  centre for  all
ages—varied program, emphasis on youth and low income         30,689
Cowichan-Malahat Counselling Services—Family Life   5,600
Crescent Beach:
Community Resources Centre—Activity and social centre serving community, with emphasis on youth and children's services        12,520
Delta :
Deltassist Society—Information service, advocacy, volunteer bureau         44,462
Duncan:
Activity Centre—General community youth program  (recreation and
leisure activities)        24,000
Kamloops:
Family Life and Crisis Centre—Counselling, training, crisis line   20,872
FISH—Church-sponsored Helping Hand Association   800
Mt. Paul Central Church—Transportation  804
Project Recycle—Assist recycling programs (developmental phase only)   10,655
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974 R 75
COMMUNITY GRANTS—Continued
City and Grant
Organization in 1974
Kimberley:
East Kootenay Crisis & Information—Twenty-four-hour information line $
for area         9,675
Langley:
Communty Services Council—Volunteer Bureau and related services, including legal aid and transportation        25,183
Family Life Association—Information, counselling services         11,700
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows:
Community Services Council—Volunteer Bureau, Homemakers, crisis line ..       30,231
Merritt:
Home Care Services—Home Aid, nursing, transportation, information        24,114
Mission :
Community Services Society—Volunteer bureau, Family Life, information ..       40,776
Nanaimo:
Family Life Association—Counselling, information        14,236
Nelson and District:
Community Service Centre—Volunteer bureau, Family Life, information
referral         26,782
New Westminster:
Centre for information on neighbourhood services  8,394
North Burnaby:
Centre for information on neighbourhood services  8,394
North Shore:
Family Services of Greater Vancouver—Community family worker  10,625
HUB Information—Neighbouring information centre  8,394
Institute of Living & Learning—Support of Family Life program  8,400
Lower Lonsdale Neighbourhood Information Centre   8,394
Seymour Planning Association—Grant to support special research project .. 3,000
Parksville:
Society of Organized Services (SOS)—Support of community organization
services, including a thrift shop, information centre, volunteer bureau ..        6,000
Penticton :
Co-operative Community Service—Volunteer Bureau, information         28,217
Special Action Group—Headquarters for six community services  9,600
Port Alice:
North Island Family Life Centre  4,240
Prince George:
Carefree Transportation—Transportation services for handicapped, seniors,
and social assistance recipients       70,800
Community Services Centre     6,230
Quesnel and District:
Contact Crisis Line and Centre—Meals served, drop-in centre, information,
crisis line          21,000
Richmond:
Information Centre   8,394
South Burnaby:
Centre for information on neighbourhood services    8,394
 R 76
HUMAN RESOURCES
COMMUNITY GRANTS—Continued
City and
Organization
Surrey :
Community Resources Society—Advocacy, information centre, Home Aid,
home repair service for handicapped and aged	
Co-ordinating Centre—Volunteer Bureau 	
Surrey-White Rock Family Life—Counselling, information centre	
Vancouver:
Catholic Community Services 	
Community Education Exchange  	
Red Door Information Centre—Community rental aid	
Crisis intervention and suicide prevention	
Downtown  Community  Health  Services—Road  Health  services   (social
work support)    	
Dugout Day Centre—Drop-in centre for transients	
Greater  Vancouver Helpful Neighbours—Community  newspaper,  two
stores of used furniture, 24-hour phone service	
Kitsilano Neighbourhood House—Sundown Project, low-income support....
Language Aid—Information and assistance for needy persons with language
difficulties   	
National Council of Jewish Women 	
Neighbourhood Services Association—Support with workers in broad neighbourhood programs 	
St. James Social Services—Cafeteria, workshop, home services	
Society for Pollution & Environmental Control—Funding for survey on
alternative life-styles 	
Sunset Information Centre 	
Unitarian Family Life Centre	
Vancouver Community Workshop—Centre for unemployed to make day
care furniture   	
Vancouver Information Centres—Support funding for eight centres 	
Volunteer Bureau of Greater Vancouver 	
West Broadway Citizens Committee—Low-income support	
West End Landlord-Tenant Centre 	
Vernon and District:
Community Services-
Home: aid, transportation, information, repairs
Victoria :
Capital Regional District Research & Action Team—Social services	
Greater Victoria Citizens Counselling Service—Assistance for regional conferences 	
Greater Victoria Citizens Counselling Service—Family Life, training counselling, therapy 	
NEED— Crisis Intervention & Public Information Service of Greater Victoria—Twenty-four-hour crisis line and information	
Pacific Community Self Development Society (REP)—Support for research
project-newsletter information service 	
Port Renfrew Community Resource Centre—Community centre (leisure
activities) 	
Victoria West Community Development Association—Home Aid, repairs,
activity programs, arts and crafts, sports 	
Blanshard Community Council—Start-up funds   	
Grant
in 1974
123,146
1,400
8,400
25,000
4,800
4,803
33,600
79,413
8,000
21,945
5,838
10,780
3,000
33,750
90,027
2,181
7,377
7,091
10,575
75,546
41,890
11,010
5,761
24,500
20,250
4,000
18,567
20,500
13,451
4,050
29,840
150
Total
1,563,413
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974
R 77
Ten additional grants were made to organizations involved in work of general
social benefit:
Name of
Organization
Grant
in 1974
Association of B.C. Hostels	
B.C. Association of Social Workers 	
B.C. Civil Liberties Association	
B.C. Foster Parents Association	
B.C. Lions Society for Crippled Children	
Canadian Paraplegic Society  	
Social Planning and Review Council of B.C.	
The Vanier Institute	
The Canadian Council on Social Development  	
UBC Press—Support for a publication on Indians in urban society
35,000
12,000
53,361
43,500
19,926
50,000
50,000
25,000
14,783
3,500
307,070
  SERVICES FOR
SPECIAL NEEDS
  REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974 R 81
MINCOME   (HANDICAPPED PERSONS INCOME ASSISTANCE)
Goal—To provide the income essential for disabled persons to meet their
everyday living requirements and maintain their sense of independence and dignity.
Description—As a part of the Minimum Income Assistance Program (Mincome), disabled persons over 18 years of age are guaranteed a monthly income of
$234.13 (as of January 1, 1915). For detailed statistics and further information,
see the section on Mincome in "Services for Seniors."
Field staff of the Department determine eligibility in so far as income is concerned, then each applicant's medical documentation is sent to the Department's
Health Care Division for a determination of sociomedical eligibility.
Changing patterns in 1974—Increases in 1974 in the number of disabled
persons in receipt of Mincome can be seen by comparing figures for the month of
December in 1973 and 1974.
Table 32—Mincome (Handicapped Persons Income Assistance)
Number of
Recipients
Departmental
Expenditures
$
1,237,000
December 1973   6,300
December 1974     .... 8,700
1,892,000
Mincome payments were readjusted three times in 1974 to
allow for cost-of-living
increases.
To make recommendations on changes needed, beyond the income guarantee
for the disabled, the Minister appointed an Advisory Committee at the end of 1973.
The Advisory Committee on the Needs of the Physically Handicapped held
22 meetings in 1974 to work on following up and refining recommendations on the
needs of the handicapped made earlier to the Minister at a conference held in the
fall of 1973.
The Advisory Committee made four-day visits to five communities in British
Columbia in the summer and fall of 1974 to test the validity of recommendations
being "worked on" and to see how the proposals would apply to local conditions
throughout the Province. Additional needs of the communities were brought to
the Committee's attention in Parksville, Terrace, Nelson, Williams Lake, and
Vernon. Briefs from the Vancouver area had been received earlier by the Advisory
Committee. The final recommendations of the Advisory Committee will be made
to the Cabinet early in 1975.
Cost-sharing—The Federal Government participates in the cost of Mincome
to handicapped persons providing that assets do not exceed $1,500 (single) or
$2,500 (couple). This agreement provides for a maximum net return to the
Province of 50 per cent of the costs associated with ensuring that a $200 needs
budget is met.
 R 82 HUMAN RESOURCES
Example: A fully shareable (handicapped) Mincome recipient receives the
current monthly maximum $234.13 (as of January 1, 1975). The Federal Government's net return to the Province is $ 100.
In the calendar year 1974, the Mincome (HPIA) expenditure was $20.2
million. Net value of cost-sharing claims (to the Federal Government) for this
group over the same period was $5.9 million, or approximately 30 per cent of
expenditure.
For further information on Mincome (Handicapped Persons Income Assistance), contact your local office of the Department of Human Resources.
ACTIVITY CENTRES
Goal—To provide assistance to registered nonprofit societies or agencies
which operate activity centres designed to improve the quality of life for handicapped
people over school-leaving age.
Description—At least three types of activity centres have evolved throughout
the Province:
(1) Centres which operate primarily as premises for social activities with
opportunities for disabled people to meet and take part in arts and
crafts and related pastimes.
(2) Sheltered workshops which offer ongoing work for people unable
to compete in the regular labour force. Such workshops typically
(a) arrange contracts with businesses or Government for the completion of a labour-intensive task, and (b) manufacture household
articles for sale to the public.
(3) Rehabilitation workshops which, in addition to sheltered work, also
provide ability assessment, vocational training, and job placement
in their program.
To be eligible for financial support from the Department of Human Resources,
centres must agree to the following conditions:
(1) To serve physically or mentally handicapped persons over school-
leaving age, regardless of the handicapping condition.
(2) To provide evidence of continuing community support.
(3) To accept participants from community boarding-homes without
charging a fee (approximately half of the 65 subsidized centres in the
Province charge a "training fee" of up to $20 per month to participants who do not reside in boarding-homes).
(4) To ensure that charges made for contract work are comparable to
rates charged by the private sector for similar work performed.
(5) To operate under the auspices of a registered agency or nonprofit
society.
