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DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1974 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1975

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1974
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1975
  To Colonel the Honourable Walter S. Owen, Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to transmit herewith the Annual Report of the Department
of Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31, 1974.
JAMES G. LORIMER
Minister of Municipal Affairs
Victoria, B.C., February 17, 1975.
 Victoria, B.C., February 17, 1975
The Honourable James G. Lorimer,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir: I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31, 1974.
This Report contains a review of Departmental activities and observations of
the programs and financial position of the municipalities and regional districts within
the Province. Greater detail with respect to these areas is contained in the publications Municipal Statistics and Statistics Relating to Regional and Municipal Governments in British Columbia which are published annually by the Department from
information contained in audited financial and other statements of the municipalities
and regional districts.
ROBERT W. PRITTLE
Acting Deputy Minister
 CONTENTS
Page
Departmental Publications  7
Departmental Activities  8
Legislation  13
Administrative Services  14
Financial Managements  20
Planning Services  28
Transit Services  32
Charts  36
 BB 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
The Honourable James G. Lorimer
Minister of Municipal Affairs
R. W. Prittie, Acting Deputy Minister and Inspector of Municipalities.
V. J. Parker, Associate Deputy Minister and Director of Transit.
C. H. L. Woodward, F.C.I.S., Associate Deputy Minister and Deputy Inspector of
Municipalities.
G. E. Whelen, F.C.I.S., Executive Officer.
K. McLeod, Research Officer.
R. T. Cubbon, Research Officer.
Administrative Services
T. F. Moore, F.C.I.S., Executive Director.
A. R. Clarke, Senior Administrative Officer.
J. G. Callan, Senior Administrative Officer.
W. J. Larter, Administrative Officer.
O. Sylvester, A.C.I.S., Administrative Officer.
R. O'Genski, Administrative Officer.
N. A. McCrimmon, A.C.I.S., Administrative Officer.
Financial Services
J. P. Taylor, Executive Director.
H. G. Topham, C.A., Director.
K. R. MacKay, C.A., Assistant Director.
F. J. Thompson, C.G.A., Administrative Officer.
W. J. Sommerville, Administrative Officer.
R. M. A. Brearley, R.I.A., Administrative Officer.
J. Pappas, Administrative Officer.
Planning Services
G. C. Harkness, M.C.I.P., Chief Planning Officer.
W. J. Tassie, M.C.I.P., Planning Co-ordinator.
B. S. Jawanda, M.C.I.P., Planning Co-ordinator.
B. Chambers, M.C.I.P., Planning Co-ordinator.
L. Ward, M.C.I.P., Planning Co-ordinator.
T. Maftechuk, M.C.I.P., Planning Co-ordinator.
L. V. Luchin, P.M.C.I.P., Planning Co-ordinator.
A. L. Quinn, P.M.C.I.P., Planning Co-ordinator.
Transit Services
B. E. Sullivan, Assistant to the Director.
C. A. Spratt, Manager, Marketing and Operation.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1974
BB 7
DEPARTMENTAL PUBLICATIONS
Annual Report.
Municipal Statistics.
Statistics Relating to Regional and Municipal Governments.
Regional Districts in British Columbia.
A Guide to Municipal Management.
A Guide to Regional District Management.
Land Use Colour and Coding Guide.
Zoning Colour and Coding Guide.
ACTS ADMINISTERED BY DEPARTMENT OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
Municipal Act.
Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act.
Local Services Act.
Municipal Finance Authority of British Columbia Act.
Mobile Home Tax Act.
Provincial Rapid Transit Act.
Provincial Transit Fund Act.
Transit Services Act.
Sewerage Facilities Assistance Act.
 BB 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES
The continuing increase of population in the Province is accompanied by
demands for construction of local services, including water works, sewerage systems,
and other local improvements. These demands remain a source of major concern,
not only from the standpoint of their priority, but perhaps more seriously in view of
the increasing costs which must be met in undertaking the actual project construction. Commensurate with this rise in population and the capital development of
service facilities has been the increase in the revenues required to be raised by the
municipalities to provide the services. In the five-year period from 1968 to 1973,
municipal revenues, including those of utilities, have increased by approximately
$238,000,000 to $523,000,000. Debenture debt over the same period has increased
to $612,372,953 from $383,943,849.
The continued expansion and development in the various areas of local
government have added to the complexity of the problems to be solved and placed
additional demands upon all members of our staff.
The assessed value of taxable properties for municipal purposes in municipalities is nearly 11 billion dollars, an increase of approximately 22 per cent over
the previous year. It is of interest to note that while property taxes are increasing
the level of tax collections continues to rise to the point where approximately 97
per cent of current taxes were collected during the year in which they were levied.
The matter of assessment and taxation is dealt with more fully in that part of the
Report relating to financial management.
One of the principal statutory roles of the Department is the supervision of
municipal and regional district long-term borrowing for capital programs. This
responsibility rests with the Inspector of Municipalities and, during the year under
review, the total borrowing authorized for a variety of projects amounted to
$105,234,468. The percentage of current revenue expended to service long-term
debenture debt has declined in the City of Vancouver, but has increased slightly
in the cities, districts, towns, and villages. The percentage revenue expended for
this purpose is not considered excessive and is well below the amount expended in
other provinces.
The Minister was represented at the annual meeting of Provincial Ministers
of Municipal Affairs held in Regina in August.
On December 9, 1974, the Minister of Municipal Affairs chaired an informal
Tri-Level meeting in Victoria, attended by the members of the Cabinet Committee
on Transportation, Housing, and Urban Development, representing the Government
of British Columbia; the Minister of State for Urban Affairs, representing the
Government of Canada; and the Chairman of the Greater Vancouver Regional
District, representing the Greater Vancouver area. The meeting afforded the
Provincial and regional representatives the opportunity of meeting the Honourable
B. Danson, and to hear a presentation of the status of the Liveable Regional Project
of the Greater Vancouver Regional District.
Various senior staff members were involved in national conferences such as the
Municipal Finance Officers and the Provincial Planning Officers. The Department
has also been represented on the Federal-Provincial Preparatory Committees on the
United Nations Conference, Exposition on Human Settlements, which is to be held
at Vancouver in 1976.
Departmental representatives travelled extensively throughout the Province
attending committee, council, and regional board meetings and completing inspections in 181 municipalities, improvement districts, and regional districts; 435 visits
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1974
BB 9
were made in all. Attendance at such meetings as those of the Technical Planning
Committee meets legislative requirements. Others are initiated by councils or
regional boards that may wish to discuss or request assistance on specific problems.
When inspections are undertaken, the visit provides an opportunity for Departmental
staff and local officials to discuss financial and administrative situations that are
directly related to the municipality concerned. Whenever possible, general administrative procedures can be reviewed and recommended; this practice leads to greater
consistency when by-laws and other data are submitted to the Department with
requests for registration or approval.
As the annual edition of Municipal Statistics is an important source of information to investment houses, financial institutions, and others, distribution of the
publication is made as early in the year as possible; Municipal Statistics includes
some 36 different schedules. Prior to publication, the financial and statistical
returns of the municipalities and regions are closely edited to ensure conformity and
adherence to statutory and other requirements.
The Union of British Columbia Municipalities held its convention at Vernon,
and senior members of the staff attended to provide an opportunity for those
interested to discuss local problems. Vancouver was chosen as the site for the
annual conference of the Municipal Officers' Association of British Columbia and,
as at similar meetings, Departmental staff participated in the program. Senior
members of the staff also participated as resource personnel in a number of other
seminars sponsored by the University of British Columbia and the Union of British
Columbia Municipalities.
The annual shield award presented by the Minister of Municipal Affairs as an
incentive to increase turn-out at municipal elections open to all municipalities in
three categories was received by the following for the year 1973:
Per Cent
Cities and towns—Nelson  73.40
District municipalities—Kent  66.20
Village municipalities—Tahsis  8 6.60
Second-place municipalities were Fernie (cities and towns) with 72.90 per cent,
Oak Bay (district municipalities) with 58.60 per cent, Port McNeill (village municipalities) with 77.10 per cent.
BUILDING CODE
The Building Code has been in effect for the full year of 1974. The code is
mandatory in all municipalities and has been adopted by all regional districts except
five, who consider adoption is not necessary at present. The services of the Building
Code Appeal Board have been frequently utilized, with 22 formal appeals being
received by the Board and six requests for approval of alternative materials being
received by the Chairman of the Board. One Order in Council amending the Building Regulations and the British Columbia Plumbing Code was approved.
The British Columbia Plumbing Code Committee has been formed with members from Provincial Government departments and municipal and industrial organizations. This committee will make recommendations for amendments to the
Plumbing Code and will provide comments and recommendations on matters
submitted to it by the Appeal Board.
A series of study sessions for building inspectors throughout the Province was
commenced with the initial session held in Prince George. These sessions are
organized and conducted by the Building Inspectors' Association and supported by
this Department. A senior staff member presented addresses and participated as a
 BB  10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
panel member at the North Central Municipal Officers' Association Conference in
Prince George, the Building Inspectors' Association Seminar in Cranbrook, and the
Fire Prevention Officers' Association Seminar in Trail.
METRIC CONVERSION
All regular meetings of the Provincial Metric Conversion Committee were
attended. Seven subcommittees were established, including a subcommittee on
municipal affairs, of which the Chairman is a staff member of this Department. A
senior staff member participated as a panel member on the subject of metric conversion at the Union of British Columbia Municipalities Conference in Vernon.
MUNICIPAL COMMERCIAL VEHICLE LICENSING PROGRAM
A total of 135 municipalities participated in the Municipal Commercial Vehicle
Licensing Program during the 1973/74 licence-year. Sales of vehicle plates under
this program, which is administered by the Department on behalf of the municipalities, generated $954,674 in revenue during the year. After payment of incidental expenses, these funds were distributed to participants on a per capita basis.
The municipalities issued 79,700 licence-plates and 96,653 exempt plates during the
year under review.
