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Department of Labour ANNUAL REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECMBER 31 1974 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1975

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Labour
ANNUAL REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1974
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY
    To Colonel the Honourable Walter S. Owen, Q.C, LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year
1974 is herewith respectfully submitted.
WILLIAM S. KING
Minister of Labour
Office of the Minister of Labour,
May 1975
 James G. Matkin, Deputy Minister of Labour.
■—Department oj Travel Industry photo
 The Honourable William S. King,
Minister of Labour.
Sir: I have the honour to submit herewith the Fifty-seventh Annual Report on
the work of the Department of Labour up to December 31, 1974.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
JAMES G. MATKIN
Deputy Minister of Labour
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., May 1975.
  CONTENTS
Page
General Administration
Introduction  13
Information Services  14
Research and Planning  15
Labour Market Information  17
Special Services^..  36
Manpower Division
Introduction  41
Apprenticeship and Industrial Training    42
Elevating Devices  44
Occupational Environment  45
Women's Employment  50
Employment Programs  51
Trade-schools Regulation  52
Compensation Consultant  5 3
Industrial Relations
Introduction  57
Human Rights    58
Arbitration  63
Mediation Services  64
Labour Standards  65
Independent Boards
Board of Industrial Relations  69
Boards of Review  70
Statistics
Tables  75
Organization Chart  94
Personnel Directory  95
Legislation Affecting Labour ....  97
9
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  GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
INTRODUCTION
Major Developments in 1974
by James G. Matkin, Deputy Minister
The number of employed persons in
British Columbia in 1974 reached the
one-million level for the first time, in
spite of a stubbornly high unemployment rate.
The new Labour Code, various sections of which were proclaimed
throughout 1974, faced its first test in
what proved to be a major bargaining
year. Despite this, and in the face of
the marked increase in the labour force,
the number of man-days lost through
labour-management disputes declined
a dramatic 28 per cent, from a high of
2.1 million in 1972 to 1.5 million in
1974.
The Code made it possible also for
the now full-time Labour Relations
Board to accelerate the processing of
cases before it. This procedural streamlining enabled the Board to dispose of
a record 3,600 cases.
The new Summer Student Employment Program, Careers '74, produced
jobs for approximately 14,000 students,
many of whom were enabled to find
work in legal, paramedical, scientific,
and other fields related to their ultimate vocational goals.
The Department's Apprenticeship
Training Program expanded enrolment
from 9,000 to almost 13,000 trainees
during the year — the largest such
growth in the Province's history. The
program is being developed with the
co-operation of the construction industry and other vocational sectors in
which skilled training is a requirement.
A co-operative venture by the Department of Labour, other Provincial
departments, the Federal Department
of Manpower and Immigration, and a
Provincial   forest   products   company
will lead to construction of a sawmill
at Burns Lake, to be operated for and
by native Indians of the Burns Lake
area.
Plans of the Human Rights Commission for a program of public education were developed during the year.
As part of this program, the Commission will presently launch the initial
phase of a campaign to inform the
general public about human rights, and
to encourage respect for persons, whatever their race, religion, or sex.
The Department of Labour was host
at the first National Conference of Ministers responsible for human rights. An
agreement was concluded at the conference to establish a permanent national secretariat for the purpose of
conducting research and exchanging
information.
An agreement signed by the Ministers of Education and Labour established a joint Government committee
to implement co-ordinated manpower
training programs in the Province.
Personnel and Organization Changes
Following the introduction of major
legislative reform in the previous year,
1974 was a year of reorganization and
consolidation for the Department of
Labour.
Four new branches were created, to
be responsible for direct employment,
labour education, special services, and
information. These branches are under
the leadership of the following directors respectively: Robert Plecas, Ronald M. Tweedie, George Bishop, and
Jack Nugent (see organization chart,
page 94).
George C. Fuller was attached to
the Department as a Legal Officer of
13
 X  14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
the Department of the Attorney-General.
The Human Rights Branch increased
its staff during the year, and Gary L.
Carsen was appointed Assistant Director.
The former Factories and Elevator
Inspection Branch was reorganized into
two separate functions—the Occupational Environment Branch, under the
directorship of James D. Forrest, and
the Elevating Devices Inspection Bureau, under the directorship of Alexander J. Costella.
William H. Bell was appointed Personnel Officer for the Department, and
he has assisted in improving the capability of the Branches to provide training for their staff.
Legislative Changes
Legislative reforms enacted during
1974 covered workers' compensation,
manpower, and industrial relations.
Comprehensive amendments to the
Workers' Compensation Act were introduced providing for improved levels
of compensation benefits, procedural
reforms, and further recognition of
industrial safety. Additionally, the
Workers' Compensation boards of review commenced operation, establishing an avenue of appeal for aggrieved
workers in the Province.
New regulations were passed by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council, setting out the procedures to be followed
in cases before the Labour Relations
Board. A variety of procedures are
available to advance the efficacy of
labour law process in the Province.
For example, the regulations allow the
Board to postpone making any order
under the Labour Code until the parties
have attempted to settle the underlying
problem that caused the complaint.
The new procedures encourage speed in
processing complaints. The underlying
theme of the new regulations is flexibility, and so the Board is given discretion to "proceed in such other
manner as in all circumstances of the
case it deems appropriate."
Recognizing the new responsibility
of the Department of Labour to implement a comprehensive manpower development policy for the Province, the
Legislature enacted the Provincial Employment Programmes Act, which
authorized the creation of direct employment programs for youth, disadvantaged persons, and others.
In August 1974 the Legislature enacted the Essential Services Continuation Act in response to a strike of
fire-fighters from Coquitlam, Richmond, Delta, and North Vancouver
that created an immediate and serious
danger to life and health. This special
Act created a Greater Vancouver
Council of Fire Fighters Trade Union
out of the four separate fire-fighters'
locals, plus the Vancouver local.
The emergency legislation was the
occasion for a significant amendment
to section 73 of the Labour Code, giving added power to the Cabinet to
impose a 21-day cooling-off period
when a labour-management dispute involving fire-fighters, police, or hospital
workers creates a potentially serious
danger to life or health. During the
cooling-off period the right to strike or
lockout is suspended.
The new Human Rights Act was
proclaimed late in 1974 and, as a
result, protection of the individual
against discrimination has been extended to include the areas of employment, housing, and public services.
INFORMATION SERVICES
The nucleus of an Information Services Branch for the Department was
established in 1974 with the appoint
ment of a Director. The immediate
concern of the new Branch will be the
improvement of communications and
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
X  15
reporting techniques between the
branches within the Department, and
between the Department and its various
labour, management, and academic
audiences throughout the Province.
A parallel function will be to continuously inform both these specialized
audiences and the general public about
the activities and services of the Department.
The ultimate objectives of the Branch
will be to establish for the Department
and its individual branches a program
of public education that will focus attention on the activities of the Department
and the various services it provides,
explain the intent of new legislation
proposed by the Department, describe
how the laws embodied in such legislation will be enforced, increase public awareness of the rights guaranteed
under such legislation, humanize and
popularize the content of such legislation, advance public enlightenment
in the field of industrial relations,
assist in promoting stability in the
industrial relations community, aid in
the fostering of fuller employment, and
encourage harmony and teamwork in
the compulsory partnership of labour
and management.
RESEARCH AND PLANNING
The Research and Planning Branch
is responsible for providing background
information to the Minister, Deputy
Ministers, and line branches of the
Department in the areas of labour relations, labour standards, human rights,
and manpower research. The Branch
is also involved in the collection of statistics and the dissemination of information concerning the labour sector of
the economy to labour, management,
and the general public.
Another service is the collecting and
publishing of information related to
and affecting the industries and trades
operating in the Province, their rates
of wages and salaries, and their employment prospects. A recent innovation
is the provision of a series of labour
relations indicators, which includes information on strikes and lockouts,
wages settlements, and data pertaining
to the provisions contained in collective agreements.
The Branch also collects, publishes,
and distributes information concerning
the labour force, employment and unemployment, and the organized labour
force in the Province. Various special
studies deal with particular industries
such as construction, and with specific
occupations within those industries.
Other responsibilities include preparation of reports concerning minimum
wages and other labour standards in
the Province, and research and evaluation of programs not only in the
Department but in other jurisdictions.
The Research and Planning Branch
embarked on an expanded program for
research of the labour sector of the
economy of British Columbia in 1973.
This program included plans for a new,
comprehensive series of industrial relations indicators, and a new thrust in
the area of manpower economics, including continuing determination of
current needs, and of future industry
and occupational requirements. Successful implementation of these two
segments of the program, and maturation of the Branch's research capability
in both areas, were realized in 1974.
The Branch succeeded also in providing an improved research facility for
use by departmental administrators.
Collective Agreement Library
During the year the Branch developed a collective agreement library that
contains current as well as past labour
contracts for virtually all collective
bargaining units in the Province. Com-
 X 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
plementing the library are a number of
advanced record-keeping procedures,
introduced to facilitate the handling of
complicated requests for information.
In co-operation with the Province's
Centre of Computer and Consulting
Services, the Branch introduced a number of new computer programs to improve and expand its data processing
procedures.
These innovations were employed in
the publication of the following reports:
(1) B.C. Wage Settlements (editions
1971, 1972, 1973); (2) B.C. Labour
Directory, 1973; (3) Calendar of Expiring Collective Agreements, 1974;
(4) Working Conditions in B.C. Industry; and (5) Calendar of Expiring Collective Agreements, 1975.
Publications currently in the final
stages of production are Negotiated
Working Conditions, 1974 and B.C.
Labour Directory, 1974.
The study, Negotiated Working Conditions, 1974, is a further refinement in
a series of analyses of collective agreements. The work of the Branch in this
area, as in the program for wage-settlement information, incorporates many
new ideas, and it has attracted inquiries
from other research agencies in Canada
and the United States as to how these
methods might be duplicated or incorporated. The programs of the Branch
have been particularly well received
also by labour and management in the
Province, and it is anticipated that the
series of industrial relations indicators
will add a new dimension to labour-
management relations in British Columbia.
Manpower Program Evaluation
Work in the manpower area has
been proceeding smoothly. Development of expertise in manpower program evaluation was one of the year's
accomplishments. Published reports
during 1974 were (1) British Columbia
Garment Industry Manpower Analysis
and (2) B.C. Labour Market Informa
tion, 1974. These will soon be followed
by an evaluation of the Careers '74
Summer Employment Program.
Labour Research Bulletin
The Branch's monthly report on labour, the Labour Research Bulletin, was
produced again this year. Topical
articles, written by Branch staff members and commissioned from guest
authors, were included in the 1974
edition. The bulletin has become recognized as a reliable source of reference on matters in the labour sphere,
and its circulation is steadily increasing.
Expanded Services
The three Research Officers in the
Department's Vancouver offices are
primarily engaged in operational manpower research. They will continue to
concentrate their attention on Provincial training programs and short-term
labour market adjustment problems. A
fourth Research Officer attached to the
new Labour Relations Board contributes work-flow analysis and basic statistical data required by Board members, and is also studying the impact of
Provincial labour relations legislation.
The Branch's Victoria office capability
has been extended by the addition of
five Research Officers and three Research Assistants.
George Bishop, Director of the
Branch since its formation in 1966,
left during the year to become the
Director of the Department's new Special Services Branch. His knowledge
and experience were instrumental in the
development of the Research and Planning Branch from conception to a position of respect within the Government,
labour, and management communities.
Conferences
The Branch continued its co-operative programs in labour research with
other labour jurisdictions in Canada.
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
X  17
Staff members attended the Federal-
Provincial Conference on Labour Statistics. They also represented the Province on the Statistics and Research
Committee of the Canadian Association
of Administrators of Labour Legislation, presenting one paper on wage-
settlement analysis and another on the
quality of working-life. Throughout the
year, representatives attended the Research Subcommittee meetings of the
Federal-Provincial Manpower Needs
Committee on the co-ordination of
research and information related to
manpower planning and program administration.
LABOUR MARKET INFORMATION
A Review of the Labour Sector of the B.C. Economy
In 1974 the over-all state of the
labour sector of the Provincial economy
was very much improved over past
years. Increases in real income were
apparent, as was the enjoyment of improved nonwage working conditions,
especially in the areas of vacations and
dental plans. A sizeable increase in the
numbers of employees belonging to
labour unions and enjoying the right to
bargain collectively was also experienced. These two events took place
without great working-time losses,
through strikes or lockouts, in a year
when over 300 major collective agreements covering in the neighbourhood
of 160,000 employees were negotiated.
The population of the Province, the
size of the labour force, and the total
number of employed persons were all
up substantially and, more important,
the unemployment rate fell to 6.0 per
cent from the significantly higher 1973
rate of 6.5 per cent.
Population
British Columbia's population continued to show substantial growth during 1974 and, by the end of the year.
an estimated 2,240,000 persons resided
in the Province. The 3.0-per-cent rate
of increase was slightly higher than that
of recent years, but remained just over
double the Canadian average increase.
The higher population growth in
British Columbia can be explained
through examination of its three major
components—natural increases, net interprovincial migration, and immigra-
Population, 1963-74
Year
British
Columbia
Population
Yearly
Population Growth
(Per Cent)
Britisl
Column
ia
Canada
1963           	
1,699,000
1,745,000
1,797,000
1,874,000
1,945.000
2,003,000
2,060,000
2.128,000
2.184,621
2,247.000
2.315,000
2,395.000
2.3
2.7
3.0
4.3
3.8
3.0
3.2
3.0
2.7
2.9
3.0
3.5
1.9
1964                        	
1.9
1965  	
1966                                              - -    	
1.9
1.9
1967	
1968                                               	
1.8
1.6
1969	
1.5
1970                                                          	
1.4
1971'   	
1972 -  	
1.3
1.2
1973      	
1.2
1974	
1.6
1 Census counts.
Source: Population Estimates, Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
 X 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
22
20
6
4 .
Quarterly Population Growth by Component
natural     increase
-i—
—1 1	
III IV
II
III
IV
—I—
II
III
IV
1972 1973 1974
Source:  Statistics Canada, Canadian Statistical Review, Information Canada, Ottawa, Cat. 11-003  (monthly).
tion to the Province. Although it is
difficult to make a conclusive statement
about changing trends, it does appear
that immigration has made an increasingly large contribution to population
growth recently, while migration from
other provinces has decreased. The
natural rate of increase has been fairly
stable over that period.
The natural increase (net total of
births minus deaths) during 1974 was
15,546 persons, or an estimated 21.9
per cent of the total yearly increase.
The rate of natural population increase
depends on a number of variables—
death rates, average life expectancy,
the number of women of child-bearing
age, average family size (or fertility
rates), and the mean age of fertility all
being important examples.
The average fertility rate (number
of births per woman) has shown con
siderable fluctuation over time. In
1931 it stood at 2.17 births per woman,
by 1961 had peaked at 3.81, and, by the
1971 census, had fallen again to 2.13.
That is considerably below the replacement-level rate of 2.61 births per woman, that is, the rate at which population would stabilize, excluding any
external sources of population increase.
There are a number of reasons for
the trend in fertility rates. The postwar "baby boom" continued until about
1961, and was stimulated by the foregoing of children during war years, the
reuniting of families after the war, and
the added security brought about by
the then unprecedented economic expansion of the 1950's. Recent declines
in fertility rates might partially be explained by a greater awareness of the
problems created by unrestrained
population growth (the example of
many underdeveloped countries), a
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
X 19
greater acceptance and use of contraceptive devices, and the increased participation of many women in the labour
force.     British   Columbia  has  shown
The 0-14 age-group has shown a significant rate of increase and, by 1974,
totalled 616,700 people, or 26.0 per
cent of the total population.    The ab-
Fertility Rates, Canada and British Columbia
British
Canada Columbia
1931      3.20 2.17
1941      2.82 2.31
1951      3.48 3.19
1961      3.86 3.81
1971      2.19 2.13
19741   2.06-1.98 2.04-1.85
1 Projection.
Source: Statistics Canada, Population Projections for Canada and the Provinces, 1972-2001, pp. 37-39,
Ottawa, 1974. Statistics Canada, Population Projections, Information Canada, Ottawa 1974; Cat. 91-514 (occasional), p. 39.
Population by Specified Age-groups, 1941-74
700 .
0- 14
 ,        15-24
600
       25-44
^<
       65   over                                                                                               _ - - " ~              .
500.
400 .
^—^^^                /-^
300 .
^  ^'^             -^—^^^
200 .
100 .
	
1946
1951
1956 1961 1966 1971 1974
1 Estimate.
Source: Information for 1961, 1966, and 1971 is provided in the Census oj Canada, Statistics Canada,
Ottawa. Data for 1974 is a projection from the publication Population Projections for Canada and the Provinces, 1972-2001, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, 1974. This projection (projection A in the series) assumes high
levels of immigration and interprovincial migration.
much the same trend as the rest of
Canada, although British Columbia's
fertility rate has been consistently below the national average.
Population increases during the postwar period have not been distributed
uniformly throughout all age-groups.
Significant changes have occurred in
the age-structure of the British Columbia population. This structural change
is largely due to the  "baby boom."
solute and relative sizes of the 15-34
age-group have also been rising steadily. By 1974 this group comprised
33.6 per cent of the Provincial population compared with 31.1 per cent in
1971 and 25.9 per cent in 1961. The
size of the 35-and-over age-group has
also increased during recent years, but
at a rate considerably less than that experienced by the younger groups. Only
in the 55-64 bracket has fairly signifi-
 X 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
cant relative growth occurred, perhaps
the result of earlier baby booms in the
prosperous 1920's, or the result of increased immigration in the 1950's and
1960's.
Labour Force
Aggregate labour force growth was
consistently strong throughout 1974,
with the yearly average of 1,060,000
participants 5.8 per cent above that for
1973. Growth accelerated somewhat
toward the year-end, and third- and
fourth-quarter totals were 7.2 and 6.8
per cent above corresponding 1973
figures. It seems evident that much
of that growth can be attributed to a
particularly strong third-quarter performance. The labour force increased
by 4.3 per cent in July alone, before
declining slightly in August and September. It appears that many of the
July entrants did not drop out of the
labour force by summer's end, posing
a question as to how many of those
entrants were students. The significance of the third-quarter performance
is evident, given that the quarter's 3.9
per cent increase is almost three times
the corresponding 1973 increase of
1.4 per cent.
Labour Force by Sex (Quarterly)
Total
Men
Women
1973—
I	
II.....
in
IV.
1974—
I .....
ii ...
in..
IV...
972
1,009
1,023
1,005
1,013
1,056
1,097
1,073
646
674
687
668
677
697
719
697
326
334
335
337
336
359
378
377
Source: Statistics Canada, The Labour Force, Information Canada, Ottawa, Cat. 71-001  (monthly).
Labour Force, Employment and Unemployment, 1968-74
1100
lOOO
900
800.
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
!        I   Employment     =    lMQUR    foRQE
OjJC   Unemployment
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
X 21
Seasonal fluctuation is more apparent
in the male component, although consistently strong growth in the female
component may be masking inherent
seasonal variations. An examination
of monthly changes shows that the female component grew a remarkable
15.8 per cent between March and July,
before declining slightly toward the end
of the year. The number of men in the
labour force increased most rapidly in
the April-to-July period, and then
shrank during the August-to-October
period to roughly its present level.
The participation rate continued its
upward trend during 1974 and averaged 59.3 for 1974, compared with
58.4 in 1973.    That rate is virtually
than 12 months previously.
Employment
The pattern of employment growtl
exhibited during 1974 was similar to
that shown by the labour force growth.
Seasonal fluctuations are more evident
in the employment data, with the effects
of the current slowdown readily apparent. Fourth-quarter employment totals
show a 3.7-per-cent decline over third-
quarter figures, a considerably larger
drop than that occurring in 1973.
The slowdown has apparently been felt
more heavily by the male worker, as
male employment totals have declined
6.4 per cent compared with a women's
Participation Rates by Sex
SEASONALLY ADJUSTED
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Both sexes.	
