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SERVICES FOR PEOPLE ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES 1973 With Fiscal Addendum April… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1975

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 PROVINCE OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
SERVICES FOR PEOPLE
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE
DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES
1973
With Fiscal Addendum
April 1, 1972, to March 31, 1973
 Victoria, B.C., March, 1974
To the Honourable Walter Stewart Owen, Q.C, LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Human Resources for the calendar year 1973, with fiscal
addendum April 1, 1972, to March 31, 1973, is herewith respectfully submitted.
Office of the Minister of Human Resources
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
NORMAN LEVI
Minister of Human Resources
The Honourable Norman Levi was appointed Minister of Human Resources on September 15, 1972.
 Department of Human Resources, Victoria, B.C., March, 1974
The Honourable Norman Levi,
Minister of Human Resources,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir:   I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of Human Resources for the
calendar year 1973, with fiscal addendum April 1, 1972, to March 31, 1973.
J. A. SADLER
Deputy Minister of Human Resources
  SERVICES FOR PEOPLE
 This year the Annual Report has taken on a different format.
There has been an attempt to provide more detailed description
of the specific programmes offered to people by government.
Programmes have been discussed under the following four
headings:
Services for Families and Children.
Services for Senior Citizens.
Services for Special Needs.
Services for Everyone.
It is hoped this format will be useful in providing an understanding of what the Department of Human Resources is attempting to
do in co-operation with the people of British Columbia.
Accounting is done on a fiscal-year basis in this Department.
In reporting on a calendar-year basis, we run the risk of slight discrepancies between actual figures and those reported. We feel that
the advantage of up-to-date reporting compensates for any slight
errors in reporting.
A special note on cost-sharing—Municipalities at present
cost-share in Social Allowance Programmes, Health Care Programmes, and Maintenance of Dependent Children to a maximum
of 15 per cent of total costs. During 1972/73, with costs escalating,
municipal cost-sharing was frozen at $1.20 per capita. Throughout
this report we refer to cost-sharing between the Federal and Provincial Governments; it must be remembered that for many of these
programmes municipal sharing is part of the Province's contribution.   During 1974, municipal sharing will fall to 10 per cent.
 SERVICES FOR PEOPLE
Highlights of 1973.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Departmental Expenditures, 1973
10
Administration and Organization, 1973  12
Personnel Activities, 1973  13
Staff Development, 1973  14
Regional Organization    15
Research, 1973  16
Services for Families and Children
Day Care.
18
Preventive and Protective Services for Children and Their
Families	
   21
Foster Homes    24
Specialized Child-care Resources  25
Adoption  27
Community Programmes  30
Services for Everyone
Social Allowance  34
Repatriation  3 6
Homemaker Service    36
Counselling    37
The Provincial Emergency Programme  37
Health Care Services  38
Burials    39
Youth Hostels  40
Community Programmes    41
Page
Services for Special Needs
Handicapped Persons' Income Allowance  46
Activity Centres  46
Employment Project '73  48
Educational Upgrading and Vocational Training  49
Employment  Preparation  Programme  for  Youths  and
Adults    49
Detached Worker Programme  51
Incentive-Opportunities Programme  51
Halfway Houses    52
Community Programmes    53
Services for Senior Citizens
Mincome-     5 6
Senior Citizen Counsellor Service  58
B.C. Hydro Bus Pass for Senior Citizens  59
Boarding and Rest Homes    59
Private Hospital Care  60
Courtesy Card  61
Seniors' Activity Centres  61
New Directions in Services for Seniors in 1973  61
Community Programmes  62
Legislation    63
Fiscal Addendum.
65
7
 HIGHLIGHTS OF 1973
When governments change from one political philosophy to
another, they do so abruptly. But changing and improving the services provided by government agencies does not take place so
quickly. In fact, the process of improving government services is
a long one because it requires changing people's attitudes and
abilities to operate in new directions.
In 1973, these new directions became evident in the Department of Human Resources. We have initiated a significant number
of new programmes and at this point I would like to thank all of
the people in the Department for their efforts in implementing the
Government's new programmes. In many cases, the programmes
have been successful as a direct result of people putting in time
and effort far beyond the eight-hour day.
Everyone at some time needs "help." The Department of
Human Resources can be seen as a "go-between" providing help
for the people of British Columbia from the people of British
Columbia. In the humanistic tradition it is the Department's goal
to provide services in a manner which honours the individual's
integrity and takes into consideration the needs of the society at
large.
I would like to point out that the estimated expenditure of the
Department of Human Resources in the 1973 calendar year is
$232,000,000 to deliver services to the citizens of British Columbia- This compares with B171.680.815.in the 1972/73 fiscal year
and $148,504,289 in the 1971/72 fiscal year. We are spending
more money than ever to provide more and better services for the
people of British Columbia.
This is a summary of some of the things that have happened
in 1973:
• The Mincome Programme which was introduced in December of 1972 was expanded in October 1973 to include people
60 years of age and over. As of December 31, 1973, individuals on Mincome were guaranteed a monthly income of
$213.85 or $427.70 per couple.
by J. A. Sadler, Deputy Minister
• The Handicapped Persons' Income Allowance was incorporated into Mincome in October of 1973. Payments had
paralleled Mincome amounts since December of 1972.
• Social assistance rates were increased and established on a
flat-rate basis, reducing the need for extensive use of overages. New rates are in accordance with family size: single
persons, $140 per month; couple, $250 per month; three
persons, $300 per month; four persons, $350 per month;
five persons, $400 per month; six persons, $445 per month
and an additional $40 per month for each added member
thereafter to a maximum rate for a family of 10 of $605
per month.
• Extra shelter payment increased from 50 to 75 per cent for
additional rental cost in excess of the basic amount provided
for under the social assistance rate.
• Eligibility for income supplementation was extended to borderline income-earners with an income less than provided
for under social assistance.
• Special Dietary Allowances for those on social assistance
increased from $10 to $20 per month.
• Pre-natal Allowances for those on social assistance increased
from $10 to $25 per month.
• Earning exemptions by social assistance recipients increased
to $100 per month.
• School start-up fees payable at beginning of school-term were
increased to $25 for children age 12 and over whose parents
were on social assistance. Children under 12 years of age
received $15.
• Comforts Allowances were extended to include payments to
patients in mental health units.
 • Conferences were funded for people involved with special
needs in the community. For example, conferences were
held and information and recommendations exchanged with
Senior Citizen Counsellors and handicapped people.
• There was a substantial increase in the number of resources
for children at a local level.
• A review of existing legislation relative to families and children began with a world-wide search made of the various
legislative remedies in other jurisdictions.
• Study of a programme which would provide a child with
a legal representative acting on the child's behalf in disputes
relative to issues of custody or guardianship.
• Development of new programmes whereby a child and his/
her family will receive the necessary supportive help that
obviates the child leaving his/her home or community.
Authority is given to social workers to provide all support
services needed to maintain the child in his/her home rather
than taking the child into care.
• Funding was given to various community groups in conjunction with the Department of Education to develop alternative
educational programmes for the child who has dropped out
of the regular school setting.
• A public campaign was undertaken giving special attention
to the problems of the battered child and parents who abuse
their children.
• Child in care rates were increased.
• Allowances to foster homes were raised.
• Day-care Services more than tripled.
• Homemaker Service expanded.
• Increased allowances were granted for boarding-homes and
there was an increase in the number of boarding-homes.
• Planning for a Pharmacare Programme was undertaken.
• Establishment and funding of the Alcohol and Drug Commission to study and act upon related problems.
• The opening of new facilities for alcoholics.
• A new employment project was established providing more
job opportunities.
• A greater emphasis was placed on interdepartmental cooperation. Meetings, and joint-policy planning, signal new
directions for the future. Committees such as the Children's
Committee of Cabinet with representatives from Human
Resources, Education, Health, and the Attorney-General's
Department are presently operating in this integrated manner
with co-ordinated planning for children.
• Establishment with the Attorney-General's Department of a
Family Law Commission.
• Intensive planning and community dialogue took place directed toward the process of integrating the social services
in the Lower Mainland.
• Victoria Children's Aid Society and the municipal welfare
services were integrated into the general services of the Department of Human Resources. A "Specialized Services to
Families and Children" project was granted $500,000 to
focus mainly on children with learning disabilities.
• Services for Indian people were expanded, both on and off
reservations.
• A Special Consultant was appointed for handicapped people.
• Pilot projects in developing community health and human
resource centres were undertaken in several regions throughout the Province, including the remote areas of the Queen
Charlotte Islands.
• With the advancement of so many programmes, priority was
given to vigorous negotiations with the Federal Government
to maximize cost-sharing arrangements. Participation in all
Federal-Provincial conferences and policy meetings was at a
maximum.
These are just some of the highlights of 1973. Many of the
things that have happened over the last year are not so easy to
capsulize. The day-to-day operations in the field offices are where
 things really happen. This is where we find people who care working with children, and people who care working with families and
senior citizens.
With the decentralization of decision-making in 1973, field
staff have been given more authority to respond to the needs of the
citizens of British Columbia.
DEPARTMENTAL EXPENDITURES,  1973
□ Direct assistance 96%
■ Administration 4% —
Social Allowances:   Basic allowances, transportation, burials.
Aged: Mincome.
Children: Children's Aid Societies, foster homes, treatment centres, day care.
Handicapped: Blind, disabled.
Health Care: Drugs, dental, optical, medical, boarding-homes,
nursing-homes, hospitalization of social assistance recipients,
hospitalization of infants, emergency health aid.
Other Direct Assistance: Work-activity projects, summer employment, community grants, Housekeeping and Homemaker
Services.
Other direct assistance
10
 ADMINISTRATION AND ORGANIZATION,
1973
 MINISTER OF HUMAN RESOURCES
DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES
Minister's staff
Deputy Minister
Associate Deputy Minister
Departmental Comptroller
Director, Personnel Administration
Director, Office Administration and Public Information
Executive Director, Social Services
and Income Security Programmes
Executive Director, Long-range
Planning and Social Research
Assistant Executive Director,
Income Security
Director, Community
Programmes Division
Director, Residential
Treatment Programmes
Co-ordinator, Community
Grants
Co-ordinator, Day-care and
Homemaker Services
Co-ordinator, Community
Development
Co-ordinator, Activity
Centres
Superintendent of Child Welfare
and Director, F. and CS. Division
• Co-ordinator,
Children's Resources
Co-ordinator,
Special Placements
_ Director, New Denver
Youth Centre
Director, Island
YouthrCentre
Director, Income
Assistance Division
Co-ordinator, Adoption
and Child Care
Co-ordinator,
Family Services
Co-ordinator,
Rehabilitation Services
Co-ordinator,
Services to Seniors
!Director, Special Care,
Adults Division
Co-ordinator, Boarding
and Nursing-homes
Director,
Provincial Home
Matron,
New Denver Pavilion
Co-ordinator,
Minicome and H.P.I.A
Consultants,
Social Assistance
Programme
Director,
Health Care
Director,
Research
Division
Director,
Programme
Development
Review and
Evaluation
Executive Director,
Community Services
E
Director, Staff
Development
Regions
Bulkley-
Skeena
Peace
River
Prince
George-
Cariboo
kamloops.
Kootenay
Okanagan
Vancouver
Island
Capital  r
Assistant
xecutive Director
Regions
Vancouver
Fraser
Valley
North
Shore
Fraser
North
Fraser
South
12
 PERSONNEL ACTIVITIES
The present Government has brought about many changes in
programmes which have increased work loads throughout the
Province. The establishment of new programmes required additional staffing input to assist the Division in meeting objectives by
specified target dates.
The amalgamation of several social service agencies in the
Province took place in 1973. Municipal agencies in Kamloops,
Kelowna, Penticton, Chilliwack, and Victoria, as well as the Family
and Children's Service of Victoria, were brought into the Department. The Personnel Office assisted in working out the transfer
procedures with the Public Service Commission, assisted in setting
the classifications of the positions, recruited relief staff as necessary,
and provided an ongoing personnel service for an expanded
Department.
The Personnel Office has also acted as a service agency for
processing documents and initiating salary payments for a large
number of people employed under the Employment Project—1973.
During the peak period of August and September over 500 people
were employed under the programme.
The Personnel Division took responsibility for finding employment for 53 staff members at the Willingdon School for Girls, which
closed in March 1973. At year-end only one employee remained
to be placed. This person is presently seconded to another department.
SUMMARY OF 1973 ACTIVITIES
As of December 31, 1973, there were 1,485 staff members in
the Department of Human Resources. This represents an increase
of 671 staff members over 1972. Many of these employees were
added through the amalgamation of services and many still have
only temporary status.
The Personnel Office works in close co-operation with the Staff
Development Division in many areas of joint concern.
Table 1—Personnel Comparison, December 1972 and 1973
Positions at December 31, 1972  814
Positions added by Estimates, April 1, 1973  68
Positions1 added through salary contingency (salaries not included in original estimates)       320
Casual staffs on strength, December 31, 1973   283
 Total   1,485
1 Mainly staff added through amalgamation (a total of 252 was added this
way).
2 Includes   temporary/continuous,   temporary/limited,   and   "as   and   when
required" staff.
Table 2—Breakdown of New Appointments, Including Amalgam
Stenographers and Typists                                           	
ation!
241
129
80
91
46
14
6
1
3
30
2
3
1
1
4
1
3
3
2
6
3
1
671
Social Workers 1 and 2  	
Group Leaders   	
Financial Assistance Workers and Case Aides    -     	
Senior Clerical/Stenographers   - 	
Building Service Workers                                            -   	
Teachers  .„.       . -    —     „-            -  	
Head Nurse        . .                                                 	
Staff Nurses   —                                                    ..
Senior Social Workers            .           	
Orderlies     .                                                    	
Custodial Attendants —                                	
Pharmacist                                        	
Nurses Aide — __      	
House Matrons   	
Rehabilitation Officer	
Personnel Officers                       	
Administrative Officers     	
Cooks      	
Kitchen Maids      .   ._                    	
Research Officers  	
Mechanic     	
Total         ._  	
1252 of these positions were through amalgamation.
13
 STAFF DEVELOPMENT,  1973
Reorganized in June 1973, the Division focuses on the development of training resources and opportunities for field staff.
This year the Director has been exploring resources offered by
individual and institutional centres, working closely with interregional conference planners, working with the University of Victoria in development of a social work undergraduate programme,
and with the regional colleges and The British Columbia Institute
of Technology. He has met with field staff to discuss, plan, and
implement staff-development sessions, and has begun liaison or
co-ordination with regional consultants.
The Assistant Director held three two week in-service sessions
for 25 field staff. She worked on inter-regional conferences aimed
at sharing information with staff as to new developments.   At the
present time, training opportunities for clerical staff are being
explored.
The two regional Staff Development Consultants in Regions
6 and 11, appointed in December of 1973, are actively exploring
staff needs and planning programmes around case-load management, resource planning and development, communication skills,
and long-range planning in family and child welfare programmes.
Regions 4, 5, and 10 have, with some assistance of staff from
this Division, been actively planning similar programmes for the
spring.
Departmental staff are taking good advantage of night and
correspondence courses offered through the universities, colleges,
and other adult education courses. The Public Service Commission
is paying tuition costs in most cases.
14
 REGIONAL ORGANIZATION
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REGION                            OFFICE
2 VANCOUVER
3 VERNON
4 NELSON
5 PRINCE   GEORGE
6 ABBOTSFORD
7 TERRACE
8 DAWSON   CREEK
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BRITISH COLUMBIA
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REGIONAL    OFFICES     Shown  Thus
REGIONAL    BOY'S         Shown  Thui           *
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15
 RESEARCH, 1973
Research and Statistics Division is made up of a small staff
of three researchers with secretarial support.
One of the central activities of this Division has been participation in the Federal-Provincial Social Security Review. The
Director of the Research and Statistics Division has been the
Province's delegate to the Working Party on Income Maintenance
which is one of several subcommittees involved in this review. The
task of the Income Maintenance Working Party is to produce, by
April of 1975, a system for maintaining income that is equitable,
fair, and just.
With the various interpretations of "equitable, fair, and just"
presented by the representatives of the 10 provinces and the
Federal Government, and with the complexities of the present
income security programmes, participation in the working party
has been demanding of time and effort.   To meet the deadline for
a new income maintenance system it is expected the demands will
continue in the coming year.
Early in 1973 the responsibility for the statistical functions of
the Department was included with the research function. With the
added responsibility of statistics-gathering, it became apparent that
the Department's information system, including the inter-related
payment processes, required a complete review. To meet this
need, the Management Consultant Services of the Data Processing
Centre in the Department of Finance have provided the Department
with two systems analysts to study our Management Information
System and Payment Procedures.