Once approved, centres submit monthly billing forms to the Department of
Human Resources based on a formula determined by the number of user-hours
per month. The monthly grants give assistance with staff salaries and costs of
supplies.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974
Payments are made on the following basis:
R 83
Table 33-
—Departmental Assistance Rates to Activity Centres
Basic-
Payment
for Staff
Payment for
Supplies and
Materials
Total
$
$
$
600 participant hours/month up to .....
......     600
120
720
900
1,200
t
675
135
150
810
900
......     750
1,500
......     825
165
990
1,800
... .     900
180
1,080
2,100
....    975
195
1,170
2,400
1,050
210
1,260
3,000
..... 1,200
240
1,440
3,600
......  1,350
270
1,620
4,200
...... 1,500
300
1,800
4,800
...... 1,650
330
1,980
5.400
......  1.800
360
2.160
-
3
For example, a centre with 33 participants attending the centre five hours
per day may be eligible for subsidization up to $1,620 per month (33 participants X five hours per day X 22 working-days per month = 3,630 participant
hours per month).
Changing patterns in 1974—The program has grown considerably in 1974
and expanded its goals in accordance with increased community recognition of,
and support for, the special needs of the handicapped population. Increased public
recognition of the fact that one in seven Canadians is handicapped in some way
has led to increased community initiatives in this field.
The Government has set services for handicapped as one of its priority areas
for action. There is growing support for programs that seek to integrate so-called
handicapped persons more fully into community-based activities, rather than to
isolated lives in institutions.
By year-end 1974 there were 64 funded activity centres in British Columbia,
an increase of 15 over the number funded at the end of 1973.
Expenditures for funding the 64 activity centres in 1974 are approximately
$995,000. The activity centres funded are listed at the end of this section. The
costs of the program increased substantially from 1973 when $435,697.88 was
expended on funding 49 centres. In the 64 funded centres this year there are
approximately 3,400 persons attending each month, with an average of 69 hours'
attendance per person. In 1973 there were only about 2,000 persons attending
activity centres each month in British Columbia.
Grants are based on hours of participation. Therefore, the increased number
of centres and participants in 1974, together with a 20-per-cent rate increased in
December 1973, account for the increased program cost this year.
Cost-sharing status—The Provincial and Federal Governments share the
costs of the program equally.
For more information, contact your local Department of Human Resources or
the Director, Special Care—Adults Division, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
 R 84 HUMAN RESOURCES
Activity Centres Funded in 1974
Abbotsford : $
MSA Community Services       15,107.26
MSA Association for the Retarded (Wildwood)      24,764.00
Armstrong :
Armstrong-Enderby Association for the Retarded      10,775.00
Burnaby:
Burnaby Association for the Mentally Retarded     17,460.00
Campbell River:
Campbell River District Association for the Mentally Retarded       3,960.00
Castlegar:
Silver Birch Society        8,436.00
Chilliwack:
Chilliwack & District Opportunity Workshop     13,246.00
Courtenay :
Courtenay Special Opportunity Centre      15,840.00x
Cranbrook :
Kootenay Society for Handicapped Children (luniper)      19,055.00
Creston :
Kootenay Society for Handicapped Children (Cresteramics)        6,585.00
Dawson Creek:
Dawson Creek Society for Retarded Children     13,478.05l
Duncan:
Duncan & District Association for the Mentally Retarded      19,800.00
Grand Forks:
Grand Forks & District Society for the Handicapped        3,300.00
Invermere:
Windermere & District Society for Handicapped Children        7,655.90'
Kamloops:
Kamloops Society for the Retarded (Pleasant Services)      25,040.00
Kelowna :
Canadian Mental Health Association (Discovery Club)   13,698.50
Kelowna District Society for the Retarded (Sunnyvale)   27,060.00
Rutland & Winfield Discovery Club   7,156.00
Langley :
Langley Association for the Retarded      10,350.00
Maple Ridge:
Community Services Council (Haney Clothing Depot)        8,026.00
Harold E. lohnson Centre        16,640.00
Merritt:
Nicola Valley Association for the Retarded (Merritt)        7,930.00
Mission:
Mission Workshop      18,180.00
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974 R 85
Activity Centres Funded in 1974—Continued
Nanaimo: $
Canadian Mental Health Association (White Cross)   4,920.00
Nanaimo Association for the Retarded (Narco Centre)   19,980.00
Nanaimo Activity Centre (HOPE, closed in August 1974)   8,280.00
Nelson:
Kootenay Society for Handicapped Children      12,531.60
New Westminster:
New Westminster & District Society for the Retarded (Beacon Services) ...    28,740.00
New Westminster & District Society for the Retarded (Port Moody Division)         15,570.00
Canadian Mental Health Association (Sha-Sha Club)      27,880.00
North Vancouver:
Canadian Mental Health Association (Corner House)        4,050.00
Penticton :
Penticton & District Society for the Retarded       29,280.00
Port Alberni:
Alberni & District Association for the Retarded      10,844.80
Powell River:
B.C. Association for the Mentally Retarded (Artaban)      19,765.00
Prince George:
Prince George & District Association for the Retarded (Aurora Services)     18,900.00
Princeton:
Princeton Activity Centre        1,695.00
Quesnel:
Borealis Occupation Centre      11,685.00
Salmon Arm:
Shuswap Sheltered Workshop      11,880.00
Sardis :
Upper Fraser Valley Society for the Retarded (Sunshine Dr. School)      11,452.41
Squamish:
Squamish Activity Centre for the Handicapped        2,945.00
Surrey:
Surrey Association for the Mentally Retarded—Clover Training Centre ....    19,823.00
Terrace:
Three Rivers Workshop      15,840.00
Trail:
Kootenay Society for Handicapped Children          7,785.00
Vancouver :
Canadian Arthritis & Rheumatism Society   10,350.00
Canadian Mental Health Association (White Cross)   20,700.001
Coast Foundation Society      27,280.001
Handicrafts for Homebound Handicapped (3H)   —   9,120.00
Mental Patients Association     12,598.84
1 Billings not received for December, grant is estimated.
 R 86 HUMAN RESOURCES
Activity Centres Funded in 1974—Continued
$
St. James Social Service (Gastown Workshop)       15,800.00
Vancouver-Richmond   Association   for   the   Mentally   Retarded   (Varco
No.   1  Centre)       45,320.00
Vancouver-Richmond Association  for   the  Mentally  Retarded   (No.   2
Centre) _     26,280.00
Vancouver-Richmond  Association  for   the   Mentally   Retarded   (No.   3
Centre)       20,240.00
Vernon:
Canadian Mental Health Association (Vernon Workshop)        8,910.00
Venture Training Centre      33,480.00
Victoria :
Arbutus Crafts Association   19,820.00
Canadian Mental Health Association (Community Explorations)   9,930.00
Canadian Mental Health Association (Cornerstone)   10,635.00
Canadian Mental Health Association (White Cross)   26,036.00
Greater Victoria Association for the Retarded (Haywood Centre)   8,801.50
Greater Victoria Association for the Retarded (Langwood Branch)   8,773.20
Greater Victoria Association for the Retarded (Winnifred M. Clark Centre) 27,695.00
Greater Victoria Association for the Retarded (Peninsula Workshop)   1,170.00
West Vancouver:
North Shore Association for the Mentally Retarded (ARC Services)      13,393.90
North Shore Association for the Mentally Retarded  (Cootnda Progress
Centre)       17,348.76
White Rock:
Modern Service Club        23,290.00
Total cost of Activity Centres Program in 1974  994,361.72
SUMMER STUDENT EMPLOYMENT,  1974
Goal—To provide employment for high school and university students during
the summer recess.
Description—Co-ordinated by the Provincial Department of Labour, the
Student Summer Employment Program (Careers '74) hired students to work during
the 16-week period between May 6 and August 23, 1974. The program was broken
down into several distinct areas in an attempt to offer incentives to regions, municipalities, and small businesses as well as to Government.
In Government two areas were used—(a) Experience 1974, students filling
regular Public Service positions on a relief basis; (b) Innovation 1974, students
for special projects that provided services not ordinarily available.
Under the Experience Program the Department hired students to fill the positions of social worker, financial assistance worker, case aide, child care counsellor,
and research officer. Along with this many students were hired to fill clerical positions. All these students were paid at the regular rate paid for the classification
they held.
•The Innovations Program did not involve assigning students to specific Public
Service classifications. Students were paid according to their attained educational
level, not according to the duties performed.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974 R 87
There was a strong emphasis by the Department of Labour organizers on the
Innovations Program. This program was emphasized because the salaries on the
program, being lower, allowed for the hiring of more students than would have
been possible under the Experience Program.
The Department of Human Resources hired four times as many students under
the Innovations 1974 Program area as under Experience 1974.
While the program was designed for students in general, specific preference was
given to those students who might otherwise have difficulty finding suitable employment in the private sector. Priority was given to (a) handicapped persons, (b)
Indians, (c) women, (d) those with obvious financial need, and (e) mature students.
Under this program, 520 students were hired by the Department of Human
Resources. While the majority of these students were hired in the Vancouver-
Victoria area, all areas within the Province were able to take advantage of the
program.
The total cost of employing 520 students was $852,848. This amount was
substantially lower than the estimated cost, due to the following factors: (a) approximately 35 per cent of the students were in high school and only available for eight
weeks, not the full 16, (b) many projects involving children were designed for
operation during the months of July and August only, and (c) a number of students
terminated their jobs early to attend summer school or travel.
Cost-sharing—The program is financed entirely by the Provincial Government.
For information on student summer employment, contact your local Department of Human Resources ofTice.
EDUCATIONAL UPGRADING AND VOCATIONAL TRAINING
Goal—To improve employment prospects of social assistance recipients by
upgrading their technical and academic skills.