SPECIAL COURSES
During 1974 the Board of Examiners, on which the Department is represented,
granted 13 certificates of proficiency. The following table shows the classifications
of these certificates, together with the total number which have been issued:
Certificates
Junior	
Senior Administration	
Senior Finance	
Property Appraisal	
1974
To Date
4
96
5
114
4
114
71
Totals   13 395
Fifty-four persons employed in the municipal field enrolled in courses offered
by the Chartered Institute of Secretaries for the 1974/75 academic year. In addition to the professional degree "A.C.I.S." (Associate of the Chartered Institute of
Secretaries) which may be granted to a graduate of the course, application may be
made for a certificate of proficiency in municipal administration or finance, depending upon experience and office held.
The Certified General Accountants Society (C.G.A.) has at the present time
47 students enrolled who are employed in the local government field. They may
upon completion of their studies also make application for a certificate of proficiency
in municipal administration or finance.
A New Course
After extensive investigation which followed the announced phase-out of the
Municipal Administration Course, a short-term course in selected subjects for those
employed in smaller municipalities has been introduced. It was first offered in the
fall of 1972 by Malaspina College in Nanaimo. Successful completion of this two-
year course will satisfy the academic requirements for the senior certificate in
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1974 BB  11
municipal administration issued by the Board of Examiners. Of particular interest
to the student is the fact that course material will be completely portable as between
the C.I.S. and C.G.A. courses.
CONTINUING EDUCATION
During the year, seminars sponsored by the University of British Columbia,
the Municipal Officers' Association of British Columbia, and the Municipal Finance
Officers of the United States and Canada, on the subjects of Municipal Administration and Management Development, were attended by a number of senior members
of the Department.
In co-operation with the Municipal Officers' Association, the Union of British
Columbia Municipalities, and the Ministry of State for Urban Affairs, the Department is represented on the Municipal Administration Education Council. The
purpose of the Council is to make a study of existing courses for the education of
municipal administrators in the Province, and to recommend measures which may
be necessary to improve or supplement existing courses.
A research officer will be appointed to carry out the study, which is expected
to be completed within 18 months.
LOCAL GOVERNMENT RESTRUCTURING
Following the local government restructure of Kamloops and Kelowna which
took place in 1973, there were three major restructures in 1974. The first of these
was the amalgamation of the Town of Castlegar with the Town of Kinnaird, resulting
in the incorporation of the new City of Castlegar with a population of 6,160. For
many years the two communities had been examining the ramifications of a merger.
A joint study initiated by the two Councils led in 1974 to a request to the Minister
of Municipal Affairs to conduct a vote of amalgamation. The result was in the
affirmative and the new city was incorporated on January 1, 1974. Elections for
the new Council took place in the spring of 1974.
Major local government restructures were undertaken at Prince George and
Nanaimo. Following a year of study by local advisory committees appointed by the
Minister of Municipal Affairs, votes were conducted in November in both greater
Nanaimo and greater Prince George on the question of amalgamation; both votes
passed with a small margin over the simple majority required. New city municipalities were incorporated on January 1, 1975.
In both communities the terms of amalgamation were arrived at by an advisory
committee in consultation with the Minister and the Department. The membership
of the committee was drawn from elected representatives of local governments in
the community and included members of Municipal Councils, Regional Board
Directors, and "members of the Board of Trustees of improvement districts. The
committee was assisted in its study by a technical subcommittee made up of local
municipal and regional district staff, together with staff of the Department.
At Nanaimo the former city has been amalgamated with the neighbouring
Improvement Districts of Departure Bay, Harewood, Mountain, Northfield, Wellington, and Petroglyph (Chase River), together with other adjacent areas, to form
a new city with an estimated population of 40,000. The population of the former
city was 15,000.
At Prince George the former city and the former Village of South Fort George
have been amalgamated with the Nechako Improvement District and nine other
small improvement districts, together with a large adjacent area, to form a new
city having a population estimated at some 70,000. The population of the former
city was 35,500 and that of South Fort George was 1,400.
 BB 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Elections for full new Councils, both of which are on a ward basis, took place
in December 1974. An interesting feature of the Council structure of Prince George
is a three-year term of office for part of the Council. The Prince George Council
will phase out of the ward system into a Council elected at large over a period of
four years. At Nanaimo the question of the structure of future Councils will be
placed before the electorate within the term of office of the first Council.
There are several special features in the Letters Patent of Castlegar, Nanaimo,
and Prince George, including the designation of water and sewer service areas for
rating purposes and provisions for the establishment of taxation districts, the object
of which is to allow Council to set differential tax rates related to the level of
services.
To assist these three new municipalities in extending services to formerly
nonmunicipal areas and generally to expand new services, the Provincial Government has developed a special highways maintenance and policing assistance program
coupled with direct financial assistance grants.
Several other communities are considering local government restructure and it
is anticipated that studies will be under way in some of these communities in the
new year.
SEWERAGE FACILITIES ASSISTANCE ACT
The Sewerage Facilities Assistance Act, enacted at the last session of the Legislature, has provided assistance totalling $5,613,727 to 79 municipalities in the
Province. Eighteen cities applied for and received grants totalling $526,630; nineteen districts received $4,461,667; eight towns received $254,900; thirty-one villages
obtained grants totalling $338,752; and three regional districts qualified for a total
of $31,778.
The assistance under this legislation went to municipalities and regional districts
with a total population of approximately 961,000 or virtually one half of the total
population living in organized communities in the Province. The total grants of
$5,613,727 represent an average of 3 mills of municipal taxation. In some municipalities the grant is equivalent to the amount which could be raised by a mill rate
levy in excess of 20 mills and represents in some areas a per capita payment of
approximately $25.
The amount paid under this legislation in 1974 greatly exceeds the amounts
paid under the Municipal Treatment Plant Assistance Act, which amounted to a
total of $215,277 for the years 1971 to 1973, inclusive.
STAFF CHANGES
On July 31, 1974, W. K. Smith retired as Deputy Minister and Inspector of
Municipalities. Mr. Smith had been in the Provincial Service for 37 years. He
had served as Deputy Minister and Inspector of Municipalities since September 5,
1972.
Effective August 1, 1974, R. W. Prittie, Associate Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs, was appointed Inspector of Municipalities, and on December 1, 1974,
was appointed Acting Deputy Minister.
C. H. L. Woodward was appointed Acting Associate Deputy Minister, effective
January 1, 1974.
On March 10, 1974, Gary Harkness joined the Department as Chief Planning
Officer. Mr. Harkness' previous experience has been with the former Lower Mainland Regional Planning Board of British Columbia and the Ottawa-Carleton Regional
District Planning Board in Ontario.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1974
BB 13
LEGISLATION
Many of the amendments to the Municipal Act made during the 1974 Session
of the Legislature were of a largely technical nature, and among the more significant
amendments were
improvements and clarification of the provisions governing elections;
repeal of the restriction on municipalities holding shares in companies;
an amendment to place villages on the same footing as other classes of
municipalities with respect to capital borrowings;
an increase in the debt limitation on short-term capital borrowings to $25
per capita;
provisions to simplify the provision of services on a benefiting area basis;
repeal of the provisions governing policing which are now provided for
under the Police Act;
removal of the limitation on remuneration which may be provided for
directors of regional boards;
a provision for summary proceedings with respect to offences under certain
municipal by-laws.
The Islands Trust Act was enacted to preserve and protect, in co-operation with
local government bodies and the Province, the trust area and its unique amenities
and environment for the benefits of the residents of the trust area and Province
generally.
The Transit Services Act was also passed in 1974 to enable the Province to
deal with the provision of transit services.
A number of other statutes of importance to municipalities were passed in
1974, and among these were
the Sewerage Facilities Assistance Act under which the Province provides
a grant to municipalities and regional districts to assist in meeting
the annual costs of sewerage debt;
the Administration of Justice Act under which the responsibility for the
courts has been entirely transferred to the Province, thus relieving
municipalities of considerable obligations;
the Assessment Act and Assessment Authority of British Columbia Act
which will overhaul the assessment system in the Province and transfer the responsibility for assessments to the Assessment Authority;
amendments to the Municipalities Aid Act which increased the per capita
grant;
the Police Act, the Real Property Tax Deferment Act, and the Recreational Land Green Belt Encouragement Act.
 BB  14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES
NEW INCORPORATIONS AND CHANGES IN STRUCTURE
The Minister directed that a poll be taken under the provisions of section 10 of
the Municipal Act in the cities of Nanaimo and Prince George, and areas adjacent
to each of these cities, on the question of incorporation to form enlarged cities. The
vote was held on November 2, 1974, and in each case the majority favoured incorporation. Letters Patent were issued incorporating the new Cities of Nanaimo and
Prince George on December 4, 1974, with the effective date of incorporation being
set at January 1, 1975.
The Letters Patent incorporating the new City of Prince George also contained
provision for the dissolution of the Village of South Fort George, which lies within
the extended area of the new city.
A directive by the Minister under section 10 of the Municipal Act was also
issued for a poll to be held in the city of Duncan and an area adjacent to the southerly
boundary of the city on the question of incorporation. The vote was held on
July 20, 1974, and the majority voted against the proposal.
MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY EXTENSIONS
Supplementary Letters Patent, authorizing 22 extensions in boundaries for 21
municipalities were issued during the year; the municipalities affected, together with
the resulting adjustments in areas and changes in population, are indicated in Table
1. A local census is taken in the extended area and added to the original population
established under the 1971 census in order to arrive at the new municipal population
after extension.
BY-LAW APPROVALS
All village and town by-laws must be submitted to the Department for registration in the office of the Inspector of Municipalities. In addition, many by-laws for
all classes of municipalities require approval from certain Governmental agencies
before adoption can proceed or become effective. Included in this category are
by-laws which establish consumer or user charges for water and sewer services.
Such by-laws, together with supporting background material, are fully reviewed
before any suggestions or recommendations are made and before being advanced
to the approving authority. While many of the initial submissions may be found
satisfactory, others require the exchange of considerable correspondence. A total
of 832 by-laws was examined and subsequently registered—190 town by-laws, 554
village by-laws, 32 regional district by-laws, and 56 improvement district by-laws.
For a variety of purposes, 570 Minutes of Council were prepared and subsequently approved by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council. Seventy-six authorized
the abandonment and vesting of portions of highway; 69 approved municipal rates
by-laws for water, sewer, and electric power; 50 authorized appointment of members
of Municipal Boards of Variance; 252 were for regional district purposes of which
179 approved subdivision and zoning by-laws and 17 authorized appointment of
members to Regional Boards of Variance; and the balance of 179 met other legislative requirements.
