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DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DCEMBER 31 1972 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1973

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1972
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1973
  To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to transmit herewith the Annual Report of the Department
of Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31, 1972.
JAMES G. LORIMER
Minister of Municipal Affairs
Victoria, British Columbia, February 16, 1973.
 Victoria, British Columbia, February 15, 1973.
The Honourable James G. Lorimer,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir: I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31, 1972.
This Report contains a review of Departmental activities and observations of
the programmes and financial position of the municipalities and regional districts
within the Province. Greater detail with respect to these areas is contained in the
publication Municipal Statistics which is published annually by the Department
from information contained in audited financial and other statements of the municipalities and regional districts.
W. K. SMITH, F.C.I.S.
Deputy Minister
 CONTENTS
Pace
Review of Departmental Activities     7
Legislation Changes  12
New Incorporations and Changes in Structure  13
Assessment and Tax Collection  14
Revenues and Expenditures    16
Reserves and Surpluses  16
Capital Programmes    17
Regional District Activities  21
Environmental Management  24
Housing, Land Assembly, and Urban Redevelopment  26
Tables and Charts  28
Departmental Publications  42
Acts Administered  42
 W 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
The Honourable James G. Lorimer,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
W. K. Smith, F.C.I.S., Deputy Minister and Inspector of Municipalities.
C. H. L. Woodward, F.C.I.S., Programmes Co-ordinator.
G. E. Whelen, F.C.I.S., Research Officer.
Financial Management
J. H. Nuttall, Departmental Comptroller.
J. P. Taylor, Financial Analyst.
W. J. Larter, Financial Analyst.
H. G. Topham, C.A., Financial Analyst.
Administrative Services
T. F. Moore, F.C.I.S., Administrative Officer.
A. R. Clarke, Administrative Officer.
J. G. Callan, Administrative Officer.
Environmental Management
D. L. South, M.T.P.I.C, Chief Planning Officer.
W. J. Tassie, M.T.P.I.C, Senior Planning Officer.
B. S. Jawanda, M.T.P.I.C, Senior Planning Officer.
Public Housing
J. T. Williams, R.I.(B.C.), Administrative Officer.
 Report of the Department of Municipal Affairs, 1972
REVIEW OF DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES
Municipalities have continued to meet the demand for the expansion of existing local services and the provision of new services. Sewer collection and treatment facilities and water services have been extended to meet the needs of urban
areas and the construction of community buildings, particularly recreational structures, has increased substantially. If the trend toward more available leisure time
continues, people will be looking to local government to provide additional facilities.
Revenues available to municipal councils and regional boards for a variety of
purposes have increased substantially over the past several years. For the period
under review, gross revenues of municipaUties and regions were in excess of
$580,000,000, an increase of $120,000,000 over the available revenues in 1969.
There has been a corresponding increase in the amounts held in reserve and surplus accounts which at the end of 1971 amounted to $133,000,000, an increase
of approximately $30,000,000 over the amounts held in the previous year.
In 1970 the Municipal Finance Authority was established under the Municipal
Finance Authority of British Columbia Act to finance local sewer and water and
pollution-control projects. Three debenture issues in a total amount of $23,597,295
were sold on the Canadian and European markets by the Authority at very attractive interest rates and the funds were distributed to participating regional districts
and member municipaUties. Documentation to support the issues consisted of 26
regional district by-laws and 39 municipal by-laws which were approved and
adopted, and 50 regional district agreements and 58 municipal agreements which
were executed and certified. Financial and other statistical information has been
prepared in the Department to assist the Authority in the provision of material to
support the debenture issues on the market. Assistance has also been given in the
preparation of draft by-laws.
Departmental representatives travelled extensively throughout the Province
to attend committee, council, and regional board meetings and to complete inspections in 152 municipalities and improvement districts and 28 regional districts.
Of the total of 412 visits, 229 were made for general, financial, and administrative
purposes and 183 were made by our planning staff to attend Technical Planning
Committee meetings and to carry out various planning duties such as contract planning to either municipalities or regional districts. Administrative and budgetary
practices are reviewed at the time of inspections, and, when necessary, specific
recommendations are made. As a result, the over-all administrative practices followed are more consistent when by-laws and other data are submitted to the Department with requests for approval or registration.
A system of reporting local government financial activity in accordance with
the publication A Financial Information System for Municipalities has now been
in operation since January 1, 1971, and the Department has had an opportunity
of reviewing the financial data submitted for the fiscal year 1971 and published in
the 1971 edition of Municipal Statistics. The information under this system now
provides more concise detail on the financial activities of the municipalities and regional districts, increasing its value to councils and others involved in the analysis
of financial data.
 W 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Department is continuing to emphasize the importance of centralizing
electronic data processing facilities for municipalities and regional districts. There
is a continuing increase in the use of individual facilities and service bureaux, with
total annual costs expected to reach $1,400,000 within three years. Present trends
indicate the result will be a multiplicity of equipment, forms, and programmes, with
the prospect of continuing increases in costs. An essential initial step toward
standardization of procedures and equipment and the control of costs is the development of the Standard Forms and Procedures Manual. Copies of the manual to date
have been distributed by a study committee to 15 municipalities for review and
comment.
Further standardization is being considered in extending to all municipalities
the assessment and property taxation services now provided to villages and rural
areas by the Provincial Data Processing Centre. This would centralize the source
of information and reduce municipal costs. It is known that certain inequalities
occur under the present assessment system which are attributable to the numerous
assessment jurisdictions. It is believed that the assessment function could be more
effectively and more equitably performed on a regional basis and studies are continuing in this area. This would provide uniform assessment for all municipalities,
and assessment information on a common programme would be readily available
for use in determining the application of various grants and cost-sharing programmes such as regional district cost-sharing, regional hospital district grants,
home-owner grants, grants in lieu of taxes, health services, parks, and recreational
grants.
The annual edition of Municipal Statistics is an important source of information to investment houses, financial institutions, and others, and distribution of the
publication is made as early in the year as possible. Municipal Statistics includes
some 36 different schedules. Prior to publication, the financial and statistical returns of the municipalities and regions are closely edited to ensure conformity and
adherence to statutory and other requirements.
It is interesting to note that of the 143 municipaUties presently incorporated
in British Columbia, a total of 127 participated during the 1971/72 licence-year
in the Municipal Commercial Vehicle Licensing Programme administered by the
Department on behalf of the municipalities. Revenue derived from licence-plate
sales during 1971/72 was $783,081, which, after payment of incidental expenses,
was distributed to the participating municipalities on a per capita basis. A total
of 67,196 municipal commercial-vehicle plates was sold during the year under review and 71,130 exempt plates were issued.
Under the provisions of the Municipal Act, all village and town by-laws must
be submitted to the Department for registration in the office of the Inspector of
Municipalities. In addition, many by-laws for all classes of municipalities require
approval from certain governmental agencies before adoption can proceed or become effective. Included in this category are by-laws which estabUsh consumer or
user charges for water and sewer services. Such by-laws, together with supporting
background material, are fuUy reviewed before any suggestions or recommendations
are made and before being advanced to the approving authority. While many of
the initial submissions may be found satisfactory, others require the exchange of
considerable correspondence. A total of 942 by-laws was examined and subsequently registered—12 were district by-laws; 292, town by-laws; 597, village bylaws; 29, regional district by-laws; and 12, improvement district by-laws.
For a variety of purposes, 454 Minutes of Council were prepared and subsequently approved by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council—73 authorized the aban-
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1972 W 9
donment and vesting of portions of highway; 70 approved municipal rates by-laws
for water, sewer, and electric power; 20 authorized appointment of members of
municipal Boards of Variance and Boards of Commissioners of PoUce; 165 were
for regional district purposes of which 115 approved subdivision and zoning bylaws; 40 authorized appointments of members to Regional Boards of Variance;
10 were for miscellaneous uses; the balance of 126 met other legislative requirements.
In addition, 18 rezoning by-laws applicable to land in the flood-plain area
of the Lower Mainland were reviewed and recommended for approval by the Minister under section 187 of the Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act. Fifteen
building and plumbing by-laws from various regional districts were also reviewed
and recommended for approval by the Minister, pursuant to section 79 8d.
Certification by the Inspector of MunicipaUties of debenture issues of municipalities and regional districts may be completed on request. Before such certification can be completed certificates of approval to the by-law or resolution are
issued authorizing the issuance of debentures. A total of 356 certificates of approval were issued in 1972 compared to 310 in 1971. In 1972, 76 debenture
issues were examined and certified, which consisted of 3,872 debentures with a
total par value of $24,260,296. This is in addition to those debentures or agreements that were issued by municipalities and regional districts to secure undertakings financed through the Municipal Finance Authority.
