Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

Minister of Public Works REPORT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1973/74 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1975

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0376295.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0376295.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0376295-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0376295-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0376295-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0376295-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0376295-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0376295-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0376295-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0376295.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Minister of Public Works
REPORT
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
1973/74
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1975
  To Colonel the Honourable Walter Stewart Owen, Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Public Works for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1974, in compliance with the
provisions of the Public Works Act.
WILLIAM L. HARTLEY
Minister of Public Works
Office of the Minister of PubUc Works,
Parliament Buildings, December 30,1973.
 MINISTER'S COMMENT
From the separate reports from the Divisions, it is evident that the Department
of Public Works is staffed by people who are fully aware of the responsibilities of
the Department, and who apply their intelligence, experience, and skills in the best
traditions of a dedicated public service.
Consequent to growing public need, there will be even greater demand on the
Department's employees and services. As Minister, I accept the inherent obligation
to assist the Department's employees, and all employees in the public service, to
carry out their designated tasks.
Elemental to productivity is the provision of proper tools. Included in those
tools is the tool of occupational environment. Problems of overcrowding, neglected to crisis proportions, then "solved" at the expense of (esthetics and people's
working environment—this was the policy in former years. Today a new set of
values is given prominence as people and their environment are elevated to higher
priority.
Some of the projects being carried out by this Department are, of course, more
obvious than others. For instance, the Law Courts and Government Building under
construction at Vancouver Blocks 61 and 71 will be observed, written about, and
frequently discussed. The project is of dramatic importance to the core of British
Columbia's largest city; it will, therefore, have impact on the greatest number of
people. Similarly, the Parliament Buildings and the restoration programme will
attract attention. Here is a historic edifice that, prior to 1972, had been neglected
until its original dignity had diminished under a policy of expediency. In the very
near future these historic buildings will again be looked upon with justifiable pride
by all British Columbians.
Important as these major projects undoubtedly are, we cannot neglect the
working environment of our people in other parts of the Province. There is a
multiplicity of occupations where environment, and productivity, can be improved
through the thought and planning of this Department. For us, this will be a continuing task. The better we carry it out the more truly we shall live up to our
motto: "We must lead, not follow."
W. L. HARTLEY
Minister of Public Works
 Hon. W. L. Hartley, Minister of Public Works.
 "We must lead, not follow."
—Department of Public Works.
 INDEX
Minister's Comment     4
Report of the Deputy Minister     9
Design Division
Report of the Director of Design  10
Economy in the Use of Energy  17
Report of the Senior Civil Engineer  18
Report of the Senior Electrical Engineer  19
Dimension, Discipline, and Discernment  21
Report of the Senior Quantity Surveyor  22
Report of the Senior Specification Writer  23
Report of the Interior Design Architect  25
Personnel Division
Report of the Director of Personnel Services  26
Construction and Maintenance Division
Report of the Director of Construction and Maintenance  28
Report of the Co-ordinator of Construction  31
Report of the Co-ordinator of Maintenance  34
Report of the Mechanical Operations and Maintenance Engineer  35
Safety Engineering Services Division
Report of the Director of Safety Engineering Services  36
Report of the Chief Boiler Inspector  37
Report of the Chief Inspector of Electrical Energy  40
Report of the Chief Gas Inspector  42
Accounting Division
Report of the Comptroller of Expenditure  45
Tenders Received and Contracts Awarded for Buildings  52
  ■
REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER
The Honourable William L. Hartley,
Minister of Public Works,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir: I have the honour to submit for your consideration the Annual Report of
the Department for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1974.
Elsewhere in this Report will be those of the heads of divisions which set out
the work accomplished and planned, tenders called and accepted, and Departmental
accounts.
The year was an extremely busy one for the whole staff, yet with all the
pressures of the moment time was taken to reflect on the directions of the Department, to reshape our goals as a Service Agency of the Government, to reassess our
responsibilities to the public, and to continue to equip ourselves for a changing role
in a changing world.
As an essential basis to this approach we have continued with our efforts to
change from what has been described as "means" orientation to "ends" orientation.
In this sense we endeavour to remind ourselves continually that the services provided by this Department become the means by which social programs are carried
out. To make our service more truly effective we must therefore become even more
aware of the directions and underlying influences relating to social programs which
Government intends to fulfil.
This endeavour to reassess our philosophic position, to redefine our procedures,
while concurrently maintaining production output has, I am sure, proven to be an
onerous and at times a frustrating experience to the staff.
That they have responded with enthusiasm, tolerance, humour, and with energy
is to their credit and in accordance with the best traditions of the Public Service.
We owe them much for their efforts.
Yours respectfully,
GEORGE L.
GILES, f.r.a.i.c.
Deputy Minister
 G 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE  DIRECTOR OF  DESIGN
The Design Division of the Department of Public Works is a central service
agency providing accommodation for the housing of the activities of all departments
of the Government. Policies qualifying the supply of capital for accommodation are
laid down by Treasury Board and by the Department of Finance. Policies qualifying
the supply of personnel to carry out the design of accommodation are laid down by
the Public Service Commission. Regulations pertaining to the building of accommodation are laid down by the Department of Labour, the Department of Municipal
Affairs, Department of Health, and other branches of the Department of Public
Works. Regulations pertaining to zoning are laid down by the city or the municipality in which the accommodation is to be built. The time and place at which
labour and materials are available in the market is a function of the general economy.
Within these reasonably generous parameters, Public Works is free to operate.
The parameter of time is not so generous in the view of those departments
wishing to institute new programmes requiring accommodation. Devices can be
used to shorten delivery periods, such as more staff, the use of consultants, phasing
of work, pre-tendering of components, construction management, project management, fast track, and others. A year and a half to two years, however, is still a
reasonable estimate of time for programming, property acquisition, designing,
tendering, and constructing a medium-size ($1 million) facility. Departments
have been made aware of this time factor, and the necessity to decide on programme
so that property may be acquired and design and construction proceed in an orderly
fashion.
The work of the Design Division then can be reported in two categories. One,
that work which was under construction in the 1973/74 fiscal year. The report of
the Departmental Comptroller elsewhere in this Report will list by locality all expenditures that have been made in this fiscal year. A further list, also by location,
will show all work tendered, all tenders received, and indicate tenders awarded. In
this report are listed all projects going to tender, by department.
PROJECTS GOING TO TENDER
Department of Agriculture
Replacement of cattle barns, Colony Farm, Essondale	
Alterations to Dairy Laboratory, Willingdon Avenue, Burnaby 	
Drainage and dyke improvement, Colony Farm, Essondale
$
205,250.00
38,370.00
200,000.00
443,620.00
Attorney-General's Department
Corrections
Sewage and site works, Ruskin  39,296.00
Sewage-treatment plant, Prince George  106,154.00
Recreation building, Kamloops  10,986.00
Workshop building, New Haven Correctional Centre,
Burnaby  28,740.00
185,176.00
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1973/74
Courts
G 11
Provincial Court facilities, Lytton	
Provincial Court facilities, Valemount
$
40,194.00
42,721.00
82,915.00
Department of Education
Multidiscipline Building, BCVS, Burnaby—
Elevators  74,605.00
Roofing and sheet-metal work  78,667.00
Mechanical installations   541,556.00
Steel stud furring and drywall  350,790.00
Electrical installations   699,672.00
Preliminary plumbing work  219,990.00
Glass and glazing  39,900.00
Carpets and resilient flooring  97,874.00
Electrical conduit  36,888.00
Concrete work  286,003.00
Excavation and backfill  70,075.00
Foundations, Phase 2   155,000.00
Jericho Hill School, Vancouver—
Fire-alarm system   172,000.00
Demolition and site works  36,000.00
Fire-alarm systems, Nanaimo Vocational School  50,990.00
Site works and chemical stores, Selkirk College, Nelson ____ 24,430.00
Welding shops, Okanagan College, BCVS, Kelowna  138,300.00
Central heating distribution, BCIT, Burnaby  253,914.00
Ring road and ancillary work, Burnaby  64,806.00
Welding booths, Camosun College, BCVS, Victoria  66,782.00
Renovations, DeMontigny Building, Victoria  36,989.00
3,485,231.00
Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources
Forest Service
Additions and renovations to Forestry Building, Nelson .... 406,337.00
Department of Health
Laundry addition, Glendale Lodge, Victoria  248,800.00
Personal care homes, Vancouver and Burnaby  37,117.58
Pearson Hospital, Vancouver—
Installation of boilers  122,671.00
Instrumentation for boiler house  67,239.00
Fire-alarm system   69,754.00
Reroofing, Provincial Health Building, Vancouver  35,896.00
581,477.00
 G 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Mental Health
Riverview Hospital, Essondale— $
Boiler plant conversion   16,250.00
Dental suite renovations   54,560.00
Staircases, Riverside Building   99,730.00
Willingdon Avenue, Burnaby—
Renovations, Mental Health Centre  59,696.00
Electrical primary distribution system  74,692.00
Electrical renovations, Eastlawn Building, Essondale  33,315.00
Alterations, St. Eugene's School, Cranbrook  158,692.00
Colony Farm, Essondale—
Mechanical and plumbing installations, Riverside
Building   149,459.00
Electrical work, Riverside Activity Building  114,609.00
Five 20-bed units, Tranquille School, Tranquille  1,864,000.00
Alterations, Second Floor, Nootka Court  22,874.00
2,647,879.00
Department of Highways
Paint spray shop, Langford  29,465.00
Mechanical and electrical equipment building, Trout Lake 59,400.00
Highways equipment building—
McLeese Lake  207,520.00
Whistler   178,400.00
Blue River  231,700.00
Logan Lake   193,900.00
Highways building, Bob Quinn and Tatogga Lakes, Atlin __ 1,161,863.00
Materials Testing Laboratory, Victoria   82,687.00
Replacement of heating system, Highways establishment,
Lillooet    36,556.00
2,181,491.00
Department of Human Resources
Alterations, Vancouver Island Youth Centre, Nanaimo  41,558.00
Sewage and irrigation, Tranquille School ____   85,588.00
Kitchen alterations, Brannan Lake School, Wellington _ 117,604.00
244,750.00
Department of Lands
Pollution Control Laboratory, Vernon  15,960.00
Alterations to Sixth and Seventh Floors, Avord Building, Vancouver  39,400.00
Additions and alterations to Harbour Towers, Victoria .... 109,409.00
164,769.00
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1973/74 G 13
Department of Public Works $
Maintenance building, Prince George      349,700.00
Alterations and additions, Provincial Government Service
Centre, Oak Street, Victoria       156,853.00
506,553.00
Department of Economic Development
Alterations and additions—
Data Processing Centre, 421 Menzies Street, Victoria 66,222.00
Fourth Floor, Toronto-Dominion Bank Tower, Vancouver   48,374.00
Department of Recreation and Conservation
B.C. Archives and Museum Building, Victoria   171,822.00
Effluent outfall, Trout Hatchery, Summerland  79,450.00
Alterations to Second Floor, Exhibit Building, Victoria ____ 477,432.00
Site preloading, Fraser Valley Trout Hatchery, Abbotsford 63,370.00
Site development and foundation, Notre Dame Road, Kamloops   318,150.00
Department of Transportation and Communications
Weigh-scale Station—
Prince George   71,480.00
Pouce Coupe   84,400.00
Replacement of heating system, aircraft hangar, Kamloops 21,962.00
Renovations, motor-vehicle inspection station, Vancouver.. 350,000.00
Repairs to roof structure, hangar 2, Victoria  19,773.00
Renovations to Douglas Building, Victoria   408,300.00
General
Provincial Government Building—
Vernon (paving and landscaping)   75,946.00
Ganges (renovations)   24,990.00
Fort St. John  1,091,000.00
Penticton (renovations)   156,600.00
Dogwood Building, Wharf Street, Victoria (alterations) __._ 16,686.00
Parliament Buildings, Victoria—
Panelling, Third Floor  35,150.00
Copper roofing   48,429.00
Drainage and site works   117,833.00
Third Floor, East Wing (renovations)   356,576.00
Parliamentary Library (alterations and renovations)__ 378,444.00
Elevator    3 8,745.00
West Wing (panelling)   75,890.00
Department of Labour
Third Floor, International House, Victoria (alterations).
16,491.75
 G  14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PROJECTS IN THE DESIGN STAGE
Department of the Attorney-general
Corrections
Renovations to kitchen area, Haney Correction Centre.
Fire escapes for Women's Building, Lower Mainland Regional Correctional
Centre.
Designs for a new Borstal Institution at Langley were completed.
Department of Transport and Communications
Design for new motor-vehicle inspection stations at Surrey, Kamloops, and
Duncan were started.
Designs for weigh-scale stations at Yahk, Pouce Coupe, and Prince George were
completed.
Department of Education
Design for classroom and Laboratory Building, BCIT, was started.
Drawings for the Art School remodelling and addition were completed.
Drawings for the revision to storm drainage at BCIT were completed.
Preliminary designs for signage at BCIT were completed.
Department of Finance
Revisions to the Courthouse at Revelstoke were completed.
Additional contracts for the Government Building at Nelson were prepared.
New designs for the Provincial Government Building at Kimberley were completed.
Landscaping contracts were prepared for Powell River and Fernie.
Contract documents for Victoria Law Courts were started.
Department of Health
Designs for the Willow Chest Centre renovations were started.
Top-floor renovations for the Vancouver Provincial Health Building were
started.
Mental Health
Academic and Activity Building, Phase 2, was completed.
Contracts were prepared for heating and plumbing systems at St. Eugene's
Indian School.
Preliminary work was begun on the Riverview Laundry.
Department of Human Resources
Plans were prepared for the renovation of the New Denver Pavilion.
Department of Highways
Continuing programme of designs for equipment sheds for Burnaby, Cassidy,
Sparwood, Nelson, Likely, Bridge River, and Enderby were begun.
A maintenance establishment design was started for Fernie.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1973/74 G 15
Provincial Secretary's Department
General renovations to the Parliament Buildings were continued.
Department of Recreation and Conservation
Preparation of contract documents for the main hatchery building at Abbotsford were begun.
Designs in relation to the Museum and Archives Building were continued for
Thunderbird Park, St. Ann's Schoolhouse, landscaping on Elliot Street.
