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REPORT of the LANDS SERVICE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1973 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1974

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Hon. R. A. Williams, Minister D. Borthwick, Associate Deputy Minister of Lands
REPORT
of the
LANDS SERVICE
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1973
LITHOGRAPHED IN CANADA BY K. M. MacDONALD, QUEEN'S PRINTER, VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA
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  Victoria, B.C., February 27, 1974.
To the Honourable Walter S. Owen, Q.C, LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the British Columbia Lands Service of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources for the
year ended December 31, 1973.
R. A. WILLIAMS
Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources
 Victoria, B.C., February 26, 1974.
The Honourable R. A. Williams,
Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir: I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the British Columbia
Lands Service of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources for the
12 months ended December 31, 1973.
D. BORTHWICK
Associate Deputy Minister of Lands
 CONTENTS
Page
Introduction by the Associate Deputy Minister of Lands  9
Accounting Division  13
Lands Branch—
Director of Lands  21
Land Inspection Division—.     30
Special Services Division  40
Surveys and Mapping Branch—
Surveyor-General    49
Legal Surveys Division      55
Field Operations Division  60
Map Production Division  68
University Endowment Lands  79
Personnel Office  85
Mail and File Room  91
COVER PHOTO
Winter scene
near Williams Lake.
Photo by A. Paulsen
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  Report of the British Columbia Lands Service
D. Borthwick, B.S.A., B.Ed., A.A.C.I.,
Associate Deputy Minister of Lands
The year 1973 was one of marked change in the Lands Service, particularly
from the point of view of reassessing the position of the Service in the field of integrated resource management. A number of meetings were held with our field officers
and ways and means sought to swing the thrust of the Service from the traditional
administrative role to a more effective managerial role. This will require shifting
the present system of accepting individual applications for land tenure to one where
emphasis is placed on a pre-planned selection of lands that can be offered by the
Department. We are making progress, but much work remains to be done; however,
with the expansion of our field staff and the creation of the Special Services Division
we should move ahead more confidently in the coming year. Our Land Inspectors
are active participants on the Regional Inter-Sector Resource Committees and in
addition work co-operatively with other agencies to ensure that decisions on land use
are made only after assessing the total impact on the environment.
Most of the staff of the Lands Service formerly located in the main Parliament
Building moved late in 1973 or were preparing to move early in 1974 to new
temporary offices at Harbour Towers, 345 Quebec Street. The relocation to Quebec
Street also involved transfer of the field staff of Legal Surveys Division, the Personnel
Officer and the regional and district Land Inspectors from Superior Street, and the
Accounting Division from Menzies Street.
During 1973, 10 ecological reserves were established, raising the total to 53.
More than 200 scientists, educators, and interested citizens, including observers
from other provinces, attended the annual meeting of the Ecological Reserves Committee at Simon Fraser University on November 29. Fifty-three new reports and
proposals for reserves were presented and discussed at the meeting.
Among the policy changes introduced during the year were removal of the
former ceiling on lease rental increases and further movement away from purchase
as a method of disposition. Removal of the ceiling on rental charges enables rentals
to keep abreast of rising land values. Crown land dispositions for industrial or
commercial use are now disposed of on a leasehold basis only. The decline in
dispositions by purchase was reflected in a further drop of 13 per cent in the number
of Crown grants issued in 1973. Direct applications to purchase totalled only 14
for the entire year.
Reflecting the trend toward more involvement in the managerial aspects of the
Crown land resource, the Land Inspection Division was involved in several interdepartmental land-use studies and multiresource studies.
In view of the success of the moratorium on agricultural land in the Prince
George area a study is under way to determine the feasibility of extending this policy
to the Peace River Region.
The Surveys and Mapping Branch continued its major function as a service arm
of the Lands Service and other Government departments. In co-operation with the
Lands Branch and the Data Processing Centre, a complex study is under way on
ways and means of improving methods of processing, storing, and extracting land
status and cadastral data by means of electronic data processing techniques. The
Surveys and Mapping Branch is also investigating problems associated with imple-
 Y 10        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
mentation of the international metric system. Through the Provincial Metric Systems
Conversion Committee, this Department has contact with the National Metric Commission.
The Surveys and Mapping Branch is faced with heavy pressures for detailed
large-scale mapping and aerial photography as the result of growing Provincial and
regional concern with planning of all kinds. A record 310,000 standard aerial photographic prints were processed for Government departments and the public. Forty-
eight large-scale photogrammetric projects were complete or under way at the end
of the year. Detail plotting was completed on 210 planimetric resource inventory
base maps, cadastral detail was plotted on 66 land reference maps, and 95 composite maps showing land subdivisions were done in 1973.
Establishment of a basic survey control network for mapping was essentially
completed in north central British Columbia. This will be of substantial direct benefit in the production of resource maps and planning studies in that region.
The following pages contain, in detail, the accomplishments of the branches
and sections of the Lands Service during the past year.
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  ACCOUNTING DIVISION
Y  13
ACCOUNTING DIVISION
M. B. Maclean, Departmental Comptroller
The accounting function for both Lands Service and Water Resources Service
is provided by this Division. As a result of a significant increase in Departmental
personnel and the establishment of a new branch, the work load of the Accounting
Division has again continued to increase.
During 1972 we were given the responsibility of processing the flood claims
arising from the 1972 high run-off.
A variety of damage claims to be paid from the Provincial Major Disaster
Fund were honoured through 1973, and during lanuary and February several hundred water-damage claims were processed, arising from the unusual heavy rainstorms of January, together with approximately 2,200 agricultural assistance claims
and over 150 payments in settlement of damage claims resulting from the Eden
Fire in the vicinity of Salmon Arm.
The regular duties of the Division include the preparation and distribution
of payroll data, processing of accounts payable, interdepartmental charges, processing of requisitions and expenditure control, collection and billing of Water Rights
licence rentals and billing and collection of Lands Branch and Surveys and Mapping revenue.
As at December 31, 1973, there were 15,584 lease accounts; 1,288 new
leases were issued and 1,241 cancellations and expiries were processed.
Statistical Tables
Table 1—Summary of Lands Service Net Revenue Collections for the
Year Ending December 31,1973
$
Land leases, rentals, fees, etc.  2,906,536.84
Land sales   1,615,079.10
Sale of maps and air photos       207,954.91
Net revenue collections  4,729,570.85
Table 2—Comparison of Revenue Collections for 10-year
  Period, 1964-73, Inclusive     	
^^Bm^mltmlmmlmmm^^^^m^mmtt^^^mm^m^^^^^^^^^ --Hi-1H------H---11--rt1-H1_^__H-_rt-..--_
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
$
2,587,110.34
2,594,341.32
3,343,672.46
2,985,996.61
3,367,912.14
3,999,273.13
3,025,000.24
4,580,312.19
4,878,666.29
4,729,570.85
 Y 14        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 3—Classification of Revenue Collections for the Year Ended
December 31,1973
Land sales— $
Country lands       702,485.37
Town lots      911,917.70 $
  1,614,403.07
Land leases, rentals, fees, etc.—
Foreshore leases— $
Booming and log storage  510,138.60
Commercial (marinas, etc.)   645,281.88
Oyster  13,269.45
Miscellaneous (foreshore protection,
etc.)    6,258.75
 1,174,948.68
Land leases—
Grazing and (or) agriculture  489,465.03
Quarrying  (limestone,  sand,  and
gravel)       44,233.28
Camp-site (lodge, fishing)      10,072.00
Home-site        1,286.38
Residential   574,923.46
Miscellaneous      94,013.53
  1,213,993.68
Land-use permits   2,235.00
Licences of occupation        14,952.56
Royalty collections       342,372.99
Bonus bids (lease tenders and auctions)         72,830.00
Easement collections   9,626.81
Fees—
Crown grant     12,877.87
Assignment       12,435.00
Miscellaneous (lease, search, etc.) _    24,997.00
        50,309.87
Sundry   collections   (occupational   rental,   survey
charges, etc.)        42,438.76
 2,923,708.35
Sale of maps and air photos—maps, air photos, survey posts, etc.      246,631.16
Gross revenue for year  4,784,742.58
Less refunds and taxes         55,171.73
Net revenue for year   4,729,570.85
 ACCOUNTING DIVISION Y  15
Table 4—Comparison of Land Leases, Rentals, Fees, Etc., Revenue for
     10-year Period 1964-73, Inclusive
$
1964 HIHH-rtMS 1,485,539.13
1965 ■HMH----I 1,462,024.93
1966 mmmmmmmmmmm 1,514,749.69
1967 ■■■■■■■■IH 1,917,435.31
1968 IIHH-II.IIIHHHHiiBH-Ha 2,189,055.75
1969 ■HMHrt-jMHHWHBl 2,553,351.23
1970 mm^mmmmmmmmmmmm 2,283,719.11
1971 mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 3,093,281.59
1972 mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 3,268,205.08
1973 mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 2,906.536.84
Table 5—Comparison of Land Sales Revenue for 10-year Period,
1964-73, Inclusive
$
1964 mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 982,137.88
1965 mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 1,017,893.16
1966 mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 1,692,861.14
1967 mmmmmmmmmmmm 916,098.98
1968 mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 1,024,410.93
1969 mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 1,251,111.88
1970 mmmmmmm 518,015.63
1971 mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 1,297,075.28
1972 mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 1,411,178.27
1973 mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 1,615,079.10
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 THE LANDS BRANCH
At the time of the Fraser River gold-rush in 1858 the demand for land in British
Columbia was greatly intensified and pre-emptions predated surveys. Within four years
254 pre-emptors had taken up more than 50,000 acres of land. To facilitate the transfer
of real estate and provide for the registration of titles, the Land Registry Act was passed in
1860. The Government of the Province of British Columbia was now in the real estate
business in a big way; the more than 366,000 square miles of land and water that constitutes British Columbia was the real estate in question.
With the entrance of British Columbia into Confederation in 1871, the demand for
land quickened to a rush, and over the next 30 years the land-settler (and the promoter)
succeeded the gold-miner in importance. Railroads were built and land grants passed,
cities came into being, and companies became established. Land was at the core of all
developments.
The task of land administration became very heavy and necessitated the formation of
a Department of Lands in 1908. In 1912 a Forest Branch was included in the Department
of Lands. Today the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources exercises control of more than 90 per cent of the surface of British Columbia.
How does the Lands Branch fit into the total organization of the British Columbia
Lands Service of today? The relation may be expressed briefly. The Lands Branch
has jurisdiction in matters pertaining to the disposition of Crown land, and is
charged with administering and disposing of the land that the general welfare,
present and future, of the Province is protected at all times.
When an individual, or group, desires to purchase or lease Crown land, the application is directed to the Director of Lands, head of the Lands Branch. His authority
governs the following matters:
Lease and sale of Crown lands for such purposes as agricultural, industrial,
commercial, and home-sites.
Preparation and issuance of right-of-way easements for power, telephone, pipelines, etc.
Preparation and issuance of Crown grants under the Land Act and the Mineral
Act.
Reservation of suitable Crown lands and foreshore for national defence, use
and enjoyment of the public, forestry experimentation, fisheries research,
highways, and ecological research.
Granting railway rights-of-way under various Statutes.
Protection of historic sites from alienation.
Reservation and conveying of Crown lands for such purposes as school-sites,
cemeteries, and fair grounds.
Leasing of land and foreshore for such varied purposes as wharf-sites, booming-
grounds, canneries, oyster and other mollusc fisheries, and for boat-houses,
quarry-sites,  cattle-ranching, trappers'  cabins,  ship-building,  and  aircraft
bases.
To perform these and other functions efficiently, the Lands Branch works in close
co-operation with a great number of other agencies, such as municipal and regional
administrations, town-planning authorities, the British Columbia Forest Service, the Water
Resources Service, the Surveys and Mapping Branch within the British Columbia Lands
Service, and all the departments in the Government of the Province, notably Highways,
Education, Attorney-General, Agriculture, and Municipal Affairs.
Outside the Provincial departments there is much business transacted with Federal
departments, such as the Department of National Defence, the Public Works Department, and the Indian-Eskimo Branch of the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern
Development.
Direct service to the people of British Columbia is the first duty of the Lands Branch
and this takes the bulk of the time of the Lands Branch personnel. Associated with this
prime duty is the important function of the maintenance of the records, which in many
cases are the only ones in British Columbia showing the correct legal status of the surface
of the Province.
 Appraising the Crown subdivision at Heffley Lake.
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 LANDS BRANCH Y 21
LANDS BRANCH
Walter R. Redel, B.A.Sc, P.Eng., P.Ac, A.A.C.I., Director of Lands
In order that the Lands Branch can play a more positive role in the management of the Crown land resources of the Province, reorganization of the functions
of the Branch and a broadening of the resource disciplines of new personnel taken
on staff to carry out these management functions is currently under way.
The nucleus of a Special Services Division to provide some of the management
input was established with the appointment of an engineer, an ecologist, and a
planner early in the year.
Additional staff to augment the Administration Division, Land Inspection
Division, and Special Services Division will be added in 1974. It is the objective
of the Lands Branch to establish regional offices in those areas of the Province
where other regional resource administrators are now located in order that there
can be more integration in the management of the land resource with other resource
agencies. In the past, the Land Officers have sought the views of other resource
personnel as well as local organizations and regional governments before making
recommendations in respect to applications for Crown land. However, it is hoped
that, with regionalization of the Lands Branch, more emphasis can be placed on
pre-planning and the integrated use and development of Crown lands than has
been done in the past.
A study is currently under way within the Lands Service in co-operation with
the Data Processing Centre to examine the feasibility of modernizing our land
record-keeping facilities in order to speed up the extraction of status information
therefrom. It is hoped the pertinent status information can be recorded in a storage
bank and so coded that a variety of pertinent information can be extracted therefrom as the need arises.
Policy trends in the Lands Branch are directed toward disposition of all
Crown lands on a leasehold basis only, with no option to purchase. Future dispositions of Crown land for industrial and commercial purposes will be by leasehold
only. Agricultural lands which are at least 50 per cent arable are currently disposed
of on a lease-develop-purchase basis, but rapidly rising land values make it more
practical for such Crown lands to be alienated by lease only. The Lands Branch
is experimenting with disposing of rural residential sites on a long-term lease basis,
but no hard policy has as yet evolved.
During the past year the Lands Branch carried out an extensive review of
water-lot lease rentals throughout the Province. The evidence gathered indicated
that substantial increases in the annual rental charges are warranted, and hence
adjustments in these charges will be made as the leases come up for review.
The foreign-ownership question continues to be foremost in the minds of
many citizens of the Province as evidenced by the letters reaching the Land Branch.
However, with respect to Crown lands, the Land Act precludes the issuance of a
Crown grant to other than a Canadian citizen. Up until about mid-year, foreigners
could obtain a lease of Crown lands, but a policy change has now been implemented
that would restrict Crown leases to Canadians or persons who have obtained landed-
immigrant status. The somewhat larger question of the foreign ownership of
private lands is currently under review all across Canada by a committee established
by the First Ministers Conference earlier in the year. Corporations may qualify
for Crown lands if they meet the requirements of section 131 of the Companies Act.
 Y 22        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Waterfront recreational lands are disposed of on a leasehold basis only by
public competition. Exchanges of Crown land for private lands of equal value has
for the most part been discontinued except in extenuating circumstances and then
only when the parcels in question comprise relatively small areas.
Intensively used foreshore at Swartz Bay, Vancouver Island.
Foreshore trespass for boat moorage.
 LANDS BRANCH Y 23
The role of the Lands Branch has become increasingly more difficult in recent
years because of the fracturing of the authority for the management of such lands.
It is anticipated, however, that as working relationships are established with the
new agencies and as we strengthen the management role of the Branch that many
of these problems will be resolved.
A brief summary of the various sections of the Administrative Division of the
Lands Branch is set out hereunder.
Lease Section—While the number of new applications received in the Department is lower than the previous year, the processing of the applications has necessitated a much greater volume of correspondence due to our ever-changing policies
which have been instituted by the Government to prevent speculation in Crown
lands. The same situation holds true for assignments which are down in actual
volume but have necessitated extra correspondence for the same reasons mentioned
above. It is interesting to note that of the 770 assignments processed, only 1.56
per cent were assigned to non-Canadian citizens. The number of rental reviews
handled by this section is far above last year's total.