Description—Where need seems to exist but is not forthcoming through the
Federal Department of Manpower's Training Grants, Human Resources office staff
may refer interested applicants to the nearest vocational or educational training
institution. Manpower training grants are not made until individuals are out of
school for one year, or in the labour force for one year, so many persons are temporarily ineligible for their services.
Arrangements may be made by the recipient or Human Resources staff for
enrolment and training in a vocational program. Social Allowance payments may
be supplemented by an allowance of up to $15 per month for single persons and
up to $25 per month for married persons, to help meet incidental expenses. When
there are no sources of funds available from the Federal Department of Manpower
or Department of Education, the Department pays tuition fees for vocational schools.
It also provides for the cost of books and transportation.
Assistance in attending university has been extended only to single parents or
handicapped persons. All other applicants have been encouraged to follow shorter
term training in vocational schools or regional colleges. Assistance in attending
university covers family maintenance and does not include actual education costs
such as fees and books. Help with these items is provided by the Department of
Education's Student Assistance Program.
When social assistance recipients accept training grants or allowances from
other bodies, they are ensured that income from all sources during the training period
is equal to that received prior to the commencement of training.
 1
R 88 HUMAN RESOURCES
Departmental expenditures in this program follow:
Figure 15
Educational Upgrading and Vocational Training, Departmental Expenditures, 1972-74
1974
1973
$185,000
$80,000
$160,000
(est.)
Cost-sharing—Costs are shared with the Federal Government on a 50:50
basis.
For further information on educational opportunities, contact your local office
of the Department of Human Resources.
WORK ACTIVITY PROJECTS
FOR ADULTS
Goal—This program is intended primarily to provide an improved opportunity
for social assistance recipients to re-enter the labour market through development of
adequate work habits and group process. Other individuals who have had difficulty
obtaining employment may also participate.
The intention is to provide candidates with elementary skills relating to work
and generally to stimulate a positive approach to meaningful life situations, both in
work and in their personal and social environment.
Description—The goals of the program are accomplished by
(a) providing a work experience;
(b) life-skill training;
(c) a reality-oriented classroom approach to those who have had difficulty
in finding employment.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974
R 89
Two work activity projects for adults are funded by the Department in the
Fraser Valley area.
1. The Forestry Employment Project—The program uses the Forest Branch as
a work-experience base, practical classroom experience is provided by the local
school district, and social work counselling is met by a Departmental staff member.
During the three years of this program's operation, a reasonable number of
individuals have re-entered the employment market. An estimated 30 per cent of
the participants have not returned to the role of a social assistance recipient.
During 1974, 320 people participated in these work-activity crews. About
150 of the participants were between 18 and 30 years of age. Several women participated in the Forestry Employment Program for the first time in 1974. Average
length of time on the project was four months; individuals may participate up to six
months.
Costs of the project came to $192,000 in 1974. Expenditures cover salaries
of forestry foremen and instructors, and the allowances paid to participants.
Allowances are set at $100 per month, over and above the social assistance
rates paid.   Participation in the project comes to approximately 36 hours per week.
2. The Langley Work Activity Project—This program provides work experience in the private sector, e.g., cashier work at local stores, work in personal
care facilities and newspaper offices, appliance stores, upholstery shops, a textile
factory, and in municipal government offices and the Department of Human
Resources.
Participating businesses provide supervision and instruction. Progress reports
are made to the Department of Human Resources and "employers" provide references at the completion of work periods.
Approximately 100 persons participated in the Langley Project in 1974. Of
this number, approximately 40 per cent were females and 60 per cent were males.
Cost of the project in 1974 was $97,000. As with the Forestry Project,
participants received allowances of $100 per month, over and above their social
assistance payment.
Both the projects for adults are shared 50:50 with the Federal
Cost-sharing
Government.
FOR YOUTH
Goal—To prepare boys and girls 15 to 18 years of age, who have withdrawn
early from school, with further educational and (or) vocational training.
Description—Two work activity projects for youth are funded by the Department in the Capital Region. Both projects are administered by the Boys' Club, a
nonprofit society.
Participants are referred from the Family Court, the Department of Human
Resources, and the school system.
The two projects provide work experience, primarily through outdoor activity
such as grounds maintenance, brush-clearing, environmental improvement activities,
and a wood-lot operation. Some work placements in private businesses are also
carried out on a short-term basis.
A life-skill program is also provided which includes training in first aid, life-
saving, and sports. Educational upgrading is encouraged through participation in
individual correspondence courses.
 R 90 HUMAN RESOURCES
One of the projects is centred in Victoria and its enrolment is limited to 40
boys at any given time. The other project is in Langford; enrolment at Langford is
limited to 10 boys and 10 girls. Approximately 160 young people participated in
the projects in 1974.
Costs of the youth projects in 1974 were $85,500. These payments are made
directly to the Boys' Club for operation of the projects.
Cost-sharing—Costs shared 50:50 with the Federal Government.
INCENTIVE OPPORTUNITIES PROGRAM
Goal—This is a rehabilitative program, having as its objective the return of
recipients to economic independence. It provides an opportunity for social assistance recipients to regain their confidence and improve their work skills through
working with others in a nonprofit community service.
Description—The administration of the program is largely decentralized to
the various district offices throughout the Province. Local offices place participants
in a variety of jobs in many Public Service and private nonprofit agencies, including
Provincial, Federal, and municipal government offices, schools, libraries, recreational
programs, community health, and social service agencies. "Incentive workers"
serve in roles such as teacher aides, library assistants, health aides, clerical assistants,
information and counselling officers, visitors to the elderly, handicapped and sick,
home helpers, providers of home repair services for the elderly or others who cannot
afford to purchase services, public parking-lot attendants and other helpful services
of a nonprofit community nature.
In the Vancouver area the incentive opportunities program is administered
directly by social assistance recipients. The Vancouver Opportunities Program
arranges with local public and private nonprofit agencies to participate and matches
up the agencies with incentive workers who want to be involved in the program.
The Incentive Opportunities Program was extended in 1973 to enable people
who are in receipt of Handicapped Persons Income Assistance to become incentive
workers. Up to 1973, handicapped persons had been unable to take advantage of
this program.
There is no compulsion on social assistance or HPIA recipients to serve as
volunteers in the program since, to be effective, the program depends on participants'
interest and enthusiasm. It is not paid employment but there is an honorarium of
$50 per month maximum paid to single persons (on the basis of a minimum of
25 hours' service per month), and a $100 honorarium per month maximum paid
to family heads (on the basis of a minimum of 50 hours service per month). Many
participants in fact elect to donate many more hours of service than required.
Participating agencies benefit through having added staff to help in programs
that aid the community, and incentive workers have an opportunity to gain work
experience and financial help that may put them in a position to be better able to
find permanent employment. The following table shows the average number of
people on the program per year in 1974, 1973, and 1972. The cost of the program
is also given for the three calendar years. Costs reported pertain to honoraria made
to participating incentive workers.  Administrative costs are excluded.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974
R 91
Table 34—Incentive Opportunities Program
Calendar Year
Number on
Program
(Average Over
12-month
Period)
1974   4,200
1973    2,400
1972     2,300
Costs of
Program
4,400,000
2,550,000
1,750,000
The program expanded significantly in 1974 as increasing numbers of recipients
sought employment, as the existence of the program received greater visibility, and
as nonprofit agencies sought more placements. The expanded availability of day
care services in British Columbia may be contributing to the larger number of
participants.
Cost-sharing status—Costs are shared 50 per cent with the Federal Government and 10 per cent with the Municipal Government.
For further information on the program, contact your local office of the Department of Human Resources. In Vancouver, contact the Vancouver Opportunities
Program at 1108 Commercial Drive.
HOSTELS FOR ADULTS
Goal—To provide short-term shelter for persons in need who require a
temporary place to stay. Hostels run exclusively for young people are described
separately.
Description—Twenty-four hostels in the Province provide shelter on a limited
time basis. Most of these hostels are administered by nonprofit societies. When
social assistance recipients stay in the hostels, they may pay the hostel directly for
their shelter, out of their social assistance cheque. In other cases, hostel operators
bill the Department directly, on a per diem basis, for individuals who have insufficient
funds.
Hostels are licensed by the Provincial Community Care Licensing Board. By
year-end, bed capacity in these hostels amounted to more than 900.
Nine hostel programs received community grants in 1974 to improve their
services. The following list gives details of the $240,581 granted directly to hostels
for improvements, over and above the payments made on behalf of actual occupants.
Table 35—Community Grants by the Department of Human Resources to
Hostels in British Columbia, 1974
City and
Organization
Hope:
Hunters Creek Hostel—Equipment purchase  in  support of John  Howard
Hostel              	
Gram
in 1974
1,500
Kamloops:
Adonis House—Initial funding of alcohol treatment program (includes hostel)    15,000
Community YWCA—Youth programs, counselling, hostel       24,642
 R 92 HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 35—Community Grants by the Department of Human Resources to
Hostels in British Columbia, 1974—Continued
City and Grant
Organization in 1974
Nanaimo: $
Forward House—Temporary hostel for discharged mental patients  6,214
Vancouver:
Allied Indian Metis Society—Hostel for discharged Indian Metis prisoners .... 17,700
Hatfield Society—Hostel for released prisoners  31,725
X-Kalay—Hostel program for released prisoners  132,000
Loma Lodge—Hostel for young adults (ex-psychiatric care)    7,800
Victoria :
Cool Aid—Purchase of equipment for hostel     4,000
Total ._..«      240,581
Cost-sharing—50:50 sharing with the Federal Government on persons
designated by the Federal Government as being "in need."
For more information on the hostel program for adults, contact your local
office of the Department of Human Resources or the Director, Special Care, Adults
Division, Department of Human Resources, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
HALFWAY OR TRANSITION HOUSES
Goal—To provide temporary room and board to persons who are in transition" and who lack financial means—transient workers, drug and alcohol dependents,
persons who have recently left prison, women in transition, etc.