In addition, 57 rezoning by-laws applicable to land in the flood plain area of
the Lower Mainland were reviewed and recommended for approval by the Minister
under section 187 of the Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act.   Nine building
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1974
BB 15
by-laws from various regional districts were also reviewed and recommended for
approval by the Minister pursuant to section 798d.
DEBENTURE APPROVALS
Certification by the Inspector of Municipalities of debenture issues of municipalities and regional districts may be completed on request. Before such certification
can be completed, certificates of approval to the by-law or resolution are issued,
authorizing the issuance of debentures. A total of 279 certificates of approval was
issued in 1974. In 1974, 76 debenture issues were examined and certified, which
consisted of 1,140 debentures with a total par value of $42,013,000. This includes
those debentures issued by municipalities and regional districts to secure undertakings financed through the Municipal Finance Authority in the amount of
$24,761,000, but excludes those agreements certified in regard to financing through
the regional district on behalf of the member municipalities.
Table 1—Municipal Boundary Revisions, 1974
Municipality
Area (Acres)
Population
Before
Added
After
Before
Added
After
Cities
Courtenay	
Kimberley 	
1,928.06
14,570.40
1,892.00
8,845.19
4,402.40
15,747.10
1,102.00
3,860.85
4,441.81
18,890.71
9,296.60
116,902.89
1,277.81
1,690.40
3,495.19
3,740.74
945.13
622.17
588.00
825.82
319.25
1,256.91
71.50
7.80
142.90
3.10
25.94
671.54
478.20
580.96
118.04
(4.90)
1,030.00
14,274.40
367.00
460.99
268.59
30.87
1,107.20
1,078.55
.80
20,960.00
13.22
800.20
1,999.56
14,578.20
2,034.90
8,848.29
4,428.34
16,418.64
1,580.20
4,441.81
4,559.85
18,885.81
10,326.60
131,177.29
1,644.81
2,151.39
3,763.78
3,771.61
2,052.33
1,700.72
588.80
21,785.82
332.47
2,057.11
7,159
7,643
9,400
18,146
10,778
33,179
4,867
13,652
13,774
3,602
1,953
1,357
3,980
5,289
6,258
4,072
1,916
1,259
1,379
973
1,120
2,601
25
2
9
6
Nil
6
34
122
180
Nil
Nil
Nil
76
Nil
184
32
Nil
71
4
Nil
Nil
22
7,184
7,645
9,409
18,152
Port Moody._ _.   _.
10,778
33,185
Revelstoke	
Vernon	
4,901
13,774
13,954
Districts
Coldstream 	
Port Hardy	
3,602
1,953
Stewart	
Towns
1,357
4,056
Merritt	
5,289
6 442
4,104
Villages
1,916
1,330
Fruitvale	
Granisle — _.  ..
100 Mile House	
1,383
973
1,120
2,623
Source of base population figures is the 1971 census.
REGIONAL DISTRICT ACTIVITIES
Regional government in British Columbia has, since its inception in 1965,
been reviewed and discussed in previous annual reports and is now recognized in
our Province and elsewhere as an important contributor to the local government
system.
As in the past, further expansion of local government services was undertaken
by regional districts.
 BB 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Some 44 new functions were granted the 28 regional districts in 1974; Table 2
summarizes those assigned, while Table 3 sets out all functions undertaken to date.
For services required by the greater community, the regional approach has
provided an acceptable solution. Provision of sewage disposal, garbage disposal,
and ambulance facilities are particularly appropriate to this concept, and such
functions as joint computer operations, fire protection, transit, and construction
equipment-pools could conceivably be handled for the greater community by
regional districts. Services can be provided by regional districts to municipal and
nonmunicipal areas, either directly or by contract.
Supplementary Letters Patent were issued in several instances for purposes
other than to authorize the granting of functions. Revision of the internal and
external boundaries is continuing and amendments have been made to cost-sharing
formulas and other changes in corporate structure.
Specified Areas
Sixteen specified areas were established by by-law in 1974; of these areas, six
were established by petition method, and ten after the property-owners voted
favourably on the proposal. In addition, amendments in boundaries to three
specified areas already established were completed. Table 4 summarizes the
specified areas established and altered in 1974. Before regional government was
introduced, community services administered locally in nonmunicipal areas were
provided through the incorporation of improvement districts, either under the
Water Act as administered by the Water Rights Branch of the Department of Lands,
Forests, and Water Resources, or under the Municipal Act. In some other instances,
local areas were established under the Local Services Act. The latter two Acts, it
should be noted, are administered by this Department. New local service needs in
nonmunicipal areas, with the exception of water, irrigation, and dykes, are almost
all provided and financed through the facilities of regional districts.
Many of the specified areas have been established adjacent to municipal
boundaries. As the demand for further services develops, the trend will be toward
the incorporation of these areas within present municipal boundaries. Those
specified areas in more isolated situations will probably retain their nonmunicipal
status.
An Increasing Role
Regional districts are local government structures that provide services to
people. As the population of the Province increases, the demands upon regional
boards will grow. Municipalities are becoming aware of possible economies of scale
where a common service is required, and the regional district is the obvious vehicle
through which many of these services can be provided. The regional districts can
provide such services to municipal and nonmunicipal areas alike, with those people
that benefit sharing the costs on a more equitable basis.
Growth of regional districts continues to be reflected in the increase in expenditures from those over previous years. Some of these are a result of assuming new
functions, while others reflect the cost of new services to nonmunicipal areas.
Provincial grants of $10,000 are made annually to assist in meeting the administrative costs of regional districts and an annual grant of 20 cents per capita with a
minimum of $7,000 and a maximum of $33,000 is made to assist in the cost of
development of an environmental management program. The question of grant
structures applicable to regional districts is under review.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1974
BB  17
Table 2—Functions Assigned to Regional Districts During 1974 (Unless Otherwise
Indicated, All Member Areas of the Regional District Participate in This
Function).
Capital—
Royal Theatre (Victoria, Saanich, and Oak
Bay).
Community Health Services.
Land Assembly, Housing, and Land Banking.
Curling Rink and Senior Citizens' Complex
(Colwood, Langford, and Metchosin).
Central Kootenay—
Real Property Assessment (Castlegar and
Creston).
Community Centre and Ice Arena (Castlegar and Electoral Areas I and J).
Ski Hill (defined portions of Electoral Areas
E and F only).
Central Okanagan—
Garbage Disposal (defined parts of Electoral Areas G and H).
Septic Tank Effluent Disposal.
Regional Parks.
Recreation Complex (Kelowna and Electoral Area A).
Columbia-Shuswap—
Public Library Service (Golden and Electoral Area A).
Cemetery Operation (Revelstoke and Electoral Area B).
Cowichan Valley—
Nuisance Control (all electoral areas).
Community Activity Centre  (Lake Cowichan and Electoral Areas F and I).
Fraser-Cheam—
Ice Arena (Hope and Electoral Areas B
and C).
House Numbering (electoral areas only).
Street Lighting (electoral areas only).
Fraser-Fort George—
Land Assembly and Public Housing (Electoral Areas A, C, D, and F).
Ice Arenas (McBride, Valemount, and defined area of Electoral Area H).
Greater Vancouver—
Mosquito Control (New Westminster, Port
Coquitlam, Surrey, and Coquitlam).
Recreational Programs (Electoral Areas A,
B, and C).
Kootenay  Boundary—Library  Grant   (Electoral Areas C and D).
Mount Waddington—Television Rebroadcast-
ing.
Nanaimo—
Soil Fill Regulation (Electoral Areas A, B,
C, D, E, F, G, H, and I).
Noise Regulation (all electoral areas).
North Okanagan—
Recreational Programs.
House Numbering (all electoral areas).
Harvest  of  Aquatic  Weeds   (Coldstream,
Vernon, and Electoral Areas A, B, C,
and F).
Regional Parks.
Car Body Disposal Sites.
Untidy and Unsightly Premises (Electoral
Areas A, B, and C).
Control of Noxious Weeds and Other
Growths (Electoral Areas A, B, C, D,
E, and F).
Ocean Falls—Recreational Programs.
Okanagan-Similkameen—
Mosquito Control (Electoral Areas A, B,
C, D, E, and F).
Regional Parks.
Powell River—
Garbage Disposal (amendment to include
Electoral Area D).
Squamish-Lillooet—
Firearms Regulations (Lillooet, Pemberton,
Electoral Areas A, B, C, D, and E).
Television Rebroadcasting (Lillooet and defined portion of Electoral Area B).
Sunshine Coast—
Emergency Program (electoral areas only).
Cemetery Operation.
Thompson-Nicola—
Public Library Service.
Cemetery Operation (Clinton and Electoral
Area E).
Recreational Facilities (Logan Lake and defined areas of Electoral Areas I and I).
 BB  18                                                  BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 3—Regional District Functions as of December 31,1974
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Activity Centre	
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Ambulance     	
x
P
p
p
p
p
x
p
P
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x
Airport Facilities	
p
p
.Air Pollution 	
X
X
x
Bus Transit     	
P
Cemetery Operation	
p
Community Health Services „
X
Control of Gatherings _ 	
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
x
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
x
X
X
X
X
X
X
Elderly Citizens* Housing
p
p
X
X
P
Emergency Programs	
x
x
p
Firearms	
p
X
P
p
P
X
p
X
Fireworks
x
p
x
x
x
p
P
x
p
x
Health Regulation and Centre
p
X
Home Nursing   	
p
House Numbering	
PI
ip
P
Labour Negotiations	
p
Land Assembly, Housing and
Land Banking
x
p
Library Study 	
p
P
x
Noise     -	
P
Nuisance Control   	
p
p
p
P
p
p
p
p
p
x
p
Okanagan Basin Water Board
X
X
X
Operation of Wharves   	
1 p
Park   and   Green   Belt   Land
Acquisition 	
p
p
Pest Control       	
P
x
P
p
P
IP
x
p
Public Library Service 	
p
x
Public Use Area Lighting	
p
Recreation Facilities	
p
p p
p
PIP
p
PIP
p
p
P
p
P
p
p
p
Recreation Programs      _
P 1 P 1 VI
p
p
p
p
V
V
x
x
Refuse Disposal	
X
X
X
P
X
p
p
p
p
p
p
p.
p
p
p
P|X
X
p
Regional Parks 	
x
p
x
x
p
p
x
x
x
p
x
x
y
x
p
Septic Tank Effluent Disposal
X
Sewers           -	
x
p
p
x
Soil Fill Regulation.	
p
Soil Removal 	
X
p
p
p
p
p!
