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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA One Hundredth Annual Report 1970/71 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1972

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 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
One Hundredth Annual Report
1970/71
By the Honourable the Minister of Education
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1972
      To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the One Hundredth Report of the Public Schools
of the Province.
DONALD LESLIE BROTHERS
Minister of Education
January 1972.
  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION,  1971
Minister of Education:
The Honourable Donald Leslie Brothers, Q.C., LL.B.
Deputy Minister of Education:
J. Phillipson, B.A., B. Ed.
Superintendents of Educational Services:
Administrative Services:
C. I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed.
Field Services:
W. D. Reid, B.A., M.Ed.
Financial Services:
S. E. Espley
Instructional Services:
J. R. Meredith, B.A., M.Ed.
Post-secondary Services:
A. E. Soles, B.A., M.Ed.
Special Services:
J. L. Canty, B.A., M.Ed.
Technical and Vocational
Services:
J. S. White
District Superintendents, Superintendents, and Inspectors of Schools:
H. D. Abbott, B.A., M.A., Nanaimo.
K. F. Alexander, B.Sc, B.Ed., Mission City.
N. A. Allen, B.A.(Hons.), West Vancouver.
J. E. Beech, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent, Surrey.
G. C. Bissell, B.A., B.Ed., Castlegar.
R. S. Boyle, B.A., B.Ed., Dawson Creek.
C. A. Bruce, B.A., B.Ed., Kamloops.
A. D. Campbell, B.A., B.Ed., Vanderhoof.
D. H. Campbell, B.A., B.Ed., Oliver.
N. Clark, B.Ed., M.A., Inspector, Vancouver.
R. B. Cox, B.A., Courtenay.
H. E. Cullis, B.Sc.(Hons.), M.A., Squamish.
C. Cuthbert, B.Acc, B.Ed., M.Ed., Mur-
rayville.
D. E. A. Eldred, B.Ed.(Sec)(U.B.C),
M.Ed.(Toronto), Grand Forks.
J. M. Evans, B.A., M.Ed., Alberni.
D. L. Feir, B.A., M.A., Quesnel.
H. C. Ferguson, B.A., Powell River.
R. E. Flower, B.A., B.Ed., Williams Lake.
W. B. Fromson, B.A., B.Ed., North Vancouver.
G. W. Graham, B.A., Richmond.
S. J. Graham, B.A., New Westminster.
J. V. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
P. C. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Vernon.
R. R. Hanna, B.A., B.Ed., Sechelt.
W. L. B. Hawker, B.A., B.Ed., Haney.
J. Holden, B.A., M.Ed., Fort St. John.
C. Holob, B.S.A., M.Ed., Sidney.
C. Hopper, B.Ed., M.Ed., Kamloops.
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.P/Ed., Sooke.
E. Irwin, B.A., B.Ed., Inspector, Vancouver.
W. B. Johnston, B.Ed., M.Ed., Port Hardy.
E. E. Lewis, B.A., B.P/ED., Duncan.
W. J. Logie, B.A., Campbell River. ,
A. J. Longmore, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Victoria.
R. F. Lucas, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Prince Rupert.
W. E. Lucas, B.A., B.P/ED., North Vancouver.
R. G. Lyon, B.Ed., M.Ed., Hope.
J. I. Macdougall, B.A., M.A., M.Ed.,
D.P/ED.,  Chilliwack.
D. E. McFee, B.A., M.A., Kitimat.
A. P. McKay, B.Com., M.Ed., Revelstoke.
C. S. McKenzie, B.A., Trail.
D. H. MacKirdy, D.F.C., B.A., B.Ed.,
M.Ed.,  Ladysmith.
E. Marriott, B.A., Cloverdale.
F. T. Middleton, B.A., B.Ed., Creston.
W. J. Mouat, B.A., M.Ed., Abbotsford.
G. H. Nelson, B.A., B.Ed., Penticton.
F. J. Orme, B.A., B.P-ED., Kelowna.
G. M. Paton, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Coquitlam.
P. B. Pullinger, B.A., B.Ed., Cranbrook.
W. F. Ramsay, B.A., B.Ed., Merritt.
C. T. Rendle, B.A., Burnaby.
A. C. Rutledge, B.Ed., M.Ed., Kimberley.
R. F. Sharp, B.A., D.P.ED., Superintendent,
Vancouver.
E. C. Stewart, B.A., B.Ed., Terrace.
M. V. Thorsell, B.A., M.Ed., Sidney.
R. F. Thorstenson, B.A., Ladner.
D. P. Todd, B.A., B.Ed., Prince George.
J. Walsh, B.Sc, M.Ed., Jericho Hill Schools.
D. N. Weicker, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Fort
St. John.
J.  H.  Wormsbecker,  B.A.,  M.A.,   Ed.D.,
Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
C. C. Wright, B.A., Salmon Arm.
W. J. Zoellner, B.A., B.Ed., Nelson.
 SPECIAL OFFICIALS
Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment: P. J. Kitley, MA.
Supervisor of School Construction: H. Dickinson
Assistant Director of Technical and Vocational Education: V. E. Rickard, B.Ed.
Inspectors of Technical Classes: M. J. Tidmarsh and R. Smith
Inspector of Technical and Vocational Education: P. C. MacGregor
Registrar: E. A. Killough, B.Ed., M.A.
Director of Home Economics: Miss J. R. Irvine, B.Sc.(H.Ec)
Inspectors of Home Economics:
Miss J. Campbell, M.A., B.Sc.(H.Ec), Dip.Ed. and Mrs. H. Krueger, B.Sc.(H.Ec)
Director of Curriculum Development: W. B. Naylor, B.A.
Director of Audio-Visual Services: B. A. Black
Director of Research and Standards: C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.P/ED.
Director of Correspondence Education: J. R. Hind, B.A., B.P/ED.
Director of Curriculum Resources: D. W. C. Huggins, C.G.A.
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Pace
Report by the Deputy Minister.___     13
Reports by Superintendents of Educational Services:
Superintendent of Administrative Services	
Superintendent of Field Services	
17
20
Superintendent of Financial Services  28
Superintendent of Instructional Services  31
Superintendent of Post-secondary Services  45
Superintendent of Special Services  54
Superintendent of Technical-Vocational Services  65
Statistical Tables:
1. Pupils     85
2. Teachers  167
3. Financial Data  183
4. Schools  191
5. Post-secondary and Adult Education  201
6. Technical and Vocational Education  205
Supplement:
100 Years—Education in British Columbia.
11
  Report of Deputy Minister of Education, 1970/71
The school-year 1970/71 was marked by a major reorganization within the
Department. Dr. G. Neil Perry resigned as Deputy Minister in August 1970 and
Mr. Franklin P. Levirs, Superintendent of Education, resigned in December 1970.
Dr. G. Neil Perry served the Department since October 1965, giving valued
leadership and direction. He was responsible for much of the initial planning and
development of the post-secondary institutions, particularly the college programme.
Mr. Franklin P. Levirs has given many years of dedicated service to education
in the Province. He served the Department in a number of roles for a quarter of a
century. His impact on the growth and direction of the system is recognized by
trustees and teachers everywhere. In leaving the Department, he takes with him
the good will of all those with whom he was associated over the years.
The Department responsibilities, increasing in scope, have become a matter of
serious concern. It was evident that, in the interests of efficiency, and in order to
delineate responsibilities, it was desirable to establish clearly defined "divisions,"
each in charge of senior personnel who were responsible and accountable for specific
areas of administration.
The Department has been organized into seven such divisions, each with a
"Superintendent" in charge, as follows:
Division of Administrative Services, Mr. C. I. Taylor.
Division of Field Services, Mr. W. D. Reid.
Division of Financial Services, Mr. S. E. Espley.
Division of Instructional Services, Mr. J. R. Meredith.
Division of Post-secondary Services, Mr. A. E. Soles.
Division of Special Services, Mr. J. L. Canty.
Division of Technical-Vocational Services, Mr. J. S. White.
The restructuring of the Department has been done in such a way that each
Division Superintendent assumes responsibility for specific areas of administration.
In relation to previous posts, some of the duties are unchanged, but in other instances
there are significant revisions.
The Division of Administrative Services assumes responsibility for matters of
school board relations—elections, appointment of trustees and representatives, land
acquisition and disposal, processing of referenda and variations, and, also, approval
of expenditure of capital funds. The Division also handles matters of personnel
within the Department, the preparation of the Annual Report, the School Calendar,
transportation and boarding allowances. The School Planning Branch within this
Division maintains construction-cost control and approves all school district plans.
It also designs and supervises the construction of a number of "pilot" projects, with
a view to applying modern techniques and cost-saving procedures.
The Division of Field Services is concerned with the inspection of schools,
evaluation of teachers, as well as problems arising from the transfer and dismissal
of teachers. Matters relative to pupil attendance and authority for the opening and
closing of schools come within the jurisdiction of this Division. The District Superintendents of Schools, the Director of Home Economics, and the Co-ordinator of Industrial Education, as well as the Industrial Education Technical Advisers, respond
to the head of this Division.
The Division of Financial Services has a broad area of responsibility within the
Department, including budget preparation and control, payroll, and personnel rec-
13
 C 14 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
ords. In addition, this Division is responsible for approving all school district budgets, college budgets; and the finances relative to universities, Provincial vocational
schools, the British Columbia Institute of Technology, and Jericho Hill Schools.
The Division is also concerned with all financial arrangements with Canada related
to Indian and Service pupils enrolled in the public schools, the Fiscal Arrangements
Act, and Canada Manpower agreements.
The Division of Instructional Services operates a broad spectrum of activities.
The development of a Provincial curriculum, the authorization and supply of textbooks, the provision of examinations, the accreditation of secondary schools, the
approval of locally developed curricula, are all matters which come under the jurisdiction of this Division. In addition, the audio-visual services, teacher certification,
research and standards, are included as related responsibilities.
The Division of Post-secondary Services has been established to co-ordinate
the development of the college programme in the Province, as well as to bring about
an orderly relationship among all post-secondary institutions. The Division also
processes all scholarship, loans, and bursaries for post-secondary students. The
Division is currently concerned with the process of combining Provincial vocational
schools and colleges. Provincial responsibility with respect to adult education is
administered under this Division.
A variety of matters comes under the jurisdiction of the Division of Special
Services. The functions of the Correspondence School, the Guidance Branch, and
Jericho Hill Schools for the Deaf and the Blind are handled by personnel in this
Division. Grants for special classes are administered hereunder. Liaison with
other Departments is maintained by the Superintendent in matters of health, rehabilitation, and legislation.
Finally, the Division of Technical-Vocational Services maintains the traditional
role of arranging for a full programme of technical training, generally at the post-
secondary level. The Division is concerned with Industrial Education programmes,
technical and vocational teacher training, the vocational branches of colleges, and
vocational night school and part-time courses. In addition, it operates the Provincial
vocational schools and the British Columbia Institute of Technology. The Superintendent maintains a working liaison with the Provincial Department of Labour and
the Department of Manpower and Immigration, negotiating and providing services
according to annual contractual agreements.
Superintendents, with the exception of Mr. A. E. Soles, were assigned from
experienced senior officials employed within the Department. Mr. Soles joined the
Department in December 1970, bringing with him a rich background of experience
as teacher and principal, not only in public schools but also as Principal of Selkirk
College. His responsibility will be great, as the college developments take place
throughout the Province. The headquarters staff is knowledgeable and extremely
competent in the broad spectrum of education. Each superintendent will report
elsewhere on the developments within his division for the year.
The changes in organization were supported by significant changes in the Public
Schools Act which, in effect, eliminated the position of "Superintendent of Education" and, like other Departments of Government, placed the total responsibility
with the Minister and provided authority for him to delegate. The various responsibilities under the Act have been assigned to the Superintendents of Divisions
through the Deputy Minister.
The Annual Report for 1970/71 is supplemented with a special section reminding us that this is not only the Centennial year of British Columbia's entry into
Confederation but also that it marks 100 years of publicly supported, free, and non-
sectarian schools in the Province.
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER C 15
The first Public Schools Act was approved April 11, 1872. Educational opportunity has expanded at a dynamic rate since that time to serve a total of 527,106
public school students, as well as 2,424 regular students enrolled in the Provincial
Correspondence School, and 236,476 adult students enrolled in Public School Adult
Education Programmes, Provincial Correspondence Courses, or Canadian Vocational Training Programmes.
The year has been highlighted by the growth and expansion of post-secondary
facilities. The District College Programme is rapidly expanding through the Province. The Provincial vocational schools, the British Columbia Institute of Technology, and the newly developed colleges are providing career programmes for over
51,000 students. The high standard of training in these schools accounts, in large
part, for the acceptability of the graduates in the commercial, industrial, and professional sectors of the Provincial work force. A new vocational school, complete with
dormitory facilities, was opened in Terrace by the Honourable W. A. C. Bennett,
Prime Minister, in August 1970. On that occasion the Honourable the Prime Minister announced plans to build another school in the Fraser Valley. At the same
time construction was well under way on the new vocational school at Kamloops,
scheduled to open in the fall of 1971.
The combining of vocational schools and colleges under single regional administration, where such is feasible, is proceeding. This programme, planned to bring
together post-secondary facilities at a regional level, offers increased opportunity, not
only in structuring a total educational programme, but in making the most efficient
use of all facilities.
This year's Annual Report, being the Centennial edition, recognizes the fact
that the first Education Act was passed by the Legislature 100 years ago. A special
supplement, containing items of historical interest, will not only provide interesting
reading but also will document highlights of the century.
I consider it a great privilege to have had this opportunity to work with my
colleagues in the Department and to have experienced the good will and good wishes
of trustees, teachers, and others associated with education in the Province. It is
encouraging to see the progress that is taking place everywhere.
 A new student at Graham Bruce Elementary School, Vancouver.
 DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES C 17
DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES
REPORT OF C. I. TAYLOR, B.A., B.Ed., SUPERINTENDENT
Unlike several of the Divisions of the Department of Education, this Division
has not, as a result of Department reorganization, changed its functions to any degree.
The Division is responsible for the following:
(1) School board organization, election and appointment of school trustees.
(2) Building programmes in school districts, together with site-acquisition and
equipment.
(3) With the Division of Financial Services, preparation of referenda for capital finance requirements.
(4) Transportation, conveyance of pupils, and boarding allowance.
(5) School building planning and supervision of school plans.
(6) Personnel of the Department of Education.
(7) Editing and compiling the Annual Report of the Department.
(8) School board relations.
School Board Organization
The following amalgamations have taken place during the year:
School District No. 25 (Barriere) with School District No. 24 (Kamloops).
School District No.  58   (McBride)  with School District No.  57  (Prince
George).
School District No. 8 (Slocan) in part with School District No. 10 (Arrow
Lakes), in part with School District No. 7 (Nelson).
This has reduced the number of school districts in the Province to 77, of which
75 have elected school boards, two have official trustees.
It is noted that school boards are requesting election-at-large by ballot and that
the number of trustees elected by representatives is declining.
As at the end of the 1970/71 school-year, school district organization was as
follows:
Municipal school districts   70
Rural school districts      7
Total   77
and school boards were organized as noted below:
Three-member board     1
Five-member board  20
Seven-member board  37
Nine-member board  17
Official Trustees (number of districts)      2
Total   77
Sites, Buildings, and Equipment
Capital expenditures (section 190 approvals, calendar year 1970):
Site purchase and improvement     $2,514,832
Buildings (construction)      28,923,938
Equipment       6,016,776
Plans and supervision      2,422,440
Total  $39,877,986
 c 18 public schools report, 1970/71
Referenda
In September and October a detailed survey of essential school building needs
was made by this Division. Every school board in the Province was visited. This
resulted in the school boards placing 27 referenda before the taxpayers.
Referenda presented, 1970/71  $25,104,175
Funds available from previous referenda     22,533,764
Total capital funds  $47,637,939
In December 1970, gymnasia, which had not been authorized in 1969/70, were
allowed for construction, to which purpose $5,700,000 has been approved to date
of May 31, for 48 gymnasia or major additions to same.
Transportation, Conveyance of Pupils
The following statistics indicate details connected with the conveyance of
school-children during the school-year 1970/71:
1. Number of large school districts providing transportation  71
2. Total number of vehicles        837
(a) District-owned   600
(b) Contract  230
(c) Other (water taxis, etc.)      7
3. Total daily approved mileage  61,780
4. Total number of pupils carried daily  82,858
Transportation Assistance
Transportation assistance is made available to the parents of pupils who reside
in isolated areas of the Province where there are insufficient pupils to establish a bus
route or a school of the appropriate grade. In the school-year 1970/71 the Province
shared in $429,148 of transportation assistance for 2,153 pupils in 64 school districts.
Boarding Allowances
A school board may provide boarding allowances for pupils who are not able
to utilize transportation or dormitory facilities. An allowance of up to $40 a month
per pupil is shared by the Province in all approved cases.
In the school-year ending in 1971 the Province shared in boarding allowances
for 571 pupils in 43 school districts, amounting to $224,280.
Dormitory Operation
Dormitory facilities are operated by nine school districts to provide accommodation to over 500 pupils in various areas of the Province to enable these pupils
to receive a secondary education. Dormitory data will be found among the statistical information, Table 3.7.
School Planning
This Branch of Administrative Services continues to scrutinize and approve
all school plans. In addition, much original planning of school buildings for school
districts has been carried on.
Department plans have been used in the following districts: No. 35 (Langley),
No. 62 (Sooke), and No. 81 (Fort Nelson).
This Branch serves in an advisory capacity to school boards, architects, and
construction and maintenance personnel.
 DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES C 19
STRATHCONA TRUST
{Report of Thomas H. Buckham, B.Com., Secretary, Local Committee')
The Strathcona Trust Fund was created in 1908 by Lord Strathcona, then High
Commissioner for Canada. Lord Strathcona gave $500,000 to the trust, with the
yearly interest of $20,000 being apportioned to the provinces, according to the
school enrolment.
The Province has participated in the Strathcona Trust since 1917. An annual
grant of approximately $1,750 has been received in recent years. The money has
been utilized to encourage physical fitness in the schools, as well as cadet training.
The Local Committee, Strathcona Trust for British Columbia, administers the
money received and consists of military representatives and representatives of the
Department of Education. The annual meeting was held on December 10, 1970,
at Headquarters, Maritime Forces Pacific, Department of National Defence, in
Victoria.
The terms of reference were reviewed and a subcommittee formed to present
new proposals. The subcommittee's report was adopted at the next meeting of the
Local Committee on February 4, 1971. The Local Committee has decided to stop
support for cadet camps, since they are already adequately supported. The Strathcona Trust Shoot and Proficiency Awards for cadets have been retained. In recent
years, surplus funds have accumulated, giving the Local Committee more funds to
spend during the Centennial year.
The Local Committee made funds available for a grant of $2,000 toward a
clinic for physical education teachers sponsored by the British Columbia Federation
of School Athletic Associations. The Local Committee also has provided funds for
two boys to attend Outward Bound, who otherwise could not attend for financial
reasons.
 C 20 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
DIVISION OF FIELD  SERVICES
REPORT BY W. D. REID, B.A., M.Ed., SUPERINTENDENT
Staff
This Division of the Department of Education, which is primarily concerned
in the area of field services, was staffed in the field by 56 District Superintendents of
Schools assigned to various superintendencies in the Province. The headquarters
staff consisted of the Superintendent, the Director, two Inspectors of Home Economics, the Co-ordinator of Industrial Education, and two Inspectors of Technical
Education.
During the year, there were three changes made in January which affected the
field staff as shown below:
Mr. W. J. Logie was transferred from District Superintendent of Schools, School
District No. 72 (Campbell River) to Relieving District Superintendent of
Schools, with headquarters in Victoria.
Mr. W. F. Ramsay was transferred from District Superintendent of Schools,
School Districts No. 30 (South Cariboo) and No. 31 (Merritt) to District
Superintendent of Schools, School District No. 72 (Campbell River).
Mr. C. Hopper was transferred from Relieving District Superintendent of
Schools to District Superintendent of Schools, School Districts No. 30
(South Cariboo) and No. 31 (Merritt).
Mr. Hopper also continued to serve as an adviser to the Board of School Trustees in Birch Island.   On his transfer as Relieving District Superintendent of Schools,
Mr. Logie assumed responsibility for the day-to-day work in the schools of that
district.
Both Mr. R. F. Thorstenson, District Superintendent of Schools, School District
No. 37 (Delta), and Mr. H. D. Abbott, District Superintendent of Schools, School
District No. 68 (Nanaimo), elected to take early retirement and will leave the service
of the Department of Education, with effect July 31, 1971. These gentlemen have
given long, dependable, and effective leadership in their school districts and their
presence will be missed in the coming school-year.
In August 1970, Mr. J. Holden and Mr. W. B. Johnston began their services
as District Superintendents of Schools in the Department of Education and were
appointed to Fort Nelson, Stikine, and Portage Mountain, and North and West Vancouver Island District Superintendencies respectively.
In-service Training
Continuing workshops for the members of the field staff are organized in six
zones in the Province and were held in both the fall and spring of the school-year
1970/71. These are organized and chaired by District Superintendents, and senior
officers from the Department of Education, including the Superintendent of Field
Services, attend these workshops in order to discuss and consider problems which
are of particular concern in the several zones. The conferences have particular value
for members of the field staff. The following zone conferences were held in 1970/71
in the zones and locations on the following dates:
 DIVISION OF FIELD SERVICES C 21
Zone Location Dates
Okanagan Penticton October 29,30
Osoyoos March 4, 5
Vancouver Island Campbell River November 5, 6
Victoria March 11, 12
Fraser Valley Victoria October 15
Kootenay Grand Forks October 1, 2
Nelson May 6, 7
Northern Prince George November 19, 20
Quesnel May 14
Metro Vancouver December 9
Sechelt March 25, 26
Seminar for District Superintendents
(Sponsored by the University of Victoria)
The fourth annual seminar for District Superintendents was held at Harrison
on January 13 to 15, 1971. Twenty-four District Superintendents were present.
The over-all theme was "Staff Differentiation," with papers provided by Dr. Roy E.
Edelfelt, Executive Secretary, National Commission on Teacher Education and
Professional Standards, National Education Association, Washington, D.C. Dr.
Edelfelt presented his papers in three sessions and was assisted by Mr. Robert A.
Pyke, teacher, Vancouver School District, and Mr. Harold Wik, Project Director,
Staff Differentiation Project, Beaverton, Oreg.
The Department is indebted to Dr. F. T. Tyler, Dean of Education, University
of Victoria, for the continued sponsorship of this valuable seminar.
Department of Education Conference
On April 14 and 15, 1971, the Department of Education sponsored a conference of all Field Services staff and senior officers of the Department of Education,
which was held in the British Columbia Museum complex in Victoria. The conference devoted itself mainly to changes in legislation, the melding of vocational
schools and colleges, the duties of District Superintendents of Schools, and considered questions which the field staff submitted.
The Honourable the Minister of Education attended all sessions and made
himself available to the assembly for discussion of policy.
In keeping with recent changes in policy, the conference was so designed that
members of the field staff participated fully not only in its planning and organization
but in the conduct of the conference.
Canadian International Development Agency
The Department of External Affairs in Ottawa again requested that the Field
Services Division of the Department of Education conduct interviews for the
selection of British Columbia teachers for service overseas in the developing nations
in the West Indies, in Africa, and southeast Asia.
A total of 54 interviews was conducted between January 22 to 29, 1971, in
Victoria and Vancouver.
3
J
 C 22 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
A final selection of four teachers from British Columbia was made by the Canadian International Development Agency for this service.
Teachers going abroad for this service normally serve for a minimum of two
years and, on their return to their school districts in British Columbia, are more
knowledgeable of the very important countries which are developing in the areas
mentioned above, and consequently are better equipped for their day-to-day work
in our schools.
The interview team was chaired by the Superintendent of Field Services. Members of the team were Mr. W. E. Lucas, District Superintendent of Schools, North
Vancouver; Mr. K. M. Aitchison, Director of Communications of the British
Columbia Teachers' Federation. It has been the aim of the interview team to make
certain that British Columbia and Canada are represented abroad by very able and
competent teachers.
Investigation Committees
During the year, investigation committees, provided for under section 134 of
the Public Schools Act, were held with respect to appeals by teachers who had been
dismissed by Boards of School Trustees.   These were held:
December 28, 1970—Prince George.
February 15, 1971—Duncan.
March 31, 1971—Smithers.
June 16, 1971—Mission.
The Superintendent of Field Services chaired the first-mentioned committee,
and the others were chaired by Mr. W. B. Fromson, Assistant District Superintendent of Schools, North Vancouver; Mr. D. P. Todd, District Superintendent of
Schools, Prince George; and Mr. C. T. Rendle, District Superintendent of Schools,
Burnaby, respectively.
Additional Duties Performed by District Superintendents in Behalf of
the Department of Education
In the beginning of the school-year 1970/71, the Department of Education
expanded and concentrated on its policy of involving members of the field staff intimately in matters which are of concern to education as a whole in the Province of
British Columbia. It may be of interest to note the variety of tasks which various
District Superintendents have performed in behalf of the Department during this
year which are, of course, in addition to their regular duties as District Superintendents of Schools.
One District Superintendent has continued to serve as a member of the interview panel for the Canadian International Development Agency. Two Superintendents have served as members of the Provincial Advisory Committee, at both the
elementary and secondary curriculum levels. Three District Superintendents have
been concerned with the study of the duties of the District Superintendent of Schools,
from which has arisen recommendations which are being considered by the Honourable the Minister of Education. One District Superintendent has served on the
Senate of the University of British Columbia. Eight Superintendents have served as
members of college councils. One Superintendent has provided two building-space
studies which affect the amalgamation of vocational schools and colleges.
One Superintendent has served as chairman of the revision committee for the
elementary administrative bulletin. One Superintendent has served as chairman of
the Accreditation Revision Committee. One Superintendent has served as chairman
of the Social Studies Curriculum Revision Committee. Three Superintendents have
served as chairmen of investigation committees with respect to the dismissal of teach-
 DIVISION OF FIELD SERVICES C 23
ers. Two Superintendents have served as members of the Department Examination
Committee, and one of whom also served as chairman of the Adjudication Board.
Four Superintendents have served and will continue to serve as a committee to assess
guidance practices in the schools of British Columbia. Three Superintendents have
served as a committee to assist in the revision of regulations appended to the Public
Schools Act.
A Superintendent has served on a committee of one requested to evaluate the
performance of an experimental programme in a junior secondary school. Three
Superintendents have served and are serving as a committee to study the use of
school buses.
From the above, it can be readily seen that members of the field staff are intimately concerned in work which affects the whole of the Province and work which
may affect the development of practices and procedures in school districts throughout the Province of British Columbia.
In short, it is the policy of the Department of Education that full use should be
made of the very considerable experience which is possessed by the 56 members of
the field staff who are serving actively in school districts throughout this Province.
Annual and Monthly Reports of the District Superintendents
of Schools
The members of the field staff who serve as District Superintendents of Schools
in the school districts of the Province of British Columbia are very much involved
in the administrative work of school boards as well as being deeply concerned with
the operation of schools in school districts. They are responsible for the supervision
of all educational staff and for the efficiency and effectiveness of the schools in their
districts.
The average number of meetings attended by District Superintendents in each
month during the school-year was approximately 477. These represent board,
committee, and district staff meetings, which take a considerable amount of the time
of each District Superintendent. Written reports on teachers, totalling 2,714 in
number, were submitted by the District Superintendents to the Department of Education in the year 1970/71.
From a study of annual reports submitted by District Superintendents, the following trends are those which are reported most frequently:
1. Most districts show a continued decline in the growth rate at the elementary
level, while secondary enrolments continue to rise. Some districts such as Kelowna,
Fernie, Kamloops, Richmond, Delta, and Langley, to mention a few, have shown
considerable growth. Some districts show a decline in the rate of growth, others
remaining fairly static. Only a few districts—Kelowna, Fernie, Campbell River,
for example—report classes on "shift," although in many districts portable classrooms, rented accommodation, and the extended school-day were used to avoid putting students on shift.
2. Most District Superintendents report little difficulty in staffing with qualified
teachers, although some mention shortages in specialist fields; Home Economics,
Commerce, and Special Education teachers being the most frequently mentioned
ones. Smaller staff turnover and a greater number of applications appear to be the
reasons for the improved staffing situation.
3. Consideration of amalgamation of school districts was reported by several
District Superintendents. In 1970/71, School District No. 8 (Slocan) was divided,
the northern part being attached to School District No. 10 (Arrow Lakes), the
southern end to School District No. 7 (Nelson).   School District No. 25 (Barriere)
 C 24 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
amalgamated with School District No. 24 (Kamloops), and School District No. 58
(McBride) was joined to School District No. 57 (Prince George). Reports with
respect to amalgamation are being prepared for the East Kootenays and Central
Vancouver Island. Discussions have been held between the school boards of Peace
River North and Portage Mountain.
4. Adult Education programmes continue to grow in most districts. Some
reports state that the administration of the Adult Education programme has been or
will be taken over by the regional college serving that area. Cariboo College, particularly, has entered into agreements with some participating districts to administer
the Adult Education programmes for those districts.
5. "Outdoor schools," noted in last year's Report, represent a trend which
seems to be increasing. Several reports mention these extended field trips where
classes spend some days in a rural, natural environment. West Vancouver, for example, provided one-week outdoor schools for Grade VI and VII pupils from eight
elementary schools, some on Thetis Island and some on Gambier Island.
6. The trend to establish kindergartens as an integral part of the school system
continues and several districts report the start of kindergartens in 1970/71, with
more proposed for September 1971.
7. The semester system is becoming well established, particularly at the senior
secondary level. Some reservations were expressed as to its suitability for certain
courses, Mathematics 12 and Physics 12 being mentioned as examples.
8. A number of reports indicate increasing attention being given to involving
the Indian population in educational matters. North Vancouver appointed a Coordinator of Indian Education; Lillooet appointed a native Indian as Home School
Co-ordinator; Howe Sound invites the Band Council to attend board meetings; Duncan authorized a research project by the University of Victoria, "aimed at isolating
aspects of Indian culture that teaching programmes would use." Other reports make
mention of efforts being made to make education more meaningful to the native
Indian.
9. The trend, noted in last year's Report, toward remedial instruction for pupils
with learning disabilities is very evident this year, with most districts reporting increased remedial instruction. Integration of these pupils into regular classrooms
continues, with assistance from teachers specially trained and able to help the regular
teacher with the pupils. Some districts report the appointment of a psychologist or
Special Counsellor to assist in the diagnosis of learning difficulties.
10. District Superintendents report increasing use of ETV as an instructional
aid. With the cost-sharing arrangements announced by the Department of Education, this trend seems likely to continue. The results of the Penticton pilot project,
partially financed by the Department, have not been published, but the District
Superintendent states: "ETV has added a real strength to the instructional programme of the district."
11. A wide variety of Centennial projects was reported. Pageants, musical
programmes, and extensive student tours to different parts of British Columbia were
among the many worth-while projects reported.
12. Some reports mentioned efforts being made by school boards to involve
the community in educational matters. Among methods used were discussion
groups; the holding of board meetings at different schools in the district, with the
public invited to attend; distributing information bulletins to parents; and setting up
of Community Educational Advisory Committees. Vancouver, for example, is considering the establishment of 18 Community School Committees, each to be related
to a number of schools.
 DIVISION OF FIELD SERVICES C 25
13. Other trends as reported in previous years continue. These include establishment of libraries in elementary schools, the development of resource centres, the
use of science kits in the elementary schools, the individualization of instruction, and
the development of resource courses. A great range of in-service activities is reported. These are board and teacher sponsored and cover a great number of problem areas.
HOME ECONOMICS
(Report of Miss Jean R. Irvine, B.Sc, Director)
During the 1970/71 school-year, the total course enrolment in home economics
and community services in the public schools of British Columbia was 84,945, which
is an increase of 10,439 over the previous year. All course enrolments had increased.
The greatest numerical increases were in Home Economics 8, Cooking and Food
Services 9 (course for boys) and Foods 11 (course for boys and girls).
The growth in each of the three community services specialties has steadily
increased since their introduction in 1965/66. The foods specialty, which may be
elected by boys and girls, had the highest enrolment. A comparison of enrolment
in the community services specialties with total enrolment in community services
courses indicated that a fairly large number of pupils on other programmes took one
or more community services courses as electives.
There were 265 public schools with a home economics department, which was
an increase of seven over the previous year. Home economics was offered for the
first time at Grassy Plains, School District No. 55 (Burns Lake), and at Stewart,
School District No. 88 (Skeena-Cassiar). The home economics department at
Wells, School District No. 28 (Quesnel) was reopened. Home economics was included in new schools in the following school districts: No. 23 (Kelowna), No. 43
(Coquitlam), No. 61 (Greater Victoria), and No. 70 (Alberni).
There were 671 home economics and community services teaching positions,
which was an increase of 48 over the preceding year. Of the total number of home
economics and community services teachers, degrees were held in home economics
by 54 per cent, and in education by 18 per cent. Master degrees were held by 12
teachers.   Fourteen men were instructing in one or more foods courses.
In the past it has been possible for a home economics graduate to undertake a
prescribed study programme for three summer sessions at the University of British
Columbia in lieu of a professional year. The summer of 1971 is to be the last session in which graduates may begin the summer session teacher-training programme,
and the work is to be completed in 1973.
Members of the Home Economics Branch had consultative visits with 189
teachers in 49 school districts. Group conferences were held at Abbotsford, Courtenay, Kamloops, Kelowna, Maple Ridge, Revelstoke, and Richmond.
The deletion of the Home Management Area from all future secondary schools
took effect in January 1971. Because of this change and the updating of the suggested equipment for home economics departments, a new Advisory Equipment List
for Home Economics and Community Services Programme was prepared and distributed to each school district.
The Home Economics and Community Services Report form, which replaced
the former Report of Home Economics Classes, was available for September 1970
from the Textbook Branch.
A Home Economics Branch supplementary library list and a bulletin with
information regarding home economics and community services were sent, in September, to each teacher of home economics and community services. Upon requests,
a total of 1,608 books and other teaching-aids were sent on loan to teachers.
 C 26 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
Members of the Home Economics Branch made visits to the University of
British Columbia to speak to winter session and summer session home economics
education classes, to represent the Department of Education on the Council of the
School of Home Economics, and to interview prospective teachers.
Other activities during the year included continuing contacts with the Vancouver Co-ordinator of Home Economics and the Victoria Home Economics Consultants; meetings with the Home Service Consultant and Home Service Advisers of
the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority; attendance at a Department of
Industry, Trade, and Commerce meeting; attendance at the Vancouver Teachers'
Professional Day; and attendance at The Teachers of Home Economics Specialist
Association annual convention.
Home economics and community services teachers and their pupils undertook
Centennial '71 projects which were in keeping with the needs and interests of the
local communities. As a Centennial project, The Teachers of Home Economics
Specialist Association, in affiliation with the British Columbia Teachers' Federation,
published Home Economics' Heritage From the Past, in which the development of
home economics in British Columbia is traced from 1896 to 1941. The booklet
100 Years of Ladies' Costume Trends, which was issued by the British Columbia
Centennial '71 Committee, was reproduced and sent to each school district by the
Home Economics Branch.
CONCLUSION
The Superintendent, Field Services, has had the privilege of continuing to represent the Department of Education on the Educational Research Institute of British
Columbia as a member of the Board of Directors, and has served as a member of
the Nancy Greene Scholarship Selection Committee, as a member of the Department
of Education Examination Committee, as a member of the British Columbia Student
Aid Committee, and as a member of the Senate of Simon Fraser University.
One would be insensitive if he did not express appreciation of his senior colleagues in the headquarters of the Department of Education, to all members of the
field staff, and to school trustees and secretary-treasurers as well as officials of other
groups with whom this Division deals, for the many courtesies and the generous cooperation which have been shown to the writer.
  C 28 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
DIVISION OF FINANCIAL SERVICES
REPORT OF S. E. ESPLEY, SUPERINTENDENT
During the year under review the Department of Education continued to be
the largest-spending Department of Government. For the fiscal year April 1, 1970,
to March 31, 1971, $367,380,000, or 31 per cent of total Provincial revenue, was
appropriated for educational spending.
The activities of the Division are complicated due to the fact that there are
three distinct periods involved—first, educational service is related to the school
year, July 1 to June 30; second, the fiscal year for school districts is the calendar
year, January 1 to December 31; and, third, the fiscal year for the Provincial
Government is April 1 to March 31. The involvement of these three separate
periods frequently results in some confusion in relating statistics derived from independent sources without proper identification of the related period or year.
The total expenditures of all school districts for 1970 for operating expenses,
auxiliary services inclusive of colleges, and repayment of principal and interest on
capital debt amounted to $375,435,003, an increase of $43,540,989, or 13.12 per
cent over the total expenditures for 1969 of $331,894,014. The increase in expenditures is attributal to three factors—(a) the growth of enrolment in the public
schools; (b) the expansion and development of the colleges; and (c) the impact
of inflation in education spending.
Not included in the total expenditures of the school districts, but nevertheless
forming a part of the cost of operation of the public school system, are the direct
expenditures made by the Province, amounting to several millions of dollars, for
such items as the employer contribution to the Teachers' Superannuation Fund
and the provision of textbooks in the schools.
While it was the third year of implementation of the revised formula for providing Provincial financial assistance for operating and auxiliary services of school
districts, the year 1970 can be considered as the first stable year of application of the
revisions. The Province-wide total amount of the cost of the basic education programme, which is the total of operating and auxiliary services expenses approved
as eligible for Provincial financial assistance, continued to be well in excess of
90 per cent of the total budgeting of all school districts for these purposes in 1970.
The local contribution to the cost of the basic education programme was the amount
of money which could be raised by the uniform basic levy of 24.1 mills in each
school district, the balance being provided by Provincial basic grant. Any amount
budgeted by a school district for operating and auxiliary services expenses in excess
of the cost of the basic education programme is entirely a local cost to the district.
It does not appear that school districts are experiencing major difficulties in relating
budgeting for operating expenses to the amounts established for their basic programmes. However, those school districts having a proportionately heavy volume
of auxiliary services expenses—pupil transportation, dormitories, health services,
etc.—claim the existence of certain inequities. These claims are being studied and
appropriate solutions will be developed as required.
Not only does the cost of the basic education programme calculated for each
school district each year serve as establishing the amount of operating and auxiliary
services expenses eligible for Provincial basic operating grant, it also serves as a
target figure for budgeting for those expenses in that year by the district. To pay
the costs of features and services in excess of the basic programme, boards of school
J
 DIVISION OF FINANCIAL SERVICES C 29
districts may at their own discretion budget up to 110 per cent of the amount of the
basic programme, but budgeting above this requires local ratepayer approval for
the amount involved.
For the year 1970, it was not anticipated that there would be any appreciable