In addition to the above activities and functions, the Division
has been involved in analysing programmes from existing data and
supplying information for the development of new programmes for
the Department.
16
 SERVICES FOR FAMILIES AND CHILDREN
 PROGRAMME: DAY CARE
Goal—To meet the care needs of children up to 12 years of
age through a variety of programmes. Day care provides a support
for the family when the parent(s) is working, attending an educational institution, or during prolonged illness or other family crises.
The programme is designed to provide an enriching experience
supplying extra stimulation, emotional and physical support for
the child.
Description—Five distinct programmes are now available to
the 9,500 children in the Province receiving subsidized day
care.
Figure 1
Children Receiving Subsidized Day Care as of December 31, 1973
All-day Programmes
• Group day care
• Family day care
• In-home care
Est. 6,400 children
Half-day Programmes
• Nursery schools
• Private kindergartens
• Group and family day care
(part-time attendance)
Est. 3,100 children
9,500 children
A. Group day care—Child-care centres throughout the Province serve~as-centres~ror 3 to 5-year-olds, handicapped children,
children aged 18 months to 3 years of age, and school-age children
who attend the centre after school. All centres are inspected and
licensed by the Department of Health, through the Community
Care Facilities Licensing Act, and staff are required to have
specialized pre-school training. Group day-care facilities may be
open all day (see Fig. 1).
B. Family day care—Child-care centres in licensed homes provide an^fternYtiveType of care for up to five children per home.
These small home-based centres permit considerable flexibility with
regard to hours and age-range of children accepted. Homes
delivering day-care services to fewer than three children do not
require licensing by the Health Department, but a support programme is being implemented to aid the head of each of these
small family day-care centres. The support programme makes
available child-care information and help, as needed. Family
day-care centres may be open all day.
C. In-home care—A new programme that enables children to
remain in their own home with care given by an individual chosen
by the parent(s). There are many situations at present where
group care or family day care may not be available or sufficiently
flexible. For example, in-home care may be used by families
employed in shift work. A screening and support service is being
implemented to help parent(s) requiring the in-home programme.
As of November 30, 1973, approximately 2,000 children are being
assisted to receive substitute care in their own homes.
D. The Nursery School Programme—Furnishes valuable preschool experience for 3 to 5-year-olds up to a maximum of three
hours per day, five days a week. Supervisors in this programme
must have special pre-school training; centres are licensed by the
Department of Health. Approximately 35 nursery schools are
providing special programmes for handicapped children.
E. Kindergarten—Fee subsidization is available to children
attending private kindergartens in cases where public kindergartens
18
 do not yet exist. Handicapped children attending specialized private kindergartens are eligible for fee assistance. Kindergartens are
open half day (see Fig. 1).
Figure 2
Numbers1 of Children Subsidized in Day-care Programmes,
September 1972 to December 1973
2,600
children
Sept. 15, '72
3,000
children
Jan. 1, '73
9,500
children
Dec. 31,'73
1 Figures are rounded for convenience.
Changing patterns in 1973—The new day-care programme,
instituted on April 1, 1973, has been planned to:
(1)  Provide more, and better quality, day-care centres (see
Fig. 3).
Figure 3
Number of Croup Day-care Centres in British Columbia Operating or
Being Developed at Year-end, 1966-73
300
250
in
u
Tt
(250)m
$   200
/
O
/
/
£3
B
I   150
(152)/
100
(67)/
(54)    J1V
50
ilVfJ^^^
1966     1968       1970     1971      1972    1973
Year
19
 (2) Involve communities and parents directly in the development of day-care centres.
(3) Make the variety of services available to more families
through a revised subsidization programme. Under the
new simplified subsidization plan, parents are eligible
for subsidies determined on a sliding scale, based on
parents' net income (see Fig. 4). Applications are
readily available through day-care centres, local Human
Resources offices or day-care information centres.
Parents are free to choose from the variety of types of
child care so as to~receive carie^HPsuite^TcriReir
individual needs.
Size of
family
If two persons
in family, family
pays
Three persons,
family pays
Four persons,
family pays
Five persons,
family pays
Six persons,
family pays
Seven persons,
family pays
Eight persons
or more, family
pays
Figure 4
Day Care Subsidy Chart
FAMILY NET INCOME PER MONTH
400 420 440 460 480 500 520 540 560 580 600 620 640 660 680 700 720 740 760 780 800 820 840 860 880 900
5 15 25 35 45 55 65 75 85 95
5 15 25 35 45 55 65 75 85 95 105 115 125 135 145 155 165 175 185 195
5 15 25 35 45 55 65 75 85 95 105 115 125 135 145 155 165 175 185 195
5 15 25 35 45 55 65 75 85 95 105 115 125 135 145 155 165
5 15 25 35 45 55 65 75 85 95 105 115 125 135
15 25 35 45 55 65 75 85 95 105
5 15 25 35 45 55 65 75
Here is an example, using the chart:
In a three-person family (two parents and one child
or one parent and two children), if the total take home
pay is $460, the chart shows that the family group
would pay a total $5 a month for day care for the
children and the Government would pay the balance of
up to $110 per child.
20
 A survey conducted in Vancouver during the summer indicated that, in that city, children of single-
working-parent families comprise 70 per cent of the
day-care consumers receiving Government subsidization. The other 30 per cent are children of two-parent
families, some where both parents work or attend educational institutions.
(4) Enable communities to open new group centres
through the Capital Grants Programme. Nonprofit
societies are eligible for grants of up to $20,000 to meet
capital costs, and up to $2,500 for equipment. Money
is extended on a matching basis to the society. That is,
the society must match the contribution of the Government. Matching is frequently accomplished by the
community with a land donation or a long-term lease
at nominal rental. Donations by parents of hard work,
time, materials, and skills are also considered in assessments of matching. Community need is an important
factor in determining grant allocation. At the end of
1973, 103 day-care societies have received grants totalling $509,724 through this programme.
(5) In 1974 the increased Family Allowances ($20 per
child as of January 1) will be treated as income in determining families' net income. Government child-care
subsidies will rise to accommodate this increase so that
families will receive the benefit of these new higher
family allowances.
Cost-sharing status—With the Department's move to replace
"means testing" by net income figures as the criteria used to deter
mine rates of fee subsidization, the Province has encountered some
difficulty in reaching a suitable cost-sharing agreement with the
Federal Government.
Initially, Ottawa agreed to accept the income test as an acceptable basis for sharing. However, when the scope of the Day-care
Programme was realized, the Federal Government advised the
Province that under the Canada Assistance Plan they would be
willing to share costs only for those persons who were in "social
need" or "likely to become in need."
What this means to British Columbia is that in order to take
full advantage of Federal funding, the focus of the Day-care Programme would have to be changed from that of a preventive social
service to a service for families who are already experiencing serious
social problems. Low income is not considered a sufficient reason
in itself to establish "social need."
Details have not yet been completely resolved, but we are still
hopeful of a compromise that will enable us to obtain sharing for
the major portion of our programme, without destroying its direction. The following table shows day-care expenditures and the
amounts contributed by the Federal Government, 1971/73.
Table 3—Total Day-care Expenditures and Federal Sharing
Calendar Year Expenditure Federal Portion Received
1973.
1972..
1971..
4,266,591
(to be determined)
1,533,827
660,123
1,194,116
518,193
PROGRAMME: PREVENTIVE AND PROTECTIVE SERVICES FOR CHILDREN AND THEIR FAMILIES
Goal—To provide preventive and protective services to
troubled families with children.
Description—Preventive and protective services to children
and their families are authorized by the Protection of Children Act,
the Equal Guardianship of Infants Act, the Juvenile Delinquents
Act, and the Children of Unmarried Parents Act. This entails all
supportive services, including counselling, to maintain a child in
his/her own home, as well as protection through Court sanction in
cases where removal becomes necessary.
21
 The protection services carried out by the Department include
the following:
A. Under the Protection of Children Act, Departmental staff
first carry out investigation of complaints that a child is in need
of protection. They attempt to determine the family problem leading to neglect or abuse, and provide services to help in resolution
of these problems within the family. The separation of child
(where necessary) is through application to the Court. There is
a provision of continuing service to the family to reunite the child
with his/her biological parents, or alternative planning for the
child. The Child-in-Care Section plans for children who are
temporary wards, permanent, wards, equal guardianship wards
(orphans), Juvenile Delinquents Act wards, and nonwards with
parental consent.
Efforts are geared, first, to reunite the child with his/her
biological family. All needed support and services are mobilized
to this end. If the child's return to his/her home, at that time,
appears inadvisable, plans for an alternative home are made. Such
plans are made on a short-term basis as long as there exists some
possibility of the child's return to his/her biological parents.
The number of children in care under the Protection of Children
Act is given in the following table:
Table 4—Protection of Children Act Wards
Number of children in care of the Superintendent
of Child Welfare and of Children's Aid
Societies—
As at December 31, 1973     6,301
As at March 31, 1973   6,444
As at March 31, 1972      6,448
B. Under the Juvenile Delinquents Act, where the Court disposition results in committal of the child to the care of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare, services are also provided by the
Department of Human Resources.    Such service may include the
placement and supervision of the child in a foster home or other
child-care resource and provision for any other services required.
In the provision of any service, the specific goal is to co-ordinate
activities with the Probation Officers to develop and implement
special services, programmes, and resources that will enable the
child to remain in his own home or community while seeking
amelioration of the problems that have brought him into conflict
with the law.
The number of children in care under the Juvenile Delinquents
Act is given in the following table:
Table 5—Juvenile Delinquents Act Wards
Number of children in care of the Superintendent
of Child Welfare and of Children's Aid
Societies—
As at December 31, 1973           971
As at March 31, 1973         1,111
As at March 31, 1972      1,290
C. Under the Equal Guardianship of Infants Act there is a
guarantee of provision of service to children who are orphans.
Guardianship is shared between the Superintendent of Child Welfare and the Public Trustee, who take responsibility for the child's
financial affairs.
The number of children in care under the Equal Guardianship
of Infants Act is given in the following table:
Table 6—Equal Guardianship of Infants Act
Number of children in care of the Superintendent
of Child Welfare and of Children's Aid
Societies—
As at December 31, 1973         254
As at March 31, 1973       171
As at March 31, 1972         87
In 1971 the Public Trustee started to assign guardianship of the
person to the Superintendent of Child Welfare, reserving for his
22
 office responsibility for the child's financial affairs. In 1973
changes in the Equal Guardianship of Infants Act enshrined in
legislation this arrangement for every orphan.
This added a number of children to the case loads who do not
necessarily require social work service since they are living with
concerned and competent relatives. However, these relatives now
have access to a local social worker who is accustomed to dealing
with children's problems, if they do require advice.
D. Under the Children of Unmarried Parents Act, the obligation is placed on the Superintendent of Child Welfare to "obtain
all information with respect to every child born out of wedlock and
do all such things as permitted and required under the Act." In
the first instance, service is provided at the local level. This may
be to provide advice and assistance, financial and (or) otherwise,
to the mother during pregnancy, and advice with reference to
planning after the child's birth, which may include consideration
regarding adoption.
The Superintendent of Child Welfare becomes involved in the
situation if and when action is taken by the mother to obtain
financial assistance from the putative father. Maintenance for the
child may be provided either by way of agreement or court order.
Agreements are among the mother, putative father, and the Superintendent, who must be responsible for the final amount agreed upon
and protect the interests of the child. The Superintendent of Child
Welfare is notified of and acknowledges all initial Court hearings
under the Act, and payments ordered by the Court, or arranged by
agreement, are payable to the Superintendent of Child Welfare.
The programme, therefore, functions in close liaison with Child
Welfare Accounts, with one person responsible for all CUPA
accounts.
E. The Superintendent of Child Welfare is responsible for the
provision of reports to the Supreme Court, at the direction of a
Judge of the Supreme Court, on any matter concerning custody of
children under the Divorce Act or Equal Guardianship of Infants
Act.
The Order of a Judge of the Supreme Court, directing the
Superintendent of Child Welfare to provide a report to the Court,
is forwarded to Child Welfare Division. Child Welfare Division
requests an inquiry by the appropriate District Offices(s) and
provides pertinent information and forms. The District Office(s)
return completed forms.
A Court report is completed in Child Welfare Division providing information on the parents' circumstances and a recommendation to the Court respecting custody of the children.
In a specific few cases, the Superintendent may appoint separate
counsel to represent the interests of the children, particularly where
the custody dispute is between other than biological parents.
Similar service is provided for the Supreme Court and Family
Courts in other provinces and countries.
The numbers of reports filed follows: 1973, 70 reports; 1972,
37 reports; 1971, 51 reports.
The substantially increased number of reports filed in 1973 may
reflect an increasing awareness among Supreme Court Judges of the
importance of soliciting disinterested judgements that would help
to protect the rights of children.
Some custody decisions are made at the Provincial (Family)
Court level, under the Family Relations Act. Custody reports to
Family Court are provided directly to the Court from the District
Office involved.
F. The Superintendent's office maintains a Registry of Abused
Children to promote better understanding in the professional and
lay public of the problems of the battered child and of the parent
who abuses or neglects his/her child. The Protection Services seek
to make professionals aware of their obligation to report cases of
child abuse to the Registry, to the end of providing a body of documentation from which a sound preventive programme may be
developed. Cases of reported child abuse have increased steadily
in the past three years, from 90 in 1971 to 136 in 1972 and 171
in 1973.
G. The Superintendent's office is responsible for arrangements
to return to other provinces (or states) of residence, children under
age 17 temporarily stranded in British Columbia, or of British
Columbia children stranded in other provinces or states.   Any child
23
 is eligible if he/she is destitute, without guardianship, and a resident
of another province, state, or country.
The Child Welfare Division acts as liaison in dealing with a
similar child welfare authority in the other province or state in most
cases, making contact to advise of transportation arrangements.
The district office assumes direct responsibility for making transportation arrangements, co-ordinating service with RCMP and
municipal police where they are involved, and, in many cases,
where no particular problem exists, may make direct contact with
the other province to effect repatriation.
The following table indicates the numbers of children returned
to their permanent residences in 1973 and the past three fiscal
years:
Table 7—Repatriation of Children
1973     494 1971/72      674
1972/73   595 1970/71   822
The declining number of children returned to their permanent
residence in 1973 may reflect, in part, a decline in the number of
unprepared children travelling in British Columbia. As described
in the section on hostels, travelling youth tended to be better
equipped, financially, in 1973.
The total number of children in care of the Superintendent of
Child Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies was 9,574 as of
December 31, 1973. This figure includes all the children who are
nonwards (children in care wtih parental consent), wards, and
children before Court under the Protection of Children Act, the
Juvenile Delinquents Act, the Equal Guardianship of Infants Act,
and children in British Columbia who are wards of other provinces.
Changing patterns in 1973—Based on the premises that services to troubled families with children should focus, first, on efforts
to improve the relationship of the child in thejiqme, field staff have
been encouraged to develop special services geared to the individual needs of each family. The freedom to spend considerable
money on the child without admitting him/her to care is a new
development which started in the fall of 1972. Such expenditures
follow from the principle that children should be taken into care
only as a last resort. Field staff may arrange for counsellors, child-
care aides, or other specialized support as needed.
As part of the over-all integration of services in the Province,
the Family and Children's Service and Municipal Welfare Services
in Victoria were integrated on September 1, 1973, with the general
services of the Department of Human Resources.
PROGRAMME:
Goal—To provide good substitute parenting by meeting the
physical, emotional, and social needs of children placed in the
home and to present identification models of positive adult functioning by which children may pattern their own lives constructively.
Description—Foster parents are approved by the Department
for the placement of children who need a temporary or permanent
substitute home. Some foster homes are placements of the child
in the home of a relative. A considerable portion of the placements
made in the homes of relatives receive no financial support from the
Department. These "free" foster homes made up about one-
seventh of the total foster placements in 1973. No payments are
made to the relatives to defray costs, but social workers can be
called on to offer help.    Most foster parents are paid the basic
FOSTER HOMES
rates which defray expenses only and include no fee for service.
However, a child who needs extra supervision for his/her special
needs may have a special rate paid on his/her behalf to compensate
foster parents for extra time and skills required.
