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Minister of Public Works REPORT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1972/73 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1974

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Minister of Public Works
REPORT
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
1972/73
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1974
  To the Honourable Walter Stewart Owen, Q.C, LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Public Works for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1973, in compliance with the
provisions of the Public Works Act.
WILLIAM L. HARTLEY
Minister of Public Works
Office of the Minister of Public Works,
Parliament Buildings, December 30,1973.
 Hon. W. L. Hartley, Minister of Public Works.
 MINISTER'S COMMENT
The term covered in the attached Report is marked by change. Arnold E.
Webb retired as Deputy Minister after almost 15 years of service in this Department.
George L. Giles was promoted from the position of Director of Design to Deputy
Minister.
In the months ahead we hope to be able to plan and construct between one-
half million and one million square feet of office space in Victoria so that many of
the departments can move into Government-owned and operated space.
We plan to get the Block 51, 61, 71 project in Vancouver well under way in
this next year so that more adequate Court and Government services will be available as soon as possible.
Since coming into office we have been made aware of the many public concerns
with the Electrical Inspection services provided by this Department. In order that
we might determine the most desirable course of action to satisfy those concerns
and to give the public the maximum opportunity of participating, we have initiated
a public inquiry under the Chairmanship of Dr. Hugh L. Keenleyside. We anticipate
that the results of this inquiry will be made public during the Spring Session of the
Legislature in 1974.
W. L. HARTLEY
Minister of Public Works
 'We must lead, not follow."
—Department of Public Works.
 INDEX
Page
Minister's Comment     5
Report of the Deputy Minister     9
Design Division
Report of the Director of Design  10
Report of the Senior Mechanical Engineer  12
Report of the Senior Civil Engineer  14
Report of the Senior Electrical Engineer  16
Report of the Architect-Planner  20
Report of the Senior Quantity Surveyor  22
Report of the Senior Specifications Writer  24
Construction and Maintenance Division
Report of the Director of Construction and Maintenance  26
Report of the Co-ordinator of Maintenance  29
Report of the Co-ordinator of Construction  31
Report of the Mechanical Operations and Maintenance Engineer  34
Safety Engineering Services Division
Report of the Director of Safety Engineering Services  36
Report of the Chief Boiler Inspector.  37
Report of the Chief Inspector of Electrical Energy  41
Report of the Chief Gas Inspector  43
Accounting Division
Report of the Comptroller of Expenditure  47
Tenders Received and Contracts Awarded for Buildings  54
 Landscaping, British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby.
Horticultural Centre, British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby.
8
 REPORT OF THE  DEPUTY MINISTER
The Honourable William L. Hartley,
Minister of Public Works,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir: I have the honour to submit for your consideration the Annual Report of
the Department for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1973.
Elsewhere in this Report will be those of the heads of divisions which set out
the work accomplished and planned, tenders called and accepted, and Departmental
accounts.
Since the work involved in this Report was largely produced under the direct
supervision of my predecessor, A. E. Webb, it is appropriate, I believe, to pay
tribute here to his services to this Department.
Arnold Evan Webb served this Department from August 1, 1958, until January
15, 1973, and during this time saw this Department grow from a total work-force
of 639 to a work-force of 1,950; saw its budget grow from almost $7 million to
approximately $31V2 million. He administered a programme of major development
which included many innovative improvements. During this entire period he was
a member of the Purchasing Commission and also a member of the Capital Improvement District Commission as well as serving on many Centennial Committees, and
also Chairman of the Museum Steering Committee.
He served this Department most loyally and well and we wish him long life and
happiness in his retirement.
Yours respectfully,
G. L. GILES
Deputy Minister
 F 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF DESIGN
This section of the Public Works Report has in the past been a review of the
Design Division's work during the previous year. Since that information is contained in other sections of this Report, and since this is the first report from myself,
as Director of Design, it will, I hope, be acceptable to vary from the established
format, and to attempt to enunciate a design policy for the Design Divisions of the
Department of Public Works. This policy is not original with me. It is, I believe,
part of the presently emerging systems of ideas of this Department, and compatible
with those systems which the present Government proposed, and to which society
gave its backing.
No system with which we work in the Department of Public Works is a closed
system. All of them are related to other systems and are interdependent on them.
It has been demonstrated repeatedly how small changes in the environment can
drastically affect the whole of the ecology. It is now time that building projects
be examined, not only as artifacts in which to carry out the functions of the user,
but as an addition to a neighbourhood, a town, or a district. It has been accepted
that no building does damage to its occupants. It is now asked that each building
not only does no damage, but contributes positively to the individual and to the
social complex in which it is situated. We have already been requested by the
Corrections Service not to increase the size of any of their institutions; that the conventional twin cities of prisoners and guards produce no mutual benefits. Mental
Health has been moving in the same direction. Major buildings in major cities
create problems, and the public has reacted to some of them. Minor buildings in
minor cities can also create problems or they can contribute to the urban environment. The prevention of damage to individuals and the accrual of benefits to the
individual and to society will be actively sought by all branches of this Division.
The Programming Branch will be asked to examine broader aspects of the
problem. The resources of the community, its character and its institutions, will be
examined in relation to the projects, staff and clientele, individual and group, visitor
and passer-by. Assistance will be sought from the social sciences, psychologists,
and geographers. The problems will be examined in depth. Some regions have no
centres, but have equally developing villages which offer some of the satisfactions
that can be experienced in an urban environment. Contracts will be made with
other departments and other jurisdictions to promote the coalescing of institutions,
and the resulting development of regional centres.
The Architectural Branch will be asked to re-examine its standards in the light
of increased capital costs, maintenance, and operating cost. It will not be enough
to seek a handsome solution to functional problems. A building will have to be
adapted to its site in a variety of ways in order to contribute to the total life of the
community. The co-operation and active involvement of the municipal authorities
must be achieved.
The Mechanical and Electrical Branches will be asked to play a greater role
in influencing design decisions. The continuing increase in the cost of energy and
the continuing relative decrease in supply requires new approaches to the design of
buildings. Programmes are available that can give quick comparisons of the effect
of differences in massing, orientation, fenestration, and shading. These programmes
will allow us to reassess the indigenous methods of combating the rigours of our
climate. Solving problems of environment by the profligate use of equipment and
energy will be resisted.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1972/73
F 11
Civil and structural engineers will be asked to continue their co-operation with
pollution control and municipal authorities.
The Interior Design group will be asked to re-examine the use of office landscaping. The landscaped office in its current fashion is one of the most profligate
users of equipment and energy. Its only claimed advantage is an increased interaction among middle management. The compatability of this interaction with
confidentiality and security will be re-examined and recommendations made.
It is not that these systems are something new. They have been with us since
the Division began. Nor is it that the old ways were wrong. It is that, as society
changes, institutions must change to meet the new needs. These needs will require
further changes and readjusting of basic systems. This report is our assurance to
you that this Division will remain flexible enough and eager enough to meet any
challenge that is assigned to it.
W. W. Ekins, M.R.A.I.C.
Director of Design
Renovated Court facility, New Westminster.
 F  12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
SOLID REFUSE  DILEMMA—TO WASTE OR RECYCLE
The disposition of solid waste is at a crossroads. In most communities it is
a definite problem.
Last fall the Mechanical Branch was asked to conduct an engineering feasibility
and economic study into utilizing solid waste from a community, as a source of heat
energy for Government buildings. On the surface, when one considers that three
to four tons of municipal garbage has a heat value equivalent to a ton of coal, the
study appears to be a worth-while effort.
Across the Continent, many novel schemes for improving existing techniques
or proving new approaches are under investigation, but there is no way, at this time,
to predict which will afford a practical and economic means of handling the millions
of tons piling up every day.
The idea of recycling is not new. The paper industry, the steel and non-
ferrous metal industries, and to some extent the textile industries, have been using
recycled material.
Recycling of material is excellent for it conserves the natural resources. However, the problem with recycling at this time, is economic. The cost of collection,
sorting, and transportation is often higher than the cost of new raw material.
The traditional procedure of handling solid waste has been to dump it onto
some back area. It is unsightly, lets out offensive odours, it is a haven for rodents
and constitutes dangerous fire traps. It is completely unacceptable in this day
and age.
Sanitary landfill is acceptable from both the aesthetic and hygienic standpoints
provided that it is carried out in a satisfactory manner. The waste should be
shredded, dumped evenly upon the land, compacted, and carefully covered, There
is some possibility of ground water contamination.
Compositioning is another beneficial way of handling the solid-waste problem.
This method entails aerobic bacteriological decomposition of refuse after removal
of the metal and glass. This method produces a usable soil, but costs about the
same as good sanitary landfill and incineration.
Incineration provides the greatest volume reduction, about 85 to 90 per cent.
This method offers the greatest variety of solutions. It produces sterile and inert
material which can be used for landfill. A by-product of this method is heat energy,
since solid waste contains from 2,000 to 5,000 B.T.U. per pound.
Where the heat energy can be used, i.e., district heating and cooling or converted to electrical energy, a fairly economic process can be realized, however, the
first costs are high.
Care must be taken to keep the obnoxious parts of this process under control,
that is, material handling, particulate emissions, odours, and obnoxious gases and
noise to a minimum.   With todays technology it can be done.
Pyrolysis is a process which does not destroy the refuse by combustion, but
heats it without contact with oxygen. The waste is converted to char, waxes and
greases, gases and liquids. The useful products are recovered and the gases used
for fuel.   The residue, much reduced in volume, is deposited in landfill.
High temperature (up to 3,000°F) solid-waste disposal systems are being
developed. This process, besides producing heat, produces a molten slag which,
when cooled, can be used as a road aggregate, filter media, or construction material.
About 20 tons of waste produces a ton of slag. One type of high-temperature incineration being developed uses a fluidized fuel bed in the combustion chamber.
The cleaned hot gases are fed to a gas turbine to generate electric power.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1972/73
F  13
It would appear, that in the circumstances where there is solid waste, a use for.
the heat energy and the necessary capital can be combined, then solid waste might
be an asset.
The Mechanical Branch has participated in most of the projects listed elsewhere in this Report.
There are several projects, however, that I would like to mention.
The conversion from coal to natural gas-fired oil in the boiler-plant at River-
view Hospital has been completed. The results are up to expectations and this
has been very gratifying.
The Abbotsford Trout Hatchery—we have participated in developing a water
recirculation system. The spent water from the fish ponds has to be purified and
reoxygenated for reuse.
The system devised was tested in a pilot plant, and seems to be satisfactory.
At this time, I would like to thank the field operating staff for their "feed-back"
which helps us to solve mechanical problems.
W. E. Mills
Senior Mechanical Engineer
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 F 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE SENIOR CIVIL ENGINEER
Throughout the ages peoples have venerated historic places and buildings.
This has been particularly evident in periods of unstability when people tend to fall
back on to reminders and mementoes of a so-called relatively stable past rather
than anticipating the sometimes uncertain future.