IP
Street Lighting _ _	
1
1   1
IP
Television Rebroadcasting
p
MM
p
X
1
1
p
p
Theatre
p
1   1   1
Untidy and Unsightly Premises
1   1   1
p
Urban Renewal	
M   I p
Water  	
i
p!l!
1
p
The functions of Regional Planning, Community Planning, Building Inspection, Contract Services, Loc
al
Works and Services, and Grants-in-Aid are assigned by statute to all regional districts.
X—indicates function.   P-
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 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1974
BB  19
Table 4—Regional District Specified Service Areas Established During 1974
Cariboo—
Street Lighting (Lone Butte).
Sewage   Disposal   and   Sewage   Collection
(Wells).
Street Lighting (Lac la Hache).
Airstrip (Nimpo Lake).
Fire Protection (108 Mile House).
Comox-Strathcona—
Garbage Disposal Unit (Denman Island).
Fire Protection (Denman Island).
Fraser-Cheam—
Garbage Collection and Disposal (Harrison
Mills and vicinity).
Fire Protection (Flood, Laidlaw, Silver
Creek).
Television Broadcast Satellite Station (Boston Bar).
Fraser-Fort   George—Sewage   Collection
(North Blackburn).
Nanaimo—Fire Protection (French Creek).
Skeena-Queen   Charlotte—Electric   Power
Transmission Facilities (Skidegate-Tlell).
Squamish-Lillooet—Street  Lighting   (Gold-
bridge).
Sunshine   Coast—Street   Lighting   (Veterans
Road).
Thompson-Nicola—Street  Lighting   (Prit-
chard).
Amendments to Established Specified Service Areas Completed During 1974
Comox-Strathcona—Water (Lake Trail and
Powerhouse Road) and extension of boundaries.
Fraser-Fort George—Street Lighting (Hixon)
and extension of boundaries.
Kootenay Boundary—Fire Protection (Christina Lake) and revision in boundaries to
remove two lots which were already included within the Grand Forks Rural Fire
Protection District.
 BB 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
ASSESSMENT AND TAX COLLECTION
The major single revenue source for municipalities in British Columbia continues to be the real property tax. The growth in assessed values of real property
and revenue from taxation of these properties over the past 10 years is illustrated
in the following table. It will be noted that revenue from this source of taxation in
1973 totalled $444,993,642. Of this total, $237,762,036 represented taxation for
general municipal purposes, and $207,231,606 represented taxation for school
purposes.
Table 5—Growth in Combined Assessed Values and Taxes in Municipalities
of British Columbia
Year
Gross Assessed Values
Assessed Values Actually
Taxed
Tax
Revenue
All
Properties
Taxable
Properties
School
Municipal
1964	
1070
(Millions)
$
4,188
6,9721
9,1922
7,6201
10,0762
8,2921
11,6772
8,8691
12,8552
11,1561
15,6082
(Millions)
$
3,534
5,9051
6,2262
6,4561
6,8172
7,0421
7,9502
7,5391
9,0232
9,2911
10,8682
(Millions)
$
2,878
4,835
5,279
5,753
6,171
7,653
(Millions)
$
2,295
6,072
6,632
7,744
8,612
10,414
(Thousands)
$
154,074
323,925
349,845
390,368
1071
1972                          	
1973 	
1974                  .                  -
444,994
520,0003
i School values.       2 Municipal values.       3 Estimated.
The following table (Table 6) provides a further analysis of the assessed value
of real property and indicates the distribution of 1974 assessed values by class
of municipality, with the percentage increase over 1973 shown in parentheses.
Table 6—Assessed Values by Class of Municipalities
General Municipal Gross
Assessed Values
Assessed Values Actually
Taxed
All
Properties
Taxable
Properties
School
Municipal
(MiUions)    (%)
$
3,305    (38.69)
6,161    (67.76)
253    ( 0.01)
286    (21.70)
(Millions)    (%)
$
2,223    (40.43)
4,282    (19.71)
160 (-0.02)
182    (24.66)
6,847    (25.19)
4,021    (13.14)
(MiUions)    (%)
$
1,938    (37.64)
3,376    (20.83)
191 (-0.06)
223    (21.19)
(MiUions)    (%)
$
2,050    (42.86)
4,103    (20.78)
152 (-0.01)
174    (25.18)
10,005    (25.66)
5,603    (14.51)
5,728    (24.82)
1,925    (21.68)
6,479    (26.42)
3,935    (12.85)
Totals	
15,608    (21.42)
10,868    (20.45)
7,653    (24.03)
10,414    (20.92)
As a result of the continuing rapid growth in the urban communities, it is
anticipated that proceeds from real property taxation for school and general municipal purposes in 1974 will reach $520,000,000. This would represent an increase
of approximately 60 per cent over the revenue of five years ago. The total assessed
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1974
BB 21
values actually taxed for school purposes in the Province in 1974 amounted to
$9,919,174,759, an increase of approximately $1,738,000,000 over 1973. Of
this amount, $7,653,294,122 or approximately 77 per cent represented assessed
values in the city, district, town, and village municipalities.
Tax Collection
The tax collection picture in municipalities is considered to be the primary
indicator, not only of the efficiency of the administration but also of the ability of
the taxpayer to meet the municipal tax levy prompdy. In the year under review,
tax collections have shown an increase over the collections of 1972 and continue to
maintain a very high level. During the period, collection in cities, districts, and
villages exceeded 97 per cent of the levy, and towns collected in excess of 96 per
cent. We have established a practice of communicating with any municipality where
the arrears of taxes are in excess of 10 per cent of the current levy in an effort to
determine the cause and what steps may be taken to improve the position.
The collection of current taxes in British Columbia continues to be the highest
among the provinces in Canada publishing statistics of a comparable nature, while
the percentage of arrears is the lowest. Economic factors may have contributed
substantially to the favourable position indicated in the property taxation field;
however, municipal treasurers and collectors are to be congratulated for their continued efforts in maintaining this high rate of tax collection.
Chart 1, to be found at the back of this Report, shows the percentage of tax
collection for the period 1963 to 1973, inclusive, and Tables 7 and 8 reveal further
information relative to tax collection by class of municipality for the years shown.
Table 7—Percentage Tax Collections
Percentage of
Current Levy
CoUected
Total Collections
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
Outstanding Taxes
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
1939- ...
Cities (Except Vancouver)
81.10
96.28
96.61
96.65
96.82
99.46
96.79
97.05
97.36
99.10
100.40
100.30
100.20
100.32
99.69
100.41
100.62
100.69
103.10
100.20
100.15
98.87
99.96
99.12
100.17
99.79
100.82
95.80
100.67
100.17
100.29
100.08
99.48
100.54
100.39
100.82
40.16
1966	
5.12
1967	
4.57
1968	
4.44
1969
4.15
1970 _ -
1971	
4.64
4 34
1972 	
3.88
1973
3.39
1939	
Vancouver
91.00
96.03
96.36
95.67
96.11
95.80
96.29
96.20
97.03
77.60
96.51
96.69
97.00
96.85
96.37
96.80
96.88
97.51
30.06
1966     	
1967               	
5.80
5.04
1968 .	
1969     	
5.75
5.22
1970
5.87
1971                      	
5.28
1972  ....
5.19
1973     .
3.51
1939	
Districts
34.81
1966 	
1967           	
1968       	
4.64
4.22
3.90
1969     ...
3.95
1970	
4.54
1971    ...
4.15
1972           	
3.96
1973    ...
3.21
 BB 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 7—Percentage Tax Collections—Continued
Percentage of
Current Levy
Collected
Total Collections
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
Outstanding Taxes
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
1958       	
Towns
1966	
1967
1968. .             _   ....           .     _
1969      	
1970 __    ■	
1971      ■
1972
1973	
1939
Villages
1966 _	
1967                                      	
1968  	
1969
1970.     .
1971
1977.
1973	
89.55
92.81
93.21
93.98
93.45
93.56
94.59
96.25
96.75
97.06
98.90
99.75
100.20
99.46
99.36
101.03
102.05
100.69
76.50
98.30
95.21
99.08
95.64
100.07
95.45
99.97
95.70
100.27
94.85
100.72
96.08
101.21
97.11
101.01
97.02
100.41
13.62
10.16
9.84
9.06
9.08
9.35
7.96
5.37
4.48
38.71
6.48
6.16
6.15
6.39
7.00
5.53
4.09
3.95
Table 8—Collections, 1973 (With Comparative Figures for 1972)
Percentage of
Current Taxes
CoUected
Arrears as a
Percentage of
Adjusted Levy
Cities	
1973
97.36
97.56
96.75
97.02
1972
97.05
96.88
96.25
97.11
1973
3.39
3.21
4.48
3.95
1972
3.88
3.96
5.37
4.09
Totals    	
97.41
97.03
96.92
96.20
3.34
4.03
3.99
5.19
97.32
96.74
3.51
4.30
It is interesting to note that, notwithstanding the fact that property taxes are
increasing, the level of tax collections continues to rise, and the percentage of arrears
continues to decline.
SCHOOL ASSESSMENT AND GENERAL MUNICIPAL ASSESSMENT
It should be noted that the difference between the school assessment and the
general municipal assessment is the result of a number of municipalities using a
dual role, i.e., general assessments are based on 100 per cent of market value, while
the school assessments are on 50 per cent of value.
This dual role had the following effect in 1973:
School assessment
Less landlord and tenant, machinery and equipment
General municipal assessment
Less adjusted school assessment
Millions
$
6,171
842
5,329
8,612
5,329
3,283
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1974
BB 23
The figure of $3,283,000,000 represents in part the effect of the dual roll on
the general assessment. This roll is in effect in the following municipalities: Pentic-
ton, Vancouver, Burnaby, Peachland, Summerland, West Vancouver, Kamloops,
City of North Vancouver, District of North Vancouver, and City of Langley.