The basic rates paid to foster parents on behalf of children in
care follows:
Table 8—Child-in-care Rates as of June 1, 1973
Basic Clothing
Age-group                                                      Maintenance Allowance
$ $
Birth to 5 years       60 9
6 to 11 years      75 11
12 and 13 years      85 13
14 years and over      95 15
Total
$
69
86
98
110
24
 Social workers in the Department work together with members
of the B.C. Federation of Foster Parents' Association, a registered
society that acts as the collective voice for all foster parents. There
are 36 local Foster Parents' Associations in British Columbia working toward improved fostering and child-care standards.
The following table indicates the number of children placed in
foster homes in 1973 and the past three fiscal years:
Table 9—Number of Children (in care of Superintendent of Child Welfare
and Children's Aid Societies) in Foster-home Care
As at December 31, 1973.
As at March 31, 1973	
As at March 31, 1972	
As at March 31, 1971	
Paid
Foster-home
Care
Free Home
and Free
Relatives'
Home
Total
6,106
1,107
7,213
6,471
950
7,421
6,762
1,021
7,783
6,910
218
7,128
The number of foster homes approved for placement has been
declining steadily over the past few years, but in 1973 the decline
was arrested (see Table 10 following).
Table 10—Foster Homes Approved for Placement
Homes Approvals
Approved Pending Total
As at August 1973  2,789                    758 3,547
As at August 1972   2,877                    645 3,522
As at October 1971  2,976                    747 3,723
As at August 1970   3,121                    795 3,916
The following graph illustrates Departmental expenditures for
foster children:
Foster Children Expenditures, 1973 and Fiscal Years 1970/71,
1971/72, 1972/73
1973
$7,899,694
$6,756,953
1972/73
1971/72
$6,223,569
1970/71
$6,130,190
Changing patterns in 1973—The increased expenditure in
1973 represents an   increase in the basic rates paid   for children
"oTchil
in care, rather than an increase in the number
lildren placed
in paid foster-home care.
In 1973 there were fewer children coming into care as Special
Services to Children were used to help maintain the child in his/her
own home. Related to this, the children coming into care in 1973
had greater problems than in the past. A higher proportion of
foster homes received special rates in line with the extra care
required.
Cost-sharing basis—Costs of the Foster Parents Programme
are shared on a 50:50 basis with the Federal Government.
SPECIALIZED CHILD-CARE RESOURCES
Goal—To provide the best form of alternative care within the
community for children who cannot remain in their own homes or
fit into the available foster homes.
Description—Children in care are served through a variety
of means. Some are placed in foster homes, others are on probation for adoption, some remain in their own homes or in the homes
25
 of relatives, and some are independent and self-supporting. There
is an additional group of children who are in specialized child-care
resources. This group makes up about 16 per cent of the total
number of children in care. As of December 31, 1973, the total
number of children in care was 9,574. This is an interesting drop
over previous years, considering British Columbia's rising population.
Table 11—Comparison Number of Children in Care
Over the Past 3% Years
December 1973
9,574
March 1973
9,913
March 1972
10,27'4
March 1971
_9i2ZL__j
These children are in the following types of care:
CMdrcrtjLajCarfi.
atJJecej
This section of the report concentrates on specialized resources.
These specialized resources vary in size, purpose, and structure.
Sizes range from small group homes like the McKenzie Street Group
home in Vancouver, serving eight children, to larger facilities such
as the Island Youth Centre near Nanaimo which had an enrolment
of 64 children as of December 1973. The general trend is toward
smaller centres. For example, the enrolment in Island Youth Centre
decreased by 86 children in 1973.
Resources may be categorized as follows:
1- Rscdying-homes and assessment and planning centres—
These are temporary residences for children taken into care. Assessment and planning centres are well staffed with professionals who
attempt to set out a programme for the child and a plan for his/her
future. Receiving-homes have fewer staff members; some are private homes, others are run and managed by the Department.
Residence in receiving-homes is viewed as a short-term arrangement. This arrangement is "preventive" in nature in that receiving-
homes often look after children in crisis household situations, until
they can return to their own homes.
2- GrouP homes—These are used for "treatment purposes"
and as a substitute for smaller foster homes and family homes.
The number of children in group homes ranges from six to twelve.
Many of these children return to their families within a short time.
3- Tj^atment and education resources—As much as possible,
these centres try to adapt their programmes to fit the needs of the
children referred. Of primary importance is the attempt to provide
service in such a way as to avoid the labelling of individuals. Children are referred to programmes within their own community
wherever they are available. There is contact between the referring
worker, the family, and programme staff. In 1973, great efforts
were taken to keep the child in his or her community. New programmes for autistic children and children with other learning
disabilities are being developed.
26
 The following table shows Departmental expenditures for specialized resources for children:
Table 12—Costs of Specialized Resources to the Department in 1973
Departmental
Expenditures
$
Receiving-homes             454,078
Group homes  -      1,415,396
Treatment and educational resources  ---    9,302,947
Total      11,073,421
Changing patterns in 1973—As was noted earlier, the total
number of children in care did not increase in 1973. In fact,
despite population growth in the Province, the total number of
children in care declined. This new trend is also reflected in the
numbers of children in specialized resources as the following table
indicates:
Table 13—Comparison of the Number of Children in Specialized
Resources Over the Past 33A Years
December 1973   March 1973       March 1972    March 1971
Treatment and educational
centres   785
Group homes  486
Receiving   homes,   assessment and planning    183
Therapeutic foster homes1   44
Total 	
.1,498
1,049
330
198
9
1,586
1,031
384
168
1,583
1,131
217
135
1,483
i A new programme designed to meet individual needs.
Of the children in specialized resources there is a notable
change in programme emphasis. Perhaps this may best be summed
up in comments by John Noble, recently appointed Executive
Director of Social Services and Income Security, to the Educational
Rehabilitation Conference at the University of British Columbia in
December of 1973. He said: "We have been known to say: 'This
child is not doing well in our programme; take him away and bring
us a better child.' I am amending this to read as follows: 'This
programme is not meeting the needs of this child; take away the
programme and bring us a better one.' "
This individualized approach to children in need might be
summed up in the phrase "programmes for kids, not kids for programmes." Importance is given to work with families and to support programmes such as educational programmes, group and
individual counselling, and recreational activities. Evaluation of
programmes is an ongoing concern. While it is still in the transitional stage, eventually all resources will be "attached" to regions
with decentralized community control.
Cost-sharing status—Most of these programmes are shared
on a 50:50 basis with the Federal Government.
PROGRAMME: ADOPTION
Goal—First, to provide a permanent home to any child or
children whose biological parents are unable to care for them.
Services are rendered also to the person or persons who want to
become adoptive parents, as well as the biological parents of
adopted children.
Second, to ensure that the legal and social requirements have
been met in each adoption completed in British Columbia.
Description—The programme will be described in two sections—adoption placement and adoption completion.
A. Adoption placement—To make the best plan possible for
each child available for adoption, all resources are reviewed.
Should there not be a suitable home in British Columbia, other
resources are explored through ARENA or the Adoption Resource
Exchange of Ontario.
ARENA, the Adoption Resource Exchange of North America,
was established in 1968 as an interprovincial and international
organization to help with children awaiting placement. In the mid-
1960's the large number of infants available for adoption surpassed
27
 the supply of adoptive parents and an active recruitment programme was begun. Through ARENA, adoptive parents were
sought throughout British Columbia, the United States, and Europe,
with considerable success.
The adoption situation was dramatically reversed in 1970 with
a steadily diminishing number of infants available and a large
number of adoptive parents awaiting a child. This situation came
about because of cultural, social, and legal change, with the liberalized abortion law making the greatest impact.
In 1973, through ARENA, the Department is offering homes
for the child with special needs in the care of agencies elsewhere
in Canada or the United States. Infant placement directly from
hospital has been the prime objective of the Adoption Programme
for the past 20 years, but presently with a diminishing number of
infants available for adoption, the focus has been directed to the
older child and family groups. In 1973, 24 family groups were
placed, a total of 55 children. The dearth of infantjTavailable has
Seated a more positive climate also for the adoption of children
with health problems.
Through the co-operation of International Social Service a
number of children from Hong Kong, Korea, and Japan have been
brought to British Columbia for adoption. Presently placements
are being arranged for children from Viet Nam.
Since 1966 the co-operation and involvement of the Open Door
Society in the Adoption Programme in British Columbia has been
of great importance. The Open Door Society was founded in
Montreal to encourage couples to adopt children of races other
than their own. In 1966 a branch was established in British
Columbia. This society is a voluntary one, achieving its objectives
through workshops, seminars, and individual relationships. Its
members make themselves available for discussion of the unique
needs of parents and children, share programmes, and offer encouragement.
During 1973, 636 children were placed in adoption homes.
The following table compares 1973 figures with the last three fiscal
years:
Table 14—Adoption Placement, 1973 and Fiscal Years
1970/71, 1971/72, 1972/73
Children
Year Placed
1973       636
1972/73        766
Children
Placed
Year
1971/72       839
1970/71   1,131
The following table gives a break-down by type of placement
for the 1973 adoption placements:
Table 15—Adoption Placements During 1973, by Type of Placement
Location
Type of Placement
Total
Direct Placements
Foster Home to Adoption
Six Months'
Probation
Long-term
Probation
Within Same
Home
In Another
Home
In Province	
.   236
6
70
12
308
4
Total
620
16
636
Outside Province
Table 16 gives a break-down on the age-range of children
placed in 1973.
Table 16—Age-range of Children Placed in Adopting Homes
Total
Number o
Children
Birth up to but not including 15 days   213
15 days up to but not including 1 month  101
1 month up to but not including 3 months     84
3 months up to but not including 6 months     32
6 months up to but not including 1 year      36
1 year      28
2 years     16
years
3 years .
4 years .
5 years
6 years .
20
26
18
14
28
 Table 16—Age-range of Children Placed in Adopting Homes—Continued
Total
Number of
Children
7 years
8 years.
....      13
__   10
9 years  —    ->
10 years -     °
11 years    '
12 years      3
13 years    1
14 years    2
15 years  —   2
16 years  *
17 years      —   1
18 years  1
Total
636
B. Adoption completion—The Department must prepare the
Superintendent's report and recommendation to the Supreme Court
in all adoptions (including those not placed by the Department).
All documents necessary for legal completion of adoptions of
children placed by the Department also must be submitted to the
Supreme Court, together with the Superintendent's report.
In 1973 the Superintendent of Child Welfare submitted reports
on 1,846 children to the Supreme Court. This is not the number
of children legally adopted in the calendar year, as there is normally
a time lag between submission of the report and making of the
adoption order. Figures for the legal completions in 1973 will not
be available for several months. The following table gives information as to the number of children legally adopted in the past three
fiscal years:
Table 17-
Fiscal Year
1972/73 -
1971/72 .
1970/71 .
-Children Legally Adopted in British Columbia,
by Fiscal Year
Number of Children
  1,820
    2,306
  2,804
The next table gives a break-down of legal adoptions completed,
according to the kind of adoption situation involved. The following
four descriptive groups have been isolated for this table:
(1) Children placed for adoption by the Department of
Human Resources and the Children's Aid Societies.
(2) Step-parent adoptions.
(3) Relative adoptions other than step-parent.
(4) Private adoptions (child is not related to the adopting
parents and placement was not made through a social
agency).
The 1973 calendar-year figures are based on the number of
reports of children filed with the Supreme Court by the Superintendent of Child Welfare.
Table 18—Adoptions Completed, by Categories of Adoption
Category
Placed by Department of Hu
man Resources or the Chil
dren's Aid Society 	
Fiscal Year                             Calendar
1970/71
1971/72
1972/73
Year 1973
1,955
742
69
38
2,804
1,445
763
65
33
2,306
965
745
76
34
1,820
915
831
55
45
1,846
Other relative  	
Totals	
From this table it can be seen clearly that the decline in numbers has been in Departmental and Children's Aid Society placements.
Changing patterns in 1973 — Adoption placements and
completions continued to decline in 1973 as the number of children
needing homes declined.
With a decreasing number of newborn babies needing homes,
the Department announced a one-year moratorium in July on
applications for newborn babies with no problems. At that time
the Department had 1,200 applications on file for newborn babies.
29
il
 In April a Supreme Court of Canada decision effectively froze
all adoption procedures involving Indian children and non-Indian
families. In October the Minister ordered a temporary moratorium on all new applications for adoption of children with Indian
status by non-Indian families, pending the resolution of certain
legal questions in the Courts.
Cost-sharing status—No accounts are kept of expenditures
with regard to adoption, as it is entirely a service programme, with
no ready means of assessing costs. Federal contribution is on a
50:50 basis toward the social workers' salaries.
Services to families and children are provided by some of the
following Community Programmes:
COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES
Supporting
Programme Contribution!
Delta: $
Tsawwassen Latch Key Society—Day care after school,
one-shot grant      1,000.00
Duncan:
Community Options Society—Drop-in and live-in centre
for disadvantaged youth with farm section  87,500.00
Kaslo:
Village of Kaslo—Employment programme	
4,180.00
Kelowna:
Group Living Home Society—Establishment of group-living home for disadvantaged youth  20,000.00
Mission:
Memorial Centre Society—Drop-out redirection programme    6,551.67
School District No.  75—Helping boys  regain self-confidence; directed at education drop-outs      3,370.00
Nanaimo:
1927 Drop-in Centre Association—Proposal for co-ordinating and evaluating existing agencies, drop-in and
planned youth activities    14,970.00
Nelson:
Child  Care District—Two child-care  centres, pre-school
learning disability, camp resources for children in need . 22,988.00
Single Parents Group—Single parents social and resource
programme, with counselling available        300.00
New Westminster:
YM-YWCA—Detached youth workers identify needs of
youth and meet needs with programme     3,120.00
Programme
Quesnel:
Pacific Association of Communication in Friendship Indian
Centres—Help for children of Nazko, recreation travel,
and redirection in education	
Supporting
Contribution!
8,750.00
i From the Department of Human Resources.
Smithers:
Northern   Training  Centre   (Dave's  Plumbing) — Youth
training centre    25,890.00
Vancouver:
Children's Furniture Workshop—Programme to produce,
repair, and make toys and equipment for day-care centres   	
Children's Hospital Diagnostic Centre—Programme to discover if pre-school children might profit from day care..
Clark Park Latch Key Programme—Grant for after-school
day care 	
Out of School Society—Drop-out, remedial education	
The Outreach  House—Programme  to  assist  youth  who
have  become disillusioned  about regular  school  and
offers some alternatives to a new life-style 	
Saturna Youth Camp  	
Serendipity Play School—Day care    	
The Toy Library—Toy pick-up and exchange in association
with libraries  	
Vancouver Area YMCA—Social services prevention programme 	
Vancouver-Richmond Association for Retarded—Child preschool for retarded, programming includes family	
600.00
5,000.00
1,865.00
1,000.00
12,922.15
600.00
4,062.00
5,164.00
3,000.00
15,575.45
30
 Supporting
Programme Contribution!
Vancouver—Continued $
Association for Children With Learning Disabilities—Survey "at risk" children     2,000.00
Society for Total Education—Co-operative with education
and assisting youth to pursue education in supportive
and imaginative methods;  all-rounded programme     7,490.00
Vernon:
Youth Resources Society—To assist youth drop-in, information, and referral         500.00
i From the Department of Human Resources.
Programme
Victoria :
Blanshard   Community
income children	
Supporting
Contribution!
Council—Arts   and   crafts,   low-
    100.00
Langford Alternative Programme—Educational and vocational redirection for boy and girl drop-outs  7,000.00
Langford Boys' Club—Work activity, alternative education, incentive programme for drop-outs  4,575.00
Victoria YM-YWCA—Camp on Saltspring Island for teenagers   12,861.00
Society for Autistic Children—Programme to assist autistic
children     5,100.00
31
  SERVICES FOR EVERYONE
 PROGRAMME:  SOCIAL ALLOWANCE
Goal—To provide a substitute income and special services to
British Columbians who are unable to provide for themselves.
Description—Professional and semiprofessional staff in local
Human Resources offices receive applications for assistance, assess
eligibility, and arrange for payment. In addition to the processing
of the applications, the local staff are responsible for the provision
of counselling regarding other concerns that the applicant or recipient might have.
Persons in British Columbia qualify for assistance
(1) If applicant's individual assets other than his/her
home and personal belongings total no more than $500
if single or $1,000 if married. Applicants owning
automobiles arc eligible if the car is valued at $1,500
or less.
AND
(2) If applicant has no other source of income available
to provide an income at the level of basic social
allowance rates (see Table 19).
