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Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT for the Year Ended… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly

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Full Text

 Minister of Mines and
Petroleum Resources
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
for the Year Ended December 31
1972
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1973
 BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES
AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES
VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Hon. Leo T. Nimsick, Minister.
James T. Fyles, Deputy Minister.
J. W. Peck, Chief Inspector of Mines.
S. Metcalfe, Chief Analyst and Assayer.
E. J. Bowles, Chief Gold Commissioner.
Stuart S. Holland, Chief, Mineralogical Branch.
J. D. Lineham, Chief, Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch.
R. E. Moss, Chief Commissioner, Petroleum and Natural Gas.
 Colonel the Honourable J. R. Nicholson,
P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Mineral Industry of the Province for the year 1972
is herewith respectfully submitted.
LEO T. NIMSICK
Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources
Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources Office,
June 1,1973
 Dewi Richard Morgan died suddenly in Prince George on August 16,
1972, while in the employ of the Department as engineer in charge of the
Department's Omineca Road programme. He was born on June 10, 1905,
in South Wales and received his engineering education at the Monmouthshire
School of Mines. After serving for 23 years in various official and managerial
positions in coal mines in South Wales, he emigrated to Canada in 1947. He
spent two years with West Canadian Collieries Limited at Blairmore, Alta.,
before joining the Department at Fernie as Inspector and Resident Engineer of
the East Kootenay District. In 1967 he was transferred to Victoria as Senior
Inspector of Mines in charge of administering the Department's road and trail
programme and the grubstaking of prospectors. He retired in June 1970 and
was then employed every summer as the engineer of the Omineca Road in
north central British Columbia. Dewi Morgan was highly respected throughout
the coal-mining industry for his knowledge of the hazards of that industry.
He was a member of the Association of Professional Engineers of British
Columbia and the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. He is survived by his wife, a son, and a daughter.
 CONTENTS
Page
CHAPTER 1
Introduction      A 6
Review of the Mineral Industry       A 7
CHAPTER 2
Statistics    A 14
CHAPTER 3
Departmental Work    A 59
CHAPTER 4
Petroleum and Natural Gas    A 80
CHAPTER 5
Inspection of Mines  A 204
A 5
 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MINISTER
OF MINES AND PETROLEUM
RESOURCES, 1972
CHAPTER 1
Introduction
A Departmental report on the mineral industry in the Province has been published annually since 1874. From 1874 to 1959 it was the Annual Report of the
Minister of Mines, and since 1960 it has been the Annual Report of the Minister of
Mines and Petroleum Resources.
Starting with 1969, the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum
Resources contains a review of the mineral industry, and chapters dealing with
Statistics, Departmental Work, Petroleum and Natural Gas, and Inspection of Mines.
Technical reports on geology, mineral exploration, metal mines, placer, industrial
minerals and structural materials, and coal which formerly were included in the
Annual Report are published separately in a volume entitled Geology, Exploration,
and Mining in British Columbia. A new series of annual publications of that name
began with the 1969 volume.
This Annual Report contains a general review of the mineral industry. The
chapter on Statistics records in considerable detail all phases of the mineral production of the Province. Current and past practices in arriving at quantities and in
calculating the values of products are described.
The organization of the Department and the work of its various branches are
outlined in the chapter on Departmental Work.
The chapter on Petroleum and Natural Gas contains a general review and
records in considerable detail the development and production statistics of that
important industry.
Information concerning mine safety, fatal accidents, dangerous occurrences,
etc., and the activities of the Inspection Branch are contained in the chapter on
Inspection of Mines.
A 6
 Change
(Per Cent)
Review of the Mineral Industry
By Stuart S. Holland
Production—The value of the 1972 production of British Columbia's mineral
industry amounted to $637,168,940. A new record was established for the 11th
successive year, for the second time the annual production has exceeded half a
billion dollars, the previous year's total was exceeded by $109,205,795 or 20.7 per
cent, and the cumulative value to date has now reached $8,814,069,403.
The values of the four classes of products are as follows:
1971 1972
$ $
Metals  301,059,951 372,995,661 +23.9
Industrial minerals   21,909,767 25,752,393 +17.5
Structural materials  59,940,333 66,745,698 +11.4
Fuels  145,053,094 171,675,940 +18.4
The outstanding feature of the year was the enormous gain in quantity of copper
produced. There were also significant increases in amounts of coal and natural gas
and important gains in amounts of molybdenum, asbestos, and sand and gravel. On
the other hand there were significant decreases in the quantities produced of iron
concentrates, lead, zinc, and crude oil.
The increase in value of total metal production of $71,835,710 or 23.9 per
cent was largely due to the increased value of production of copper (despite a
further decline in the price of copper) and to a lesser degree to the increased value
of gold and molybdenum production. There were significant decreases in value of
production of iron concentrates, lead, zinc, tungsten, and mercury.
The increase in total value of industrial minerals of $3,842,626 or 17.5 per
cent resulted from gains in all commodities except fluxes. The most significant gain
was that of asbestos.
The value of structural materials increased by $6,805,365 or 11.4 per cent very
largely as a result of the increase in value of sand and gravel.
The value of fuels produced increased by $26,622,846 or 18.4 per cent as a
result of large gains in coal and natural gas production. Both quantity and value
of crude oil declined in 1972.
Total value of production will increase further in 1973. It is estimated that
the copper production will increase by 30 to 40 per cent in quantity and by 100
per cent in value and that molybdenum production will increase further. The
increased copper production will result from a full year's production from the Bell
(Newman), Bull River, Gibraltar, Lornex, Similkameen (Ingerbelle), and Sunro
mines, and of molybdenum by the resumption of maximum production at Endako
mine. Increased prices for gold, silver, and zinc should enhance production of those
metals in 1973 and production of coal and natural gas should continue to increase.
Provincial revenue—Direct revenue to the Provincial Government derived from
the entire mineral industry in 1972 was as follows:
Free miners' certificates, recording fees, lease $
rentals, assessment payments, etc.     1,758,526.49
Royalties on iron concentrates        145,225.35
A 7
 A 8
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1972
Rentals and royalties on industrial minerals and
structural materials	
Fifteen-per-cent mining tax
Coal licences and annual rentals	
Petroleum and natural gas rentals, fees, etc.
Sale of Crown reserves	
Royalties on oil, gas, and processed products ___.
Miscellaneous petroleum and natural gas fees _
Total	
520,446.90
5,686,845.43
184,444.95
8,813,383.00
20,495,662.00
15,469,938.00
42,775.00
53,117,247.12
Expenditure by the industry—The total expenditures in 1972 by the mineral
industry for exploration, development, and production were $631,054,837. Companies involved in the exploration, development, and production of metals, minerals,
and coal spent $490,658,837 and companies involved in the exploration and production of petroleum and natural gas spent $140,396,000.
Metal mining—In 1972, 41 mines produced more than 62.52 million tons of
ore. Thirteen produced more than one million tons each, of which nine were open-
pit mines, and 12 mines produced between 100,000 and one million tons each, of
which six were open-pit mines. The 15 open-pit mines produced 53.078 million
tons of ore or almost 85 per cent of the total tonnage of ore mined.
Concentrators having a total daily capacity of 95,200 tons were completed at
the following seven mines: OK (Alwin), Bell (Newman), Gibraltar, Lornex, Silver
Queen (Nadina), Similkameen (Ingerbelle), and Sunro.
During the year, mining operations were terminated by British Columbia
Molybdenum Limited at their mine at Alice Arm, OK Syndicate, at their OK
(Alwin) mine in the Highland Valley, and by Coast Copper Company Limited at
their Old Sport mine at Benson Lake, Vancouver Island.
The Trail smelter treated 1,116 tons of crude ore and 324,906 tons of concentrates from British Columbia mines as well as a large tonnage of concentrates, crude
ore, and scrap from sources outside the Province. A total of 2,088,303 tons of
concentrates was shipped to foreign smelters. Of the total metal production of the
Province, concentrates representing 56.7 per cent of the total value were shipped to
Japanese smelters and 5.7 per cent of the total value was shipped to smelters in the
United States.
Destination of British Columbia Concentrates in 1972
Smelters
Lead
Zinc
Copper
Nickel-
Copper
Iron
Tungsten
Trail
Tons
142,048
Tons
182,848
Tons
10
28,409
33,964
761,284
42,064
Tons
18,994
Tons
83,474
169,191
985,533
18,110
Tons
29
United States	
2,966
43,141
12,159
511
202
184
Totals
145,014
238,148
865,731
18,994
1,256,308
926
Molybdenum as molybdenite concentrate, molybdic oxide, and ferromolyb-
denum was shipped mainly to buyers in Europe and Japan.
Exploration and development—The rate of prospecting, mineral exploration,
and mine development activities in 1972 is displayed by the following statistics.   In
 REVIEW OF THE MINERAL INDUSTRY
A 9
general, claim recordings increased but expenditures on exploration were lower and
expenditures on mine development were very much lower in 1972 than in 1971.
Locating of mineral claims was most active in the Kamloops, Liard, and
Omineca Mining Divisions. The discovery of zinc-lead mineralization at Robb
Lake led to the locating of a large number of claims along the eastern margin of
the Rocky Mountains in the Omineca and Liard Mining Divisions. Similarly,
intense locating activity resulted from the discovery of copper mineralization in
volcanic rocks at the head of the Sustut River, and renewed interest in the area of
the Iron Mask batholith east of Kamloops resulted from the favourable exploration
of the Afton orebody.
The number of mineral claims recorded in 1972 was 78,901, a 36.5-per-cent
increase over 1971. Footage of surface and underground diamond drilling was
413,344 feet, a decrease of 48,447 feet or 10.5 per cent, and of percussion drilling
was 164,795 feet, a gain of 82,861 feet or 101.5 per cent.
About 576 geological, geochemical, and geophysical reports were accepted in
1972 by the Department of assessment work credit. They represent approximately
$4,100,000 in work done on claims.
The following statistics of expenditures on exploration and development of
coal, mineral and metallic deposits, and mines are summarized from data recorded
on Statistics Canada forms. They represent minimum amounts, but the response
of the industry is sufficiently complete to provide figures that are substantially correct.
Comparable figures for petroleum and natural gas operations are not available.
Exploration and Development Expenditures, 1972
Number
of Mines
Reporting
Physical
Work and
Surveys
Administration, Overhead, Land
Costs, Etc.
Total
A. Prospecting and exploration on undeclared mines—
389
9
5
$
28,684,131
280,972
327,230
$
9,530,614
123,014
120,837
$
38,214,745
403,986
1, Othp.rs
448,067
Totals
403
29,292,333
9,774,465
39,066,798
B. Exploration on declared or operating mines—
17
2
1,796,535
195,395
646,916
65,740
2,443,451
261,135
T  Others
Tnfflle
19
1,991,930
712,656
2,704,586
C. Development on declared mines—
10
3
62,281,197
4,419,879
3,435,052
134,532
65,716,249
4,554,411
->, ntvr<i
Totals
13
66,701,076
3,569,584
70,270,660
D. Development on operating mines—
26
2
5
33,124,424
15,481,000
5,548,903
3,110,672
36,235,096
15,481,000
5,574,475
1    Dthprs
25,572
Totals 	
33
54,154,327
3,136,244
57,290,571
E. Total expenditures on exploration and development—
1. Metal mines—A(l) + B(l) + C(l) + D(l)
2. Coal mines—A(2) + B(2) + C(2) + D(2)..
3. Others—A(3) + B(3) + C(3) + D(3)„.	
	
125,886,287
20,377,246
5,876,133
16,723,254
323,286
146,409
142,609,541
20,700,532
6,022,542
	
152,139,666
17,192,949
169,332,615
 A 10 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1972
Exploration includes all work done up to the time when a company declares
its intention of proceeding to production, after that date the work is classed as
development.
Major expenditures in 1972 by companies involved in the exploration, development, and mining of metals, minerals, and coal were as follows:
$
Mining operations (metals, minerals, coal)   240,667,327
Mining operations (structural materials)      19,581,875
Repairs expenditures      61,087,020
$
Capital expenditures   100,757,109
Exploration and development     68,565,506
169,322,615
490,658,837
Capital and repair expenditures are listed separately because of difficulties in
allocating them consistently. Actually most of the repair expenditures should be
applied to mining operations, and most of the capital expenditures to exploration
and development.
Structural materials and industrial minerals—Exploration work was done on
the following industrial mineral showings in British Columbia during 1972: The
J asbestos prospect southwest of Letain Lake, barite properties near Mile 548 and
Muncho Lake on the Alaska highway and near Atan Lake, the Liard Hot Springs
fluorite deposits and another fluorite showing at Muncho Lake. An examination
and some drilling were done at the Rexspar fluorite property. Further testing of
the diatomite-pozzolan mill at Quesnel resulted in some production. Increasing
interest was shown in gravel deposits near Vancouver, and one deposit on the east
side of Texada Island was drilled. Further investigation was done on the large
magnesite property east of Radium, more diamond-drill holes were drilled to test
phosphate beds south of Corbin, and silica was investigated near Golden and
Greenwood.
Production continued about normal at established pits and quarries. A new
lime-burning kiln went into production at a plant near Port Kells.
Production of asbestos at Cassiar was slightly in excess of 105,000 tons,
reflecting a full year's run by their enlarged mill.
Coal mining—The amount of coal mined (clean coal) in British Columbia in
1972 was 6,564,731 short tons. The basis of production statistics was changed
in 1972 from "gross production" to "clean coal," and so precise comparison with
previous years is not possible. However, the production of "raw coal" in 1972,
which is broadly equivalent to gross production, was 9,053,357 tons, that is to say
approximately double the previous year's production, and by far the greatest amount
of coal ever produced in one year in the Province.
Total shipment of coking coal to Japan during the year was 5,695,028 tons.
Five companies produced coal during the year, and their production was as
follows: Kaiser Resources Ltd., 5,352,590 tons; Fording Coal Limited, 1,141,452
tons; Coleman Collieries Limited, 58,213 tons; Coalition Mining Limited, 12,000
tons; Bulkley Valley Coal Sales Ltd., 476 tons.
The largest coal-producing company is Kaiser Resources Ltd. This company
conducts large open-pit operations on Harmer Ridge, near Sparwood, and two
underground mines in the same vicinity.   Production of raw coal was as follows:
 REVIEW OF THE MINERAL INDUSTRY A 11
Underground, 1,029,608 tons; open pit, 5,211,611 tons; total, 6,307,285 tons.
After processing through the Elkview coal-preparation plant, this yielded 5,352,590
tons of clean coal. A total of 4,536,499 tons was shipped to Japan during the year.
The company continued its exploration activities in various parts of the Crowsnest
coal lands.
In 1972 a second major coal company, Fording Coal Limited, came into
production. The company, a subsidiary of Cominco Ltd., operates a large open-pit
mine in the Fording River valley, 30 miles north of Sparwood. The first production
was recorded in February, and by the year-end a total of 2,659,418 tons of raw
coal had been mined. After processing through the coal-preparation plant, this
yielded 1,141,452 tons of clean coal. A total of 1,100,316 tons was shipped to
Japan during the year. When in full production this company is committed to ship
3,000,000 long tons of coal per year to Japan.
Coleman Collieries Ltd. was a relatively minor producer in British Columbia.
The production of 58,213 tons came from a portion of the Tent Mountain open-pit
mine which straddles the British Columbia-Alberta border.
Except for a few hundred thousand tons sold to domestic, United States, and
a few other foreign customers, all the above coal production was shipped to Japan
as part of long-term contracts. The coal was hauled to the Coast in unit trains of
10,000 tons capacity and loaded into ships at Roberts Bank.
The 12,000 tons of coal produced by Coalition Mining Limited was for testing
purposes.
There was a somewhat lessened interest in coal exploration in 1972. Only 77
new coal licences were taken out in the year, whereas 331 were forfeited. However,
1,759 licences were maintained in good standing covering 1,004,183 acres, a reduction 16.6 per cent on the acreage held at the end of 1971.
Exploration work in the East Kootenay coalfield was limited to Kaiser Resources Ltd. and to Rio Tinto Canadian Exploration Limited, who have been
exploring in the Dally Hill-Cabin Creek area in the Flathead district.
There has been considerable exploration activity, principally by Utah Mines
Ltd., Coalition Mining Limited, Teck Corporation Ltd., and Denison Mines Limited
in the northeastern coalfield, extending along the eastern foothills of the Rocky
Mountains from the Alberta border south of Narraway River for over 200 miles to
north of Halfway River. The property most advanced in exploration is the Sun-
kunka, where Coalition Mining Limited initiated a trial mining and development
programme and drove a series of entries into the Chamberlain seam. This project,
which continued into 1973, is extended to provide direct information on mining
conditions prior to making a final production decision. A reserve of at least
65,000,000 tons of high-grade coking coal is indicated by fairly close drilling and
outcrop tracing of the Chamberlain seam between Chamberlain and Skeeter Creeks.
Denison Mines Limited continued to drive test adits and diamond-drill holes
on Babcock Mountain south of Murray River.
Utah Mines Ltd. for the third successive season carried out exploration work
imediately south of Williston Lake and the Peace River in the Carbon Creek and
east Mount Gething areas.
Petroleum and natural gas—The value of production of the petroleum industry in 1972 amounted to $105,644,978, up 6 per cent from 1971. Crude-oil
production was 23,831,444 barrels, down 5 per cent. The major oil-producing
fields, all under active water-flood programmes, were Boundary Lake, Peejay, Inga,
and Milligan Creek.
 A 12 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1972
Natural gas delivered to pipe-lines was 379,969,499 MSCF, an increase of 30
per cent, and the value to gas producers was $41,616,824. The major gas-producing fields were Clarke Lake, Yoyo, and Beaver River, all located in the northern
part of the productive area.
Footage drilled increased to 1,142,950 feet, an increase of 15 per cent over
1971. All the drilling operations were conducted in the northeastern corner of
the Province, except one abandonment near Prince George and a wildcat venture
in the Bowser Basin which was still drilling at year-end.
Interesting gas exploration was being undertaken in the Grizzly Valley area
about 60 miles south of Dawson Creek. Two wells indicated important gas finds
and three were actively drilling at the end of 1972.
Additional production and transportation facilities were completed in the Fort
Nelson area to provide increased throughput of gas from this area.
Expenditures in 1972 by companies involved in the exploration and production
of petroleum and natural gas were:
$
Exploration, land acquisition, and drilling     74,337,000
Development drilling       9,260,000
Capital expenditures     15,066,000
Natural gas plant operations       5,211,000
Field, well, and pipe-line operations     14,938,000
General (excluding income tax)      21,584,000
Total   140,396,000
 Statistics
CHAPTER 2
CONTENTS
Page
Introduction  A 14
Method of Computing Production  A 14
Metals  A 14
Average Prices  A 14
Gross and Net Content  A 15
Value of Production  A 15
Industrial Minerals and Structural Materials . A 16
FueL  A 16
Notes on Products Listed in the Tables  A 16
Table 1—Mineral Production: Total to Date, Past Year, and Latest Year A 27
Table 2—Total Value of Mineral Production, 1836-1972  A 28
Table 3—Mineral Production for the 10 Years 1963-1972  A 30
Table 4—Mineral Production, Graph of Value, 1887-1972  A 32
Table 5—Production of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, and Molybdenum,
Graph of Quantities, 1893-1972  A 33
Table 6—Production of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, Molybdenum,
and Iron Concentrates, 1858-1972  A 34
Table 7a—Mineral Production by Mining Divisions, 1971 and 1972, and
Total to Date  A 36
Table 7b—Production of Lode Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc by
Mining Divisions, 1971 and 1972, and Total to Date.  A 38
Table 7c—Production of Miscellaneous Metals by Mining Divisions, 1971
and 1972, and Total to Date  A 40
Table 7r>—Production of Industrial Minerals by Mining Divisions, 1971
and 1972, and Total to Date.  A 44
Table 7e—Production of Structural Materials by Mining Divisions, 1971
and 1972, and Total to Date  A 46
Table 8a—Production of Coal, 1836-1972  A 47
Table 8b—Coal Production and Distribution by Collieries and by Mining
Divisions, 1972  A 48
Table 9—Principal Items of Expenditure, Reported for Operations of All
Classes  A 49
Table 10—Employment in the Mineral Industry, 1901-1972  A 50
Table 11—Employment at Major Metal Mines and Coal Mines, 1972_  A 51
Table 12—Metal Production, 1972  A 52
A 13
 INTRODUCTION
The statistics of the mineral industry are collected, compiled, and tabulated for
this Report by the Economics and Statistics Branch, Department of Industrial
Development, Trade, and Commerce, Victoria.
In the interests of uniformity and to avoid duplication of effort, beginning with
the statistics for 1925, Statistics Canada and the Provincial departments have cooperated in collecting and processing mineral statistics.
Producers of metals, industrial minerals, structural materials, coal, and petroleum and natural gas are requested to submit returns in duplicate on forms prepared
for use by the Province and by Statistics Canada. '
As far as possible, both organizations follow the same practice in processing
the data. The final compilation by Statistics Canada is usually published considerably later than the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources
for British Columbia. Differences between the values of production published by
the two organizations arise mainly because Statistics Canada uses average prices
considered applicable to the total Canadian production, whereas the British Columbia mining statistician uses prices considered applicable to British Columbia production.
Peat, classified as a fuel by Statistics Canada, is not included in the British
Columbia statistics of mineral production being regarded as neither a fuel nor a
mineral.
METHOD OF COMPUTING PRODUCTION
The tabulated statistics are arranged so as to facilitate comparison of the
production records for the various mining divisions, and from year to year. From
time to time, revisions have been made to figures published in earlier reports as
additional data became available or errors become known.
Data are obtained from the certified returns made by producers of metals,
industrial minerals and structural materials, and coal, and are augmented by data
obtained from custom smelters. For placer gold, returns from operators are augmented by data obtained from the Royal Canadian Mint. For petroleum, natural
gas, and liquid by-products, production figures supplied by the Petroleum and
Natural Gas Branch of the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources are
compiled from the monthly disposition reports and the Crown royalty statement
filed with the Department by the producers.
Values are in Canadian funds. Weights are avoirdupois pounds and short
tons (2,000 pounds), and troy ounces.   Barrels are 35 imperial gallons.