decrease in the number of school districts budgeting in excess of 110 per cent of
the cost of their basic programme amounts, nor did this prove to be the case.
However, it is worthy of note that there was a marked reduction in the amounts by
which these districts exceeded the 110 per cent amount. On the other hand there
was a marked tendency for those school districts budgeting below the 110 per cent
amount to increase their budgeting closer to that figure. These facts would appear
to indicate that the higher-cost school districts are attempting to hold their costs
more closely related to the cost of the basic education programme, but that the other
districts are showing a tendency to take full advantage of the permissive discretionary
authority to budget at the level of 110 per cent of their basic programme amounts.
This would imply that budgeting at 110 per cent of the amount of the basic programme is being looked upon by school districts as a floor of budget structure and
not a ceiling, as expressed in the Public Schools Act.
In addition to the calculation of basic operating and capital grants for each
school district, the determination of the annual basic mill-rate levy for local contribution to the cost of the basic education programme, and the establishment of
over-all school mill rates for all of the school districts, many other activities have
occupied the staff of this Division during 1970.
During the year, seven sales of school districts' debentures, totalling $45,459,-
000, to fund capital expenditures were arranged with the British Columbia School
Districts Capital Financing Authority. These seven sales involved 184 separate
issues of individual school district debentures. The voluminous documentation of
each issue of debentures, ranging from preparation of money by-laws for the school
districts, registration of these by-laws, and issuance of final certificates, is all carried
out by this Division as a service to the school districts.
No less demanding and arduous is the documentation of authorities for school
districts to obtain approval of their owner-electors for borrowing authority by
referendum for capital expenditure programmes. Associated with this is the arrangement of interim capital financing pending the issue and sale of debentures, and
all the documentation of short-term financing of capital expenditures required in
school districts for the acquisition of school buses, emergent classroom facilities, etc.
During 1970 the number of Indian pupils and National Defence Service pupils
in the public schools continued to increase, there being some 8,000 Indian pupils
and some 2,500 Service pupils enrolled. Under the terms of Federal-Provincial
agreements, Canada pays tuition fees to cover operating expenses relating to these
pupils, and the collection of these fees from Canada is carried out by this Division.
Similarly, where specific capital expenditures are incurred to provide school facilities
for these pupils, the negotiations for sharing and collection of funds from Canada
are also carried out by this Division.
The expansion and development of colleges by school districts continued at
an accelerated rate during 1970. Specific statistics with reference to the eight
colleges in operation are contained elsewhere. Because the colleges are in varying
stages of start-up development, it is not practical at this time to define a formula
for the calculation of Provincial financial assistance. Consequently, with 42 school
districts participating, the budgetary requirements of each college, the apportionment of grants, and local costs are individually established. In all probability this
procedure will have to be continued for several years until the college operating has
stabilized, at which time consideration could be given to formula financing.
 C 30 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
As with the colleges, formula financing also does not apply with respect to
grants made to the universities. Capital grants are appropriated to each university
and operating grants are appropriated in total for the three institutions and apportioned to each of them on the recommendation of the Advisory Board established
under the Universities Act. The writer serves as a member of this Board, which is
comprised of a representative of each of the three universities and three members
and a chairman appointed by the Minister of Education. In addition to acting as a
member of the Advisory Board, the writer also serves as a member of the Student
Aid Committee which is charged with the determination of Provincial scholarships
and bursaries paid to students, and the administration of the Canada student loans.
By no means the least function of this Division is the responsibility of the
accounting for all Branch expenditures, including the Correspondence School, the
Jericho Hill School for the deaf and the blind, the British Columbia Institute of
Technology, and the eight Provincial vocational schools in operation during 1970.
Allied with this work is the involved and detailed task of compilation of reports and
statements with respect to the cost-sharing agreement with Canada covering manpower training and the compilation of detailed post-secondary education expenditures under the Canada Fiscal Arrangements Act.
My thanks and appreciation must be extended to the staff of this Division for
their dedication to duty and their willingness to carry out assignments during the
year. In addition I wish to express my sincere appreciation to the senior staff of the
Department, the many trustees and school district staff with whom I have had the
pleasure of working during the year. Their co-operation in meeting the pressures
of this extremely busy year has been most gratifying.
 DIVISION OF INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES C 31
DIVISION OF INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
REPORT OF J. R. MEREDITH, B.A., M.Ed., SUPERINTENDENT
If this report were being written 100 years ago, the statement could be made
as it was then with complete confidence that "reports are indispensable and . . .
enable us to record with perfect accuracy the educational progress of the Province."
The report dealt with the conduct of public schools, examinations, textbooks, and
certification of teachers. Twenty textbooks were prescribed "after very careful consideration," but "supplying books to schools gratis would be open to very serious
objection." Only "third-class teaching certificates have so far been issued" as "all
the incumbents of existing schools should qualify" and "a more searching examination" is needed. Remarks on the statistics had to be deferred since returns had not
come in from the districts. It was noted that there was a "great want of blackboards."
It is not the purpose of this report to define what is meant by "educational progress," but it may be inferred that it is concerned with the same elements as were
reported on originally and involves, among other things, changes such as new systems
for data collection and prediction of educational trends, changes in examinations,
different concepts of curriculum and textbooks and learning-aids, and different approaches to the preparation and certification of teachers. Each of these is now being
administered by a separate branch in the Division of Instructional Services. This
Division is responsible for the general supervision and co-ordination of the work
involved.
Additional responsibilities include the following:
(1) The accreditation of senior secondary public schools: There were 46
schools accredited this year, bringing the total to 120 schools which are
entitled to recommend pupils for Department of Education Statements of
Standing. A major revision in the process for accreditation was begun and
will involve school staff in the procedures for evaluating the effectiveness
of the school.
(2) Participation on the Joint Board of Teacher Education, the function of
which is to advise the appropriate authorities on matters connected with
the preparation and certification of teachers: A new instructor's diploma
programme is being developed to meet the certification needs of those
employed in vocational schools and senior secondary schools to teach specific subjects.
(3) Centennial '71 Educational Activities Subcommittee, the work of which
has included development of a historic document kit for schools, an essay
contest, and the organization of school district Centennial committees.
(4) The Subcommittee for the Advisory Council on the Drugs, Alcohol, and
Cigarette Fund. This Committee is responsible for reviewing applications
for grants from this Fund.
A considerable amount of time and attention has also been given to a study of
the regulations governing the conduct of public schools, with a view to improving
and updating them.
  DIVISION OF INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES C 33
RESEARCH AND STANDARDS BRANCH
(Report of C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Pasd., Director)
Demands for statistical background information continued to increase during
1970/71, and as a result the Branch became even more statistically oriented than it
has been in the past. Although not officially responsible for the collection, editing,
or processing of educational statistics in the Province, more and more seem to be
needed and the Branch has been involved with many other branches, divisions, and
departments in their production and interpretation. This year, through the cooperation of the Data Processing Centre, all pupil and teacher data were produced
at the earliest date since the 1930's, when the Superintendent and the School Inspectors would sit around a large table in July, calculating average daily attendance.
Several meetings with the Registrar and Dominion Bureau of Statistics officials have
resulted in much more thorough analysis of teacher statistics—sources and migration
of teachers, certificate levels, inflow and outflow from the profession, and other pertinent summaries. Table 2.2, for example, shows that in spite of rumours of a surplus of teachers "in Canada," British Columbia teacher-education institutions provided only 75.6 per cent of the elementary and 61.4 per cent of the secondary teachers who began teaching in British Columbia in September 1970. Steps are being
taken, in co-operation with the Director of Teacher Recruitment, to counteract possible adverse effects on enrolment in faculties of education. New projections of
pupil enrolment made independently and using the British Columbia Research Council's computer programmes show that, in addition to replacements and retirements,
almost 3,000 additional secondary-school staff members will be needed by 1978.
Mr. R. May has been the Branch's representative on the Committee producing
the special Centennial supplement and has been responsible for most of the statistical
tables and graphs that it contains. Other smaller jobs that occupied our attention
for various lengths of time included determining trends in enrolment in mathematics,
science subjects, and French; revision of the schools' lists, which required some additional programming; distribution of the Vital Statistics Report to libraries in larger
schools; helping to design and distribute Dominion Bureau of Statistics' forms; recording and summarizing graduates of secondary schools on nonacademic programmes (a valuable set of records when school records are burned or otherwise
destroyed); comparison of annual rates of increase in operating costs and expenditures for school construction over the 10-year period, 1959 to 1969. The fact that
the distribution of rubella vaccine in September 1970 depended upon our age-grade-
sex estimates was mentioned in last year's report. Liaison has been maintained with
Health and Hospital Branch officials, Rehabilitation and Social Improvement, the
Department of Trade and Commerce, the Vital Statistics Branch, various planning
committees, the Dominion Census Bureau, school districts, and others interested in
the migration and enrolment of children. A special article by the Director, that was
written originally for the Canadian Association of School Superintendents and
Inspectors' Yearbook, was published in the Journal of Education of UBC and separately by the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. A preliminary report on
the use of educational television in Penticton was prepared.
Meetings attended during the year included a workshop on educational research
sponsored by the Canadian Council for Research in Education, several meetings of
the BCSTA Data Processing Committee (Mr. R. May), a committee composed of
French teachers and professors (Mrs. O. Bowes), and two meetings with the Universities Academic Planning Committee.
Testing carried out during the year was largely a continuation of the previous
programmes.   A fifth aural test in French was taped, administered to 4,343 Grade
 C 34 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
XII students, marked and standardized, and two final forms of the Grade XI Mathematics Test were standardized by administration to 18,577 students. Comparisons
of test results in semestered and nonsemestered schools have raised some questions
regarding the value of the semestered school-year, and although it is difficult to test
students at comparable course-time intervals, this work will be continued.
CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT BRANCH
(Report of W. B. Naylor, B.A., Director)
With the recent reorganization of the Department, the former Division of
Curriculum is now designated as the Curriculum Development Branch.
The main responsibilities of the Branch are the development of new courses
and the revision of prescribed courses in the curriculum, the preparation of course
outlines and curriculum guides for authorization and publication, and the evaluation and selection of textbooks for authorization. In addition, the Curriculum
Development Branch advises on the administration of curriculum and prepares
bulletins dealing with curriculum policy. Advisory committees of teachers and
other experts assist the Branch in this work.
The extent of the contribution of these advisory committees may be illustrated
by the fact that during the year under review a total of 18 committees, comprising
136 members, held 138 meetings on curriculum matters. An estimated 4,697
hours of members' time was devoted to this work. It is significant to note that
assistance given by these members is voluntary. The policy of providing for
released time for teacher members was continued.
Course development and revision work were continued in the following curriculum areas: Human life science, kindergarten, music, physical education, social
studies, arithmetic/mathematics, commerce, English, French, industrial education,
science, biology, and physics. A total of 125 new textbooks have been prescribed
for the 27 new or revised courses which will be introduced in September 1971.
The human life science programme suggests an interesting new approach to
elementary school health instruction. Rather than being based on a definite course
outline to be "covered" in a specified amount of time, the programme involves the
use of the "teachable moment" and the extensive integration with other subjects.
Another curriculum innovation is the support material for the new primary
social studies programme. The Department is providing picture sets that have been
tailor-made to assist the teacher in developing the concepts. Appropriate background information on the backs of the pictures and teachers' manuals will be of
further assistance.
An experimental course to be given in two schools during the next school-
year will employ the film medium as its major basis of development. This course
will revolve around the film version of Civilization, produced by Kenneth Clark,
and will employ extensive team teaching techniques.
In the broader field of curriculum, a committee has completed a revision of
the Administrative Bulletin for elementary schools. The Advisory Committee on
the Secondary School Curriculum spent considerable time discussing a reorganization of the secondary-school curriculum. This matter is presently under study by
the Department.
Acknowledgment
Grateful acknowledgment is extended to the British Columbia Teachers'
Federation and to the three public universities for their co-operation, specifically to
those teachers and members of university faculties who served on committees.
 DIVISION OF INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES C 35
Particular acknowledgment is extended to the members of the two advisory committees on school curriculum. They met regularly throughout the year to advise
on matters affecting the curriculum for the elementary and secondary schools of the
Province.   Their help and advice has been most valuable.
Curriculum Consultants
The practice was continued whereby two outstanding teachers in the Province
are released on loan by boards of school trustees to work with the Curriculum
Development Branch. This year's appointees were Mr. J. C. Clark (Saanich) and
Mr. W. D. Oliver (Victoria). Their enthusiasm and knowledge, combined with
their practical experience and professional training, made an invaluable contribution
to the work of this Branch.
Staff Reorganization
Two significant developments relating to the staffing of the Branch took place
during the year. Mr. Oliver was appointed to the newly created post of Assistant
Director, effective August 1. Mr. Clark was granted an additional year's absence
by his school board in order that he might remain for another year with the Department in his capacity as curriculum consultant. This will mark the first time
since the introduction of the plan that a consultant has served for more than one
year. The policy of having two consultants will be retained with the appointment
of a teacher from one of the schools of the Province.
Information and Related Services
Services related to the curriculum were also provided by the staff of the
Curriculum Development Branch. The Director participated in meetings of the
Directors of Curriculum of the western provinces. In addition, members of the
Branch represented the Department at various teachers' conferences and symposia
convened by universities and other organizations for the purpose of discussing educational developments and problems.
CURRICULUM RESOURCES BRANCH
(Report of D. W. C. Huggins, C.G.A., Director)
As the colourful rockets roared up out of Victoria's Inner Harbour and illuminated the majestic Empress Hotel, and her equally majestic neighbour the Parliament
Buildings, British Columbia started into the year in which it could celebrate the
completion of 100 years in the Confederation of Canada. This, indeed, was a fitting
time for the Textbook Branch to find itself with a new title and a new location.
In the last week of 1970 the old Textbook Branch moved to a newly erected
warehouse and office complex which had been especially designed to fit the needs
of the Branch. With the arrival of the new year, the Branch became known as the
"Curriculum Resources Branch," to better identify its purpose in support of the
ideals of the Department of Education to provide up-to-date and efficient service to
the people of the Province of British Columbia.
The new premises, on Viewfield Road in the Municipality of Esquimalt, provide
railroad delivery facilities at the north end of the building with ample driveway area
for the receiving and shipping of materials by truck at the south end. Office space
is provided for the staff of the Curriculum Resources Branch and it was possible at
 C 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
this time to effect accommodation for the staff of the Curriculum Development
Branch, so that the established rapport between these two branches could become
cemented with the melding of office locations.
The designation of "Curriculum Resources" to replace "Textbook" is an indication of the expanded application of the services of this Branch into new kinds of
instructional technology requiring the purchase, handling, and distribution of non-
printed media.
This Branch was established on July 1, 1908, and the first annual report was
submitted by Mr. David Wilson, as Officer in Charge of the Free Textbook Branch.
Mr. Wilson reported on the six months' activities which preceded his report, and the
costs for operation of the Branch in that six months period did not exceed $25,000.
The current budget of the Branch is in excess of $5,700,000.
Negotiations with publishers during the 1970/71 fiscal year resulted in the
expenditure of $5,399,665, distributed through the issuance of 2,205 purchase
orders. This expenditure and activity represents a 431/_-per-cent increase in the
actual value of purchases made, with a 12Vi-per-cent decline in the number of orders
issued to effect these purchases. Although these figures include the number of purchase orders processed by the Director on behalf of the British Columbia Institute
of Technology and the vocational schools of the Province, no reporting is made here
in regard to the value of the purchase orders authorized on behalf of the vocational
schools and the institute.
A decline in the number of school requisitions submitted for school requirements resulted in a total processing of 7,110 requisitions, which equates to almost
a 10-per-cent reduction in the number of requisitions handled. At the same time
we experienced a 4-per-cent increase in the number of sales invoices processed to
14,406 for the 1970/71 fiscal year. To effect the outflows of inventory related to
these school requisitions and sales invoices, the staff of the Curriculum Resources
Branch handled 91,751 cartons and parcels for an approximate 9-per-cent increase
of packages handled, and the weight of these activities resulted in an increase of
70 per cent, to 2,680,185 pounds.
The continuing review of the curricula, with their consequent expanded adoptions, requires constant attention to the timing of order placements and the planning
of receipts for warehousing purposes. A new system of cataloguing has been introduced during this school-year and the advantages will be experienced during the
outflows of inventory in the summer of 1971. The need for guidance to school
administrations in the ordering method results in recurring amendments to the format
of the school-opening requisition, and urgency of material supply has been recognized
for those schools on semestered programmes where individual subject instruction is
at an accelerated pace. It is hoped that these contributions will assist in maintaining
the high level of mutual understanding which has developed between the schools and
the Curriculum Resources Branch.
In closing this annual report for the 100th edition, the following words used by
Mr. David Wilson in his first interim report could well suffice.
"In dealing with the various requests for free textbooks, the utmost care has
been exercised by me in order to give each school what it appeared to need, as well
as what it was entitled to according to the enrolment by grades entered on requisition form presented to the Free Textbook Branch. It was necessary also freely to
exercise the right to question requisitions and even to decline to fill them, except in
part, when they appeared to be excessive. Some criticism may have been passed
upon the officer in charge for exercising this right, but it seems to me better, if err
one must, to commit a fault on the side of reasonable economy than on that of careless generosity."
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 C 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
AUDIO-VISUAL SERVICES BRANCH
(Report of Barrie A. Black, Director)
The work of the Audio-Visual Services Branch encompasses a variety of technical, administrative, and creative activities. Although normally integrated to provide a comprehensive audio-visual programme, these activities have been separated
for the purposes of this report.
Distribution Services
The circulation report for films and filmstrips may be found in Table 2.20.
Other materials distributed by the Branch included still pictures, dioramas, and
multimedia kits. Through a co-operative arrangement with the Curriculum Resources Branch, 4,000 French language tapes were duplicated and distributed. A
review of the methods of film distribution was conducted in consultation with school
district audio-visual co-ordinators. This review is continuing into the next school-
year, but some efficiencies have already been effected in the "circuit" method of
distributing groups of films throughout a school district before they are returned to
the library. Revised film and filmstrip catalogues have been distributed to all schools.
Broadcast Services
The 1970/71 audience for television broadcasts showed an increase of 20,000
students over the previous year. (See Table 2.19 for statistics of radio and television
programming and use.) Much of the increase may be attributed to the use of videotape recorders to delay and replay broadcasts, and to an increase in the number of
television receivers in the schools.
One broadcast—"King Tut's Tomb," in the Grade VII Social Studies series,
"Civilizations: Lost and Found"—won an Ohio State Award at the American Exhibition of Educational Television Programs. The citation reads: "This program's
method of reconstructing the step-by-step discovery and excavation of the tomb was
exemplary. Its skillful use of the model enhanced instructional value by keeping
curiosity alive to the end, and the description of the culture and customs of the
ancient Egyptians helped set the stage for follow-up discussion. For dramatic presentation of the wonders of a lost civilization, for use of television to arouse interest in
and awareness of an historical subject, 'King Tut's Tomb' is exceptional."
Information and Related Services
The Director served as Chairman of the Educational Media Standards and Specifications Committee. This committee brought in recommendations which resulted
in the establishment of guidelines for the purchase and use of educational television equipment, including receiver/monitors, video-tape recorders, and cable
installations. A formula for inclusion of these items in capital-cost grants was
also developed.
The Director represented the Department at meetings of the Joint Programming
Committee of the Council of Ministers of Education, the Western Regional Conference on School Broadcasting, and the Subcommittee on Educational Broadcasting.
Each of these bodies is responsible for the planning of radio and television broadcasts for use in British Columbia and other provinces.
Assistance was provided to the Curriculum Development Branch and the Curriculum Resources Branch in the development and selection of picture sets for the
new Primary Grades Social Studies curriculum.
Approximately 800 new films were previewed for possible inclusion in the film
library. Evaluations of these films are being made available to audio-visual coordinators.
 DIVISION OF INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES C 39
Photographic Services
These services include still and motion-picture photography, film processing,
editing, enlarging, and filmstrip production. During the past year, several hundred
enlargements, slow-motion film, and special effects film were prepared for inclusion
in television broadcasts. A set of 200 filmstrips on the forest industry was prepared;
editing services were provided for three filmstrips prepared by the Centennial Industrial Progress Subcommittee. Enlargements and other photographic work were
done for the Department of Education display at the Pacific National Exhibition.
A number of photographs were taken and reproduced for Government publications,
including the 100th Annual Public Schools Report.
The past year saw the retirement of Roger Kerkham after more than 20 years
of outstanding service as photographer, assistant director, and acting director. His
talent, experience, and wisdom will be missed in the years to come.
ETV Project
The Branch was responsible for the establishment of an ETV Project in Penticton. The project involves the use of two channels on the local cablevision system
(South Okanagan Television Distributors Limited) to deliver programmes to 12
schools in the district. Arrangements were made to obtain videotapes from several
different sources. These tapes were relayed to the classrooms on request from the
Instructional Media Centre in the Penticton Secondary School. The project is continuing into the new school-year, with evaluation procedures in progress.
REGISTRAR'S BRANCH
(Report of Edward A. Killough, B.Ed., M.A., Registrar)
The Registrar's Branch has two primary functions—
(a) To evaluate the academic and professional qualifications of all applicants
for British Columbia teaching certificates, to issue appropriate certificates
to those who qualify under current regulations, and to maintain a Provincial registry of all certificated teachers:
(b) To prepare and administer all senior secondary school Department of
Education regular and scholarship examinations; to issue statements of
standing or transcripts to all Grade XII Academic and Technical Programme and Grade XIII students; and to maintain a Provincial registry
of these senior secondary school students.
Provincial Government scholarship awards to Grade XII and Grade XIII students
also are administered by this Branch. The report of the Director of Examinations,
Registrar's Branch, on the second of these functions, immediately follows the report
on teacher registration and certification.
Teacher Registration and Certification
Each teacher employed in the public schools must hold a valid teaching certificate. Eligibility for a teaching certificate is determined by the Registrar's Branch,
which maintains a record for every certificated teacher.
The school-year 1970/71 was the second during which revised teacher certification regulations and procedures were in effect. Under these regulations, the
number of types of regular teaching credentials available for issue has been reduced
from six (Professional Advanced, Professional Basic, Professional C, Elementary
A, Elementary B, and Elementary C) to three (Professional, Standard, and Teaching Licence).   The Professional and Standard are both certificates, and therefore
 C 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
may be made permanent following at least two years of satisfactory teaching service
in British Columbia schools. The Professional Certificate requires completion of
a minimum four-year programme, normally including an acceptable university
degree, and the Standard Certificate, of a minimum three-year programme of post-
secondary professional and academic or specialist studies, including appropriate
basic teacher education. The Teaching Licence, a credential which cannot be made
permanent, requires completion of a similarly acceptable two-year post-secondary
programme of studies, including basic teacher education.
The new regulations, together with commensurate modifications in office procedures, made possible improved service to those applying for teaching certificates.
In the calendar year 1970, 34,045 letters were received concerning teaching certificates, of which 7,929 were initial inquiries. Table 2.5 provides a breakdown by
area of these inquiries, and indicates the return, on teacher certification evaluations
performed, as measured in terms of the number of certificates issued as a percentage
of both the new and total teaching population. Conclusions based on these statistics
must take into account policy whereunder in view of the current reduced general
demand for additional teachers, applicants for certification from other jurisdictions,
and, in particular, those from outside Canada, are not encouraged to come to British
Columbia unless they possess specialist qualifications of a type known to be in short
supply. Further, teaching certificates are not issued other than to qualified applicants resident within the Province.
As may be determined from the table, almost one-third of all new inquiries
received in the calendar year 1970 concerning teacher certification were from persons
residing in British Columbia, and in excess of three-quarters of all initial certificates
granted were to this group. Further, some 44 per cent of new inquiries received
originated within Canada, and approximately 90 per cent of the total number of new
certificates granted were to persons who made initial inquiry from British Columbia
or another Canadian province and who, at the time of certificate issue, were resident
in this Province. Inquiries originating from the United States, the United Kingdom,
and Australia-New Zealand, represented the three most significant non-Canadian
sources. Furthermore, persons originally writing from these jurisdictions, who now
are British Columbia residents, accounted for almost 90 per cent of first certificates
issued in the calendar year in 1970 to persons who initially wrote from outside
Canada.
Table 2.5 also establishes that almost 70 per cent of all new appointees for
September 1970 obtained their first teaching certificate in British Columbia, and a
similarly high percentage of the total full-time teaching force for the school-year
1970/71 was accounted for by teachers initially certificated within British Columbia.
It is reasonable to conclude, therefore, that a significant majority of British Columbia's teachers, both continuing and new appointees, are products of the Province's
own teacher education institutions. The Prairie Provinces continue to represent
the most important source of non-British Columbia teachers currently teaching in
this Province, but the proportion of teachers from that jurisdiction is decreasing
while that of teachers from Ontario, Quebec, and the Atlantic Provinces is increasing.
There is a similar trend toward reduced reliance upon teachers from the United
Kingdom and Australia-New Zealand, long the most significant non-Canadian
sources of British Columbia teachers, and a rapid increase in the proportion of
teachers originating in the United States.
Table 2.5 also reflects a very close relationship between the number of new
teacher appointees from various jurisdictions as a percentage of total new teachers
for 1970/71, and the number of teachers originating from various jurisdictions as
 DIVISION OF INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES C 41
a percentage of total full-time teaching population in the same school-year. This
suggests that most teachers moving to British Columbia tend to remain in the Province. As might be expected, those first certificated in British Columbia tend to
remain within our schools as teachers for a longer period of time than do most other
groups. Teachers from Australia-New Zealand and the United States apparently are
less likely to provide long service in British Columbia, although the average number
of years of British Columbia teaching experience of these groups is significantly
influenced by the rapidly growing number of teachers from these jurisdictions.
In September 1970, the full-time teaching force of the Province numbered
21,890, a net increase in teaching positions of 788, or some 3.7 per cent over last
year's equivalent figures of 21,102. Of the 1969/70 total teaching force, 18,661,
or 88.4 per cent, again were teaching in British Columb'a in the new school-year,
while 2,441 retired or otherwise left teaching between September 1969 and September 1970. Exclusive of staff changes during the school-year, new teacher appointees in September 1970, therefore, numbered 3,229 (2,441 to replace last year's
"drop-outs" and 788 to staff additional teaching positions). The activity during
1969/70 of these 3,229 new appointees may be determined from Table 2.6. Increases in teacher population (full-time and part-time) during the school-year, and
between June 30, 1970, and June 30, 1971, may be determined from Table 2.7.
Table 2.6 also establishes that 1,774, or in excess of 54 per cent, of the 3,229
new entrants and returnees to the September 1970 teaching population came directly
from the Province's teacher education institutions. Undoubtedly, further significant
numbers of new appointees were products of these same universities in an earlier
year, but during the interim they had been housekeeping, employed in nonteaching
occupations, or otherwise involved. Table 2.8 shows that 68 per cent of those beginning to teach in this Province for the first time had attended British Columbia teacher-
training institutions, 75.6 per cent of the elementary beginners and 61.4 per cent of
the secondary beginners. It is interesting to note that had all those who completed
teacher certification programmes at British Columbia universities in 1969/70 elected
to start teaching in September 1970, and had they all obtained appointments as teachers, the Province's own institutions would have supplied 2,593 out of 3,229 appointees, or in excess of 80 per cent of the total replacements and new teachers required
for the 1970/71 school-year (Table 2.9).
Detail concerning the numbers of trainees prepared by each university in
1969/70, and the types of certificates authorized for issue, is shown in Table 2.9.
Significant is the fact that some 54 per cent of the total group completing certification
programmes qualified at the Professional Certificate level, compared with approximately 32 per cent and 12 per cent for the Standard Certificate and the Teaching
Licence respectively. Further, fully 70 per cent of those qualifying for the Professional Certificate began teaching on September 1, 1970, while some 40 per cent of
those qualifying for the Standard Certificate and about 62 per cent of those qualifying for the Teaching Licence did not begin teaching in the 1970/71 school-year.
In summary, approximately half of those qualifying for lower certification at the
Standard Certificate and the Teaching Licence levels were not teaching in September,
and, of these, the majority presumably remained at university to seek a higher level
of certification. This may partially be a result of greater demand for secondary
teachers, but it also may be concluded that there is an accelerating general commitment to the Professional Certificate as the acceptable level of qualification to be possessed prior to initial appointment to any teaching position.
Data in Tables 2.10, 2.11, and 2.12 establish that this trend toward higher certification also is discernible in the general teaching population. Of the 7,295 certificates issued in the calendar year 1970 (Table 2.10), 4,036, or over 55 per cent,
 C 42 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
were Professional Certificates (including Permanent Professional Basic and Professional Advanced Certificates), representing at least four years of university preparation by the applicants. An additional one-third were Standard Certificates, each
requiring a minimum three-year university programme. Initial British Columbia
certification of new teachers accounted for 2,951 of 4,402 interim certificates issued,
while 1,451 teachers previously certificated qualified for interim certification at a
higher level. All 2,893 permanent certificates authorized were granted to certificated
applicants now qualifying for permanent certification at the same, or at a higher level
than that previously held. That 60 per cent of these were Permanent Professional
Certificates reaffirms the trend toward higher certification.
As might be anticipated, there also is a relationship between level of certification and average number of years of teaching experience, with higher average teaching experience normally reflected by those possessing higher qualifications. As indicated in Table 2.11, teachers with Professional Certificates (including Professional
Advanced, Professional Basic, and Professional C Certificates) have an average of
8.95 years of British Columbia experience compared with an average of 5.48 for
those with Standard Certificates (including Elementary A Certificates). The high
average of 8.07 years for those with Teaching Licence qualifications is accounted
for by the large numbers of teachers with lengthy experience who hold Permanent
Elementary B Certificates, which are included in this category. Those few active
teachers still possessing Elementary C Certificates (only 4 per cent of the total
teacher population and down 61 to 92 compared with 153 in 1969/70) presumably
have remained in demand during the current school-year largely because of their
long British Columbia experience.
Table 2.12 provides the numbers and percentages of full-time teachers possessing each type of certificate, and equivalent data for those with no degrees, undergraduate degrees, and graduate degrees for the school-years 1969/70 and 1970/71.
Significant increases are discernible in the number and proportion of active teachers
holding both higher certification and degree qualifications. Finally, as indicated in
Table 2.13, teachers who obtain their initial certificate outside British Columbia and
subsequently immigrate to the Province tend to evidence less university preparation
than do their counterparts educated within British Columbia. Particularly is this
so of teachers originating in Canadian jurisdictions other than British Columbia but
now teaching in this Province.
Teacher-exchange applications also proceed through the Registrar's Branch.
Although the number of applications from British Columbia teachers annually exceeds that of exchange positions available, the relatively small number of exchanges
completed for 1970/71, particularly with other provinces, was disappointing. A total
of 21 British Columbia teachers went on teacher exchange for the school-year—17
to the United Kingdom and four to other Canadian provinces.
EXAMINATIONS BRANCH
(Report ofH. C. D. Chalmers, CD., B.Sc, Director)
Examination Preparation and Marking
For the school year 1970/71, Grade XII Regular Departmental Examinations
covering 12 courses were prepared for each of January and June, and an additional
12 Grade XII Scholarship Departmental Examinations were provided for June only.
Twenty-two Grade XIII courses were examined in both June and August. In June
1971, 158 regular and special examination centres were established in the Province
and 20 outside British Columbia, with the farthest removed centres being in Ceylon,
Germany, and South America.
  C 44 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
School students who were required to write the Grade XII Regular Departmental Examinations received final standing in such examinations based on the average of a mark measured by the school plus the mark achieved on the Departmental
Examination. For the second year, January semester Regular Departmental Examinations were conducted.
The reduced number of Grade XII Departmental Examinations marked in the
past three years (Table 1.8) resulted from a change in regulations whereunder recommended scholarship candidates are no longer required to write the Regular Departmental Examination in addition to the Scholarship Departmental Examination.
Since June 1969, all Regular Departmental Examinations have been entirely objective in format. These examinations are computer-scored, which has brought about
a very substantial decrease in the number of Assistant Examiners (Table 1.9).
Grade XII Scholarship Examinations and the Grade XIII Departmental Examinations have remained predominantly subjective in format, and have been marked
by Assistant Examiners. Grade XII students competing for Provincial Government
Scholarship are required to write the Scholarship Departmental Examinations in two
courses, as shown in Tables 1.6, 1.7, and 1.8. In 1969/70 the number of Scholarship Examinations marked increased 28 per cent over that in the previous school-
year. In 1970/71 the number marked showed a decrease of 9 per cent below that
in the 1969/70 school-year.
Scholarship Examination Results
Scholarships were awarded on a rank basis to all qualifying students who wrote
the Scholarship Departmental Examinations and achieved averages of 70 per cent or
higher, providing the number of awards made did not exceed 17 per cent of the total
Grade XII Academic-Technical Programme and Grade XIII enrolment. In June
1971, of the 2,825 Grade XII and Grade XIII students who wrote for scholarships,
1,048 qualified for three-quarters, 717 for one-half, and 200 for one-third of their
next year's post-secondary tuition fees.
Hilary Maddison Powell, of Crofton House School in Vancouver, ranked first
on the Grade XII Scholarship Examinations, and won the Governor-General's silver
medal. The Governor-General's bronze medal was awarded to Gary Bruce Little,
a Grade XII student at Cowichan Senior Secondary School, Duncan.
EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT
(Report of Mrs. Alice Kean, Secretary to the Commission)
During the school-year 1970/71 a total of 296 applications was considered by
the Commission. Of these, 46 were turned down, the main reason being that family
income was higher than the ceiling set by the Commission for grant purposes.
For the first payment of the grant, 250 students were approved; for the second
payment of the grant, 230 applications were approved. Of the 20 students who
became ineligible for the second payment, 15 had withdrawn from school and 5 were
turned down because of poor reports.
The students who were eligible for the second payment of the grant were distributed by grades, as follows: Grade IX, 50; Grade X, 68; Grade XI, 60; Grade
XII, 52.
The students in the greatest financial need received $168.05 for the year and
the balance received $148.05.
After almost 30 years of dedicated service on the Commission, Mr. F. J. Town-
send has resigned due to ill health. Mr. Townsend's wise counsel will be greatly
missed.   He has been replaced by Mr. T. G. Harris.
 DIVISION OF POST-SECONDARY SERVICES C 45
DIVISION OF POST-SECONDARY SERVICES
REPORT OF ANDREW E. SOLES, B.A., M.Ed., SUPERINTENDENT
In the reorganization of the Department that took place at the mid-point of this
year, the name of the Division of University and College Affairs was changed to the
"Division of Post-secondary Services." This change was made to reflect the broadened area of the Division's sphere of concern in the field of post-secondary education.
Notably the increase in the Division's responsibilities is apparent in the rapidly expanding system of public colleges and in the melding of these colleges with the Adult
Vocational Schools. Development of the "melding process" was well advanced by
the end of this year.
At the same time, the Division's association with the universities has grown with
the expanding responsibilities of their administrations. The "new look" in university
curricula inevitably has influenced the developing academic curricula of the colleges,
and thereby has involved the activity of the Academic Board with which this Division
works closely. Another addition was the transfer to this Division of responsibility
for Adult Education.
A continuing responsibility of this Division is the administration of the several
financial aid plans which assist students in their post-secondary education. There
was a steady demand throughout the year on the Canada Student Loans Plan,
administered in British Columbia by this Division on behalf of the Government of
Canada. This year the Division assumed full responsibility for the Government of
British Columbia Scholarships and the Provincial Bursary Plan. Administration of
the latter has increased considerably.
Douglas College, serving the Lower Fraser Valley region, opened its doors with
a full range of programmes in the autumn of 1970. It brought to eight the number
of public two-year colleges operating through this year. Camosun College, in the
Greater Victoria region, will admit its first class of students in September 1971, with