Table 19-
—Basic Social Assistance Rate Schedule
as of December 1973
Number of Persons
(Family Size)
Total
Support
Shelter
Basic
Maximum
$
$
$
1   	
     65
75
120
135
150
160
140
250
300
350
400
2 	
   130
3  	
   165
4 	
   200
5 	
  240
6 	
  275
170
180
445
485
7 	
  305
In practice, recipients of social assistance generally fall into
one or more of the following groups:
(1) Separated, divorced, and widowed mothers.
(2) Those unable to be employed due to mental or physical
health problems.
(3) Unemployed.
(4) Children in the care of relatives.
Ninety per cent of the Social Allowance recipients are considered not employable, or only marginally employable, due to
poor health, the need of mothers to care for their children, or
inability to satisfy minimal requirements of employers.
Approximately one-quarter of all social assistance recipients
are children. Some of these children are cared for by relatives
outside the immediate family. In such cases, support payments
are made, but shelter payments are not generally included (see
Table 19).
Changing patterns in 1973 — The following table gives
figures for the monthly average numbers of people receiving social
assistance during 1973 and the last three fiscal years:
Table 20—Number of Recipients: Basic Social Allowance
Estimated Average Number of Recipients per Month
1973
104,528
1972/73
105,339
1971/72
123,385
1970/71
133,153
As can be seen in the table, the average number of recipients
per month decreased by 18,046 over the previous year in the fiscal
year 1972/73. Further decreases occurred late in 1973, with the
transfer to Mincome of recipients over 60 years of age.
34
 Table 21   indicates the Departmental expenditures  of basic
Social Allowance during 1973 and the last three fiscal years:
Table 21—Departmental Expenditure: Basic Social Allowance
Year Amount Year
1973   106,039,053
1972/73      92,390,107
Amount
$
1971/72     94,142,806
1970/71     93,486,525
Increased expenditures in 1973 reflect the change in the basic
Social Allowance rate, rather than an increase in the number of
recipients.
The social assistance rales quoted in Table 19 represent the
new increases applicable as of June 1973. Rates were increased by
an average of 32 per cent and a simpler method for determining
the rate to be paid was adopted.
The rate provision for shelter meets the actual cost for approximately two-thirds of British Columbia's social assistance recipients.
Family units of two or more with shelter costs in excess of these
amounts receive an additional payment of three-quarters the
amount by which the actual cost exceeds the basic shelter provision.
Previous to June 1, 1973, recipients were supplemented for only
one-half of the difference between actual shelter cost and the basic
provision.
A pre-natal allowance of $25 per month is also provided to
ensure adequate nutrition for expectant mothers. Dietary allowances of $20 per month are provided with respect to other health
conditions entailing special dietary costs. In the autumn, families
with school-age children were granted a special payment to help
with the extra costs incurred at the beginning of the school-term.
Fifteen dollars was granted for each child up to the age of 12, and
$25 for each child age 12 and over. To provide for other Items of
Special Need, social workers are equipped with authority for expenditures in amounts of up to, but not exceeding, $500. The following table indicates the Departmental expenditures for Items of Special Need (formerly called "Emergency Health Aid"):
Table 22—Departmental Expenditure: Items of Special Need
Year $ Year $
1973  751,903 1971/72   158,921
1972/73  281,555 1970/71  323,885
It is the intent of British Columbia's new rates to provide a level
of basic income sufficient to permit an individual or family to budget
for their basic needs without privation and without requests to local
Department of Human Resources offices for additional amounts of
money (overages). These rates replace a system of payments that
were substantially less than needed for basic budgetary requirements. As a result, continuous requests had to be made for additional funds or overages for food, clothing, utilities, and other
critical needs. The social worker was placed in the position of
having to exercise unmanageable discretion and of being seen in a
hostile rather than in a helping role by the recipient.
In undertaking to improve public welfare benefits, British
Columbia has recognized the need to move away from demeaning
public welfare processes, however well meaning, and to permit the
beneficiary to assume responsibility for his or her own life. It is
anticipated this will remove much of the sense of "hassling" that
has characterized public welfare and will free social workers to
provide more constructive help in problem-solving.
In undertaking to improve substantially the level of public welfare benefits it was recognized that persons in full-time employment
should not receive less than was available through public welfare
programmes. The Province of British Columbia has therefore
adopted a policy of supplementing full-time earnings when necessary to ensure a comparable basic level of income. The same
eligibility factors that apply to other social assistance recipients are
used. Such applicants are not, of course, eligible for supplementation if their asset levels exceed the levels set out in policy for other
recipients.
The option available for low-income individuals to supplement
their income to ensure a basic level of income comparable to those
on social assistance helps individuals and families remain on jobs
35
 inadequate to their economic needs, rather than moving to full
public assistance.
Cost-sharing status—Federal Government sharing of social
assistance payments is slightly below 50 per cent.   Municipalities,
at present, cost-share in Social Allowance programmes to a maximum of 15 per cent of total costs. During 1972/73, with costs
escalating, municipal cost-sharing was frozen at $1.20 per capita.
During 1974, municipal sharing will fall to 10 per cent.
PROGRAMME:  REPATRIATION
Goals—To assist recently arrived migrants to British Columbia to return to their former residences elsewhere in Canada in
cases where they have been unable to establish satisfactorily in
British Columbia and they are unable to make their own arrangements. Help is also occasionally provided to assist in return to
another country when there are strong social reasons in support of
this.
Description—Under Provincial arrangements, the other province must be contacted for approval before assistance is provided
to help a person return to that province. Costs for transportation
are arranged by the local Human Resources office and are otherwise
a responsibility of the originating province in which the request for
such help is made. Similarly, other provinces have contact with
the central office here for approval of assistance for purposes of
movement into British Columbia. Many of the requests from other
provinces relate to long-time residents of other provinces who wish
to locate in British Columbia for health reasons or because other
relatives have moved to British Columbia. In the case of major
help for a person or family wishing to return to their home country,
a review is carried out in conjunction with Immigration authorities
and the final arrangements are also confirmed with the Federal
Immigration officials, who then maintain a record in the event the
person or family wishes to return to Canada once again.
Departmental expenditures given in Table 23 indicate a sharp
decline in this fiscal and calendar year:
Table 23-
Year
1973 	
-De
:pai
tmental E.
Amount
$
.    9,889
pendt
titre by Year:
Year
1971/72
Repatriation
Amount
$
  21,369
1972/73
9,224
1970/71.	
27 292
Changing patterns in 1973 — In previous years, Departmental policy reflected a concern about the financial cost of maintaining migrants from out of Province who were unable to support
themselves. An agreement has now been reached between the
provinces to limit the frequent practice of returning migrants to
their former residences, a practice previously viewed as a control
on rising social assistance expenditures. The net effect of the practice did not limit social assistance costs, however, and the programme is now used basically as a resource for helping those in
need who wish to return.
Cost-sharing status — The programme is shareable on a
50:50 basis with the Federal Government.
PROGRAMME:  HOMEMAKER  SERVICE
Goal—The main goal of this programme is to enable people
to remain in their own homes with supplemental help. Home-
makers are mobilized to care for elderly and infirm persons, to look
after children during the temporary absence of a parent, and to
offer service in household management.
Description—Several nonprofit societies in British Columbia
hire and train homemakers. The Department of Human Resources
makes annual grants to these societies to help defray costs. The
homemaker fees-for-service charged to recipients of public assistance
and other low-income families are also paid by the Department.
36
 Changing patterns in 1973—There are approximately 1,050
homemakers in the Province at present, an increase of 20 per cent
over 1972.
The following table shows calendar-year expenditures in this
programme:
Table 24—Departmental Expenditure by Calendar Years
Homemaker Service
Year
Amount
1973    2,036,313
1972   1,394,221
Year Amount
$
1971    1,187,491
1970   1,125,224
Increased costs in 1973 reflect
• imposition of $2 minimum wage through first 11 months;
the minimum wage rose to $2.25 on December 3, 1973;
• greater usage of Homemaker Service.
Cost-sharing status—Costs are shared on a 50:50 basis with
the Federal Government.
PROGRAMME:  COUNSELLING
Goal—To assist in solving personal and family problems that
handicap social functioning or impede independence.
Description—The Department actively carries out counselling where needed to deal with marital, child behavioural, and
rehabilitative problems. In cases of marriage breakdown, social
workers advise those separated wives who are social assistance
recipients of the protective services of the Family Relations Act,
particularly with respect to income maintenance. The Divisional
office acts as a liaison with the Attorney-General's Department,
bringing problems related to the administration of the Family
Relations Act to the attention of the Attorney-General. The provision of counselling services is the responsibility of the Social Allowance and Child Welfare Divisions. There are no expenditures,
other than the indirect cost of staff salaries.
The Department supports counselling programmes initiated in
Family Life Programmes in six communities. These community
programmes are staffed by a total of approximately 65 volunteer
workers who help with problems of all kinds.   In 1973, the Depart
ment granted up to $20,000 to Family Life Associations in British
Columbia. The clientele in these community programmes has
been middle-class, by and large. Many other community programmes funded by the Department include substantial counselling,
e.g., crisis lines, drop-in centres, information services. Community
programmes receiving Departmental support are described at the
end of this section.
Changing patterns in 1973—Counselling services have become more extensive and intensive throughout the Province in 1973.
Departmental funding of community programmes such as crisis
lines, the Family Life Associations, drop-in centres, and information services has contributed to a major increase in these services
to all classes of people in British Columbia. With regard to counselling under the Family Relations Act, the Departmental staff has
been instructed to take direct responsibility with respect to the laying of complaints in cases where the separated dependant feels
unable to take action.
PROGRAMME: THE PROVINCIAL EMERGENCY PROGRAMME
Goal—To ensure that an adequate delivery system is available
at the community level to meet any welfare needs which occur by
reason of a disaster striking the community.
Description—Trained volunteers join the regular staff of the
Department in providing emergency welfare assistance in time of
disaster.   Assistance takes the form of financial aid, clothing, hous-
37
 ing, counselling, and other needed services. Expenses incurred are
passed on to the Provincial Emergency Programme, a co-ordinating
office under the jurisdiction of the Provincial Secretary, for payment.
The Provincial Emergency Programme has a special funding
arrangement with the Federal Government.    In 1973 this pro
gramme was called on to give emergency assistance to travellers
during the ferry strike.
Changing patterns in 1973—There have been no major
changes in goals or procedures during 1973. Statistics relating to
this programme are gathered by the Provincial Emergency Programme and are not kept separately by this Department.
PROGRAMME: HEALTH CARE SERVICES
Goal—To assist in providing quality health care for eligible
persons from all professionals in the field at a reasonable cost.
Description—The Health Care Division administers a wide-
ranging programme to cover the health needs of all recipients of
Social Allowance, Mincome, Handicapped Persons Income Assistance, and Children in Care.
The following table indicates the number of people eligible for
all health care services provided by the Department:
Table 25—Persons Eligible for Health Care Coverage in the Department
at Year-end 1970/73
Eligible
Persons
1973     116,2391
1972  112,836
Eligible
Persons
1971    115,813
1970  115,512
1 Estimated.
Description of health services follow:
A. Medical—Payments are made to hospitals, doctors, and
other professionals for services not covered by British Columbia
Hospital Insurance or the British Columbia Medical Plan. For
example, payment is made for such things as the provision of extra
physiotherapy treatment on the doctor's recommendation, when
the BCMP $50 yearly limit has been passed. Examinations for
persons requiring medical clearance for activities such as camp
attendance and examinations for applicants for the Handicapped
Persons Income Assistance and other purposes are also covered.
B. Pharmacy—The service provides prescribed drugs and surgical supplies to patients in their own homes, or private hospitals,
to Government institutions and to some private agencies, e.g., the
Provincial Home and the Victorian Order of Nurses. The Provincial Pharmacy stocks over 5,000 items; about 100,000 prescriptions were filled in 1973.
C. Dental—The service provides basic dental care to eligible
persons by using the services of dentists, dental mechanics, or
dental laboratories. Basic care includes check-ups, extractions,
fillings, prophylaxis, and initial dentures. Special dental care, such
as root-canal treatment, is also provided when necessary.
D. Optical—Standard single-vision and bifocal glasses are provided when prescribed by an ophthalmologist or optometrist.
Special needs such as special lenses, trifocals, and contact lenses
may also be provided with prior approval of the Division.
E. Ancillary services — The Department provides ancillary
medical needs, prescribed by the client's physician, which will
benefit the client and assist in his/her rehabilitation. For example,
braces, artificial limbs, wheel-chairs, surgical supports, and colostomy supplies are provided. The Canadian Paraplegic Association
helps the Division with wheel-chair requests. The CPA assesses
each client's needs for the Health Care Division and recommends
the most suitable chair.
F. Transportation—Transportation for clients and low-income
persons in need is provided to clinics, hospitals, rehabilitation
centres, or nursing-homes.
Changing patterns in 1973 — The following table gives a
breakdown on the expenditures in each of the separate health
services in 1973 and the last three fiscal years:
38
 Table 26—Health Care Expenditures, Breakdown by Service
Year Medical
1973   620,935
1972/73...   677,194
1971/72.   614,365
1970/71..  591,206
Expenditures
Pharmacy
Dental
Optical
Ancillary
Services
Transportation
Total Health
Care Expenditure
3,814,907
2,577,059
322,794
300,172
377,450
8,013,317
3,626,268
2,429,538
304,387
264,522
367,888
7,669,797
3,334,160
2,403,257
290,116
165,979
342,712
7,150,589
3,102,874
2,491,589
282,272
121,892
326,166
6,915,999
In 1973 the $8 million expenditure in basic and ancillary
medical services gives coverage to approximately 116,000 eligible
clients, averaging about $68 per person. The total cost per person
would also include a proportion of other related costs such as
hospital costs and premiums to the B.C. Medical Plan.
Coverage of medical services was extended to include recipients
of public assistance who do not qualify for the B.C. Medical Plan
(2 to 3 per cent of the total number of recipients) because they have
been in British Columbia for less than three months and (or) less
than six months in Canada. Such newly arrived residents were
also ineligible for medical services available through this Department until 1973.
Certain fees paid to professionals by the Department increased
in 1973, notably those paid to doctors and dental mechanics. Fee
increases for other categories of professionals and the prices of
certain supplies are expected in 1974. As the goal of home health
care is reached for many people now in hospitals, the expenditures
for ancillary services can be expected to grow substantially.   Items
now provided in hospitals, such as special mattresses, hospital-type
beds, and lifts will be needed.
In 1973 the Division became more involved in research and
education, with the goal of encouraging preventive health care.
Exercise programmes were planned in nursing-homes and Riverview Hospital. It is recognized that regular exercise contributes to
improved mental and physical health. An audiological survey of
senior citizens was undertaken to assess the best kinds of hearing-
aids. A survey is being planned for seniors that will check individuals who have had cataracts removed. Optometrists will
examine patients to see if contact lenses are advisable.
Cost-sharing status—All health care expenditures in this
programme are shared on a 50:50 basis with the Federal Government.
Municipalities at present cost-share in Health Care programmes
to a maximum of 15 per cent of total costs. During 1972/73, with
costs escalating, municipal cost-sharing was frozen at $1.20 per
capita.    During 1974, municipal sharing will fall to 10 per cent.
PROGRAMME:  BURIALS
Goal—To provide for burial in those instances where there is
no family or estate that can assume responsibility.
Description—Requests for such help are received usually
from family, friends, funeral parlours, or the Public Administrator.
Private resources are reviewed and, where indicated, a basic funeral
is arranged for in accordance with the schedule of rates. Except
for an occasional instance in which cremation may be used, the
requirements set forth a standard fee worked out from time to time
with the Funeral Directors' Association, which includes provision
for a casket and a dignified burial.
39
 Changing patterns  in 1973 — Departmental expenditures
have declined slightly, as can be seen in the following table:
Tabic 27—Departmental Expenditures: Burials
Year
Amount
$
1973    143,409
1972/73  :.  166,212
Year
Amount
1971/72    187,513
1970/71   168,663
In 1973 the cost of burial was about $300 per person. The
Department assumed the cost of burial for approximately 475
people.
Cost-sharing status—Costs of this service are shared on a
50:50 basis with the Federal Government.
PROGRAMME:  YOUTH HOSTELS
Goal—To provide low-cost accommodation for travelling
youth.
Description—The 1973 British Columbia Hostel Programme
housed 57,492 travdlm^OTtF] for a total of 92,538 bed-nights.
There were 20 hostels outside Vancouver operating. In Vancouver
a Home Placement Programme functioned, together with nine
hostels.
The Hostel Programme operated between June 1 and September
15. Co-operation and planning between the three levels of government, private agencies, and citizens contributed to the programme's
considerable success in cutting costs while expanding and improving
services.