Department of Travel Industry
Designs were prepared for Visitors Information Centre at Golden.
Fish and Wildlife Branch
Design of storage buildings for Cranbrook, Nelson, and Nanaimo were begun.
General
Liaison with other departments continued.
Senior citizens' housing plans were examined for the Department of the Provincial Secretary.
Assistance was given to Municipal Affairs on housing.
Professional services were provided to a variety of departments, including
Crown corporations such as the Liquor Administration Branch, the Motor Carrier
Commission, and the Purchasing Commission.
Finally, may I recommend for your approbation the staff who served so well
in the period of expansion, reorganization, and reorientation and inflation; who held
the line, filled in the gaps, cut the corners, and generally performed in a highly professional and creditable manner.
W. W. Ekins, B.Arch., Dip.Pub.Admin.
Director of Design
 G 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
09
o
X
o
o
_-
o
>
3
o
0
CQ
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1973/74
G  17
ECONOMY IN  THE  USE OF  ENERGY
Economy in the use of energy is currently a popular subject. Much has been
said about it in both the public and technical press. Circumstances, of course, have
forced all of us to look at the way we use energy.
British Columbia is fortunate. We have natural resources for hydro-electric
power, and the fossil fuels of natural gas, oil and coal. Because we are fortunate,
however, there is no reason for us to squander these resources.
The Department is charged with the responsibility of providing comfort conditions in Government Buildings throughout the Province. We (do) use a lot of
energy to light, heat, and cool these buildings.
To use energy to the best advantage and to obtain these objectives (and thus
minimize our use of energy) the Department has taken two important steps this year.
First of all, the Department has purchased two types of computer programmes.
With these two programmes we can test proposed building systems and heating/
cooling systems in relatively short time. Systems can be compared and the most
suitable combinations chosen without long and laborious manual calculations.
The first one, called the APEC Programme (the abbreviation for Automated
Procedures for Engineering Consultants Ltd.), is an energy demand programme.
It combines the weather data with the heat loss or gain of the building under consideration.  This programme allows us to size the equipment needed.
The second computer programme will be used to estimate the energy consumption of buildings. This programme introduces both time and building-use
factors and allows us to determine how much energy we use on, say, an annual
basis. Many times this programme will indicate to us that the size of equipment
might be modified down in capacity from that indicated in the APEC Programme,
by introducing comfort tolerance and heat-transfer time lag.
This means that we can get a better use factor out of mechanical equipment
by operating at its maximum efficiency for a longer time.
The other step is to make use of heat-reclaiming equipment. Of course, heat-
reclaiming equipment is an additional capital expense for the mechanical equipment.
Because of the increased cost of energy (dramatic increases in fact), the additional
capital expense is more than economically justified.
In some cases the entire capital is returned in a very short time.
Heat reclaiming is difficult to talk about in a general sense, because it is
usually tailored to a specific project. Use is made of heat exchangers, heat pumps,
heating/cooling refrigeration cycles, and heat sinks.
As a further step in the economy of use of energy, we have made a feasibility
study of utilizing the solid waste from municipal garbage. The study reveals that it
is economically feasible. This study is based upon utilizing the municipal solid waste
from the City of Kamloops to generate steam for the heating and cooling of the
buildings in the Provincial Government Precinct, and the adjacent Royal Inland
Hospital.
The energy extracted from the solid-waste garbage can, to a large extent,
supplement the use of natural gas for this service. It also aids in the disposal of
this material by reducing the incoming volume by 50 times and producing a sterile
ash that can have other uses than to fill a garbage dump.
Glass and metals can be recycled.
The Mechanical Branch has participated in most of the projects listed.
Again, this year, I wish to thank the field operating staff for their "feed-back."
It is very helpful.
W. E. Mills, P.Eng.
Senior Mechanical Engineer
 G  18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE SENIOR CIVIL ENGINEER
The Civil Engineering Branch, comprising the disciplines of civil engineering,
structural engineering, and landscaping had a busy and rewarding year.
In all areas of British Columbia it is now mandatory to use the National Building Code of Canada. There are very few problems that occur in applying the code
to new construction, but there are many very difficult and costly problems in applying
the code to old and historic buildings.
In essence, the code states that, when the occupancy of a building is changed
or extensive structural alterations are carried out, all parts of the building shall
conform to the code. This criteria can usually be met in the fields of space, electrical
and mechanical engineering, but presents, in many instances, very difficult and costly
solutions in structural engineering. The problem concerns compliance with the
Earthquake Code provisions in the National Building Code.
For example, there could be two identical old buildings side by side—one
occupied by office workers and classed as an office building and the other presently
being used as a warehouse. If it were decided to change the warehouse into an
office building, without any significant structural alterations, all parts of the building
would have to comply to the code. Even though the occupancies are now similar,
one building would now be of a higher standard than the other. There is, of course,
a reason for this. The authorities wish to slowly upgrade our stock of buildings to
National Building Code standards. If all existing buildings had to be brought up
to code simultaneously, it would cause chaos and financial bankruptcy, as very few
old buildings would meet the requirements of the Earthquake Code.
The present situation places a heavy penalty on the restoration of older and
especially historic buildings. Many owners, when faced with the attendant heavy
costs, prefer to leave the buildings in their present condition or to demolish them.
Buildings left in their present condition tend to become less desirable and to
deteriorate into slum areas; this condition can affect large areas of cities.
Another aspect that is becoming increasingly important, particularly in urban
societies, is the problem of noise pollution.
A certain amount of alarmist literature has been produced, but some authorities
have related excessive exposure to noise with high blood pressure, heart disease, and
stomach ulcers, while another researcher has concluded that in 20 years at the
present rate of noise increase there will be widespread deafness in Los Angeles.
Of more immediate concern to the Department is control of noise within
buildings, and, in order to have the capability to deal with these problems, an
engineer from this Division is currently undertaking an M.Eng. programme in
acoustics at the University of Western Ontario.
Noise control in industrial areas such as vocational school workshops has been
a problem. In these cases, noise levels may be such that permanent hearing losses
are possible, unless measures are taken to meet Workers' Compensation Board
criteria.
In addition to industrial problems, sound control in office buildings requires
careful treatment, and the increased use of office landscaping presents its particular
problems if an atmosphere conducive to efficient working is to be created.
J. R. Simpson, P.Eng.
Senior Civil Engineer
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1973/74
G  19
REPORT OF THE  SENIOR  ELECTRICAL  ENGINEER
For the Electrical Engineering Branch the fiscal year 1973/74 was mainly
identified as a year of change. The creation of the Department of Transport and
Communications meant a division of the Branches' subsections. The communications wing was to be transferred to the new department. Yet, locally on the same
premises, the Communications staff were no longer an entity within the electrical
design ring. The Senior Electrical Engineer, J. B. Hall, P.Eng., although still leader
of the entire group, became already responsible and responsive to the Minister of
Transport and Communications, attending meetings, going with the Minister to
conferences, etc. The strain could be felt by the remaining staff. In spite of the
leadership handicap, the Branch fulfilled all its obligations and commitments.
In technical view some important changes became also imminent. The great
energy crunch south of the border left its mark in British Columbia, too. Due to
British Columbia's vast potential of renewable energy sources (hydro power), the
energy push was not felt as badly here as by our neighbours to the south. Yet,
advice was given and heeded to use the available energy wisely and economically.
Moderation in this approach, however, was to be exercised. It was and still is a
difficult task to combine aesthetic value achievement with energy conservation,
specifically in the field of illumination. Thus, in dealing with the architects, it was
always a "give and take" in the design of the illumination for the restoration of the
Legislative Building. The task was to restore and preserve the architectural character
of the Rattenbury-designed building's interior. The illumination had to satisfy the
requirements as manifested in the British Columbia Factories Act and on the other
hand should preserve the turn of the century character of the building. In many
cases a compromise solution had to be found. Those parts of the building which
have been completed show that engineers and architects have succeeded.
Among the many projects designed and completed, the renovation of the
Cardio-thoracic Unit at the Willow Chest Centre at Vancouver stood out as a shining
example for co-operation, experience, and knowledge poured into the design. It
should be pointed out that on open-heart surgery, more so than in any other kind
of physical entry into the human body, the danger of electric shock is extremely
great. Only a few micro-amperes of leakage current over the heart muscle will
cause heart fibrillation and death. It was, therefore, necessary to isolate each
appliance and instrument circuit for use in the operating-rooms and at the bedsides
of the Post-operative Recovery (PAR) and Intensive Care Units (ICU). One
isolating transformer was required for each power outlet. The transformers had to
have a guaranteed maximum leakage current of 5 micro-amperes. The lead from
the transformer had to be held short in order to keep the natural leakage current of
the circuit down. Each room was also equipped with a room reference ground to
which all noncurrent-carrying metal parts within the room are bonded.
Everything humanly possible has been done to eliminate micro or macro shock
to the patient. The conversion work on the three operating-theatres, PAR, and ICU
had to be done within a narrow time slot of three weeks and four days, during which
operations could be postponed. This was only possible through thorough planning
and excellent contract management. Although finishing touches had to be carried
out to corridors, convalescent rooms, and the operating-theatre, support facilities
were back in working order on time and the backlog of waiting heart patients could
be cleared up soon through the expanded facilities. All engineering disciplines,
trades, and contract supervisors deserve thanks for their excellent team work. Other
 G 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
work by the Branch was done for Highways establishments, weigh-scale stations,
high-tension distributions in larger institutions, also upgrading of fire-alarm systems,
was included.
Electrical power and sound and visual installations for the rapidly progressing
exhibit expansion within the Provincial Museum was designed and installed. At
year-end this work is still to be continued as the creation of new exhibits progresses.
Similar to the electrical additions to the existing distribution system in the
Museum, the staff of this Branch completed many electrical expansion or renovation
projects on behalf of the Operations Services Division. Of all problems to reach this
office, the more difficult ones are those where expansions must be built onto or into
existing systems. It may be, by far, more glamourous to design a new building and
its power and lighting facilities within, but the real ingenuity will reveal itself when
the designer has to add to an existing system or to modify such system. If the
designer achieves such alteration without or with a minimum of disturbance to the
operations within the existing area, nobody will know about the built-in obstacles
and frustrations that he had to overcome in order to succeed. The knowledge of a
difficult job well done is the designer's only award. His name will not appear on
any plaque or be printed on any inauguration programme. And yet his work is too
important to be forgotten. My thanks go specially to those engineers, designers,
and draughtsmen who, with faith in their ability and with diligence, carry out an
important job little known to the outsider.
Harry E. Beier
Acting Senior Electrical Engineer
Nanaimo Motor-vehicle Testing Station.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1973/74
G 21
DIMENSION,  DISCIPLINE, AND  DISCERNMENT
Do we know where we are going? Do we know what we want? Are we
heading for a state of chaos in our cities through congestion and chaos in the country
through subtopia? Will it be said of us by later generations they accused their forefathers of ruining the towns, yet did not they in their turn ruin the country?
Our real task in this generation is to determine just how much space we require
to make a civilized environment The hope of planning lies in stripping it of its
pretentiousness, recognizing its limitations, yet granting the essential role it must
play.
Mediaeval man was never in doubt, their towns had a charter, and what went
on under that charter was quite different from the unchartered feudal squalor outside
the town walls. Inside the town he found a visual environment—cathedrals, schools,
market places, houses in a unified street architecture.
Modern man, when he reaches the town transit terminal, steps into an uninviting world.
People may hold the key to the revival of cities in an automotive age.
The restoration of pedestrian rights may help to redesign the urban area for
people. It took until 1850 a.d. to reach the first billion. The second billion was
here within the next 100 years, and we are now warned that the third billion will be
upon us within the next year, namely 1975.
Many of our plans to date have not been so much an expression of goals and
aspirations for the future, as ways of extricating ourselves from the worst aspect of
the present. We become so ensnared with red tape in planning everything in a
precise manner that very little is accomplished. We try to plan in feet and inches,
soon to be metres and centimetres, when we should really be planning in acres and
miles.
We require a profession capable of great achievements. A new discipline can
arise in the guise of the city region where designscape, landscape, and townscape
can blend together by joining forces.
Today, too many of our buildings look isolated, autonomous, proudly detached,
there are little or no good manners in architecture.
We have an opportunity to think from the beginning. How are we to cure the
twin problems of overcrowding and depopulation? How can we arrange matters so
that the bulk of people obtain the sort of surroundings they require? How can we
preserve individuality in our properties? Is there too much individuality already?
Why do we still receive rave notices concerning the urban squares of Europe, the
planned villages of the United Kingdom, the rehabilitation of New Orleans? Is there
more credit in unity than individuality?
We have to decide on our dimension and disciplines, and in a language that
discerns 20th century thinking. A new architectural language, however, cannot be
created by one profession alone, because it must be regional in its outlook. It is a
cultural burden too great to be borne by one set of shoulders. There is no doubt
that our culture is in a state of flux, and someone must lead us out. Will it be the
townplanner, the landscape architect, the architect? The floundering will continue
unabated unless all professions pool their resources and make an effort to rise above
their own routines in order to furnish a more comprehensive dimension in their arts.
W. D. Lougher-Goodey, M.R.T.P.I., M.C.P.I.,
M.I.F.L.A., F.I.LA., M.A.S.P.O., A.I.Struct.E.
 G 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE SENIOR QUANTITY SURVEYOR
The most notable characteristic of the year 1973/74 was the unprecedented
inflation that was experienced in the construction industry. The major cause of the
increases in prices was the rise in costs of materials. For the first half of 1973,
lumber prices increased then stabilized, but by October almost every other material
price had increased significantly and continued to increase. Wages in this period
increased by only 6 or 7 per cent.
Contractors' selling prices were generally in conformity with changes in wages
and material prices up to September 1973, but after that they took into account the
uncertainty of material prices, the possibility of large wage demands and the increase
in volume of work. The result was a very large increase in the unit price of all types
of buildings.
Prices were also affected by the small number of tenders received on many
projects; in many cases there was not a single tender. Many factors contributed to
this, including an overloaded market.
Forecasting probable prices of buildings is rather like shooting at a moving
target whose direction is affected by the movement of material prices, wages, the
date of tender, and the tender climate at that date. The most difficult to project is
the tender climate, but it is one that can have a major effect on the price.