58.5
78.4
38.9
58.6
79.1
38.4
58.5
78.3
38.6
58.8
78.1
39.5
59.2
77.9
40.5
58.3
77.7
39.5
59.6
78.1
41.2
59.7
78.2
41.3
60.6
78.7
41.7
59.4
77.6
41.3
59.8
78.0
41.6
60.0
78.2
Women	
41.9
ACTUAL
Both sexes —	
57.5
57.6
57.7
58.6
59.7
60.0
62.3
61.2
59.4
58.8
58.9
59.1
Men 	
77.0
77.4
77.1
78.0
78.7
79.3
81.7
80.8
77.9
76.8
76.8
76.8
Women 	
38.1
37.9
38.3
39.3
40.7
40.8
43.0
41.6
41.0
41.0
41.1
41.5
Source:   Statistics   Canada,   The   Labour  Force,   Information   Canada,   Ottawa,   Jan.   1975:   Cat.   71-001
(Monthly); Tables 29, 30.
identical to the Prairie's rate, and just
slightly less than that shown by Ontario. As in past years, the upward
drift in the aggregate participation rate
is caused by the increased participation
by women in the labour force. The
participation rate for men in British
Columbia has not changed appreciably
during the past 20 years, whereas the
rate for women has almost doubled in
that same time span. The yearly rate
for men actually declined slightly in
1974, but this was compensated for by
a considerable increase in the female
participation rate, which, by December,
stood at a level of 8.9 per cent higher
job decline of only 0.3 per cent in the
fourth quarter.
An examination of the monthly figures shows male employment increasing between February and July, but
declining since that time. In contrast,
female employment has been expanding slightly since October. Large second- and third-quarter employment
increases have been maintained, and,
as a result, the number of jobs filled by
women in the fourth quarter were 12.7
per cent above the corresponding 1973
figure. Over the same time span, male
employment increased by only 2.5 per
cent.
 X 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Employment by Sex (Quarterly)
Total
Men
Women
1973—
I	
888
944
971
945
947
997
1.038
999
589
631
655
628
630
659
681
644
299
II 	
313
Ill 	
316
IV 	
1974—
I 	
316
317
II 	
339
Ill	
357
IV    .                        	
356
Source: Statistics Canada, The Labour Force, Information Canada, Ottawa, Cat. 71-001 (monthly).
Employment by Industry, Annual Growth Rates
17.0 .
16.0 .
15.0
14.0
13.0
12.0
11.0 .
10.0 .
9.0
8.0
7.0
6.0 .
5.0 .
4.0
3.0
2.0
1.0
0.0
-1.0
total
goods   producing
 service   producing
m j j a
month   ending    calculation     period
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
X 23
As expected, seasonal factors are
stronger in the youth categories, especially in the 14-19 age-group. Peak
summer employment totals were 34
per cent above yearly averages, more
than four times the variation exhibited
by any other group. The effects of a
fourth-quarter downturn are not readily apparent in any of the age-groupings, as no one group appears especially
hard hit. Although the numbers of
employed in the 65-and-over groups
have declined throughout the year, it is
not clear whether the cause has been
economic conditions or changing social
policy.
Employment-by-industry estimates
clearly indicate the manner in which
the Provincial economy has expanded.
Average employment has grown considerably in both the goods- and service-producing sectors. Their employment growth rates of 4.5 and 6.9 per
cent are well above the Canadian averages for the corresponding sectors. In
the case of the goods sector, however,
its average growth rate is influenced
upward, largely by events that happened early in the year.   Much better
growth rates for the first few months.
In contrast, the growth shown by the
service sector has been consistent
throughout the year. Employment in
that sector dropped off by only 0.6 per
cent in the fourth quarter, compared
with the 3.9 per cent decline shown by
the goods sector.
Comparison of year-end figures
further points out the differing performances of the two sectors. Compared with December 1973, employment in the service sector was up 9.8
per cent, whereas employment in the
goods sector declined 0.6 per cent.
The consistent growth of the service
sector is readily apparent, as is the
cyclical performance of its counterpart.
The question of multiplier effects
should be considered when looking
forward to 1975 performance. Current
cutbacks in goods-producing activity
may portend future cutbacks in service
sector employment, especially if the
former slowdown is prolonged.
Unemployment
The average level of unemployment
in British Columbia was slightly lower
during 1974 than it had been during
Employment by Industry (Quarterly)
■
II
III
IV
Average Annual
Increase
(PerCent)
Total     	
Goods —	
Agriculture	
947
311
46
174
75
636
97
182
46
251
60
997
326
45
180
78
671
106
189
49
265
65
1,038
352
53
193
81
687
107
187
55
270
67
999
316
18
48
174
76
683
107
189
51
273
63
6.3
4.5
6.7
Manufacturing  	
Construction  	
2.9
8.3
6.9
Transportation     	
Trade    - -
1.0
5.6
11.1
9.1
Public administration	
8.5
Source: Statistics Canada, Detailed Provincial Labour Force Data, Labour Force Survey.
economic conditions existed early in
1974 than during the corresponding
period of 1973. A comparison of the
two years, therefore, gives very high
1973. The monthly average of 64,000
labour force participants without jobs
comprised an average of 44,000 men
and 20,000 women.   When compared
 X 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
to 1973, these figures represent a 2.3-
per-cent increase in male unemployment and a 9.1-per-cent decrease in
female unemployment. The patterns
of unemployment, however, were quite
different for each sex. The level of
women's unemployment fluctuated little
during the year, varying between a low
of 18,000 and a high of 22,000 women
without work. The numbers of men
unemployed varied between 35,000 in
June and 58,000 in December.
The slight decline of unemployment
totals, when coupled to a large labour
force increase, has resulted in the
unemployment rate declining significantly for 1974 from its 1973 level.
The aggregate rate of 6.0 per cent for
the year is an average of the 6.3-percent male and 5.5-per-cent female
rates. These component rates exhibit
1 and 11 percentage-point declines
from their 1973 levels.
Two   age-groups   appear  to  have
been the main beneficiaries of improved
unemployment rate differences, is evident in all age-groups. As expected,
the largest summer declines are evident
in the 14-19 age-group, which experiences large participation and employment gains during those months. The
consistently high unemployment rates
for this segment of society has long
been a concern. Similarly, high rates
in the 20-24 age-bracket also declined
somewhat during the year, especially in
the second quarter, when many university students came on the job market.
Organized Labour Force
There are a number of significant
structural changes worthy of mention
before examining the statistical details
of union membership in the Province.
Five unions appear for the first time in
the Directory: The B.C. Government
Professional Employees' Association,
representing licensed professional employees of the Public Service; the
Registered Psychiatric Nurses' Association of B.C.; the Workers' Compensa-
Unemployment Rates (Quarterly)
14-19
20-24
25-44
45-64
Total
13.2
13.9
16.1
13.3
11.4
15.4
10.8
9.6
10.6
8.7
9.3
10.5
4.4
4.3
4.7
4.0
3.7
5.2
4.9
3.6
3.6
3.2
3.2
4.6
6 5
1974 average  	
I	
6.0
6 5
II  	
Ill  	
IV  	
5.6
5.3
6.9
Source: Statistics Canada, "Detailed Provincial Labour Force Data," Labour Force Survey.
economic conditions. The unemployment rate for people in the 20-24 age-
bracket declined from its 1973 level of
10.8 to 9.6 per cent in 1974, and the
rate prevalent in the 45-64 bracket
declined from 4.9 to 3.6 per cent. A
modest 1-point decline to 4.3 per cent
occurred in the 25-44 age-group,
while the unemployment rate rose to
13.9 per cent from 13.2 per cent for the
14-19-year-olds.
Some  seasonality,  as measured  by
tion Board Employees' Union; the
Association of University and College
Employees; and the Canadian Union of
Transportation Employees, which represents locomotive engineers employed
by the B.C. Railway.
In addition, there have been several
name and affiliation changes affecting
labour organizations in the Province.
The Canadian Aluminum, Smelter and
Allied Workers, formerly an independent union, has changed its name to the
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
X 25
Union Membership, 1940-74
Total
British Columbia
Membership
Percentage
Change From
Previous Year
Total
Paid
Workers i
Organized
Labour as a
Percentage of
Total Paid
Workers
i The Labour Force, Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
2 Estimated by the Research and Planning Branch.
1940	
44,867
50,360
61,292
91,618
107,402
110,045
108,125
119,258
135,326
142,989
146,259
157,287
170,036
174,894
178,533
186,951
191,952
216,070
233,972
219,279
215,437
221,946
216,685
222,138
226,690
237,864
256,241
273,946
287,502
292,842
310,222
316,587
332,091
350,175
395,846
12.24
21.71
49.47
17.22
2.46
-1.75
10.30
13.47
5.66
2.29
7.54
8.10
2.86
2.08
4.72
2.68
12.56
8.28
-6.30
-1.75
3.02
-2.37
2.52
2.05
4.93
7.73
6.91
4.95
1.86
5.93
2.05
4.90
5.45
13.04
1941 	
1942	
	
213,000
231,000
266,000
283,000
322,000
334,000
338,000
340,000
335,000
342,000
362,000
368,000
370,000
390,000
421,000
439,000
434,000
452,000
448,000
455,000
477,000
501,000
529,000
561,000
597,000
636,000
663,000
714,000
722,000
753,000
793,000
858,000
902,0002
28.8
1943 	
1944   	
1945   	
1946	
39.7
40.4
38.9
33 6
1947	
35.7
1948	
40.0
1949            	
42.0
1950               	
43.6
1951	
46.0
1952	
47.0
1953 	
47.5
1954 	
48.2
1955 	
47.9
1956	
45.6
1957 	
1958 	
49.2
53.9
1959 	
1960 -.-	
48.5
48.1
1961      	
48.8
1962   	
1963     .      	
45.4
44.3
1964 	
1965	
42.9
42.4
1966	
42.9
1967  .....	
43.1
1968.	
1969  	
1970	
43.4
41.0
43.0
1971  	
1972	
42.0
41.9
1973 	
40.8
1974	
43.9
Unions With a British Columbia Membership Greater Than 5,000, 1974
Relative
Position,
19741
Membership,
January
1974
Relative
Position,
1973
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
International Woodworkers of America (AFL-CIO/CLC)	
British Columbia Government Employees' Union (CLC)  	
British Columbia Teachers' Federation (Ind.) 	
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CLC)	
International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and
Helpers of America (Independent)	
Registered Nurses' Association of British Columbia (Independent)	
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America (AFL-CIO/
CLC)  	
United Steelworkers of America (AFL-CIO/CLC)	
Public Service Alliance of Canada (CLC)  	
Hospital Employees' Union (Ind.).  	
International Union of Operating Engineers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 	
Labourers' International Union of North America (AFL-CIO/CLC)	
Canadian Paperworkers Union (CLC)   	
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International Union
(AFL-CIO/CLC)     	
Federation of Telephone Workers of British Columbia (CLC)	
International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (AFL-
CIO/CLC)
International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC).
Retail Clerks' International Union (AFL-CIO/CLC)  	
United Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union (CLC)	
Pulp, Paper and Woodworkeis of Canada (CCU) 	
45,943
37,637
24,852
18.096
17,745
15,237
13,567
13,472
12,320
11,395
9,870
9,474
9,472
9,343
9,026
8,332
7,859
6,523
6,394
5,920
9
7
10
12
11
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
i As of January 1974.
 X 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Canadian Association of Smelter and
Allied Workers, and is now affiliated
with the Council of Canadian Unions
(CCU). Local 333 of the International Union of United Brewery, Flour,
Cereal, Soft Drink, and Distillery
Workers of America is now the Grain
Workers' Local 333, directly chartered
under the CLC. The Royal Jubilee
Hospital Employees' Association is
now part of the Hospital Employees'
Union, Local 180, an independent
union. The employees formerly represented by the Laundry, Dry Cleaning
and Dye House Workers International
Union are now represented by the International Brotherhood of Teamsters,
Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of America, Local 351. The International Printing Pressmen and Assistants Union of North America has
changed its name to the International
Printing and Graphic Communications
Union. The Canadian locals of the
United Paperworkers International
Union became an autonomous unit
under the new name of Canadian
Paperworkers Union.
As of January 1, 1974, there was a
total of 137 unions operating in British
Columbia, with a total membership of
395,846 workers. This represents a
13.04-per-cent increase in the number
of organized workers from 1973.
Twenty unions had a membership in
British Columbia greater than 5,000.
These 20 largest unions comprised a
total membership of 292,477 workers,
representing 74 per cent of the Province's total union membership. The
International Woodworkers of America
(AFL-CIO/CLC), with a membership
of 45,943 workers, continued to be
British Columbia's largest union. It is
followed by the British Columbia
Government Employees' Union (CLC),
with 37,637 members, and the British
Columbia Teachers' Federation (Ind.),
with 24,852 members.
The total union membership of
395,846 accounts for 43.9 per cent of
the Province's estimated 902,000 paid
workers, and represents a 3.1-per-cent
increase over the 40.8-per-cent figure
for 1973. As the growth in total paid
workers in the Province continued at a
regular pace, it is not unreasonable to
assume that there has been a significant
increase in efforts to organize that portion of the Province's labour force.
Another major reason has been the
granting of collective bargaining rights
to Provincial Government employees.
Strikes and Lockouts
In 1974 there were 139 labour disputes, involving just under 87,000
workers for a total duration of approximately 1.6 million man-days. Although the number of labour-management disputes seems relatively high
when compared with past years, it must
be reviewed in the light of 1974 being
an "on" year in bargaining, with over
300 major agreements being settled
covering an estimated 160,000 employees. The figures for the year are
a considerable improvement over the
figures for the last major bargaining
year of 1972, when over 2.1 million
man-days were lost. The total working-time lost was just over 0.7 per cent
of the total time worked by all wage-
earners and salaried employees.
An examination of disputes by number of workers involved shows 59 disputes involving less than 100 workers
per dispute, and 61 disputes involving
between 100 and 500 employees.
There were only 19 major disputes. A
large portion of the time-loss factor can
be attributed to the four-month dispute
between Cominco Limited and the
United Steelworkers of America, and
the month-long dispute between the
Construction Labour Relations Association and the building trade unions.
The most troubled industrial sector
in 1974 was construction, which, with
496,000 man-days, accounted for 30.8
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
X 27
per cent of the total man-days lost.
This sector, with most agreements not
expiring until 1976, is expected to remain relatively dispute-free in the near
future. Those industrial sectors experiencing no known disputes were
agriculture and finance, and insurance
and real estate, sectors in which the
employees are virtually unorganized.
The ease with which collective bargaining was introduced in the Provincial
Public Service sector in 1974 was an
encouraging development. With certification of Provincial Government employees and employees of Crown corporations enabling collective bargaining
for the first time, there was no stoppage
of work by either party.
The British Columbia Department of
Labour has been collecting and reporting labour-dispute statistics since 1918.
In 1970, new improved techniques with
respect to collecting and reporting
labour-dispute statistics were introduced. In reporting labour-dispute information, it has always been the policy
of this Department to include only
those data that can be accurately estimated. As in past years, the same
techniques and policy were used in calculating man-days lost and workers involved in 1974.
Total Time-loss Due to Work Stoppages, 1965-74
2200.
2000 .
1965 1966        1967 1968        1969 1970        1971 1972        1973 1974
 X 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Analysis of Time-loss by Industry, 1974
Industrial Classification
Number of
Disputes
Workers Directly
Involved
Estimated Duration
in Man-days
Number
Percentage
of Total
Number
Percentage
of Total
Agriculture 	
12
1
18
21.4
3 9
Forestry (primarily logging)	
19,092
3.500
225,724
66,500
447 492
14.0
4 1
10929                    12.3
27.7
63         1       21.620
24.3                 199,453
14.0         1        496.318
12.3
6
16
7
16
7
12,441
14,154
246
30.8
15.9
0.3
2.3
5.6
68,984
2,718
4 3
0.2
Business and personal service	
Public administration  .,	
2,056
5,000
56,358
50,176
3.5
3.1
Totals	
146
89.038
100.0
1,614,041
100.0
Analysis of Labour Disputes, 1954-74
Year
Total Paid
Workers1
Number
of
Disputes2
Estimated
Number of
Workers
Affected
Estimated
Man-days
Lost
Estimated Time-
loss as a Percentage of Total
Working-time
of Wage and
Salary Earners
1954...            -  ...
370.000
390,000
421,000
439,000
434,000
452,000
448,000
455,000
477,000
501,000
529,000
561,000
597,000
636,000
663,000
714,000
722,000
753,000
794,000
877,000
895,000
24
25
35
35
29
34
14
17
33
23
29
40
39
54
66
85
82
113
101
142
1.39
12,622
3,367
3,197
8,914
11,709
33,443
999
1,638
1,982
824
9,503
6,755
24,748
11,371
12,179
17,916
46,642
52,358
106,399
96,078
86,932
140,958
27,588
39,211
225,869
325,211
1,423,268
35,848
34,659
32,987
24,056
181,784
104,430
272,922
327,272
406,729
406,645
1,683,261
276,999
2,120,848
705,525
1,614,041
0.163
1955  ...
0.030
1956        	
0.040
1957	
0.222
1958               	
0.325
1959      	
1.338
1960    	
1961    	
1962.	
1963                       	
0.035
0.033
0.030
0.021
1964          	
0.147
1965                                             	
0.080
1966	
0.198
1967                                         	
0.222
1968                                               	
0.265
1969              ....
0.246
1970         	
0.942
1971    .           	
0.147
1972                         	
1.050
1973                                          -	
0.319
1974                	
0.707
1 Does not include persons who operated their own business, firms, or professions, or persons who worked
without pay on a farm or business owned or operated by a member of the household to whom they were related.
2 Statistics for years prior to 1970 exclude disputes not within the scope of the Mediation Commission Act.
Theoretically, when reporting and
recording disputes and time-loss information, it would be desirable to classify
workers unable to work because of
strikes into three main categories.
These would be
(a) workers who are directly involved in the strike or lockout;
(b) workers who are not on strike,
but are unable to work for reasons concerning respect of
picket lines at the firm or firms
involved in a dispute; and
(c)  workers who are employees of
other plants, but are unable to
work for lack of materials or
other reasons directly attributable to the strike.
From an economic point of view, all
three categories of workers are significant.   The economy as a whole suffers
a loss of production, and workers suffer
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
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 X 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
a loss of wages. Insurmountable difficulties in obtaining an accurate measurement of (b) and (c) categories of
workers, however, prevent their inclusion in the figures given in this Report.
When using these statistics, one should
keep in mind that they deal only with
the (a)-category of worker, those workers directly involved in the dispute.
Definitions
Dispute—For the purposes of definition, strikes and lockouts are recorded
under the single heading of "labour dispute." Individual disputes are not
classified as being either strikes or lockouts, and no indication is given of their
legality. Labour disputes under Federal jurisdiction, and those that are
contrary to the Labour Code of British
Columbia, are also included.
Workers involved—Only those workers whose unions are directly involved
in the strike or lockout are reported.
Where the number of workers involved
varies in the course of a stoppage, the
maximum number is shown.
Employer—Firm(s) employing the
workers reporting on strike or locked
out.
Duration—The duration of each
stoppage is calculated in terms of working-days, counting the starting date and
all subsequent normal working-days,
up to the termination date.
Man-days—Duration in man-days is
calculated by multiplying duration in
working-days by the number of workers involved. For disputes commencing before 1971, only time-loss during
1971 is considered. Variations in the
number of workers involved in the
course of the stoppage are also taken
into account in the calculation, as far as
this is practicable. The man-days-lost
figure shows the total number of man-
days lost without regard to whether or
not the workers made idle were employed elsewhere during the strike.
Contract Settlements
Preliminary figures reveal that a
total of 309 collective agreement settlements were brought to the attention
Wage Settlements, Preliminary, Four Quarters of 1974
Number of
Contracts
Employees
Covered
Average Annual Increase
Percentage
Cents-per-hour
First Quarter! —
Contract average-..  	
65
45
58
105
76
79
79
58
59
60
50
44
309
229
240
41,359
27,206
40,732
47,492
38,107
19,837
55,121
52,958
52,057
15,305
12,849
12,448
159.277
131,120
125,074
12.9                        56
11.6        1               64
Unskilled classes 	
Second Quarter! —
13.0
15.8
15.3
17.0
18.2
20.9
15.0
17.4
17.2
18.7
16.0
17.0
15.0
52
100
Skilled classes  	
Unskilled classes  	
Third Quarter^—
Contract average2  	
101
90
94
125
64
Fourth Quarter*—
90
Skilled classes	
101
83
Average, Four Quarters4—
86
Skilled classes	
103
66
1 Final.
~ As represented by the arithmetic average of the modal skilled and modal unskilled pay rates.