Europe, with its wealth of historic buildings, has been in the forefront of
efforts to save and preserve its past. The formation of the National Trust for
buildings in England, the very strict zoning codes and the support of the people,
have been instrumental in saving its buildings and countryside. The recent spate
of new tall buildings in London and the preposterous proposal to move Eros' statue
in Piccadilly Circus, has raised a storm of protest. A poll taken in London recently,
showed that the vast majority of the population did not want their city altered by
new developments; they were more at home and content with their old and familiar
surroundings. In other words, the emphasis should be on a certain amount of new
building that would fit into the character of the area and the restoration of the old
and worth-while buildings.
The demolition and erection of a Scottish Church in a California Funeral Park,
and the removal of the Old London Bridge from London to an artificial lake in
Arizona, are rather bizarre examples of the craving for instant history.
One of the most imaginative engineering feats of recent times was the removal
and re-erection of the temple of Abu Simbel in Egypt. This temple would have
been flooded by the impounded waters of the new Aswan Dam, so it was relocated
on higher ground. The large sum of money needed for the work came from public
subscription and governmental sources. The preservation of this priceless antiquity,
which was irreplaceable, was considered worth the enormous costs involved.
British Columbia, with its comparatively short history, has very few buildings
of a historic nature. For this reason alone it is essential that efforts be made to
preserve as many as possible. The Public Works Department, in a modest way,
has been involved in restoring old buildings and objects throughout the Province.
We are presently involved in the restoration of the Old Parliament Buildings in
Victoria, and the Courthouse in Revelstoke. Some of our past restoration work
included Craigflower Manor, Helmcken House in Victoria, and investigatory work
on the old Vancouver Courthouse. We have also been involved in the restoration
and setting-up of historic Indian totem poles, etc. Perhaps the greatest problem
involved in checking old buildings is the scanty information available on the structure and in many instances the complete lack of any structural plans. This fact
necessitates breaking through architectural finishes in order to check the construction. With all the work and money involved, the end result of saving historic and
attractive old buildings is certainly worth while.
In other work, the division had a very busy and rewarding year. Perhaps our
largest and most complex job at present is the new Abbotsford Fish Hatchery. This
project incorporates a recirculation system designed to make maximum use of the
water available. The success of the hatchery will be completely dependent on the
adequacy of the method of water-treatment selected. Research, by B.C. Research,
into various systems and using a pilot plant, has been continuing for more than
a year. This is now drawing to a close, and following receipt of a Pollution Control
Permit, it is hoped that construction can proceed.
J. R. Simpson, B.Sc, F.I.C.E.
Senior Civil Engineer
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1972/73
F 15
 F  16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE ELECTRICAL ENGINEER
Part 1—Electrical Design and Maintenance
Personnel of this Branch continued at a stable level of work output, while the
employment of consultants showed a considerable increase. This was particularly
noticeable in the case of major projects for Government office buildings and courthouses throughout the Province, most of which used consulting services. At the
same time, many widely varied projects were completed by Department staff, including design of new buildings, remodelling of existing, and miscellaneous jobs,
such as electrical supply and distribution systems, fire-alarms, emergency lighting
and power, audio and video systems, and many others.
The increased use of office machines of all types has resulted in a necessity for
an office electrical distribution system which, in larger offices, can be more flexible
and economical than previously existing systems. It is often not possible to provide
electrical and communication outlets in the partitions. In many cases partitions
have been eliminated, or they may be semiportable, or of partial height and thin
construction. Floor outlets in open spaces are expensive and may not provide for
sufficient flexibility of office arrangements. A simple solution has evolved in the
power and communication utility poles, which can be installed between a suspended
ceiling and the floor at any location. These have been developed into reasonably
attractive units, and have won general acceptance. They are now being installed
in large numbers.
Encouraging development has taken place in the field of fire-alarm systems.
There are now a number of manufacturers producing modular solid-state systems,
with improved reliability and less required maintenance. The programme of
upgrading and replacing fire-alarm systems throughout the Province continued.
Developments in office lighting have been noticeable during the year. Where
detailed work in large offices requires a high and even level of illumination, the
lighting layout has been designed to reduce the effect of veiling reflections on the
task. Such design is now assisted by "bat wing" diffusers which beam the light
away from the vertical axis, thus permitting the task to be lighted from the side
instead of the front. However, for proper applications, furniture layout is determined by lighting fixture locations, so that some flexibility is lost. In view of the
considerable improvement in working conditions, the restrictions in furniture placement may become acceptable.
A second noticeable trend during the year has been the application of lighting
to a specific working area within executive offices. In some cases, fluorescent
lighting has been used at the desk and incandescent accent lighting elsewhere in the
office. In other cases, where lower-light levels are desired or where a high ratio
of heat to light is not objectionable, all-incandescent office lighting is being used to
give a specific effect.    This is being done in the main Legislative Building.
A considerable effort on the part of the senior personnel of the Branch has
been devoted to assisting the electrical maintenance personnel on the staffs of the
Superintendents of Works. Similarly, the maintenance staffs have been of invaluable assistance to design personnel, helping in site surveys, passing detailed information about existing installations, and providing the feed-back that is so
necessary to permit a continuing improvement in design. The existing co-operative
liaison is very valuable and very much appreciated.
By far the most significant trend during the year has been the continually
increasing emphasis within society on the improvement of the human environment.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1972/73
F  17
Both of the key factors, reduction of waste of energy and reduction of pollution,
are of vital concern to the Electrical Engineer and the Electrical Designer. The
policy of encouraging the use of electricity purely for sales promotion has been
rightly discarded, and one reason why conservation of electrical energy is necessary
is that large amounts are required to reduce the present causes of pollution. The
total requirement for electrical energy is growing rapidly, but electricity is not the
problem.   Electricity is a major part of the solution to the problem.
J. B. Hall, P.Eng.
Senior Electrical Engineer
Part 2—Communications
The men and women of the Electrical and Communications Branch have
traditionally been involved with a variety of communications equipments and systems, for which some definition of terms is required. "Communications" is the
all-encompassing word referring both to the exchange of information and to the
devices which facilitate the exchange. Telecommunications is generally taken to
be communications over a distance by an electro-magnetic system, including wire
and cables, as well as radiated or ducted waves. Internal communications systems
within buildings or complexes, although often having the same components as telecommunications systems, are usually classed separately. These systems include
office intercoms, public address, paging, music distribution, fire-alarm, security,
monitoring, control, and others. They are included in the design of all buildings
with which the Department has been involved.
The major telecommunications commitment of this Branch is the design,
administration, and control of the telephone utility systems used throughout the
Province. During the past year, there were 1,600 orders placed with the telephone
companies for additions or alterations to telephone equipment in Government buildings. Every order involves detailed study, consideration as to necessity, analysis
of a suitability and cost, and clerical processing. Many require site inspection and
discussion.
Two important improvements were made to the telephone systems during the
year. The switchboard in the Parliament Buildings was converted to a centrex
system, which permits outside callers to dial direct to the number they want,
without going through the operator. This permits much faster service with fewer
operators, even though the caller must look up the number of the office he wants,
or ascertain it from the operator and note it for future calls.
A second advance has been the installation of direct dialing from any local
on the building exchange to Prince George, Smithers, Quesnel, Dawson Creek,
Fort St. John, and vice versa. This also speeds service with fewer operators. The
system will be extended in the near future to cover the communities around Nelson
and those around Kamloops.
Although the above changes do improve service, it is realized that there remains
much to be done, and intensive study of system additions was in progress at the end
of the period under report. It is expected that a very significant increase in the
Telpak facilities will be effected prior to printing of this Report.
In spite of the improved automatic features of the telephone system, the
services of the operators remain indispensible. Their individual performance continues to be commendable, especially during peak periods when they work under
 F  IS
BRITISH COLUMBIA
considerable pressure with the utmost courtesy and efficiency.    Their work, and
the work of their supervisors, fulfils a very important function of this Branch.
This year, for the first time, communications personnel from other Departments, as well as from the Public Utilities Commission, the B.C. Hydro and Power
Authority, and the B.C. Railway, have formed a common function group which is
performing in an advisory capacity dealing with all aspects of telecommunications.
A major study of all Government communications has been initiated, and is being
conducted by a competent firm of consultants. Communications discussion amongst
all provincial governments, and with the Federal Government, is now continually
scheduled, particularly regarding long-range policy dealing with evolving conditions. The interconnection of privately owned equipment to the public networks
could produce a whole new industry. The advent of widespread use of two-way
inter-active co-axial cable in the cities may well have an impact comparable to that
of the automobile. And this has been the year of the domestic communications
satellite, a field where Canada is leading the world.
J. B. Hall, P.Eng.
Senior Electrical Engineer
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Conversion of control room, boiler-house, Essondale.
J
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1972/73
F 19
Jericho Hill School Infirmary facilities, Vancouver.
Jericho Hill School Cafeteria, Vancouver.
 F 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE ARCHITECT-PLANNER
The year that is covered by this Report is of particular interest in that it is
marked by a change in executive midway between its commencement and closure,
the pressures being varied but constant.
It was anticipated that changes would occur in policy thinking and that these
would be favourable toward a movement in further planning action, and this has
been borne out in the comparison of the two six-month periods.
It would be invidious to place emphasis or give equal status to every project
emanating originally from this Division, but those pertaining to space programming
and the planning of Civil Service Departmental movements cannot pass without
comment, particularly in regard to the over-all enlargement of the Civil Service.
From previous reports during the past 18 years it is on record that a standing
requirement in the efficiency of a work force is that it should have sufficient room in
which to carry out those duties it has to perform.
Master plans had been drawn up in 1954 for a Legislative Precinct in order
that those in authority would at least consider such implications that were crying
out for attention. These plans were amplified by suggested use patterns of the two
major buildings then in existence and the status of others that were no longer producing a return in usefulness. Work on the Main Building is well under way and
when completed the space use will have returned to the original intent of the design.
The first half of the period under review showed a quickened pace of production, particularly in purchase of sites for small courts buildings throughout the
Province that far outstripped any movement than had gone on in previous years.
However, in contrast to this the second period is marked by a programme of purchasing that should have been accomplished in the years that preceded this Report.
These pages have never failed to reiterate the importance of land as the
Province's most precious resource and although the area on a map may appear vast,
and indeed is, as we who fly over it will agree, the actual acreages available for
reasonable economical development become more difficult to procure. Thus, we
had a spate of site requirements that came at a time when real estate values were
commencing to climb at \Vi per cent per month in league with food prices. Land
is now virtually impossible to obtain in urban areas, whether large or small, except
at inflated prices and we are now suffering from the inability of being able to proceed
with a comprehensive purchasing programme over the preceding 10 years. However, with the considerable increase in staff appointments throughout the Civil
Service and the declared intention to disperse the work force the climb in required
leased premises has taxed the limits of the Division to breaking point with no
abatement in sight.
The inventory of real estate owned by the Crown and the survey of properties
proceeds as expeditiously as time and staff available will allow, together with such
time-consuming duties as attending to rights-of-way, easements, appraisals, purchase
and sale of properties, lease of more than 1,000 properties, with all the attendant
legal matters for which this Division is responsible.
An excellent rapport pertains with all departments of government and a constant communication is maintained with municipal councils, regional boards, and
town planning commissions.