Metals
Average Prices
The prices used in the valuation of current and past production of gold, silver,
copper, lead, and zinc are shown in the table on page A 26.
The price of gold used is the average Canadian Mint buying-price for fine gold.
In 1972 this was $57,517 per ounce.
A 14
 STATISTICS
A 15
The price used for placer gold originally was established arbitrarily at $17 per
ounce, when the price of fine gold was $20.67 per ounce. Between 1931 and 1962
the price was proportionately increased with the continuously changing price of fine
gold. Since 1962, Canadian Mint reports giving the fine-gold content have been
available for all but a very small part of the placer gold produced, and the average
price listed is derived by dividing ounces of placer gold into total amount received.
Prior to 1949 the prices used for silver, copper, lead, and zinc were the average
prices of the markets indicated in the table on page A 26, converted into Canadian
funds. The abbreviations in the table are Mont.=Montreal; N.Y.=New York;
Lond.=London; E. St. L.=East St. Louis; and U.S.=United States.
Latterly the prices of silver, copper, lead, and zinc are average United States
prices converted into Canadian funds. Average monthly prices are supplied by
Statistics Canada from figures published in the Metal Markets section of Metals
Week. Specifically, for silver it is the New York price; for lead it is the New York
price; for zinc it is the price at East St. Louis of Prime Western; for copper it is the
United States export refinery price. However, commencing in 1970 the copper
price is the average of prices received by the various British Columbia shippers.
For antimony the average price for the year and for cadmium, the New York
producers' price to consumers are used. For nickel the price used is the Canadian
price set by the International Nickel Company of Canada Ltd. The value per ton
of the iron ore used in making pig iron at Kimberley is an arbitrary figure, being the
average of several ores of comparable grade at their points of export from British
Columbia.
Gross and Net Content
The gross content of a metal in ore, concentrate, or bullion is the amount of
that metal calculated from an assay of the material, and the gross metal contents
are the sum of individual metal assay contents. The net contents are the gross
contents less smelter and refinery losses.
In past years there have been different methods used in calculating net contents,
particularly in the case of one metal contained in the concentrate of another. The
present method was established in 1963 and is outlined in the following table. For
example, the net content of silver in copper concentrates is 98 per cent of the gross
content, of cadmium in zinc concentrates is 70 per cent of the gross content, etc.
Lead
Concentrates
Zinc
Concentrates
Copper
Concentrates
Copper-Nickel
Concentrates
Copper
Matte
Silver
Per Cent
98
Less 26 lb./ton
98
50
Per Cent
98
50
90
70
Per Cent
98
Less 10 lb./ton
Per Cent
85
88
Per Cent
98
Less 10 lb./ton
50
Zinc	
Value of Production
For indium, iron concentrate, mercury, molybdenum, and tin the value of
production is the amount received by the shippers.
For gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, antimony, bismuth, cadmium, some iron
concentrate, and nickel the value of production is calculated from the assay content
of the ore, concentrate, or bullion less appropriate smelter losses, and an average
price per unit of weight.
 A 16 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1972
Prior to 1925 the value of gold and copper produced was calculated by using
their true average prices and, in addition, for copper the smelter loss was taken
into account.
The value of other metals was calculated from the gross metal content of ores
or concentrates by using a metal price which was an arbitrary percentage of the
average price, as follows: Silver, 95 per cent; lead, 90 per cent; and zinc, 85 per cent.
It is these percentages of the average price that are listed in the table on page
A 26.
For 1925 and subsequent years the value has been calculated by using the true
average price {see p. A 26) and the net metal contents, in accordance with the procedures adopted by Statistics Canada and the Department of Mines and Petroleum
Resources.
In the statistical tables, for gold the values are calculated by multiplying the
gross contents of gold by the average price for the year; for the other metals, by
multiplying the net contents of metals as determined by means of the above table
by the average price for the year.
Industrial Minerals and Structural Materials
The values of production of industrial minerals and structural materials are
approximately the amounts received at the point of origin.
Fuel
The value of production of coal is calculated using a price per ton {see p. A 26)
which is the weighted average of the f.o.b. prices at the mine for the coal sold.
The values of production of natural gas, natural gas liquid by-products, and
petroleum including condensate/pentanes plus are the amounts received for the
products at the well-head.
NOTES ON PRODUCTS LISTED IN THE TABLES
Antimony—Antimony metal was produced at the Trail smelter from 1939 to
1944; since 1944 it has been marketed alloyed with lead. The antimony is a byproduct of silver-lead ores. In 1907 the first recorded antimonial ore mined in British Columbia was shipped from the Slocan area to England. Since then other out-
of-Province shipments have originated in the Bridge River, North Lardeau, Slocan,
SpiUimacheen, and Stuart Lake areas. In Table 7c the antimony assigned to individual mining divisions is the reported content of ore exported to foreign smelters;
the antimony "not assigned" is that recovered at the Trail smelter from various ores
received there.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7c.
Arsenious oxide—Arsenious oxide was recovered at foreign smelters from
arsenical gold ores from Hedley between 1917 and 1931, and in 1942, and from
the Victoria property on Rocher Deboule Mountain in 1928. No production has
been recorded since 1942.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Asbestos—British Columbia has produced asbestos since 1952 when the Cas-
siar mine was opened. All British Columbia production consists of chrysotile from
the Cassiar mine near the Yukon border. This deposit is noted for its high percentage of valuable long fibre and for the low iron content of the fibre. The original
claims were located at Cassiar in 1950, and the first fibre was shipped two years
 STATISTICS A 17
later. The fibre is milled from the ore at Cassiar, shipped by truck to Whitehorse,
and then moved by rail to tidewater at Skagway. From 1953 to 1961 the fibre was
valued at the shipping point in North Vancouver, but beginning in 1962 it has been
valued at the mine, and values for the preceding years have been recalculated on
that basis.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7d.
Barite—Barite production began in 1940 and has been continuous since then,
coming from several operations in the upper Columbia River valley. Some barite
is mined from lode deposits and the rest is recovered from the mill-tailings ponds of
the former Silver Giant and Mineral King silver-lead-zinc mines. See Tables 1,3,
and 7d.
Bentonite—Small amounts of bentonite were produced between 1926 and
1944 from deposits in the coal measures near Princeton. There has been no production since 1944.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Bismuth—Since 1929 the Trail smelter has produced bismuth. It is a byproduct of lead refining and thus the production cannot be assigned to specific
properties or mining divisions.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7c.
Brick—See Clay and shale products.
Building-stone — Dimensional stone for building purposes is quarried when
required from a granite deposit on Nelson Island and an andesite deposit on Haddington Island. Other stone close to local markets is quarried periodically or as
needed for special building projects.   See Table 7e.
Butane—Butane is recovered as a by-product at the gas-processing plant at
Taylor and at oil refineries.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7a.
Cadmium—Cadmium has been recovered as a by-product at the Trail zinc
refinery since 1928. It occurs in variable amounts in the sphalerite of most British
Columbia silver-lead-zinc ores. In Table 7c the cadmium assigned to individual
mining divisions is the reported content of custom shipments to the Trail and foreign
smelters; that "not assigned" is the remainder of the reported estimated recovery at
the Trail smelter from British Columbia concentrates.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7c.
Cement—Cement is manufactured from carefully proportioned mixtures of
limestone, gypsum, and other mineral materials. It has been produced in British
Columbia since 1905. Present producers are British Columbia Cement Company
Limited, with a 700,000-tons-per-year plant at Bamberton, and Canada Cement
Lafarge Ltd. with a 612,500-tons-per-year plant on Lulu Island and a 210,000-
tons-per-year plant at Kamloops.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7e.
Chromite—Two shipments of chromite are on record, 670 tons from Cascade
in 1918 and 126 tons from Scottie Creek in 1929.   See Tables 1 and 7c.
Clay and shale products—These include brick, blocks, tile, pipe, pottery, lightweight aggregate, and pozzolan manufactured from British Columbia clays and
shales. Common red-burning clays and shales are widespread in the Province, but
better grade clays are rare. The first recorded production was of bricks at Craig-
flower in 1853 and since then plants have operated in most towns and cities for
short periods. Local surface clay is used at Haney to make common red brick,
tile, and flower pots. Shale and fireclay from Abbotsford Mountain are used to
make firebrick, facebrick, sewer pipe, flue lining, and special fireclay shapes in plants
at Kilgard, Abbotsford, and South Vancouver. A plant on Saturna Island makes
light-weight expanded shale aggregate and pozzolan clinker irom a local shale
deposit. A plant as Quesnel makes pozzolan from burnt shale quarried south of
Quesnel.   Common clays and shales are abundant in British Columbia, but fireclay
.
 A 18 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1972
and other high-grade clays are rare. Several hobby and art potteries and a sanitary-
ware plant are in operation, but these use mainly imported raw materials and their
production is not included in the tables.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7e.
Coal—Coal is almost as closely associated with British Columbia's earliest
history as is placer gold. Coal was discovered at Suquash on Vancouver Island in
1835 and at Nanaimo in 1850. The yearly value of coal production passed that of
placer gold in 1883 and contributed a major part of the total mineral wealth for the
next 30 years.
First production, by Mining Divisions: Cariboo, 1942; Fort Steele, 1898;
Kamloops, 1893; Liard, 1923; Nanaimo, 1836; Nicola, 1907; Omineca, 1918;
Osoyoos, 1926; Similkameen, 1909; and Skeena, 1912.
The Nanaimo and Comox fields produced virtually all of the coal until production started from the Crowsnest field in 1898. The Crowsnest field contains coking-
coal and prospered in the early years of smelting and railroad-building. Mining
started in the Nicola-Princeton coalfield in 1907, at Telkwa in 1918, and on the
Peace River in 1923. The Nanaimo field was exhausted in 1953 when the last large
mines closed, and only small operations on remnants were left. The colliery at Mer-
ritt closed in 1945 and at Coalmont in 1940. The closing of the last large mine at
Tsable River in 1966, and of the last small one, near Wellington in 1968, marked
the end of production from the once important Vancouver Island deposits.
Undeveloped fields include basins in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains north
and south of the Peace River, the Groundhog basin in north central British Columbia, the Hat Creek basin west of Ashcroft, and Basins on Graham Island.
The enormous requirements for coking-coal in Japan created great activity in
coal prospecting in various areas of British Columbia since 1968. The signing of
large contracts with the Japanese resulted in preparations for production at several
deposits in the East Kootenays. First shipments to Japan via special port facilities
at North Vancouver and Roberts Bank began in 1970.
All the coal produced, including that used in making coke, is shown as primary
mine production. Quantity from 1836 to 1909 is gross mine output and includes
material lost in picking and washing. From 1910 the quantity is the amount sold
and used, which includes sales to retail and wholesale dealers, industrial users, and
company employees; coal used under company boilers, including steam locomotives;
and coal used in making coke.   See Tables 1,3, 7a, 8a, and 8b.
Cobalt—In 1928 a recovery of 1,730 pounds of cobalt was made from a shipment of arsenical gold ore from the Victoria mine on Rocher Deboule Mountain.
In 1971, 113,545 pounds of cobalt were shipped from the Pride of Emory mine at
Hope.   See Tables 1 and 7c.
Coke—Coke is made from special types of coal. It has been produced in
British Columbia since 1895. Being a manufactured product, its value does not
contribute to the total mineral production as shown in Table 1. Up to 1966, coke
statistics had been included in the Annual Report as Table 9, but this table has been
discontinued.   The coal used in making coke is still recorded in Table 8b.
Copper—Copper concentrates are shipped to Japanese and American smelters
because no copper smelter has operated in British Columbia since 1935. Small
amounts of gold and silver are commonly present and add value to the ore, but some
ores contain important amounts of gold (as at Rossland), silver (Silver King mine),
lead and zinc (Tulsequah), or zinc (Britannia mine). Most of the smelting in
British Columbia in early years was done on ore shipped direct from the mines
without concentration, but modern practice is to concentrate the ore first.
 STATISTICS A 19
Ore was smelted in British Columbia first in 1896 at Nelson (from Silver
King mine) and at Trail (from Rossland mines), and four and five years later at
Grand Forks (from Phoenix mine) and Greenwood (from Mother Lode mine).
Later, small smelters were built in the Boundary district and on Vancouver and
Texada Islands, and in 1914 the Anyox smelter was blown in. Copper smelting
ceased in the Boundary district in 1919, at Trail in 1929, and at Anyox in 1935.
British Columbia copper concentrates were then smelted mainly at Tacoma, and
since 1961 have gone chiefly to Japan.
Most of the production has come from southern British Columbia—from
Britannia, Copper Mountain, Greenwood, Highland Valley, Merritt, Nelson, Ross-
land, Texada Island, and Vancouver Island, although a sizeable amount came from
Anyox and some from Tulsequah. During recent years exploration for copper has
been intense, interest being especially directed toward finding very large, low-grade
deposits suitable for open-pit mining. This activity has resulted in the establishment of operating mines at Merritt (Craigmont) in 1961, in Highland Valley
(Bethlehem) in 1962, on Babine Lake (Granisle) in 1966, near Peachland (Brenda)
in 1970, Stewart (Granduc) and near Port Hardy (Island Copper) in 1971, near
Babine Lake (Bell), McLeese Lake (Gibraltar), Highland Valley (Lornex), and
Princeton (Ingerbelle) in 1972.
After a lapse of many years, copper has been produced comparatively recently on Vancouver Island at Jordan River, Courtenay, Benson Lake, Quatsino,
and also at Buttle Lake, together with zinc and silver. At Tasu Harbour on
Moresby Island and at Texada Island copper is produced as a by-product of iron-
mining.
Copper is now the most valuable single commodity of the industry. Production
in 1972 was 467.0 million pounds.   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7b.
Crude oil—Production of crude oil in British Columbia began in 1955 from
the Fort St. John field, but was not significant until late in 1961, when the 12-inch
oil pipe-line was built to connect the oil-gathering terminal at Taylor to the Trans
Mountain Oil Pipe Line Company pipe-line near Kamloops. In 1972, oil was
produced from 33 separate fields, of which the Boundary Lake, Peejay, Milligan
Creek, and Inga fields were the most productive.
In Tables 1, 3, and 7a, quantities given prior to 1962 under "petroleum,
crude" are total sales, and from 1962 to 1965 include field and plant condensate
listed separately. Full details are given in tables in the Petroleum and Natural Gas
chapter of this Report.
Diatomite—Relatively large deposits of diatomite are found near the Fraser
River in the Quesnel area, and small deposits are widespread throughout the Province. Small amounts of diatomite have been shipped from Quesnel periodically
since 1928. One plant to process the material locally was built in Quesnel in 1969
and a new one to replace it was completed in 1970.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7d.
Field condensate—Field condensate is the liquid hydrocarbons separated and
recovered from natural gas in the field before gas processing. See Tables 1,3, and 7a.
Fluorite (fluorspar)—Between 1918 and 1929, fluorite was mined at the
Rock Candy mine north of Grand Forks for use in the Trail lead refinery. From
1958 to 1968, small quantities were produced as a by-product at the Oliver silica
quarry.   See Tables 1,3, and 7d.
Flux—Silica and limestone are added to smelter furnaces as flux to combine
with impurities in the ore and form a slag which separates from the valuable metal.
In the past silica was shipped from Grand Forks, Oliver, and the Sheep Creek area.
—
 A 20 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1972
Today silica from Sheep Creek and limestone, chiefly from Texada Island, are
produced for flux. Quantities have been recorded since 1911. See Tables 1, 3,
and7D.
Gold, lode—Gold has played an important part in mining in the Province. The
first discovery of lode gold was on Moresby Island in 1852, when some gold was
recovered from a small quartz vein. The first stamp mill was built in the Cariboo
in 1876, and it seems certain that some arrastras—primitive grinding-mills—were
built even earlier. These and other early attempts were short lived, and the successful milling of gold ores began about 1890 in the southern part of the Province. The
value of production was second only to that of coal by 1900 and continued to
be very important. At the start of World War II, gold-mining attained a peak yearly
value of more than $22 million, but since the war it dwindled, owing to the fact
that the price for gold was fixed and the cost of mining rose and continues to rise.
In the early years, lode gold came mostly from the camps of Rossland, Nelson,
McKinney, Fairview, Hedley, and also from the copper and other ores of the
Boundary district. A somewhat later major producer was the Premier mine at
Stewart. In the 1930's the price of gold increased and the value of production
soared, new discoveries were made and old mines were revived. The principal gold
camps, in order of output of gold, have been Bridge River, Rossland, Portland Canal,
Hedley, Wells, and Sheep Creek. In 1971 the Bralorne mine in Bridge River closed;
it was the last gold mine in the Province to operate. To date the gold mines have
paid a total of about $82 million in dividends.
With the closing of the Bralorne mine, all lode gold is produced as a by-product
of copper, copper-zinc-silver, and other base-metal mining. See Tables 1, 3, 6,
and 7b.
Gold, placer—The early explorations and settlement of the Province followed
rapidly on the discovery of gold-bearing placer creeks throughout the country. The
first placer miners came in 1858 to mine the lower Fraser River bars upstream
from Yale.
The year of greatest placer-gold production was 1863, shortly after the discovery
of placer in the Cariboo. Another peak year in 1875 marked the discovery of placer
on creeks in the Cassiar. A minor peak year was occasioned by the discovery of
placer gold in Granite Creek in the Tulameen in 1886. A high level of production
ensued after 1899, when the Atlin placers reached their peak output. Other important placer-gold camps were established at Goldstream, Fort Steele, Rock Creek,
Omineca River, and Quesnel River. The last important strike was made on Cedar
Creek in 1921, and coarse gold was found on Squaw Creek in 1927 and on Wheaton
Creek in 1932.
Mining in the old placer camps revived during the 1930's under the stimulus
of an increase in the price of fine gold from $20.67 per ounce to $35 per ounce in
United States funds. Since World War II, placer-mining has declined under conditions of steadily rising costs and a fixed price for gold. Since 1858, more than 5.2
million ounces valued at almost $97 million has been recovered.
A substantial part of the production, including much of the gold recovered
from the Fraser River upstream from Yale (in the present New Westminster, Kamloops, and Lillooet Mining Divisions) and much of the early Cariboo production,
was mined before the original organization of the Department of Mines in 1874.
Consequently, the amounts recorded are based on early estimates and cannot be
accurately assigned to individual mining divisions.
 STATISTICS A 21
The first year of production for major placer-producing mining divisions was:
Atlin, 1898; Cariboo, 1859; Liard, 1873; Lillooet, 1858; Omineca, 1869.
In 1965, changes were made in the allocation of placer gold to the New Westminster and Similkameen Mining Divisions and "not assigned," to reconcile those
figures with data incorporated in Bulletin 28, Placer Gold Production of British
Columbia.   See Tables 1, 3, 6 and 7a.
Granules—Rock chips used for bird grits, exposed aggregate, roofing, stucco
dash, terrazzo, etc., have been produced in constantly increasing quantities since
1930. Plants operate in Burnaby and near Grand Forks, Sirdar, Vananda, and
Armstrong.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7d.
Gypsum and gypsite—Production of gypsum and gypsite has been recorded
since 1911. Between 1925 and 1956 more than 1,000,000 tons was shipped from
Falkland and some was quarried near Cranbrook and Windermere. Since 1956
all production has come from Windermere.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7d.
Hydromagnesite—Small shipments of hydromagnesite were made from Atlin
between 1904 and 1916 and from Clinton in 1921.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Indium—Production of indium as a by-product of zinc-refining at the Trail
smelter began in 1942.    Production figures have not been disclosed since 1958.
Iron—Iron ore was produced in small quantities as early as 1885, commonly
under special circumstances or as test shipment. Steady production started in 1951
with shipments of magnetite concentrates to Japan from Vancouver and Texada
Islands.
Most of the known iron-ore deposits are magnetite, and occur in the coastal
area. On the average they are low in grade and need to be concentrated. Producing
mines have operated on Texada Island, at Benson Lake and Zeballos on Vancouver
Island, and at Tasu and Jedway on Moresby Island. At Texada Island copper is a
by-product of iron-mining, and in the Coast Copper mine at Benson Lake iron was
a by-product of copper-mining. The latest operation, and to date the largest, is that
of Wesfrob Mines Limited at Tasu, begun at the end of 1967; copper is produced
as a by-product.
From January 1961 to August 1972, calcined iron sulphide from the tailings
of the Sullivan mine was used for making pig iron at Kimberley. This was the first
manufacture of pig iron in British Columbia. The iron occurs as pyrrhotite and
pyrite in the lead-zinc ore of the Sullivan mine. In the process of milling, the lead
and zinc minerals are separated for shipment to the Trail smelter, and the iron
sulphides are separated from the waste rock. Over the years a stockpile had been
built containing a reserve of about 20 million tons or iron ore.
The sulphur was removed in making pig iron and was converted to sulphuric
acid, which was used in making fertilizer. A plant built at Kimberley converted
the pig iron to steel, and a fabricating plant was acquired in Vancouver. The iron
smelter at Kimberley closed in August 1972. The entire production, credited to
the Fort Steele Mining Division in Table 7c, is of calcine. See Tables 1, 3, 6,
and 7c.
Iron oxide—Iron oxide, ochre, and bog iron were mined as early as 1918 from
several occurrences, but mainly from limonite deposits north of Squamish. None
has been produced since 1950.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Jade (nephrite)—Production of jade (nephrite) has been recorded only since
1959 despite there being several years of significant production prior to that date.
The jade is recovered from bedrock occurrences on Mount Ogden and near Dease
Lake and as alluvial boulders from the Fraser River; the Bridge River and its tribu-
 A 22 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1972
taries, Marshall, Hell, and Cadwallader Creeks; O'Ne-ell, Ogden, Kwanika, and
Wheaton Creeks. See Tables 1, 3, and 7d.
Lead—Lead was the most valuable single commodity for many years, but it
was surpassed in value of annual production by zinc in 1950, by copper in 1966,
and in total production by zinc in 1966. Lead and zinc usually occur together in
nature although not necessarily in equal amounts in a single deposit. Zinc is the
more abundant metal, but lead ore usually is more valuable than zinc ore because
it contains more silver as a by-product. For a long time British Columbia produced
almost all of Canada's lead, but now produces only about one-quarter of it. Most
of the concentrated ore is smelted and the metal refined at Trail, but some concentrate is shipped to American and Japanese smelters.