Vancouver was chosen as the site for the convention of the Union of British
Columbia Municipalities and senior members of staff attended and were available
to those who wished to discuss local problems. For the first time in four years the
annual conference of the Municipal Officers' Association of British Columbia was
held in Victoria; this is in keeping with policy that was set down by the association
a few years ago when a decision was made to hold the conference in various centres
throughout the Province. Senior members of staff participated in the programme
of the Municipal Officers' Association of British Columbia and also participated
as resource personnel in seminars sponsored by the University of British Columbia
and the Union of British Columbia Municipalities.
An annual shield award presented by the Minister of Municipal Affairs to all
municipalities in three categories as an incentive to increase voter turn-out at municipal elections was received by the following for 1971:
Per Cent
Cities and towns—Fernie   74.10
District municipalities—Mackenzie  75.00
Village municipalities—Port McNeill  78.02
In second place were Nelson (cities and towns) with 74.08 per cent, Dufferin
(district municipalities) with 67.07 per cent, and Nakusp (vUlage municipalities)
with 75.51 per cent.
For 1972, those municipalities eligible for the annual shield award will be:
Per Cent
Cities and towns—Merritt   66.17
District municipaUties—Kitimat   62.10
Village municipaUties—Port McNeiU  78.90
Second place was taken by Kimberley (cities and towns) with 63.50 per cent, Kent
(district municipaUties) with 59.82 per cent, and Fruitvale (viUage municipaUties)
with 69.27 per cent.
Examinations associated with the four-year Municipal Administration Course
sponsored by the Department and provided by the Faculty of Commerce and Busi-
 W 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ness Administration of the University of British Columbia were held for the last
time in May 1972, and, of those enrolled in this the final year of the course, a total
of 30 students received diplomas from the university signifying successful completion of the prescribed programme and of having passed the required examination.
Diplomas were awarded as foUows:
4th Year Accounting/Finance Option  15 students
4th Year Administration/Law Option  10 students
One Year Assessors' Course     5 students
During 1972 the Board of Examiners, on which the Department is represented,
granted 18 certificates of proficiency, and the foUowing table shows the classifications of these certificates, together with the total number which have been issued:
Certificates 1972 To date
Junior   4 85
Senior Administration  5 106
Senior Finance   2 104
Property Appraisal  7 68
Totals   18 363
Prior to the phasing-out of the Municipal Administration Course, arrangements were made with the Chartered Institute of Secretaries and the Certified General Accountants' Association to offer courses under their sponsorship oriented to
the fields of administration and finance in local government.
Thirty persons employed in the municipal field enrolled in courses offered by
the Chartered Institute of Secretaries for the 1972/73 academic year. In addition
to the professional degree "A.C.I.S." (Associate of the Chartered Institute of Secretaries) which may be granted to a graduate of the course, appUcation may be
made for a certificate of proficiency in municipal administration or finance, depending upon experience and office held.
Applications for enrolment in the special undergraduate course offered by
the Certified General Accountants' Association were received in the 1972/73
academic year from eight persons employed in the municipal field. As the student
completes various phases of this course he will receive recognition toward a certificate of proficiency in municipal finance, while at the same time, in completing the
mandatory subjects which form part of the course, he wiU have the opportunity
of continuing his studies to meet the full academic qualification requirements leading to the professional designation "C.G.A." (Certified General Accountant).
FoUowing extensive investigations which commenced with the announced
phase-out of the Municipal Administration Course, there has now been introduced
a short-term course in selected subjects for those employed in smaUer municipaUties.
This goal was reached with the offering in the faU of 1972 of a two-year course in
municipal administration by Malaspina College in Nanaimo. Successful completion of this course wiU satisfy the academic requirements for the junior certificate
in municipal administration issued by the Board of Examiners. Of significant interest to the student is the fact that course material wiU be completely portable as
between the C.I.S. and C.G.A. courses. A total of 25 applications for first-year
enrolment were received by Malaspina CoUege from persons associated with the
field of local government. It is anticipated that arrangements wiU be made in the
immediate future to ensure that a course of this type wUl be avaflable from other
educational institutions within the Province in order that a greater number of
prospective students will have the opportunity to gain academic qualifications in
this field.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1972 W 11
As has been their practice for the past several years, the continuing Education
Committee of the Municipal Officers' Association presented a five-day seminar in
management techniques entitled "Industrial and Employee Relations," which immediately followed the 1972 conference of the association. This type of seminar,
which was originaUy introduced with a two-day format, has been well received and
provides a means by which those presently certified and working in the field of
public administration can upgrade their specific skiUs. In offering a five-day seminar the committee feels that it is possible to provide a much more meaningful presentation for participants. On the basis of this conclusion, their intention is to offer
further five-day seminars in the future, each yearly segment of which wiU cover some
special phase of the management process.
 W 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
LEGISLATION CHANGES
At the first session of the 1972 Legislature, amendments were made to the
Municipal Act, most of which were of a technical nature. In addition, provisions
were included to aUow municipalities to withhold business licences in instances
where a business was conducted or a service performed or goods sold or displayed
for sale that may be harmful or dangerous to the health or safety of a person under
16 years of age. Other provisions ensured that in certain instances a close relation,
such as a father or son, could subdivide a parcel of land for the purpose of providing
a separate residence for such relation. Some changes were also made to the election
procedures provision of the Act. The regional district provisions relating to the
Technical Planning Committee were amended and a new provision for the creation
of Advisory Counrils in the nonmunicipal parts of regional districts was enacted.
The Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act enabled particular municipaUties to solve specific problems not dealt with by the Municipal Act. The Municipal
Finance Authority Act was also amended to strengthen the operation of that
organization.
At the second session of the Legislature in 1972, the Municipal Act was again
amended to reinstate the special two-thirds' majority requirement for the adoption
of land-use contracts and zoning by-laws which had been removed by the amendments made at the first session.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1972 W 13
NEW INCORPORATIONS AND CHANGES IN STRUCTURE
CHANGES IN STATUS
While no new municipal incorporations occurred during 1972, three proposals
for incorporation were reviewed by the Department.
Under direction of the Minister, plebiscites were held on the question of incorporation of the Nechako and Westsyde areas as district municipalities. Both proposals failed to receive the assent of the owner-electors.
A plebiscite on a change in status was directed by the trustees of the View
Royal Fire Protection District, pursuant to section 20 of the Municipal Act. The
proposal did not receive the required assent of the owner-electors.
The Councils of the Village of Abbotsford and the District of Sumas agreed to
undertake a study of amalgamation of the municipalities under the direction and
co-ordination of the Department. Amalgamation of the two municipalities took
place on the 17th day of November 1972, following a successful vote of the owner-
electors held on November 8.
To accommodate future growth, to encourage long-term planning and to
ensure the over-all areas were sharing in community costs in an equitable manner,
the Minister, in a statement of principles, set out the boundaries, terms, and conditions of incorporation of the greater communities to be known as the Cities of
Kamloops and Kelowna.
MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY EXTENSIONS
The issue of supplementary Letters Patent authorizing 13 municipal boundary
extensions was completed during the year; the municipalities affected, together with
the resulting adjustments in areas and changes in population, are indicated in Table
1. A local census was taken in the extended area and added to the original population established under the 1971 census in order to arrive at the population after
extension.
At the request of the Trustees of the Derby Dyking District, the East Langley
Dyking District, the Salmon River Dyking District, and the West Langley Dyking
District, the dyking districts were dissolved and by resolution of Council the Corporation of the Township of Langley agreed to accept aU assets, rights, claims, obU-
gations, and UabiUties of the respective dyking districts which were established as
specified areas of the Township of Langley. The West Sechelt Waterworks District,
at the request of the Trustees, was dissolved and became a specified area of the
Sunshine Coast Regional District.
 W 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ASSESSMENT AND TAX COLLECTION
The major single source of revenue of municipalities in British Columbia continues to be the real property tax. The growth in assessed values of real property
and revenue from taxation of these properties over the past 10 years is illustrated in
the foUowing table. It wfil be noted that revenue from this source of taxation in
1971 totaUed $349,844,921. Of this total, $184,223,616 represented taxation for
general municipal purposes and $165,621,305 represented taxation for school
purposes.