Planning has become a priority for two reasons—to remedy the defects of our
inherited legacy of land use and at the same time to provide for expected change in
established and new areas, including the stimulation of change and the protection
against change.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1972/73
F 21
The subject-matter is all the land of a country that has a past, present, or potential use for human activity, land in this connection, including water surfaces, the air
above which would be used for building, the minerals beneath, and the man-made
improvements and buildings on the land. In brief, we in this Department are concerned with man's environment, historic, current, and potential.
The object of land use planning is the same as in all planning—by applying
some conscious process to achieve a better realization of objectives that would obtain
with the process.
W. D. Lougher-Goodey, M.R.T.P.I., M.T.P.I.C, M.I.F.L.A.,
F.L.I.A., M.A.S.P.O., A.I.Struct.E.
A rchitect-Planner
Landscaping, Duncan Courthouse.
 F 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE QUANTITY SURVEYOR
During the year 1972/73 most of the employer/union wage agreements were
renegotiated, but before a settlement could be agreed, the industry experienced a
shut-down of almost three months duration. The increase over the October 1971
rates that were accepted, averaged approximately 16 per cent over the two-year
period, a decrease of TVi per cent from the increase of approximately 23.5 per cent
for a similar period in the previous agreement.
This reduction in wage increases from the previous period has, however, been
counterbalanced by unusually high increases in some material costs. The prices
of lumber and reinforcing steel in particular, have increased considerably. The
result of these changes in wages and material prices is an increase of approximately
7 per cent in the capital costs of buildings.
Another feature of the tenders received in this period is the relatively small
number of bidders. After the shut-down ended, contractors concentrated on completing the backlog of work that had accumulated and the few that tendered on the
Department's work submitted prices that were considered unduly high. This condition lasted for approximately one month, after which more contractors became
interested in tendering and prices returned to normal. The number of bidders,
however, is still disappointingly small.
The work of the Branch has been extended to give assistance to the Department
of Education in determining the budgets for schools. The method being researched
is the use of functional space prices. These are prices of the finishings, equipment,
and services in an area that serves a particular function or need, such as a classroom,
washroom, gymnasium, office, etc. The number of each of the functional spaces
is known and thus the cost of a group of them (i.e., a school) can be added to the
appropriate costs of the structure and services to obtain the total cost of the building.
Correcting factors must be calculated to include variations in local material
prices, foundation requirements, environmental conditions, etc., to permit the cost
of a particular school to be computed.
The building price indexes that were started in 1971 are beginning to be of
use in the updating of estimates. Of the two major indexes, the one reflecting input
prices, that is, variations in wages and material prices is adjusted in May and
October, following the changes in wage rates. The index reflecting tender prices
is obtained by applying to the input indexes a percentage mark-up that is obtained
from Department estimates that are submitted at the time tenders are received. In
order to increase the range of tenders used in this index, quantity surveyors in
Vancouver have been invited to participate in the project. This broader base should
result in a more complete index.
S. R. Toller, M.C.I.Q.S.
Senior Quantity Surveyor
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1972/73
F 23
Landscaping, Government House, Victoria.
Playground, Glendale Hospital, Victoria.
 F 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE SENIOR SPECIFICATIONS WRITER
The past year has been extremely significant for the production of good specifications. In the past there have been many problems; despite the huge size of the
construction industry it is extremely fragmented. This has made communication
difficult and materially affected specifications which form the main avenue for communication in the industry.
There has been continual endeavour to improve specifications and, during the
past year, two events occurred which will have a profound effect.
The first of these was the adoption in Canada of the section format developed
by the Construction Specifications Institute. This format is excellent, extremely
logical, and is now standard throughout North America. For us it at last provided
a definite path to follow in contrast with the partial confusion which previosuly
existed.
The second was the simultaneous adoption in Canada and the U.S.A. of the
Uniform Construction Index. This document contains formats for specifications,
data filing, cost analysis, and project filing. All of these interrelate to provide
cohesion and facilitate communication.
With the necessary guidelines established, we have been able to proceed with
the research and preparation of master specification sections, for storage on magnetic
tape.
We now have a number of sections at various stages of completion. Initial
research is extensive and invariably uncovers a number of previously unsuspected
facts. This has been of great interest and sometimes surprise to the trades and
manufacturers involved. It has been interesting to note the extent to which others
use the results of this research. In fact, we are looked to increasingly for guidance
by trades and associations in the industry.
Draft-specification sections are circulated for criticism. They are sent to trade
associations, contractors, and suppliers in British Columbia, in some cases also to
Eastern Canada and the U.S.A.   Response has been excellent.
In conjunction with master-specification research, we set up standard schedules
and details. Last year we completed "finish" and "door" schedules, door and frame
details with standard nomenclature to identify door types. In course of preparation
are details covering flashings, casework, and steel studs. These are arranged to
complement the specifications, simplify the design process, improve details, and
speed up production. In addition, we have arranged seminars and technical presentations on new materials, building problems, and construction techniques.
One result of our research has been an invitation by the Canadian Government
Specifications Board to membership of their committee covering construction sealants. This is, in fact, the only provincial government representation in Canada.
Apart from the individual standards covering each type of sealant, we also provide
input to their Guide to the Selection and Use of Sealants, which is now under
preparation.
In addition to the normal consulting service which we perform within our own
division, we receive requests to assist other divisions and departments. This service
has expanded considerably and we receive innumerable requests for assistance
ranging from advice to investigation and reports on building material failures.
For the future, we anticipate increasing use of performance specifications, with
these the specification becomes the basis for the design of the building. We will also
have the first of the computer-aided information retrieval systems to evaluate.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1972/73
F 25
There seems little doubt that the industry will change rapidly in the near future
and we have to keep pace with or ahead of the changes.
J. C. Currie, M.C.I.Q.S., A.R.I.C.S., R.S.W.
Senior Specifications Writer
Playground, The Woodlands School.
 F 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF CONSTRUCTION
AND MAINTENANCE
This year's Public Works Report includes individual reports by the Mechanical,
Maintenance, and Operations Engineer in addition to the Co-ordinators of both
Construction and Maintenance. These presentations will disclose the majority of
work carried out by the Division in connection with its construction and maintenance
operations on both Government owned and leased premises. My report will include
information on activities not always related to the operation of the Government's
physical plant, and items of special interest.
The object of primary function maintenance, is to generally preserve the building equipment and grounds in a state of repair equal to that when it was first constructed. In this respect it is the custom to accept reasonable wear and tear which
often entails throughout the life of an asset its periodic upgrading and renovation.
Operations Maintenance Prime Function include:
(a) Maintenance of buildings.
(b) Maintenance of grounds.
(c) Maintenance of heating, ventilation, and other plant equipment.
(d) Periodic inspection of equipment, its lubrication, and replacement
of worn parts.
(e) Keeping in serviceable condition plumbing, heating, water and sewerage distribution systems (institutions and large complexes).
(/)  Providing improvement to equipment and buildings to enable them
to better serve the need of their occupants.
(g)  Installation of replacement equipment and removal of obsolescent
items.
Secondary function objectives support and complement the above functions
and are of equal importance in this Division's work:
(h)  Security of the physical plant.
(i)  Fire protection.
(j) Trash and garbage disposal.
(k) Property and plant inventory.
(.) Vermin control.
(m) Pollution control.
(«)  Janitorial and cleaning services.
(o) Storekeeping.
The Division's capability of providing a service beyond that normally required
to meet the objectives of an Operations Maintenance Primary Function arises from
the composition of its labour force and the sensitivity of its personnel to respond to
Government's particular operational requirements. In this respect supervisory and
key tradesmen from this Division's maintenance forces are now participating in the
major restoration work currently under way in the Parliament Buildings.
During the period under review, the Chief Security Officer and senior staff
participated as speakers in advising groups of Government employees on emergency
and security procedures in the Parliament Buildings Precinct and Victoria area.
Approximately 5,000 Government employees attended these meetings which were
held during the months of January and February 1973. In this respect the New-
combe Auditorium provided a suitable location for the assembly of these personnel.
The material presented at the meetings included individual response to fire, earth-
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1972/73
F 27
quake, and more common accident emergencies, beside the measures employees
can take to protect both life and also Government property. It is gratifying to
report that four native Indians are currently employed in this Division as Security
Officers and carry out their duties at the St. Eugene Mission School premises in
Cranbrook. Although these are the first native Indians to be employed in connection with this Department's responsibilities we hope a greater number of qualified
persons from this group will be encouraged to apply for other positions as and when
these become available.
Our Chief Security Officer reported four incidents which resulted in Government employees either being verbally and (or) physically assaulted in their offices.
In each instance assistance from the Security Force was available and provided. In
several instances the attendance of security personnel was instrumental in preventing
injury and therefore eliminated the necessity of any legal action. Approximately
20 demonstrations were held outside the Parliament Buildings and monitored by
our Security Officers. Participants and spectators included groups of 16 to 2,000
persons. Personnel in the Parliament Buildings Inquiry Office assumed responsibility on a 24-hour basis for initiating action in respect to telephone 111 emergency
call system, thus relieving the telephone operators for other duties. Numerous
investigations relating to damage to Government property and theft of employees'
possessions throughout the Province were the subject of investigation and report
and often entailed establishing liaison with the local police authorities. In the
current fiscal period under review, approximately 1,222,564 persons visited the
Provincial Museum and at least 50 per cent were conducted on tours of the Parliament Buildings by Public Works tour guides. The number of visitors constituted
a challenge to the ability of not only our guides and their supervisors but also to
our security personnel who attempted to provide information and help when it was
requested.
Glendale Laundry operation allowed us to provide service to the Glendale
Hospital Society, Vancouver Island Regional Correctional Centre, Gorge Road
Hospital, and the Victoria Vocational School. The Gorge Road Hospital was provided with laundry service in August 1972, and approximately 14,071 pounds of
laundry were cleaned in the first month this service was provided.
By the end of March 1973, with the additional extended-care unit at the above
hospital, the laundry load had increased to 42,100 pounds. At the termination of
the current fiscal period approximately 130,184 pounds of laundry were being
processed for the month of March 1973, and provided service to five institutions.
During the period under review negotiations with the Department of Veterans
Affairs were in progress and agreement has now been reached to accept the Victoria
Veterans Hospital linen for processing at Glendale, thus eliminating the necessity
for them to obtain service from Vancouver. It is appropriate at this time to mention that our negotiations both with the Veterans Hospital and the Royal Jubilee
Hospital in connection with providing laundry service have been negotiated with
help from the Hospital Insurance Branch of the Department of Health, and I would
like to acknowledge the co-operation and valuable help this other Government
department has given us on all matters pertaining to institutional laundry service.
Currently, the Veterans Hospital laundry is being processed and it is expected when
additional laundry machinery and alterations to the laundry floor plan has been
made sufficient capacity will exist to accept laundry from the Royal Jubilee Hospital.
The sudden and sad death of A. Taylor, our first Laundry Manager, early this year
placed considerable strain upon our laundry staff, and it was only with their cooperation we were able to maintain service to the users without serious disruption.
 F 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Meetings have continued throughout the fiscal period with the consultants for
the British Columbia building and although the concept of this project has now
changed, the majority of information and data compiled will be relevant to the
current project. Detailed information is being provided in respect to the composition of persons to be employed to keep the building in operational condition, the
cleaning of the building, security, and other matters in connection with maintenance
and operations.