The tender climate is affected mostly by the volume of work in progress. As
this increases, prices move upward partly as a result of contractors increasing their
profit margins and partly due to tradesmen asking for a premium on their wage,
particularly in the more remote parts of the Province. Some material prices also
increase in these circumstances.
Whether the cycles experienced by the construction industry can be combatted
or their amplitudes reduced, is questionable. However, a reliable information
service is needed that would provide data reflecting the volume of construction in
progress and the projected volume for the following 12 months. Statistics Canada
have stated that they intend to provide such a service, but there is no indication of
when it will be available or how up-to-date it will be. The data would be of value
to all sections of the industry.
The indications for the year 1974/75 are that prices will continue to escalate
rapidly. Projections indicate that prices in early 1975 will be approximately 25
per cent above those of November 1973.
A system of collecting the maintenance and running costs of all buildings was
started, using the Essondale Zone for a pilot study. The system proposed will differ
from systems operated elsewhere in that the costing will be more refined and in
sufficient detail that studies can be conducted with the objective of obtaining information that can be used in the design process. At the feasibility stage of a design,
both the estimated capital cost and the projected life-cycle cost will be given. This
will result in a better comparison being made of building designs and also the
anticipated economic life of the building can be projected. Individual case studies
will be made of the maintenance costs of various building materials and systems.
These will aid the designer in selecting the most economical system for use in his
desism.
S. R. Toller, M.C.I.Q.S.
Senior Quantity Surveyor
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1973/74
G 23
REPORT OF THE SENIOR SPECIFICATION  WRITER
During 1973/74 a number of significant changes took place in the functions
performed by this office. These stemmed primarily from my appointment to the
B.C. Building Code Appeal Board and our participation in the field of C.G.S.B.
standards. This is reflected in a name change, we are now the Research, Standards,
and Specifications Section.
As Chairman of the Appeal Board I am faced with an ever-increasing work
load. Initially the setting up of procedures, communication channels, and advisory
sources was time-consuming. This was followed by a slack period, but now that
the public and industry are aware of the situation the work is growing daily in
quantity and diversity.
In addition to Appeal Board duties the Chairman is required to approve all
alternate systems, materials, plumbing brass goods, and backflow preventers under
the B.C. Plumbing Code. This function could well be extended in the future to
include the entire Building Code. The work is extremely interesting and carries a
high degree of responsibility, basically all decisions made become law in most of
British Columbia.
In another area of the Building Code we are commencing the preparation of a
manual dealing with Part 9. This section of the Building Code relates to housing
and buildings up to 6,000 square feet and is extremely critical for most of the
Province. The manual will provide clarification notes and diagrams. Legal interpretations will be made where necessary through the Appeal Board, serious inadequacies corrected by Provincial regulations.
To the best of my knowledge the preparation of such a manual will be the first
undertaking of its kind in Canada. As such it represents a tremendous challenge,
one that will have the enthusiastic support of both the National Research Council
and the Building Inspectors Association. We foresee the manual being used as a
reference document across the country as well as a textbook for education.
The field of standards has become another very busy area. All Canadian
Government Specification Board standards must now be evaluated on a national
basis prior to submission for adoption as National Standards. We are carrying out
the evaluation on behalf of British Columbia for most of those published. Eventually,
I anticipate that we will have processed over a thousand standards. This is not a
rubber-stamp procedure, the last five evaluated were rejected for various reasons
and were referred back to the respective committees for rewriting. Our work was
highly commended by the C.G.S.B. Secretary in Ottawa.
We are presently represented on eight committees covering 100 standards, but
are under pressure to broaden our representation in the future.
In addition to our C.G.S.B. involvement we have been approached by the
Canadian Standards Association to participate on their Canadian Building Officials
Advisory Council, which will play a very significant part in the development of
future standards, particularly on a performance basis for industrialized construction.
Our relationship with other departments has changed. Now, in addition to
answering requests for general advice we find ourselves drafting by-laws and statutory
changes, preparing detailed reports and advising on the establishment of day-care
and detoxication centres.
The increased functions have unfortunately placed a heavy drain on manpower
and, although we have been able to keep projects moving through overtime, work
 G 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
on our master specification is at a standstill.    Hopefully we will be able to recruit
sufficient staff to structure the office for the different levels of responsibility.
In the field of specification production it is critical to have staff working full
time on the production, updating, and expansion of a master specification, utilizing
computer storage, editing, and printout. With the rapid changes in the industry a
number of private design offices are finding it increasingly difficult to cope with their
specifications. Although the Federal Government is trying to establish a national
document, I think that it will find very limited acceptance. It seems clear from
discussion with the private firms that we will eventually be requested to make a
master specification available for general use.
J. C. Currie, A.R.I.C.S., M.C.I.Q.S.
Senior Specification Writer
Provincial Court of British Columbia, Lytton.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1973/74 G 25
REPORT OF THE  INTERIOR  DESIGN ARCHITECT
A dramatic increase in the volume of furnishing requirements has been the
most significant feature in the work of the Interior Design office during the period
covered by this Report. This, coupled with extremely short notice in many cases,
has caused some administrative problems and a difficult to handle surging work
load. The necessity in several instances for the temporary renting of furniture, while
awaiting permanent items, in effect, more than doubles the organizational input on
any one project. However, with the help of outside consultants, our extremely
capable staff and willing summer Interior Design students have kept delays to a
minimum and often achieved the seemingly impossible.
In addition to work placed by direct contract, approximately one thousand
requisitions were placed with the Purchasing Commission, representing some thirty
thousand items of furniture and equipment. The majority has been destined for new
Government office buildings throughout the Province and the new intermediate care
homes. The remainder was mostly for new rental premises to accommodate over-all
expansion of the Public Service, or the formation of new Boards and Commissions.
More intensive research into furniture manufacture and quality has resulted
in a generally higher standard of product purchased. The apparent similarity
between higher- and lower-priced items has been taken beyond the face value into
the often concealed construction and a more sophisticated appraisal made. These
studies have extended to field testing in the case of hospital furniture, and comprehensive criteria are now being established.
Greater depth of thought in the design of total interior spaces has also been
apparent this year and, for the first time, one of our Interior Designers has been
appointed to work with the Programming Branch on a permanent basis to assist in
basic environmental planning concepts. Included in the obvious advantages of an
integrated initial concept are the in-depth considerations of the office landscaping
policy, as foreseen by the Director of Design in his previous report. This is no longer
a matter of policy, but a calculated assessment of pros and cons.
Among the other total design concepts handled by this office during the year
are the complete interior alterations and renovations to the Revelstoke Courthouse.
The first two phases of this work have been completed, but the third is being redesigned to include additional requirements recently introduced. Foremost in the
concept of this building is that the interior will complement the classic design of
this historic structure.
In marked contrast to the courthouse style is the contemporary design of the
Fraser Valley Trout Hatchery. This was another total design concept, with the
architectural work and interior handled as one project in this office. The building
will contain a number of exhibits and aquaria to interest the public, and this interest
is apparent back in the design stage where it is conceived in the imagination of the
designer.
Another major activity in this office has been the preparation of colour schemes
for both the exterior and interior of Government Buildings.   Of particular interest
is the Academic and Activity Building at Woodlands School, where a cheerful and
uplifting atmosphere has been created as a result of colour selection.   There have
been many other successful schemes, though I recall one incident where one of our
summer students had selected a bright orange for the mechanical dung-scrapers of
a cow barn. A nice thought, but on reflection we considered this feature might be a
little lost in the environment.       _ „ ., „ T .     »,_..-,
Ralph Gillett, M.S.I.A., M.R.A.I.C.
Interior Design Architect
 G 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE  DIRECTOR OF  PERSONNEL SERVICES
The Division of Personnel Services exists as a staff arm of the Department of
Public Works to provide advisory, consultative, and administrative services to all
line managers within the Department. Our services are dispensed around several
core functions which, for the most part, are traditional to the Personnel role. These
functions include staffing, position establishment and evaluation, organization
analysis, employee relations, labour relations, training and staff development, and
accident prevention.
In co-operation with Divisional management and the Public Service Commission, we arrange to have all positions filled through a competitive process based
upon the merit principle as dictated by the recently revised Public Service Act.
Many of our vacancies are filled within the Department or the Public Service at
large. In those areas where qualified public servants cannot be found, we engage
new members from the public at large.
Within the area of position establishment and evaluation, we attempt to
promote the principles of efficiency and equity. Before new positions are added to
the organization we assess the validity of need through recommendations to Division
Directors and the Deputy Minister. Once the need has been established, we
determine the appropriate level or grade to ensure that other public servants
performing similar functions are compensated fairly for the responsibility of their
jobs. Organization analysis is an extension of the above process whereby we work
with all divisions to ensure the greatest possible efficiency by critically assessing how
our line functions are being performed.
Employee relations has always been a vital part of our role in attempting to
promote harmonious working relationships between our operational staff and line
management. When dialogue has failed, the grievance procedure comes into play
to ensure a rational and orderly means of resolving disputes. In this process the
Personnel Division attempts to maintain a dual vision of Departmental objectives
and basic principles of fairness and equity.
With the recent proclamation of the Public Service Labour Relations Act, we
are anticipating an increasing involvement in the rapidly developing labour relations
scene within the Public Service generally and the Department of Public Works in
particular. Our role will be to represent Departmental concerns to the Public
Service Commission in negotiations with the Public Service Unions and to assist line
management in the interpretation and administration of the various contracts which
will come from those negotiations.
Increasing attention has been paid to our role in staff training and employee
development. With the rapid pace of technological and other events, the development of our human resources is now mandatory. Through financial sponsorship of
individual employees and programmes promoted by the Department, we are
promoting the advancement of staff in every division and at all levels. In the forthcoming year this area will receive increasing attention by Personnel Services.
Given the nature of the Department of Public Works, it is of paramount
importance that accident prevention be foremost in everyone's mind. Through
various levels of safety committees we have developed a mechanism to review and
monitor our practices to ensure the best in safe working conditions. With the
forthcoming addition of the Department's first full-time Safety Officer we intend to
strengthen our commitment toward this formidable challenge.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1973/74
G 27
In summary, it should be noted with emphasis that we exist as a division solely
to provide service to line management. Our mission shall continue to be to improve
and develop those services in such a manner that our managers can pursue their
mandates in the most effective and efficient manner possible.
M. V. Collins, B.A.
Director of Personnel Services
Provincial Government Building and Law Courts, Smithers.
Provincial Government Building and Law Courts, Powell River.
 G 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE  DIRECTOR OF CONSTRUCTION
AND MAINTENANCE
An in-depth study of this Division's organization, with emphasis upon its role,
function, and methods, focused attention upon the necessity of
(a) increasing the technical resources available to implement the work
load;
(b) consolidating all technical services in one branch under a responsible
senior administrator;
(c) developing better liaison with the Design Division and other branches
of the Department;
(d) alleviating some of the heavy administrative load carried by the
Superintendents of Works.
Further, as the work load of the Division includes many activities not directly
associated with the operation and maintenance of Government owned and leased
property, it was decided to change the title of the Division and its senior personnel.
In addition to the role of a number of our personnel being changed early in 1973,
two new Regional Representatives were established and now perform to greater
depth those tasks formerly the responsibility of the Co-ordinator of Maintenance.
It was with regret that one of the recommendations adopted from the above report
will result in the Division no longer being responsible for Construction, as this
branch under the management of D. Grey was both progressive and productive in
addition to occupying a unique position in the Division.
Although many of the organizational changes and staff additions contained in
the above report were not implemented in the period under review, this Division
has been fortunate in obtaining the services of a controls technician for the servicing
and maintenance of mechanical equipment control systems. The recruitment of a
civil engineer to fill an existing vacancy will provide expertise and direction required
by field staff in relation to sewerage, water, drainage, and other civil engineering
fields.
An increasing demand for the installation of fire and intrusion alarms in both
Government-owned and leased properties will in future be planned and installed by
our personnel, with monitoring, where possible, by security staff and local police.
The leasing of premises not always specifically designed for Government use often
requires the installation of sophisticated alarm systems and we are fortunate to
have in the Division an employee trained by the industry who has the ability to
plan and install these systems.
The decentralization of human welfare services (health, welfare, corrections,
education) and other agencies, is resulting in the formation of societies throughout
the Province who occupy both existing and new Government properties. As these
societies are not always obligated to obtain their building maintenance services from
this Department, we are actively engaged in adjusting our organization to cope with
providing a service on demand and compatible with that which could be obtained by
either the employment of their own staff or outside service. Preliminary assessment
of the problem would seem to indicate the above client relationship calls for a
revision to staff recruitment practices in order to expedite our reaction for demand
service, in addition to faster reactions on requisitions for plant and material, if we
are to meet competition and keep our existing staff in employment.
The acquisition by the Province of the Glenshiel Hotel, Victoria, early in 1973
also necessitated the formation of a Management Committee composed of this
Department's personnel.   As the property was not immediately required for Govern-
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1973/74
G 29
ment use, in accordance with terms of reference, it has throughout the current fiscal
period been operated as a hotel with a minimum disruption of services to both the
guests and public. It is of interest to note the building is currently providing a home
for approximately 74 senior citizens, in addition, the public dining-room has throughout the summer provided a food service both to tourists and the general public.
With the ever-increasing scarcity of living accommodations close to town for those
on limited income, this facility is helping to satisfy an urgent need.
In addition to the above facility the committee which I was privileged to chair
continued to supervise, with the help of our Superintendent of Works for Vancouver,
the Lions Gate Motel, North Vancouver, which throughout the year provided
reasonable cost family accommodation to the transient public. Much of the credit
for the success of this operation can be attributed to the competence of our managers.