Growth in Combined Assessed Values and Taxes in Municipalities
of British Columbia
Gross Assessed Values
Assessed Values Actually
Taxed
Tax
Year
All
Properties
Taxable
Properties
School
Municipal
Revenue
1963
(Millions)
$
4,062
5,7971
7,4772
6,3521
8,3292
6,9721
9,1922
7,6201
10,0762
8,2921
11,6772
(Millions)
$
3,434
4,8851
4,9582
5,4001
5,6182
5,9051
6,2262
6,4561
6,8172
7,0421
7,9502
(Millions)
$
2,795
3,950
4,402
4,835
5,279
5,753
(Millions)
$
2,225
4,372
5,404
6,072
6,632
7,744
(Thousands)
$
141,021
1968    ....
1969	
1970
251,693
286,239
323,925
1971
349,845
1977
375,0003
i School values.
2 Municipal values.
s Estimated.
The following table provides a further analysis of the assessed value of real
property and indicates the distribution of 1972 assessed values by class of municipality, with the percentage increase over 1971 shown in parentheses.
General Municipal Gross
Assessed Values
Assessed Values Actually
Taxed
All
Properties
Taxable
Properties
School
Municipal
(Millions)   (%)
$
2,172    (18.48)
4,600    (20.45)
222    (12.69)
217    (29.17)
(Millions)   (%)
$
1,425    (20.87)
3,093    (21.20)
140    (11.11)
133    (26.67)
(Millions)   (%)
$
1,327    ( 6.76)
2,565    ( 8.92)
166    (13.69)
171    (37.90)
(Millions)   (%)
$
1,310    (22.20)
3,048    (21.14)
135    (13.44)
126    (27.27)
7,211    (19.98)
4,465    ( 9.81)
4,791    (20.98)
3,158    (10.54)
4,229    ( 9.33)
1,523    ( 7.94)
4,619    (21.36)
3,123    (10.51)
Total?
11,676    (15.88)
7,949    (15.14)
5,752    ( 8.96)
7,742    (16.74)
As a result of the continuing rapid growth in the urban communities, it is
anticipated that proceeds from real property taxation for school and general municipal purposes in 1972 wiU reach $375,000,000, which would represent an increase
of approximately 65 per cent over the revenue of five years ago. The total assessed
values actually taxed for school purposes in the Province in 1972 amounted to
$7,538,036,809, an increase of approximately $675,000,000 over 1971.   Of this
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1972 W 15
amount, $5,753,114,043 or approximately 76 per cent, represented assessed values
in the city, district, town, and village municipalities.
The tax-coUection picture in municipalities is considered to be the primary
indicator, not only of the efficiency of the administration, but also of the abnity of
the taxpayer to meet the municipal tax levy promptly. In the year under review,
tax collections have shown an increase over the collections of 1970 and continue to
maintain a very high level. During this period, coUection in cities, districts, and
villages exceeded 96 per cent of the levy, and towns coUected in excess of 94.5 per
cent. We have established a practice of communicating with any municipality where
the arrears of taxes are in excess of 10 per cent of the current levy in an effort to
determine the cause and what steps may be taken to improve the position. The
coUection of current taxes in British Columbia continues to be the highest among
the provinces in Canada pubUshing statistics of a comparable nature, while the percentage of arrears is the lowest. Economic factors may have contributed substantially to the favourable position indicated in the property taxation field; however,
municipal treasurers and coUectors are to be congratulated for their continued efforts
in maintaining this high rate of tax coUection.
Chart 1 shows the percentage of tax coUection for the period 1961 to 1971,
inclusive, and Table 2 reveals further information relative to tax collection by class
of municipality for the years shown.
 W 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES
It is apparent from a review of the audited financial statements and other statistical information that British Columbia municipalities, generally, continue to enjoy
a favourable financial position.
During the year 1971, the last year for which audited financial statements are
available, revenues, including those of aU utilities, were in excess of $580,000,000,
an increase of $60,000,000 over the previous year. The major revenue sources were
general municipal taxation of $185,000,000 and school taxation of $165,000,000.
These have increased $13,000,000 each over the amounts received in 1970. Transfers from other governments accounted for $120,000,000, of which $110,000,000
was from Provincial Government grants, excluding capital and special-purpose
grants, an increase of $19,000,000 over the amount received in the previous year.
Revenue from own sources amounted to $110,000,000. The school taxation levy
was offset by the application of home-owner grant payments of $57,000,000, an increase of $5,000,000 over 1970, leaving a net of approximately $108,000,000 in
school taxes payable by the property-owner.
Chart 3 indicates per capita and percentage of revenues of the various classes
of municipalities by major source for the 1971 fiscal year. Chart 4 reflects the expenditure by major function of these funds on a per capita basis, and as a percentage
of total expenditure.
RESERVES AND SURPLUSES
Statutory reserve funds of various municipalities have again shown an increase
over the previous year. At the end of 1971 these funds, held for a variety of purposes, amounted to $48,000,000, an increase of $6,000,000 over the previous year,
after giving effect to the fact that approximately $9,000,000 was expended on capital
works from reserve funds during the year 1971. It is interesting to note that over
the last six years the amount held in these reserve funds has increased from $30,000,-
000 to the current figure of $48,000,000, an increase of 60 per cent.
The total of statutory reserves and operating reserves and surpluses held in all
accounts of the municipalities was $132,717,577. This is equivalent to 31 per cent
of the total revenue, excluding school taxes, of the municipaUties. Of this total,
$95,365,683 is held in liquid form or in investments authorized by statute, and a
portion of the surplus is represented in arrears of taxes and other receivables.
The following table provides an analysis of these reserves and surpluses by class
of municipality:
Reserves
Surpluses
Total
Total
Revenuel
$
25,655,171
35,148,714
845,042
560,588
417,107
$
10,406,831
19,708,046
1,313,217
2,203,559
1,092,430
$
36,062,002
54,856,760
2,158,259
2,764,147
1,509,537
(Per Cent)
31.12
34.94
T""'
19.27
32.85
11.38
Snhfntals
62,626,622
31,575,336
34,724,083
3,791,536
97,350,705
35,366,872
31.84
29.53
Tntfejln
94,201,958
38,515,619
132,717,577
31.19
i Excluding school taxation.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1972
W 17
CAPITAL PROGRAMMES
Capital projects were undertaken during 1971 by municipalities to the value of
$166,000,000. Of this total programme, $153,000,000 was completed during the
fiscal year, leaving a balance of works in progress of $13,000,000 at year-end. In
the total capital programme, municipalities were able to provide $37,000,000 out of
current general revenue and utility revenue funds, $10,000,000 from reserve funds,
and approximately $7,000,000 was obtained from grants-in-aid from the Provincial
and Federal Governments. The balance of the amount expended was financed by
debenture loans, temporary bank loans, and other methods of financing. Figures
reflecting the activity in this area over the past five years are as follows:
Projects
Undertaken
Works
Completed
Works in
Progress
Source of Funds
Year
Revenue
Reserve
Funds
Grants
19fi7
(Thousands)
$
117,000
101,000
118,000
118,000
166,000
(Thousands)
$
102,000
87,000
102,000
96,000
153,000
(Thousands)
$
15,000
14,000
16,000
22,000
13,000
(Thousands)
$
29,000
34,000
36,000
33,000
37,000
(Thousands)
$
6,000
5,000
7,000
8,000
10,000
(Thousands)
$
6,000
1968
3,000
5,000
1969
1970
3,000
7,000
1971      	
The trend in authorized term borrowing over the past five years is indicated
below.
Year
Regional
Districts
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Total
1968                      	
1969	
1970	
1971....	
1972	
$
567,750
4,084,500
13,531,000
3,950,200
14,986,500
$
5,754,270
6,288,970
15,909,500
20,104,529
13,036,100
$
41,051,821
11,552,108
13,903,894
47,581,626
34,319,885
$
1,200,000
75,360
3,545,751
5,120,820
2,329,950
$
2,392,945
1,342,616
558,050
4,039,630
1,035,981
$
50,967,479
23,343,554
47,448,195
80,796,805
65,708,416
The decline in authorized borrowing shown in 1969 is a reflection of the restraint practised by municipalities in avoiding long-term debt during the period when
exceptionally high-interest rates for this type of borrowing were in effect. The increase in authorized borrowing during 1970 is attributed to a substantial increase
in borrowing for sewer programmes due, no doubt, to the rapid development in
urban communities. The very sharp increase in debenture borrowings in 1971 is
partly a reflection of the impact of the Federal-Provincial Special Development Loan
Programme which made available low-interest Federal funds for municipal projects
and the Federal-Provincial Employment Loan Programme, 1971, which provided
low-interest Federal funds as well as a forgiveness feature of 75 per cent of direct
on-site labour incurred to May 31, 1972. It is also partly attributable to the favourable rate the Municipal Finance Authority of British Columbia has been able to
obtain in the marketing of municipal debentures.