In conclusion, I would like to express my appreciation to all members of this
Division for the co-operation and help they have given me in discharging my duties
and obligations. I would, at this time, also like to record on behalf of the Division
the excellent help and co-operation we have reecived from the Design Division and,
indeed, all Government departments and others whom we have been able to provide
a service.
Stanley Lloyd, M.R.A.I.C, A.R.I.B.A., Dip.Pub.Admin.
Director of Construction and Maintenance
Renovation, Abbotsford Government Building.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1972/73 F 29
REPORT OF THE CO-ORDINATOR OF MAINTENANCE
The responsibility for maintenance of Provincial Government buildings and
grounds is assigned to the Maintenance Branch of the Construction and Maintenance
Division, S. Lloyd, Director.
For administrative purposes, the Province is divided into zones, numbered 1 to
6, with headquarters at Victoria, Burnaby, Essondale, Kamloops, Nelson, and Prince
George, respectively. Each zone is headed by a Superintendent of Works, who has
a staff of tradesmen, building service workers, etc., under him. Branch headquarters is in Victoria and includes the offices of the Co-ordinator of Maintenance.
The distribution of maintenance personnel by trades among the six zones was
as follows:
Distri
bution of Maintenance Personnel by Trades
Zone 1
Victoria
Zone 2
Burnaby
Zone 3
Essondale
Zone 4
Kamloops
Zone 5
Nelson
Zone 6
Prince
George
Total
Building service workers	
201
18
9
18
8
35
11
17
4
8
4
44
24
41
20
126
13
3
7
8
23
10
15
7
1
67
16
5
17
16
13
16
17
13
44
10
3
6
9
6
28
8
1
1
3
5
4
5
3
50
8
1
1
3
17
6
7
1
30
3
466
73
30
Electricians	
Fire-fighters 	
49
26
38
Labourers	
Office staff	
16      |          20
12      '           6
25      '           10
10      1
114
50
Painters	
78
14
Plumbers	
Roofers and sheet metal	
Stationary engineers.—	
Switchboard operators	
Security 	
12
4
60
4
30
3
6
32
9
236
46
55
20
Totals	
462
301
231
157
58
127
1,336
Maintenance Expenditures by Zones, 1972/73
Zone 1
Victoria
Zone 2
Burnaby
Zone 3
Essondale
Zone 4
Kamloops
Zone 5
Nelson
Zone 6
Pi'ince
George
$
3,356,076.41
683,621.98
441,227.68
$
2,379,640.03
717,845.85
517,396.87
$
2,223,201.72
733,121.06
513,110.90
$
1,424,685.48
449,981.53
248,906.82
$
453,564.45
105,485.85
118,669.12
$
1,075,765.99
Heat,   light,   power,   and
336,846.02
Maintenance of buildings._
276,563.79
4.480.926.07  1   3.614.882.75
3,469,433.68
2.123.573.83   I      677.719.42
1,689,175.80
Grand total, $16,055,711.55.
Tenders were invited for 149 projects during the year, and contracts awarded
totalled $740,000.
H. J. Greig, B.A.Sc, P.Eng., Dip.Pub.Admin.
Co-ordinator of Maintenance
 F 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Office area, Provincial Government Service Centre, Victoria.
Shop area, Provincial Government Service Centre, Victoria.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1972/73
F 31
REPORT OF THE CO-ORDINATOR OF CONSTRUCTION
This fiscal year commenced with the biannual construction strike/lockout
situation with most of the trades, thereby substantially reducing the number of
"good weather" months available to the industry. The shut-down and subsequent
restarting of the majority of projects ensured that there were any number of different problems to challenge us.
A feature of the year was the first major renovation and alteration job to
be carried out under construction management, at the Willow Chest Centre,
Vancouver.
A good team was assembled for the project and such essential aspects of
construction management as costing, purchasing and quality control were well
handled.
This augurs well for the future, since there seems to be little doubt that the
industry is starting to move away from the traditional concept of general contracting, with all the "opposed factions" troubles implicit in stipulated sum contracts.
Flexibility, cost, and time-saving are accepted as being desirable features that are
capable of achievement with construction management.
The inspectors' training programme instituted three years ago was continued
with several inspectors completing the "Human Relations and Communications"
course at BCIT, and most inspectors attending the roofing seminars presented by
the Roofing Contractors Association in conjunction with the National Research
Council.
An average of approximately 75 active projects were being supervised at all
times during the year by this Branch, ranging from personal-care homes, highways
maintenance establishments, cafeteria and infirmary, gymnasia, horticultural building, library and courthouses, to major and minor renovations, fire-alarm systems,
electrical distribution and sewage treatment plants.
There has been a considerable improvement in terms of closer liaison with
members of the Design Division with the move of the Construction Branch to new
space in the same building as that occupied by the Design Division. This has
facilitated the solution of problems related to design in projects under way, since
headquarters staff and the specialist electrical and mechanical inspectors can now
maintain daily contact with designers.
I wish to thank the Director of Design and his staff for the excellent co-operation which we received during the year, and look forward to continuing in the same
spirit into the next fiscal year.
D. Grey, M.C.I.Q.S., Dip.Pub.Admin.
   F 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE MECHANICAL OPERATIONS
AND MAINTENANCE ENGINEER
This Branch has supervisory responsibility for the operation and maintenance
of boiler plants and mechanical equipment and systems in Provincial Government
institutions and office buildings.
The headquarters staff provides engineering services, technical assistance,
supervision, and direction to the field-operating and maintenance staffs.
During the year, drawings and specifications were prepared, and contracts
awarded for 31 projects for upgrading, renovation, and alteration work to mechanical services. In addition, mechanical drawings and specifications were also prepared for incorporation into general contracts on a number of building-alteration
projects initiated by the Co-ordinator of Maintenance.
Throughout the year frequent field trips were made by headquarters staff
members, to survey and exercise corrective measures on operational problems, and
to assess the functional effectiveness of equipment and systems.
A continuous and active liaison was maintained with our Superintendents of
Works and Chief Stationary Engineers. Their co-operation and assistance, and
their dedicated attention to the operation and maintenance of plants and systems
is greatly appreciated.
F. D. Sturdy, P.Eng.
Mechanical Operations and Maintenance Engineer
Boiler-house, BCIT, Burnaby.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1972/73
F 35
Ned DeBeck Lounge, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, before renovations.
Ned DeBeck Lounge, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, after renovations.
 F 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR
SAFETY ENGINEERING SERVICES DIVISION
The Safety Engineering Services Act was passed by the Spring Legislature in
1972 and will be proclaimed at some later date.
The proposed regulations pursuant to the Safety Engineering Services Act are
being formulated in conjunction with the Advisory Boards. The members of these
Advisory Boards represent all facets of the industries and trades which may be
affected by the Act and subsequent regulations.
I expect that during the next year many of the proposed regulations, which
are now being drafted, will be enacted.
During the year we have increased our inspectoral staff by 10 inspectors. They
were distributed in the Branches as follows:
(1) Boiler Inspector for the Terrace office.
(2) Gas Inspectors—one for the Prince George office and the other for
the Surrey office.
(7)  Electrical Inspectors—one for each of the following offices, Prince
George, Williams Lake, Kamloops, Salmon Arm, Nelson, Langley,
and Vancouver.
Stanley Smith, Chief Boiler Inspector, retired on November 30, 1972, and was
succeeded by B. W. Cole, P.Eng.
J. F. Helme, P.Eng., Assistant Chief Gas Inspector, left to take another position and was succeeded by J. A. Smith, P.Eng.
There has been considerable turnover in the clerical staff and this has interfered
to some extent with the operation of the Division.
Our experience during the year was that suitable clerical and technical personnel were in short supply in the Province.
The work load increased approximately 8 per cent over the previous year,
and it is expected that the work-load will increase in the Fiscal Year 1973/74 to
about 10 per cent.
A. G. Kaneen, P.Eng.
Director
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1972/73
F 37
REPORT OF THE CHIEF BOILER INSPECTOR
A best phrase to summarize our year's activities would be to say we have
carried on a retrograde action. In numbers our Provincial totals of boilers, pressure
vessels, candidates for welding and engineering certificates increases and expands
while our capabilities to perform functions and activities inherent in our Act
diminishes.
One bright spot on our horizon that has practically come into being will be
standardization of power engineers study courses and examinations. In the same
vein, standardization efforts are being directed towards welding and acceptance of
design surveys. Coupled with those items are our plans to reschedule our activities
and minimize inspection frequencies. However, without additional staff much
survey work would not be done and many classes of vessels would continue to receive
no examination on installation.
Decentralization of our offices advanced another step with the opening of an
office in Terrace. Indications are that the overload in the northern part of our
Province is being alleviated somewhat and reports are that the communities are
better served.
Accidents
We investigated 10 incidents of rriajor significance during the year, fortunately
no fatalities involving code plant and equipment occurred. Mainly the accidents
occurred because of human error, either something was done incorrectly or not
done at all. Emphasis on establishment of operating procedures and training with
responsible maintenance, reporting and testing have been put forward and are provided for in new regulation proposals to help correct the conditions and situations.
Full reports of the incidents are on file.
B. W. Cole, P.Eng.
Chief Inspector
 F 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAJOR ACTIVITY CHARTS
Boiler Inspection Branch
INSPECTIONS, SURVEYS, EXAMINATIONS
Boiler Inspections (1,000's)
lllllll-llllll.llllll.11.1.11111.1111.1..Illllll.l_llllllll.il.Mill
Pressure Vessel Inspections (100's)
t ■ I ■ 111111 111111111111111 i 1111111 ■ 11 ■ 11 111111111111111
incomplete
6,000
3 6 9 12 15
Shop Inspections (100's)
iiiiiiiiiiiim mil i i i 111111111
Welder's Tests (1,000's)
iiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiimiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
Engineer's Examinations (100's)
lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillll
Refrigeration Surveys (10's)
llllllllllllllll 1 Illllllltllllllllllllllllllll lllltlll
Defects Reported (100's)
11111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111 1111 f 11111111
12 3 4
Design Surveys (100's)
"""H""" « " m '■'■' «««'"«'
incomplete
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1972/73
F 39
Cast-iron boiler (no controls), defective and leaking.
Control room, Cariboo Pulp Mill,
 F 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Cariboo steam plant buildings and digestive house.
Burner systems, Cariboo Pulp Mill.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1972/73 F 41
REPORT OF THE  INSPECTOR OF  ELECTRICAL ENERGY
The fiscal year 1972/73 has proved to be the third consecutive year in which
substantial increases in activity occurred in all sections of the Electrical Energy
Inspection Branch, except one.
Certificates of Competency issued reached 2,341, up 20.4 per cent over the
previous year. Examinations conducted numbered 763, an increase of 25 per cent.
The total number of permits issued reached 64,596, up 1.4 per cent, but the value
of these was up 15 per cent over the previous year. Despite the addition of six new
Inspectors to the staff, the average work load per man was 1,460 man-hours, up
3.4 per cent from the previous year, and 9.5 per cent in excess of the standard work
load of 1,333 man-hours per man.