Purchase Section—The number of direct applications to purchase continues
to decline due to the well-established lease-develop-purchase policy. Only 14 such
applications were received in 1973. Lease-converted-purchase applications however increased from 292 to 330.
The section issued 347 waterfront leases and 216 inland leases, which is less
than we issued in 1972. However, these figures do not represent the full amount
of work completed by the section as we also disallowed 1,019 applications in 1973.
This large number of disallowances reflects a growing concern and awareness by
the Department and local planning authorities over good land-management practices, and every application receives very close scrutiny.
Certain changes in policy have been instituted in the disposition of land for
residential leases to try to inhibit speculation. If the lessee does not construct a
home, or at least make a substantial start, within the initial three-year term of the
lease, then the lease is not renewed. Also in inland residential leases the purchase
option price is now applicable only for the initial three-year term and not for 10
years, and this it is felt will encourage early completion of a home. In addition
it is now stipulated that before the purchase option can be exercised the lessee
must be using the dwelling as his permanent place of residence.
During the year the Branch amended the lease indenture form for cottage-site
leases to ensure that the lessee is cognizant that the intended use of the Crown
lands is for recreational purposes only and not as a permanent place of residence.
Crown Grant Section—The number of Crown grants issued in 1973 totalled
602 as compared to 694 in the previous year.
Although these figures reflect a decrease of slightly over 13 per cent, the
number of certificates of purchase issued increased to 446 from 433 in 1972, or
approximately 3 per cent.
This section is also responsible for clearing applications for reverted mineral
claims, which showed a dramatic decrease to 54 from 631 in the previous year.
The drop was caused by a change in policy by the Department of Mines and
Petroleum Resources whereby tenure over reverted mineral claims is now issued
on the same basis as for newly staked mineral claims. In other words, a clearance
is not required because the onus is now on the holder of the claim to ascertain
surface conflicts before proceeding with development work.
 Y 24        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
In addition, this Section processed 38 status clearances and two transfers of
the administration, control, and benefit of Provincial Crown lands to Her Majesty
the Queen in right of Canada.
Seven exchanges of land were finalized during the year.
Seven certified copies of Crown grants were issued.
In keeping with the provisions of certain statutes, four free grants were issued
to School Boards; three free grants were issued to the Canadian National Railways
Company, and six free grants to the British Columbia Railway Company.
Reserve Section—During the year, 340 reserves were established and 21 applications for accreted lands were received. In addition, the Section processed 10
ecological reserves which were established by Order in Council under the Ecological
Reserves Act. A total of 8,229 letters was received, of which 7,177 were general
inquiries. Every effort is made to answer fully all general inquiries, because in the
majority of cases this is the first contact the writer may have with the Branch.
Clearance Section—This Section provides map-status information for the
Department of Lands as well as other Government departments and internal agencies
which are involved in land administration. Our responsibilities, briefly, include the
following:
(a) The clearing of all lands under application to lease, purchase, etc.,
to determine all existing surface alienations. The number of parcels
of land cleared during 1973 totalled 31,220 as compared to 17,211
the previous year; this substantial increase can be attributed to the
fact that many of the special map statuses completed covered much
larger areas, reflecting a greater increase in acreages and townlots
covered.
(b) The preparation of maps showing the status of lands thereon; these
maps are constantly being revised and amended in order to maintain
an up-to-date status of those lands covered. There are now 164 of
these maps completed, 52 having been prepared this year, also all
the Davenport maps for Vancouver Island have been amended to
show current land status.
(c) The statusing and clearing of all northern Provincial lands required
by numerous Alberta-based gas and petroleum companies in connection with drilling projects and pipe-lines.
(d) The preparing of special or priority status maps when requested by
the Ministerial and Senior Departmental officials; these maps are
statused under a colour-code system and 174 were completed in
1973.
In view of the foregoing it is apparent the functions of this Section have greatly
increased during the past year, reflecting an increased awareness of land use, ecological, and environmental policies of the Government. These policies point to an ever-
increasing expansion of the services of this Section.
Easement Section—The number of easements granted in 1973 was 39 and five
licences of occupation. This is considerably less than previous years. The reduced
output of rights-of-way is directly related to the Department's policy of holding
power-line, gas and oil pipe-line, and wellsite applications in obeyance pending a
review of the right-of-way terms. Applications for rights-of-way are still being
accepted and are being processed to the point of survey.
 LANDS BRANCH Y 25
In view of the disturbance and interference that rights-of-way may have on the
surrounding environment, all applications are now being referred to the Special
Services Division of the Lands Branch for an ecological impact report.
Letters of consent for the construction of access roads have increased from 58
letters to 79 letters. Road access is becoming a greater problem to the Branch as
more landlocked areas of the Province are being utilized.
GENERAL ACTIVITY
Twelve units were tendered for lease during 1973. Bonus bids were received
on eight of the units and the bonus bid revenue realized was $4,954.75. There were
338 lots offered for lease by auction, of which 199 were leased. The bonus bid
realized at the time of auction amounted to $83,938.
In 1973 the Branch embarked on a programme of increased news media coverage. On routine public competitions, advertisements are now placed in the real
estate sections of the classified ads, and on public competitions of lands in which it
appears there is a great public interest; display ads, including sketches of subdivision plans, were placed in the news media. Radio and television advertising
were also introduced. In those instances where extended coverage was used, a far
greater degree of public interest appears to have been generated.
The following tables indicate in detail the work carried out by the various sections of the Lands Branch in 1973:
Table 6—Country Land Sales, 1973
Acres
Unsurveyed   46.53
Surveyed  25,416.69
Total   .  25,463.22
Table 7—Certificates of Purchase Issued, 1973
Agency Number Acreage
Alberni   9 31.64
Atlin   Nil Nil
Burns Lake    8 705.28
Clinton  .  14 52.43
Cranbrook   10 219.61
Fernie   11 165.893
Fort Nelson   24 141.31
Fort St. John  61 20,818.54
Golden  7 710.54
Kamloops   11 260.06
Kaslo  .—_...  Nil Nil
Nanaimo  55 158.611
Nelson   8 152.155
New Westminster  44 23.145
Penticton   18 20.668
Pouce Coupe  8 4,217.37
Prince George  12 696.23
Prince Rupert .  10 144.47
 Y 26
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 7—Certificates of Purchase Issued, 1973—Continued
Agency                                                                                    Number Acreage
Quesnel      16 2,028.11
Revelstoke        8 112.74
Smithers     11 148.95
Vancouver      29 257.465
Vernon        3 9.18
Victoria        5 38.103
Williams Lake     64 1,355.45
University Endowment Lands       1 Nil
Totals   446 32,566.95
Table 8—New Leases Issued (1973)
Land  Number
Agriculture  165
Hay and grazing (pasture and hay-cutting) 69
Quarrying (sand, gravel, limestone, etc.) 19
Residential (waterfront)   347
Residential (inland)   216
Miscellaneous  (resorts, service-stations,
camp-sites)	
Foreshore—
Booming, log storage, log-dumping, etc.
Oyster 	
Industrial (canneries, mill-site, wharves,
etc.)  	
Quarrying (sand, gravel from sea or river
beds) 	
Commercial (boat rentals, marinas, marine
service-stations, etc.) 	
Miscellaneous (private wharves, boat-
houses, etc.) 	
Totals   1,114
131
76
7
1
3
29
51
Acreage
43,338.08
52,969.04
993,19
257.541
609.76
6,173.671
1,850.742
25.6
9.59
22.41
160.126
807.265
107,217.015
Table 9—Licences to Occupy Issued, 1973
Number
54
Acreage   1,518.22
Table 10—Assignments Approved, 1973
Leases, land-use permits, licences of occupation	
770
 LANDS BRANCH
Table 11—Easements Granted, 1973
Y 27
Number
Miles
Acres
Foreshore
3
3
0.848
7.335
0.127
0.906
373.243
0.185
Totals	
7
8.310
374.334
Land
4
6
4
4
2
3
2
3
2
16.091
0.268
71.090
Television antenna-sites and power-lines	
4.140
8.103
	
19.370
1.201
12.007
1.424
0.784
1.487
3.197
Water pipe-lines	
207.716
Suspension bridges and water pipe-lines	
|          10.760
Sewer pipe-lines	
2.721
T-bar and chair-lifts	
11.863
Totals	
30
33.262
338.960
Southern Okanagan Lands Project
Road	
1
1
0.009
0.032
0.038
Sewer pipe-line 	
0.076
Grand totals	
39
41.613
713.408
In line with current Departmental policy, 79 letters of consent for the construction of access roads were issued during the year.
Table 12—Crown Grants Issued, 1973
Purchases (country lands) _. -     388
Purchases (town lots)  . .  149
Pre-emptions       18
Public Schools Act      4
Veterans' Land Settlement Act     4
Home-site leases    4
British Columbia Railway Company   6
Miscellaneous       29
Total    602
Certified copies of Crown grants issued _._       7
Table 13—Crown Grants Issued for Past 10 Years
 Y 28        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 14—Total Area Deeded by Crown Grant, 1973
Acres
Purchases (country lands)   37,705.17
Pre-emptions   2,829.54
Public Schools Act  11.96
Veterans' Land Settlement Act  168.55
Home-site leases  51.51
British Columbia Railway Company  451.82
Miscellaneous   1,263.35
Total   42,481.90
Table 15—Reserves, 1973
Applications Reserves
Received Completed
Use, recreation, and enjoyment of the public     54 67
B.C. Department of Highways   (rights-of-way,  gravel
pits, bridge-sites, etc.)      84 67
Federal Government   (defence  purposes,  wharf-sites,
etc.)      41 34
B.C. Forest Service (ranger stations, grazing, radio-
sites, reforestation, etc.)    107 42
Miscellaneous (Wildlife Branch, water-power projects,
garbage dumps, school-sites, cemeteries, etc.)   223 130
Totals  509 340
 LANDS BRANCH
Y 29
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 Y 30        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
LAND INSPECTION DIVISION
G. H. Wilson, B.S.A., P.Ag., A.A.C.I., Chief
The Lands Service, which is charged by statute to exercise a role in the management of the Crown lands of the Province, has for many years been unable to
assume full managerial responsibility because of the lack of staff. However, the
field staff is now being expanded and their academic resource expertise diversified
in order that the Land Inspection Division can fulfil the managerial role that it is
charged with. It is therefore anticipated that the Land Officer will act as a catalyst
to promote integrated resource management of the Crown land resource and act as
a custodian of those lands that lend themselves to multiple use.
In 1973 the Land Inspection Division took on some of this broader managerial
role, responding to the needs of all resource-users in the total resource management
of Crown lands. Discussions, study sessions and meetings with the various resource
departments and agencies became a more active part of the staff's responsibilities
than previously. This kind of communication permits a free interflow of ideas and
recommendations between resource departments and the Lands Service to ensure
that a decision is made consistent with good resource-management practice. As a
result of this change, together with more public calls, greater distances to travel to
examine isolated land applications, more consultations with the applicants, more
difficult special appraisal requests, and a shorter 11-month recording period, the
total number of inspections completed in 1973 are down 15 per cent from the
average for the five-year period 1969-72, inclusive. The recording period for 1973,
as a convenience in reporting, runs from January 1 to November 30. In future a
12-month period running from December 1 to November 30 will be used for recording purposes.
As a result of direction given by the Minister, an assessment was made of the
Division's role in the future administration of Crown lands in British Columbia.
Meetings were held with the field staff early in June of 1973 and as a result of these
meetings a report was compiled. The recommendations given in this report represent
the full response of the staff in pointing the direction of the Lands Service in the
future management of Crown Provincial lands.
A change in the Department's policy and a continuing appreciation in land
values have had a profound effect on waterfront residential lease rentals established
in 1973. Previously at the five-year review date the rental was limited to a figure of
no more than double the rental of the previous term. This limitation on the magnitude of rental increases was eliminated and, as a result of the growth in land values,
the resulting rentals frequently showed increases of 300 to 500 per cent. While there
were outcries from some lessees, it should be noted that rental reviews are made
once every five years and as a consequence in an appreciating market the lessee is
paying less than economic rent for the major portion of the five-year period. It is
also notable that the rate of 5 per cent is far below the market rate of 8 per cent
currently applied for establishing rentals in the case of industrial and commercial
leases.
Also noteworthy have been the problems associated with appraising the market
value of agricultural lease lands. With developmental requirements an integral
portion of the lessees' responsibilities and a covenant to be placed on the ensuing
title limiting development to agriculture, it has been difficult to find similarly influenced sale properties in the market place. Sales occurring subsequent to the Land
Commission legislation, however, have invariably been similar and surprisingly are
 LANDS BRANCH
Y 31
for the most part selling at higher rates than before its enactment. Unless a lease-
only policy is adopted it is apparent that the value of Crown land leases for agricultural purposes must be linked to the value of land as indicated by sales in the
private sector. In the view of some lessees a rental based on a rate of 5 per cent of
market value is too high, because the market value of the land is inflated in relation
to its productive value under agricultural use. There is no simple answer to the
problem, but it seems that a policy for the development of potentially arable land
must be worked out which will aid the full-time farmer and at the same time limit
the potential for speculation. A number of undeveloped leases have been noted in
the Real Estate Multiple Listings at Prince George, despite firm guidelines laid down
in the lease indenture concerning assignments.
Well-maintained portion of grazing lease at Campbell Lake, south of Kamloops.
PRINCE GEORGE REGION
As a result of changing road patterns and anticipated future developments, the
boundaries between the Prince George and the Coast Regions north and east of
Prince Rupert were altered in 1973. The change involving the Prince Rupert District
of the Coast Region as well as the Fort St. John and Smithers Districts of the Prince
George Region will permit better access to the northwest sector of the Province and
will result in an enlarged Smithers District.
There was considerable activity in the Prince George Land Inspection Region
during 1973. Despite the early arrival of snow this fall, the open working season
allowed for a substantial volume of field work to be accomplished during the 11-
month period ending November 30. The total annual inspections completed compares favourably with past years, but the number of outstanding inspections at the
end of November is the highest recorded in the past five years.
 Y 32        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
During the 1973 period the changing role of the Land Inspection Division
became more apparent in this region with the staff's involvement in the following
multiresource and interdepartmental Land Use Studies:
Grassy Plains Community Pasture proposal.
Smithers Landing, Babine Forest—possible subdivision.
Peace River Moratorium Study.
Groundbirch Community Pasture.
Bear Mountain Community Pasture.
East Pine Area Multi-use Resource Study.
Wren Multi-use Reserve Study.
Bear Lake Townsite Study.
Tete Jaune Cache—possible subdivision.
Finlay Bay, Williston Lake—commercial application.
City of Prince George—sewage sludge-disposal site (550 acres).
Gerimi Multi-use Planning Study.
Dragon Lake Community Pasture proposal.
Nazko—commercial residential proposal (Forest Service).
Hudson Bay Mountain Study.
Owen Lake-Lower Morice River Land Use Study.
Atlin Townsite. .. t ', :
•   Kispiox Valley—-inventory of agricultural lands, ■■'.,..■■■_•,■-,.-.."■
. ;>■ • Narcosli Creek Grazing Study (3,000 acres). ■   -■
Takla Townsite Study—-Leo Creek, Lovell Cove.
Takla Lake barge-crossing.    ■
Germansen Landing, Finlay Forest—trespassers.
. North Shore Stuart Lake, between Tachie and Pinchi Lakes.
Studies related to numerous proposals for the subdivision of Crown land.
The Moratorium Policy is continuing to work well, with many farmers clearing,
cultivating, and cropping large tracts of their private lands, enabling them to in turn
qualify to lease and develop arable Crown land in a manner consistent with sound
economic principles. In view of the success of this policy in the Prince George
area, a study is currently under way to determine the feasibility and need to extend
the Moratorium Policy into the Peace River area.
The unauthorized use of Crown land is more evident in the Prince George
Region than ever before. Some of the more serious trespasses noted are at Hudson
Bay Mountain near Smithers, Telegraph Creek, Atlin, and Germansen Landing.
Hopefully, the Department's current land-use studies in these areas will aid in correcting this unauthorized use by providing planning for and development of multilot
subdivisions. In some cases positive steps such as providing residential lots by
subdivision will not solve the problem of trespass, and firm steps to end the use of
Crown land in trespass must be adopted as a last resort.