a wide choice of programmes offered. It is interesting to note that this ninth college
will commence its operation with its administration already attuned to melding with
the administration of the British Columbia Vocational School in Greater Victoria.
The first principal of Camosun College is Grant L. Fisher, B.Sc, M.Sc, Ph.D., from
the Faculty of Education, University of Alberta. The principalship of Selkirk College, vacated by Mr. A. E. Soles on his appointment to the Superintendency of this
Division, has been filled by William F. Murison, B.Sc, M.F., Ph.D., from Humboldt
State College, Areata, Calif.
Arrangements for the melding of five of the public colleges with the adult
vocational schools serving the same regions occupied much of the attention of this
Division in 1970/71. Vancouver City College, in its sixth year of operation, has
always been closely associated with the Vancouver Vocational Institute, as both have
been under the general administration of the Board of Trustees of School District
No. 39 (Vancouver). Others for which "melding" arrangements have been completed on a three-year trial basis are Cariboo College in Kamloops, Malaspina
College in Nanaimo, the College of New Caledonia in Prince George, Okanagan
College in Kamloops, and Camosun College in Victoria. Studies are continuing to
determine the feasibility of amalgamating the Nelson Vocational School with Selkirk
College at Castlegar and the Burnaby Vocational Institute with the British Columbia
Institute of Technology.
Of the colleges mentioned, Selkirk College has completed its fifth year of
operation, Okanagan and Capilano have completed three years, Malaspina and New
 Library, Vancouver City College.
—Photo by courtesy of Mr. T. Kewalke (student in Photography class)
 DIVISION OF POST-SECONDARY SERVICES
C 47
Caledonia two years, Cariboo and Douglas their first year. With the exception of
Vancouver City College and Selkirk College, each of which has its own campus and
buildings, the public colleges are conducting their programmes in temporary or
shared accommodation. Camosun College will open in permanent accommodation
on its own campus. In spite of the difficulties inherent in such circumstances, the
colleges are providing programmes noticeably more comprehensive, more effective,
than the old Grade XIII offered previously. The latter tended to be very much a
"continuation" of high school, whereas the colleges now introduce the student to,
and encourage him in, the self-discipline of the seeking of knowledge rather than
submission to teaching.  The success of this is apparent.
Such success has been attained so quickly largely as a result of the conscientious
manner in which the college councils have served their communities and thereby the
Province as a whole. The principals and staffs of the colleges have been able to
pursue vigorously and effectively the development of the colleges because of the
active support and interest of the college councils. For this spirit of co-operation
and support the Department is very grateful.
All of the colleges offer academic courses leading into second- and third-year
programmes at the Provincial universities. In addition they offer one-year courses
in several technologies, and these are transferable to the British Columbia Institute
of Technology. Each college admits students to a programme of "preparatory"
courses to upgrade incomplete entrance requirements for admission to college, university, or technical programmes of study. Depending upon the needs and demand
in each region, the colleges provide a broad range of one- and two-year "career"
courses that enable the student to improve his knowledge and skills within his chosen
vocation. These "career" programmes will now more and more become closely
finked with similar courses provided at present by the vocational schools, with mutual
benefit to each. An important third type of programme available at the colleges is
the general one under the title of "continuing education." This programme, somewhat similar to the "university extension" series, is proving of value within the
community-at-large. Finally, mature students are encouraged to enter the colleges
and every effort is made to ease their entry into their programme of studies and to
accelerate their progress.
From the outset, in establishing the system of public colleges, this Division has
fostered the close liaison that has existed between the administrations of the several
institutions. The Department is grateful for the valuable co-operation through which
the staffs of the longer-established colleges have so willingly assisted in the task of
setting up, establishing, and operating the more recently founded institutions. This
year, for the first time, a long step was taken toward effecting an even broader area
of co-operation. This Division organized and conducted an Assembly of College
Councils from all regions in the Province. Eighty councillors from the nine public
colleges, with the principals and bursars, met with 30 representatives of the four
universities, the Academic Board of British Columbia, the Provincial School Trustees
Association, the College Faculties Association, the British Columbia Educational
Research Council, and the Department of Education to discuss in detail their various
problems, like and unalike. The first of its kind in Canada, this Assembly was very
successful in bringing together for their mutual benefit all those concerned.
Degree enrolment in British Columbia universities for the school-year 1970/71
may be determined from Table 5.1, while Table 5.2 shows enrolment in the public
colleges and British Columbia Institute of Technology for the same period.
  DIVISION OF POST-SECONDARY SERVICES C 49
The Academic Board for Higher Education in British Columbia
The Academic Board continued to meet regularly throughout 1970/71, with
its functions increasing through the addition of the two public colleges that came
into being this year and the assumption of broader duties as adviser to the Honourable the Minister of Education on the periodic visits to institutions of post-secondary
education.
College Principals
The courtesy of the principals of the public colleges in inviting the head of this
Division to attend their meetings during this year is greatly appreciated. This has
enabled us to enjoy close co-operation between the college administrations and the
Department in the co-ordination of programming, in seeking solutions to various
problems, and particularly in the establishment of the newly formed colleges. The
valuable assistance given by these principals has helped materially in the work of
this Division undertaken on behalf of the colleges. The universities, too, have been
most helpful in this regard.
Financial Assistance for Full-time Students in
Post-secondary Education
The British Columbia Student Aid Committee, the chairman and the secretary
of which are members of this Division, held regular and frequent meetings throughout the year to interpret policy and to hear appeals relating to scholarships, bursaries,
and loans awarded to full-time students in the designated post-secondary educational
institutions. Since the administration of the British Columbia scholarships and of
the Provincial bursaries was transferred to this Division this year, the staff has been
involved in bringing together more closely the criteria applied to these and to the
Canada Student Loan applications. Much was accomplished in this regard to ensure
equitable distribution and fair consideration for all students in all parts of the Province. A single application form has been developed and brought into use for both
loans and bursaries, which will result in a more efficient distribution of the funds
available to assist students in financial need, whether through direct grants or repayable loans, or both. The Committee has given careful consideration to the comments
and suggestions submitted to it by the institutions concerned, and several of the
changes effected this year in applying relevant criteria have resulted from this cooperation. Indeed, some of these changes were carried forward to the Plenary
Committee for Canada Student Loans in Ottawa to help in establishing national
criteria to ensure similar opportunities for students of all provinces.
Table I—Canada Student Loans Authorized for British Columbia
Students, 1970/71
Number issued  9,796
Total amount authorized  $7,307,598
Average loan amount  $746
British Columbia Scholarships
The Government continued this year the policy established in 1969/70 of
awarding scholarships to able students proceeding in post-secondary undergraduate
education in the Province at the Universities, colleges, or the British Columbia Institute of Technology. These were granted on the basis of three-quarters of the basic
tuition fee to the top 5 per cent of the full-time undergraduate students at each designated post-secondary institution, and to the top 5 per cent of those writing the Pro-
 C 50
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
vincial scholarship examinations at the Grade XII and Grade XIII levels; one-half
of the basic tuition fee to the next 6 per cent of the students in each of the above two
groups; and one-third of the basic tuition fee to the next following 6 per cent.
Table II—Scholarship Awards
Year
Number Authorized
Total
Aware
Three-
quarters
One-
half
One-
third
Amount
1969/70... _	
1970/71
3,242
3,163
3,523
3,748
3,041
2,537
9,806
9,448
$
1,966,730
1,793,532
British Columbia Government Bursaries
Provision is made annually by the Government of the Province for the granting
of bursaries to needy students to enable them to proceed with post-secondary education. An academic standing with an average of 65 per cent is required to qualify
for a Provincial bursary. The bursaries are granted for study at any of the universities and public colleges in British Columbia, at the British Columbia Institute of
Technology, and for training in nursing at designated hospitals in this Province.
A bursary may be granted also for study at a university outside the Province in a
programme not available in British Columbia (such as in Veterinary Medicine).
Table III—Bursaries Granted by the Government, 1970/71
Award Year
Bursaries Authorized
No.
Amount
Average
1969/70...                  	
1070/71
5,538
5,598
$                      !
1,159,590
1,165,600
$
208
208
The amount made available by the Government of the Province of British
Columbia for students' financial assistance this year was increased by 13 per cent
over the previous year. It is interesting to note that the amount allocated to this
purpose for the coming year represents a further increase of 12 per cent over the
year.
ADULT EDUCATION BRANCH
(Report of A.L. Carder, M.A., Co-ordinator)
Public school adult education has become one of the principal ways of maximizing the utilization of public schools for the benefit of the whole community. To
make this happen, the local director of adult education mobilizes the educational
resources of the community to meet the learning needs of adults who experience the
need to learn different things as they go through the various stages and crises of
their lives.
For the most part, the adult education programmes do not consist of preset
courses designed by experts who presume to know what is good for the students.
Instead, the programmes are developed by a dialogue with the community.   This
 DIVISION OF POST-SECONDARY SERVICES
C 51
organic process is nourished by sensitivity to the interests and needs of the adults
who five in the community. Course content is thus usually developed by collaboration with the students as a function of what they need and want to learn.
The role of the Department in adult education has been that of facilitating the
processes by which good continuing education programmes develop. The helping
or consulting process is one of assisting the Director to understand what his job is;
it is helping him to learn and to use all the techniques of listening to or sensing the
needs of his community, the cries for help that can be answered with educational
resources; it is helping him to recognize the resources both inside and outside the
community so that he can use them to respond to needs; it is helping him to find
effective ways of publicizing his programme; it is helping him to learn how to
co-operate and collaborate with other agenices involved in continuing education.
Finally, the Department assists the development of adult education programmes by
providing grants-in-aid of education and administration.
During the past decade, enrolment in adult education classes has quadrupled.
In 1961 there were some 40,000 adults involved in the public school adult education
programme. In 1971 there were over 180,000. The 1971 enrolment increased by
11 per cent over the preceding year. The largest increase last year was in the vocational sector, a 25-per-cent increase, due in part to financial encouragement of adult
students by Canada Manpower. There were about 43,000 adults taking upgrading
vocational courses in public night schools, this in addition to those attending night
school at the British Columbia vocational schools.
It is interesting to note that this growth is taking place parallel to the development of new institutions such as the colleges and vocational schools, which are so
designed that continuing education is an integral part of their function. (See Tables
5.3 and 5.4.)
Special Projects, 1970/71
In such a vast programme, the co-ordinator must limit himself each year to
working at the most pressing needs over and above the routine administration of
grants and correspondence. During the past year, assistance was given to the following kinds of projects:
1. At the request of the British Columbia Safety Council and the Motor-vehicle
Branch, 10 classes were visited in defensive driving to assess the effectiveness of the
programme and the rather standardized methodology. The resulting report made
several recommendations for improving not only the course but the methods of instruction. These recommendations are being incorporated into the course and into
a programme for the training of instructors.
2. There was collaboration with the Department of Rehabilitation and Social
Improvement in the development of programmes to rehabilitate employable persons
presently on welfare. Such programmes were organized in Colwood, Comox, Langley, Mission, and Vancouver.
3. There was also co-operation with a number of other departments or branches
in the development of projects; with the Indian Affairs Branch in the development
of numerous classes for native Indians, with the Citizenship Branch in working out
a better approach for English and citizenship classes for disadvantaged immigrants
and for East Indians, with the Attorney-General's Department in the development
of the Defensive Driving Programme and consumer education, with the Health
Branch in fostering nutrition courses and family life education for adults, with the
Department of Recreation in the Hunter Training Programme, and with the Community Recreation Branch in the planning of recreation leadership workshops.
4. The co-ordinator of adult education acted as a resource person or leader at
conferences for administrators of adult education, for the Registered Nurses Asso-
  DIVISION OF POST-SECONDARY SERVICES
C 53
ciation to consider continuing education for nurses, for groups doing family life
education and counselling, for a conference on academic upgrading of Indians, a
conference on religious adult education, a conference for leaders of organizations
for the blind, and for a community conference on needs and resources for children.
Public School Adult Education and the Colleges
The Department is presently studying the feasibility of co-ordinating all forms
of public adult education on a regional basis through the regional colleges. It is
planned to meld the programmes in such a way that the organizational skills and
facilities that have been developed by local school districts will be preserved. With
the resources available to a regional college added to or melded with the programmes
that have been developed by local school districts, it will be possible to bring into
being the ideal of the "community school," where any person can find instruction in
any subject.
 C 54 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
DIVISION OF SPECIAL SERVICES
REPORT OF J. L. CANTY, B.A., M.Ed., SUPERINTENDENT
General
The Division of Special Education, established during the 1968/69 school-year,
was incorporated as part of the Division of Special Services which came into being
as a result of the general Department reorganization in the current school-year.
The new Division has as matters of direct concern responsibility for recommendations concerning and implementation of policy in the following areas:
1. Approval, for the purposes of section 180 of the Public Schools Act, of
special education programmes operated by boards of school trustees.
2. Approval of salary payments to teachers instructing classes under section
20 of the Public Schools Act.
3. Health services provided by the boards of school trustees.
4. Liaison with other Government departments and private agencies in matters
concerning education of the handicapped. This includes representing the Department of Education on the Provincial Youth Resources Panel and the Community
Care Facilities Licensing Board.
The Division also contains three branches—The Jericho Hill Schools for the
Deaf and the Blind, Correspondence Education, and Guidance Services. Each of
these branches is the subject of a separate report.
The decade since 1960 has been characterized by a major expansion in the
approved special education programmes in the public school system of the Province
of British Columbia, as the following table clearly shows:
Special Education Approvals, 1960/61 to 1970/71
Number Number
School-year of Approvals School-year of Approvals
1960/61   249 1966/67    938
1961/62   308 1967/68   1,045
1962/63   496i ,qM/m i m_i
1963/64   615 1968/69   1'034
1964/65   731 1969/70   1,158
1965/66   838 1970/71   1,220
i Approvals from 1962/63 onward include the Occupational Programmes.
A comparison of the rates of growth is even more revealing:
Growth in Growth in
Period Net Enrolment Special Education
(Per Cent) (Per Cent)
1960-70   64 389
1965-70   26 141
The tremendous increase over the entire decade is due in part to the implementation of the Occupational Programme in 1962/63. However, the growth rate
in the latter half of the decade indicates that continued efforts were being made to
fill an obvious need in the school system.   Growth for the current year indicates that
 DIVISION OF SPECIAL SERVICES
C 55
this need may now be substantially met, since the number of approvals increased
only 5 per cent, while the general enrolment increased less than 3 per cent.
Details of enrolments in the various types of special education programmes
are reported in Table 1.3, included as part of the statistical tables at the end of this
Annual Report.
Special Education in Secondary Schools
The Occupational Programme continues to serve as the major vehicle for
special education in secondary schools. Enrolment in this programme, as reported
by boards of school trustees on September 30, continues to grow slowly, remaining
at a figure which is slightly below 3 per cent of the total secondary enrolment.
Occupational Programme Enrolments
1968
Number of approvals      290
Number of students  5,068
1969
324
5,167
1970
324
5,295
Certificates are issued to pupils who have successfully completed the Occupational Programme.   The number of certificates for the past five years is as follows:
Occupational Certificates
Year
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
696
677
792
644
596
The main purpose of the Occupational Programme continues to be to provide
an instructional situation oriented positively toward school leaving and entry into
employment at the end of two or three years, with provision for work experience.
Enrolment is restricted to pupils of secondary-school age who are retarded in terms
of school progress and show indication of low scholastic-aptitude ratings. However,
there are indications that an increasing number of pupils who have been enrolled in
the Occupational Programme later transfer to one of the other school programmes,
thus qualifying for a wider range of vocational training programmes and job-entry
positions. Reports from the field indicate that this provision of an alternate mode
of instruction apparently permits some pupils to reorient themselves educationally,
with ensuing benefits to themselves and society.
A significant development in special education in secondary schools during the
1970/71 school-year has occurred in the field of hearing impairment. For the first
time, resource teachers and classrooms have been provided for these handicapped
children, to enable them to benefit from the instruction of the regular secondary
school. The specially qualified teachers must work not only with the hearing-
impaired pupils but also with the staff and the other students of the school in order
to attain this goal.
Two such programmes were established this year. The first, at Kitsilano
Secondary School in Vancouver, is discussed in the report of the District Superintendent in charge of the Jericho Hill Schools. The second, operated by the Board
of School Trustees of School District No. 41  (Burnaby) is located in the Royal
 C 56
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
Oak Junior Secondary School. Through these programmes, necessarily located in
large population centres, it is hoped to enable many hearing-impaired children to
enrol in the full range of secondary programmes available only in a large school.
Trainable Mentally Retarded Children
The education and training of trainable mentally retarded children is conducted
both in schools operated by local chapters of the British Columbia Association for
the Mentally Retarded, supported by grants made through boards of schools trustees
and in classes operated as a part of the regular public schools of the Province.
Details of schools, classes, and enrolments are indicated in the following tables:
Schools Operated by Chapters of the British Columbia Association
for the Mentally Retarded
Districts
Schools
Enrolment of Pupils in Relation to Grants
Year
Fully
Eligible
Kindergarten
Ineligible
Total
1969    _
35
35
35
35
417
430
29
22
29
24
475
1970 _             	
476
Classes Operated by School Districts
Year
Districts
Schools
Enrolments
1969	
22
22
24
24
916
1970    	
957
Tutorial Assistance for Pupils in Isolated Areas
The establishment of classes for pupils living in isolated areas is authorized
where neither school accommodation nor transportation is available. All pupils
in such classes must be assembled in suitable quarters during regular school hours,
be tutored by an instructor with suitable credentials, and be enrolled in courses
provided by the Correspondence Education Branch.
During the past school-year there were 16 classes of this nature in operation,
enrolling a total of 46 pupils, of whom 40 were elementary and 6 were secondary.
These classes were operated in conjunction with the Correspondence Education
Branch and were authorized under the provisions of section 20 of the Public
Schools Act. Under this section, salary aid in the form of a grant of $20 per pupil
per month of instruction is paid directly to the teacher by the Province.
Liaison Activities
Much of the work of this Division is concerned with maintaining and developing effective liaison with a number of other Government departments and with
various private organizations. Liaison becomes desirable when the general welfare
of a handicapped child would be furthered by the provision of an educational
programme. There are many situations in which it is impossible for the child to
attend a regular public school situation.   Attempts to provide educational oppor-
 DIVISION OF SPECIAL SERVICES C 57
tunities while the child remains at home or is confined to a treatment institution
must then be explored. In all cases the local school district is considered to be
the primary source of the educational programme.
The arrangements completed last year by which the Board of School Trustees
of School District No. 68 (Nanaimo) assumed responsibility for the operation of
classrooms within the Brannan Lake School for Boys appear to be working well
and to have resulted in substantial improvement in the educational opportunities
for the boys involved.
The Superintendent of Special Services is also a member of the Board of
Directors of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind and of the Professional
Advisory Committee of the British Columbia Association for the Mentally Retarded,
since both these organizations are directly involved in educational activities relating
to handicapped children.
Other Activities
During the year the Superintendent visited many school districts to discuss
with boards of school trustees, district officials, principals, and special education
staffs problems of mutual concern. In addition, he attended a number of conferences
of various organizations involved in the field of special education, to inform them
of elements within the Provincial system as well as to acquire a greater understanding
of the concerns felt in various areas of the Province.
Trends
Last year's report referred to a definite move away from almost exclusive
reliance on special classes and curricula for the child with learning problems. An
analysis of the enrolment in special education programmes indicates that slightly
more than one-quarter of the pupils enrolled in these programmes are also enrolled
in regular classes, most of these being pupils in the Type 3 (Remedial) category,
although a small number of the more mildly retarded or emotionally disturbed
children are also programmed in this manner.
Requests for the provision of educational programmes for children in hospitals
and other medical therapeutic centres continues to be received by school boards.
The latest development has been a request that children who are necessarily confined in a therapeutic centre, but are able to leave that centre for a portion of the
day, be provided with educational facilities, including special education programmes
within the public schools.
The further development of educational programmes for pre-school deaf children also deserves note. Toward the end of the year, arrangements were completed
to assist financially in the provision of teachers for these children by a co-operative
effort of the Jericho Hill School for the Deaf and any society which has as one of
its major purposes the educational assistance of such children.
The supply of specially qualified teachers for special education programmes
continues to be one of the relatively few areas of shortage. It is noted, however,
that an increasing number of teachers in the universities appear to be considering
this area of specialization and also that more teachers are improving their skills
through participation in in-service programmes operated by school districts and
by the British Columbia Teachers' Federation.
This report cannot conclude without an expression of thanks to the many
people with whom the Superintendent has worked closely during the year. Special
education touches on many fields, including not only education but also the whole
broad spectrum of health and social welfare services. Full co-operation has been
received by this Division, not only from those in other branches of Government
 C 58 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
service but also by the many people in private practice and associated with private
agencies, in the search for solutions to the problems of children with educational
handicaps. As we enter a decade in which it appears that the major emphasis will
shift from quantitative growth to qualitative growth, it is imperative that every
effort be made to continue and further develop this co-operation.
CORRESPONDENCE BRANCH
(Report of J. R. Hind, B.A. B.Pced., Director)
The significance of this year to education in British Columbia justifies a departure from the more stereotyped report of former years. An attempt will be made,
therefore, to trace some aspects of Correspondence Education in British Columbia
from the beginning to the end of the year under consideration.
On May 23, 1919, two parcels containing books, supplies, and lesson material
were mailed from the Parliament Buildings to the three children of Samuel W.
Spetch, a farmer at Pemberton Portage, Owl Creek. This was the beginning of
Correspondence Instruction at the elementary-school level in our Province. This
section of the work continued separately until amalgamation with the Secondary
School Correspondence Branch in January 1969. From this beginning in 1919
until March 31, 1971, 30,280 elementary school students had enrolled for courses.
Student Number 30,000 was Susan Yvonne Ramstad, of Rainbow Ranch, Vernon.
In August 1970 she enrolled in Grade VI and has since completed the work of her
grade.
Correspondence instruction at the secondary-school level was not authorized
until 1929. In that year the then Minister of Education, Canon Joshua Hinchliffe,
appointed J. W. Gibson: "Director of High School Education for the Province of
British Columbia." Since 1929 until March 31, 1971, file numbers were assigned
to 221,300 students at this level.
In general, Grade I-VIII students have enrolled for the work of a full grade.
In the two decades which followed 1929 this was principally true of students at the
secondary level. However, at the close of World War II, great numbers of adults
needed further training in specialized areas and registered for single courses in such
subjects as Electricity, Mathematics, Draughting, Bookkeeping, and English for
New Canadians. In consequence, adult education has become a firmly entrenched
part of the correspondence service to the people of British Columbia. This has not
duplicated the cost of adult education but rather made it available to persons who
may not attend adult education classes by reason of work commitment, place of
residence, sickness, lack of instruction in certain subjects, and similar difficulties. In
recent years adults have accounted for approximately half of the enrolment at the
secondary-school level, and 7 per cent in Grades I-VII.
The influence of the Branch has not been confined to our own Province but
has made itself felt throughout Canada and abroad. The First International Conference on Correspondence Education met in Victoria in August 1938. From this
beginning the conference has since convened seven times in the United States, New
Zealand, Canada, Sweden, and France. The administrative organization and format
of British Columbia correspondence courses have been borrowed by three provinces
in Canada, by Australia, New Zealand, the Bahamas, and elsewhere. The Branch
pioneered the development of courses in English for New Canadians. It was the
subject of a treatise published by UNESCO, Education Abstracts, Volume XIII,
No. 2, 1961. It was the principal inspiration and source of material for the Canadian Legion Correspondence Courses supplied to servicemen during and immediately
following World War II.
 DIVISION OF SPECIAL SERVICES C 59
The courses have followed British Columbia families around the world. In
1970/71, 486 students registered from other provinces in Canada and 428 students
in 25 other countries. It is interesting to note some recent inquiries which are the
direct result of these outside contacts.   The following are extracts:
"While in Kuwait we have had many queries from various people of other
nationalities such as Kuwaiti, Indian, Palestinians, etc. They all are interested in
your correspondence courses and wish to know if they can participate. This question
has specifically been asked of me by Dr. J. Singh, UNESCO, United Nations Educational Planning Adviser to the Kuwaiti Government.   .   .   ."
". . . Our school has many American missionaries and these particularly
want to use the B.C. correspondence when they leave to work in remote areas of
Peru. Is it at all possible for them to use the B.C. system? . . . Having studied
the correspondence courses available I can tell you that the B.C. set-up takes better
care of the students. Specifically, it is more structured, more thorough in course
work, and in many subject areas more current,   .   .   ."
Listing and description of the courses offered in 1970/71 are contained in the
booklet, Correspondence Education, which is printed annually in July: A summary
of this listing follows:
Number
Level of Courses of Courses
Kindergarten   1
Grades I-VII  30
Grades VIII-XII   106
Grade XIII  16
Special Vocational Courses  18
1971 Centennial Course  1
Total   172
No attempt will be made here to mention these courses other than the 1971
Centennial Course entitled, "British Columbia—Canada's Pacific Province."
The course was developed for the purpose of stimulating general interest in
British Columbia during the Centennial year which began in January 1971. It
consists of five papers which refer to the early history of our Province, its geography,
industry, and natural resources. The response to the course by March 31 consisted
of an enrolment of 3,523 adults from all walks of life. In addition, several hundreds of teachers had requested the course for use in the classroom situation.
The following are enrolment figures for the year:
General enrolment1—
Grades VIII-XIII and special vocational courses  16,940
Grades I-VII (Victoria)         739
Grades I-VII (Pouce Coupe)        115
Total students   17,794
Special groups for whom free instruction was provided in the
value of $41,587.50—
Inmates of institutions  765
Social assistance cases  277
Special illness cases  460
Recent immigrants   18
Distance cases  288
Total students      1,808
1 The total enrolment compares with 14,799 in 1969/70.
 C 60 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
GUIDANCE SERVICES, TEACHER RECRUITMENT,
YOUNG VOYAGEUR PROGRAMME
(Report of Philip J. Kitley, M.A., Director)
Guidance Services
Two important additions were made this year to the file of career information
in British Columbia schools. After months of preparation on the part of a number
of co-operating bodies, including Canada Manpower, the Vancouver School Board,
the Vancouver Board of Trade, The University of British Columbia, and the British
Columbia Department of Education, a large handbook of well over 400 pages,
Careers for the 70's, was issued and distributed in May to secondary schools, colleges, universities, and other interested groups. The book carries descriptions of 346
jobs of particular significance to this Province, both from the point of view of numbers employed and with specific relation to local training facilities and needs. Other
pertinent information is included. This is the first time such a compendium has been
available in this Province, and it is hoped that continued revision will be possible in
order to keep it an effective reference.
The second, Hospital Careers, was prepared by the British Columbia Hospitals'
Association and printed and distributed through this Branch. Outlining description
and training requirements of some 22 hospital occupations (not including the various
branches of the medical profession), and with comment on an additional eight or
more allied fields, this provides a sound reference for students interested in such
work. The popularity of the book can be judged from the fact that a second printing
has been made necessary.
During the year, nearly 25,000 additional pieces of guidance material were distributed to schools, together with two large issues of a Guidance Bulletin containing,
among other things, abstracts of information of possible counselling value.
With the co-operation of the British Columbia Chamber of Commerce, several
regional Business-Education Conferences were planned. Conferences were held at
Prince George, Terrace (which the Director unfortunately could not attend), and
Victoria. The last proved to be the beginning of a continuing project which has been
established under the chairmanship of Mr. G. Bevis, of Canada Manpower. In addition, the Vancouver Board of Trade, in co-operation with the Vancouver School
Board and the British Columbia Institute of Technology, held a Business-Education
Conference at the institute, to which were invited representatives of school, business,
and industry from the surrounding area.
From time to time the Director was concerned with other meetings and conferences, as, for example, continued work on a revision of the Guidance Curriculum,
revision of the guidance section of the accreditation manual, talks to university
classes, University of British Columbia Conference on Health Occupations, counsellors' meetings, etc. An interesting project concerned the evaluation by a senior
secondary class of films dealing with drug abuse.
Teacher Recruitment
Promotion of Future Teachers Clubs occupied a good proportion of time in this
area. Three newsletters and quantities of programme material were distributed. An
article by Mr. M. Hassen in one of the newsletters, called "Teaching—What's It
Really Like?", attracted considerable attention. Addresses were given to one or two
clubs. This Branch shared actively in the planning and presentation of a conference
for club sponsors, under the auspices of the British Columbia School Trustees Association, as well as in plans for a forthcoming conference in the fall of 1971.   Assis-
 division of special services
C 61
tance was also given students planning the Future Teachers Conference at the University of British Columbia, as well as a one-day conference of Southern Vancouver
Island clubs at Victoria.
With the ending of the critical teacher shortage, a reduction in both the number
of clubs and the total membership was to be expected. A drop of 20 per cent in the
number of clubs and about 33% per cent in the number of members resulted in a
total of 81 known clubs for a membership of 1,400. In spite of this there were 13
new clubs and 13 with a membership of 30 or more, two having at least 50 each.
An effort was made during the year to point out to clubs and schools generally that
the "shortage" has not disappeared but has simply gone underground temporarily.
The Director attended three meetings of the Joint Board of Teacher Education. The Advisory Committee on Teacher Recruitment, of which the Director is
chairman, met once during the year and agreed to restrict its meetings to one a year
until circumstance directed a change.
Staffing reports during the summer of 1970 indicated continuing needs for
teachers in special categories such as commerce or instrumental music.
During the year further attention was paid to plans to encourage people with
business experience to enrol in a commerce teacher-education programme; meetings
concerned with a revision of the industrial education accelerated programme were
attended.
In the continuing programme of teachers' scholarships offered by the Minister
of Education, an award of $2,500 was made to Mrs. Shirley Henslowe, of the Richmond School District, to enable her to continue a study of reading education at
the University of British Columbia.
This Branch supervised for the Province a programme of two-year International Teaching Fellowships offered by the Government of Victoria, Australia.
From several applicants, Mr. R. J. Robinson, of Lynn Valley Elementary School,
North Vancouver, was chosen to represent the Province.
Young Voyageur Programme
The growing popularity of this Grade XI student travel and exchange programme was reflected in this year's activities. For the first time students travelled
by air rather than by train, remaining for the most part for a full week with host
families in another part of Canada. In the following table the British Columbia
centre is shown in the middle column, the point visited in the left-hand column,
and the point from which visitors came in the right-hand column:
Travelling to—
Winnipeg, Man.
Woodstock, Ont.
Alma, Que.
Saint John, N.B.
Victoriaville, Que.
Ottawa, Ont.
St. Catharines, Ont.
St. Georges, Que.
Quebec City, Que.
Saskatoon, Sask.
Quebec City, Que.
Montmagny, Que.
Dartmouth, N.S.
British Columbia Centre
Burnaby
Chilliwack
Coquitlam
Courtenay
Kamloops
Kimberley
Mission
Nelson
Penticton
Port Alberni
Quesnel
Sidney
Vancouver
Hosting Visitors From-
Sherbrooke, Que.
Quebec City, Que.
Ottawa, Ont.
Montreal, Que.
Toronto, Ont.
Montreal, Que.
Winnipeg, Man.
Hamilton, Ont.
Hanover, Ont.
Halifax, N.S.
Fredericton, N.B.
North Bay, Ont.
Montreal, Que.
 C 62
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
Travelling to—
Montreal, Que.
Toronto, Ont.
Windsor, Ont.
Winnipeg, Man.
British Columbia Centre
Vancouver
Vernon
Victoria
Victoria
Hosting Visitors From-
Winnipeg, Man.
Cowansville, Que.
Mont-Laurier, Que.
Saskatoon, Sask.
The use of charter aircraft necessitated a number of late-night departures and
arrivals, and, consequently, accommodation at a university residence in a number
of instances, as well as lengthy bus rides from airport to host centre. The cooperation of the Vancouver School Board in helping supervise some of these was
greatly appreciated.
The Director was fortunate in having an opportunity to travel with four British
Columbia student units during July, and study something of the Young Voyageur
Programme in Quebec.
There are mounting evidences that this project is capturing the imagination
of local school people and others, as a valuable ancillary to the social studies and a
worthy exercise in Canadian citizenship.
Education Display
As a member of the Department of Education Exhibit Committee, the Director
attended many meetings and did the voice recording for the two film-slide projectors
that were installed in the exhibit at the British Columbia Building, Hastings Park.
JERICHO HILL SCHOOLS AND SERVICES
A Government Resource for Aurally and Visually Impaired Children
of Our Province
(Report of J. Walsh, B.Sc, M.Ed., District Superintendent)
The enrolment for the 1970/71 school-year was divided as follows:
Day
Resident
Total
110
16
109
53
219
Blind or partially sighted   	
69
126
162
288
School for the Deaf
During this Centennial year, resources and services for the aurally impaired
child were extended and refined. An attempt is being made to provide pre-school
training to all aurally impaired children and guidance to the parents of the children
through pre-school classes, home visits, and in-service clinics for parents. After a
very careful assessment at the age of 5, the most suitable placement is found for all
educable children. Those children for whom education in the local district is inappropriate come to Jericho Hill School. The educational programme at Jericho is
diversified to meet the needs of individuals. To achieve this diversification, about
one-third of the students attend classes in regular public schools in Vancouver. From
the age of 15, all students receive pre-vocational training and as wide a range of
work experience as it is possible to give. A very interesting development which has
been prepared during this year, to begin in September 1971, is the Careers Programme, which is in effect post-secondary education for the deaf. This is a joint
venture of the Rehabilitation Department, Canada Manpower, the Western Institute
for the Deaf, and the school.
 DIVISION OF SPECIAL SERVICES C 63
The number of off-campus classes was increased with the addition of two classes
in Kitsilano Secondary School. This experiment in integration at the secondary
level was a great success, thanks to the sincere and wholehearted co-operation of the
principal, Mr. Birch, and the staff of the school, and very significantly to the realistic,
positive, and friendly attitude of the Kitsilano students. This trend toward educating
deaf students in a hearing environment has manifest advantages and will certainly
continue. An interesting development of this is the setting-up of an off-campus class
in Victoria for September 1971.
Equipment available to the deaf continues to improve in quality and versatility.
Our new amplification equipment will make a significant contribution to improved
education of the deaf in this decade. The school is also being equipped with educational television, including a titling generator. It is very likely that the special
taped material being created at the school will be of general use to all children with
language disorders.
School for the Visually Impaired
There has been a very gratifying decrease in enrolment and this trend is continuing. This is partly due to the decrease in blindness and partly due to continuing
efforts to place visually impaired children in regular classrooms. All blind children
are being taught to type (so that they can hand in assignments in regular print to their
teacher), to use braille and all kinds of recording devices. At the moment children leave Jericho at the Grade IX level. It appears possible that some of the children can be placed in public schools earlier than this. Once children are in public
schools, the Jericho School provides large print or brailled copies of prescribed
books. This service is possible thanks to the fine work carried out by the Pioneer
Group, a British Columbia Telephone voluntary group, the CNIB, and the school.
General
Extensive renovations are presently being carried out in Lawrence Hall, and a
new dining-room/hospital complex is scheduled to open in 1971/72. Presently a
new gymnasium will be designed. With these additions, this will probably be the
finest campus in Canada.
The interest shown in the Jericho Hill resources has been at a high level. This
augurs well for public understanding of the problems of the deaf and the blind. Over
1,000 professional workers visited the school during the year and resource personnel
from Jericho have visited school districts throughout the Province. This interest also
led to over 150 volunteer workers giving their valuable time to our children. A highlight of the year was the visit of the Governor General of Canada, the Honourable
and happy Roland Michener, who presented awards to the members of the Duke of
Edinburgh Club.
Throughout the year we have been examining assessment procedures and, in
co-operation with Dr. G. Robinson of the Children's Diagnostic Centre, new assessment procedures for both blind and deaf have been worked out.
We wish to acknowledge with thanks the support and co-operation of the Department of Education, the Department of Public Works, the Vancouver School
Board, the PTA's of the two schools, the Western Institute for the Deaf, the Metropolitan Health Department, and all those private citizens who have helped us so
much.
  '
DIVISION OF TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL SERVICES C 65
DIVISION OF TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL SERVICES
REPORT OF J. S. WHITE, SUPERINTENDENT, AND REGIONAL
DIRECTOR FOR CANADIAN VOCATIONAL TRAINING
Major changes in the structure of technical-vocational training in British
Columbia involving community colleges are referred to elsewhere in the Annual
Report, and it is sufficient to say that while the integration of vocational schools at
Nanaimo, Victoria, Kelowna, Prince George, and Nelson began to take shape late
in this year, the remaining schools at Terrace, Burnaby, and Dawson Creek will for
the time being remain as separate units.
An announcement by the Honourable W. A. C. Bennett, Premier of British
Columbia, caused a survey to be made of the Abbotsford and Chilliwack areas to
determine the need for and location of a new vocational school in the Fraser Valley
region. As a result, it was decided to construct the school in Chilliwack, and plans
are now moving ahead to facilitate this.
The additional school at Kamloops is rapidly nearing completion and will be
ready for occupancy in the fall as an integrated community college/vocational
school project.