Operation of the Glendale Laundry during the period under review provided
service to two extra clients, namely, the Veterans' Hospital (July 1973) and the
Saanich Peninsula Hospital (January 1974). The total load processed from all
sources amounted to 2,468,469 pounds and was an increase of approximately 116
per cent over the previous fiscal period. Adjustments to the organizational structure
were required to provide better control and have led to improved work flow and
communication. We were fortunate in obtaining the services of J. W. Pennington,
who was appointed the Laundry Administrator on December 27, 1973, and his
appointment brought to the position extensive experience in the laundry industry
and hospital administration. Mr. Pennington joined the Public Service after serving
in a similar position in Victoria for a number of years. Planning for the major
expansion of existing facilities by providing both extra space and machinery continued, and will eventually add an extra 5,000 square feet of space. The expansion
planned will enable the new account from the Royal Jubilee Hospital to be assumed
and the anticipated additional laundry to be processed will be approximately three
million pounds per year. It is with pleasure I am able to report breakdown of equipment was kept to a minimum by the effective maintenance programme by Glendale
boiler house stationary engineers. It is also of interest to report 18,000 pounds of
laundry will eventually be processed daily at Glendale on a seven-day basis and will
entail a staff component of 80 persons.
My attendance at meetings with the consultants for Blocks 51, 61, and 71 Projects in Vancouver continued throughout the period under review. Discussions have
now progressed to detailed review of the capabilities of mechanical and electrical
control and security control centres, and as it is anticipated maintenance of these
premises will require support from our Work Zone headquarters in Burnaby, our
Regional Representative for the area will be participating in future consultations
with the architects and planners.
Considerable attention has been given to energy conservation and economy
of operation. Although the best way to have energy-efficient buildings is to design
and construct them that way from the inception, not all energy conservation measures can be accomplished in the design of a building. The proper combustion of
fuel can effect up to 8 per cent savings. Use of capacitators to raise and maintain
good power factor of the building electrical systems, and the less sophisticated
reduction of the use of lighting for night-time cleaning, are actively being promoted.
It may be of interest to note it requires four times as much energy to heat water
from 140° to 160° as it does to heat it from 100° to 140°. As fluorescent lamps
lose up to 20 per cent of their efficiency after they have been in use 9,000 hours
or more, greater attention has to be paid to their replacement. In conclusion, I
believe there are many other practical ways by which the drain on our energy supply
can be reduced, and we shall continue to promote this objective.
 G 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
At this time I would like to convey to all members of the Division my appreciation of the help and co-operation they have given me in discharging my duties and
obligations in the period under review. We have in addition received help and
advice from the Design Division, and indeed all Government departments, for which
I would like on behalf of the Division to extend our thanks. Although we have not
always been able to satisfy the demands of all clientele, we will continue to try
and upgrade the service we are providing.
Stanley Lloyd, M.R.A.I.C, A.R.I.B.A., Dip.Pub.Admin.
Director of Construction and Maintenance
Department of Public Works Service Centre, Kamloops (under construction).
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1973/74 G 31
REPORT OF THE CO-ORDINATOR OF CONSTRUCTION
The most noticeable features of the year were the expansion of the "Construction Management" system, both in very large ($2 million to $8 million) and
moderate-sized ($500 thousand to $1V_ million) projects, and a very large amount
of "tenant improvement" type of work in rental premises.
There are problems inherent in the "Construction Management" type of construction system, since the conventional general contractor is not present, with his
staff on payroll to carry out the necessary cutting, patching, clean-up, and other
work, for instance, which does not fall within the scope of the normal trade contractor, nor is a precise end-figure arrived at until the project is complete. Instead,
there is a target figure, within which the Construction Manager keeps by a series
of "trade-offs" and design amendments throughout the life of the project. He also
organizes those functions which are normally handled by a general contractor, such
as temporary heat and lighting, first aid, site safety programme, ensuring observance
of Workers' Compensation Board requirements, scheduling, drawings control,
changes to the contract, etc.
There is no doubt of the advantage of the system in a time of spiralling costs,
since by its nature, Construction Management permits a project to start with, say,
an excavation contract when plans are at a comparatively rudimentary stage and
the remainder of the work is progressively tendered and carried out at its earliest
point in time. With conventional contracting, no work would start until all the
drawings were complete, and there would be perhaps a year's lapse, in which costs
might rise by as much as 15 per cent.
We achieved marked success in moderate-sized alteration and renovation
projects with the use of Construction Branch staff as managers. It became clear
that the process was faster, cheaper, and more flexible in the conduct of the projects
when subtrades contracted directly to Government.
It was also obvious that as more companies entered the management field, there
was a notable spread in the level of performance. For several companies, it was
their first expedition into this area, and the Construction Branch found it necessary
to educate the staff involved, both in performance and in their approach to the
conduct of the projects.
The sudden rise in numbers in the Public Service resulted in a great increase
in rented space to accommodate them. Most of this space required conversion to
Government use, and since only a limited number of construction firms will do
alteration work, the result was to strain the resources of that segment of the industry
to the limit, with consequent delays. The move of a large number of Government
employees out of the Parliament Buildings at the same time added to the problem.
The reluctance of some landlords to react quickly to the "teething troubles" which
occur on most new premises did nothing to lighten the burden.
Our relations with the design staff were harmonious, and I wish to thank them
for their forbearance and co-operation in management projects when as many as 30
tender packages had to be put together instead of the single one to which they were
normally geared.
I also wish to pay tribute to the hard-working staff of the Construction Branch,
to the inspectors, specialist inspectors, and particularly to the headquarters staff, on
whom the extensive amount of "in house" management imposed a great deal of
additional work, on top of a work load which was already severe.
D. Grey, M.C.I.Q.S., Dip.Pub.Admin.
Co-ordinator of Construction
 G 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
3
m
"Hi
3
S
3
m
a
c
o
o
> c
g.2
2 o
§ g
° 5
CJ o
"S S3
•a-a
c 5
M  3
  G 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CO-ORDINATOR OF MAINTENANCE
The responsibility for maintenance of Provincial Government buildings and
grounds was assigned to the Maintenance Branch of the Construction and Maintenance Division, S. Lloyd, Director.
For administrative purposes, the Province is divided into zones, numbered 1
to 6, with headquarters at Victoria, Burnaby, Essondale, Kamloops, Nelson, and
Prince George respectively. Each zone is headed by a Superintendent of Works,
who has a staff of tradesmen, building service workers, etc., under him. Branch
headquarters is in Victoria and includes the offices of the Co-ordinator of Maintenance.
The distribution of Maintenance personnel by trades among the six zones was
as follows:
Distribution of Maintenance Personnel by Trades
Zone 1,
Victoria
Zone 2,
Burnaby
Zone 3.
Essondale
Zone 4.
Kamloops
Zone 5,
Nelson
Zone 6,
Prince
George
Total
167
18
7
15
11
20
13
16
3
7
7
41
19
39
40
144
15
I
7
12
22
9
18
10
2
69
25
10
21
14
6
15
15
16
22
9
20
7
13
3
62
46
9
1
5
9
9
20
5
11
5
38
5
37
8
1
1
6
6
5
6
2
64
7
1
1
3
22
5
_....
2
1           35
4
	
	
479
Carpenters.	
Drivers and mechanics	
71
17
44
Fire fighters	
Gardeners—. _ _.__.
24
51
112
Office staff 	
47
78
Plasterers and masons.__ _ _
Plumbers  	
Roofer and sheet metal—	
Stationary engineers 	
10
37
12
251
48
56
40
Totals             	
423
344
223
163
72
152
1,377
Maintenance Expenditures by Zones, 1973/74
Zone 1.
Victoria
Zone 2,
Burnaby
Zone 3,
Essondale
Zone 4.
Kamloops
Zone 5,
Nelson
Zone 6.
Prince
George
Salaries and wages  ...
Heat,   light,   power,   and
water 	
Maintenance of buildings...
Maintenance of mechani-
$
3,907,471.30
794,449.90
598,946.24
li.059.58
$                        $
2.881,224.23  | 2,592.057.89
1
720.249.37 |      730.060.13
627,698.58        595,216.51
10.182.33  1         9.827.21
S
1,735.694.86
502,383.26
304,743,89
2,838.00
$
554,944.54
115,385.67
139,145.38
2,479.29
$
1,321,483.14
334.197.99
337,745.22
9,228.79
Totals 	
5,311,927.02 j 4,241.354.51  |  3,927,161.74
1                          1
2.545.660.01
811,954.88
2,002,655.14
Grand total, $18,840,713.30.
Tenders were invited for 155 projects during the year, and the value of contracts awarded totalled $544,100.
H. J. Greig, B.A.Sc, P.Eng., Dip.Pub.Admin.
Co-ordinator of Maintenance
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1973/74
G 35
REPORT OF THE MECHANICAL OPERATIONS
AND MAINTENANCE ENGINEER
This Branch of the Construction and Maintenance Division has supervisory
responsibility for the operations and maintenance of boiler plants, and all machinery
and systems providing mechanical services to Provincial Government installations
and office buildings.
The Branch was actively engaged during the year in providing technical direction and assistance to field operations and maintenance staffs. Frequent field trips
were made throughout the Province to assess the functional effectiveness of equipment and systems, and to investigate and exercise corrective measures on operational
problems. Designs, drawings, and specifications were prepared and contracts
awarded for 30 projects for the upgrading, renovation, or alteration to mechanical
services. In addition, mechanical drawings and specifications were prepared for
incorporation into general contracts on a number of building alteration projects
initiated by the Co-ordinator of Maintenance.
Difficulty has been encountered in obtaining qualified replacements for two
staff members who resigned during the year, and this is placing some burden on the
Branch in meeting work commitments.
Active liaison was maintained with the Superintendents of Works and Chief
Stationary Engineers; their continuous co-operation and assistance is greatly
appreciated.
F. D. Sturdy, P.Eng.
Mechanical Operations and Maintenance Engineer
Department of Highways Maintenance Establishment, McLeese Lake.
 G 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE  DIRECTOR, SAFETY ENGINEERING
SERVICES  DIVISION
On September 10, 1973, Order in Council 299 was made which brought into
being the Commission of Inquiry Into Electrical Inspection in British Columbia.
The members were Dr. Hugh L. Keenleyside (Chairman), Kenneth Bentley, John N.
MacMillan, and Mrs. Shannon O'Neill.
The Commission was charged to make recommendations upon
(a)  suggested revisions to the existing methods of operation of the Electrical Inspection Branch;
(_>)  suggested revisions to the present system of delegation of authority;
(c) suggested revisions to the existing legislation;
(d) suggested revisions to the existing staffing of the Electrical Inspection
Branch;
(e) suggested alternative systems of inspection or control which may appear to be desirable;
(/)  the constitution and function of Advisory or Appeal Committees
which may be deemed necessary;
(g)  the projected costs of revisions to the existing systems.
Meetings were held in Victoria, Vancouver, Vernon, Nelson, Prince George,
Fort St. John, and Nanaimo.
The Commission received 46 written and oral submissions from all aspects of
the electrical trade and industry. After due consideration the Chairman presented
the complete report to the Honourable W. L. Hartley, Minister of Public Works,
on January 14, 1974.
The report was immediately taken under study by myself, and the timing and
methods of implementing the Commission's recommendations are being worked out.
During the year, we have increased our staff by 24. Three boiler inspectors,
three gas inspectors, twelve electrical inspectors, and six clerks. Technical people
are still very scarce and difficult to obtain, therefore, at the time of writing, three
of the above technical personnel still have not been hired.
The fees received for permits, special inspections, and other services provided
by the Division increased over 42 per cent in the fiscal year 1973/74 and it is expected that the revenue will increase about 25 per cent in the fiscal year 1974/75.
A. G. Kaneen, P.Eng.
Director, Safety Engineering Services Division
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1973/74
G 37
REPORT OF THE CHIEF  BOILER  INSPECTOR
The growth of industrial plants and apartment complexes throughout our
Province continues. Even so, we show an improvement in completion of tasks for
the period as benefits are derived from newly trained staff and further decentralization of our operations.
Plans have been put forward to reorganize our activities to produce a more
co-ordinated consistent product with better more responsive and quicker service
to the public in mind to minimize delays of approvals and examination services to
enable speedy issuance of certificates, both plant and personal.
Training and upgrading of our staff have started with participation in technical
courses as they became available, all of which enable us to perform the quality
assurance controls inherent in codes and standards, as we need to be able to demonstrate our capabilities to the various code-setting bodies.
Nationally and internationally at meetings we are pursuing standardization of
codes and any associated qualifying certificates for persons engaged in design,
fabrication, installation, inspection, and operation of pressure plant components.
We conducted 13 investigations into major plant accidents and incidents involving considerable property damage, but fortunately no fatalities. Full accounts of
incident reports are on file. Recommendations and instructions directed to prevent
such accidents were made as deemed necessary.
Most of our investigations showed low-water conditions has subjected boilers
to overheating, further, many tube sheets had become cracked as well as tubes. In
some cases the troubles were caused by operating errors, in other control failures.
All units were satisfactorily repaired and returned to service.
B. W. Cole, P.Eng.
Chief Inspector
 G 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
SUMMARY OF WORK
16% INCREASE IN NEW DESIGNS CHECKED
i% INCREASE IN GAS-FITTER LICENCES ISSUED
7% INCREASE IN APPLIANCE
CERTIFICATIONS (FIELD APPROVALS)
1,600
1,500
70/71 71/72 72/73
YEAR
73/74
32,000
34,000
30,000
16% INCREASE IN ISSUANCE OF GAS PERMITS FOR
ALL MUNICIPALITIES
71/72 72/73
YEAR
73/74
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1973/74
G 39
Pressure vessel at Victoria Machinery Depot inspected by Safety Engineering Services.
Ellet copper and brass heat exchangre, and pressure vessel manufacturing shop.
 G 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CHIEF  INSPECTOR
OF  ELECTRICAL ENERGY
The fiscal year 1973/74 proved to be the fourth consecutive year in which
activity of the Branch increased substantially.
Certificates of competency issued, totalling 2,766, were as follows:
A—268 B—403 C—444
PA—298 PB—445 PC—661
RA—16 RB—18 RC—213
This represented an 18 per cent increase over the previous year.
The number of examinations conducted during the year was 611. The number
of permits issued increased by 14.2 per cent to 74,121; the miles driven during
inspection of installations covered by these permits was 710,226. Inspections
physically performed totalled 77,906; an additional 22,735 installations were
accepted on the basis of contractors' declarations.
The number of pieces of equipment approved totalled 4,464. An additional
500 applications were reviewed by the Branch and rejected as unacceptable. In
addition, 250 inquiries, resulting in 96 Special Acceptance applications were directed
to the local office of the Canadian Standards Association.