Soil erosion on some of the agricultural leases in the Peace River areas is felt
to be indirectly a result of the existing Department policy which requires that 80
per cent of the arable acreage must be brought under cultivation. Where soil erosion
is taking place on slopes as little as 5 per cent, the Land Inspector is recommending
that the area of cultivation be reduced from the 80-per-cent figure to allow for windbreaks and leave strips by creeks. Such a change in policy would remove the compulsion to develop erosion-prone areas and allow for better land-use practices.
 LANDS BRANCH Y 33
COAST REGION
In 1973 the inspections completed by the Land Inspection staff in this region
were significantly lower than in 1971 and 1972. Special appraisals for other departments were also down in relation to corresponding figures for 1972. Eight of the
more significant appraisals involved flooded lands in Surrey between the Serpentine
and Nicomekl Rivers, tidal lands in the Sturgeon Bank area of Richmond, the
Delkatla Marsh in the Queen Charlotte Islands, the St. Ann's Academy property in
Victoria, the surface of Crown-granted mineral claims near Horseshoe Bay, waterfront lands south of Squamish, recreational lands in the vicinity of Thetis Lake near
Victoria, and agricultural lands in the Alberni Valley on Vancouver Island. The
total appraised value of these eight properties amounts to $4,034,900.
The outlook for 1974 is difficult to forecast for this region. In the Pemberton
area, for example, the partial closure in 1973 of the Evans Products mill has had a
marked effect on the local economy. This is a significant setback in the community
and the repercussions from the continuation of the present conditions will be difficult
to measure. Nevertheless, in view of the proximity of this area to Vancouver and
the continuing demands on land for recreational use and other purposes it is anticipated that, despite a predictable drop in the local demand for permanent residential
lots, the over-all demand will remain strong. Like most other sectors of the Province, land values in this area during 1974 will likely continue to climb.
Technical Planning Committee Meetings in this region during 1973 numbered
approximately 60, with the majority occurring in the southerly reaches of the region.
All of these meetings were attended by either the Regional Land Inspector or the
District Land Inspector. Intersector meetings, on the other hand, numbered only
one. In view of the need for input from all resource-users in the planning and
management of Crown land, it is imperative that the frequency of intersector-type
meetings increase.
With the Lands Service attaining a more positive planning and management
role, it is apparent that many of the problems and needs recorded over the past
few years in this region can be dealt with. Noteworthy among the problems are
those associated with issuing home-site leases over isolated sites which lack basic
services, trespass use of foreshore for log-storage purposes, a strong recreational
demand by the public from the Vancouver area, and the lack of a clear working
liaison with regional districts and others involved in planning and managing Crown
land. The present and future development of Crown land in this region is of
immediate concern. Measures will have to be taken to carry out some long-range
planning that will hopefully reduce the major problem areas and provide better
land-management practices in this region.
KAMLOOPS REGION
During the 11-month period from January 1 to November 30, 1973, the
number of inspections completed in the Kamloops Region totalled 1,999. As in
1972, this region continues to lead the Province in numbers of inspections completed. The 400 outstanding inspections, of which 70 per cent are in the traditionally heavy work-load districts of Clinton and Williams Lake, represents a 52-
per-cent increase over the corresponding figure for 1972.
Some of the studies undertaken during 1973 are significant in pointing out the
areas of concern in land-use planning for this region. The "Purcell Study" relating to the Purcell Range of mountains on the east side of Kootenay Lake is one
of the most notable. This study was headed by Dr. A. D. Chambers, of the Uni-
2
 Y 34        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
versity of British Columbia, and included input from the Land Inspection Division
staff as well as other Departmental staff. The study was instigated as a result of
a conflict between public recreation and logging interests in the Fry Creek Watershed and was expanded to cover the much larger issue of land-use conflicts for the
entire Kootenay area. Two other highlights in 1973 involved an exchange of
range lands in the Riske Creek area, west of Williams Lake, with mutually beneficial results. The Crown will benefit through acquiring a much needed protected
winter range for the Chilcotin band of big horn sheep, while the rancher will benefit by gaining range land more convenient to his existing operation and by having better live-stock control. The second highlight in this region pertains to a
large grazing lease in the Lac du Bois area north of Kamloops. In addition to
being under a strong demand by local recreation and housing interests, the leased
range is badly overgrazed. In an attempt to resolve land-use problems in this
area, the Kamloops staff have worked closely with the Federal Range Experimental
Station personnel in setting down specific management requirements on the part
of the user to improve the vegetative cover as well as the carrying capacity of the
range. It is quite conceivable that ranges like this one will require a complete rest,
supplemented by reseeding to palatable grass species. Even further measures
such as protective fencing and fertilization may be required to bring these ranges
back to their original level of productivity.
Some of the special appraisal projects undertaken in the Kamloops Region
included an appraisal of the St. Martin's Hospital property in Oliver, private lands
fronting Cosens Bay at Kalamalka Lake, Raymer Park at Kelowna, private lands
fronting the west side of Osoyoos Lake, and three appraisals on lands at Williams
Lake for the B.C. Railway. In the Kelowna district alone it is estimated that the
appraisal work associated with the first three properties at Oliver, Kalamalka Lake,
and Kelowna consumed 37 man-days or 15 per cent of the Kelowna Inspector's
annual work load.
With the inspection staff becoming more involved in land-use planning and
management, it is inevitable that liaison with all resource-users is becoming more
close knit. Integrated use of Crown lands can be accommodated through cooperative efforts among the various resource-users. Accordingly, in 1974 it is
the aim of the Division to implement more land-capability studies in the Kamloops
Region with a view to resolving land-use problems such as the conflict between
wildlife and domestic live-stock grazing interests; the problem of log-storage use
on highly valuable recreational lakes, and many other complex problems on the
use and development of Crown land. Indeed, the key words are planning and
managing Crown land for the ultimate benefit of all British Columbians.
TRAINING
Training courses continued to be a very important extracurricular activity
of the Land Inspection Division during 1973. Although only 12 of the staff are
accredited as real estate appraisers, there are 23 actively engaged in courses and
appraisal reports leading to accreditation. With this group are nine on the old
study programme. These individuals have passed their appraisal courses and
have until December 31, 1974, to complete their demonstration appraisal reports
in order to qualify for accreditation. Among the remaining 14 on the new study
programme, the following successful completions are noted: Appraisal I, 11; Appraisal II, 6; Appraisal III, 3; Economics I, 9'; Economics II, 7; and Building Construction and Cost Estimating, 2. To date no one has completed the courses on
Land Law and Communication Concepts and Strategies.
 LANDS BRANCH Y 35
Another important course being undertaken by two members of the staff at
this time is the three-year diploma course on the Executive Development Training
Programme. As in last year's Annual Report, four of the staff have completed the
course and received their diplomas.
One member of the staff completed his course requirements and obtained his
degree of bachelor of science in agriculture.
During 1973 a number of short seminar courses were attended by some members of the staff. Two of the nine noteworthy ones were the ARDA Soils Classification Seminar in Prince George and the Forest Service Soils Seminar in Fort St. John.
There were four Regional Land Inspector meetings held in Victoria during
1973. These meetings, held once every three months, provide a valuable comuni-
cations link between the headquarters and field staffs.
STAFF CHANGES
Staff changes in 1973 were not as numerous as in 1972. Two resignations,
four promotions, five transfers, and two hirings were recorded among the field staff.
R. Avis, following a transfer from Prince Rupert to Vancouver, resigned his position
as Land Officer 1 to accept a position with the Municipality of Burnaby, and E. S.
Gowman resigned as Technical Land Officer 2 at Smithers to accept a position in
Pouce Coupe with the Department of Finance. Subsequent to these two departures
and the transfer of G. A. Rhoades, Coast Regional Land Inspector, to the Administration Division, effective September 1, 1973, the following changes occurred: J. A.
Esler was promoted from Land Officer 4, Victoria District, to Land Officer 5 in
charge of the Coast Region, effective September 1; F. G. Edgell, Land Officer 5,
was transferred from the post of Regional Land Inspector at Prince George to fill
the new position of Administrative Assistant in the Land Inspection Division effective September 1; and H. K. Boas was promoted from Land Officer 4, New Westminister District, to Land Officer 5 in charge of the Prince George Region, effective
September 1. Further changes involved the promotion of D. W. Berry from Land
Officer 1, Fort St. John, to Acting Land Officer 2 i/c, Prince Rupert District, effective October 5; the transfer of R. N. Bose, Land Officer 4, Prince George District, to
Land Inspector i/c, New Westminster District, effective October 1; the promotion
of D. E. Jaffray from Land Officer 3, Vanderhoof District, to Acting Land Officer 4
i/c, Prince George District, effective October 24; and the transfer of D. M. Ferrier,
Technical Land Officer 3, from Kamloops to Smithers, effective October 31.
As a result of these changes, B. L. Froebel was hired as Land Officer 1, Fort
St. John, effective October 1, and H. Hess was hired as Land Officer 1, Kamloops,
effective November 1. Two positions, one at Victoria and the other at Vanderhoof,
remain vacant at year-end.
The total complement of the field staff as of November 30, 1973, amounts to
33, comprising three Regional Land Inspectors, 24 Land Inspectors, and six Deputy
Land Inspectors.
STATISTICS
Table 17 represents a summary of the number and type of inspections completed in the Province by this Division in 1973.
Table 18 is a comparison on a year-to-year basis of the volume of field work
completed and requests outstanding at the end of each year for the period 1969 to
1973, inclusive.
Table 19 is an analysis of requests for inspections processed by this Division for
the years 1969 to 1973, inclusive.
 Y 36        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 17—Types of Inspections, 1973
Purchases—
Agriculture (other than grazing)   197
Access (roads, etc.)     _ 2
Commercial (resorts, service-stations, hotels, airfields, etc.).... 6
Community (cemeteries, church-sites, parking areas, etc.) .... 5
Grazing (pasture, range)     	
Homesites (permanent)   266
Industrial (millsites, power-sites, manufacturing plants, etc.) 5
Summer home or camp-site  1
Woodlots or tree farms      	
Others __.       8
Leases—
Land—
Agriculture( other than grazing)   479
Commercial (resorts, service-stations, hotels, airfields, etc.) .. 72
Community (parks, cemeteries, dump-sites, etc.)   32
Fur-farming    	
Grazing (pasture, range, haycutting, etc.)   216
Cancellations (sec. 44, Land Act, 1970)       37
Homesites (permanent)     510
Industrial (millsites, power-sites, manufacturing plants, etc.) 42
Summer home or camp-site  172
Quarrying (sand, gravel, limestone)   42
Reviews (rental and (or) diligent use)   1,540
Others      -    27
Foreshore—
Booming and log storage or log-dumping  89
Commercial (boat rentals, marine service-stations, wharves,
etc.)   69
Industrial (millsites, canneries, factory-sites, wharves, etc.).. 26
Quarrying (sand and gravel from river beds)  6
Oyster and shellfish    30
Private (floats, boathouses)    28
Reviews (rentals and (or) diligent use)   175
Others  _     22
Land exchanges (sec. 85, Land Act, 1970)   8
Licences of occupation    86
Easements and (or) rights-of-way  46
Pre-emptions   {Land Act, R.S.B.C.   1960—Annual  inspections
(including applications for Crown grant)  80
Subdivisions—
Valuations          45
Survey inspection     1
Plans cancellation  2
Proposals (lakeshore, residential, etc.)  43
Others     2
 LANDS BRANCH Y 37
Reserves—
Grazing  2
Gravel pits  1
Recreational  27
Others   11
Veterans' Land Act  3
Doukhobor lands  2
Southern Okanagan Land Project    	
B.C. Railway    3
Other agencies—
B.C. Forest Service  2
BCHIS—St. Martin's Hospital  1
B.C. Hydro  1
Department of Highways  3
Fish and Wildlife Branch   3
Canadian Pacific Railway  1
Water Resources—
Delta flood lands  1
Miscellaneous flood valuation  1
Fire Marshal    1
Attorney-General    1
Historic sites  1
Department of Public Works  1
Miscellaneous inspections—
Assignments  44
Delinquent Accounts  5
Escheats Act  1
Lake Reconnaissance  14
Land Use Surveys    6
Land Revaluations of Special Nature  35
Protests  47
Section 53 (2), Land Act, R.S.B.C. 1960 (verifying improvements)   212
Section 65, Land Act, R.S.B.C. 1960, and section 48, Land
Act, 1970 (free grants)  1
Section 78, Land Act, R.S.B.C. 1960 (re compliance with
provisions of)   9
Section 130, Land Act, R.S.B.C. 1960, and section 97, Land
Act, 1970 (lands vested in Crown under Taxation Act) 2
Section 131b, Land Act, R.S.B.C. 1960, and section 53, Land
Act, 1970 (cases of doubt regarding inclusion of body
of water in Crown grant)  4
Trespass (land)   47
Trespass (water)   67
Quieting Titles Act      	
Section 102 (2), Land Registry Act    9
Others  36
Total  5,022
 Y 38
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 18—Analysis of Inspections Completed and Inspections Outstanding at
Year-end for the Years 1969 to 1973, Inclusive
Land Inspection
District
Coast Region
Courtenay	
Forest Service	
Headquarters	
New Westminster	
Prince Rupert	
Vancouver	
Vancouver North	
Victoria	
Subtotals.—
Kamloops Region
Clinton	
Kamloops	
Kelowna	
Nelson.—	
Williams Lake	
Subtotals
Prince George Region
Burns Lake	
Fort St. John	
Pouce Coupe	
Prince George	
Quesnel	
Smithers	
Vanderhoof	
Subtotals..—
Grand totals-
Examinations Made During-
I I
1969        1970   I    1971        1972        1973
325
16
2
303
146 |
263
462
428
267
369
567
252_
U307~
190
858
513
406
185
244
341
377
6
2
301
194
342
189
~L4lT
551
469
240
200
223
324
230
1,768
289
153
216
334
215
385
267
164
161
183
146
! 1,676 j 1,306
374
503
236
313
687
412
702
249
372
763
2,093    j 2,113    | 2,498
206
620
273
318
179
183
305
2,737    [ 2,084
6,137    | 5,608
I
227
439
282
362
191
182
155
378 |  390
486 j  402
209 193
425 j  417
603 597
2,101 | 1,999
115
459
150
435
243
199
169
174
533
198
294
195
222
101
1,838 j 1,770 | 1,717
6,104
5,547
5,022
Outstanding at End of—■
1969 I 1970   1971   1972   1973
24
7
23
74
58
48
234
89
58
59
9
41
56
157
27
74
14
57
61
85
1
91
49
75
50
351
115
33
34
63
87
32
364
147
102
62
35
200
86
64
37
48
59
256 |  546 |  294
446 |  416 |  268
103
6 I
34
29
59 I
29
69
30
42
59
62
262
67
13
40 |
86
72
209 [
19
7
84 |
111
64
33 |
25
46
18 !
88
54
20
12
5
389
936
I
1,313
926 |  911
I
91
45
23
13
40
50
260 |  262
166
39
47
37
111
400
78
85
92
65
15
69
57
461
,123
 LANDS BRANCH
Y 39
Table 19—Analysis of Requests for Inspection Processed by Land Inspection
Division for Years 1969 to 1973, Inclusive
Average change for 1973 over 1972 for Province is 5.4 per cent.
Average change for 1973 over 1969 for Province is 13.7 per cent.
District
New Reques
s Received During—
Per Cent Change
1969
1970
1971 1   1972
1
1973
1973 Over
1972
1973 Over
1969
Coast Region
288
18
2
277
194
288
284
438
2
369
169
359
191
581
182
185
249
271
457
261
153
182
306
373
305
153
145
164
167
-18.4
+29.5
+ 16.9
Nil
-20.3
-46.4
-21.2
+ 10.1
—21.1
Vancouver _     	
-49.7
Vancouver North _..
Victoria  _	
212 |     212
-41.2
1,351
1,528
1,680 |  1,571
1,307
-16.8
-3.3
Kamloops Region
Clinton  	
339
426
283
362
557
432
547
239
339
843
351 |     361
664 |     452
224 1     214
385 1     436
619 |     603
487
411
198
395
645
+35.0
-9.1
-7.5
-9.4
+7.0
+44.0
Kamloops	
-3.5
-30.0
Nelson	
Williams Lake '.	