It is a notable fact that in the past three years the work load has increased by
nearly 36 per cent, while the field inspection staff has increased only 22 per cent.
In addition, we have suffered considerable losses of time due to the extended illnesses of six of our field Inspectors, which still further increased the load upon
those who remained active. Under the circumstances, our staff is to be most highly
commended for its excellent performance under the most adverse conditions.
The Branch is continuing to experience great difficulty in recruiting suitable
Inspectors and at the year's end were short three men from the established strength
due to two retirements and one death.
The reorganization of the Branch along regional lines was undertaken during
the year with the Province being divided into nine Regions, each to be supervised
by a Regional Inspector. These men have been selected and several have been
authorized to assume their supervisory duties. But all are still burdened with the
duties of inspecting a District and the regional concept cannot be fully implemented
until nine more Inspectors can be obtained to assume the District duties of the
Regional Inspectors.
The one area in which a decrease of activity was apparent was the Approval
of Equipment section. The number of pieces of equipment approved was 4,301,
down 28.5 per cent from the previous year. This was primarily due to the need to
reduce the number of Inspectors working on approvals from two to one, in order to
increase strength of the field inspection staff.
The Branch investigated 77 incidents involving eight fatalities, 11 injuries, and
60 fires. Of the latter, 39 were of electrical origin, 15 were probably not of
electrical origin, and six were doubtful or undetermined.
Of the eight fatalities, four were children killed in two fires, neither of electrical
origin. One was a man who attempted to cut a kite string, fouled in a 230-kv line,
with a knife attached to a long freshly cut green alder pole. One was a carpenter,
whose metal ladder fell against a high-voltage line. Two were linemen, killed in
separate accidents involving high-voltage lines.
G. A. Harrower, P.Eng.
Chief Inspector
 F 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Vancouver Post Office sorting equipment.
Substation, UBC Endowment Lands.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1972/73
F 43
REPORT OF THE CHIEF GAS INSPECTOR
The Regulations
In the fall of this year, this Branch will be adopting the Canadian Standards
Code B 149.1 1971 for use in this Province.
There will be some amendments to this code which are applicable only to
British Columbia, but any major changes have been kept to a minimum.
The Branch
There has been a general increase in nearly all areas of the Province in the
extension of gas service to the municipalities, even greater than the past year.
The number of gas permits issued by this Branch has increased in some
districts as much as 30 per cent.
The checking of new designs increased by 10 per cent over the past year.
During the past year the Gas Inspection Branch took over the inspection
services for the University Endowment Lands, New Westminster, and Pouce Coupe.
There was also a marked increase in the number of applicants for gas-fitter's
licence, indicating a considerable growth in the natural gas industry which will
continue into the next year.
B.C. Research Council has been engaged in several projects involving local
manufacturers of gas-fired equipment, one of which is located at the Canadian
Kenworth Plant.
Accidents
There were 13 fires investigated by this Branch and all were of a minor nature
and with no serious injuries to persons involved.
 F 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
SUMMARY OF WORK
2,500
2,400
10 per cent increase in
y*
new designs checked.
2,300
2,200
2,100
/   /
r   /
/
/
f
_ 25 per cent increase in
gas-fitter's licences issued.
2,000
1,900
	
^"y
A*
1,800
1,700
1,600
1,500
4 per cent increase in
appliance certification
(field approvals).
1,400
1,300
1,200
1,100
1,000
Year 69,
HO       70/71
71/72        72/73
30,000
28,000
18 per cent increase for all
municipalities for
26,000
gas permits.
24,000
22,000
20,000
Year 69
/70        70/71
71/72        72/73
W. R. Montgomery, P.Eng.
Chief Inspector
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1972/73
F 45
Direct-fired rooftop heater, Canadian Kenworth Ltd.
Unit to convert waste sawdust to coke, B.C. Research Testing Station Laboratory.
 F 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1972/73
F 47
REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF  EXPENDITURE
The following pages present in detail the expenditures relating to the construction, alterations, and repairs on the various Government buildings and institutions, etc., coming under the management, charge, and direction of the Minister of
Public Works. The total gross expenditure of $47,720,937.94 represents an
increase of approximately $11,000,000 over the previous period, and this increase
is reflected mainly in the capital construction programme.
A. E. Rhodes
Comptroller of Expenditure
STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES, FISCAL YEAR 1972/73
ADMINISTRATION AND MAINTENANCE VOTES
(For details, see Public Accounts)
$
Vote 226—Minister's Office    42,890.46
Vote 227—General Administration   455,510.89
Vote 228—Government Buildings (maintenance) (gross) 18,299,165.63
Vote 230—Rentals  .(gross) 4,288,974.88
Vote 231—Safety Inspection Division ...... 1,435,200.48
Less credits—
Items recovered from the Department of Education re Technical and
Vocational Schools (Government Buildings Vote)      2,749,089.87
Items recovered re Vocational Training, Textbook Branch, Mediation
Commission, etc. (Rental Vote)         549,274.71
21,223,377.76
CAPITAL
Vote 229—Construction of Provincial Buildings (see expenditure by building)
     (gross)  21,907,284.69
Vote 23155—British Columbia Building (Vancouver)—Special Fund, Revenue
Surplus Appropriation Act, 1969     1,291,910.91
Less credits—
Items recovered from the Department of Education re Technical and
Vocational Schools       1,759,663.56
SUMMARY
Gross expenditure, Department of Public Works—
Administration and maintenance 	
Capital   	
Gross expenditure
Less credits—
Maintenance .
21,439,532.04
24,521,742.34
23,199,195.60
47,720,937.94
3,298,364.58
Capital     1,759,663.56
Net expenditure   42,662,909.80
 F 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Project No.
1-2-B
631-B
763-B
461-B-l
759-B
26-5-B
30-B-5
30-B-8
11-0
11-4-B1
39-B-62
39-B-73
39-B-75
39-B-76
20-70-B1
539-B
656-B
20-0-B1
20-50-B1
699-B
748-B
716-B
548-B
702-B
661-B
41-3-B1
42-0
705-B
707-B
762-B
468-B-l
754-B
54-22-B1
52-1-B1
5-B-121
5-B-116
5-B-134
5-B-138
5-B-143
5-B-146
5-B-147
5-B-148
5-B-149
5-B-152
5-B-153
12-54-B1
5-B-151
6-B-38
6-B-39
14-0-B1
VOTE 229—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS
Description
Abbotsford—
Government buildings—renovations 	
Fraser Valley Trout Hatchery 	
Tourist Information Centre 	
Alberni—Government buildings (renovations) 	
Barriere—Maintenance establishment, Department of Highways 	
Bella Coola—Accommodation for highways foreman 	
Brannan Lake School—
Maintenance building 	
Reroofing dormitories 	
Burnaby—
Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre—
Power supply system 	
Exhaust system (carpenter shop) 	
Roads 	
Security 	
Licence-plate shop   	
East Wing Unit (plumbing) 	
Highway yard-fencing   	
B.C. Youth Development Centre	
Motor-vehicle Inspection Station  	
West Complex, electrical primary distribution system  (Willing-
don Avenue) 	
Dairy laboratory, Willingdon Avenue	
Special Unit for Adolescents, Willingdon Avenue	
Personal Care Home 	
Burns Lake—Provincial Government building 	
Charlie Lake—Alterations to Department of Mines 	
Clinton—Government Agent's residence 	
Coquitlam—Remand Centre 	
Courtenay—Highways Office building 	
Cranbrook—Purchase of property 	
Creston—Wildlife Management Area Administration Centre 	
Dawson Creek—Provincial Government building 	
Douglas—Tourist Information Centre 	
Duncan—
Provincial buildings 	
RCMP detachment, renovations	
Elkford—Department of Highways yard site
Enderby—Purchase of Highways yard site ....
Essondale—■
Structural alterations, Zone 3 	
Riverview—
Landscaping, roads, parking, etc. 	
