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REPORT OF THE LANDS SERVICE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1974 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1975

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Hon. R. A. Williams, Minister N. Pearson, Associate Deputy Minister of Lands
REPORT
of the
LANDS SERVICE
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1974
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1975
  Victoria, B.C., April 4, 1975.
To Colonel the Honourable Walter S. Owen, Q.C, LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the British Columbia Lands Service of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources for the
year ended December 31, 1974.
R. A. WILLIAMS
Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources
  CONTENTS
Pace
Lands Branch—
Director of Lands  13
Land Inspection Division  24
Special Services Division  37
Ecological Reserves Section  40
Surveys and Mapping Branch—
Surveyor-General  47
Legal Surveys Division  51
Field Operations Division  56
Map Production Division  67
University Endowment Lands  77
Personnel Office  81
Mail and File Room    87
Accounting Division  91
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    LANDS BRANCH
Z  13
LANDS BRANCH
Walter R. Redel, B.A.Sc, P.Eng., P.Ag., A.A.C.I., Director of Lands
The year 1974 will probably be remembered as the one in which more physical,
organizational, and policy changes were made by the Lands Branch than in any
other year in recent history.
In January, after nearly 70 years of occupancy of the main floor of the Legislative Building, the entire Branch, together with the vault records, were moved to
Harbour Towers at 345 Quebec Street. Shortly after the physical move to Harbour
Towers, the first staff conference since 1962, involving all personnel in the Land
Inspection Division, was held in Victoria. This was the first opportunity that some
of our more recently appointed field staff had to meet with senior people in the
Department.
In September, Norman Pearson was appointed Associate Deputy Minister of
Lands and reorientation and reorganization of the Branch began almost immediately.
Program budgeting was introduced for the first time in the preparation of annual
estimates of revenue and expenditures. This change in procedure necessitated a
re-examination of the short- and long-term objectives of the Lands Branch. Initial
emphasis is to be placed on development of 5,000 lots during the forthcoming year
to meet the demand for building sites and to eliminate some of the difficulties
experienced by applicants in locating suitable Crown lands for residential use.
Major reorganization, both at headquarters and in the field, is now taking place
in order to strengthen the managerial role of the Lands Branch over the Crown
land resources of the Province. Regional Land Officers were appointed in the seven
resource management regions, the boundaries of which have now been designated
by Cabinet. Decentralization of the decision-making process is expected to follow
as personnel can be trained at headquarters and subsequently transferred to the
regional offices.
In order for decentralization to function effectively, it is imperative that the
Branch improve its physical communication network with the regional offices and
modernize its record-keeping procedures. The land records of the Province are still
being entered by hand and most of the entries are made in the original ledgers that
have been in use for over 100 years. Although a program has been implemented
to prepare and update the status maps for the Province, details for all transactions
in Crown land must be derived from the handwritten lot registers. It has been
estimated that it would require 190 man-years to rewrite these records in a form
suitable for electronic data processing. The quick extraction of status information
from the Provincial land records is critical to provision of a better service to the
public as well as meeting the ever-increasing demands for this type of information
from other resource departments and outside agencies.
However, even without a modern communication system and quick access to
land status, some decentralization of administration is already taking place. Short-
term temporary use of Crown lands for various purposes as well as demands for
limited quantities of gravel are being dealt with at the regional level. A gravel control
officer, working under regional control, is now operating in the Lower Fraser Valley.
He is monitoring and permitting the removal of all gravel from the Fraser River
between Hope and the east boundary of the Fraser River Harbour and there has
already been a substantial increase in royalty payments.
 Z  14
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
The Special Services Division is being reorganized into a land development
arm of the Department. The engineering and planning staff will now form the core
of the development group which will be headed by John Webster, whose services
were contracted for on December 1, 1974.
A number of policy changes were implemented in 1974 to meet the objectives
of Government. Lessees of Crown land for commercial and industrial uses are now
being required to post a bond to ensure that the development proceeds according to
plan and to ensure the Crown lands are left in a clean, tidy, and sanitary condition
upon termination of the lease. While the Department formerly made free grants of
Crown land to municipalities, regional districts, and school boards for municipal
and school purposes, such dispositions will now be on a lease basis. Free Crown
grants will continue to be made to the British Columbia Housing Management Commission where such land is required in connection with its housing development
program. In view of the abnormally rapid rise in recreational waterfront values and
the burden it was placing on Crown lessees of recreational cottage-sites, Government
decided that as a matter of policy the annual rental charge would be no more than
doubled in any five-year period. Rentals for booming and log storage leases have
been increased from 5 to 8 per cent in line with the rental return expected for industrial uses of this nature. In order to provide better service to the- residents of the
Queen Charlotte Islands, a Land Commissioner has now been located at Queen
Charlotte.  The land recording district includes both Graham and Moresby Islands.
Since passage of the Department of Housing Act in November 1973, Crown
lands at Chetwynd, Port McNeill, Nakusp, Brackendale, Prince Rupert, Fort Nelson,
and Kamloops have or are in the process of being turned over to the British Columbia Housing Management Commission for public housing purposes. The transactions to date comprise 251 acres of raw land and 285 surveyed lots having an
estimated value of $1,044,985. In addition, prior to the change in policy of
disposing of Crown land to municipalities, regional districts, and school boards on
a leasehold basis for public purposes, 673 acres of Crown land having an estimated
market value of $693,245 were committed to these groups on a free Crown-grant
basis.
All applications for foreshore and land covered by water are now being processed through our chief biologist in order to ensure that the ecological impact of such
uses may be properly assessed before adjudication.
A more detailed summary of the activities of the Land Administrative Division,
Land Inspection Division, and the Special Services Division is set out hereunder.
A brief summary of the activities of the various sections of the Lands Administration Division for the year 1974 follows:
Lease Section—The Section issued 358 new leases covering such purposes as
agriculture, grazing, industrial, and commercial. A total of 761 leases was assigned
during the year.
Purchase Section—The Section issued 459 new leases, being composed of 253
for residential purposes, 47 for inland recreational cottage-site purposes, and 159
for waterfront recreational cottage-site purposes. There were 38 direct sales to
applicants requiring an additional town lot to comply with the minimum land areas
for building requirements and to those persons desiring to legalize improvements
that had been constructed in trespass. There were 324 leases converted to purchases
as the lessees completed the required improvements and exercised their purchase
option.
 LANDS BRANCH
Z  15
Crown Grant Section—A total of 637 Crown grants was issued during 1974,
which was 35 over the number issued the previous year. There were 39 free Crown
grants issued for public, municipal, and recreational purposes. The number of
certificates of purchase declined from 446 in 1973 to 418 in 1974. Eight land exchanges were finalized during the year. The total acreage deeded by Crown grants
increased from 42,482 in 1973 to 66,530 in 1974.
Reserve, Clearance, and Easement Section—During the year the Land Administration Division underwent certain reorganization, part of which was the amalgamation of the former Reserve, Clearance, and Easement Sections into one section under
the supervision of an administrative officer, the purpose being to give more flexibility
of staff and more centralization of control.
Reserves established totalled 309, which is slightly lower than the previous
year. However, applications for reserves increased with there being 559 requests
for reserves, 60 of which were for ecological reserves. These 60 are now in the
process of being established.
This Section also provides land status information for the Department, other
Government departments, and Crown agencies involved in land administration.
During the year, 20,127 parcels of land were cleared through the records of the
Department. The preparation of mylar base status maps continued with 15 completed this year, making a total of 179 completed to date. These maps are constantly being revised and amended in order to maintain an up-to-date status.
The demand for special or priority status maps continued with 230 completed
in 1974 as requested by Ministerial and Senior Departmental officials and Crown
agencies.
Conversion of information contained in Departmental records into a form
suitable for use in an electronic data processing system was commenced during
the year. Information concerning the status of Crown land parcels is at present
recorded in the Official Land Registers and over the years since the Crown Colony
days, a multitude of entries has been made, and in some instances completely lacking
in any systematic method. This situation results in an unacceptable amount of time
being required to determine the current status of many land parcels.
Computerization of the record system appears to be the best answer to this
problem. However, to implement a computerized system it is first necessary to go
through all the existing written records, unravel the complexities, weed out dead
material, and rewrite the current status of each parcel, together with such past history
as is relevant to the future, on forms which may be used as the source document
for entering the data into a computer system.
During 1974 a start was made, on an experimental basis, of rewriting the
Official Registers onto loose-leaf forms which were designed both to replace the
registers and to be the source documents for key-punching the data.
Owing to the complexities of the land system, a number of modifications have
been made and it is expected several more will be required before a completely
viable system is designed.
A staff of four persons has been employed so far for this program and the
areas chosen for the trial were Quadra Island and the part of Range 5, Coast District, lying between Fraser Lake and Vanderhoof.
The review of easements for electrical transmission-lines and petroleum and
gas-gathering systems has been completed and issuance of easements for these
purposes has been recommenced. It is anticipated that the output of these easement documents will be greatly increased during the coming year.
 Z 16
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
The terms and conditions relating to natural gas and oil pipe-lines was still
under review at year-end; however, it is hoped that the new policy will be established
early in the new year.
Letters of consent for the construction of access roads have decreased from
79 to 34 letters.
GENERAL ACTIVITY
Five units of land were tendered for lease during 1974. Bonus bids were
received on three of the units and the revenue realized from bonus bids was $730.
There were 372 lots offered for lease by way of public auction, of which 272
were leased, and bonus bids realized at the auctions totalled $220,525. This is an
increase over 1973 when 338 lots were offered for lease by auction, of which 199
were leased and bonus bids received amounted to $83,938.
It is of interest to note the Division has lost through transfers and resignations
eight Clerks and five Stenographers and (or) Typists during the year. This loss
causes considerable readjustment down the line of staff and tends to slow the work
flow because of the time required to fill positions and time required for job training.
Twelve persons were taken on staff in a parital reorganization of the Division
in order to improve the work flow. An Administrative Officer 3 was employed
to prepare policy memoranda, circular letters, and to assist the Chief of the Land
Administrative Division. An Administrative Officer 1 was added to staff to head up
the new section formed by the amalgamation of the former Easement, Reserve, and
Clearance Sections. Clerks 6 were added to the Purchase and Leases Sections as
2 i/c to allow the Supervisor more time for training of staff. Purchases Section also
required a Clerk 5 to assist in processing residential lease applications. Six Clerks 4
were added to staff, two to help with the preparation of status maps and four to
undertake the rewriting of the Lot Registers. Also a Clerk 2 was required to assist
with the processing of incoming mail and recording of applications.
Status Clerk extracting information from Official Registers and other documents
and entering it on computer form.
 LANDS BRANCH
Z  17
Evidence of continued public interest in Crown Provincial lands is noted in
that 230 special statuses were completed, 7,177 general inquiries were received
along with specific inquiries for 925 parcels of land.
The following tables indicate in detail the work carried out by the various
sections of the Lands Branch in 1974:
Table 7—Rural Land Sales, 1974
Acres
Unsurveyed          321.39
Surveyed   34,764.23
Total   35,085.62
Table 2—Certificates of Purchase Issued, 1974
Agency                                                                                            Number Acreage
Atlin        2 7.565
Burns Lake     16 734.37
Clinton       22 286.77
Cranbrook      13 126.387
Dawson Creek     19 5,503.50
Fernie      16 198.833
Fort Nelson     31 73.97
Fort St. John     60 23,556.41
Golden        1 Nil
Kamloops       14 457.59
Kaslo        2 0.251
Nanaimo      33 93.363
Nelson        8 31.51
New Westminster      21 3,683.582
Penticton      13 150.723
Port Alberni      11 44.193
Prince George     12 930.08
Prince Rupert     11 7.304
Quesnel       24 413.79
Revelstoke        4 34.86
Smithers         24 1,271.21
Vancouver      23 631.47
Vernon        6 63.70
Victoria        8 473.054
Williams Lake      41 839.92
Totals    435 39,614.405
Table 3—New Leases Issued (1974)
Land                                                                                               Number Acreage
Agriculture      83 22,001.886
Hay and grazing (pasture and hay-cutting)    94 27,625.64
Quarrying (sand, gravel, limestone, etc.)     17 2,370.93
Residential  253 698.879
Recreational cottage-site (inland)      47 47.835
Recreational cottage-site (waterfront) _. 159 112.908
Miscellaneous (resorts, service-stations,
camp-sites)      77 1,840.119
 Z 18
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 3—New Leases Issued (1974)—Continued
Foreshore ■ Number Acreage
Booming, log storage, log-dumping, etc. __    39 968.557
Oyster        5 66.08
Industrial (canneries, mill-site, wharves,
etc.)        2 11.8
Quarrying (sand, gravel from sea or river
beds)     Nil Nil
Commercial (boat rentals, marinas, marine service-stations, etc.)      22 102.544
Miscellaneous (private wharves, boat-
houses, etc.)      19 88.259
Totals  .... 817 55,935.437
Licences to occupy issued (1974)      52 837.52
Assignments approved (1974)—leases, land-
use permits, licences of occupation  761
Table 4—Easements Granted, 1974
Number
Miles
Acres
Foreshore
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
0.26
2.650
31.817
0.193
0.234
2.369
1.232
0.113
0.130
Land
6.426
77.667
0.020
Television antenna-site and power-line.	
1.620
1.236
13.328
Sewer pipe-line	
Water pipe-line (     _  . —	
2.784
0.310
Totals   _ _  	
11
38.608
103.391
Southern Okanagan Lands Project
1
0.485
1.175
Grand totals	
13
39.093
104.566
In line with current Departmental policy, 34 letters of consent for the construction of access roads were issued during the year.
Table 5—Crown Grants Issued, 1974
Number
Purchases (rural lands)   421
Purchases (town lots)  131
Pre-emptions      24
  6
  3
  2
  1
  1
Miscellaneous                      48
Totals   637
Certified copies of Crown grants issued  12
Public Schools Act	
Veterans' Land Settlement Act
Home-site leases	
Supplementary timber grant ____
British Columbia Railway Company
Acreage
52,463.38
3,733.76
55.80
11.76
28.11
98.01
10,139.15
66,529.97
 LANDS BRANCH
Table 6—Crown Grants Issued for Past 10 Years
Z 19
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
Ten-year average
dumber
Acres
1,087
86,166
1,020
115,917
980
117,672
957
129,307
931
81,881
708
38,412
735
74,493
694
59,279
602
42,482
637
66,629
8,351
812,138
835
81,213
Table 7—Reserves, 1974
Applications Reserves
Received Completed
Use, recreation, and enjoyment of the public     62 44
B.C. Department of Highways (rights-of-way, gravel
pits, bridge-sites, etc.)    112 55
Federal Government (defence purposes, wharf-sites,
etc.)      38 26
B.C. Forest Service (ranger stations, grazing, radio-
sites, reforestation, etc.)      62 50
Miscellaneous (Game Branch, water-power projects,
garbage dumps, school-sites, cemeteries, etc.) .... 285 134
Totals  559 309
 Z 20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
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Z 21
Table 9—Free Crown Grants Issued, 1974
British Columbia Housing Management Commission for Residential Development Purposes
Crown Grant No.
and Date
Acreage
Market Value
Location
6030/1131: May 2, 1974	
6196/1132: July 12, 1974
10.06
8.751
14.93
131.00
$
50,000
80,000
15,000
131,650
North of Squamish.