Almost all of British Columbia's lead comes from the southeastern part of the
Province. The Sullivan mine at Kimberley is now producing about 93 per cent
of the Province's lead and has produced about 85 per cent of the grand total. This
is one of the largest mines in the world and supports the great metallurgical works at
Trail. Other mines are at the Pend d'Oreille River, North Kootenay Lake, Slocan,
and southwest of Golden. In northwestern British Columbia less important parts of
the total output have come from Tusequah, the Premier mine, and several small
mines in the general region of Hazelton.
A small amount of high-grade lead ore is shipped directly to the smelter, but
most of the ore is concentrated by flotation and the zinc content is separated from
the lead. All output from the Sullivan and other mines owned by Cominco Ltd.
goes to the Trail smelter, but part of the output of other mines goes to American
smelters. Lead was first produced in 1887, and the total production amounts to
approximately 8 million tons.
In 1958, revisions were made in some yearly totals for lead to adjust them for
recovery of lead from slag treated at the Trail smelter.   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7b.
Limestone—Besides being used for flux and granules (where it is recorded
separately), limestone is used in agriculture, cement manufacture, the pulp and
paper industry, and for making lime. It has been produced since 1886. Quarries
now operate at Cobble Hill, near Prince George, at Kamloops, and on the north
end of Texada Island.   See Tables 1,3, and 7e.
Magnesium—In 1941 and 1942, Cominco Ltd. produced magnesium from
magnesite mined from a large deposit at Marysville.   See Tables 1 and 7c.
Magnesium sulphate—Magnesium sulphate was recovered in minor amounts
at various times between 1915 and 1942 from small alkali lakes near Basque,
Clinton, and Osoyoos.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Manganese—From 1918 to 1920 manganese ore was shipped from a bog
deposit near Kaslo and from Hill 60 near Cowichan Lake, and in 1956 a test shipment was made from Olalla.   See Tables 1 and 7c.
Mercury—Mercury was first produced near Savona in 1895. Since them small
amounts have been recovered from the same area and from the Bridge River district.
The main production to date was between 1940 and 1944 from the Pinchi Lake and
Takla mines near Fort St. James. In 1968 the Pinchi Lake mine reopened and
continues in operation.   See Tables 1 and 7c.
Mica—No sheet mica has been produced commercially in British Columbia.
Between 1932 and 1961 small amounts of mica schist for grinding were mined near
Albreda, Armstrong, Oliver, Prince Rupert, and Sicamous.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7d.
 STATISTICS A 23
Molybdenum—Molybdenum ore in small amounts was produced from high-
grade deposits between 1914 and 1918. Recently, mining of large low-grade molybdenum and copper-molybdenum deposits has increased production to the point
that molybdenum now ranks third in importance in annual value of metals produced in British Columbia. The upswing began when the Bethlehem mine recovered
by-product molybdenum from 1964 to 1966. In 1965, the Endako and Boss Mountain mines, followed by the Coxey in 1966, and British Columbia Molybdenum mine
in 1967, all began operations as straight molybdenum producers. In 1970, the
Brenda mine, a combined copper-molybdenum producer, started operating, and
Island Copper in 1971. Large-scale combined metal deposits at Lornex and Gibraltar mines were brought into production in 1972.   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7c.
Natro-alunite—In 1912 and 1913, 400 tons of natro-alunite was mined from
a small low-grade deposit at Kyuquot Sound. There has been no subsequent production.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Natural gas—Commercial production of natural gas began in 1954 to supply
the community of Fort St. John. Since the completion in 1957 of the gas plant at
Taylor and the 30-inch pipe-line to serve British Columbia and the northwestern
United States, the daily average volume of production has increased to more than
950,000,000 cubic feet. In 1972 there were 42 producing gas fields, of which the
Yoyo, Clarke Lake, and Beaver River were the most productive.
The production shown in Tables 1,3, and 7a is the total amount sold of residential gas from processing plants plus dry and associated gas from the gas-gathering
system; that is, the quantity delivered to the main transmission-line. The quantity
is net after deducting gas used on leases, metering difference, and gas used or lost
in the cleaning plant. The quantity is reported as thousands of cubic feet at standard
conditions (14.4 pounds per square inch pressure, 60°F temperature, up to and
including the year 1960, and thereafter 14.65 pounds per square inch pressure,
60°F temperature).
Full details of gross well output, other production, delivery, and sales are
given in tables in the Petroleum and Natural Gas chapter of this Report.
Nickel—One mine, the Pride of Emory near Hope, shipped nickel ore in 1936
and 1937 and began continuous production in 1958. Since 1960, bulk copper-
nickel concentrates have been shipped to Japan for smelting. See Tables 1, 3, and
7c.
Palladium—Palladium was recovered in 1928, 1929, and 1930 as a by-product
of the Trail refinery and is presumed to have originated in copper concentrates
shipped to the smelter from the Copper Mountain mine.   See Tables 1 and 7c.
Perlite—In 1953 a test shipment of 1,112 tons was made from a quarry on
Frangois Lake. There has been no further production.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Petroleum, crude—See Crude oil.
Phosphate rock—Between 1927 and 1933, Cominco Ltd. produced 3,842 tons
of phosphate rock for test purposes, but the grade proved to be too low for commercial use. More test shipments were made in 1964 but there has been no commercial production.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Plant condensate—Plant condensate is the hydrocarbon liquid extracted from
natural gas at gas-processing plants.   See Tables 1,3, and 7a.
Platinum—Platinum has been produced intermittently from placer streams in
small amounts since 1887, mostly from the Tulameen and Similkameen Rivers.
Placer platinum also has been recovered from Pine, Thibert, McConnell, Rainbow,
Tranquille, Rock, and Government Creeks; from Quesnel, Fraser, Cottonwood,
Peace, and Coquihalla Rivers; and from beach placers on Graham Island.   Some
 A 24 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1972
platinum recovered between 1928 and 1930 as a by-product at the Trail refinery is
presumed to have originated in copper concentrates shipped to the smelter from the
Copper Mountain mine.   See Tables 1,3, and 7c.
Propane—Propane is recovered from gas-processing plants at Taylor and
Boundary Lake, and at oil refineries.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7a.
Rock—Production of rubble, riprap, and crushed rock has been recorded since
1909.   See Tables 1,3, and 7e.
Sand and gravel—Sand and gravel are used as aggregate in concrete work of all
kinds. The output varies from year to year according to the state of activity of the
construction industry.   See Tables 1,3, and 7e.
Selenium—The only recorded production of selenium, 731 pounds, was in
1931 from the refining of blister copper from the Anyox smelter. See Tables 1
and 7c.
Silver—Silver is recovered from silver ores or as a by-product of other ores.
Most of it is refined in Trail, some goes to the Mint in gold bullion, and some is
exported in concentrated ores of copper, lead, and zinc to American and Japanese
smelters.   Silver bullion was produced by the Torbrit mine from 1949 to 1959.
Invariably some silver is associated with galena, so that even low-grade lead
ores, if mined in quantity, produce a significant amount of silver. Some silver is
recovered from gold ores and some from copper ores, and although the silver in
such ores is usually no more than a fraction of an ounce per ton, even that amount
is important in a large-tonnage operation.
Silver-bearing ores were intensively sought in the early days. A metal of high
unit value was the only one worth finding in regions remote from market, and in the
1880's and 1890's there was little point in prospecting for ores that did not contain values in silver or gold. Prospecting for silver ores started in southeastern
British Columbia in about 1883, and from 1894 to 1905 British Columbia produced
most of Canada's silver, many of the early ores being mined primarily for then-
silver content.
Production of silver began in 1887 from silver-copper and silver-lead ores in
the Kootenays and has continued in this area to the present. Now, most of the silver
is a by-product of lead-zinc ores and nearly all is refined at Trail, although some is
exported with concentrates to American and Japanese smelters, or may go to the
Mint in gold bullion. Today the greatest single source of silver is the Sullivan mine,
which has been in production since 1900. By 1972 the Sullivan mine has accounted
for 47 per cent of the total silver production of the Province. A significant total
amount is contributed by the Lynx, Silmonac, Phoenix, Bethlehem, Granisle, Brenda,
and Granduc mines. The only steady producer that is strictly a silver mine is the
Highland Bell mine at Beaverdell, in operation since 1922. A former important
mine, the Premier near Stewart, produced more than 41 million ounces of silver
between 1918 and 1968.   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7b.
Sodium carbonate—Sodium carbonate was recovered between 1921 and 1949
from alkali lakes in the Clinton area and around Kamloops. There has been no
further production.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Stone (see Building-stone)—Cut stone for building purposes is prepared from
rock produced at quarries in various parts of the Province when required. Two of
the most productive quarries have operated on Haddington and Nelson Islands. See
Tables 1, 3, and 7e.
Structural materials—In Table 7e the value of $5,972,171 for unclassified
materials is the total for structural materials in the period 1886-1919 that cannot
 STATISTICS A 25
be allotted to particular classes of structural materials or assigned to mining divisions,
and includes $726,323 shown against 1896 in Table 2 that includes unclassified
structural materials in that and previous years not assignable to particular years.
The figure $3,180,828 in Table 7e under "Other Clay Products" is the value in the
period 1886-1910 that cannot be allotted to particular clay products or assigned
to mining divisions.   See Tables 1, 2, 3, 7a, and 7e.
Sulphur—The production of sulphur has been recorded since 1916. From
1916 to 1927 the amounts include the sulphur content of pyrite shipped. From
1928 the amounts include the estimated sulphur content of pyrite shipped, plus the
sulphur contained in sulphuric acid made from waste smelter gases. The sulphur
content of pyrrhotite roasted at the Kimberley fertilizer plant is included since 1953.
Since 1958, elemental sulphur recovered from the Canadian Occidental Petroleum
Ltd. plant at Taylor has been included.   See Tables 1,3, and 7d.
Talc—Between 1916 and 1936, talc was quarried at Leech River and at
Anderson Lake to make dust for asphalt roofing. There has been no production
since 1936.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7d.
Tin—Tin, as cassiterite, is a by-product of the Sullivan mine, where it has been
produced since 1941. The tin concentrate is shipped to an American smelter for
treatment.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7c.
Tungsten—Tungsten, very largely as scheelite concentrates, was produced from
1937 to 1958, first from the Columbia Tungstens (Hardscrabble) mine in the Cariboo in 1937 and during World War II from the Red Rose mine near Hazelton and
the Emerald mine near Salmo. The Red Rose closed in 1954 and the Emerald in
1958. Small amounts of scheelite have been produced from the Bridge River,
Revelstoke, and other areas where demand was high. In 1970 production began
from the Invincible mine near Salmo.
A very small amount of wolframite came from Boulder Creek near Atlin. See
Tables 1, 3, and 7c.
Volcanic ash—The only recorded production of volcanic ash is 30 tons from
the Cariboo Mining Division in 1954.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Zinc—Zinc was first produced in 1905. For many years lead was the most
valuable single metal, but in 1950 the annual value of production of zinc surpassed
that of lead and in 1966 the total value of zinc production exceeded that of lead.
In 1972 the annual production of zinc is exceeded by that of copper, coal, and crude
oil. Zinc is invariably associated with lead, and most ores are mined for their
combined values in zinc, lead, and silver, and rarely for their zinc content alone.
Some zinc ores contain a valuable amount of gold, and zinc is associated with copper
at the Lynx mine. Modern practice is to concentrate and separate the zinc mineral
(sphalerite) from the lead mineral (galena). Most of the zinc concentrates go to
the zinc-recovery plant at Trail, are roasted, and are converted electrolytically to
refined metal.   Some concentrates are shipped to American or Japanese smelters.
More than 86 per cent of the zinc has been mined in southeastern British Columbia, at the Sullivan mine, and at mines near Ainsworth, Invermere, Moyie Lake,
Riondel, Salmo, Slocan, and Spillimacheen. Other production has come from mines
at Portland Canal and Tulsequah and is coming from Buttle Lake. The greatest zinc
mine is the Sullivan, which has contributed about 74 per cent of the total zinc production of the Province.
Records for the period 1905 to 1908 show shipments totalling 18,845 tons of
zinc ore and zinc concentrates or unstated zinc content. In 1918, revisions were
made to some yearly totals for zinc to adjust them for recovery of zinc from slag
treated at the Trail smelter.   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7b.
 A 26
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1972
Prices1 Used in Valuing Production of Gold, Silver, Copper,
Lead, Zinc, and Coal
Year
Gold,
Placer,
Oz.
Gold,
Fine,
Oz.
Silver,
Fine,
Oz.
Copper,
Lb.
Lead,
Lb.
Zinc,
Lb.
Coal,
Short
Ton
1901_
1902-
1903-
1904._
1905-
1906-
1907-
1908-
1909-
1910-
1911-
1912-
1913-
1914-
1915-
1916-
1917-
1918.
1919-
1920-
1921-
1922-
1923-
1924-
1925-
1926-
1927-
1928-
1929-
1930-
1931-
1932-
1933-
1934-
1935-
1936-
1937..
1938-
1939-
1940-
1941..
1942-
1943-
1944-
1945-
1946-
1947-
1948-
1949-
1950-
1951-
1952-
1953-
1954-
1955-
1956-
1957-
1958-
1959-
1960-
1961-
1962-
1963-
1964_
1965-
1966-
1967-
1968_
1969-
1970-
1971-
1972..
17
20.67
23.47
28.60
34.50
35.19
35.03
34.99
35.18
36.14
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
36.75
35.00
35.00
36.00
38.05
36.85
34.27
34.42
34.07
34.52
34.44
33.55
33.98
33.57
33.95
35.46
37.41
37.75 I
37.75
37.73
37.71
37.76
37.71
37.69
36.56
35.34
57.52]
Cents
56.002 N.Y.
49.55
50.78
53.36
51.33
63.45
62.06
50.22
48.93
50.812
50.64
57.79
56.80
52.10
47.20
62.38
77.35
91.93
105.57
95.80
59.52
64.14
61.63
63.442
69.065
62.107
56.370
58.176
52.993
38.154
28.700
31.671
37.832
47.461
64.790
45.127
44.881
43.477
40.488
38.249
38.261
41.166
45.254
43.000
47.000
83.650
72.000
75.000 Mont.
74.250 U.S.
80.635    „
94.550    „
83.157   „
83.774    „
82.982   „
87.851    „
89.373    „
87.057   „
86.448   „
87.469    „
88.633    „
93.696 „
116.029 „
137.965 „
139.458 „
139.374 „
139.300 „
167.111 „
231.049 „
192.699 „
184.927 „
155.965 „
166.324 „
Cents
16.11 N.Y.
11.70 „
13.24 „
12.82 „
15.59 „
19.28 „
20.00 „
13.20 „
12.98 „
12.738 „
12.38 „
16.341 „
15.27 „
13.60 „
17.28 „
27.202 „
27.18 „
24.63 „
18.70 „
17.45 „
12.50 „
13.38 „
14.42 „
13.02 „
14.042 „
13.795 „
12.920 „
14.570 „
18.107 „
12.982 „
8.116 „
6.380 Lond.
7.454 „
7.419 „
7.795 „
9.477 „
13.078 „
9.972 „
10.092 „
10.086 „
10.086 „
10.086 „
11.750 „
12.000 „
12.550 „
12.800 „
20.390 „
22.350 U.S.
19.973 „
23.428 „
27.700 „
31.079 „
30.333 „
29.112 „
38.276 „
39.787 „
26.031 „
23.419 „
27.708 „
28.985 „
28.288 „
30.473 „
30.646 „
33.412 „
38.377 „
53.344 „
50,022 „
54.216 „
66.656 „
58.6982
46.6962
44.8392
Cents
2.577 N.Y.
3.66 „
3.81 „
3.88 „
4.24 „
4.81 „
4.80 „
3.78 „
3.85 „
4.00 „
3.98 „
4.024 „
3.93 „
3.50 „
4.17 „
6.172 „
7.91 „
6.67 „
5.19 „
7.16 „
4.09 „
5.16 „
6.54 „
7.287 „
7.848 Lond.
6.751 „
5.256 „
4.575 „
5.050 „
3.927 „
2.710 „
2.113 „
2.391 „
2.436 „
3.133 „
3.913 „
5.110 „
3.344 „
3.169 „
3.362 „
3.362 „
3.362 „
3.754 „
4.500 „
5.000 „
6.750 „
13.670 „
18.040 „
15.800 U.S.
14.454 „
18.400 „
16.121 „
13.265 „
13.680 „
14.926 „
15.756 „
14.051 „
11.755 „
11.670 „
11.589 „
11.011 „
10.301 „
12.012 „
14.662 „
17.247 „
16.283 „
15.102 „
14.546 „
16.039 „
16.336 „
13.950 „
14.876 „
Cents
4.60E.St.L.
4.90 „
5.90 „
4.80 „
4.40 „
11.25 „
10.88 „
7.566 „
6.94 „
6.24 „
6.52 „
3.95 „
4.86 „
5.62 „
5.39 „
7.892 Lond.
7.409 „
6.194 „
5.493 „
5.385 „
3.599 „
2.554 „
2.405 „
3.210 „
3.044 „
3.099 „
3.315 „
4.902 „
3.073 „
3.069 „
3.411 „
3.411 „
3.411 „
4.000 „
4.300 „
6.440 „
7.810 „
11.230 „
13.930 „
13.247 U.S.
15.075 „
19.900 „
15.874 „
10.675 „
10.417 „
12.127 „
13.278 „
11.175 „
10.009. „
10.978 „
12.557 „
11.695 „
12.422 „
13.173 „
14.633 „
15.636 „
15.622 „
14.933 „
14.153 „
15.721 „
16.006 „
16.286 „
15.579 „
$
2.65
2.63
2.67
2.62
2.70
2.61
3.07
3.11
3.19
3.35
3.18
3.36
3.39
3.46
3.43
3.45
3.48
4.99
4.92
4.72
4.81
4.72
4.81
4.89
4.79
4.84
4.81
4.71
4.74
4.73
4.35
4.04
3.90
4.00
3.95
4,23
4.25
4.01
4.02
4.26
4.15
4.13
4.17
4.25
4.24
4.68
5.12
6.09
6.51
6.43
6.46
6.94
6.88
7.00
6.74
6.59
6.76
7.45
7.93
6.64
7.40
7.43
7.33
6.94
7.03
7.28
7.75
7.91
8.00
7.40
10.03
10.96
i See page A 14 for detailed explanation.
2 See page A 15 for explanation.
 STATISTICS
A 27
Table 1—Mineral Production: Total to Date, Past Year,
and Latest Year
Products!
Total Quantity Total Value     Quantity,
to Date to Date 1971
Value,
1971
Quantity,
1972
Value,
1972
Metals
lb.
lb.
Cadium	
 lb.
Cobalt             	
.    .   lb.
lh,
Gold—placer
—lode, fine .
Iron concentrates .
tvr.,
oz.
tons
lh.
Magnesium
Manganese           	
lb.
tons
lb.
Mnlyhripnum
 lb.
lh,
lh.
Silver
07,
Tin
lh.
Tungsten (WO3)    —
lb.
lb.
ntw*
53,569,508
6,922,796
41,153,874
796
271,014
5,007,309,980
5,236,276
17,233,886
29,492,096
16,271,392,718
204,632
1,724
4,171,110
169,561,242
47,465,767
749
1,407
731
499,861,801
18,855,025
18,628,328
14,994,858,109
17,543,869
14,463,399
76,098,687
32,295
259,258
,452,549,267
96,988,949
513,842,781
269,525,985
,411,548,450
88,184
32,668
10,447,358
284,617,746
45,572,116
30,462
135,008
1,389
376,662,453
17,094,227
43,843,954
486,803,434
42,861,359
323,525
82,521
1,036,713
113,545
280,619,150
177
85,781
1,929,868
248,827,301
21,884,729
2,543,578
7,673,546
318,999
1,335,808
305,451,243
Totals
,.|6,161,043,298|_.
Industrial Minerals
Arsenious oxide  lb.
Asbestos   tons
Barite  tons
Bentonite    tons
Diatomite   tons
Fluorspar    tons
Fluxes   tons
Granules   tons
Gypsum and gypsite  tons
Hydromagnesite tons
Iron oxide and ochre tons
Jade    lb.
Magnesium sulphate
Mica 	
Natro-alunite	
Perlite	
.tons
_lb.
..tons
-tons
Phosphate rock  tons
Sodium   carbonate   tons
Sulphur tons
Talc   tons
Others , ,	
22,019,420
1,118,132
439,158
791
11,143
35,682
4,142,671
456,014
4,818,401
2,253
18,108
1,007,879
13,894
12,822,050
522
1,112
3,842
10,492
7,881,634
1,805
I
273.
218,102.
4,489,
16.
280
795
7,733.
7,286
16,443.
27.
155.
963.
254.
185,
9.
11,
16,
118,
99,988
34.
5.
201
692
.307
858
,068
,950
,576
,241
,448
,536
,050
.220
352
818
398
.120
894
983
,030
871
.213
87,118
21,267
1,550
26,740
29,238
344,795
167,760
288,467
Totals
-|   357,191,826|-
Structural Materials
Cement    tons
Clay products
14,751,453
Lime and limestone ._ tons
Rubble,  riprap,   crushed
rock tons
Sand and gravel  tons
Building-stone tons
Not assigned 	
Totals	
1,164,515
Fuels
Coal  . tons
Crude oil bbl.
Field condensate bbl.
Plant condensate bbl.
Nat'l gas to pipe-line _.MSCF
Butane  bbl.
Propane bbl.