 W 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FIVE-YEAR CAPITAL EXPENDITURE PROGRAMMES SUMMARY
The programmes submitted by municipalities and regional districts during
1972 and covering the five-year period ending 1976 continued to provide meaningful
information and guidance, not only to the local government bodies involved, but also
to the Department, other levels and departments of government, and various financial
institutions. The Departmental review of each of these submissions and the offering
of constructive criticism, where necessary, has achieved maximum consistency in the
format of these programmes and has been found to be of benefit to aU concerned.
A summary of the Capital Expenditure Programmes by year is Usted below. Included in the "General" heading under "Classification of Expenditures" are aU
capital expenditures of roads, sidewalks, public buildings, recreational facilities, land
purchases, and other capital projects not related to either water or sewage systems.
Municipal councils are continuing in their efforts to finance a large portion of their
capital works out of current revenue and reserves. An analysis of this summary
indicates that with the exception of 1972, where term borrowing is indicated as
being the major source of capital funds due to the availabUity of Federal-Provincial
loans, over 50 per cent of anticipated capital works are to be financed from current
revenues and reserves.
Five-year Capital Expenditure Programmes Summary by Year for All
Municipalities (Including Vancouver)
Classification of Expenditures
Year
Water
Sewer
General
Total
19-p
$
27,234,385
12,904,875
10,299,450
8,682,325
7,996,175
$
40,366,590
19,886,650
15,310,370
14,316,390
10,733,050
$
144,999,989
92,026,233
78,302,630
78,219,199
76,210,043
$
212,600,964
1973...               	
1974
1975                       ....     .
1976
124,817,758
103,912,450
101,217,914
94,939,268
Totals
67,117,210
100,613,050
469,758,094
637,488,354
Proposed Source of Funds
Year
General
Revenue
Grants
Reserve
Funds
Prior Years'
Surplus
Debenture
Sales
Total
1972...    	
1973..
1974	
1975
1976. .
$
37,991,089
36,949,162
36,005,308
34,871,275
37,590,517
$
12,066,568
4,541,450
4,187,825
4,344,450
3,634,575
$
25,275,178
14,484,620
11,333,522
10,536,599
10,487,176
$
2,281,582
199,056
179,000
149,000
109,500
$
134,986,547
68,643,470
52,206,795
51,316,590
43,117,500
$
212,600,964
124,817,758
103,912,450
101,217,914
94,939,268
Totals
183,407,351
28,774,868
72,117,095
2,918,138
350,270,902
637,488,354
In contrast to comments contained in reports of the last few years where sewer
projects were indicated as requiring the major portion of over-all capital financing,
it will now be noted that municipalities are anticipating applying approximately two-
thirds of their capital funds to the "General" classification of expenditure. A further
breakdown of this category shows that the construction of recreational facilities and
public buildings have now become priority items for proposed capital outlay. This
change in priority has resulted from the fact that the required capital funds for sewer
and water projects have either been undertaken by the Municipal Finance Authority
or satisfied by recent Federal-Provincial Loan Programmes.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1972
W 19
Notwithstanding that funds were not avaUable through Federal-Provincial Programmes in 1972 to finance local projects, councils and regional boards continued
to meet a substantial demand for municipal services, and 171 term borrowing bylaws were approved by the Inspector of Municipalities and subsequently adopted by
the local governing body that provided the service.
A greater portion of the authorized borrowing consisted of financing of sewer
and water projects, while the cost of parks and recreational projects also constituted
a substantial part. Most borrowing by-laws are submitted to the owner-electors for
assent; however, a large number of those by-laws financing water and sewer services
are advertised pursuant to statutory provisions and are only voted on when a petition
is submitted requesting a vote be held.
Borrowing of $71,590,907, as summarized in the following table, is $9,205,989
less than the amount authorized in 1971; the lower amount is considerably above
other years when the Federal-Provincial Programme funds were not available. Completion of the various projects authorized wUl be over a number of years and the
demand for funds will follow the progression of construction. Included in the
authorized borrowing is $2,955,543 in short-term loans which under the Municipal
Act have a per capita limitation.
BORROWING AUTHORIZATION, 1972
Purpose
Regional
Districts
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Total
$
111,500
14,460,000
5,938,000
401,500
$
5,870,000
2,722,900
1,737,500
1,210,900
$
5,179,920
11,898,500
6,158,600
3,609,100
1,489,200
5,461,900
147,665
$
948,300
62,650
170,000
1,043,000
31,000
$
383,500
400,000
$
12,493,220
29,544,050
14,004,100
Sewers and drains	
24,000
6,288,500
1,520,200
1,524,700
284,685
88,706
86,681
7,075,306
Equipment (including fire protection)
96,500
50,000
665,531
Totals 	
21,007,500
13,350,685
33,944,885
2,304,950
982.887  1    71.590.907
The Inspector of Municipalities is not required to approve borrowing of the
City of Vancouver or the Metropolitan Water and Sewer Boards, and, therefore,
such borrowing is not included in the above table.
Preliminary borrowing of an estimated amount of $7,833,330 was approved
for local improvement works. Other additional special improvement funds are
established by the municipalities that finance local works and these have not been
included in the figure for preliminary borrowing approval.
Details of debenture issues and other securities that have been approved in
principle at the time of adoption of the loan authorization by-laws are specified in
security issuing by-laws; 188 security issuing by-laws authorizing the issue of debentures and other terms of indebtedness in the total amount of $55,183,364 were
approved; of this sum, municipaUties and regional districts financed $31,586,066 on
the open market or through bank facilities.
In 1972, no municipal debenture issues were guaranteed by the Province under
the Municipal Assistance Act. Details of the issues guaranteed as at December 31,,
1972, are shown on the foUowing schedule.
 W 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
OUTSTANDING DEBENTURES GUARANTEED, 1972
Village
Municipalities
Assistance Act
Municipalities
Assistance Act
Total
$
351,000
383,500
626,500
296,200
$
10,607,231
9,738,031
1,814,000
3,990,212
$
10,958,231
Districts
Towns
10,121,531
2,440,500
4,286,412
Totals
1,657,200
26,149,474
10,264,000
555,000
1,462,000
57,000
17,157,000
27,806,674
10,264,000
Greater Victoria Water District    .                   	
555,000
1,462,000
	
57,000
Greater Vancouver Water District         	
17,157,000
Grand totals
1,657,200
55,644,474
57,301,674
In addition to the totals shown in the table of $57,301,674 as debenture debts
guaranteed by the Province, a total amount at the end of the year of $22,531,000
was guaranteed under the Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District Act.
Total debenture debt, as at December 31, 1971, of all municipalities, including
City of Vancouver, is shown below. The debenture debt of the Greater Vancouver
Sewerage and Drainage District and the Greater Vancouver Water District is not
included.
Sold
Unissued
and
Unsold
Total
$
67,472,498
100,571,639
9,511,447
8,603,591
6,075,471
$
33,690,018
79,810,102
7,491,245
5,066,929
13,885,743
$
101,162,516
180,381,741
17,002,692
Villages                                            	
13,670,520
19,960,944
192,234,646
167,735,441
139,944,037
332,178,413
167,735,441
Totals     	
359,970,087
139,944,037
499,913,854
Debenture sales for all municipaUties amounted to $41,478,000 for the year
1.971. This resulted in an increase of $16,573,621 to the total outstanding debenture debt of aU municipalities for 1971, after giving effect to the retirement of
debentures maturing during the year.
The percentage of current revenue expended to service debenture debt, excluding utilities, in cities, including the City of Vancouver, declined in 1970, and
increased slightly in towns and viUages. Figures for 1971 are shown below, along
with the 1970 figures in parentheses:
Cities	
Vancouver-
Districts	
Towns	
VUlages..
Per Cent
6.0 (6.4)
(9.1)
(6.4)
(7.4)
(5.6)
8.1
6.4
8.2
5.7
Debenture debt of utiUties is serviced almost entirely by revenues derived by
charges paid by consumer and by frontage taxes.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1972 W 21
REGIONAL DISTRICT ACTIVITIES
Introduction and establishment of regional government in British Columbia
has, since the inception of the concept in 1965, been reviewed and discussed in
previous annual reports and now has become recognized not only by people in our
Province but also in others as an important contributor to the everyday benefits we
receive from actions of local government.
