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annual report of the CORRECTIONS BRANCH DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL for the year ended March 31… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1974

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 annual report
of the
CORRECTIONS
BRANCH
DEPARTMENT OF THE
ATTORNEY-GENERAL
for the year ended March 31
1973
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY
  The Honourable Walter Stewart Owen, Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Corrections Branch for the year ended March 31, 1973,
is herewith respectfully submitted.
Alex. Macdonald
A ttorney-General
Attorney-General's Office, January 1974.
  Department of the Attorney-General,
corrections service,
vancouver, b.c.,
November 1, 1973
The Honourable Alex. Macdonald,
A ttorney-General,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir:
I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Corrections Branch for the
12 months ended March 31, 1973.
Respectfully submitted,
EDGAR W. EPP,
Deputy Minister of Corrections
  CONTENTS
Institutions
Regional correctional centres     9
Specialized facilities  12
Forestry camps  12
Young Offender Programmes  13
Facilities for chronic alcoholics  14
Discipline and security  14
Institutions staff -  15
Staff-training  15
Construction and works  16
Probation
Adult probation  17
Children in conflict with the law  17
Community involvement  18
Staff-training  18
Classification  19
Treatment and training programmes
Individual and group counselling  20
Institutional maintenance programmes  20
Production programmes  20
Forestry programmes  21
Vocational training  21
Academic education  21
Recreation  21
Religious programmes  22
Community service programmes  23
Institutional use of community volunteers  23
Temporary absence programme  24
Medical, dental, and psychiatric services  25
B.C. Board of Parole 26
Appendices
Population graph  28
Statistical tables  29
  DIRECTORY OF CORRECTIONAL FACILITIES
Regional correctional centres
Lower Mainland Region
1. Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre—This facility serves as the receiving
centre for the Lower Mainland Region, as well as holding remand and appeal cases. In addition,
a number of fairly well-defined groups of offenders are classified to this multipurpose institution:
(a) Drug addicts, mainly hard-core heroin-users:
(b) Physically disabled, and other medical and psychiatric cases:
(c) Overt and aggressive homosexuals:
(d) Miscellaneous short-term cases:
(e) Day parole/work release candidates for the region.
2. Women's Unit of Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre—Serves as the receiving
centre for sentenced female offenders from all parts of British Columbia. One cottage is used
for those cases with very short sentences. A small number of offenders with sentences of a
few months and a history of alcoholism or problems with alcohol are transferred to Twin
Maples Farm.
The remainder is composed mainly of offenders addicted to heroin, security risks, the
psychologically unstable, or medical cases. They are kept in the main building of the unit.
3. Mount Thurston and Ford Mountain Camps—Located in the Chilliwack Valley, and
serve as minimum security facilities for inmates transferred from Lower Mainland Regional
Correctional Centre. For the most part these camps receive older offenders showing a fair
range of criminal sophistication or inadequacy, but who are not drug addicts, escape risks, or
serious behavioural problems.
Vancouver Island Region
1. Vancouver Island Regional Correctional Centre—Outside Victoria, which acts as the
receiving centre for sentenced offenders as well as holding remand and appeal cases. As with
Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre, problem cases of a psychological, medical, or
security nature are kept at this institution.
2. Snowdon and Lakeview Forest Camps—Located north of Campbell River, they serve as
minimum security housing for the region. All inmates are received upon transfer from Vancouver Island Regional Correctional Centre. Lakeview was used for the recidivist in the latter
stages of a sentence, provided his progress had been satisfactory at Vancouver Island Regional
Correctional Centre, until December 1972. Because of the reduction in numbers of minimum
security inmates, operation of the Lakeview Camp was discontinued in December 1972.
Interior Region
1. Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre—Near the city of Kamloops, takes all sentenced
prisoners from the Interior and Kootenay areas. A small number of remand and waiting-trial
cases are kept here.
As the centre itself has a limited capacity, all but the most difficult security and medical
cases are transferred to camps.
2. Rayleigh Camp—Is a short distance outside the city and takes short-sentence inmates.
Most such cases have less than one month to serve and tend to be nomadic alcoholics.
3. Clearwater Forest Camp—In the Wells Gray Provincial Park, receives all inmates with
longer sentences who are fit for work in the forest.
Prince George Region
1. Prince George Regional Correctional Centre—Performs the same function for the north
of the Province.
2. Hutda Lake Forest Camp—Thirty miles outside Prince George, receives on transfer
inmates suitable for work in the forest.
3. Farm Trailer Camp—Located on the grounds of the Prince George Regional Correctional Centre and provides housing for those with sentences of less than one month or medical
cases not fit for transfer to Hutda.
 W 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Specialized young-offender facilities
Haney Correctional Centre—Is the placement utilized for 40 to 45 per cent of the young
offenders with definite-indeterminate sentences. It offers a broad range of academic, vocational,
work, and counselling programmes, as well as a good level of security for the unstable types.
Most of the juveniles transferred to adult Court require the security of this institution. Haney
Correctional Centre thus receives a wide range of young offenders from the grossly immature
and disturbed or inadequate to the more stable offender who shows a capacity and motivation
for vocational or academic courses.
Selected short-term offenders are housed in Pine Ridge Forest Camp, a satellite camp of the
Haney Correctional Centre. Many of them return during the day to the main institution for a
course or work placement.
Stave Lake Camp—An additional resource for inmates serving their first gaol sentence.
New Haven Correctional Centre—Is a small, open, Borstal-type facility in the metropolitan Vancouver area. The offender's basic stability and capacity for response to an intensive
responsibility-type training are key factors to be considered. Apart from this, New Haven
accepts a fairly broad range of delinquents.
Boulder Bay and Centre Creek Forest Camps—Both offer a high-demand type of graded
training programme. The one at Boulder Bay is of four months' duration; at Centre Creek, six
months'. The content of the final training stage includes mountain-climbing, wilderness survival,
search and rescue, and forest fire-fighting. Groups from both camps have distinguished themselves in fighting forest fires and finding lost hunters and hikers.
Facilities for chronic alcoholics
Alouette River Unit—Accommodates male alcoholics who are held on a detaining order
imposed by the Courts under an amendment to the Summary Convictions Act. Only the Cities
of Vancouver and Prince George have so far invoked the use of this legislation. Men at the unit
undergo a course of treatment in which they are brought face to face with their problems,
discuss them, hopefully gain a greater insight into their behaviour, and learn ways to live full
and useful lives without having to have recourse to alcohol.
All cases are admitted direct to the institution, and the length of the treatment period
depends on the individual's ability to profit from it. Men are released under a probation order
to the community when they are deemed fit.
Twin Maples Farm—Performs the same function for female alcoholics and comes under
the same administration. The legislation for females has been invoked on a Province-wide basis.
In spite of this, the number of admissions is very low.
Young female offenders with definite-indeterminate sentences are classified to a cottage on
the grounds for a specialized training programme geared to their age-range.