Description—When persons eligible for social assistance reside in halfway or
transition houses, their living expenses are covered by the Department of Human
Resources. Programs designed to meet specific needs may receive additional grants.
For example, halfway houses for drug addicts and alcoholics receive grants directly
from the Provincial Alcohol and Drug Commission.
In 1974 there were 25 halfway houses in British Columbia licensed by the
Community Care Facilities Licensing Board to provide lodging and counselling to
persons with drug and (or) alcohol problems. Bed capacity for the halfway houses
stood at approximately 500.
Halfway houses for people with other problems are run by various nonprofit
societies.
Three transition houses for women were supported by Departmental grants in
1974. The Ishtar Women's Centre in Langley offered counselling, training, and
seminars as well as lodging. The Victoria Women's Centre ran a transition house
with counselling. In Vancouver, a $91,494 grant to the Vancouver Transition
House subsidized costs of providing lodging, counselling, and information on other
community services. By year-end the Vancouver Transition House was administered directly by the Vancouver Resources Board.
In contrast to hostels, halfway houses usually provide counselling services and
information on other community organizations.
Cost-sharing—50:50 sharing with the Federal Government on expenditures
for social assistance recipients who are lodged temporarily in halfway or transition
houses.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974
R 93
For more information on halfway houses, contact your local office of the
Department of Human Resources or the Director, Special Care, Adults Division,
Department of Human Resources, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
COMMUNITY GRANTS FOR SPECIAL NEEDS
Community grants were made to 128 groups in 1974 that offer services directed
to special problems or situations. The following list documents the grants made and
briefly describes the projects' concerns:
City and Grant
Organization in 1974
Abbotsford:
MSA Society  (Operation Reachout)—Alternative education program for $
youth    3,357
Ahousat :
Indian Co-operative—Assist with development costs  4,100
Burnaby:
Lifeline Society—Youth services for low-income families         23,965
PURPOSE (Family Court Committee)—Services for delinquent youth ......       59,502
Burns Lake:
BCANSI—Development work for Burns Lake Native Development Corporation         42,204
Bridge the Gap Society—Youth  programs  to  meet  social  and  cultural
deprivation problems   2,955
Community Development Association—Program  for  developing  socially
oriented programs for Native Indians         73,920
Campbell River:
BCANSI—Funding of Adoption Home Finding Unit         10,340
John Howard Society—Funding of social work and rehabilitation services
for parolees         16,086
Courtenay :
Bevan Lodge Association—Development of day workshop in community ....       28,500
Upper Island Social Assistance and Low Income  Group—Self-help  and
Thrift Shop program   7,136
Cranbrook:
Boys' and Girls' Club—Drop-in counselling, social, cultural         12,951
BCANSI Local—Start-up funding   300
Dawson Creek:
Nawichan Friendship Centre—Native Indian drop-in, information, referral 6,257
Duncan :
Community Options—Services to problem youth, counselling, live-in, seminars, work preparation programs           73,714
Fort Nelson:
BCANSI Fort Nelson Chapter—Native Indian worker  for  information,
counselling, referral     6,024
Fort St. John:
Friendship Society—Native Indian drop-in, information, referral   6,257
Good Hope:
BCANSI—Community Development Project         41,086
 1
R 94 HUMAN RESOURCES
COMMUNITY GRANTS FOR SPECIAL NEEDS—Continued
City and Grant
Organization in 1974
Hope: $
Hunters Creek Hostel—Equipment purchase in support of John Howard
Hostel   1,500
Houston:
SCRAP—Social cultural program of arts and crafts for teenage youth         12,950
Kamloops:
B.C. Union of Indian Chiefs—Funding of Adoption Home Finding Unit .... 10,340
Adonis House—Initial funding of alcohol treatment program hostel   15,000
Boys' and Girls' Club—Youth activity centre, drop-in, social cultural centre 9,000
Community YWCA—Youth programs, counselling, hostel   24,642
Elizabeth Fry Society—Counselling, assisting youth in trouble with the law 12,600
Indian Interior Friendship Society—Staff support for centre's programs,
information, counselling   27,000
John Howard Society   2,671
Women's  Centre    4,770
Kelly Lake:
BCANSI—Community Development Project in conjunction with Frontier
College         28,250
Kelowna:
Central Okanagan Friendship Centre—Native Indian drop-in, information 6,257
Kyuquot :
Receiving Home—Establishment of centre for children needing shelter        34,000
Langley:
Ishtar Women's Centre—Transition house, counselling, training, seminars       32,486
Services Incorporated—Youth employment service   2,500
Mission:
Friendship Centre—Native Indian drop-in, information, referral   6,257
Community Services—Transportation services for handicapped   6,996
Workshop Association—Support staff for handicapped workshop   14,760
Nanaimo:
Association for Intervention & Development—Advocacy, street workers,
crisis line, counselling         22,890
Family  Life Association   (Northfield)—Alternative   school  program  for
teenage youth   5,600
Forward   House   (CMHA)—Temporary   hostel   for   discharged   mental
patients   6,214
Hope Vocational Rehabilitation Workshop for the Handicapped   6,020
Tillicum Haus Society—Native Indian drop-in, information, referral service      6,257
Nelson and District:
Community Action Group—Support funding for low-income group   900
Community Service Centre  (ASPIRE Program)—Alternative  education,
social work component         20,500
Youth Activities Centre—Drop-in centre, counselling, social and cultural
activities      4,000
New Westminster:
Self Aid Never Ends  (YWYM,   New  Westminster  District)—Clothing,
furniture depot for low-income group         10,758
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974
R 95
COMMUNITY GRANTS FOR SPECIAL NEEDS—Continued
City and
Organization
Nicola Valley:
Counselling Centre—Alcohol counsellor start-up  (continued by Alcohol
and Drug Commission)  	
North Shore:
West Vancouver Sentinel Work Activity Project (SWAP)—Work preparation for teenagers
YMCA—Program support involving handicapped in recreation programs
Port Alberni :
Friendship Centre—Native Indian drop-in, information, referral service ....
Hesquiat Indian Band Council—Support staff for community work	
Port Hardy:
Tsulquate—Development of children's receiving-home 	
Prince George:
Doh Day De Claa Club Friendship Centre—Native Indian drop-in, information  	
Prince Rupert:
Attendance Centre (City of Prince Rupert)-
with the law	
-Program for youth in trouble
Friendship House Association—Native Indian drop-in, information referral
Third Avenue Worker (Friendship House)—Street worker 	
Penticton :
Buyer's Co-op—Food services for low income 	
Employability Project—Street worker counselling to transient youth	
Multiple Sclerosis—Transportation for handicapped
Sinu'llustra Friendship Centre—Native Indian drop-in centre, information
Sinu'llustra Indian Band—Program support for youth services 	
Quesnel and District:
Tillicum Society—Native Indian centre, drop-in, information referral 	
Nazko Indian Band—Summer youth program 	
Revelstoke:
Kinsmen Club—Assistance with transportation for seniors and handicapped
Richmond:
Project Contact—Services to pre-delinquent youth and families	
Richmond Chimo Personal Distress Intervention Service—Crisis line 	
Carefree (one shot)—Assist volunteers to provide transportation to handicapped  	
Salmon Arm :
Shuswap Youth Centre Association Drop-in Centre—Offering counselling,
recreation, street work, work with Native Indian youth on reserve .._
Remand Home of Social Assistance—Assistance with building costs, youth
in conflict with the law program	
Association for the Mentally Retarded—Support staff for workshop 	
Smithers:
Employment Counsellor-
-Assist unemployed to secure employment
South Burnaby:
Teen Challenge—Support for a youth program 	
Surrey:
Intersection Society—Crisis line, advocacy, youth services 	
Rehabilitation Workshop—Support staff of workshop for handicapped ...