The balance of the difference is represented by B.C. Hydro values included in
the school assessment roll, but not included in the general assessment roll. The
Provincial total for B.C. Hydro is $605,000,000, but no breakdown is available at
this time of the amount applicable to the incorporated areas.
REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES
The 1973 audited financial statements indicate that British Columbia municipalities continued to maintain a favourable financial position. Gross revenues from
all sources during 1973 exceeded $730,000,000, which represents an increase of
$90,000,000 over the previous year.
The major revenue sources, with comparative figures for 1972, were as follows:
1973 1972 Increase
(Millions) (Millions)        (Millions)
$ $ $
General municipal taxation  238 210 28
School taxation  207 180 27
Transfers from other governments .__ 149 130 19
Revenue from own sources  136 120 16
730
640
90
The home-owner grant payments increased by $10,000,000 in 1973 to a total
of $77,000,000. When this is offset against the school tax levy of $207,000,000, a
balance of $130,000,000 remains of this levy to be borne by the property-owner.
The major expenditure items incurred during 1973, with comparative figures
for 1972, were:
General government	
Fire protection _ „   	
1973
(Millions)
$
37
„    32
• .    48
1972
(Millions)
$
31
28
42
42
19
89
180
41
43
125
640
Increase
(Millions)
$
6
4
Administration of justice 	
6
Public works
__    46
_„_    23
4
Sanitation and waste removal
4
Social welfare    	
103
208
48
...    50
135
730
14
Education           	
28
Debt charges	
Capital expenditure from revenue .
Other5 	
7
7
10
90
i Includes recreation, public health, environmental development, utilities, and contributions to reserves and
other funds.
 BB 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 9—Trends in Financial Aspects of Municipal Government Compared to
Population and Income Expressed as Indexes
Year
Population
Total Revenue
(Excluding
Utilities)
Building
Permits
Debenture
Debt
Maximum
Values
Taxable
Total B.C.
Personal
Income
1961      ■
100.00
104.91
107.20
110.71
114.63
116.65
122.44
127.14
133.02
138.35
136.55
143.60
153 30
100.00
110.76
113.31
121.60
138.66
156.62
180.90
207.52
234.38
266.95
306.45
337.75
390 48
100.00
114.24
130.47
173.67
203.57
206.83
252.27
269.74
316.20
291.26
384.97
414.34
602.31
100.00
100.72
107.20
109.60
114.30
125.04
127.48
127.46
130.62
132.10
137.00
145.75
157.18
100.00
110.03
111.03
114.32
122.02
131.68
145.10
156.88
174.83
192.06
209.69
252.93
286 97
100.00
1962
109.19
1963 _
1964	
116.85
127.27
1965	
1966
142.22
160 41
1967     _ .    .
178.09
1968  	
1969	
1970    .
194.37
221.58
239.33
1971
270 56
1972	
1973..	
303.03
353 18
RESERVES AND SURPLUSES
The total of statutory reserves and operating reserves and surpluses held in all
accounts of the municipalities was $185,442,333. This represents 33.74 per cent
of the total revenue, excluding school taxes, of the municipalities. Of this total,
$119,242,171 is held in liquid form or in investments authorized by statute, and a
portion of the surplus is represented in arrears of taxes and other receivables.
Statutory reserve funds of various municipalities have again shown an increase
over the previous year. At the end of 1973 these funds, held for a variety of purposes, amounted to $60,554,587, an increase of $6,534,927 over the previous year,
after giving effect to the fact that approximately $20,000,000 was expended on
capital works from reserve funds during the year 1973. Over the last seven years
the amount held in these reserve funds has increased from $33,000,000 to the
current figure of $60,000,000, an increase of 82 per cent.
CAPITAL PROGRAMS
The value of capital projects undertaken during 1973 by municipalities
amounted to $338,000,000. Of this total program, $273,000,000 was completed
during the fiscal year, leaving a balance of works in progress of $65,000,00 at
year-end. In the total capital program, municipalities were able to provide
$57,00,000 out of current general revenue and utility revenue funds, $20,000,000
from reserve funds, and approximately $10,000,000 was obtained from grants-in-aid
from the Provincial and Federal Governments. The balance of the amount expended was financed by debenture loans, temporary bank loans, and other methods
of financing. The activity in this area over the past five years is indicated in Table
10 following.
Table 10—Capital Programs, 1973
Projects
Undertaken
Works
Completed
Works in
Progress
Source of Funds
Year
Revenue
Reserve
Funds
Grants
1969                                	
1970 ....
1 (MUlions)
1        S
118                102
118        I         96
166        1        153
215        I       200
(Millions)
$
16
22
13
15
65
1
(Millions) j (Millions)
$                  $
36 |         7
33        |          8
37 |        10
43        1        14
(Millions)
$
S
3
1971
7
1972                   .      .                	
6
1973
338
|        273
57
1        20
10
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1974
BB 25
Five-year Capital Expenditure Programs Summary
The programs submitted by municipalities and regional districts during 1974
and covering the five-year period ending 1978 continued to provide meaningful
information and guidance, not only to the local government bodies involved but
also to the Department, other levels and departments of government, and various
financial institutions. Departmental review of each of these submissions and the
offering of constructive criticism, where necessary, has achieved maximum consistency in the format of these programs and has proved beneficial to all concerned.
A summary of the Capital Expenditure Programs by year is provided in Table
11. Included in the "General" heading under "Classification of Expenditures" are
all capital expenditures for roads, sidewalks, public buildings, recreational facilities,
land, and other capital projects not related to either water or sewage systems. As in
the past, municipal councils are attempting to finance a large portion of their capital
works out of current revenue and reserves, although the availability of Federal-
Provincial loans and the infusion of capital funds via specific purpose grants have
had a direct effect on this policy.
Table 11—Five-year Capital Expenditure Programs Summary
By Year for All Municipalities (Including Vancouver)
CLASSIFICATION of expenditures
Year
Water
Sewer
General
Total
1974 ■'	
1975	
1976   .    .              	
$
27,068,928
19,656,151
23,685,217
17,063,450
18.585,450
$
47,898,769
42,525,133
28,699,483
21,619,883
19,971,133
$
224,652,139
173,120,461
150,125,517
123.470,150
120,968,013
$
299,619,836
235,301,745
202,510,217
1977	
1978 _	
162,153.483
159,524,596
Totals
106,059,196
160,714,401
792,336,280
1,059,109,877
PROPOSED SOURCE OF FUNDS
Year
General
Revenue
Grants
Reserve
Funds
Prior Years'
Surplus
Debenture
Sales
Total
1974	
1975  	
1976	
$
72,315,328
61,686,536
56,323,765
54,692,068
52,837,345
$
27,365,762
15,923,878
9,391,220
6,426,967
5,917,267
$
34,300,938
21,588,712
13,500,375
12,450,208
13,418,696
$
624,773
336,300
245,600
150,500
167,500
$
165,013,035
135,766,319
123,049,257
88,433,740
87,183,788
$
299,619,836
235,301,745
202,510,217
1977	
1978	
162,153,483
159,524,596
Totals
297,855,042
65,025,094
95,258,929
1,524,673
599,446,139
1,059,109,877
BORROWING
During 1974, councils and regional boards continued to meet a substantial
demand for municipal services, and 153 term borrowing by-laws were approved by
the Inspector of Municipalities and subsequently adopted by the local governing
body that provided the service.
A greater portion of this authorized borrowing consisted of financing for sewers,
parks, and recreation projects. Funds for water facilities, civic buildings, and road
improvements also constituted a substantial portion.
 BB 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Borrowing of $105,234,468, as summarized in Table 12, is $10,478,946 more
than was authorized in 1973; the increase is attributable to the fact that more money
is being spent on water and sewer projects. Completion of the various projects
authorized will be phased over a number of years, and the demand for funds will
follow the pace of construction. Included in the authorized borrowing is $4,457,530
in short-term loans which, under the Municipal Act, are subject to a per capita
limitation.
The Inspector of Municipalities is not required to approve the borrowing of
the City of Vancouver or the Metropolitan Water and Sewer Boards. Such borrowing is therefore not included in Table 12.
Preliminary borrowing of an estimated amount of $8,909,842 was approved
for local improvement works. A number of municipalities have established special
improvement funds to finance local works; these have not been included in the
figure for preliminary borrowing approval.
Table 12—Borrowing Authorization, 1974
Purpose
Regional
Districts
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Total
$
595,000
830,000
12,255,000
3,496,000
$
3,919,000
10,923,750
5,360,150
3,815,400
1,915,852
2,206,000
271,600
$
8,745,000
16,695,200
7,523,500
5,253,525
1,665,000
6,439,200
336,500
$
1,768,916
6,000
975,000
$
903,800
7,232,040
850,000
695,880
$
14,162,800
Sewers and drains	
Parks and recreation _	
37,449,906
25,988,650
13,266,805
3,580,852
Road improvements and sidewalks
Equipment (including fire protec-
256,500
199,730
100,925
9,819,930
965,525
Totals.. _  	
17,432,500
28,411,752
46,657,925
2,749,916
9,982,375
105,234,468
Debentures
Details of debenture issues and other securities that have been approved in
principle at the time of adoption of loans authorization by-laws are specified in
security-issuing by-laws; 134 security-issuing by-laws authorizing the issue of debentures and other terms of indebtedness in the total amount of $110,259,919 were
approved.
In 1974, no municipal debenture issues were guaranteed by the Province under
the Municipal Assistance Act. Details of the issues guaranteed as at December 31,
1974, are shown below in Table 13.
Table 13—Outstanding Debentures Guaranteed, 1974
Village
Municipalities
Assistance Act
Municipalities
Assistance Act
Total
Cities (excluding Vancouver)..
Districts	
Towns	
ViUages  	
Subtotals	
Vancouver	
Greater Victoria Water District	
Greater Nanaimo Sewer District	
Greater Nanaimo Water District	
Greater Vancouver Water District _
Totals	
171,500
185,000
308,000
175,000
839,500
839,500
8,719,154
8,450,778
1,532,000
3,540,376
8,890,654
8,635,778
1,840,000
3,715,376
22,242,308
9,078.000
470,000
1,280,000
39,000
15,891,000
23,081,808
9,078,000
470,000
1,280,000
39,000
15.891.000
49,000,308 49,839,808
I
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1974
BB 27
In addition to the totals shown in Table 13 of $49,839,808 as debenture debts
guaranteed by the Province, a total amount at the end of the year of $22,093,000
was guaranteed under the Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District Act.