When the concept of regional districts was first introduced the various roles
these new corporate structures would play in the area of local government was not
always clearly envisaged. Through seminars, informative publications, staff participation and direction, and the actual exercise of powers, a better understanding has
developed both within Provincial Government agencies and municipal councils.
Encouragement of co-operation and liaison between the departments of Government
and regional districts will continue in those areas of jurisdiction that have common
interests.
As in the past, further expansion of local government services was undertaken
by regional districts, but land use and its control through regional and community
planning have continued to be emphasized as the need for enactment of zoning
regulations has come to the forefront. Amendments to governing legislation were
kept to a minimum in 1972 as regional boards exercised use of powers in the areas
of land-use management and local government services granted to them in 1971 and
earlier years.
Some 24 new functions were granted the 28 regional districts in 1972 and
Table 4 summarizes those assigned, while Table 5 sets out all functions undertaken
to date. Protection of our environment continues to be one of the major concerns
of regional districts as the functions in the areas of garbage disposal, collection and
disposal of derelict vehicles, and sewage disposal were undertaken. Of particular
interest was the assumption of the function of sewage disposal by the Regional District of Nanaimo from the Nanaimo Sewerage and Drainage District; a similar undertaking was made last year by the Regional Board of the Greater Vancouver Regional
District when the powers and functions of the Boards of the Greater Vancouver
Water District and the Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District were
assigned to an administrative board consisting of a larger part of the Regional Board.
Vancouver-Fraser Park District was dissolved under the provisions of section
185 of the Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act, and an addition was made
to the powers of the Greater Vancouver Regional District when supplementary
Letters Patent were issued to grant the regional district the function of regional
parks, pursuant to the Regional Parks Act.
During the year, regional parks have been assumed as a function either over the
whole regional district, or in part, by three regional districts; 12 regional districts
now exercise this function. Provision of recreational facilities and recreational programmes was also undertaken on a functional basis. The increasing interest in parks
and recreational facilities gives an indication of a trend toward the pursuit of recreation as an outlet for the use of our leisure time and a regional approach to meeting
the cost assures a more equitable distribution of the burden of providing the service.
Home entertainment has also become a consideration as two regional districts
assumed the function of television rebroadcasting as empowered by recent changes
in legislation.
A service required by the greater community is now being considered as a single
entity by many municipalities and the regional approach has provided an acceptable
solution to the problem.   Provision of sewage disposal, garbage disposal, and ambu-
 W 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
lance facilities are particularly adaptable to this concept, although the functions such
as joint computer operations, fire protection, transit, and construction equipment-
pools could conceivably be established for the greater community by regional districts. Services can be provided by regional districts to municipal and nonmunicipal
areas, either directly or by contract.
Supplementary Letters Patent were issued in several instances for purposes
other than to authorize the granting of functions. Revision of the internal and
external boundaries is continuing and amendments have been made to cost-sharing
formulas and other changes in corporate structure.
In the Regional District of Alberni-Clayoquot, on the order of the Minister
under provisions in the Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act, Electoral Areas
E and F were created from those areas known as Beaver Creek and Cherry Creek
Improvement Districts.
Thirty-three specified areas were established by by-law in 1972; of these areas
five were established by petition method, 22 after the property-owners voted favourably on the proposal, six were garbage-disposal units established under the authority
of Letters Patent, and in addition one was created by Order in CouncU when a local
service area under the Local Services Act was dissolved. Before regional government was introduced, community services administered locally in nonmunicipal areas
were provided through the incorporation of improvement districts, either under the
Water Act as administered by the Water Rights Branch of the Department of Lands,
Forests, and Water Resources, or under the Municipal Act, or in some instances
local areas were established under the Local Services Act; the latter two Acts are
administered through this Department. New local service needs and their financing,
with the exception of water, irrigation, and dykes, in nonmunicipal areas are almost
all provided through the facilities of regional districts.
Many of the specified areas have been established adjacent to municipal boundaries and, as the demand for a multiplicity of services develops, the trend will be to
move toward the incorporation of these areas within present municipal boundaries,
while those that are in more isolated situations will probably retain their nonmunicipal status. A recent directive of the Minister of Municipal Affairs to the areas of
Kelowna and Kamloops to become incorporated as new cities to encompass the
greater community will give some indication of the extent of provision of local services to such areas through the facilities of a municipality.
Since the delegation of regional planning was made a statutory responsibUity of
regional districts, emphasis has been placed on the preparation of a regional plan as
a prerequisite to proceeding with zoning by-laws and, as in the past, seminars have
been held at which the need for regional planning has been discussed; other topics of
local concern were also given attention. In keeping with the promotion of the
preparation of regional plans, contracts with regional districts have been entered into
for the services of our planning officers. Continued efforts will be made to encourage
the completion of regional plans which, when they are in place, will provide standards for the preparation of zoning and other land-use by-laws.
Regional districts are local government structures that have been incorporated
to provide services to people and, as the population in the Province increases, the
demands upon Regional Boards wiU also grow. Municipalities are becoming aware
of the economies of scale where a common service is required and the regional district is the obvious vehicle by which many of these services can be provided. Regional districts can provide such services to municipal and nonmunicipal areas alike
and those people that benefit pay on a more equitable basis.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1972 W 23
Growth of regional districts continues to be reflected in the increase in expenditures from those over previous years. Some of the expenditures are a result of
assuming new functions consisting of transfers of municipal services applicable to
greater communities to regional jurisdiction, while others are new services to non-
municipal areas.
After the result of the 1971 census was known, all Regional Boards were advised of population changes and their effect upon the voting strength of the representatives of the member municipalities. Some changes in electoral areas and
regional district boundaries were indicated and we have suggested each Regional
Board review the boundaries of their regional district in light of the new population
figures. As settlement trends in the Province establish themselves, no doubt other
boundary reviews wiU be required.
Provincial grants of $6,000 are made annually to assist in meeting administrative costs of regional districts and an annual grant of 15 cents per capita with a
minimum of $5,000 and a maximum of $25,000 is made to assist in the cost of
development of an environmental management programme. The whole question of
grant structures applicable to regional districts is under review.
 W 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
Further progress was made in the development of regional plans by Regional
District Boards. Most regional districts are now actively engaged in adopting or
revising regional plans.
The Department has contracted with some Regional Boards to prepare their
first-phase regional plans for them.  A summary of these contracts is as follows:
A regional plan has been prepared for the Ocean Falls Regional District
in the BeUa Coola Subregion.
A first-phase regional plan has been completed for the Cowichan Valley
Regional District.
In Mount Waddington Regional District the first-phase regional plan is
now being printed on behalf of the Board.
Fraser-Cheam Regional District has asked the Department to extend the
regional plan from the boundaries of the former Lower Mainland
Regional Planning Area and develop a plan to cover the other areas
of the regional district.
Kootenay Boundary Regional District has engaged the Department to do a
two-section regional plan for the Columbia Valley and the Boundary
Area and continue with subsequent community planning work.
Work is continuing toward a regional plan in the Columbia-Shuswap
Regional District.
On behalf of Skeena A Regional District the Department is directly involved in a study for the Queen Charlotte Islands and to this end
resource information is being printed and will be available to the
public.
The Department has also been directly involved in community planning work
in electoral areas.   In the Kitimat-Stikine Regional District, community planning
work for the Thornhill area, south of the District of Terrace, has been completed.
At the request of the Lands Service of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water
Resources, subdivision layout for a new community at Dease Lake, which will be at
the junction of the terminus of British Columbia Railway and the Stewart-Cassiar
Road, has been prepared.   This project has been undertaken in consultation with
other departments on the amount of land required for various services and facilities
and for future community needs.  The Lands Service has also requested the Department undertake a planning study of Texada Island and this study is now under way.
Direct participation and community planning through the Local Services Act
continues in nonmunicipal areas with the subdivision regulations for many of the
Gulf Islands under Community Planning Area 24.   Some regional districts have
adopted subdivision by-laws and in those instances subdivision regulations have
been rescinded.   The Department continues to administer building regulations directly from Victoria for Community Planning Area 23 at Shawnigan Lake.