SHARE Women's Centre—Clothing, furniture depot, counselling, drop-in
Grant
in 1974
4,284
11,200
1,500
6,257
5,555
48,125
6,257
8,296
6,257
885
5,740
10,136
2,886
6,257
2,500
6,257
791
1,968
28,962
22,477
500
34,118
2,801
12,000
5,334
872
22,218
33,710
13,077
 R 96 HUMAN RESOURCES
COMMUNITY GRANTS FOR SPECIAL NEEDS—Continued
City and Grant
Organization in 1974
Terrace and District: $
Golden Rule—Assist unemployed to secure employment   5,100
Native Action for Social Justice—Development of information and counselling centre   4,170
Vancouver:
Allied Indian Metis Society—Hostel for discharged Indian Metis prisoners 17,700
Association of Concerned Handicapped—Transportation, activity centre ... 17,500
Canadian National Institute for the Blind   500
Cedar Cottage Youth Services Project—Probation, alternative education ... 13,983
Coast Foundation Society—Transportation for handicapped, rehabilitation 45,178
Detention and Recreation Extension (DARE)—Probation counselling, parenting, alternative education   97,922
Federated Anti-Poverty Group—Support of low-income persons   6,750
Grandview-Terrace  Recreation  Project—Alternative   education   in   social
and cultural programs     16,602
Hatfield Society—Hostel for released prisoners   31,725
John Howard Society—Family Service Group   7,200
John Howard Society (Siblings Project)—Alternative education, probation
counselling       48,380
Loma Lodge—Hostel for young adults (ex-psychiatric care)   7,800
Patient After-Care Support Service (PASS)—Support of released patients
from Vancouver General Hospital   39,508
Peoples Resources Committee—Handicrafts program   26,306
Recreational Track and Field Program—Services to pre-delinquents   17,100
United Housing Foundation (downtown eastside housing)—Assistance with
equipment for renovated hotels   64,500
United Housing Foundation   (Multi-use  centre)—Salary  of  architect  in
renovation of downtown hotels   20,000
Vancouver Association for Children With Learning Disabilities  13,500
Vancouver Indian Centre Society     10,073
Handicapped—Housing placement service, information, transportation .... 52,056
Vancouver Society for Total Education—Alternative education program .... 18,000
Vancouver Unemployed Citizens Welfare Improvement Council   276
Vancouver YWCA Multilingual Information Service   68,310
X-Kalay—Hostel program for released prisoners  .  132,000
YMCA Youth Employment Services   3,000
YWCA Multilingual Social Services—Services to Greek population  3,510
Door is Open—Youth centre in skid row  6,000
First United Church Outreach—Temporary support for alternative education (downtown program)   4,440
Cerebral Palsy Association of British Columbia—Funding of social work
component    6,489
BCANSI Headquarters—Funding of staff person   11,532
PACIFIC—Staffing for Vancouver Headquarters   29,244
Victoria:
Community Action Group, Sidney—Advocacy and information for low-
income group   3 00
Cool Aid—Purchase of equipment for hostel   4,000
Employment Counselling Program (five Counsellors)—To assist unemployed in Region 11 to secure employment  25,478
Langford Boys Club—Alternative education programs   50,100
Regional Rental Referral Agency—Rental services for low-income group 1,281
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974
R 97
COMMUNITY GRANTS FOR SPECIAL NEEDS—Continued
City and
Organization
VlCTORIA-
Continued
Rental Aid Society—Rental services for low-income group
Seven Beds for Seven Mothers 	
Society of Disability Rights for Injured Workers—To assist members involved in compensation cases 	
Vancouver Island Mobile Community Food Service—Delivery of food at
cost to senior citizens and Indian reserves  	
Canadian Mental Health Activity Centre—Single grant to enrich vocational training for handicapped 	
Victoria Community Action Group—Advocacy and information for low-
income group 	
Victoria Contract Services-
capped 	
-Assistance for workshop program for handi-
Victoria Friendship Centre—Native Indian drop-in, information, referral
Victoria Girls Alternative Program—Social work support staff for Alternative Education Project 	
Victoria Indian Educational Incentive Program 	
Victoria Self-Help Society—Education and cultural support services to low-
income youth	
Victoria Women's Centre—Transition house, counselling
Warehouse School—Alternative Education Program 	
Williams Lake:
Anahim Lake Worker—Initial funding for alcoholic counselling 	
Cariboo Friendship Centre—Native Indian drop-in information, referral
Total 	
Grant
in 1974
$
2,383
247
24,762
7,620
14,000
26,282
6,500
6,257
31,656
10,776
18,009
61,260
17,952
4,080
6,257
2,230,546
  SERVICES FOR
SENIOR CITIZENS
  REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974
R 101
SERVICES FOR SENIOR CITIZENS
Figure 16
w^^OTa^Ajasar*6rants ,o seniors as weu as the bc
MINCOME
Goal—To provide a guaranteed minimum income to senior citizens and handicapped persons to assist them in meeting their everyday living requirements and
maintaining their sense of independence and dignity.
Description—The Mincome Program was introduced in December 1972 to
provide citizens of the Province aged 65 and over with a guaranteed minimum
income of $200 per month. In June 1973 the payment process for Handicapped
Persons Income Assistance benefits was incorporated into the Mincome Program.
On October 1, 1973, another significant change in the program occurred when
Mincome benefits were extended to citizens between the ages of 60 to 64.   Since
 R 102
HUMAN RESOURCES
the inception of the program the guaranteed minimum income level has been
increased six times in order to meet the increased cost of living. As of January 1,
1975, citizens aged 60 and over (18 and over if handicapped) are guaranteed a
monthly income of $234.13 or $468.26 per couple.
To be eligible for Mincome benefits an individual must meet the following
qualifications:
(a) Must be age 60 or over (18 or over if handicapped);
(b) Must have five consecutive years' residence in Canada with landed
immigrant status, or hold Canadian citizenship;
(c) Monthly income must not exceed the Mincome guaranteed level.
Persons aged 65 and over in receipt of the Old Age Security and the Guaranteed
Income Supplement will receive Mincome automatically if eligible.
Handicapped individuals and those persons aged 60 to 65 must make application for Mincome at their nearest local office of the Department of Human Resources.
Public response to the Mincome Program has been most favourable and all
indications are that the program is quite effective in meeting its goals. The senior
citizens of the Province appreciate the fact that they are the beneficiaries of one of
the most generous income maintenance programs in North America.
Steady increases in the number of people in receipt of Mincome payments can
be shown by the following bar graph, giving the total number of recipients in December of 1972, 1973, and 1974.
Figure 17
Total Mincome Program Recipients
118,000
persons
December
1972
December
1973
128,000
persons
December
1974
As mentioned earlier, Mincome benefits are paid to handicapped persons or
senior citizens whose monthly income does not exceed the Mincome guarantee.
The proportion of persons receiving Mincome who are (1) handicapped, (2) aged
60 to 64, or (3) 65 plus, in receipt of Old Age Security and the Guaranteed Income
Supplement follow:
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974
Figure 18
Mincome Recipients as at December 1974
R 103
Handicapped: 8,700 persons
Age Benefit: 22,900 persons
(60-64)
65 and Over: 96,500 persons
(Supplement)
The increase in Mincome recipients from December 1973 to December 1974
was 10,000 persons. This increase is largely due to the increased number of persons
aged 60 to 64 who have made application for the Mincome payment. The following
bar graph shows the number of recipients aged 60 to 64 in receipt of Mincome
benefits at three points in 1974. As depicted in the bar graph, the number of
recipients in this age-group increased by almost 6,000 persons.
17,000
persons
Figure 19
Number of Mincome Age Benefit (60-64) Recipients
21,700
persons
WmBBm
WMBaNSm
As at January
1974
As at July
1974
As at December
1974
 R 104
HUMAN RESOURCES
Expenditures by the Department of Human Resources for the Mincome Program are shown in the following tables:
Table 36—Departmental Expenditures, Mincome Program, 1972-74
Calendar Year
1974 .
1973 .
19721
Expenditure
$
100,042,000
54,479,000
4,624,000
i Program commenced December 1972.
The increases in 1974 expenditures for this program can be attributed to two
factors:
(a) Growth in the number of recipients in the age benefit (60 to 64) and
handicapped categories;
(fo) Quarterly cost-of-living increases.
Because the age benefit (60 to 64) and handicapped recipients do not qualify
for the Federal Old Age Security Pension or Guaranteed Income Supplement, the
Province must contribute a much higher proportion of the payment made to these
groups. The following pie graph breaks out Departmental expenditures for the
Mincome Program for the month of December 1974.
Figure 20
Proportion of Total Expenditure, Mincome, December 1974
As can be seen by the pie graph, the costs to the Department for the 60 to 64
age-group make up almost half the cost of the Mincome Program, although the number of recipients in that category is not so large.   The reason for this is that persons
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1974 R 105
aged 60 to 64 are not eligible for Old Age Security/Guaranteed Income Supplement,
which means that the Province provides total support up to the guaranteed level
in a great number of cases.
British Columbia is the only province to offer a universal guaranteed income
starting at 60 years of age.
Cost-sharing status—The Federal Government shares in the cost of assistance to those individuals designated as "persons in need" under the Canada Assistance Plan. Under the current agreement, approximately 13 per cent of the total
Provincial expenditure for Mincome is returned to the Province in the form of
Federal cost-sharing payments. The Province is currently negotiating with the
Federal Government to increase the amount of money that the Federal Government
will contribute toward the cost of our income maintenance programs.
For further information on Mincome, contact your local office of the Department of Human Resources or write Mincome, Box 2500, Victoria,' B.C.
SENIOR CITIZEN COUNSELLOR SERVICE
Goal—To provide a counselling and information service to senior citizens,
run by counsellors who are senior citizens themselves.
Description—The program began in 1968 with 30 senior citizen counsellors
recommended to the Department by old age pensioners' groups. The number of
counsellors has grown yearly—by the end of 1974 there were 130 senior citizen
counsellors volunteering their time and energy in all parts of British Columbia.
Senior citizen counsellors are called on to help with an almost limitless variety
of undertakings. Reports from the counsellors have shown them driving elderly
people to their doctor or hospital, assisting in the development of housing projects
and activity centres, helping to establish the Meals-on-Wheels Program, visiting
house-bound senior citizens, writing letters for elderly people who have difficulty
writing, providing information of new Government programs such as Mincome and
Pharmacare.
Prospective counsellors are recommended for appointment by local offices of
the Department of Human Resources. Once the counsellors have been appointed
by the Minister of Human Resources, they make themselves known in the community
by speaking to senior citizens groups and contacting service agencies.
Senior citizen counsellors are seniors themselves who have a strong social
interest in other elderly citizens; it is their dedication and peer group support which
explains the continuing effectiveness of this program. The program does not
presume to offer an in-depth type of counselling but can make referrals where such
is necessary. One of the most valuable aspects of the program is that the counsellor
often becomes a good friend.
Counsellors submit reports of out-of-pocket expenses, which may be reimbursed
up to $50 per month. The following table shows expenditures for the Senior
Citizen Counsellor Program in 1974 and the fiscal year 1971/72 to 1973/74:
Table 37—Departmental Expenditures, Senior Citizen Counsellor Service
$ $
1974 (calendar)   47,000      1972/73   25,000
1973/74   38,074      1971/72   21,100
 R 106 HUMAN RESOURCES
The following table gives an estimate of the number of people that have been
served by senior citizen counsellors in 1974 and the last three fiscal years:
Table 38—Numbers of Persons Served by Senior Citizen Counsellors
1974   63,500 1972/73   44,200
1973/74   49,000 1971/72   37,600
In the 1971 census there were 198,000 people in British Columbia over 65
years of age. Projecting from that figure, the Bureau of Vital Statistics estimated
that in 1974 there were 223,241 persons over 65 years of age in the Province. It
is estimated that the group over 65 is increasing at a rate of 5.4 per cent per year,
whereas the general population is increasing at a lower rate of 3.9 per cent per year.