 REPORT OF CORRECTIONS BRANCH, 1972/73
Administrative staff
DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL
CORRECTIONS SERVICE
The Honourable Alex. Macdonald, Q.C., Attorney-General
Gilbert D. Kennedy, Q.C., Deputy Attorney-General
SENIOR CORRECTIONS ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
S. Rocksborough Smith, Director of Correction and Chief Probation Officer
M. A. Matheson, Deputy Director of Correction
C. D. Davidson, Assistant Chief Probation Officer
W 11
HEADQUARTERS STAFF OFFICERS
A. K. Brind-Sheridan
Probation Staff Training Officer
G. R. Bulmer
Senior Medical Officer
R. E. Fitchett
Staff Officer—Personnel
E. M. Pierce
Staff Officer—Correctional Programmes
Rev. E. J. Hulford
Senior Protestant Chaplain
Rev. T. F. M. Corcoran
Senior Roman Catholic Chaplain
Mrs. M. M. Berg
Staff Officer—Services
S. A. Thorvaldson
Supervisor of Classification and Research
CORRECTIONAL CENTRE ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
W. H. Mulligan
Warden, Lower Mainland Regional
Correctional Centre
J. W. Bellis
Warden, Haney Correctional Centre
H. B. Bjarnason
Warden, Prince George Correctional Centre
O. J. Walling
Warden, Alouette River Unit
V. H. Goad
Director, New Haven Correctional Centre
W. Scott (to June 30, 1972)
G. J. Chapple (from Aug. 1, 1972)
Warden, Kamloops Regional Correctional
Centre
S. A. L. Hamblin
Warden, Vancouver Island Regional
Correctional Centre
and Sayward Forest Camps
G. J. Chapple (to July 31, 1972)
B. W. Tate (from Aug. 1,1972)
Officer-in-Charge, Chilliwack Forest Camps
PROBATION ADMINISTRATION STAFF
K. M. Richardson
Supervisor, Vancouver Region
A. E. Jones
Supervisor, Vancouver Island Region
R. G. McKellar
Supervisor, Northern Region
O. E. Hollands
Supervisor, Fraser Valley Region
J. Wiebe
Supervisor, Interior Region
J. V. Sabourin
Supervisor, Parole and Special Services
BRITISH COLUMBIA PAROLE BOARD
C. J. A. Dalton (Chairman)
Mrs. T. G. Norris
E. Kelly
Members
Dr. G. Kirkpatrick
A. Watts (Vice-Chairman)
 W 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
INSTITUTIONS
Regional correctional centres
1. Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre—This facility contains
units for both remand and sentenced persons, male and female. The men's
remand unit receives and holds all males over the age of 17 who are awaiting
trial.   The units for sentenced males contain several differing groups:
(a) Drug addicts, mainly hard-core heroin-users:
(b) Physically disabled, and other medical and psychiatric cases:
( c ) Overt or aggressive homosexuals:
(d) Offenders serving sentences under 60 days:
(e) Work and educational release candidates within the Greater Vancouver area:
(/) Persons serving intermittent sentences.
The women's unit serves as a remand centre and a facility for sentenced female
offenders from throughout the Province.   All those female offenders who require
secure facilities or who are criminally sophisticated remain at the women's unit.
2. Vancouver Island Regional Correctional Centre—This facility serves the
Vancouver Island region as a remand centre and holds those sentenced persons who,
by reason of being security risks, or for medical or other reasons, cannot be transferred to a minimum security facility.
The centre is an old, outdated building. Renovations of certain portions of
the facility have been undertaken. However, further extensive renovation is required
if continued use of the facility is to be made.
3. Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre—This facility exists within the city
of Kamloops and serves as both a remand centre and a facility for sentenced persons
from within the Interior region. Persons from the Okanagan and Kootenays are
held in this centre as well as those from the area around Kamloops.
The programme of this facility is severely limited by the physical plan. The
facilities were taken over on a temporary basis but have continued in use. Living
accommodation for those awaiting trial and for sentenced offenders is inadequate.
There are inadequate provisions for security and consequently those who are held
on remand for a lengthy period of time or who are in need of being held in a very
secure situation are transferred to the Lower Mainland Regional Correctional
Centre. Planning to provide alternative and additional facilities and programmes
for the Interior region, both in Kamloops and in other locations within the region,
is a definite priority.
4. Prince George Regional Correctional Centre—This centre provides facilities
for those awaiting trial and also serves as a remand centre and a facility for sentenced
offenders from the north. This facility is more adequate than any of the other
regional correctional facilities in that it is of more recent construction and has a
population which can be handled well within one facility.
Specialized facilities
Forestry camps
Throughout the Province, forestry camps have been developed to accommodate those sentenced persons who can be housed within minimal security requirements.  The work programmes of the forestry camp are developed in conjunction
 REPORT OF CORRECTIONS BRANCH, 1972/73 W 13
with the Department of Forestry of the Province and provide an opportunity for
work and training for offenders in fields related to British Columbia's major industry.
1. Chilliwack Forest Camps—Mount Thurston and Ford Mountain Camps,
part of the Chilliwack Forest Camps complex located in the Chilliwack Valley,
serve those offenders who can take advantage of their programme from within the
Lower Mainland area.
2. Pine Ridge and Stave Lake Camps—These camps are operated as satellites
of Haney Correctional Centre. They are designed to serve relatively unsophisticated
offenders. The Stave Lake Camp, in particular, houses those persons who are
serving their first gaol sentence. The Stave Lake Camp programme has been undertaken in a three-way partnership between the B.C. Corrections Service, the B.C.
Forest Service, and B.C. Hydro. The major focus of its work programme is cleaning the debris from Stave Lake with the long-term goal of enhancing the lake's
potential as a public recreational site.
3. Snowdon Forest Camp and Lakeview Forest Camp—These camps provide
minimum security forestry camp placements for offenders from the Vancouver Island
region. In November 1972, the Lakeview Forest Camp was closed due to the small
number of minimum security offenders available for placement in this camp.
4. Rayleigh Camp and Clearwater Forest Camp—These camps are operated
as satellites of the Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre and provide minimum
security facilities for offenders from the Interior region. The Rayleigh Camp programme is focused on farming activities in addition to some forestry work. The
Clearwater Forest Camp near the Wells Gray Provincial Park is located approximately 90 miles from Kamloops.
5. Hutda Lake Forest Camp—This camp is located approximately 30 miles
from the city of Prince George and operated as a satellite of the Prince George
Regional Correctional Centre. This camp provides minimum security facilities for
offenders from throughout the northern region of the Province.
Young Offender Programmes
1. Haney Correctional Centre—This centre offers a broad range of academic,
vocational, work, and counselling programmes within a medium security setting.
Forty to forty-five per cent of young offenders throughout the Province are classified
through this centre. While this centre offers the advantage of a wide range of
programme resources, it suffers the disadvantage of size in that it is required to
accommodate a wide range of offenders. Offenders within this centre vary from the
grossly immature, disturbed, or inadequate offender to the more stable offender who
shows capacity and motivation for good use of the programme facilities.
2. New Haven Correctional Centre—This facility, modelled on the British
Borstal System, is ideally located in the metropolitan Vancouver area. It is small in
size, accommodating between 40 and 50 persons. Both its size and location have
contributed to the development of a long-standing relationship with volunteers
through the B.C. Borstal Association. Members of the association serve as sponsors
for the young adult offenders released from the New Haven Centre.
3. Boulder Bay Camp and Centre Creek Camp—Both of these camps offer an
Outward Bound Programme for young offenders. Since early 1973 both camps
having been offering programmes of four months' duration. Centre Creek is utilized for younger persons in the 15 to 17-year age-range. Boulder Bay Camp
accommodates older persons (18 to 21 years) who are generally more criminally
 W 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
sophisticated and frequently have completed programmes within other young
offender facilities. During the final month of the four-month graded programme
within each of these camps, activities such as mountain-climbing, wilderness survival,
search and rescue, and fire-fighting are provided. Groups from both of these camps
have distinguished themselves in fighting forest fires and participating in search and
rescue operations for lost hunters and climbers.
Facilities for Chronic Alcoholics
1. Alouette River Unit—This facility is located in Maple Ridge and provides
programmes for offenders who have problems relating to the use of alcohol. Both
those serving definite sentences and those who are held on a detaining order imposed
under section 64a of the Summary Convictions Act are held at this centre.