Total debenture debt as at December 31, 1973, of all municipalities, including
the City of Vancouver, is shown in Table 14, following. The debenture debt of the
Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District and the Greater Vancouver
Water District is not included.
Table 14—Total Debenture Debt, December
31,1973
Sold
Unissued
and
Unsold
Total
Cities     	
$
84,367,196
132,291,404
12,274,206
12,485,215
18,206,162
$
39,248,891
105,206,816
5,726,083
4,202,300
33,745,402
$
123,616,087
237,498,220
Towns	
18,000,289
16,687,515
51,951,564
Subtotals
259,624,183
164,619,278
188,129,492
447,753,675
164,619,278
Totals	
424,243,461
188,129,492
612,372,953
Debenture sales for all municipalities amounted to $43,875,205 for the year
1973. This resulted in an increase of $33,993,413 to the total outstanding debenture
debt of all municipalities for 1973, after giving effect to the retirement of debentures
maturing during that year.
The percentage of current revenue expended to service debenture debt (excluding utilities) increased in all classes of municipalities except the City of Vancouver,
which showed a decline. These figures for 1973 are shown below, with the 1972
figures in parentheses:
Per Cent
Cities  6.07 (5.99)
Vancouver  7.61 (8.49)
Districts   6.53 (6.18)
Towns  8.14 (7.87)
Villages  6.99 (6.55)
The debenture debt of utilities is serviced almost entirely by revenues derived
by consumer charges and frontage taxes.
 BB 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PLANNING SERVICES DIVISION
A review of the role of the Planning Services Division, both as it relates to
other Provincial departments as well as to municipal and regional levels of government, was undertaken this past year. This process of role reassessment pointed to
the need to shift the focus of the Division's activities toward a program of coordination aimed at those Provincial initiatives which bear directly on urban settlement patterns throughout British Columbia. This new emphasis reflects the
Department's mandate to serve as the key link between the Government of British
Columbia and the Province's municipalities and regional districts.
The Division also carried forward its program to advance the process of
planning for community and regional development at the regional district level.
Planning staff undertook to explore with regional districts ways of expanding their
planning programs with a key objective in mind of encouraging regional district
planning offices to provide continuing assistance to local municipalities and electoral
areas in meeting day-to-day needs for advice on land use issues.
To assist in advancing the planning process in the Province, the Department
continued its basic planning grant program for regional districts. In 1974, this
grant was increased to 20 cents per capita, with a minimum grant of $7,000 and a
maximum of $30,000. Furthermore, the Department extended its support of the
regional district planning role last year by initiating an incentive grant program
related to the implementation of regional plans. A 10 cents per capita grant was
provided to those regional districts which had official regional plans adopted as of
the end of 1974. It is intended to continue this program, although alternative
criteria for determining eligibility to receive the grant will be established.
In return for this investment of planning grants, the Provincial Government
looks to the regional districts to initiate and maintain active planning programs.
The Province also expects local policy guidelines to be established for both private
and public development initiatives, including Provincial action programs, by regional
districts exercising their planning role.
The following table summarizes the Provincial Government's program of financial support for the regional district planning function as administered by the
Planning Services Division.
Table 15—Provincial Funding Program for Regional District Planning
Regional District Basic Planning Grant Regional Plan Grant
$ $
Alberni-Clayoquot   7,000.00 3,059.60
Bulkley-Nechako   7,000.00 2,504.00
Capital   30,000.00 20,358.70
Cariboo   7,486.60             	
Central Fraser Valley  11,584.00 5,792.00
Central Kootenay  8,996.00 4,498.00
Central Okanagan  11,000.60              	
Columbia-Shuswap   7,000.00               ;	
Comox-Strathcona   9,291.00             	
Cowichan Valley  7,353.40             	
Dewdney-Alouette   7,988.20 3,994.10
East Kootenay  7,886.00 3,943.00
Fraser-Cheam   8,939.00 4,469.50
Fraser-Fort George  12,863.80              	
Greater Vancouver  30,000.00 50,000.00
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1974
BB 29
Regional District                                     Basic Planning Grant Regional Plan Grant
$ $
Kitimat-Stikine   7,000.00 	
Kootenay Boundary  7,000.00 	
Mount Waddington  7,000.00 	
Nanaimo   9,507.00 	
North Okanagan  7,000.00 	
Ocean Falls  7,000.00 	
Okanagan-Similkameen   8,569.00 4,284.50
Peace River-Liard  8,651.00 	
Powell River  7,000.00 	
Skeena-Queen Charlotte  7,000.00 	
Squamish-Lillooet  7,000.00  dJl
Thompson-Nicola   16,085.60 	
Totals   280,201.20 102,903.40
COMMUNITY AND REGIONAL PLANS AND PROGRAMS
The Division provided a range of advisory services in 1974, from preparing
and updating regional and community development plans and land use control
by-laws to organizing regional district planning programs. Staff, with the assistance
of a consultant, prepared a comprehensive development plan for the Alta Lake-
Whistler Mountain area of the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District. The plan is
intended to serve as a policy framework within which the activities of private
interests, the regional district, and Provincial agencies can be co-ordinated in the
development of a major summer and winter recreation community. This assignment entailed continuing liaison with other Provincial departments, and the published report, Whistler Mountain Area: A Community Development Study, is a
synthesis of technical contributions from many agencies. The Division was also
responsible for the over-all management of a consultant's study of potential ski-resort
areas in the Squamish-Pemberton Valley undertaken at the request of the Environment and Land Use Committee of Cabinet.
During the year, Divisional staff completed and published a draft community
plan report for the Village of Lake Cowichan and assisted in presenting the plan at a
number of public meetings. As a result of these meetings and discussions with the
Village Council, a final plan document is being prepared, including an official
community plan by-law.
Following the announcement of the Provincial Government's intentions for
development of the northwest region of British Columbia, the planning staff initiated
a community planning program for the Village of Burns Lake at the request of the
Village Council. This program is aimed at achieving community participation in
determining how best to expand and improve Burns Lake as it grows in response to
the development of a new sawmill and related industries in the surrounding region.
The program also is geared to providing a co-ordinative framework for the policies
and actions of other Provincial departments such as Housing, Highways, and
Economic Development. As of the end of 1974, the program had included the
preparation and distribution of a newsletter as well as meetings with local residents
and elected officials to discuss community development issues. Staff of the Division
are also seeking to integrate the Burns Lake community development process with
the planning program of the Regional District of Bulkley-Nechako.
Although Burns Lake has been the focus in 1974 of the Division's planning
initiatives in northwest British Columbia, staff was active as well in advising other
 BB 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
communities within the Highway 16 corridor. These advisory services included
initiating an update of the community plan for the Village of Fraser Lake and
assisting the Village of Vanderhoof in determining land use policy requirements
to guide future development.
Other communities throughout the Province were assisted over the past year
with their local planning needs. Staff advised on zoning by-laws for the Villages
of Port Edwards, Port Alice, and Lillooet, on a downtown development program
for the City of Cranbrook, and on the location of industrial lands for the Village of
Port Hardy. A planning study was also initiated for the Town of Creston and the
surrounding area, with participation expected from the Regional District of Central
Kootenay.
As an example of the Division's role in encouraging the establishment and
expansion of regional district planning programs, our staff have been assisting the
Regional District of Columbia-Shuswap to organize and staff a planning department
and continuing program. During 1974, this assistance took the form of preparing
an over-all work program and recruiting a planning technician to undertake base
mapping and data collection as a first step toward establishing a planning office
for the regional district.
The Division's program of co-ordination and liaison was also advanced through
our staff's participation on the various Regional District Technical Planning Committees. As an additional assignment, Divisional staff were called upon during the
first half of the year to assist several regional districts and the B.C. Land Commission in finalizing agricultural land reserve plans. This assistance included the
identification of lands for designation as agricultural reserves and attendance at
public meetings to present and explain the recommended designations. Staff
participated as well on the interdepartmental committee advising the Environment
and Land Use Committee on appeals under Order in Council 151/73 respecting the
Province-wide moratorium on development of farmland.
BY-LAW AND BOUNDARY REVIEW
During 1974, staff continued to administer the Division's statutory program
of advising the Minister on zoning, subdivision, and land use contract by-laws submitted for approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council. This advisory role
was also performed in relation to proposals for the extension of municipal boundaries, and our technical staff prepared detailed descriptions of the new boundaries
in both written and map form.
PROVINCIAL POLICY PLANNING
An increasingly important element of the Division's 1974 program was staff
participation in advising on Provincial policies and regulations related to urban
development and settlement pattern issues. Staff assisted in formulating an interdepartmental action program to meet community development needs on the Queen
Charlotte Islands as well as participated on working committees to review and
recommend on Provincial sewage-disposal regulations and flood-control requirements. As an assignment of the Environment and Land Use Committee, a staff
member chaired an interdepartmental committee to review and advise on standards
for rural subdivisions.
At the request of the B.C. Land Commission, staff conducted an intensive
research investigation into the problem of "ancient" subdivisions throughout the
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1974
BB 31
Province. Planning staff also participated in the process of establishing new
boundaries for the administrative regions as managed by the Provincial resource
departments.
PROVINCIAL-FEDERAL PROGRAM LIAISON
The Division's 1974 program of co-ordination and liaison included continuing
contact with the Federal Ministry of State for Urban Affairs. A new Federal
program was established by legislation this past year concerned with the relocation
of railway facilities to facilitate urban redevelopment. The program requires
Provincial participation for a project to be fully implemented, and our planning
staff have been acting as the principal liaison contact for Federal officials responsible
for the program as well as municipal and regional district inquiries concerning the
program.
OTHER ACTIVITIES
A continuing responsibility of the Division has been advising on legislation
related to land use and planning matters. During 1974, staff advised on a variety
of draft legislation initiated both within the Department as well as by other Provincial agencies. Preliminary steps were also taken to initiate a review of planning
legislation under the Municipal Act.
A further ongoing function of the Division has been the provision of information to municipal and regional agencies and the general public respecting Provincial
programs, policies, and legislation related to urban and regional development. Day-
to-day requests for map and statistical information on communities and regions
throughout the Province were also handled by the Division.