6197/1132: July 12, 1974	
6296/1133: Oct. 30, 1974	
Prince Rupert.
Fort Nelson.
Totals
164.74
276,650
1 129 town lots.
British Columbia Harbours Board for the Purpose to Provide Root of Title
5803/1129: Feb. 28, 1974..
3,450.00
3,450,000
Roberts Bank.
Municipalities and Regional Districts
Name
Crown Grant
No. and Date
Acreage
Market
Value
Purpose
Cities
6141/1132: June 21, 1974
6227/1133: Oct. 31, 1974
6271/1133: Oct. 31, 1974
6272/1133: Oct. 31, 1974
6323/1134: Oct. 31, 1974
5962/1130: Apr. 1, 1974
6421/1135: Dec. 16, 1974
6264/1133: Sept. 3, 1974
6265/1133: Sept. 3, 1974
6266/1133: Sept. 3, 1974
6267/1133: Sept. 3, 1974
6268/1133: Sept. 3, 1974
6269/1133: Sept. 3, 1974
5817/1129: Jan. 21, 1974
5872/1129: Feb. 21, 1974
6018/1131: Apr. 29, 1974
6176/1132: July 26, 1974
6198/1132: July 12, 1974
6283/1133: Oct. 11, 1974
6365/1134: Dec. 18, 1974
5993/1130: Apr. 9, 1974
6061/1131: May 16, 1974
6062/1131: May 16, 1974
6076/1131: June 17, 1974
6077/1131: June 17, 1974
6328/1134: Nov. 8, 1974
63.90
0.17    1
(2)         1
c2)   r
0.21    J
2.00
(2)
2.13
2.00
(2)
2.75
7.03
10.00
10.00
(2)
5.00
13.96
4.51
11.00
9.98
1.08
3.45    \
15.75    /
310.00
160.00
38.40
$
25,000
45,000
2,000
7,000
17,000
6,000
1,350
15,000
18,000
50,000
1,100
14,195
5,000
30,400
30,000
14,000
25,000
2,200
96,000
170,000
90,000
29,000
Recreational.
Penticton	
Penticton	
Public recreational.
Public recreational
Public recreational.
Penticton	
District Municipalities
Mackenzie ....
Delta	
Public recreational.
Cemetery.
Road.
Powell River	
Fire hall.
Park.
Park.
Park.
Park.
Villages
South Fort George
Sechelt	
Residential development.3
Tahsis    ..
Park and municipal works storage.
Regional Districts
Greater Vancouver
Greater Vancouver
Capital	
Recreational.
Recreational.
Park.
Park.
Airport.
Totals	
673.32
693,245
2 Town lot.
;i Payment will be made by South Fort George after lots have been serviced and  disposed of by public
competition.
 Z 22 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Crown Grants Issued Under Public Schools Act
Crown Grant
No. and Date
No. and Name of
School District
Acreage
Market
Value
Location
5772/1128: Jan. 16, 1974
No. 81 (Fort Nelson)
9.88
(2)
17.15
5.17
7.60
16.00
$
2,500
6,800
15,500
3,000
10,000
17,600
5807/1129: Jan. 22, 1974
5969/1129: Apr. 4, 1974
6019/1130: Apr. 29, 1974....
6108/1131: June 4, 1974
No. 84 (Vancouver Island
West)
No. 26 (North Thompson)
No. 56 (Nechako) 	
Walter Island.
Vavenby.
No. 2 (Cranbrook)
6199/1132: Aug. 12, 1974...
No. 27 (Cariboo-Chilcotin)
Chimney Creek.
Totals	
55.80
55,400
Crown Grant Issued Under Chap. 34, S.B.C. 1912, to B.C. Railway Co. for Right-of-way
Crown Grant No.
and Date
Acreage
Market Value
Location
5994/1130: April 9, 1974	
98.01
$
9,801
Pinchi Lake.
Crown Grant Issued Under Chap. 3, S.B.C. 1910, to Canadian National Railway Company
for Right-of-way
Crown Grant No.
and Date
Acreage
Market Value
Location
6422/1135: Dec. 16, 1974..	
0.98
$
250
North of Vavenby.
Summary Acreage       Estimated Value
$
British Columbia Housing Management Commission   164.74 276,650
British Columbia Harbours Board  3,450.00 3,450,000
Municipalities and regional districts  673.32 693,245
School districts   55.80 55,400
British Columbia Railway Company  98.01 9,801
Canadian National Railway Company  0.98 250
Totals  4,442.85    4,485,346
 LANDS BRANCH
Table 10—Exchanges, 1974
Z 23
Crown Grant
No. and Date
Name of Grantee
Acreage
Remarks
5881/1129: Feb. 21, 1974..
5882/1129: Feb. 21, 1974..
5886/1129: Feb. 27, 1974..
6006/1131: Apr. 22, 1974..
6017/1131: May 2, 1974..
6155/1132:
6156/1132:
6157/1132:
6158/1132:
6159/1132:
6160/1132:
6161/1132:
6162/1132:
6173/1132:
July 10, 1974 .
July 10, 1974 .
July 10, 1974..
July 10, 1974..
July 10, 1974..
July 10, 1974..
July 10, 1974..
July 10, 1974..
July 19, 1974..
6206/1133: July 18, 1974..
6329/1134: Oct. 23, 1974..
Texada Logging Ltd...
Texada Logging Ltd...
The Robert and Florence Fil-
berg Foundation
Frank Webb and Frances T.
Webb (joint tenants)
MacMillan Bloedel Ltd	
Riske Creek Ranching Ltd	
Riske Creek Ranching Ltd	
Riske Creek Ranching Ltd	
Riske Creek Ranching Ltd	
Riske Creek Ranching Ltd	
Riske Creek Ranching Ltd	
Riske Creek Ranching Ltd—
Riske Creek Ranching Ltd	
Frances William James and
Eileen      Thelma      James,
Joseph   Russel   Byatt   and
Doris Evelyn Byatt.
Leslie Delong 	
Leopold Godfield Guzauskas.
629.63
19.00
320.00
(!)
80.00
750.10
915.30
912.07
480.00
648.20
650.40
400.40
52.60
0.29
(!)
2.23
This exchange was authorized to eliminate
] I     undivided V2 interests in certain sections
\\     on Texada Island and provided lands
J      which  were incorporated  in  Harwood
Point Park.
I This land was granted in return for land
j     that  has  been  established  as  Octopus
j     Islands Marine Park.
j This  exchange was made to provide Forest
Service   Range   Station   in   Cranbrook
with better access and provide land for
private owner to legalize his occupation
upon which considerable improvements
were located.
This land was exchanged for lands which
were conveyed to  the  Crown  (provincial) and were conveyed by free Crown
grant to District of Powell River.
I
I These eight Crown grants in reality
represent one exchange, which involved
the giving-up of certain lands by Riske
Creek Ranching Ltd. in order that Fish
and Wildlife Branch could establish a
game reserve for the big horn shepp.
This exchange provided the Crown with
lakefront land for more suitable public
recreational use on Osprey Lake.
I B.C. Forest Service wished to "square
up" boundaries of a reserve established
for this service and in return Mr.
Delong was able to consolidate his
holdings.
Dept. of Highways required additional
land for an extension of their yardsite
and Mr. Guzauskas agreed to give up
some of his land and receive a equitable parcel in return.
1 Town lot.
Total exchanges, 8
 Z 24 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
LAND INSPECTION DIVISION
G. H. Wilson, P.Ag., A.A.C.I., Chief
The Land Inspection Division in 1974 moved closer to this Government's
policy of achieving integrated resource use and management over Crown lands as
a result of the establishment of seven resource management regions. These regions
and their corresponding centres are
Vancouver Island, centred in Nanaimo;
Lower Mainland, centred in Greater Vancouver;
Thompson-Okanagan, centred in Kamloops;
Kootenay, centred in Nelson;
Cariboo, centred in Williams Lake;
Omineca-Peace, centred in Prince George;
Skeena, centred in Smithers.
With the implementation of this new framework the Lands Branch can fulfil
a more meaningful role as a land manager and as a co-ordinator of land uses, as
demands arise, between all resource discipline. Our regional boundaries will be
common with all other resource managers. Consequently, communication between
our management staff and the various resource managers such as the Forest Service
and the Recreation and Conservation staff can be more positively oriented, giving
rise hopefully to optimal utilization of Crown land.
During 1974 the Land Inspection Division continued to act as the eyes and ears
of the Lands Branch, reporting to the Director of Lands on all applications for Crown
land as well as trespasses on Crown land. Despite the fact that our staff have been
called upon to attend meetings and carry on a larger, more communicative role with
other agencies and the public, they were able to complete 17 per cent more inspections during the year than were completed during the corresponding period in the
previous year. Hopefully, with the implementation of the Department's Crown Lot
and Sites Program with the ultimate provision of lots to the public on an "over the
counter" basis, the volume of applications requiring field examinations will be greatly
reduced.
Other measures used to speed up the service to the public in 1974 relate to the
current short-cut routing of land applications from the Land Commissioner to the
Land Inspector, who, after carefully reviewing the application, provides his findings
together with his recommendations to the Regional Land Inspector. If, in the opinion of the Regional Land Inspector, the information provided by the Inspector
clearly indicates that the application should be disallowed, then the process is terminated at that point and the applicant is advised immediately. On the other hand,
if an examination is required, the application is passed to Victoria for clearance and
a formal examination is requested from the Inspector. This initial screening of
applications by Land Inspectors had made it possible to advise applicants quickly
when it is clearly evident that alienation of Crown land would not be in the public
interest. This is a significant improvement as in the past applicants frequently had
to wait many months to receive a negative reply. As a result of this short-cut procedure the processing of over 25 per cent of the new applications is being terminated
in the very early stages.
In order to provide a sound basis for the utilization of Crown land with due
regard for all resource constraints, the Lands Branch was actively engaged in 10
major land-use planning projects during 1974, the majority of which relate to community pasture developments for the Department of Agriculture.   We note that the
 LANDS BRANCH
Z 25
total Federal-Provincial funds allocated to the development of five of these community pasture proposals amounts to $1,470,000.
Special appraisals continue to occupy a significant portion of our staff's time.
Most of the 29 special appraisals completed in 1974 were conducted by our staff
for other agencies such as the B.C. Land Commission, the B.C. Hydro and Power
Authority, and the Department of Agriculture. In addition to this number and, as
of November 30, 1974, four appraisals for the Department and 26 appraisals for
the B.C. Land Commsision were contracted out to private fee appraisers.
Two rather significant developments took place on Crown lands in 1974 that
appear to point up the Land Inspection Division's changing managerial role. In the
Squamish area the Department took control of Crown lands on which substantial
improvements had been created under a now bankrupt ski development. In the
Fraser River the Department embarked on a program to control removal of gravel
from the bed of the river between Kanaka Creek and Hope, with permits being
issued by a Gravel Control Officer authorized to act on behalf of the Department.
From the inception of the Gravel Control Program in mid-September to year-end,
76,500 cubic yards of gravel have been taken under permit, yielding a revenue of
$30,600.
The 1974 staff conference of the Land Inspection Division on February 12, 13,
and 14 helped to lay a cornerstone for better communication within the Division as
well as between the Division and the other resource managers and users of Crown
land. Other sessions held during 1974 were the four quarterly meetings of Regional
Land Inspectors in Victoria, numerous intersector committee meetings relating to
the proposed agricultural land reserves, and a number of brief regional and district
meetings on specific problems in the management of Crown land. In addition to
attending Technical Planning Committee and Livestock Association Meetings, some
of the staff attended conferences such as the Conference of the Professional Economists, the Western Water Users, and the Outdoor Recreationists.
The Careers '74 Program proved to be very successful, complementing the
Division's movement toward stronger and better land management. Nineteen Land
Management Assistants under the Experience category and two Clerk-Typists represented our total summer student complement under this program.
In keeping with the demands of the Land Officer position, all of our non-
accredited field staff continued to work toward their real estate accreditation with
the Appraisal Institute of Canada in 1974. Most of the staff on the "old program"
have now completed the requirements leading to accreditation. Although only 12
members of the staff are currently accredited real estate appraisers, we feel certain
that another six will be accredited by November 1975.
As a result of increased management responsibilities and a continuing heavy
work load, the number of field staff, as of November 30, had been increased to 43
from 33 in 1973. Eight vacancies in the field staff complement remained to be
filled pending reorganization of the Lands Branch.
Details of activities within the land management regions are contained within
the following individual regional reports.
VANCOUVER ISLAND REGION
J. A. Esler, P.Ag., A.A.C.I., Regional Land Inspector
The Vancouver Island Land Management Regional Office is located in Victoria,
with Land Inspection Offices in Victoria and Courtenay. This is a new region
formed in early 1974 by taking Vancouver Island and a small portion of the Mainland out of the former Vancouver Region.
 Z 26 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
There was a total of 840 inspection requests received in 1974 compared to 672
in 1973. The increase was partly attributable to a substantial increase in the number
of leases that came up for review during the year.
Fifty per cent of all requests handled dealt with foreshore uses with the majority
being for booming and log-storage purposes. In order to reduce the environmental
impact as a result of dumping and sorting logs in the water, companies are being
encouraged to establish dryland sorts wherever possible and to bundle logs and lower
them into the water rather than use conventional log dumps.
Many of the older log-sorting and booming grounds have been poorly managed
in the past, with the result that there has been a build-up of debris on the submerged
land and the escape of deadheads and sinkers into open water. The Lands Branch,
with the co-operation of the Federal Fisheries Service, the Fish and Wildlife Branch,
and the Ministry of Transport has been encouraging the logging companies to undertake clean-ups of their leasehold areas. All new leases issued require posting of a
bond to ensure clean-up when the lease expires.
Through the use of Government aircraft the Lands Branch has been able to
minimize unauthorized use of Provincial waters for booming and log-storage purposes. A closer working relationship with the Forest Service at the regional level
will alert the Lands Branch to the water-lot requirements of a timber operator prior
to the issuance of a harvesting licence by the Forest Service.
Considerable time has been spent during the past year on the problem of valuing
foreshore leases. Federal Department appraisers, fee appraisers, and others have
been contracted. In September a trip was made to Olympia, Wash., to confer with
appraisers from Washington and Oregon to explore new methods. Present plans
are to devise a satisfactory method of arriving at rentals for marina leases based on
a percentage of gross income. The use of the Multiple Listings Service has enabled
the Land Inspector to keep abreast of market data at a time of rapidly rising land
values.
The present formal system of referring applications to other agencies is cumbersome and time-consuming. When the proposed Regional Land Management Advisory Committee is formalized, applications will be reviewed at meetings to be held on
a regular basis involving the various resource managers, and hopefully the whole
process will become much more meaningful and efficient.
LOWER MAINLAND REGION
R. F. Gilmour, P.Ag., A.A.C.I., Regional Land Inspector
In March 1974 the Lower Mainland Land Management Region, comprising
the Land Inspection Districts of New Westminster, Vancouver, and Vancouver North
was formed. Five hundred and forty-nine examinations were undertaken in 1974
but as a result of mid-season staff changes and a higher than normal number of
complicated appraisals completed, 175 inspection requests remained outstanding at
the end of the year.