3 Revised.
■!- Preliminary.
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
X 31
of the Research and Planning Branch
during 1974. A total of 159,277 employees was covered by the settlements,
which provided for average annual increases in hourly wages of 16.0 per
cent, or 86 cents an hour. There was
a total of 229 settlements affecting
skilled employees. Skilled employees
received wage increases of 17.0 per
cent, or $1.03 an hour. Unskilled
employees received increases of 15.0
per cent or 66 cents an hour in a total
of 240 labour contracts.
The contract average figure of 16.0
per cent was higher than had been
apparent in the past few years. In 1973
the average annual increase for contracts as a whole was 10.6 per cent, and
the comparable 1971 and 1972 figures
were 9.4 and 8.2 per cent. Data for the
skilled and unskilled job classes reveals
a similar pattern. Skilled average
annual increases for 1971, 1972, and
1973 were 9.8, 8.1, and 10.1 per cent.
Corresponding unskilled figures were
9.2, 8.6, and 11.4 percent.
Key collective agreement settlements
in the first quarter of 1974 were:
Municipal  Labour  Relations   Bureau
(representing   Lower    Mainland
municipalities)   and Canadian
Union of Public Employees, several locals (5,500 employees).
B.C. Hospitals Association and Hospital Employees Union, Local 180
(11,500 employees).
Kaiser  Resources   and   United   Mine
Workers, Local 7292 (1,300 employees ).
Canadian National Railway and  Associated   Non-operating    Unions
2,580 employees).
Transport Labour Relations   (Master
Freight and Cartage Agreement)
and Teamsters (5,500 employees).
Large collective agreements settled
in the second quarter of the year were:
Silverwood Dairies, Fraser Valley Milk
Producers, et al., and Teamsters
Local 464 (1,100 employees).
LaFarge Cement and B.C. Cement and
Teamsters, Local 213 (300 employees).
Construction Labour Relations and
Teamsters, Local 213 (1,200 employees).
Construction Labour Relations and
Carpenters (6,000 employees).
Construction Labour Relations and
Construction General Labourers
(4,725 employees).
Construction Labour Relations and
Plumbers, Local 170 (2,500 employees).
Construction Labour Relations and
Operating Engineers, Local 115
(3,000 employees).
Construction Labour Relations and
Sheet Metal Workers (1,600 employees).
Construction Labour Relations and
Painters (1,500 employees).
B.C. Hospital Association and Registered Nurses Association (6,000
employees).
Large   collective   agreement   settlements in the third quarter were:
Forest Industrial Relations (Coast Master Agreement) and International
Woodworkers of America, several
locals (28,000 employees).
Interior Forest Labour Relations Association and International Woodworkers of America, several locals.
North Cariboo Forest Labour Relations
Association   and   International
Woodworkers of America, Local
1-424 (3,500 employees).
Construction Labour Relations  Association and Iron Workers, Local
97 (1,400 employees).
University   of   British   Columbia   and
Association of University and College Employees, Local 1   (1,300
employees).
B.C. Hotels Association (representing
Lower Mainland hotels) and Beverage   Dispensers   Union,   Local
835 (2,000 employees).
 X 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
B.C. Hotels Association (Vancouver
hotels) and Hotel and Restaurant
Employees, Local 16 (2,000 employees).
Two   key   contracts   settled   in   the
fourth quarter were:
Various Maintenance Contractors and
Service Employees Union, Local
244 (1,000 employees).
Workers' Compensation Board of British Columbia and the Workers'
Compensation Board Employees
Union (1,200 employees).
Negotiated wage settlements climbed
through the first three quarters of the
year, and then apparently levelled off.
This is the pattern that occurred in
1973 and it reflects, in addition to general economic conditions and consumer
price movements, the types of contracts
that are negotiated in summer and fall
versus the winter. As a general rule,
construction and industrial collective
agreements (traditionally the settlement
pacesetters) are renegotiated in the
summer and fall, whereas in the winter
the service industry contracts are bargained collectively. It may be erroneous to draw the conclusion that the
magnitude of the Province's settlements
has peaked and will now be returning
to traditional levels. Nevertheless,
there has usually been a fairly similar
pattern of movement between consumer
prices and negotiated average annual
increases in hourly earnings.
The level of settlements in 1974 was
5.4 percentage points higher than in
1973. The national rate of inflation
for 1974 of 10.9 per cent was, correspondingly, 3.3 per cent higher than
the 1973 figure.
Manufacturing settlements, as in
1973, were the leaders in terms of the
magnitude of the settlements. A total
of 104 settlements provided for average
annual increases of 18.0 per cent and
first-year increases of 18.8 per cent.
The food and beverage and wood products industries were the leading sectors.
The major contract negotiated during
1974 in manufacturing was the coastal
forestry agreement between Forest Industrial Relations and the International
Woodworkers of America (28,000
employees).
Trade and service contracts provided
for average annual increases of 15.8
percent with first-year increases of 19.5
per cent. Agreements in the trade sector provided for the largest settlement.
Construction collective agreements negotiated in 1974 also provided for
average annual increases of 15.8 per
cent, and first-year increases of 19.1
per cent. Mining, transportation, and
communication agreements provided
for increases of 12.6 per cent, and first-
year increases of 15.5 per cent.
Wage-settlement information provides current, statistically sound information regarding the magnitude of the
wage increases being bargained for the
Province's organized labour force.
Measurements of the increases in hourly
earnings of the skilled and unskilled
employees, and of the bargaining unit
as a whole, are made for each settlement covering 25 or more British Columbia employees. Calculations are
based on modal rates of pay and, as
such, are not necessarily representative
of the average increase of the entire
bargaining unit.
The object of the analysis is to measure the increases in hourly earnings
as provided by collective agreements
settled in a particular quarter. For each
of the wage rates under study, the total
increase over the term of the new agreement is calculated and then reduced to
an annual figure. The increases are
measured in cents-per-hour and percentage terms, and all percentages are
compounded. Averages are weighted
by the numbers of employees covered
by each settlement. All settlements occurring in a particular calendar quarter,
and covering 25 or more British Columbia employees, are included in that
quarter's   settlement   statistics,   except
J
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
X 33
those in which payment for work is
based on a piece-rate system and those
for which incomplete settlement information is obtained.
The average annual percentage increase is the commonly used compound
rate of increase. This statistic assumes
equal timing of the actual wage adjustments throughout the contract and is,
therefore, not time-weighted and does
not take into account the staging of the
increases of a contract. It is the rate
that, when applied first to the previous
rate and then to each successive annual
wage rate, will yield the termination
wage rate at the end of the new contract. This concept is analogous to the
compound interest of a savings account.
The formula that has been used to calculate the compound rate  of increase is as
follows:
12
R = 100% X {A log [y (logW-logW )]-!}
The annual average cents-per-hour increase can be easily calculated by using the
formula: n (W     w )
C = to
q    ■ •
Where:
R =:=the average  annual  percentage  increase  expressed in  compound
1 terms;
C = average annual cents-per-hour increase;
H
T =the duration of the contract expressed in months;
W =the wage rate on the last day of the newly negotiated contract (the
termination rate); and
W = the wage rate on the last day of the recently expired contract (the
0 previous or original rate).
Forthcoming Negotiations
The coming year will see the expiration of at least 453 collective bargaining agreements, covering more than
233,920 organized employees. In previous years, the odd calendar years (69,
71, 73) were considered to be "off*'
years in terms of the numbers of major
labour contracts negotiated; but in 1975
a greater number of contracts covering
a greater number of people will be negotiated than ever before.
One reason for this disappearance of
"on" and "off" years in bargaining is
the negotiation of a one-year contract
in 1974 for both the coastal and Interior forestry industries. Major B.C.
Government collective agreements will
also be renegotiated in 1975, including
the Province's largest labour contract,
the BCGEU master agreement.
Peak collective bargaining periods
during the year will relate to the months
of June, September, and December. In
June, 45 collective agreements covering 57,114 employees will be expiring.
September will see 45 contracts covering 41,615 employees expiring, and
December will see 111 labour contracts,
covering 70,966 employees, up for
renegotiation.
 X 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Collective Agreements Expiring in 1975, by Month
Agreements
January      17
February     2 8
March     64
April       47
May      26
June      45
July      25
August      19
September     3 5
October     24
November      12
December   111
Totals
453
Employees
Covered
2,230
8,374
15,440
14,786
2,968
57,114
5,002
4,243
41,615
5,066
6,116
70,966
233,920
In many industries, almost all major
collective agreements will be expiring
during 1975. In addition to the logging, plywood, and sawmilling contracts, the Province's pulp and paper
agreements will be renegotiated. Thirteen school board agreements and important university and college contracts
expire in the coming year. Major
fishing, metal fabrication, and transportation agreements also expire in
1975. The largest (over 500 employees) collective agreements expiring in
each industrial group are as follows:
Manufacturing—In food and beverage manufacturing, three large contracts will be expiring in April. These
are the Fishermen and Allied Workers
fresh and cold storage agreement with
Atlin Fisheries et al. (12 companies
covering 1,500 employees), and the
Fisheries Association of B.C. Cannery
(3,000 employees) and Tendermen
(600 employees) agreements. During
the year the three large Lower Mainland dairy companies will be renegotiating their collective agreement (800
employees) with Local 464 of the
Teamsters union. Also expiring in
1975 is the Lower Mainland chain
stores (Safeway et al.) agreement with
Local 212 of the Meatcutters (669 employees).
The large expiring collective agreement in the wood products sector is the
Forest Industrial Relations-IWA Coast
master forestry agreement, one of the
Province's largest collective agreements, with 28,000 employees. The
Interior Forest Labour Relations-IWA
agreement (6,000 employees) will also
expire in June. The two Pulp and
Paper Industrial Relations Bureau
agreements with the Pulp, Paper and
Woodworkers of Canada (5,000 employees), and the new Canadian Paper-
workers Union (6,500 employees) are
up for renewal in the year, as are Can-
for (Chetwynd)-IWA (1,000 employees) and Weldwood of Canada-IWA
(600 employees) contracts.
The two largest labour contracts expiring in the metal industry group are
the Aluminum Company of Canada
agreement with the Canadian Association of Smelter and Allied Workers
(1,950 employees) and the Metal Industries Association agreement with
the Machinists and Aerospace Workers
(1,459 employees).
The large cement companies (La-
farge et al.), employing approximately
1,300 people, will be renegotiating their
contract with the Teamsters Union,
Local 213. Other large manufacturing
contracts are the Government of Can-
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
X 35
ada agreement with the Federal Dockyard (ship repair), covering 978 people,
expiring in March; the B.C. printing
shop agreement (11 firms) with the
Graphic Arts International union (600
employees); and the Finning Tractor
and Equipment Company agreement
with the Machinists Union (743 employees).
Construction—In February the B.C.
Roadbuilders Association agreements
with the Labourers and Tunnel & Rock
Workers Union (1,000 employees), the
Operating Engineers (3,000 employees), and the Teamsters (800 employees) will be expiring. Forest Industrial
Relations will be renegotiating its sawmill construction agreement (650 employees) with the IWA in June.
Trade and service—Five large chain
store (Safeway et al.) contracts with
Local 1518 of the Retail Clerks Union,
covering a total of approximately 4,434
people, will expire during 1975. The
other two large agreements that will be
expiring in the trade sector are the
Hudson's Bay Company agreement
with the Retail Clerks Union (525 employees) and the Eaton's (Victoria)
agreement with the Eaton's Employees
Association (290 employees).
In the education sector, the largest
group of collective agreements expiring
in 1975 is the B.C. School Trustees
Association contract (representing 74
school districts) with the B.C. Teachers
Federation, covering 23,500 people.
The University of B.C. agreements with
CUPE (1,500 employees) and the Association of University & College Employees Union (1,200 employees) will
expire during the year. Many CUPE
agreements with school boards will also
be up for renegotiation.
The Municipal Labour Relations
Bureau will be renegotiating the Lower
Mainland municipal contracts with
CUPE in December, and the two Vancouver City agreements with the Municipal and Regional Employees Union
and CUPE, Local 1004. Also expiring
in 1975 is the Vancouver City Police
Commissioners Board agreement with
the Vancouver Policemen's Union, covering 814 people.
There are many large agreements
expiring in the miscellaneous services
sector, the largest of them being the
B.C. Government agreements with the
BCGEU and its various components,
covering a total of 37,938 employees.
The B.C. Hospital Association agreements with the Hospital Employees,
Local 180 (8,300 employees) and the
Registered Nurses Association (6,000
employees) expire in December. The
B.C. Association of Hospitals and
Health Organizations-Health Sciences
Association, covering 1,400 employees,
also expires in December. Four large
Government of Canada contracts with
various groups of the Public Service
Alliance of Canada, covering approximately 8,118 people, will be renegotiated during the year. Other agreements
expiring in this sector are the Hilton
(Hotel Vancouver)-Railway, Transport
and General Workers Union (500 employees); White Spot-Food and Associated Services Union (1,000 employees); and the Workers' Compensation
Board-WCB Employees Union (1,200
employees).
Other industries—In mining, the
Kaiser Resources (Sparwood Division)
contract with the Mine Workers Union,
covering 1,300 employees, will be expiring in 1975.
In the transportation sector, there
are several large agreements expiring
during the year, the largest of them
being the Transport Labour Relations
contract with the Teamsters (Master
Freight and Cartage), covering approximately 5,500 people. Towboat Industrial Relations has agreements expiring
with Railway, Transport and General
Workers and Seafarers (650 employees) and the Merchant Service Guild
(1,050 employees). The B.C. Government   has   agreements   expiring   with
 X 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
BCGEU- Marine Services General
(2,621 employees) and Marine Services
Licensed (651 employees). Also expiring in 1975 are the B.C. Railway
contracts, the largest of which is the
Maintenance of Way Employees (1,057
employees), and the CP Air contract
with Machinists and Aerospace Workers (930 employees).
In the communications sector, the
major agreement to be renegotiated in
1975 is the B.C. Hydro contract with
Electrical Workers, covering 2,500 employees.
Collective Agreements Expiring in 1975, by Industry
Employees
Agreements Covered
All industries  453 233,920
Manufacturing   168 76,738
Food and beverage  43 10,853
Wood products  31 50,156
Metals   27 5,893
Machinery, transportation equipment, and electrical products   27 4,216
Miscellaneous manufacturing   40 5,620
Construction   19 7,700
Trade and service  182 122,622
Trade   39 7,303
Education services  33 30,181
Municipal services   52 15,585
Miscellaneous services  58 69,553
Other industries   84 26,860
Mining   17 3,643
Transportation   54 19,265
Communication and other utilities  13 3,952
SPECIAL SERVICES
The Special Services Branch is
charged with the responsibility of preparing material that will enable the
Department to respond to issues of concern to the Province that are raised by
national and international bodies working in the area of industrial relations,
for example, OECD, CAALL, TAGLO,
and ILO. In particular, the Branch
will maintain a surveillance of ILO
activities, and weigh the implications
of ILO conventions for the British Columbia labour force.
The Branch is responsible also for
promoting early consultation between
labour and management on complex,
contentious matters, in order to relieve
the pressures preceding collective bargaining negotiations for the renewal of
contracts. This function will enable
the Department to use the pre-media-
tion stage to head off labour disputes
that might lead to work stoppages.
When this new concept of a Special
Services Branch has been fully implemented, it will investigate a variety of
problems of concern to both labour and
management, for example, technological change, intercraft and interindustry
wage differentials, job evaluations, and
scheduling of hours.
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
X 37
Special Studies
The Branch is also required to undertake special studies and projects assigned by the Deputy Minister or the
Associate Deputy Ministers. These include long-range research on the problems of labour and management, with
a view to identifying new directions and
initiatives for industrial relations policies.
One such study concerned an exemption under the Hours of Work Act.
Subsequent to a decision rendered by
the Board of Industrial Relations in
November 1974, wherein the pulp and
paper industry exemption from the
operation of section 3 (1) of the Hours
of Work Act was rescinded, the Branch
was requested to conduct a study of
overtime in the industry to monitor the
efficacy of the decision, and to provide
the Board with independent data for
use in future decisions.    The project
included discussions with a number of
labour and management spokesmen at
mill-sites throughout the Province.
Liaison has been established with the
Director of the Canada Branch of the
International Labour Office. In addition, plans to conduct an ILO seminar
in British Columbia next summer are
currently being considered. Aim of the
seminar will be to bring together labour,
management, and government in order
to broaden interest in and expand on
the objectives of the ILO as a member
of the United Nations.
Recently the Branch has been circulating ILO descriptions of job vacancies
in foreign countries. These positions
call for expert help in vocational training, manpower, and employment planning, and related labour fields. The
tenure of these positions generally
ranges between six months and two
years. Further details are available
from this Branch.
  \1   .*->»
:*?*»
-.<>-"-*
r* * «< «
*5«
X
k**-*^
~---Q^
•   4*0
 Heavy-duty Equipment Operator Course, B.C. Vocational School, Prince George.
 MANPOWER DIVISION
Rangit S. Azad,
Associate Deputy Minister.
Reorganization of the Department
was initiated by the Minister in 1973.
Under the first phase, the Manpower
Training and Development Branch,
Apprenticeship and Industrial Training
Branch, Women's Employment Bureau,
Occupational Environment Branch,
Elevating Devices Inspection Bureau,
and Workers' Compensation Consultants were placed within the newly
formed Manpower Division. At a later
date the Employment Programs Section
and a Manpower Research Component
were added to strengthen and enlarge
the Division's role.
During the fiscal year 1974/75, all
components of the Manpower Division
were given a new mandate, with a substantially enlarged area of responsibility. At the same time, additional
resources were allocated to them to
ensure that they would be able to meet
their objectives and obligations.
For the first time, the Province is
taking the initiative in identifying manpower training priorities and establishing the necessary training and upgrading programs. The apprenticeship
program is expanding at a rapid pace,
and now possesses an improved counselling service. Efforts are being made
to break traditional barriers and increase  employment opportunities  for
women in the nontraditional occupations.
The Occupational Environment
Branch has extended its activities to
nearly all parts of the Province, and
many plants that have never been
visited in the past are scheduled for
inspection. The Elevating Devices
Inspection Bureau has reduced its backlog of work and is providing better service. The Employment Programs Section, like Manpower Research, was a
new experience for the Department,
but both are yielding satisfactory results. The researchers are investigating
many unexplored territories, and their
data are being regularly used to enhance
our investment in training programs.
Under the new look, Manpower Division services have been extended to
areas of the Province that received
extremely limited service in the past, or
none at all. We are still far from
achieving our objectives of providing
the quality of service that the residents
of the Province deserve; but we are
optimistic that, during the next fiscal
year, we will make appreciable advances in this area.
The Manpower Division is charged
with the responsibility of preparing
Provincial manpower policy, and cooperating with the Federal Government
on problems connected with immigration, manpower training and development, employment, and unemployment.
To this end, the Division participated in
several discussions with Canada Manpower during 1974.
The Division took part also in meetings of provincial manpower Ministers,
and established excellent working relations with the Province of Alberta in
the manpower training field. This concept has now been further extended to
include all four western provinces and
the western territories.
41
 X 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APPRENTICESHIP AND INDUSTRIAL TRAINING
The Apprenticeship and Industrial
Training Branch is responsible for the
promotion and operation of apprenticeship and industrial training throughout
the Province, and for the certification
of tradesmen.
The Branch supervises the on-the-
job work experiences of apprentices,
assigns their in-school technical training, and prepares and conducts examinations to certify the competence of
apprentices and tradesmen. It is responsible also for operating an extensive, pre-apprentice, trades training
program for young men and women
seeking employment as apprentices.
The Branch works closely with secondary schools, school boards, vocational schools, and colleges on apprentice and pre-apprentice training, and
with the Department of Education and
Canada Manpower and Immigration on
the development of training programs.
The Apprenticeship and Industrial
Training Branch listed 12,965 apprentices on its records as of December 31,
1974. This was an unprecedented increase over 1973, and a reflection of
the need for both trained tradesmen
and the services of the Branch in promoting apprenticeship in industry, business, and the secondary schools. Contract negotiations, and the subsequent
disruptions in the work force, did not
inhibit registration; on the contrary,
they increased the need for additional
apprentices. The greatest demand
occurred in electrical construction, carpentry, automotive mechanical repair,
heavy-duty mechanic, and millwright.