Outside Vancouver
The hostel programme outside Vancouver was a co-operative
effort between the Federal and Provincial Governments and the
Association of B.C. Hostels. The hostels were funded by the
Federal Secretary of States' Department for refit, maintenance,
administration, and salaries for hostel staff. The Federal funds,
however, do not make any provision for food costs. This Department provided base funding for food costs. This was done in the
form of a grant made to the Association of B.C. Hostels, a nonprofit organization. The Association was put in charge of the
distribution of this money to the individual hostels.
Each hostel had a mandatory 50-cent user fee and each person
was also asked to donate 50 cents toward food costs. Both the user
fee and the donation went toward covering food costs.   With the
funding from the Department and the money collected, each hostel
was able to provide two hot meals a day for the hostellers. However, if any person did not have the $1 fee for room and board, they
were not turned away from the hostel.
The hostels outside Vancouver had a three-day stay limit.
However, this limit could be extended under certain circumstances
such as in the case of illness.
In Vancouver
The Vancouver hostel programme was run with co-operation
and involvement from all three levels of government. Advance
planning was by the Vancouver Hostels Board, with one member
from the city Department of Social Planning. This department and
the Federal Department of Secretary of State resulted in a system
whereby the actual costs of hostel operation were shared by the
two senior levels of government.
The Federal Government, through the Office of the Secretary
of States' summer hostel programme, participated fully in funding
Vancouver hostels this year. This department subsidized food
costs up to $2 per day per person. The Department of Human
Resources co-operated with the Federal Government to share some
of the start-up, maintenance, and staff costs.
The Provincial and Federal Governments shared the costs of
required renovations and repairs to prepare some buildings for use
as hostels. This system insured that only these items that were
actual costs of the hostel programme were funded, resulting in lower
40
 per diem rates and complete accountability for all moneys spent on
the programme. The Vancouver Hostel Board provided the coordination and administration of the over-all programme.
The following table compares 1972 and 1973 operational costs.
Note should be made that the decreased costs in 1973 coincided
with a 10-per-cent increase in the number of travelling youth.
Table 28—Programme Costs: Youth Hostels,
Comparison 1972 and 1973
1972
1972
Total: $425,000.00
100,000.00 $325,000.00
H     T
In
Vancouver
Outsid'
Vancouver
Changing patterns in 1973—The 1973 youth hostel programme represents a gradual evolution over the past three or four
years from an emergency programme of providing accommodation
for a sudden influx of unknown numbers of young transients to a
more predictable programme of a recreational nature for persons
who are travelling. These travellers have tended to be younger and
better prepared, both financially and in terms of their individual
planning.    More and more persons have discovered that it is a
1973
$8,497.89
Outside
Vancouver
$105,052.91
In
Vancouve
1973
Total: $127,591.62.
Including a grant of
$14,040.82 to the
Association of B.C.
Hostels' Administration.
good programme that provides, through the provision of subsidized
and inexpensive accommodation, a worth-while way to discover
and see Canada.
Cost-sharing status—All costs to the Province are shareable
on a 50:50 basis except the $14,040.82 granted to the Association
of B.C. Hostels.
Other services for everyone are provided by the Community
Programme listed on the following page.
COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES
Goal—To encourage and support community-operated voluntary social services.
Description—Community Programmes Division accepts proposals for funding community services from Departmental field
staff through the Regional Directors. The Division then refers the
project to the appropriate Departmental authority and, if approved,
arranges for the proper supervision of the project.   Where Com
munity Resource Boards have been formed, the Division will accept
proposals from Boards on behalf of the community which they
represent. When determining which applications should receive
support, the Department does not consider the "make work" aspects
of the programme so much as the amount of service to people per
dollar budgeted. Programmes that utilize volunteers are looked
upon favourably.
41
 Changing patterns in 1973—Prior to 1973, grants to communities for innovative, useful, and possibly experimental nonstatutory services were almost nonexistent. With increased money
going directly into communities for services, the concept of involving the community in the provision of services in its own area has
been accentuated and stressed.   This has resulted in increased com
munity awareness of needs for service and increased activity in
attempts to meet these needs. Such involvement serves to facilitate
the formation of community-based organizations. Spending on
Community Grants is up four times what it was last year and more
than 10 time's what it was in 1971.
1973 calendar year
1972/73
1971/72
1970/71
Table 29—Dollars1 Spent on Community Grants: A Comparison
$2,843,082
$737,850
1   $242,678
$212,864
i Includes activity centres.
Grants that have been allocated are listed at the end of each
section of this Report. Some that provide service to everyone are
as follows:
Snn^ort'ne
Programme Contribution l
Abbotsford:
Association of Family Life Centres—Programme of family $
life, volunteer, leadership training for area     1,431.08
Burnaby:
Joint Information Services—Combination of 11 information centres, referral and crisis assistance      6,800.00
Campbell River:
Family Counselling Service—Family counselling, information, referral, and education     1,200.00
1 From the Department of Human Resources.
Programme
Chilliwack:
Information Centre—Information and referral service	
Community Chest—Co-ordination services of family life,
crisis, meals-on-wheels, and homemaker programmes ..
Courtenay :
Social Assistance and Low-income Group—Conference ...
Supporting
Contribution!
$
100.00
7,750.00
593.80
Delta:
Deltassist Society—Centralized referral, volunteer bureau
for all levels of people      40,853.33
Grand Forks:
Community Services Committee—Centring of services in
organized manner, drop-in, information, counselling ._.
5,000.00
42
 Programme
Kamloops:
Community Resources Society—Referral, information,
volunteer placement, carefree taxi service for elderly,
etc.  	
Family Life Association—Family counselling, training,
volunteers 	
Merritt:
Crisis and Community  Centre-
referral, drop-in centre 	
-Crisis  line, information,
Mission:
Community Services Society—Legal and consumer advice,
family-life counselling, furniture exchange, meals-on-
wheels, information, and referral	
Nakusp:
Village of Nakusp—A Winter Works project sponsored in
co-operation with the Federal and Municipal Governments   	
Nanaimo:
Association of Intervention and Development—Crisis centre, family guidance, drop-in, crafts training for native
Indian crisis leaders 	
Nelson:
Community Action Group—Plans for Resource Board,
drop-in centre, incentive workers	
Penticton:
Na.amata Centre—Conference centre	
Port Coquitlam :
Share Society—Rehabilitation of chronic welfare recipients,
crisis line and lifeline, paper-recycling, free store	
Prince George:
Community Services Centre—Integrated delivery system of
voluntary services   	
Resources Planning Board—Plans for improvement and
evaluation of social service   	
Supporting
Contribution *-
6,320.00
2,275.00
20,600.00
150.00
50,000.00
31,326.65
100.00
7,813.50
1,172.50
7,176.29
125.00
i From the Department of Human Resources.
Supporting
Programme Contribution1
Queen Charlottes:
Queen Charlotte Regional Health—Community resource $
centre, health, human resource planning     4,137.00
Salmon Arm:
Drop-in and Crisis Information Centre-
information, and assistance 	
-Drop-in,  crisis,
14,368.55
Surrey:
Community Service Bureau—Advocacy and community
development and support service   18,806.00
Vancouver:
B.C. Civil Liberties Association—A grant to produce and
assist with publication of social services handbook;
disseminate information in classrooms       4,000.00
Board of Parks and Public Recreation—A grant to assist
programmes for the disadvantaged      2,000.00
Community Resources Foundation—A foundation to
research and prepare way for resource centre programming       2,000.00
Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention—A crisis line
and intervention of suicide attempts and restoration of
persons so threatened    25,110.00
Downtown Community Health Society—Medical care, free
meals, and a low-cost food store  15,462.00
Family Service Centres—Family counselling, information,
and referral, family-life education      3,220.00
Fed-up Food Co-operative—A programme to provide food
for lower income people in distressed areas  20,000.00
Federated Anti-poverty Groups—A grant to assist programmes which are organized to study and meet the
inflationary trends       5,165.00
Joshua Town House Society—Repair and resale of furniture      1,000.00
Recreational Track and Field—A grant to further and improve Provincial level of athletics with emphasis on
B.C. Festival of Sports and for lower income persons    6,657.55
Social Planning: Community Development—One-shot
grant programme        950.00
43
 Supporting
Programme Contribution!
Victoria: $
Community Action Group—Projects for incentive workers,
drop-in centre, assistance for immigrants, information    8,758.24
Crisis  Intervention  and Public  Information—Crisis   line
and referral        4,735.00
Programme
Victoria—Continued
James Bay Community Development—Study on community development   	
Citizens' Counselling Centre—Family counselling, education, group and volunteer training  	
Supporting
Contribution5-
2,762.10
651.00
i From the Department of Human Resources.
44
  HANDICAPPED PERSONS' INCOME ALLOWANCE
(now Mincome)
Goal—To provide the income essential for handicapped persons to meet their everyday living requirements and maintain their
sense of independence and dignity.
Description—In December of 1972 the Handicapped Persons'
Income Allowance (formerly the Blind Persons' Allowance and
the Disabled Persons' Allowance) was raised to $200 per month.
In June of 1973 the Handicapped Persons' Income Allowance
statistics were incorporated in Mincome. As of December 31,
1973, all handicapped persons are guaranteed a minimum monthly
income of $213.85. For detailed statistics and further information, see section on Mincome in "Services for Seniors."
Changing patterns in 1973—Although a guaranteed income
through Mincome may be seen as a first and very important step
in the direction of improving opportunities for handicapped people,
it is recognized that much more must be done if handicapped
people are to participate fully in our communities. In response to
this realization, a Special Consultant to the Minister on the Needs
of the Physically Disabled was appointed to co-ordinate efforts
and make recommendations.
Further, in order to involve the disabled in identifying needs
and required services, a Conference for the Physically Disabled
was sponsored by the Department of Human Resources on October
31 and November 1, 1973. Handicapped persons and representatives of various agencies and organizations attended and made
recommendations to all levels of governments.
As a result of the conference an advisory committee was
formed for the purpose of meeting with Government to follow up
implementation of the recommendations that resulted from the
conference.
Recommendations concerned
(1) architectural barriers;
(2) education, employment, and recreation opportunities;
(3) income security and health-care benefits;
(4) personal attendant care (in-home);
(5) transportation facilities.
These recommendations point to new directions in 1974.
ACTIVITY CENTRE PROGRAMME
Goal—To assist centres in the development of programmes
designed to improve the quality of life of handicapped persons
regardless of the cause of the handicapping condition.
Description—These centres provide opportunities for handicapped persons to involve themselves in useful enterprises. Work
activities and recreational undertakings vary from centre to centre.
Crafts, carpentry, and clerical pursuits are some of the activities
the participants involve themselves in.
At the end of each month a billing form and attendance record
are sent each centre for completion. The amount paid for staff
salaries and the total number of participant-hours of service rendered by the centre help determine the payment the centre will
receive.
Changing patterns in 1973 — The programme has only
been in effect since April 1, 1971. At the end of 1973 there was
a total of 49 centres in the Province receiving support under this
programme. Actually, other centres have been approved for payment, but billing forms and attendance records of recent approvals
were not received in 1973. The monthly attendance at activity
centres is approximately 2,000 persons.
The following centres were funded in 1973.
Total Paid
Each Centre
Abbotsford: $
MSA Association for the Retarded (Wildwood).....    10,900.00
Armstrong:
Armstrong-Enderby Association for the Retarded     2,287.99
46
 Burnaby:
Burnaby Association for the Retarded
Chilliwack:
Chilliwack & District Opportunity Workshop
Cranbrook:
Juniper School Occupational Workshop 	
Dawson Creek:
Dawson Creek Society for Retarded Children
Duncan:
Duncan & District Association for the Mentally Retarded
Haney:
Maple Ridge Association for the Retarded Children (Harold E. Johnson)   	
Invermere:
Windermere Society for Handicapped Children
Kamloops:
Kamloops Society for the Retarded	
Total Paid
Each Centre
$
9,200.00
8,286.00
2,170.00
7,441.00
9,666.07
7,800.00
4,743.75
10,682.00
Kelowna:
Canadian Mental Health Association (Discovery Club)	
Kelowna & District Society for the Mentally Retarded	
2,850.00
14,250.00
Mission City:
Mission Workshop Association     8,767.00
Nanaimo:
Canadian Mental Health Association (Nanaimo Branch)....    3,476.00
Nanaimo Association for the Mentally Retarded (Narco)    9,234.43
Nanaimo Vocational Rehabilitation Workshop for Handicapped (Beacon)      5,525.00
New Westminster:
Canadian Mental Health Association (Sha-Sha Club)         750.00
New  Westminster  &  District  Society  for  the  Retarded
(Port Moody)     17,000.00
New  Westminster   &  District  Society  for  the  Retarded
(A.R.C.)           750.00
North Vancouver:
Adult Day-care Centre   ._...  10,000.00
Total Paid
Each Centre
Penticton:
Penticton & District Society for the Mentally Handicapped
(Aurora)     	
Port Alberni:
Alberni District Association for the Retarded 	
Powell River:
Artaban Training Centre   	
Prince George:
Prince George & District Association for the Retarded	
Quesnel:
Quesnel & District Association for the Mentally Retarded
Sardis:
Upper Fraser Valley Association for the Retarded	
Surrey:
Clover  Valley Training Centre   (Surrey  Association  for
Mentally Retarded) 	
Terrace:
Terrace Association for the Mentally Retarded 	
Trail:
Kootenay Society for Handicapped Children (Maple)
Vancouver:
Canadian Arthritis & Rheumatism Society 	
Canadian Mental Health Association (White Cross, Vancouver)  	
Coast Foundation Society (East End House) 	
Handicrafts for Homebound Handicapped   	
Mental Patients Association   	
St. James Social Service (Gastown Workshop) 	
Vancouver Association for the Mentally Retarded (Workshop 1) 	
Vancouver Association for the Mentally Retarded (Workshop 2) _ 	
Vancouver Association for the Mentally Retarded (Workshop 3) 	
13,779.50
4,197.22
7,031.00
10,000.00
2,838.80
6,190.50
11,557.91
3,550.00
750.00
3,900.00
11,520.00
16,250.00
5,073.98
5,687.44
6,000.00
17,200.00
13,650.00
2,400.00
47
 Total Paid
Each Centre
Vernon: $
Vernon & District Association for the Retarded    15,402.09
Victoria:
Arbutus Crafts Association  9,750.00
Canadian Mental Health Association (Cornerstone)   1,625.00
Canadian Mental Health Association  (White Cross, Victoria)      .__  1  13,913.54
Canadian Mental Health Association (Community Explorations) ._ --   1,625.00
Greater Victoria Association for the Retarded (Haywood) 585.00
Greater Victoria Association for the Retarded  (Winifred
M. Clark)       13,901.48
Greater Victoria Association for the Retarded (Langwood
Branch)       585.00
Total Paid
Each Centre
West Vancouver: $
North Shore Association for the Mentally Retarded .....  ... 8,062.14
North Shore Association for the Mentally Retarded  9,795.60
North Shore Association for Retarded Children  1,679.32
Total        364,279.76
Average month       30,356.65
As of December 1, 1973, rates were raised on the average of
20 per cent.  This will be reflected in higher expenditure in 1974.
Cost-sharing status—Shareable with the Federal Government on a 50:50 basis.
EMPLOYMENT PROJECT '73
Goal—To provide funds for socially useful employment of
students, welfare recipients, and other unemployed people within
Government and nonprofit societies.
Description—The Employment Project sponsored by the Provincial Government came into effect on July 1, 1973. At that time
the Department of Human Resources was allotted $1 million out
of the total $20 million the Government allocated for this project.
Originally the project was planned for a three-month period, but
at the end of that time it was extended another six months due to
its success. With the extension of this project the Department of
Human Resources received an additional $2 million. This budget
was pro-rated in relation to the social assistance case loads of each
region, for example, the region with the highest number of social
assistance recipients was authorized to hire the largest number of
people on the Employment Project.
Patterns—From July 1, 1973, to December 31, 1973,
people were employed in the programme.   Of these:
• 365 were female; 302 were male;
• 70 per cent were under 35 years of age;
1667
Average pay was $518 per month; females averaged $480
and males averaged $564;
42 per cent were single;
72 per cent had lived in British Columbia more than five
years;
92 per cent had lived in Canada more than 15 years;
72 per cent had received social assistance in the month
previous to entering the programme; their average total income in the preceding month was $259.46;
10 per cent were handicapped;
75 per cent of those who have left the project are now employed; only 20 per cent returned to social assistance after
termination of their employment with the project.