Rossland is the scene of a new venture in vocational education, this time in the
training of mining operators in open-pit mining. This project is sponsored by
Canada Manpower as are many other courses throughout the Province, all under
the general heading of the "Special Projects Division." This "Division" negotiates
and administers courses which are mostly of short duration, are not attached to a
specific vocational school, and are established at the request of Canada Manpower
for their own sponsored students. Last year some two hundred such projects were
launched and the Special Projects "Division" is now regarded as a separate school
within its own right, but without the customary central physical plant.
Thirteen projects, with 200 students, were organized primarily for training
native Indians as part of the special project venture.
The continued expansion of Canada Manpower requests for training, plus
increases in other areas, made this year as busy as if not busier than previous years.
Curriculum Development Branch
During the year, the Branch's responsibilities centred around the development
and publication of course outlines, instructional materials, manuals, examinations,
and publicity materials.
Course Outlines
Course outlines were developed in 21 different apprentice and pre-apprentice
courses and 18 separate pre-employment courses.
Instructional Materials
Printed instructional materials were developed for almost all the pre-
employment and pre-apprenticeship courses offered in the British Columbia
vocational schools and technologies offered in the British Colombia Institute of
Technology.
Printed materials were also developed for use at Summer School (Vocational
Instructor Certificates) and for numerous apprenticeship and night school courses
 C 66
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
offered at both the British Columbia vocational schools and the British Columbia
Institute of Technology.
Twenty-five manuals were developed on a wide variety of subjects, in addition
to 14 publications.
Photography
A considerable amount of photographic work was undertaken during the year,
and several 35-mm. colour-slide sequences, filmstrips, and 8-mm. loops were
developed for use by instructors in the vocational schools and the British Columbia
Institute of Technology.
Several thousand black and white photographs and colour slides were taken
in various areas of the British Columbia vocational schools, the British Columbia
Institute of Technology, the Industrial Education Teacher Training Centre, the
Jericho Hill School for the Blind, and many other locations in the community.
These photographs are all filed, and are used for record, instructional, or publicity
purposes.
Examinations
Tradesmen's qualification examinations were developed for five trades and
five others for Provincial examinations. In addition, examinations were produced
for 29 subjects for the British Columbia Institute of Technology.
Publicity materials of many kinds and covering numerous topics produced by
this Branch were distributed to District Superintendents, principals, counsellors,
teachers, apprenticeship and manpower counsellors, etc., throughout the Province
and also to educators in other parts of Canada, the United States, and in numerous
foreign countries.
Most of the bulletins, brochures, and booklets used by and for the vocational
schools and the British Columbia Institute of Technology were developed and
produced in considerable quantities by the Curriculum Branch.
Other Projects
We continued to assist with the refurbishing of the Department of Education
display at the PNE and supplied photographs, drawings, etc., for this project.
CO-ORDINATION WITH INDUSTRY AND OTHER AGENCIES
During the past year a variety of meetings was held with representatives of
business, industry, and labour to consider new programmes proposed for various
British Columbia vocational schools or changes to existing programmes.
Of special importance have been the modifications made to the Nautical Training Programmes which will be introduced for the first time next winter as a result
of close co-operation with industry and the Federal Ministry of Transport.
A Provincial committee has recently been established to take a fresh look at
the training of stationary engineers. Although only three meetings have been held
to date, much useful groundwork has been laid.
A summary of topics covered at other meetings attended is as follows:
1. Agriculture Upgrading Advisory Committee.
2. Building Service Workers Advisory Committee.
3. Carpentry Advisory Committee.
4. Child Care Aides Advisory Committee.
5. Diamond Drilling Advisory Committee.
6. Electronics Advisory Committee.
 DIVISION OF TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL SERVICES C 67
7. Farrier Training Advisory Committee.
8. Food and Accommodation Industry Advisory Committee.
9. Key Punch Training Advisory Committee.
10. Legal Stenography Advisory Committee.
11. Logging (Interior) Advisory Committee.
12. Occupational Orientation Advisory Committee.
13. Office Machine Repair Advisory Committee.
14. Orderly Training Advisory Committee.
15. Painting and Decorating Advisory Committee.
16. Practical Horticulture Advisory Committee.
17. Saw-filing Advisory Committee.
18. Sign-painting Advisory Committee.
Other projects undertaken during the year included working with the Division
of Rehabilitation on selection of students, adjudicating student loans, and reviewing
applications to conduct night school classes.
Inspection Report, Regional Vocational Schools
Visits to Regional Vocational Schools
All regional vocational schools were visited during this past year. One hundred
and sixty-seven supervisory visits were made with instructional staff, and varying
amounts of time were spent with administrators in each school.
Burnaby—Because of the problems experienced by the school during this
term, a considerable amount of time had to be devoted to this complex. The
Acting Principal and his assistants are to be commended for their work, carried
out under very difficult circumstances.
Dawson Creek—This school was visited during the month of September. I
am pleased to report that once again there have been few problems and a very
effective job is being done by both the administration and the staff of the school.
Kelowna—Staff and administration were visited during the month of October.
In general, a commendable job is being done in all training areas.
Nanaimo—Visits were conducted during the months of September, November,
and December.    This school continues to do effective work in all training areas.
Nelson—Visits were conducted during the months of September and April.
The new Acting Principal has adjusted to his position extremely well and good
progress is being made in most training areas.
Prince George—The staff and administration were visited during the months of
November and March.
Terrace—Visited during the months of November, January, and March. Very
good progress has been made in the developing of this school. The Principal and
his staff are to be commended for their work. They have been sensitive to the
needs of the area and have taken the initiative in developing and modifying programmes to suit the area's requirements.
Victoria—Visited during the months of September, December, and January.
The rapid expansion of this school and the fact that buildings used are several miles
apart have created many problems for the administration. The Principal, however,
has done an exceptionally fine piece of work in creating a unified, high-calibre
training institution.
Selection of Staff
During the year interviews were conducted for 56 competitions in Burnaby,
Prince George, Terrace, Nelson, Nanaimo, and Victoria.
 C 68 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
Industrial Education and Vocational Programmes
Secondary Schools
The Technical and Vocational Services Division provides assistance for
approved programmes in technical, industrial, commercial, agricultural, community services, visual and performing arts, occupational, and other programmes for
particular occupations.
Construction and Equipment
Capital projects under the Federal/Provincial AOTA Capital Agreement are
continuing within the Accelerated Phase-out Programme three being near completion to a total gross cost of $1,475,000, five contracts having been let for
$1,494,445 and three more out to tender for an estimated gross cost of $1,241,000.
Technical books for use in Commerce, Industrial Education, and Community Services were approved and 68 schools have purchased books to a gross total of
$177,961.
Twelve additional projects are in the planning stages, estimated to cost
$3,662,000 and to be completed in 1971/72/73.
Staffing
The graduating class from the Industrial Education Accelerated Programme
at the University of British Columbia numbered 57, 48 of whom were sponsored by
Canada Manpower and 9 by the Province. The majority of the graduates found
suitable employment in the Province and brought the total number of Industrial
Education teachers employed to 981.
Recruitment
Sixty-nine persons have been recruited for training during the 1971/72 year,
36 to be sponsored by Canada Manpower and 33 by the Province. The Canada
Manpower clients accepted for 1971/72 will be sponsored for 9V_t months only,
and the tuition costs for the remaining IVi months will be borne by the Province.
In-service Training
It has become obvious the Industrial Science 12 course introduced in the
senior secondary programme in 1965 was receiving little or no attention in some
schools, whereas in a very few schools a determined effort was being made to offer
an effective course. As a result, six workshops were held in Courtenay, Kitimat,
Surrey, Cranbrook, Vernon, and Prince George, with 154 teachers attending and
66 school districts represented. Practically every Industrial Science teacher in the
Province took part. The objectives of each workshop were to recognize the work
being done in the chosen centre, to benefit from the visiting consultant from UBC,
and for the teachers themselves to react and participate in the whole programme.
Judging by the response from teachers, principals, and district administrators,
this style of workshop is highly successful and it is planned to offer a similar series
in Safety for the school-year 1972/73.
As a follow-up, a revision will be made to the equipment requirements, and
resource material will be distributed to all schools enrolling Industrial Science 12
students.
 r
DIVISION OF TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL SERVICES
Education Media Standards and Specifications Committee
C 69
Recommendations for the use and installation of ETV "hardware" in the
public school system have been made to the Department by this committee, one
result of which appeared in Administrative Circular 15.2.71, which identified the
standards recommended and the approximate cost sharing available from the
Department.
This committee, in addition to its permanent members, appoints specialist
consultants from the various institutions within the Province. Currently the committee is working on the Provincial developments for installations to produce
"software" in the form of video-tapes and it also is studying the type and utilization
of cassettes.
Plastics in Industrial Education
In co-operation with the Provincial Fire Marshal's office and the Workmen's
Compensation Board of British Columbia, recommendations were made to the
Department of Education for the handling and use of thermoforming and thermosetting materials in school shops, and the Department issued guidelines on their
uses in Administrative Circular 17.9.70.
Student Enrolment
The following figures indicate the number of Industrial Education
taken by pupils:
I.E. 8   22,424
I.E. 9  43,856
I.E. 11   26,088
I.E. 12  14,168
Programmes for particular occupations (specifics)   1,430
Occupational   2,798
courses
Grand total, student/course enrolments  110,764
Teachers instructing in Industrial Education, 981.
The number of student/courses in Industrial Education increased by approximately 14.1 per cent, and the number of instructors by 6.3 per cent over the 1969/70
year.
There was a significant increase at the senior secondary level, and the numbers
taking Industrial Education courses in Grades XI and XII increased by 13.9 per cent.
Supervisory and Management Training
The Management Development, Communications and Human Relations, and
the Techniques of Work Study courses which are designed to give fundamental training to foremen, superintendents, office personnel, plant managers, engineers, and
anyone in charge of people or responsible for production continue to be popular,
hence well subscribed.
Final results are important in any training programme, and the number of requests to repeat courses bears out the good results that are being achieved.
The Mining Association of British Columbia has trained new conference leaders
through our courses and is carrying out extensive field work in all member mines in
British Columbia.    Other companies, Government departments, and associations
 C 70
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
(forest industries) continue to carry the course Communications and Human Relations to the far reaches of our Province and are concentrating on all levels of line
supervision.
Enrolment
Communications and Human Relations
Work Study	
Conferences conducted within industry
Total	
112
170
427
709
Tourist Services
Most of the activities under this section are carried on outside the Provincial
vocational schools.
In co-operation with various school districts, the Department of Travel Industry
and other outside agencies, 21 courses were conducted over a wide area of British
Columbia.
Enrolment
Legal Aspects of the Hospitality Industry
Service-station Attendants	
Waiter/Waitress Training	
Short-order Cooks 	
Room Maids	
Retail Sales	
Travel Counsellors 	
Total enrolment
41
76
190
26
14
64
78
489
Hospitality seminars, 312
Close contact was maintained throughout the industry by means of advisory
committees and orientation meetings with Canada Manpower and directors of adult
education in the Province.
Finally, assistance was given to a number of institutions by organizing training
programmes, and guidance was offered to students by means of career days.
Sundry
The Division continued to involve itself in the Armed Services training programme at Chilliwack.
Financial assistance by way of grants for the purchase of equipment was provided to the Forestry Training School (Department of Lands, Forests, and Water
Resources), where 149 students passed through various levels of training.
Advanced training course	
Miscellaneous short divisional courses
Indoctrination courses—
Professional appointees	
Technical appointees 	
24
75
21
29
 DIVISION of technical-vocational SERVICES C 71
British Columbia Vocational School—Burnaby
This has perhaps been the most critical year in the history of the school.
Both the day and night school operations were hard pressed to accommodate the
demands for training during this period of economic recession. Major expansion of
facilities and staff must be the first priority to relieve this dangerous situation.
There was a 9.4-per-cent increase in enrolment in pre-employment classes, a
5.5-per-cent increase in the number of apprentices, but a 3.5-per-cent decrease in
pre-apprentice enrolment, resulting in an over-all increase of 6.1 per cent.
A second position of Assistant to the Principal was approved to meet the
expansion needs of the school, and an appointment is pending.
Malaysia Project
Mr. R. Curtis, Carpentry Instructor, was assigned to this project in November
1970. Mr. G. Bradbury, Sheet Metal Instructor, returned to duty in April 1971
on completion of a two-year assignment in Malaysia.
Training—Expansion and Changes
Regular meetings were held with advisory committees to review training
requirements and curriculum modification. British Columbia Vocational School—
Burnaby representatives attended all Trade Advisory Committee meetings called by
the Apprenticeship Branch.
Close co-operation was maintained with Canada Manpower to develop special
short upgrade classes for unemployed tradesmen. A total of 19 of these courses
had an enrolment of 642. These courses are judged to be very effective in improving
the skills of the existing labour force. Continual effort must be maintained to
develop this important service.
New Programmes
A successful course in Commercial Legal Stenography was introduced to
replace the Court Reporter and Stenotype operator, which were moved to the
night school.
Apprenticeship courses for Drywall Installers and Drywall Finishers were
conducted in addition to a new Glazier course.
Major curricula revisions were made to the Building Service Workers and
Appliance Servicing courses, and mobile Building Service Workers courses were
conducted at Terrace, Victoria, Nanaimo, and Nelson.
Building Programme
The need for a major expansion of facilities is urgent to improve existing
training and meet the increasing needs for additional courses.
The building requirements are:
Diesel workshop—This facility is urgently required to accommodate apprentices who are now delayed in receiving technical training.
Classroom and laboratory block—This is a major building required to house
programmes temporarily located at the Pitpar Building and to permit expansion of
existing programmes in the main school. It will be necessary to extend the lease
on the Pitpar Building beyond the stated completion date of March 31, 1972. Again
this major facility is desperately needed and must receive top priority if we are to
meet training demands.
 Machine Shop student at the Vocational School, Burnaby, sets up the numerically
controlled turret head for drilling and tapping.
 division of technical-vocational services C 73
Steel trades building—A separate building is requested to accommodate
courses now at Pitpar and day school Steel Fabrication apprentice classes now
scheduled for the fall.
Greenhouse—Design work is nearly complete and funds reserved. It is
hoped that tenders will be called soon to avoid operating this class in borrowed
facilities.
Tenders have been called to establish a temporary building adjacent to the
Commercial Department and relieve the overcrowding in that department. This
must be considered as a temporary measure until the major classroom and laboratory
block is built.
The urgency for expansion of facilities cannot be overstated. Second and even
third shifts were added in several departments to meet the demands for additional
training.
Industrial Instrumentation
All major construction is now complete on this project. Commissioning of
the instruments and processes is now under way with the co-operation of skilled
personnel donated by industry.
Comments
The past year has been one of very vigorous activity. The challenge to meet
all new training needs has been generally met. Adequate facilities remain our
major problem.
Modification of training schedules, particularly for apprentice classes, has
permitted greater flexibility in staff assignments and an opportunity to update
instructional materials.
The new schedule for pre-apprentice training is most welcome and will further
improve our training standards.
The reorganization of all training within eight major divisions will contribute
greatly to improved communications and efficiency in the school. Department
heads are now being recruited to lead these divisions.
Close co-operation has been maintained with all outside agencies, particularly
Canada Manpower on-site staff and the Apprenticeship Branch.
Night School Division
Enrolment in the night school classes showed a downward trend.
The transfer of apprentice classes to day school gained momentum in 1970
and it is felt this was the reason for the 21.75-per-cent drop in apprentice night
school enrolment. Of the 156 apprentices who wrote interprovincial examinations
in their graduating years, there were only 14 failures for an average 9 per cent failure rate.
Enrolment figures in trade extension courses show a drop from 2,177 to 1,700,
or 21.9 per cent. Some of this drop is due to what formerly were two-part courses
being combined into one course to facilitate handling by Manpower. This is borne
out by the training-hour figures, which only show a drop of 14.24 per cent. Another
reason was the large number of day upgrading programmes that were put on at this
school due to high unemployment. New courses offered during the year included
the following:
Court Reporting—Transferred from the day programme.
Upgrading of British Columbia Ferry cooks—Our instructors conducted these
courses on the British Columbia Ferries at Horseshoe Bay and Tsawwas-
 C 74 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
sen terminals for a rotating group of cooks as they came off shift.  This
was a difficult situation and the programme was considered to be of limited
value.
Motor Controls—An upgrading for journeymen electricians in the application
of modern solid state controls.
Ventilation Layout—A new course for sheet metal journeymen.
Roofer Upgrading—A course in modern roofing methods for persons employed
in this field.
The conference room in our Administration Building was again used regularly
for meetings, seminars, and conferences by a large number of local professional,
technical, industrial, and sports organizations.  This is a good source of contacts for
the school and gives us good public relations within the Greater Vancouver area.
British Columbia Vocational School—Dawson Creek
The increase in the number of students enrolled in 1970/71 is attributable to an
increase in class capacities as well as additional short courses that were established
during the year.
Upgrading courses in Carpentry and Automotive Mechanics were offered during the early spring for tradesmen preparing for Provincial qualification examinations, while short courses in Waiter/Waitress Training and Service-station Salesmanship were offered to meet the demands of industry.
A number of successful agriculture short courses for farmers of the Peace River
region were given with the co-operation of the British Columbia Department of
Agriculture, and future programmes are planned.
The Farrier Training course was initiated in September 1970 and graduate
farriers are now serving the light-horse industry throughout British Columbia and
Canada, with placement of graduates from this course being excellent.
Placement of graduates from all pre-employment courses has been very gratifying, but graduates from the pre-apprentice courses have had some difficulty in
obtaining employment.
The school farm continued to play a significant role in the local agricultural
industry through the sale of high-quality breeding-stock. A successful beef-feeding
project was conducted on the farm this past winter with the co-operation of the
Department of Agriculture and with important results for the grain and live-stock
industry of the Province.
Instructors and administration staff carried out liaison and career day-visits
during the year and it was evident that the courses and reputation of this school are
becoming well recognized in the region, with more than half the student population
from the local area.
Construction has started on the addition to the Food Training Centre to provide
much needed space for a bake-shop and classroom.
A very successful year of expansion and growth has been achieved. Credit
must be given to all the staff of this school for their assistance and co-operation.
British Columbia Vocational School—Kelowna
This past year has been very successful.
The school enrolment increased beyond the day school capacity and resulted
in six day classes being offered from 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. and two from 11 p.m. to
6 a.m. Over 1,500 day students were enrolled during the year, the March enrolment reaching an all-time high of 535, with major increases in the Basic Training
Skills Development, Commercial, and Welding courses.
 DIVISION OF TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL SERVICES
C 75
The night school programme remained relatively constant in comparison with
last year. Air Brakes Operator courses were most in demand, with 200 taking
the training.
This school was pleased with being selected to implement a 10-month Practical
Nursing course as a pilot project. The first class commenced in January 1971.
These students took two months of training in the school instead of four before
entering their eight-month hospital training. A reasonably valid assessment should
be available* a year hence.
With the completion of the cafeteria, the Cook Training course commenced
in May. It is interesting to note that approximately 25 per cent of the staff and
students patronize and partake of the culinary efforts.
Finally, we are pleased to report that Mr. Bert Gibson, Vice-Principal, had
sufficiently recovered from near-fatal burns to resume his duties in November. At
that time the Workmen's Compensation Board gave a reception and presented
awards to the three students who risked their lives to save a life.
British Columbia Vocational School—Nanaimo
Day school enrolment increased by 249 students to 2,397, and night school
enrolment by 205 students to 839.
The new automotive shop is now complete and is relieving the very crowded
conditions that existed in the old auto-diesel shop.
The melding with Malaspina College is progressing and enabling both institutions to enlarge and enrich their programmes.
Placement continues to be very favourable in all areas except the auto pre-
apprentices, who are experiencing some difficulty in finding apprenticeships.
Along with the regular classes, eight dental assistants and 17 practical nurses
were upgraded to licence.
New courses added during the year were Dental Assistants, Steel Spar Operator, Linemen Apprentices, Beauty Culture Apprentices, and Basic Training for
Skills Development Level IV, while additions were made to the Timekeeping, First
Aid, and Basic Accounting and Heavy Duty Mechanics classes.
British Columbia Vocational School—Nelson and
Kootenay School of Art
Highlights of Year's Activities
Staffing—In October 1970, Mr. J. P. Wapple, Principal, was transferred to
Victoria to become Principal of Special Projects and was replaced by Mr. D. S.
Goard as Acting-Principal.
Visitors, tours, public relations—In May 1971, the school was visited by the
Honourable D. L. Brothers, Minister of Education.
Regular tours of the school were made by high school students and other
visitors, while a number of the vocational school staff undertook to address service
clubs and high schools. A Career Expo in Cranbrook included representatives
from the school.
Courses—A team teaching programme was developed in the Basic Training
for Skills Development area, while additional classes were introduced in Heavy
Duty Mechanics, Basic Training for Skills Development, and Millwright Upgrade.
The Fine Arts and Commercial Art programmes were over-subscribed, which
necessitated the creation of a screening committee.   Certain courses were offered
  DIVISION OF TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL SERVICES C 77
in conjunction with the Notre Dame University, enabling students from that centre
to obtain credit for studies completed at the Kootenay School of Art. The Display
Gallery was well used by several travelling shows and local exhibitors, as well as
the usual school displays.
As a result of a recommendation made last year, the Kootenay School of Art
was used to better advantage during the summer months, including the offering of
credit courses.
Night school and special short courses—The night school programme was
expanded over last year with an increase in the number of both students and courses.
Other uses of school facilities—The school also provided space for meetings
for Canada Manpower and the Department of Highways. The Department of
Labour made good use of the facilities for tradesman qualification examinations
throughout the year.
British Columbia Vocational School—Prince George
The Basic Training for Skills Development division of the school has had an
exceptionally busy year. A special instructor came on staff in January 1971, to
conduct a class for functional illiterates; this programme proved to be highly successful. Most Basic Training for Skills Development graduates from the Levels III
and IV courses either found employment or entered specific training programmes.
Post-secondary programmes continue to attract an increasing number of well-
qualified high school graduates. The Dental Assistants course has been expanded
and now includes the material authorized by the College of Dental Surgeons. The
Draughting class was again able to gain practical experience in local offices, and
nearly all these students were placed in employment before graduation. Students
in the Secretarial and Bookkeeping classes also found employment fairly quickly
after completing training programmes. After considerable examination, entry to
these commercial courses is now established on a two-month schedule. Pre-employment courses also continued on a generally full-enrolment basis. Fifteen general
welding students completed Department of Public Works tests in June and jobs were
available for all of them. Heavy Equipment Operator classes are operating at
capacity and there is a 12-month wait list for fee-paying students. The volume of
applications for the Practical Nursing course remains steady and most applicants
must wait at least a year before they can be formally invited to apply for training.
Night school courses were well attended and a wide variety of programmes
was offered, the general response being good. Most of the students are local residents, but some people come from considerable distances to attend, e.g., Fort St.
James, Quesnel, and Vanderhoof.
During this past year, the school was fortunate in having an active Student
Council, which was able to sponsor many worth-while student functions. Throughout the year the Council also operated the Student Canteen, which serves light
refreshments at break-times and noon-hour daily.
As this will be the last annual report from British Columbia Vocational School
—Prince George, it seems appropriate that some mention should be made of the
many people and agencies that have made contributions to the school. Over 12,000
students have attended classes since the school opened in 1962, many of these ex-
students have returned to offer constructive criticism and advice. Only the interest,
enthusiasm, and dedication of both instructional and support staff has enabled this
school to function so successfully.
Support for courses and students has been generously given by such agencies
as Canada Manpower, the Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement,
 o
ft
3
O
 DIVISION OF TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL SERVICES C 79
Workmen's Compensation Board, Rehabilitation Branch of the Department of
Health, Department of Indian Affairs, and many other private and governmental
agencies and individuals.
The school has also enjoyed the co-operation and assistance of the City of
Prince George (City Hall staff); the Government Agent, Prince George; the Prince
George Regional Hospital.
British Columbia Vocational School—Terrace
Again, during the school-year of 1970/71, this school experienced substantial
growth, both in the variety of programmes offered and the number of students enrolled. The total enrolment increased during this period from 691 to 956 full-time
day students, with a maximum daily enrolment of 368 persons.
The school witnessed two major events this past year. The first occurred on
August 11, 1971, when the Honourable W. A. C. Bennett, Premier, "cut" a chain
to officially open British Columbia Vocational School—Terrace. An indication of
public interest in technical and vocational education was evident by the large turnout
of over 1,000 persons who attended the ceremony and toured the facilities.
The second milestone was the completion of the current building programme,
which includes a cafeteria and dormitory complex, a central stores building, as well
as the landscaping around the new construction. As a result we were able to enrol
our first Cook Training students on April 19, 1971, and extend existing temporary
dormitory accommodation.
We have again moved further into the field of revising our courses into self-
contained units so that the various curricula can be completed even on an interrupted
programme. This pattern of training is based on the concept of capitalizing on
periods of low employment to attract as many students as possible into training, and
in February 1971 this resulted in peak enrolment when we offered, in addition to
the continuing programmes, 16 short courses ranging from Blasting Upgrade through
Welding, Plumbing, Logging, to Basic Language and Leadership Training courses.
Five of these were set up for the native Indian people of the area, with a high degree
of success both in enrolment and course mastery.
The two key words which describe our training programme are "availability"
and "versatility"; and the staff of this school has risen to the challenge to accept this
philosophy in its most practical form. This has led not only to revision of course
content for the benefit of the students, but also, in some cases, completely rewriting
an entire programme such as is now being done for the Nautical Training Division.
Although not as successful as the previous year, night school courses were
offered in Welding, Outboard Repair and Maintenance, First Aid, Automotive Tune-
up, and Navigation.
To stimulate additional interest in vocational education we have invited local
industry to use our facilities for short seminars and industrial training programmes.
During the year, 13 groups accepted the offer and were evenly divided between either
company-sponsored groups, industrial associations, or other Governmental departments.
British Columbia Vocational School—Victoria
Day school enrolment increased from 862 to 2,226, while night school enrolment increased from 356 to 735. A recent survey shows that the school must be
prepared for a further increase in all programmes during the coming year.
Two additional courses were added—Diesel Mechanics and Marine and Stationary Engineering. The latter concerns itself primarily with the preparation of
candidates for the various marine and stationary tickets.
 C 80 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
The school continues to work closely with various agencies such as the Apprenticeship Branch of the Department of Labour, Canada Manpower, and the Provincial
Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement in their endeavours to provide useful skills to unemployed persons and to upgrade the skills of persons presently employed.
The instructional staff, being aware of the poor economic conditions, collectively
launched a campaign by telephone and mail bringing to the attention of employers
that graduate students would be seeking employment. This action by the staff produced results beyond expectations and resulted in our not having sufficient graduates
to meet the demand in some areas.
Construction of the new Cafeteria Building, located on the site of the Interurban
Complex, commenced in May. Upon completion, this unit will permit the school
to offer training to persons interested in entering the food services industry and, of
course, will provide much-needed dining facilities to students.
British Columbia Institute of Technology
Construction Programme
The fine new multi-purpose building which has been named the Student Activity
Centre was completed in March 1971 and is being made good use of by the students
of the British Columbia Institute of Technology, the Vocational Teachers Training
College, and British Columbia Vocational School.
The annual Convocation of BCIT was held in June in the new Student Activity
Centre with 2,300 students, parents, and faculty comfortably accommodated in the
large auditorium. The Honourable W. A. C. Bennett, who was the keynote speaker
at Convocation, officially opened the centre.
The roads serving the campus were added to during the year, and a new interior
road leading to the south end of the campus parking-lots will greatly improve access
to and egress from the campus.
A new all-purpose gravel playing-field was constructed by the Nanaimo Vocational School students.
Landscaping is under way and when completed will greatly add to the appearance of the campus.
Negotiations are being conducted with the Departments of Education and Public Works in developing a feasible plan for building residences on the campus.
Enrolment of Students
In 1970 we enrolled 173 more students than in 1969, the extra numbers were
made possible through larger enrolments in the second year, partly the result of the
transfer programme with regional colleges. This programme is growing and will
become an important factor in our second-year classes (see table, p. 211).
New Building
Planning for the construction of a new classroom and laboratory building is in
progress.
Employment of Graduates
In spite of the economic slowdown experienced in Canada, BCIT graduates
have continued to find opportunities in the industries of British Columbia. By the
end of June 1971, 81 per cent of the graduating class had obtained employment.
 DIVISION OF TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL SERVICES C 81
New Directors for Advisory Council
During the year, three new directors were appointed to serve on the Advisory
Council.   Their experience and abilities will add strength to the Council.
Extension Classes
Regular evening classes continued to attract a wide cross-section of students
from the total Lower Mainland area (see p. 212).
The exciting growth in extension classes has come in the new Industry Services
area, where special courses and programmes have been created in response to the
needs expressed by industry, governments, unions, and other associations.
It is important to note that, through these special industry courses, BCIT has
been able to extend its services beyond Greater Vancouver to the whole Province.
  STATISTICAL TABLES
  STATISTICAL TABLES
C 85
PUPILS
Page
1.1 Enrolment and Average Daily Attendance  86
1.2 Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex  87
1.3 Special Education Programmes  87
1.4 Home Economics and Community Services Enrolment, 1970/71  88
1.5 Net Enrolment by Programme, Grades XI and XII, 1970/71  89
Examinations—
1.6 Number of Candidates  107
1.7 Candidates Completing  107
1.8 Papers Marked  107
1.9 Number of Assistant Examiners (Markers)  107
1.10 Summary of Net Enrolment  108
1.11 Recapitulation of Net Enrolment, 1970/71, by Type of School, Grade,
and Sex of Pupil  164
 C 86 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
TABLE 1.1    ENROLMENT AND AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE
Enrolment in the public schools of the Province rose from 513,079 in June
1970 to 527,106. The increase of 14,000 was the smallest in the past 16 years but
it still represents an increase equal to the addition of the total enrolment of a city
midway in size between Kelowna and Kamloops. During the next seven years a dip
in enrolment should pass through the elementary grades, particularly in the urban
centres, but secondary enrolment will continue to rise and the grand total is expected
to reach 600,000 about 1983.
Number
of
Schools
Enrolment of Pupils
Attendance
of Pupils
Type of School
Boys
Girls
Total
Per Cent
of Total
Mean Daily
Attendance
Per Cent
of Enrolment
17
118
97
13
52
1,210
8,898
50,830
33,168
4,410
7,475
167,134
8,116
48,042
31,285
4,009
6,981
156,758
17,014
98,872
64,453
8,419
14,456
323,892
3.2
18.8
12.2
1.6
2.7
61.4
13,700.5
84,345.1
57,248.0
7,242.5
12,886.1
301,220.5
80.5
85.3
88.0
Elementary-senior secondary...
Elementary-junior secondary...
86.0
89.1
93.0
Totals	
1,507
271,915
255,191
527,106
100.0
476,642.7
90.4
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled:
Secondary School Correspondence classes, regular students (exclusive of the 4,334 officially registered in other schools)	
In the Elementary School Correspondence classes, regular students 	
Under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, pupils receiving
instruction	
1,706
718
38
Adult Education
Canadian Vocational Training Programme—
Day	
Night	
2,462
  31,491
  13,668
Public School Adult Education  180,282!
Secondary School Correspondence (adults only)  10,899
Elementary School Correspondence (adults only)  136
Public colleges and British Columbia Institute of Technology—
Full time	
Part time	
9,456
7,836
256,230
l Includes 137,345 nonvocational.
 STATISTICAL TABLES
C 87
TABLE 1.2    DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
The following table provides a distribution of pupils by grade and sex for the
school-year 1970/71 and a comparison of the totals with 1969/70. Grade I
decreased by over 1,600 from June 1970 to June 1971 and should continue to
decline until June 1974 as a reflection of the decreasing births between 1960 and
1966.   Grade XIII was discontinued at the end of the 1970/71 school-year.
Grade
Boys
Girls
Total,
1970/71
Total,
1969/70
Ratio,
1971:1970
Grade XIII
Grade XII—
Grade XI	
Secondary
166
16,081
18,262
94
14,749
17,105
260
30,830
35,367
897
28,528
32,411
.290
1.081
1.091
Totals, senior secondary gradesi-
Grade X ~
Grade IX. .
Grade VIII-
Totals, Grades VIII to X .
Occupational 3 	
Occupational 2  	
Occupational 1	
Totals, occupational classes	
Totals, junior secondary grades-
Totals, secondary grades—	
Elementary
Intermediate Special 	
Grade VII  	
Grade VI  	
Grade V	
Grade IV ._	
Totals, intermediate grades
Primary Special ~ 	
Grade III 	
Grade II  	
Grade I  _
Kindergarten.—   —
Totals, primary grades	
Totals, elementary grades-
Grand totals 	
34,509
31,948
19,465
20,832
21,439
18,835
20,158
20,932
61,736
59,925
763
1,027
1,472
482
567
725
3,262
1,774
64.998
61,699
99,507
93,647
66,457
61,836
1.075
38,300
40,990
42,371
36,113
39,465
40,621
1.061
1.039
1.043
121,661
116,199
1.047
1,245
1,594
2,197
1,208
1,601
1,982
1.031
.996
1.108
5,036
4,791
1.051
126,697
120,990
1.047
193,154
182,826   ,
1.056
2,508
21,668
22,463
22,756
22.30S
1,371
20,946
21,267
21,632
21,403
3,879
42,614
43,730
44,388
43,711
4,233    |
40,625    ]
41,859
43,207
43,885    |
.916
1.049
1.045
1.027
.996
91,703 .|  86,619
178,322 j 173,809
1.026
2,176
22,467
22,747
22,450
10,865
1,206
3,382
3,055    |
1.107
21,502
43,969
43,756    ]
1.005
21,331
44,078
43,751    .
1.007
20,695
43,145
44,765
.964
10,191
21,056
21,117    [
.997
80,705
74,925
155,630
156,444
.995
172,408
161,544
333,952 | 330,253
1.011
271,915 i 255,191
527,1062 I 513,0922
1.027
1 See pages 89 to 106 for enrolment by programme in Grades XI and XII.
2 Includes January graduates.
TABLE 1.3    SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMMES
Type
Number
Function
Number of
School
Districts
Number of
Approvals
Number of
Pupils
1969
1970
1969
1970
1969
1970
61
22
59
6
8
8
1
10
1
5
2
15
67
56
22
63
7
8
13
1
11
1
6
6
24
63
304
90
295
33
14
46
1
15
2
5
2
42
324
298
96
298
39
15
58
1
16
2
8
3
62
324
3,908
916
3,665
522
(!)
687
5
134
66
C1)
23
321
5,167
3,726
2
957
3
4
Remedial  	
4,810
518
5
C1)
6
813
7
8
8
123
9
18
10
11
Speech .
C1)
93
12
579
5,295
Totals	
265
281
1,1732
1,220
15,414
16,940
i Enrolment varies greatly.
2 Total differs from that in previous table, since this figure includes all classes reported.
 C 88 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLE 1.4    HOME ECONOMICS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES
ENROLMENT, 1970/71
A. Course enrolment—
Senior
Foods 11  7,679
Foods 1 2a  1,649
Foods 12b  981
Textiles 11  5,095
Textiles 12a  1,677
Textiles 12b  737
Management 11  2,272
Home and Industrial Service 12  411
Child Care 12  2,378
Community Recreation 12  5,283
Junior
Home Economics 8  21,275
Foods, Nutrition 91  12,537
Clothing, Textiles 91  12,752
Child Care 9 _:  2,579
Cooking and Foods Service 9  5,928
Occupational
Home Economics I  780
Home Economics II  532
Home Economics III  400
B. Community Services Specialties enrolment—
Foods  1,416
Textiles  :  917
Home and Industrial Services  685
1 In many cases these courses are combined and taken over a two-year period.
 STATISTICAL TABLES
C 89
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WH
 STATISTICAL TABLES
TABLES 1.6-1.9    EXAMINATIONS
Table 1.6   Number of Candidates
C 107
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
1969/70
1970/71
Grade XII—
3,962
17,769
6,490
June	
21,952
17,470
18,910
20,826
Totals                    	
21,952
17,470
18,910
21,731
27,316
Grade XIII—
June  _	
August
2,784
658
2,016
528
1,224
326
801
82
645
145
Totals
3,442
2,544
1,550
883
790
25,394
20,014
20,460
22,614
28,106
Table 1.7    Candidates Completing
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
1969/70
1970/71
Grade XII—
7^448
938
12,979
1,456
10,722
12,253
13,370
Totals...                    	
10,722
11,448
12,253
13,917
14,826
Grade XIII—
June                              _ 	
August. -                            	
602
87
470
67
268
41
131
38
33
6
Totals    	
689
537
309
169
39
11,411
11,985
12,562
14,086
14,865
Table 1.8    Papers Marked
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
1969/70
1970/71
Grade XII—
21,955
5,466
4,003
17,046
6,824
6,273
24,676
4,927
19,242
5,345
16,891
6,711
Totals                     	
29,603
27,421
24,587
27,873
29,875
Grade Xni—
June   _    	
August
10,534
1,226
8,813
961
4,978
447
3,121
373
1,275
159
Totals     	
11,760
9,774
5,425
3,494
1,434
41,363
37,195
30,012
31,367
31,309
Table 1.9    Number of Assistant Examiners (Markers)
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
1969/70
1970/71
344
11
300
16
151
14
163
15
148
14
Totals	
355
316
165
178
162
 C 108
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys      Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
II
III
Primary
Special
District No. 1 (Fernie)
Secondary—
Fernie	
Sparwood	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—J affray
Elementary—
Isabella Dicken.-	
Elkford  	
Elko	
Grasmere _ 	
Ridgemont- —   _
Sparwood  _
Waldo  	
Totals, District No. 1	
District No. 2 (Cranbrook)
Secondary—Mount Baker	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—■
Laurie  	
Parkland 	
Elementary-
Muriel B axter  	
Cranbrook Central  _	
Moyie  	
T. M. Roberts 	
Tenth Avenue 	
Wardner	
Amy Woodland 	
Totals, District No. 2 	
District No. 3 (Kimberley)
Secondary—Selkirk-
Junior Secondary—McKim .
Elementary—
Blarchmont   —
Chapman Camp..
Lindsay Park	
Marysville ~	
Meadowbrook—
Ta Ta	
Wasa	
A. A. Watkins.
Totals, District No. 3..
District No. 4 (Windermere)
Secondary—David Thompson	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Canal Flats _	
Edgewater 	
Elementary—■
Brisco   	
Galena	
Invermere_
J. Alfred Laird-
Radium 	
Wilmer	
Windermere.
Totals, District No. A..
District No. 7 (Nelson)
Secondary—L. V. Rogers.
Junior Secondary—Trafalgar	
Elementary-Senior Secondary—
Mount Sentinel	
Salmo-
Elementary-Junior Secondary—W. E. Graham
505
269
238
517
17
47
50
530
647
18
258
137
117
283
7
21 i
29
275
350
11
247
132
121
234
10
26
21
255
297
7
115
81
16
134
3
10
9
  I
92
2
15
123
4
13 :
11
89
2,838 | 1,'
1,350
196
266 i|  255
831
528
461
265
559
12
540
349
17
498
445
292
239 i
128
286
4
276
194
7
284
386
236
222
137
273
8
264
155
10
214
63
64
59
65
4,060 | 2,155 i| 1,905
251
346
349
615
398
216
113
143
202
86
32
42
559
320
203
106
63
68
100
49
17
19 I
293
295
195
110
50
75
102
37
15
23
266
2,406 | 1,238 ]  1,168
441
225
137
217
115
73
13
7
12
6
247
133 i
157
79
43
22
39
18
92
52
224
110
64
6
6
114
78
21
21
40
1,406
722 |
684
736
701
396
352
218 114
355 | 184
104 I   58
340
349
104
171
46
197 i
194
22
7
1
25
26 i
14
12.
19
42
12
19
132
3
11
6
260
 I
—  1
32
42
48
89
88
72
4
3
1
79
88
62
62
58
64
9
3
5
71
'  67
56
308
 1
49
37
33
18
14
19
32
49
33
27
35
30
21
10
9
14
11
17
36
38
40
181
33
13 I
5
1
3
4
28
25
33
26
7
8
7
5
17
24
129
154
139
	