Two District Inspectors, one of whom took early retirement for health reasons,
left the Service during the year. Ten additional inspectors were hired. Even with
these additional personnel the Branch is not able to cope with the rapidly increasing
work load.
In November the Minister appointed a Commission of Inquiry Into Electrical
Inspection in British Columbia. The Commission held several public hearings and
received briefs from any interested parties. Its report was submitted to the Minister
in January and was made public the following month. The report is now being
studied to ascertain that which can be immediately implemented and that which
required further legislation.
Seventy-eight electrical incidents were investigated by the Branch. These
included 52 reported fires, 10 injuries, seven fatalities, nine instances of machinery
contacting energized lines, and one instance in which an automobile damaged a
high-voltage transmission tower. One of the fatalities resulted from asphyxiation
through inhalation of combustion products produced by a fire of electrical origin.
Fifteen of the fires could not be established as being of electrical origin.
G. A. Harrower, P.Eng.
Chief Electrical Inspector
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1973/74
G 41
Pavilion Lake Lime Plant.
 G 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CHIEF GAS  INSPECTOR
THE REGULATIONS
There was no change to the regulations during the past year, although we had
planned to adopt the C.S.A. Gas Installation Code for use in this Province. We
do, however, anticipate that this change will come about later this year.
THE BRANCH
The general increase in the number of new gas installations has remained high
throughout the whole Province for the past three years, despite much discussion on
gas shortages.
The number of gas permits issued by this Branch continues to increase at a
rate of 16 to 18 per cent per year, adding appreciably to the work load of the present
inspection staff.
The checking of new designs has increased by 16 per cent during the past year
to a total of over 2,800. Field certifications have increased by 7 per cent to a total
of over 1,700.
Natural gas service has been extended into Keremeos and will be extended into
Hedley this year.
Gas service will also be extending into the East Kootenay area soon from
Creston to Nelson.
ACCIDENTS
The Gas Inspection Branch investigated 15 fires, most of which were of a minor
nature.
There were four explosions, two of which resulted in extensive fire damage.
Four persons were injured in these explosions.   There were no fatalities.
W. R. Montgomery, P.Eng.
Chief Gas Inspector
SUMMARY OF WORK
16 per cent increase in
new designs checked.
8 per cent increase in
Gas-fitter Licences issued.
7 per cent increase in
appliance certification
(field approvals).
16 per cent increase in
issuance of gas permits
for all municipalities.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1973/74
G 43
MAJOR ACTIVITY CHARTS
BOILER INSPECTION BRANCH
INSPECTIONS, SURVEYS, EXAMINATIONS
Boiler Inspections (1,000's)
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX    Incomplete
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIII   1972/73
2 4 6
Pressure Vessels (1,000's)
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXV"    Incomplete
 11111 111 f 1972/73
1973/74
2 4 6
_■_■ 1973/74
8 10
10
Shop Inspections (100's)
llltltll I1EIIIIIII llllBIllllli:illlltllllllllllll 1972/73
12
1973/74
15
Welder's Tests (1,000's)
llllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll   1972/73
HHI^H_^_H-H-H-H-BHH-_Bi-HB--H--H-l-H 1973/74
12 3 4
Engineer's Examinations (100's)
;_11111111111111111111_111111111111111111111111J111111111jI■If    1972/73
-■■--■-l-H-H--H-l---H-H-H-H-H-H_H-HB_B  1973/74
2 4 6 8
Refrigeration Surveys (10's)
\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\>    Incomplete
i 111111111111111111111! 111 ! 1111 111111 111111111 i i f I    1972/73
1973/74
10
Defects Reports (100's)
lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll     1972/73
■■■-■-■-i-H-i--H-H-B---H-i_H_-_n_H_H_lH--B-n_IHn
2345
Design Surveys (100's)
11111 11 i I! 111S1111! 1 11111 _! 1111 i _! I! 11 i I _ 1111 ■ IE _ 11! 1 1111111 i   1972/73
10
1973/74
 G 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Boiler room, Department of Highways Garage, Grand Forks.
Boiler room, B.C. Vocational School, Nelson.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1973/74
G 45
REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF  EXPENDITURE
The following pages present in detail the expenditures relating to the construction, alterations, and repairs on the various Government buildings and institutions,
etc., coming under the management, charge, and direction of the Minister of Public
Works. The total gross expenditure of $69,836,844.37 is a record high expenditure
for this Department, and while the increase over the previous fiscal period is reflected
in the various votes, the increase in the capital construction programme is the most
significant.
A. E. Rhodes
Comptroller of Expenditure
STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES, FISCAL YEAR 1973/74
Administration and Maintenance Votes
(For details, see Public Accounts)
$
Vote 216—Minister's Office _..       65,865.39
Vote 217—Administration                516,960.48
Vote 218—Government Buildings    (gross)  21,676,593.60
Vote 220—Rentals      (gross)    7,249,585.11
Vote 221—Safety Inspection Division         1,942,078.97
Less credits—
Items recovered from the Department of Education re Technical and
Vocational Schools (Government Buildings Vote)      3,104,267.10
Items recovered re Vocational Training, Textbook Branch, Mediation
Commission, etc. (Rental Vote)           497,623.62
27,849,192.83
Vote 219—Construction of Provincial buildings  {see expenditure by building)
    (gross)  37,330,844.51
Vote 22155—British  Columbia Building  (Vancouver)   Special Fund, Revenue
Surplus Appropriation Act, 1969 _.      1,054,916.31
Less credits—Items recovered from Department of Education re Technical
and Vocational Schools „         2,926,769.86
35,458,990.96
SUMMARY
Gross expenditure, Department of Public Works—
Administration and maintenance     31,451,083.55
Capital       38,385,760.82
Gross expenditure      69,836,844.37
Less credits—
Maintenance      3,601,890.72
Capital          2,926,769.86
Net expenditure      .... 63,308,183.79
 G 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOTE 219—CONSTRUCTION  OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS
Project
1-0
1-2-B
631-B
46I-B-1
5-0-B1
759-B
26-5-B
26-6-BI
30-1-B1
122-5-B1
30-B-5
30-B-8
11-0
11-5-B1
39-B-62
39-B-75
39-B-76
11-33-B1
539-B
656-B
20-0-B1
20-50-B1
748-B
20-28-B1
20-29-B2
30-0-B1
702-B
41-3-B1
36-0
43-0
705-B
42-0
707-B
51-0
52-1-B1
5-B-121
5-B-143
5-B-146
5-B-147
5-B-148
12-10-B1
5-B-152
12-54-B1
12-63-B1
6-B-38
6-B-39
14-0-B1
14-71-B1
54-1-BI
58-5-B1
Description
Abbotsford—
Purchase of property   	
Government buildings (renovations)    	
Fraser Valley Trout Hatchery 	
Alberni—Government buildings (renovations)  _  	
Allison Pass—Highways establishment 	
Barriere—Highways maintenance establishment   	
Bella Coola—
Accommodation for highways foreman 	
Highways residence   	
Blue River—Highways equipment building  	
Bob Quinn Lake—Highways maintenance establishment	
Brannan Lake School (now Island Youth Centre)—
Maintenance building       	
Dormitories  (reroofing)        	
Burnaby—
Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre—
Power supply system 	
Sprinkler  system      	
Roads     	
Licence-plate shop   	
East Wing unit (plumbing) 	
Boiler room   ...    	
B.C. Youth Development Centre  	
Motor-vehicle inspection station    	
West   Complex,   Willingdon   Avenue   (electrical   distribution
system   	
Dairy Laboratory, Willingdon Avenue    	
Personal care home    	
Mental Health In-patient Unit 	
Girls' Industrial School Complex, Willingdon Avenue 	
Charlie Lake—Department of Mines establishment (site works) ....
Clinton—Government Agent's residence 	
Courtenay—Highways office building   	
Chilliwack—Purchase of property      	
Creston—
Purchase of property   	
Wildlife Management Area Administration Centre 	
Cranbrook—Purchase of property   	
Dawson Creek—Provincial Government Building 	
Duncan—Purchase of property   	
Enderby—Purchase of Highways yard-site  	
Essondale—
Structural alterations, Zone 3      	
Riverview—
Essondale (fire protection and escapes)  	
Boiler plant  (conversion)      	
Cable TV. connections     	
Centre Lawn  Building   	
East Lawn Building (renovations)    	
Crease Clinic (renovations to washrooms) 	
Patients' residences        	
Laundry (preliminary design costs)    	
Colony Farm—
Dormitories   	
Riverside Building (alterations and extensions) 	
Drainage and dyke improvements 	
Cow barn   	
Fernie—Government Office Building and Courthouse	
Fort Nelson—Staff residence    	
Expenditures
$
75,220.00
14,118.45
239,124.87
17,161.87
2,903.26
76,940.71
94.62
33.05
199,947.63
641,850.87
123,423,68
2,218.71
4,752.90
311.07
21,221.61
964.63
172.47
831.75
38,883.65
34,158.58
76,559.80
31,067.56
778,898.68
7,901.15
708.57
4,485.19
35,093.32
62,388.72
185,001.90
26,255.59
19,174.33
74,626.23
948,478.93
37.500.00
127.48
100,000.00
104,031.09
34,301.34
11,995.00
880.00
29,853.59
48.02
310.869.11
3,198.84
21,007.27
474,961.03
155,203.33
123,951.48
14,001.39
14.85
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1973/74
G 47
VOTE 219—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project                                                                Description Expenditures
$
708-B           Fort St. John—Provincial Government Building   304,071.17
130-12         Fort St. James—Purchase of property     59,890.56
59-2-B1        Ganges—Provincial Government Building, Courtroom   32,016.97
General—
289-B                   General expenses        677,858.36
289-B-l                Wages and expenses, Casual Design staff   1,298,531.36
289-B-2                Furnishings, partitions, etc.      65,961.53
384-B                   Grounds improvement, various Government buildings   63,246.96
Golden—
61-9-B1                Highways residence        31,262.18
61-21                    Visitor Reception Centre     14,818.91
729-B                   Highways maintenance establishment   22,267.64
62-5-B1        Grand Forks—Highways maintenance establishment     538,316.83
67-32-B1      Haig—Weigh-scale station   48,082.60
Haney—
10-0-B1                Alouette River Unit (site works)   17,407.28
123-B-22              Correctional Institution (roof replacement)   9,918.28
42-15-B1      Jaffray—Extension to Highway site (purchase of property)   10,530.00
Kamloops—
10-B-56                Structural alterations, Zone 4  52,431.38
17-0                      Purchase of property  167.94
17-0-B1                Site-development roads and services, Columbia Street   475,989.84
17-0-B2                Site-development, Notre Dame Road  321,052.05
17-14-B1              Land Registry Office     18.36
17-28-B1              Personal care home     1,821,911.98
17-68-B1              Bunkers (former National Defence site)   38.22
17-507-B1            Aircraft hangar       9,968.20
Regional Correctional Centre—
733-B-2                        Recreational  building      69,135.45
743-B                           Public Works maintenance building   61,533.71
760-B           Kimberley—Provincial Government buildings, Phase 1     4,628.07
Lillooet—
79-2-B1                Highways   maintenance   establishment   (replacement  of  heating system)          33.565.27
79-0                     Purchase of properly     5,714.02
17-122-B1    Logan Lake—Highways equipment building   151,381.43
735-B           Lytton—Court  facilities     46,599.00
110-71-B1    McLeese Lake—Highways equipment building    208,002.10
122-4           Meziadin Lake—Highways maintenance building     65,444.88
Nanaimo—
29-5-B1                Island Youth Centre, duplex residence     3,883.88
89-0                      Purchase of property       230,000.00
202-B-2                Courthouse   (renovations)       51,868.53
711-B                   Motor-vehicle inspection station  362,031.30
727-B                   Public Works building, Phase 2 (alterations)    3,810.22
Nelson—
90-2-B1                Forestry Building       169,531.16
641-B                   Structural alterations, Zone 5       39,112.79
698-B                   Provincial Government Building      910,270.81
New Denver—
91-10-B1              Pavilion Building        2,341.33
91-20-B1              Engineer's residence (repairs)       7,000.00
519-B                   Dormitory (alterations)       18.157.09
728-B                   Highways maintenance establishment    .'  600.291.35
New Haven—
719-B                   Institute, Langley      j  13,232.01
92-15-B1              Workshop building, Burnaby     9,715.73
 G 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOTE 219—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project Description Expenditures
New Westminster—
Woodlands School—
7-B-49                          Industrial Therapy Unit     25,621.10
7-B-51                           Fire-alarm system     19,102.42
7-B-56                          Wing 2, Centre Building (renovations)   43,643.18
7-B-57                           100-bed units  (ventilation)     10,920.84
7-B-58                          Academic and Activity Buildings    303,373.40
7-B-59                          Playground       754.85
7-B-61                          Fraserview Building (ventilation)     366.14
93-0                      Purchase of property    700,000.00
746-B                   Courthouse (renovations)   6,436.62
16-32-B1      North Vancouver—Highways District Office (renovations)   38,996.72
647-B           100 Mile House—Highways maintenance establishment (Credit) 442.00
Penticton—
102-6-B1            Highways establishment     6,757.45
102-10-B1            Fish and Wildlife premises     166.98
761-B                   Provincial Government Building     205,380.99
Port Hardy—
115-9-B1              Purchase of trailer (Probation Officer)   11,760.00
115-10-B1            Purchase of trailer (Government Agent)   12,402.00
715-B           Powell River—Provincial Government Building   445,327.50
103-21-B1    Pouce Coupe—Weigh-scale station       2,786.65
Prince George—
106-14-BI            Weigh-scale station    6,883.50
106-51-B1            Public Works maintenance building   53,443.17
201-B-2                Courthouse (roads and paving)    1,986.60
479-B                   Structural alterations, Zone 6     58,806.95
646-B                   Library Development Commission   1,994.84
Regional Correctional Centre—
106-6-B1                      Sewage-treatment plant     81,153.95
720-B                           Services connection     1,434.55
720-B-l                         Heating system       5,499.75
Prince Rupert—
107-3-B1              Forestry Building   7,320.53
742-B                   Courthouse (new Court facilities and roof repairs)   29,012.23
724-B                   Courthouse (heating system)       3,153.50
452-B1         Revelstoke—Courthouse (renovations)     110,509.74
611-B           Richmond—Motor-vehicle  inspection  station      4,335.43
10-0-B2        Ruskin—Women's  Detention  Camp   (sewage-disposal  system  and
site work)       42,392.03
24-B-10        Skeenaview Hospital—Alterations and renovations   52,850.92
Smithers—
118-2                    Highways establishment (heating system)     24,676.64
688-B                   Provincial Government Building     659,057.74
693-B                   Fish and Wildlife storage buildings     642.00
122-4-B1      Stewart—Highways maintenance establishment     72,886.99
142-1-BI      Summerland—Fish Hatchery (effluent outfall)   74,552.13
38-0             Surrey—Purchase of property       120,000.00
47-3-B1        Tatogga Lake—Highways equipment building   155,796.32
730-B           Tete Jaune Cache—Highways maintenance establishment   2,208.68
104-11-B1    Texada Island—Ferry crew accommodation (trailer unit)   12,876.83
717-B           Trail—Provincial Government Building     8,424.55
Tranquille—
10-B-12                Water supply and sewage disposal     84,316.66
10-B-51                 104-bed unit       --. 4,418.82
10-B-57                Fire-alarm  systems       5,089.51
10-B-61                 100-bed unit        1,617,386.57
15-20-B1              East Pavilion (alterations)     52.32
15-46-B1              Bunkhouse (renovations)   20,914.15
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1973/74
G 49
VOTE 219—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project Description Expenditures
4-4
712-B
16-0
16-39-B1
16-39-B2
16-3-B1
16-3-B2
16-110-B1
79-B-15
79-B-16
79-B-17
79-B-18
16-31-B1
89-B-3
408-B
546-B-2
610-B
634-B
721-B
747-B
18-5-B1
18-1-B1
617-B-l
9-B-19
19-0
19-4-BI
19-34-B1
19-35-B1
19-49-B1
19-98-B1
19-83-B1
10-104-B1
19-129-B1
19-499-B
10-503-B1
39-10-B1
78-3-B1
211-B-l
292-B
385-B
464-B
486-B
518-B
536-B
554-B
601-B-2
629-B
690-B
722-B
731-B
732-B
738-B
146-1-B1
-Highways maintenance establishment
Court facilities    	
Trout Lake
Valemount-
Vancouver—
Purchase of property 	
Pearson T.B. Hospital—
Fire-alarm system  	
Boiler plant 	
Jericho Hill School—
Fire-alarm system 	
Boiler plant 	
Site  works  	
Principal's residence 	
Kitchen, dining, Infirmary Building
Renovations of existing building .	