As in past years, rental reviews comprised the largest number of inspections
completed. Foreshore lease applications for industrial, commercial, and private
uses were next in number, followed by applications for home-sites, quarrying, and
Crown grants. The number of inspections made does not indicate the time spent
on the various applications. Several appraisals for the B.C. Land Commission
proved very complex and time-consuming, as were examinations of accretions and
trespasses. Other significant appraisals were undertaken at Jericho Beach and the
University Endowment Lands.
 LANDS BRANCH
Z 27
A new program of on-site management of gravel removal from the Fraser River
from Kanaka Creek to Hope was commenced during the year. A Gravel Control
Officer was taken on staff under contract to carry out this function under the direction
of the Land Inspector. To date the program has been successful in that it gives fast
service to the operators and has given the Lands Branch a greater knowledge of the
river with regard to gravel-removal techniques, trespasses, the needs of salmon
habitat, flood control, gravel disposition, and an awareness of the many other uses
in the river.
In the Squamish area the Department took control of Crown lands on which
substantial improvements had been created under a now bankrupt ski development.
The buildings have been boarded up and a watchman hired to live at the top of
Brohm Ridge and guard against vandalism and pilfering.
In this Region, being close to a large centre of population, the demand for rural
home-sites, both permanent and recreational, is high. The creation of subdivided
parcels of land for these two uses has been given high priority and every effort will
be made in 1975 to provide the public with building-lots. Tentatively, sites have
been chosen which would provide 700 lots. This number may be increased or
decreased depending on final physical tests for drainage and water.
To date this Region has not been involved in any multiresource or interdepartmental land-use studies. Areas designated for study had to be given low priority, but
it is planned to implement such studies in 1975. Also, in the coming year more
emphasis will be placed on input from all resource-users in the planning and management of Crown land by the holding of more frequent meetings of the Regional
Resource Committee and their subgroups.
Germansen Lake inspection.
 Z 28 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
THOMPSON-OKANAGAN REGION
D. I. Snider, P.Ag., A.A.C.I., Regional Land Inspector
The outstanding number of inspections in the Thompson-Okanagan Region at
the end of 1974 is the lowest for the past five years despite the number of requests
for field examinations being up 23 per cent. This high level of requests should be
materially reduced next year due to the change in processing the flow of applications
from the Land Commissioners to the Land Inspectors instead of directly to Victoria.
Although not a large number are being directly disallowed, the process should save
considerable staff time in Victoria and in the field in 1975.
In attempting to implement the policy direction toward more land management,
much staff time was consumed in 1974 seeking solutions to the provision of selected
areas for all-terrain vehicle uses (motor-cycles, four-wheel drives, etc.), which have
been very evidently having a detrimental effect on the dry grasslands adjacent to
Kamloops in the past few years. Another example of our increased determination
to improve methods of protecting the basic land capability was illustrated this past
year in our implementing numerous cattle seizures under the Grazing Act to protect
some specific range areas from further decline in productivity due to excess cattle
pressure.
Although motor-cycles, four-wheel drives, and cattle are our more mobile and
difficult forms of trespass, we are not without more stationary types such as (probably our largest problem in this region) the illegal occupation of areas of foreshore
by upland owners. This problem is more one of education enforcement and some
recent court cases in the Okanagan this year will undoubtedly help if appropriately
publicized. Our greatest concern here is the physical obstructions that effectively
prevent the public from enjoying even an evening walk along many beaches. A clear
and positive position on foreshore trespasses must be taken by the Lands Service and
this position adequately publicized so that future staff action can be more effective.
Much work has been done this year in studying methods of assuring better management of that range which is presently the responsibility of the Lands Service under
grazing leases. Three summer sudents were used from May to August primarily on
a ranch inventory program in order to build a data bank on physical holdings, etc.,
to be used in setting management practices for future leases. As a result of these
studies it appears clear that a new basis for rentals for grazing use should be evolved
and primarily be based on a charge for the forage consumed, rather than on the
acreage basis now used. It is equally clear that more actual management controls
such as numbers of cattle and periods of use must be implemented at an early date.
In many ways, 1974 has been a most progressive year, but most particularly in
the gradual evolution of interdepartmental communication and understanding at
both regional and district levels.
KOOTENAY REGION
A. G. Anderson, P.Ag., A.A.C.I., Regional Land Inspector
In 1974, 347 inspections were made out of 400 requests received. Of these,
30 per cent involved homesites, 19 per cent were lease reviews, and 17 per cent
involved agriculture and grazing, while the remaining 34 per cent covered a wide
miscellany of purposes. There is obviously a growing demand for rural home-sites,
while the demand for recreational home-sites is surprisingly low, being 79 and 4
respectively.
 LANDS BRANCH Z 29
Highlights for 1974 in this region are first, the formation of the Nelson Land
Management Region and the appointment of a Regional Land Inspector. So the
year was one of reorganization, orientation, and familiarization of the work and the
area. Other highlights must be the publication of the Purcell Study and the
Mica Region Resource Study. These studies clearly point out the problems, conflicts,
and possible solutions. A number of other special reports on pipe-lines and electrical
transmission-lines have also been made and assist in clarifying the problems and
solutions. For much the same reasons the meetings of the Technical Planning Committees of the three regional districts as well as the Intersector Committee meetings
cover the problems, changes, and effects occurring throughout the region and allow
more participation and communication among the resource agencies.
Land-use trends are toward small acreage home-sites, if types of requests and
inquiries are indicative, despite a considerable resistance from the regional districts
as they anticipate the problems of servicing outlying areas with little or no returns
from taxes. The rural part-time farm or small holding has become quite desirable,
possibly due to the uncertainties of the economy.
While problems of trespass continue, they are really of minor importance except
where the public is being excluded or prevented the use of a desirable area. With
a continuing program of publicity and very infrequent prosecution this problem may
be controlled.
Problems of competition between the resource agencies for control of the land
base continue. Until truly realistic and impartial analysis and decisions are made,
this problem will remain.
The major factors affecting the rational development of various land uses are
the very large areas being held by large companies such as those of Crows Nest Industries, Dark Woods Forest Industries, as well as the large relatively unused areas in
Christmas-tree farms and the current forest reserves over low timber-producing areas
which should be utilized for more realistic purposes.
CARIBOO REGION
L. M. Warner, P.Ag., A.A.C.I., Regional Land Inspector
The inauguration in March of this Land Management Region provided further
advancement toward better co-ordination in land management and resolution of
land-use conflicts. Within the Region's 57,000 square miles there exists three major
land uses—residential, ranching, and timber production. Superimposed on these
are other types of land usage which interact, often in conflict.
The reserve on all unsubdivided Crown lakefront lands established in 1971
continued to limit the number of new applications for recreational waterfront use.
Examinations of applications of this type were confined to the Clinton District and
represented about 1 per cent of the total number of inspections completed in the
region.
Lease reviews for all uses accounted for about 60 per cent of the regional total.
New applications for grazing leases increased from the 1973 figure. The requirement
for in-depth consideration of other uses of Crown lands has been a major factor
contributing to the high number of year-end outstanding inspections.
Difficulties in locating sales information continued to create problems in arriving at values for Crown lands within the Region. Many Crown leases are located on
lakes for which there are no sales data available and in such cases the only alternative is to relate to sales on other lakes. This requirement not only complicates the
appraisal process but reduces the reliability of the value estimates.  The problem has
 1
Z 30 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
been particularly noticeable in the past three years as sale prices and lease rentals
have skyrocketed. In the agricultural sector a similar situation exists, but is now
further complicated by recently introduced restrictive covenants and legislative
restrictions to land usage.
Infiltration of the rural area by residential applications and ranch expansions
have invariably conflicted in some degree with livestock permit grazing and wildlife
habitats. Several meetings were held with fish and wildlife biologists in an effort to
arrive at mutual understanding and resolution of land uses.
Rural residential developments have been proposed in five locations throughout
the Region, totalling 125 lots. Additional urban fringe residential developments are
planned for Quesnel, Williams Lake, and 100 Mile House. The size of these developments is currently envisaged to total 300 sites.
Multidisciplinary meetings have concentrated on developing land-management
plans for two large areas in the Quesnel district. There are four other areas in the
Region awaiting discussion. Problems of communicating and meeting with other
resource managers have been experienced in this Region since some resource departments do not as yet have a regional office established at Williams Lake.
OMINECA-PEACE REGION
H. K. Boas, R.P.F., A.A.C.I., Regional Land Inspector
In March the Quesnel, Burns Lake, and Smithers Land Inspection Districts
were split off from the former Omineca-Peace Land Management Region, leaving
four districts in the Region—Fort St. John, Pouce Coupe, Prince George, and Vanderhoof.   The statistical part of this Report is based on the Region as it now exists.
Requests received for examinations were up 50 per cent from last year and
were the highest number in the past five years. Examinations completed were 49
per cent above last year and reports submitted were 16 per cent above last year.
Twenty-six applications were terminated at the regional level as a result of the shortcut routing of land applications directly from the Land Commissioners to the Land
Inspectors, instead of being first forwarded to Victoria.
The summer assistant program was of benefit to the Region and we look forward to employing students again next year. There was a total of five students
employed in 1974.
Integrated resource studies were carried out and completed on the Wren Multi-
Use Reserve, the Bear Mountain Community Pasture, and in the Peace River Region
on District Lot 2222, as well as a preliminary report on the Ground Birch Community Pasture. Similarly, field work was completed on the Purden Lake study, but
maps are needed from Victoria to complete the study.
Within the Omineca-Peace Region, sheet and gully erosion is becoming recognized as a very great potential problem. It is incumbent upon us as land managers
to place development conditions in our leases to keep such erosion to a minimum.
The need for Departmental personnel to enforce the Land Act and the conditions which we put in our leases is quite evident. Several areas of concern require
early attention, namely, trespass use of Crown land, an accurate assessment of improvements prior to extending the terms of leases, unauthorized assignments, and
interference with public roads and trails.
The integrated resource-use approach to land management is a necessity and
hopefully we can begin a program of planning areas of Crown land. The Crown
Lots and Sites Program would benefit greatly from such planning and is a natural
outcome of such a program.
 LANDS BRANCH
Z 31
There appears to be a trend by Government departments to hire their own
experts in the fields of other line departments. This approach would appear to be
in conflict with the integrated resource approach to the management of Crown lands.
If resource departments cannot rely on advice furnished by other line departments
without vetting one another's work, then the objectives of integrated resource management may not be reached.
Many meetings were attended during the year—T.P.C. meetings for three
regional districts, Secretariat meetings on the Williston Lake Study, Common Resource Boundaries and the North-West Study, Intersector and Regional Resource
meetings on the A.L.R.'s and pasture developments, Prince George Forest District
Environmental Education Committee, and departmental meetings.
There is a definite need for an Assistant Regional Land Inspector in the Region
and it is hoped that the vacancy in the Region can be filled.
View of Dalton Dome (left) and Atwell Peak
east of Garibaldi village.
 Z 32 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
SKEENA REGION
R. N. Bose, P.Ag., Regional Land Inspector
The Skeena Region has a Regional Land Management Office in Smithers and
is comprised of the Burns Lake, Prince Rupert, and Smithers Land Inspection Districts.   This is one of the new land management regions formed early in 1974.
Reviews of leases, whether on land or foreshore, continue to account for the
greatest number of inspections in all three districts. Grazing leases and permanent
home-site lease applications accounted for the next most frequent types of inspections in the Region. In the Prince Rupert district, inspections of log-storage and
booming leases ranked third behind inspections for permanent home-sites.
This year, Land Inspectors commenced investigating requests to assign grazing
leases and agricultural leases. Thus, Crown lands are being managed to ensure that
farm units are not destroyed by indiscriminate dispersal of grazing leases. Also, in
areas covered by the partial moratorium on agricultural lands, investigation ensures
that assignees qualify to hold agricultural leases.
The Land Inspection Division has been involved in an interagency study of
Hudson Bay Mountain, near Smithers. A resource folio was prepared by the Lands
Service and proved valuable in resolving certain resource conflicts.
Various staff members attended public meetings at Queen Charlotte, Smithers,
Atlin, and Dease Lake. The latter two meetings were concerned with community
development and required local input.
In the Burns Lake district the partial moratorium on agricultural lands is
encouraging development of private lands. In the Smithers and Prince Rupert
districts the number of agricultural lease applications has declined, partly reflecting
the diminishing amount of accessible arable land. Some grazing leases are being
converted to agricultural leases.
Trespass use of Crown lands continues to be a problem in this Region. Insufficient direction to the public and the lack of suitable alternatives are partly to blame
for this uncontrolled use of Crown lands. We anticipate, however, that the recently
announced Crown Lots and Sites Program will help greatly in meeting this need for
rural home-sites and will do much to slow down the incidence of new trespasses.
The increasing involvement of resource departments at all levels, as occurs
regionally through the Regional Resource Management Committee, will foster a
greater understanding of resource potentials for any land and thus reduce the likelihood of poor land-use decisions.
The one major private development currently under way in this Region is the
construction of the new sawmill at Sheraton, east of Burns Lake, by Babine Forest
Products Limited. We anticipate that this development will stimulate the local
economy.