The centre's programme includes didactic sessions on the nature of alcoholism,
group counselling, and discussion sessions, and individual counselling. These programme components are directed toward assisting the alcohol offender in developing
greater insight into his behaviour and finding ways to live without dependency
upon alcohol.
Those with definite sentences are classified from throughout the Province to
this centre. Those who have been detained under the relevant section of the Summary Convictions Act come only from Vancouver and Prince George. These are
the only cities in the Province in which the legislation has been invoked to date.
It is the finding of the staff of this centre that those incarcerated under the
compulsory treatment provisions of the Summary Convictions Act are most frequently unmotivated and make very little use of the programme. Because of this,
further examination should be undertaken regarding the merit of the compulsory
treatment provisions of the Summary Convictions Act. The facility appears to serve
better the needs of those offenders who have alcohol problems and who seek participation in a programme focused on treatment.
2. Twin Maples Farm—This farm is operated as a satellite of the Alouette
River Unit, for females. It provides a similar programme for females with problems
of alcoholic use. In addition, the facility serves as a training unit for young female
offenders who can cope with minimum security facilities.
While section 64a of the Summary Convictions Act has been invoked on a
Province-wide basis for females, relatively little use has been made of it.
Discipline and security
During the year, large institutions noted an increase in the numbers of violations of gaol rules and regulations which occurred. However, smaller institutions
reported a reduction in the incidents of disciplinary infractions. This would suggest
that smaller institutions provide an environment which is less likely to stimulate
behavioural problems. This may be partially due to the greater possibility in smaller
institutions of closer staff-inmate relationships.
During the year the Lower Mainland Centre noted a sharp increase in the
number of fires deliberately set by aggressive and disturbed inmates.
A serious disturbance and mass escape attempt took place at the Women's
Unit, Lower Mainland Centre, in September 1972. This incident was brought under
control with a minimum degree of difficulty.
Safe custody of the mentally ill or disturbed person intent on suicide is of
increasing concern at the Lower Mainland Centre. In spite of great care and surveillance by concerned staff, two suicides occurred during the year.
 REPORT OF CORRECTIONS BRANCH, 1972/73 W 15
Each of the regional correctional centres, except the Prince George Centre,
experienced a slight increase in the number of escapes during the year. As in the
past, the greater number of escapes were from forest camps or other minimum
security facilities. Five of the thirteen escapes reported by the Lower Mainland
Centre were persons who were unlawfully at large through failing to return from
work release.
The continuing high number of escapes from the Alouette River Unit by persons on confirming orders, under section 64a of the Summary Convictions Act,
gives cause for concern. Most of these escapees were in the late stages of alcoholism
and were objecting to the lack of availability of sedating, pain-relieving, or tranquillizing drugs.
Institutions staff
Clearly, staff within the Corrections Branch continue to obtain the greatest
satisfaction in those centres where populations are small and the focus of the centre's
goals is clear and understood by all. In the larger centres, particularly Lower
Mainland and Haney, concern continues to be expressed because of the feelings of
frustration and lack of accomplishment which accompany attempts to handle large
numbers of increasingly difficult persons with widely varying needs. For example,
the closing down of the Westgate A Programme at the Lower Mainland Centre was
regretted by staff because they viewed this decision as a loss of opportunity to work
more intensively with a relatively small number of inmates.
The disturbance at the Women's Unit, Lower Mainland Centre, in September
1972, had a temporary effect on the level of staff morale. This was coupled with
the fact that many staff illnesses put pressure on the remaining personnel. Overcrowding and inadequate resources continue to be a difficulty in the Women's Unit.
An increasing number of staff at Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre
with lengthy service records are suffering from health problems, both physical and
psychological. This is a direct consequence of the constant, intense pressure of
working with large numbers of inmates who have serious behavioural problems.
At Haney Correctional Centre, Vancouver Island Centre, and Chilliwack
Forest Camp, separation and recruitment patterns varied little from last year. At
the Lower Mainland Centre there was an increased number of both staff separations
and staff recruitments during the year.
There has been an increase in the employment opportunities available in the
Prince George and Kamloops areas. This has created problems in staffing the
correctional centres in those two places. Staff frequently leave for higher paid positions in the community and it has become increasingly difficult to obtain high quality
applicants for available positions.
Staff-training
Staff-training continues to be handled primarily by the Staff Training Academy
at the Chilliwack Forest Camps. The academy programme includes training for
security officers, correctional officers, and principal officers.
Thirty-one staff were enrolled in certificate programmes given at community
colleges throughout the Province; others were enrolled in the certificate course in
criminology given at the University of British Columbia. Staff are encouraged to
participate in such training programmes in order to further professionalize their
job functions.
 W 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Specialized training was taken by a number of staff members of the Alouette
River Unit. This training was specifically focused on problems of alcohol and drug
dependency. The Director of the unit spent three weeks at Rutgers University
School of Alcoholism, and one week visiting institutions and agencies treating alcoholism. One of the chaplains attended the Willmar State Hospital in Minnesota
for three weeks, a hospital for the treatment of chemically dependent people. Five
other staff spent three weeks at the Hazelton Treatment Centre as observers. One
correctional officer attended a three-week course at the Johnston Institute in Minnesota on the treatment of chemically dependent persons.
This training was made possible by a grant through the Drug, Alcohol, and
Cigarette Education, Prevention, and Rehabilitation Fund. All who participated in
the training returned with increased knowledge and also with the firm conviction
that specific training for staff working with chemically dependent people is extremely
important.
Construction and works
The Department of Public Works has supported the Corrections Service in its
development of both capital and maintenance projects over the past year.
A number of maintenance projects have been completed in the past year under
the direction of the maintenance tradesmen employed by the Service. These tradesmen have made use of the availability of the inmate labour force in much of their
activity.
The past year saw the completion of the new security unit and a new storage
building at the Chilliwack Forest Camp. At the Haney Correctional Centre the
boat-maintenance shop was completed and a newly constructed sawmill should be
in operation soon.
Programme facilities have been expanded by the completion of the recreational
building at Snowdon Forest Camp, the new multipurpose building at Kamloops
Regional Centre, and new administration-infirmary building at Alouette River Unit.
The Corrections Service and the Department of Public Works have been involved in extensive planning relating to the renovation of the admissions area, the
upgrading of the houses, kitchen renovations, and the construction of a chapel
building at the Haney Correctional Centre.
The Department of Public Works, together with a private architect, have been
working on a plan for a fourth house at Alouette River Unit. In these plans, the
effect of architectural design on treatment is being considered.
PROBATION
The number of persons placed under probation supervision has continued to
increase during the past year. This continuing trend toward increased use of probation as an alternative to incarceration, together with other factors, indicates the
need to concentrate on the development of programmes and style which provide the
best service, both to the Courts and to the probationer.
In developmental terms, several shifts in emphasis seem to be indicated. One
example is the need for a shift in the role of Probation Officers from a more traditional therapist-counselling role to an organizational-management role in the delivery of services. Coupled with this is the need for continuing emphasis on areas of
community involvement, the use of volunteers, the special problems of the juvenile
probationer, and staff training. Planning and programme implementation has continued to develop in all of these areas over the past year.
 REPORT OF CORRECTIONS BRANCH, 1972/73 W 17
One of the ways that Probation Officers have been responding to these developmental concerns has been by concentrating on developing a team approach within
the Criminal Justice System. This team approach requires that the police, the Judge,
and the Probation Officer keep in close communication so that they understand and
have sympathy with each other's goals. In the Lower Mainland area, particularly
in Vancouver, this team approach is now an established fact. Where implemented,
this approach has led to a more consistent handling of offenders.