For the first nine months of 1974, Divisional staff continued to provide building inspection services for Community Planning Area 23 (Shawnigan Lake). As of
October 1, 1974, this building inspection responsibility was assumed by the Regional
District of Cowichan Valley for Electoral Area B, which includes the Shawnigan
Lake region.
 BB 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TRANSIT SERVICES DIVISION
When the Transit Services Division opened its doors in February 1973, it was
directed to assign priority to meeting the transit needs of residents in the Capital
Region and the Greater Vancouver Region for the years 1973 and 1974. The program was to be one of upgrading and extension of those bus services operated by
the Transportation Division of the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority.
During 1974 the Transit Services Division operated with head offices at Suite
470, 700 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, and with a small staff in Victoria lodged
with the head offices of the Department of Municipal Affairs. The Transit Services
Division operates as the Bureau of Transit Services of the Department of Municipal
Affairs.
GREATER VANCOUVER TRANSIT SYSTEM
The program of the Division in the Greater Vancouver Regional District was
advanced in 1974 on a number of matters.
In areas presently with bus service, measures were introduced to improve
frequency of service, and additional buses were made available to cope with
increased passengers. Service was doubled in Richmond; restoration of those
services cut back in 1971 by B.C. Hydro was begun; fares and transfer privileges
were integrated between West Vancouver and B.C. Hydro bus services. Changes
in the Barnet Highway FastBUS service were introduced, together with a new Town
and Country BUS service extending to Maple Ridge, Mission, and Abbotsford.
The year 1974 saw completion of the first stage of the program for extensions
of bus service throughout Greater Vancouver. At year-end, planning was nearing
the approval point on new services in Surrey-Delta-White Rock. Service implementation was contingent on vehicles and completion of a new operating centre in
Newton.
Advance planning for the next stage of the transit improvements program was
initiated during 1974. This work involves review and redesign of bus services in
Richmond, North Vancouver City and District, Vancouver, New Westminster, and
Burnaby. Much of the service design under this program is contingent on the plan
for the second stage of transit services in passenger transit ferries between North
Vancouver and Vancouver across Burrard Inlet, and in light of transit services
using surface alignments in Vancouver, Burnaby, New Westminster, Surrey, and
Richmond. Basic consultant studies were under way at year-end on the Cross-Inlet
ferry system, and on the light-rail network. The Division published its report,
Granville Waterfront Interchange, the major passenger station in the system of
future passenger services in City BUS, Town and Country BUS, Cross-Inlet Ferries,
Commuter Train, Passenger Train, and Light Rail Transit.
CAPITAL REGION TRANSIT SYSTEM
At year-end 1974, staff were completing their overview of transit needs and a
preliminary long-range plan for transit services for the metropolitan area of Victoria
City. During the year, two new bus routes were introduced in a Crosstown City
BUS service between Esquimalt and Cadboro Bay, and a FastBUS service between
downtown Victoria and the Gordon Head community. Public response to these
services indicate the potential to attract passenger ridership in Greater Victoria
through well-designed scheduled bus services.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1974
BB 33
Studies were continuing at year-end for a downtown Victoria passenger interchange, a downtown Victoria-James Bay loop service, a park and ride system to
future FastBUS routes, and a light-rail transit system that would utilize existing
railway lines in the Capital Region.
NEW TRANSIT SYSTEMS
During 1974 the Transit Division has again provided technical and management assistance to communities, as resources permitted. A new transit service in
Kitimat was planned with, and subsequently initiated on a contract basis, by the
District of Kitimat.
The scope of the transit program has broadened during the past year to include
a preliminary investigation of passenger transit service needs in Port Alberni,
Salmon Arm, Kamloops, Prince George, Prince Rupert, and Nanaimo. Municipalities and regional districts requesting studies under the 1975 program include
Trail, Campbell River, Penticton, Kelowna, Maple Ridge, Mission, Chilliwack, and
Cowichan Valley Regional District.
Division staff were also called upon this past year to investigate invitations by
private companies wishing to dispose of their operations, or offering their companies
and available expertise, to the Province of British Columbia to form the basis for a
public program in their area of the Province. The approach taken included appraisals and planning meetings with the local government representatives to consider
each situation in light of requirements for a public bus system.
The Division is planning a review of 19*75 of the existing transit systems in
Powell River, Nelson, Nanaimo, and West Vancouver to be included in the new
system program.
PLANNING TRANSIT SERVICES
The technical staff of the Transit Services Division have been active in meeting
with municipal and regional district staff and elected representatives around the
Province on the transit program. The Division assisted in a successful committee
arrangement involving both Council members and citizens in Surrey-Delta-White
Rock municipalities. This committee prepared the evaluation of the need for transit
in relation to the settlement and activity patterns of residents. The transit plan was
seen as part of the community planning process, and decisions on zoning and subdivision were seen as determining both the mobility patterns of residents and the
extent to which transit services can be provided in the community.
Liaison was continuing at year-end with the planning staff of the Greater
Vancouver Regional District regarding the Liveable Region Plan Program, and of
the Capital Regional District the Regional Plan Program. It has been a policy
during the year to maintain contact with planning and engineering staff of municipalities where specific service design was being planned. The Transit Division
maintained an active membership in the Vancouver City Waterfront Working Committee throughout 1974.
NEW TRANSIT VEHICLES
The planning of equipment purchases follows from the advance planning of
routes, increased service requirements, and the design of new systems. During
1974, orders were placed through public tender calls for 250 new vehicles, and for
an unspecified number of used vehicles. Arrangements were made with the Federal
Government to permit the import of up to 75 used transit vehicles. The Transit
Division has been working toward an age profile of fleet vehicles that is related to
 BB 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
replacement and maintenance requirements. Deferment of some new vehicle orders
that this program requires will have a beneficial effect in enabling suppliers to forecast for consistent annual production requirements.
The Division has also been active in the search for new surface transit vehicles
appropriate for British Columbia passenger service needs. A European Transit
Tour in the month of June provided first-hand viewing of the current transit services
and systems in a number of European cities. Transit-vehicle manufacturing facilities
were inspected as part of this fact-finding mission. Subsequently, several types of
European vehicles were tested on the streets of Greater Vancouver communities as
a follow-up to this program. At year-end, discussions were continuing with three
European manufacturers regarding electric trolley buses, diesel buses, and light-rail
transit vehicles.
PLANNING FOR INTEGRATION OF SCHOOL BUSSING
WITH TRANSIT
Two pilots transit school-bus projects were being designed at year-end for
implementation in 1975 to provide information on transit in small communities and
rural areas. There are extensive areas of British Columbia now covered by school
bus services. The Bureau of Transit staff are investigating the possible integration
of transit and school bus programs to achieve a measure of service and economies
in operation for public transportation services. Initial planning for the Salmon
Arm project was carried out in 1974, and one school bus will be used in this study.
Arrangements were made during 1974 with Nanaimo Regional Transit to add contract school bussing for Nanaimo and Qualicum School Districts, with project
planning to follow in early 1975.
TRANSIT SURVEYS
Under the Provincial Careers '74 Program, the Transit Division conducted a
number of basic information-gathering surveys using summer student staff. Park
and Ride information was gathered on the Park Royal project of West Vancouver
Municipal Transportation, and on the PNE project of B.C. Hydro. Interview and
questionnaire surveys were conducted on services in Coquitlam, Port Moody, and
Port Coquitlam, and the findings were published in the report, The Impact of New
Bus Services in the Coquitlam Area, October 1974. A survey of passengers using
the Prince George Transit System was conducted in October 1974 to provide basic
information for planning new services during 1975. Bureau staff also conducted
a questionnaire survey on the passenger services operated by the British Columbia
Railway to provide information for policy decisions regarding intercity rail and
regional bus services. The rail passenger study was continuing at year-end.
TRANSIT LEGISLATION
This past year saw enactment of the Transit Services Act as basic enabling
legislation through which the transit policies would be implemented in communities
and regions around the Province.
The Provincial Transit Fund Act, also enacted during 1974, effectively redirect
funds from a third automobile-crossing facility of Burrard Inlet to the Provincial
transit program. Under this fund, the Province acquired three lines of buses in the
Capital Region, ordered 250 new and 54 used buses, acquired a site in North
Vancouver City of a major passenger interchange, and commenced a transit ferry
project across Burrard Inlet during 1974.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1974
BB 35
Payments in 1974 under the Provincial Rapid Transit Act to public transit
authorities in British Columbia were again made to the four systems shown in
Table 16.
Table 16—Subsidy Payments for 1972 and 1973
1972
PubUc Transit Authority (9 Months)
West Vancouver Municipal Transporta-        $
tion     82,266
Nanaimo Regional Transit System     60,667
Nelson Transit System     17,049
Powell River Transit System     25,465
Total subsidies paid
1973
(12 Months)
$
174,473
118,336
17,330
14,638
185,447        324,777
 BB 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PERCENTAGE      TAX       COLLECTIONS
CHART 1
LEGEND
-Cities
» Districts
• Towns
-Villages
-Vancouver
%
PERCENTAGE     OF    CURRENT    LEVY   COLLECTED
97
•^
***' **"*>
^
«**<*
V*
.tT-TT——
*...
S              •*'
,•
..