	
13
13
14
 STATISTICAL TABLES
C 109
OF NET ENROLMENT
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
vm
IX
X
XI
xn
XIII
~ 29
3
1
10 I
125
83
4
21
4
136
65
9 ;
40
113
62
13
9
6
100
89
32
92
69
33
103
55
18
99
32
83
24
j
15
4
12
10
147
87
9
2
277
255 |  235
215
9
13 |   9 1   6
221
194 I
176
131
107 l|	
44
77
91
34
~~90
54
71
80
35
87
166
186
	
11
11
2
154
145
	
208
■ 120
341
227
239
	
I.:
10
84
14
76
-  -
37
62
	
309
336 |  327
352
24
11 >|  11 |   2
299
328
341
227
239
35
19
30
27
22
	
::
177
	
14
11
7se
	
187
	
218
198
199
—
32
	
29
  1 	
34 !   24
30
16
12
	
99
30
%
20
59
202
199 |  207
199
;    141    a i 	
186
187
218
198
199
30
25
24
20
7
10
20
20
23
50
22
115
24
23
78
	
	
1
	
64
16
23
103
120
120
116
116
90
90
51
51
—
38
	
4
•
17
—
12
25
45
26
10
22
5
J
5 1   5
3    5
276
35
93
30
299
35
71 i
25
181
106
37
60
23
270
41
41
285
23
32
i
 C 110 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
TABLE  1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I      1
1
II
III
Special
District No. 7 (Nelson)—Continued
Elementary—
30 '
187 ;
155
108
11
436
421
97
72
190
353
94
46
341
60
6
52
70
25
46
15
92
85
57
4
225
216
49 I
30
88
188
55
28
179
34
4
25
32
15
23
15
95
70
51
7
211
205
48
42
102
165
39
18
162
26
2
27
38
10
23
47
  1
56
47
34
35 i
28
4
22
20
4
56
44
10
8
27 '
39
18
8
33
~~U
20
  1
9
5
9
27
25
4
51
62
16
9 I
25
49
17
12
50
3
13
7 ',
5
29
21
28
3
44
56
15
14
28
59
12
34
3
13
6
A. I. Collinson  —
9
Hume  	
	
North Shore        	
Procter	
Rosemont. —   — 	
8
14
W E Wasson                         -	
Willow Point                         	
Winlaw   	
Ymir.	
Totals, District No. 7	
4,914
2,548
2,366
247
346
384
370
31
District No. 9 (Castlegar)
830
285
106
35
122
364
42
45
203
39
130
378
76
145
416
152
59
17
61
192
17
20
108
17
59
199
37
78
414
133
47
18
61
172
25
25
95
22
71
179
39
67
19
58
28
9
12
36
13
18
23
19
23
64
28
8
12
34
7
12
26
27
18
31
31
6
6
10
20
74
27
26
Junior Secondary—Kinnaird	
Elementary—■
	
Kinnaird .   	
	