 LANDS BRANCH
Table 11—Types of Inspections, 1974
Purchases—
Agriculture (other than grazing)  237
Access (roads, etc.)   5
Commercial (resorts, service-stations, hotels, airfields, etc.) .. 4
Community (cemeteries, church-sites, parking areas, etc.).... 11
Homesites (permanent)   297
Industrial (mill-sites, power-sites, manufacturing plants, etc.) 5
Summer home or camp-site  23
Others  10
Leases—
Land—•
Agriculture (other than grazing)  348
Commercial (resorts, service-stations, hotels, airfields, etc.) .. 63
Community (parks, cemeteries, dump-sites, etc.)  51
Grazing (pasture, range, hay-cutting, etc.)  296
Cancellations (sec. 44, Land Act, 1970)  90
Home-sites (permanent)   497
Industrial (mill-sites, power-sites, manufacturing plants, etc.) 54
Summer home or camp-site  81
Quarrying (sand, gravel, limestone)  30
Reviews (rentals and (or) diligent use)  2,430
Others  20
Foreshore—
Booming and log storage or log dumping  190
Commercial (boat rentals, marine service-stations, wharves,
etc.)  80
Industrial (mill-sites, canneries, factory-sites, wharves, etc.) 25
Quarrying (sand and gravel from river beds)  11
Oyster and shellfish  23
Private (floats, boathouses)   27
Reviews (rentals and (or) diligent use)  233
Others  11
Land exchanges (sec. 85, Land Act, 1970)  7
Licences of occupation  103
Easements and (or) rights-of-way  39
Pre-emptions  (Land Act, R.S.  1960)—annual inspections  (including applications for Crown grant)  58
Subdivisions—
Valuations  50
Surveys inspection    	
Plans cancellation  1
Proposals, residential (permanent)   21
Proposals, recreation (temporary)   2
Others  6
Z 33
 Z 34 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 11—Types of Inspections, 1974—Continued
Reserves—■
Grazing  1
Gravel pit  1
Planning development  1
Recreational  7
Subdivision  1
Wildlife reserve  1
Veterans' Land Act    3
Doukhobor lands    	
Southern Okanagan Lands Project  11
Reports for other agencies—
B.C. Railway  1
Corrections Branch  1
Appraisals—■
Special Departmental appraisals  11
Appraisals for other agencies—
Department of Agriculture  2
B.C. Hydro  2
B.C. Land Commission  12
Parks Branch  1
Forest Service  1
Miscellaneous inspections—
Assignments  92
Delinquent accounts   2
Escheats Act  4
Lake reconnaissance  3
Land-use surveys  12
Land revaluations of special nature  35
Protests  45
Sec. 53 (2), Land Act, R.S. 1960 (verifying improvements) 70
Sec. 65, Land Act, R.S. 1960, and sec. 48, Land Act, 1970
(free grants)     	
Sec. 78, Land Act, R.S. 1960 (re compliance with provisions
of)  6
Sec. 130, Land Act, R.S. 1960, and sec. 97, Land Act, 1970
(lands vested in Crown under Taxation Act)  3
Sec. 131b, Land Act, R.S. 1960, and sec. 53, Land Act, 1970
(cases of doubt regarding inclusion of body of water in
Crown grant)   5
Trespass (land)   49
Trespass (water)   76
Quieting Titles Act :  2
Sec. 102 (2), Land Registry Act  13
Others  66
Total  5,979
 LANDS BRANCH
Z 35
Table 12—Analysis of Inspections Completed and Inspections Outstanding at
Year-end for the Years 1970 to 1974, Inclusive
Land Management Regions and
Land Inspection Districts
Examinations Completed During Year
III
1970 I    1971  I    1972 I    1973 I    1974
IIII
Vancouver Island Region
Courtenay 	
Victoria	
Subtotals -	
Lower Mainland Region
New Westminster	
Vancouver   	
Vancouver North	
Subtotals	
Thompson-Okanagan Region
Kamloops  	
Kelowna  	
Subtotals	
Kootenay Region
Nelson...  	
Cariboo Region
Quesnel   	
Williams Lake.... 	
Clinton   	
Subtotals	
Omineca-Peace Region
Fort St. John......	
Pouce Coupe.—  	
Prince George... 	
Vanderhoof...	
Subtotals	
Skeena Region
Prince Rupert 	
Smithers   	
Burns Lake 	
Subtotals 	
Grand totals	
377 551  |     469        385
189 230 |     215 146
566
781  |     684 |     531
I
301
342
643
503
236
240
223
324
I
I
289  |
216 j
334 |
702
249
486
209
402
193
739
951
695
595
I
313  |     372 J     425  |     417
179
687
374
191 i 243
763 I 603
412        378
195
597
390
1.240 |   1.366 |  1.224 |  1.182
620
273
318
305
1,516
194
183
206
583
5,600
439
282
362
155
459
150
435
169
1,238 |  1.213
200 | 153
182 I 199
227 I      115
609
467
6,104 | 5,547
I
533
198
294
101
1,126
164
222
174
560
5,022
432
272
704
I
267 I 188
161  j 176
183 185
787 |      839 |     611  |     549
546
225
771
347
157
514
605
1,276
690
386
385
219
158
302
192
652
5,979
Examinations Outstanding at Year-end
1970 I    1971   [    1972 I    1973       1974
I  I I
49
67 |
204
1,312
115 |
32 |
103
29
91  |
50 j
164 |      101
72  |
86
!    I    !
35  j       48 |       59 j
37
34
54
13
34
40
23
69
78
I
101
74 |     170
69
67
135
147 |
132
141 |
136
91
75
1
1
33 j
63
6
29
1
45 j
13 |
72
25
87 |
59 |
40 |
79
166
183 |
94 |
98 |
176
102
62
1
64 |
37 1
1
30 |
42 |
1
1
39
47 |
45
21
66
53
11
25  |        46           18  |        15  | 60
200 j        59 I       62  |      111  | 227
147 [       86 j       69 |      166 j 50
372
191 |
149
292
337
86
1
1
72 |
209
85
35
19
7 1
84
92
46
111
64 1
33
65
108
20
12 |
5
57
67
236 |     155 |     331  |     299 |     256
76
50
76
202
926
911 |  1,123 | 1,226
 Z 36 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 13—Analysis of Requests for Inspection Processed by Land Inspection
Division for Years 1970 to 1974, Inclusive
Land Management Regions and
Land Inspection Districts
New Requests Received During—
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
Vancouver Island Region
438
191
581
212
457
212
373
167
410
Victoria 	
289
Subtotals - - —	
629
793
669
540
699
Lower Mainland Region
369
359
182
249
271
261
182
306
305
145
164
214
188
Vancouver North	
224
Subtotals 	
728
702
749
614
626
Thompson-Okanagan Region
547
239
664
224
452
214
411
198
552
199
Subtotals    	
786
888
666
609
751
Nelson  	
Kootenay Region
339
385
436
395
363
Cariboo Region
185
843
432
205
619
351
209
603
361
187
645
487
200
628
489
1,460
1,175
1,173
1,319
1,317
Fort Sr John         	
Omineca-Peace Region
494
207
337
252
397
188
299
135
583
200
386
152
398
163
316
148
633
301
422
221
1.290
1,019
1,321
1,025
1,577
Skeena Region
169
214
217
185
148
172
153
145
142
153
291
211
211
283
Burns Lake	
190
600
505
440
655
684
5,832
5,467
5,454
5,157
6,017
 LANDS BRANCH
Z 37
SPECIAL SERVICES DIVISION
During 1974 the three component sections of the Special Services Division
polarized into two distinct units in accordance with the needs of the Lands Service
for the specific expertise on hand. The activities of the Planning and Engineering
Sections were progressively merged into a Crown land development unit oriented
to the production of Crown subdivisions and related developments. The Environmental Section continued on its own as an environmental advisory group to both
the land management and land development components of the Lands Service. For
administrative purposes, the Special Services Division remained intact throughout
the year.
Environmental Section
J. P. Secter, Senior Biologist
The Environmental Section advises the Associate Deputy Minister, the Director
of Lands, and the senior professional staff on the biological, ecological, and environmental aspects of Crown land management. Throughout 1974 the main activities of
this unit continued to be in the areas of control of environmental impacts of proposed
development projects, resolution of conflicts in land resource use, and facilitation of
integrative resource management on Crown-administered lands. The activities of
the Senior Biologist were augmented in early May with the appointment of an
Aquatic Biologist and again in September with the contracting of an Ecological
Technician. In additioin, two summer student assistants were on hand from May
through August.
The Section has expanded its role in the co-ordination, management, and review
of environmental assessments of major development projects on Crown lands. In
the apportionment of Provincial environmental impact control responsibilities, the
assessment of intensive environmental impacts oriented to determining optimal location, design, and construction procedures within a predetermined corridor or site on
Crown lands are co-ordinated by this Section.
An ongoing program to ensure the mitigation of environmental impacts related
to smaller easements over Crown land has been arranged with the Regional Land
Inspection Offices. Major concerns here are with the detailed location of access
roads and of small transmission-lines. A working liaison was also established with
the B.C. Energy Commission regarding the control of potential impacts of proposed
pipe-line projects. This Section combined efforts with the ELUC Secretariat and
the Energy Commission to establish environmental control procedures for the Inland
Natural Gas East Kootenay Link Pipeline from Yahk to Rossland. In addition, the
Section was appointed to represent the Province on the Environment Canada Task
Force to Review McKenzie Valley Pipeline Applications and has initiated a review
of the environmental statements submitted by two applicants for the British Columbia portions of that pipe-line. Included among the other intensive assessments with
which the Section was involved in 1974 are the Carcross, Y.T., to Skagway, Alaska
Highway (B.C. portion), Houston-Ootsa Lake Highway, Kitwanga-Meziadin Highway, and the Meziadin Railway.
The assessment and control of impacts on aquatic environments has been a
major undertaking in 1974. The Section has been involved with a variety of
marina sites on the lower Coast and will be initiating planning studies to determine
optimal locations for marina facilities within both the Capital and Greater Vancouver
Regional Districts.   The Section played a significant role in the management of a
 Z 38 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
major environmental assessment of alternative bulk marine terminal sites in the
Prince Rupert area. Examination of all foreshore lease applications to ensure
environmental impact mitigation is a major undertaking. Log-handling in lakes
and estuarine zones has been of particular concern and is under continuous review
on both a general and site specific basis. The Section is looking to careful initial
site selection and to modified handling practices as two basic methods of mitigating
environmental problems in this area. Conservation of estuaries has been another
primary concern and all Crown foreshore leases at Comox and Campbell River are
currently under review pending the preparation of foreshore management plans by
short-term task groups under the leadership of Environmental Section personnel.
This sort of planning should be extended to all estuaries administered by the Crown.
A similar exercise is also in effect for water lot leases on selected large lakes. The
development of a management plan for Ladysmith Harbour is a key project of this
program. This major planning exercise approaches the management of the harbour,
its foreshore, and related upland on a totally integrative basis and is expected to
establish a precedent for small harbour management throughout the British Columbia Coast.
The Environmental Section represents the Lands Service on a variety of formal
intergovernmental and interagency committees. Included in addition to those previously noted are the B.C. Mines Reclamation Committee and the B.C. Salmon
Enhancement Review Committee. The Section is consulted in-Service regarding
portions of the total array of land applications, ranging from the foreshore to the
alpine zones. Special projects during 1974 have included the provision of environmental base data on the University Endowment Lands; an investigation of alternative
forms of sewage disposal for alpine, montane, and rocky terraine; and examinations
of the Haines Road relocation proposal, the Nanaimo Duke Point port-site, peat
mine restoration at the Nadu River, and the Penticton Bypass highway proposal.
The positive contribution of this new section to sound land-management practices
is being felt throughout the Province.
Engineering Section
B. A. Lambert, P.Eng., Senior Engineer
The Engineering Section advises the Director of Lands on the engineering
aspects of the management and development of Crown land. Its major concern has
continued to be the investigation and development of Crown land subdivisions.
Site inspections are made to determine such physical criteria as the availability
of potable water, the safe disposability of sewage, and the suitability of the ground
for building and road construction. Site inspection for subdivision proposals have
been made in Atlin, Sundance near Chetwynd, Goldbridge, several locations in both
the Quesnel and Williams Lake areas, Nanoose and Williams Beach on Vancouver
Island. A preliminary study was made on the costs of various schemes of installation
and operation of a community water supply system for the existing Crown subdivision at Dease Lake allowing for some expansion to be expected with the completion
of the B.C. Railway line and improvement of highway access.
Construction of roads for Crown subdivision has proceeded at Fort Nelson,
Purden Ski Hill near Prince George, and Westbridge near Greenwood. Roads in
the Dog Creek and Esler Road subdivisions have been paved. A water-line extension
was installed at Bear Lake north of Prince George to serve Crown lots intended for
trailer use. Pedestrian lake access was improved at Sulphurous Lake subdivision
and road access and a boat ramp provided at Smithers Landing subdivision on
 LANDS BRANCH
Z 39
Babine Lake. A creek was cleared out to improve surface drainage at the Beaver
Harbour subdivision at Port Hardy. The foregoing projects have been undertaken
on behalf of the Lands Branch by the Department of Highways, Forest Service, and
Parks Branch.
Road construction for the Cablecar Subdivision, Kitimat, was commenced
under contract and the community water system was designed by the Section staff
with some assistance from consultants. A communal pumphouse was also designed
by section staff for the residents of Dease Lake. At year-end the building had been
constructed and equipment ordered.
Site inspections and reports have also been made to provide technical guidance
to the Land Inspection Division and the Environmental Section on environmental
impact of proposed marine, road, and sewage treatment developments on Crown
lands by other agencies or private concerns. These projects included an assessment
of the British Columbia section of the Carcross-Skagway Highway project. Periodic
observations have also been made of the coastal erosion at Whiffin Spit, a public
recreation reserve at the mouth of Sooke Harbour. It has yet to be established
whether the shoreline movement follows seasonal cycles or is progressive.
The Brohm Ridge ski development lease reverted to the Crown, together with
the partially completed terminal buildings and cable towers for the gondola system
and a lodge and chalets. These structures were examined by staff of this Section
to determine their condition and whether any action was required to prevent deterioration. Snow-damaged balconies on the lodge were removed and sheathing applied
to several buildings to prevent entry of water and vandals.
The Lands Branch was represented on both the Sewage Disposal Task Group
and the Subdivision Standards Committee set up by the Environment and Land Use
Committee.
This year a professional geological engineer and an engineering technician
joined the Section, both of whom have particular expertise related to subdivision
work, assessment of groundwater and soils, materials testing, and road construction.
 Z 40 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
ECOLOGICAL RESERVES SECTION
Dr. J. B. Foster, Co-ordinator
On October 1 the Ecological Reserves Program acquired its first full-time staff
member when Dr. J. B. Foster was appointed Co-ordinator. Work earlier in the
year on the establishment of new reserves was slow since David Borthwick and Don
Pearson of the Lands Branch were largely involved in other duties.
On November 27 the Annual Meeting of the Ecological Reserves Committee
was held at the University of Victoria. After an opening speech by the Minister, 69
new reserves were proposed. These included an enlarged version of the Spatsizi
proposal and the first marine proposals.
The meeting was filmed by the National Film Board to provide material for
their 50-minute documentary film on ecological reserves.
During the year three new reserves were created for a total of 56 reserves and
95,315 acres. The pace of creating new reserves is expected to quicken now there
is a full-time Co-ordinator. The accumulated total of unresolved ecological reserve
applications is now over 100.
As the year ended, the draft regulations for protecting ecological reserves were
being formalized, as well as the means for enforcing the regulations. Attempts were
also being made to strengthen the Ecological Reserves Act to give the reserves a
greater degree of permanence.
Dr. V. J. Krajina et al. continued their hard work during the year surveying
potential areas for reserves and producing a book on the ecological reserves in the
Province (185 pp.). Priority is expected to change from surveying to research on
existing reserves in the coming year.
 Goosegrass Creek Ecological Reserve, 5,400 acres of forest, tundra, and glaciers,
lying to the west of McNaughton Lake.
  CO
o
D
O
Q
8°
    SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Z 47
SURVEYS AND MAPPING RRANCH
A. H. Ralfs, B.C.L.S., D.L.S., Director, Surveyor-General,
and Boundaries Commissioner
DATA PROCESSING
For many years raw survey data have required manipulation, adjustment, and
computation in such volume that they can only be handled by an electronic computer. For this purpose the Branch maintains a number of programs which run on
the Computer and Consulting Services IBM 370/145 computer. During the year,
several additions and amendments have been made to these programs to keep
abreast of developments in survey technology and to assist in the map-making
process. Recent decreases in cost and increases in versatility have also led to the
increased use of hand and desk-top calculators which now, particularly in the area
of legal surveys, are able to provide on-the-spot solutions to most of the surveyors'
problems. The expertise and experience of the Branch in data processing has also
been made available to the Lands Branch in its investigation of the possible computerization of land status records.