There are basically four areas of programme emphasis within probation. They
are Adult Probation; Programmes for Children in Conflict With the Law; Community Involvement, including the use of volunteers;  and Staff-training.
Adult probation
Over the past year the demand for pre-sentence reports has increased. The
Courts are looking for more detailed and factual information as a guide in sentencing and for the consideration of alternatives to imprisonment, whenever possible.
It is now commonplace for detailed reports to be prepared on the majority of persons
convicted for serious offences so that every possible opportunity for the offender's
rehabilitation can be considered. This is illustrated by the fact that one in every
four reports prepared in the Greater Vancouver area is written on a heroin addict
and approximately one-third of the addicts on whom reports are written are placed
on probation supervision.
This has resulted not only in an increase in the number of persons supervised
in the community, but also has given the Probation Officer a wider range of complex
problems with which to deal. It has become evident that new techniques must be
developed and more resources must be available to the Probation Officer if this
trend of using imprisonment only when necessary is to continue. As a result, Probation Officers have been spending an increasing amount of time developing resources
in the community rather than providing direct case supervision. Two examples of
such community involvement include the development of a Worker Service Programme in Courtenay and a Training Programme for persons convicted on impaired
driving charges in the Salmon Arm area. If probation is going to meet the challenge
of the present flexibility in sentencing, it is essential that more staff time be devoted
to developing programmes of this nature. This will require an increase in the total
number of Probation Officers in the Province.
Children in conflict with the law
This area of probation work has seen some of the more creative developments
alongside some of the greatest frustrations. The present split of administrative
responsibility between the Department of the Attorney-General and the Department
of Human Resources continues to prove unsatisfactory in the handling of many
juveniles who are brought before the Family Court. In too many cases the child is
overlooked while the departmental formalities are being completed.
On the positive side, the number of cases brought to Court has been reduced
significantly due to pre-Court intervention under the authority of section 16 of the
Provincial Court Act. In many instances, Probation Officers are able to help the
child and his family constructively resolve those situations which have brought the
child into conflict with the law without the intervention of the Court. This has been
a most hopeful development for corrections work in this Province and, with experience, new skills and techniques will be developed for work at this pre-Court stage.
2
 W 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Wherever feasible, children who come into conflict with the law, whether dealt
with at the pre-Court or post-Court levels, are referred to the appropriate educational, training, recreational, health, or social service agencies. In many instances,
the services offered by these agencies are successful in preventing the child's return
to delinquent behaviour and helping the child and his family to overcome behavioural difficulties. However, there are children of both sexes, throughout the
Province, who are beyond the control of resources in the community, particularly
child-care resources, which are the final resources available to the Court through
committal to the Superintendent of Child Welfare. These children have disrupted
group homes, have proven unresponsive to residential treatment programmes, and
in some instances, become a danger to the community.
The Search and Leadership Programme which is in its ninth year has proven
successful in dealing with some of these children, as have week-end and after-school
attendance programmes which have been developed specifically for the difficult
acting-out child who does not respond to normal control. However, there is still
a large group of children who are beyond the help or control of any facilities presently in the Province. These children are either transferred to adult Court and
sentenced to an adult institution, or left to their devices until they turn 17 and can
be dealt with under the Criminal Code. If the alarming increase in transfers to adult
Court is to be reduced, it is essential that the Corrections Service have the mandate
to develop the appropriate resources to keep children out of our adult institutions
and protect their rights as children.
Community involvement
A significant emphasis is being placed by Probation Officers on the task of
involving the community in Corrections programming. This is being done through
the development of public education programmes in schools, through the use of the
news media, through public speaking engagements, and through the involvement of
volunteers.
Volunteer programmes under the direction of Probation Officers have resulted
in the community becoming part of the team approach, and the benefits of this
approach are becoming increasingly apparent. Volunteers serve in a supportive
role by assisting in the organization of resources and the management of offenders
on probation. Volunteer sponsors for probationers are proving to be a valuable
resource, not only to probationers and Probation Officers, but also in the development of an increasing public awareness of the problems involved in Corrections
work.
The importance of community involvement cannot be underestimated. Probation Officers in a number of areas are increasing their efforts to help initiate and
provide effective follow-up for community involvement programmes of various kinds.
It is clear that if the potential for community involvement is to be realized, an
increased complement of field probation staff is required.
Staff-training
Thirty-four applicants were selected for Probation Officer training over the
year, with 31 completing the training programme successfully. It had been hoped
that at least 40 new officers could be trained, but this was not possible. Partially,
this has been due to the emphasis on selecting only those applicants who meet the
high standards necessary for probation work and avoiding the tendency to simply
 REPORT OF CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1972/73 W 19
fill vacancies.   The emphasis on quality over quantity can be seen in the calibre of
officers currently working in the field.
Refresher training courses for Probation Officers in the field were also provided
at the Training Centre. A total of four general refresher courses were offered where
Probation Officers from different parts of the Province were brought together to
examine their job performance and areas of need for continuing professional development. Five special refresher courses were offered through educational institutions
which gave the staff an opportunity to attend educational programmes relative to
their responsibilities.
CLASSIFICATION
During the fiscal year 1972/73 there was relatively little change in the total
number of persons classified to the various facilities throughout the Province. In
total there was a slight decrease in the number of inmate-days spent within Provincial correctional centres. However, increases in two areas are both interesting and
significant. Both the Haney Correctional Centre and the New Haven Centre witnessed an increase in the number of persons admitted. This reflects the increasing
number of young-adult offenders being admitted to the adult correctional system.
In addition, a dramatic increase occurred in the number of female offenders admitted.
Central Classification, which serves the function of classifying offenders to the
various facilities within the Province, is faced with serious difficulty in dealing with
the increased number of female offenders. Since only two facilities are available to
which female offenders can be classified, groups of offenders are being mixed, by
necessity, who should be separated because of their varying degrees of sophistication
and variety of needs.
The roles of Boulder Bay and Centre Creek Camps have changed slightly during the past year with respect to the age-group of offenders admitted to the programme. The Boulder Bay Camp is now being used for more sophisticated persons,
who are older and have experienced other programmes within the various correctional centres. The Centre Creek Camp is being used exclusively for young and (or)
first offenders. This change was undertaken in order to provide the more sophisticated offenders with an opportunity for an Outward Bound-type programme. Preliminary results indicate that many of the more sophisticated offenders classified to
the Boulder Bay Camp programme have made good use of it. There have been
some difficulties, but this is to be expected with the admission of more criminally
sophisticated persons to this type of programme.
Within the Alouette River Unit, offenders who are not motivated to participate
in the programme are now being accommodated within one house in order to diminish their negative effect on other residents of the Centre. In addition, programmes
specifically designed to develop motivation and encourage the involvement of these
persons are being provided.
At the Haney Correctional Centre, classification to houses according to a
behaviour category system has been initiated. On the basis of staff observation,
personal and social history, and personal interviews, new admissions are classified
to the living units according to one of four behavioural categories. Staff have been
assigned to the houses on the basis of their ability to work most effectively with
inmates who fall within one of the four categories. These staff have begun to
develop programmes centred on the needs of the behavioural group classified to
their unit.
 W 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TREATMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMMES
Individual and group counselling
Within each correctional centre and camp facility in the Province, individual
and group counselling programmes are available. These programmes take a variety
of forms but offer, in all facilities, the opportunity for inmates to seek staff assistance
with the resolution of day-to-day problems. Highly professionalized counselling is
available in those centres which have full-time Probation Officers on staff and is also
available through arrangements with the personnel of local mental health clinics.