Cost-sharing status—Not determined as yet.
48
 EDUCATIONAL UPGRADING AND VOCATIONAL TRAINING
Goal—To improve employment prospects of social assistance
recipients by upgrading their technical and academic skills.
Description—Where need seems to exist but is not forthcoming through the Federal Department of Manpower's Training
Grants, the social worker in the local Human Resources office
may refer interested applicants to ihe nearest vocational or educational training institution. Arrangements are made for enrolment
and training. Social Allowance payments are supplemented by a
small monthly allowance for incidental expenses. The Department
also provides for the cost of books and transportation.
Changing patterns in 1973—There has been a sharp drop-off
in the number of people enrolled in this programme. Partly this
can be explained by the smaller Social Assistance Rolls in 1973
and also by the larger numbers of young people shifting from the
Social Assistance Rolls to the Unemployment Insurance Rolls with
the easing of the Unemployment Insurance regulations.
Table 30—Number of People
Sponsored by the
Department of
Human Resources in
Upgrading Progr
ammes
1972
1973
1
■
600
1
1,300
This movement is reflected in lower operating costs of the
programme.
Total cost of the programme over and above social assistance
payments in 1973 was $80,000. This is approximately one-half of
1972 costs.
Cost-sharing status — Costs arc shared with the Federal
Government on a 50:50 basis.
EMPLOYMENT PREPARATION PROGRAMME FOR YOUTH AND ADULTS
Goal—To prepare
(1) adults who have withdrawn from the labour market
for a lengthy period; and
(2) youth 15 years of age and over who have withdrawn
from the public school system
for entry into the labour force or into vocational training programmes.
Description—
Youth Programmes
During 1973 two experimental work projects were financed by
the Department of Human Resources—the Victoria Work Alternative Project and the Langford Alternative Project.
The Victoria project is open to boys recommended by the local
Human Resources offices, Family Court, Manpower, and the
Greater Victoria School District. The Langford project is open
to both boys and girls.   Students gain knowledge and work exper
ience by becoming involved in work projects that lead to environmental improvement such as park and forestry maintenance. They
are also involved in marketing commodities such as cordwood.
Other interesting tasks are made available to the Youth through
Provincial, municipal, and private organizations.
A balance between work, education, and recreation is reached
with courses in first aid, life-saving, fire-fighting, gymnastics, health,
and hygiene. Traditional academic study is undertaken through
correspondence courses and classroom attendance. Informal
group discussions and adult counselling provide an important "preventive" aspect to the programme.
Both of these projects are fairly new. The Langford project
has been operating for one year and the Victoria project has functioned for two years. Over 200 young people participated in
these two projects in 1973, with an average enrolment at any given
time of approximately 40 persons in each project.
49
I
a; I
 Adult Programmes
The largest Employment Preparation Programme for adults is
the "Forestry Employment Preparation Programme." It operates
in the Lower Fraser Valley districts of Chilliwack, Mission, and
Maple Ridge.
The Forestry Work Activity Project uses a combination of
sheltered work experience, life skill training, and practical academic
upgrading to provide a comprehensive approach for those who have
been disadvantaged in finding employment. Individuals selected
for this programme have usually been recipients of Social Allowance
for a considerable length of time.
The Provincial Forestry Department provides jobs involving
slashing, burning, clearing, trail-making, building repair, saw and
tool maintenance, and upkeep. Each work situation has a forestry
foreman who works in conjunction with the social worker project-
co-ordinator of the Human Resources Department. Half of the
participants' time is spent on work-sites. The remaining time is
spent in classroom learning situations where the focus is on learning
to deal effectively with daily problems and the use of community
services and agencies, so as to improve participants' capacity to
obtain employment.
The social work co-ordinator provides the family with counselling services. Allowances are paid to participants—the social
assistance payment plus $100 per month. Special clothing needed
for work and other costs incurred in the programme are covered
by the Department.
During 1973, 185 men participated in these work-activity
crews. There were no women trained in the programme. As of
December 31, 1973, 39 men were on the project and 91 others
had found employment. The remaining 55 former participants
were on social assistance or could not be located.
A second important employment preparation programme is the
Langley Work Employment Preparation Programme. Similar in
benefits to the Forestry programme, an important variation in the
Langley project is that private work placements are utilized. Placements are made in welding shops, hairdressing establishments, the
library, the museum, Langley Municipal Works, and the local
Human Resources office. Both women and men are involved in
the Langley project.
The Langley project is in its second year. The pilot project
has a total of 18 men participating in it. Half of these men had
been on Social Allowance for 10 years or more. At present, two
and one-half years after completion of the pilot project, only five
men have returned to social assistance.
The amount of time spent on these projects varies with the
individual's needs to a maximum of six months.
Changing patterns in 1973 — Although the Employment
Preparation Programme is a relatively new feature of the Department, it has already proved valuable as a support to people wishing
to return to the labour market. Previous to 1973, only family heads
were allowed to participate in the programme. In 1973 the qualification criteria was expanded to include single people as well as
family heads.
Expenditure during the 1973 calendar year was $328,755 on
the total programme. The breakdown in expenditures may be
represented as follows:
EXPENDITURES IN THE EMPLOYMENT PREPARATION
PROGRAMME FOR YOUTH AND ADULTS
50%    Forestry Programme
(ADULTS)
25%
Langley Project
(ADULTS)
■k
12.5%
Langford
Alternative
Project
(YOUTH)
12.5%
Victoria
Alternative
Project
(YOUTH)
50
 DETACHED WORKER PROGRAMME
Goal—To provide special programmes and resource people
for youth with difficulties.
Description—Schools, hospitals, or the Courts refer youth
who arc experiencing difficulties to the programme. Youth workers, hired directly in the community, get to know the young
person and through encouragement and special programmes help
the person discover his/her aptitudes and potential. The workers,
many who are young themselves, are available to help young
people in obtaining gainful employment, furthering educational and
vocational training, and improving interpersonal relationships.
Programmes involve group counselling, recreational activities, and
volunteer work in the communities. One of the characteristic
features of these programmes is the variety of approaches being
taken to meet the individual needs of the young people involved.
Changing patterns in 1973—This is a growing programme.
More emphasis is being placed on person-to-person interaction
with recognition that the problem which confronts the young person
cannot be handled in isolation from his family or community setting.
A general trend which has recently developed is the increased
usage of detached workers as their value has been accepted at the
community level. Presently there are nine programmes which
involve 18 youth workers and serve over 1,000 youth.
NUMBER OF YOUTH SERVED, BY AREA,  1973
Williams
Victoria   Vancouver   Burnaby   Penticton     Lake
Prince
Rupert    Nanaimo
Number of
programmes
Number of
youth workers
Number of
youth  served ..
■HH
65
70
wymnn
40
MHHm
\.    ■    . :■ ::v "it'"'::
35 50
Victoria   Vancouver   Burnaby   Penticton Williams     Prince     Nanaimo
 Lake Rupert	
Cost-sharing  status—The  costs  of  this  programme  are
shared with the Federal Government on a 50:50 basis.
INCENTIVE—OPPORTUNITIES PROGRAMME
Goal—To provide an opportunity for social assistance recipients, who are able to work, to be employed part-time in Government and nonprofit businesses so as to improve their social
relationships and increase their participation in society, increase
their income, and improve their work skills and work experience.
Description—Participating agencies include schools, health
or recreational centres, libraries, information offices, and various
municipal, Provincial, and Federal Government agencies. Some of
the positions filled were school helpers, library aides, assistants in
day-care centres, clerical helpers, information officers, parking-lot
attendants, home helpers, visitors to the elderly and sick, counsellors
and homemakers. In a number of locales, most notably in Vancouver, participants have their own organizations and undertake
responsibility for placement, replacing volunteers and providing
other services.
Any social assistance recipient interested in this programme can
contact his or her local Human Resources office which, in turn,
will refer the applicant to interested agencies in the community.
51
 Individuals receive up to $100 per month in this programme.
Remuneration does not affect the size of the individual's Social
Allowance cheque.
In 1973, there were approximately 2,400 people at any given
time working on the Opportunities Programme. Since the average
number of hours of service to communities contributed by "Opportunities" people is approximately 50 hours, the number of "hour
of service" contributed to the people of British Columbia was close
to one and one-half million.
2,400 People working on "Opportunities."
X   50 Average number of hours worked per month.
120,000 Total hours of service per month.
X   12 Number of months per year.
1,440,000
Total hours of service per year to communities
Reciprocally, many recipients have gone on to full-time employment as a result of the skills they have acquired working in the
community.
Changing patterns in 1973—
Table 32—Incentive-
-Opportunides Programme
Number of People
on Programme
Cost of
Programme
$
2,550,000
1,750,000
1973  ...
   2,400
1972  ...
2,300
In 1973 more people on Opportunities Allowance were receiving higher honorariums than in 1972. This accounts for increased
expenditures as is evidenced in the table above. Of the 2,400
receiving Opportunities Allowances, 1,850 received $100 per
month and 550 received $50 per month.
Cost-sharing status—Costs are shared with the Federal
Government on a 50:50 basis.
HALFWAY HOUSES
Goal—To provide a living-in programme for individuals who
need support in dealing with personal and social problems.
Description—The halfway houses function on the concept of
"self-help". Residents give and receive support and encouragement from others who have been through similar experiences
and realistically dealt with their problems. Departmental support
is given to seven halfway houses that work with alcoholics; three
other houses are funded to help persons recently released from
correctional programmes. Referrals are made by social workers,
Probation Officers, the police, other agencies, and friends. The
halfway houses have counselling and group discussions. Job
referrals arc made as well as referrals for retraining.
The halfway houses are run by private groups; Departmental
financial support is given in the form of community grants to
nonprofit organizations and rates paid to houses for occupants who
are on social assistance.    Costs for the support of people in this
programme cannot be isolated in the general social assistance
expenditures.
Approximately 90 per cent of the people using the residences
for former inmates of correctional institutions are eligible for
social assistance. About 500 persons used these specialized halfway houses in 1973. The bed capacity in the three halfway houses
specializing in the needs of persons released from correctional
programmes was 110 beds. Two houses were run for men only
and one house takes male and female occupants.
The seven halfway houses specializing in the needs of the
alcoholic have an approximate maximum capacity of 105 live-in
accommodations. Each house has room for approximately 15
people. All seven houses are planned for the male alcoholic, but
females are occasionally included as well.
There have been no major changes in programme operation
this year.
52
 Cost-sharing status—Social assistance expenditures are
shareable on a 50:50 basis with the Federal Government. Most
persons staying in halfway houses qualify for social assistance.
Other special needs are met in some of the community programmes listed following:
COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES
Supporting
Programme Contribution!
Burnauy: $
Citizens Development Fund—Intensive counselling services  12,859.00
United   Church   Home   for  Girls—Serves   unwed-mother
group with excellent counselling and educational support      9,700.000
Cloverdale:
The Dismis Society—Living facilities for ex-convicts, employment on contract basis   32,850.00
Nanaimo:
Vocational   Rehabilitation  Workshop—Rehabilitation   for
all handicapped persons __    11,525.00
Nelson:
Aspire Programme—Co-operation with education on redirecting programme for drop-outs      5,125.00
100 Mile House:
Association for the Mentally Retarded—A programme to
relocate and renovate mentally retarded centre      3,000.00
Richmond:
Church of God at Richmond—One grant for equipment.—    1,455.00
Salmon Arm:
Association for the Mentally Retarded—A grant for the
support of mentally retarded centre  28,920.00
Surrey:
Rehabilitation Workshop—Workshop with retarded, handicapped, disabled—arts and crafts   13,900.00
Supporting
Programme Contribution!
Vancouver: $
Association of Non Status Indians—A programme to assist
with housing renovations in off-reserve situations for
Indians who have left their reserve and thus lost their
native status     — . 172,200.00
B.C. Association of Social Workers      9,628.85
B.C. Indian Homemakers—A programme to assist in promotion of Homemaker Programmes on  reserves and
with non-status Indians living in urban areas     2,000.00
B.C. Pre-school Teachers Association — Conference expenses   -       700.00
Dugout Day Centre—Hostel and care for unemployed     3,500.00
Hatfield Society—Hostel   29,700.00
John Howard Society—A society to assist probationers and
parolees back into society, job security, and rehabilitation programme          2,100.00
People's   Resources   Committee—Crafts   for   low-income
workers, training, and sales       4,455.00
Project Bread—Skid road project—coffee houses and counselling, with drug and alcoholic drifters   10,000.00
X-Kalay Foundation Society—A society for ex-convicts—
drug and alcohol rehabilitation    39,951.00
Victoria:
Kwa-Win-Nah Society—A halfway house for discharged
Indian prisoners and alcoholics     1,200.00
Victoria Girls Alternative Programme—A programme for
drop-outs, with provision for finding a new life-style
and a return to the labour market, co-operating with
education   ._.-   22,020.00
Victoria Women's Centre—A grant for the purchase of
house and building costs re a group-living home  28,525.00
1 From the Department of Human Resources.
53
   PROGRAMME:  MINCOME
Goal—To provide the income essential for senior citizens to
meet their everyday living requirements and maintain their sense
of independence and dignity.
Description—Introduced in December 1972, Mincome
assured citizens of the Province over the age of 65 a minimum
income level of $200 a month. On October 1, 1973, the Mincome
programme was extended to include those between the ages of
60 and 64. In order to meet the increased cost of living, payments
have been raised twice during 1973. As of December 31, 1973,
citizens over 60 years of age are guaranteed a monthly income of
$213.85 or $427.70 a couple.
Table 33—Total Cost of Mincome, December 1972 to December 1973
Date
1972—
Dec OAS/GIS
Recipients
109,980
1973—
Jan OAS/GIS  108,387
Feb  OAS/GIS   108,600
Mar  OAS/GIS.... .     ....108,938
Apr OAS/GIS    .   ....   94,396
May OAS/GIS     95,000
June... .-..OAS/GIS    95,800
Handicapped      4,000
July— OAS/GIS	
Handicapped..
99,800
96,800
4,600
101,400
Aug..
..OAS/GIS      96,900
Handicapped       5,200
102,100
4,624,000
4,540,500
4,576,000
4,589,000
2,462,000
2,490,000
2,543,000
734,000
3,277,000
2,583,000
863,000
3,446,000
2,552,000
961,000
3,513,000
Date
Sept.
Oct...
Nov..
Dec.
Recipients Amount
$
..OAS/GIS...      97,000 2,551,000
Handicapped       6,300 1,171,000
103,300 3,722,000
..OAS/GIS     97,600 2,560,000
Handicapped       6,300 1,200,000
Age benefit          5,500 1,100,000
65 and over non-OAS         600 110,000
110,000 4,970,000
OAS/GIS      97,900 2,555,000
Handicapped      6,300 1,235,000
Age benefit      9,500 1,900,000
65 and over non-OAS          800 160,000
114,500 5,850,000
..OAS/GIS..     97,700 2,547,000
Handicapped       6,300 1,237,000
Age benefit       13,000 3,000,000
65 and over non-OAS       1,000 194,000
118,000 6,978,000
Total expenditure for December 1972 to December 1973,
inclusive = $55,000,000
Changing patterns in 1973 — Since Mincome payments
began a little over a year ago, the portion of the Department's
budget given over to Mincome has progressively increased. This
is a result of higher rates and the inclusion of those aged 60-64
years in the programme.
The 60-64 age-group does not qualify for the Federal Government's Old Age Security Pension or Guaranteed Income Supplement. Therefore, the Province must contribute a higher proportion
of the payment to this group.
56
 As of December of 1973, the following groups were eligible for
Mincome:
(a) Old Age Security/Guaranteed Income Supplement
Recipients.
(b) Those over the age of 60 without a minimum income.
(c) Handicapped persons.
(d) Those 65 and over who are without adequate income
but are for some reason ineligible for the Federal
Government's Old Age Security programme.
A statistical breakdown of kinds of recipients and typical
monthly costs follows. The month of December is used in this
example:
Table 34-
-Statistical Summary, Month
of December
December 1972
December 1973
Recipients    Expenditures
Recipients
Expenditures
(a)
OAS/GIS
recipients	
$
..    109,980      4,624,000
97,7001
$
2,547,000
(b)
60-64-year-
olds	
No coverage
13,000
3,000,000
(c)
Handicapped
Covered in Disabled
Persons and
Blind Allowance
6,300
1,237,000
(d)
65 and over,
non-OAS/GIS.