155,680,542
208,246,758
614,844
12,935,848
2,563,398,508
5,642,046
4,324,851
Totals	
Grand totals
256,451,810
88,937,117
60,101,459
57,614,433
312,104,198
9,216,931
5,972,171
790,398,119
748,115,691
480,219,321
1,501,047
6,285,149
266,131,706
1,802,897
1,380,349
1,505,436,160
[8,814,069,403
906,467
1,819,549
3,668,244
29,320,104
2,267
4,565,242
25,154,122
109,008
1,114,139
291,188,481
318,195
468,876
$
243,614
388,674
2,011,223
679,601
93,820
695,650
$
419,042
324,617
1,759,995
103,099
131,037,918
4,647
3,031,844
18,153,612
34,711,408
155,739
467,012,694
691
121,624
1,256,308
194,249,571
155,739
209,403,822
26,905
6,995,448
12,604,409
28,896,566
36,954,846
3,497,420
28,041,603
3,240,483
43,261,210
4,601,486
11,968,046
421,079
3,012,540
49,745,789
5,774,192
6,926,036
351,043
1,273,196
268,347,996
11,519,660
473,908
2,167,663
47,172,894
3,212,297
301,059,951
	
372,995,661
17,800,406
179,455
105,807
44,237
20,870,241
395,289
37,830
875
40,346
98,426
519,192
930,348
31,600
37,158
388,315
59,246
757,924
1,087,196
196,332
243,725
235,218
2,147,778
297,707
2,306,933
21,909,767
	
25,752,393
21,629,385|         890,926
5,981,785]	
3,037,2221      2,026,309
3,670,583)      3,321,764
25,612,3961    34,826,518
8,962 194
59,940,3331.
45,801,936
66,471,856
287,781
293,287
31,946,372
101,822
150,040
6,026,198
23,831,144
104,531
1,018,012
379,969,499
340,904
480,047
145,053,094|_
527,963,145
21,014,112
5,263,749
3,357,927
4,032,548
33,076,196
1,166
66,745,698
66,030,210
63,166,717
277.069
327,820
41,616,824
106,533
150,015
171,675,188
637,168,940
1 See notes on individual products listed alphabetically on pages A 16 to A 25.
2 From 1968, excludes production which is confidential.
 A 28 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1972
Table 2—Total Value of Mineral Production, 1836-1972
Year
Metals
Industrial
Minerals
Structural
Materials
Fuels
Total
1836-86.
1887	
1888	
1889	
1890	
1891	
1892	
1893	
1894	
1895	
1896	
1897	
1898	
1899	
1900	
1901-
1902_
1903-
1904-
1905-
1906-
1907-
1908-
1909-
1910-
1911-
1912_
1913-
1914-
1915-
1916-
1917-
1918-
1919-
1920-
1921-
1922_
1923-
1924-
1925-
1926-
1927-
1928-
1929-
1930-
1931_
1932-
1933-
1934-
1935-
1936-
1937-
1938-
1939-
1940-
1941_
1942_
1943-
1944-
1945-
1946_
1947-
1948-
1949-
1950-
52,808,750
729,381
745,794
685,512
572,884
447,136
511,075
659,969
1,191,728
2,834,629
4,973,769
7,575,262
7,176,870
8,107,509
11,360,546
14,258,455
12,163,561
12,640,083
13,424,755
16,289,165
18,449,602
17,101,305
15,227,991
14,668,141
13,768,731
11,880,062
18,218,266
17,701,432
15,790,727
20,765,212
32,092,648
27,299,934
27,957,302
20,058,217
19,687,532
13,160,417
19,605,401
25,769,215
35,959,566
46,480,742
51,867,792
45,134,289
48,640,158
52,805,345
41,785,380
23,530,469
20,129,869
25,777,723
35,177,224
42,006,618
45,889,944
65,224,245
55,959,713
56,216,049
64,332,166
65,807,630
63,626,140
55,005,394
42,095,013
50,673,592
58,834,747
95,729,867
124,091,753
110,219,917
117,166,836
2,400
46,345
17,500
46,446
51,810
133,114
150,718
174,107
281,131
289,426
508,601
330,503
251,922
140,409
116,932
101,319
223,748
437,729
544,192
807,502
457,225
480,319
447,495
460,683
486,554
543,583
724,362
976,171
916,841
1,381,720
1,073,023
1,253,561
1,434,382
1,378,337
1,419,248
1,497,720
1,783,010
2,275,972
2,358,877
2,500,799
2,462,340
43,650
22,168
46,432
77,517
75,201
79,475
129,234
726,323
150,000
150,000
200,000
250,000
400,000
450,000
525,000
575,000
660,800
982,900
1,149,400
1,200,000
1,270,559
1,500,000
3,500,917
3,436,222
3,249,605
2,794,107
1,509,235
1,247,912
1,097,900
783,280
980,790
1,962,824
1,808,392
2,469,967
2,742,388
2,764,013
2,766,838
3,335,885
2,879,160
3,409,142
3,820,732
4,085,105
3,538,519
1,705,708
1,025,586
1,018.719
1,238,718
1,796,677
2,098,339
1,974,976
1,832,464
2,534,840
2,845,262
3,173,635
3,025,255
3,010,088
3,401,229
5,199,563
5,896,803
8,968,222
9,955,790
10,246,939
10,758,565
1,240,080
1,467,903
1,739,490
2,034,420
3,087,291
2,479,005
2,934,882
3,038,859
2,824,687
2,693,961
2,734,522
3,582,595
4,126,803
4,744,530
5,016,398
4,832,257
4,332,297
4,953,024
5,511,861
5,548,044
7,637,713
7,356,866
8,574,884
11,108,335
8,071,747
10,786,812
9,197,460
7,745,847
7,114,178
8,900,675
8,484,343
12,833,994
11,975,671
13,450,169
12,836,013
12,880,060
12.678.548
9,911,935
12,168,905
11,650,180
12,269,135
12,633,510
11,256,260
9,435,650
7,684,155
6,523,644
5,375,171
5,725,133
5,048,864
5,722,502
6,139,920
5,565,069
6,280,956
7,088,265
7,660,000
8,237,172
7,742,030
8,217,966
6,454,360
6,732,470
8,680,440
9,765,395
10,549,924
10,119,303
63,610,965
1,991,629
2,260,129
2,502,519
2,682,505
3,613,902
3,119.314
3,594,851
4,230,587
5,659,316
8,394,053
10,459,784
10,909,465
12,434,312
16,355,076
19,674,853
17,445,818
17,497,380
18,955,179
22,461,826
24,980,546
25,888,418
23,784,857
24,513,584
26,377,066
23,499,071
32,458,800
30,194,943
26,382,491
29,521,739
42,391,953
37,056,284
41,855,707
33,304,104
35,609.126
28,135,325
35,207,350
41,330,560
48,752,446
61,517,804
67,077,605
60,720,313
65,227,002
68,689,839
55,763,360
35,233,462
28,806,716
32,639,163
42,407,630
48,837,783
54,133,485
74,438,675
64,416,599
65,711,189
75,028,294
77,566,453
76,471,329
67,151,016
54,742,315
62,026,901
72,549,790
112,583,082
145,184,247
133,226,430
139,995,418
 STATISTICS A 29
Table 2—Total Value of Mineral Production, 1836-1972—Continued
Year
Metals
Industrial
Minerals
Structural
Materials
Fuels
Total
10S1
$
153,598,411
147,857,523
126,755,705
123,834,286
142,609,505
149,441,246
125,353,920
104,251,112
105,076,530
130,304,373
128,565,774
159,627,293
172,852,866
180,926,329
177,101,733
208,664,003
235,865,318
250,912,026
294,881,114
309,981,470
301,059,951
372,995,661
$
2,493,840
2,181,464
3,002,673
5,504,114
6,939,490
9,172,792
11,474,050
9,958,768
12,110,286
13,762,102
12,948,308
14,304,214
16,510,898
16,989,469
20,409,649
22,865,324
29,364,065
26,056,782
20,492,943
22,020,359
21,909,767
25,752,393
$
10,606,048
11,596,961
13,555,038
14,395,174
15,299,254
20,573,631
25,626,939
19,999,576
19,025,209
18,829,989
19,878,921
21,366,265
23,882,190
26,428,939
32,325,714
43,780,272
44,011,488
45,189,476
55,441,528
46,104,071
59,940,333
66,745,698
$
10,169,617
9,729,739
9,528,279
9,161,089
9,005,111
9,665,983
8,537,920
10,744,093
11,439,192
14,468,869
18,414,318
34,073.712
42,617,633
42,794,431
50,815,252
60,470,406
74,141,627
82,870,204
93,573,164
110,534,136
145,053,094
171,675,188
$
176,867,916
iq<!->
171,365,687
10«
152,841,695
10*4
152,894,663
1Q5S
173,853,360
1Q*6
188,853,652
]0<i7
170,992,829
105«
144,953,549
10«
147,651,217
10fifl
177,365,333
179,807,321
1QR1
10fi?
229,371,484
1961
255,863,587
10A4
267,139,168
280,652,348
IQfiS
lOfifi
335,780,005
383,382,498
10fi7
1968
405,028,488
1969
464,388,749
488,640,036
527,963,145
1970
1971
1972   __           ...           -
637,168,940
Totals
6,161,043,298
357,191,826
790,398,119
1,505,436,160
8,814,069,403
 A 30
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1972
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 a 32            mines and petroleum resources report
Table 4—Mineral Production, Graph of Value,
1972
1887-
1972
900-
800-
700 -
600-
500-
400 -
300-
200-
150-
100-
90-
80-
70-
8     60-
3     50
g     40-
h     30
§    20-
_l
3      15-
10-
9-
8-
7-
6-
5-
4-
3-
2
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-J      80
g      70
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 STATISTICS
A 33
Table 5—Production of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, and
Molybdenum, Graph of Quantities, 1893-1972
700-
-  rsO'
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ii/yc-
t-fis.
i
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s
 A 34 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1972
Table 6—Production of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, Molybdenum,
and Iron Concentrates, 1858-1972
Year
Gold (Placer)
Quantity
Value
Gold (Fine)
Quantity        Value
Silver
Quantity
Value
Copper
Quantity
Value
1858-90	
1891-1900-
1901-10	
1911	
1912	
1913	
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917	
1918	
1919
197(1
1921	
1922	
1923	
1924	
1925	
1926	
1927	
1928	
1929	
1930	
1931	
1932	
1933	
1934	
1935	
1936	
1937	
1938	
1939	
1940	
1941	
1942	
1943	
1944	
1945	
1946	
1947	
1948	
1949	
1950	
1951	
1952.	
1953	
1954 —
1955	
1956	
1957	
1958	
1959	
1960	
1961	
1962	
1963	
1964	
1965	
1966	
1967	
1968_	
1969-
1970-
1971_
1972..
Totals-
o,   *
3,246,585'55
376,290   6
507,580   8
25,060j
32,680
30,000
33,240
45,290
34,150
29,180
18,820
16,850
13,040
13,720
21,690
24,710
24,750
16,476
20,912|
9,191
8,424
6,983
8,955
17,176
20,400|
23,928!
25,181
30,929
43,389
54,153
57,759
49,746
39,067
43,7751
32,904,
14,600[
11,433
12.589;
15,7291
6,969
20,332
17,886
19,134
23,691
17,554
14,245
8,684
7,666
3,865
2,936
5,650
7,570
3,847
3,416
3,315
4,620
1,842
866
1,535
891
670
399
491
177
691
5,236,276
$
,192,163
,397,183
,628,660
426,000
555,500
510,000
565,000
770,000
580,500
496,000
320,000
286,500
221,600
233,200
368,800
420,000
420,750
280,092
355,503
156,247
143,208
118,711
152,235
291,992
395,542
562,787
714,431
895,058
,249,940
558,245
671,015
,478,492
236,928
385,962
,041,772
462,270
361,977
398,591
475,361
200,585
585,200
529,524
598,717
717,911
494,756
403,230
238,967
217,614
109,450
80,990
157,871
208,973
107,418
99,884
96,697
135,411
55,191
25,053
44,632
25,632
19,571
11,720
14,185
4,647
26,905
Oz.
632,806,
2,322,118!
228,617!
257,496
272,254
247,170
250,021
221,932
114,523
164,674
152,426
120,048
135,765
197,856
179,245
247,716
209,719
201,427
178,001
180,662
145,223
160,836
146,133
181,651
223,589
297,216
365,343
404,578
460,781
557,522
587,336
583,524
571,026!
444,518
224,403
186,632]
175,373
117,612
243,282
286,230
288,396
283,983
261,274
255,789
253,552
258,388
242,477
191,743
223,403
194,354
173,146
205,580
159,821
158,850
154,979|
138,487
117,124
119,508
126,157
123,896
117,481
100.809
85,781
121,624
12,858,353
47,998,179
4,725,512
5,322,442
5,627,595
5,109,008
5,167,934
4,587,333
2,367,191
3,403,811
3,150,644
2,481,392
2,804,197
4,089,684
3,704,994
5,120,535
4,335,069
4,163,859
3,679,601
3,734,609
3,002,020
3,324,975
3,020,837
4,263,389
6,394,645
10,253,952
12,856,419
14,172,367
16,122.767
19,613,624
21,226,957
22,461,516
21,984,501
17,113,943
8.639,516
7,185,332
6,751,860
4,322,241
8,514,870
10,018,050
10,382,256
10,805,553
9.627.947
8,765,889
8,727,294
8,803,279
8,370,306
6,603,628
7,495,170
6,604,149
5,812,511
6,979,441
5,667,253
5,942,101
5,850,458
5,227,884
4,419,089
4,506,646
4,763.688
4,672,242
4.427,506
3,685.476
3,031,844
6,995,448
Oz.
221,089;
22,537,306'
31,222,548
1,892,364
3,132,108
3,465,856
3,602,180
3,366,506
3,301,923
2,929,216
3,498,172
3,403,119
3,377,849
2,673,389
7,101,311
6,032,986
8,341,768
7,654,844
10,748,556
10,470,185
10,627,167
9,960,172
11,328,263
7,550,331
7,150,655
7,021,754
8,613,977
9,269,944
9,547,124
11,305,367
10,861,578
10,821,393
12,327,944
12,175,700
9,677,881
8,526,310
5,705,334
6,157,307
6,365,761
5,708,461
6,720,134
7,637,822|
9,509,456
8,218,914
8,810,807
8,378,819
9,826,403
7,903,149
8,405,074
8,129,348
7,041,058
6,198,101
7,446,643
7,373,997
6,189,804
6,422,680
5,269,642
4,972,084
5,549,131
6,180,739
7,130,866
5,760,534;
6,511.316'
7,673,546]
6,926,036
$
214,152
13,561,194
16,973,507
958,293
1,810,045
1,968,606
1,876,736
1,588,991
2,059,739
2,265,749
3,215,870
3,592,673
3,235,980
1,591,201
4,554,781
3,718,129
5,292,184
5,286,818
6,675,606
5,902,043
6,182,461
5,278,194
4,322,185
2,254,979
2,264,729
2,656,526
4,088,280
6,005,996
4,308,330
5,073,962
4,722,288
4,381,365
4,715,315
4,658,545
4,080,775
3,858,496
2,453,293
2,893,934
5,324,959
4,110,092
5,040,101
5,671,082
7,667,950
7,770,983
7,326,803
7,019,272
8,154,145
6,942,995
7,511,866
7,077,166
6,086,854
5,421,417
6,600,183
6,909,140
7,181,907
8,861,050
7,348,938
6,929,793
7,729,939
10,328,695
16,475,795
11,100,491
12,041.181
11,968,046
11,519,660
Lb.
35,416,069
379,957,091
36,927,656
51,456,537
46,460,305
45,009,699
56,918,405
65,379,364
59,007,565
61,483,754
42,459,339
44,887,676
39,036,993
32,359,896
57,720,290
64,845,393
72,306,432
89,339,768
89,202,871
97,908,316
102,793,669
92,362,240
64,134,746
50,608,036
43,149,460
49,651,733
39,428,208
21,671,711
46,057,584
65,769,906
73,254,679
77,980,223
66,435,583
50,097,716
42,307,510
36,300,589
25,852,366
17,500,538
41,783,921
43,025,388
54,856,808
42,212,133
43,249,658
42,005,512
49,021,013
50,150,087
44,238,031
43,360,575
31,387,441
12,658,649
16,233,546
33,064,429
31,692,412
108,979,144
118,247,104
115,554,700
85,197,073
105,800,568
172,739,548
160,993,338
167,415,411
212,371,731
280,619,150
467,012,694
4,365,210
56,384,783
4,571,644
8,408,513
7,094,489
6,121,319
9,835,500
17,784,494
16,038,256
15,143,449
7,939,896
7,832,899
4,879,624
4,329,754
8,323,266
8,442,870
10,153,269
12,324,421
11,525,011
14,265,242
18,612,850
11,990,466
5,365,690
3,228,892
3,216,701
3,683,662
3,073,428
2,053,828
6,023,411
6,558,575
7,392,862
7,865,085
6,700,693
5,052,856
4,971,132
4,356,070
3,244,472
2,240,070
8,519,741
9,616,174
10,956,550
9,889,458
11,980,155
13,054,893
14,869,544
14,599,693
16,932,549
17,251,872
8,170,465
2,964,529
4,497,991
9,583,724
8,965,149
33,209,215
36,238,007
38,609,136
32,696,081
56,438,255
88,135,172
87,284,148
111,592,416
124,657,958
131,037,918
209,403,822
96,988,949
17,233,886)513,842,781
499,861,801 376,662,453
5,007,309,980
1,452,549,267
 STATISTICS
A 35
Table 6—Production of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, Molybdenum,
and Iron Concentrates, 1858-1972—Continued
Year
Lead
Quantity
Value
Zinc
Quantity
Value
Molybdenum
Quantity       Value
Iron Concentrates
Quantity      Value
1940-
1941-
1942..
1943-
1944-
1945-
1972-
Lb.
1,044,400
205,037,158
407,833,262
26,872,397
44,871,454
55,364,677
50,625,048
46,503,590
48,727,516
37,307,465
43,899,661
29,475,968
39,331,218
41,402,288
67,447,985
96,663,152
170,384,481
237,899,199
263,023,936
282,996,423
305,140,792
307,999,153
321,803,725
261,902,228
252,007,574
271,689,217
347,366,967
344,268,444
377,971,618
419,118,371
412,979,182
378,743,663
466,849,112
456,840,454
507,199,704
439,155,635
292,922,888
336,976,468
345,862,680
313,733,089
320,037,525
265,378,899
284,024,522
273,456,604
284,949,396
297,634,712
332,474,456
302,567,640
283,718,073
281,603,346
294,573,159
287,423,357
333,608,699
384,284,524
335,282,537
314,974,310
268,737,503
250,183,633
211,490,107
208,131,894
231,627,618
210,072,565
214,838.525
248,827,301
194,249,571
45,527
7,581,619
17,033,102
1,069,521
1,805,627
2,175,832
1,771,877
1,939,200
3,007,462
2,951,020
2,928,107
1,526.855
2,816,115
1,693,354
3,480,306
6,321,770
12,415,917
18,670,329
17,757,535
14,874,292
13,961,412
15,555,189
12,638,198
7,097,812
5,326,432
6,497,719
8,461,859
10,785,930
14,790,028
21,417,049
13,810,024
12,002,390
15,695,467
15,358,976
17,052,054
16,485,902
13,181,530
16,848,823
23,345,731
42,887,313
57,734,770
41,929,866
41,052,905
50,316,015
45,936,692
39,481,244
45,482,505
45,161,245
44,702,619
39,568,086
34,627,075
33,542,306
38,661,912
42,313,569
34,537,454
37,834,714
39,402,293
43,149,171
34,436,934
31,432,079
32,782,257
33,693,539
35.096.021
34,711,408
28,896,566
Lb.
12,684,192
2,634,544
5,358,280
6,758,768
7,866,467
12,982,440
37,168,980
41,848,513
41,772,916
56,737,651
47,208,268
49,419,372
57,146,548
58,344,462
79,130,970
98,257,099
142,876,947
145,225,443
181,763,147
172,096,841
250,479,310
202,071,702
192,120,091
195,963,751
249,152,403
256,239,446
254,581,393
291,192,278
298,497,295
278,409,102
312,020,671
367,869,579
387,236,469
336,150,455
278,063,373
294,791,635
274,269,956
253,006,168
270,310,195
288,225,368
290,344,227
337,511,324
372,871,717
382,300,862
334,124,560
429,198,565[
443,853,004|
449,276,797|
432,002,7901
402,342,850
403,399,319
387,951,190
413,430,817
402,863,154
400,796,562
311,249,250
305,1124,440
262,830,908
299,396,264
296,667,033
275,590,749
305,451,243
268,347,996
Totals
16,271,392,718
1,411,548,450
14,994,858,109 1,486,803,434
894,169
129,092
316,139
324,421
346,125
1,460,524
4,043,985
3,166,259
2,899,040
3,540,429
3,077,979
1,952,065
2,777,322
3,278,903
4,266,741
7,754,450
10,586,610
8,996,135
9,984,613
9,268,792
9,017,005
5,160,911
4,621,641
6,291,416
7,584,199
7,940,860
8,439,373
14,274,245
9,172,822
8,544,375
10,643,026
12,548,031
13,208,636
13,446,018
11,956,725
18,984,581
21,420,484
28,412,593
37,654,211
38,181,214
43,769,392
67,164,754
59,189,656
40,810,618
34,805,755
52,048,909
58,934,801
50,206,681
43,234,839
44,169,198
50,656,726
45,370,891
51,356,376
53,069,163
58,648,561
48,666,933
47,666,540
39,248,539
43,550,1811
46,639,024
44,111.055
49,745.789
47,172,894
Lb.
1,987
3,618
12,342
6,982
960
5,414
28.
7,289.
17,094.
17,517
19,799
26,597
31,276,
21,884,
28,041
,245
,125
,927
,543
,793
,477
662
2,000
20,560
11,636
1,840
9,500
.4971 52.
,729| 36.
,603| 43
47,063
,405,344
,606,061
,183,064
.552,722
999,442
561,796
954,846
,261,210
169,561,2421284,617,746
Tons
29,869
13,029
19,553
1,000
1,230
1,472
1,010
1,200
243
20
679,
5,472
113,535
900,481
991,248
535,746
610,930
369,955
357,342
630,271
849,248
1460,355
1,335,068
1,793,847
2,060,241
2,002,562
2,165,403
2,151,804
2,154,443
2,094,745
2,074,854
1,879,065
1,929,868
1.256,308
$
70.879
45,602
68,436
5,000
6,150
7,360
5,050
3,600
1,337
3,735
27,579
790,000
5,474,924
6,763,105
3,733,891
3,228,756
2,190,847
2,200,637
4,193,442
6,363,848
10,292,847
12,082,540
18,326,911
20,746,424
20,419,487
21,498,581
20,778,934
20,820,765
21,437,569
19,787.845
17,391,883
18,153,612
12.604.409
29,492,096|269,525,985
 A 36 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1972
Table 7a—Mineral Production by Mining
Division
Period
Placer Gold
Quantity
Value
Metals
Industrial
Minerals
Structural
Materials
Alberni..