Group counselling takes a variety of forms within the various centres. These
forms include group discussion, the use of confrontation techniques, and activity
oriented group programmes.
At the Vancouver Island Regional Correctional Centre, for example, one
marathon group session was held during the past year. This session took the form
of a 22-hour marathon followed by a four-hour session three days later. Those participating in this programme reported that it was useful in assisting them to increase
their understanding of themselves and of their relationships with other people.
The marathon session at Vancouver Island Regional Correctional Centre included volunteer participants from the community as well as inmates and staff. This
type of programme reflects a growing trend within the Corrections Service toward
an increasing participation of community volunteers in group programmes.
Institutional maintenance programmes
Correctional centres are dependent on inmate work crews for their maintenance.
This is particularly true in the area of food services. In every correctional centre and
camp facility inmates work alongside staff in the provision of meals for the population. While these programmes, particularly at Haney Correctional Centre, the
Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre, and the New Haven Correctional Centre,
include a training component, their main purpose is obviously the provision of meals
as required. Conflicts between the production needs and training goals of these
various institutions is frequently noted by staff.
Similarly, many inmates are involved in maintaining the standard of cleanliness
required within correctional facuities and others are involved in carpentry, electrical,
and plumbing and maintenance programmes.
Production programmes
As with the inmate contribution toward maintenance of the institutions, inmate
involvement in areas of production is of economic benefit to the Service and to the
Government. Production areas include licence-plate production, sheet-metal shops,
carpentry shops, clothing manufacturing, boot and shoe manufacturing, and farming.
With the exception of the licence-plate production, virtually all of the production programmes of the Corrections Service is directed toward meeting the needs of
the correctional centres. The manufacture of clothing, boots, and shoes meets a
great proportion of the inmates requirements for these items. The farm programme
has been developed to provide as much of the food requirements as possible within
the Service. This has been particularly true in the areas of pork, beef, and poultry
production, with these farm products all being produced by various correctional
centres.
 REPORT OF CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1972/73 W 21
These production programmes are in need of review within the Service. Their
value related to the involvement of inmates needs to be examined more closely as
does their genuine economic value to the Service.
Forestry porgrammes
The programmes undertaken by the correctional centres in conjunction with
the Department of Forestry include a variety of forest operations. These operations
include reforestation; silvicultures; pre-nursery operations; land, lake, and shoreline clean-ups; maintenance of roadways; fire suppression; and the production of
shakes and finished lumber as a by-product of clean-up operations.
The lumber and shakes produced are made available not only for Corrections
Service projects but also for the Department of Forestry and Parks to meet some
of the needs of these other Government departments.
Of more lasting benefit to the community at large are projects like the Stave
Lake Camp operation. This programme is directed toward the eventual recovery of
a potentially valuable recreation site and is being undertaken in conjunction with the
Department of Forestry and the B.C. Hydro. This project permits offenders to
participate in making a significant contribution to the community at large.
Vocational training
In addition to the on-the-job training experience provided through institutional
work programmes, specific vocational training programmes are available at the
Haney Correctional Centre, the Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre, and the
New Haven Centre. Problems have been encountered, particularly at the Haney
Correctional Centre, with regard to formal vocational training programmes. Persons admitted to British Columbia correctional centres tend to have minimal levels
of formal education and are generally not prepared to enter directly into formalized
vocational training programmes. The instructional staff are continuing to face the
challenge of teaching an increasingly younger group of trainees. Trainees now start
at a more elementary level than at one time and make slower progress.
An additional training programme was made available at Haney Correctional
Centre during the past year. A boat-maintenance shop was completed and it is
planned to provide a basic boat-building and maintenance course. At the Kamloops
Regional Correctional Centre, pre-apprenticeship training programmes in institutional cooking and auto-mechanics are being offered.
During the past year discussions were held with the administration of Douglas
College, the Superintendent of Vocational Education for the Province, and the
representative of the Provincial Apprenticeship Branch concerning the possible use
of the vocational training facilities at Haney Correctional Centre by students from
the community under the a;gis of Douglas College. Approval of such an arrangement would permit a greater utilization of the facilities available at the Centre and
would provide the community with additional vocational training resources without
added cost. This programme could also be of assistance in meeting the need for
correctional programmes to be more community related by offering an opportunity
for inmates and students from the community to attend vocational training courses
together.
Academic education
Academic Education Programmes are available to inmates at correctional
centres throughout the Province. Increasingly, these programmes involve the use
of teachers from the community to complement institutional resources.
 W 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
At Haney Correctional Centre, teachers are employed on a contract basis from
Douglas College to supplement the teaching staff at the centre. The relationship
between the centre and Douglas College has resulted in a wide range of benefits,
particularly in the area of remedial help for those students with special needs.
At Prince George Regional Correctional Centre, school attendance has increased with the addition of a qualified teacher who comes to the centre twice
weekly. This teacher has assumed responsibility to provide guidance with the
upgrading courses and assistance with correspondence courses.
At the Vancouver Island Regional Correctional Centre a well-developed educational programme is operating under the supervision and direction of two Sisters
from St. Ann's Academy. At the Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre,
a member of the Order of the Child Jesus offers classes four evenings a week assisting with correspondence courses. At Rayleigh Camp and the Chilliwack Forest
Camps, educators from the community are involved in programmes. Cariboo College supplies three instructors to assist in the upgrading courses at Rayleigh Camp
three nights a week. At the Chilliwack Forest Camp an instructor from the local
adult education programme in Chilliwack supervises the educational programme
available to inmates.
Recreation
Recreational programmes are a significant part of the over-all programme of
each correctional centre. Such programmes serve to provide stimulation for the
inmate population, counter problems resulting from inactivity, and develop recreational skills and interests which will be helpful when the offender returns to the
community. Included are all types of athletic, social, and cultural activities geared
to both individual and group participation.
Physical education activities are included in the programmes at all centres and
are particularly important in those centres accommodating young offenders. Team
sports are emphasized as a training medium and most institutions are fully involved
in both indoor and outdoor sports programmes.
Recreational activities take on added importance for persons who are on
remand, since persons awaiting trial are not involved in work programmes. An
increase in the recreational activities for persons awaiting trial has been reported
by the Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre, the Vancouver Island Correctional Centre, and the Haney Correctional Centre.
Hobby programmes are available in all institutions and gain a good deal of
interest from the inmates.
At the Prince George Centre, a music group is active and was involved in the
presentation of two concerts during the year. At the Haney Centre a music appreciation group and an art group are operated with participation from trainees.
Books and films continue to provide a focus for leisure-time activity in the
institutions. There does appear, however, to be a need to review the use of books,
films, and other related materials for leisure time or recreational purposes within
the institutions.
Religious programmes
All institutions and camps continue to be provided with religious services
and education programmes through the ministrations of full-time and part-time
clergy.
Many of the chaplains are using community volunteers in their programmes.
At the Haney Centre, the chaplain provides opportunity for both young people
 REPORT OF CORRECTIONS BRANCH, 1972/73 W 23
and adults to serve as volunteers in various aspects of his programmes. Elsewhere,
volunteers have conducted Bible discussions, assisted at services, visited and counselled individual inmates, provided lectures, and offered music instruction.
Since many inmates have no church affiliation, services are usually relatively
informal and are frequently followed by group discussion.
One of the major roles played by the chaplains within the centre is in the area
of individual counselling. Many disturbed trainees look to the chaplains for needed
help and support. Worthy of special mention is the group conducted by the Protestant chaplain in the remand unit, Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre.