Centennial Gymnasium
Motor-vehicle inspection station (renovations) 	
Provincial Health Building (renovations) 	
Structural alterations, Zone 2     _.
Willow Chest Centre (renovations) 	
Courthouse, Courtroom facilities	
British Columbia Building 	
Personal care home 	
Marpole Probation Office and Training Centre  	
Vernon—
Dellview Hospital (modifications and laundry facilities) 	
Provincial Government Buildings and Courthouse	
Provincial buildings (landscaping) 	
Victoria—
Vancouver Island Regional Correctional Centre, Phase IV	
Purchase of property	
Finance Building (alterations) 	
No. 4 Temporary Building, 544 Michigan Street (renovations)
Motor-vehicle Building, Data Processing Centre 	
Government House (renovations)  	
Central Microfilm Bureau (renovations and extensions) 	
Law Courts Building (extension) 	
Motor-vehicle inspection station	
Data Processing Centre (renovations)	
Mobile home for Safety Inspection Services (various zones) ..
Office building (Pandora and Blanshard Streets) 	
Glendale Laundry
Langford Highways establishment (paint spray room) 	
Materials Testing Laboratory    	
Structural alterations, Zone 1   	
Parliament Buildings (parking facilities) 	
Eric Martin Institute   	
B.C. Museum and Archives Building	
Dogwood Building (1019 Wharf Street)  	
Parliament Buildings (new electrical distribution system) 	
Glendale Lodge (formerly Glendale Hospital)   	
International Airport (roof repairs to hangars) 	
Windermere Building (roofing, parapets, and renovations) 	
Parliament Buildings (renovations) 	
Tillicum Lodge (formerly Personal Care Home) 	
Cafeteria (renovations)  	
Douglas Building (renovations) 	
Provincial  Government Service  Centre   (ex-Hudson  Bay  Co.
Warehouse)    	
Whistler—Highways Equipment Building  	
103,078.10
47,503.89
74,061.92
71,997.77
109,485.67
5,134.29
143.13
6,485.66
298.82
82,776.12
7,494.15
375,940.04
23,025.34
91,926.94
103,469.73
156,264.30
28,201.76
5,673,425.71
695,979.34
38,628.21
23,836.49
11,779.84
3,505.77
157.50
2,824,233.96
94,766.15
10,875.66
81,539.57
9,787.76
1,165.38
5,576.70
9,027.37
16,076.76
5,706.89
478.37
32,373.31
25,803.21
86,463.73
83,739.12
24,453.56
31,239.35
383,574.99
26,097.03
25,282.15
107,674.44
26,535.65
4,711.07
2,865,050.87
104,920.19
95,069.73
55,680.81
279,279.81
88,748.92
 G 50 BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOTE 219—CONSTRUCTION OF  PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project                                                                Description Expenditures
$
British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby—
20-23-BI              Central heating plant      266,971.91
401-B-l                Addition         39,313.98
401-B-2                Library   57,244.81
401-B-5                Underground power distribution system   15,553.36
401-B-7                Roads and ancillary site work    111,395.21
401-B-8                Multipurpose Student Centre   11,397.79
401-B-9                Food Training Centre (addition)   58,342.58
20-108-B1            Temporary office accommodation         47,267.65
British Columbia Vocational School—■
Burnaby—
20-104-B1                    Ironworkers Shop    490,047.04
20-105-B                      Multidiscipline Building     1,242,590.94
299-B-5                        Heavy-duty Diesel Mechanics Workshop   17,528.01
299-B-8                        Horticultural Building       13,428.15
36-0-B1                Chilliwack—Vocational School   8,055.88
50-23-B1              Dawson Creek—Welding Shop       3,028.50
Kamloops—
17-34-B1                      Stores building     157,900.09
620-B-l                        Vocational School       19,199.94
Kelowna—■
72-7-B1                        Classroom (conversion)    10,273.61
72-22-B1                      Welding School   123,672.25
412-B-2                        Cafeteria and Training Kitchen   1,882.24
Nanaimo—
89-6-B1                        Fire-alarm system     42,785.46
89-21-B1                      Welding Shed (extension)     11,264.03
231-B-10                      Electrical distribution     521.10
Nelson—
90-25-B1                      Kootenay School of Art (renovations and extensions)   57,045.69
429-B-l                        Central Receiving and Stores Depot  11,112.59
312-B-2                Prince George—Welding Shop (alterations)   458.19
Terrace—
126-21-B1                   Workshop building   25,642.09
407-B-l                        Dormitory and Cafeteria   2,133.88
Victoria—
633-B                           Workshop complex     -. 75,509.68
633-B-l                        Cafeteria building     1,397.52
37,330,844.51
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1973/74
G 51
Provincial Government Building, Nelson.
Provincial Government Building and Law Courts, Dawson Creek.
 G 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAJOR TENDERS  RECEIVED
AND CONTRACTS AWARDED FOR BUILDINGS
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
63 IB
ABBOTSFORD
Site Preloading, Fraser Valley Trout Hatchery:
$
63,370.00
70,960.00
78,900.00
85,853.00
87,100.00
88,818.00
98,442.00
106,000.00
113,646.00
147,450.00
231,700.00
259,769.00
1,161,863.00
1,257,211.00
38,370.00
39,600.00
41,128.00
41,300.00
41,953.00
47,300.00
37,117.59
41,538.00
47,123.00
74,692.00
77,621.00
77,652.00
79,485.00
91,734.00
59,696.00
61,300.00
66,330.00
67,600.00
28,740.00
29,897.00
32,580.00
37,800.00
34,820.00
39,540.00
253,914.00
255,206.00
274,000.00
299,900.00
316,459.00
322,777.00
323,448.00
328,867.00
Edco Construction Ltd .	
W. C. Arnett & Co Ltd.           	
30-1-B1
BLUE RIVER
Highways Equipment Building:
122-5-B1
BOB QUINN LAKE
Highways Maintenance Establishment (combined with equipment
establishment, Tatogga Lake):
20-50-B
BURNABY
Alterations, Dairy Laboratory:
748-B
Carpets, Dogwood Lodge (formerly personal care home):
Hal H. Paradise Ltd	
20-0-B1
Primary Electrical Distribution, Willingdon Avenue, West Complex:
J. H. McRae Co. Ltd.            —-                                 	
C. H. E. Williams Co. Ltd                	
20-28-B1
Hume & Rumble Division.	
Renovations, Mental Health Centre:
92-15-B1
Workshop Building, New Haven Correctional Centre:
11-133-B1
Barnett-McQueen Co. Ltd.	
Renovations to Boiler House,  Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre:
20-23-B1
British Columbia Institute of Technology
Central Heating Distribution:
Seaward Construction Ltd.            	
Lockerbie & Hole Western Ltd 	
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1973/74 G 53
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
20-107-Bl
BURNABY—Continued
Construction Management Services, Classroom-Laboratory Building:
$
155,400.00
198,000.00
224,600.00
265,298.00
298,535.00
298,535.00
399,000.00
98,900.00
136,600.00
139,844.00
149,550.00
150,000.00
154,500.00
194,500.00
206,000.00
319,000.00
155,000.00
157,326.00
142,000.00
176,206.00
177,663.00
185,000.00
185,000.00
200,800.00
206,055.00
218,003.00
232,749.00
70,075.00
78,300.00
157,943.00
286,003.00
325,400.00
373,001.00
13,170.00
17,889.00
18,450.00
219,990.00
230,000.00
247,774.00
251,470.00
265,692.00
21,210.00
21,853.00
97,874.00
104,249.00
34,050.00
38,222.00
38,242.00
41,085.00
61,725.00
61,853.10
74,605.00
350,790.00
381,600.00
382,222.00
419,000.00
Cana Construction Co. Ltd	
Pentagon Construction (1969) Co. Ltd	
Awarded.
Dawson & Hall Ltd  	
20-105-B
British Columbia Vocational School, Multidisctpline Building
Construction Management Services:
Pentagon Construction (1969) Co. Ltd _	
Concordia Management Co. Ltd	
Foundations:
Metro Construction Co. Ltd	
Argus Installations Ltd.....	
Awarded.
Bird Construction Co. Ltd	
Shopland Construction Co. Ltd  	
Coastside Construction Co. Ltd  	
Kany Construction & Engineering Ltd	
G. D. Shaw Construction Ltd  	
Smith Bros. & Wilson Ltd                           	
Excavation and Backfill:
Lorjack Contracting Ltd   	
Johnny Walker Bulldozing Co. Ltd...	
Walter Cabott Construction Ltd	
Concrete Grade Slab/Concrete Toppings:
Awarded.
Bent Construction Co.	
Waterproofing:
Duron (B.C.) Ltd	
Preliminary Plumbing Work:
Argus Installations Ltd	
A & A Plumbing & Heating Ltd	
Hollow Metal Doors and Frames:
Campbell & Grill Ltd.	
Carpets and Resilient Flooring:
Johnson Floor Co. Ltd.	
Awarded.
Tile Work:
Star Tile Co. Ltd	
Finishing Hardware:
Campbell & Grill Ltd.. .               	
Elevators:
Otis Elevator Co. Ltd	
Mechanical:
Whitehall Contracting of B.C	
 G 54 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
702-B
707-B
14-0-B1
BURNABY-Con//H(f.t/
British Columbia Vocational School, Multidiscipline Building
—Continued
Electrical:
Comstock International Ltd -	
Metro Mechanical Ltd.	
Argus Installations Ltd _.„„....	
A & A Plumbing & Heating Ltd.... ___	
Westgate Mechanical Contractors Ltd	
Fred Walsh Ltd.-- - - ._	
Steel Stud, Furring, and Drywall:
Mott Electric Ltd.  	
Comstock International Ltd  —.	
Commonwealth Construction Co. Ltd 	
LC.R. Electric Ltd.	
D. Thompson (Western) Ltd.	
Electrical Conduit:
I.C.R. Electric Ltd       -
Flanders Installations Ltd ___	
D. Thompson (Western) Ltd 	
Roofing and Sheet Metal:
Bollman   Roofing   &   Sheet  Metal   Ltd.   (excluding   plastic
roofing) ...        — —	
Aetna Roofing (1965) Ltd - -	
Coast Hudson Ltd..   —	
Maurice Fox & Associates Ltd __ -	
Campbell & Grill Ltd. -. _	
Jackson Sheet Metal & Roofing Co. Ltd	
Skylights/Glass and Glazing:
Central Glass Products (glass only).  	
Pilkington Contract Division..- 	
Canadian Pittsburg Industries Ltd 	
Insulation:
Arctic Installations Ltd 	
Miscellaneous Metals:
Royal City Ironworks  _._ „..	
Mitchell Sheet Metal & Steel Fabrication Ltd ~~	
Masonry:
Elligott Masonry Ltd   	
Supply of Sundry Labour (unit labour contract):
Allen & Viner Construction Ltd	
Cana Construction Co. Ltd	
CASTLEGAR
Air-conditioning, Liquor Administration Branch Outlet:
Carlson Equipment & Refrigeration Ltd..	
Broadway Refrigeration & Air Conditioning 	
CLINTON
Government Agent's Residence:
Trails West Homes Ltd. _ .._
CRANBROOK
Alterations to St. Eugene's School:
Kirkwood Construction Ltd -	
Douillard Construction Ltd	
Carron Construction Ltd 	
Boundary Industries Ltd.___ ___ _.	
Renovations to Water Supply, St. Eugene's School:
Kirkwood Construction Ltd  ._...
DAWSON CREEK
Carpeting Provincial Government Building:
Jordans Commercial Furnishings Ltd __ 	
L. Frederick Interiors Ltd ____	
K & P Flooring Ltd  	
ESSONDALE
Colony Farm
Drainage and Dyke Improvements, Phase I:
Coyne Construction Co. Ltd  	
Industrial Seaboard Co. Ltd _	
541,556.00
548,414.00
556,000.00
575,184.00
558,300.00
635,000.00
Awarded.