Changing patterns in 1974—Responsibility for administering the program
was transferred in 1974 from the Division of Aging in Vancouver to the Special
Care Adults Division in Victoria. The Special Care Adults Division will be helping
to publicize the work of counsellors by informing each developing Community
Resources Board of the counsellors in its area and by encouraging more contacts
between counsellors and local Human Resources offices.
Counsellors have in the past had an opportunity to meet one another and learn
more about the Department by attending conferences held every other year. In
1974 a conference was held for senior citizens, but not for counsellors exclusively.
One large conference or several smaller regional conferences may be held for senior
citizen counsellors in 1975.
Cost-sharing status—The Federal Government shares in the costs of this
program on a 50:50 basis.
For more information about the program, contact your local Department of
Human Resources office or the Director, Special Care, Adults Division, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
B.C. HYDRO BUS PASS FOR SENIOR CITIZENS
Goal—To aid and encourage mobility among senior citizens.
Description—Bus passes are issued to (1) persons 65 years or over who are
in receipt of the Federal Guaranteed Income Supplement and (or) Mincome and
(2) persons under 65 years of age who are in receipt of Handicapped Person Income
Assistance or Mincome for the 60 to 64 age-group. The pass is good for six months,
costs $5, and entitles the holder to ride at any time on any scheduled Hydro bus
operating in the Greater Vancouver or Victoria area. No bus fare is necessary on
presentation of the pass in these two metropolitan areas.
A continuing increase in the number of passes issued to B.C. residents was
shown in 1974. The following table shows the number of passes issued in the two
issuing periods in 1974 and for the last three years:
Table 39—Number of Passes Issued
November 1974   26,892 May  1972   16,847
May 1974   23,000 November 1971  15,846
November 1973   20,570 May  1971   15,263
May  1973      18,657 September  1970   13,035
November  1972    17,119
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974 R 107
One of the main benefits to elderly and handicapped persons in receipt of the
bus pass appears to be the convenience of not having to worry about change when
getting on the bus. Getting proper change and putting it in the fare box while the
bus is under way is often a real physical chore for the frail or debilitated person.
Changing patterns in 1974—In April of 1974, responsibility for issuing bus
passes was taken on by the Division of Office Administration and Public Information in Victoria. The passes were previously issued by the now-discontinued Division of Aging in Vancouver. Administrative costs for issuing the November 1974
series of passes amounted to almost 65 cents per card. This expense includes
printing, personnel, and mailing costs. A large increase in applications for the
November issue required a 22-per-cent increase in the work load of issuing passes,
but over-all costs remained constant even at increased pay and work load levels
due to automation of more of the issuing procedures.
Cost-sharing status—Administrative costs of this program are borne by the
Department of Human Resources. All revenue occurring as a result of the $5
charge is remitted to B.C. Hydro. The Federal Government does not participate in
this program.
For more information on the program, write to the Division of Office Administration and Public Information, Department of Human Resources, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria (telephone: 387-3125, 387-6092).
ADULT CARE
Goal—To subsidize those elderly or handicapped persons who must be cared
for outside their own home and whose income is insufficient to meet the costs of the
supportive services they need.
Description—Departmental programs such as Meals-on-Wheels and Home-
maker Services play a part in supporting elderly persons who want to stay in their
own home. A small percentage of senior citizens find it necessary to be cared for
in institutional settings. An estimated 2 per cent of the persons aged 65 and over
require extended care and 3 per cent require personal and intermediate care.
Rates paid to institutions on behalf of persons requiring care vary with the
intensity of care required.
A definition of the types of care subsidized by the Department of Human
Resources follows:
Table 40—Definition of Types of Care in British Columbia Subsidized by
the Department of Human Resources
TYPE  1—PERSONAL CARE
Features:
Independently mobile (with or without mechanical aids).
Some forgetfulness, occasional confusion.
|-Needs:
Room and board  (any special diets will be of a simple nature,  such as diabetic,
pureed, low salt, low fat, or bland).
Limited lay supervision.
Assistance with activities of daily living (self-care, finances, etc.).
Planned program of social and recreational activities.
Occasionally requires skilled nursing procedures of the sort which could be performed
by a visiting nurse or orderly.
Usual Sites:
Personal care home; licensed boarding-home.
 R 108 HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 40—Definition of Types of Care in British Columbia Subsidized by
the Department of Human Resources—Continued
TYPE 2—INTERMEDIATE CARE
Features:
Independently mobile (with or without mechanical aids).
Forgetfulness and periods of confusion may be expected.
Needs :
Room and board (with more complex diets available).
Some daily professional nursing supervision.
Changing surgical dressings, the management of colostomy and urinary appliances,
postural drainage, oxygen therapy. Not every intermediate care facility is able
to provide all of these services.
Assistance with some activities of daily living (self-care, finances).
Planned program of social and recreational activities.
Usual Sites:
Personal or intermediate care home.
PRIVATE HOSPITAL
Features:
Usually unable to move about without the physical assistance of another person, or if
more mobile, presenting a more complex problem of medical management than
can be handled in intermediate care.
Needs:
Twenty-four-hour-a-day skilled professional care with graduate nurse supervision.
Organized activity and social program to promote as much independence as possible.
Sites:
Facility licensed as a private hospital.
Human Resources rates for Type 1—Personal Care range between $225 to
$250 per month, depending on the type of care. This range represents an increase
over the amount provided by the Department prior to June 1, 1974. Before that
time, rates for personal care were made up to $195.25 per month for persons
qualifying for social assistance {see details on eligibility for Social Allowance elsewhere in this Report).
For adults eligible for assistance receiving Type 2—Intermediate Care in rest
homes or other special care facilities, new rates commencing from June 1, 1974,
range between $250 to $400 per month per resident, depending on the nature of
the program. The rate prior to June 1, 1974, was $219.25 up to $245.25 per
resident per month.
The rate for an adult in a private hospital is a maximum of $525 per month
per resident as of June 1, 1974. The maximum payment to private hospitals by
Government for individuals in private hospital care prior to June 1, 1974, was
$401.75 per month.
Requests to the local Human Resources office for referral to care facilities are
made by relatives, friends, doctors, hospitals, or other members of the community.
Local Departmental staff are responsible for reviewing each situation and assessing
the kinds of care needed. The recipient contributes to the care costs to the extent
his income permits and the balance of the cost is then provided for by the
Department.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974
R 109
A monthly "comforts allowance" of $25 is provided for patients in need in the
various special care institutions and mental health facilities. The comforts allowance
was raised to its present level from the earlier rate of $18.30 per person per month
on July 1, 1974. The following table gives expenditures and number of persons
subsidized in adult care facilities by the Department of Human Resources for calendar year 1974, plus the fiscal years 1971/72 to 1973/74.
tmam
Table 41—Adult Care Expenditures and Number of Persons Assisted by the
Department of Human Resources
 Private Hospital Care (Nursing Home)
Expenditure
Average Number of
Persons Assisted
per Month	
1974	
1973/74..
1972/73..
1971/72..
4,000,000
2,523,189
2,537,450
2,596,299
1974	
1973/74..
1972/73..
1971/72..
Personal and Intermediate Care (Boarding and Rest Homes)
    8,500,0001
   5,160,2631
 4,908,7061
 4,300,9891
1,300
1,350
1,400
1,550
4,000
3,600
3,300
3,100
1 Does not include New Denver Pavilion or Provincial Home, Kamloops.
Substantial increases in Departmental expenditures in 1974 for adult care have
come about for several reasons. The increased rates effective July 1, 1974, were
necessitated by the higher operating costs of these facilities through unionization of
personnel, general rise in the cost of living, and increases in the minimum wage.
More persons were served in the personal and intermediate care facilities. In the
case of subsidies for private hospital care, most of the clients we serve are on a small
fixed income and when a rate is raised as it was on June 1, the Department of
Human Resources must usually assume responsibility for the entire increase.
Cost-sharing status—Federal and Provincial Governments share the cost
of adult care on a 50:50 basis.
For more information on adult care facilities, contact your local office of the
Department of Human Resources or the Director of Special Care, Adults Division,
Department of Human Resources, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
COURTESY CARD
Goal—To provide easy identification for persons 65 and over that will be
honoured by banks, stores, travel agencies, and other such establishments. It is
useful as a means of obtaining reduced prices in some areas.
Description—The courtesy card is free and entitles the holders to various
benefits, a major one being reduced fare on B.C. Hydro transit systems. Holders
pay 15 cents instead of 25 cents in a single zone and 25 cents instead of 40 cents
for a multizone fare.
 R 110 HUMAN RESOURCES
Approximately 157,000 people have applied for and received courtesy cards
since the program was instituted in 1972; 11,687 courtesy cards were issued between January 1 and December 31, 1974.
Changing patterns in 1974—Program costs for courtesy cards declined
slightly in 1974. Administration costs, under contract, were $11,500 in 1974, down
from $13,000 in 1973.
Cost-sharing status—Costs of this program are borne entirely by the Provincial Government.
For more information on the Courtesy Card Program, write to the Division of
Office Administration and Public Information, Department of Human Resources,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria (telephone: 387-2125, 387-6092).
PHARMACARE
Goal—To provide assistance in purchasing prescriptions to those individuals
and families with limited financial means, and to provide free prescription drugs to
senior citizens aged 65 and over and to eligible Social Allowance recipients.
Description—Pharmacare is of particular benefit to the senior citizens of
British Columbia—of the 225,000 senior citizens in the Province, more than half
have no taxable income. Approximately 30 per cent of the elderly suffer from one
or more chronic diseases or conditions, many of which can be controlled or alleviated
by the proper use of drugs.