This group-counselling programme has centered on a wide range of topics, including personal needs, institutional needs, parole, the use of drugs, etc. The group
has proven to be invaluable in interpreting institutional policies and the purposes
behind them and has thereby relieved pressures for inmates. Discussions have
led to significant changes of attitude on the part of several inmates.
The chaplains are frequently approached by staff around areas of personal
concern and for assistance with private problems. The chaplains feel that it is
important to offer this service in the realization that staff require stability, a sense
of personal security, and healthy attitudes toward human relations if they are to
be of assistance to those under their care.
Community service programmes
A number of specific community service projects have been undertaken at the
various centres. This is in addition to the community service aspect of the work
of inmates involved in forestry programmes.
Some centres have undertaken the repair and repainting of toys on behalf of
charitable organizations at Christmas time. Inmates respond well to this activity
since it gives them an opportunity to feel a sense of personal involvement.
Red Cross blood donor clinics are regularly held at most centres and camps
and receive an enthusiastic response from the inmate population. These clinics
are particularly valuable for the Red Cross since they can be scheduled for those
periods of the year when donations from the general public are low.
Of particular interest is a programme developed at the Haney Correctional
Centre which has been in operation for one year. This programme involves the
absence of individual trainees from the centre without escort on Saturdays and
Sundays. The inmates use this time to undertake volunteer work for senior citizens
or handicapped persons in the Maple Ridge area. Sixty-seven such volunteer service work outings were held during the year, with only one small incident being
reported.
Community service programmes allowing both group and individual participation are an important means for the offender to contribute to the community at
large. Such programmes have been a part of the Corrections programme for
some years and will continue to increase and develop in the future.
Institutional use of community volunteers
The use of community volunteers in education programmes at the various
centres has been mentioned earlier in this Report. In addition to this type of
community involvement there has been a noticeable increase in the involvement
of volunteers in counselling and social education programmes.
Volunteers from the community have been involved with groups of women
both at the Lower Mainland Centre and at Twin Maples.    The introduction of
 W 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
volunteers at the Lower Mainland Centre has been gradual and it is hoped that
there will be an increase in this involvement in the coming year.
The Haney Correctional Centre has developed a good working relationship
with the Sorrento Centre for Human Development of the Anglican Church. This
relationship has led to the implementation of three programmes of from four to
five days' duration. Each of these programmes involved eight trainees in residence
at the Sorrento Centre at Shuswap Lake. The programmes involved trainees in
work projects at the centre and in group programmes with staff from the Haney
Centre, staff from the Sorrento Centre, and other volunteers. The result of these
ventures has been most gratifying and mutually beneficial and it is planned to
continue and develop these programmes further.
At the Vancouver Island Centre, the increase in the number of community
volunteers has enabled the centre to double the number of its activity groups.
An interesting development in community involvement took place at the
Prince George Centre during the year. The president of the local Crisis Centre
and her assistant visited the institution weekly for meetings with inmate groups.
Meetings were held without correctional staff in attendance. Methods used were
Gestalt therapy, role-playing, and other exercises for the development of trust and
physical expression.   The meetings seemed to be well received by the inmates.
There has been an increase in the number of requests for institutional staff
to speak to community groups on the subject of Corrections. Coupled with this
is an increase in the number of requests from individuals and groups for tours of
the various centres. These occurrences give indication of the increasing potential
for participation from the community in institution programmes.
Temporary absence programme
The temporary absence programme continues to expand for the purpose of
permitting inmates to continue their relationship with the community while serving their sentences.
During the past year a total of 665 temporary absences were approved.
Twenty-seven of those were revoked because of failure to observe the conditions
of the absence, a failure rate of approximately 4 per cent. Such a low failure rate
indicates the success of this programme and warrants both its continuance and
expansion in the future.
Of the 665 temporary absences granted, 334 were for employment purposes,
111 were for medical reasons, 67 in the interest of family relations, 17 for educational purposes, 8 on compassionate grounds, and 128 on week-end passes.
During the year those persons on work release earned a total of $119,692.
Persons on temporary absence were thus able to contribute to their own upkeep
in the institution, contribute to the support of their families, and build up savings
for use on their eventual release. A further breakdown of the total moneys earned
shows that $8,390 was dispersed to pay individual debts which the inmates had
approved prior to their incarceration and $7,596 was paid in restitution and in
compensation to victims of the offender's crimes.
Expansion of the temporary absence programme is warranted not only because of the evident success of the programme but also because it provides a vehicle
whereby the inmate can prepare himself for his return to the community. It
is unrealistic to expect that a person who is incarcerated without significant community contact for a period of time can be released from the institution and move
readily into a life-style that is free from the commission of further offences.
Gradual entry into the community on a temporary absence programme allows for
 REPORT OF CORRECTIONS BRANCH,  1972/73 W 25
the maintenance of more control than is provided by parole, but provides the inmate
with an opportunity to assume a considerable degree of responsibility for himself.
Medical, dental, and psychiatric services
There have been few changes in the medical services provided by the Corrections Service during the past year. Those changes which have occurred have
primarily involved changes in the status of resource faculties or programmes available to the Corrections Service. An example of this is the change in status of the
Fairview Pavilion Ward at the Vancouver General Hospital. This ward was closed
for several weeks during the summer due to a shortage of nurses. It is expected
that increased pressure will be applied by the Vancouver General Hospital to have
the wards closed for longer periods in the future.
The Department of Health and Welfare has instituted stricter measures to
control the use of methadone in the treatment of narcotic addiction. These new
restrictions demand much more detailed bookkeeping procedures. The effectiveness
of the new measures is expected to be evaluated in November 1973.
A proposed clinical research project has been shelved indefinitely. Medical
problems in the early implementation of the project, together with strong public
reaction to the use of prisoners for research purposes, has demonstrated the inadvis-
ability of proceeding with this type of programme. The position of the Corrections
Service related to these types of projects needs to be reviewed in depth.
The practice of remanding inmates to the Lower Mainland Centre for psychiatric evaluation still persists. Over 400 such evaluations were ordered during the
past year and in over 20 per cent of these cases the person was judged to be mentally
ill. The presence of these disturbed individuals in the antiquated remand facilities of
the Lower Mainland Centre has presented a series of difficult management problems.
During the year there was a serious disruption of dental services at the Lower
Mainland Centre and the Haney Centre. The Dental Officer was granted a leave of
absence for several months due to illness, and although part-time replacement service
was obtained, it was sporadic and not at all satisfactory. The method of providing
dental services within the Service is also an area which requires review.
Two new resource programmes have been made available to the Corrections
Service over the past year. One is a service provided by the Behaviour Therapy
Clinic at Riverview Hospital. This clinic is prepared to offer a treatment programme
for sex offenders, using a technique called "aversion therapy."
The other programme is a community-based, self-help programme operated by
a society named "Narconon." This society has expressed an interest in forming a
treatment group among the heroin addicts at the Lower Mainland Centre.
Two major problem areas have been noted during the year. Several centres
are concerned with the need for a facility to accommodate the prisoner with borderline mental competency and for those who are mentally unstable through the use of
hallucinogenic drugs.
There is also an alarming number of persons with chronic medical conditions
who are being sent to the Alouette River Unit. Many of these conditions preclude
any realistic treatment of the individual's alcoholism.
The Senior Medical Officer of the Corrections Service is a representative on a
committee formed by the Deputy Attorney-General and the Deputy Minister of
Health to investigate and report on the forensic psychiatric services available in the
Province. A number of other areas relating to the use of medical, dental, psychiatric,
and psychological services within the Corrections Service need to be reviewed as
well.