699,672.00
732,204.00
739,890.00
784,699.00
787,250.00
Awarded.
36,888.00
39,995.00
51,450.00
Awarded.
74,947.00
78,667.00
81,500.00
91,500.00
97,960.00
98,365.00
Awarded.
23,975.00
39.900.00
49,881.00
Awarded.
24,224.00
Awarded.
66,576.00
75,257.00
Awarded.
28,843.00
Not awarded
10,462.00
12,275.00
Awarded.
8,286.00
8,881.00
Awarded.
24,764.00
Awarded.
158,692.00
159,194.00
163,856.00
166,399.00
Awarded.
24,850.00
Awarded.
26,991.00
31,269.23
34,916.40
Awarded.
139,050.00
144,300.00
Not awarded.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1973/74 G 55
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
14-0-B1
14-71-B1
12-54-B1
12-10-Bl
5-B-146
5-B-143
5-B-143
6-B-39
ESSONDALE—Colony Farm—Continued
Drainage and Dyke Improvements, Phase I (recall) and Phase II
Seaward Construction Ltd	
Industrial Seaboard Co. _ „ „ —	
Dillingham Corp. (Canada) Ltd 	
Northern Construction Co.  (div. of Morrison-Knudson Co.
Inc.) 	
Flanders Installations Ltd....	
Replacement of Cattle Barns:
Seaward Construction Ltd	
Quadra Construction Ltd.—... -  	
Walter Cabott Construction Ltd.	
Riverview Hospital
Dental Suite, Patients' Residence:
Sherwin-McRae Contract Services Ltd	
Seaward Construction Ltd,—. -	
Ratcliffe & Sons Construction Ltd  -	
Coastside Construction Co. Ltd	
Bengal Construction Co. Ltd	
Gadicke Construction Co. Ltd.— - .„.	
Bent Construction Ltd —
East Lawn Building, Renovations:
Inlet Electric Ltd. _	
J. H. McRae Co. Ltd - —
Mott Electric Ltd.	
Paragon Electric Ltd.-   —	
Boiler Plant Conversion, Phase 6:
Mott Electric Ltd. .._______  	
Staircases, Riverside Building, Colony Farm:
G. S. Shaw Construction Ltd __ _	
Staircases, Riverside Building, Colony Farm (recall):
Bent Construction Ltd. —— .._,  	
Gadicke Construction Co. Ltd 	
Coastside Construction Co. Ltd	
Ansha Contracting Co. Ltd.	
Bengal Construction Co. Ltd.   -	
Seaward Construction Ltd 	
Arlen Construction Ltd ____	
Riverside Activities Building, Colony Farm
Mechanical:
Gordon Lathem Ltd. —   .....
Fenk Plumbing & Heating Ltd —	
Jack Riley Plumbing & Heating Ltd..	
A & A Plumbing & Heating Ltd	
Electrical:
J. H. McRae Co. Ltd	
D. Thompson (Western) Ltd.	
Sundry Labour Supply (unit labour contract):
Allan & Viner Construction Ltd _	
Ratcliffe & Sons Construction Co. Ltd ._	
Career Construction Co. Ltd  _ __	
Excavation:
Ratcliffe & Sons Construction Co. Ltd	
Concrete Foundations and Slabs:
Ratcliffe & Sons Construction Co. Ltd.	
Career Construction Co. Ltd..	
Masonry:
Ekelund Masonry Ltd.— —	
A.F. Masonry Ltd   __ ___ _ __	
Miscellaneous Metals:
Kay-Son Steel Fabricators & Erectors Ltd..	
Dan-Can Manufacturing Co. Ltd.	
Structural Steel Work:
Kay-Son Steel Fabricators & Erectors Ltd.—	
Corrugated Metal Deck:
McGinnis Construction Ltd. 	
Metal Siding:
McGinnis Construction Ltd	
Built-up Roofing and Sheet Metal Flashings:
Bollman Roofing & Sheet Metal Ltd.	
J. K. Campbell Associates Ltd,	
Jackson Sheet Metal & Roofing Co. Ltd _„..,
200,000.00
228,000.00
238,553.00
Awarded.
239,700.00
743,890.00
205,250.00
206,366.00
236,503.00
Awarded.
54,560.00
57,000.00
61,508.00
62,000.00
69,442.00
75,000.00
79,000.00
Awarded.
33,315.00
37,217.00
43,776.00
55,570.00
Awarded.
16,250.00
Awarded.
102,280.00
Not awarded
99,730.00
102,298.00
107,000.00
108,982.00
128,937.00
147,100.00
167,477.00
Awarded.
149,459.00
155,695.00
158,800.00
165,733.00
Awarded.
114,609.00
127,432.00
Awarded.
8,532.00
9,274.00
10,028.00
Awarded.
4,084.00
Awarded.
17,688.00
26,900.00
Awarded.
8,260.00
23,800.00
Awarded.
2,898.00
2,945.00
Awarded.
4,990.00
Awarded.
7,914.00
Not awarded
3,515.00
Not awarded
4,572.00
4,985.00
10,570.00
or
9,700.00
Awarded.
 G 56                                                    BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—
-Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
6-B-39
ESSONDALE—Riverview Hospital—Continued
Riverside Activities Building, Colony Farm—Continued
Glass and Glazing:
Atlas Glass Co. Ltd.           .—        -    .
$
596.00
699.00
800.15
1,185.00
811.87
861.00
874.00
930.00
10,732.00
13,750.00
16,597.00
16,730.00
17,411.00
48,582.00
13,700.00
14,228.00
14,758.00
16,736.00
16,830.00
17,485.00
17,985.00
20,833.00
633.00
752.00
917.00
1,200.00
998.00
1,049.00
3,648.45
9,575.00
9,880.00
2,200.00
4,873.00
incomplete
6,708.00
7,110.00
7,250.00
476.70
696.65
14,400.00
14,671.00
21,248.00
699,700.00
706,730.00
707,890.00
724,850.00
794,800.00
1,091.000.00
1,116,472.00
1,148,200.00
1,174,000.00
Awarded.
Rolling Pass Windows:
Awarded.
Ambassador Door Sales -
Millwork (supply and delivery):
Awarded.
Plastering and Drywall:
Painting and Caulking:
Awarded.
Glazed Wall Finish:
Awarded.
Acoustic Ceiling Tile:
F Drexel Co Ltd
Awarded.
Resilient Flooring:
Fred M  Beatty Ltd                                  	
Awarded.
Nolan Tile-Brick Co Ltd.                      -	
Terrazzo and Ceramic Tile:
Awarded.
Toilet Partitions and Lockers:
Awarded.
Finishing Hardware (supply only):
Awarded.
Games Equipment (supply only):
Awarded.
Pole Line and Transformer:
Awarded.
56-6-B1
FERNIE
Highways Maintenance Establishment:
Not awarded.
W. H Tayler Construction Ltd -	
Walter Cabott Construction Ltd....	
708-B
FORT ST. JOHN
Provincial Government Building, Phase II:
Awarded.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1973/74 G 57
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Remarks
59-2-B1
59-2-B1
61-21
733-B-2
17-0-B2
17-507-B1
72-22-B1
736-B
735-B
712-B
760-B
78-3-B1
79-2-B1
GANGES
Renovations, Provincial Government Building:
E. J. Hunter & Sons Ltd.            .__
Burak Construction Ltd 	
Laupland & Louie Construction Ltd  	
Australian Construction Ltd. ._.	
Renovations, Provincial Government Building (recall):
Australian Construction Ltd. 	
Laupland & Louie Construction Ltd.	
Burak Construction Ltd.	
Seaward Construction Ltd.  	
GOLDEN
Visitor Reception Centre:
A. R. Metcalfe Construction Ltd. —   —
KAMLOOPS
Insulation, Recreational Building, Regional Correctional Centre:
Tidy Insulators Ltd.	
Westech Plastics Ltd.....	
H. L. Blachford Ltd __ 	
F. L. Drexel Co. Ltd  _
Site Development Foundations, Notre Dame Road Complex:
Penkam Contracting Co. Ltd   	
Pine Tree Construction Co. Ltd 	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd _	
Johnson's Trucking (Western) Ltd _	
Bird Construction Co. Ltd..... 	
Sewer, Regional Correctional Centre:
Metcalfe & Whelan Water Systems Ltd. ~ 	
Continental Developments Ltd..	
Penkam Contracting Co. Ltd  —	
Heating System Replacement, Aircraft Hangar:
Harvie Plumbing & Heating   - -	
Stellar Heating & Plumbing Co. Ltd. 	
McKinnon Plumbing & Heating Ltd     	
D. C. Cross Ltd     	
Interior Plumbing & Heating Ltd.  	
Dawson and Hall Ltd   	
KELOWNA
Welding Shops, Okanagan College:
Fred Western Construction Ltd _  .
Dovillard Construction Ltd   —	
KEREMEOS, LYTTON, AND VALEMOUNT
Provincial Court Facilities:
Crystal Construction Ltd. (Keremeos).... 	
Crystal Construction Ltd. (Lytton)...... 	
Crystal Construction Ltd. (Valemount)  	
Hall, Hahn & Associates Ltd. (three sites)  	
Commercial Construction Co. Ltd. (Lytton only)	
KIMBERLEY
Provincial Government Building, Phase II:
Guran Construction Co. Ltd. 	
Walter Cabott Construction Ltd  	
LANGFORD
Paint Spray Shop, Highways Department:
Dalziel Construction Ltd.   	
Dura Construction Ltd   	
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd   	
Australian Construction Ltd. 	
LILLOOET
Heating System Replacement, Highways Maintenance Establish
ment:
A & A Plumbing & Heating Ltd  	
Stellar Heating & Plumbing Ltd 	
Mechanical Installations Co. Ltd  _	
Century Plumbing & Heating Ltd 	
Northway Plumbing & Mechanical Installations Ltd	
Gordon Latham Ltd. 	
37,363.00
38,650.00
39.944.00
46,307.00
24.990.00
25,400.00
27,811.00
33,500.00
242,094.00
10,986.00
15,200.00
17,600.00
17,854.00
318,150.00
333,142.00
352,000.00
360,778.00
396,765.00
Not awarded.
Awarded.
Not awarded.
Awarded.
11.160.00    i Not awarded.
19,935.00
21,597.00
21,962.00
26,865.00
27,755.00
28,900.00
33,253.0(1
56,760.00
138,300.00
149,932.00
49,711.00
40,194.00
42,721.00
165,600.00
68,995.00
357,300.00
382,911.00
29,465.00
29.748.00
30,280.00
38,389.00
36,556.00
37,474.12
38,631.00
41,600.00
43,500.00
45,294.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Not awarded.
Awarded.
[ Awarded.
Not awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
 G 58 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
17-122-B1
110-71-B1
89-6-B1
29-5-B1
30-B-5
429-B-l
90-2-B1
698-B
746-B
103-21-B1
715-B
715-B
106-6-B1
106-51-B1
LOGAN LAKE
Highways Equipment Building:
McGregor Construction Ltd	
Marini & Sons Ltd _	
Pine Tree Construction Co. Ltd.
Fred Western Construction Ltd..
McLEESE LAKE
Highways Equipment Building:
Pine Tree Construction Co. Ltd.
Guran Construction Co. Ltd ...
NANAIMO
Fire-alarm Systems, Malaspina College:
Canpac Installations Ltd	
Western Power Cable Jointing Ltd	
R & A Smith Plumbing & Heating _._	
Vancouver   Island  Youth  Centre   (Formerly   Brannan   Lake
School)
Alteration to Duplex:
E. J. Hunter & Sons Ltd	
L & B Construction Ltd.	
Kitchen Alterations:
Burak Construction Ltd _ -.
T & B Construction Ltd	
NELSON
Site Works and Chemical Stores, Selkirk College:
Fame Construction Ltd .__	
Additions and Renovations, Forestry Building:
Fame Construction Ltd	
Boundary Industries Ltd.—.	
Demountable Partitioning, Provincial Government Building:
F. Drexel Co. Ltd 	
Ascot Acoustics Ltd :	
Benton & Overbury Ltd. 	
NEW WESTMINSTER
Alterations to Fire Escapes, Courthouse:
Pine Tree Construction Co. Ltd	
Bengal Construction Co. Ltd	
Bent Construction Ltd	
POUCE COUPE
Weigh-scale Station:
Dyke Construction Ltd	
Quadrant Construction Ltd..
POWELL RIVER
Carpets, Provincial Government Building:
Berg & Johnson Building Supplies Ltd	
Eatons Contract Sales	
L. Frederick Interiors Ltd	
Shokaal Floors Ltd _.	
L. R. Clark Builders Mart Ltd	
Exterior Work, Provincial Government Building:
Cesare Piazza	
Australian Construction Ltd 	
PRINCE GEORGE
Sewage Treatment Plant, Regional Correctional Centre:
Earlco Mechanical Contractors Ltd	
Cana Construction Co. Ltd	
McGinnis Construction Ltd	
Maintenance Building, Department of Public Works:
H. Erickson & Sons Ltd.....	
R. J. Cooper Construction Ltd	
Viking Construction Ltd	
Dezell Construction Ltd	
Walter Cabott Construction Ltd.	
F. Hedges Construction Ltd	
Norcan Construction Co. Ltd	
Office Building, Developer Proposal:
No bids.
193,900.00
205,000.00
214,884.00
232,800.00
207,520.00
212,000.00
50,990.00
54,925.00
55,430.00
41,558.00
54,160.00
117,604.00
122,990.00
24,430.00
406,337.00
480,000.00
19,773.00
23,800.00
35,994.00
10,838.00
14,303.00
18,340.00
84,400.00
116,633.00
14,263.31
15,598.93
16,026.18
16,100.00
16,984.00
57,200.00
79,900.00
106,154.00
135,000.00
158,386.00
349,700.00
354,000.00
358,365.00
367,151.00
379,000.00
379,500.00
400,000.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Not awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1973/74 G 59
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
106-14-B1
452-B-l
10-0-B2
PRINCE GEORGE—Continued
Weigh-scale Station:
F. Hedges Construction Ltd 	
Norgaard Construction Ltd	
Wayne Watson Construction Ltd.