Pass Creek	
	
Woodland Park	
9
Totals, District No. 9	
2,800
1,432
1,368
	
235
241
249
9
District No. 10 (Arrow Lakes)
283
125
51
50
37
137
266
103
48
159
70
30
28
23
69
129
60
25
124
55
21
22
14
68
137
43
23
41
6
6
4
20
27
21
8
4
5
21
28
13
8
12
7
25
27
35
Elementary—
Burton  .—. 	
Edgewood	
	
Totals, District No. 10 —	
1,100
593
507
41
84
79
114
District No. 11 (Trail)
Secondary—
J. Lloyd Crowe    ..       _   -
Rossland	
Junior Secondary—
Beaver Valley .	
Trail            	
1,139
416
258
657
14
297
520
44
291
648
215
127
347
4
165
290
21
149
491
201
131
310
10
132
230
23
142
	
6
54
76
13
34
4
39
59
15
48
4
47
60
6
35
	
Elementary—
9
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C 111
Grade
Inter-
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
vn
Special
1
2
3
VIII
DC
X
XI
XII
XIII
4
7
5
20
19
20
21
	
	
	
	
	
16
17
29
45
	
	
	
	
	
•	
	
	
23
•	
3
	
	
	
	
	
	
51
55
61
62
	
	
	
	
	
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36 ,
54
52
70
	
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12
15
14
15
	
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12
14
'  15
	
	
	
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31
27
24
28
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53
43
'  58
10
	
	
	
	
	
	
16
11
20
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
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17
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32
57
36
36
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30
30
	
	
	
	
	
	
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16
g
7
18
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7
6
11
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
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336
387 |  395
373
27
37 |   8 i|  10
434
430
407
352
340
1
3
7
6
' 176
215
235
188
	
	
	
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63
	
	
	
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21
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... .
4
	
—._
	
	
	
	
 i
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
' __
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—.—
55
63
62
86
11
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
10
8
.29
9
25
4
7
35
5
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
~41
~28
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
27
28
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
65
71
60
108
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
. _
	
	
	
	
	
—
 —
	
	
	
	
16
14
34
	
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
.	
232
242 1  244
222
11
3
7|   6
222
239
215
235
188
	
68
57
80
50
28
	
	
29
	
	
	
19
23
24
IS
IS
	
9
10
10
	
	
. ...
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
8
9
4
5
 _
	
2
 .
	
	
	
	
4
9
4
4
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
26
19
26
	
	
	
	
—,—
	
	
	
	
.	
27
29
33
54
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
25
29
28
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
-
 -
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
——
	
	
	
99
105
105
92
1 -
 | 	
89
80
104
65
43
11
377
411
340
	
	
9
3
3
97
94
69
94
47
	
102
97
59
	
	
	
	
	
17
18
	
307
315
	
	
	
	
42
41
33
~~41
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
86
10
40
70
73
87
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
50
~46
—H
	
	
	
	
	
	
 C 112
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 11 (Trail)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
361
241
447
160
80
482
294
190
129
242
88
38
241
142
171
112
205
72
42
241
152
52
38
57
20
17
59
49
48
36
43
26
15
53
34
43
35
59
13
20
59
33
13
Trail Central                _	
11
James L. Webster 	
5,701
3,036
2,665
  |     475
420
414
33
District No. 12 (Grand Forks)
618
60
631
262
318
25
332
143
300
35
299
119
	
9
8
75
32
12
76
29
Elementary—
46         69
40 1       34
4
John A. Hutton  	
Totals, District No. 12	
1,571
818
753
86 |     112
115
117
4
District No. 13 (Kettle Valley)
245
48
35
275
43
35
33
121
23
19
126
21
18
20
124
25
16
149
22
17
13
44
5
11
33
13
6
8
11
20
10
6
9
13
29
12
4
Elementary—
Greenwood — 	
Kettle Valley                .  .    . ~	
	
Totals, District No. 13 	
714
348
366
44 [       68
55
67 |   	
District No. 14 (Southern Okanagan)
785
594
103
542
232
114
422
304
45
288
121
69
363
290
58
254
HI
45
16
122
71
32
9
110
43
56
24
110
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Osoyoos	
Elementary—
Okanagan Falls	
14
Osoyoos Primary	
	
Totals, District No. 14	
2,370
1,249
1,121
209
194
190
14
District No. 15 (Penticton)
1,130
489
447
121
523
86
108
18
138
334
456
478
427
226
124
609
250
229
72
267
46
57
10
75
167
230
236
210
125
65
521
239
218
49
256
40
51
8
63
167
226
242
217
101
59
45
32
13
17
44
47
55
56
20
16
54
27
11
19
44
50
64
74
27
10
63
27
15
18
53
59
64
70
29
12
Junior Secondary—
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Learning
14
Elementary—
Naramata	
	
O'Connell                                	
West Bench                    	
Totals, District No. 15 —   _	
5,105
2,648
2,457
  |     345
380
410
14
District No. 16 (Keremeos)
246
151
61
234
122
70
27
137
124
81
34
97
41
24
7
22
17
6
23
26
19
30
Elementary—
Hedley                            	
5
Totals, District No. 16 	
692
356
336
41
53
46
75
5
 NET
STATISTICAL TABLES
ENROLMENT—Continued
C 113
 C 114
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 17 (Princeton)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Princeton	
Elementary-
Allison Pass  —
Coalmont.
Tulameen.
Totals, District No. 17-
District No. 18 (Golden)
Secondary—Golden	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Field-
Elementary—
Alexander Park -
Columbia Valley	
Donald 	
Golden	
Nicholson   	
Totals, District No. 18	
District No. 19 (Revelstoke)
Secondary—Revelstoke 	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Mica _
Elementary—
Big Eddy	
Farwell 	
Mount Begbie	
Mountain View..
Selkirk  _..
Trout Lake	
Totals, District No. 19	
District No. 21 (Armstrong-Spallumcheen)
Secondary—Armstrong	
Elementary—
Armstrong  	
Len W. Wood —  	
Totals, District No. 21..
District No. 22 (Vernon)
Senior Secondary—Vernon..
Junior Secondary—■
Charles Bloom	
W. L. Seaton 	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Clarence Fulton
Elementary—■
B.X.    	
Beairsto .	
Cherryville—	
Coldstream	
Harwood	
Lavington	
J. W. Inglis	
Lumby Primary-
Mission Hill	
Okanagan Landing-
Silver Star	
South B.X 	
West Vernon	
Totals, District No. 22-
Dlstrict No. 23 (Kelowna)
Secondary—
George Elliot  	
Kelowna	
Dr. Knox 	
George Pringle..
Rutland	
855
9
17
IS
458
3
6
12
397
6
11
6
60
64
2
2
2
69
1
2
4
63
3
6
6
899 |  479 |
420
60
70
76
540
277
82
39
275
144
121
67
33
19
491
265
184
84
263
43
131
54
14
226
100
14
37
22
10
53
28
46
23
6
65
48
38
22
4
65
22
1,726 |  895 |
831
750
312
118
286
262
449
223
21
382
157
68
151
135
237
122
13
2,421
1,265
445
470
239
228
235
120
1,154 |  583
896
269
831
719
234
580
87
371
509
137
357
113
143
284
551
42
516
6,639
285
1,763
875
418
766
368
155
50
135
127
212
101
28
72
50
31
28
56
28
1,156
150
216
217
235
119
37
82
571
37 |  82
463
126
421
362
132
319
44
182
265
49
181
62
69
149
275
24
263
3,386
144
875
431
219
350
433
143
410
357
102
261
43
189
244
88
176
51
74
135
276
18
253
3,253
141
888
444
199
416
27
86
18
41
58
13
50
36
35
86
13
57
520
38
38
19
29
56
50
28
27
73
71
3
2
217 |  217
81
98
81 |  98
29
74
6
44
75
12
63
34
44
69
8
70
528
23
78
13
52
70
25
69
35
38
68
12
72
555
78 |
2
10
164 |  197 |  156 |
12
33
15
48
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C 115
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
vn
1
2
3
VIII
DC
X
XI
XII
XIII
68
1
68
1
75
69
1
14
1
	
72
77
58
62
35
\
3
4
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
75
76
75
70
14 |   1
	
72
77
58
62
35
	
8
7
10
7
7
7
1
123
7
137
7
116
8
96
53
	
35
42
38
39
18
23
13
2
4
3
2
	
	
	
70
65
45
105
13
.
	
	
	
32
30
24
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
165
171
133
151
15
7 I   7 |   1
130
144
124
96
53
	
9
10
5
172
163
153
134
104
40
31
30
24
24
19
9
20
22
52
_
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
58
33
38
39
106
124
165
15
	
	
	
	
	
	
3
5
4
i
 	
	
	
	
	
	
zz
	
	
—_
212
197
196
190
15
9
10
5
196
182
162
134
104
	
99
73
	
10
9
9
109
104
82
66
56
	
33
98
108
	
	
	
	
	
_	
	
	
	
99
106
98
108
10
9
9
109
104
82
66
56
	
	
7
21
3
21
6
10
96
280
94
251
63
248
473
423
	
56
15
215
225
208
	
	
29
45
42
39
88
76
72
60
13
	
	
19
13
8
10
	
	
	
42
56
78
58
	
	
	
	
	
72
72
75
72
 	
	
	
	
	
	
18
19
25
25
	
,	
	
	
	
62
84
65
77
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
38
' ""
	
 ,
43
39
38
47
	
	
	
	
	
74
86
77
91
	
	
	
	
.	
9
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
63
88
94
63
9
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
557
578
574
598
37
28 |  24
16
591
570
519
473
423
	
67
84
66
42
26
	
	
16
33
35
37
197
232
328
453
432
	
	
	
	
174
215
186
164
136
	
	
	
109
236
113
209
86
182
63
81
47
58
	
 C 116 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
1
II
in
Special
District No. 23 (Kelowna)—Continued
482
470
37
18
421
107
93
126
28
285
162
115
82
325
337
430
100
127
136
128
140
173
83
124
95
328
544
400
121
558
340
230
428
195
306
246
238
19
10
195
69
49
63
17
133
87
63
42
158
174
223
48
63
66
77
72
89
47
71
52
157
293
225
68
307
175
119
215
105
175
236
232
18
8
226
38
44
63
11
152
75
52
40
167
163
207
52
64
70
51
68
84
36
53
43
171
251
175
53
251
165
111
213
90
131
55
11
7
58
18
8
5
31
30
52
16
58
19
99
29
67
19
25
65
86
75
22
87
36
61
63
62
8
11
35
13
17
4
35
21
52
40
13
30
14
52
29
23
70
18
42
71
65
74
14
100
40
75
63
52
8
1
10
12
69
29
50
38
35
84
34
36
17
28
54
76
64
24
95
37
35
69
54
Elementary—
DeHart               -	
14
Ellison    —	
	
Glenmore  	
24
Mountainview No. 1 -	
Mountainview No. 2— 	
	
Oyama    	
Peachland 	
South Rutland	
16
West Rutland  -   —	
Winfield  	
15
Totals, District No. 23	
12,181
6,229
5,952
1,102
1,091
1,062
69
District No. 24 (Kamloops)
809
245
351
925
1,162
878
592
840
11
10
12
341
501
326
602
12
247
264
23
43
351
524
61
188
503
64
405
125
182
511
606
470
288
420
8
6
6
177
275
169
302
6
138
146
13
21
178
271
38
91
241
29
404
120
169
414
556
408
304
420
3
4
6
164
226
157
300
6
109
118
10
22
173
253
23
97
262
35
52
1
3
4
45
81
41
74
4
52
55
4
22
48
76
65
22
1
5
6
43
64
52
70
1
42
62
4
21
45
79
64
23
2
2
53
82
54
78
1
85
49
4
47
72
77
19
Secondary—
Kamloops	
Junior Secondary—■
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Brocklehurst —   	
Elementary—
Ralph Bell  	
Chu Chua	
Dallas.	
Bert Edwards      	
11
8
Heffley Creek	
 r
NET
STATISTICAL TABLES
ENROLMENT—Continued
C 117
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
112     13
1             1
vni
DC
X
XI
XII
XIII
60
10
16
62
34
34
48
38
47
89
24
23
39
~59
83
56
1
90
78
41
56
67
85
167
37
62
42
70
87
38
30
6
31
83
54
20
3
78
37
53
86
82
115
34
105
31
75
79
~33
38
81
11
22
88
71
41
57
79
74
7T6
118
61
75
62
32
~7i
41
70
66
18
79
76
57
74
	
239
186
57
	
	
 —
~V2
	
29
	
1,082
1,069
1,042
1,034
57
33 |       35
37
1,022
1,039
905
803
699
-
3
51
61
45
103
3
68
46
3
55
71
83
48
57
55
129
1
i
54
90
60
65
2
40
86
39
148
2
5
46
65
67
69 i
113
1
61
70
40
56
71
61
72
14
18
54
10
17
34
28
	
21
18
68
59
381
285
175
247
2
63
75
357
304
232
246
1
48
90
113
331
189
175
217
479
34
66
455
330
32
47
357
	
	
20
	
50
 C 118
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys      Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
in
Primary
Special
District No. 24 (Kamloops)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
George Hilliard  	
Little Fort	
Lloyd George	
Louis Creek	
Allan Matthews _
North Kamloops.
Overlander —
A. E. Perry	
Rayleigh	
Savona  —
Marion Schilling-
George Slater	
Arthur Stevenson-
John Tod 	
Westsyde.	
Westwold	
Stuart Wood	
Totals, District No. 24..
District No. 26 (Birch Island)
Secondary—Clearwater	
Elementary—
Avola	
Birch Island-
Blue River	
Dutch Lake	
Star Lake	
Vavenby.	
Total, District No. 26_
District No. 27 (Williams Lake)
Secondary—
Columneetza..
100 Mile House 	
Junior Secondary—Williams Lake-
Elementary—Junior Secondary—
Boss Mountain	
Bridge Lake.
Horsefly-
Elementary—
Alexis Creek	
Big Creek	
Big Lake .
Buffalo Creek-
Canim Lake East..
Chilcotin Road	
Crescent Heights
Deka Lake 	
Dog Creek—	
Eagle Creek	
Empire Valley	
Forest Grove	
Gang Ranch	
Glendale-
Kwaleen	
Lac La Hache..
Lakehill	
Likely	
Lone Butte	
McLeese Lake...
Mountview _
Poplar Glade ....
Riske Creek	
Marie Sharpe...
Wildwood	
Wright Station .
595
51
531
51
212
487
198
520
232
157
438
262
353
501
334
129
230
305
25
278
26
99
261
115
271
119
76
233
127
188
269
173
55
114
296
46
64
78
278
117
65 i
944
702
666
691
57
70
117
62
11
29 i
65
9
169
253
19
15
45
10
175
27 I
272
125
153
51
26
48
39
278
358
31 I
553
135
16
154
27
29
42
146
56
24
362
348
350
25
35
60
36
6
17
31
3
89
147
14
9
26
5
94
12
157
57
77
26
14
23
17
125
179
19
295
77
11
290
26
253
25
113
226
83
249
113
81
205
135
165
232
161
74
116
15,166 | 7,856 I 7,310
142
19
35
36
132
61
41
478 |  466
340
318
341
32
35
57
26
5
12
34
6
80
106
5
6
19
5
81
15
115
68
76
25
12
25
22
153
179
12
258
58
5
81
9
86
10
27
50
27
85
25
28
45
34
48
50
47
22
42
103
11:
59
12
27
63
25
102
20
22
68
34
58
77
43
15
29
95
6
70
"34
75
31
90
19
32
62
38
50
69
58
20
24
10
9
12
10
11
11
14
17
10
21
50
43
24
10
10
10
18
94
90 !  88
7
14
"22
30
....„
7
1
23
8
48
23
19
6
3
8
6
44
48
1
82
23
3
4
2
13
2
28
50
2
3
6
3
28
5
54
20
18
5
4
9
5
51
53
4
70
13
3
1
3
13
1
24
33
2
5
5
16
3
32
17
16
6
4
10
6
39
43
7
73
17 I
4
15
52 j 1,313 I 1,350 I 1,398 ,|  34
17
17
13
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C 119
Grade
IV
VI
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
VIII       DC
XI        XII      XIII
71
6
71
9
28
64
23
54
41
13
58
39
46
82
69
16
30
77
86
5
14
80
85
17
2
26
20
72
74
32
30
71
70
36
56
17
21
74
62
44
36 i
44
64
73
71
38
36
23
22
39
36
82
"so
1
27
79
30
48
35
24
69
37
43
79
43
11
30
1,312 | 1,330 i| 1,354 | 1,263
11
9
12
10
10
62
60
4
■-1 |
4
11
9
52
17
93 .|  96 1  87 i[
8
66
83
10
12
10
4
1
2
3
3'
22
29
4
~io
1
27
2
26
15
37
6
24
58
6
99
22
10
113 1  62J39
1,217
1,278 i] 1,163
1,034
766
72
77
68
52
27
18 .
72
181
339
3
5
20
77
144
341
68
275
127
52
212 i
94
27
215
102
 C 120
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
m
Special
District No. 27 (Williams Lake)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
93 Mile	
50
483
280
32
273
136
18
210
144
8
76
52
2
59
49
4
74
32 i
mn Mile Hnusp
14
Totals, District No. 27
6,090
3,187
2,903
18 ]     603
601
537
27
District No. 28 (Quesnel)
Secondary—Quesnel
Junior Secondary—Cariboo _	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Wells-Barker-
877
682
112 I
46
9
430
129
284
229
301
118
138
202 i
53
19
35
60
125
21
273
122
239
107 i
137
425
358
54
28
3
213
80
159
117
134
59
70
112
25
10
20
38
56
9
152
58
120
71
70
452
324
58
18
6
217
49
125
112
167
59
68
90
28
9
15
22
69
12
121
64
119
36
67
18
7
3
56
31
61
25
43
17
16
27
7
4
11
20
12
12
38
27
31
14
18
11
9
2
67
16
31
25
39
15
20
36
6
5
4
10
19
9
36
15
37
17
13
12
9
3 i
87
17
43
31 1
34
17
12
18
12
5
3
4
16
37
16
36
14
19
	
Elementary—
Pinecrest 	
Red Bluff	
15
Riverview 	
Strathnaver	
	
Totals, District No. 28	
4,748
2,441
2,307
498
442
445
15
District No. 29 (Lillooet)
Secondary—Lillooet 	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Bralome	
Elementary—-
299
115
78
427
23
112
43
142
56
43
215
10
61
21
157
59
35
212
13
51
22
69
14
33
4
30
17
17
28
2
30
26
7
16
35
7
52
	
Totals, District No. 29	
1,097
548
549
69 |       98
103
117
District No. 30 (South Cariboo)
Secondary—
253
189
161
465
20
326
332
20
372
32
44
98
129
95
76
229
9
151
181
9
197
20
21
54
124
94
85
236
11
175
151
11
175
12
23
44
46
47
35
27
53
3
61
49
3
65
4
12
13
65
6
51
50
7
44
4
6
8
71
3
37
33
5
41
10
4
12
Elementary—
15
14
Scotty Creek                       	
Totals, District No. 30	
2,312
1,171
1,141
155
263
241
216
29
District No. 31 (Merritt)
Secondary—Merritt	
767
393
374
	
	
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C 121
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
vn
1
2
3
vm
u
X
XI
xn
XIII
56
7i
72
32
6
62
33
9
65
26
1
	
	
1
	
—
	
	
568
547
563
537
2
18 |   5 |   6
548
485
402
306
317 ,
17
Q
1
55
17
35
32
21
13
36
5
8
10
20
35
23
31
16
29
i
i
1
8
5
~ 58
20
35
43
61
12 !
19
37
12
5
6
17
34
12
37
20
21
11
8
38
18
39
36
40
19
23.
29
10
4
5
18
38
16
33
15
18
10
~~69
10
40
37
37
17
35
23
5
23
40
13
34
11
19
	
	
	
"421
12
1
201
171
7
1
210
90
6
273
:::::
193
	
	
15
	
	
446
462
418
423
15
  | _
	
433
379
306
273
193
9
17
75
1
13
10
61
3
7
21
66
3
~13
14
60
3
6
5
7
63
12
82
11
63
12
37
36
	
	
102
87
97
90
6
5
7
75
93
75
37
36
63
1
32
42
37
3
10
16
47
4
29
45
4
45
5
5
17
48
2
35
39
41
6
7
17
45
1
34
39
~ 44
15
6
8
3
80
61
50
72
33
49
64
38
35
37
15
27
"25
12
	
14
	
—
205
201
195
178
26
1   6
8 |   3
191
154
137
79
1  25
 —
18
17
10
199
170
152
110
91
 C 122
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
m
Special
District No. 31 (Merritt)—Continued
Elementary—
192
321
187
140
540
44
291
95
171
102
73
274
21
144
97
150
85
67
266
23
147
29
57
19
22
60
22
44
35
44
31
23
59
22
53
31
46
29
27
55
44
12
13
2,482
1,273
1,209
253
267
232
25
District No. 32 (Hope)
565
208
636
84
290
85
298
107
343
45
152
45
267
101
293
39
138
40
18
53
13
47
6
11
80
10
41
10
29
68
12
27
17
18
99
14
33
15
Elementary—Junior Secondary—Boston Bar	
Elementary—
	
Totals, District No. 32—	
1,868
990
878
137
152
153
179
District No. 33 (Chilliwack)
Secondary—
1,218
1,195
751
374
409
122
340
46
67
112
566
137
122
88
115
229
116
222
480
81
253
60
225
170
273
69
371
262
53
101
205
656
372
649
607
385
176
195
67
164
24
42
60
286
76
68
46
62
123
52
108
231
39
126
34
114
93
149
32
177
120
36
55
117
316
193
569
588
366
198
214
55
176
22
25
52
280
61
54
42
53
106
64
114
249
42
127
26
111
77
124
37
194
142
17
46
88
340
179
78
52
49
45
50
44
25
24
97
28
19
39
7
9
14
37
21
18
14
17
23
37
30
45
14
35
7
17
28
31
7
54
42
~19
29
71
59
14
37
5
12
25
45
18
14
12
12
25
42
29
60
13
32
7
25
34
32
4
43
40
18
24
75
37
17
32
7
11
13
48
28
11
20
15
29
37
22
61
12
39
12
15
40
40
10
45
34
12
27
88
47
Junior Secondary—
Chilliwack    	
	
Elementary—
19
29
23
Totals, District No. 33	
9,860
5,022
4,838
492
743
734
772
71
District No. 34 (Abbotsford)
1,087
1,146
770
230
220
381
575
606
379
108
115
208
512
540
391
122
105
173
49
40
37
42
19
34
48
13
55
56
22
36
Junior Secondary
Clearbrook- 	
Elementary—
	
31
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C 123
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
rv
V
VI
vn
1
2
3
vm
!«
X
XI
xn
XIII
47
48
39
22
77
45
24
48
36
15
39
33
26
36
33
31
67
35
42
158
~24
........
	
—
—
	
—
13
	
278
195 |  228
224
13
18
17
10
199
170
152
110
91
14
117
11
33
10
19
61
16
36
13
22
81
8
31
14
29
77
42
9
14
6
113
27
113
21
122
98
90
	
185
145 1  156
148
9
14 |   6
140
134
122
98
90
........
16
50
11
8
17
96
14
21
11
17
17
~22
53
12
35
7
26
24
30
10
45
45
~19
32
72
45
14
32
11
14
23
95
19
20
16
v  11
25
~~19
69
12
39
7
53
35
11
43
42
~~18
35
76
50
14
40
5
13
20
76
21
13
15
14
25
~~20
62
7
42
7
47
46
16
56
31
~Ts
28
68
62
28
32
103
16
25
29
36
~~35
47
11
31
13
42
34
11
61
28
30
72
44
17
36
19
17
22
23
275
263
112
155
257
258
131
109
92
253
194
112
128
479
224
513
169
89
14
	
14
	
	
	
24
	
14
755
789 |  763
728
66
89
22
23
805
755
779
703
682
89
	
35
25
35
29
47
31
47
59
40
32
15
354
244
323
319
382
207
555
469
63
	
	
 C 124
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
in
Special
District No. 34 (Abbotsford)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
48
110
172
244
40
133
126
56
625
25
87
157
22
113
86
268
89
463
103
41
58
242
271
239
218
24
179
291
24
64
91
128
20
73
51
32
342
17
51
78
17
51
40
141
49
239
60
23
29
131
142
126
112
10
84
151
24
46
81
116
20
60
75
24
283
8
36
79
5
62
46
127
40
224
43
18
29
111
129
113
106
14
95
140
48
105
1
34
34
48
50
53
18
17
43
7
15
8
56
8
19
6
19
9
31
8
61
11
6
19
37
31
34
6
40
38
15
20
31
9
14
11
56
~15
22
10
17
11
21
11
48
19
6
15
_22
31
37
5
41
42
6
18
44
7
14
9
67
~12
21
6
8
15
19
7
62
8
4
10
~~41
21
37
13
45
34
13
10
King
12
Philip Sheffield
Upper Sumas
	
Totals, District No. 34...
8,364
4,367
3,997
499
642
645
642
66
District No. 35 (Langley)
Secondary—
675
1,093
380
390
347
157
357
172
122
362
308
242
276
116
61
120
277
200
295
50
177
254
113
38
97
34
112
225
184
134
381
553
204
207
184
81
196
82
66
179
168
129
136
56
36
59
152
113
156
22
104
127
55
24
53
15
63
115
106
69
294
540
176
183
163
76
161
90
56
183
140
113
140
60
25
61
125
87
139
28
73
127
58
14
44
19
49
110
78
65
56
46
60
44
52
55
58
44
54
17
39
11
18
41
29
24
51
16
23
16
35
19
30
13
26
40
18
12
29
15
20
30
15
46
17
47
17
19
49
27
19
54
17
23
21
30
27
42
14
20
29
17
8
16
18
25
27
31
47
14
48
18
15
48
19
25
49
17
15
19
29
20
29
11
24
42
13
9
20
~~ 13
19
23
23
Junior Secondary—
W, T.   St^flFririi
Elementary—■
7
Belmont                                                         —
	
12
North otter
Otter
South c.nrvolth
South otter
Ti.lic.im
13
8
7,368
3,891
3,477
415
1
641
660
609
40
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C  125
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
vn
•!•
3
vra
DC
X
XI
XII
xm
30
37
17
20
~7i
30
—
	
53
5
45
5
28
7
	
29
33
38
33
21
25
21
16
9
58
8
53
11
79
92
	
—
_
	
	
46
14
16
8
	
9
~79
■
19
27
26
23
	
	
	
	
24
"76
16
19
	
13
14
11
13
42
12
28
21
31
16
62
14
	
	
68
66
59
75
12
12
19
18
16
9
8
8
14
	
67
71
104
35
31
35
36
16
36
29
27
36
24
	
	
	
—
37
47
43
50
	
_
	
	
673
706 |  671
745
72 |  40 |  32 |  15
598
642
589
555
469
63
_
26
5
5
117
131
156
116
119
	
56
29
13
128
150
143
335
239
144
136
100
	
	
—
152
127
111
	
	
51
36
43
63
15
16
22
46
45
40
46
16
23
27
	
21
13
12
24
34
51
64
75
41
49
45
42
15
20
48
77
14
31
39
19
20
11
16
	
	
17
19
11
17
32
36
30
30
35
32
27
40
27
34
25
36
14
12
23
35
20
29
35
39
34
35
1?
18
11
19
	
	
	
-—
	
16
21
12
	
_—
	
	
	
	
~ 17
14
23
22
26
30
39
24
25
19
28
...
	
18
15
17
15
	
593
621
559
631
61
I
82
34
18
541
544
510
451
	
358
 C 126
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
in
Special
District No. 36 (Surrey)
Senior Secondary—
798
1,277
596
510
682
680
936
766
657
871
772
642
736
975
203
589
178
198
484
314
354
387
476
149
452
61
482
242
10
108
120
23
422
143
375
412
136
308
152
142
285
190
157
243
221
613
207
172 i
186
608
419
219
153
685
326
732
237
251
601
326
347
578
41
119
49
405
415
655
320
264
379
356
490
423
336
461
415
333
374
530
106
306
93
98
237
165
189
208
256
82
249
36
255
143
8
61
61
11
229
68
214
226
72
180
71
63
150
108
69
110
114
289
100
91
107
309
216
108
73
326
175
377
124
135
303
170
198
309
21
62
27
203
383
622
276
246
303
324
446
343
321
410
357
309
362
445
97
283
85
100
247
149
165
179
220
67
203
25
227
99
2
47
59
12
193
75
161
186
64
128
81
79
135
82
88
133
107
324
107
81
79
299
203
111
80
359
151
355
113
116
298
156
149
269
20
57
22
202
	
28
87
27
28
65
56
72
50
54
47
20
66
16
~31
14
9
54
19
52
61
21
27
46
116
34
31
19
33
42
25
75
36
38
66
52
56
43
61
56
20
72
19
~~40
18
7
59
10
62
61
18
26
32
26
26
21
20
34
35
83
29
26
63
66
78
30
24
93
58
83 i
27
89
45
40
70
11
19
14 I
37
37
96
25
19
94
51
51
51
67
59
21
70
10
37
16
7
57
17
71
59
21
42
40
33
17
31
28
18
88
20
29
59
78
56
32
19
112
39
135
40
99
53
67
84
12
17
10
67
Queen Elizabeth  	
	
Secondary—Princess Margaret	
Junior Secondary-
William Beagle	
	
West Whalley  	
White Rock     ..       .              	
	