Fire-alarm system 	
West Lawn building, alterations 	
Essondale—fire protection and escapes
Conversion of boiler plant	
Cable TV. connections 	
Renovations, Centre Lawn Building	
Renovations, East Lawn Building 	
Crease Clinic 	
Laundry and stores building, renovations
Patients residences 	
Valleyview—Hospital alterations 	
Colony Farm—■
Dormitories  	
Riverside Building, alterations and extensions
Drainage facilities	
Expenditures
$
34,051.92
140,991.15
49,683.35
13,977.59
57,479.07
28,924.89
24,434.71
16,149.65
155.80
12,163.00
3,218.79
31,434.08
2,704.93
52,448.03
49.14
26,946.22
69,769.65
5,969.73
1,506.56
46,267.01
781,516.21
60,087.12
40,474.10
4,000.00
44,690.42
5,538.59
28,755.00
121,803.43
492,171.20
20,203.50
10,612.44
2,489.70
101.50
232.00
101,682.73
11,869.91
75,452.17
20,388.09
205,045.26
362,473.08
114.02
65,322.06
2,542.59
80,310.91
25,786.94
111,835.70
12,599.13
864.30
42,233.42
25,103.52
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1972/73
F 49
VOTE 229—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project No.                                                   Description Expenditures
Fort Nelson— $
744-B                  Living accommodation—Department of Health   5,452.59
745-B                   Living accommodation—Department of Commercial Transport 4,511.83
708-B           Fort St. John—Provincial Government building   52,437.32
59-2-B1       Ganges—Provincial Government building, courtroom   136.21
General—
289-B                  General expenses   408,000.27
289-B-l               Wages and expenses—casual design staff  868,442.21
384-B                  Grounds improvement—various Government buildings    44,406.50
Golden—
61-0                     Purchase of property (residence for District Superintendent, Department of Highways)     3,000.00
61-21                   Visitor reception centre   2,544.72
700-B                  Weigh-scale station   5,072.62
729-B                  Highways maintenance establishment     446,379.26
62-5-B1       Grand Forks—Highway maintenance establishment  77,483.39
67-32-B1     Haig—Weigh-scale station   4,815.32
Haney—
10-71-B1             Gold Creek Camp (acquisition of trailer for caretaker)   9,552.90
10-91-B1             Purchase of property (site for Motor-vehicle Inspection Station) 13,045.96
Correctional Institution—
123-B-22            Roof replacement  .    41,472.00
123-B-23             Boiler renovations  1,888.34
Alouette River Unit—
10-0-B1               Site works     26,899.05
599-B-2               Administration building   9,050.79
Kamloops—
10-B-56               Structural alterations, Zone 4   52,904.44
17-0-B1               Site development roads and services, Columbia Street  72,020.07
701-B                  Weigh-scale station   1,442.15
718-B                  Provincial Government building   24,603.79
723-B                  Personal Care Home (consultant's fee)   37,551.95
17-28-B1            Personal Care Home  603,447.53
Regional Correctional Centre—
733-B                          Alterations      23,836.77
733-B-2                       Recreational building   57,338.80
743-B                   Public Works maintenance building   16,261.97
760-B          Kimberley—Provincial Government building     135,179.04
421-B          Kootenay—Trout Hatchery, Bull River improvements  3,290.39
79-2-BI       Lillooet—Highways maintenance establishment (replacement of heating system)    2,183.40
122-4          Meziadin  Lake—Maintenance   building,   Department   of   Highways 121,308.02
Nanaimo—
202-B-2               Courthouse,  renovations    26,726.72
711-B                  Motor-vehicle Inspection Station   265,757.63
727-B Department of Public Works Building, replacement of electrical
and heating systems   70,904.17
Nelson—
641-B                 Structural alterations, Zone 5   70,127.46
698-B                  Provincial Government building   1,006,765.30
90-23                  Purchase of property for Department of Public Works maintenance depot   47,031.80
New Denver—
519-B                  Dormitory—alterations    21,691.46
728-B                 Highways maintenance establishment  7,899.12
719-B          New Haven—Institute, Langley, B.C.   147,562.97
 F 50 BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOTE 229—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
New Westminster—
Woodlands School— $
7-B-26                         Motor Transport Branch, quonset hut conversion   39,187.96
7-B-40                         Landscaping, fencing, and paving, etc.   2,740.44
7-B-49                         Industrial therapy unit   342,943.74
7-B-51                         Fire-alarm system   27,193.07
7-B-56                         Renovations to Wing No. 2, Centre Building  5,848.24
7-B-57                        Ventilation to 100 bed units  35,125.09
7-B-58                         Academic and activity buildings   232,207.40
7-B-59                         Playground    22,063.39
7-B-61                         Fraserview Building, ventilation   2,879.15
13-0-B1                       Nature Park   1,300.14
746-B                  Courthouse—renovations    134,116.54
16-171         North Vancouver—Purchase of property  45,600.00
Penticton—
102-0                   Purchase of property  14,195.40
102-6-B1             Highways establishment   117.20
715-B          Powell River—Provincial Government building   538,300.53
Prince George—
106-51-B1           Public Works maintenance building  8,867.85
201-B-2              Courthouse—roads and paving   26,751.79
479-B                  Structural alterations, Zone 6   59,874.71
646-B                  Library Development Commission   123,836.52
Regional Correctional Centre—
720-B                          Services connection   23,152.91
720-B-l                      Heating system   12,684.91
Prince Rupert—
724-B                Courthouse, heating system   8,587.90
742-B                 Courthouse, new Court facilities and roof repairs  71,864.94
658-B         Quesnel—Highways maintenance establishment     7,447.93
452-B         Revelstoke—Courthouse renovations   154,355.26
659-B                 Salmon Arm—Highways maintenance establishment  1,633.75
Smithers—
11B-2                 Department of Highways establishment (heating system)   456.76
688-B                 Provincial Government building   1,260,965.21
693-B                 Storage building   5,884.29
122-4-B1    Stewart—Highways maintenance establishment  81,259.36
750-B        Surrey—Motor-vehicle Inspection Station  18,600.44
24-B-10      Terrace—(Skeenaview Hospital)—Alterations and renovations  236,225.77
750-B         Tete Jaune Cache—Highways maintenance establishment  388,571.32
717-B         Trail—Provincial Government building  110,107.94
Tranquille—
10-B-12              Water supply and sewage disposal  11,258.28
10-B-51               104-bed unit   30,466.03
10-B-57              Fire-alarm system, renovations   44,627.19
10-B-60              Greaves Building   16,950.22
15-20-B1            East Pavilion alteration  2,100.49
4-4              Trout Lake—Maintenance establishment, Department of Highways... 29,530.73
126-61        Usk—Ferryman's accommodation   10,375.34
Vancouver—
16-25-B1            800 Cassiar Street (heating)     7,000.00
Pearson TB. Hospital—
16-39-B1                   Fire-alarm system   538.74
31-B-9                        Modifications     55,233.58
Jericho Hill School—
16-3-B1                     Fire-alarm system    1,586.12
79-B-15                      Principal's residence   3,863.97
79-B-16                     Kitchen-dining-infirmary building  569,034.49
79-B-17                     Renovations of existing building   4,340.23
79-B-18                     Centennial gymnasium    265,697.50
79-B-19                     Swimming-pool   __ __ -   48.79
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1972/73
F 51
VOTE 229—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project No.
89-B-3
408-B
546-B-2
610-B
634-B
649-B
721-B
747-B
411-B-l
617-B
617-B-l
9-B-19
19-0
19-4-B1
19-98-B1
19-104-B1
19-201
19-499-B
39-0
101-0
211-B-l
292-B
385-B
464-B
486-B
487-B
492-B
518-B
536-B
552-B
554-B
601-B-2
629-B
690-B
784-B
709-B
722-B
731-B
732-B
738-B
Description
Vancouver—Continued
Provincial health building renovations	
Structural alterations, Zone 2	
Willow Chest Centre—renovations	
Courthouse, courtroom facilities 	
British Columbia building	
Roads, paths, and parking areas 	
Personal Care Home 	
Marpole Probation Office and Training Centre 	
Vernon—
Highways maintenance establishment 	
Courthouse—elevator and alterations	
Provincial buildings (landscaping) 	
Victoria—
Vancouver Island Unit Regional Correctional Centre—
renovations 	
607-B-l
657-B
Victoria area—purchase of property   	
Alterations—finance building	
Central Microfilm Bureau—renovations and extensions 	
Motor-vehicle Inspection Station 	
Glenshiel Hotel—purchase of property 	
Mobile home for safety inspection services (various zones)	
Purchase of property, Colquitz 	
Department of Highways yards site, Saanich—purchase of property   	
Materials Testing Laboratory (extension) 	
Structural alterations, Zone 1 	
Parking facilities—Parliament Buildings 	
Eric Martin Institute 	
British Columbia Museum and Archives Building	
Acquisition of property—Parliament Buildings Precinct 	
Motor-vehicle building—Data Processing Centre	
Dogwood Building, 1019 Wharf Street	
Parliament Buildings—new electrical distribution system 	
Windermere Building—purchase 	
Glendale Hospital 	
International Airport—roof repairs, hangars 	
Windermere Building, roofing, parapets, and renovations 	
Parliament Buildings, renovations	
Langford—holding and fabricating shop 	
No.   4  temporary  building   (B.C.   Hospital  Insurance   Services
accommodation) —renovations 	
Personal Care Home 	
Cafeteria—renovations 	
Douglas Building renovations 	
Provincial   Government   Service   Centre   (ex-Hudson   Bay   Co.
warehouse)  	
Williams Lake—
Courthouse    	
Highways maintenance establishment	
Expenditures
$
263,389.82
72,836.77
703,371.66
23,165.97
1,052,479.63
6,969.72
774,655.37
50,830.84
61,980.82
1,794.69
34,858.08
205,919.83
4,047.55
7,196.35
32,292.31
21,005.34
592,858.95
57,307.34
4,321.34
36,102.17
12,920.30
56,990.06
55,373.36
121,632.47
73,408.26
28,549.83
26,192.79
7,834.80
45,682.04
59,500.00
310,259.96
8,214.60
13,634.01
382,837.66
4,416.71
1,744.96
905,640.25
107,394.22
112,044.39
406,903.56
76,532.60
5,724.62
401-B-l
401-B-2
401-B-5
Vocational Schools*
B.C. Institute of Technology, Burnaby-
Addition   	
Library
Underground power-distribution system
100,582.03
63,743.28
41,361.79
* Credits were received from the Department of Education to offset part of these expenditures.
 F 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOTE 229—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project No.
401-B-7
401-B-8
401-B-9
20-104-B1
20-105-B
299-B-5
299-B-7
299-B-8
299-B-ll
607-B
36-0-B1
481-B-3
17-34-B1
620-B-l
72-7-B1
412-5-2
89-6-B1
89-18-B1
89-21-B1
231-B-8
231-B-9
231-B-10
90-25-B1
429-B-l
312-B-2
126-21-B1
407-B-l
633-B
633-B-l
Description
B.C. Institute of Technology, Burnaby—Continued
Roads and ancillary site work 	
Multipurpose student centre 	
Addition to Food Training Centre 	
B.C. Vocational School, Burnaby—
Iron Workers Shop	
Multidiscipline building 	
Heavy-duty diesel mechanics workshop	
Temporary commercial classroom 	
Horticultural building 	
Air-compressor system 	
Vocational Teacher College
B.C. Vocational School, Chilliwack—Phase 1—Preloading on site...
B.C. Vocational School, Dawson Creek—Addition to food training
area  	
B.C. Vocational School, Kamloops—
Stores building 	
Vocational school   	
B.C. Vocational School, Kelowna—
Classroom conversion   	
Cafeteria and training kitchen 	
B.C. Vocational School, Nanaimo—
Fire-alarm system 	
Steam-distribution system 	
Welding shed extension 	
New workshop building	
Welding shed 	
Electrical distribution     	
B.C. Vocational School, Nelson—
Kootenay School of Art (renovation and extensions) 	
Central Receiving and Stores Depot  	
B.C. Vocational School, Prince George—Alterations to welding shop
B.C. Vocational School, Terrace—
Workshop building 	
Dormitory and cafeteria 	
B.C. Vocational School, Victoria—
Workshop complex 	
Cafeteria building 	
Expenditures
$
98,174.10
135,320.68
13,958.82
236,801.96
67,340.36
50,680.85
1,773.71
165,596.65
33,158.64
267.46
176,879.68
639.46
40,766.98
77,939.54
83,552.91
38,967.50
5,544.54
12,696.74
58.69
1,497.84
5,100.96
2,754.54
35,020.43
2,919.39
167,739.66
38,971.90
7,843.95
5,428.89
53,459.24
21,907,284.69
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1972/73
F 53
 F 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED
AND CONTRACTS AWARDED FOR BUILDINGS
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
736-B
ABBOTSFORD
Site Works, Tourist Information Centre:
$
33,956.90
45,730.00
48,125.00
43,317.00
46,700.00
68,414.00
42,710.00
31,000.00
6,900.00
8,127.00
9,025.00
10,250.00
10,550.00
11,772.00
14,200.00
15,768.00
16,872.00
18,811.00
25,660.90
25,647.00
1,278,950.00
1,296,822.00
1,313,300.00
1,289,740.00
20,938.65
9,220.08
36,800.00
47,255.00
48,466.00
35,990.00
62,200.00
30,000.00
24,838.00
31,700.00
22,500.00
14,679.00
13,500.00
11,435.00
39,681.00
39,320.00
71,610.00
60,697.00
59,995.00
55,754.00
59,000.00
61,643.00
59,046.00
53,900.00
54,070.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
1-2-B
Alterations io Courthouse:
Commonwealth Construction Co. Ltd.	
759-B
BARRIERE
Electrical and Mechanical, Highways Equipment Building:
Waller Electric Co. Ltd.                                            	
748-B
Nordic Electric Ltd. and Interior Plumbing and Heating Ltd.
(combined) 	
BURNABY
Personal Care Home:
Janin Western Contractors Ltd. and Turnkey D.E.C.M. Ltd.
H. Haebler Co. Ltd	
539-B
Television Distribution System, B.C. Youth Development Centre:
R.CA. Limited             .,'                          	
401-B-7
British Columbia Institute of Technology
Playing-field:
Spra-Mac Landscaping Ltd 	
401-B-l
Additions to Computing Centre:
401-B-7
Road Widening, Phase 1:
B.A. Blacktop Ltd               	
401-B-2
Revision to Library Lighting:
Summit Electric Ltd.	