Totals.-	
No coverage
1,000
194,000
109,980      4,624,000
118,000
6,978,000
i Decline due to Increased Old Age Security/Guaranteed Income Supplement payments in April 1973 rendering some recipients ineligible for Mincome benefits.
Cost-sharing status—
Eligibility
Under the Canada Assistance Plan, Canada will share in the
cost of assistance to those individuals designated as "persons in
need" (CAP 2-g).   For the purposes of Mincome it has been
agreed that those eligible are
(a) OAS/GIS recipients who have been designated as
"persons in need" via Mincome Form 33 (blue form)
or previously by the Supplementary Social Assistance
Needs Test;
(b) those persons 65 or over who are not recipients of
OAS/GIS and who have been found to be "persons
in need" via Mincome Form 33;
(c) those blind, disabled, and handicapped persons found
to be "persons in need" via Mincome Form 353 or
previously by a Handicapped or Social Allowance
Needs Test;
(d) those persons aged 60-64 found to be "persons in
need" who were previously on Social Allowance prior
to October 1, 1973.1
Asset Levels
For groups (a), (b), and (c), Canada currently recognizes
liquid asset exemption levels of $1,000 for a single person, and
$1,500 for a couple utilizing a needs budget of $200 (pre-added
budget of $140 and shelter and utility requirements of $60). This
means that Canada will share in that portion of the Mincome payment that guarantees the recipient an income of $200 if he meets
the asset requirements.
For example, single individual, assets less than $1,000:
$
OAS/GIS rate   183.99
Mincome payment      29.86
Total income   213.85
Canada will share in $29.86 — $13.85 = $16.01 on a 50:50
basis. The $13.85 figure is subtracted as Canada will not share in
the cost of any assistance leaving an individual with a total monthly
income that exceeds the $200 needs budget.
i Sharing for this group is only to $140 per person.
57
 PROGRAMME: SENIOR CITIZEN COUNSELLOR SERVICE
Goal—To provide a service whereby active knowledgeable
community-minded senior citizens serve as resource people to
assist other senior citizens.
Description—Presently there are 1120] Senior Citizen Counsellors of mixed ethnic backgrounds serving communities throughout British Columbia. The Senior Citizen Counsellor is available
to discuss issues of concern to seniors, such as income security,
health, living accommodation, loneliness, and feelings of self-worth.
Rapid changes taking place in present Government programmes
such as Old Age Security, Canada Pension, and Mincome, and the
introduction of new programmes such as Pharmacare, make it
imperative that counsellors be kept up to date on the latest changes
respecting the elderly so they can pass on this information to
seniors.
Each counsellor has regular contact with the Provincial Government for the exchange of information and is reimbursed up to $50
per month for out-of-pocket expenses.
Table 35—Costs of the Programme
Jan. 1, 1973,
to
Dec. 31, 1973
Apr. 1, 1972,
to
Mar. 31, 1973
Apr. 1, 1971,
to
Mar. 31, 1972
Apr. 1, 1970,
to
Mar. 31, 1971
Changing patterns in 1973—During the latter part of 1973,
approximately 50 new counsellors were appointed. It is expected
that this trend will continue so a wider number of people will be
reached, especially ethnic minority groups. The increased service
to people is a direct result of the appointment of additional counsellors.
Table 36—Number of People Served by Senior Citizen Counsellors,
April 1, 1970 to December 31, 1973—A Comparison
Jan. 1, 1973,
to
Dec. 31, 1973
Apr. 1, 1970,
to
Mar. 31, 1971
Cost-sharing status—The Federal Government shares in
the costs of this programme on a 50:50 basis.
58
 PROGRAMME: B.C. HYDRO BUS PASS FOR SENIOR CITIZENS
Goal—To aid and encourage mobility among senior citizens.
Description—The bus pass is made available to elderly and
handicapped persons in receipt of Mincome by the Department of
Human Resources in co-operation with the B.C. Hydro and Power
Authority for the sum of $5 for six months. It is renewable every
six months.
No bus fare is necessary on presentation of the pass in all regular bus zones in Greater Victoria and Greater Vancouver.
Changing patterns in 1973—With the introduction of Mincome at age 60, bus passes were made available to those between
the ages of 60 and 64 who are in receipt of Mincome.
Cost-sharing status—Administrative costs of this programme
are borne by the Department of Human Resources. All revenue
accruing as a result of the $5 charge is remitted to B.C. Hydro.
The Federal Government does not participate in this programme.
Table 37—Number of Passes Issued
Nov. 1973   20,570
May 1973   18,657
Nov. 1972     17,119
May 1972   16,847
Nov. 1971    15,846
May 1971    15,263
Sept. 1970    13,035
PROGRAMME: BOARDING AND REST HOMES
Goal—To provide for elderly or handicapped persons who
require it, but whose income is insufficient to meet the costs of
care.
Description—The individual or patient must be ambulatory
and at least partially able to look after personal needs.
Referrals are made to local Human Resources offices by relatives, friends, doctors, hospitals, or members of the community.
Local staff are responsible for reviewing each situation and assessing the kind of care needed. Placements are made as soon as
suitable arrangements can be made relative to accommodation
available and rates of payment provided for under Department
policy. The recipient contributes to the extent his income permits
and the balance of the cost is then provided for by the Department.
In addition, a monthly "Comforts Allowance" of $18.30 is provided.
Staff of local offices also help in arranging private placements
for a number of those who are able to meet the cost of care privately.
Residents are visited from time to time by staff of the Department to ensure that they are being satisfactorily cared for.
Changing patterns in 1973—No matter how good the
boarding or rest home, most people prefer their own home. Mincome has made it possible for more people to remain at home.
Since Mincome was introduced, the percentage increase of people
admitted to boarding and rest homes is not so great as previously
and the average cost per person of those admitted has increased
only slightly.
59
 Table 38—Comparison of Costs, Number of People Served, and
Average Cost per Person Over a 33A-Year Period
Average Cost Number Average Cost
Number         per Person of People per Person
of People   Over and Above     Served Over and Above
Yearly     Served on        Mincome on Social Social
Cost1       Mincome         Payments Assistance Assistance
Ip 3> 3>
1973 5,158,374 1,087     438     2,386 1,962
1972/73 4,908,706  937     406     2,381 1,902
1971/72 4,300,989  862     473     2,231 1,745
1970/71 3,843,633  701     577     2,118 1,624
1 Costs do not include Mincome payments and basic Social Allowances.
Fees for boarding and rest homes are determined by the level
of care provided and are arrived at through a point system.
The three basic monthly rates were last increased on December
1, 1973.
Table 39—Boarding Rest Home Rates
Prior to Dec. 1973        As of Dec. 1, 1973
1. A basic rate for simple boarding
care requiring a minimal amount $
of help and supervision..   172.00
2. A rate for those requiring an
intermediate level of help and
supervision     196.00
3. A higher rate for those instances
in which a high degree of help
and supervision is required  222.00
$
195.25
219.25
245.25
Cost-sharing status—The Federal and Provincial Government share the costs of this programme on a 50:50 basis.
PROGRAMME: PRIVATE HOSPITAL CARE
Goal—To provide care for elderly or handicapped persons
who require a relatively high degree of nursing attention but who
do not have the resources to meet this need.
Description—As with the Boarding and Rest Home Programme, staff of the local Human Resources offices receive referrals
from hospitals, doctors, relatives, and others. Staff members arrange placement in keeping with the doctor's recommendation, the
patient's needs, and the available care facilities. Accounts for cost
of care are submitted by the care facility to local Human Resources
offices and the amount of the difference between the patient's
private income and the Departmental rate for such care is sent to
the private hospital. A "Comforts Allowance" is provided and
local staff visit from time to time to ensure that the patient's needs
are satisfactorily looked after. In many instances transfers are
made to private hospitals from boarding or rest homes if additional
care is required.
Changing patterns in 1973—As of December 31, 1973, the
maximum  payment  to  private   hospitals   by   Government   was
$401.75 per person per month. In 1973 more extended-care beds
were made available through the public sector. Most of these beds
are covered by hospital insurance plans. The declining number of
people assisted in private hospitals reflects this trend.
Table 40-
A
—Comparison of Costs, Number of People Served, and
>erage Cost per Person Over a 33A-Year Period
Number
of People
Yearly     Served on
Costi       Mincome
Average Cost
per Person
Over and Above
Mincome
Payments
Number        Average Cost
of People         per Person
Served      Over and Above
on Social             Social
Assistance         Assistance
$
$
$
1973	
..2,561,242     974
1,760
1,550
325
481
2,607
2,312
1972/73..
.2,537,450     920
1971/72.
2.596.299      842
1.426
714
1,955
1970/71
1 Costs do
3,336,203     659             1,572            1,181
include Mincome payments and basic Social Allowances
1,947
not
Cost-sharing status—The Federal and Provincial Governments share in the costs of this programme on a 50:50 basis.
60
 PROGRAMME: COURTESY CARD
Goal—To provide easy identification for persons 65 and over
that will be honoured by banks, stores, travel agencies, and other
such establishments. It is also useful as a means of obtaining
reduced prices in some areas.
Description—The card is issued free of charge on proof of
age to anyone over the age of 65, regardless of financial status.
Since the programme's inception in 1972 a total of 145,546 cards
has been issued. One of the immediate benefits of having this
identification card is lower bus fares (15 cents instead of 25 cents).
Changing patterns in 1973—During 1973 the cost to the
Province of operating the Courtesy Card programme was approximately $13,000. During the year there was an increased attempt
to provide lists of benefits available to seniors in each community.
Many benefits found in the Province, such as motels, hotels, and
service-stations, are yet to be listed.
Cost-sharing status—Costs of this programme are borne by
the Provincial Government.
PROGRAMME: SENIORS' ACTIVITY CENTRES
Example: "411 Seniors Centre"
Goal—To provide senior citizens with opportunities for social
and recreational activities as well as inexpensive nutritional lunches
and snacks.
Description—Lower Mainland residents use the 411 Seniors
Centre on Dunsmuir in Vancouver as a "drop-in centre" for rest and
refreshments. Lunches are provided at cost. Music, films, arts and
crafts projects, and a library are some of the resources available to
participants. Senior volunteers, along with three professional workers, are responsible for the centre's day-to-day operations.
Since the centre opened in December 1972, it has also been
used as a rest stop for bus-touring seniors from elsewhere in the
Province.
During 1973 a cumulative total of 14,278 senior citizens signed
the guest book at the centre.
NEW DIRECTIONS IN SERVICES FOR SENIORS IN 1973
The year 1973 was one of transition. A conference on the
needs of senior citizens was sponsored by the Department of
Human Resources and the Department of Health Services on
March 13 and 14, 1973. A second conference for Senior Citizen
Counsellors was sponsored by the Department of Human Resources
early in October. Recommendations from these conferences
pointed out the need for more decentralized services. At these
meetings, senior citizens stressed that co-ordination and integration
of services must begin at the local delivery level, and local services
such as housekeeper/homemaker services, meals-on-wheels, and
information services must be made available in co-ordination with
local Human Resources offices. Transportation, the cost of drugs,
the cost of prostheses and other special equipment, meals-on-
wheels, homemaker services, and recreational needs, were some of
the items of concern raised by the participants.
In 1973 approximately 25 per cent of the users of the Department's Homemaker Service were people over 60 years of age. New
directions in 1974 point to greater expansion of the Homemaker
Services and to a closer look at further support for the Meals-on-
Wheels programmes. Introduction of the Pharmacare programme
on January 1, 1974, is directed toward meeting the prescribed drug
requirements of citizens over 65. It is expected that senior citizens'
conferences will become a yearly event.
Examples of some other community programmes sponsored by
the Department of Human Resources follow:
61
 COMMUNITY
Supporting
Programme Contribution!
New Westminster: $
Senior Citizens Service Bureau—Work among disabled,
elderly, and blind—catalyst between agencies; to meet
deficit         900.00
North Vancouver:
Silver Harbour Manor Society—Senior citizen housing   56,397.00
Penticton:
Retirement Centre—For elderly,  social,  and information
and referral
Courtenay :
Comox  Valley Meals-on-Wheels — Meals-on-wheels  with
elderly and handicapped  	
476.50
100.00
Prince George:
Carefree—Transportation   for  elderly,   handicapped,   and
retarded, and service other programmes   40,000.00
Saanich:
Saltspring Meals-on-W heels—Meals-on-wheels for elderly
and shut-ins       4,000.00
Surrey:
Community  Service Bureau—Transportation  for elderly,
in home visitation, crisis line for all   56,419.00
i From the Department of Human Resources.
PROGRAMMES
Supporting
Programme Contribution1
Terrace: $
The Golden Rule—Senior citizens' support         900.00
Nanaimo:
Meals-on-W heels        1,200.00
Victoria:
Mcals-on-Wheels   (Silver   Threads)—Meals-on-wheels   for
shut-ins, elderly     10,703.49
Silver Threads Service—Activity, drop-in centre for elderly 56,359.55
Vancouver:
Project Outreach—Geriatric centre  to  help elderly  with
home care   .._..        5,400.00
West Vancouver:
North Shore Volunteers for Seniors—North Shore training
and assistance for senior citizens       2,400.00
Kelowna :
Homemaker Services—Homemaker programme for shut-
ins, elderly, and handicapped persons       900.00
62
 LEGISLATION
ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES
Department of Human Resources Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap.
111, as amended)—This Act establishes the Department of Human
Resources as having jurisdiction of all matters relating to social
and public welfare and social assistance.
Social Assistance Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap. 360, as amended)
—The purpose of this Act and its regulations is to provide financial
assistance and other services that are essential for a reasonably
normal and healthy existence to individuals and families who are
unable to maintain themselves by their own efforts.
Protection of Children Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap. 303, as
amended)—The purpose of this Act is to provide protection and
care for children who are neglected, abused, abandoned, or without
proper supervision or guardianship.
Children of Unmarried Parents Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap. 52,
as amended)—This Act is to ensure that the interests of the mother
and her child born out of wedlock are protected.
Adoption Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap. 4, as amended)—The
purpose of this Act is to provide the same rights and privileges for
family.
• Replaced by Federal Old-age Security and Guaranteed Income Supplement Programmes, effective January 1, 1970; certain cases still active, however.
Old-age Assistance Act* (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap. 270)—The
purpose of this Act is to provide financial assistance to persons
between 65 and 68 years of age who have limited assets or income.
Disabled Persons' Allowances Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap. 113,
as amended)—This Act provides financial assistance to persons
over 18 years of age who are totally and permanently disabled
and who have limited assets or income.
Blind Persons' Allowances Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chap. 29, as
amended)—This Act provides financial assistance to blind persons
over 18 years of age and who have limited assets or income.
Provincial Home Act (1969, chap. 29)—The purpose of this
Act is to provide care for persons who are unable to maintain themselves by their own efforts.
Handicapped Persons Income Assistance Act (S.B.C. 1972
(2nd Sess.), chap. 4)—The purpose of this Act is to provide
financial assistance and other services to the blind and disabled.
Guaranteed Minimum Income Assistance Act (S.B.C. 1972
(2nd Sess.), chap. 3)—This Act provides a guaranteed minimum
assistance to persons 60 years of age and over.
63
   Table 41—Proportion of Total Gross Welfare Expenditure
\9i\ni
1972/73
Value
Per Cent
Value
Per Cent i
$
1,205,109
0.8
$
1,483,893
0.9
1,768,434
1.2
1,904,140
1.1
5,481,303
3.7
5,673,501
3.3
289,439
0.2
233,463
0.1
19,741,383
13.2
21,997,737
12.8
7,150,589
4.8
7,670,283
4.5
103,169,623
69.3
102,800,065
59.7
10,122,773
6.8
30,403,634
17.7
148,928,653
100.0
172,166,716
100.0
Administration (includes Minister's Office and part of Accounting Division)
Institutions _	
Field service _  	
Provincial Alliance of Businessmen	
Maintenance of dependent children (includes New Denver Youth Centre).....
Medical services, drugs, etc.	
Social Allowances, Work Activity Projects, and burials 	
Mincome and allowances for aged and handicapped... _	
Totals _ _.
i Does not add to 100.0 due to rounding.
66
 Table 42—Comparison of Number of Cases in the Province, by Category of
Service,x as at March 31, 1972, and March 31, 1973
Table 43—Number of Cases Receiving Service in the Province, by Category
of Service, During the Years 1972 and 1973
Category
Family Service	
Social Allowance—
Single persons	
Couple	
Two-parent family 	
One-parent family..	
Child with relative	
Totals, Social Allowance	
Handicapped Persons Income Assis
tance2 	
Blind Persons' Allowance	
Disabled Persons' Allowance ... .