Apprenticeship Training
The increase in the number of apprentices has sparked a requirement for
additional technical training classes
under the apprentice day-school technical program. These are day-school
courses of four to eight weeks' duration
for each year of apprenticeship for each
trade, and are conducted at B.C. Vocational School, Burnaby; Malaspina
College, Nanaimo; Camosun College,
Victoria; Okanagan College, Kelowna;
and Cariboo College, Kamloops. Because of the pressure on the space
available in these schools, new classes
for apprentice training have been
scheduled for both the College of New
Caledonia in Prince George and Selkirk
College in Nelson.
Where day-school training is not
economically feasible, the Branch continues to offer evening-class apprenticeship training for a small group of
trades. During 1974, 528 apprentices
were assigned to evening classes, either
for apprenticeship or upgrading training. Daytime classes provided training
for 7,970 apprentices in 44 trades during the year. (For a breakdown of the
number of apprentices training in each
trade or occupation, see Table 13,
"Summary of Apprentices in Trades,"
on pages 82 and 83.)
Pre-apprenticeship Training
The pre-apprenticeship technical
training program continues to expand.
The courses are designed to provide
individuals with an opportunity to
acquire basic skills that will equip
them for employment, and to help overcome the reluctance of employers to
hire individuals without experience.
Under it, training was provided for
1,996 students in 132 classes during
1974. In all, 3,628 applications for
such training were considered by various selection committees during that
period. This program, which began in
1957, now offers training in 24 different trades, and industry has shown
increasing interest in employing its
graduates.
For example, to provide trainees
for the steel-fabrication industry, a
special program of steel-assembler
training was instituted in 1974.    Since
 MANPOWER DIVISION
X 43
then it has reorganized as a regular steel-
fabrication and ship-plating course.
Again, in co-operation with the Federal
Department of Manpower and Immigration, two special pre-apprenticeship
carpentry courses were established to
enable native Indians to assist in the
construction of houses on reserves.
The pre-apprenticeship courses range
from four to six months in duration and
tuition costs are paid by the Branch, as
are subsistence and travel allowances.
Advisory Committees
During the year the Provincial Apprenticeship Committee held public
hearings at Prince George, Prince Rupert, Kelowna, and Nelson for the purpose of considering submissions made
by interested parties regarding compulsory tradesmen's qualification certification throughout the Province for the
trades of plumbing, steamfitting, and
pipefitting and sprinklerfitting.
Public hearings were held in Vancouver for the purpose of considering submissions made by interested
parties regarding the designation of
apprenticeship and tradesmen's qualification for the trades of bookbinding,
automotive parts, warehousing, and
merchandising.
On the recommendation of the Piping Trades Trade Advisory Committee
and the Provincial Apprenticeship
Committee, the indenture length for
plumbing, steamfitting, pipefitting and
sprinklerfitting was shortened from five
years to four, and technical training
periods were changed from five four-
week periods in school to four six-week
periods. Indenture time in the trade of
machinist was also reduced from five
years to four.
Designation of Trades
Recommendations made by the Provincial Apprenticeship Committee to
the Minister resulted in the passing of
a number of Orders in Council desig
nating automotive parts, warehousing
and merchandising, and bookbinding as
trades for apprenticeship.
Another regulation made by Order
in Council decreed that all persons in
the Province engaged in the trades of
plumbing, steamfitting, pipefitting and
sprinklerfitting must hold a certificate
of proficiency if they are to engage in
these trades.
Other regulations prescribed the rates
of wages for apprentices, and decreed
that they must be paid not less than
the prevailing minimum wage, or in
accordance with the new percentage
wage scale, whichever is greater.
Federal-Provincial Co-operation
A new agreement between the Provincial and Federal Governments under
the Adult Occupational Training Act,
giving British Columbia greater responsibility in the allocation of funds, was
signed in 1974. During the year, representatives of the Department of Manpower and Immigration in Ottawa met
with the directors of apprenticeship
and the examination co-ordinators from
the various provinces and territories to
discuss interprovincial examinations,
trade analyses, course outlines, new
testing procedures, the development of
standard trade names, and other items
related to apprenticeship training and
tradesmen's upgrading.
In co-operation with Canada Manpower, the Branch continues to arrange
for apprentices from the Yukon, Northwest Territories, Saskatchewan, and
Manitoba to attend technical training
classes in British Columbia. This opportunity, which would otherwise be
unavailable, is made possible through
financing by Canada Manpower.
Talks were also held with officials of
Alberta's Manpower and Labour Department to discuss programs, and such
topics as the exchange of apprentices
between Alberta and British Columbia
 X 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
for special technical training, common
curricula, and special training for the
coal-mining industry.
Examination Development
Examinations to establish and maintain satisfactory standards of trade
knowledge and competence are continually being developed and revised, in
co-operation with other provinces.
One of the examinations so developed
—that for the trade of industrial instrumentation—is intended for interprovincial standards use by all of the provinces
as a certification examination.
The Branch continues to use these
interprovincial examinations as a requirement for apprenticeship certification in the 16 trades encompassed by
the Canadian interprovincial standards
examination program.
With the co-operation of instructors
from the heavy-duty mechanic trade
classes in the various training institutions, administrators of those schools,
and officials of the vocational education
section of the Department of Education, a series of examinations was developed for classes in that trade. It is
the intention of the Branch to extend
this project to other trades.
An examination to assist in the selection of applicants for apprenticeship
training is currently being developed for
industry. Specifically, it will be designed
to determine an employee's potential
for absorbing instruction from the training for a skilled trade.
The value of providing training for
indentured apprentices is indicated in
two recent surveys. A review conducted by the Federal Government in
1972 showed that, during a two-year
period, candidates in the British Columbia apprenticeship program had a
90-per-cent pass rate, compared with
58 per cent in the rest of Canada. The
review was brought up to date in 1974
to cover a four-year period, and it
showed a similarly favourable comparison.
ELEVATING DEVICES
The Elevating Devices Inspection
Bureau is responsible for the safety of
all persons (workers in industry and
commerce, and the general public alike)
who use vertical transportation in the
form of passenger and freight elevators,
escalators, dumbwaiters, moving walks,
and worker construction hoists.
These responsibilities are met
through licensing and periodic safety
inspections designed to ensure that the
regulations set out in legislation, and
the directives issued, are complied with.
Before any such vertical transportation
units are allowed to be put into service,
inspectors of the Bureau must conduct
a full-scale acceptance test. Subsequent to installation, inspections are
made to ensure that engineering techniques and technological change do not
adversely affect the safe operation of
these devices.
The Bureau also provides a consultative engineering service to unions, management, building-owners, and the general public, as well as to Government
departments. Safety legislation itself
is constantly under review, and from
time to time, recommendations for
change are made to the Minister.
The number of elevating devices installed or projected in all areas of the
Province increased in 1974. The type
of equipment being installed depends
on the industry and the particular
building structure. As new construction methods are used, and electrical
and engineering technologies continue
to change, the importance of public and
worker safety remains paramount.
Recognizing this fact, all provinces in
Canada provide an elevating devices
inspection service.
 MANPOWER DIVISION
X 45
Organization Changes
Two additional Elevator Inspectors
and one clerical support staff member
were added to strengthen the Bureau.
Preliminary studies on reorganization
have been completed, and three inspectors will be posted to cover Prince
George, Vernon, and Victoria in 1975.
Diversification will provide more efficient coverage to all areas of the Province.
Problems between the elevator manufacturers and the International Union
of Elevator Constructors, which interfered adversely with the completion of
safety directives issued by the Bureau,
were settled in 1974. The situation
should correct itself as relations in the
industry gradually return to normal.
Liaison and Teamwork
The Department established direct
liaison in 1974 with the Canadian
Standards Association Code Committee, whose work directly affects the
safety of all persons using elevating devices in the Province. Relations between the Association and the Department have improved to such an extent
that the General Code Committee meetings are scheduled to be reconvened at
Vancouver in September 1975 for the
first time in eight years.
The Bureau's Senior Inspector attended the meeting of the College of
Fire Chiefs of British Columbia, held
at Prince George in May 1974. Principle aim of the delegates was to ex
change technical advice on the function
of elevators in high-rise buildings during an emergency situation.
Again last year, the Bureau fulfilled
its commitment to the Federal Government, namely, to perform safety inspections of elevating devices in all buildings under Federal jurisdiction, and on
defence establishments throughout the
Province.
Other departments of Government
availed themselves of the Bureau's consultative services during 1974. As a
consequence, the Bureau was involved
with the engineering sections of the Department of Public Works, the B.C.
Hospital Insurance Services, and the
B.C. Hydro and Power Authority on
projects both in the planning stage and
in progress.
Inspections of elevating devices on
both the British Columbia ferry fleet
and on foreign, ocean-going vessels,
whether in port or drydock, continue to
be made on request. These inspections
are welcomed by the owners and masters, who are obviously concerned
about the safety of both passengers and
crew.
Inspections and Approvals
The number of inspections performed in 1974 totalled 5,896; the
number of directives issued to owners
and employees concerning these inspections, 6,715; and the number of engineering plans and specifications approved for construction, 469.
OCCUPATIONAL  ENVIRONMENT
The Occupational Environment
Branch is responsible for ensuring that
employees in factories, stores, and
offices work in conditions that promote
and maintain their health, comfort, and
well-being, as set out in the Factories
Act, 1966 and Occupational Environment Regulations.
The Branch examines engineering
plans and specifications and approves
new construction on the basis of its
conformity with the legislation.
Existing factories, stores, and offices
are regularly visited by Branch inspectors who make certain that these structures meet the required standards for
  MANPOWER DIVISION
X 47
proper servicing and maintenance of
heating, cooling, make-up air, exhaust
systems, lighting, control of air contaminants, and employee amenities
such as lunchrooms, washrooms,
shower rooms, locker rooms, rest
rooms, and general sanitation.
For the renamed Occupational Environment Branch, 1974 was a progressive year of reorganization, expansion of services, and decentralization.
Now that its name is synonymous with
the title of the new regulations—Occupational Environment Regulations—
the Branch will not only become better
known, but its services and responsibilities will also be more readily understood by unions, workers, management,
and others concerned with this enforcement agency of the Department.
New Offices and Staff
In line with Departmental policy,
further decentralization of the Branch
took place with the opening of regional
offices in Prince George, Kamloops,
and Nelson. With the previous establishment of offices in Victoria and
Kelowna, the midway point has now
been reached in a program to provide
service on a regional basis throughout
the Province. In conjunction with this
decentralization, 10 new instructors
have been appointed to permit the
opening of additional regional offices,
and to strengthen the staff of the more
heavily industralized regions.
Because of the educational and vocational background required of these
new staff members, an inspector experienced in several technologies associated with the application of the
regulations was assigned as a training
officer to assist new personnel in developing similar expertise. Because the
services of the Branch are to be extended throughout the Province, it is
necessary that the inspectorate have a
strong capability, not only for interpreting the legislation, but also for ensuring
that the requirements for lighting, heat
ing, ventilation, and the exhausting of
air contaminants are satisfactorily applied in factories, stores, and offices.
Owing to the variety of buildings
associated with factories, stores, and
office buildings, and the diverse climatic
conditions throughout the Province, it is
essential from the point of view of both
construction plan approval and the inspection of such working places that the
Branch's services be uniformly applied.
Areas of Concern
The antipathy of workers toward
unsatisfactory working conditions in
industry and commerce became more
marked during 1974. This reaction is
particularly obvious in the organized
segment of the work force, although
unorganized workers are also becoming
more conscious of deteriorating conditions in their job environment.
Branch observations reveal that these
adverse conditions have been developing insidiously in recent years, especially in situations where new processes,
chemicals, methods, machinery, and
automation have been introduced without consideration being given to the
human element. The Branch has
discerned, both through inspectional
experience and investigation of complaints, that as new and faster methods
of production take place, adequate control of atmospheric contaminants, heating, ventilation, and exhaust systems
are a prerequisite for maintenance of
an acceptable human environment.
During routine inspection of auto-
body shops, for example, one inspector
was advised that certain new drying
agents being used in automotive paints
were irritating to the lungs. Subsequent
investigation revealed that these products contain highly toxic substances.
Ultimately, the Branch contacted all
the manufacturers and requested that
the warning labels be revised to encourage greater care and discretion in the
use of these products. As a result,
greater attention is now being paid to
 X 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA
the ventilation of paint booths, and to
the proper use of protective equipment
when paint containing these substances
is being used. To augment the information contained in the revised labels,
a circular outlining the correct procedures to follow when using such
paints has also been distributed.
It is equally important that employers provide industrial and commercial
workers with the other amenities required under the Occupational Environment Regulations pursuant to the Factories Act, 1966, namely, washrooms,
shower rooms, lunchrooms, and clothing storage facilities.
Now that the Occupational Environment Regulations, effective as of 1974,
have been published and are available
to employers, employees, unions, architects, engineers, contractors, and others,
the Branch is expecting a marked
increase in the co-operation and support required to maintain acceptable
working conditions in those places of
employment covered by the Act and its
regulations.
Substantial progress has already been
made in upgrading the environmental
aspect of working conditions in the
pulp and paper, fish-canning, and
smelting industries. Because of the
sheer size of the pulp and paper industry, a survey of working conditions
begun in 1974 will have to be continued in 1975, but early completion
of the report and substantial improvements in the situation are still expected.
The small and medium-sized factories continue to be a source of great
concern to the Branch, because they
form the largest and most varied segment of industry. Not only does British
Columbia experience its greatest industrial growth in this segment, but also
most new businesses first begin operating in old buildings. These buildings
often require a great deal of alteration
and modification before they satisfy
regulations with respect to lighting,
heating, ventilation, and other environmental conditions.
In the case of new industries, it is
Branch policy to assist and advise concerning the various requirements under
the Act and regulations, in order that
costly oversights may be avoided. Routine inspections conducted this year on
a zone basis have revealed a large number of employers in this category in the
Metro-Vancouver area.
Federal Employees
An agreement with the Canada Department of Labour continued throughout the year, permitting the Branch to
conduct inspections for the protection
of Federal Government employees and
those employed by businesses under
Federal jurisdiction. The industrial
health and safety regulations of the
Canada Department of Labour, which
are similar to those of British Columbia, are being applied, with the result
that this large segment of the Province's
labour force now works in an improved
environment.
During the year, 35 employers and
49 home workers were authorized by
permit to perform homework in accordance with the provisions contained in
the Factories Act, 1966. All homework
employers were consequently informed
of the revised minimum wage of $2.50
an hour, which became effective in June
1974.
Inspections and Approvals
The Branch performed 6,094 inspections of factories, stores, and offices in
1974. Directives to conform to the
Act and regulations were issued to
3,962 owners and employers. In addition, 789 plans and specifications for
construction were approved.
The effectiveness of the Branch was
enhanced by the co-operation and support provided by other departments of
the Government of British Columbia,
the Canada Department of Labour,
building inspectors, employers, employees, trade unions, architects, and
engineers.
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
WOMEN'S  EMPLOYMENT
The Women's Employment Bureau
exists to increase equal employment
opportunities for women generally, and
to improve the status of employed women—their working conditions, and
training, and upgrading programs—so
that they can participate fully in the
economic growth of British Columbia.
To this end, the Bureau made 73
contacts during 1974 with employers'
organizations, unions, and individual
managers to identify areas where women were already, or could be, integrated into traditionally male-oriented
jobs, including fork-lift operators, upholstering, painting and decorating,
forestry, and para-legal occupations.
In addition, the Bureau continues to
provide consultation regarding legislative requirements and affirmative action
for employers seeking assistance in improving the training and upgrading of
women in their labour force, and the
setting-up of special programs for women.
The personal job counselling services
of the Bureau have been extended and
intensified. During the year in review,
for example, more than 100 women
were encouraged to take training, in
preparation for either job openings or
advancement. Others seeking a change
of vocation were directed to areas of
employment experiencing shortages of
skilled labour. Assistance was offered
also to women interested in pre-apprenticeship training classes.
Women seeking a new job perspective through the various courses offered
by community colleges have been made
aware of changing attitudes in employment hiring practices, as reported to
the Bureau; and pertinent information
and relevant material concerning the
status of women was supplied to employers, unions, schools, women's
groups, and other organizations both
within and outside British Columbia.
The Director is involved with a variety of committees investigating pres
ent and future training needs. In this
connection, she has accepted an increasing number of speaking engagements, participated in panel discussions, and acted as a resource person at
conferences and seminars designed to
broaden occupational horizons, and
thereby the role of women in the economy. The Director also continues to
serve on the Tourist Service Training
Advisory Committee, and as a Trade-
schools Administrative Officer.
Two of the conventions attended by
the Director during 1974 merit special
mention because of their accomplishments in promoting equal rights for
women. One was the 4th annual conference of the B.C. Federation of Labour's Committee on Women's Rights,
which was held last May, and included
male representatives among the delegates. The other was the founding
convention of the B.C. Federation of
Women, held in September, which attracted representatives from 40 women's groups. The federation aims to
bring organizations and individuals together in order to realize the maximum
potential of the women's movement.
The United Nations has proclaimed
1975 as International Women's Year,
and it is evident that women in British
Columbia wholeheartedly endorse the
six aims enunciated by the Federal
Government: (1) to promote equality
between women and men; (2) to inform and educate the general public
about the changing attitudes toward
women's roles in society; (3) to end
discrimination against women in all aspects of life; (4) to create awareness
among Canadian women of career opportunities open to them; (5) to increase the number of women in positions of prominence in government,
business, and industry; and (6) to promote recognition of women's responsibility in the economic, social, and cultural development of Canada.
 Increasing numbers of women are receiving apprenticeship training in a wide variety of
trades, such as automotive mechanics repair, at B.C. Vocational School, Burnaby.
 MANPOWER DIVISION
X 51
The Bureau is aware of the attitudi-
nal change of a few employers who
have found that it is good business to
hire and promote women, but, in the
absence   of   statistics   to   substantiate
this change during International Women's Year, will concentrate on making
women in British Columbia aware of
new career openings and opportunities.
EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS
The Employment Programs Branch
is responsible for creating jobs in the
Province. Job creation is not a form
of providing make-work programs. It
is an attempt to break down initial
entry problems and other constraints
that face many disadvantaged citizens
in modern society. By providing meaningful employment that enables a person to acquire work skills, habits, and
references, the Branch facilitates movement into the labour force on a full-
time basis.
Disadvantaged workers may include
such groups as the physically and mentally handicapped, students, first-time
entrants into the labour force, the
socially disadvantaged, Indian students,
and women. Other selected clientele
may be included as conditions demand.
Because job creation is also a response to cyclical fluctuations in the
Province's economy, it should be possible to improve the employment picture by investing public funds in programs designed to produce more jobs.
These two functions, creation of
career-oriented jobs for selected groups,
and co-ordination with Federal programs having similar objectives, form
the main functions of the Branch.
The Employment Programs Branch
of the Department of Labour was
formed under the aegis of the Special
Provincial Employment Programmes
Act, in 1974. The function of the
Branch is to administer special Provincial employment programs for students and disadvantaged persons. To
this end, funds may be distributed to
Government departments, regional districts, universities, colleges, corporations, societies, and individuals.
Careers '74
Specifically, in 1974, the Branch administered the student summer employment program, Careers '74.
Careers '74 had two major objectives in
its first year: (1) to employ as many
students as possible for an equitable
salary in a realistic budgetary framework, and (2) to provide students with
a valuable work experience, contacts,
and references to better equip them for
their eventual full-time membership in
the labour force.
With a staff of three permanent personnel, four temporary student program administrators, and 25 temporary student field representatives
operating out of Canada Manpower
Centres for students throughout the
Province, the program was able to meet
both of these objectives. Operating
on a budget of $30 million, the program created approximately 14,000
jobs for young people in British Columbia.
Participation
All Provincial Government departments participated in the program, employing a total of 9,009 young people.
In the private sector, Careers '74 subsidized 301 small businesses, 251 small
farms, 38 Indian bands, and 17 educational institutions to employ 1,426 students. Regional districts employed
1,572 students, and municipalities hired
1,655 students.