 W 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
B.C. BOARD OF PAROLE
The membership of the Board remained as for the previous year:
C. J. A. Dalton, Chairman.
A. Watts, Q.C., Vice-Chairman.
Mrs. J. M. Norris.
Dr. Gordon Kirkpatrick.
E. Kelly.
Usually the Board operated in panels consisting of the Chairman and two
members.
Panels were convened at the Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre,
Vancouver Island Regional Correctional Centre, and Chilliwack Forest Camps
monthly. As a rule, two panels per month were convened at the Haney Correctional
Centre.
The primary function of the Board is to enquire into cases under its jurisdiction
and to select those persons who it is felt are eligible for the granting of parole.
In parole consideration, the Board assesses several important factors. These
factors include the protection of the public, appropriate timing, and the applicant's
demonstration of motivation and needs.
Should the parolee not respond to parole positively and abide by reasonable
conditions of parole, the Board, after considering all the circumstances, may cancel
the parole and return the individual to a correctional centre.
The Board is concerned that, of the parole candidates now appearing before
them, few have not been involved in drugs to some degree. It is also their experience
that only the most highly motivated heroin-user seems able to abstain from use on
returning to the community.
During the past year the Parole Board submitted a brief to the Department of
the Attorney-General for inclusion in the Brief to the Senate Committee on Parole.
Another brief was sent to the Attorney-General's Task Force on Corrections in
British Columbia.
  W 28                                                   BRITISH COLUMBIA
PROBATION CASE LOAD AND AVERAGE DAILY INSTITUTIONAL POPULATION,
BRITISH COLUMBIA, APRIL 1, 1972 TO MARCH 31, 1973
Provincial
Population
irunn
10,000
9,500
.3,100,000
9,000
3,000,000
2,900,000
2,800,000
8,500
8,000
7,500
2,700,000
7,000
2,600,000
6,500
2,500,000
6,000
2,400,000
5,500
.2,300,000
5,000
2,200,000
4,500
2,100,000
4,000
2,000,000
3,500
. 1,900,000
3,000
1,800,000
2,500
1,700,000
2,000 '
rt*
tr^
J— «*" """
"^^
	
	
"*-^^
1,600,000
1,500
Proh
LEC
.END
1,500,000
	
(10,348)
- Average daily institutional
population (1,984).
1,400,000
1,300,000
0
0     B.C. population
(2,304,000)
1            1            1             1
<
;
1
V
^        <■
3        v
3          H
9            5
5
»         <
O             v
>\            <
o            t
S           <
o           >
■*                        1
^            <
3                1
-*               <
-                    !
•*            r
-.           r
-•           r
—          r
 REPORT OF CORRECTIONS BRANCH, 1972/73
W 29
1.    Statement of Expenditure, Year Ended March 31, 1973, (Includes
Headquarters, Institutions, Probation Services, and Parole)
Salaries—
Permanent staff :.
Temporary assistance
Office expense 	
Travelling expense 	
Office furniture and equipment
Advertising
Medical services	
Clothing and uniforms .
Provisions in catering _.
Laundry and dry-goods
Inmate earnings
Printing and publishing	
Equipment and machinery
Medical supplies 	
Library
Maintenance of buildings and grounds	
Maintenance and operation of equipment.
Transportation (inmate) 	
School supplies and services  	
Supplies for training
Acquisition and construction of buildings
Motor-vehicles and accessories	
Incidentals and contingencies _. 	
Staff-training	
Prison industries (Licence-plate Shop) _...
Training Academy
Fund to assist probationers and parolees
Farm operations	
Group work programme
Operation  of  probation  hostels  and  Search  and  Leadership
Training Programme 	
Licence-plate Shop ...  	
Total institutional expenditure
Add Public Works maintenance costs
Total
11,781,250
1,030,202
109,405
98,757
40,584
308
202,988
162,445
842,488
44,084
200,290
383
202,047
57,230
6,965
93,326
237,390
21,320
52,104
59,775
86,235
198,397
3,774
6,878
87,878
12,643
189
260,880
3,999
23,619
140,491
16,068,324
816,022
16,884,346
Public Works costs—
Maintenance 	
Capital projects
Total	
816,022
670,324
1,486,346
2. Inmate-days
LMRCC
HCC	
VIRCC -
PGRCC.
KRCC ...
CFC .	
NHCC _
ARU .-...
TM __—
1971/72
290,474
136,152
73,818
73,602
68,250
42,588
11,286
49,640
12,045
1972/73
262,270
168,387
63,653
59,400
57,622
41,034
14,058
45,260
12,775
Increase Decrease
-28,204
+32,235        	
  -10,165
 : . -14,202
'.  -10,628
 ._.. -1,554
+2,772 „„.:__-_--
  -4,380
+730      ..; .	
Totals
757,855       724,459
-33,396
 W 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
3. Operational Expenditure, 1972/73
Prisoner-days
Expenditure for maintenance 	
Average total maintenance cost per day per prisoner .
Expenditure for provisions and catering	
Average dietary cost per day per prisoner—
1972/73 	
1971/72 	
724,459
$
13,557,593.00
18.71
842,555.00
Increase
4. Movement of Population, Year Ended March 31,1973
On register, morning of April 1, 1972— Male
Sentenced      1,694
On remand        225
Totals
New admissions
Totals
1,919
8,363
10,282
Discharged during year     8,071
On register, afternoon of March 31, 1973    2,211
Female
105
20
125
715
840
638
202
Total
1,799
245
2,044
9,078
11,122
8,709
2,413
5. Disposition on Admission
Probation 	
Remanded  	
Fine/in default	
Definite + probation
Definite 	
Definite/Indeterminate
Others 	
Totals .
8,363
Female
Total
1
6
283
3,081
96
2,162
44
257
159
2,362
26
446
106
764
715
9,078
6. Discharges
Male
Expiration of sentence  4,595
Released at Court and fine    74
Released at Court and dismissed  258
To bail     732
Payment of fine  344
Death   8
To B.C. Penitentiary   555
To Provincial Mental Hospital  148
Immigration order   376
Pardoned   3
Own recognizance   788
Out of British Columbia  63
Time expired, Appeal Court  7
Undertaking to appear .  22
To National Parole Service  93
Court and custody, C.A.S   5
Female
Total
261
4,856
2
76
35
293
109
841
19
363
8
4
559
11
159
93
469
3
48
836
24
87
5
12
16
38
10
103
1
6
Totals
8,071
638
8,709
 REPORT OF CORRECTIONS BRANCH, 1972/73
W 31
7. Escape Index^
1968/69
0.82
1969/70   0.84
1970/71   1.75
1971/72
1972/73
i Total escapes x 100
total admissions
8. Accommodation (Capacity)
1.21
0.85
Lower Mainland Centre           ■     	
Male
   1,005
Female
122
Vancouver Island Centre and camps	
Kamloops Centre and camps	
Prince George Centre and camps
      260
      206
_         200
Haney Correctional Centre and camps	
New Haven Centre	
      577
        48
Chilliwack Forest Camps   	
Alouette River Unit   	
      210
       147
Twin Maples _.   .           ..	
60
Provincial totals        	
.      2,653
182
13 years	
14 years 	
15 years	
16 years	
17 years	
18 years	
19-21 years, inclusive
22-24 years, inclusive
25-34 years, inclusive
35-44 years, inclusive
45-59 years, inclusive
60 years and over	
Not stated 	
9. Ages of Inmates
Male Female
  1
        16
       29
        58 1
      349 37
      488 64
  1,477 170
  1,300 115
  2,192 185
  1,268 64
      983 55
      184 13
        18 11
Totals
8,363
715
Total
1
16
29
59
386
552
1,647
1,415
2,377
1,332
1,038
197
29
9,078
10. Nationality
Male
Canadian   7,327
British subject
U.S.A. .....	