Atlin..
Cariboo..
Clinton..
Fort Steele..
Golden-
Greenwood-
Kamloops..
Lillooet...
New Westminster..
Osoyoos..
Revelstoke-
Similkameen..
Slocan..
Trail Creek..
Vancouver..
Vernon-
Victoria..
Not assigned..
Totals..
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
Oz.
1,617
4
ee
735,880
148
BOS
2,611,006
33,253
141
1,848
17,390.960
3,781
21,066
54,187,492
10,171
20.531
469
5,074
112
50,296
92,946
866
3,586
234
25
56,431
7,582
45,507
4,603
851
182
2,732
8
1,525,528
243,069
468,450
115,662
604,785
3,732
1,251,883
1,925,688
19,300
89,026
595,910
4,764
725
1,503,680
5,466
878,204
105,569
9,397
24,260
5,306
72,885
259
17,262.515
177
691
5,236,276
4.647
26,905
988,949
13,592,004
13,346,043
144.505,222
15
38,047,207
2.734,101
33,965,284
105,983,897
848,377
64,189,929
65,467,594
2,290,605,183
1,017,942
63,472.
7,765,
6,605
194,913
25,096
38,791
213,502
6,183
11,236
713
679
475
315
,340
,722
.982
296
725
15
,439
,090
148,167,2
16,997,484
43,998,994
256,433,175
8,685,162
7,075,391
354,334,512
4,312.143
5,752,173
55,455,930
18,768,216
21,296,539
224,959,502
27,441,963
34,330.377
288,045,572
25.225,679
33,895,391
141,169,838
1,615,109
1,029,821
14,961,357
9,398
432,472
253,026
4,288.706
3,375
20,325
37,830
40,346
423,548
162,427
609,564
676,439
19,478,684
1,109.803
1,482,485
14,306,575
2,327,897
6,540,
18,224.
21,182
234,054
102
142
465.
168
141.
1,815.
281
506
2,218
52
80
1,611
538
832
310
854
900
800
895
196
336
352
843
.465
428
330
,000
625
10.050
85,660
88,729
448,907
73.019
89,159
6,512,982
9,975,651
130,173,851
42,949.118
33,266,658
394,332,981
10,054,1791
1,798,497
274,791,277
950.904
524,403
90,286,718
8,042.080
8,838,521
276,454,663
3,482
1,240,215
335,113
381,993
17,069,526
14.716,797
12,628,099
333,968,438
301.055.304
372,968.756
6,064,054,349
7,066,964
42,000
55,478
230
210
189,871
1,121.560
1,322,114
58,213,255
338,241
3,150,193
3,511,618
23,711,064
270,282
773,614
3,675,486
581,641
610,689
9,166,983
246,678
163,141
3,564,286
175,325
250,704
2,186.658
4,476.797
5.166,348
28,574,775
1,375,835
1,289.689
11,764,196
164,244
62,059
3,248,863
4,109,496
4,252,048
68,508,074
550,212
642,903
7,476,417
14,107,989
14,849,901
174,940,412
293,023
266,451
1,914,414
1,158,738
1,096,719
12,821,968
447,910
718,952
3,818,598
194,583
153,939
2,908,317
121,785
81,535
4,231,918
1,738.301
1,867,340
17,001,410
106,916
80,129
2,019,418
139,259
270,434
3,595,621
10,132,873
10,010,701
133,782,806
805,641
1,140,765
7,860,985
13.492.425
14,477,864
214,585,799
1,664,340
4,755,129
44,512,704
21,909,767!  59,940,333
25,752,393|   66,745,698
357,191,8261790,398,119
 STATISTICS
Divisions, 1971 and 1972, and Total to Date
A 37
Fuels
Coal
Crude Oil and
Condensates
Natural Gas Delivered
to Pipe-line
Butane and
Propane
Division
Total
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Tons
$
Bbl.
$
MSCF
$
Bbl.
$
$
14.024,476
13,599,069
148,836,579
3,516
1,863
55,796,733
5.925,905
37,538,314
. 290
1,100
184,307,101
270.282
773,614
4,829,359
4,565,242
6,014,035
73,179,454
45,801,936
65,909,040
412,037,498
111.183.070
132.663.762
2,374,423
1,645,626
81,354,808
7,940,800
6,856,019
199,543,557
29,573,519
43,958,330
15,087
59,765
249,282,159
26,377.269
24,953,687
221,797,450
67.052.924
63,771,606
488,005,517
291,188,481
379,969,499
2,563,398,508
31,946,372
41,616,824
266,131,706
787,071
820,951
9,966,897
251,862
256,548
3,183,246
125,035,550
11,687
111,120
116,870
816,391
128,237,594
1,016,444,232
980,234
204,859
153,807,702
21,275,176
48,392,378
74,324,471
301,144,744
627,920,645
9,517,217
8,224,759
364,118,383
|
18,472,462
20,682,074
232,603,877
19,061,239
21,562,990
2,929,584
11,080,836
237,969,566
28,687,086
476
501,936
4,300
3,416,508
35,520,125
306,236.635
25.746,608
34,703,502
1,122
5,008
151,511,892
1,809,692
1,183,760
18,034,151
121,785
10,057,188
4,617,442
19,553,725
154,856,256
44,687,419
35,133,998
36
116
412,680,291
10,161,095
1,878,626
276,820,092
1,090,163
794,837
93,906,599
18,174,953
18,849,222
417,309,739
851,123
1,140,765
8,324,461
13,492,655
14,860,067
231,860,876
17,502,697
18,705,601
453,956,912
4,565,2421  45.801.936
6,026,1981 66,030,210
155,680,542 748,115,691
26,377,269
24,953,687
221,797,450
67,052,924
63,771,606
488,005,517
291,188,481
379,969,499
2,563,398,508
31,946,372
41,616,824
266,131,706
787,071
820,951
9,966,897
251,8621    527,963,145
256,548     637,168,940
3,183,246 8,814,069,403
 A 38
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1972
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18,403,536
8,571,198
103,751,213
197,868
42,828
5,741,319
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 A 44
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1972
Table 7d—Production of Industrial Minerals by
Period
Asbestos
Barite
Diatomite
Fluxes (Quartz
and Limestone)
Granules (Quartz,
Limestone, and
Granite)
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
Tons
$
1
Tons    |        $
 1	
Tons
$
Tons
$
Tons
$
Atlin	
1,550
875
11,143
37,830
40,346
280.068
48
168
Clinton	
8
21.267
44,237
439,150
	
80
179,455
395,289
4,489,227
3,259
12,612
1,790,502
1,540,319
200
4,000
625
12,230
87,118
105,807
1,118,132
17,800,406
20,870,241
218,102,692
_____ .1	
26,719
31,579
937,450
98,196
59,036
1.420,153
S.OOO
3,800
22,809
13.440
18,747
82.636
3,210
3,706
109,669
70,000
82,300
395,199
506,465
 1	
7,601
8,174
2,154 353
52,330
80,000
1,611,625
8,456
10,905
199,098
73,019
89,159
  1	
802,611
3,699,031
2,481,480
 1	
601,019
1,050,722
 |	
 [	
 ]	
29,692
1_132
418,606
 1	
42 000
 |	
	
1,632        51,500
21
21
229
230
 1	
210
 |	
2,565
9,605)    157,080
Not assigned
Totals
1971
1972
To date
87,1181   17,800,406
105,807!   20,870,241
1,118,1321218,102,692
1
21,267
44,237
439,158
179,455
395,289
4,489,307
1,550
875
11,143
37,830
40,346
280,068
26,740
31,600
4,142,671
98.426
59,246
7,733,576
29,238
37,158
456,014
519,192
757,924
7,286,241
Other: See notes of individual minerals listed alphabetically on pages A 16 to A 25.
i Arsenious oxide.
2 Bentonite.
3 Fluorspar.
* Hydromagnesite.
5 Iron oxide and ochre.
6 Magnesium sulphate.
 STATISTICS
Mining Divisions, 1971 and 1972, and Total to Date
A 45
Gypsum and
Gypsite
Jade
Mica
Sulphur
Other,
Value
Division
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Total
Tons
,
Lb.
$
Lb.
$
Tons
$
$
$
9,3987
9,398
20,3254
20 325
37,830
10,013,800
143,012
30012
423,548
6,236
156,1914 6 10
162,427
609,564
676,439
80,737
81,597
1,149,132
609,564
676,439
19,162,886
112,878
344,795
388,315
298,824
930,348
1,087,196
9,803,460
16,8949
19,478,684
1,109,803
3,455,075
1,2765 11
14,306.575
783,5783
2,327,897
1,246,918
6,323,178
424,700
2,075
203,0556 10
6,540,538
18,224,832
21,182,310
234,054,854
102,900
142,800
465.895
168,196
141,336
1,815,352
281,843
506,465
2,218,428
52,330
80,000
1,611,625
3,993
2,934
45,297
44,867
192,450
530,584
7,772
3,689
65,007
102,900
142,800
400,766
59,179
56,627
812.107
416,654
308,380
15,887,155
5,12911
|
 1	
55,9015
 1	
2,407
10,050
10,050
85.660
88,729
448,907
73,019
89,159
6,512,982
118,900
48,341
431,998
85,660
88,729
437,447
11,4601 8
1,588,800
25.938
306,5331 3 6
1,700
16,8582
18,558
634,250
10.815
41,624
178,678
1,240,215
687,596
6,550,969
97,3895
7,066,964
42,000
160.500
3.978
55,478
 :	
30,22611
189,871
1,121,560
1,322,114
58,213,255
i
148,551
159,483
5,191,175
1,121,560
1,322,114
58,208,342
i
4,913
344,795
383,315
930,348
1,087,196
16,443,448
167,760
243,725
1,007,879
196,332
235,218
963,220
 i	
288,467
297,707
7,881,634
2,147,778
2,306,933
99,988,030
21,909,767
25,752,393
357,191,826
	
4,818,401
12,822,050|185,818
1
1,719,426
7 Natro-alunite.
8 Perlite.
9 Phosphate rock,
io Sodium carbonate.
ii Talc.
12 Volcanic ash.
 A 46
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1972
Table 7e—Production of Structural Materials by Mining Divisions,
1971 and 1972, and Total to Date
Division
Period
Cement
Lime and
Limestone
Building-
stone
Rubble,
Riprap,
and
Crushed
Rock
Sand and
Gravel
Clay
Products
Unclassified
Material
Division
Total
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
1971
1972
To date
$
$
$
$
5,013
5,168
339,510
$
427,459
247,858
3,949,196
3,375
$
$
$
432,472
253,026
4,288,706
3,375
1,108
293,400
224,853
1,013,794
102,453
391,518
382,149
2,956,395
988
530,614
1,783,785
170,867
102,430
2,576,929
5,498
6,453
208,940
5,160
234,680
2,391,205
2,836,516
19,408,418
269,294
243,000
1,791,701
410,774
508,259
6,458,322
230,680
153,801
3,182,932
166,105
250,504
1,606,005
1,289,533
1,675,934
13,069,376
915,262
1,137,309
10,308,692
70,341
32.501
338,241
74,070
68,100
3,150,193
3,511,618
332,457
23,711,064
270,282
773,614
3,575,486
581,641
43,873
71,941
15,918
10,500
2,887
120,574
9,166,983
246,678
163,141
1,000
50,840
4,000
200
138,336
3,564,286
175,325
250,704
42,560
278,474
392,255
872,572
9,389,649
460,573
152,380
1,455,504
93,903
29.558
121,283
2,186,658
2,795,009
2,617,842
5,998,504
4,476,797
5,166,348
25,067
19,800
72,379
28,574,775
Liard
1,375 835
11,764,196
164,244
62,059
100
2,496,269
2,806,033
51,912,554
90,018
203,549
727,837
138,945
102,175
3,216,387
2,000
1.066.9081     2.179.855
3,248,863
587,301
261,617
2,660,298
24,645
1,418
546,119
1,099,716
991,023
16,468,797
20,108
1,025,926
1,184,398
9,305,495
430,587
436,970
5,748,923
7,751,450
9,185,040
82,514,259
272,915
266,451
1,718.660
1,006,989
939,347
10,513,403
420,864
650,454
3,420,734
167,548
124,245
2,388,165
121,785
76,285
3,515,645
1,595,021
1,740,392
11,939,750
106,106
79,319
1,771,672
139,169
120,434
3,098,608
2,518,610
3,320,186
47,419,829
757,641
1,081,335
7,160,976
1,472,175
2,108,725
25,792,835
1,645,522
4,676,933
33,606,067
4,109,496
4,252,048
3,450,735
4,962
966
431,564
1,178,992
68,508,074
550,212
642,903
21,974
5,117,878
4,571,663
72,719,995
7,476 417
14,107,989
14,849,901
20,974
174,940 412
293,023
266,451
8.000
187,754
149,249
154,253
2,290,824
21,046
68,498
321,072
27,035
29,694
513,577
2,500
3,119
12,467
1,158,738
1,096,719
5,274
12,821 968
718,952
43,774
33,018
3,818,598
194,683
153,939
1,000
5,575
2,908,317
121,785
5,250
656,847
143,280
126,948
3,259,111
810
810
131,603
90
150,000
378,993
81,535
10,500
11,571
24,000
13,355
4,231,918
1,738,301
1,867,340
1,645,300
144,000
13,249
17,001,410
106,916
80,129
1,000
115,143
2,019,418
139,259
270,434
32,500
85,520
3,595,621
10,132,873
7,614,263
6,683,954
73,027,618
6,561
8,193,322
48,000
59,430
394,404
4,710
17,526
520,043
18,818
78,196
933,122
10,010,701
40,885
4,012,560
1,088,592
133,782,806
805,641
1,140,765
46,499
16,090
18,198
966,685
97,852
161,254
779,337
621,099
9,890,993
7,860,985
11,220,113
11,712,316
177,415,188
13,492,425
14,477,864
55
214,585,799
Not assigned	
1,664,340
4,755,129
315,498
505,018
3,180,828
5,972,171
44,512,704
1971
1972
To date
21,629,385
21,014,112
256,451,810
3,037,222
3,357,927
60,101,459
8,962
1,166
9,216,931
3,670,583
4,032,548
57,614,433
25,612,396
33,076,196
312,104,198
5,981,785
5,263,749
88,937,117
59,940,333
66,745,698
5,972,171
790,398,119
 STATISTICS
Table 8a—Production of Coal, 1836-1972
A 47
Year
Quantityl
(Short Tons)
Value
Year
Quantityl
(Short Tons)
Valuo
1836-59-
1860	
1861	
1862	
1863	
1864_
1865__
1866	
1867	
1868	
1869	
1870	
1871	
1872_
1873 .
1874	
1875	
1876	
1877	
1878	
1879	
1880	
1881	
1882	
1883	
1884	
1885	
1886	
1887	
1888___
1889	
1890	
1891	
1892	
1893-
1894-
1895-
1896-
1897-
1898-
1899-
1900-
1901-
1902-
1903-
1904-
1905-
1906„
1907-
1908-
1909-
1910-
1911-
1912-
1913-
1914-
1915-
1916-
41,871
15,956
15,427
20,292
23,906
32,068
36,757
28,129
34,988
49,286
40.098
33,424
55,458
55,458
55,459
91,334
123,362
155,895
172,540
191,348
270,257
299,708
255,760
315,997
238,895
441,358
409,468
365,832
462,964
548,017
649,411
759,518
,152,590
925,495
,095,690
,134,509
,052,412
.002,268
999,372
,263,272
,435,314
781,000
,894,544
.838,621
,624,742
,887,981
,044,931
,126,965
,485,961
,362,514
,688,672
,314,749
,541,698
,211,907
,713,535
237,042
076,601
,583,469
$
149,548
56,988
55,096
72,472
85,380
115,528
131,276
100,460
124,956
176,020
143,208
119,372
164,612
164,612
164,612
244,641
330,435
417,576
462,156
522,538
723,903
802,785
685.171
846,417
639,897
1,182,210
1,096,788
979,908
1,240,080
1,467,903
1,739,490
2,034,420
3,087,291
2,479,005
2,934,882
3,038,859
2,824,687
2,693,961
2,734,522
3,582,595
4,126,803
4,744,530
5,016,398
4,832,257
4,332,297
4,953,024
5,511,861
5,548,044
7,637,713
7,356,866
8,574,884
11,108,335
8,071,747
10,786,812
9,197,460
7,745,847
7,114,178
8.900,675
1917-
1918-
1919-
1920-
1921_
1922_
1923-
1924-
1925-
1926-
1927-
1928-
1929-
1930-
1931-
1932-
1933_
1934-
1935-
1936-
1937-
1938-
1939-
1940-
1941-
1942-
1943-
1944-
1945-
1946-
1947-
1948-
1949-
1950-
1951-
1952-
1953-
1954-
1955-
1956-
1957-
1958-
1959-
1960-
1961-
1962-
1963-
1964-
1965-
1966-
1967...
1968-
1969...
1970-
1971-
1972..
2,436,
2,575
2,433
2,852,
2,670,
2,726,
2,636,
2,027,
2,541.
2,406,
2,553
2,680
2,375,
1,994
1,765
1,614
1,377,
1,430,
1,278,
1,352
1,446
1,388
1,561
1,662,
1,844,
1,996,
1,854,
1,931,
1,523,
1,439,
1,696,
1,604,
1,621
1,574,
1,573
1,402
1,384
1,308,
1,332
1,417.
1,085.
796.
690
788
919,
825,
850
911
950,
850,
908.
959,
852.
2,644
4,565,
6,026.
,101
275
540
.535
,314
,793
,740
,843
212
094
,416
608
,060
,493
.471
,629
,177
,042
,380
,301
,243
507
,084
,027
,745
,000
749
950
,021
,092
,350
,480
,268
,006
,572
,313
,138
284
874
.209
,657
,413
,011
,658
,142
,339
541
326
,763
,821
790
,214
,340
,056
,242
,198
8,484,343
12,833,994
11,975,671
13,450,169
12.836,013
12,880,060
12,678,548
9,911,935
12,168,905
11,650,180
12,269,135
12,633,510
11,256,260
9,435,650
7,684,155
6,523,644
5.375,171
5,725,133
5,048,864
5,722,502
6,139,920
5,565,069
6,280,956
7,088,265
7,660,000
8,237,172
7,742,030
8,217,966
6,454,360
6,732,470
8,680.440
9,765,39$
10,549.924
10,119.303
10,169,617
9,729,739
9,528.279
9,154,544
8,986,501
9,346,518
7,340,339
5,937,860
5,472,064
5,242,223
6,802,134
6,133.986
6,237,997
6,327,678
6,713,590
6,196,219
7.045.341
7,588,989
6,817,155
19.559.669
45.801.936
66,030,210
Totals-
155,680,542    | 748,115,691
i Quantity from 1836 to 1909 is gross mine output and includes material lost in picking and washing.
1910 and subsequent years the quantity is that sold and used.
For
 A 48
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1972
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 STATISTICS
A 49
Table 9—Principal Items of Expenditure, Reported for Operations
of All Classes
Class
Salaries and
Wages
Fuel and
Electricity
Process
Supplies
Metal-min ing_
Exploration and development..
Coal	
Petroleum and natural gas (exploration and production).
Industrial minerals .	
Structural-materials industry-
Totals, 1972	
Totals, 1971..
1970-
1969-
1968-
1967-
1966-
1965-
1964..
1963-
1962-
1961-
I960-
1959-
1958-
1957-
1956-
1955-
1954_
1953..
1952-
1951-
1950..
1949-
1948..
1947..
1946-
1945-
1944-
1943-
1942-
1941-
1940-
1939	
1938	
1937	
1936	
1935	
107,603,117
41,835,526
26,031,235
5,475,297
7,431,053
10,975,221
199,351,449
179,
172,
123
113
94
93
74.
63.
57.
55,
50.
52,
49.
48.
56.
57.
51-
48,
55.
62
52
42,
41,
38
32.
26.
22.
23,
26.
26,
26.
23,
22.
22,
21,
17,
16,
175,692
,958,282
,450,327
,459,219
,523,495
409,528
.938,736
,624,559
939,294
522,171
887,275
694,818
961,996
933,560
409,056
266,026
,890,246
.702,746
.543,490
.256,631
607,171
738,035
.023,786
813,506
160,338
,190,200
620,975
.131,874
051,467
913,160
050,491
391,330
357,035
765,711
349,690
887,619
753,367
20,042,981
4,447,018
1,768,770
4,856,852
31,115,621
23,166,904
19,116,672
14,554,123
13,818,326
13,590.759
12,283,477
11,504,343
10,205,861
10,546,806
9,505,559
8,907,034
7,834,728
7,677,321
8,080,989
8,937,567
9,762,777
9,144,034
7,128,669
8,668,099
8,557,845
7,283,051
6,775,998
7,206,637
6,139,470
5,319,470
5,427,458
7,239,726
5,788,671
7,432,585
7,066,109
3,776,747
3,474,721
3,266,000
3,396,106
3,066,311
2,724,144
2,619,639
67,245,083
3,947,711
2,150,359
3,749,802
77,092,955
68,314,944
59,846,370
43,089,559
38,760,203
34368,856
28,120,179
30,590,631
27,629,953
12,923,325
14,024,799
17,787,127
21,496,912
17,371,638
15,053,036
24,257,177
22,036,839
21,131,572
19,654,724
20,979,411
27,024,500
24,724,101
17,500,663
17,884,408
11,532,121
13,068,948
8,367,705
5,756,628
6,138,084
6,572,317
6,863,398
7,260,441
6,962,162
6,714,347
6,544,500
6,845,330
4,434,501
4,552,730
Note—This table has changed somewhat through the years, so that the items are not everywhere directly
comparable. Prior to 1962 lode-mining referred only to gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc. Prior to 1964 some
expenditures for fuel and electricity were included with process supplies. Process supplies (except fuel) were
broadened in 1964 to include " process, operating, maintenance, and repair supplies . . . used in the mine/mill
operations; that is, explosives, chemicals, drill steel, bits, lubricants, electrical, etc. . . . not charged to Fixed
Assets Account . . . provisions and supplies sold in any company operated cafeteria or commissary." Exploration and development other than in the field of petroleum and natural gas is given, starting in 1966.