An independent evaluation indicated
that the vast majority of employers (95
per cent) considered the students good
workers who knew how to use their
 X 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA
skills and abilities. Almost 80 per cent
of the students judged themselves challenged by their jobs, and admitted to a
sense of accomplishment. About two-
thirds of the students stated that they
had been able to save a substantial
amount of money to further their education, and three-quarters of them considered themselves financially independent for the summer. The majority of
students declared that they had made
useful contacts for future employment,
and that they had learned much that
was directly relevant to their careers.
Preferred Program
Both employers and employees preferred the Careers '74 program over
Federal job creation programs, mainly
because the initiative in Careers '74
was left to the employers. A majority
of employers (93 per cent) expressed
a desire to participate in the same
program next year.
The operation of Careers '74 has
particularly benefited the marginal
farmer, small businessman, regional
districts, and municipalities. Furthermore, young, less-educated workers
were assisted. Of those employed, 25.7
per cent were 17 years or under and
11.1 per cent had Grade X education
or less. The effects of the program
were significant throughout the Province; approximately 18.5 per cent of
all students employed in British Columbia were directly helped by it; and
the 13,662 jobs provided had a favourable impact on the unemployment rate
for students.
TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION
The Trade-schools Regulation Administration Office is responsible for
the registration and supervision of private trade schools, both practical and
correspondence.
A "trade school" is any school or
place wherein a trade is taught, and
"trade" means the skill and knowledge
requisite for, or intended for use in, any
business, trade, occupation, calling, or
vocation designated as a trade by the
regulations.
Administrative officers appointed by
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council are
responsible for implementing the
provisions of the Trade-schools Regulation Act. Under this legislation,
trade schools are required to register
annually, and pay the required registration fee.
Supervision of the operation of registered trade schools includes the approval of premises and equipment,
health, sanitary and safety conditions,
hours of operation, courses to be offered, form of contract, fees to be
charged, teacher qualification, perform
ance bond, cancellation provisions, and
advertising copy.
The Trade-schools Administrative
Officers met 13 times during the year.
Recommendations were made to the
Minister concerning registration, re-
registration, changes in tuition fees, approval of new courses, the general
conduct of private trade schools, and
other matters regarding administration
of the Act.
As of December 31, 1974, 97
schools were registered, in accordance
with the Trade-schools Regulation Act
in British Columbia, to offer correspondence courses, practical courses,
and combined correspondence and
practical training.
Eighty-four schools were re-registrations from the year 1973, and 13 new
schools were considered, recommended
to the Minister, and approved for Certificate of Registration. Twenty-three
schools discontinued operation in British Columbia in 1974.
All schools offering practical training were visited and inspected at least
 MANPOWER DIVISION
X 53
twice during the year. Visits to evaluate the quality of training facilities and
the suitability of premises were made
also to new schools applying for a
Certificate of Registration to operate
in the Province. Special visits were
made to assist schools in resolving
specific problems and complaints. In
instances where complaints were received from students wishing to discontinue training, and who had moneys
owing to them by way of prepaid tuition
fees, refunds were made in accordance
with the regulations.
Order in Council 3140, approved
September 27, 1974, has amended the
General Regulations Governing Trade
Schools by adding the following paragraph after item  (4)  of section 14:
"On   the   recommendation   of   the
administrative officers of the Trade-
schools Regulation Act, the Minister
may require additional security on any
of the foregoing items at any time
deemed necessary to protect the public
interest."
The addition of this clause will allow
the administrative officers to recommend that the Minister of Labour increase the bonding required from any
trade school whenever such an increase
is deemed necessary to protect the public interest.
Beginning on page 85, Tables 17,
18, and 19 list the schools re-registered
for 1974, the new schools registered
during the year, and the courses each
school offers. The schools that discontinued operation during the year are
also listed.
COMPENSATION CONSULTANT
Both the Compensation Consultant
and the Compensation Counsellor devote a large share of their time to advising claimants about the procedures
used by the Workers' Compensation
Board in administering claims generally, and in assisting workers who are
having problems dealing with the
Board.
The Offices of the Compensation
Consultant and Compensation Counsellor were created in their present
form as a result of recommendations
by the Honourable Mr. Justice Tysoe
in a Royal Commission Report on
Workmen's Compensation published
in 1966.
Mr. Justice Tysoe recommended that
a lawyer be appointed to act in concert with the compensation counsellor
to advise workers about, and represent
them before, the various appeal bodies
created under the Workers' Compensation Act.
Claim Referrals
Compensation claim referrals in
1974 totalled 529.   Table 16 on page
85 indicates the breakdown of this total
by agency, inquiry, and nature of claim.
The total number of new claimants
assisted during the year was 545, and
the total number of new claims received was 668. Table 16a on page
85 indicates the date of origination of
each claim—by decade to 1969, and
annually from 1970 to 1974.
New Developments
It is important to emphasize that
this office functions independently of
the Workers' Compensation Board in
counselling claimants—a fact that will
become more readily apparent with the
opening of new office facilities.
During the past year the independent
boards of review under the Workers'
Compensation Act were expanded to
their full complement of three chairpersons and six members. Every claimant who has a claim refused by the
Workers' Compensation Board has a
right to appeal to these boards of review within 90 days of receipt of the
decision.   The boards will travel to any
 X 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA
major population centre within British
Columbia to hear an appeal. Claimants who have their claims refused are
free to seek the counsel of the Compensation Consultant and Compensation
Counsellor concerning a possible appeal to these boards of review. The
new office facilities will permit a more
complete advisory service in Vancouver and throughout the Province.
To extend the benefits available to
workers and their dependents, many
amendments were made to the Work
ers' Compensation Act during 1974.
Edward C. Zurwick was appointed Employers' Adviser with the Department.
One of his responsibilities will be to
expand the independent advisory services available to employers in the field
of workers' compensation.
A key function of this office continues to be to advocate changes and
improvements in the Workers' Compensation Act, so that compensation
services and benefits for the worker will
continue to improve.
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  INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
James Kinnaird,
Associate Deputy Minister.
—Vancouver Sun photo.
Legislation concerning four Branches
of the Department's Industrial Relations Division—Arbitration, Human
Rights, Labour Standards, and Media-'
tion—was subject to major amendment in 1974, with the result that there
were changes in the performance and
output of these Branches.
Increased staff for all four expanded
the capabilities and services of the Department's offices throughout the Province, as the figures contained in the
individual Branch reports indicate.
Clearly, the legislative changes stimulated greater public interest in and
awareness of the many Acts administered by the various Branches.
Greater emphasis has been placed
by the Minister on upgrading and retraining existing staff, and he is insistent
that the highest possible recruitment
standards be set, in order to ensure that
the Department's staff is fully qualified
to handle the complexities with which
it is faced.
Each Branch has had supervisory
staff promoted from within the ranks of
experienced officers. Additionally, in
Human Rights, Labour Standards, and
Mediation, a senior officer has been
designated to be in charge of education
and training—this in addition to the
training provided through the Personnel Branch of the Department.
Increasingly, the officers have had
more involvement in the general community, advising, explaining, and projecting the legislation, regulations, and
policies of the Department.
Regular meetings are held by the
Branches to keep staff up to date on
policy and new methods of operation.
The annual conference held in Harrison Hot Springs in October 1974 provided the opportunity for an invaluable
exchange of ideas and knowledge
among personnel of all branches of the
Department. The better we understand each other's role, the more effective we will be as a team.
Inquiry Commissions
Section 122 of the Labour Code of
British Columbia was proclaimed on
January 14, 1974, and there have since
been 13 Industrial Inquiry Commissions. The commissions were, for the
most part, appointed to investigate and
make nonbinding recommendations
concerning contentious issues being
negotiated between the parties to a
collective agreement.
There is sufficient evidence in the
record of the past year to indicate that
Industrial Inquiry Commissions have
been instrumental in resolving industrial conflict. In seven disputes in
which work stoppages were well under
way, it was through a Commission's
investigation and subsequent recommendations that the parties were able
to reach agreement. In other instances,
the efforts of the Commissions were
largely responsible for averting prolonged conflict and subsequent strikes
or lockouts. It would appear that the
special status conferred upon an Industrial Inquiry Commission engenders a
climate in which the parties respond
more positively to the need for settlement of disputes.
57
 X 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Special Officers
Sections 113 to 121(a) of the Labour Code were proclaimed on March
14, 1974, and introduced a new concept to mitigate against wildcat strikes
or work stoppages during the term of
a collective agreement. In such instances, these sections enable the Minister to appoint a special officer, who is
equipped with a wide arsenal of options, as set down in section 114.
The principle behind section 114 involves dealing with the cause of a
dispute in a speedy and equitable manner. Since its proclamation, the section has been invoked on three occasions.
HUMAN RIGHTS
The role of the Human Rights
Branch is to promote equal opportunity
for every person without regard to race,
religion, colour, sex, marital status,
ancestry, or place of origin. The
Branch administers the Human Rights
Code, which prohibits discrimination in
the areas of employment, tenancy and
public services.
Any complaint of discrimination contrary to the Code is investigated by
the Branch, and every effort is made
to bring about a fair and reasonable
settlement. If such a settlement is not
possible, the case is referred to an independent Board of Inquiry that has
the power to order that the rights being
denied to the individual discriminated
against be restored, and that costs or
compensation be paid.
The Branch is also involved in developing educational programs and
conducting public meetings to combat
discrimination.
The year 1974 has been one of
change and progress for the Human
Rights Branch. Particularly important
was the proclamation of the Human
Rights Code in October 1974. The
new legislation is clearer, includes more
areas within its protection, and allows
for more effective enforcement. This
has resulted in an increase in cases
and has opened up new areas of involvement.
The number of formal complaints
that were investigated under the Human Rights Act and the Human Rights
Code was 241.   This represents more
than a doubling of cases compared with
1973 when, aside from the 342 equal-
pay complaints involving the hospital
industry, 98 cases were investigated.
Of these 241 formal complaints in
1974, only 10 required referral to the
Human Rights Commission. Of the
remainder, 75 were settled, 48 were
judged to be without merit, and 11 were
withdrawn. There are 97 cases held
over for decision.
In addition to the formal complaints,
the Branch received 1,800 calls of inquiry in 1974. Of these, 300 required
investigative action by a Human Rights
Officer.
Tables 1 to 4, on pages 75 and 76,
indicate the number and nature of complaints investigated under the Human
Rights Act or the Human Rights Code
during the year.
The following cases are examples of
kinds of complaints dealt with under
the different sections of the legislation:
Tenancy
A complaint of race discrimination
was filed by a woman who was being
evicted from her apartment. She was
white, but had a boyfriend who was
black. When he started to visit her at
the apartment, she was told that she
must leave. The landlord maintained
that there was excessive noise, but the
investigation indicated that racial prejudice was the main reason for her eviction.
 The Department was host at the first national Conference of Human Rights Ministers,
November, 1974.
 X 60
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The landlord refused to reconsider,
and the Human Rights Act in effect at
the time did not cover a situation in
which a person was discriminated
against because of the colour of a
friend. This loophole in the Human
Rights Code has been closed, and
action can now be taken in situations
of this kind.
Equal Pay
A number of complaints were filed
under the equal-pay section of the
legislation. One case involved a female technician who worked for a steel
company. She discovered that she was
being paid less than male technicians
doing essentially similar work. She
broached the matter with her immediate supervisor on a number of occasions over a period of months, but was
told that the company president had
not yet approved any change in her
pay-
Ultimately she decided to take the
matter into her own hands and confronted the president in his office. He
sent her back to her supervisor, declaring that he had no say in the matter.
Her job was terminated a few days
later, allegedly for "insubordination."
The complainant contacted the Human Rights Branch to file a complaint.
After discussions were held between
the company, the complainant, and the
Human Rights Officer, it was conceded
by the company that something had
gone wrong. A settlement consisting
of $1,000 and a good letter of reference
was made, to the satisfaction of the
complainant.
Employment
A native Indian filed a complaint
alleging that he had been discriminated
against in employment because of his
race. He stated that, on applying for
a job at a cement company, he had not
been given an application form to fill
in, but was told he needed an engineer's
certificate and that jobs were scarce.
He alleged that, two weeks later,
three persons were hired. Investigation revealed that full-time positions at
the plant did require a certificate, and
that a list of the names and phone
numbers of people who came into the
office looking for other work was left
with the receptionist. When other
openings occurred, people on the list
were phoned. The complainant's name
was on the list, but not his telephone
number.
No clear evidence of discrimination
was found, but discussions were held
with the manager on the need to ensure
that Indians living in the area be given
a fair opportunity for jobs with the
company. The manager agreed to
give the complainant first chance at
the next opening, and he was subsequently hired.
Promotion is an area in which complaints of sex discrimination are frequently encountered. Sometimes there
is simply an unwritten policy whereby
lower jobs are designated for females,
and promotions are blocked.
One complaint investigated by a
Human Rights Officer concerned a
finance company that had two separate and distinct promotion ladders for
males and females. The catch was that
the only route to management followed
on from the male positions; there was
no way a woman could be considered,
no matter how able she was. At a
meeting with a Human Rights Officer,
the company agreed to a complete revision of its promotion policies and
manual, so that female and male employees would have an equal opportunity for promotion.
Public Facilities
A complaint of race discrimination
was made by a native Indian after he
was refused a room in a hotel. He was
told by the desk clerk that there were
 INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
X 61
no rooms available, as a hockey team
had checked in earlier. The man left
the hotel, went to his car, and asked
his wife who was white, to go to the
desk and request a room. This she
did, and received one immediately
upon filling out the registration card.
The man and his wife then took the
room without any further exchange
with the desk clerk.
A complaint was filed and the incident discussed with the manager of the
hotel. He stated that it was their
policy not to discriminate on the basis
of race. He agreed to make sure that
this policy would henceforth be followed by all hotel staff members, and
he wrote a letter of apology to the complainant, assuring him that such an incident would not recur. The complainant was satisfied and decided not
to pursue the matter further.
New Areas
The Human Rights Code prohibits
discrimination in employment or public services "unless reasonable cause
exists for such discrimination." For
the first time, therefore, complaints of
discrimination have been dealt with on
grounds other than those specifically
listed in the Code.
One case concerned discrimination
against handicapped persons. A
group, consisting of eight counsellors
and eight children with physical, mental, or sensory handicaps had planned
a five-day visit to a ski resort.
The reservation was accepted, and
everything was fine, until the counsellor
asked whether there were many steps
at the resort, and the owner then realized that the group included handicapped children. The reservation was refused with the explanation that "this is
a family place."
The owners of the resort were contacted by the Human Rights Branch
and informed that the stairs did not
pose any insurmountable problem, be
cause only one of the children was in a
wheelchair, which was collapsible.
With help, all the children could manage stairs, and were used to doing so
as they went about the community.
The resort owners agreed that there
was no reason to reject the group, and
they confirmed their willingness to accept a reservation from them at any
time.
Other complaints have been filed by
homosexual groups alleging discrimination in services available to the public.
All of these were settled successfully,
with the exception of one (the refusal
of a newspaper to accept advertisements from homosexual groups), which
has been referred to a board of inquiry.
Complaints alleging discrimination
against people on welfare have also
been investigated. These cases involved the refusal to provide dental
services to welfare recipients at a time
when negotiations between the B.C.
Dental Association and the Government had broken down. Some complaints were settled when the dentists
agreed that services should be provided; in others it was decided that the
dentists had a valid reason for withholding.
Promotion and Education
With the hiring of four Human
Rights Officers and an Assistant Director in 1974, the Branch, for the first
time, had resources to reach out into
the community, and take the initiative
in combatting discrimination.
At every opportunity, the Director
and staff appeared as guest speakers,
or as resource persons at workshops,
in order to publicize the provisions and
purposes of the Human Rights Code.
Consequently, the Branch participated
in annual conferences of the B.C. Association of Non-Status Indians, the
B.C. Federation of Labour, the Employers' Council, the Industrial Relations Management Association, the
 Owen B. Shime, barrister and solicitor, addresses the 1974 Arbitration Seminar. Flanking Mr. Shime are James Kinnaird, Associate Deputy Minister; James G. Matkin, Deputy
Minister; and Labour Minister W. S. King.
 INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
X 63
Native Indian Brotherhood, the Chinese Community Services, and the B.C.
Teachers' Federation.
The Branch contributed also to the
Police Commission's Task Force on
Women and the Police, the Department
of Education's Committee on Sexism
in the Schools, and the East Indian-
Canadian Human Rights Committee,
set up by the Director to work toward
resolution of racial tensions in Vancou
ver. The latter committee expanded
its work during the year to include all
racial and ethnic minorities within the
community.
The Branch became involved also
in initiating the equal employment
opportunities program, established by
the Provincial Government to ensure
that women, minority groups, and
handicapped people have equal access
to employment in the Public Service.
ARBITRATION
The principal function and responsibility of the Arbitration Branch, which
came into being early in 1974, is to
maintain a register of arbitrators, correlate arbitration awards, and make
these awards available to persons interested in legal decisions concerning
grievances that arise out of collective
agreements.
The awards received by the Branch
are published monthly in its Labour
Research Bulletin. Copies of the
awards are forwarded regularly to
Labour Arbitration Cases, and to Western Labour Arbitration Cases for publication, together with similar awards
from other jurisdictions. Arbitration
awards may be examined at the office
of the director of arbitration.
The Labour Code of British Columbia states that, where there is failure to
appoint or constitute an arbitration
board under a collective agreement, the
Minister of Labour may, at the request
of either party, make such appointments as are necessary to constitute
such a board. In 1974 the Minister
made 26 such appointments; 16 of
them were for chairmen of arbitration
boards and 10 were for single arbitrators.
During 1974, arbitrators forwarded
141 copies of awards to the Minister.
Of those, 65 were decisions of arbitration boards and 76 were awards of
single arbitrators.    (Table 6, page 76,
lists frequency of occurrence of reported issues.)
Of the awards handed down in 1974,
42 were concerned with the discharge
of employees from their employment.
The average length of time elapsing
from the date of the alleged violation
of the collective agreement to the date
of the award was 143.1 days; the shortest length of time was 12 days; and
the longest period of those grievances
taken into consideration extended beyond 290 days.
Table 5 on page 76 shows that the
average time-span from appointment of
a single arbitrator by the parties to the
date of an award is 47.5 days, whereas
the time-span from appointment of an
arbitration board to award date is 61.7
days.
The average time-span between date
of hearing and date of award by an
arbitration board is 23.7 days, but in
the case of a single arbitrator, 9.5 days.
On three occasions, arbitration boards
handed down awards immediately after
the hearing, whereas the shortest period
taken by a single arbitrator was one
day.
The first seminar on arbitration,
sponsored by the Department of Labour, was held at the University of
British Columbia in December. Papers
were presented on the subjects of chairing, rights arbitrations, "med-arb," and
interest disputes arbitration.    (Copies
 X 64
BRITISH COLUMBIA
of these papers are available from the
Branch.)
It is the intention of the Branch to
increase the facilities now available for
the use and guidance of arbitrators. To
this end, seminars will be arranged, and
it is planned that representatives of
labour and management will participate
in these endeavours to bring about a
more stable industrial relations atmosphere by the application of arbitration
proceedings.
MEDIATION SERVICES
The prime objective of the Mediation
Services Branch is the settling of labour
disputes in the Province. To achieve
this goal, the Branch provides assistance to management and trade unions
in disputes between the parties during
negotiation for renewal of a collective
agreement, or during negotiations for
an initial collective agreement.
Either labour or management may
apply for such assistance by writing to
the Director of Mediation Services,
Burnaby, B.C., and requesting appointment of a Mediation Officer under the
Labour Code of British Columbia. The
Branch may also intervene and voluntarily offer the services of a Mediation
Officer to the parties when a labour-
management dispute has resulted in a
strike or lockout.
A mediator functions so as to advance the principles of free, responsible
collective bargaining. He is there to
make both procedural and substantive
suggestions, and to propose whatever
alternatives are likely to assist the contending parties in reaching a collective
agreement. The success of mediators
in British Columbia is demonstrated by
the very large majority of collective
agreements that are negotiated without
resort to strikes or lockouts.
At its Burnaby offices, the Branch
maintains a file of copies of collective
agreements for use by trade unions and
employers.