Old Age Supplementary Social Allowances3	
Adoption home pending _	
Adoption home approved	
Child in adoption home	
Foster home pending   .	
Foster home approved	
Child-in care .. .,
Unmarried parent	
Welfare institution ._.	
Health and Institutional Service	
Totals	
Cases at March 31
1972
2,772
29,049
3,059
6.978
14,479
1,321
75,052
24,733
1973
3,623
26,443
2,412
5,545
14,459
1,324
54,886
50,183
556"
5,125
3,295
643
634
493
466
792
824
699
714
2,942
2,917
6,869
6,681
590
648
225
158
290
119
72,092
Minus
or Plus
Change
+ 851
-2,606
—647
-1,433
—20
+ 3
Per Cent
+30.6
—9.0
—21.1
-20.5
—0.13
+0.2
-4,703
-8.5
+ 59
+ 1.8
-9
-1.3
— 27
-5.4
+32
+4.0
+ 15
+2.1
—25
-0.8
-188
-2.7
+ 58
+9.8
—67
—70.2
— 171
-58.9
-2,960 -15.0
1 Region 9 was created in January 1973; Regions 10 and 11 in February 1973. The
last two were formerly Region 1, with the addition of Victoria Family and Children's
Service.
- As the Handicapped Persons Income Allowance Programme was introduced in
December 1972, the cases of Blind and Disabled Persons' Allowances have been combined
under Handicapped Persons Allowance cases for March 31, 1973.
3 With the introduction of the Mincome Programme in December 1972 for persons 65
years and over, the Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance Programme was
discontinued. The italicized case count for March 31, 1972, has not been included in
the total. The number of Mincome cases as at March 31, 1973, was 108,938.
Category
Family Service	
Social Allowance-
Single	
Couple..
Two-parent family..
One-parent family-
Child with relative-
Total, Social Allowance..
Handicapped Persons Income Assistance "1
Blind Persons' Allowance I
Disabled Persons' Allowance1 J
Old Age Supplementary Social Allowance2.
Adoption pending	
Adoption approved	
Child in adoption home	
Foster home pending	
Foster home approved	
Child-in-care	
Unmarried parent	
Welfare institution	
Health and Institutional Service	
Totals..
Ufc
■d
•a .-
i a
u rt
£>"
J-S
O M
oM
o^
CS]   O
8*5
x'C
i-o
«3
UQ
UQ
ow
2,772 |
1 "Cases Served in Year" is the total open at the first of the year plus the cases opened
during the year.
2 With the introduction of the Mincome Programme in December 1972 for persons 65
years and over, the Old Age Supplementary Social Allowance Programme was discontinued. The italicized case count for March 31, 1972, has not been included in the
total.   The number of Mincome cases at March 31, 1973, was 108,938.
3 As the Handicapped Persons Income Assistance Programme was introduced in December 1972, the Blind and the Disabled Persons' Allowances have been combined under
Handicapped Persons Income Assistance cases for March 31, 1973.
67
 Table 44—Number of Cases, by Category of Service and Regions, as of March 31, 1972 and 1973
Region 2
Region 3
Region 4
Region 5
Region 6
Reg
ion 7
Region 8
Region 91
Region 101
Region 111
Mar.
1972
Mar.
1973
1
Mar.
1972
Mar.
1973
Mar.
1972
Mar.
1973
Mar.
1972
Mar.
1973
Mar.
1972
Mar.
1973
Mar.
1972
Mar.
1973
Mar.
1972
| Mar.
1   1973
Mar.
1972
Mar.
1973
Mar. | Mar.
1972  j   1973
Mar.
1972
Mar.
1973
1,268
1,828
558
288
130
115
142
189
331
371
50
115
66
70
260
335
227
52
Social Allowances—
Single	
15,520
1,255
2,130
6,743
276
13,653
906
1,660
6,416
302
2,242
399
923
1,317
191
1,562
235
522
844
122
1
1,533     1,411
1991       153
3831       322
660j       701
751        fil
1,150
158
577
734
119
1,220
166
463
768
115
3,034
349
1,175
1,918
166
2,894
266
914
1,989
151
1,124
169
464
457
229
753
98
294
432
226
501
92
284
402
88
397
84
229
361
64
'"
604
100
258
529
76
      1,758
 1       210
1        480
3,945
438
1,042
2,248
177
2,191
194
403
1,159
156
1,260
51
2.850
25,924
22,937
5,072
3,285
2.648
2,738
2,732
6,642
6,214
2,443
1,803
1,367
1,135
1,567
3,763
7,850
4,099
	
	
182
1,052
49
392
318
17
180
	
41
78
121
63
35
87
110
236
632
30
14
1
54
473
2,802
100
123
109
103
486
1,143
113
9
	
31
55
8
33
j             |
 j.	
44
485
	
3,612
81
81
121
60
564
1,159
20
23
172
	
 1 1      .......
 1       	
Handicapped Persons' Income Al-
2,021
1,541
50
45
54
57
215
440
15
142
557
	
89
~41
25
47
45
153
485
16
17
1
1
43!	
152
267
	
200
OAS   Supplementary   Social   Al-
10,115
172
96
240
78
640
1,362
340
143
....
2,316
686
63
37
75
93
261
664
23
12
301
32
21
47
48
133
432
16
11
	
203
Adoption home pending	
Adoption home approved	
Child in adoption home ..	
138
106
264
86
553
1,138
374
56
	
124
83
119
201
570
1,382
57
27
116
8,750
54
32
48
79
302
631
28
6
18
56
44
51
63
218
393
13
95
91
123
111
483
1,153
132
20
21
7
27
59
73
287
6
20
79
47
49
91
320
65
60
97
23
8
30
67
68
285
9
18
28
45
517
17
67
743
 1    1,023
198
 1          17
24
28
5
16
95
1
Health	
1
1
 1           3
Totals
31,497
29,501
5,089
4,053
3,846
4,228
4,285
9,686
9,555
3,319
2,860
1,955
1,736
3,573
 1    6.313
10,887
5,049
1 Region 9 was created in January 1973; Regions 10 and 11 in February 1973.   Region 10 and 11 were formerly Region 1. with addition of Victoria Family and Children's Service.
2 With the introduction of Mincome Programme in December 1972 for persons 65 years and over, the Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance Programme was discontinued.
The italicized case count for March 31, 1972, has not been included in the total.  The number of Mincome cases at March 31, 1973, was 108,938.
3 As the Handicapped Persons Income Allowance Programme was introduced in December 1972, the cases of Blind and Disabled Persons' Allowances have been combined under
Handicapped Persons Allowance cases for March 31, 1973.
68
 Table 45—Expenditures for Social Allowance, 1972/73
Basic Social Allowance  	
Repatriation, transportation within the Province
92,111,866
nursing- and
boarding-home care, special allowances, and grants  7,868,152
Housekeeper and Homemaker Services   1,394,221
Emergency payments    281,555
Hospitalization of Social Allowance recipients    34,952
Tuberculosis allowances and transportation  39,395
Total costs, Social Allowance .
Municipal share of costs 	
Federal-Provincial cost-sharing—
Canada Assistance Plan	
Department of Indian Affairs	
101,730,141
18,860,830
66,921,231
1,448,546
Table 46—Average Monthly Number Receiving Social Allowances
During 1971/72 and 1972/73
Average Case Load and
Recipients per Month
1971/72 1972/73
Heads of families      25,102 22,343
Single persons     34,432 28,806
Dependents
Total case load (average).
Totals.
59,564
66,759
126,323
51,148
57,052
108,200
Table 48—Expenditures for Provincial Home, Kamloops, for the Fiscal Year
Ended March 31, 1973
$
Salaries...     233,410.00
Expenses—
Office expense      —-          336.00
Travelling expense  —   142.00
Medical services          4,122.00
Clothing and uniforms  .._         4,045.00
Provisions and catering .  —   -    60,048.00
Laundry and dry goods    _...       9,978.00
Comfort allowance, etc.
Equipment and machinery
Medical supplies
Maintenance of buildings and grounds	
Maintenance and operation of equipment.
Motor-vehicles and accessories      	
Burials                  	
Less—
Board             .. ..
$
     120.00
Rent 	
.      50.00
Provincial Home expenditure
Public Works expenditures	
SUMMARY
4,956.00
996.00
187.00
166.00
863.00
1,028.00
3,885.00
2,085.00
170.00
326,077.00
326,077.00
11,599.75
Table 47—Gross Costs of Medical Services for Fiscal Years 1966/67
to 1972/73
Year
Medical
Drugsi
Dental
Optical
Transportation
Other
Total
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1966/67	
2,422,702
2,095,733
670,580
118,003
183,285
48,723
5,539,026
1967/68	
2,344,676
2,157,182
773,979
145,588
187,357
50,524
5,659,306
1968/69 	
1,403,378
2,423,798
792,475
140,591
212,550
53,571
5,026,363
1969/70	
465,738
2,444,968
1,611,115
219,858
252,999
72,862
5,067,540
1970/71	
591,206
3,102,874
2,491,589
282,272
326,166
121,892
6,915,999
1971/72 	
614,365
3,334,159
2,403,257
290,116
342,712
165,980
7,150,589
1972/73	
677,194
3,626,268
2,429,538
304,695
367,888
264,700
7,670,283
i Not included in these figures is the cost of drugs purchased by the dispensary for welfare institutions.
337,676.75
Cost per diem, $377,677.00-*-46,750 = $7.22.
Pensions paid to Government Agent, Kamloops   207,387.99
Comfort money paid to pensioners       16,546.21
RESIDENT-DAYS
Residents in the Home, April 1, 1972   149
Residents admitted during the year     47
196
Residents discharged      68
Residents deceased           18
86
Total number of residents, March 31, 1973  110
Number of resident-days for the year, 46,750
69
 Table 49—Cost of Maintaining Children, 1972/73
The cost to Provincial Government of maintaining children for the fiscal
year was as follows:
Gross cost of maintenance of children in Child Welfare Division $
foster homes      9,736,171
Gross cost to Provincial Government of maintenance of child-
in care of Children's Aid Societies     11,760,761
Gross cost of transportation of children in care of Superintendent 138,515
Gross cost of hospitalization of new-born infants being permanently planned for by Superintendent     45,279
Gross expenditures      21,680,726
Less collections          5,372,733
Net cost to Provincial Government, as per Public Accounts        16,307,993
Table 50—Number of Children in Carel of Superintendent of Child Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies, by Legal Status,
by Regions, and by Societies, as at March 31, 1973
Children in Care
P.C.A.
Wards
Before
Court
J.D.A.
Wards
Assigned
Guardianship
Other
Provinces'
Wards
Non-
wards
Other
Agency
Nonwards,
Wards, and
Before
Court
Total
Superintendent of Child Welfare—
67
740
397
290
442
734
319
180
531
687
178
4
41
22
16
30
35
13
20
17
28
	
23
134
37
35
74
130
57
39
72
88
6
1
41
10
6
10
21
22
10
32
16
9
26
25
9
7
24
6
6
7
16
84
164
107
48
36
152
50
29
84
110
2
6
18
7
13
11
38
5
1
6
33
26
194
1,164
605
417
610
Region 6.	
Region 7   ...	
Region 8 	
1,134
472
277
727
994
Superintendent of Child Welfare and agency wards
supervised by  another province	
228
Totals, Superintendent of Child Welfare	
4,565
226
695
171
135
866
164
6,822
801
690
388
26
47
19
227
86
103
5
4
7
284
81
64
117
45
97
1,460
Catholic Family and Children's Service, Vancouver	
953
678
Totals,   Superintendent   of   Child   Welfare
6,444
318
1,111
171
151
-      1,295
423
9,913
1 "In care" is defined as the actual number of children being cared for by the agency, regardless of which agency has legal responsibility for the
child.
2 Two additional regions were created during 1972/73.   With minor variations the former Region 1 is now divided between Regions  1  and 10
and the former Region 3 is now Regions 3 and 9.
70
 Table 51—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies,
by Type of Care, as at March 31, 1973
Type of Care
Superintendent
of Child Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid Society
Catholic
Family and
Children's Service, Vancouver
Victoria Family
and Children's
Service
Total
1
4,398 | 1,001
141 21
739 95
360            j                64
1,056 i 236
128            |                43
632
19
61
61
164
16
440
18
55
22
130
13
6,471
Boarding-home, child maintains self	
199
Free home and free relatives' (or parents') home	
950
507
Resourcesl            	
1,586
A.W.O.L	
200
6,822                        1,460
953
678
9,913
i This is a new term covering the wide variety of placements ranging from subsidized receiving homes to Federal institutions.
Table 52—-Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies, by Age-group, at March 31, 1973
Age-group
Superintendent
of Child Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid Society
Catholic
Family and
Children's Service, Vancouver
Victoria Family
and Children's
Service
Total
Under 3 years	
504
677
2,01°
2,150
1,127
346
99
110
388
412
306
145
108
93
255
246
173
78
38
76
180
749
3-5 years, inclusive	
956
2.841
192                        3,000
133                         1,739
18 years           ....                    ...  .
59                           628
Totals	
6,822
1,460            |              953
1
678           i            9,913
1
71
 Table 53—Number of Children Placed for Adoption by the Department
of Human Resources and Children's Aid Societies for Fiscal Years
1971/72 and 1972/73.
1971/72 1972/73
Regions         839 766
Children's Aid Society, Vancouver         219 174
Catholic   Family   and   Children's
Service, Vancouver       100 76
Victoria   Family   and   Children's
Service         96 61
Subtotals       415 311
Grand totals   1,254 1,077
Table 54—Adoptions Completed, by Type of Adoption and Percentages of
Total, Fiscal Years 1971/72 and 1972/73
Type of Adoption
Department   and   private   agency   place
ments	
Step parent adoptions	
Other relative adoptions..	
Private adoptionsi - —	
Totals .__■	
Fiscal Year 1971/72
Total
Adoptions
Completed
1,445
763
65
33
Per Cent
of Total
62.7
33.1
2.8
1.4
2,306
100.0
Fiscal Year 1972/73
Total
Adoptions
Completed
965
745
76
34
1,820
Per Cent
of Total
53.0
40.9
4.2
1.9
100.0
1 Child and adopting parents not blood relations, and placement was arranged through
means other than social agency or Department.
The following tables are available, on request, from the Division of Office Administration and Public Information, Department
of Human Resources:
Table 55—Total Persons Receiving Social Allowances and Costs in
Regions, by Provincial and Municipal Areas, in March 1972 and
1973.
Table 56—Number of Family Service Cases (Not in Receipt of Financial
Assistance from the Department of Human Resources) Served by the
Department of Human Resources During the Fiscal Year 1972/73.
Table 57—Number of Unmarried Mothers Served by Department of
Human Resources and Children's Aid Societies for Fiscal Year
1972/73.
Table 58—Number of Children Born Out of Wedlock in British Columbia, by Age-group of Mother, During Fiscal Years 1971/72 and
1972/73.
Table 59—Cases Receiving Services From Department of Human
Resources and Children's Aid Societies Related to Protection of
Children, by Type of Service, for Fiscal Years 1972 and 1973.
Table 60—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies During and at End of Fiscal Year
1972/73.
Table 61—Number of Children Who Are the Legal Responsibility of
the Superintendent of Child Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies,
by Legal Status, by Regions, and by Societies, as at March 31, 1973.
Table 62^—Number of Children Admitted to Care of Superintendent of
Child Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies, by Legal Status,
During Fiscal Year 1972/73.
Table 63—Reasons for New Admissions of Children to Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies During
Fiscal Year 1972/73.
Table 64—Number of Children Discharged From Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies for Fiscal
Year 1972/73.
Table 65—Reasons for Discharge of Children in Care of Superintendent
of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies for Fiscal Year
1972/73.
Table 66—Children Who Are Legal Responsibility of Superintendent
of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies Receiving Institutional
Care as at March 31, 1973.
Table 67—Number of Children With Special Needs Placed for Adoption
by Department of Human Resources and Children's Aid Societies
During Fiscal Year 1972/73.
Table 68—Number of Adoption Homes Awaiting Placement, in Which
Placement Made, and Homes Closed for Fiscal Year 1972/73.
Table 69—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of
Human Resources (by Regions) and Children's Aid Societies (by
Type of Placement) for Fiscal Year 1972/73.
Table 70—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of
Human Resources (by Regions) and Children's Aid Societies (by
Religion of Adopting Parents) for Fiscal Year 1972/73.
Table 71—Ages of Children Placed for Adoption by Department of
Human Resources and Children's Aid Societies During Fiscal Year
1972/73.
72

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