 A 50 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1972
Table 10—Employment in the Mineral Industry, 1901-1972
tH
5
Metals
Coal Mines
Structural
Materials
"Us
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Year
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1901	
2.736 1.212
3,948
3,345
2,750
3,306
3,710
3,983
3,943
3,694
3,254
3,709
3,594
3,836
4,278
4,174
4,144
5,393
5,488
4,390
4,259
3,679
2,330
2,749
3,618
4,033
5,138
7,610
8,283
8,835
8,892
7,605
6,035
4,833
6,088
8,046
7,915
8,197
9,616
10,192
10,138
10,019
9,821
8,939
7,819
7,551
7,339
7,220
9,683
10,582
10,724
10,832
12,831
13,730
11,006
9,412
9,512
9,846
9,006
7,434
7,324
7,423
7,111
8,228
8,264
8,681
9,051
10,864
10,151
12,537
13,101
15,360
14,165
14,584
3,041
3,101
3,137
3,278
3,127
3,415
2,862
4,432
4,713
5,903
5,212
5,275
4,950
4,267
3,708
3,694
3,760
3,658
4,145
4,191
4,722
4,712
4,342
3,894
3,828
3,757
3,646
3,814
3,675
3,389
2,957
2,628
2,241
2,050
2,145
2,015
2,286
2,088
2,167
2,175
2,229
1,892
2,240
2,150
1,927
1,773
1,694
1,594
1,761
1,745
1,462
1,280
1,154
1,076
1,100
968
1,020
826
765
894
705
548
501
446
405
347
260
195
245
242
444
214
933
910
1,127
1,175
1,280
1,390
907
1,641
1,705
1,855
1,661
1,855
1,721
1,465
1,283
1,366
1,410
1,769
1,821
2,158
2,163
1,932
1,807
1,524
1,615
1,565
1,579
1,520
1,353
1,256
1,125
980
853
3,974
4,011
4,264
4,453
7,922
7,356
1902	
2,219
1,662
2,143
2,470
2,680
2,704
2,567
2,184
2,472
2,435
2,472
2,773
2,741
2,709
3,357
3,290
2,626
2,513
2,074
1,355
1,510
2,102
2,353
2,298
2,606
2,671
2,707
2,926
2,316
1,463
1,355
1,786
2,796
2,740
2,959
3,603
3,849
3.905
1,126
1,088
1,163
1,240
1,303
1,239
1,127
1,070
1,237
1,159
1903	
7,014
1904	
7,759
1905	
4,407
4,805
3,769
6,078
6,418
7,758
6,873
7,130
6,671
5,732
4,991
5,060
5,170
5,427
5,966
6,349
6,885
6,644
6,140
5,418
5,443
5,322
5,225
5,334
5,028
4,645
4,082
3,608
3.094
8,117
1906	
8,788
7,712
9,767
1909	
9,672
11,467
10,467
1,364
10,966
1,505
1,433
1,435
2,036
10,949
9,906
1914	
1915	
9,135
10,453
2,198
10,658
1918	
1,764
1,746
1,605
975
1,239
1,516
1,680
2,840
1,735
1,916
2,469
2.052
1,260
834
900
1,335
1,729
1,497
1,840
1,818
2,266
2,050
2,104
1,823
1,504
1,699
1,825
1,750
1,817
2,238
2,429
2,724
2,415
3.695
3,923
2,589
2,520
2,553
2,827
2,447
1,809
1,761
1,959
1,582
1,976
2,012
1,967
2,019
2,296
2,532
2,369
2,470
3,167
3,058
9,817
10,225
1920	
10,028
9,215
9,393
9,767
9,451
1924	
1925	
10 581
1926	
299
415
355
341
425
638
874
1,134
1,122
1,291
1,124
1,371
1,303
1.252
808
2,461
9.  849
493
647
412
492
843
460
536
376
377
536
931
724
900
G52
827
766
842
673
690
921
827
977
1,591
2,120
1,916
1,783
1,530
1,909
1,861
1,646
1,598
1,705
1,483
1,357
1,704
1,828
1,523
900
1,293
1,079
1,269
1,309
1,207
1,097
740
846
1,116
324
138
368
544
344
526
329
269
187
270
288
327
295
311
334
413
378
326
351
335
555
585
656
542
616
628
557
559
638
641
770
625
677
484
557
508
481
460
444
422
393
372
380
549
647
794
800
124
122
120
268
170
380
344
408
360
754
825
938
369
561
647
422
262
567
628
586
679
869
754
626
660
491
529
634
584
722
854
474
446
459
589
571
517
528
509
639
582
584
582
567
627
666
B27
14,172
1927	
14,830
1928	
91112,748
966|2,948
83213,197
58113,157
54212.036
531 2.436
63112.890
90712,771
720|2,678
1,16813,027
91913,158
99613,187
1,04812,944
1,02513,072
960|3,555
89H2.835
84912,981
82212,834
67212,813
96013,461
1,12613,884
1,203|3,763
1,25013,759
1,30714,044
1,51614,120
1,37113,901
1,12913,119
1,09113,304
1,04313,339
838|3,328
625'3,081
61813.008
15,424
1929	
15,565
1930	
14,032
1931
12,171
1932
10,524
1933
11,369
1934..
R43I2.S93
12,985
1935
826
799
867
874
809
699
494
468
611
689
503
532
731
872
545
516
463
401
396
358
378
398
360
260
291
288
237
228
247
267
244
267
197
358
455
1,033
11,013
1,771
I
2,971
2,814
3,153
2,962
2,978
2,874
2,723
2,360
2,851
2,839
2,430
2,305
2,425
2,466
2,300
2,261
1,925
1,681
1,550
1,434
1,478
1,366
1,380
1,086
1,056
1,182
942
776
748
713
649
614
457
553
700
1,275
1,457
1,985
13,737
1936....
14,179
1937	
16,129
1938	
16,021
1939	
15,890
1.00413.923
93913.901
48912,920
21212,394
255|1,896
20911,933
34711,918
360|3,024
34813,143
30313,034
32713,399
20513,785
23014,171
13213,145
19912,644
10312,564
105|2,637
6712,393
7511,919
9911,937
8611.782
1941—-
15,084
1942	
13,270
1943	
12,448
1944	
12,314
11,820
1946.
11,933
1947...
14,899
1948
16,397
1949	
16,621
1950....
16,612
1951	
17,863
1952	
18,257
1953	
15,790
1954	
14,128
1955	
14,102
1956	
14,539
1957	
13,257
1958.. .
11,201
1959	
10,779
1960	
648
626
949
850
822
966
1,014
992
1,072
1,099
1,331
1,513
1,734
3,034
3,118
3,356
3,239
3,281
3,529
3,654
3,435
3,283
3,468
3,738
3,481
3,353
11,541
1961....
74
35
43
5
2
2
1,785
1,677
1,713
1,839
1,752
2,006
1,928
1,823
1,794
2,160
2,073
11,034
1962	
270
450
772
786
1,894
1,264
3,990
4,270
4,964
4,040
4,201
11,560
1963	
10,952
1964	
441
478
507
400
416
437
495
458
11,645
1965	
12,283
1966	
14,202
13,380
15,659
1969	
7
16,437
19,086
18,423
1972
1,833
3,483
19,470
1 Commencing with 1967, does not include employment in by-product plants.
Note—These figures refer only to company employees and do not include the many employees of contracting firms.
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CHAPTER 3
CONTENTS
Page
Retirements  A 58
Organization  A 58
Administration Branch  A 5 8
Mining Titles  A 58
Staff.  A 58
Central Records Offices (Victoria and Vancouver)  A 59
List of Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders  A 59
Maps Showing Mineral Claims and Placer Leases  A 61
Coal  A 61
Coal Revenue, 1972  A 61
Gold Commissioners' and Mining Recorders' Office Statistics
1972  A 62
Petroleum and Natural Gas Titles  A 63
Staff.  A 63
Titles  A 63
Title Transaction Statistics, 1972  A 63
Administration of Regulations  A 64
Analytical and Assay Branch  A 64
Staff.  A 64
Staff Changes  A 65
Analytical and Assay Work  A 65
Mineralogical Branch Samples   A 65
Inspection Branch Samples  A 65
Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch Samples  A 66
Miscellaneous Samples  A 66
X-ray Powder Diffraction Analyses  A 66
Examinations for Assayers  A 66
Inspection Branch  A 66
Organization and Staff  A 66
Inspectors and Resident Engineers  A 66
Co-ordinators, Mine-rescue Stations  A 67
Staff Changes  A 67
Fig. 1—Index map showing inspectoral districts  A 68
Board of Examiners  A 67
Board of Examiners (Coal Mines Regulation Act)  A 67
Board of Examiners (Mines Regulation Act)  A 69
Mining Roads and Trails  A 69
Grub-staking Prospectors  A 70
Grub-stake Statistics  A 71
Mineralogical Branch .  A 74
Staff  A 75
Staff Changes  A 76
Field Work, 1972 Season  A 76
Publications and Reports  A 76
Aeromagnetic Surveys and Magnetic Surveillance  A 76
Rock and Mineral Sets  A 77
A 56
 Petroleum and Natural Gas  A 77
General  A 77
Administration  A 78
Staff.  A 78
Headquarters, Victoria  A 78
Field Operations, Charlie Lake  A 78
Staff Changes  A 78
Board of Arbitration  A 79
Conservation Committee  A 79
Publications  A 79
A 57
 A 58 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1972
RETIREMENTS
Kenneth B. Blakey retired as Deputy Minister on April 30, 1972, after serving
nearly 49 years with the Government. Mr. Blakey was born on December 20,
1909, in Bedfordshire, England, and received his schooling in England and Canada.
He joined the Department as an office boy on May 5, 1923. In 1929 he was transferred to Vancouver as office assistant to B. T. O. Grady, the Resident Mining
Engineer. On January 8, 1940, he joined the RCNVR and served five and one-half
years in the North Atlantic and the British Isles during World War II. He returned
to the Department on October 1, 1945, as a clerk and on December 12, 1945, was
appointed Gold Commissioner of the Victoria Mining Division. In April 1954 he
became Deputy Chief Gold Commissioner and Deputy Chief Commissioner,
Petroleum and Natural Gas. In 1958 he was appointed Chief Gold Commissioner
and Chief Commissioner, Petroleum and Natural Gas. On November 1, 1966, on
the retirement of P. J. Mulcahy, he was appointed Deputy Minister, a position he
held until his early retirement. Mr. Blakey's service was the longest on record with
the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
Ronald H. McCrimmon retired as Chief Gold Commissioner on April 30,
1972, after serving nearly 38 years with the Department. Mr. McCrimmon was
born on April 16, 1916, in Victoria, where he received his schooling. He joined
the Department on October 22, 1934, as a junior clerk. He served with the 1st
Battalion, Canadian Scottish, in Canada and the British Isles during World War II.
He was invalided home and rejoined the Department on April 1, 1944, as a clerk.
On April 1, 1946, he was appointed Deputy Gold Commissioner and on April 1,
1954, he was appointed Gold Commissioner of the Victoria Mining Division. In
October 1958 he was promoted to Deputy Chief Gold Commissioner. On November 1, 1966, he was appointed Chief Gold Commissioner, a position he held until
his early retirement.
ORGANIZATION
The organization of the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources is
displayed in the chart on page 60.
ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
The Administration Branch, consisting of three divisions — Mining Titles,
Petroleum and Natural Gas Titles, and Accounts—is responsible for the administration of the Provincial laws regarding the acquisition of rights to minerals, coal,
petroleum, and natural gas, and deals with other departments of the Provincial
service for the Department or for any branch.
Mining Titles
Staff
E. J. Bowles Chief Gold Commissioner
R. Rutherford Deputy Chief Gold Commissioner
J. G. B. Egdell Gold Commissioner, Vancouver
Gold Commissioners, Mining Recorders, and Sub-Mining Recorders, whose
duties are laid down in the Mineral Act and Placer-mining Act, administer these
Acts and other Acts relating to mining. Mining Recorders, in addition to then-
own functions, may also exercise the powers conferred upon Gold Commissioners
with regard to mineral claims within the mining division for which they have been
appointed.
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK
A 59
Recording of location and of work upon a mineral claim as required by the
Mineral Act and upon a placer claim or a placer-mining lease as required by the
Placer-mining Act must be made at the office of the Mining Recorder for the mining
division in which the claim or lease is located. Information concerning claims and
leases and concerning the ownership and standing of claims and leases in any mining
division may be obtained from the Mining Recorder for the mining division in which
the property is situated or from the Department's offices at Victoria, and Room
320, 890 West Pender Street, Vancouver 1. Officials in the offices of the Gold
Commissioner at Victoria and the Gold Commissioner at Vancouver act as Sub-
Mining Recorders for all mining divisions. Sub-Mining Recorders, who act as
forwarding agents, are appointed at various places throughout the Province. They
are authorized to accept documents and fees, and forward them to the office of the
Mining Recorder for the correct mining division. Officials and their offices in
various parts of the Province are listed below.
Central Records Offices (Victoria and Vancouver)
Transcripts of all recordings in Mining Recorders' offices throughout the
Province, and also the names of lessees of reverted surveyed mineral claims, are
sent to the office of the Chief Gold Commissioner in Victoria twice each month.
The records and maps showing the approximate positions of mineral claims held
by record and of placer-mining leases may be consulted by the public during office
hours at Victoria and at the office of the Gold Commissioner at Vancouver, Room
320, 890 West Pender Street. The approximate position of mineral claims held by
record and of placer-mining leases is plotted from details supplied by locators.
During 1972, nine investigations were carried out pursuant to section 80 of
the Mineral Act. Three investigations with regard to certificates of work being
wrongfully or improperly obtained resulted in 28 certificates of work being cancelled. Nine investigations with regard to mineral claims having been located or
recorded otherwise than in accordance with the Mineral Act resulted in 89 mineral
claims being cancelled.
List
of Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders
Mining Division
Location of Office
Gold Commissioner
Mining Recorder
Port Alberni...             	
T   S   rinhsnn
T. S. Dobson.
Atlin
P. J. Newall-    	
P. J. Newall.
Cariboo
Quesnel  —
H. S. Tatchell	
H. S. Tatchell.
Fort Steele
Cranbrook	
W. L. Draper	
W. G. Mundell    .
G. A. Broomfleld	
N. R. Blake	
E. J. Bowles _	
K. J. Weir
R. H. Archibald  .
G. L. Brodie	
F. E. Hughes 	
L. P. Lean 	
A. W. Milton...	
W. L. Draper.
W. G. Mundell.
Kamloops
Kamloops... .	
N. R. Blake.
E. A. H. Mitchell.
K. J. Weir.
R. H. Archibald.
G. L. Brodie.
New Westminster
Merritt       	
Nicola
L. P. Lean.
A. W. Milton.
T   S   Tlnlhy
T. S. Dalby.
Revelstoke_	
Princeton -	
D. G. B. Roberts.   .  	
W. L. Marshall	
T, H, W, Har_1inE
D. G. B. Roberts.
Similkameen
W. L. Marshall.
T. H. W. Harding.
T. P. McKinnon	
T. P. McKinnon.
Trail Creek
J. Egdell   _      	
N. A. Nelson.         	
Vernon ,     	
E. A. H. Mitchell.
 A 60
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1972
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 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 61
Maps Showing Mineral Claims and Placer Leases
Maps showing the approximate locations of placer-mining leases, mineral
leases, and mineral claims held by record may be seen at the Central Records Offices
at Victoria and at Room 320, 890 West Pender Street, Vancouver. Prints are
obtainable on request made to the Chief Gold Commissioner at Victoria, and
accompanied by the proper sum. The charges are $1.25 per sheet. The maps
conform to the reference maps issued by the Legal Surveys Branch, Department of
Lands, Forests, and Water Resources, in size and geographical detail.
The Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources is now engaged in replacing the above-mentioned maps with maps based on the National Topographic
System of mapping. The new sheets cover 15 minutes of longitude and 15 minutes
of latitude, and are available from this Department at 50 cents per sheet at a scale
approximately 1V4 inches to 1 mile, or $1 per sheet at a scale of 2 inches to 1 mile
(including tax).
It is advisable to order claim maps from an index, which will be supplied on
request.
Coal
Information concerning the ownership and standing of coal licences and coal
leases may be obtained upon application to the Chief Gold Commissioner, Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Victoria. Maps showing location of coal
licences and coal leases are also available upon application and payment of the
required fee.
Coal Revenue, 1972
Licences— $
Fees     34,397.00
Rental   170,493.45
Total   204,890.45
During 1972, 77 coal licences were issued, totalling 45,965 acres. As of
December 31, 1972, a total of 1,759 coal licences, amounting to 1,004,183 acres,
was held in good standing.
 A 62
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1972
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 DEPARTMENTAL WORK
A 63
Petroleum and Natural Gas Titles
Staff
R. E. Moss__
W. W. Ross
 Chief Commissioner
-Deputy Chief Commissioner
Petroleum and Natural Gas Titles, under the direction of the Chief Commissioner, is responsible for the administration of the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act,
1965, which includes all matters related to and affecting title to Crown petroleum
and natural gas rights and includes the collection of revenue from fees, rents, disposition, and royalties. Regulations governing geophysical operations and petroleum-development roads are also administered by the Chief Commissioner.
Information concerning all forms of titles issued under the Petroleum and
Natural Gas Act may be obtained upon application to the office of the Chief
Commissioner, Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Victoria. Maps
showing the locations of all forms of title issued under the Petroleum and Natural
Gas Act are available, and copies may be obtained upon application to the office of
the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Victoria. Monthly land
reports and monthly reports listing additions and revisions to permit-location maps
and listing changes in title to permits, licences, and leases, and related matters are
available from the office of the Chief Commissioner upon application and payment
of the required fee.
Titles
As of December 31, 1972, 27,309,202 acres or approximately 42,671 square
miles, an increase of 545,886 acres over the 1971 total, of Crown petroleum and
natural gas rights, issued under the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act, 1965, were
held in good standing by operators ranging from small independent companies to
major international ones. The form of title held, total number issued, and acreage
in each case were as follows:
Form of Title
Permits __
Natural gas licences .
Drilling reservations
Leases (all types) __.
Number
483
44
3,605
Total
Acreage
19,891,946
452,079
6,965,177
27,309,202
Title Transaction Statistics, 1972
Permits
Leases
Drilling
Reservations
Natural Gas
Licences
No.
Acres
No.
Acres
No.
Acres
No.
Acres
90
37
353
92
2
80
2,766,410
1,581,703
313
401
3,223
1,117
66
150
515,820
1,147,972
31
20
6
12
31
311,150
196,727
—
Cancelled or surrendered	
	
102,194
85,838
	
18,898
2,482,264
Crown reserve dispositions	
311,150
	
 A 64 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1972
Petroleum and Natural Gas Revenue, 1972
During the year there were four dispositions of Crown reserve petroleum and
natural gas rights resulting in tender bonus bids amounting to $20,495,662, a
decrease of $1,690,589 from the previous year. A total of 428 parcels was offered
and bids were accepted on 261 parcels covering 5,758,504 acres. The average price
per acre was $7.12, which is a decease of $2.25 per acre over the previous year.
Average bonus price per acre was respectively—permits, $5.57; leases, $42.69; and
drilling reservations, $9.68.
Rentals and fees— $ $
Permits      1,729,829
Drilling reservations      107,537
Natural gas licences	
Petroleum, natural gas, and petroleum and
natural gas leases     6,976,517
Total rentals and fees     8,813,883
Disposal of Crown reserves—
Permits  13,818,020
Drilling reservations     3,011,025
Leases     3,666,617
Total Crown reserves disposal  20,495,662
Royalties—
Gas      5,580,434
Oil     9,845,125
Processed products         44,379
Total royalties  15,469,938
Miscellaneous fees  42,775
Total petroleum and natural gas revenues  44,822,258
Administration of Regulations
During the year, 22 geophysical licences were renewed or issued, one petroleum-
development road application was received and processed for approval, and three
unit agreements and three royalty agreements were approved.
A total of 124 notices of commencement of exploratory work was recorded
during the year. These notices are required prior to the commencement of any
geological or geophysical exploration for petroleum or natural gas.
ANALYTICAL AND ASSAY BRANCH
Staff
S. W. Metcalfe Chief Analyst and Assayer      ,
N. G. Colvin Laboratory Scientist
R. J. Hibberson Laboratory Scientist
W. M. Johnson, Ph.D Laboratory Scientist
Mrs. E. A. Juhasz Laboratory Technician
F. F. Karpick Assayer
L. E. Shepard Crusherman
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK
A 65
Staff Changes
R. S. Young, Ph.D., laboratory scientist, retired on October 31, 1971.
W. M. Johnson, Ph.D., laboratory scientist, a graduate of the University of
British Columbia and of the University of Washington, joined the staff on July 10,
1972.
Analytical and Assay Work
During 1972 the analytical laboratory in Victoria issued reports on 519 samples
received for analysis from prospectors and Departmental geologists and engineers.
Between May 1 and September 30 only five samples will be assayed without charge
for a prospector who makes application for free assays and satisfies the Chief
Analyst that prospecting is his principal occupation during the summer months. A
form for use in applying for free assays may be obtained from the office of any Mining
Recorder. A laboratory examination of a prospector's sample generally consists of
the following: (1) A spectrographic analysis to determine if any base metals are
present in interesting percentages; (2) assays for precious metals and for base metals
shown by the spectrographic analysis to be present in interesting amounts.
The laboratory reports were distributed in the following manner among prospectors who were not grantees, prospectors who were grantees under the Prospectors' Grub-stake Act, and Departmental geologists and engineers:
Samples
Spectrographic
Analyses
Assays and
Analyses
Prospectors (not grantees)	
Prospectors (grantees) 	
Departmental geologists and engineers
Totals	
156
62
301
519
150
62
1451
357
295
125
1,677
~2,097~
1 An additional 78 spectrographic analyses were done for Departmental engineers and geologists, but the
results were not reported.
Mineralogical Branch Samples
Of the 145 samples for spectrographic analysis, 12 were for five elements each,
28 for 14 elements each, and 58 for four elements each, making a total of 680
quantitative determinations. The remainder of the samples were for semiquantitative
analyses.