Mediation Officers of the Branch
were involved in a total of 350 disputes
in 1974—292 to which they were appointed, and 58 carried over from the
previous year. In addition, they were
involved in 18 disputes, subsequent to
the report of the officer, and in six
where no official appointment was
made. Eighty disputes have been carried forward into 1975.
The number of employees, bargaining units, and employers were greatly
increased over 1973, owing mainly to
negotiations in the construction and
forest industries, and a greater number
of appointments, as indicated in Table
7, page 77.
Inquiry Service
Upon request, the Branch provided
speakers and panelists for trade union
and employers' organizations, and for
educational establishments. In addition, a great number of inquiries concerning legislation affecting collective
bargaining were received from all areas
in the Province.
Communications among conciliation
and mediation services in various provinces, as well as agencies in the United
States, were established and maintained
for continual information exchange on
matters of administration and legislation, and on trends and problems of
mutual interest and concern. In sum,
the Branch adopted a more aggressive
and participative role in dispute involvement during the year.
 INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
X 65
LABOUR STANDARDS
The Labour Standards Branch is responsible for informing all employees
and employers in the Province about
their rights under the statutes administered by the Branch. These statutes are
concerned with such matters as hours
of work, payment of wages, minimum
wages, maternity protection, employment agencies, employment of children,
and annual and general holidays.
To this end, the Branch's Industrial
Relations Officers are trained to interpret the various statutes, and to assist
both employers and employees with
problems arising under the Acts and
orders governing labour standards in
the Province. The officers also perform
services related to requirements of the
Labour Code and the Human Rights
Code.
The Department maintains offices in
Victoria, Nanaimo, Vancouver, Chilliwack, Kamloops, Kelowna, Williams
Lake, Prince George, Terrace, Nelson,
Cranbrook, and Dawson Creek, variously staffed by some 60 Industrial
Relations Officers.
To avoid misunderstandings, and obtain compliance, Industrial Relations
Officers of the Labour Standards
Branch regularly call on employers and
employees to explain the functions of
these Acts. The extent of their responsibilities can be appreciated only when
one considers that, over the past three
years, an average of more than 9,000
new companies have been incorporated
each year, and approximately 3,000
dissolved. In addition, there are the
individuals who start up businesses and
do not incorporate them.
The Branch made significant changes,
during 1974, in the duties and responsibilities of Industrial Relations Officers
employed throughout the Province.
The Labour Code of British Columbia has given the officers a more positive and challenging role to play on the
industrial relations scene. To meet this
new  challenge,   and  to   heighten   the
effectiveness of the services offered by
the Branch, the training program for
both new and established officers has
been increased.
The officers made 52,298 calls and
investigations in performing the duties
imposed by legislation. The type of
complaints registered with the Branch
continue to be concerned largely with
nonpayment of wages. Total adjustments were made to 12,912 employees,
involving 5,017 employers, for a total
of $1,657,039.96.
The Board of Industrial Relations
was requested to issue 667 certificates
under the provisions of the Payment of
Wages Act. In addition, 491 demands
were issued to persons indebted to
employers named in certificates, and
numerous other legal documents were
required to obtain payment of employees' wages.
Sixty-seven registrations were issued
to employment agencies subsequent to
assurances by an officer that these
agencies were observing the requirements of the Employment Agencies Act
and various other legislation.
Four hundred and sixty-three permits
were issued to children under the age
of 15 years. Each application was investigated to determine whether the
work involved would be detrimental to
the applicant's health or schooling.
Statistical data attesting to the extent
of Branch activity during 1974 appears in Tables 8 to 12, on pages 78
and 81. A list of organizations to
which registrations were issued under
the Employment Agencies Act appears
on page 79.
Considerable time and effort was
expended by the staff of the Branch
during the year to familiarize organizations and individuals with the requirements of the legislation administered by
the Branch. In addition to the regular
addresses delivered to various groups,
efforts were made to advise all workers
 X 66
BRITISH COLUMBIA
of their rights, and of the services offered by the Branch. The co-operation
of other Provincial Government depart
ments helped to ensure compliance with
Labour Standards legislation as it now
applies to their employees.
 •v.
/- e■
  INDEPENDENT BOARDS
BOARD OF  INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
The Board of Industrial Relations is
a quasi-judicial body, appointed under
the Minimum Wage Act. Its responsibilities include establishment of minimum wage orders and regulations;
establishment of hours of work regulations; issuing of overtime permits and
variance in hours of work; establishment of orders regulating the observance, and pay, for general holidays;
and the issuing and enforcing of certificates for the recovery of unpaid wages.
Two orders were made pursuant to
the Minimum Wage Act in 1974. Order
14 (1974) Occupation of Resident
Caretaker supersedes Order 14 (1972)
and establishes a minimum wage scale
for resident caretakers in apartment
buildings of $150 a month, plus $6 a
month for each residential suite in
apartment buildings containing more
than four and less than 61 residential
suites, and $510 a month in apartment
buildings containing more than 60 residential suites. The order also requires
that every resident caretaker be given
a 32-hour period free from duty, or be
paid $3.75 an hour for all hours worked
during that period.
The Order Requiring Employers to
Give Their Employees a General Holiday With Pay amends a previous order
made on July 16, 1968, by adding British Columbia Day to the list of required
general holidays, and also by making
provision whereby, in exceptional cases,
the Board may approve an arrangement
differing from that provided for in the
order in respect of a general holiday.
Two orders were rescinded pursuant
to the Minimum Wage Act. One was
Order 2 (1951) Apprentices Indentured Under the Apprenticeship Act,
the other was Order 8 (1972) Fresh
Fruit and Vegetable Industry, rescinded
effective June 1, 1975.
Pursuant to the Minimum Wage Act,
three regulations exempted certain em
ployees from operation of the Act. One
was Regulation 8 (1974), which
amended Regulation 8 (1965) by adding exemptions for pupils enrolled in
classes of work study and work experience programs in public secondary
schools; the second was Regulation 43
(1974), which exempts professional
workers and residential therapists employed by the British Columbia Brown-
dale Society for the period expiring
August 30, 1975; and the third was
Regulation 44 (1974), which exempts
employees of Lifeline Drug Rehabilitation House, Victoria.
Pursuant to the Hours of Work Act,
Regulation 21 (1964) Fresh Fruit and
Vegetable Industry was rescinded, effective June 1, 1975.
An exemption from section 3 (1) of
the Hours of Work Act, granted to the
pulp and paper industry in 1968, was
rescinded, and permission granted to
allow employees in the industry to
exceed the limits prescribed in section
3 (1) of the Act, but only to the extent
permitted by any collective agreement
covering such employees.
The Board considered numerous applications for overtime permits and,
where the requirements of the legislation were satisfied, permits were issued.
The Board also considered and granted
many requests for scheduling and varying hours under section 11 (3) of the
Hours of Work Act and Minimum
Wage Order 17.
The Board confirmed many certificates for wages owing under the Payment of Wages Act. (For detailed information in this connection, reference
should be made to the report of the
Labour Standards Branch.) Several
requests for exemption from section
1 5a of the Payment of Wages Act were
also dealt with.
69
 X 70
BRITISH COLUMBIA
BOARDS OF REVIEW
The boards of review were created
by the 1973 amendments to the Workers' Compensation Act, and consist of
a panel of nine people—three lawyers
acting as chairmen, three appointees
with a management background, and
three with a labour background. Each
board considering any given appeal
consists of a chairman and two representatives, one each from labour and
management.
The new structure under the Workers' Compensation Act provides for a
vertical system of appeals whereby decisions by the claims adjudicators may
be appealed to the boards of review,
and decisions by the boards of review
may be appealed to the commissioners.
At any of these levels, an appeal may
be made to a medical review panel on
a medical issue only; the decision of the
panel is final, binding, and not reviewable. The boards of review, therefore,
perform the function of an intermediate
appeal tribunal, and their jurisdiction
is limited to decisions related to a
worker made by any department of the
Workers' Compensation Board. This
jurisdiction, for example, excludes any
consideration by a board of review of
issues arising solely between employers
and the Board, such as Accident Prevention Regulations, penalty assessments, or allocation of costs.
The boards of review are independent of the Workers' Compensation
Board, and are situated in separate offices. All members and chairmen are
appointed by Order in Council and are
not employees of the Board. The
boards of review maintain control over
selection and supervision of staff, and
over all procedural and administrative
matters.
The boards of review hear appeals
on a great variety of issues, including
the origin of an injury, the existence of
a continuing disability, and the sufficiency and adequacy of time-loss benefits  and  pensions.    Appeals  may  be
considered either on the contents of the
existing Workers' Compensation Board
file, with any further materials sought
and received by the board, or, if the
worker or employer so requests, may
include a personal meeting so that further information may be presented and
submissions made. These meetings
take place in Vancouver, or close to the
worker's or employer's residence or
place of business, usually at the appellant's convenience. One board of
review travels every two weeks throughout the Province. These circuits normally take one week and encompass an
average of 12 to 15 meetings.
When the board of review meets with
an employer or a claimant, the appellant has the right to be represented
either by a union official, the Compensation Consultant, the newly appointed Employers' Adviser, or a representative from an organization of
employers. Occasionally claimants seek
representation through a lawyer. The
procedure at meetings is intended to be
as informal as possible. Court procedure is not emulated; in fact, by regulation, the boards of review are directed
to avoid similarities to court procedures.
The boards of review often seek
further medical information through
examinations by, and opinions from,
physicians at the Workers' Compensation Board, or from outside consultants.
In 1974 the number of appeals received totalled 1,015, of which 796
were concluded prior to December 31,
1974. Of this total, 861 appeals were
made by or on behalf of workers, and
154 were made by or on behalf of employers. Of the many issues considered
by the boards of review, the most common (306) appeals involved a decision
by the Workers' Compensation Board
not to reopen an existing claim. Other
issues frequently raised were the insufficiency of permanent partial disability
awards, and the determination by the
 INDEPENDENT BOARDS
X 71
Workers' Compensation Board that no
compensable injury has arisen out of a
work-related incident. From the employer's point of view, issue was taken
most often with Workers' Compensation Board decisions that a compensable injury had resulted from a
particular work incident, or that an incident that led to injury was within the
scope of the worker's employment.
More than one third of all appeals
(385) involved back injuries. These
claims present great difficulties to adjudicators, both in the first instance and
on appeal.
Most of the appeals pending as of
December 31, 1974, involved a request
by the board of review for further medical examination and information, or a
request by the worker or employer for
a meeting with the board of review.
Generally speaking, over half of all
appeals submitted were dealt with and
concluded within two months of the
date  of receipt of the file from the
Workers' Compensation Board. The
delays beyond that period of time were
usually caused by an inability to get
prompt action on requests for further
information. In all, 627 appeals involved requests for a meeting. With
cancellations, 586 such meetings were
conducted, 288 in Vancouver and 298
in other localities in the Province. The
schedule for meetings has thus developed a general delay of approximately
one and one half months. The backlog
has been constant since mid-summer
of  1974.
A great many appeals were submitted to the boards of review in the
first few months of 1974; this number
was reduced considerably by the summer, but began increasing again during
the fall and into December. The experience gained in a year of operation
has prompted a review and revision of
administrative and adjudication procedures that should lead to improved
efficiency of the system in 1975.
   Boilermaker Course, B.C. Vocational School, Burnaby.
 STATISTICS
TABLES
Table 1—Number of Complaints Investigated, by Section of the Human
Rights Act (Jan. 1 to Oct. 10, 1974)
Section
Total
Complaints
Settled
by
Officers
Without
Merit
Before
Human
Rights
Commission
Held
Over
to 1975
Withdrawn
13
118
2
1
2
38
1
2
34
2
1
....
8
1
7
34
1
2
4
6—Discrimination by trade union prohibited	
7—Discrimination   in   application   for   employment
1
8—Discrimination prohibited in accommodation, services, or facilities —  ..
9—Discrimination prohibited in tenancy	
10—Publishing or displaying discriminatory signs prohibited ....    _ __  _..
I
9                5
16               6
1       |        1
|         1
1      |        6
3
Totals	
161              53
39              10             49              10
Table 2—Number of Complaints Investigated, by Section of the Human
Rights Code (Oct. 10 to Dec. 31, 1974)
Section
Total
Complaints
Settled
by
Officers
Without
Merit
Before
Board
of
Inquiry
Held
Over
to 1975
Withdrawn
3—Discrimination in public facilities	
4—Discrimination in purchase of property	
5—Discrimination in tenancy premises.—  	
13
1
13
3
49
1
5
4
1
12
1
6
1
9
2
29
1
1
8—Discrimination in respect of employment	
9—Discrimination by trade unions and employers' and
8      |      ....
Totals __ -	
80
22
9
48
1
Table 3—Number of Complaints Investigated Under the Human Rights Act,
by Nature of Complaint (Jan. 1 to Oct. 10, 1974)
Nature of Complaint
Total
Settled
by
Officers
Without
Merit
Before
Human
Rights
Commission
Held
Over
to 1975
Withdrawn
Race     	
Religion	
Sex   	
Colour	
Nationality	
Ancestry	
Place of origin-
Age  	
Other-.	
Totals
40
5
69
6
3
4
3
11
20
161
14
1
28
1
7
3
13
2
1
1
5
7
~39~
19
3
I
49
75
 X 76
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 4—Number of Complaints Investigated Under the Human Rights Code,
by Nature of Complaint (Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1974)
Nature of Complaint
Total
Settled
by
Officers
Without
Merit
Before
Board
of
Inquiry
Held
Over
to 1975
Withdrawn
Race     -          	
13
5
3
5
Sex-     	
28
10
3
14
1
2
2
3
3
Marital status  	
13
5
8
Without reasonable cause..	
20
2
3
15
Other  	
1
1
....
Totals 	
80
22
9
48
1
Table 5—Average Number of Days to Complete Arbitration Cases in 1974
Single Arbitration
Events in the Span                                            Arbitrators Boards
Date of discharge to date of award  123.2 160.9
Date of appointment by Minister to date of
award     59.1 72.0
Date of appointment by parties to date of
award     47.5 61.7
Date of hearing to date of award       9.5 23.7
Table 6—Frequency of Occurrence of Issues in Cases Reported in 1974
Frequency of
Issue Occurrence1
Accommodation  2
Annual vacation   6
Contracting out   3
Demotion  1
Discharge  42
Discipline   2
Holiday pay  2
Interpretation   9
Job classification   10
Job evaluation   6
Jury duty  1
Lay-off  4
Management rights   1
Overtime  9
Personal appearance  1
Promotion  2
Scheduling hours   1
 STATISTICS
X 77
Table 6—Frequency of Occurrence of Issues in Cases Reported
in 1974—Continued
Frequency of
Issue Occurrence1
Seniority   16
Sick pay  2
Statutory holiday   3
Statutory holiday pay  1
Suspension  5
Technological change  1
Terms of agreement  2
Termination  1
Transportation  1
Travelling allowance  1
Union security   1
Vacation pay   2
Wages   13
Welfare plan .  1
Work assignment  4
1 These figures do not correspond to number of awards received as some awards deal witli more than one
Table 7—Appointment of Mediation Officers
1974
Appointments continued from previous year  58
Appointments made during the year  292
No official appointment  6
Totals	
Less—
Appointments continuing   80
Appointments rescinded  11
Total appointments completed	
356
1973
35
253
6
295
9
58
-91
•—
-67
265
228
Settlements—■
During the officer's appointment
Following report of the officer „_
No official appointment	
Total settlements
160
18
6
184
Number of employers involved        1,048
Number of bargaining units involved        1,110
Number of employees involved    106,179
154
9
6
169
419
449
38,308
 X 78 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 8—Payment of Wages Act
1973
Certificates made under section 5 (1) (c)  545
Certificates confirmed under section 5 (2) (a)  427
Certificates cancelled under section 5 (2) (b) (ii)  11
Certificates cancelled and remade under section 5  (2)
(b) (i)   28
Certificates paid before confirmation  38
Certificates paid before filed in court  47
Certificates confirmed under section 5 (2) (b) (i) filed
with Registrar of
County Court   364
Supreme Court   44
Appeals under section 5 (4)  	
Demands made under section 6(1)  249
1974
667
552
14
23
45
16
435
43
491
Table 9—Comparison of Investigations and Wage Adjustments,
1973 and 1974
1973 1974
Inspections and investigations                48,893 52,298
Annual and General Holidays Act—
Firms involved                  1,234 1,227
Employees affected                 1,943 2,053
Arrears paid      $108,476.58 $145,831.40
Minimum Wage Act—
Firms involved                      348 405
Employees affected                  1,089 909
Arrears paid         $92,596.76 $60,257.72
Payment of Wages Act—
Firms involved                  3,021 3,385
Employees affected                   6,063 9,950
Arrears paid   $1,002,706.40 $1,450,950.84
Total adjustments  $1,203,779.74 $1,657,039.96
Table 10—Court Cases, 1974
Name of Act
Number of
Employers
Charges
Convictions
Dismissals
Payment oj Wages A ct
Minimum Wage Act-..
Flours oj Work Act	
10
2
1
11 I
1 I
11
1
1
 STATISTICS
X 19
Table 11—Summary of Permits Issued, 1974, Under Control of Employment
of Children Act
District
M
ii
a>
>,
a
M
a
*
M
o
o
£i
C
U
o
a
o
o
1
o
o
1
'«
a
c
o
O
0
u
EQ
(J
_rt
0
i
Total
u
i
CQ
u
u
P
X
ii
^
IS
CL.
h
>
Amusement 	
4
4
i
1
2
12
Automobile service-stations  	
13
2
4
8
3  |    3
2
7
2
6
50
Catering.   .  .
106
4
10
5
27
4  ]    7
i
25
10
12
12
223
11
1
2  |    2
...
...
6
1
2
1
26
Electricity^  ..     ... .
Laundry, cleaning, dyeing	
6
....
i
3
10
1
2
3
6
Manufacturing __ _.__  .„.„_
11
1
5
3
3
....
5
1
1
1
31
Mercantile. _	
46
4
2
4
7
4
9
1
7
3
5
2
94
Shoe-shine stands  ___ _ 	
Ship-building __	
1
....
1
Transportation  __._ ___	
4
2
1
-
3
10
Totals _	
199
14
"
12
53
16 [ 26
3
50
26
22
25
463
Table 12—Registrations Issued, 1974, Under Employment Agencies Act
A-l Personnel,
136 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver.
A.B.C. Employment Service,
100, 395 West Broadway,
Vancouver.
Able Personnel,
1956 West Broadway,
Vancouver.
Accounting Personnel Services (div. of H. S.
Services Ltd.),
509, 1200 West Pender Street,
Vancouver.
Acme Personnel Service Ltd.,
130, 1030 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver.
Active Personnel & Business Services Ltd.,
4, 2571 Shaughnessy Street,
Port Coquitlam.
Beacon Services Ltd.,
876 Commercial Drive,
Vancouver.
Beacon Services Victoria Ltd.,
100, 395 West Broadway,
Vancouver.
Betterstaff Business Services Ltd.,
670a, No. 3 Road,
Richmond.
B.C. Central Credit Union,
885 Dunsmuir Street,
Vancouver.
B.C. Management Recruiters Ltd.,
300, 1111 West Georgia Stret,
Vancouver.
B.C. Personnel (Pacific Personnel Ltd.),
Box 10050,
1250 Toronto-Dominion Bank Tower,
Vancouver.
Brockton Employment Agencies Ltd.,
820, 925 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver.
Career Personnel Ltd.,
543 Seymour Street,
Vancouver.
Centennial Personnel,
Suite 8, 6035 Sussex Avenue,
Burnaby.
Chinese Employment Bureau,
529 Gore Avenue,
Vancouver.
Classic Personnel,
6968 Ash Street,
Vancouver.
Computech Consulting Canada Ltd.,
1009, 1177 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver.
Contact Personnel Ltd.,
837 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver.
Copeman Employment Agencies Ltd.,
3107, 1733 Comox Street,
Vancouver.
Daisy  Lake  Personnel   (div.  of  Daisy  Lake
Enterprises Ltd.),
613, 207 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver.
Dave Boddy's Service Ltd.,
207 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver.