Additions to Multipurpose Student Centre:
401-B-9
Additions to Cafeteria Building:
401-B-2
Alterations to Library, Production Studio:
Commonweath Construction Co. Ltd	
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1972/73 F 55
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
401-B-5
BURNABY—Continued
British Columbia Institute of Technology—Continued
Underground Electrical Distribution System (Substation M):
Ocean Park Construction Ltd	
C H. E. WiUiams Co. Ltd	
$
56,206.00
36,606.00
52,482.00
79,190.00
73,848.00
68,744.00
74,117.00
64,806.00
68,358.00
149,375.00
153,000.00
159,943.00
152,800.00
695,174.00
705,000.00
682,529.00
721,153.00
654,000.00
683,683.00
716,720.00
778,000.00
1,134,515.00
905,000.00
31,850.00
45,075.00
56,700.00
36,960.00
41,877.00
50,263.00
55,419.00
64,753.00
50,290.00
55,050.00
13,719.88
13,596.00
16,102.00
18,563.00
12,047.00
47,225.00
161,016.00
164,550.00
221,100.00
163,074.00
122,712.00
59,428.00
64,980.00
65,500.00
12,540.00
15,270.00
9,200.00
11,264.00
401-B-7
Ring Road and Ancillary Site Works:
Winvan Paving Division of Crystal City Construction Ltd	
B.A. Blacktop Ltd	
Columbia Bitulithic Division of Ashland Oil Canada Ltd	
299-B-8
British Columbia Vocational School
Horticultural Building:
Awarded.
20-104-B
Ironworkers Shop:
Awarded.
20-105-B
Multidiscipline (Pre-cast Structure):
299-B-ll
Compressed Air System, Welding Shop:
H. S. Crombie Ltd	
39-B-76
Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre
Renovations to Cell Block, Showers, Admitting Building:
Pine Tree Construction Co. Ltd	
Awarded.
Van Construction Division of Van Vliet Construction Co. Ltd.
11-4-B1
Dust Collection System, Carpenters Shop:
Jackson Sheet Metal and Roofing Co. Ltd.	
Nelson Blower Co. Ltd . 	
Awarded.
716-B
BURNS LAKE
Provincial Government Building, Phase 1, Foundations:
Awarded.
36-0-B
CHILLIWACK
Vocational School Site, Preloading:
Conniston Construction Co. Ltd	
Awarded.
41-3-B1
COURTENAY
Extension to Department of Highways Offices:
Awarded.
Georgian Bay Construction (B.C.) Ltd.	
	
CRANBROOK
Sale of Crown Property:
John S. Ward                       	
Awarded.
Bernie J. Hamilton	
 F 56                                                    BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED-
-Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
CRANBROOK—Continued
Alterations to St. Eugene School:
$
204,700.00
185,870.00
199,451.00
28,480.00
1,358,000.00
1,374,000.00
1,384,000.00
1,389,000.00
62,500.00
62,821.00
74,030.00
65,710.00
56,000.00
80,947.00
69,250.00
68,782.00
60,806.00
70,480.00
87,833.00
18,800.00
18,177.00
17,100.00
21,963.00
23,559.00
15,835.00
44,485.00
28,198.00
67,470.00
66,215.00
63,950.00
59,896.00
119,000.00
178,600.00
627,459.00
493,000.00
340,430.00
366,342.00
383,700.00
24,670.00
30,325.00
26,185.00
26,230.00
21,445.00
1,074,200.00
571,268.00
574,000.00
566,000.00
582,299.00
608,081.00
Not awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Not awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Not awarded.
Awarded.
707-B
Douillard Construction Co. Ltd  _ _	
Kirkwood Construction Co. Ltd. ...  ■ 	
DAWSON CREEK
Provincial Government Building, Phase 1, Excavation:
707-B
Provincial Government Building, Phase 2:
5-B-146
ESSONDALE
Riverview Hospital
Boiler Plant Conversion, Phase 4:
Argus Installations Ltd.  	
Mathios and Nichol Mech. Div. of Commonwealth Construction Limited ._ . ---                        	
A. & A. Plumbing and Heating Ltd.  _ .._-	
5-B-152
Washroom Renovations, Crease Clinic:
Seaward Construction Ltd.   _ 	
R. J. Booth Contracting Ltd   	
Hartley, Leslie and Hartley                  .-.'„ 	
5-B-143
Fire Escapes, North Lawn Building:
Pine Tree Construction _   _...__	
Ocean Park Construction Ltd. ..
3-B-J46
Boiler Plant Conversion, Phase 5b:
Seaward Construction Ltd	
5-B-148
Alterations to East and Centre Lawn Building:
5-B-146
Boiler Plant Conversion, Phase 5c:
6B-39
12-54 BI
Ocean Park Construction Ltd 	
Alterations and Additions, Riverside Activity Building, Colony
Farm:
McGuinness Construction Ltd __ _	
Ratcliffe and Sons Construction Co. Ltd. 	
Alterations to new Patients Residences:
6 -B-39
Foundations, Activity Building, Colony Farm:
Seaward Construction Ltd....   _	
708-B
FORT ST. JOHN
Provincial Government Building, Phase 1, Cabin Moving:
Strome Building and Moving Ltd.   ...      _ _ 	
Provincial Government Building, Phase 2:
62-5-B1
GRAND FORKS
Highways Maintenance Establishment:
Parkin Construction Ltd.  .,.	
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1972/73 F 57
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
67-32-B1
10-0-B1
620-B-l
17-28-B1
17-28-B1
17-34-B1
17-0-B1
15-20B1
743-B
733-B-2
412-B-2
72-7-B1
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
HAIG
Weigh-scale Station:
Allison Construction Co. Ltd	
D. C. Festing and Sons Ltd.  	
Quadrant Construction Ltd. 	
HANEY
Electrical Distribution, Alouette River Unit:
Paragon Electric Co. Ltd ....	
Surfcrest Construction Ltd.  	
Commonwealth Construction Co. Ltd	
KAMLOOPS
Electrical Service and Fire-alarm Systems, Cariboo CoUege (B.C.
Vocational School):
Ricketts-Sewell Electric Ltd.	
Demolition of old Home for Aged:
Interior Plumbing and Heating Ltd  	
Personal Care Home:
Dawson and Hall Ltd   _	
Frank Stanzl Construction Ltd  	
Bird Construction Ltd  	
Stores Building, Cariboo College (B.C. Vocational School):
Max Daburger Contracting Ltd  	
Wilson and Dalgleish Contracting Ltd.  	
Pine Tree Construction Co. Ltd  	
Site Development, Roads and Services, Columbia Street Precinct:
Fownes Construction Co. Ltd..  	
Penkam Contracting Co. Ltd.   	
Metcalfe and Whelan Water System Ltd.	
Alterations to East Pavilion, Tranquille School:
Max Daburger Contracting Ltd...  	
Maintenance Building, Department of Public Works:
Wilson and Dalgleish Contracting (1970) Ltd 	
McGinnis Contracting Ltd	
Perma Steel Engineering Ltd..  	
Norspan Building Systems (B.C.) Ltd  	
Interlox Building Systems (B.C.) Ltd.	
Regional Correctional Centre
Foundations Multi-use Building:
Max Daburger Contracting Ltd	
Wilson and Dalgleish Contracting (1970) Ltd.  	
Busch Construction Ltd   	
Norspan Building Systems (B.C.) Ltd.	
Pentagon Construction (1969) Co. Ltd. — 	
Pine Tree Construction Co. Ltd   _	
Electrical Distribution System:
Betts Electric Ltd.     	
Heal Electric Ltd 	
Walker Contracting Ltd  ..—	
Mechanical and Electrical Work, Multi-use Building:
Max Daburger Contracting Ltd 	
Wilson and Dalgleish Contracting (1970) Ltd.	
Insulation of Multi-use Building:
Tidy Insulators Ltd  _.
F. L. Drexel Co. Ltd.  	
H. L. Blackford Ltd 	
Westech Plastics Ltd.  	
KELOWNA
Heating Main Replacement, Okanagan College (B.C. Vocational
School):
Unico Mechanical Installations Ltd.	
Barr and Anderson Ltd   	
Classroom    Conversion,    Okanagan    College    (B.C.    Vocational
School):
Douillard Construction Ltd.	
Amount
65,260.00
52,438.00
45,635.00
24,672.00
21,392.00
31,145.00
11,945.00
69,506.00
2,229,829.00
2,256,523.00
2,207,000.00
218,700.00
222,626.00
192,527.00
549,000.00
511,500.00
419,800.00
28,650.00
68,670.00
75,203.00
55,982.00
47,578.00
67,556.00
29,820.00
35,431.00
47,129.00
29,612.00
■85,467.00
43,350.00
13,400.00
17,488.00
8,054.49
66,150.00
75,050.00
10,986.00
17,854.00
17,600.00
15,200.00
27,200.00
49,935.00
1,639.00
Remarks
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded
withdrawn.
Not awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
 F 58 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
760-B
KIMBERLEY
Provincial Government Building, Phase I, Foundations:
$
69,820.00
24,990.00
25,550.00
1,472,000.00
1,471,637.00
1,470,000.00
1,423,607.00
16,785.00
11,800.00
13,248.00
547,732.00
566,300.00
539,800.00
71,408.00
74,799.00
81,600.00
72,089.00
59,450.00
14,988.00
610,000.00
574,680.00
595,570.00
614,000.00
593,939.00
629,792.00
597,000.00
619,482.00
588,000.00
584,705.00
549,000.00
76,000.00
116,690.00
44,300.00
39,900.00
49,500.00
37,100.00
39,409.00
40,870.00
43,055.00
44,998.00
33,700.00
719-B
LANGLEY
New Haven Correctional Centre, Phase 1, Preloading:
719-B
New Haven Correctional Centre, Phase 2:
Northern Construction Division of Morrison Knudson Inc.
89-18-B1
NANAIMO
Boiler   and   Underground   Steam-line,   Malaspina   College   (B.C.
Vocational School):
I. Gordon Gas Co. Ltd.            	
Awarded.
711-B
Motor-vehicle Inspection Station:
D. Robinson Construction (1952) Ltd	
202-B-2
Renovations, Phase 1, Courthouse:
202-B-2
Renovations, Phase I, Courthouse (Recall):
90-25-B1
NELSON
Melting Furnace, Selkirk College (B.C. Vocational School):
728-B
NEW DENVER
Highways Maintenance Establishment:
Awarded but
728-B
Highways Maintenance Establishment (Recall):
Awarded.
746-B
NEW WESTMINSTER
Courthouse Renovations:
Seaward Construction Ltd.	
Awarded.
7-B-26
Woodlands School
Conversion of Motor Transport Building:
Creighton Construction Co. Ltd	
7-B-51
Fire-alarm Systems:
Mott Electric Ltd _	
I.C.R. Electric Ltd                   	
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1972/73 F 59
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
7-B-58
NEW WESTMINSTER—Continued
Woodlands School—Continued
Alterations, Academic and Activity Building:
Allstate Construction Co. Ltd. :....	