Nine complete limestone analyses were performed.
Complete analyses were performed on six silicate rock samples, each for 17
elements, and on 48 for 15 elements each; in addition, partial analyses were conducted on 24 silicate rocks.
Twenty-four sediments were analysed for various elements.
Ferrous and ferric oxides were determined in nine glass beads obtained by the
arc-fusion process.
Three samples of ore were assayed for both oxide and sulphide copper, and two
of these samples were assayed for gold and silver.
Eighty-one samples were assayed for various elements, and the black material
in a sample of fluorspar was identified as carbon.
Inspection Branch Samples
Free silica was determined in seven dust samples, and four tailings effluents
were analysed.
3
 A 66 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1972
Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch Samples
One sample of water was analysed, and tests were performed on oil stains on a
paper towel.
Miscellaneous Samples
Reports were issued on 112 samples of a miscellaneous nature.
For the Department of Highways, Geotechnical and Materials Branch, a
cutter and a shaft were analysed and the silica content of a sample of sand was
determined.
For the Department of Recreation and Conservation, Fish and Wildlife Branch,
19 water samples were analysed; in addition, a precipitate and a coating on a rock
were identified.
For the Department of Public Works, Architectural Branch, two samples of
plaster were analysed.
For the Department of Agriculture, Field Crops Branch, green crystals and
two pieces of cloth, one with a sediment attached, were analysed.
For the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources, Research Division, a tree-ash residue was analysed.
For the Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance, Health Branch,
arsenic was determined in two samples of material from the tailing pond at Hedley.
For the Minister of the same Department, an ore sample was examined for its copper
content.
For the Speaker of the House, one ore sample was assayed.
For the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, two ore samples were assayed.
For the City of Victoria, Smoke Inspection, determination was made of the
weights of residues and soluble salts collected in 65 bottles of water placed at
various stations in the city.
X-ray Powder Diffraction Analyses
One hundred and sixty-five mineral samples were identified by X-ray diffraction,
quartz was determined quantitatively in 460 samples, and calcite, dolomite, and
magnesite were determined quantitatively in eight samples.
Examinations for Assayers
Examinations for assayers were held in May and December. In the May
examination, two candidates wrote and passed the examination. In the December
examination, three candidates were examined, of whom one was granted a supplemental, and two failed.
INSPECTION BRANCH
Organization and Staff
Inspectors and Resident Engineers
J. W. Peck, Chief Inspector Victoria
J. E. Merrett, Deputy Chief Inspector of Mines Victoria
V. E. Dawson, Senior Inspector, Electrical-Mechanical Victoria
A. R. C. James, Senior Inspector, Coal; Aid to Securities Victoria
Harry Bapty, Senior Inspector, Mining-roads .Victoria
J. Cartwright, Inspector, Electrical Victoria
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 67
W. B. Montgomery, Inspector, Reclamation Victoria
S. Elias, Senior Inspector, Environmental Control Vancouver
D. I. R. Henderson, Inspector, Environmental Control Vancouver
J. W. Robinson, Inspector and Resident Engineer Vancouver
W. C. Robinson, Inspector and Resident Engineer Nanaimo
R. W. Lewis, Inspector and Resident Engineer Fernie
David Smith, Inspector and Resident Engineer Kamloops
E. Sadar, Inspector and Resident Engineer Kamloops
B. M. Dudas, Inspector and Resident Engineer Prince Rupert
P. E. Olson, Inspector and Resident Engineer Nelson
T. M. Waterland, Inspector and Resident Engineer Prince George
A. D. Tidsbury, Inspector and Resident Engineer Prince George
W. G. Clarke, Inspector and Resident Engineer Smithers
W. H. Childress, Technician, Noise Surveys Vancouver
Inspectors are stationed at the places listed above and inspect coal mines,
metal mines, and quarries in the districts shown on Figure 1. They also may
examine prospects, mining properties, roads and trails, and carry out special investigations under the Mineral Act. The Environmental Control Inspectors conduct
dust, ventilation, and noise surveys at all mines and quarries, and where necessary,
make recommendations to improve environmental conditions. H. Bapty supervises the roads and trails programme and prospectors' grub-stakes. W. B. Montgomery administers the reclamation sections of the Coal Mines Regulation Act and
Mines Regulation Act. A. R. C. James is Senior Inspector, Coal, and has additional
duties as mining adviser to the Securities Commission.
Co-ordinators, Mine-rescue Stations
E. C. Ingham, Co-ordinator, Rescue Training Prince George
G. J. Lee, Co-ordinator, Rescue Training Nelson
A. Littler, Co-ordinator, Rescue Training Fernie
T. H. Robertson, Co-ordinator, Rescue Training Nanaimo
J. A. Thomson, Co-ordinator, Rescue Training Kamloops
Staff Changes
In January, W. G. Clarke, Inspector and Resident Engineer, was transferred
from Prince George to Smithers. On March 14, T. M. Waterland rejoined the staff
as Inspector and Resident Engineer at Prince George.
Board of Examiners
Board of Examiners (Coal Mines Regulation Act)
J. W. Peck, Chairman Victoria
A. R. C. James, member Victoria
R. W. Lewis, member Fernie
The Board conducts written and practical examinations for the various certificates of competency under the provisions of sections 25 and 26 of the Coal Mines
Regulation Act, and advises the Minister on the granting of interchange certificates
under this Act. Under the new Act the Board is no longer responsible for issuing
coal miners' certificates; these are now issued after examination by the District
Inspector.
 A 68
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1972
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 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 69
Board of Examiners (Mines Regulation Act)
J. E. Merrett, Chairman .Victoria
A. R. C. James, member Victoria
W. C. Robinson, member Nanaimo
The Board conducts written examinations in various mining centres for applicants for underground and surface shiftboss certificates. The Board is also empowered to grant provisional certificates without examination and under such conditions as the Board considers necessary.
Mining Roads and Trails
Provision is made in the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources Act
whereby the Minister may, with the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council,
authorize the expenditure of public funds for the construction or repair of roads and
trails into mining areas. Assistance on a half-cost basis may also be provided on
roads and trails to individual properties.
Requests for road and trail assistance must be made to the Department before
the commencement of work. The type of access upon which assistance may be
given depends upon the value of the property, the stage of development, and the
amount of work to be done. A trail is sometimes sufficient for initial exploration, and
a tractor-road may be adequate for preliminary work. Subsequent development
might warrant assistance on the construction of a truck road. A carefully drawn
sketch or plan of the location of the road is required to be submitted and, where
warranted by the amount of assistance requested, a report on the property by a
professional geological or mining engineer may be required. An engineer from the
Department may be required to report on the property before a grant is made and
to inspect the road after the work has been done.
The total mileages and expenditures under "Grants in Aid of Mining Roads
and Trails" during the 1972/73 fiscal year were as follows:
Miles Cost
Roads— $
Construction   34.5 134,241.41
Maintenance   362.0 204,762.79
Bridges—
Construction       28,876.29
Maintenance       82,589.89
Total  450,470.3 8
In addition to the above, work continued on the Stewart-Cassiar Road. The
construction is done by contract, and is supervised by the Department of Highways
on behalf of the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
Construction was done under Projects 2233, 2234, and 763. Projects 2233
and 2234 were completed in 1972 to close the remaining gap of 14.76 miles of
unfinished road. Vehicular traffic may now flow from Stewart to the Alaska Highway and all Alaska Highway traffic has access to British Columbia's most northerly
coastal port of Stewart.
Since the closing of the gap, further responsibility of the road has been transferred to the Department of Highways.
 A 70 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1972
Funds for completion of Project 763 (Barnett-McQueen Ltd. contract for the
Stikine River bridge) have been included in the Department of Mines and Petroleum
Resources estimates for 1973/74.
Total expenditure on the road to this date is $31,277,285.58. The Federal
Government's commitment of $7,500,000 under the "Roads to Resources" agreement was expended by the end of September 1967 and since that time the whole cost
of construction has been borne by the Provincial Government.
The Omineca Road, which extends 205 miles northwest of Fort St. James, was
extended an additional 15 miles past Johanson Lake. Further construction will be
undertaken.
The new British Columbia railway extension to Takla Lake has expanded the
use of the Omineca road. This increased use has been reflected in much higher road
and bridge maintenance costs. Also, additional logging is anticipated and the road
between Fort St. James and the Nation River bridge is being upgraded from a 15-ton
load limit to a 50-ton load limit as far as Nation River.
For the purpose of assisting the development of the petroleum and natural-gas
resources in the northeastern part of the Province, an additional grant was provided
to improve the vehicle access approaches to the new British Columbia railway bridge
over the Fort Nelson River. The cost of this work totalled $44,000.
Grub-staking Prospectors
Under the authority of the Prospectors' Grub-stake Act the Department has
provided grub-stakes each year since 1943 to a limited number of applicants able to
qualify. Grub-stakes up to $500 for food, shelter, and clothing, plus a reasonable
travelling allowance, are available to a limited number of qualified prospectors who
undertake to prospect in British Columbia in areas considered favourable by the
Department in accordance with a long-range plan for the development of the Province. Experienced prospectors may be granted a maximum of $300 for travelling
expenses if prospecting is to be done in remote areas where air transportation is
necessary.
Application forms and terms and conditions under which grub-stakes are
granted may be obtained from H. Bapty, Senior Inspector, Department of Mines
and Petroleum Resources, Victoria.
Samples received from grub-staked prospectors are assayed free of charge and
mineralogical identifications may be made on request.
Forty-three applications were received, and 27 grub-stakes were authorized.
Grantees unable to complete the terms and conditions of the grant received only
partial payment. Eleven prospectors were given grants for the first time. One
grantee proved to be unsatisfactory.
E. R. Hughes interviewed applicants in Vancouver and contacted 15 grantees
in the field, giving advice and direction to those requiring additional guidance. Personnel in offices of Government Agents and local Mine Inspectors throughout the
Province assisted in administering the programme. The following notes comprise
summaries by Mr. Hughes of the prospecting activities and results. They are based
on observations made by him in the field and from information contained in diaries
of the grantees.
Alberni Mining Division—Several short holes were drilled and blasted in an
area well served with logging-roads, in the Donner Lake area, west of Strathcona
Park, and at Kunlin Lake, between Strathcona Park and Gold River. One sample
taken from the area assayed copper, 0.89 per cent, and silver, 0.9 ounce per ton.
Another sample assayed copper, 2.78 per cent, and silver, 2.0 ounces per ton.
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK
Grub-stake Statistics
A 71
Field Season
Approximate
Expenditure
Men
Grub-staked
Samples and
Specimens
Received at
Department
Laboratory
Mineral
Claims
Recorded
1943                                              	
$
18,500
27.215
90
105
773
606
448
419
469
443
567
226
255
251
201
336
288
163
174
287
195
358
309
233
150
213
241
224
148
234
151
84
29
64
87
1944   - 	
135
1945                       ...                  	
27.310           I             84
181
1946                  -	
35,200
36,230
35,975
31,175
26.800
95
91
92
98
78
162
1947 -	
1948                    -	
142
138
1Q4Q
103
1950        ....   _ -	
95
1951
19,385          |           63
19,083          |           50
17,850          |           41
19,989          |           48
21,169          1           47
20,270          |           47
22,000          |           46
24,850          1           47
21,575                      38
28,115          |           50
29,175          i           47
26,730          |           52
29,000          |           50
31,751          |           53
24,717          [           42
26,787           [            43
29,891          |           47
31,224          |           47
21,758          |           27
30,614                      39
21,081          |           23
20.838                          27
137
19S2
95
1953                           -	
141
1954
123
1955 -.   .-.
183
1956
217
1957
1958
101
211
1959-                - -  	
202
19fi0
241
1961               .     .             .                ....
325
1962                  	
189
1963..                            	
843
1964        	
351
1965 	
219
1966 _               _     -.
239
1967         ,
432
1968 _	
402
1969       _     	
1970
221
423
1971..    •'.	
348
1972.      _     _	
190
Some work was done in the Brooks Peninsula, near the boundary of the
Nanaimo and Alberni Mining Divisions. Of 13 samples, several indicated traces
of gold and silver. One sample assayed copper, 0.32 per cent, and another sample
assayed copper, 0.14 per cent.
Clinton Mining Division—Several short holes were drilled and blasted, and
some trenching was done in an area west of Kelly Lake where pyrite and copper
stains were found.   The work was inconclusive.
A camp at Bluff Lake in the Clinton Mining Division served as a base for a
two-man team to prospect an area on both sides of the boundary between the
Clinton and Cariboo Mining Divisions. Most of the work was done in the Clinton
Mining Division. Between Bluff Lake and the headwaters of Klinaklini River,
shales, sandstones, limestones, coarse conglomerate, phyllite, porphyritic basalt,
pyroxene, and scattered dolomite were seen. A sample taken from a quartz outcrop, 2 to 3 feet wide, assayed silver, 1.1 ounces per ton. A second sample in this
area assayed molybdenum, 0.4 per cent. Further sampling of quartz outcrop
assayed silver, 1.5 ounces per ton. A sample from the Wolverine Creek area
assayed gold, 0.04 ounce per ton; silver, 4.9 ounces per ton.
In the Sapeye Lake area, sandstone was reported with many basaltic intrusions.
Fossils seen were brachiopods and gastropods. On Razor Creek, sedimentary rocks
were dominant; these being chiefly conglomerates and sandstones, with many
basaltic intrusions.
Near the southeast end of Blackhorn Lake, the rock consisted primarily of
granodiorite cut by dykes of porphyritic andesite and containing veins of quartz,
 A 72 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1972
with minor chalcopyrite and sphalerite. On the west side of Blackhorn Lake,
adjacent to some old mine workings, dump materials were found to consist of
arsenopyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, and pyrite.
In the Lord River area, south of Taseko Lakes, acid instrusive rocks with
minor pyritization were encountered and some silt samples were taken. Occasional feldspar-porphyry dykes were seen. Coarse molybdenite rosettes in quartz
and on fracture faces were found in large angular float boulders. Detailed prospecting of granitic ridges revealed quartz stringers and veins with occasional pyrite.
East of the upper Taseko Lake, chalcopyrite and bornite were found in rounded
boulders.
Some prospecting was done in the Scum Lake and Taseko River area with
inconclusive results. In the Fish Lake area, east of Taseko River, extensive dioritic
feldspar porphyry float was found and some silt-sampling was done. Coarsegrained igneous rocks on the southeast side of Anvil Mountain were examined, and
a gossan zone on Beece Creek was silt-sampled. A grid was established over an
area of molybdenite float and four mineral claims were staked near the south side
of Taseko River.
Kamloops Mining Division—A little over one month was spent by a two-man
team in the area between Bonaparte Lake and the town of Barriere. The rocks
encountered were mostly granodiorite, monzonite, and gabbro near Bonaparte Lake,
and andesite breccia, syenite, shale, and slate nearer Barriere. Some soil-sampling
was done with mediocre results. Minor amounts of molybdenite were seen in float.
One sample taken from the area assayed 0.08 per cent nickel.
In the Birch Lake area, diorite, gabbro, and chert-breccia were reporteed, but
copper mineralization was found to be a sparse.
In the Sleetsis Creek, Skoonka Creek, and Murray Creek areas, west of Spences
Bridge, some prospecting was done, and andesite, basalt, argillite, and quartzite
rocks were found.   Except for minor pyrite, no mineralization was seen.
Liard Mining Division—A base camp was established at the Smith River
bridge at Mile 514 on the Alaska Highway, and some prospecting was done northward along the Smith and Coal Rivers, and adjacent to the Alaska Highway between
Mile 504 and Mile 538. Calcite, limestone, slate, and barite stringers were reported
to have been seen near Smith River Falls, and a small outcrop of basaltic rock was
observed near the confluence of the Smith and Liard Rivers. On the west side of
Smith River there were showings of argillite, limestone, calcite, shale, quartz, quartzite, schist, and pieces of pyrite float. On the east side of Smith River, traces of
bornite and chalcopyrite in fresh float were observed. On Coal River, shale with
quartzite layers was seen, and near Mile 538 quartzite and shale were found. A
sample taken from near Mile 504 assayed 34.4 per cent iron.
Lillooet Mining Division—In the Lizzie Creek area, east of Lillooet Lake,
some prospecting was done along logging-roads and on the flanks of the valley
north of the creek. An extensive area of rusty, stained, and altered granodiorite
was seen with occurring pyrite in hairline fractures. A magnetometer survey was
made over an established grid in the Owl Lake area, and 96 soil samples were
taken.   Intrusive rocks were examined and some minor malachite was seen.
Nanaimo Mining Division—Some prospecting was done on the hillside east
of the highway bridge at the north end of Buttle Lake. An "M" scope was used
and five diamond-drill holes were completed, the deepest of which was 85 feet. The
purpose of this work was an attempt to find the source of free gold found in a
boulder in this vicinity.   The effort was not successful and drilling was discontinued.
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 73
In the Upper Quinsam Lake-Iron River area some prospecting was done and
seven mineral claims were staked from which five samples were submitted for assaying. One sample from the Heather Hill claim assayed 4.25 per cent zinc, 0.86 per
cent copper, and 1.3 ounces silver per ton. Other samples indicated traces of gold
and silver.
Nelson Mining Division—Some prospecting was done in the Ymir Creek,
Porcupine Creek, Barrett Creek, Erie Creek, Active Creek, Blazed Creek, and
Sheep Creek areas. Outcrops of quartzite, schist, dolomite, and quartz were reported in the Porcupine Creek area. Barren quartz float was found on Erie Creek.
Plentiful quartzite was reported east of the old Reno mine, and some large pieces
of zinc sulphide float were seen on the Huckleberry Creek Road.
An outcrop on Stewart Creek, northwest of Ymir, was investigated and some
shallow holes were drilled with a pack-sack drill. One sample taken here was reported to assay 5 per cent zinc, and another was reported to assay 10 per cent zinc.
The extent of the mineralization cannot be determined until some stripping has
been done.   Six mineral claims were staked to cover the area.
Omineca Mining Division—Nine miles of trail was cut northward from a base
camp on Tchentlo Lake to the FUM group of mineral claims. Some prospecting
was done east of the trail where fractured syenite and granite occur. Minor pyrite
was found but no copper. West of the trail, float with malachite was found and
some silt-sampling was done. West of the FUM group in a basin, near the top of
Nation Mountain, several streams were silt-sampled and a diorite to granite outcrop
was prospected. Some disseminated chalcopyrite with epidote and sulphides was
encountered in a rhyolite dyke which follows a small stream. Plugger holes were
blasted in trenches on the COL group north of the west end of Chuchi Lake. Magnetite and chalcopyrite were found in float in a stream east of Lisa Lake.
Some prospecting was done south of Tchentlo Lake and some silt-sampling
was done. Several outcrops of rhyolite intruded into coarse conglomerate were
examined.   The only mineralization found was minor pyrite.
On foot and by boat, investigations were made in areas where anomalies were
indicated by aeromagnetic mapping in the country adjacent to Ootsa, Frangois,
Gale, and Cheslatta Lakes. Small amounts of opal, of undetermined value, were
reported north of Tatalrose road west of Southbank and near Hallet Lake. Perlite
was seen on the north side of Cheslatta Lake. Heavy pyrite in basalt was reported
west of Jacob Lake, and specular hematite, pyrite, and minor chalcopyrite were
found east of Danskin.
On Kitnayakwa River, a tributary of Zymoetz River, much red andesite was
reported. Some prospecting was done along a gravel bar on the east side of the
river near its confluence with Iceflow Creek where pieces of float containing bornite
and malachite were found. Fine grains or bornite were also reported in calcite
stringers. Native copper was found in float on the west side of Kitnayakwa River.
One sample taken in the area assayed 0.4 ounce silver per ton and 2.15 per cent
copper. Twenty-nine mineral claims were staked near Icebow Creek. A long season
was spent in the Fredrikson Lake-McConnell Lake area, but no significant mineralization was found.
A trip was made by aircraft from Fort St. James to Takatoot Lake, east of
Takla Lake. The rocks encountered in the area included granodiorite, quartzite,
limestone, and conglomerate. Minor pyrite was the only mineralization that was
found.
 A 74 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1972
Osoyoos Mining Division—Prospecting was done in the area adjacent to Mile
7 and Mile 30 on the Ashnola River forest road. Soil sampling was reported to be
favourable. Some minor scheelite was found in quartz float, and some minor
malachite was seen. Bornite was also found in float. A sample taken from this
area assayed 0.23 per cent tungsten.
Revelstoke Mining Division—Some prospecting was done in the Rady Creek,
Laughton Creek, Ottawa Creek, Brown Creek, and Fays Peak areas northeast of
Trout Lake. On Rady Creek, a phyllite band was found cut by highly oxidized
quartz veins containing minor galena. On Fays Peak a wide band of calcite schist
appears to run the entire length of the mountain at about the 6,500-foot level. Some
well-disseminated chalcopyrite was reported to have been seen in the schist. Four
samples were taken from the Fays Peak area. One of the samples assayed 0.14
ounce gold per ton; 0.4 ounce silver per ton, and 3.65 per cent zinc. Another
sample assayed a trace of gold, 0.2 ounce silver per ton, and 0.51 per cent copper.
The third sample assayed a trace of silver and the fourth sample had neither gold
nor silver.   Six mineral claims were staked between Fays Peak and Ottawa Creek.
Similkameen Mining Division—In the Pasayten River, Placer Creek, Trapper
Lake, and Lime Creek areas, east of the Hope-Princeton Highway, a full season's
prospecting was done. The area is underlain by rocks of the Princeton and Nicola
Groups and by Coast Instrusions. The rocks seen were limestone, sandstone,
argillite, quartzite, andesite, felsite, dolomite, gabbro, and granite. No significant
mineralization was found. Coarse coal float was found in Tuning Fork Creek, east
of Placer Lake, but efforts to find a coal seam were not successful.
Slocan Mining Division — Some prospecting was done on Hamill, Carter,
Argenta, Glacier, Salisbury, Gardner, and Gar Creeks near the northeast end of
Kootenay Lake, but no mineralization of any significance was reported.
In the St. Leon-Halcyon Hot Springs area and in the Halcyon Ridge area, east
of the Upper Arrow Lake, some prospecting was done on foot. A helicopter was
used to reach the height of land between the Upper Arrow Lake and Trout Lake.