STANDARD SYSTEM OF MAPPING AND GEO-REFERENCING
Apart from the Surveys and Mapping Branch, many other departments of
Government, Crown agencies, and municipal authorities have been involved in
map-making in British Columbia without any central direction. The result has been
a proliferation of scales, sheet sizes, and numbering systems, and in many cases a
duplication of effort. In an attempt to improve this situation a Standard System of
Mapping for British Columbia was proposed. Sponsored by the Honourable the
Minister, this system was promulgated by Order in Council 2884, dated September
5, 1974. The schedule to this Order makes all specifications in metric units and is
binding on all map-making supported by public funds.
Toward the end of the year a Branch representative served on a task group of
the ELUC Data Services Committee, looking into all aspects of geo-referencing.
The recommendation of this group is the adoption of the Universal Transverse
Mercator (U.T.M.) Rectangular Grid as the system for geographically referencing
all types of data. Such a system is dependent on there being available mapping at
suitable scales and showing the grid. For a variety of technical reasons, the key
scale appears to be 1:20,000 which seems acceptable to all the major map users.
There is a body of opinion that maps at 1:20,000 and larger scales should be
formatted on rectangular grid sheet lines and that the sheets of larger scales be
modular with those of smaller scales.
However, there still remain some uncertainties about this because of phasing-
out problems, and at the year's end studies are continuing so that the matter can be
resolved with minor amendments to the aforesaid Order in Council.
In all of this the major role of Surveys and Mapping Branch is the production
of base maps at standard scales upon which other departments and agencies can
compile the data of interest to themselves.
 Z 48 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
BRITISH COLUMBIA-YUKON-NORTHWEST TERRITORIES
BOUNDARIES COMMISSION
In April 1974 the British Columbia-Yukon-Northwest Territories Boundaries
Commission issued instructions to A. G. Sutherland, Technician, from this Branch
to continue the clearing and maintenance program on the boundary east of Monument 374 north of Lower Post, B.C.
By early lune the eight-man field crew began work and, with the aid of helicopter support, nine working camps were established before the crew completed its
work and returned to Victoria in September for disbandment.
There was a total of 134 kilometres of boundary line hand-cleared to a 2-metre
skyline and 60 boundary monuments targetted for identification. Following this
work, low-level air photographs were taken from the Government's Otter aircraft.
All monuments were inspected and pits and mounds renewed. Two test areas of
line which had been hand-treated with Tordon defoliant pellets in 1973 showed
good control of willow, Arctic birch, and small conifers on relatively dry ground.
BRITISH COLUMBIA-ALBERTA BOUNDARY
A project, initiated by this Branch, was completed during the year with the
passing, subject to proclamation, of new legislation by British Columbia, Alberta,
and Ottawa. This legislation finally clarifies a long-standing restriction of the old
legislation by allowing for further monumentation when necessary of sinous "height
of land" portions of the Rocky Mountains section of the boundary. There are some
secondary passes where the height of land would be impossible to locate and which
nevertheless could become economically important. The new legislation will now
allow the height of land to be replaced by straight-line monumented courses.
GEOGRAPHICAL NAMES
The Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical Names issued the first
Cumulative Supplement for British Columbia since the Provincial Gazetteer was
published in 1966. Containing about 3,700 new names and amendments supplied
by the member for British Columbia, D. F. Pearson, the supplement differs slightly
in format, with latitudinal and longitudinal references to the position of features
replacing the less precise quadrantal references found in the Gazetteer. Two
hundred copies of the supplement were received from Ottawa for redistribution to
Government offices holding the 1966 edition. The book will also be issued free of
charge by Information Canada to old and new purchasers of the 1966 volume of
the British Columbia Gazetteer.
A major geographical names project tackled in 1974 was processing new
names and name changes brought about by the filling of McNaughton Lake and
Williston Lake. The work generated a large volume of research and communication
with local authorities.
The reports of the Legal Surveys, Field Operations, and Map Production Divisions, which follow, outline in some detail their activities for the year. The Legal
Surveys Division continued to provide legal survey services for other departments
as well as for Lands and to function as the central registry for field books, plans,
and maps relating to disposition of Crown land.
The Field Operations Division directed its energy into two main channels—
control for primary mapping and integrated surveys, and aerial photographic proj-
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Z 49
ects. Modernization of the photogrammetric section and reproduction laboratories
through installation of new equipment helped the Map Production Division to
comply with demands for primary and derived mapping and for production of prints
and air photographs. However, the Reproduction Lab in the main Parliament
Building is seriously in need of relocation because of the strict limitations on needed
expansion.
 Z 50 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Z 51
LEGAL SURVEYS DIVISION
W. A. Taylor, B.C.L.S., Chief
The involvement of this Division in the work of other departments such as
Forest Service, Water Resources, Mines and Petroleum Resources, Recreation and
Conservation, Vital Statistics, Attorney-General, Municipal Affairs, Highways, etc.,
is best illustrated by the proportionate work table and production tables shown.
Apart from the approximately 50,000 survey documents that are consulted
every year in carrying out the work, on the average about 30,000 recorded items
are dealt with of varying degrees of complexity. This, together with an abundance
of unrecorded spontaneous matters which arise, is accomplished with a total office
staff of 28 people.
Table 14—Production Totals for the Years 1973 and 1974
1973 1974
Field books prepared  393 277
Lots surveyed  619 389
Survey plans examined  433 253
Lots confirmed   517 330
Lots cancelled  892 1,599
Lots amended  106 50
Reference maps compiled or renewed  61 68
Applications for purchase cleared  550 298
Applications for lease cleared  4,886 5,417
Reserves cleared  551 698
Timber sales cleared  1,353 1,089
Crown grant applications cleared  719 917
Cancellations from maps  714 614
Inquiries   943 667
Letters received and dealt with  3,753 3,463
Examination sketches  1,560 1,672
Crown grant and lease tracings made  10,931 6,257
Well-site plans recorded  183 208
Survey instructions issued  422 337
Mineral claim lots created  31 61
Mining leases cleared  107 12
Mining claims plotted  102 133
Mineral claims gazetted  208 22
Mineral claims cancelled  313 101
Placer leases plotted  551 337
Placer leases cancelled  273 297
Documents from vault examined  52,334 41,704
Crown land subdivision and right-of-way plans  393 432
Plans checked for the Land Registry Office  1,988 1,603
Descriptions written  658 439
 Z 52
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
A stock of official survey-posts is maintained in all offices of Government
Agents for use in Crown land surveys and replacement of original survey corners.
A resume of the activity in this service appears below.
Table 15—Distribution of Survey-posts
B.C.L.S.
Bars
Standard
Pipe
Rock
Post
Drive-
able Pins
Post Caps
Anchor
Plates
Drive-
able Pipe
214" Bolts
Amount on hand, Jan. 1,
1974	
3,550
Nil
1,237
Nil
1,439
1,000
834
6,000
2,961
2,896
1,875
Nil
504
702
1,812
Nil
Totals	
3,550
1,237
2,439
6,834
5,857
1,875
1,206
1,812
Legal surveys	
1,075
Nil
Nil
20
Nil
75
205
570
486
250
2,690
343
40
2,600
1,225
Nil
100
Nil
78
298
90
22
Nil
Public surveyors 	
100
Total used in 1974	
1,075
95
1,261
3,283
3,865
100
466
122
Balance on hand, Dec. 31.
1974	
2,475
$0.60
$645.00
1,142
$4.05
$384.75
1,178
$1.45
$1,828.45
3,551
$0.85
$2,790.55
1,992
$0.75
$2,898.75
1,775             740
$0.25          $4.60
1
$25.00 1$2,143.60
1
1,690
Selling price of one post
Selling value of posts used
in 1974	
$0.50
$61.00
Total selling value, $10,777.10.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Z 53
Tieing highway control traverse to triangulation station.
Legal Surveys Division Draughting, in new location at Harbour Towers.
 Z 54
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
FIELD WORK
The field office of Legal Surveys enjoyed a typically busy year handling the
survey requirements of the Lands Branch and requests from other Government
departments. The mid-season retirement of one of our senior surveyors reduced
the work capacity, and unfortunately several requests from outside departments
could not be undertaken. The majority of the 44 surveys completed were for the
Lands Branch, with a considerable increase in the number of residential and recreational building lots realized over last year.
Lands Branch Subdivision Surveys
Table 16—Town and Rural Roadside Lots
Bear Lake (PrinceGeorge)   11
Port Hardy  3 3
Princeton  7
Bear Lake (vicinity)   17
Kitimat  118
Powell River  3 2
Purden Mountain  16
Kamloops  9
Fort Nelson   2
Summit Lake (waterfront)   7
252
In West Vancouver, two surveys were conducted to enable an exchange of
land—139 acres as an access corridor to Cypress Park and a 120-acre parcel required by the City for reservoir purposes. A 10-acre lot was posted on Milburn
Mountain, and a 79-acre lot surveyed at Enderby.
Lands Branch Miscellaneous Surveys
On Vancouver Island, levelling and profile work were done on an existing
Crown subdivision at Beaver Harbour, and at Ladysmith, Weirs Beach, and in the
Industrial Reserve in Victoria surveys were made to determine the extent of fill on
Crown foreshore. The location of improvements relative to the boundaries of
Crown-leased lots along approximately 1,000 feet of waterfront at Cowichan Bay
was determined in order to assist the Inspection Branch in resolving a problem of
multiple encroachments. Elsewhere in the Province a subdivision was made at
Rock Creek to dedicate a portion of highway from a lease area going to grant, and
at Westbridge a 66-foot strip was surveyed out of a lease lot for a reserve along the
Kettle River. A boundary of an ecological reserve was posted and flagged near
Summerland, and at Squamish a survey was made to determine if occupation on a
Crown-granted lot conflicted with an Indian Reserve boundary. The conventionalized upland boundary in Twin Bays on Kootenay Lake was posted as a result of a
Supreme Court decision concerning the ownership of the beach area in favour of
the Crown. In Gold Bridge Townsite, groups of small lots were reposted to permit
Crown leases of viable units. An inspection survey was conducted in the Ashcroft
area, considered necessary by the Legal Surveys Division.
To enable a large land exchange to be completed, 8.7 miles of Forest Service
road and 30.7 miles of access roads for the Fish and Wildlife Branch had to be
surveyed for elimination by Gazette.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Z 55
Interdepartmental Surveys
Several assignments were accepted from the Department of Housing; however,
a policy change became necessary when it was apparent that the anticipated volume
of work planned by that department would strain our resources beyond the point
where our obligations to the Lands Branch could be met. Work undertaken included the contouring and subsequent subdivision into 57 lots of an area at Port
McNeill, and a similar job in the Marigold area of Saanich involving 33 acres was
completed to permit replotting under the Municipal Act. A 4-mile perimeter
boundary posting was carried out in the Roy Road area of Saanich preparatory to
proposed subdivision, and a 10-acre perimeter survey and site plan were prepared
for a parcel near Squamish.
For the Department of Public Works, posting and consolidation surveys were
made in Victoria at Humboldt and Blanshard Streets, at Pandora Avenue and
Blanshard Street, and at Burdett Avenue and Blanshard Street. At Penticton the
property occupied by the courthouse was posted, and an extensive survey was carried out in Burnaby to consolidate and define a 156-acre parcel from the Oakalla
Prison Farm property. A small parcel was surveyed out of the Indian Reserve
at Fort Nelson for the Department of Highways, and near Fort St. John the British
Columbia Land Commission required a survey to acquire a 16-acre greenbelt parcel.
For the Parks Branch a 110-acre parcel was subdivided off private ownership for
park purposes at Otter Lake near Princeton, and for the B.C. Hospital Service an
area presently occupied by the George Derby Hospital was surveyed to permit
control to be transferred from the Federal to the Provincial Government. Several
assignments received from the Forest Service regrettably could not be undertaken
due to overcommitment of our services. A ranger station site of 16 acres was
surveyed near Squamish. The single most extensive survey undertaken was for the
Water Rights Branch. It involves the acquisition of property in Delta, fronting on
Boundary Bay, required for dyke construction and improvement purposes. The
work extends along 12 miles of waterfront and entails some 65 individual survey
plans.
Highway Surveys
The control traverse and monumentation of the Stewart-Cassiar Highway,
commenced in 1973, was continued for 43 miles this year, and is now completed
to a point 26.4 miles north of Dease Lake. Beyond this the highway is subject to
relocation and upgrading, and until this is done, our operations in that area will
necessarily be suspended. The Surveys and Mapping Branch is grateful to the
Department of Highways, the B.C. Forest Service, and to the British Columbia
Railway for assistance provided in the maintenance of our camp and crew at Dease
Lake.
Restoration Surveys
There was a total of 16 district lot corners renewed by our field staff in the
course of the year's field program. It was not possible to assign a party from
Legal Surveys to carry out restoration work in a selected area due to pressure of
other work. Funds provided in the year's budget for restoration work were therefore
committed to obtain such work from private surveyors, under instructions from the
Surveyor-General. Two areas were chosen—one just east of Vanderhoof and the
other south and west of Pouce Coupe.
 Z 56
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
FIELD  OPERATIONS DIVISION
A. D. Wight, B.C.L.S., Chief
The accomplishment of the Division for the 1974 season was highlighted by
a 30-per-cent increase in the number of air photographs and completion of the
Provincial primary control covering 34 standard National Topographic Series map-
sheets. At the current rate of progress on primary control, the Province will be
covered by a control network with an average density of one point per hundred
square miles by the year 1980. Thirty-five per cent of the uncontrolled area is in
the northwestern sector adjacent to the Alaska boundary, while 50 per cent is in
the southeastern sector of the Province.
The Provincial 40-chain air photo cover is 90 per cent complete. However,
50 per cent of the existing photography is more than 10 years old and out of date
for most applications. Of the outdated photography, 30 per cent is more than 15
years old, technically obsolete, and of limited historic value because the acetate film
base has become brittle and is susceptible to cracking when handled.
MAPPING CONTROL
The primary control party operated in the northern part of the Province and
occupied 171 stations in National Topographic Map-sheet 94B and the west halves
of 94C and 94J. The party employed an Alouette II turbine-powered helicopter
which flew 265 hours to transport the observing crews over the accomplished 1,770
miles of traverse.
Base camps were established at Hudson Hope, Mile 147 on the Alaska Highway, and Fort Nelson.   Torrential rains which flooded the northeastern part of the
■■■■■■■■■I
<sj;  :J-^p
'-*S^fc^^^.5'?''!»3> 3fNp
Wi.      -   '■-...
■&&'**'       «SK«-
Looking southwest from Station Whiteface, vicinity of Mount Lady Laurier
(headwaters of Graham River).
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Z 57
;.:,-..■■.
l*tt_____B?£&;
■ ■                ...-.--■-.           -  ■ .-
-   -7-  ^
"""*"""■ ■                       ."_                                                            ■                ' • ' 3
■ ":*   ~
Station Deadman on Mount Trimble, looking southwest toward Mount McCusker
(south of Redfern Lake).
Province forced the evacuation of the base camp established at Mile 147 when the
waters of the Beatton River rose 12 feet over a period of 12 hours. The Government's Otter aircraft was assigned to this party, while working out of Fort Nelson,
to supplement crew transportation and for taking low-level identification photography of all control points.