+9.1
+ 15.8
Subtotals	
1,967
2,400
2,243 | 2,066 | 2,136
+ 3.4
+8.6
Prince George Region
238
840
376
414
161
276
354
2,659
5,977
217
494
207
337
185
214
252
~T,906~
172
397
188
299
205
148
135
142
583
200
386
209
145
152
211
398
163
316
187
291
148
+48.6
-31.7
-18.5
-18.1
-10.5
+ 100.7
-2.6
-11.3
Fort St. John	
— 52.6
-56.6
-23.7
+ 16.1
+5.4
Vanderhoof	
-58.2
1,544
1,817 | 1,714
-4.6
-35.5
5,834
5.467  1  5.454
5,157
     |     . .
1
 Y 40        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
SPECIAL SERVICES DIVISION
The Special Services Division was established in mid-1973 to provide the Lands
Branch with professional expertise in disciplines allied to the administration and
management of public lands.
ENVIRONMENTAL SECTION
J. P. Secter, Staff Biologist
The Environmental Section of the Special Services Division advises the Director
of Lands on the biological, ecological, and environmental aspects of Crown land
management. Included in its primary responsibilities are the control of environmental impacts of development projects, the resolution of conflicts in resource use,
and facilitation of integrative resource management on Crown-administered lands.
The activities of this section were initiated in mid-July with the appointment of
one Resource Systems Ecologist. Ongoing programmes of the Environmental Section are integrally linked with those of the Special Services Planning Section.
A significant amount of time has been devoted to the development of policy
and procedures for effecting environmental impact controls on major and minor
proposed developments and to the evolution of an integrative environmental planning approach to managing British Columbia's public lands. General policy advice
has also been provided in the areas of range-land management, small-harbour
management, estuarian management, and northern development.
Environmental approval by the Special Services Division has been incorporated
into the system of land application clearances conducted by the Lands Administration Division. This process is handled by means of selective referrals to Provincial
and Federal resource and environmental agencies and to regional districts and
municipalities where applicable. The Lands Branch, therefore, has the means to
deny land applications on environmental grounds and (or) require adjustments of
development plans to conform with environmental standards. During the latter half
of 1973, over 100 applications for the leasing, easement, and reservation of Crown
lands were referred to and processed by the Special Services Environmental Section.
Within this programme, ecological inspection trips were conducted by the Staff
Biologist at the Oyster River estuary, Beaver Cove, and Hardy Bay on Vancouver
Island, Carrington Lagoon on Cortes Island, and at Brisco in the East Kootenays.
Ecological inspections of proposed Crown subdivision sites were conducted for
the Special Services Division Planning and Engineering Sections at Ta Ta Creek,
Kootenay District, and at three sites on the Sechelt Peninsula. Lee Creek and
Ladysmith Harbour were also visited with a view to advising the Director of Lands
on the resolution of specific resource-management problems. The Environmental
Section is currently developing an integrative resource-management plan for Ladysmith Harbour with a view to determining a suitable local management authority.
This project will also serve as a pilot for the establishment of policy for the management of small coastal harbours throughout the Province.
Environmental impact control of major development projects also has been a
prime task. Almost all of the major projects handled by the Special Services Division Environmental Section concern developments which are going to take place but
which require environmental impact controls on location, design, and construction.
Here the Special Services Division Environmental Section has been working closely
with the Environment Canada-Environmental Protection Service with reference to
 LANDS BRANCH
Y 41
the construction of a highway linking Carcross, Y.T., and Skagway, Alaska, through
British Columbia, from the vicinity of Tagish Lake to the White Pass area. This
project has involved several trips to Whitehorse and extensive liaison with the
developer, Canada Department of Public Works.
The Environmental Section is co-ordinating the resource agencies in setting
terms of reference for environmental studies and in controlling impacts on four
proposed railway-lines: CNR, Terrace to Groundhog; CNR, Houston to Ootsa
Lake; CNR, Clinton to Ashcroft; and BCR, Dease Lake Extension, Mile 170-239.
Co-ordination of impact controls is also being conducted for a variety of smaller
highway, pipe-line, and hydro-line proposals.
ENGINEERING SECTION
B. A. Lambert, P.Eng., Staff Engineer
The Engineering Section of the Special Services Division advises the Director
of Lands on the engineering aspects of the administration and development of Crown
lands. In particular, it is responsible for arranging the construction of roads and
provision of services for recreational and residential Crown land subdivisions.
The Section commenced operations with the appointment of one professional
engineer at the end of May 1973. A large portion of the following half year has
been spent in the work of establishing a new office, determining requirements, and
evolving policies.
Responsibility was taken over from the Lands Administration Division for the
subdivision of Crown lands. So far, this has largely been a matter of further work
with ongoing projects, and the use of past policies and methods for handling new
subdivision proposals. Thus, detailed proposals submitted by Land Inspectors have
been reviewed and either referred to the Division's Planner or Ecologist for further
investigation or approval and arrangements made for any necessary construction.
Most construction and some engineering have been undertaken by the Department
of Highways, the Forest Service, the Water Resources Service, and various municipal authorities, with reimbursal of costs by the Lands Branch.
During 1973 fewer subdivision proposals were submitted than in recent years
because of uncertainty about the areas to be included in the agricultural land
reserves. However, work proceeded with road construction for residential subdivisions near Comox, Port Hardy, Williams Lake, Princeton, and Fort Nelson, a
recreational subdivision at Meziadin Lake, and a commercial subdivision at Cassiar
Junction. Other projects include the clean-up of Alpha Lake, excavation of a
drainage ditch at Anderton Road Subdivision near Comox, percolation tests at
Sulphurous Lake Subdivision, boat-ramp construction at Christina Lake, and sanitary sewer construction on the Victoria Industrial Reserve. Arrangements were
also completed for an urban subdivision in Powell River, extension of a ski cabin
subdivision on Purdon Hill near Prince George, and the construction of a car park
at Whiffin Spit, Sooke.
Consultations were held with the Water Resources Service, which arranged for
an exploratory drilling contract for water supply for a proposed townsite at Dease
Lake. This programme resulted in two successfully developed and tested wells and
a hole to be used for monitoring changes in groundwater quality due to the use of
septic tanks. At Kitimat, a rural subdivision of 104 lots had been planned by the
municipality in order to provide an alternative type of home-site to the existing
urban development. The Engineering Section has been involved in further investigation of this proposal. The Section set up and supervised a drilling programme to
 Y 42
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
locate suitable water supply.   An aquifer has been located, and a well developed
and tested.   Right-of-way clearing has been commenced, and next year roads will
be constructed and a community water
supply installed. Investigation of water
supply has also been commenced in
connection with the expansion of Bear
Lake townsite, north of Prince George.
This requires the upgrading of the existing facilities of the Crooked River
Waterworks District and particularly
the provision of iron-removal treatment.
Engineering problems investigated
in 1973 included the probable physical
effects of a proposed breakwater and
barge jetty at Metchosin and a proposed marina boat channel and groins
at Oyster River. Both of these proposals are for private developments on
Crown foreshore. An earth slide onto
the foreshore at Cadboro Bay, Victoria,
was inspected and a review made of the
proposals prepared by the upland owners' consulting engineers. The probable
effects of increased storm run-off from
possible residential development in the
University Endowment Lands onto
Shaughnessy Golf Course were also
investigated.
It is expected that use will continue to be made of other Government
agencies when they are able to execute
the work required to serve Crown subdivisions. The Section also has the
capability of selecting and preparing
terms of reference for consulting engineers who may be requested to provide specialist advice, design services, and site work. However, during 1974, additional
staff will join the Section, making it possible to undertake its own design and contract
supervision for many of the Crown land subdivisions.
Road built by Lands Service into Crown
subdivision at Heffley Lake.
PLANNING SECTION
K. P. Ohlemann, Staff Planner
The Planning Section advises the Director of Lands on the principles and
practice of urban and regional planning matters on Crown land throughout the
Province. In part, the responsibilities are to develop plans and policies in light of
the social, economic, and environmental objectives. Accordingly, this Division
plays a leading role in respect to integrative resource management on public lands
and encourages interdisciplinary contact within the Public Service and with outside agencies.
The activities of this Section were introduced in mid-July 1973 with the
appointment of one Regional Planner.   During the following months the Planning
 LANDS BRANCH Y 43
Section has been closely linked with both the Environmental and Engineering
Sections.
Since co-ordination is critical for a harmonious multipurpose use of resources,
all land applications referred to this section are reviewed, inspected where required,
and channelled to the appropriate departments and agencies. As the Environmental
Section has indicated, the Lands Branch not only has the means to deny, approve,
or amend land application plans from an environmental point of view, but also from
the planning and engineering point of view.
It has also been this Section's contention that a better quality Crown subdivision can be achieved through site evaluation and design and analysis of the suitability
of a particular location from a biophysical basis. Land being made available prematurely for year-round subdivision residences often results in isolated patchwork
subdivisions, and it is therefore the intention to locate and take advantage of sites
with existing services. Although there appears to be a steady demand for property,
a complicating factor encountered is the linear nature of design experienced due to a
universal desire for proximity to water, view, or easy access. This prevailing zest
will be dealt with by planning procedures which culminate the unique environmental
parameters of a particular site.
In order to substantiate subdivision proposals adequately, empirical data were
established relating to the costs, capabilities, and implications for alternative locations and types of development. In keeping with this programme, inspection trips
have been conducted to the Sunshine Coast Regional District, Queen Charlotte Islands, Prince George, Williams Lake, Smithers, Tete Jaune Cache, and Port Hardy
areas, enabling the Planning Section to make more rational and economically
feasible decisions concerning subdivision development.
Concurrently, the Planning Section has become involved in the establishment
of new townsites at Dease Lake, Lovell Cove, and Leo Creek. For the success of
these centres, the objective is to set the stage to permit a strong sense of community
as the inhabitants move into these locations. In the selection of sites, the design will
be monitored by the Planning and Engineering Sections to harmonize with its surroundings and impart human qualities as well as its practicality.
In keeping with the need to establish and implement land use and development
controls along the Haines Road and Skagway-Carcross Highway in northwestern
British Columbia, the Planning Section is assessing the capability of development
along these routes and setting terms of reference in co-operation with other resource
departments. Similarly, the same approach is being followed for four proposed
railroad lines—CNR, Terrace to Groundhog; CNR, Houston to Ootsa Lake; CNR,
Clinton to Ashcroft; and BCR, Dease Lake extension.
Since numerous departments and agencies have expressed a high interest in the
development of Hudson Bay Mountain, Smithers, the Planning Section has set terms
of reference to study the entire mountain on an interdisciplinary level to determine
the alternative courses of action.
Additionally, the Planning Section has been requested to take part in two task
forces—the Northern Vancouver Island Study and the Northwestern British Columbia Study.
More implicitly, to perform the above-stated functions, a close liaison has been
established between the Special Services Division and the Environment and Land
Use Committee Secretariat.
   THE SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
It is the responsibility of the Surveys and Mapping Branch, through the Boundary
Commissioner, to establish and maintain co-operatively the boundaries between this
Province and the other adjacent provinces and territories of Canada. Within the Province, the Branch has established and is even extending a basic network of triangulation
surveys which is fundamental to determining geographical locations and co-ordinating
property boundaries. The surveying procedures vary according to the intended purposes.
Topographic surveys are constantly improving the portrayal of various physical features.
Cadastral (legal) surveys, on the other hand, delineate the parcels of Crown lands subject
to alienation under the Land Act. Finally, it is necessary to show on published maps the
combined survey effort in order to give a visual account of the position of land alienation
and geographic features of British Columbia. Maps must satisfy a wide range of uses,
whether it be by the sportsman searching for an untapped valley or virgin lake, the homesteader seeking unsettled lands, or the industrialist planning new ways and new places to
develop the resources of this Province.
So much for the uses of maps and surveys and their necessity. Also interesting is the
great variety of techniques and equipment which must support our complex surveying and
mapping organization. This includes photography from aircraft using precise cameras
calibrated to less than a thousandth of an inch, modern optical surveyors' theodolites
which read directly to seconds of arc, other instruments such as the tellurometer (a
distance-measuring device which operates on a principal similar to radar), and plotting
devices which are capable of precise mapping directly from aerial photographs. Helicopters and other aircraft speed surveyors to the remotest locations. Surveying is also
expanding into the realm of electronic computers which can process the contents of field-
notes in seconds compared with hours by manual methods. In all these ways, the science
of surveying and mapping continues to serve the people by keeping pace with their needs
and with the continual technological advances of our age.
The following is a brief summary of the functions of the various units of Surveys
and Mapping Branch:
/. Administration—General co-ordination of the three divisions of the Branch, these
being the Legal Surveys, Map Production, and Field Operations Divisions; delineation,
restoration, and maintenance of the Alberta-British Columbia Boundary and the British
Columbia-Yukon-Northwest Territories Boundary through the office of Boundary Commissioner; interdepartmental and intergovernmental liaison; geographical research and
data processing and research; editing of Lands Service Annual Report.
//. Legal Surveys Division—Survey regulations under various Provincial Statutes,
such as the Land Act, Land Registry Act, Mineral Act, and Petroleum and Natural Gas
Act; preparation of survey instructions to British Columbia land surveyors for surveys
of Crown lands and subsequent check of field-notes and plans; preparation and safekeeping of official field-notes and plans; maintenance of Departmental reference maps;
processing applications for disposition of Crown lands to determine the status of the
land; recording on maps, dispositions by other Departments such as timber sales, mineral
claims; and well-sites, reserves such as forests, roads, and parks, and all boundaries of
incorporated areas of other levels of Government; surveys of Crown lands and rights-of-
way at the request of other Government departments; computer checks of subdivision
plans for Land Registry offices; inspection surveys in areas of dispute; restoration of old
lot corners.
///. Map Production Division—Compilation and draughting of four main programmes of mapping—planimetric, for the Forest Inventory Series and for the Land
Reference Series; cadastral, for lot overlays at all scales as well as for the Composite
Series; topographic, for all large-scale engineering maps; and derived mapping, for the
Lithographic Series. Special mapping services including geographic information, editing,
descriptions, and delineation of administration boundaries. Operation of a large reproduction laboratory of three sections—printing, photo-mechanical, and air photo to supply
a map and air photo sales office.
IV. Field Operations Division—Propagation and maintenance of Provincial network
of survey control by triangulation, traverse spirit and barometric levelling, and photo-
topographic methods; operation of two or more aerial photographic survey aircraft, fixed-
wing aircraft, and helicopters on charter; surveys for establishment of integrated survey
areas under the Official Surveys Act; field control and mapping for site plans and other
special projects; data processing and plan checking of surveys made under the Petroleum
and Natural Gas Act, 1965; survey-control records; operation of radio and electronic
maintenance section; aircraft maintenance, instrument and camera shop, and field equipment warehouse.
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 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH Y 49
SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
A. H. Ralfs, B.C.L.S., D.L.S., Director, Surveyor-General,
and Boundaries Commissioner
With the active interest and approval of the Provincial Government, a Branch
committee was established on March 2 to proceed with investigations leading to
metric conversion. Later in the year the Director was also appointed to the Provincial Government Metric System Conversion Committee to represent the Lands
Service. Surveys and Mapping is an area in which metric conversion presents relatively few problems and may therefore be expected to be among the first to make
the change.
During the year the following topics have received major attention:
(1) The adoption of a new map projection and metric rectangular grid
to replace the present system based upon the polyconic projection:
After considerable study of the various alternatives and an examination of the systems used by the Federal Government and other
provinces it was decided to adopt the Universal Transverse Mercator
projection and rectangular grid system.
(2) Ratio map scales to replace current scales based upon so many miles
or feet to an inch: The Branch committee considers that the standard
metric scales should be 1:1, 1:2, and 1:5 multiplied by any power
of 10. In addition the scales 1:125 and 1:25 multiplied by powers
of 10 should be acceptable and in many instances may be preferred
to the standard scales because they will represent a smaller proportional change from existing scales. There is already support for this
selection of metric scales from Ontario and the Federal Government.