Elementary-
Bear Creek	
	
15
Bridgeview _ 	
	
27
67
10
24
Holly                                    -
25
A. H. P. Matthew
80
-  i       32
28
64
j       82
  i        58
22
Newton  	
Old Yfc'eRc-vai.
16
Port Kells    	
	
26
26
62
38
37
79
46
41
74
18
20
25
44
Prince Charies	
T. E. Scott.	
Mary Jane Shannon  	
15
12
Dr. F. D. Sinclair _	
16
Sunnyside	
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C 127
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
rv
V
VI
vn
Special
1
2
3
vni
DC
X
XI
xn
XIII
397
401
_
_
	
	
	
698
579
	
_
	
	
	
305
291
 ,
_
_
	
	
270
240
	
—
	
17
20
16
246
216
104
165
305
273
	
10
16
11
319
301
279
13
21
15
260
238
219
___
241
236
180
—
19
11
4
332
280
225
6
10
10
262
259
225
212
211
219
9
11
15
275
210
216
~z
	
	
—
12
12
6
330
307
308
	
	
 .
24
31
23
88
85
74
84
	
	
	
...
	
	
	
	
26
28
14
22
26
33
30
24
	
	
	
62
49
69
64
	
	
	
.	
	
36
46
44
29
48
38
46
43
	
	
	
58
51
71
63
	
.	
	
	
	
70
81
73
70
37
37
38
37
	
60
64
48
68
23
	
	
	
	
	
	
70
76
70
58
,
"
-
	
26
13
16
9
66
	
	
	
	
	
	
19
18
17
18
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
~69
53
54
~63
13
25
32
23
17
	
	
.	
	
	
	
	
	
51
43
56
40
48
55
54
50
	
	
	
	
	
15
22
16
23
38
34
61
59
42
13
	
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
""32
~39
41
40
15
	
	
	
	
	
	
™
	
29
27
35
30
	
	
	
.
	
.	
	
27
15
28
17
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
30
48
34
36
	
	
	
	
	
.	
	
	
37
21
37
31
1
98
85
85
72
35
28
30
17
16
	
31
24
20
14
l
1
89
81
98
71
27
!
	
  I
	
	
	
67
55
56
49
31
32
30
38
18
27
17
22
112
117 .
95
94
40
51
29
47
24
 1
 .
	
121
137
129
127
	
	
 . ]
- ..
53
66
77
41
 '
	
	
 1
	
	
	
51
32 i
31
33
	
	
...
 1
	
60
91
88
80
	
	
42
43
45
40
	
 1
	
52
61
39
47
	
 1
	
,	
87 :
76
87
84
	
 1
	
	
~7I
15
22
_.._-.
""
	
	
  ;
59
57
62 1
1
64
15
___.. ,j
	
	
 - 1
1
	
 C 128
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
m
cmar./,
Special
District No. 36 (Surrey)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
207
330
178
197
203
262
688
139
102
162
86
100
103
135
352
75
105
168
92
97
100
127
336
64
21
23
43
29
24
23
34
67
41
26
52
26
29
33
39
72
40
H. T. Thrift.   	
37
20
14
31
23
43
1       73
  |       49
White Rock
12
K. B. Woodward Annex
9
Totals, District No. 36... 	
28,392
14,827
13,565
  | 2,402
2,383
2,578
284
District No. 37 (Delta)
Secondary—
1,517
1,202
582
746
601
203
291
50
73
392
692
586
555
48
215
211
410
654
503
137
578
635
650
73
302
790
609
289
373
299
114
163
30
43
200
354
302
286
23
117
104
206
329
258
67
307
322
295
40
166
727-
593
293
373
302
89
128
20
30
192
338
284
269
25
98
107
204
325
245
70
271
313
?55
33
136
  1   ...	
69
36
30
16
15
60
105
90
87
12
40
48
68
124
54
50
93
92
105
17
46
89
55
20
8
13
58
107
81
104
11
31
39
85
107
56
37
82
91
86
9
39
North Delta _... ....	
Junior Secondary—
Delview—	
-	
	
	
76
36
28
Elementary—
Annieville  	
6
14
-  i       14
1       64
|       93
.           78
  i       59
4
Cliff Drive	
Fast Delta
14
English Bluff _	
	
30
38
74
103
55
45
92
87
89
4
35
Gray    _ 	
Hawthorne
Heath
	
Kennedy. _	
5
Sntifb Park-
10
Totals, District No. 37 	
11,906
6,086
5,820
-  1 L128
1,257
1,208
25
District No. 38 (Richmond)
Senior Secondary—
1,096
1,025
917
721
667
998
823
458
347
361
701
550
504
39
69
52
564
98
456
135
437
103 i
567
532
444
357
334
514
449
249
189
192
357
291
257
21
35
29
286
59
245
58
230
59
529
493
473
364
333
484
374
209
158
169
344
259
247
18
34
23
278
39
211
77
207
44
10
73
26
85
54
63
22
25
69
22
35
	
9
53
30
%
66 i
51
24 .
27
71
18
39
38
30
29
17
63
26
109
68
64
""23
56
19
32
36
58
40
Junior Secondary—
J. N. Burnett	
Robert C. Palmer	
Elementary—
Blundell   _     .
8
Bridgeport
Samuel Brighouse     _	
1
3
14
William Cook
10
21
Alfred B. Dixon	
Harry Eburne	
14
11
W D Ferris
28
29
           34
4
B W Garratt
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C  129
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
rv
V
VI
vn
■     '
r
3
vm
DC
X
XI
xn
XIII
44
41
35
35
37
41
109
28
59
23
21
26
36
125
	
30
38
20
29
24
41
116
	
35
46
25
28
37
28
106
	
	
 i
	
	
—
	
	
8
2,495
2,455 | 2,416
2,261
220
86 |     101 |       77
2,477
2,258
2,140
1,975
1,784
	
89
40
24
12
17
39
108
86
88
36
95
83
65
59
89
84
75
41
72
88
75
109
122
~~42
4
11
6
5
	
1
11
4
8
8
6
4
8
260
205
200
272
236
202
170
248
	
219
176
198
205
424
316
...—
365
275
	
	
6
42 i       82
14
51
115
81
93
45
27
49
96
98
73
93
74
11
47
50
75
86
66
37
28
35
69
.77
80
78
88
~53
	
7
	
 —
5
7
12
1,068
1,133 |     999
1,004
37
26 [       24 |       26
937
856
798
740
640
	
67
43
64
70
67
15
85
98
42 i
61
103
111
74
_ 63
24
97
81
123
42
95
86
89
85
104
76
78
120
31
87
109
84
74
103
77
"76
11
14
10
18
27
	
9
6
11
15
  i
46
309
258
207
347
271
 1
    1
I
320
229
219
302
271
268
214
220
316
254
594 i
538
456
487
	
6
6
13
18
77
" 4
5
 C 130 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
in
Special
District No. 38 (Richmond)—Continued
Elementary— Continued
767
424
101
48
386
228
500
86
83 i
215
87
541
258
188
213
117
320
70
466
452
393
194
44
25
192
93
275
33
41
129
54
297
143
94
109
65
162
31
248
248
374
230
57
23
194
135
225
53
42
86
33
244
115
94
104
52
158
39
218
204
95
34
9
13
57
43
67
24
8
32
18
71
45
25
41
30
37
16
52
55
112
39
15
9
57
51
78
27
18
23
20
89
34
25
33
40
37
9
71
74
107
51
15
16
51
54
74
35
19
31
29
69
38
31
50
19
56
17
67
61
6
9
8
Alexander Kilgour  -	
8
5
15
Daniel Woodward— 	
4
Totals, District No. 38	
16,671
8,624
8,047
1,347
1,442
1,501
141
District No. 39 (Vancouver)
Secondary—
1,334
1,689
1,794
1,842
1,858
1,923
523
1,651
958
2,316
1,241
1,066
2,030
1,870
1,743
2,211
276
2,301
487
585
809
549
258
445
807
583
388
421
66
493
236
570
353
843
665
193
852
412
529
72
608
625
690
830
909
905
948
985
272
865
494
1,215
625
516
1,067
916
876
1,082
146
1,288
239
313
427
278
141
238
404
296
200
224
40
236
101
299
184
420
349
93
442
202
263
43
307
335
644
859
885
937
910
938
251
786
464
1,101
616
550
963
954
867
1,129
130
1,013
248
272
382
271
117
207
403
287
188
197
26
257
135
271
169
423
316
100
410
210
266
29
301
290
58
76
71
49
60
44
84
59
39
48
39
57
70
59
91
47
40
91
40
65
30
86
84
59
71
79
59
57
55
95
59
47
54
20
24
55
74
27
102
58
39
87
41
67
18
78
82
76
62
67
71
56
50
98
78
35
47
19
37
63
64
21
104
60
38
94
65
66
11
74
66
60
76
88
40
71
47
101
65
34
33
5
29
61
69
19
103
65
34
112
50
56
13
76
63
Elementary-Senior Secondary—
Elementary—
26
14
15
33
23
22
2
11
Grandview                         	
	
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C 131
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
vn
1
2
3
vm
DC
X
XI
XII
xm
111
93
121
117
5
44
68
108
66
5
- 1
 ;
11
12
18
19
	
	
	
41
54
49
62
7
	
. 	
	
	
48
32
	
64
77
68
58
6
— 1
	
	
15
8
15
	
.
25
36
36
32
	
—
	
	
	
—
72
80
72
11
36
33
35
37
	
 1
	
	
	
	
25
29
30
23
1
46
28
38
43
48
"si
53
	
— 1
	
	
	
	
—
12
16
68
59
55
72
7
66
68
61
58
5
	
	
1,447
1,502
1,505
1,424
115
80 |  41 |  46
1,392
1,341
1,272
1,132
943 | 	
	
23
294
274
242
253
248
	
	
	
330
352
357
327
336
361
312
364
354
390
77
22
354
332
411
340
306
28
29
26
336
324
366
391
358
12
28
395
402
331
374
381
95
110
115
91
112
60
16
	
280
175
311
199
311
197
340
162
333
225
—
150
413
485
445
472
351
23
250
266
239
222
241
	
	
	
197
437
231
448
213
407
232
346
193
392
—
27
35
25
27
20
381
392
392
375
352
334
344
345
292
272
—
73
40
102
39
437
414
389
366
351
	
46
 	
72
38
37
36
47
	
-
153
17
59
62
22
416
463
457
339
313
—
68
61
56
49
64
66
59
61
24
	
_ __
_
105
137
150
112
82
66
82
54
81
60
74
69
11
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
98
93
87
107
29
76
84
75
87
55
46
38
37
24
51
59
57
49
	
.	
	
103
85
87
62
"~86
79
~ ii
67
	
	
	
.....
27
30
31
21
116
109
104
105
110
15
	
	
58
110
94
105
99
79
	
	
	
	
	
	
121
119
118
I _
45
58
51
47
15
	
79
74
63
59
	
	
80
73
66
75
77
87
85
81
	
	
	
	
	
——
 r
C 132
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
m
mary
Special
District No. 39 (Vancouver)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
304
580
769
339
605
205
386
517
828
173
609
794
481
183
642
516
112
533
652
246
429
460
347
774
204
902
453
229
825
244
424
951
286
544
558
800
215
400
462
637
786
204
672
444
626
152
430
593
691
833
256
213
700
827
623
446
211
1,029
715
218
502
346
572
109
351
728
590
502
618 |
173
298
397
162
314
111
202
255
384
91
317
406
224
113
348
253
55
292
334
129
227
239
185
389
102
460
229
121
414
128
227
487
147
297
294
432
126
201
242
321
393
102
341
227
334
80
229
297
379
445
123
114
352
436
330
228
98
527
374
108
268
184
263
55
181
369
279
254
332
131
282
372
177
291
94
184
262
444
82
292
388
257
70
294
263
57
241
318
117
202
221
162
385
102
442
224
108
411
116
197
464
139
247
264
368
89
199
220
316
393
102
331
217
292
72
201
296
312
388
133
99
348
391
293
218
113
502
341
110
234
162
309
54
170
359
311
248
286
56
61
55
86
56
41
44
45
59
50
49
69
29
48
50
58
30
59
41
42
50
50
30
55
48
67
48
55
76
46
31
100
60
51
62
74
~39
47
70
74
59
57
45
59
29
33
60
67
77
57
46
53
101
43
~62
115
40
57
68
64
53
23
61
74
59
47
67
67
72
46
78
64
49
51
49
77
46
49
87
46
52
80
43
28
65
50
65
40
48
29
86
22
98
30
50
111
54
48
126
62
72
70
95
~~46
62
72
91
46
79
54
55
22
30
109
83
80
62
59
72
112
69
"79
111
67
59
61
53
42
29
49
78
73
51
82
77
86
64
103
80
30
52
53
87
44
84
108
31
39
70
68
30
45
55
54
48
66
37
70
53
109
39
62
83
50
45
91
64
64
61
87
~~46
52
69
88
45
82
49
46
44
22
84
78
78
48
55
56
91
87
70
115
66
44
79
64
44
28
57
89
68
59
70
46
74
55
72
63
52
52
59
86
33
66
84
45
44
66
53
24
69
34
85
59
66
28
61
29
116
34
62
81
63
38
96
55
56
77
110
51
54
58
79
54
73
52
52
42
25
59
94
66
45
53
73
93
90
65
114
56
45
60
75
39
29
53
92
72
55
64
Sir Wilfred Grenfell             	
15
12
10
Annie B. Jamieson	
Lloyd George Annex  	
Dr A. R. Lord                      - ..           - -
14
17
15
24
15
13
15
215
7
Sir William Osier	
9
Queen Mary    	
15
15
50
Lord Selkirk	
9
J. W. Sexsmith	
25
14
13
Tecumseh 	
21
13
10
Thunderbird._	
Trafalgar—                      ....             	
Trafalgar Annex
	
T)r. George M Weir
General Wolfe
12
Totals, District No. 39	
75,080 [
38,531 |
36,549
5,124
5,649 |
5,684 |
5,495
724
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C 133
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
DC
X
XI
XII
XIII
86
76
115
93
45
75
142
86
119
76
85
78
~72
112
~~67
79
61
147
155
75
7l4
42
155
61
82
119
~44
50
81
123
99
55
86
~~35
55
136
121
76~3
130
86
95
122
122
52
33
95
42
104
87
71
84
55
136
81
41
74
128
97
105
103
106
76
76
129
54
61
53
132
128
76
140
47
135
58
74
93
~45
74
92
112
97
60
102
42
70
134
157
7o6
88
85
85
113
122
44
120
41
94
83
82
71
70
112
93
41
91
122
95
100
77
84
72
~~70
112
61
54
140
73T
62
124
43
143
57
72
96
~52
52
67
98
93
62
101
39
66
121
91
83
83
105
7io
107
""52
90
88
71
74
80
	
	
	
	
	
	
132
63
39
33
38
62
127
12
9
83
122
74
101
68
63
102
50
58
55
17
83
52
98
89
96
31
50
105
_56
30
60
60
96
" 50
71
90
121
52
15
20
29
92
52
88
76
71
99
111
44
37
118
19
13
~92
91
80
29
24
96
._..:. 1   	
126
114
90
	
	
  1   	
61
57
15
	
	
75
14
	
48
89
77
20
63
66
22
5,754
5,914 | 5,830
5,589
1,158 |     516 |     149 |     109
5,606 | 5,748 | 5,543
5,329
5,159 I   	
 C 134 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri
District, Type, and School
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
mary
Special
District No. 40 (New Westminster)
Secondary—New Westminster   _ 	
Elementary—
2,930
205
264
75
556
691
374
519
641
573
1,501
113
130
46
278
336
191
263
324
280
1,429
92
134
29
278
355
183
256
317
293
28
26
61
77
45
75
53
56
21
24
24
86
69
47
66
58
62
20
24
27
63
65
49
70
85
80
24
24
24
74
57
47
56
76
62
8
12
8
9
Totals, District No. 40	
6,828
3,462
3,366
421
457
483
444
37
District No. 41 (Burnaby)
1,379
1,029
1,576
1,190
920
628
1,242
1,113
954
595
1,348
691
547
234
625
266
178
778
552
603
625
323
453
97
699
338
234
608
704
388
498
223
604
508
555
526
465
148
237
390
193
464
512
638
538
335
318
485
536
563
695
480
873
657
426
311
615
561
472
335
674
364
289
105
293
140
94
414
284
298
321
161
248
51
355
182
114
325
352
219
268
108
299
250
290
275
245
71
124
211
99
251
270
337
279
184
146
241
283
293
684
549
703
533
494
317
627
552
482
260
674
327
258
129
332
126
84
364
268
305
304
162
205
46
344
156
120
283
352
169
230
115
305
258
265
251
220
77
113
179
94
213
242
301
259
151
172
244
253
270
59
47
84
72
28
36
74
62
58
59
47
55
55
26
38
62
78
56
48
59
64
50
47
52
49
57
53
62
49
58
94
53
35
68
61
27
64
26
22
108
54
63
79
44
62
85
31
26
69
90
43
64
28
73
79
59
61
46
21
25
42
29
59
66
80
73
31
31
57
69
72
50
83
67
23
64
24
24
89
60
73
88
42
53
34
77
55
25
85
91
47
57
36
64
77
54
66
42
24
28
44
21
59
76
82
72
41
26
55
55
75
32
85
61
29
69
39
23
94
66
74
61
40
53
28
96
47
22
60
88
41
56
31
84
56
61
73
61
14
24
45
31
58
65
75
70
31
41
53
49
72
Secondary—
Cariboo Hill   	
Junior Secondary—
	
Moscrop „
	
Elementary—
Capitol Hill
10
22
Douglas Road 	
	
8
8
Lochdale	
1
Stridr
10
14
Totals, District No. 41-	
29,653
15,232
14,421
1,791
2,122
2,208
2,158
73
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C 135
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
vn
1
2
3
vm
DC
X
XI
XII
XIII
23
35
~ 64
105
41
59
89
80
26
39
63
98
42
61
101
64
29
50
~66
102
42
64
100
91
54
33
28
581
576
601
612
445
	
26
30
12
79
96
53
59
10
79
63
15
485
496
494
544
37 |  54 |  33 |  28
581
576
601
612
445
43
82
68
36
100
43
23
86
71
75
91
41
56
"162
35
32
83
82
59
72
32
84
61
74
82
68
22
32
51
33
71
81
83
54
51
38
59
94
73
40
82
87
16
96
36
18
100
75
85
87
33
73
100
56
32
82
92
33
75
26
88
53
74
78
73
21
47
60
29
56
83
90
70
41
45
56
89
82
152
77
~~89
37
18
98
70
87
84
32
47
""86
35
34
79
84
41
57
35
63
57
112
93
68
13
42
39
25
57
~~9_
49
51
41
57
88
89
51
	
49
47
36
238
~285
229
452
376
360
175
384
204
~248
198
375
375
349
157
395
214
201
233
201
415
362
245
165
270
727
208
554
597
154
652
165
821
508
E
	
47
80
	
79
19
	
71
33
14
90
67
88
29
5
70
44
6
54
35
90
53
25
	
99
45
69
35
15
78
60
71
73
11
60
21
39
38
25
12
19
55
84
84
	
75
40
13
25
54
3
39
55
31
2,271
2,423
2,459
2,329
144
51
96
36
2,499
2,301
2,306
2,240
2,146
—
 C 136
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 42 (Maple Ridge)
Secondary—
616
1,688
405
91
55
256
258
285
264
315
150
333
279
93
164
465
342
144
121,
100
219
206
269
312
892
201
48
29
127
124
152
127
156
88
154
138
45
77
230
173
74
66
52
116
111
137
304
796
204
43
26
129
134
133
137
159
62
179
141
48
87
235
169
70
55
48
103
95
132
50
51
65
58
35
20
23
29
34
34
31
53
60
46
~~21
58
50
15
15
12
29
27
28
12
18
31
41
34
37
23
~53
30
10
24
54
32
25
14
22
29
18
33
16
14
24
31
42
31
46
53
31
18
30
70
41
17
20
22
26
30
22
Elementary—
15
38
14
Totals, District No 42	
7,118
3,629
3,489
259
585
540
584
67
District No. 43 (Coquitlam)
2,291
646
934
842
444
604
463
861
510
673
466
673
65
473
502
367
640
425
325
360
530
382
321 i
488
607
538
592
63
547
528
585 i
234
544
345
603
475
435
1,275
329
469
456
227
319
230
442
275
301.
239
335
38
245
244
194
347
237
170
188
283
196
176
259
287
271
297
30
258
286
302
114
274
175
288
245
229
1,016
317
465
386
217
285
233
419
235
372
227
33S
27
228
258
173
293
188
155
172
247
186
145
229
320
267
295
33
289
242
283
120
270
170
315
230
206
::::::
86
95
46
49
39 ,
80
52
30
38
58
42
35
64
67
57
51
55
55
86
24,
59
60
60
49
46
61
72
11
51
49
34
100
43
49
50
72
36
34
85
83
49
64
12
75
71
91
29
68
28
76
66
49
61
92
11
60
56
46
82
42
43
36 i
69
48
23
89
81
79
89
12 i
79
83
82
26
78
49
86
62 ,
50
62
71
11
46
62
80
91
48
36
62
76
51
58
48
83
80
69
9
80
59
73
35
66
55
86
39
54
Secondary—
Junior Secondary—
Dr. Charles Best _ _
Mary Hill  	
Mnntpnmprv
George Pearkes  	
.......
Elementary—
Alderson	
10
15
Brookmere . .    ._ -	
11
14
10
Glen _.  _            	
Glenayre   	
6
Hillcrest	
loco _	
13
11
Leigh  _	
Mary Hill
	
Millside _	
14
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C 137
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
vn
'     ■
3
VIII
DC
X
XI
XII
XIII
186
174
142
67
47
51
36
25
329
280
283
392
292
	
	
	
	
	
	
107
121
82
49
46
	
7
16
12
8
-
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
28
34
~ 23
~~22
38
35
35
41
58
38
39
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
43
37
43
40
45
31
39
33
39
28
22
19
31
12
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
26
43
37
34
13
	
	
,	
	
43
48
45
36
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
~16
~* 26
24
23
75
64
80
64
	
	
	
	
	
	
„	
	
46
36
43
36
25
22
20
15
18
24
13
7
10
14
31
30
30
44
	
	
""
	
	
	
IS
21
29
21
52
41
54
39
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
574
580
618
577
25
51 |  36 |  25
622
575
507
508
385 ,
'
1,077
' 1,214
12
6
3
188
173
171
93
  I ...	
101
125
150
309
249
9
10
9
305
249
260
241
203
7
12
9
184 i
186
' 206
_
	
10
9 i   7
150
146
141
	
	
16
14
314
267
250
	
	
48
39
29
11
15
8
15
18
15
191
194
155
1%
127
238
	
	
53
27
75
83
81
76
18
	
 .
	
	
	
	
13
9
10
	
50
65
63
62
15
.   .
 	
	
	
63
64
70
74
15
	
i 	
 ■
	
	
	
33
39
52
33
11,
	
	
.	
„	
	
66
66
83
58
14
.
i
	
	
 ,
	
56
49
57
59
8
.
	
	
	
	
50
35
38
30
	
	
_
	
„.	
	
	
38
30
44
48
14
	
	
	
	
„	
71
71
65
48
56
47
48
44
90
20
33
28
69
61
72
	
	
	
	
. -
	
90
71
65
67
66
61
66
74
77
11
71
10
?9
85
	
	
—
	
	
	
	
77
67
58
56
56
61
55
62
15
_____
	
	
	
77
54
60
62
	
	
	
	
	
30
30
30
30
	
	
—
	
	
	
	
	
86
54
67
55
11
	
	
	
.
	
	
30
40
35
34
	
	
	
 „
	
	
	
	
87
79
70
59
	
■	
	
_	
	
	
60
68
67
64
	
62
58
64
52
	
—
"-
	
"
	
 C 138
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
m
Special
District No. 43 (Coquitlam)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
616
616
167
695
530
418
664
455
80
31
648
328
319
93
386
278
226
336
230
41
20
332
288
297
74
309
252
192
328
225
39
11
316
60
62
29
64
65
56
92
64
~~75
69
77
14
116
72
62
75
64
69
95
83
12
78
66
57
79
78
68
86
90
23
88
68
57
102
60
~~ 8"7
Porter Street                        -	
10
25
13
25,301
13,119
12,182
1,950
2,126
2,230
2,251
152
District No. 44 (North Vancouver)
Secondary—
1,256
780
1,345
1,226
827
812
1,000
911
747
323
178
499 i
580
325
649
445
541
670
324
671 i
396
513
252
403
344
56
265
257 i
127
412
299
559
174
78
627
425
603
113
501
505
416
522
178
328
16
663
400
708
609
439
410
497
532
403
181
86
255
292
171
325
213
274
325
165
338
208
259
136
220
173
32
131
125
76
215
143
307
91
45
306
237
315
56
268
257
213
272
93
184
16
593
380
637
617
388
402
503
379
344
142
92
244
288
154
324
232
267
345
159
333
188
254
116
183
171
24
134
132
51
197
156
252
83
33
321
188
288
57
233
248
203
250
85
144
	
63
42
44
84
51
65
65
67
67
46
111
43
55
33
48
56
40
40
36
57
41
56
42
96
59
52
57
65
37
49
70
19
41
68
47
39
57
36 i
67
53
70
89
53
91
46
60
36
47
54
40
45
49
50
50 i
74
46
68
49
54
56
69
45
56
83
24
43
66
42
54
60
55
73
68
63 i
91
38
110 i
50
76
37 [
60
62
27
39 i
42
63
58 i
67
54
103
51
90 i
65
45
53
50
20
31
Junior Secondary—
Elementary—
Blueridge 	
Boundary.	
.....
9
9
5
Montroyal  .
39
Queen Mary     	
Queensbury
15
Seymour Heights     	
	
9
Totals District No, 44
22,478
11,664
10,814
1,797
1,814
1,863
86
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C 139
Grade
Inter-
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
vn
Special
1
2
3
VIII
DC
X
XI
xn
XIII
84
79
58
72
13 ,
90
71
71
72
.
16
17
23
33
	
	
.	
	
_	
	
80
83
86 I
85
15
	
	
	
—
52
78
62
57
10
	
—
	
	
46
47
41
42
	
	
	
	
	
87
97
69
63
49
54
43
43
55
	
——
	
	
	
—
  I
	
	
18
	
	
—
__—
	
_____
—
.	
74
98
89
88
  i   	
	
	
—
	
	
	
—
2,101
2,043 | 2,005
1,916
266 ,j       73 ]       74 |       61
1,868
1,700
1,543
1,479
1,463
191
192
191
207
337
303 i
345
270
	
	
	
1>62
216
202
 I
261
204
215
176
249
174
165
648
212
104
138
521 i
242
129
92
	
	
	
	
	
61
75
106
445
224
413
230
142
215
	
271
250
226
56
70
47
82
94
87
99
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
92
107
89
91
47
45
51
40
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
112
119
102
103
8
	
	
	
	
	
62
63
66
68
89
80
85
87
	
	
	
 .
	
	
	
92
93
126
112
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
39
52
51
36
	
	
	
 ....
	
	
70
100
96
69
15
...    .
„
	
—
	
	
49
66
75
75
82
63
93
9
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
29
44
35
38
	
	
	
	
	
	
__—
.    ...
68
51
75
53
57
62
	
	
___
	
	
	
" 38
29
37
35
45
32
38
37
	
	
	
	
	
—,—
	
	
	
	
	
~~54
38
71
39
	
	
 .
 .
	