Field survey control was completed for the following large and intermediate
scale mapping projects:
At the request of the Environment and Land Use Committee Secretariat,
control was generated in and around the Towns of Vanderhoof,
Burns Lake, Houston, Telkwa, and Smithers, also the Terrace area,
including Lakelse Lake, Kitsumkalum Valley to Treston Lake, and
up the Skeena Valley to Usk for 1:2,500 scale mapping.
Control for 1:12,000 scale mapping was completed for the Parks Branch
of the Department of Recreation and Conservation.   It covered Cape
Scott Park, Desolation Sound Park, a portion of Wells Gray Park,
Elk Lakes Park, and an extension to an existing map series in the
Red Pass-Mount Robson area.    Seven site plans were compiled by
field surveys for the Department of Public Works and five projects
were completed for the Special  Services  Division  of the  Lands
Service.
Other projects completed for Government Departments were Roy Road development for the Department of Housing, Mud Bay area for the Fish and Wildlife
Branch of the Department of Recreation and Conservation, and the Port Edward
townsite for the Department of Municipal Affairs.  The flood plain at Alta Lake was
also defined for the Department of Municipal Affairs.
Two parties were assigned to the Integrated Survey Program and completed
priority sections in the City of Kelowna and the District of Matsqui.   The project
 Z 58 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
at Kelowna was an expansion of Integrated Survey Area 4 and designed as the first
stage in extending the Integrated System to the surrounding areas which were
recently incorporated into the city. Two hundred and seventy-three permanent control monuments were co-ordinated on the North American Datum through survey
ties to the Primary Geodetic network. Because the vertical control extended beyond
the limits of reliability for third-order levelling, and because the Geodetic bench
marks were not sympathetic over the area, a network of second-order levels was run
to establish 26 bench marks which now form the primary datum for vertical control
in the City of Kelowna.
The party operating in the District of Matsqui controlled an area of approximately 16 square miles in the centre of the district surrounding Clearbrook. There
were 220 monuments co-ordinated and their elevations established from the geodetic
datum.
A reconnaissance of the City of Vernon to design a control network for an
Integrated Survey System was carried out on request from the City of Vernon. The
recommended network comprised 200 locations at which the city will be responsible
for constructing monuments.
The Division established a 100-metre chain standardization base and an electronic distance-measuring base in the City of Prince George. A standard 300-foot
base in the District of Surrey was calibrated and authorized for use by the Surveyor-
General.
The British Columbia-Yukon-Northwest Territories boundary maintenance
program on the 60th parallel was administered by the Division and the field party
was under the direction of a staff member. The balance of the crew were auxiliary
employees. Sixty boundary monuments were inspected and the reference markers
restored where necessary; in addition, 83 miles of line were recut between the Lower
Liard River Crossing at Watson Lake eastward to Tropical Creek.
Station Kelly, east slope of Rocky Mountains overlooking the Muskwa River valley.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Z 59
Interior of Beechcraft King Air Model 200 in photographic configuration.
  SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Z 61
AIR SURVEY SECTION
The aerial photographic operation underwent major changes during the 1974
season. Two Beechcraft King Air Model 200's were added to the Government's
fleet of aircraft and assigned to the photographic operation. The first aircraft was
operational in early July and the second one by August 7. The new aircraft have
a speed of 325 miles per hour and an operating ceiling of 32,000 feet. The increased performance was a major contribution toward the record production of
59,452 new aerial photographs exposed during the season.
The increased performance, all-weather capability, and dual camera installation of the aircraft provide operational flexibility which is not totally revealed by an
increase in the number of exposures. The ratio between the number of photographs
to the square miles of coverage for the Forest Inventory 20-chain program increased
from 1.01 in 1973 to 1.18 last year. In addition, 13,150 square miles of 40-chain
photography were completed in the northwest corner of the Province, where time
on photography is relatively low in relation to total flight times.
OK
Floating ice on Peace River, January 1975.
 Z 62
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Throughout the Province, 157 special projects requiring 19,473 photographs
to cover a total of 11,541 lineal miles were completed. Of the special projects, 46
per cent of the photography was requested by the Water Investigations Branch of
this Department, 14 per cent by the Department of Recreation and Conservation,
9 per cent by the Lands Service, 6 per cent by the Department of Highways, and the
remaining 25 per cent by all other departments. A detailed listing of the projects
by departments is appended.
Wild RC8 camera in Lear Jet camera door.
Photographic accomplishment was extended further by the lease of a Lear Jet
for small-scale photography on which the special camera door constructed by this
Division in 1972 was installed. During the two-month lease, 82,600 square miles
of 1:70,000 scale photography were completed and approximately 80 per cent of
the completed area was high-priority work in the poor weather zone in the north
coastal area. The high-level program was extremely successful, but a restriction
on the use of the photography to Provincial Government departments and agencies
was imposed by the Air Transport Committee as a condition to the importing of an
American aircraft.
SURVEY CONTROL SECTION
Final adjustments of horizontal and vertical control established by field surveys
during the season are completed or under way. Revision of old survey networks
and their incorporation into the Data Bank covered areas in the vicinity of Quesnel,
Vancouver Island, the Okanagan Valley, and coastal triangulation adjacent to the
Strait of Georgia.
Checked during the year were 160 wellsite surveys submitted by private
surveyors under the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act.
Four students employed under the Student Employment Program were assigned
to the Section and correlated the data to enter all the geodetic and Provincial bench
marks in the Control Data Bank.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Z 63
Instrument shop used to maintain and modify Surveys and Mapping Branch equipment.
 Z 64 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 17—Accomplishments of Air Survey Section
Number of
Photos
Lineal
Miles
Square
Miles
A. 80-chain vertical cover—
Environment and Land Use Committee:
Gulf Islands  	
Iskut-Bell Irving (104A, B)	
Nass (93M, N, 1030, P)	
Queen Charlotte Islands	
Skeena (93K, L, 1031, J)	
Stikine (104G, J)	
Vancouver Island (92B, C, K, L)	
Subtotals	
Lands Service:
Cariboo (93G )  	
Chilcotin (92N, O, P, 93A).	
Subtotals	
Totals	
B. 40-chain vertical cover—
Forest Surveys and Inventory Division:
Alsek PSYU	
Dease PSYU  	
Taku-Boundary PSYU 	
Totals	
C. 20-chain vertical cover—
Forest Surveys and Inventory Division:
Big Bar PSYU	
BowronPSYU	
Burns Lake PSYU  	
Cariboo Reforestation	
Dean PSYU 	
Kamloops PSYU	
Narcosli PSYU  	
Nechako-Westlake-Kluskus PSYU	
Okanagan-Kettle PSYU	
Shuswap PSYU	
Skeena PSYU 	
Smithers PSYU	
Stum PSYU  	
TFL 1 	
Totals	
D. Special projects—
Department of Agriculture:
Fraser Valley raspberry fields .	
Smithers transects 	
Vancouver Island transects	
Attorney General's Department: Richmond
B.C. Hydro and Power Authority:
Kootenay Canal  	
Mica transmission-line	
Pend-d'Oreille -
UBC Forest 	
B.C. Land Commission: Central Okanagan
Department of Education:	
BCIT Forest	
Deep Cove  	
Environment and Land Use Committee:
Terrace 	
Vancouver Island 	
Department of Finance:
Kootenay Lake	
Quadra-Maurelle Island	
Saltery Bay	
Forest Service:
Kluskus   	
Mica Pondage	
Morice River Road	
Soo Fire	
Department of Highways:
Ashcroft -	
Avalanche areas	
Blue River —	
Burns Lake	
Cache Creek   :...
Cassiar Road	
Clearwater	
105
435
405
270
1,000
385
175
915
3,690
2,380
2,290
1,070
1,680
2,995
2,590
500
4,895
6,820
1,730
130
260
1.940
7.010
33,910
198(C)!
289
270(C)
30
103
39
165
34
165
28
33
432
23
130
180
156
190
310
277
815
7
354
7
50
6
210
9
59
78
70
7
15
21
54
10
255
20
11
220
287
220
300
130
176
258
160
181
5
564
5
24
5
120
7
2,400
10,100
9,350
6,125
20,650
9,000
3,650
2,775
61,275
	
85
2,250
830
19,100
21,350
82,625"
1,650
3,350
8,150
13,150
3,090
1,285
2,350
2,600
3,365
650
6,365
6,720
1,905
170
340
2,425
8,760
40,025
l (C)—Colour photography.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH Z 65
Table 17—Accomplishments of Air Survey Section—Continued
Number of
Photos
Lineal
Miles
Square
Miles
D. Special projects—Continued
Department of Highways:—Continued
Duncan 	
Fort Langley to Coquitlam 	
Fraser Highway 	
Hazelton  	
Kamloops.. 	
Kathlyn Lake   	
Penticton	
Pitt Meadows  	
Port Alice	
Powell River 	
Princeton  	
Prince Rupert 	
Prince Rupert Slide 	
Sechelt-Gibsons   	
Second Narrows 	
Smithers 	
Terrace-Hazelton...	
Department of Housing: Panama to Wilkinson .
Lands Service:
E. & N. lands   	
Esperanza Inlet 	
Fraser River gravel bar	
Government Precinct 	
Hope-Merritt Highway	
Howe Sound	
Kispiox to Kitwanga	
Kyuquot	
Ladysmith  	
Lasqueti Island 	
Libby Pondage 	
Malcolm Island....   .....
Masset Highway 	
Port Hardy to Quatsino	
'   Saanichton Bay  	
Sayward	
Sechelt Inlet 	
Thetis Island	
Thompson Sound	
Tulpana Inlet _ 	
Victoria Airport	
Windermere Lake	
Department of Municipal Affairs:
Alta Lake   	
Smithers to Telkwa to Houston	
Department of Public Works: Victoria	
Department of Recreation and Conservation:
Cape Scott  	
Chehaiis River  	
Chilcotin to Fraser 	
Desolation Sound 	
Indian River  	
Inonoaklin River	
Ispah Lake   	
Kootenay Lake 	
Mosquito Creek   	
Oyster River	
Pillar Lake  	
Redpass Revision  	
Seymour River	
Shulaps Range 	
Shuswap River  	
Silverhope River  	
Summit Lake 	
Trapp Lake  	
Trout Lake  	
Tsitika River  	
Tsuh to Eneas Lake 	
Upper Shuswap River... 	
Upper Vedder River 	
Wells Gray Park 1    	
Wells Gray Park 2  	
Widgeon Creek —	
Whiteswan to Alces Lakes 	
138
6
80
3
50
26
306
33
350(C)
42
22
100
320
75
14
33
25
15
8
55
3
48
193
161
3
16
221
96
8
73
46
15
165
17
10
1 I
67
120
580
38
195
9
109
3
270
4
29
20
110
376(C)
32
20
4
64
1
16
105
17
20
17
34
22
13
11
16
9
13
248
87
7
50
1
15
35
308
24
78
31
43
86
268
65
7
36
6
3
7
45
1
28
31
91
1
16
91
60
15
27
21
4
22
28
4
8
58
55
455
23
50
5
62
2
251
3
18
4
167
115
65
6
 Z 66 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 17—Accomplishments of Air Survey Section—Continued
Number of
Photos
Lineal
Miles
Square
Miles
D. Special projects—Continued
Department of Transport and Communications:
Airports	
Ferry terminals  	
44
51
31
47
353
262(C)
20
107(C)
25
10
25
10
11
71
20
130
189(C)
20
25
85
10
475
875
587
13
15
43(C)
70
9
15
86
23
20
30
791
18
141(C)
105
15
10
8
249
1,215
260
40
21
97
724
345
15
484
30
15
17
35
19
91
20
124
48
115
115
78
53
20
36
15
25
365
13
10
3
35
72
37
8
38
8
5
12
3
5
40
4
66
103
11
7
44
3
155
191
389
7
3
15
20
5
5
40
36
6
18
502
9
47
94
4
3
2
31
1,188
44
13
6
53
165
182
4
176
14
2
2
19
12
49
4
67
27
148
79
77
43
4
38
3
10
120
Horseshoe Bay.....	
Water Resources Service:
Alice Arm	
Aquatic weeds, Kalamalka Lake  	
Bethlehem Complex  	
Chase  -       	
Fraser River flood plain   	
Lower Cowichan     	
Merritt Flood Plain  	
Nuttal Lake  	
-
Scotty Creek   	
Victoria to Saanich _  	
19,472        |
11,542        |
Grand totals   '
59,452        |
11,542        [
135,800
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Z 67
MAP PRODUCTION DIVISION
E. R. McMinn, B.A., B.A.Sc, D.L.S., B.C.L.S., P.Eng., Chief
This Division now has a staff of 120 and in the work of making maps for
Government some 106 projects, as well as the continuing programs, produced 1,100
sheets at many scales and for many purposes. At present the Division has eight
uncompleted 1972 projects, seven uncompleted 1973 projects, nine uncompleted
1974 projects, and 60 requests to date for 1975.
Many of the requests are made at the annual interdepartmental meeting in
October, but others come in the course of events during the year, some of these
having special urgency.
Essential to a map production operation is the provision of quality air photography and good, preferably perfect, field control; in this we have the expert services
of the Field Operations Division, with which excellent liaison exists in the planning
of mapping projects.
PLANIMETRIC SECTION
Compilation—This program, which employs a staff of 15, has continued since
1946 and again met the need this year in the formidable task of handling 31,000
airphotos. Each year the work consists of preparing base maps for the Forest
Inventory crews to use the following summer; priorities are assigned and about
seven PSYU's are covered each year at either the 40-chain or 20-chain scale. New
compilation, revision, laydown only, or locating of photo centres only, may be
required, depending on detail changes or availability of improved field survey
control.
This year template laydowns were made for 275 map sheets and complete
sheets numbered 351. All photos are baselined and those for laydown common-
pointed; a duplicate set of marked photos is needed for the field crews, but this year
Forest Inventory made staff available to do this work. It is hoped that in future
this enormous and tedious job can be done on the Itek Processor.
With the acquisition this year of a Gradicon Digitizer in the Photogrammetric
Section, paid for by the Water Resources Service, a method of replacing template
laydowns was tested. A block of 200 photos for which a laydown had been made
was digitized, and the adjustment to varying control layouts effected by a computer
program. Co-ordinate values for the same points were available from a precise
A7 Aerotriangulation, which was accepted as correct. The displacement of the
digitized block using eight control points was 120' maximum and 60' average and
the displacement of the template assembly using 25 control points was 150' with
60' average; a position error of 2 chains is allowable at the 40-chain scale. Time
saving for handling 30,000 photos by the analytic method would be about 500
man-days.
Cadastral compilation—Sixteen persons are employed in the preparation of
manuscripts, grids, and control, for the base mapping and, at the final stage, the
draughting enhancement of the sheets, the compilation being intially in ink. The
group also prepares and keeps up to date the lot structure of all of the 20- and
40-chain sheets of the Province, and these are added to the new sheets. Work
related to this compilation is the addition of lots to the 1:50,000 sheets sent to us
from Ottawa, British Columbia being the only province that requires, or is able to
add, the lot structure on these maps. Some 111 map sheets were so completed
this year.    A further task is the preparation of new land reference maps for the
 Z 68 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Legal Surveys Division to maintain a graphic record of transactions in Crown land.