(3) A standard system of sheet lines and numbering for all Provincial
mapping. The relative merits of geographical and grid sheet lines
were examined in depth and it appears there is a place for both. For
small-scale mapping there seems to be no need to make any change
from the existing geographic sheet lines and the National Topographic numbering system. For large-scale mapping there are many
advantages to sheet lines and a numbering system based upon the
U.T.M. rectangular grid. A description of the proposals regarding
map scales, sheet lines, and numbering is being prepared which it is
proposed to circulate in 1974 to all map-making departments and
agencies for comment, following which it is hoped that a standard
system may be promulgated by Order in Council.
(4) Changes in equipment necessitated by metric conversion will fortunately be small since most of the extensive items, including photo-
grammetric plotters, electronic distance-measuring equipment, and
transits are already graduated in metric units. Some effort will be
required to convert computer programmes to accept input and
produce output in metric units.
Because of extensive renovations to the main Parliament Buildings, Branch
staff formerly quartered there were transferred in December to new temporary
offices at Harbour Towers, 345 Quebec Street. The field section of Legal Surveys
Division was also transferred there from its former quarters at 525 Superior Street.
Only the reproduction laboratory of the Map Production Division remains in the
 Y 50        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
main Parliament Buildings and plans are in hand to move it to a new site in 1974.
It is expected that when the new Resources Building, now in the planning stages, is
completed that it will finally be possible to consolidate the Surveys and Mapping
Branch operations under one roof.
In September, D. F. Pearson, Provincial Representative on the Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical Names, attended the annual meeting of the
Committee, which for the first time was held at Yellowknife, N.W.T. The meeting
coincided with that held by the Canadian Council on Surveying and Mapping which
the writer attended as Provincial member. Both meetings offered opportunities for
discussion of topics of common concern among representatives of Federal and Provincial departments responsible for surveying, mapping, and geographical names.
George New, surveyor with the Field Operations Division, retired in November
after 21 years' service. Commencing continuous employment in 1952 as a survey
assistant, he earned his B.C.L.S. in 1956, serving in that capacity until his retirement. Much of Mr. New's work took him on surveying assignments in northern
British Columbia and he had an extensive knowledge of that part of the Province.
His departure was marked by a presentation, carrying with it the best wishes of his
friends and colleagues in the Branch.
George Barnes, technician (surveying) in the Survey Control Section of Field
Operations Division, retired in May of 1973. He entered the Provincial Service in
1936 and served at various levels in the computation section of the Geographic
Division before being promoted to supervisor in 1956. In that position he was
responsible for processing computations and maintaining statistical records of Provincial survey control data.
British Columbia-Yukon-Northwest Territories Boundary
Commission
In April 1973, instructions were issued by the British Columbia-Yukon-
Northwest Territories Boundary Commission to A. G. Sutherland, Technician 2,
and a staff member of this Branch, to clear a section of the British Columbia-Yukon
Boundary commencing at the upper boundary crossing of the Liard River north of
Lower Post, and continuing west toward Teslin Lake. It was estimated that approximately 100 miles of line would be hand-cleared in a three-month period starting on
or about June 1, 1973.
Specific instructions included the placing of targets on all monuments not previously targetted for aerial photography; to select two areas at different elevations
and over different kinds of tree cover as test strips for the application of Tordon
10K pellets as brush control; and, while hand-clearing the line, to make a check of
the results of two previous defolient spray programmes carried out by the Boundary
Commission in 1969 and 1971.
The boundary from Watson Lake on the Liard Plain rises to the Dease Plateau,
then through the Cassiar Mountains on to the Nisutlin Plateau; it varies in elevation
from 2,000 feet on the plains to heights of 7,000 feet in the Cassiar Mountains. The
latter area is well above timber-line and therefore did not require any clearing.
Aside from Mr. Sutherland, the crew was comprised of seasonal help. Six
engineering aides and a cook were all recruited from the Victoria area and were
mostly university students.
The party left Victoria on May 24 and the first camp was set up at Porter
Lakes, south of Watson Lake. Camp equipment was kept to a minimum for portability, and a rubber boat proved to be a real time-saver as it was used to transport
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Y 51
one crew across the lake twice a day, thus eliminating a two-hour hike each day.
It was subsequently used to cross the Little Rancheria River and a lake west of
Morley River.
Arrangements were made with Frontier Helicopters of Watson Lake for the
casual charter of an S55T helicopter to supply and move camps. This machine
proved ideal as it has an inside cargo capacity of 2,000 pounds or 10 passengers at
a speed of 100 knots.
Camps were set up at approximately 8-mile intervals, and over the course of
the summer equipment was moved 14 times. At Swift River and Two Ladder Creek
the problem of getting crews to and from the line in the mountains was resolved
with the charter of a Bell 47J helicopter that could carry a three-man crew. It was
also used to move camp from Two Ladder Creek, using a sling.
During the month of June, camp was moved five times and a total of 40 miles
was cleared in 21 days. Targets were placed on 27 monuments. This area was one
of the easiest to clear as the Liard Plain is relatively flat, with pine being the predominant species. West of the Little Rancheria River, the Dease Plateau offers
more spruce and heavier underbrush, and rainfall is noticeably higher.
The month of July yielded 29 miles of line in 23 days with a total of 28
monuments targetted. This put the crew across the main Cassiar Range to Swift
River, leaving approximately 34 miles of line to be cleared to Teslin Lake. During
the month of August the remaining distance was cleared and targets were placed on
39 monuments.
For restricting growth along the cleared line, Tordon pellets were applied to
two selected small test areas during the summer. The first site was east of the
Stewart-Cassiar Road between Monuments 262 and 263, while the second was
west of Hazel Creek at an elevation of approximately 4,000 feet.
The last camp for the season was broken on August 30 and the crew returned
to Victoria on September 5 for dispersal.
In summary, 103 miles of line were cleared from the Upper Liard (Monuments
373 and 374) to Teslin Lake (Monument 200). A total of 94 targets was placed
on monuments for later air photo identification. Pits and mounds were repaired
where necessary, and two monuments were found in a damaged condition. Monument 212 was missing and 222 had been heaved out of position, apparently by
winter frosts.
The results of the two spraying operations in 1969 and 1971 indicated no
belated kill in black spruce and verify the report of A. F. Swannell, B.C.L.S., in
June 1972.
Further clearing programmes could be carried out in much the same way as
this one, but air support would have to be increased as access to the boundary
would be mainly from the air.
Data Processing
Control Survey Data Bank
This data bank is a file on magnetic tape on survey control points. In March
the file was reorganized to contain additional information which use of the file had
indicated was desirable. In particular the new records contain a unique seven-
character identifier for each control point, in line with the system adopted by the
Federal Government. From the start of the year 1973, all new control points will
have the identifier stamped on the post in the ground, which will provide unique
positive identification.
 Y 52        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
As a result of the reorganization of the file, the seven computer programmes
which enter new control points, amend existing records, and search the data bank
selectively for required output, have all required extensive amendment.
The card index file of control points maintained by the Survey Control Section
is also to be reorganized and an attempt is being made to weed out worthless
material. The data bank now contains the records of over 30,000 points, but there
still remain some 20,000 points entered on cards only.
Programmable Calculators
In April a WANG 600-14 calculator was acquired by Legal Surveys Division
to replace a SCM calculator primarily for plan-checking purposes. A library of
programmes was supplied by WANG, but not being tailored to our requirements
proved cumbersome to operate and would not do everything that is required.
New programmes were therefore written specially designed to deal with the
checking of plans of small and moderate size. These are simple and fast to operate
and the WANG machine has given virtually no trouble. The WANG has proved of
value for many other survey applications for which results are required quickly
without resort to the big computer at the Data Processing Centre.
Two Compucorp Calculators were also acquired for use by surveyors in the
field and the office. These are programmable to a iimited extent and programmes
have been written for several of the routine surveying operations.
Programme LSM 139
This general purpose surveying programme, which runs on the IBM 370 computer and is used by several Government departments, has continued to receive
extensive use. Some minor modifications have been made to some of the routines
to meet requirements of particular users and a start has been made at amendments
which will enable the programme to deal with metric units of measurement.
EDP for Land Status Records
After some months of inactivity in this field, the new Government's requirement for fast searches for available Crown (or other) land in specified areas has
reactivated research. Michael Perks, B.C.L.S., A.R.I.C.S., the Branch Officer i/c
Data Processing and Research and a Supervising Analyst from the Data Processing
Centre have been studying existing procedures in the Lands Branch with a view to
determining if EDP at moderate cost could substantially speed the operation. As a
by-product of this investigation a flow chart of the existing procedure for processing
leases and Crown grants was drawn up. This visual aid is proving of value in explaining the procedure to those unfamiliar with it and may be of assistance in
streamlining the operation. Preliminary investigation has indicated that an EDP
system of moderate cost can only be an assist to statusing and that the main requirement is for the rewriting of the official registers in a form that will be amenable to
key-punching and will also reveal the status of a parcel quickly, with the least possible reference to files, other registers, and maps.
It also means that a system will have to be set up whereby land transactions
by all Government departments and Crown agencies are funnelled through the
Lands Branch.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Y 53
British Columbia-Alberta Boundary
Considerable progress was made during the year by finally gaining the approval of the Governments of Alberta and of Canada to a proposed new British
Columbia-Alberta Boundary Act.
It had been realized for some time that the existing definition of the Rocky
Mountains portion of the boundary was inadequate and that serious problems
could arise should development take place up to the boundary line by either province.   There were two weaknesses requiring
(1) a clarification that the sinuous portions of the boundary, which
follow along the height of land of the Rockies, mean the height of
land as it exists on the ground and not that obtained by measuring in
any way from the map sheets referred to in the existing legislation;
(2) authorization to conventionalize where necessary the sinuous height
of land through certain passes by setting out and monumenting a
series of straightline courses to clearly define the boundary.
It is hoped that the proposed Bill drafted by this Province can be enacted
soon. The approval given to our Bill by Alberta and Canada ensures that those
governments will enact similar legislation which, when completed, will overcome
any potential jurisdictional disputes.
After having provided for all requests from our Lands Service, the Branch
was able to divert its field control, mapping, and allied services to other departments of Government as the Division reports reveal. The only way the Branch
has of determining the best of its capabilities is to hold an Interdepartmental Committee Meeting on Surveys and Mapping. The ninth such annual meeting was
held on September 12, 1973 and all departments for whom we have provided services were represented by one or more delegates. The meeting is called prior to
preparation of estimates for the ensuing year and in this way the field and office
programme for the Branch is planned.
Nevertheless, it is still difficult to allocate priorities for one department against
another. This difficulty is aggravated now by the great and increasing volume
of demands which face the Branch. Main problems are air photography and
large-scale mapping, since great emphasis is being placed by all departments in
planning in all its details.
For many years the Branch staff has remained stable and the ever-increasing demands have been satisfied by the many improvements in technology, all of
which have quickly been taken advantage of. However, this solution of the
problem has been fully exploited and it is now clear that we must find other means
to meet the demands or simply refer lower priority departments to commercial
suppliers.
Because we have some $498,000 worth of photogrammetric plotting and
photographic reproduction equipment, it would be wrong not to maximize its use
to the extent of recruiting a second shift of operators.
Another matter of concern to the Branch is the growing tendency of other
departments to recruit survey technicians to carry out field assignments. It is not
only that the Branch has the knowledge to supervise and carry out such work,
but in any case it has to supply the other departments with the basic descriptions
and co-ordinates of survey control monuments in the area concerned before the
work can begin. This control is provided from the survey control data bank of
some 30,000 points with a further 20,000 points now being processed for the
bank.    Unfortunately from this point on there is no further control information
 Y 54        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
or fixed survey marks provided to augment the control bank as would be the case
if Surveys and Mapping was carrying out the work.
The many services which have been supplied over the year to other departments of government at every level, and to the public, is well documented in the
reports of the three Divisions of the Branch which follow.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH Y 55
LEGAL SURVEYS DIVISION
W. A. Taylor, B.C.L.S., Chief
The tabulated statistics in the production table do not indicate any particular
growth trend but rather the increases and decreases reflect the changing times.
As at least 40 per cent of our work load is geared to activity in other departments,
any changes in policy therein affects demands on our staff. An increase in quantity of mineral claim surveys checked is a direct result of changes in the Mineral
Act, and the large decrease in mining lease applications cleared is no indicator
of a lessening of mining activity but merely the result of the Department of Mines
and Petroleum Resources putting the onus on the applicant to determine surface
ownership. Although the number of descriptions written was over a hundred less
than the previous year, in actual fact more long metes and bounds descriptions
were written for the increased number of parks established and fewer short descriptions for alienation of land were required because of the effect of the agricultural
land policy. This same land policy had a marked effect on the number of parcels surveyed for lease or purchase, and from an all-time high of 1,199 in 1964
these have reduced to 422 this year.
Table 20—Production Totals for the Years 1972 and 1973
1972 1973
Field books prepared  475 393
Lots surveyed  633 619
Survey plans examined  598 433
Lots confirmed   573 517
Lots cancelled  707 892
Lots amended  58 106
Reference maps compiled or renewed  110 61
Applications for purchase cleared  446 550
Applications for lease cleared  5,660 4,886
Reserves cleared  518 551
Timber sales cleared  1,369 1,353
Crown grant applications cleared  723 719
Cancellations from maps  3,033 714
Inquiries   891 943
Letters received and dealt with    4,622 3,753
Examination sketches   2,472 1,560
Crown grant and lease tracings made  11,845 10,931
Well-site plans recorded  208 183
Survey instructions issued  839 422
Mineral claim lots created  36 31
Mineral leases cleared  622 107
Mining claims plotted  36 102
Mineral claims gazetted     24 208
Mineral claims cancelled  96 313
Placer leases plotted  340 551
Placer leases cancelled  530 273
Documents from vault examined  55,277 52,334
Crown land subdivision and right-of-way plans  584 393
Plans checked for the Land Registry Office  2,240 1,988
Descriptions written  782 658
 Y 56
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
A stock of official survey posts is maintained in all offices of Government
Agents for use in Crown land surveys and replacement of original survey corners.
A resume of the activity in this service follows:
Table 21—Distribution of Survey-posts
B.C.L.S.
Bajrs
Standard
Pipe
Rock
Post
Drive-
able Pins
Post Caps
Anchor
Plates
Drive-
able Pipe
2>/_" Bolts
Amount on hand, Jan. 1,
1973	
1,950
3,000
4,950~
850
250
300
1,401
Nil
2,610
Nil
1,951
2,000
2,362
5,213
7,575
162~
3,275
1,177
1,975
Nil
1,850
Nil
1,937
Nil
Totals	
1,401
35
Nil
129
2,610
3,951
1,975
1,850
1,937
600
375
196
260
2,625
232
Nil
100
Nil
114
838
394
U46~
50
75
Public surveyors	
Nil
Total used in 1973
1,400
164
1,171
3,117
4,614
100
125
Balance on hand Dec. 31,
1973	
Selling price of one post
Selling value ol posts used
in 1973	
3,550
$0.60
$840.00
1,237
$4.05
$664.20
1,439
$1.45
$1,697.95
834
$0.85
$2,649.45
2,961
$0.75
$3,460.50
1,875
$0.25
$25.00
504
$4.60
$6,191.60
1,812
$0.50
$62.50
Total selling value, $15,591.20
FIELD WORK
The 1973 season was again an active one for the field staff of the Legal Surveys Division, with 47 cadastral survey assignments completed at the request of
various Government departments. The work was undertaken by a staff presently
comprised of six professional land surveyors, one fewer than in 1972 through a
resignation, and eight permanent technicians, with nine summer-employed assistants.
Of particular note was the commencement of a survey of the Stewart-Cassiar
Highway, on which one surveyor and crew were deployed for the season.
The Lands Branch continues to place the major demand on our services,
however it is significant to note the reduction in the number of lots created by
Crown subdivisions, particularly with regard to the waterfront leasehold-type development. This is attributable mainly to policy changes and the awareness of the
need for improved planning, in so far as over-all best land use and environmental
aspects are concerned.
Lands Branch Subdivision Surveys
Table 22—Surveys of Lots
Waterfront Lease Lots
Meziadin Lake .        .     	