There is a growing concern about development on flood plains. The Water
Resources Service, in co-operation with the Department, has reviewed and advised
on land-use by-laws which deal with areas subject to periodic flooding. Similarly,
the Department has co-operated with the Department of Agriculture in controlling
subdivision of classified farmland through the Environment and Land Use Act.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1972 W 25
The Technical Planning Committees for the regional districts have been in
operation for a number of years and the Department has now reissued an administrative guide, stemming from the experience gained in the operation of Technical
Planning Committees.
Technical planning staff have been involved in a growing number of legal
descriptions covering municipal boundary extensions, specified areas, and changes
in regional district boundaries. Of the 80 changes made, 54 required some form of
mapping for distribution to other government agencies and required intensive and
accurate attention.
 W 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
HOUSING, LAND ASSEMBLY, AND URBAN REDEVELOPMENT
PUBLIC HOUSING
During the past year, in the administration of the Housing Act, the principal
activities have continued as joint undertakings of the Provincial and Federal Governments in response to requests from municipaUties.
Public housing has been provided in smaUer groups of buUdings than in the
past so they may be more widely distributed throughout communities. The inventory
of completed or contracted accommodation now stands at 4,820 units, and with 697
units in the planning stage or approved, the total is 5,517 units.
The Greater Vancouver Regional District is participating in the housing field
and at present has approval and plans for 380 units of accommodation. Considerable activity throughout the Lower Mainland area is anticipated as a result.
The Government has studied the subject of mobile homes from the point of
view of the quaUty of design, specification, and the assurance of satisfactory manufacture. Co-ordinated action may be necessary to remove these buildings from the
classification of vehicles or chattels where their location and apparent use is for
continuing residence, and this concept wiU be pursued to recognize and control
structures which have proven to be a quick and satisfactory solution to housing
problems for many people.
Municipality
Public Housing Units
Completed
or Under
Construction
Approved
Project
Planned
Project
Total
Alert Bay_
Burnaby..
Dawson Creek-
Langley.
New Westminster-
Pen ticton	
Port Alberni	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Saanich	
Surrey	
Vancouver	
Victoria	
Greater Vancouver Regional District-
Totals.
431
50
53
101
125
126
134
233
248
3,135
184
4,820
23
22
190
300
535
12
70
80
162
12
431
50
53
101
125
23
126
134
255
438
3,205
184
380
5,517
LAND ASSEMBLY
A programme of land assembly, both for immediate development and to hold
for future development, is important to the orderly growth of the residential areas
of communities. This has generated an active programme of acquisition of land
which will assist particularly those municipalities which lack the capital resources
with which to gain control of suitable property. The programme includes resources
for early development of land with a view to providing serviced property at low cost
to the user.
 report of department of municipal affairs, 1972        w 27
URBj\N redevelopment
There have been significant activities in the redevelopment field, partly as a
result of the continuation of programmes which had been advanced in the planning
stage, even though the Federal Government has suspended general support of urban
renewal projects. One of these projects was aid to the City of Victoria in the acquisition of property for the rejuvenation and beautification of the Inner Harbour area.
Two projects are under way in the City of Vancouver—one is a redevelopment
programme in the Britannia area which wiU provide considerable assistance in producing a new community complex; the other project is in the Strathcona area where
an experiment in rehabiUtation is being carried out with great co-operation of the
residents of the area.
The Province has joined in discussions with the Federal Government and the
governments of other provinces with regard to reinstating assistance in modified
programmes of rehabnitation and redevelopment more directly related to the owners
of properties, particularly where rejuvenation of older residential areas is deemed
important and practical.
 W 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TABLES AND CHARTS
Table 1—Municipal Boundary Revisions, 1972
Municipality
Area (Acres)
Population
Before
Added
After
Before
Added
After
Cities
12,128.19
3,393.28
3,419.79
25,431.00
3,141.57
3,257.27
3,468.69
871.40
933.63
569.46
924.00
288.31
166.67
3,618.91
26.51
85.38
1,078.40
115.70
476.61
24.53
1,323.91
11.50
135.00
1,194.17
30.94
36.11
15,747.10
3,419.79
3,505.17
26,509.40
3,257.27
3,733.88
3,493.22
2,195.31
945.13
704.46
2,118.17
319.25
202.78
33,110
13,285
13,335
65,040
8,264
8,278
6,252
3,787
1,916
396
1,163
1,120
634
69
50
71
Nil
14
52
6
Nil
Nil
Nil
1
Nil
Nil
33,179
13,335
Vernon (second)	
District
13,406
65,040
Towns
Fort St Tohn
8,278
8,330
6,258
Valleyview	
Villages
3,787
1,916
396
Nakusp
IOO Milp. Wniiesp.
1,164
1,120
634
Source of base population figures is the 1971 census.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1972
W 29
Table 2—Percentage Tax Collections
Percentage of
Current Levy
Collected
Total Collections
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
Outstanding Taxes
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
Cities (Except Vancouver)
1939  ....           .    	
1946                    .     .
81.10
94.13
96.28
96.61
96.65
96.82
99.46
96.79
91.00
95.74
96.03
96.36
95.67
96.11
95.80
96.29
77.60
92.32
96.51
96.69
97.00
96.85
96.37
96.80
89.55
88.69
92.81
93.21
93.98
93.45
93.56
94.59
76.50
92.45
95.21
95.64
95.45
95.70
94.85
96.08
99.10
100.46
100.40
100.30
100.20
100.32
99.69
100.41
103.10
100.57
100.20
100.15
98.87
99.96
99.12
100.17
95.80
99.28
100.67
100.17
100.29
100.08
99.48
100.54
97.06
98.00
98.90
99.75
100.20
99.46
99.36
101.03
98.30
99.90
99.08
100.07
99.97
100.27
100.72
101.21
40.16
7.85
1966                                 	
5.12
1967
4.57
1968                             	
4.44
1969
4.15
1970. -    .
4.64
1971	
4.34
Vancouver
1939	
30.06
1946
5.90
1966	
1967    ..          ..             	
1968 	
I960
5.80
5.04
5.75
5.22
1970
5.87
1971
5.28
Districts
1939                      	
34.81
1946
9.45
1966       	
4.64
1967
1968
4.22
3.90
1969
3.95
1970
4.54
1971 	
Towns
1958
4.15
13.62
1959    ..
15.18
1966      .
10.16
1067
9.84
1968
1969
9.06
9.08
1970
1971.. - _   ...
9.35
7.96
Villages
1939
38.71
1946
11.90
1966
f               6.48
1967
1968
6.16
6.15
1QfiQ
1970        .. ..                                             ...
1971
6.39
7.00
5.53
 W 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 3—Trends in Financial Aspects of Municipal Government
Compared to Population and Income Expressed as Indexes
Year
Population
Total Revenue
(Excluding
Utilities)
Building
Permits
Debenture
Debt
Maximum
Values
Taxable
Total B.C.
Personal
Income
1961    	
1962
100.00
104.91
107.20
110.71
114.63
116.65
122.44
127.14
133.02
138.35
136.55
100.00
110.76
113.31
121.60
138.66
156.62
180.90
207.52
234.38
266.95
306.45
100.00
114.24
130.47
173.67
203.57
206.83
252.27
269.74
316.20
291.26
384.97
100.00
100.72
107.20
109.60
114.30
125.04
127.48
127.46
130.62
132.10
137.00
100.00
110.03
111.03
114.32
122.02
131.68
145.10
156.88
174.83
192.06
209.69
100.00
109.19
1963
116.85
1964
127.27
1965
142.22
1966
160.41
1967
178.09
1968
194.37
1969	
1970
221.58
239.33
1971	
270.56
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1972
W 31
Table 4—Functions Assigned to Regional Districts During 1972
(Unless otherwise indicated, all member areas of the regional district participate in the function.)
Alberni-Clayoquot — Television rebroadcast-
ing (Tofino, Ucluelet, and Electoral Area
C).
Bulkley-Nechako—
Operation cost of arena  (Fort St. lames
and defined part of Electoral Area C).
Ambulance (all electoral areas).
Garbage disposal (all electoral areas).
Cariboo—
Senior citizens' housing (100 Mile House,
Electoral Area H, and defined part of
Electoral Area G).
Recreational programmes   (Williams Lake
and defined parts of Electoral Areas D,
E, andF).
Collection and disposal of derelict vehicles
(100 Mile House, Electoral Areas A, C,
F, G, H, I, and J).
Central Okanagan—
Fireworks and firearms regulation (Peachland, Electoral Areas A, B, C, D, E, F,
G, H, and I).
Dog control (Electoral Areas A, B, C, D,
E, F, G, and I).
Columbia-Shuswap—
Ambulance vehicles (Golden and Electoral
Area A).