This 12-year program was started three years ago as a 40-chain replacement of the
old 1 mile to 1 inch series; scale was changed this year to 1:25,000 and 1:12,500.
In 1974 some 145 sheets were completed, with 44 in hand. In connection with
large-scale topographic mapping, cadastral overlays are usually needed. These
are prepared by original compilation or by adopting and updating existing composite
maps, which requires redraughting. This year 161 map sheets were produced and
44 were revised. We retain about 1,000 of these sheets accumulated during the
past years.
PHOTOGRAMMETRIC SECTION
This Section of 19, including a Programmer-Analyst, is now fully equipped
with modern instruments. Two shifts are in operation. Equipment consists of a
Wild A7 with a digital read-out by Flexowriter, three Wild B8S plotters, one with
connection to a Gradicon digitizer; two Kern PGII plotters, one with a Cybernex
digitizer, display screen, tele-type, and Inter-Data mini computer, and one Zeiss
Topocart at present hooked up with an Orthophoto plotter on trial. Auxiliary
equipment is a Gradicon table, an Aristo Coordinatograph with a digiscale and a
Wild PUG transfer device. Computations are programmed for the IBM 370-145.
In the year, 1,500 overlaps were processed in 47 projects, the largest clients being
Highways, Recreation and Conservation, and Water Resources Service, each taking
about 20 per cent of our output. Many projects are delivered at the compilation
stage, so as to avoid fairdrawing in ink, if possible. Experiments are continuing
with ink compilation and on all large projects of continuing use, where contours
and planimetry are in separation, a metric contour sheet is being produced.
DRAUGHTING SECTION
The largest Section of the Division, 29, is responsible for the lithographic
program in British Columbia, the fairdrawing of large-scale topographic mapping
and of Integrated Survey plans for deposit in the Land Registry Offices. It also
carries out general draughting involved in land capability folios for the Lands
Branch and in enhancement of sketches, indexes, illustrations, boundaries, and
mosaics. This fiscal year 25 new maps will be published and 12 reprints. Included
is the new B.C. Wall Map at a scale of 1:1,000,000, which is selling at 200 copies
a month. The latest reprinting this year of SGS1, the Vancouver Island Map,
brings the total of that sheet to 76,830, of which 56,000 have been sold. The
1:125,000 and 1:250,000 sheets now in hand have metric interpolated contours.
Fairdrawing of 336 sheets of large-scale mapping, three Integrated Survey Plans,
and 78 sheets of land capability folios were completed.
The lithographic mapping program is the only project done that is initiated
by the Division rather than performed as a direct service to other departments. The
cartographic draughting is of high standard and the 1:125,000, 1:250,000,
1:500,000, and 1:1,000,000 sheets compare favourably with any in the world.
The origin of the program is the Departmental responsibility to produce maps
showing ownership status of land and the map series is unique in that a 7 to 10-year
revision cycle is attempted.
Special requests for lithographic work this year were received from Department of Mines for their coal reserves study and from Department of Recreation
and Conservation for a booklet atlas to accompany new regulations.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Z 69
MAPS AND AIR PHOTO REPRODUCTION AND SALES
This Section is responsible for the vast amounts of paper copy consumed by
departments and pressures of new programs in Government eventually surface here
as requisitions for airphotos, enlargements, colour prints, film positives, photo-copy,
whiteprints, contract documents, job printing, and reports. The Section of 26
persons, enlarged in the summer by temporary help, is continually being further
equipped, but the requests grow at a faster rate. Further expansion of our service
is not possible because of our inability to acquire space or shift workers. Demand
for maps and airphotos increased 17 per cent and 30 per cent to new records;
airphoto production rose to 412,000 prints. Half of the map sales and one quarter
of the airphoto sales are to the public, but other reproduction work is almost wholly
for departments, the Lands, Forests, and Water Resources Service taking 30 per cent
of the whiteprints, 90 per cent of the offset work, and 30 per cent of the photocopy.
Lists of mapping projects and of published maps, and other statistics of map
production, are appended to this Report.
Table 18—Forest Inventory 20-chain Mapping Program
PSYU
COMPILATION (31,000 PHOTOS)
Number of
Laydown
Map Sheets
Windermere      55
Narcosli Extension      24
Babine   110
Soo      74
TFL 2     12
Robson/Canoe   	
Big Bar	
Number of
Map Sheets
Detail Plotted
110
74
12
110
45
Totals  275
351
DRAUGHTING
Finished sheets   347
Grids prepared   267
Grids for 1975 mapping   803
PM
80
PM
81
PM
88
PM
89
PM
90
PM
91
PM
92
PM
93
PM
94,95
PM
96
PM
97
PM
98
PM
99
PM
100
Table 19—Mosaics
Map Sheets
Strathcona Provincial Park  3
Fort St. John area  22
Mud Bay  7
Dease Lake   ____
Terrace District Municipality 	
Ocean Falls/Roscoe Inlet  .__
Hazelton and vicinity  __
Okanagan-Kalamalka Lakes   5
Queen Charlotte City  ....
Nicomekl and Serpentine Rivers  3
Vanderhoof and vicinity   14
Hudson Bay Mountain  ...
Skwawka River  ....
Victoria-Highland District  2
 Z 70
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 20—Land Reference Maps
In Hand
1:12,500   15
1:25,000   24
1:50,000       5
40-chain 	
Totals  44
1 Not delivered.
Finished1
Delivered
6
46
70
14
9
66
79
Table 21—Large-scale Cadastral Overlays
Map Sheets
Denman Island Photogrammetric (with contours)   11
Highlands Photogrammetric (with contours)   39
Alta Lake Photogrammetric (with contours)   7
Meziadin Lake Photogrammetric (with contours)   7
Desolation Sound Photogrammetric (with contours)   5
Cormorant Island Photogrammetric  2
Queen Charlotte Islands Photogrammetric  70
Quatsino Photogrammetric  1
Cortes Island 20-chain enlarged  10
Gambier Island 20-chain enlarged  9
Totals  161
REVISION
Sunshine Coast   40
Squamish   17
Hornby Island      2
Totals   59
1:50,000 FEDERAL GOVERNMENT MAPS (CADASTRAL ADDED)
82F/16
82G/12-13
82L/12W, 13W, 16
92E/1E, 7E, 8-10, 14-16
92F/1-16
92G/1-9
92H/3-6, 11-14
92J/4-6, 11, 13-14
92K/3-6, 10-11, 13, 15-16
92L/1-8, 10-13
92M/11-16
92N/4-5, 12-13
92P/1-3
93C/4
93E/3-4
931/3-6
93N/1-10, 12, 14-16
930/4-5
102I/8E, 9, 16    111
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Z 71
Table 22—Topographic Mapping, 47 Projects
No.
Project
For
Scale
Contour
Interval
Statusi
M251 (add.)
Highways
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
Highways
Rec. & Con.
Highways
Rec. & Con.
Rec. & Con.
Rec. & Con.
Rec. & Con.
Mun. Affairs
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
Mun. Affairs
Highways
Mines
Parks
Parks
Parks
Parks
Housing
Housing
Highways
Parks
Highways
Forest Engineering
Mun. Affairs
Hydro
Highways
W.I.B.
Forest Engineering
Map Production
Mun. Affairs
Mines
Map Production
Highways
Mun. Affairs
Highways
Lands
W.I.B.
Highways
Highways
W.I.B.
1:4800
1:1200
1:6000
1:6000
1:1200
1:12000
1:1200
1:2400
1:12000
1:2400
1:12000
1:2400
1:12000
1:2400
1:12000
1:2400
1:2400
1:2400
1:2400
1:6000
1:4800
1:1200
1:1200
1:15840
1:12000
1:12000
1:12000
1:12000
1:2400
1:480
1:2400
1:1200
1:2400
1:4800
1:6000
Bridging
1:4800
1:2400
1:5000
1:5000
1:2500
1:15840
1:12500
1:4800
1:2500
1:4800
1:4800
1:6000
1:4800
1:1200
1:2500
10'
2'
10', 20', 100'
10', 20', 100'
5'
20'
5'
5'
10'
5'
10'
10'
20'
5'
10'
5'
2', 5'
2', 5'
2', 5'
10'
5', 10'
Spot
5'
5'
100'
20'
20'
20'
20'
10'
2'
Profiles
5'
10'
10', 20'
20'
10'
5'
10m
2m
50'
20m
5'
2m
10'
20'
10'
10'
5'
lm, 5m
C
72-2T
72-5T
72-6T
72-67T
Creston „	
Vernon Creek	
Continuation of M13-Pent., U.S.A	
Parksville Qual. (add.)	
I,P
IP
IP
c
73-10T
Extension of M36, M37	
C
73-17T
IP
73-45T
IP
73^t6T
IP
IP
73^t8T
73-49T
73-66T
Carp Lake	
Boya Lake ...
Extension of M180 (Highlands)	
IP
C
C
C
C
C
73-73T
C
73-74T
C
73-75T
c
73-77T
IP
73-81T
73-84T
Kamloops Floodplain	
IP
IP
c
73-8 6T
c
74-1T
Sustut (add. to 73-35T)...
c
74^tT
IP
75-5T
c
74-6T
IP
74-9T
Wells Gray Park   	
IP
74-30T
c
74-39T
c
74-42T
c
74-43T
c
74^4T
c
74^»5T
Gold River	
c
74^17T
74^t8T
Alta Lake extension	
B.C. Hydro	
c
c
74-52T
Little Fort	
c
74-53T
c
74-54T
74-59C
74-60T
74-65T
Duhamel Creek	
Quatsino	
Burns Lake	
93N 10 (part)	
c
c
c
c
74-70T
Shack Bay	
c
74-72T
c
74-78T
74-79T
Vanderhoof	
Little Fort (add.)	
c
c
74-91T
c
74-93T
c
74-102T
c
74-108T
c
74-109T
IP
1 C—complete; IP—in progress.
Number
Department of projects
Highways   11
Rec. & Con. (Parks)   10
W.I.B.   12
Housing  2
Municipal Affairs  5
Number
Department of projects
Forest Engineering   2
Map Production   2
B.C. Hydro  1
Mines  2
Total   47
Film diapositives used in 1974, 1,500
 Z 72 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 23—Lithographed Maps Published in 1974
Map No.
Name
Edition
Scale
Contour
Interval
Remarks
*82E/SW
•82E/NW
*82F/SE
*82F/NW
T82G/SW
•82G/NW-NE
•82K/SE
*82K/SW
t92C/NE-NW-SE
t92F/SW
t92I/NW
t82M
I83D-C
*93M
t94H
t94I
t94J
t94K
t94N
t940
194P
tl031-J
tl03F
*1A
*1B
Penticton..	
Kelowna 	
Creston	
Slocan	
Elko	
Cranbrook	
Lardeau _	
Nakusp	
Nitinat Lake	
Kennedy Lake	
Ashcroft	
Seymour Arm	
McNaughton Lake	
Hazelton 	
Beatton River	
Fontas River...	
Fort Nelson	
Tuchodi Lakes..	
Toad River  	
Maxhamish Lake	
Petitot River.. 	
Prince Rupert-Terrace
Graham Island—	
B.C. Wall Map...   	
Northwestern B.C	
Third
Third
Second
Second
Second
Second
Second
Second
First
First
Third
Second
Second
Third
First
First
First
First
First
First
First
Third
Second
1974
1973
125,000
125,000
125,000
125,000
125,000
125,000
125,000
125,000
125,000
125,000
125,000
250,000
250,000
250,000
250,000
250,000
250,000
250,000
250,000
250,000
250,000
250,000
250,000
1,000,000
10 miles
200'
200'
200'
200'
200'
200'
200'
200'
50m
50m
50m
500'
500'
500'
50m
50m
150m
150m
150m
50m
50m
150m
500'
Complete revision.
Complete revision.
Complete revision.
Complete revision.
Complete revision.
Complete revision.
Complete revision.
Complete revision.
Seven colours, contoured.
Seven colours, contoured.
Complete revision.
Complete revision.
Complete revision.
Complete revision.
Seven colours, contoured.
Seven colours, contoured.
Seven colours, contoured.
Seven colours, contoured.
Seven colours, contoured.
Seven colours, contoured.
Seven colours, contoured.
Complete revision.
Complete revision.
Complete revision.
Partial revision.
REPRINTS
•82L/SE
Sugar Lake	
Second          1
125,000
100'
No revision.
*82L/SW
Vernon  	
Second          1
125,000
100'
No revision.
*92H/NW
Yale  	
Second          1
125,000
100'
No revision.
*921/SW
Lytton	
Second          1
125,000
100'
No revision.
*82M
Seymour Arm	
First            1
250,000
500'
No revision.
t92B-C
Victoria	
Second          1
250,000
500'
No revision.
*92N
First            1
250,000
500'
*93E
250,000
250,000
500'
*93F
Nechako River	
500'
No revision.
*93G
First            1
250,000
500'
t93I
Monkman Pass	
First           1
250,000
500'
No revision.
•93J
McLeod Lake	
First            1
250,000
500'
No revision.
t93N
Manson River	
First           1
250,000
500'
No revision.
•103F
Graham Island 	
First            1
250,000
500'
No revision.
tlE
1972              1
1968              1
1969
1971
0 miles
0 miles
4 miles
5 miles
500', 1,000'
tlG
t3E
•SGS1
: Lithographed during 1974.
" Will be lithographed between Januaryl, 1975, and March 31,
1975.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Table 24—Map and Air Photo Sales
Litho Map Distribution
Requisitions Provincial Federal
Public sales   11,125 64,104 27,664
Government departments      6,705 68,301 52,366
17,830        132,405 80,030
212,435
White Print Maps
Requisitions Prints
Mail and counter sales      1,602 15,527
Government departments   12,628        351,019
14,230        366,546
Offset
Number   535        2,471,395
Photo Reproduction
Mail and counter sales        17 552
Government departments   5,136        87,835
5,153        88,387
Air Photo Distribution
Requisitions 9X9 Enlarged Colour
Public sales   3,949        108,919 966 817
Government departments   2,325        294,670        3,789        3,784
6,274        403,589        4,755        4,601
Diapositives
Requisitions        Public Government Total
Number   292        3,847        1,987        5,834
Air Photo Rentals
Requisitions Public Departments Total
Number   2,146        19,860        52,622        72,482
Total requisitions  46,460 Counter sales     $31,549.29
Letters inward   12,555 Total cash sales ._ $270,139.59
Z 73
 Z 74 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 25—Reproduction Work for Departments
Department
Whi
teprints
Offset
Photographic
Requisitions
Prints
Requisitions
Prints
Requisitions
Prints
97
1,934
3
5
4
7
202
421
78
825
337
1,055
211
87
445
506
157
729
64
17
95
63
	
	
	
15
62
8
2,142
757
3,925
1,321
1,415
1,464
390
38
492
291
172
54
1,602
	
973
141
97,243
12,227
54,614
21,435
24,844
22,397
4,782
1,318
97,159
5,503
4,840
1,609
15,527
33
650
10
196
163
58
50
10
6,440
469,085
759,468
401,140
612,342
57,840
17,023
493
10,656
4,337
10,727
1,800
273
Mines	
3
5
6
32
2
600
12,150
15,625
136,205
500
3,506
10,466
14,570
Public Works	
12,260
868
Public           	
552
Totals	
14,230
366,546
535
2,471,395
5,153
88,387
 1300
(D
O
O
C
0
$
D
  UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
Z 77
UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
R. P. Murdoch, Project Manager
During the year under review a grant was obtained from the Department of
Labour under their Innovation '74 Program. This grant allowed us to undertake
a project of upgrading the trails in the University Endowment Lands to a point
which would allow access on an all-weather basis. The map on page Z 78 shows
the approximate 4 miles of trails worked on, which are located in the natural park
area south of 16th Avenue. The program has been well received by the public
who use the trails as footpaths and bridle paths.