40
Rural Roadside Lots
Nanoose   	
     21
Sointula  	
6
Williams Lake 	
     31
Qualicum 	
     43
Dog Creek        	
.    18
Blackwater Road     ___
.._       5
Hosmer  	
       5
Fort Nelson 	
       5
Dokie Siding r	
       2
Stewart-Cassiar-Nass H/W junction 	
       2
Cassiar         	
5
Total 	
  143
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH Y 57
Extensive surveys on and adjoining the Gang Ranch holdings, involving the
creation of parcels totalling 1,400 acres, was necessary to facilitate land exchanges,
and a 13-acre camp and trailer-park site was surveyed near Fort Nelson for lease
purposes. A road right-of-way was posted through a part of the Chehalis Indian
Reserve, and an exchange block of land of equal area was surveyed adjoining the
reserve as compensation for the road taken.
Reposting and Restoration
At Fort Nelson, numerous lots of a 1972 Crown subdivision required corner
repostings as a result of construction disturbance, and at Quatsino, the remaining
part of a section of land from which several alienations had occurred by description was posted, thus clarifying the boundaries of Crown and adjoining private
ownership. The location of leased lots in the vicinity of Cowichan Station on
Vancouver Island was resolved by a partial posting of the subdivision involved.
Again this year a crew spent over two months in the area of the Mud River,
12 miles west of Prince George, re-establishing missing corners of the district lot
survey structure. The area was originally surveyed in the early 1900's, following
which an extensive forest fire destroyed most of the timber and left little evidence
of boundary corners. An area approximately 10 miles long and 1 to 3 miles wide
has now been reposted, and this will be of great assistance to the farmers and
ranchers concerned. An expanded survey restoration programme is anticipated
in 1974.
A total of 116 district lot corners was renewed this year in the course of
surveys carried out by this Division.
Interdepartmental Surveys
Forest Service—Only one small job, a right-of-way survey near Parksville,
was requested this year in contrast to previous years' demands.
Department of Recreation and Conservation—A small waterfront park was
created at Wardner, a 4-acre parcel was surveyed for removal from the Crooked
River Park, and near Radium a short piece of power-line right-of-way was posted
over private land to serve the adjoining park. In continuation of last year's work,
3V2 miles of the west boundary of the Creston Valley Wildlife Management Area
were established and posted, as were the boundaries of two smaller blocks in the
area. An isolated district lot in the Churn Creek area, Lillooet District, was
located to enable the Wildlife Branch to assess its potential. The use of a helicopter
greatly simplified what otherwise would have been an arduous task.
Department of Public Works—A survey of the Courthouse property at Powell
River was carried out, and in Victoria a posting of Crown land on Admirals Road,
and a survey of the Glenshiel Hotel property and an adjoining lane closure, were
carried out. A small posting job was completed on the former DND property at
Kamloops, and in Nanaimo the proposed new Malaspina College site was surveyed for conveyance from the present Federal ownership. At The Woodlands
School, a parcel of land was required to be delineated for transfer to the Queens
Park Hospital, and a 100-acre piece of the Oakalla Prison Farm was surveyed for
an intended conveyance.
Department of Attorney-General—An inspection survey involving riparian
rights was made near Nelson, and on behalf of the Log Theft Division of the RCMP,
field ties of a booming lease lot in the Fraser River were required to enable an
accurate illustrative plot on an air photo for Court purposes.
 Y 58        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Department of Housing—A topographic plan and consolidation survey of
Crown property on Summit Avenue in Victoria was undertaken, as was a subdivision at Alert Bay to create a 6-acre parcel for housing development.
Department of Highways—In the vicinity of Wardner, eight lots and one-third
of a mile of road were surveyed in connection with the Libby Dam flood area,
and at Fort Nelson, 1 mile of road right-of-way was posted through the Indian
reserve and connecting with the Alaska Highway.
Highway Surveys
The survey of the Stewart-Cassiar Highway previously referred to consists
of a highly accurate control traverse of the route, with the traverse stations monu-
mented with consecutively numbered capped posts. This will permit the road to
be properly plotted on our maps, and provide the "backbone" control monumenta-
tion to which subsequent surveys along the highway will be tied.
The survey was commenced near Meziadin Lake and progressed to Gnat
Lake, a distance of 195 miles, before weather forced a stop. The crew, consisting of a surveyor, two technicians, and four temporary assistants, worked from
Department of Highways camps at Meziadin Lake and Bob Quinn Lake, and a
motel at Eddontenajon Lake.
Over 500 monuments were set, and 25 bench-marks established in 1965 by
the Topographic Division were integrated in the traverse. The main traverse was
tied to seven Provincial triangulation stations en route, and 21 stellar observations
were taken for azimuth control. The surprisingly high mileage accomplishment
and distance measurement accuracy could not have been realized without the use
of an electronic distance meter acquired this year for the purpose. The investment in this machine and necessary ancillary equipment has proven well justified.
Fortunately, from the viewpoint of work interference, the traffic flow over
the newly opened highway fell far short of that anticipated, averaging about two
vehicles an hour through the summer.
Miscellaneous Surveys
Subdivision surveys to resolve boundary problems were carried out at Sechelt,
Ladysmith, and Campbell River through pre-arrangement with owners and the
Land Registry Offices concerned. Investigation surveys were made for the Lands
Branch at Port Hardy, at Island View Beach near Victoria, and at Christina Lake,
and inspection surveys required by our own office were conducted at Enderby,
Paul Lake, and near Barriere. A small dyke right-of-way survey was needed by
the Water Resources Department at the Oak Hills subdivision at Kamloops.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Y 59
Automatic paper feed into print processor.   Designed and built by instrument shop.
 Y 60        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
FIELD  OPERATIONS DIVISION
A. D. Wight, B.C.L.S., Chief
The buoyant economy and expanding Government involvement in regulating
development by planning increased the need for current information, much of
which is provided by air photography and specialized mapping. This Division has
been hard pressed to meet urgent demands for air photography for several years,
and latterly increased requests have compounded the problem. Although approval
to lease a high-performance aircraft with a capability for medium- and small-scale
photography was again received this year, as a short-term expedient, a suitable
aircraft could not be leased. Air photo production for the year was therefore
limited (both in quality and scope) to the capability of our available equipment.
A study on the operation of Government aircraft resulted in all aircraft, pilots,
and maintenance personnel being transferred to the Department of Transport and
Communications. The new Department will provide aircraft and operating crews
to service our requirements for air photography and fixed-wing transport for the
ground survey crews. Two Beechcraft Super King Air aircraft have been ordered
and are scheduled to be operational for the 1974 photographic season. The new
aircraft are twin turbo-powered, pressurized machines, and will be equipped with
dual camera ports. Improved performance in speed and altitude will roughly
double our productive capability with other factors remaining constant. Additional benefits applicable to the new aircraft will be gained through improved
mobility and the ability to photograph with a combination of either two scales
or two emulsions simultaneously.
The consolidation of Government aircraft under a single authority was implemented to improve efficiency through better utilization of personnel and equipment.
This general principle may be applied to many fields of Government activity with
comparable benefit when considered in the broad sense and in the long term.
One particular aspect which concerns this Division is the number of Government
organizations establishing or expanding survey units to undertake field control
for mapping. The Surveys and Mapping Branch is responsible for establishing,
maintaining, and recording the Provincial survey network. Control established
by other than the Surveys and Mapping Branch does not form part of the Province's data bank and is not readily available to other departments or industry.
Where public funds are spent on surveys of a standard and scope to be of significance to the Provincial survey network, it would appear logical that those surveys
should be undertaken by the Surveys and Mapping Branch and form part of the
control system.
Field Survey Section
Five years ago there was a large area of approximately 50,000 square miles
in the north central part of British Columbia that was virtually devoid of any
form of survey control. Apart from a thin band of triangulation up the Rocky
Mountain Trench and two or three east-west networks, this vast area was uncontrolled. In 1969 a programme was instigated to establish survey control in
this area, primarily for resource mapping. The year under review saw the culmination of that project with the control network being completed in map sheets
104J, N, O, and K. After five seasons, approximately 1,000 second-order control points on about a 10-mile grid have been established to form the basic control for mapping the above area.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Y 61
 Y 62        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
The airborne control party commenced operations in the vicinity of Chetwynd
this year to make ties to the West Coast Transmission Co. pipe-line survey running
south from the Halfway River to the John Hart Highway west of Chetwynd. The
ties were made to isolate errors that were evident from random ties to the pipe-line
right-of-way. On completion of the ties to the right-of-way, the crew moved
north to commence the control survey in map sheets 104J, N, O, and K. A base
camp was established at Tuya Lake, from where the bulk of the project was completed. A total of 195 control stations was occupied to control 12,000 square
miles. The airborne crew again used a turbine helicopter, an Allouette II to transport the observing crews from mountain top to mountain top, and once again it
proved to be a time-saving machine because of its extra carrying capacity and
range compared to the smaller helicopters.
The helicopter flew 256 hours during the period of our contract and the
Otter flew 284 hours in support of the airborne field party. The Otter, like the
photographic aircraft, was transferred to the Department of Transport and Communications, but remained under this Division's direction and continued to service all departments during the off-season. A total of 174 hours was flown for
the Lands Branch, Forest Engineering, Pollution Control, Attorney-General's Department, Human Resources, and Tax Assessors—to make a season total of 458
flying-hours.
The Integrated Survey Programme continued and the following four new
areas were declared: Integrated Area 10 within the District of North Cowichan;
Area 11, the City of Duncan; Area 12, a portion of the City of Penticton; Area
13, the southern part of the Municipality of Delta.
Integrated Survey Area 1 in the District of Surrey was expanded, from a
small area in the northwest section of the municipality, to include all of the municipality with the exception of a narrow band of undeveloped or industrial area along
the south bank of the Fraser River. Amended plans were compiled and registered
for integrated survey areas in Mackenzie, Granisle, and Elkford. Sufficient additional control monuments were established in these areas in conjunction with subdivision development to warrant updating the plans.
The integrated survey party spent the bulk of the field season in the District
of Coquitlam, where 447 control monuments, set by the district, were co-ordinated.
The survey was tied to the Provincial triangulation network and to the geodetic
network in the area. Spirit levels were run connecting all the control monuments
to geodetic bench-marks. All survey returns for this area will be on the metric
system with the U.T.M. grid. Reconnaissance surveys were carried out in the
following areas: District of Matsqui to locate sites for 200 monuments; the Village of South Fort George to locate sites for 18 monuments; a portion of the
expanded City of Kelowna to locate sites for 250 control monuments. All monuments have been or are in the process of being installed by the districts or cities
concerned in preparation for field control next year. A precise baseline distance
was measured this year by the integrated crew at Clearwater for a proposed bridge-
site for the Department of Highways.
A variety of mapping projects was completed this year for various Government departments. Control for 1"= 1,000 feet mapping was completed in the
Fort Nelson area for the Water Investigations Branch. Horizontal and vertical
control was established in additional areas in the Okanagan Valley as requested
by the Water Investigations Branch. A large-scale mapping project was completed in the Creston Valley area from Kootenay Lake south to the 49th parallel,
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Y 63
where 52 control stations were occupied, 200 miles of levels were run, and 142
vertical points were identified.
Control for mapping five park-sites was completed for the Parks Branch.
The park-sites were Carp Lake, Meziadin Lake, Boya Lake, Ruckles Park on
Saltspring Island, and Muncho Lake. Site plans were done at the Victoria Personal Care Centre and the Creston Wildlife Interpretation Centre, and control for
mapping the D.N.D. property at Kamloops was supplied to the Department of
Public Works. The proposed townsite for the Silvacan mill on Takla Lake was
mapped, and preliminary engineering data for a proposed subdivision at Kitimat
was obtained for the Lands Department. Mapping control was established for
mapping of the Highlands District in Victoria and a subdivision in Kamloops for
the Department of Housing.
At the request of the British Columbia-Yukon-Northwest Territories Boundary Commission, a section of the British Columbia-Yukon boundary was cleared
between Teslin Lake and the Upper Liard Crossing, a distance of about 103 miles.
This clearing was all done by hand with the camps being moved along the line
by helicopter. Monument reference marks were restored and the monuments
were targetted to establish photo control on aerial photography.
Air Survey Section
The Air Survey Section produced a total of 42,340 new photographs during
the season, covering 27,045 square miles of block vertical photography and 7,611
line-miles on special projects. The total number of photographs exceeded 40,000
for the first time, but this feature reflects the type of projects rather than a record
accomplishment.
An extremely poor spring inhibited the photographic operation until early
July, but the balance of the season produced above-average opportunities over
the southern regions of the Province. The extensive programme based on accumulated and new requests provides an unlimited scope permitting utilization of suitable weather wherever and whenever it occurred within the Province. No progress was made on the long-outstanding block photographic requests north of 56°.
The one period of good weather occurred in late September after the sun's angle
was below minimum for effective operations in block cover in the northern latitudes.
Because of the critical situation in the Forest Inventory programme, our efforts
were focused on the 20-chain block cover. Of the 27,045 square miles photographed, 26,395 square miles covered 20-chain areas, with a large percentage
being over terrain with average ground elevations in the five to six thousand feet
range. The combination of high ground and limited aircraft performance prevents photography at the specified scale and results in a large number of photographs in relation to the square-mile accomplishment.
The special project accomplishment was good, although the colour programme
was small because of the poor weather during early spring, the period best suited
to colour photography because of clear atmospheric conditions.
The two photographic Beechcraft D.18's flew a total of 600 hours and completed 120 of the 185 projects assigned for the year. Both aircraft maintained
full serviceability through the photographic season because of a well-executed programme of running and preventive maintenance.
 Y 64        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Electronic and Instrument Shop
In addition to repairs and maintenance of equipment, a marked increase
in modification and construction projects took place during the past year. One
hundred and three construction projects covering electronics, optical, camera,
machine shop, and wood work were completed. The increased output was due
primarily to an increase in staff of two men on loan and other occasional help
which doubled the man-hours on production. Approximately 65 per cent of the
permanent staff's time is spent on maintenance, which leaves little time for new
projects. The major projects comprised construction of customized draughting
tables for the Map Production and Legal Surveys Divisions, and an automatic
paperfeed and a film feed for the new Log-E photo printer for the air photo processing laboratory.
The warehouse used for storage of field equipment and distribution of survey
posts was moved from Esquimalt Road to the Oak Street Centre. The new
location will be an ideal warehouse, but to date there has been some frustration
because of long delays in the modifications to the building.
Survey Control Section
Computations and final adjustment of horizontal and vertical positions for
12 survey projects from field data supplied by the Field Section were completed.
In addition, revision of old networks involving several hundred positions in the
Quesnel area and the east coast of Vancouver Island were undertaken.
Under the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act, 177 wellsite surveys were checked
for accuracy and eight were rejected because of inaccuracies. To facilitate the
expansion of oil and gas exploration surveys, the positions of cadastral lot corners
west of the Peace River Block and north of the Halfway River were co-ordinated
by route calculations from existing surveys. It was found impossible to continue
this system through the lots south of the Halfway River because of inadequate field
data to bridge the Halfway River.   It is hoped to rectify this in the coming year.
The calculations required to co-ordinate control monuments set by private
surveyors under the Integrated Survey Regulations is now an appreciable work
load. During the past year, 100 new monuments were set and 22 supplementary
certificates issued to the Land Registry Offices concerned.
An edit of the Survey Control Data Bank was initiated in late 1973. To
date, 2,890 individual records have been examined and the search parameters included assigning a unique identifier to each record entered in the bank.
During the year, two senior, long-service members of the Surveys and Mapping Branch retired from the Division. George Barnes, Supervisor of the Survey
Control Section, after 35 years' service, and George New, B.C.L.S., after 21 years'
service.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Table 23—Accomplishments of Air Survey Section, 1973
Y 65
Square
Miles
A. 80-chain vertical cover	
B. 40-chain  vertical  cover—Finance  Department:   North  Coast
Region -	
20-chain vertical cover—Forest Inventory:
Babine PSYU	
Blueberry PSYU	
Dewdney PSYU	
NarcosliPSYU ....	
Nechako PSYU	
Robson-Canoe PSYU	
Salmo PSYU _	
Salmon Arm-Shuswap PSYU _
SooPSYU	
Windermere PSYU  _
Subtotals __	
Dewdney PSYU (colour).—	
Totals	
D. Special Projects—
Department of Agriculture: Clearwater to Valemount—
B.C. Hydro and Power Authority:
Kootenay Canal	
Mica transmission-line	
District Forester, Kamloops: Kamloops District burns..