The rocks encountered were granite, quartz diorite, quartzite, shale, and schist.
Other than minor iron pyrite and sphalerite float, no mineralization was observed.
Vancouver Mining Division — Some prospecting was done in the Pokosha
Creek area, about 26 miles north of Squamish, where the rocks were reported to be
mostly quartz porphyry, granite, and limestone. Scattered pyrite and chalcopyrite
were found in some specimens. In the Ashlu Creek area, near the old Ashloo mine,
some prospecting was done and two samples were taken. These assayed as follows:
Gold, 0.14 ounce per ton; silver, 0.2 ounce per ton, and gold, 0.46 ounce per ton;
silver, 2.1 ounces per ton; copper, 0.02 per cent. Several short holes were drilled
and blasted.   A new logging-road now provides improved access into the area.
Victoria Mining Division—In the San Juan-Clapp Creek area, a trail was
blazed and some prospecting was done where antimony had been found in several
outcrops on a previous occasion. Eight mineral claims were staked. One sample
assayed 20 per cent antimony.
MINERALOGICAL BRANCH
The principal functions of the Mineralogical Branch are to assist in the orderly
exploration, development, and use of the Province's coal and mineral resources and
to provide information to Government and industry on the quantity and distribution
of the coal and mineral resources of the Province. The Branch makes a variety of
geological studies; publishes data concerning mineral deposits; makes mineral poten-
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 75
tial assessments of land; collects, stores, and disseminates geological and statistical
data; and records the exploration and mining activities of the industry. The Branch
is engaged in inventorying the mineral deposits of the Province and is working
toward a metal-by-metal quantitative appraisal of the mineral resources. It provides
rock and mineral identifications, limited free assaying for prospectors, contributes
lectures in courses on prospecting, participates in scientific meetings, and arranges
educational exhibits.
The Branch consists of an Economic Geology Section, a Mineral Resources
Section, and a Publication and Technical Services Section. The Analytical and
Assay Branch in effect functions as a fourth section of the Branch inasmuch as it
reports to the Deputy Minister through the Chief of the Mineralogical Branch.
The Economic Geology Section, under the direction of Dr. A. Sutherland
Brown, is responsible for the scientific investigations related to mineral deposits.
The work may involve detailed geological mapping and study of mineral deposits
in mining camps or areas of recognized mineral potential as well as chemical, petro-
graphic, and other studies in the laboratory.
The Mineral Resources Section, under the direction of N. C. Carter, is concerned with the documentation of current exploration and mining activity, compilation of an inventory of all mineral deposits, and obtaining and interpreting data for
the purpose of appraising the mineral resource of areas for various purposes.
The Publications and Technical Services Section is responsible for the production and editing of manuscripts and maps for publication, and for library, lapidary,
photographic, transport, and equipment services.
Staff
On December 31, 1972, the professional and technical staff included the
following:
Stuart S. Holland, Ph.D., P.Eng Chief
A. Sutherland Brown, Ph.D., P.Eng Deputy Chief
N. C. Carter, M.Sc, P.Eng Senior Geologist
B. N. Church, Ph.D., P.Eng Geologist
G. E. P. Eastwood, Ph.D., P.Eng.___ Geologist
J. A. Garnett, B.Sc, P.Eng Geologist
E. W. Grove, M.Sc, P.Eng Geologist
E. V. Jackson, B.Sc, P.Eng Geologist
W. J. McMillan, Ph.D., P.Eng Geologist
J. W. McCammon, M.Sc, P.Eng Geologist
K. E. Northcote, Ph.D., P.Eng Geologist
A. Panteleyev, M.Sc, P.Eng Geologist
V. A. Preto, Ph.D., P.Eng Geologist
A. F. Shepherd, B.Sc, P.Eng Geologist
R. I. Thompson, Ph.D., P.Eng Geologist
Miss E. M. Balicki, B.Sc Research Officer (Geology)
Mrs. Rosalyn J. Moir Manuscript Supervisor
K. S. Crabtree Draughting Supervisor
R. E. Player Lapidary and Photographer
 A 76 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1972
Staff Changes
A. Panteleyev, geologist, a graduate of the University of British Columbia,
joined the staff on May 15, 1972.
N. C. Carter, geologist, a graduate of the University of New Brunswick and
of Michigan School of Technology, was appointed Senior Geologist (Mineral
Resources) to fill the position vacated by James T. Fyles who, on September 5,
1972, was appointed Deputy Minister of the Department of Mines and Petroleum
Resources.
Field Work, 1972 Season
A. Sutherland Brown visited all major copper deposits coming into production.
N. C. Carter mapped in detail an area adjacent to Babine Lake for the purpose
of preparing and publishing a preliminary geological map.   Numerous mining properties under active exploration were examined.
B. N. Church completed the geological mapping and property examination of
the Buck Creek map area.
J. A. Garnet continued detailed geological mapping of the Hogem batholith in
the Omineca.
E. W. Grove made property examinations in the Stewart area.
W. J. McMillan completed the geological mapping of the Guichon Creek
batholith and began detailed examinations of the mineral deposits of the area.
J. W. McCammon examined fluorite deposits at Liard Hot Springs and
examined quarries from Prince George through the Kamloops to the East and West
Kootenays.
K. E. Northcote undertook regional mapping and examination of mining properties on Vancouver Island.
A. Panteleyev examined active mining properties in the Atlin area and western
part of the Stikine Basin.
V. A. Preto examined active mining properties in the Iron Mask area west of
Kamloops.
R. I. Thompson did some detailed geological mapping near Harrison Lake and
made mineral evaluation and reconnaissance studies near Keremeos, Taseko Lakes,
and Robb Lake.
Four senior geological field assistants and 10 junior assistants were employed
on the various projects.
Publications and Reports
Technical reports of the Mineralogical Branch were published in Geology,
Exploration, and Mining in British Columbia, 1972. Bulletin 59, Geology of
Copper Mountain, by V. A. Preto and Bulletin 62, Gravity, Magnetics, and Geology
of the Guichon Creek Batholith, by C. A. Ager, W. J. McMillan, and T. J. Ulrych
were also published.
A considerable number of scientific reports and papers resulting directly from
their work as staff geologists were also published by officers of the Branch.
Aeromagnetic Surveys and Magnetic Surveillance
The programme of airborne magnetometer mapping, jointly financed by the
Geological Survey of Canada and the British Columbia Department of Mines and
Petroleum Resources, continued in 1972. Eight map sheets (94 D/l and 2, 7 to
10, 15 and 16) were released during the year.
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 77
Maps released in former years as well as index maps showing the coverage by
aeromagnetic mapping in British Columbia may be obtained from the British
Columbia Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Room 411, Douglas
Building, Victoria, or the Geological Survey of Canada, 100 West Pender Street,
Vancouver 3.
The basic data used in compiling the maps are on open file at the Geological
Survey of Canada in Ottawa, where interested parties may arrange to obtain them
for special processing.
The Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Earth Physics Branch)
operates a magnetic observatory at Victoria. Services available to geophysical
exploration companies and other interested agencies include:
(a) Three-hour range indices of magnetic activity; these provide a
measure of the intensity of the magnetic disturbance (on a 0-9
scale) for each three-hour period. The monthly listings of these
indices are normally mailed within a few days after the end of each
month.
(b) Copies of magnetograms are available through a local duplicating
firm at a charge of $7.50 for a monthly set. These recordings of
the magnetic field can be used to control field surveys, in particular
to correct for the diurnal changes and magnetic disturbances. The
area over which this control is valid depends on the required
accuracy; for ±5 gamma accuracy, it covers an elliptic region
reaching roughly as far as longitude 118 degrees to the east and
latitude 50.5 degrees to the north.
Further details can be obtained by writing to the Officer-in-charge, Victoria
Magnetic Observatory, RR 7, Victoria.
Rock and Mineral Sets
Sets of rocks and minerals are available for sale to prospectors, schools, and
residents of British Columbia. Information regarding them may be obtained from
the Chief of the Mineralogical Branch, Douglas Building, Victoria.
PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS BRANCH
General
The Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch, under the direction of the Chief of
the Branch, is responsible for the administration of Part XII of the Petroleum and
Natural Gas Act, 1965 and the Drilling and Production Regulations made thereunder.
The regulations provide for the use of efficient and safe practices in the drilling,
completion, and abandonment of wells; for the orderly development of fields discovered within the Province; and for the conservation and prevention of waste of
oil and natural gas within the reservoir and during production operations.
Every well location must be approved by the Branch before the well is drilled.
All operations related to drilling and production are inspected frequently to ensure
compliance with the provisions of all regulations, including such features as facilities
and practices used, adequate plugging of abandoned wells, surface restoration of
well-sites, well-testing and measurement procedures employed, disposal of produced
water, protection of installations against fire, and general conservation.
 A 78 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1972
Investigations are made of complaints of property damage resulting from
drilling and producing operations, and from geophysical work programmes.
Comprehensive records of all drilling and producing operations are maintained
at Victoria and are made available for study, or are published, for the use and
benefit of anyone interested in oil or gas development in British Columbia. Samples
of bit cuttings, as well as all core, obtained from every well drilled in the Province,
are collected and retained at the field office located at Charlie Lake, where they are
available for study. Charlie Lake is adjacent to the Alaska Highway, about 5
miles northwest of Fort St. John.
Detailed reservoir engineering and geological studies are conducted on the
basis of technical information submitted to the Branch from operating companies,
as well as information acquired through field work by Branch personnel. Estimates
of the reserves of oil and natural gas are made annually, at the end of December.
Crown-owned oil and natural-gas rights are evaluated prior to being disposed of
by public tender.
Administration
The Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch is subdivided for administrative purposes into four sections. These sections and their supervisors are as follows:
Development Engineering, W. L. Ingram; Field Operations, D. L. Johnson; Geology,
W. M. Young; and Reservoir Engineering, A. J. Dingley.
Staff
Headquarters, Victoria
J. D. Lineham Chief of Branch
W. L. Ingram Deputy Chief of Branch
and Senior Development Engineer
M. B. Hamersley Development Technician (Engineering)
J. F. Tomczak Statistician
A. J. Dingley Senior Reservoir Engineer
B. T. Barber   Reservoir Engineer
P. S. Attariwala   Reservoir Engineer
P. K. Huus ,___ Reservoir Technician (Engineering)
W. M. Young Senior Geologist
S. S. Cosburn Geologist
T. B. Ramsay Geologist
J. Y. Smith Geologist
R. Stewart Geologist
Field Operations, Charlie Lake
D. L. Johnson District Engineer
T. B. Smith Field Engineer
D. A. Selby Field Technician (Engineering)
G. T. Mohler Field Technician (Engineering)
W. B. Holland Field Technician (Engineering)
J. W. D. Kielo Field Technician (Engineering)
Staff Changes
J. W. D. Kielo, Technician, Engineering, joined the staff on March 6, 1972.
 departmental work a 79
Board of Arbitration
Chairman: A. W. Hobbs, Q.C.
Vice-Chairman: S. G. Preston, P.Ag.
Member: J. D. Lineham, P.Eng.
The Board of Arbitration, established under the authority of the Petroleum
and Natural Gas Act, 1965, grants right of entry to oil and gas companies upon
alienated land and determines condition of entry and compensation therefor. It
also terminates the right-of-entry when a company has ceased to use the land.
In 1972, five applications for right-of-entry were submitted to the Board and
four were carried over from 1971.   Three applications were withdrawn.
Six right-of-entry orders were issued and one was terminated after the parties
reached agreement.
A hearing was held on September 26 at Fort St. John. Of the seven cases
scheduled to be heard, two resulted in compensation awards, one resulted in a
jurisdictional award, three were adjourned at the request of the land-owners, and
one was settled by agreement.
Seven cases were outstanding at the end of the year. These involve five right-
of-entry orders, the case stemming from the jurisdictional award, and an application
for review of an existing award order.
Conservation Committee
Chairman: J. T. Fyles, Deputy Minister, Department of Mines and Petroleum
Resources.
Members: M. H. A. Glover, Economist, Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce, and one to be named.
The Conservation Committee is responsible to the Minister of Mines and
Petroleum Resources and was established originally on October 11, 1957, under
the authority of the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act.   Its duties are as follows:
(1) To act as an advisory committee to the Minister on such questions
of conservation that the Minister, in writing, shall refer to the Committee for consideration and recommendation.
(2) To deal with such questions of conservation and production in the
various fields of British Columbia as may arise between two or
more operators in the same field or between operators and the
Branch when appeals on such questions are made to the Minister
and referred by him to the Committee.
The Conservation Committee did not meet in 1972.
PUBLICATIONS
A list of the publications of the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources
is available free on request to the Chief of the Mineralogical Branch or Chief of the
Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch, Douglas Building, Victoria.
Publications that are in print may be obtained from the Department of Mines
and Petroleum Resources, Douglas Building, Victoria, and from the Geological
Survey of Canada, 100 West Pender Street, Vancouver. Current publications may
also be obtained from the Gold Commissioner's Office, Room 320, 890 West Pender
Street, Vancouver.
Publications are available for reference use in the Departmental Library, Room
430, Douglas Building, Victoria, in the reading-room of the Geological Survey of
Canada, 100 West Pender Street, Vancouver, in the offices of the Inspectors of
Mines in Nelson and Prince Rupert, as well as in some public libraries.
 Petroleum and Natural Gas
CHAPTER 4
CONTENTS
Page
Petroleum and Natural Gas Titles  A 83
Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch  A 86
General  A 86
Administration    A 86
Board of Arbitration  A 87
Conservation Committee  A 87
Field Operations  A 88
General  A 88
Laboratories .  A 88
Inspections  A 89
Spillages, Accidents, and Fires  A 89
Geological Section  A 89
Genera]  A 8 9
Reservoir Geology and Regional Subsurface Mapping  A 90
Drilling Highlights  A 91
Geophysical and Surface Geological Coverage  A 91
Reservoir Engineering Section  A 92
General  A 92
Oil Allowables, MPRs, and Improved Recovery Schemes  A 93
Associated and Solution Gas Conservation Schemes  A 94
Gas Allowables and Well Tests  A 94
Hydrocarbon and Associated Sulphur Reserves  A 95
Miscellaneous  A 96
Development Engineering Section     A 97
General     A 97
Drilling     A 98
Production  A 101
Pipe-lines, Refineries, and Gas Plants  A 103
Well Records -  A 103
Reports and Publications  A 105
Statistical Tables—
Table 13—Exploratory and Development Wells Completed, January to
December 1972  A 109
Table 14—Geophysical Exploration, 1972  A 110
Table 15—Surface Geological Exploration, 1972  A 112
A 80
 PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS A 81
Petroleum and Natural Gas—Continued
Page
Table 16—Project and Individual Well MPR Data at December 31,
1972  A 129
Table 17—Gas-well Test and Allowable Data, December 31, 1972  A 134
Table 18—Hydrocarbon and By-products Reserves, December 31,
1972  A 158
Table 19—Oilfield Reservoir Fluid Data  A 159
Table 20—Gasfield Reservoir Fluid Data  A 164
Table 21—Wells Drilled and DriUing, 1972  A 169
Table 22—Oilfields and Gasfields Designated at December 31, 1972. A 175
Table 23—Number of Capable and Operating Wells at December 31,
1972  A 182
Table 24—Monthly Crude-oil Production by Fields and Pools, 1972_. A 188
Table 25—Monthly Natural Gas Production by Fields and Pools,
1972 A 189
Table 26—Summary of Drilling and Production Statistics, 1972   A 192
Table 27—Monthly Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Conden-
sate/Pentanes Plus, 1972  A 193
Table 28—Monthly Supply and Disposition of Natural Gas, 1972  A 195
Table 29—Monthly Production and Disposition of Butane, Propane, and
Sulphur, 1972  A 197
Table 30—Monthly Gross Values to Producers of Crude Oil, Natural
Gas, Natural Gas Liquids, and Sulphur, 1972  A 198
Table 31—Crude-oil Pipe-lines, 1972  A 198
Table 32—Crude-oil Refineries, 1972  A 199
Table 33—Natural Gas Pipe-lines, 1972  A 200
Table 34—Gas-processing Plants, 1972  A 202
Table 35—Sulphur Plants, 1972  A 203
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Drawings
Figure
2. Footage drilled in British Columbia, 1954-72     A 99
3. Petroleum and natural gas fields, 1972  A 100
4. Oil production in British Columbia, 1955-72  A 101
5. Gas production in British Columbia, 1955-72  A 102
6. Petroleum and natural gas pipe-lines, 1972  A 102
Map
1. Union Oil project, Gething zone, Aitken Creek field  A 113
2. Monsanto project, Charlie Lake zone, Bear Flat field  A 113
3. BP Oil project, Halfway zone, Beatton River field  A 114
4. BP Oil and Gas Unit 1, Bluesky zone, Beatton River West fiekL. A 114
5. Amoco project, Nahanni zone, Beaver River field  A 115
6. Pacific Petroleums project, Baldonnel zone, Beg and Beg West fields  A 115
7. Pacific Petroleums project, Halfway zone, Beg field  A 116
 A 82 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1972
Petroleum and Natural Gas—Continued
Drawings—Continued
Map Page
8. Pacific Petroleums project, Debolt zone, Blueberry field  A 117
9. Boundary Lake zone projects, Boundary Lake field  A 117
10. Pacific Petroleums project, Baldonnel zone, Bubbles field  A 118
1.1. Union Oil project, Halfway zone, Bulrush field  A 118
12. Pacific Petroleums project, Slave Point zone, Clarke Lake and Clarke
Lake South fields  A 119
13. Union Oil Unit 1, Halfway zone, Crush field  A 119
14. Pacific Petroleums Unit 1, Halfway zone, Currant field  A 120
15. Pacific Petroleums Unit 1, Charlie Lake zone, Fort St. John field  A 120
16. Inga zone units, Inga field  A 121
17. Pacific Petroleums projects, Baldonnel and Halfway zones, Jedney
field A 122
18. ARCO projects, Halfway and Baldonnel zones, Julienne field  A 122
19. Pacific Petroleums project, Halfway zone, Kobes-Townsend field  A 123
20. Baldonnel pool project, Laprise Creek field  A 123
21. Union Oil Unit 1, Halfway zone, Milligan Creek field  A 124
22. Texaco Exploration project, Baldonnel zone, Nig Creek field  A 124
23. Pacific Petroleums project, Halfway zone, Osprey field  A 125
24. Pacific Petroleums project, Wabamun zone, Parkland field  A 125
25. Halfway zone projects, Peejay field  A 126
26. Dunlevy pool project, Rigel field  A 126
27. Monsanto Conservation projects, Dunlevy zone, Rigel field  A 127
28. Halfway zone units, Weasel field  A 127
29. Wainco Unit 1, Halfway and Belloy pools, Wilder field  A 128
30. Union Oil project, Halfway zone, Wildmint field  A 128
 PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS A 83
PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS TITLES
Staff
R. E. Moss Chief Commissioner
W. W. Ross Deputy Chief Commissioner
Petroleum and Natural Gas Titles, under the direction of the Chief Commissioner, is responsible for the administration of the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act,
1965, which includes all matters related to and affecting title to Crown petroleum
and natural gas rights and includes the collection of revenue from fees, rents, disposition, and royalties. Regulations governing geophysical operations and petroleum-
development roads are also administered by the Chief Commissioner.
Information concerning all forms of title issued under the Petroleum and
Natural Gas Act may be obtained upon application to the office of the Chief Commissioner, Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Victoria. Maps showing
the locations of all forms of title issued under the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act are
available, and copies may be obtained upon application to the office of the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Victoria. Monthly land reports and
monthly reports listing additions and revisions to permit-location maps and listing
changes in title to permits, licences, and leases, and related matters are available
from the office of the Chief Commissioner upon application and payment of the
required fee.
During the year, there were four dispositions of Crown reserve petroleum
and natural gas rights resulting in tender bonus bids amounting to $20,495,662,
a decrease of $1,690,589 from the previous year. A total of 428 parcels was offered
and bids were accepted on 261 parcels covering 5,758,504 acres. The average
price per acre was $7.12 which is a decrease of $2.25 per acre over the previous
year. Average bonus price per acre was respectively—permits, $5.57; leases,
$42.69; and drilling reservations, $9.68.
During the year, 22 geophysical licences were renewed or issued.
During the year, one petroleum-development road application was received
and processed for approval.
A total of 124 notices of commencement of exploratory work was recorded
during the year. These notices are required prior to the commencement of any
geological or geophysical exploration for petroleum or natural gas.
During the year, three unit agreements and three royalty agreements were
approved.
As of December 31, 1972, 27,309,202 acres or approximately 42,671 square
miles, an increase of 545,886 acres over the 1971 total, of Crown petroleum and
natural gas rights, issued under the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act, were held in
good standing by operators ranging from small independent companies to major
international ones. The form of title held, total number issued, and acreage in each
case were as follows:
Form of Title Number Acreage
Permits      483 19,891,946
Natural gas licences  	
Drilling reservations        44 452,079
Leases (all types)  3,605 6,965,177
Total   27,309,202
 A 84 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1972
Title Transaction Statistics, 1972
Permits
Leases
Drilling
Reservations
Natural Gas
Licences
No.
Acres
No.
Acres
No.
Acres
No.
Acres
90
37
353
92
2
80
2,766,410
1,581,703
313
401
3,223
1,117
66
150
515,820
1,147,972
31
20
6
12
31
311,150
196,727
—
Acreage amendments	
Crown reserve dispositions	
18,898
2,482,264
102,194
85,838
311,150
	
Petroleum and Natural Gas Revenue, 1972
Rentals and fees—
$ $
Permits      1,729,829
Drilling reservations        107,537
Natural gas licences	
Petroleum, natural gas, and petroleum and
natural gas leases     6,976,517
Total rentals and fees     8,813,883
Disposal of Crown reserves—
Permits  13,818,020
Drilling reservations  3,011,025
Leases  3,666,617
Total Crown reserves disposal  20,495,662
Royalties—
Gas   5,5 80,434
Oil   9,845,125
Processed products  44,379
Total royalties  15,469,938
Miscellaneous fees         42,775
Total petroleum and natural gas revenues  44,822,258
 PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS
A 85
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