Before establishment of this program, the expense of proper medication represented a heavy burden for the elderly. Accounting for less than 10 per cent of our
population, the elderly receive 22 per cent of all prescriptions and account for over
28 per cent of all drug expenditures.
In its first year of operation, Pharmacare appears to have effectively met its
original goals and objectives. Normal professional services of physicians and
pharmacists are extended to Pharmacare recipients in an identical manner to that
enjoyed by all citizens.
A higher number of prescriptions are being filled for elderly citizens than was
the experience of this group before the advent of Pharmacare. This was anticipated
and, in fact, was a prime consideration in establishing the program. Prior to
Pharmacare, many elderly citizens avoided having a prescription filled due to the
cost factors. Failure to obtain necessary medication meant incomplete therapy and
possible waste of the medical and (or) hospital care already provided.
Pharmacare administers three drug programs, each benefiting a different group
of people.
Plan A—Any person who has resided in the Province of British Columbia for
90 days or more and who is 65 years of age or more is entitled to receive free of
charge any drug prescribed by a physician upon presentation of a Pharmacare card
to the pharmacist filling the prescription.
Any person registered with one of the Province's medical insurance carriers
(the British Columbia Medical Plan, the Medical Services Association, and the
CU. & C. Health Services Society) and who can meet the age requirement is automatically provided with a Pharmacare card.
Plan B—Plan B was formerly known as the "British Columbia Prescription
Drug Subsidy Plan" and it subsidizes the cost of prescription drugs for eligible
persons.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT,  1973/74 Rill
Any person who has resided in the Province for at least 12 months who was
not required to pay income tax in the previous year and who has completed an
acceptable declaration to that effect for one of the Province's medical insurance
carriers is eligible for benefits under Plan B. The dependents of the head of a
household who can meet the requirements outlined above are also eligible.
The beneficiary of Plan B is required to pay the first $2 of the cost of each
prescription plus half the balance. Plan B pays the remainder of the cost. In other
words, if a prescription costs $5, the beneficiary is required to pay $3.50 and
Plan B will pay $1.50.
Plan C—Plan C is designed to provide eligible persons (exclusive of senior
citizens) in receipt of financial assistance from the Department of Human Resources
with their prescription drugs free of charge.
As a general rule, the persons eligible for benefits under Plan C are those
persons in receipt of financial assistance from the Department of Human Resources
because of inability to work or, in the case of single parents, those persons who
must stay home to care for their young children. The person who is able to work,
but who is temporarily in receipt of financial assistance because of unemployment,
is not eligible for these benefits.
The drug benefits are identical under the three plans and include all prescription drugs.
The following table presents figures on the number of persons registered for
benefits in the three plans and the 19*74 expenditures for the program:
m
Table 42—Expenditures and Numbers of Persons Served by Pharmacare in 1974
Plan Number of Persons Cost
.
A   225,000      11,792,713
B   211,000        403,228
C   100,000       2,954,240
Totals   536,000 15,150,181
Cost-sharing Status—At present, only the costs under Plan C are shared
with the Federal Government. Plans A and B are financed entirely by the Government of British Columbia.
For more information on Pharmacare, contact your local office of the Department of Human Resources or Pharmacare, Department of Human Resources,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
COMMUNITY GRANTS FOR SENIOR CITIZENS
Community grants (described elsewhere in this Report under "Services for
Everyone") were made to 30 projects in 1974 that offer services primarily for
senior citizens. These grants are:
City and Grant in
Organization 1974
Abbotsford: $
Senior Citizens Service—Transportation of seniors for medical and hospital       18,970
Burnaby:
United Community Services (Meals-on-Wheels)   3,353
 R 112
HUMAN RESOURCES
COMMUNITY GRANTS FOR SENIOR CITIZENS—Continued
City and
Organization
Chilliwack:
Home Aides—In-home care support program	
Coquitlam :
Senior Citizens Bureau—Transportation, home aid program, home visiting
for aged persons 	
Dawson Creek:
Community Effort for Senior Citizens—Visitation of boarding-homes, home
aid 	
Delta:
Deltassisl Society—Transportation services for seniors and handicapped	
New Denver:
Nakusp Community Organization (Meals-on-Wheels) 	
New Westminster:
Senior Citizens Service Bureau—Transportation, home aid, visitation 	
North Shore:
Adult Day Care Centre—Services to the elderly and physically handicapped
Co-op Project Society—Home visits support for seniors	
Silver Harbour Manor Society—Seniors centre, arts,  crafts, social, meal
service  	
Transportation Service—Seniors, handicapped 	
Victorian Order of Nurses Home Aid Program—Nursing and home visits
for aged and handicapped 	
Voluntary Services for Seniors—Visits to private hospitals and boarding-
homes, using volunteers 	
Penticton :
Retirement Centre—Support for senior citizens, social and cultural centre ...
Princeton :
Community Services—Home aid, transportation, information for seniors ....
Sidney:
Aid-to-Pensioners—Home repair program for seniors	
Summerland :
Community Homemakers Services Society 	
Surrey:
Community Resources Society—Transportation for seniors and handicapped
SCAMP (Senior Citizens Activity Motivation Program)—Visitation, programs for 11 boarding-homes	
Surrey-White Rock Home Aid Program (VON)—Home visiting, support
for aged persons 	
Vancouver:
Cedar Cottage, Kensington  (Services to  Seniors)—transportation,  visits,
home support   ~ 	
Crossreach—Senior citizens' centre and visitation	
Kitsilano Inter-Neighbourhood Development (KIND)—Seniors centre	
Marpole-Oakridge Seniors Program—Seniors' centre, transportation, home
support  	
Senior Citizens Outreach—Services to seniors in Hastings-Sunrise area	
West End Volunteer Senior Services Centre—Home aides, visits to shut-ins
Grant in
1974
6,743
35,000
28,049
97,884
176
74,467
28,613
12,960
39,367
47,439
47,369
2,400
18,370
20,027
14,700
10,780
103,987
50,391
52,003
40,339
23,085
45,166
31,786
29,813
36,554
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974
COMMUNITY GRANTS FOR SENIOR CITIZENS—Continued
City and
Organization
Victoria :
Silver Threads Service—Senior drop-in, information, activity, referral
Sooke Meals-on-Wheels 	
R 113
Grant in
1974
42,119
300
White Rock:
Community Aid Program—Transportation,   referral,  information,   home
visiting for aged persons   	
Total   1,003,310
41,100
 R 114 HUMAN RESOURCES
LEGISLATION
ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF
HUMAN RESOURCES
Department of Human Resources Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap. 111, as amended)
—This Act establishes the Department of Human Resources as having jurisdiction
over all matters relating to social and public welfare and social assistance.
Social Assistance Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap. 360, as amended)—The purpose
of this Act and its regulations is to provide financial assistance and other services
that are essential for a reasonably normal and healthy existence to individuals and
families who are unable to maintain themselves by their own efforts.
Children of Unmarried Parents Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap. 52, as amended) —
This Act is to ensure that the interests of the mother and her child born out of
wedlock are protected.
Adoption Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap. 4, as amended)—The purpose of this Act
is to provide the same rights and privileges for adopted children as those of children
born to both parents in a family.
Provincial Home Act, 1969 (S.B.C. 1969, chap 29)—The purpose of this Act
is to provide care for persons who are unable to maintain themselves by their own
efforts.
Handicapped Persons' Income Assistance Act (S.B.C. 1972 (2nd Sess.), chap.
4)—The purpose of this Act is to provide financial assistance and other services to
the blind and disabled.
Guaranteed Minimum Income Assistance Act (S.B.C. 1972 (2nd Sess.), chap.
3)—This Act provides a guaranteed minimum assistance to persons 60 years of age
and over.
Protection of Children Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap 303, as amended)—The
purpose of this Act is to provide protection and care for children who are neglected,
abused, abandoned, or without proper supervision or guardianship. Amendments
to the Act in 1974 provide for increased reporting and investigating requirements in
regard to battered children and lay representation on panels in hearings.
Human Resources Facilities Development Act (S.B.C. 1974, chap. 39)—The
purpose of this Act is to provide development grants to municipalities, societies, and
the boards established under the Community Resources Act.
Community Resources Board Act (S.B.C. 1974, chap. 18)—This Act provides
for greater local control over the administration of social services.
 FISCAL ADDENDUM,
1973/74
  REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974 R 117
Table 43—Proportion of Total Gross Welfare Expenditure
1972/73
1973/74
Value
Per Cent
Value
Per Cent
Administration (includes Minister's Office
and part of Accounting Division)	
$
1,483,893
5,673,501
0.9
3.3
0.1
1.1
12.8
4.4
59.7
17.7
$
2,585,204
8,933,806
2,172,583
1.0
Field Service                         	
3.4
Summer Employment Program	
Provincial Alliance of Businessmen	
0.8
233,463
1,904,140
21,997,737
7,670,283
102,800,065
30,403,634
Institutions    . 	
1,788,653
30,456,705
10,821,559
140,367,218
67,430,107
0.7
Maintenance of dependent children   (includes New Denver Youth Centre)	
11.5
4.1
Social Allowances, work activity projects,
and burials .	
53.0
Mincome  and allowances for  aged  and
handicapped	
25.5
Totals  	
172,166,716
100.0
264,555,835
100.0
Municipal share of costs      	
18,860,830
66,921,231
1,448,546
24,381,
82,401,
1,236,'
179
Federal-Provincial cost-sharing—
Canada Assistance Plan	
544
Department of Indian Affairs.
/37
Table 44—Comparison of Number of Cases, by Category of Service
as at April 1,1973, and March 31,1974
Category
Cases as at—
April 1/73      March 31/74
Minus or Plus Change
Number
Per Cent
Family Service	
Social Allowance—
Single person	
Couple	
Two-parent family	
One-parent family	
Child with relative	
Social Allowance totals..