District Forester, Nelson: Nelson District burns	
District Forester, Vancouver:
Hayward Lake -	
Texada Island _	
Federal Fisheries: Herring spawn 	
Department of Finance: Kitimat Valley _	
Forest Engineering:
Duncan Forest Development Road	
Duncan Reservoir—  	
Jordan River Reservoir..
Kingcome River _	
Little Lillooet Lake	
McLeod Lake	
Mesachie Lake	
Mica Pondage	
Mission to Hope	
Nazko River _
Nilkitwa River	
Okanagan Falls Road	
Ootsa Lake Pondage _	
Stuart River	
Sumas Forest Development Road-
Forest Inventory:
Homathko to Southgate	
Kaouk to Little Zeballos Rivers	
Nicola	
Nootka Island	
Okanagan beetle kill	
Quatam River _	
Skwakwa River	
Department of Highways:
Blanshard Street extension	
Burns Lake	
Cache Creek to Ashcroft	
Castlegar-Trail-Rossland-Salmo-.
Cranbrook	
Fort Simpson Road-
Grand Forks to Greenwood-
Hope	
Hope-Merritt Road	
Merritt	
Nelson to Balfour	
Parksville to Nanaimo	
Port Mann  	
Prince George Bypass	
Prince Rupert _ _.
Quesnel Bypass	
25,770
375
26,145
100
333
101
211
154
11
54
992
208
14
149
11
9
5
4
2
325
113
4
5
105
521
4
15
435
126
79
95
613
28
72
13
16
140
11
411
37
10
504
21
115
71
16
23
20
562
135
29
50
120
80
5
44
113
117
5
45
8
4
2
1
1
63
71
1
1
66
432
1
6
330
90
54
54
296
12
56
5
76
6
97
22
4
164
12
31
18
9
8
2
91
130
650
3,400
3,900
130
100
3,710
	
3,850
3,195
3,900
1,715
2,050
6,945
5,650
1,510
1,660
395
400
2,580
....
2,400
2,065
2,220
26,005
390
26,395
 Y 66        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 23—Accomplishments of Air Survey Section, 1973—Continued
Number of
Photos
Lineal
Miles
Square
Miles
D. Special projects—Continued
Department of Highways—Continued
67
20
14
46
22
19
160
19
88
12
195
230
103
80
300
283
332
234
45
66
17
1
10
44
30
26
1
13
111
165
33
23
22
16
440
4
6
369
20
17
6
7
17
62
21
43
92
101
11
14
30
34
525
13
63
85
38
27
1,874
394
95
44
5
8
24
8
8
90
26
28
8
20
360
22
62
225
257
546
126
33
98
2
1
4
29
4
7
1
16
63
44
48
12
11
14
273
6
7
94
12
9
4
4
17
39
3
10
22
55
5
6
48
9
306
6
14
48
14
9
1,151
24
20
Lands Branch:
UBC                                     	
Land Inspection Division:
	
	
Department   of   Municipal   Affairs:   Tranquille   to   Monte
Department of Public Works:
BCIT to Jericho  .
Kamloops D.N.D            	
Pollution Control Branch:
Rupert Inlet-to-Utah   	
Department of Recreation and Conservation:
....
	
Regional districts:
Gold River           	
Water Resources:
Comox foreshore (LR)
Comox to Royston (C)
	
Fort Nelson	
Harrison Mills to Greyell Island	
Okanagan Storage	
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH Y 67
Table 23—Accomplishments of Air Survey Section, 1973—Continued
Number of
Photos
Lineal
Miles
Square
Miles
D. Special projects—Continued
Water Resources—Continued
14
56
210
1,632
22
6
7
120
174
6
Postill Lake	
Willis Lake	
16,065
7,611
Grand totals	
42,340
7,611
27,045
 Y 68        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
MAP PRODUCTION DIVISION
E. R. McMinn, B.A., B.A.Sc, D.L.S., B.C.L.S., P.Eng., Chief
Requests for all forms of map production information increased in volume and
in urgency as new undertakings in resource management gathered momentum. The
first effect of this need for services is shown in the production figures from the Reproduction Section where, fortunately, we have acquired new equipment and expect
to move to larger quarters in 1974. A more serious situation confronts the compilation groups, the Photogrammetric Section has considerable work on hand, and
the Planimetric Section must cope with an increased Forest Inventory programme
supported by increased photo-acquisition capability.
PHOTOGRAMMETRIC SECTION
This Section completed 42 projects as listed. A change from aerotriangulation
methods to independent model bridging has effected a 30-per-cent saving in control
extension time. A special computer adjustment programme for combining these
independent stereo models in a large block of air photos was developed by Ottawa
and by the University of Stuttgart for a large-capacity computer and the programme
is available commercially. We have been able to utilize our existing block adjustment programme for our smaller IBM 370, which deals with strips of air photos, by
writing a preliminary programme which combines the independent models into these
constituent strips. The Section now supervises the operation of a digitized Zeiss
Topocart plotter for the Forest Inventory Division as well as their Wild A40. Our
own Topocart is being replaced by the Zeiss Company following analysis of unacceptable performance. Experience of both overtime work and shift work was
gained during the year and it is hoped to increase production by shift work during
the year.
PLANIMETRIC COMPILATION SECTION
The lack of new photography in the northern half of the Province necessitated
a change from the expected compilation of 40-chain base maps to a revision programme of 20-chain base maps farther south in the heavier-logged sectors of the
Province.
A total of 25,000 photographs was used in our 20-chain programme that resulted in the completion of 633 laydown map sheets, of which 210 were detail
plotted. The PSYU's thus completed were Nehalliston, Carp-Crooked, Fernie,
Salmo, Narcosli for laydowns, and Seymour, Williams Lake, and Dewdney for
plotting.
The 40-chain Forest Inventory Mapping programme mainly consisted of the
plotting of detail from photographs taken in previous years. Sixty-six map sheets
were completed, bordering on the Liard, Dease, and Kechika PSYU'S. The Bell-
Irving and Boundary PSYU's comprised the other northern area to be completed
and consisted of 36 map sheets from our own laydowns, and an additional 25 map
sheets traced from Multiplex mapping in 104b and 104g.
As requested by the Department of Finance, Timberland Appraisers Division,
87 map sheets lying within the E and N Land Grant were updated to show the
position of 1972 20-chain photo centres.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH Y 69
The following mosaics were compiled during the calendar year:
Courtenay River to Comox Bay (Department of Health).
Mount Robson Park (Parks Branch).
Mount Assiniboine Park (Parks Branch).
Golden Ears Park (Parks Branch).
Manning Park (Parks Branch).
Cortes Island (Parks Branch).
Cameron River Reserve (Fish and Wildlife).
Eden Fire (Forest Protection).
CADASTRAL COMPILATION
The output of land reference maps in this 12-year programme dropped from
109 to 66 mainly because of the need for a second checking step. In the fair-
drawing of the planimetric mapping 371 20-chain sheets and 159 40-chain sheets
were completed. Composite mapping was completed on nine projects, totalling 95
sheets. An index of this type of mapping, which is carried on by many departments
of Government, is being maintained to avoid duplication, instances of which have
occurred in the past. Lots were plotted on 180 1:50,000 sheets prior to shipment
to Ottawa for lithography and printing.
DRAUGHTING SECTION
Fairdrawing of large-scale topographic mapping totalled 217 sheets; these
projects are prepared on a standard indexing system and, where indicated, have a
composite overlay of the property subdivisions. Some 22 integrated control survey
plans were prepared for submission to the Land Registry Offices. In response to
the needs of the B.C. Land Inventory, all of the 1:50,000 manuscripts on hand, 90
sheets, were revised and shipped to Ottawa under a renewal of our agreement with
them for publication. Lithographic compilation was completed for seven maps,
and five were published as listed.   Reprints were made of seven sheets.
REPRODUCTION SECTION
An increasing percentage of the requests to this Section of 25 workers involves
deadlines. This year only about 25 per cent of the work had to go out to commercial firms. Offset work and Xerox increased by 15 per cent and 8 per cent respectively. Air photo production hit a record of 310,000 prints with 50,000 on order.
Photo copy and whiteprint volume decreased, although material usage increased
because of the need for full-size recovery from 105-mm records.
Equipment purchases include a GAF 920 whiteprinter, an AB Dick 17x22
offset, a stitcher, a collater, a Log-E-tron printer, a Kodak Supermatic 42-inch
processor to supplement the Versamat and to handle enlargements, a Kreonite
20-inch colour processor, a Wild VG1 enlarger, and a Pako 48-inch film processor.
Planning for the new Reproductions Centre is nearly complete; visits were
made to the new Federal Centre at Ottawa and to those of the Ontario Government
to study workflow, machine layout, and storage. The Section expects to move in the
latter part of the year into what should be the second largest plant in Canada.
 Y 70        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 24—Planimetric Compilation
Forest Inventory—
PSYU 40-chain mapping:
Narcosli extension   	
Bell-Irving	
Boundary  	
Portions Liard, Kechika, Dease  	
Number of Number of
Laydown Map Sheets
Map Sheets        Detail Plotted
Totals
25
36
66
127
PSYU 20-chain mapping:
Creston   	
Nehalliston       23
Carp-Crooked  110
Fernie      79
Salmo  3 7
Narcosli   ._ __     102
Seymour   25
Williams Lake  28
Dewdney  101
Robson-Canoe   128
35
25
28
101
21
Totals  633
210
Cadastral Compilation
Map Sheets
...    66
Land reference maps   	
Planimetric mapping—
Draughting  	
20-chain ..__     3 71
40-chain    159
20-40 reduction        25
Lot plotting 1:50,000 series—103h, 92i, 93a, 93h, 93g
90
Composite mapping— Base
Deep Bay-Base Flat Photogrammetric plot  5
Rosedale to Laidlaw Photogrammetric plot   13
Hedley Townsite Photogrammetric, with contours  7
Grand Forks Photogrammetric, with contours  25
Port Hardy 20-chain enlarged  1
Hornby 20-chain enlarged  8
Stuart Island 20-chain enlarged   4
Green Lake 20-chain enlarged    6
Sechelt revision 20-chain enlarged  24
Total
95
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Table 25—1973 Photogrammetric Projects
Y 71
Project
No.
Scale
VI
Department
Status^
72-24T
72-39T
72-94T
72-123T
72-130T
72-134T
72-135T
72-136T
72-137T
73-7T
73-8T
73-9T
73-1 IT
72-115T
72-lT
M298A
72^T
72-6T
72-67T
72-114T
73-16T
73-29T
73-3 IT
73-32T
73-35T
73-36T
73-40T
73-23P
73-42P
73^14T
73-52T
73-56T
72-14C
73-39T
73-57T
73-62T
73-63T
73-72T
73-76T
73-77T
73-2 IT
73-78T
M251
73-8 IT
73^t8T
73-86T
73-66T
73-91T
1:1,200
1:2,400
1:25,000
1:31,680
1:2,400
1:6,000
1:2,400
1:2,400
1:6,000
1:4,800
1:4,800
1:1,200
1:6,000
1:2,400
1:1,200
1:12,000
1:2,400
1:6,000
1:1,200
1:1,200
1:25,000
1:1,200
1:2,400
1:1,200
1:12,000
1:2,400
1:2,400
1:6,000
1:1,200
1:4,800
1:4,800
1:4,800
1:4,800
1:2,400
1:4,800
1:2,400
1:2,400
1:1,200
1:12,000
1:6,000
1:1,200
1:12,000
1:4,800
1:4,800
1:2,400
1:12,000
1:1,200
1:1,200
1:2,400
1:2,400
1'
10'
25', 100'
loos'
20'
5', spot heights
Spot heights
5'
10'
10'
2', 5'
20'
10', spot heights
Spot heights
20'
2', 5'
10', 20', 100'
5'
2', 10'
50', 100'
2', 5'
5'
2'
50'
5'
5'
10'
10'
10'
5'
10', 20'
Spot heights
5'
Spot heights
20'
10'
2'
50'
10'
5', 10'
Spot heights
10'
20'
5'
5'
5'
Rec. & Con.
W.I.B.
Map Production
Mines
Fish & Wildlife
Lands
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
Highways
Highways
W.I.B.
Highways
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
Highways
W.I.B.
Lands
W.I.B.
Forest Eng.
W.I.B.
Mines
Parks
W.I.B.
Mun. Affairs
Highways
Lands
Highways
Lands
Map Production
Public Works
Highways
Lands
Mun. Affairs
Lands
Lands
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
Environment
Highways
W.I.B.
Rec. & Con.
Highways
Mun. Affairs
W.I.B.
C
C
92 F (part)	
c
c
c
Bob Quinn Lake	
c
c
c
c
c
c
c
c
c
c
c
c
M13 (Penticton) continuation	
IP
c
c
c
c
Mesachie Lake	
c
c
Sustut .„	
Ruckle Park	
c
c
c
c
c
c
Beatton Hill	
c
Port Hardy_                         	
c
c
Kamloops D.N.D.
c
Martel Bluffs              	
c
c
c
c
c
IP
c
c
c
IP
IP
IP
IP
c
i c—complete; IP—in progress.
 Y 72        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 26—Mosaics
P.M.                              Name
No.
Enlargement
Factor
Date of
Photography
Number
of
Sheets
Sheet
Size
Approximate Scale
tFt./In.)
c
c
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
c
c
c
c
c
c
1972
1972
1972
1964
1972
1972
1972
1972
1972
1972
1972
1970
1972/72
1972
1973
1970
1973
1973
1973
1973
1973
3
1
1
4
1
1
4
2
4
1
2
3
9
1
2
1
1
2
2
26X36
30X40
30X40
30X36
30X30
18X30
30X40
30X40
30x40
30X40
30x30
30X40
24X34
18X30
1,100
1,200
2,640
5,280
1,000
70. Koksilah River	
1,320
1,320
72. Kelowna  	
1,000
2,640
2,640
2,640
2,640
5,280
78. Barton Hills Forest	
1,320
5,000
28x38
28X31
38X20
31X22
36X26
1,000
83. Eden Fire	
1,320
500
500
500
Table 27—Lithographed Maps Published in 1973
(Surveys and Mapping Branch, B.C. Lands Service)
Map No.
Name
Edition
Scale
Contour
Interval
(Ft.)
Remarks
+82 E/SW
Third
Second
Third
Second
Second
Second
Second
Second
First
Third
Third
Third
1974
Fourth
1973
1973
1:125,000
1:125,000
1:125,000
1:125,000
1:125,000
1:125,000
1:125,000
1:125,000
1:125,000
1:125,000
1:125,000
1:250,000
1:1,000,000
1"=_10 miles
1"=1 mile
1"__30 miles
200
100
200
200
200
200
200
200
200
200
100
500
500
•82 E/NE
t82 E/NW
+82F/SE
•82 F/NE
t82F/NW
.82 K/SE
Kaslo  —	
Slocan	
Complete revision.
Complete revision.
t82 K/SW
*92 G/NE
Pitt River     -	
*92 H/SW
•92 I/SE
+93 M
tl A
*1 K
»PSB2
British Columbia Wall Map
Southwestern British Columbia.
Complete revision.
Complete revision.
British Columbia Air Facilities-
Complete revision.
Reprints
*92 G/SW
Elko	
First
First
Second
Second
First
First
First
First
1972
1971
1"=2 miles
1"=2 miles
1"__2 miles
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1"= 10 miles
1"=6 miles
1"=30 miles
100
100
100
500
500
500
500
500
500,
1,000
*92 G/NW-NE
*92 I/NW
•93 E
Cranbrook.	
Ashcroft -	
No revision.
No revision.
•93 G
•93 J
t82M
+ 103 F
*1E
*SGS1
Southeastern British Columbia....
No revision.
•1JNT
National Topographic Index.
* Lithographed during 1973.
t Will be lithographed between January 1, 1974, and March 31, 1974.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Y 73
Table 28—Maps Received Into Stock, 1973
(Surveys and Mapping Branch, Department of Energy, Mines and Resources, Ottawa)
Map No.
Name
Edition
Map No.