$
446,500.00
503,190.00
512,000.00
470,806.00
28,264.00
27,997.00
28,980.00
33,721.00
188,300.00
156,600.00
9,883.00
10,180.00
6,379.00
17,636.00
14,965.00
11,816.00
11,491.00
779,000.00
798,798.00
22,600.00
39,800.00
34,164.00
39,500.00
42,362.00
149,219.00
1,714,287.00
1,690,000.00
1,635,000.00
1,707,000.00
1,668,000.00
22,480.00
15,664.00
29,545.00
24,974.00
23,300.00
29,253.00
35,362.00
36,360.00
Awarded.
7-B-56
Transformer Room Alterations, Centre Building:
Mott Electric Ltd                                                      	
J. H. McRae Co. Ltd	
761-B
PENTICTON
Renovations, Phase I, Provincial Government Building:
461-B-l
PORT ALBERNI
Exterior Alterations, Provincial Government Building:
Souther Construction (1968) Ltd.                     	
461-B-l
Alterations, Phase 3, Provincial Government Building:
Souther Construction (1968) Ltd.                    	
715-B
POWELL RIVER
Government Office Building, Phase 1, Site Works:
Best Bulldozing Ltd       	
715-B
Provincial Government Building, Phase 2:
720-B
PRINCE GEORGE
Embankment Drainage Regional Correctional Centre:
742-B
PRINCE RUPERT
Reroofing Courthouse:
452-B-l
REVELSTOKE
Replacement of Heating System, Courthouse:
452-B-l
688-B
Renovations, Phase 2, Courthouse:
Revelstoke Construction Co. Ltd.	
SMITHERS
Provincial Government Building, Phase 2:
Awarded.
688-B
Cana Construction Co. Ltd 	
Douillard Construction Co. Ltd	
Passenger Elevator, Provincial Government Building:
Awarded.
118-2-B1
Heating System, Highways Establishment:
730-B
TETE JAUNE CACHE
Water Supply, Highways Maintenance Establishment:
Mechanical Installation Co. Ltd	
 F 60 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
24-B-10
TERRACE
Alterations, Phase 2, Skeenaview Hospital:
$
176,342.00
44,721.00
47,900.00
15,200.00
8,900.00
1,368,000.00
1,467,000.00
1,337,819.00
1,332,064.00
1,377,657.00
1,904,385.00
1,976,000.00
2,052,000.00
1,889,348.00
1,982,870.00
1,909,000.00
1,985,000.00
1,864,000.00
1,297,950.00
1,270,750.00
1,295,700.00
36,753.00
40,423.00
56,132.00
55,740.00
63,600.00
43,500.00
47,445.00
86,840.00
69,754.00
98,962.00
107,283.00
60,717.00
65,850.00
62,600.00
58,459.00
58,600.00
11,084.00
8,172.00
7,564.00
263,894.00
251,495.00
238,940.00
274,655.00
121,075.00
94,432.00
126-21-B1
Alterations to Workshop, B.C. Vocational School:
717-B
TRAIL
Provincial Government Building, Phase 1, Site Works:
717-B
Provincial Government Building, Phase 2.
Creighton Construction Co. Ltd 	
Kenyon and Co. Ltd. 	
Awarded.
10-B-61
TRANQUILLE
20-bed  Units, Tranquille School:
Foundation Co. of Canada Ltd 	
Walter Cabott Construction Ltd.
721-B
VANCOUVER
Personal Care Home:
747-B
Janin Western Contractors & Turnkey D.E.C.M. Ltd. (Joint
Venture)	
H. Haebler Co. Ltd  	
Renovations to Probation Officers Training Centre:
Onyx Contractors Ltd	
Awarded.
Awarded.
Garbage Disposal Services,   Various Buildings  in  Greater  Vancouver Area:
16-26-B1
79-B-15
16-39-B1
Elevator Replacement, 411 Dunsmuir Street:
Otis Elevator Co. Ltd    ...
New Residence, lericho Hill School:
Pacific Coast Construction Ltd.   	
Fire-alarm System, Pearson Hospital:
Not awarded.
Not awarded.
C. H. E. Williams Co. Ltd  	
Paragon Electric Co. Ltd 	
Mott Electric Ltd 	
Awarded.
546-B-2
Cardio-Thoracic Facilities, Willow Chest Centre
Staircase and Renovations:
Pine Tree Construction Co. Ltd   	
H. Haebler Co. Ltd    	
Awarded.
Sundry Labour, Provision of:
Ocean Park Construction Ltd....     	
Awarded.
Mechanical and Plumbing Services:
Awarded.
Electrical Installations:
D. Thompson (Western) Ltd  	
Awarded.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1972/73 F 61
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
VANCOUVER—Continued
Cardio-Thoracic Facilities, Willow Chest Centre—Continued
Plastering, Drywall, and Steel Studding:
$
30,549.00
31,367.00
32,365.00
29,320.00
23,630.00
13,088.00
11,794.00
16,889.26
17,000.00
39,600.00
34,700.00
33,445.00
30,948.00
34,344.00
39,920.00
43,341.90
32,965.00
39,482.00
256,699.00
289,129.00
239,470.00
275,341.00
252,914.00
14,124.00
22,606.00
16,000.00
15,399.00
17,848.00
21,782.25
421,960.00
469,354.00
401,500.00
69,203.00
67,420.00
64,580.00
52,942.03
48,538.60
43,737.85
57,900.00
54,397.00
71,952.00
48,374.00
56,430.00
232,627.00
240,364.00
242,000.00
211,216.00
35,800.00
30,622.00
34,848.00
41,000.00
41,225.00
40,599.00
1
Millwork:
Sigurdson Millwork Co. Ltd.	
Acoustical Ceilings:
Benton and Overbury Ltd  	
B.C. Acoustical Specialties Ltd	
Resilient Flooring;
F. M. Beatty Ltd	
634-B
British Columbia Law Courts
Hoarding, Block 61:
Alterations and Additions, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Floors, Pacific
Centre:
Turnbull & Gale Construction Co. Ltd	
Franz Patella Contracting Ltd     	
Halse, Martin Construction Co. Ltd.    .                         	
Passenger Elevator and Link, Courthouse:
Montgomery Elevator Co. Ltd   	
Awarded.
Otis Elevator Co. Ltd..                 ....               	
Video-display Systems:
Total Video Systems Ltd.
Renovations, Phase 8, and Structural Link, Courthouse:
H. Haebler Co. Ltd	
Alterations Small Claims Division, Richards Street:
Bengal Construction Co. Ltd 	
H. Haebler Co. Ltd	
Furniture for Fifth and Sixth Floors, Pacific Centre:
Alterations and Additions, Fourth Floor, Pacific Centre:
H. Haebler Co. Ltd	
Franz Patella Contracting Ltd          	
Awarded.
89-B-3
Provincial Health Buildings
Renovations to Laboratories:
Janin Western Contractors Ltd. & Turnkey D.E.C.M. Ltd	
Commonwealth Construction Ltd  	
Van Construction Division of Van Vliet Construction Ltd	
Alterations to Pharmacy:
Awarded.
Double V Construction Co. Ltd.-  	
Fire-alarm System:
 F 62                                                    BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED-
—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
617-B
VERNON
Alterations, Phase 4, Courthouse:
$
47,964.00
47,599.00
29,630.00
32,656.00
32,965.00
55,590.00
53,438.00
58,379.00
55,822.00
38,890.00
28,500.00
29,878.00
33,523.00
19,690.00
17,800.00
21,700.00
16,933.00
16,686.00
10,120.00
11,923.00
8,986.00
8,950.00
20,222.00
17,751.00
16,786.00
23,874.00
24,526.00
29,476.00
199,520.00
193,564.00
195,228.00
184,610.00
220,283.00
58,995.00
59,747.00
175,700.00
175,708.00
162,341.00
159,898.00
15,312.00
13,734.00
14,981.00
13,490.00
14,084.00
65,683.00
68,835.00
62,396.00
19,439.00
20,594.00
20,645.00
68,797.00
69,300.00
1
Not awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
■
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded:
Awarded.
Awarded.
19-98-B1
VICTORIA
Renovations and Extension to Central Microfilm Bureau:
19-4-B1
Alterations, Phase I, Finance Building:
486-B
Farmer Construction Ltd 	
Alterations to Central Heating Plant:
Cana Construction Ltd	
518-B
Alterations to Dogwood Building:
W. Campbell Ltd..	
464-B
Eric Martin Institute
Interconnecting Ducts:
W. Campbell Ltd 	
Alterations to Sixth Floor:
Cana Construction Co. Ltd.-	
W. Campbell Ltd	
Minor Alterations:
W. Campbell Ltd  	
738-B
Provincial Government Service Centre
Alterations:
Farmer Construction Ltd   ..
W. Campbell Ltd.
Herb Bate Ltd	
Paving and Site Works:
O.K. Paving Co. Ltd.   	
Addition:
M. P. Paine Co. _.. _	
Herb Bate Ltd 	
K. C. Johnson Construction Ltd         	
732-B
Douglas Building
Basement Alterations:
G. H. Wheaton Ltd.	
W. CampbeU Ltd	
731-B
Cafeteria Alterations, Phase I:
731-B
Cafeteria Alterations, Phase 2, Michigan Annex:
731-B
Cafeteria Alterations, Phase 3, Kitchen:
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1972/73 F 63
MAJOR TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
732-B
VICTORIA—Continued
Douglas Building—Continued
Occupational Health Unit:
$
29,274.00
23,878.00
25,396.00
19,945.00
20,247.00
20,413.00
19,300.00
21,610.00
13,885.00
14,665.00
14,879.00
14,981.00
17,638.00
43,266.00
41,355.00
227,200.00
229,777.00
212,800.00
16,893.80
39,620.00
25,250.00
48,045.00
52,000.00
72,172.00
43,444.00
43,666.00
59,663.81
65,683.25
23,785.00
12,910.00
28,464.00
14,208.00
31,311.00
22,985.00
13,904.00
14,800.00
1
W. Campbell Ltd                   	
690-B
Parliament Buildings
Renovations, Rooms 126 and 127:
Farmer Construction Ltd	
Alterations and Renovations, Third Floor, Legislative Library:
Elevator:
Otis Elevator Co. Ltd.    ...	
9-B-19
VICTORIA/COLQUITZ
Renovations, Vancouver Island Correctional Centre:
633-B-l
Landscaping and Irrigation, Camosun College (B.C.  Vocational
School):
Kimoff Landscaping Ltd.  	
Awarded.
554-B
Playground, Glendale Hospital (Glendale Lodge):
554-B
Kitchen Alterations Glendale Hospital (Glendale Lodge):
Awarded.
722-B
Food Service Equipment, Personal Care Home (Tlllicum Lodge):
722-B
Fire Main, Personal Care Home (Tillicum Lodge):
A. J. Barr Ltd	
Herb Bate Ltd.              '.	
30-B-8
Norseman Construction and Engineering Ltd	
WELLINGTON
Reroofing Brannan Lake School:
Pacific Sheet Metal (1965) Ltd.                           	
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1974
530-1073-9347
 

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