Adoption home pending	
Adoption home approved	
Child in adoption home	
Foster home pending	
Foster home approved	
Child in care	
Unmarried parent	
Welfare institution	
Health and institutional service..
Other	
Totals
3,623
26,443
2,412
5,545
14,459
1,324
50,183
634
466
824
714
2,917
6,681
648
158
119
66,967!
4,734
27,869
2,436
5,853
17,448
1,538
55,144
554
509
1,030
904
3,062
7,235
676
158
28
410
74,4441
+ 1,111
+ 1,426
+24
+ 308
+2,989
+ 214
+ 4,961
-80
+43
+206
+ 190
+ 145
+ 554
+28
-91
+410
+ 7,477
+ 30.7
+ 5.4
+ 1.0
+ 5.6
+20.7
+ 16.2
+ 9.9
-12.6
+9.2
+25.0
+ 26.6
+ 5.0
+ 8.3
+ 4.3
-76.5
+ 11.2
1 Not included in these totals are the number of people served by the Mincome Program, which was introduced in December 1972 and has since been expanded. The number of Mincome cases at March 31, 1973, was
108,938 and at March 31, 1974, was 124,667.
 R 118
HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 45—Number of Cases Receiving Service During the Fiscal Year
April 1,1973, to March 31,1974
Category
Cases Open
at
April 1, 1973
Cases Opened
During
Fiscal Year
Cases Closed
During
Fiscal Year
Cases Open
at End of
Fiscal Year
Number
Served
Family Service	
Social Allowance—
Single person	
Couple	
Two-parent family	
One-parent family	
Child with relative	
Social Allowance totals	
Adoption home pending	
Adoption home approved	
Child in adoption home	
Foster home pending	
Foster home approved	
Child in care	
Unmarried parent 	
Welfare institution	
Health and institutional service
Other r	
Totals	
3,623
26,443
2,412
5,545
14,459
1,324
50,183
634
466
824
714
2,917
6,681
648
158
119
66,967J
5,328
52,657
11,310
10,477
18,220
1,457
94,121
790
652
1,102
190
1,302
4,438
60
12
410
4,217
51,231
11,286
10,169
15,231
1,243
89,160
870
609
896
1,157
3,884
32
103
4,734
27,869
2,436
5,853
17,448
1,538
55,144
554
509
1,030
904
3,062
7,235
676
158
28
410
108,405
100,928
74,4441
8,951
79,100
13,722
16,022
32,679
2,781
144,304
1,424
1,118
1,926
904
4,219
11,119
708
158
131
410
175,372
1 Not included in these totals are the number of people served by the Mincome Program, which was introduced in December 1972 and has since been expanded. The number of Mincome cases at March 31, 1973, was
108,938 and at March 31, 1974, was 124,667.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974
R 119
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 R 120
HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 47—Expenditures for Social Allowance, 1973/74
$
Basic Social Allowance     116,950,639
Repatriation, transportation within the Province, nursing and boarding-home care,
personal care, special allowances, and grants   8,267,921
Housekeeper and Homemaker Services   2,812,704
Emergency payments   1,097,094
Hospitalization of Social Allowance recipients   3,667
Total costs, Social Allowance   129,132,025
Table 48—Average Monthly Number Receiving Social Allowances
During 1972/73 and 1973/74
Average Case Load and
Recipients per Month
1972/73 1973/74
Heads of families     22,343 23,807
Single persons     28,806 26,708
Total case load (average)      51,149 50,515
Dependents        57,052 58,310
Totals    108,201 108,825
Table 49—Gross Costs of Medical Services for Fiscal Years
1966/67 and 1973/74
Year
Medical
Drugs!
Dental
Optical
Transportation
Other
Total
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1966/67	
2,422,702
2,095,733
670,580
118,003
183,285
48,723
5,539,026
1967/68	
2,344,676
2,157,182
773,979
145,588
187,357
50,524
5,659,306
1968/69	
1,403,378
2,423,798
792,475
140,591
212,550
53,571
5,026,363
1969/70..--
465,738
2,444,968
1,611,115
219,858
252,999
72,862
5,067,540
1970/71. . .
591,206
3,102,874
2,491,589
282,272
326,166
121,892
6,915,999
1971/72	
614,365
3,334,159
2,403,257
290,116
342,712
165,980
7,150,589
1972/73	
677,194
3,626,268
2,429,538
304,695
367,888
264,700
7,670,283
1973/74
634,1362
6,461,400
2,655,573
322,489
419,451
328,510
10,821,559
1 Not included in these figures is the cost of drugs purchased by the dispensary for welfare institutions.
2 Includes drug costs incurred in the Pharmacare Program  in  the  last  three  months  of the  fiscal  year
1973/74.   (Pharmacare program commenced January 1, 1974.)
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974 R 121
Table 50—Expenditures for Provincial Home, Kamloops,
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31,1974
$
Salaries      331,290
Expenses—
Office expense     327
Travelling expense     140
Medical services   3,706
Clothing and uniforms  1,637
Provisions and catering   42,704
Laundry and dry goods   9,427
Comfort allowance, etc.  3,813
Equipment and machinery   43
Medical supplies       5,094
Maintenance and operation of equipment   326
Transportation      844
Burials     1,600
400,951
SUMMARY
Provincial Home expenditure     400,951
Public Works expenditure        8,980
409,931
Cost per diem, $409,931 4- 34,046 = $12.04.
Pensions paid to Government Agent, Kamloops    184,403
Comfort money paid to pensioners      14,000
RESIDENT-DAYS
Residents in the Home, April 1, 1973   110
Residents admitted during the year        19
  129
Residents discharged      29
Residents deceased       16
    45
Total number of residents, March 31, 1974      84
Number of resident-days for the year, 34,046
Table 51—Cost of Maintaining Children, 1973/74
The cost to Provincial Government of maintaining children for the fiscal year
was as follows:
Gross cost of maintenance of children in Child Welfare Division— $
Foster homes   9,205,036
Other Residential resources  r  7,226,482
Receiving Special services       581,820        $
  17,013,338
Gross cost to Provincial Government of maintenance of children in care of Children's Aid Societies   — 12,889,057
Gross cost of transportation of children in care of Superintendent         158,426
Gross cost of hospitalization of new-born infants being permanently planned for by
Superintendent    46,629
Gross expenditures   30,107,450
Less collections      7,315,617
Net cost to Provincial Government as per Public Accounts   22,791,833
 R 122
HUMAN RESOURCES
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R 123
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—
 R 124 HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 55—Number of Children Placed for Adoption by the Department of Human
Resources and Children's Aid Societies for Fiscal Years 1972/73 and 1973/74
1972/73 1973/74
Departmental regions       766 637
Children's Aid Society, Vancouver        174 128
Catholic Family and Children's Service, Vancouver        76 71
Victoria Family and Children's Service         61 C1)
Subtotals           311 199
Grand totals    1,077 836
1 Pertains to first three months of fiscal year 1973/74 only.  Work of this agency was taken over July 1, 1973.
The following tables are available, on request, from the Division of Office
Administration and Public Information, Department of Human Resources:
Table 56—Total Persons Receiving Social Allowances and Costs in Regions, by Unorganized and
Municipal Areas, in March 1973 and 1974.
Table 57—Number of Family Service Cases (Not in Receipt of Financial Assistance From the
Department of Human Resources) Served by the Department of Human Resources During
the Fiscal Year 1973/74.
Table 58—Number of Unmarried Mothers Served by Department of Human Resources and
Children's Aid Societies for Fiscal Year 1973/74.
Table 59—Number of Children Born Out of Wedlock in British Columbia, by Age-group of
Mother, During Fiscal Years 1972/73 and 1973/74.
Table 60—Cases Receiving Services From Department of Human Resources and Children's
Aid Societies Related to Protection of Children by Type of Service, for Fiscal Year
1973/74.
Table 61—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's
Aid Societies During and at End of Fiscal Year 1973/74.
Table 62—Number of Children Who Are the Legal Responsibility of the Superintendent of
Child Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies, by Legal Status, by Regions, and by
Societies, as at March 31, 1974.
Table 63—Number of Children Admitted to Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and of
Children's Aid Societies, by Legal Status, During Fiscal Year 1973/74.
Table 64—Reasons for New Admissions of Children to Care of Superintendent of Child
Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies During Fiscal Year 1973/74.
Table 65—Number of Children Discharged From Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare
and Children's Aid Societies, by Legal Status, for Fiscal Year 1973/74.
Table 66—Reasons for Discharge of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and
Children's Aid Societies for Fiscal Year 1973/74.
Table 67—Children Who are Legal Responsibility of Superintendent of Child Welfare and
Children's Aid Societies Receiving Institutional Care as at March 31, 1974.
Table 68—Number of Children With Special Needs Placed for Adoption by Department of
Human Resources and Children's Aid Societies During Fiscal Year  1973/74.
Table 69—Number of Adoption Homes Awaiting Placement, in Which Placement Made, and
Homes Closed for Fiscal Year 1973/74.
Table 70—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of Human Resources, by
Regions, and Children's Aid Societies, by Type of Placement, for Fiscal Year  1973/74.
Table 71—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of Human Resources, by
Regions, and Children's Aid Societies, by Religion of Adopting Parents, for Fiscal Year
1973/74.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 1974
R 125
Table 72—Ages of Children Placed for Adoption by Department of Human Resources and
Children's Aid Societies During Fiscal Year 1973/74.
Talbe 73—Number of Legally Completed Adoptions, by Type of Placement, by Regions, and
by Children's Aid Societies, During Fiscal Year 1973/74.
Table 74—Total Number of Persons Eligible for Health Care in the Calendar Years 1971 to
1974.
Table 75—Payments to British Columbia Doctors (Gross Costs), 1966-74.
Table 76—Dental Expenses, 1966-74.
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1975
5,030-375-4991
 

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