Name
Edition
*83 D/5
Scale, 1:50,000
*93 K/11
*93 K/16
•93L/16
*93 M/10
*93M/11
94 K/16
94 N/7
94 N/8
94 N/9
94 N/10
94 N/11
94 N/12
94N/13
94N/14
94 N/16
92 NE
92 SE
93 NE
94 NE
Scale, 1:50,000
Cunningham Lake	
Tezzeron Creek _ _ —
Fulton Lake	
*83D/12
93 E/l
93 E/2
93 E/7
93 E/8
McClennan Creek	
93 E/U
93 F/l
*93 G/3
Catkin Creek	
*93 G/4
*93 G/5
Bulwell Creek	
*93 G/6
•93 G/7
Hixon	
Thorpe Creek	
*93 G/10
Red Rock	
•93G/11
Bobtail Mountain	
*93 G/12
Scale, 1:500,000
*93 J/5
*93 J/6
4
*93 J/12
6
*93 K/8
♦93 K/10
Fort St. James	
Prince George-Dawson Creek	
6
5
(Canada Land Inventory, Department of the Environment, Ottawa)
Map No.
Name
Edition
Map No.
Name
Edition
82 J/NE
Scale, 1:250,000
A
82 F
82 J
82 K
93 E
93 M
94 B
Scale, 1:125,000
A
Scale, 1:500)000
Strait   of   Georgia-Puget   Sound-
Nelson-	
R
R
E.L.D.-l
R
U
E.L.D.-2
Strait   of  Georgia-Puget  Sound-
Hazelton	
Halfway River	
u
R
A—Agriculture; F—Forestry; R—Recreation; U—Ungulates; W—Waterfowl.
 Y 74        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 29—Map and Air Photo Sales
Lithographed Maps
Government
Public Sales Departments Total
Requisitions    11,589 5,236 16,825
Maps issued—
Provincial    82,163 37,535 119,698
Federal   33,613 27,389 61,002
White Print Maps
180,700
Requisitions      1,561          14,827 16,388
Prints     14,282        318,070 332,352
Photo Reproduction
Requisitions             4            5,011 5,015
Prints            20          82,061 82,081
Air Photo Distribution
Requisitions        2,927            1,762 4,689
Air photos—
9X9   98,077        212,289 310,366
Enlarged _      1,622            1,476 3,098
Rentals  22,772          63,134 85,906
Requisitions    2,43 7
Requisitions       704
Offset _     3,032,881
Xerox      361,775
Diapositives—
Requisitions    240
Number      3,264
Total requisitions  46,298
Letters inward     13,012
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Table 30—Summary of Copy Work by Departments
Y 75
Department
White Prints
Photographic
Requisitions
Prints
Requisitions
Prints
74
129
12
54
33
2,464
972
4,289
2,109
1,542
1,522
367
61
729
349
1,561
121
4,590
15,389
190
996
418
74,401
3,554
40,431
23,526
16,786
14,635
4,069
471
123,653
7,489
14,282
2,614
1
6        I                24
Canada Land Inventory  	
Education -	
432
29
4
7,271
296
174
Health	
73
566
102
335
21,577
621
841                    6,998
430        |          6,882
934        |          6,606
Mines 	
346        |          2,846
117                     715
393                  2,920
787                22,656
209                    9,958
Public                               	
4                         20
222                       457
    UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
Y 79
UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
R. P. Murdoch, Project Manager
On December 25, 1972, we experienced a storm which dropped 1 inch of rain
in a 24-hour period. This heavy rainfall caused surcharging in a section of our
storm-sewer system, resulting in flooding of basements. The area most affected
centred around Acadia Road, Wycliffe Road, and Chancellor Boulevard. During
the year covered in this report, a relief storm sewer was installed in the area most
affected. In December 1973 we experienced a storm which dropped 1% inches of
rain in a 24-hour period with no surcharging in our storm-sewer system, nor any
reports of flooded basements.
The erosion of Spanish Banks continues to be a problem. Plans have been
prepared to correct part of the problem in the area adjacent to Cecil Green Park.
However, during the heavy rainstorm in December 1973, over 8 inches of silt was
deposited on Northwest Marine Drive, covering the road surface for over 200 feet
in the area adjacent to Block 32b.
A substantial part of our Fire Department's duties involves inhalator and
rescue work. In the past we used our fire pumper trucks for this type of emergency.
Because of the increase in the number of inhalator and rescue calls, it was considered advisable to have a vehicle designed to handle this type of work. Consequently, during the year we purchased and outfitted a vehicle; photos are included
in this report. This vehicle is also equipped to be used as an ambulance for emergency cases, and is able to transport up to four stretcher cases at a time.
Phase 1 of the remodelling of the golf course has been completed. This involved the remodelling of nine holes, including the installation of grass tees and a
fully automatic underground irrigation system. Work was commenced during the
year on three of the remaining nine holes. Because of certain administrative difficulties encountered in trying to provide 18 holes of golf on a nine-hole course, it is
our intention to carry out phase 2 of the remodelling in three steps, and by the use
of temporary greens maintain 18 holes of golf, effective April 1, 1974.
The interest in the future of the University Endowment Lands is reflected in
the wide publicity which we continue to receive.
It will be noted from the attached tabulations of comparative revenue figures
for the past 10 years that our revenue exceeded $1,000,000 for the first time on
record. We are also including a tabulation showing the summary of building permits
issued during the last three years.
 Y 80        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
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9.
 UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
Y 81
Table 32—Number and Value of Building Permits Issued for the Calendar Years
1971, 1972, and 1973
1971
1972
1973
Number
Value
Number
Value
Number
Value
....
2i
i
4
2
$
2
26
1
2
2
8
$
3,627,000
18
2
1
2
$
25,000
89,050
3,000
182,000
2,800
14,000
	
139,875
6,150
105,000
14,000
39,700
	
106,480
44,300
6,000
5,000
7,000
Alterations to commercial buildings	
Alterations and additions to schools	
Swimming-pools	
36
315,850
41
3,931,725
24
168,780
    PERSONNEL OFFICE
Y 85
PERSONNEL SERVICES
R. C. Webber, Senior Personnel Officer
This Division provides personnel services for the Water Resources Service and
the Secretariat to the Environment and Land Use Committee, as well as the Lands
Service. Activity in 1973 again continued at a high level. The following table summarizes the principal activities of Personnel Services during 1973, and a comparison
of the previous three years.
1970
1971
1972
1973
34
41
7
6
4
5
36
4
38
62
65
28
8
12
6
29
4
45
44
54
16
10
13
4
31
3
68
65
54
25
10
18
24
38
6
59
RECRUITMENT
Staff recruitment reached an all-time high in 1973 with a 25-per-cent increase
in recruitment of continuous staff, although this was offset somewhat by a decrease
in temporary appointments.
Recruitment of Land Surveyors, Land Officers, and Map Draughtsmen continues to be difficult, with an almost complete absence of experienced applicants.
ESTABLISHMENT
Increases in establishment totalled 72 new positions.
The establishment of the Personnel Office was increased by two positions in
1973. An Assistant Personnel Officer and a Clerk-Typist commenced work in
June to help handle the heavy work load.
Other increases in the Lands Service establishment are listed below:
University Endowment Lands—10 Fire-fighters.
Land   Inspection   Division — one   Land   Officer   5  and   one   Clerk-
Stenographer.
Map Production Division—four positions (two Draughtsmen, one Photo/
Graphic technician and one Clerk), eight Photo/Graphic technician
positions transferred from Departments of Highways and Public
Works.
Special Services Division, Lands Branch (newly established)—four positions (Biologist, Engineer, Planner, and one Clerk-Stenographer).
Land Administration Division—one Clerk.
Late in the year, 41 new positions were approved, mainly Land Officers for the
Land Inspection Division, clerical staff for the Land Administration Division, and
professional staff for the Special Services Division.
Staff establishment as of December 31, 1973, included the following permanent
and temporary positions: professional, 63; technical, 177; clerical, 115; operational
services, 57; totalling 412 (including 13 vacancies). Temporary employees on staff
numbered 22, and new positions approved at December 21, 1973, numbered 41,
for a grand total of 475.
 Y 86        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
PRINCIPAL PROMOTIONS, APPOINTMENTS, AND TRANSFERS
DURING 1973
Promotions within the Lands Service in 1973 were up over the previous year.
Most significant, however, was the number of employees who transferred or were
promoted from other departments, which was only in part due to the eight Photo/
Graphic Technicians who transferred into the Department.
J. P. Secter appointed Biologist, Special Services Division.
B. A. Lambert promoted to Engineer, Special Services Division.
R. M. Renaud appointed Assistant Personnel Officer.
K. P. Ohlemann, promoted to Planning Officer, Special Services Division.
D. W. Berry promoted to Land Officer i/c Prince Rupert.
D. E. Jaffray promoted to Land Officer i/c Prince George.
J. A. Esler promoted to Regional Land Inspector, Victoria.
H. K. Boas promoted to Regional Land Inspector, Prince George.
D. E. Goodwin promoted to Chief, Land Administration Division.
S. P. Vanderjagt promoted to Technician 2, Legal Surveys Division.
C. S. Buchanan promoted to Fire Captain, University Endowment Lands.
F. G. Edgell transferred to Land Officer 5, Victoria.
G. A. Rhoades transferred to Land Officer 5, Land Administration Division.
R. N. Bose transferred to Land Officer 5 i/c New Westminster.
STAFF TURNOVER
The Department-wide turnover rate in 1973 was down from the previous year,
primarily as a result of a 52-per-cent decrease in the clerical turnover rate. This
significant drop, unfortunately, was offset by an equally significant increase in turnover for the professional, technical, and operational services categories. Perhaps
the April salary increase, which had a more dramatic effect percentage-wise on
clerical salaries than for the other classification groups, is mainly responsible for
the improvement in the clerical turnover rate.
The Department continues to have a more favourable turnover rate than the
Public Service as a whole.
Table 34—Turnover Rate, by Classification Category
1972 1973
Professional    8.5 14.9
Technical   1.5 5.8
Clerical   24.4 14.2
Operational services   6.3 17.3
Lands average  12.2 11.0
Government-wide average  16.3 (*)
i Not available.
RECLASSIFICATION
In 1973 the number of reclassifications remained consistent with the previous
year but below the record set in 1971. A major reclassification study of all map
draughting positions in the Surveys and Mapping Branch was made in 1973; however, the Department's recommendations were still under review by the Public
 PERSONNEL OFFICE
Y 87
Service Commission at the year-end. The Department was successful in its recommendations concerning the classifications of Air Survey Technicians and Field
Survey Technicians, in which more senior levels were established.
STAFF TRAINING
Executive Development Training Plan—In 1973, D. V. Smith, a Detachment
Chief in the Field Operations Division, and D. Conway, a Clerk in the Land
Administration Division, received diplomas in public administration after having
completed the Executive Development Training Plan. Presently taking the course
are L. G. Smith, a Technician in the Map Production Division (3rd year); L. M.
Warner, a Land Officer in the Land Inspection Division, Williams Lake (2nd year);
and H. K. Boas, a Regional Land Inspector in the Land Inspection Division, Prince
George (1st year).
Correspondence Course in Public Administration—In 1973, N. D. Smith, a
Clerk in the Environment and Land Use Committee, completed this one-year
course. Presently enrolled are K. M. Hall, a Land Officer in the Land Inspection
Division, Clinton; and G. T. Cooper, a Draughtsman in the Legal Surveys Division.
Defensive Driving Course—This course is available to all Government employees throughout the Province whose work involves a significant amount of
driving. The Accident Prevention Division of the Public Service Commission conducted the course and, in 1973, 19 Lands Service employees successfully completed
it. This brings the total number of Lands Service employees who have taken the
course, since its inception in 1972, to 32.
Staff-training assistance—As of June 1973, staff-training funds were made
available to all departments through a Staff Development Appropriation. Employees have been urged to submit requests for reimbursement of tuition fees for
courses that would assist them in developing their skills and potential. To date, 10
Lands Service employees have been reimbursed for up to 100 per cent of the cost
of courses that they are taking.
SICK LEAVE
The rate of sick leave continued to drop in 1973, with the Department enjoying
a rate which is significantly below the average within the Public Service.
Table 35—Sick-leave Rate in Days per Employee
Lands Service   	
1971
5.9
6.2
1972
5.3
6.7
1973
4.2
Government-wide average 	
C1)
- Not available.
SAFETY
The Lands Service was awarded the Premier's Safety Trophy "On Target"
award for accident frequency of under 5.0 per million man-hours in the preceding
12 months for departments in the low-hazard category. Employees within the Department should be proud of this accomplishment and encouraged to keep up the
good work.
FIELD TRIP
In September 1973 the Personnel Officer visited Land Inspection Division
offices in Clinton, Williams Lake, Quesnel, Prince George, Fort St. John, Vanderhoof, Burns Lake, Smithers, and Courtenay.
 Y 88        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RECOURCES
RETIREMENTS
During 1973 the following Lands Service employees retired:
A. G. Grant, Fire Captain, University Endowment Lands (after 28 years).
G. W. Barnes, Technician, Field Operations Division (after 37 years).
Mrs. P. L. Enefer, Head Waitress, University Endowment Lands Golf
Course (two years with the Department).
J. C. Moore, Clerk, Accounting Division (after 31 years).
J.  W.  Bathurst, Fire-fighter, University Endowment Lands (after 28
years).
G. New, Surveyor, Field Operations Division (after 21 years).
25-YEAR-SERVICE AWARDS
The following employees were presented with 25-year-service awards at a
dinner held in Government House:
D. G. Alexander, Surveyor, Legal Surveys Division.
A. R. Best, Instrument-maker, Field Operations Division.
L. D. Hall, Technician, Map Production Division.
J. J. Jones, Clerk, Land Administration Division.
A. C. Kinnear, Secretary, Environment and Land Use Committee.
M. B. C. Maclean, Departmental Comptroller.
R. S. Parsons, Draughtsman, Map Production Division.
Mrs. L. I. Salmond, Clerk-Stenographer, Field Operations Division.
P. H. Salmond, Draughtsman, Map Production Division.
R. H. Smith, Map Production Division.
L. G. Smith, Map Production Division.
A. G. Sutherland, Technician, Field Operations Division.
DEATHS
During 1973 two deaths occurred in the Department: C. T. V. (Vic) Morley,
Technician, Legal Surveys Division, who served 26 years with the Lands Service;
and J. K. Player, Mapping Assistant, Map Production Division, after nine years'
service.
 F
o
o
<_
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O
c
D
I
1
O
F
  MAIL AND FILE ROOM
Y 91
MAIL AND FILE ROOM
David S. Preston
Letters received in the Department during 1973 amounted to 231,667, compared to 224,440 in 1972, an increase of 7,237 pieces.
Microfilming has continued, but due to the volume of work placed with the
filming bureau by other departments, progress with our Department material has
been slow. The material now being forwarded for filming has passed the point
where the first filming concluded and should move more rapidly because of less bulk.
The number of files (new) recorded during the year does not reflect a true
expansion figure. Many files throughout the system have subsections made which
are not recorded, but are, however, made to support new subject material. These
subsections, along with the normal amount of expansion from correspondence, tend
to overexpand the filing system internally, and is only obvious when shelves become
tightly packed.
New shelving was obtained to replace the old wooden type, this will now make
it possible to colour code the balance of the "O" series files.
Table 36—Mail and File Room Work Load
Letters Inward
1973
10-year
1972                  Average,
1964-73
Branch—
63,097
106,127
41,520
20,933
66,926        j          61,969
97,880                 128,209
38,095                  34,638
Surveys and Mapping	
21,539        |          23,194
Totals	
231,677                224,440        |        248,010
I                             1
Letters Outward (Recorded)
Branch—
1
14,700                    15,000
2.166                      1.400
13,593
1.874
Totals	
16,866                    16,400
1
15,467
Miscellaneous Reports
Designation—
2,870        j
5,047
5,022        |
1,903       j
7,052
5,547
2,463
8,895
5,740
12,939
1
14,502
1
17,098
New Files Created
Designation—
"O" files	
6,322        |           6,636
1,628        |            1,246
605        ]               732
7,101
1,520
1,220
Totals	
8,555        ]             8,614
9,841
Micro-film reference, 869.
 Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1974

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