The normal municipal maintenance continues to be carried out, and during
1974 an extensive recapping program was undertaken with all the roads in the part
of the Lands known as "Little Australia" receiving a 2-inch lift. The boulevard
trees have grown to a point where their root structure is causing a considerable
amount of damage to the road surface and the sidewalks. This damage will necessitate continuation of the recapping program throughout the developed area.
The Provincial Bureau of Transit is continuing to review and assess public
transportation throughout the Greater Vancouver Regional Area, and during 1974
a substantial upgrading of both the number of routes and the frequency of service
was implemented in the University Endowment Lands.
There are, at present, 11,000 automobiles parked each day on the University
of British Columbia campus. This places a considerable stress on the arterial
roadways and the parking facilities. Over the next few years it is the intention to reduce the number of parking stalls which will be available. This must be done in an
orderly fashion and can only be achieved with the upgrading of public transportation available to those requiring it. Consequently, planning continues in conjunction with the Department of Highways to upgrade the arterial roadways making
them suitable for adequate public transportation. This introduces another problem,
namely, that of appropriate street lighting, which must also be considered.
The ambulance service rendered by the Endowment Lands Fire Department
has been brought under the provisions of the Ambulance Service Act, and in 1974
responded to 170 emergency calls. The Fire Department is presently being brought
up to an acceptable manpower standard. Temporary accommodation for the expanded staff has been provided at the existing fire hall site.
During 1974, Phase 2 of the golf course renovation program was commenced
with three new holes and a practice range completed. The renovation program has
now reached a point that no additional work can be undertaken on the course until
such times as a clubhouse is erected at the new control site.
Table 25 shows the comparative summary of building permits issued for the
last three years and Table 26 shows the comparison of revenue for the last 10 years.
 Z 78 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 25—Number and Value of Building Permits Issued for the Calendar Years
1972, 1973, and 1974
1972
1973
1974
Number
Value
Number
Value
Number
Value
2
26
1
2
2
8
$
3,627,000
18
2
1
2
1
$
1
17
3
3
$
150,000
195,230
139,875
6,150
105,000
14,000
39,700
106,480
44,300
6,000
5,000
7,000
Alterations and additions to schools	
9,000
Swimming-pools 	
24,500
Totals    	
41
3,931,725
24
168,780
24
378,730
 UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
Z 79
K
•n
On
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tu
£
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tu
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oa\<r-'-<rJrJm<NMp~
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 Z 80 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
 PERSONNEL OFFICE
Z 81
PERSONNEL SERVICES
R. C. Webber, Director
LANDS SERVICE
This office provides personnel services to the Water Resources Service and the
Secretariat to the Environment and Land Use Committee as well as to the Lands
Service. A close liaison is also maintained between the Department and the Public
Service Commission through this office.
The following table summarizes the principal Lands Service activities of this
office in 1974, and provides a comparison with the previous three years:
Table 27—Personnel Services Activities
1971
1972
1973
1974
62
65
28
8
12
6
29
4
45
44
54
16
10
13
4
31
3
68
65
54
25
10
18
24
38
6
59
89
71
Promotions —  	
48
10
27
29
32
6
139
Labour Relations
With the passing of the Public Service Labour Relations Act in the fall of
1973, the way was clear for collective bargaining in the British Columbia Government. Two of the three bargaining units established by this legislation have a major
influence on the Lands Service staff. The first of these to get under way was the
British Columbia Government Employees' Union, which signed a master agreement
on June 28, 1974. This office was involved to a limited extent with management's
input into the master agreement, but became fully involved with several of the
component agreements, particularly the Engineering, Technical and Inspectional,
the Environment, Resource and Conservation, and the Educational and Scientific
Services Components. Other British Columbia Government Employee Union
components affecting the Service are Trades and Crafts, Operational Services,
Administrative Fiscal and Regulatory, and Administrative Support.
Additionally, the British Columbia Government Professional Employees' Association started negotiating its master agreement in July and at year-end the first
contract had not yet been signed. The British Columbia Government Professional
Employees' Association agreement covers a number of the Service's employees,
namely, Land Officers, Engineers, Planning Officers, and Surveyors, and many
hours of the Director's time were spent in providing management input into these
negotiations.
Recruitment and Selection
Recruitment of continuous staff increased 36.9 per cent and appointments of
temporary and summer staff greatly increased by 135.6 per cent over 1973. The
increase in temporary appointments was largely due to the Department of Labour's
Careers '74 Program, which provided funds to take on summer help in addition to
that which had been budgeted by the Service.
 Z 82
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Difficulties were encountered in recruiting for some professional and technical
positions such as Land Officers, qualified Map Draughtsmen, and Mapping Assistants experienced with plotting-machines. The major reason for this was the large
differential that existed between external and Provincial salaries brought about by
protracted negotiations prior to the signing of the various collective agreements. At
the end of the year several collective agreements were still unsigned, although
progress was being made.
New Positions Established
The Personnel Office:
Director, Personnel Services
R. C Webber
Personnel Officer
(Vacant)
Personnel Officer
R. M. Renaud
Clerk 4
J. Bond
Clerk 2
D. Reichert
Clerk-Stenographer 2
M. Sledz
Clerk-Typist 1
C Wong
(Temporary)
In 1974 the staff complement of the Personnel Office increased by one Personnel Officer and one Clerk-Stenographer 2. A temporary Clerk-Typist 1 also
assisted for four months and a Personnel Officer with the Public Service Commission spent a one-month orientation period with the Personnel Office. Recruiting
for the additional Personnel Officer had been completed, but final arrangements were
not concluded at year-end.
Increases in Lands Service Establishment totalled 30 positions:
University Endowment Lands: Five Fire-fighters, four Fire Lieutenants.
Lands General Administration: One Clerk 3 (Accounts Office).
Ecological Reserves: One Biologist 5.
Lands Administration Division: One Clerk 2, one Clerk-Stenographer 2.
Map Production Division: One Driver, six Draughtsmen 3, five Mapping
Assistants 4, one Technician.
Field Operations Division: Three Engineering Aides 2, one Communication Technician 1.
Table 28—Current Service Establishment
stonaf      Technical       Clerical
Operational
Services
1                     1
76                 182                 139
....        |            3        |           4
7        |          15        |           7
50
3
4
83         1         200         1         150         1           57
1                         1
Total Service establishment, 490 positions.
 PERSONNEL OFFICE Z 83
Principal Promotions, Appointments, and Transfers Within the
Lands Service During 1974
The number of promotions within the Lands Service was up substantially from
1973 by 92 per cent.
Some of these are listed below:
N. Pearson, appointed as Associate Deputy Minister.
D. Borthwick, appointed as Special Adviser to the Lands Service.
B. Foster, appointed as Director, Ecological Reserves Program.
L. M. Warner, promoted to Regional Land Inspector, Cariboo Region.
A. G. Anderson, promoted to Regional Land Inspector, Nelson Region.
R. F. Gilmour, promoted to Regional Land Inspector, Vancouver Region.
R. N. Bose, pormoted to Regional Land Inspector, Prince Rupert Region.
Table 29—Turnover Rate by Classification Category
1972
1973
1974
Per Cent
8.5
1.5
24.4
6.3
12.2
16.3
Per Cent
14.9
5.8
14.2
17.3
11.0
17.2
Per Cent
4.8
8.6
19.2
16.7
12.4
Government-wide average 	
(!)
i Not available.
Turnover of professionals within the Service has greatly decreased in comparison to 1973. Part of the reason for this has been that fewer professional jobs have
become available outside of Government in recent months. No doubt the higher
salaries and anticipation of further salary increases and benefits as a result of collective bargaining have made employment within the Government more appealing.
There was a continued increase in technical staff turnover in 1974.
Clerical staff turnover increased significantly in 1974, but is still below the
1972 level. A high rate of turnover within this category was particularly noticeable
in the first six months of 1974 when substantial differentials existed between external
and Provincial salaries. With collective bargaining and the implementation of the
higher salary levels, the trend is reversing itself and we are now finding a significant
increase in the number of people applying for Government clerical positions.
The turnover percentage for operational services employees was slightly down
from 1973.
The Lands Service's percentage turnover, although being slightly higher in
1974 than in 1972 and 1973, is still lower than the Government-wide average.
Reclassifications
There was a 31.5 per cent increase over 1972 and 1973 in the number of
reclassifications completed. This office also had input into a major Government-
wide draughtsman series review and other major organization and classification
reviews conducted during 1974.
 Z 84
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Staff Training
Executive Development Training Plan—Four Lands Service employees are
presently on this program.
Correspondence Course in Public Administration—Two employees graduated
from this course in 1974 and two employees are presently taking the program.
Defensive Driving Course—Available to all Provincial Government employees
whose work involves a significant amount of driving. Five employees took the
course in 1974.
Staff Training Assistance
Staff training funds are available through the Public Service Commission's Staff
Training Division. Approximately 40 employees had their tuition fees reimbursed
for courses taken in 1974.
Sick Leave
The average number of days sick leave taken by Lands Service employees
increased very slightly over the 1973 rate. However, the average continues to be
lower than the Government-wide average.
Table 30-
—Sick Leave in Days per Employee
1971
1972
1973
1974
1
5.9                  5.3
6.2                  6.7
4.2
5.1
4.3
(*)
1 Not available.
 F
o
o
c_
<R
0_
D
C
o
1
1
o
F
  MAIL AND FILE ROOM
Z 87
MAIL AND FILE ROOM
David S. Preston
Letters received in the Department during 1974 amounted to 246,199, compared to 231,677 in 1973, an increase of 14,522 pieces.
In addition to recorded mail, there is the usual third-class type such as periodicals, newspapers, various reports, and personal, which is sorted through without
record being kept.
Outgoing mail generated in the Department is received and batch-sorted, and
otherwise prepared for pick up by the Provincial Government Mail Department.
Microfilming of all obsolete files has now been completed to December 31,
1963. Space gained through filming does not quite meet the daily requirements for
storage of correspondence, which indicates an early start must be made on a new
filming program.
Work load, together with relocation of filing vaults and offices in a number of
floors, made it necessary to increase staff in order to meet the demands for correspondence retrieval and restoring. The increase has proven adequate and all
requests are met on a daily basis.
Table 31—Mail and File Room Work Load
letters inward
1974
1973
10-year
Average,
1965-74
Branch—
66,094
116,614
44,024
19,467
63,097
106,127
41,520
20,933
63 295
Forests       	
124,666
36,103
Surveys and Mapping 	
22,915
Totals       	
246,199
231,677        j        246,979
1
LETTERS OUTWARD (RECORDED)
Branch—
Lands  	
Forests 	
1                            1
13,366         |            14,700                      13,532
1,400        |           2,166        1            1,854
Totals 	
14,766                  16,866
15,386
MISCELLANEOUS REPORTS
Designation—
2,555
13,077
5,979
2,870
5,047
5,022
2,607
8,814
Land classification reports  	
5,820
Totals       	
21,611
12,939
17,241
NEW FILES CREATED
Designation—
"O" files   	
6,359
1,711
554
6,322
1,628
605
7,130
1,526
1,046
8,624
8,555
9,702
Microfilm reference, 865.
  o
CO
>
CD
13
O
O
o
D
  ACCOUNTING DIVISION
Z 91
ACCOUNTING DIVISION
M. B. Maclean, Departmental Comptroller
The year 1974 was indeed busy for the Accounting Division. During the year
there had been substantial increases in staff in most divisions of the Service with
resulting increased field travel, payroll activity, and material and supply purchases.
In addition to the normal high summer activity which is characteristic of the Department, every division participated in the Innovation 74 and Experience 74 Programs
which again substantially increased the work load of the Accounting Division, particularly in respect of processing payroll data and travel claims. The additional
work load resulted in delays of payment of accounts payable of up to two and one-
half months—a situation which hopefully we will avoid in the future.
As at December 31, 1974, there were 15,275 lease accounts.
Table 32—Summary of Lands Service Net Revenue Collections for the Year
Ended December 31, 1974
$
Land leases, rentals, fees, etc  3,501,138.48
Land sales      915,420.38
Sale of maps and air photos      242,259.66
Net revenue collections  4,658,818.52
Table 33—Comparison of Revenue Collections for 10-year Period,
1965-74, Inclusive
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
2,594,341.32
3,343,672.46
2,985,996.61
3,367,912.14
3,999,273.13
3,025,000.24
4,580,312.19
4,878,666.29
4,729,570.85
4,658,818.52
 Z 92
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 34—Classification of Revenue Collections for the Year Ended
December 31, 1974
Land sales—
$ $
Country lands  768,163.44
Town lots  139,646.00
Indian Reserve cut-off    13,193.16
Land leases, rentals, fees, etc—
Foreshore leases—
Booming and log storage  677,427.95
Commercial (marinas, etc.)  679,552.10
Oyster     18,483.85
Miscellaneous_,     32,614.71
921,002.60
1,408,078.61
Land leases—•
Grazing and (or) agriculture  418,980.32
Quarrying  (limestone, sand,  and
gravel)  107,639.10
Camp-site (lodge, fishing)  2,788.00
Home-site  1,179.38
Residential  701,456.27
Miscellaneous  74,421.21
1,306,464.28
Land-use permits  771.00
Licences of occupation        23,980.36
Royalty collections      475,732.83
Bonus bids (lease tenders and auctions)      159,364.25
Easement collections        43,910.86
Fees—
Crown grant      22,895.00
Assignment     17,315.00
Miscellaneous (lease, search, etc.)._._    31,010.00
71,220.00
40,857.56
Sundry collections (occupational rental, survey charges,
etc.)	
3,530,3793.75
Sale of maps and air photos—maps, air photos, survey posts, etc      270,139.59
Gross revenue for year  4,721,521.94
Less refunds and taxes        62,703.42
Net revenue for year  4,658,818.52
 ACCOUNTING DIVISION
Z 93
Table 35—Comparison of Land Leases, Rentals, Fees, Etc., Revenue for
10-year Period, 1965-74, Inclusive
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1,462,024.93
1,514,749.69
1,917,435.31
2,189,055.75
2,553,351.23
2,283,719.11
3,093,281.59
3,268,205.08
2,906,536.84
3,501,138.48
Table 36—Comparison of Land Sales Revenue for 10-year Period,
1965-74, Inclusive
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
$
1,017,893.16
1,692,861.14
916,098.98
1,024,410.93
1,251,111.88
518,015.63
1,297,075.28
1,411,178.27
1,615,079.10
915,420.38
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1975
1,230-675-8548
   

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