Swimming-pool  (Revelstoke and Electoral
Area B).
Fireworks regulation.
Cowichan Valley—Regional parks.
Fraser-Cheam—
Historic site (Harrison Mills).
Recreation   programme   (Hope,
Areas A, B, and C).
Electoral
Fraser-Fort George—
Health  centre   (Mackenzie   and   Electoral
Area G).
Television rebroadcasting (McBride and defined part of Electoral Area H).
Greater Vancouver — Regional parks (Burnaby, Coquitlam, Delta, New Westminster,
Port Moody, Richmond, Surrey, Vancouver,
White Rock, City of Langley, District of
Langley, Matsqui, Port Coquitlam, District
of North Vancouver, Maple Ridge, and
Electoral Areas A, B, and C).
Nanaimo—
Sewage disposal.
Park and green belt land acquisition (electoral areas only).
Ocean Falls—
Airport and facilities
and D).
Civil Defence.
(Electoral Areas C
Okanagan-Similkameen — Garbage disposal
(Keremeos and defined parts of Electoral
Areas B and G, Penticton and defined parts
of Electoral Areas D, E, and F).
Thompson-Nicola — Untidy and unsightly
premises (all electoral areas).
 W 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 5—Regional District Functions as of December 31, 1971
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Contract services1	
Local works and services*	
Grants-in-aid1                      .    ..
Ambulance-	
X
P
p
P
p
P
X
P
P
P
X
p
P
V
Y
P
v
Y
V
v
Y
V
Y
Y
Y
Y
V
V
v
V
Y
Y
V
V
Y
Y
v
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Elderly citizens* housing	
p
P
X
X
p
p
Firearms
P
Y
P
V
P
Y
P
Y
P
Y
P
P
V
P
Y
Health regulation and centre	
P
X
p
Library study	
X
p
p
P
P
P
P
p
P
P
Okanagan Basin Water Board...
X
X
X
P
Y
p
P
Y
P
p
P
p
P
P
P
P
P
p
P
P
p
P
Recreation programme	
P
p
X
P
P
p
1
X
X
Refuse disposal
X
X
P
p
P
p
p
P
P
P
p
p
X
P
Regional parks 	
X
P
X
P
P X
X
X
PI
X
X
p
p
p
Soil removal
X
P
p
1
P
p
p
P
Watfr
p
p
Public use area lighting	
p
Television rebroadcasting	
P
p
i Assigned by statute to all regional districts.
X =indicates function. P=indicates application of function in part of regional district only.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1972
W 33
Table 6—Regional District Specified Service Areas Established
During 1972
Alberni-Clayoquot — Fire   protection   (Bam-
field).
Bulkley-Nechako — Electrification (Tatalrose).
Capital—Activity centre  (Saltspring Island)
(one amendment).
Cariboo-
Garbage-disposal   units   (all   of  Electoral
Areas A, F, and G, all of Electoral Areas
I and C) (two by-laws).
Recreation facilities (Kersley area).
Central Kootenay—
Street lighting (Riondel area).
Water   supply   and   distribution   (Riondel
area).
Fire protection (Riondel area).
Recreation facilities (Riondel area).
Refuse disposal (Riondel area).
Recreation lands and parks (Riondel area).
Ambulance (Riondelarea).
Central Okanagan—
Parks (Rutland).
Street lighting (Pritchard Drive).
Street lighting (Westbank).
Central Fraser Valley — Street lighting, fire,
and ambulance (Huntingdon).
Columbia-Shuswap -
Creek).
-Refuse dispose (Silver
Comox-Strathcona—
Garbage disposal (Hornby Island).
Fire protection (Cortez Island).
Cowichan Valley—
Fire protection (Saltair).
Recreation (Saltair).
Garbage collection (Cowichan Lake).
East Kootenay—
Street lighting (King Cobham).
Improvements to dam and installation of
pipe-line (Lazy Lake).
Fraser-Fort George—
Street lighting (Clear Acres).
Fire protection (Buckhorn).
Street lighting (Hixon).
Okanagan-Similkameen—
Fire protection (Kaleden).
Community centre (Okanagan Falls).
Peace River-Liard — Fire protection (Fort
Nelson).
Thompson-Nicola—Garbage-disposal units (all
of Electoral Areas G, M, A, and N) (four
by-laws).
 W 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
PERCENTAGE  TAX  COLLECTIONS
CHART 1
LEGEND
 Cities  Villages
Districts  Vancouver
♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦Towns
7.
PERCENTAGE    OF    CURRENT    LEVY  COLLECTED
96
\.
,••■*
v
'■•••—"■■
■••...
/
94
93
92
9)
90
19
""*^H
•;:'--'
..■•■
.•''
	
.„•* ....♦♦♦
.-■
..-••■
.«■•
-••
'•»-,
..■■
.••'
••♦.
0
OUTSTANDING    TAXES    AS   A    PERCENTAGE OF   CURRENT    LEVY
....♦♦
^tew
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1972
W 35
TRENDS    IN     FINANCIAL   ASPECTS   OF   MUNICIPAL    GOVERNMENT
COMPARED     TO   POPULATION   AND     INCOME
CHART 2
LEGEND
Population in   millions
Total   revenue   in   millions of dollars
Maximum values taxable in
hundreds of millions of dollars
Building   permits   in    millions of dollars       ■■■■
of millions of dollars
s
sot
500
400
A
^
**
H*
H-*"^
300
^^--
r-"-""'
_._
200
100
90
SO
70
60
50
40
3D
20
—
.**♦♦■
	
.%•""
	
	
	
..«■
~-B- *"
	
■•••♦**""
	
	
10
9
S
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
961                 6
2                      6
3                       6
4                      6
5                      6
6                       6
7                       6
9                      6
1                       7
0                 1971
 W 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
MUNICIPAL  REVENUES
BY   MAJOR   SOURCE   1971
CITIES  (EXCLUDING VANCOUVER)
CHART 3
UTILITIES1
LICENSES   AND  OTHER
OTHER   PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE   GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL MUNICIPAL TAXATION*2'
PROVIDED BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
%OF  REVENUE
100%
2.49 (2.66)
18.29 (12.19)
.79 (  .94)
11.86 (11.81)
8.01 (9.19)
30.86 (34.07)
15.53 (15.11)	
27.69 (29.23)
S PER CAPITA
S326.79   (328.24)
$ 8.15 (8.73)
59.78 (40.05)
2.56 ( 3.07)
38.78 (38.77)
30.00 (30.00)
100.86 (111.69)
90.48(95.93)
1070 FIGURES   SHOWN   IN  PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$142,304,972    TOTAL  POPULATION  435,464
DISTRICTS
LICENSES   AND  OTHER
OTHER   PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL MUNICIPAL TAXATION'2'
PROVIDED  BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
%OF  REVENUE
100%
$  PER CAPITA
S 275.06 (297.31)
14.24 ( 9.45)
$39.25 (28.08)
.63 (   .58)
7.53 ( 7.59)
8.98 (10.18)
1.74 ( 1.72)
20.76 (22.59)
30.00 (30.00)
HP
WW>
35.01 (36.76)
:mm:;A
96.50 (109.56)
18.31 (18.16)	
P
B
33.61 (35.44)
■
92.66(105.36)
m
1970  FIGURES   SHOWN   IN  PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENU£~S223,116,432   TOTAL POPULATION-809,409
NOTE:-  (1) Utilities   represents   amount   appropriated   from   utility   operations   for   General   Municipal   Purposes,   is   not   Major
Source of   Revenue   for  Districts, Towns, Villages  and  Vancouver, included   in 'Licenses and Other'  for  1970  and  1971..
(2) General  Municipal   Taxation  includes Ad Valorem Tax,   Business Tax, Sewer  and Water   Frontage  Tax  and  Special
Assessments.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1972
W 37
MUNICIPAL  REVENUES
BY   MAJOR   SOURCE    1971
TOWNS
CHART 3
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER   PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION'"
PROVIDED  BY  PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
%  OF   REVENUE
18.94 (11.69)
.88 ( 1.08)
9.62 ( 9.38)
10.53 (11.93)
28.35 (33.64)
20.02 (19.49)
31.68 (32.28)   <-
IHTIUVXIVKII
leiiiiiiiiii.eii
$  PER  CAPITA
$253.18   (235.45)
$47.95 (27.53)
2.24 ( 2.55)
24.35 (22.09)
30.00 (28.00)
71.78 (77.28)
80.20 (76.00)
1970 FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$15,019,496    TOTAL POPULATION-59,325
VILLAGES
% OR REVENUE
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL MUNICIPAL TAXATION1"
PROVIDED  BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
26.10   (11.85)
.56 (   .77)
15.40 (17.64)
23.97 (33.13)
23.81 (23.07) —
33.97 (36.64)
	
S PER CAPITA
$101.20   (173.11)
49.90 (20.51)
1.08 ( 1.33)
30.00 (28.00)
45.82 (57.87)
64.96 (63.40)
1970  FIGURES   SHOWN   IN PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-811,801,813     TOTAL POPULATION-61,727
NOTE'- (1) General  Municipal  Taxation includes  Ad Valorem Tax,   Business  Tax, Sower and Water   Frontage Tax  and  Special
Assessments.