...•"""
**■•••
*
,•"
.•*
_
0
OUTSTANDING    TAXES    AS    A    PERCENTAGE  OF    CURRENT     LEVY
1963 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 1973
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1974           BB 37
TRENDS    IN     FINANCIAL   ASPECTS   OF   MUNICIPAL    GOVERNMENT
COMPARED      TO    POPULATION    AND      INCOME
CHART 2
LEGEND
Total   revenue   in   millions   of   dollars
Building    permits   in    millions  of dol
hundreds of  millions of dollars
ii,,.            of
millions of dollars
L/CU                                C                        V»
/
y
,—--
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y
y
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-—
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^—    -*    ""
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 '■■'
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963                64                      65                      66                      67                      68                       69                      70                       71                        72                  197
3
 BB 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
MUNICIPAL   REVENUES
BY    MAJOR   SOURCE    1973
CITIES   (EXCLUDING  VANCOUVER)
CHART 3
UTILITIES'1'
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER   PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE   GRANT
PROVINCIAL  LOCAL  GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL   MUNICIPAL  TAXATION1
%OF   REVENUE
100%
$  PER   CAPITA
S392.71    (358.59)
PROVIDED  BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
2.04 (2.38)
19.53 (18.68)
.98 (  .80)
9.67 (10.82)
8.66 (8.38)
30.43 (31.95)
10.21 (16.62)	
28.69 (26.99)
$  8.00 (8.54)
76.70 (66.69)
3.84 ( 2.86)
37.96 (38.32)
32.00 (30.00)
119.52 (114.58)
112.66 (96.80)
1972   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$186,230,962   TOTAL   POPULATION   474,221
DISTRICTS
%OF   REVENUE
100%
S   PER  CAPITA
$360.51   (311.71)
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER   PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE GRANT
PROVINCIAL  LOCAL  GOVERNMENT  GRANT
GENERAL   MUNICIPAL TAXATION1'
PROVIDED   BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL  TAXATION
15.04 (14.59)
.26 ( .43)
7.28 ( 6.82)
8.95 ( 9.62)
36.14 (35.59)
13.17  (19.48)^.,— ;
32.33 (32.95) |_
ffg^wjgPflWPPi
$54.22(45.49)
.94 ( 1.35)
26.25 (21.26)
32.00 (30.00)
130.29 (11093)
116.53(102.68)
1972   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$288,099,538  TOTAL POPULATION-799,145
NOTE--   (1) Utilities   represents    amount   appropriated  from   utility   operations   for   General   Municipal   Purposes,   is   not   Major
Source of   Revenue   for   Districts, Towns, Villages   and   Vancouver,  Included   in   'Licenses   and   Other'   for  1971   and   1972.
(2) General   Municipal   Taxation  includes  Ad Valorem Tax,   Business Tax, sewer   and Water   Frontage  Tax   and  Special
Assessments.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1974 BB 39
MUNICIPAL   REVENUES
BY   MAJOR   SOURCE    1973
TOWNS
CHART 3
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER    PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL   MUNICIPAL TAXATION1
PROVIDED   BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER  GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
/„   OF   REVENUE
 100%
$   PER  CAPITA
$333.51   (279.90)
19.46 (18.58)
1.11 (    .41)
7.49 ( 7.78)
9.63 (10.71)
29.38 (29.40)
12.79  (20.78)
32.93 (33.12)
iiriYxvtiiivta:
$64.90(52.00)
3.71 ( 1.15)
24.99(21.75)
32.00 (30.00)
97.97 (82.28)
109.83 (92.72)
1972   FIGURES    SHOWN    IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$18,522,675     TOTAL POPULATION-55,538
VILLAGES
LICENSES    AND   OTHER
OTHER PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION1"
PROVIDED  BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
X   OF   REVENUE
 100%
24.74  (23.06)
2.16 (    .70)
12.33 (13.59)
26.21  (25.86)
13.89 (38.49)
34.56 (36.79)
•uttnawMi
S   PER   CAPITA
$288.71    (231.21)
66.48 (53.33)
5.81 (   1.62)
32.00 (30.00)
70.42 (59.80)
92.86 (85.06)
1972   FIGURES    SHOWN    IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$16,906,326    TOTAL POPULATION-62,917
NOTE -   (1) General   Municipal   Taxation   includes   Ad   Valorem Tax,   Business   Tax,   Sewer   and   Water   Frontage   Tax   and   Special
Assessments.
 BB 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
MUNICIPAL   REVENUE
BY    MAJOR    SOURCE    1973
VANCOUVER
CHART 3
LICENSES    AND   OTHER
OTHER   PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE   GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION'1'
PROVIDED   BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER  GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
%  OF   REVENUE
100%
$  PER  CAPITA
$474.41   (419.63)
17.82   (16.04)
.35 (   .38)
17.85 (17.14)
6.75  ( 7.15)
33.13 (34.09)
7.55 (13.49)	
24.10 (25.20)
$ 84 .57 (67.32)
1.64 ( 1.60)
84.70 (71.93)
32.00 (30.00)
157.16(143.04)
114.33(105.74)
1972   FIGURES    SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$202,218,772     TOTAL POPULATION-426,256
NOTE:-  (1) General  Municipal  Taxation includes   Ad Valorem Tax,   Business  Tax, Sewer  and Water  Frontage Tax  and   Special
Assessments.
REVENUE   SHOWN   FOR   ALL  CLASSES   OF   MUNICIPALITIES    INCLUDING    VANCOUVER    OOES    NOT    INCLUDE
APPROPRIATION    OF    PRIOR   YEARS     SURPLUS.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1974
BB 41
VENUE    EXPENDITURES
BY    MAJOR    FUNCTION    1973
CITIES    EXCLUDING  VANCOUVER
CHART 4
% OF   EXPENDITURE
100%
$  PER   CAPITA
$393.98   (353.24)
GENERAL   GOVERNMENT
FIRE
ADMINISTRATION   OF  JUSTICE
OTHER   PROTECTION
TRANSPORTATION    SERVICES
ENVIRONMENTAL   HEALTH
SOCIAL WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT   CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL   EXPENDITURES  FROM   REVENUE
5.80
4.36
6.59
.98
7.42
3.91
( 5.60)
( 4.55)
( 7.08)
( .93)
( 8.26)
( 4.22)
aaggBgaagi
13.10   (14.38)
28.55   (28.03)
6.07   I 5.99)
7.39   ( 5.87)
15.83   (15.09)
$22.84  (19.80)
17.20 (16.08)
25.96 (25.00)
3.86 ( 3.28)
29.23 (29.20)
15.41 (14.89)
51.60   (50.82)
112.49   (99.00)
23.91    (21.15)
29.11    (20.72)
62.37    (53.30)
1972   FIGURES    SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$186,834,614    TOTAL   POPULATION - 474,221
DISTRICTS
% OF   EXPENDITURE
100%
GENERAL   GOVERNMENT
FIRE
ADMINISTRATION  OF  JUSTICE
OTHER   PROTECTION
TRANSPORTATION   SERVICES
ENVIRONMENTAL   HEALTH
SOCIAL  WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT   CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL  EXPENDITURES   FROM   REVENUE
OTHER
5.85 ( 5.81)
3.96 ( 3.82)
5.93 ( 5.82)
1.43 ( 1.35)
7.52 ( 7.89)
.42 ( 2.98)
11.21 (10.85)
32.50 (33.45)
mmrnm
6.53 ( 6.18)
6.60 (6.51)        HJ
18.05 (15.34)
$   PER CAPITA
$359.16   (307.34)
$21.02
14.23
21.29
5.15
27.01
1.49
(17.86)
(11.76)
(17.88)
( 4.16)
(24.24)
( 9.16)
40.25   (33.36)
116.74 (102.80)
23.44 (18.96)
23.71 (20.01)
64.83    (47.15)
1972   FIGURES    SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$287,023,470    TOTAL   POPULATION-799,145
NOTE:- Expenditures   for   Health   included  in 'Other'.
 BB 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REVENUE    EXPENDITURES
BY    MAJOR    FUNCTION    1973
TOWNS
CHART 4
GENERAL   GOVERNMENT
FIRE
OTHER  PROTECTIONS
TRANSPORTATION  SERVICES
ENVIRONMENTAL   HEALTH
SOCIAL  WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT    CHARGES    (NET)
CAPITAL   EXPENDITURE   FROM   REVENUE
OTHER
%  OF   EXPENDITURE
100%
$ PER   CAPITA
$326.50   (278.74)
7.80 (7.48)
1.81 (1.78)
1.07 (1.25)
9.10 (10.32)
4.43 (4.36)
11.66 (11.94)
33.72 (33.48)
vmi&mgm.
$25.47 (20.83)
5.90 ( 4.95)
3.50 (  3.48)
29.71  (28.76)
14.46  (12.16)
38.08(33.29)
110.10 (93.34)
26.57 (21.95)
28.72 (26.06)
43.99(33.92)
1972   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$18,133,474     TOTAL   POPULATION - 55,538
VILLAGES
% OF EXPENDITURE
100%
GENERAL     GOVERNMENT
FIRE
OTHr
OTHER PROTECTIONS
TRANSPORTATION   SERVICES
ENVIRONMENTAL  HEALTH
EDUCATION
DEBT   CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL  EXPENDITURE  FROM   REVENUE
OTHER
11.08 (11.07)
2.27 ( 2.29)
■ 88 1    .92)
11.43 (11.48)
5.17   (4.93)
34.04 (37.13)
6.99 (6.55)
12.74(11.27)
15.39 (14.30)
vmmw/M      i-
$   PER CAPITA
$273.31   (231.14)
$30.29 (25.58)
S.21  (5.28)
!.41  (2.27)
31.24 (26.54)
14.13 (11.41)
93.04 (85.82)
19.10 (15.14)
34.83 (26.05)
42.06(33.05)
1972   FIGURES   SHOWN    IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$17,195,885     TOTAL   POPULATION-62,917
NOTE:-  Expenditures   for    Health   included   in    'Other'.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1974
BB 43
VENUE    EXPENDITURES
BY    MAJOR    FUNCTION    1973
VANCOUVER
CHART 4
% OF   EXPENDITURE
100%
$  PER   CAPITA
$468.29   (414.04)
GENERAL  GOVERNMENT
FIRE
ADMINISTRATION   OF JUSTICE
OTHER   PROTECTION
TRANSPORTATION   SERVICES
ENVIRONMENTAL   HEALTH
SOCIAL WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT  CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL  EXPENDITURES  FROM  REVENUE
OTHER
3.18   ( 2.92)
5.91   (6.14)
9.31
1.36
3.63
2.29
( 9.53)
(1.22)
( 3.69)
(2.12)
xatxaaxata
mmm&
22.14   (21.29)
24.71   (25.86)
7.61   ( 8.49)
7.01   ( 5.26)
12.85   (13.48)
14.88 (12.05)
27.70 (25.43)
43.58  (39.44)
6.38  ( 5.07)
17.01   (15.30)
( 8.78)
10.70
103.69   (88.14)
115.71 (107.0
35.64   (35.16)
32.83   (21.77)
60.17    (55.82)
1972   FIGURES    SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$199,611,670    TOTAL   POPULATION - 426,256
NOTE,- Expenditures    for    Health    included   in   'Other'.
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1975
1,530-775-9277
 

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