Other 	
Not stated	
70
426
347
193
Female
553
14
110
26
12
Total
7,880
84
536
373
205
Totals
8,363
715
9,078
 W 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Illiterate 	
11. Education
Male
58
Female
9
42
125
235
238
35
31
715
Total
67
Grade VI   ..   	
...     621
663
Grade VII-VIII     	
.   1,855
1,980
Grade LX-X	
... 2,884
3,119
Grade XI-XII	
... 2,255
2,493
University   .... 	
534
569
Unknown   ..    	
..     156
187
Totals 	
.... 8,363
9,078
12. Marital Status
Male
Single   4,954
Married/Common-law  1,950
Divorced         399
Widowed        125
Separated       729
Unknown        206
Totals   8,363
Female
Total
310
5,264
243
2,193
41
440
24
149
91
820
6
212
715
9,078
13. Primary Use of Drugs
Heroin	
Methadone	
Barbiturates	
Amphetamines
Marijuana 	
L.S.D	
Other narcotics	
Other hallucinogenics _.
Nonuser 	
Not known	
Totals
Male
922
36
58
15
1,188
98
16
72
4,835
1,123
8,363
Female
250
8
20
6
50
2
2
8
310
59
Total
1,172
44
78
21
1,238
100
18
80
5,145
1,182
715       9,078
14. Use of Alcohol
Excessive 	
Moderate or nonuser
Totals	
Male
4,327
4,036
8,363
Female        Total
145   4,472
570  4,606
715
9,078
 REPORT OF CORRECTIONS BRANCH, 1972/73
W 33
15. Offences
Male
(a) Against public order   166
(b) Against administration of law and justice  150
(c) Sexual offences, public morals, and disorderly
conduct   499
(d) Disorderly house and gambling  17
(e) Against person and reputation  2,335
(/)  Against property   2,766
(g) Relating to currency       75
(h) Unclassified—
(1) Breach of Narcotic Control Act      741
(2) Breach of Food and Drug Act        90
(3) Breach of Motor-vehicle Act  1,027
(4) Section   64a,   Summary   Convictions
Act  ..  167
(5) Fail to appear  238
(6) Breach of Immigration Act  345
(7) Other    427
Totals   9,043
Female
Total
6
172
14
164
47
546
41
58
63
2,398
210
2,976
2
77
93
834
7
97
6
1,033
16
183
41
279
85
430
77
504
708
9,751
16. Offences Related to A Icohol
(These figures are included in Table 15)
Male
Breach of Government Liquor Act      152
Impaired driving     955
Refusing breathalizer test      138
Driving with blood alcohol content in excess of 0.08     373
Totals
1,618
Female
Total
1
153
23
978
9
147
4
377
37
1,655
 W 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
t— m t~-
s
5a
s
§
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J5
o <u.T3
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.. 9 8
u 5 c
IS
I I
i ts m i-t
IS
111
^ ar")
mU-o
IS
>--2 2 S
MOM     ! »n '
.5 o ° ° -S
3  C   S  rt "~l
5^
o o
-3 « G
O "°
,£> MS
•a ? a
n © 13 '—* ©
, -a .2 o u a o d a
ill g£-«SSI
a .3 a g-a fe-Sgw § 6 u.
aS
SEE,
 REPORT OF CORRECTIONS BRANCH, 1972/73
W 35
18. Headquarters Staff
Director of Correction 	
Deputy Director of Correction
Senior Medical Officer	
Psychologist 3 	
Administrative Officer 3
Research Officer 3	
Senior Chaplain (Protestant) 	
Senior Chaplain (Roman Catholic)
Chaplain (Protestant)
Chaplain (Roman Catholic) __.
Staff Training Officer (S.C.O.)
Training Officer (P.O.s) 	
Training Officer (CO.) 	
Classification Officer (CO.) ....
Clerical 	
Full Time
  1
  1
  1
..... 2
..... 4
  1
  1
._.. 1
  2
Totals
1
3
1
1
22
42
Part Time
16
19. Institutional Staff
a
o
•a
<o
■o
•a
1
H
a
5 ©
a £
a M
a
o
c3
§2
a, t>
■as
J
•a
<
.2 33
u o
*5 rt
if
S'a
a> o
o s
US
O
*e3
O
H
LMC—
11
16
29
3
13
300 (15)1
58
372 (15)*
Female   •'
1
2
1
1
63
HCC	
8
38
18
19
9
186
2
280
PGRCC	
2
2
2
3
_
70
	
79
KRCC          	
2
3
2
3
77
87
CFC  	
.1
5
2
1
63
72
VIRCC	
4
3
4
.... (2)
1
65
	
77 (2)
NHC	
1
1(2)
3
1
4
9
1(1)
17 (3)
ARU   ....   ...	
2
5
1
1
41
53
TM Farm 	
1
....
.... (1)
....
18
.._
19(1)
Totals. .               	
33
73 (2)
64
33 (3)
26
887 (15)
3 (1)
1,119 (21)
1 Part-time staff, indicated by parentheses, are in addition to full-time staff.
20. Probation Staff
Probation Officer
5
4
3
2
1
(!)
2
3
2
3
1
5
8
6
3
3
2
1
15
16
15
15
12
3
13
7
8
13
4
1
Regions	
Parole Unit- 	
-
13
Totals	
7        1        11
28        1        76
46
13
1 In training.
 W 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
In addition to the above, there were the following personnel:
■-f(l) Fourteen Probation Interviewers 2, two Probation Interviewers 1.
(2) The Assistant Chief Probation Officer (at Headquarters).
(3) On leave of absence there were one Probation Officer 4, one Probation Officer
3, one Probation Officer 2.
(4) Carried on the strength of Region  1—one General Tradesman, two House-
parents, one Principal Officer, and three Temporary Security Officers.
(5) Carried on the strength of Region 4—four Temporary Security Officers.
(6) Carried on the strength of the Parole Unit—one Correctional Officer.
21. Probation Statistics
New probation cases— Male
Adult       8,561
luvenile    2,742
Totals.
Female
Total
1,276
506
9,837
3,248
11,303        1,782
13,085
Probation Intake—
From Court ...
By transfer	
Parole	
  5,948
  2,190
  718
Voluntary probation supervision ...  631
Maintenance order supervision  354
Voluntary maintenance supervision  941
Other   521
Totals  11,303
991
6,939
427
2,617
37
755
194
825
10
364
43
984
80
601
1,782        13,085
Pre-sentence
Reports
Region I  2,314
Region II ..
Region III
Region IV
Region V..
Totals.
1,188
1,349
1,821
726
7,398
Probation
Officer
Inquiries
1,773
2,484
1,579
1,349
110
7,295
22. B.C. Board of Parole, April 1, 1972, to March 31, 1973
Number of paroles in effect April 1, 1972..
Number of sittings held during fiscal year...
397
136
Male
Number appeared for consideration  648
Number appeared for work release     37
Number appeared for B.C/National    22
Female
31
Total
679
37
22
Number of paroles granted.
Number released B.C/NationaL
707
  594
     15
Number of paroles suspended  101
Number of paroles revoked  188
Number of paroles completed  434
Number of deaths of parolees while on parole	
Number on parole at any time during fiscal year	
Number of paroles in effect March 31, 1973    	
31
26
8
11
14
738
620
15
109
199
448
2
422
342
 Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1974
630-274-2680
 

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