 W 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
MUNICIPAL  REVENUE!
BY   MAJOR   SOURCE   1971
VANCOUVER
CHART 3
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER   PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE   GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION1"
PROVIDED  BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER  GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
% OF   REVENUE
100%
$ PER  CAPITA
$385.23   (348.65)
15.42 (10.80)
.31  (   .47)
17.35 (17.33)
7.50 ( 8.60)
33.56 (35.58)
12.70 (12.98)	
25.86 (27.22)
aktatxat&ax
$ 59.43 (37.65)
1.18 ( 1.67)
66.83 (60.43)
30.00 (28.00)
129.29(124.03)
99.61 (94.87)
1970  FIGURES   SHOWN   IN  PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$164,199,444    TOTAL POPULATION-426,256
NOTE:-  (1) General  Municipal   Taxation includes  Ad Valorem Tax,   Business   Tax, Sewer  and  Water   Frontage  Tax  and  Special
Assessments.
REVENUE    SHOWN   FOR   ALL   CLASSES    OF   MUNICIPALITIES    INCLUDING    VANCOUVER    DOES    NOT    INCLUDE
APPROPRIATION   OF    PRIOR   YEARS    SURPLUS.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1972
W 39
.VENUE   EXPENDITURES
BY    MAJOR   FUNCTION   1971
CITIES
CHART 4
EXCLUDING  VANCOUVER
% OF  EXPENDITURE
100%
GENERAL  GOVERNMENT
FIRE
ADMINISTRATION   OF JUSTICE
OTHER  PROTECTION
TRANSPORTATION   SERVICES
ENVIRONMENTAL   HEALTH
SOCIAL WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT  CHARGES  (NET)
CAPITAL  EXPENDITURES FROM  REVENUE
OTHER
5.90
4.28
6.52
.85
8.16
3.73
( 5.81)
< 4.27)
( 6.06)
( 1.79)
(6.29)
(3.89)
2Z222Z222ZZZ2ZZ
16.41   (16.77)
28.33   (29.03)
6.00   ( 6.82)
5.84   ( 5.50)
13.98   (13.77)
S PER CAPITA
$325.91   (332.07)
$19.22 (19.30)
13.95 (14.16)
21.23 (20.12)
2.78 ( 5.95)
26.61 (20.90)
12.17  (12.94)
53.49   (55.67)
92.34  (96.38)
19.55 (22.64)
19.05   (18.27)
45.56 (45.74)
1970  FIGURES   SHOWN   IN  PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$141,914,912     TOTAL   POPULATION-435,464
DISTRICTS
X OF   EXPENDITURE
100%
GENERAL  GOVERNMENT
FIRE
ADMINISTRATION OF  JUSTICE
OTHER   PROTECTION
TRANSPORTATION   SERVICES
ENVIRONMENTAL   HEALTH
SOCIAL  WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT  CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL EXPENDITURES   FROM   REVENUE
OTHER
5.74 ( 5.64)
3.58 ( 3.32)
5.42 ( 4.89)
1.22 ( 1.64)
7.37 ( 6.56)
3.13 ( 2.70)
12.94 (12.96)
33.88 (34.80)
6.35   (6.75)
5.94 ( 7.40)
14.43 (13.34)
S PER CAPITA
$273.87  (303.44)
$15.72 (17.10)
9.81 (10.08)
14.84 (14.85)
3.34 ( 4.98)
20.16 (19.91)
8.58 ( 8.19)
35.40 (39.33)
92.71 (105.58)
17.39   (20.47)
16.26   (22.46)
39.49   (40.49)
1970  FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$221,508,788    TOTAL   POPULATION-809,409
NOTE:- Expenditures   for   Health   included   in 'Other*.
 W 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REVENUE   EXPENDITURES
BY    MAJOR   FUNCTION   1971
TOWNS
CHART 4
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
FIRE
OTHER PROTECTIONS
TRANSPORTATION  SERVICES
ENVIRONMENTAL   HEALTH
SOCIAL WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT   CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL  EXPENDITURE  FROM  REVENUE
OTHER
% OF  EXPENDITURE
100%
$ PER   CAPITA
$251.52  (234.09)
7.59   (7.57)
1.56   (1.52)
.84   (2.26)
10.52   (6.88)
4.18   (4.45)
14.82 (14.88)
31.91 (32.68)
8.16 ( 8.99)
6.95 ( 8.03)
1347(12.74)
xmameam
$19.08 (17.71)
3.92 ( 3.57)
2.10 (  5.30)
26.48 (16.12)
10.51  (10.42)
37.28 (34.82)
80.25 (76.50)
20.53 (21.04)
17.49 (18.80)
33.88(29.81)
1970   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$14,921,049     TOTAL   POPULATION-59,325
VILLAGES
% OF EXPENDITURE
100%
GENERAL    GOVERNMENT
FIRE
OTHER PROTECTIONS
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
ENVIRONMENTAL  HEALTH
EDUCATION
DEBT CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL EXPENDITURE  FROM  REVENUE
OTHER
11.88 (11.63)
2.35 ( 2.31)
.82 ( 2.94)
5.58 ( 9.18)
5.63 (4.74)
36.47 (37.42)
5.71 (6.97)
11.27(11.91)
20.29 (12.92)
$  PER CAPITA
$178.56   (170.39)
$21.20 (19.82)
4.20 ( 3.94)
1.46 ( 5.00)
9.96 (15.63)
10.05 ( 8.09)
65.12 (63.73)
10.20 (11.88)
20.12 (20.30)
36.23 (22.00)
1970  FIGURES  SHOWN   IN PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$11,021,370     TOTAL   POPULATION-61,727
NOTE'- Expenditures   for   Health included   in   'Other*.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1972
W 41
VENUE    EXPENDITURES
BY    MAJOR    FUNCTION    1971
VANCOUVER
CHART 4
GENERAL  GOVERNMENT
FIRE
ADMINISTRATION   OF JUSTICE
OTHER   PROTECTION
PUBLIC   WORKS
SANITATION   AND   WASTE REMOVAL
SOCIAL WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL EXPENDITURES FROM REVENUE
OTHER
% OF   EXPENDITURE
100%
$ PER  CAPITA
$384.72   (360.38)
2.62 ( 3.21)
5.96 (5.70)
9.33 ( 8.91)
1.06 ( 2.60)
4.10 (2.30)
2.38 (3.09)
22.32 (21.98)
26.23  (26.23)
8.10   ( 9.07)
4.84   ( 3.03)
13.06   (13.88)
irriiirmxmx
mKv&zz#
10.06 (11.57)
22.93 (20.54)
35.90 (32.12)
4.06 ( 9.36)
15.79 ( 8.30)
9.15 (11.14)
85.88 (79.19)
100.90   (94.51)
31.17   (32.69)
18.61    (10.93)
50.24   (50.03)
1970   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$163,980,832    TOTAL   POPULATION - 426,256
NOTE:- Expenditures  for   Health   included  in 'Other*.
 W 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENTAL PUBLICATIONS, 1972
Annual Report, year ended December 31, 1971.
Municipal Statistics, year ended December 31, 1971.
Statistics Relating to Regional and Municipal Governments, May 1972.
Regional Districts in British Columbia, September 1971.
A Guide to Municipal Management, September 1972.
A Guide to Regional District Management, September 1972.
Provincial Subdivision Regulations, November 1970.
Land Use Colour and Coding Guide, December 1970.
Zoning Colour and Coding Guide, December 1970.
ACTS ADMINISTERED BY DEPARTMENT OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
Municipal Act.
Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act.
Local Services Act.
Municipal Finance Authority of British Columbia Act.
Housing Act.
Mobile Home Park Fee Act.
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1973
1,530-273-1682

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