 X 80
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 12—Registrations Issued, 1974, Under Employment Agencies Act
—Continued
Dimension Personnel,
581 Hornby Street,
Vancouver.
Dot Personnel Services   (div. of Dictaphone
Corp.),
1930, 736 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver.
Drake Personnel,
1175 Douglas Street,
Victoria.
Drake Personnel,
Suite 202, 622-628 Columbia Street,
New Westminster.
Drake Personnel,
812, 1055 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver.
Dumaresq Loggers Agency Ltd.,
328 Carrall Street,
Vancouver.
Dunhill Personnel of Kamloops Ltd.,
204, 611 Lansdowne Street,
Kamloops.
Dunhill Personnel Recruitment Ltd.,
220, 1155 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver.
Elan Data Makers Ltd.,
826 Homer Street,
Vancouver.
Fast Action Placement Service,
527, 510 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver.
Finney-Taylor Personnel (B.C.) Ltd.,
1195 Guinness House,
Calgary, Alta.
323, 409 Granville Street,
Vancouver.
The 500 Selection Services (Western) Ltd.,
2500, 1177 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver V6E2K3.
Girl Friday Service Ltd.,
806 Granville Avenue,
Richmond.
Girl Friday Service (Elaine Nichols Management Ltd.),
559 Lawrence Avenue,
Kelowna.
Godfrey Chowne & Associates,
Box 10025,
1100, 700 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver.
Greater Vancouver Nursing Services Bureau,
828 West Broadway,
Vancouver.
H. V. Chapman & Associates Ltd.,
Suite 1495, Two Bentall Centre.
Vancouver.
Hannah, Turner & Associates Ltd.,
612 East Broadway,
Vancouver.
Helping Hands Agency,
2206 Haversley Avenue,
Coquitlam.
Helpful Aunts Bureau,
4049 West 31st Avenue,
Vancouver.
Hospitality Personnel Services Ltd.,
1015 Burrard Street,
Vancouver.
Hunt Personnel Consultants,
1100, 700 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver.
Jobfinders Personnel Services,
440 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver V6B ILL
John Fleury & Associates Ltd.,
210, 1155 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver.
June Allen Employment Agency,
1322a Government Street,
Victoria.
June Whitehead Personnel,
32 Begbie Street,
New Westminster.
Kates, Peat, Marwick & Co.,
1101, 900 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver.
Key   Personnel,   Office  Assistance   (Canada)
Ltd.,
201, 540 Burrard Street,
Vancouver.
Lamond, Dewhurst, Westcott & Fraser Ltd.,
901, 1112 West Pender Street,
Vancouver.
S. Lawrence & Associates,
736 Rogers Building, 470 Granville Street,
Vancouver V6C 1V5.
The Loggers' Agency Ltd.,
415 Carrall Street,
Vancouver.
Mennonite Bethel Agency,
5825 Sherbrooke Street,
Vancouver.
Mis-Jo Office Services Ltd.,
1836, 1055 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver.
Office Assistance (Canada) Ltd.,
201, 1139 Lonsdale Avenue,
North Vancouver.
Office Assistance (Canada) Ltd.,
805 Anderson Road,
Richmond.
Office Assistance (Canada) Ltd.,
Box 10074,
1235 Pacific Centre,
700 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver.
Office Assistance (Canada) Ltd.,
230, 550 Sixth Street,
New Westminster.
 STATISTICS
X 81
Table 12—Registrations Issued, 1974, Under EmploymentAgencies Act
—Continued
Office Auxiliary Prince George,
1525 Sixth Avenue,
Prince George.
Page Girl Personnel Ltd.,
726 Richards Street,
Vancouver.
Patton Personnel Services,
590 Hornby Street,
Vancouver.
Personnel Service,
114 Sixth Street,
New Westminster.
Philcan Personnel Consultants Ltd.,
5022 Victoria Drive,
Vancouver.
Polar Personnel Ltd.,
104, 1670 West Eighth Avenue,
Vancouver.
Professional  Hotel  &  Restaurant  Employees
Replacement Agency,
Office 34,
539 West Pender Street,
Vancouver.
Professional Personnel,
204, 1015 Burrard Street,
Vancouver.
Progressive Personnel,
305, 540 Burrard Street,
Vancouver.
P. S. Ross & Partners,
1500, 1177 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver.
Ramona Beauchamp Model & Talent Agency,
2033 West 42nd Avenue,
Vancouver.
Reliable Babysitting Service,
3145 Poyner Crescent,
Hart Highlands,
Prince George.
S. J. Renard Hospitality Consultants,
925 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver.
Reva Lander (R. Lander & Associates Ltd.),
Box 2142,
101, 1644 West Broadway,
Vancouver.
Ric-Ron Agencies Ltd.,
19, 2112 Cornwall Street,
Vancouver.
Robert  Half  Personnel   Agencies  Vancouver
Ltd.,
535 Thurlow Street,
Vancouver.
Robert H. Wood & Associates,
179 West Broadway,
Vancouver.
Ruby's Babysitting Bureau,
3038 East 59th Avenue,
Vancouver.
Select Office Services Ltd.,
5722—176a Street,
Cloverdale,
Surrey.
Scribe Services Ltd.,
507 Crown Trust Building,
475 Howe Street,
Vancouver.
Stevenson & Kellogg Ltd.,
901, 1112 West Pender Street,
Vancouver.
Talbot's Business Center,
316, 510 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver.
Technical Service Council,
310, 1199 West Pender Street,
Vancouver.
Temploy Personnel,
260, 727 Johnson Street,
Victoria.
Thorne Gunn & Co.,
305, 645 Fort Street,
Victoria.
Thorne Gunn & Co. (The Thorne Group Ltd.),
2400, 1177 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver.
Timat Consultants,
4939 Water Lane,
West Vancouver.
Toner's Hiring Service,
912, 207 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver.
Top-Notch Personnel,
205, 715 Victoria Street,
Prince George.
Tulk Personnel Ltd.,
1620, 700 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver.
Van Isle Personnel Ltd.,
4 Church Street,
Nanaimo.
The Vancouver World of Personnel Ltd.,
102, 1644 West Broadway,
Vancouver.
Walker-Davies Ltd.,
470 Granville Street,
Vancouver.
Western Physicians Replacement Services Ltd.,
201, 204 Blue Mountain Street,
Coquitlam.
Woods, Gordon & Co..
Box 10101, 700 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver.
XCS Management Ltd.,
402, 119 West Pender Street,
Vancouver.
Zee-Jay Accounting Machine Operators Ltd.,
4875 Water Lane,
West Vancouver.
 X 82
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 13—Summary of Apprentices in Trades
Term
in
Years
Ye
ar of Apprenticeship Being Served
Total
Number
of
Apprentices in
Training
Completed
in
1974
Trade or Occupation
First
Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth
Automotive—
Transmission repair  	
Body repair -	
4
4
4
3,4
3
4
4
2
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
2
4
4
3
3
2
4
3
2
4
3
4
4
4
3
3
3
4
5
3
2
3
3
4
4
3
3
3'/2
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4-5
3
2
4
2-5
2
4
4
148
2
3
2
12
343
41
7
2
16
6
6
2
9
9
14
44
34
3
1
10
71
6
7
52
11
671
19
24
25
31
39
83
8
3
8
140
59
4
5
265
2
13
7
7
15
1
3
7
16
50
7
38
57
300
21
2
103
3
3
7
363
28
2
1
1
7
1
5
7
3
2
21
3
2
2
29
17
16
54
6
416
6
9
30
17
75
3
3
6
122
39
2
1
252
3
78
1
1
4
11
328
2
15
2
1
4
2
39
1
9
6
49
47
2
377
2
21
18
26
1
15
90
28
2
251
3
82
3
1
5
321
3
16
3
2
1
	
5
4
4
32
6
281
30
15
105
257
2
18
3
11
1
1
1
1
9
7
18
32
18
	
1
	
1
10
12
411
9
8
6
35
1,355
69
11
6
1
54
2
9
9
9
16
21
22
104
38
5
1
21
100
33
72
185
25
1,745
27
24
55
109
1
82
158
12
6
44
457
126
8
6
1,025
10
63
10
15
55
1
2
15
3
3
!         23
1         43
197
24
117
191
513
65
2
41
1
4
Glass installation	
2
4
Mechanical repair	
164
14
Radiator manufacture and repair
Trimming  __	
Diesel electical   -	
Diesel engine repair	
2
1
7
Farm machinery mechanic __
Front end  alignment  and  frame
2
1
Front-end   alignment  and  brake
service _	
Marine engine mechanic	
Small engine mechanic 	
Partsman _
Auto    parts,   warehousing   and
4
1
3
40
Tire repair ____	
Baking...         _	
Barbering   	
Boatbuilding    _
Boilermaking	
17
27
2
15
9
1
Carpentry
177
Cement mason __ ____	
Cook __	
10
13
Draughtsman _	
5
9
Electrical—
Domestic radio and TV service...
Industrial 	
3
81
33
Work-
111
4    1            2
17    1          15
6
Winder.. __	
2
2
21
1
4
1
2
14
73
17
37
54
213
4
1
1
3
8
7
2
1
5
5
74
24
38
22
1
14
Industrial  ___	
Instrument repair	
2
1
Panels and controls	
1
1
1
4
17
Funeral directing and embalming ___
16
36
254
6
	
1
 STATISTICS X 83
Table 13—Summary of Apprentices in Trades—Continued
Term
in
Years
Yt
ar of App
-enticeship
Being Served
Total
Number
of
Apprentices in
Training
Completed
in
1974
Trade or Occupation
First
Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth
4
5
3
4
4
4
1
4
1
2
1
5
4
3
4
4
4
4
3
5
1
4
5
5
4
5
3
5
4
4
5
5
4
4
1-5
286
27
2
9
51
1
3
1
11
47
27
77
8
12
181
8
4
4
52
6
13
7
4
119
11
42
19
126
14
9
6
79
64
25
38
234
15
47
5
40
7
5
77
73
23
3
229
7
6
4
40
5
1
110
12
24
23
101
6
4
24
41
68
25
19
388
11
78
6
28
2
6
2
64
15
8
154
4
10
5
53
2
126
6
22
18
81
2
8
10
45
24
9
9
276
31
6
26
4
1
47
143
5
12
5
3
92
16
23
65
3
6
11
45
30
2
7
22
54
........
96
17
90
6
70
1,184
106
127
26
145
14
3
13
13
124
27
315
46
23
707
24
32
18
145
6
13
17
5
543
45
128
60
463
25
27
57
280
186
61
73
Ironwork	
Jewellery manufacture and repair....
33
2
3
Logging	
Lumber manufacturing industry—
Construction millwright 	
Benchman  	
3
7
25
12
50
Maintenance mechanic, pipe-line
Meatcutting  	
21
9
138
Moulding  	
Office machine mechanic 	
1
10
4
90
5
11
8
45
1
2
19
Steamfitting and pipefitting	
77
23
2
4
Totals     ..               	
4,186
3,413
2,839
2,160
367
12,965
1,960
Table 14—Percentage of Journeyman Rate Paid by Employer During
Stipulated Periods of Apprenticeship
Six-month Period
Percentage Rate Paid For Term
2-Year
3-Year
4-Year
5-Year
1st   	
50
60
75
90
50
55
65
70
80
90
50
55
60
65
70
75
80
90
50
2nd	
55
3rd  	
60
4th                 	
65
5th    	
70
6th    	
75
7th   	
8th	
9th  	
10th                                                                   	
80
85
90
90
 X 84 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 15—Certificates and Exemptions Issued in 1974
Certifi- Exemp-
Trade cates               tions
Automotive body repair  43
Automotive mechanical repair  360
Boilermaker (erection)  9
Bricklaying   37
Carpentry   242
Cook  26
Heavy-duty mechanic  326
Industrial electrical  151
Industrial instrumentation  89
Ironwork  7
Lumber manufacturing industry—
Benchman  19
Circular-saw filer   24
Construction millwright  1
Saw fitter   44
Steamfitting and pipefitting    	
Machinist   86
Millwright   328
Oil-burner mechanic  15
Painting and decorating  65
Plumbing   215             15
Radio and TV, domestic :____3 :._-_. 15
Refrigeration  38               8
Roofing, damp and waterproofing  32
Sheet-metal work i  100              6
Sprinklerfitting  28               2
Steamfitting and pipefitting _._.  153             12
Totals  2,470             43
 STATISTICS
Table 16—Compensation Claim Referrals
Referrals  Number
Commissioners of the Workers' Compensation Board ... 24
Medical review panel    27
Boards of review  208
Field investigators   9
Legal Aid  16
Pensions Department of Workers' Compensation Board 58
Rehabilitation consultants  27
Canada Manpower   9
St. John Ambulance  6
Miscellaneous   22
Inquiries—■
Union representatives  36
Lawyers   22
CBC program "Ombudsman"  7
Others—
Silicosis cases  23
Counselling of widows and children  19
Out-of-Province claims  16
X 85
529
Table 16a—Date of Origination of Claims
Date of
Number of
Date of
Number
Origination
Claims
Origination
Claims
1920-29—
2
1970	
     37
1930-39 ....
       6
1971	
     38
1940-49
20
1972	
     74
1950-59
45
1973	
   197
1960-69	
  109
1974	
   140
Table 17—Schools Whose Registrations Were Renewed for 1974
School
Art Instruction Schools, Inc.,
500 South Fourth Street,
Minneapolis, Minn. 55415 U.S.A.
The Canadian Executive Counsel,
Suite 311, 85 Sparks Street,
Ottawa, Ont. KIP 5A7.
Canadian Property Managers Association,
Suite 311, 85 Sparks Street,
Ottawa, Ont. K1P5A7.
Canadian School of Tax Accounting,
Suite 101, 150 Eglinton Avenue East,
Toronto, Ont. M4P 1E8.
Subjects Taught
Advertising Art,
Cartooning.
Marketing Management.
Administration of Property,
Property Law,
Buildings.
Personal Income Tax.
 X 86                                                    BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 17—Schools Whose Registrations Were Renewed for 1974—Continued
School
Subjects Taught
Canadian Travel College,
Travel Agent's Training.
Suite 302, 100 West Pender Street,
Vancouver V6B 1R8.
Columbia School of Broadcasting,
Radio and Television Announcing.
415 Birks Building,
104 Street and Jasper Avenue,
Edmonton, Alta.
Coneducor Ltd.,
Successful Investment and Money Manage
Suite 400, 150 Consumer's Road,
ment.
Willowdale, Ont. M2J 1P9.
DeVry Institute of Technology of Canada Ltd.
Electronic Engineering Technology  (practi
(one of the Bell & Howell Schools),
cal and correspondence),
970 Lawrence Avenue West,
Electronics Technician (practical and corre
Toronto, Ont. M6A 1C5.
spondence),
Television  Communications  and  Electronic
Instrumentation (practical and correspon
dence),
Television   and   Communications   (practical
and Correspondence),
Electronic   Communications   (correspon
dence),
Home   Entertainment   Electronics   Systems
(correspondence),
Electronic Operations Technology and Com
puter Control (correspondence),
Electronic   Operations   Technology   (corre
spondence).
H. & M. Professional Training Institute Ltd.,
Medical Receptionist.
204, 1501—17th Avenue S.W.,
Calgary, Alta. T2T 0E2.
International Career Academy of Canada Ltd.,
Broadcasting,
8 King Street East,
Medical Assisting,
Toronto, Ont.
Dental Assisting.
International   Correspondence   Schools   Cana
Architecture,
dian, Ltd.,
Art,
7475 Sherbrooke Street West,
Business Training,
Montreal, Que. H4B 1S4.
Chemistry,
Civil Engineering,
Draughting,
Electrical Engineering,
General Education,
Mechanical Engineering,
Plumbing, Heating, and Air-conditioning,
Railroading,
Textiles,
Traffic Management,
Mining,
Domestic Engineering,
Navigation,
Pulp and Paper Making,
Other   courses   as   listed   in   the   Guidance
Manual.
Lewis Hotel-Motel School (wholly owned sub
Hotel-Motel Management (practical and cor
sidiary of International Career Academy of
respondence).
Canada Ltd.),
8 King Street East,
Toronto, Ont.
 STATISTICS
X 87
Table 17—Schools Whose Registrations Were Renewed for 1974—Continued
School
La Salle Extension University,
417 South Dearborn Street,
Chicago, 111. 60605 U.S.A.
Mann Career Training Ltd.,
3, 113—16th Avenue N.W.,
Calgary, Alta. T2M 0H3.
McGraw-Hill Continuing Education Centre,
330 Progress Avenue,
Scarborough, Ont. M1P 2Z5.
National College of Home Study,
5740 Yonge Street,
Willowdale, Ont. M2M 3T4.
National Institute of Broadcasting
356 Furby Street,
Winnipeg, Man. R3B 2V6.
Washington School of Art,
417 South Dearborn Street,
Chicago, 111. 60605 U.S.A.
Wayne School,
417 South Dearborn Street,
Chicago, 111. 60605 U.S.A.
A.B.C. Dress Designing School,
4009 Cambie Street,
Vancouver.
Advance Business College,
136 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver.
Beauty School of Elegance,
103 Fourth Avenue South,
Port Alberni V9Y 7L6.
Subjects Taught
Accounting,
Basic Computer Programming,
Draughting,
Law,
Secretarial Training,
Interior Decorating,
Restaurant/Club and Food Management,
Business Management,
Stenotype Training,
Traffic and Transportation,
Hotel/Motel Executive Training.
Medical Receptionist,
Motel/Hotel Management.
N.R.I. Courses—
Automotive Tune-up and  Electrical Systems, Master Technician,
Television   Radio  Servicing,   Master   and
Advanced Courses,
Electronics, Communications,
Servicing Electrical Appliances,
D.O.C. Certificate Course,
Air-conditioning and Refrigeration,
Master Air-conditioning and Heating.
C.R.E.I. Courses—
Principles of Leadership,
Electronics Engineering Courses,
Nuclear Engineering Technology,
Computer Programming,
C.A.T.V. 501,
Solid State Theory 280 and 281.
Business Management and Accounting,
Secretarial Science.
Radio and Television Announcing.
Complete Art Training.
Basic Air-conditioning and Refrigeration Service,
Basic Diesel Mechanics,
Dental Office Assistant.
Dressmaking and Designing.
General Office Training (clerical),
Secretarial,
Junior Management,
Powereading,
Executive Secretarial,
Legal Secretarial.
Medical Secretarial,
Gregg Shorthand Home Study Course.
Hairdressing.
 X 88                                                    BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 17—Schools Whose Registrations
Were Renewed for 1974—Continued
School
Blair's School of Hairdressing Ltd.,
3203—31st Avenue,
Vernon V1T 2H2.
Subjects Taught
Hairdressing.
H. & R. Block Basic Income Tax School,
3716 Oak Street,
Vancouver.
Basic Income Tax.
H. & R. Block Basic Income Tax School,
1680 Douglas Street,
Victoria V8T 4M2.
British Columbia Academy of Fashion Design,
611 Rogers Building,
470 Granville Street,
Vancouver.
Basic Income Tax.
Fashion Design—Certificate Course,
Fashion Designing—Diploma Course.
B.C. Telephone Plant Training Centre,
768 Seymour Street,
Vancouver.
Toll and Exchange Plant Courses,
Customer Service Courses,
Outside Plant Courses.
The Barbers' Association of British Columbia
Advanced Barbering School,
Room 411, 207 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver.
Construction and General Labourers Training
Trust Fund,
705 East Broadway,
Vancouver V5T 1X8.
Advanced Barbering.
Foremen and Prospective Foremen,
Transit and Level,
Concrete Placement,
Trenching and Pipelaying,
Blueprint Reading,
Construction Equipment Operation,
Rigging, Slinging and Signalling.
Dorothy Dean School of Beauty,
22451 North Street,
Maple Rridge.
Hairdressing.
Duffus College Ltd.,
440 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver V6B ILL
Office Occupations (commercial and Governmental),
Legal Secretarial,
Keypunch Training,
Salesmanship Workshops.
elan Keypunch School,
826 Home Street,
Vancouver V6B 2W5.
Keypunch Training.
Elizabeth Leslie Ltd.,
1102 Hornby Street,
Vancouver.
Personal Development and Modelling,
Fashion Merchandising.