Quadrant Construction Ltd. —
REVELSTOKE
Renovations, Provincial Government Building, Phase 3:
Seaward Construction Ltd.—	
Revelstoke Construction Ltd..... _	
RUSKIN
Sewage and Site Work, Women's Detention Camp:
D. C. Festing & Sons Ltd....	
P.A.C. Environment Engineering Ltd	
688-B
142-1-B1
47-3-B1
24-B-10
10-B-12
4-4
SMITHERS
Sewage-treatment Facilities, Northern Training Centre:
Dave's Plumbing & Heating (1962) Ltd	
Earlco Mechanical Construction Ltd. ._...
Smithers Plumbing & Heating Ltd	
McGinnis Construction Ltd	
Provincial Government Building
Exterior Work, Phase 3:
Cana Construction Co. Ltd	
Sundry Work, Phase 4:
Cana Construction Co. Ltd..	
Demountable Partitions:
Benton & Overbury...	
Casework:
Nikolai Millwork Industries Ltd	
Project Construction Ltd....	
Mechanical:
Doug's Sheet Metal Ltd.	
Electrical:
Lakewood Electric Co	
SUMMERLAND
Effluent Outfall, Trout Hatchery:
Interior Contracting Co. Ltd	
Kenyon Construction Ltd.	
Ol-West Construction Ltd.	
Quadra Construction Co. Ltd	
McGinnis Construction Ltd	
H. Parkin Construction Ltd	
Industrial Seaboard Co. Ltd	
D. J. Manning Construction Ltd..
TATOGGA LAKE
Combined   with   Highways   maintenance   establishment   at   Bob
Quinn Lake.
TERRACE
Hot Water Tank & Sprinklers, Skeenaview Hospital:
Earlco Mechanical Contractors Ltd 	
Filbey & Sons Plumbing & Heating Ltd —	
Pine Tree Construction Co. Ltd 	
Office Building, Developer Proposal:
E. Lauren	
TRANQUILLE
Sewage and Irrigation, Tranquille School:
Walter Cabott Construction Ltd	
Penkam Contracting Co. Ltd 	
TROUT LAKE
Mechanical and Electrical, Highways Equipment Building:
Boundry Electric Ltd.... 	
71,480.00
74,240.00
100,310.00
109,510.00
593,000.00
791,147.00
39,296.00
59,300.00
25,890.00
36,370.00
42,112.00
57,990.00
98,500.00
122,500.00
17,357.00
13,264.00
22,000.00
12,731.00
9,800.00
79,450.00
84,225.00
89,002.00
90,751.00
98,680.00
115,000.00
119,323.00
125,926.00
12,058.00
14,600.00
19,555.00
99,500.00
85,588.00
98,520.00
59,400.00      Awarded
Awarded.
Not awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Not awarded.
Not awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Not awarded.
Awarded.
 G 60                                                    BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—
-Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
....
VANCOUVER
Alterations to Sixth  and Seventh  Floors,  Avord Building,  777
Hornby Street:
$
39,400.00
51,685.00
54,500.00
11,115.00
14,700.00
11,296.00
11,371.00
14,575.00
15,939.00
20,687.00
13,354.00
13,454.00
14,985.00
14,989.00
16,000.00
17,500.00
18,781,00
21,490.00
16,275.00
17,810.00
18,996.00
19,782.00
20,642.00
21,500.00
22,623.00
25,050.00
350,000.00
374,080.00
35,896.00
38,309.00
11,298.00
12,000.00
14,810.00
18,767.00
14,285.00
18,010.00
19,262.00
22,938.00
28,438.00
13,668.00
15,323.00
16,670.00
20,604.00
28,464.00
36,000.00
44,835.00
48,867.00
172,000.00
175,518,00
247,445.00
39,480.00
45,815.00
52,535.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded,
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Not awarded.
....
Coastside Construction Co. Ltd	
Alterations to Sixth Floor, 2525 Willow Avenue:
Commercial Construction Co. Ltd	
Mechanical, LAB Warehouse, 3100 E. Broadway:
H. S. Crombie Ltd	
Weeks & Co. Ltd	
Offices for B.C. Securities Commission, 870, 777 Hornby Street:
....
Offices for B.C. Hospital Insurance, 885 Dunsmuir Street:
Bent Construction Ltd.	
Lake Construction Ltd.	
Franze Patella Contracting Ltd	
Interior Dimensions Ltd	
Sherwin McRae Contract Services Ltd	
16-31-B1
Renovations, Motor-vehicle Inspection Station:
Allen & Viner Construction Ltd	
89-B-3
Reroofing Provincial Health Building:
Jackson Sheet Metal & Roofing Co. Ltd	
Bollman Roofing & Sheet Metal Ltd	
747-B
Paving  and  Fencing   Marpole   Probation   Office,   8.982   Hudson
Street:
E. Trasolini Paving Ltd          	
Timm Construction Co. Ltd	
634-B
B.C. Building Project Office, 944 Howe Street
Millwork:
Major Piatt & Co. Ltd...	
B.C. Millwork Products Ltd.,
Nikolai Millwork Industries Ltd.
Mechanical Alterations and Additions:
United Metal Fabricators Ltd	
City Sheet Metal Ltd.....	
Delta Mechanical Contracting Ltd	
Fred Welsh Ltd	
16-110-B1
Jericho Hill School
Demolition and Site Works:
A. Hambleton & Sons Construction Ltd	
Mainland Construction Co. Ltd..	
16-3-B1
Fire-alarm Systems:
Mott Electric Ltd.	
Canadian Electrical Construction Ltd	
Flanders Installations Ltd	
79-B-15
Residence:
Hall Hahn & Associates Ltd	
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1973/74 G 61
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Remarks
16-39-B2
16-39-B2
18-1-B1
617-B-l
211-B-l
19-35-B1
738-B
486-B
VANCOUVER—Continued
Pearson Hospital
Installation of Boilers:
Argus Installations Ltd.... „	
Babcock & Wilcox (Canada) Ltd..	
Dillingham Corp. (Canada) Ltd ._.	
Mathras   &  Nicholl  Mechanical   Division   (Commonwealth
Construction)  	
Instrumentation for Boilers:
Babcock & Wilcox (Canada) Ltd	
Bailey Meter Co. Ltd  	
Canadian Process & Control Ltd..—	
VERNON
Laboratory  Pollution   Control   Branch,   Provincial   Government
Building:
David Howrie Ltd..... _	
Mackie & Hooper Construction Co. Ltd	
Sisco Scientific Ltd. 	
Nikolai Millwork Industries Ltd	
Paving and Landscaping, Provincial Government Building:
David Howrie Ltd	
Leduc Paving Ltd.   _
VICTORIA
Additions, Harbour Towers, Quebec Street:
W. Campbell Ltd ______
Australian Construction Ltd....  	
Somersby Woodworkers Ltd -
E. J. Hunter & Son Ltd. _  	
Alterations,   Third   Floor,   International   House,   880   Douglas
Street:
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd   	
E. J. Hunter & Son Ltd 	
W. H. Wheaton Ltd  _._
Farmer Construction Ltd	
K. J. Howe Ltd  ....   	
Australian Construction Ltd         	
Alterations, Material Testing Laboratories:
H, E. Fowler & Sons Ltd ~ 	
Dura Construction Ltd — _	
E. J. Hunter & Sons Ltd     _._  	
Australian Construction Ltd  „ _	
Alterations,  Phase I,  Second Floor,  Nootka  Court,  Humboldt
Street:
E. J. Hunter & Sons Ltd. 	
Laupland & Louis Construction Ltd	
Dalziel Construction Ltd   _	
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd 	
Australian Construction Ltd  _	
Alterations and Additions, Data Processing Centre:
E. J. Hunter & Sons Ltd _.	
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd  	
Australian Construction Ltd.....  	
Alterations and Additions, Provincial Government Service Centre:
Dalziel Construction Ltd.....  	
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd ..._._.	
Australian Construction Ltd	
Foundations of Pioneer School, Thunderbird Park:
K.J. Howe Ltd.  	
Laupland & Louis Construction Ltd....	
Dura Construction Ltd...-	
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd.	
Australian Construction Ltd	
Renovations, DeMontigny Building, 755 Queens Street:
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd „.    	
Laupland & Louie Construction Ltd 	
Dura Construction Ltd  	
R. W. Matthews Agencies Ltd. (shelving)	
Dyna Metal Fabricators Ltd. (shelving)	
Alterations   for   Offices   in   Toronto-Dominion   Bank   Building,
Douglas Street:
K.J. Howe Ltd  	
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd	
122,671.00
158,137.00
167,335.00
185,900.00
67,239.00
70,516.00
73,765.00
15,960.00
16,726.00
17,104.00
21,738.00
75,946.00
78,760.00
109,409.00
110,000.00
111,584.00
127,652.00
16,491.75
19,371.00
19,729.00
19,734.00
21,145.37
29,000.00
82,687.00
85,471.00
91,282.00
93,650.00
22,874.00
25,380.00
25,475.00
26,548.00
26,999.00
66,222.00
67,845.00
80,400.00
156,853.00
162,339.00
175,380.00
7,570.00
7,976.00
8,524.00
9.444.00
9,699.00
36,989.00
37,300.00
42,890.00
18,247.25
22,270.00
18,550.70
18,649.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
 G 62                                                    BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—
-Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
19-129-B1
19-129-B1
19-4-B1
19-7-B1
VICTORIA—Continued
Carpeting, Nootka Court, Douglas Street:
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Not awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
37,785.77
38,873.80
25,275.00
31,966.00
19,996.00
20,827.00
21,574.00
24,160.00
24,212.00
15,620.00
17,969.00
18,929.00
12,525.12
13,423.20
16,745,35
12,341.00
13,324.00
15,456.00
408,300.00
412,484.00
438,741.00
443,900.00
483,134.00
15,309.83
16,193.00
16,968.00
18,300.00
19,496.00
20,300.00
22,462.00
24,714.00
25,841.00
13,927.00
15,964.00
10,975.00
13,230.00
14,380.00
57,945.00
60,500.00
62,777.00
76,734.00
92,922.00
12,698.00
14,222.00
15,828.00
Resilient Flooring, 914 Yates Street:
Electrical Service, 914 Yates Street:
Bescor Electric Ltd  .  	
Lennon Electric Ltd     —	
Renovations to Offices, 895 Fort Street:
Carpets, Chateau Victoria, 740 Btirdett Street:
Renovations, Computer Room Ventilation, Finance Building:
Renovations, Phase I, Douglas Building:
E. J. Hunter & Sons Ltd	
H. E Fowler & Sons Ltd        	
Belmont Building
Alterations to Basement:
H  E  Fowler & Sons Ltd.      ..             -	
E. J. Hunter & Sons Ltd	
Finishing Carpentry:
H   E. Fowler & Sons Ltd.          -
Drywall Partitioning:
Coast Partitions (1972) Ltd 	
Divider Units:
Painting:
Carpets and Drapes:
12,400.00
13,245.00
13,650.00
15,275.00
2,448.00
9,490.00
5,206.43
9,307.00
8,884.00
10,940.00
11,432.00
Vertical Conveyer:
Mechanical and Plumbing:
Electrical:
Wyder Electric Co. Ltd.        .             	
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1973/74 G 63
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
486-B
VICTORIA—Continued
British Columbia Archives and Museum
Alterations to Second and Third Floors, Exhibition Building:
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd	
447,432.00
528,183.00
534,970.00
171,822.00
196,990.00
378,440.00
390,359.00
48,429.00
57,910.00
63,991.00
11,050.00
11,575.00
11,695.00
55,228.47
117,833.00
198,593.00
14,210.00
16,645.00
17,998.00
35,150.00
38.771.00
E. J. Hunter & Sons Ltd	
Alterations to Curatorial Building:
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd                	
690-B
Parliament Buildings
Alterations and Renovations, Provincial Library:
H. E, Fowler & Sons Ltd                               	
E. J, Hunter & Sons Ltd.	
Copper Roofing:
Playsted Sheet Metal Ltd	
M. Griffin Ltd	
Glazed Bronze Framed Openings:
Victoria Glass Co. Ltd	
Carpet Installation, Third Floor:
Drainage and Site Work:
Fan Units:
M. Griffin Ltd	
Playstead Sheet Metal Ltd	
Panelling, Third Floor, Centre Section, North:
Australian Construction Ltd	
Awarded.
38,838.60    1
41.480.00
Panelling, West Wing:
75,890.00
110,900.00
115,698.00
129,160.00
356,576.00
370,598.00
401,623.00
35,988.00
37,034.00
11,626.50
15,653.92
23,100.00
25,800.00
29,772.00
30,915.00
248,800.00
255,455.00
277,180.00
296.824.00
280.000.00
690-B
Renovations, Third Floor, East Wing:
W. Campbell Ltd	
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd                	
E. J. Hunter & Sons Ltd 	
Steel Staircase, West Wing:
Carpets, Legislative Gallery:
554-B
VICTORIA/COLQUITZ
Drapes and Spreads,  Glendale Lodge  (formerly Glendale Hospital) :
Great Western Furnishings Exchange Ltd	
39-10-1
Laundry Addition, Glendale Lodge:
E. J. Hunter & Sons Ltd.	
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd                                   	
633-B
Welding Booths, Camosun College:
1
66.782.00    ! Awarded.
Playsted Sheet Metal Ltd                   	
69,230.00
74,952.00
79,700.00
14,800.00
18.949.27
Denford Metals Ltd   	
722-B
Site Work and Landscaping, Tillicum Lodge:
KimofT Landscaping Ltd  	
Awarded.
20,566.00    I
Laupland & Louie Construction Ltd	
21,354,00
 G 64 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
601-B-2
VICTORIA/PAT BAY
Roof Structure Repairs, Hangar 2, Airport:
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd                             	
$
19,773.00
23,800.00
35,994.00
178,400.00
191,913.00
194,000.00
95,000.00
106,946.00
146-1-B1
WHISTLER
Highways Equipment Building:
137-1-B1
YAHK
Weigh-scale Station:
137-1-B1
Weigh-scale Station (recall):
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1975
if.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0376295/manifest

Comment

Related Items