Ernest Charles School of Hairdressing Ltd.,
736 Granville Street,
Hairdressing.
Vancouver.
Finning Tractor & Equipment Co. Ltd.,
555 Great Northern Way,
Vancouver V5T 1E2.
Basic Mechanics,
Tractor Hydraulics,
Cost Control Conference,
Diesel Fuel Injection,
Hydraulically   Operated   Powershift   Trans
missions,
Machine Inspection and Maintenance,
Tractor Powershift Transmissions,
Wheel Loader Hydraulics,
Wheel Loader Powershift Transmissions,
Engine Tune-up (diesel),
Electrical Systems,
Hydraulics,
 STATISTICS
X 89
Table 17—Schools Whose Registrations Were Renewed for 1974—Continued
School
Finning Tractor & Equipment Co. Ltd.—Cont.
Glamour School of Hairdressing,
1119 Fort Street,
Victoria.
Dave Gordon Systems Ltd.,
101, 395 West Broadway,
Vancouver.
Hughes School of Retailing Ltd.,
4873 Main Street,
Vancouver.
IBM Education Centre—Vancouver,
1445 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver.
International School of Hairdressing Ltd.,
705 Johnson Street,
Victoria.
Kitanmax School of Northwest Coast,
Box 326,
Hazelton.
GTE Lenkurt Electric (Canada) Ltd.,
7018 Lougheed Highway,
Burnaby V5A1W3.
Lithographing & Photoengraving Training Institute of British Columbia,
101, 33 East Eighth Avenue,
Vancouver V5T 1R6.
The Lydia Lawrence Fashion Institute,
974 West Broadway,
Vancouver V5Z 1K7.
Maison Raymond Beauty School Ltd.,
4865 Kingsway,
Burnaby.
Metropolitan Ambulance Training School,
483 West 16th Avenue,
Vancouver.
Mixerology & Culinary School,
1943 East Hastings Street,
Vancouver V5L 1T5.
Moler School of Barbering,
376 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver.
Moler School of Hairdressing,
4242 East Hastings Street,
Burnaby.
Moler School of Hairdressing,
710 Columbia Street,
New Westminster.
Moler School of Hairdressing,
1754 Lonsdale Avenue,
North Vancouver.
Subjects Taught
Problem-Solving  I   and   II   (individual   and
employer sponsored),
Supervisory Development—Parts I and II,
Off-highway Trucks,
"Vertex" Sales and Marketing Course.
Hairdressing.
Electric Typewriter Instruction in conjunction with Dictating Equipment and Shorthand.
Sales Training and Cashiering, Upgrading.
S/3 LPI (Learner Pace Instruction).
Hairdressing.
Two   Dimensional   Design   and   Wood   Engraving,
Wood Carving.
Electronic Assembly.
Lithography  (Stripping and Copy  Preparation),
Lithography (Camera).
Professional Dressmaking,
Patternmaking,
Drawing—Illustration,
Embroidery.
Hairdressing.
Ambulance Driving and Attending.
Mixerologist.
Barbering.
Hairdressing.
Hairdressing.
Hairdressing.
 X 90                                                   BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 17—Schools Whose Registrations Were Renewed for 1974—Continued
School
Subjects Taught
Moler School of Hairdressing,
Hairdressing.
6407 Fraser Street,
Vancouver.
Moler School of Hairdressing,
Hairdressing.
317 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver.
Montrose School of Hairdressing,
Hairdressing.
2481 Montrose Avenue,
Abbotsford V2S 3T2.
Arthur Murray School of Dancing,
Professional Dancing.
695 Smythe Street,
Vancouver V6B 209.
Blanche  Macdonald  School  of  Finishing  and
Fashion Merchandising,
Modelling,
Preparation to Modelling,
964 West Hastings Street,
Professional Modelling,
Vancouver V6C 1E4.
Fashion Merchandising.
McKay Career Trainings Ltd.,
Computer Operating and Programming,
2151 Burrard Street,
Keypunch Operation,
Vancouver V6J 3H7.
Mini Computers and Machine Accounting,
Hotel   and   Motel   Accounting   (IBM   4200
Poster;,
Medical Office Assistant,
General Secretarial.
McKinley Driving Schools, Ltd.,
Air Brake Course,
1840 West Georgia Street,
Truck Driver Training (Class 5 to 3), (Class
Vancouver.
3 to 1).
Nanaimo School of Hairdressing,
Hairdressing.
41 Commercial Street,
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo School of Advanced Hair Design,
Advanced Hairdressing (limited to persons
41 Commercial Street,
holding a B.C.  Hairdressers' Association
Nanaimo.
Certificate).
New Westminster Commercial College,
Office Occupations (commercial and Govern
622 Royal Avenue,
mental).
New Westminster.
Northwestern School of Deep Sea Diving Ltd.,
Deep Sea Diving.
145 Riverside Drive,
North Vancouver.
Office Skills Training Programme,
Accounting,
Suite 201, 540 Burrard Street,
Conveyancing,
Vancouver V6C2K1.
Corporate Legal Stenography,
Business English I,
Accounting II,
Teller Training.
Operating Engineers Apprenticeship & Journey
Industrial Electrician,
man Upgrading Plan,
Millwright (Mine),
4333 Ledger Avenue,
Heavy   Mechanics   (upgrading   for   trades
Burnaby V5G 3T3.
men's qualification, electrical and hydrau
lics),
Heavy  Equipment  Operator   (backhoe  and
mobile crane).
Orchid School of Floristry,
Floral Design.
1806 Lonsdale Avenue,
North Vancouver.
 STATISTICS                                                             X 91
Table 17—Schools Whose Registrations Were Renewed for 1974—Continued
School
Subjects Taught
Pitman Business College Ltd.,
Office Occupations (commercial and Govern
1490 West Broadway,
mental).
Vancouver V6H 1H5.
Primary School of Design,
Introduction to Interior Design.
906 West Seventh Avenue,
Vancouver.
Professional Driver Centre (div. of the British
Upgrading   Course—Class   1   and   Class   3
Columbia Safety Council),
(diesel),
3750—80th Street,
Upgrading Course—Class 1 (gas).
Delta.
Realm Personnel Training School,
Supermarket Cashier.
1391 Pemberton Avenue,
North Vancouver.
Ramona Beauchamp School of Modelling,
Personal Development and Modelling.
2033 West 42nd Avenue,
Vancouver.
Roggendorf School of Hairdressing (1969) Ltd.,
13625—105a Avenue,
Hairdressing.
Surrey.
Louise Ruddell School of Floral Design,
Floral Design.
14567—72nd Avenue,
Surrey.
Russ Reid's Scuba School,
Introductory Scuba Diving.
1347 Kingsway,
Vancouver V5V 3E3.
Russell's School of Mixology,
Mixology.
410, 475 Howe Street,
Vancouver.
Sprott-Shaw College of Business Ltd.,
Office Occupations (commercial and Govern
1012 Douglas Street,
mental),
Victoria V8W2C3.
Accounting.
Patricia Stevens Career College and Finishing
School,
Professional Modelling,
470 Granville Street,
Secretarial,
Vancouver.
Upgrading Typing,
Fashion Merchandising,
Keypunch Training,
Finishing,
Office Upgrading.
Sunnyslope Dog Grooming School,
Dog Grooming.
4676 Marine Drive,
Burnaby V5J 3G2.
Taxaid (div. of Capital Data Management Ltd.),
Basic Income Tax.
Suite 2, 337 West Broadway,
Vancouver.
T. W. Thorfinnson & Associates,
Sales Course.
2029 West 42nd Avenue,
Vancouver.
Trail Business College,
Office Occupations (commercial and Govern
625 Victoria Street,
mental),
Trail V1R3S9.
Practical Accounting (correspondence).
Valle' School of Beauty,
Hairdressing.
14a Princess Avenue East,
Chilliwack.
Vansec Sales Training and Personal Develop
Vansec Sales Training and Personal Devel
ment Course,
opment Course.
103, 1237 Burrard Street,
Vancouver V6Z 1Z6.
 X 92
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 17—Schools Whose Registrations Were Renewed for 1974—Continued
School Subjects Taught
Wesley's Academy of Hair Design, Advanced Hair Design  (limited to persons
3012 Granville Street,
Vancouver.
Wesley's School of Hairdressing,
3012 Granville Street,
Vancouver.
holding a B.C.  Hairdressers' Association
Certificate).
Hairdressing.
Table 18—New Registration of Schools for 1974
Canadian Career Centre Ltd.,
706-710, 626 West Pender Street,
Vancouver V6B 1W5.
Canadian Academy of Professional Investigators,
Suite 5, 387 No. 3 Road,
Richmond.
Career Development Centre,
3955 East Hastings Street,
Burnaby V5C 2H8.
Receptionist,
Basic Typing,
Business Typing.
Professional Investigators' Training.
Switchboard—Receptionist,
General Cashiering (office orientated),
Retail and Commercial Credit Assessment.
Interprovincial Paramedical Training & Registry
Medical Assistant,
Ltd.,
Clinical Assistant,
805 West Broadway,
Medical Receptionist,
Vancouver.
Medical Secretary,
Medical Transcriptionist,
Physician Receptionist,
Nurse's Aide (male),
Nurse's Aide (female).
Medallion Sales Schools,
Sales Training,
409, 1112 West Pender Street,
Advanced Sales Training.
Vancouver V6E2S1.
Mitchell, Shave and Associates Ltd.,
T.S.A. Seminars,
1706 West First Avenue,
Logo Dynamics.
Vancouver V6J 1G3.
Northwest Schools, Inc.,
Motel-Hotel   Management   (correspondence
1221 NW. 21st Avenue,
instruction only).
Portland, Ore. 97209 U.S.A.
Ocean View Floral School,
Flower Arranging.
6472 Nelson Avenue,
Burnaby.
Ryder Technical Institute,
Tractor-Trailer Operator,
Suite 100, 53 Perimeter Center East, NE.,
Heavy Equipment Operator,
Atlanta, Ga. 30346 U.S.A.
Air  Conditioning/Refrigeration   (correspon
dence instruction and resident training).
Thomas & Associates,
Salesmanship.
F9, 6961 Hall Avenue,
Burnaby.
Marie Tomko Commercial College Ltd.,
Executive Secretarial,
60 Eighth Street,
General Secretarial,
New Westminster.
Stenographer/Clerk,
Receptionist/Clerk Typist,
Commercial Upgrading,
Commercial Refresher.
United Systems, Inc.,
Truck Driver Training (correspondence in
1600 West Oliver Avenue,
struction and resident training).
Indianapolis, Ind. 46221 U.S.A.
Western Canada School of Auctioneering Ltd.,
Auctioneering.
Box 687,
Lacombe, Alta. T0C ISO.
 STATISTICS
X 93
Table 19—Registered Schools That Discontinued During 1974
Alexander Hamilton Institute Ltd.,
Box 272,
Islington, Ont.
Autolec National Educational Program,
1025 Howe Street,
Vancouver.
B.C. Safety Council Diving Safety Section,
1477 West Pender Street,
Vancouver.
Broadway Driving School Ltd.,
10 East Broadway,
Vancouver,
The Canadian Executive Counsel,
Suite 311, 85 Sparks Street,
Ottawa, Ont. KIP 5A7.
Career Development Centre,
3955 East Hastings Street,
Burnaby V5C2H8.
Fraser Valley Secretarial Refresher Course,
11961—88th Avenue,
Delta.
International Career Academy of Canada Ltd.,
8 King Street East,
Toronto, Ont.
Interprovincial Paramedical Training & Registry Ltd.,
805 West Broadway,
Vancouver.
Lewis Hotel-Motel School (wholly owned subsidiary of International Career Academy
of Canada Ltd.),
8 King Street East,
Toronto, Ont.
Management Training Institute,
1906, 1733 Comox Street,
Vancouver.
Moler School of Hairdressing,
14853—108th Avenue,
Surrey.
Moler School of Hairdressing,
1104 Douglas Street,
Victoria.
National Meat Packers Training, Inc.,
3435 Broadway,
Kansas City, Mo. 64111 U.S.A.
New Westminster Commercial College,
622 Royal Avenue,
New Westminster.
Northwestern School of Deep Sea Diving Ltd.,
145 Riverside Drive,
North Vancouver.
Realm Personnel Training School,
1391 Pemberton Avenue,
North Vancouver.
Simtex Training Institute Ltd.,
213, 198 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver.
Kandel   Instructional   Course,
Sewing Materials Ltd.,
Suite 210, 1084 Homer Street
Vancouver.
Contemporary Spectrum Academy of the Arts Ltd..
1906 Dublin Street,
New Westminster.
Kinman Business University  (owned by Lear
Siegler, Inc.),
Bon Marche Building,
North 214 Wall Street,
Spokane, Wash.
Thomas & Associates,
F9, 6961 Hall Avenue,
Burnaby.
Taxaid (div. of Capital Data Management Ltd.),
Suite 2, 337 West Broadway,
Vancouver.
 X 94
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ORGANIZATION CHART
z
o
 STATISTICS X 95
PERSONNEL DIRECTORY
DEPARTMENT OF  LABOUR
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Minister of Labour  Hon. W. S. King.    387-6070
Executive Assistant    J. Curry    387-3336
Deputy Minister James G. Matkin   387-3282
Associate Deputy Minister (Industrial Relations) James Kinnaird     387-5611
Associate Deputy Minister (Manpower)....  Rangit S. Azad    434-5761
Office of the Deputy Minister
880 Douglas Street, Victoria
Deputy Minister   James G. Matkin   387-3282
Director of Legislation    J. R. Edgett     387-3286
Director of Special Services George Bishop   387-5482
Acting Director, Research and Planning Lorne Colungwood   387-3445
Director of Information Services  .Jack E. Nugent...  387-5239
General Administration
Executive Officer Frank A. Rhodes     387-3295
Comptroller   J. M. Skubiski     387-3288
Personnel Officer   W. H. Bell      387-3301
Industrial Relations Division
880 Douglas Street, Victoria
Associate Deputy Minister...     James Kinnaird   387-5611
Director of Human Rights    Kathleen Ruff.....  387-6861
Director of Labour Standards   W. J. D. Hoskyn   387-3284
General Inquiries      387-3290
Supervisor of Labour Standards (4211 Kingsway,
Burnaby)   ,   J. A. Laffling .  434-0317
Director of Labour Education     Ron Tweedie   387-5496
Director of Arbitration  Gerald H. O'Neill  387-3294
Director of Mediation Services  (4211  Kingsway,
Burnaby)     R. A. MacDonald      434-5761
Manpower Division
4211 Kingsway, Burnaby
Associate Deputy Minister     ..Rangit S. Azad..  434-5761
Director of Women's Employment  Mrs. C. K. Waddell  434-5761
Director of Manpower Training and Development John Melville   434-5761
Director of Apprenticeship and Industrial Training Samuel Simpson.   434-5761
Director    of    Occupational    Environment    (4240
Manor Street, Burnaby)  J. D. Forrest  438-5421
Director  of  Elevating  Devices  Inspection   (4240
Manor Street, Burnaby)  J. Costella  438-5344
Director of Employment Programs (716 Courtney
Street, Victoria)  Robert Plecas .....  387-3737
 X 96
BRITISH
COLUMBIA
BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS
Board of Industrial Relations
Boards of Review
Parliament Buildings, Victoria
(Workers' Compensation Act)
350, 2025 West 42nd Avenue, Vancouver
Chairman	
James G. Matkin
Administrative
Vice-Chairman
Chairman J. B. Paradis
and Secretary
J. R. Edgett
Chairmen                    A. M. Abramson
Members	
C. Murdock
R. S. S. Wilson
A. MacDonald
Mrs. Emily Ostapchuk
R. K. Gervin
W. I. Auerbach
Members                W. I. Beeby
J. S. Don
D. C. Fraser
J. Mackenzie
N. Mills
S. J. Squire
Human Rights Commission
Parliament Buildings, Victoria
Trade-schools Regulation Administrative
Office
Chairman	
 Bishop Remi J. De Roo
4211 Kingsway, Burnaby
Members	
Larry Ryan
Administrative            Mrs. C. K. Waddell
William Black
Officers                   John Melville
Gene Errington
Col. J. W. Inglis
Rose Charlie
Workers' Compensation Board
5255 Heather Street, Vancouver
Provincial Apprenticeship Committee
Chairman        Terence G. Ison
4211 Kingsway, Burnaby
Commissioners T. R. Watt
Chairman	
. John Melville
G. Kowbel
Executive Director     R. Caldecott
Members	
.   Thomas McGibbon
Board Counsel and
T. A. TURNBULL
Executive Officer ...J. P. Berry
C Stairs
Director, Legal
S. W. Simpson
Services  I. E. Tufts
J. W. Thompson
R. L. S. Burgoyne
Labour Relations Board
1620 West Eighth Avenue, Vancouver
Chairman 	
Paul C. Weiler
Vice-Chairman and
Chief Administra
tive Officer 	
E. R. Peck
Vice-Chairpersons
J. A. Moore
Nancy Morrison
Members	
Angus MacDonald
Arnold J. Smith
John M. Billings
Herbert L. Fritz
Mike L. Kramer
Graham D. M. Leslie
Ken R. Martin
REGIONAL OFFICE  LOCATIONS
Burnaby: 4211 Kingsway, Burnaby Centre.
Kelowna: 1913 Kent Road.
4240 Manor Street.
Nanaimo: Courthouse.
Chilliwack: 24 Victoria Avenue West.
Nelson: Box 60, 310 Ward Street.
Cranbrook: Room 226, Courthouse, 102 South      Prince George: 1600 Third Avenue.
11th Avenue.
Quesnel: 364 Front Street.
Dawson Creek:
1201—103rd Avenue.
Terrace: 4506 Lakelse Avenue.
Kamloops: 220,
546 St. Paul Street.
Williams Lake: 317, 540 Borland Avenue.
 STATISTICS X 97
LEGISLATION AFFECTING LABOUR
Annual and General Holidays Act (R.S. 1960, chap. 11, consolidated)  $0.20
Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act (R.S.  1960, chap.   13,
consolidated)  .20
Barbers Act (R.S. 1960, chap. 24)  .20
Blind Workmen's Compensation Act (R.S. 1960, chap. 31)  .20
Coal Mines Regulation Act (1969, chap. 3)  .95
Control of Employment of Children Act (R.S. 1960, chap. 75)  .20
Deceived Workmen Act (R.S. 1960, chap. 96)  .20
Department of Labour Act (R.S. 1960, chap. 105)  .20
Elevator Construction Industry Labour Disputes Act (1974, chap. 107)  .20
Employment Agencies Act (R.S. 1960, chap. 127)  .20
Essential Services Continuation Act (1974, chap. 108)  .20
Factories Act, 1966 and regulations (1966, chap. 14)  .40
Fire Departments Hours of Labour Act (R.S. 1960, chap. 146)..     .20
Fire Departments Two-platoon Act (R.S. 1960, chap. 147)  .20
Hairdressers Act (R.S. 1960, chap. 169, consolidated)  .20
Hours of Work Act (R.S. 1960, chap. 182, consolidated)    .20
Human Rights Code of British Columbia  .20
Labour Code of British Columbia and regulations  .40
Labour Regulation Act (R.S. 1960, chap. 204)  .20
Minimum Wage Act (R.S. 1960; chap. 230)  .20
Master and Servant Act (R.S. 1960, chap. 234).....  .20
Maternity Protection Act, 1966 (1966, chap. 25)  .20
Mechanics' Lien Act (R.S. 1960, chap. 238, consolidated)  .25
Mines Regulation Act (1967, chap.. 25, consolidated)  .60
Payment of Wages Act (1962, chap. 45, consolidated)         .20
Provincial Employment Programmes Act  .20
Public Works Fair Employment Act (R.S. 1973, chap. 75)  .20
Trade-schools Regulation Act (R.S. 1960, chap. 383, consolidated)  .20
Truck Act (R.S. 1960, chap. 388)  .20
Woodmen's Lien for Wages Act (R.S. 1960, chap. 411, consolidated)  .20
Workers' Compensation Act, 1968 (1968, chap. 59, and amendments)  .65
(Copies are obtainable from the Queen's Printer, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C., at the prices quoted, plus 5 per cent sales tax.)
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1975
I A^
5,030.175-3372
 

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