	
■	
41
32
	
	
	
	
84
85
79
88
26
	
——
	
32
	
39
15
	
	
	
	
108
51
82
89
	
	
	
	
52
74
74
66
95
79
106
112
65
94
67
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
77
14
39
94
121
124
61
68
56
73
68
75
68
77
31
	
	
	
34
28
25
28
	
	
55
50
38
32
29
16
™
	
1,928
1,995
1,920
1,969
202
61
75
106
1,811
1,765
1,745
1,742
1 1,599
	
 C 140
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 45 (West Vancouver)
Secondary-
Hillside  	
Sentinel   	
West Vancouver- 	
Elementary—
Caulfeild 	
Cedardale	
Chartwell	
Cypress Park	
Eagle Harbour..
Gleneagles	
Glenmore	
Hollyburn..
Irwin Park __
Pauline Johnson .
Ridgeview-	
West Bay	
Westcot —	
Totals, District No. 45-
District No. 46 (Sechelt)
Secondary—
Elphinstone	
Pender Harbour-
Elementary—
Bowen Island	
Davis Bay	
Egmont	
Gibsons„	
Half moon Bay.	
Langdale	
Madeira Park	
Roberts Creek-
Sechelt	
West Sechelt	
Totals, District No. 46-
District No. 47 (Powell River)
Secondary—Max Cameron 	
Junior Secondary—Brooks 	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Texada.
Elementary—•
Cranberry Lake 	
J. P. Dallos  	
Edgehill-
False Bay	
Gillies Bay	
Gordon Park-
Grief Point —
Henderson	
J. C. Hill	
Kelly Creek	
Lund...	
Stillwater	
James Thomson _
Toba	
Totals, District No. 47_
District No. 48 (Howe Sound)
Secondary—
Howe Sound   	
Pemberton	
Elementary—
Alta Lake __   	
Blackwater Creek..
Brackendale	
Britannia Beach	
1,003
929
1,566
560
270
270
174
170
482
525
486
490
451
446
518
532
187
11
17
251
177
528
474
795
264
148
151
99
83
252
270
247
253
228
229
249
291
475
455
771
296
122
119
75
87
230
255
239
237
223
217
269
241
,872
4,561
714
390
127
71
10
9
53
27
14
7
549
283
18
6
195
116
187
97
140
74
402
226
45
20
4,311
324
56
1
26
7
266
12
79
90
66
176
25
,454
1,326
859
415
893
466
220
119
293
147
510
274
259
136
15
11
90
40
385
175
317
158
234
118
260
136
167
80
31
24
79
38
356
190
13
9
1,128
444
427
101
146
236
123
4
50
210
159
116
124
87
7
41
166
4
4,981 I 2,536 I 2,445
29
30
31
45
49
52
48
46
30
49
46
455
87
18
41
146
23
33
47
25
39
29
31
38
29
52
346
340
98
4
11
124
92
348
89
7
6
127
85
31
26
47
22
28
39
21
61
49
56
57
39
47
44
51
53
33
28
35
40
62
73
55
59
48
50
50
63
561
649
1
15
3
72
12
29
23
12
32
9
2
7
2
61
6
31
21
24
38
11
208
203
33
56
38
3
26
54
35
37
35
32
9
33
2
38
56
29
29
46
45
26
46
39
3
52
3
	
	
61
30
28
38
40
	
63
 .
69
 _
63
63
6
49
53
18
66
70
693
1
21
5
56
~37
20
23
42
17
222
43
59
33
4
35
45
48
30
33
32
4
35
3
393
412
404
2
6
30
23
2
5
38
28
24
1
10
11
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C 141
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIU
114
52
38
70
76
65
61
70
56
92
76
115
53
47
55
68
56
58
71
67
95
75
90
44
66
64
73
68
64
72
63
71
80
35
26
5
216
218
310
220
190
303
218
159
305
187
166
302
162
196
267
	
51
36
13
35
32
38
62
68
57
74
14
56
62
51
71
693
770 |  760
755
27
35 |  26 |   5
744
713
682
655
625
WfflMM
1
2
96
""23
26
20
68
3
___.
"71
35
21
71
60
"~21
25
20
74
18
17
157
32
144
32
152
24
131
26
95
13
	
1
10
2
42
	
26
19
20
36
8
164
236 |  223
200
18
17
189
176
176
157
108
29
46
71
31
2
54
34
29
35
7
28
54
30
33
69
38
1
43
55
31
37
5
26
44
2
29
31
71
31
3
38
40
24
~25
44
1
12
7
7
~415
30
Til
23
244
101
22
338
277
	
34
36
58
34
2
20
66
31
26
36
35
3
42
2
405
420 |  414
337
20
12 |   7
7
445
374
367
338
277
	
1
39
18
29
15
"33
12
17
19
17
151
41
148
39
122
38
118
36
96
33
	
5
29
33
	
 C 142
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys      Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 48 (Howe Sound)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Mamquam..
Signal Hill.
Squamish...
Stawamus—
Woodfibre..
Totals, District No. 48 .
District No. 49 (Ocean Falls)
Secondary—
Charleson.
Sir Alexander Mackenzie.
Elementary-
Bella Coola— 	
Nusatsum —
Ocean Falls.
Owikeno	
Shearwater..
Totals, District No. 49..
District No. 50 (Queen Charlotte)
Elementary-Senior Secondary — George
Dawson     	
M.
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Agnes L. Mathers 	
Queen Charlotte	
Tasu     	
Elementary—
Moresby-Sewell..
Port Clements—
Tahayghen 	
Totals, District No. 50-
District No. 52 (Prince Rupert)
Secondary—Prince Rupert	
Junior Secondary—Booth Memorial	
Elementary—
Conrad Street 	
Digby Island- 	
Kanata  	
King Edward—
Oona River_	
Port Edward	
Roosevelt Park..
Seal Cove	
Westview	
Totals, District No. 52 .
District No. 54 (Smithers)
Secondary—
Houston...
Smithers—
Junior Secondary—Chandler Park-
Elementary—
LakeKathlyn.
Muheim Memorial-
Quick	
Silverthorne	
Telkwa  	
Walnut Park 	
Totals, District No. 54_
District No. 55 (Burns Lake)
Secondary—Lakes District  	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Babine — _ 	
Grassy Plains.
463
254
254
118
290
152
246
130
76
36
209
136
138
116
40
2,660 |    1,359 |    1,301
147
77
161
90
161
79
179
91
275
139
20
11
15
4
70
71
82
88
136
9
11
958
491
227
113
86
45
310
166 i
46
23
29
17
93
43
383
219
467
114
41
144
23
12
50
164
174
626
541
302
896
492 '
531
290
17
9
353
193
511
241
9
7
393
207
554
259
342
161
386
178
548
239
404
241
8
160
270
2
186
295
181
208
533
2,339
208
98
333
1  170
399
208
120
62 i
565
293
46
20
442
236
229
104
306
168
110
163
191
58
272
26
206
125
138
2,648 ! 1,359
1,289
432
112
219
231
64
114
201
105
55
36
37
60
28
30
31
10
64
47
30
27
39
44
30
36
13
13
185
42
35
21
17
34
2
2
30
16
44
3
4
77
76
97
27
28
12
34
5
4
13
67
55
135
7
42
9
5
13
58
21
26
39
2
1
11
24
8
5
16
66
134 |  130
52
38
71
  i
32
74
41
38
52
62
42
81
46
60
72
3
45
90
2
73
58
63
42
69
2
65
58
1
42
70
40
50
346
409 |  448
397
135
225
15
9
52
23
110
28
11
55
32
101
17
66
39
85
209
227 |  207
	
 ,
21
14
10
19
10
12
210 |  237 |  240 |   8
10
89 |
10
_ i
15
8
io
18
 STATISTICAL TABLES
C 143
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
vn
Special
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
xni
59
65
62
51
38
36
51
44
24
41
31
32
5
_
_._
29
24
22
37
9
12
9
10
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
226 |     236 |     219 |     219
5 |       17
19
17
192
187
160
154
129
	
	
	
36
51
29
43
35
27
30
25
17
15
—
24
22
33
15
18
27
25
20
31
15
18
28
	
	
—
4
2
4
4
3
2
4
2
	
	
	
	
—
81
68
81
67
4
87
72
62
55
32
—
9
29
8
30
	
7
24
51
10
30
-
	
54
9
28
39
9
25
36
4
17
31
16
— -
4            3
4
6
11
45
6
2
11
	
	
3
1
3
	
—
5
18
•        2
11
61          58
  ;
126 I     112
97
110
  i|   ----- 1     1   -	
94
74,
60
31
16 >	
	
356
732 '
106
194
236 '
193
6
	
14
70
72
70
36
9
2
3
3
3
j
1
30
69
45 :
52
45
60
33
49
	
	
	
	
::: :
  ;
2
56
56
3
52
40
	
1
	
     ; 7
 ;
69
39
78
48
69          55
38 |       27
   ;
	
	
	
	
	
—    —
64
57
32 |       43
;
	
	
	
. j 	
401  ]'    411 |     372 J    286
231 i ..- r ---
357
333
300
236
193 |         6
51 :
54 i
48
35
20
....
.    ■
_ |
	
78
149 1
106
12
20
18
133
168
48
26
17
17
93
116 i
98
116
7
	
	
	
12
7
7
	
. i
•
43
55
51
53
__
 1
_
27
27
20
30
	
 - 1
	
	
	
	
-      	
— i — i
	
	
  1   	
201 |     222 |     193
199
7 j:     12
20 [       18
184
222 |
174
184 |
126 |	
5
4
11
i
93
96
83
94
46 i
16
18 j       18
10
5
16
18 1      20
1            1
34
  '
—	
30
36 :
1
24
	
	
	
|
 C 144
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total
Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
II
III
85
66
87
5
6
10
19
22
25
6
5
7
8
13
3
9
7
5
26
19
24
Primary
Special
District No. 55 (Burns Lake)—Continued
Elementary—
Burns Lake _ — 	
Francois Lake..	
McKenna-Decksr Lake..
Ootsa Lake 	
Pendleton Bay..
Southbank	
Topley 	
Totals, District No. 55-
District No. 56 (Vanderhoof)
Secondary—Nechako Valley..
Elementary-Junior Secondary-
Fort St. James	
Fraser Lake  	
Elementary—
Braeside 	
Carman Hill	
Evelyn Dickson .
Endako	
Fort Fraser	
David Hoy	
Mapes 	
Prairiedale	
Sinkut View	
Vanderhoof 	
Totals, District No. 56-
District No. 57 (Prince George)
Senior Secondary—Prince George	
Secondary—McBride   ....
Junior Secondary—
Blackburn Road 	
Connaught.
Duchess Park .
Kelly Road	
Lakewood.	
Elementary-Junior Secondary-
Mackenzie 	
Valemount	
Winton	
Elementary—
Austin Road —
Bear Lake  -
Beaverley..
Blackburn Road_
Buckhom —
Carney Hill	
Connaught.  _
Crescent Spur	
Dome Creek	
Dunster.	
Finlay Forks _	
Fort George Central-
Fort George South	
Fraserview	
Giscome	
Hart Highway-
Harwin	
High Glen	
Highland	
Hixon.
Island Cache	
King George V	
McBride Centennial .
McLeod Lake	
Millar Addition..
Nechako North-
500
40
155
40
32
21
134
264
22
74
23
16
15
78
1,685
901 i|
666
337
508
14
66
114
39
126
267
35
100
88
522
2,882
1,599
177
390
535
1,206
530
847
504
375
336
611
139
306
515
181
484
534
4
18
50
25
517
172
52
183
318
654
203
487
156
28
488
322
55
108
196
331
177
261
28
67
20
74
150
21
49
38
291
1,515
829
100
213
264
618
289
421
254
200
226
344
67
142
274
94
239
245
2
8
34
13
276
89
27
85 i
162
352
112
248
70
11
262
176
25
58
97
236
18
81
17
16
6
56
784
335
160
247
6
38
47
19
52
117
14
51
50
231
1,367
770
77
177
271
588
241
426
250
175
110
267
72
164
241
87
245
289
2
10
16
12
241
83
25
98
156
302
91
239
86
17
226
146
30
50
99
|  198 1  162
183
	
	
  i
52
51
47
5
5
4
12
11
15
'  38
35
8
10
11
22
17
12
59
68
64
7
4
4
20
13
15
19
13
15
80
34
36
|  284 j' 264 |  258
30
68
37
93
22
57
74
24
95
57
3
1
7
8
54
43
11
35
36
97
36
86
20
28
64
37
12
36
29
|
65
38
78
25
70
91
30
76
47
1
3
5
4
68
28
15
32
51
111
36
82
15
~71
46
10
37
30
57
35
83
19
35
75
34
85
56
~6
6
9
81
22
6
34
45
82
32
74
18
~71
47
10
35
34
19
19
85
12
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C 145
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
1
2
13
83
9
25
7
2
23
66
3
21
9
1
16
65
21
3
13
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
-
130
'     185 1     154
146
  f        5 |         4 |       11
128
132
107
94
46
	
55
10
41
2
24
38
37
47
9
2
13
4
15
•      12
83
64
42
9
5
16
10
22
14
87
57
40
22
130
1
	
128
59
69
140
61
54
111
41
51
167
120
18
	
	
—  ;
1
15
282
222 i|     269
249
34 1   	
256
'    255
203
167
120
43
35
82
30
39
20
73
92
2
90
32
70
22
61
44
7
" 33
59
34
75
18
32
60
21
62 i
84
2
10
2
86 ,
22
3
23
33 i
86
26
61
30
""58 i
32
6
30
41
34
62
16
40
71
34
46
107
1
5
82
21
7
22
40
79
24
60
18
72
42
10
19
60
31
'    109
9
33
71
18
47
91
3
10
79
18
17
62
109
17
54
33
'   77
38
~~21
30
51
~4_ ,
164
1%
432
184
317
41
43
...  .    i
"~39
139
165
414
194
263
'      31
32
30
87
172
360
152
267
31
26
874
45
725
21
	
	
	
10
160
17
	
 C 146
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys      Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
II
HI
19
19
17
70
72
76
2
36
45
43
115
84
111
7
8
3
3
6
5
4
16
9
56
56
69
19
6
15
2
3
4
123
142
100
2
9
7
4
5
6
19
11
15
47
55
44
55
93
60
45
37
36
40
51
43
Primary
Special
District No. 57 (Prince George)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Nukko Lake	
Peden Hill	
Penny..
Pineview	
Quinson	
Red Rock	
Reid Lake	
Salmon Valley-
Seymour	
Shady Valley.—
Sinclair Mills —
Spruceland	
Stone Creek	
T6te Jaune	
Upper Fraser	
Vail Bien	
Vanway_ 	
Westwood	
Wildwood	
Totals, District No. 57	
District No. 59 (Peace River South)
Secondary—South Peace	
Junior Secondary—
Central 	
Frank Ross 	
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Chetwynd..
Elementary—
Canalta	
Crescent Park  	
Dawson Creek	
Irvine Dean _.	
Devereaux	
Elementary Correspondence	
Grandview-	
Kelly Lake	
McLeod—   	
Moberly Lake	
Parkhill	
James Paul  __.	
Pouce Coupe   	
Rolla 	
South Taylor	
Tate Creek 	
Don Titus	
Tremblay  .	
Willowbrook  	
Windrem	
Totals, District No. 59.
District No. 60 (Peace River North)
Secondary—North Peace _	
Junior Secondary—Bert Bowes __	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—•
Clearview _   	
Mile 18 Beatton River Road-
Prespatou Valley	
Elementary—
Airport.
Ambrose..
Attajchie..
Charlie Lake	
Fort St. John Central .
Grandhaven 	
Alwin Holland	
Montney.
North Pine	
118
61
475
244
6
3
260
149
644
354
34
18
26
15
51
27
458
230
85
44
15
11
865
445
34
18
18
11
95
47
307
144
391
205
258
118
242
116
57
231
3
111
290
16
11
24
228
41
4
420
16
7
48
163
186
140
126
687
9,186
733
385
766
409
519
261
494
254
318
164
253
113
488
241
37
18
119
62
93
44
497
254
85
46
131
53
51
23
432
229
37
19
253
133
132
78
98
53
79
33
243
126
548
280
54
24
202
98
8,501
662
3,400
666
354
837
446
251
125
67
32
150
73
84
45
249
139
8
5
253
114
800
427
217
114
521
258
74
34
36
16
348
357
258
240
154
140
247
19
57
49
243
39
78
28
203
18
120
54
45
46
117
268
30
104
3,262
312
391
126
35
77
39
110
3
139
373
103
263
40
20
27
37
74
6
27
21
69
15
18
15
58
9
31
19
9
11
39
70
13
23
	
46
34
32
43
60
64
6
7
19
19
16
16
87
66
22
7
23
13
12
17
62
70
9
12
46
35
31
14
15
14
14
14
45
50
77
70
10
9
31
34
591 |  663 |  608
35
14
22
18
33
1
30
122
26
92
7
6
	
32
35
7
14
19
23
19
15
38
39
2
1
49
34
133
117
39
33
83
70
14
18
4
6
12
12
80 | 1,836 | 1,885 | 1,754 |  129
21
11
35
67
31
 STATISTICAL TABLES
C 147
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
:
IV
V  1 VI
I
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
DC
X
XI
XII
XIII
.
17
18
69
74
1
50
60
1
17
54
2
35
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
34
99
75
81
79
	
	
	
	
	
4
5
12
4
4
6
8
3
4
	
	
	
	
	
69
24
73
13
57
8
78
	
	
	
	
	
	
4
137
6
131
4
2
108
6
7l2
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
3
19
11
12
8
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
51
43
35
44
41
38
34
46
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
38
46
32
30
33
32
37
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
1,714
1,559
1,482
1,492
177
10 |  30 |  51
1,421
1,277
1,125
919
746
	
71
328
312
22
	
	
	
21
8
14
270
194
289
174
164
151
	
	
41
53
93
51
84
66
	
	
75
83
61
71
27
	
33
32
44
32
59
8
60
3
53
7
71
26
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
13
19
22
14
6
10
10
	
	
.	
80
48
73
74
	
	
	
	
	
6
10
15
10
	
	
	
	
 ,
16
7
22
19
20
 _
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
63
7
51
75
30
12
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
28
39
38
36
	
	
	
	
	
	
23
27
18
12
18
12
18
	
	
	
	
12
9
8
11
	
	
	
.	
	
50
75
6
59
88
10
~~71
6
~~97
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
35
32
	
12
	
	
	
	
	
	
 .
	
588
586
615
559
50
21
8 |  14
539
546
447
399
339
22
	
	
	
	
16
14
10
_384
~333
172
120
237
217
	
40
11
33
3
27
10
26
1
	
	
23
7
	
	
	
	
18
19
24
14
6
4
1
17
39
1
36
15
34
1
36
~_3
2
37
~33
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
~~ 31
'
90
102
93
85
27
	
	
	
	
30
32
38
19
__,	
79
7
3
60
7
5
66
8
3
71
13
9
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
 C 148
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 60 (Peace River North)—Cont'd
Elementary—Contin ued
305
28
19
216
101
70
163
18
10
105
49
41
142
10
9
111
52
29
52
7
7
31
13
18
59
2
34
11
8
27
4
2
30
13
6
Taylor
13
Totals, District No. 60
4,952
2,568
2,384
534
553
487
44
District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)
Secondary—
769
804
745
1,152
865
1,368
620
614
922
962
66
811
925
972
961
448
251
79
595
458
363
501
588
402
867
701
592
453
537
420
405
600
218
929
98
585
619
570
638
512
307
620
192
903
40
722
570
562
27
199
274
498
505
332
67
384
404
359
589
461
748
311
295
476
516
41
412
487
470
499
222
112
47
284
243
181
254
300
204
426
367
289
215
267
217
204
308
105
496
54
299
307
271
338
269
166
300
94
476
22
382
295
289
16
95
140
259
281
153
35
385
400
386
563
404
620
309
319
446
446
25
399
438
502
462
226
139
32
311
215
182
247
288
198
441
334
303
238
270
203
201
292
113
433
44
286
312
299
300
243
141
320
98
427
18
340
275
273
11
104
134
239
224
179
32
53
51
52
57
104
63
50
50
51
41
40
48
49
93
48
58
49
50
53
43
92
63
52
95
30
45
54
25
29
28
74
53
56
51
65
60
88
88
66
58
57
72
45
57
45
123
56
58
73
80
67
34
70
29
121
89
59
58
34
63
54
35
39
15
77
55
43
65
79
54
96
74
87
44
80
44
35
75
38
128
70
75
84
86
71
36
52
26
109
90
84
73
31
65
49
35
41
19
81
63
56
72
75
64
129
88
89
50
69
57
68
66
43
128
70
80
89
97
68
45
93
30
89
86
72
73
36
61
72
37
^ak Bay
Junior Secondary—
Cedar Hill	
	
Oak Bay	
S, J Willis
	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Shoreline	
Elementary—
Bank Street
	
Burnside                                 ...
	
14
Lake Hill                    -	
6
Macaulay —   -	
Monterey 	
Oaklands     	
G. R. Pearkes Clinic.	
Quadra  —
Richmond- -	
Rockheights	
13
40
22
11
South Park - -	
12
Tillicum   - -	
16
Uplands-  —
67
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C 149
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
55
3_
10
11
40
37
35
2
21
4
8
	
	
	
	
	
	
6    5
2    1
38    31
13 |  13
10 j   9
11
487
456 |  437
372
38
16 |  14
10
420
337
293
237
217
	
._._
II
42
17
72
59
52
54
66
48
106
89
76
46
60
44
51
86
43
50
69
75
76
54
67
73
31
73
33
110
"lis
83
55
~~29
51
56
48
30
78
70
57
68
83
58
111
99
81
57
79
48
55
84
~136
"76
93
82
90
73
32
77
31
125
90
59
75
53
34
63
73
42
32
78
79
62
80
92
61
117
92
77
81
63
60
55
93
7l5
84
83
97
79
81
38
117
120
81
81
61
62
41
64
72
55
62
38
70
79
37
60
76
104
108
66
67
78
54
56
91
125
96
96
77
72
79
41
85
114
86
80
72
57
39
74
59
45
16
15
23
12
20
18
~~23
22
26
15
17
~7i
8
23
17
16
8
26
173
224
256
321
346
294
274
348
275
139
208
232
187
315
315
306
303
366
322
135
112
27
56
153
202
105
164
153
239
241
168
303
258
297
112
348
437
355
453
156
671
309
340
334
546
126
592
	
	
_____
	
	
12
12
	
17
29
8
18
10
16
15
12
10
 C 150 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
m
Special
District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
542
401
900
294
223
447
248
178
453
48
85
74
64
73
73
66
82
72
47
101
Totals, District No. 61	
32,646
16,698
15,948
242
184
182
371
378
302
6
131
112
32
19
286
88
116
33
35
240
102
194
208
1,692
2,306
2,385
2,576
201
District No. 62 (Sooke)
523
400
352
780
801
594
16
354
233
67
34
578
189
232
66
76
487
218
399
413
281
216
170
409
423
292
10
223
121
35
15
292
101
116
33
41
247
116
205
205
115
104
137
68
89
63
32
30
16
6
73
24
35
13
12
76
28
30
42
97
62
32
34
13
5
83
18
39
16
9
64
40
44
40
96
95
34
33
11
5
75
27
40
15
11
75
32
31
41
Junior Secondary—■
Elementary-Junior Secondary — John Stubbs
Elementary—
16
35
Millstream  —
Sooke      — -	
7
Totals, District No. 62	
6,812
3,551
3,261
424
569
596
621
58
District No. 63 (Saanich)
Senior Secondary—Claremont  	
Junior Secondary—
742
406
395
510
121
333
440
177
95
83
394
180
135
80
298
123
179
692
387
212
195
264
59
181
230
85
53
46
199
93
66
49
156
69
96
325
355
194
200
246
62
152
210
92
42
37
195
87
69
31
142
54
83
367
51
47
42
38
40
94
16
32
34
17
10
24
46
24
19
15
33
24
12
72
20
46
34
20
12
29
50
19
23
10
34
12
20
95
15
31
32
23
14
30
49
38
18
13
42
21
18
72
	
Elementary-
17
7
Keating   	
8
Totals, District No. 63 	
5,383
2,765
2,618
312
378
424
416
32
District No. 64 (Gulf Islands)
331
40
18
26
416
20
155
16
10
13
196
9
176
24
8
13
220
11
46
6
2
5
54
5
6
3
4
56
3
7
1
5
53
1
Elementary—
Totals, District No. 64	
851
399
452
46
72
72
67
	
District No. 65 (Cowichan)
763
401
362
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C 151
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
73
52
126
65
50
110
70
69
142
67
53
139
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
42
2,410
2,597 | 2,734
2,602
219
104 |  126
98
2,650
2,689
2,590
2,420
2,247
93
66
46
30
15
5
82
18
33
16
13
61
30
34
34
79
75
~~46
38
12
3
98
27
32
6
10
72
32
38
63
68
57
50
30
7
83
29
27
9
69
28
45
52
75
72
51
38
3
84
46
26
12
70
28
40
60
605"
4
16
8
15
7
11
94
108
267
61
86
112
238
28
84
132
233
326
82
197
35
	
28
	
6
576
631 |  554
34
20 |  23
18
530
464
449
408
232
17
26
71
29
15
52
24
13
9
39
15
20
94
16
36
64
30
15
53
22
28
10
30
11
24
75
19
33
71
27
8
43
28
16
13
46
15
20
92
18
51
70
31
21
51
25
18
10
36
25
25
98
13
8
4
4
6
9
5
114
120
179
141
132
176
125
135
140
379
363
10
10
	
424
414 |  431
479
20
25 |  10 |  14
413
449
400
379
363
„-..
3
2
5
51
3
4
3
4
48
2
5
4
48
5
9
3
3
60
10
	
3
69
67
61
58
63
I
64
61 |  62
75
1
10 |   |   3
69
67
61
58
63
!
 i	
	
1     1
  1 -- 1
1     1
   -  1
401
362 |
1
 C 152
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total
Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 65 (Cowichan)—Continued
Junior Secondary—
George Bonner	
Mount Prevost 	
Quamichan     	
Elementary—
Alex Aitken  	
Alexander-   	
Arcadian — 	
Bayview  	
Bench  	
Cobble Hill Annex	
Cowichan Station	
Crofton  	
Drinkwater	
Duncan  	
GibbinsRoad	
Glenora    _ 	
Charles Hoey, V.C  _
Khowhemun _._ —   -
Koksilah   	
Maple Bay  	
Mill Bay  	
Old Koksilah Annex  	
Sahtlam Annex  	
Shawnigan Lake  _ _ —
Somenos - _ - -	
Tansor       	
Westholme Annex - —	
York Road Annex   	
Totals, District No. 65	
District No. 66 (Lake Cowichan)
Secondary—Lake Cowichan _ 	
Elementary—
J. H. Boyd 	
Caycuse  	
Stanley Gordon	
A. B. Greenwell .	
Honeymoon Bay	
Nitinat	
Yount  	
Totals, District No. 66 - _	
District No. 67 (Ladysmith)
Secondary—
Chemainus    	
Ladysmith — 	
Elementary—
Chemainus Intermediate	
Crozier Road   	
Davis Road- 	
Diamond  	
Ladysmith Intermediate  ~	
Ladysmith Primary  	
Mount Brenton	
North Chemainus Primary	
North Oyster.	
Thetis Island 	
Totals, District No. 67..	
District No. 68 (Nanaimo)
Secondary—Nanaimo District 	
Junior Secondary—
JohnBarsby 	
Cedar 	
Wellington  	
Woodlands 	
341
613
598
141
481
17
54
318
134
118
203
200
480
107
43
106
217
211
194
195
19
53
117
237
208
26
32
164
308
315
72
248
7
34
177
71
59
104
104
266
61
26
57
104
105
93
97
8
26
61
120
103
12
13
177
305
283
69
233
10
20
141
63
59
99
96
214
46
17
49
113
106
101
98
11
27
56
117
105
14
19
226
3,216
608
322
150
91
48
17
397
194
199
107
71
36
34
19
231
112
3,010
286
59
31
203
92
35
15
119
738
898
485
249
559
285
299
148
36
22 i
63
35
52
32 1
348
165
253
132
265
150
99
57
188
98 i
13
8
236
274
151
14
28
20
183
121
115
42
90
5
2,660 | 1,381 | 1,279
1,548
892
287
479
883
798
474
144
229
446
750
418
143
250
437
42
49
47
97
51
27
43
26
10
77
"54
36
13
24
30
33
53 1
25
25
12
27
29
26
37
33
24
32
19
27
10
56
29
19
17 li
23
31
28
35
40
16
37
30
27
57
31
19
382
482
477
469
43
33
31
9
52
10
8
26
116
136
33
"47
30
44
4
18
7
"79
36
55
25
2
30
8
36
10
52
55
10
13
5
61
30
26 1
135
146
39
10
28
12
44
22
21
2
35
11
17 il
83
28 1!
28
1 l|
154 I  226 I  178
203
16
17
43
19
104
10
10
19
19
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C 153
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
	
	
	
	
39
27
"_6
124
165
192
113
180
201
104
166
205
 .	
	
	
34
21
70
29
55
36
60
25
	
	
	
	
——
	
	
	
36
33
__
~68
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
	
12
17
29
78
8
21
22
32
70
29
9
~27
39
28
117
~~21
32
91
	
	
	
	
	
! —
	
	
	
	
25
	
~~27
21
41
27
27
53
38
28
42
~_4
28
59
	
	
	
— i
	
  '
•	
	
13
18
35
24
"7i
39
18
14
32
21
~_7
29
	
	
	
	
	
	
•	
	
32
	
	
	
 j   —.—
	
	
	
.	
	
	
462
489 i|     501
495
50
39 i|       27
36
481
494
475
401
362
 I
	
	
	
	
21
6
3
140
132
114
104
88
	
5
88
 i
7
109
9
86
114
	
	
	
	
	
 .,
	
	
 .
	
7
2
30
17
6
34
14
7
24
""28
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—-
132
173 |     140
142
21 |         6 |         3
140
132
114
104
88
	
	
-
10
10
11
109
125
101
134 i
88
99
92
102
64
99
55 i
11
51
54
65
	
	
	
	
! —
	
83
84
95
86
	
	
	
	
'	
	
32
30 i
23
31
14
      	
	
, —
	
	
	
31
4
32
2
29
2 i
22
	
	
---      -	
	
; —
	
	
216
199 |     203
204
14
10 |       10 |       11
234
235
187
194
163
;
17
81
776
674
 1
	
	
	
■—
31
19
	
256
104
209
294
304
108
180
277
282
75
90
288
■
	
	
12 |       12
1
 1
 C 154
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLE  1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 68 (Nanaimo)—Continued
Elementary—
216
387
231
40
309
314
558
13
587
371
54
121
143
70
299
259
112
218
275
123
227
163
210
355
460
83
230
135
45
160
115
201
109
20
163
169
290
6
310
194
28
59
69
33
155
141
67
123
136
64
102
87
124
182
245 i
44
112
72
18
85
101
186
122
20
146
145
268
7
277
177
26
62
74
37
144
118
45
95
139
59
125
76
86
173
215
39
118
63
27
75
26
42
38
38
35
42
81
32
38
41
35
25
35
35
24
7.1
~3_
46
49
27
35
30
41
4
76
42
9
55
43
7
	
28
10
23
30
16
42
46
25
~~75
22
21
13
8
22
40
48
25
58
33
43
5
71
55
6
28
23
14
29
34
18
27
39
16
40
24
26
59
16
18
22
7
21
32
67
28
44
29
53
4
77
47
6
~~34
13
58
32
15
28
41
22
35
29
29
67
17
20
9
8
23
40
14
8
Quennell 	
12
Seaview	
Woodbank. 	
 __
Totals, District No. 68	
10,857
5,614
5,243
640
845
845
867
74
District No. 69 (Qualicum)
547
255
52
77
147
26
35
97
500 ;
235
261
135
29
42
89
13
15
54
264
117
286
120
23
35
58
13
20
43
236
118
61
33 ,
11
18
11
~~ 16
54
27
	
____
12
16
15
12
47
26
  ,
12
12
11
"To
63
29
Elementary—
Nanoose	
16
Qualicum Beach   	
1,971
1,019
952
94
137
128
137
16
District No. 70 (Alberni)
1,164
528
589
580
485
612
269
668
236
637
74
29
478
153
46
228
254
365
580
263
327
272
251
300
142
337
130
328
34
14
263
73
29
111
133
199
584
265
262
308
234
312
127
331
106
309
40
15
215
80
17
117
121
166
33
104
34
157
77
130
46
32
74
25
64
27
81
13
5
50
12
6
36
49
58
50
71
50
63
30
92
18
2
47
24
12
39
46
39
43
71
24
62
45
99
8
8
47
15
4
34
29
58
Junior Secondary—
A W Neill                                  	
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Ucluelet	
Elementary—
16
16
13
Gill                       	
4
G. W. Gray       . — .
C. T. Hilton  	
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C 155
IV
43
12
45
27
19
32
32
20
48
29
22
7
64
13
28
19
6
26
862
169
43
67
34
77
25
102
12
2
54
26
7
31
39
Grade
43
53
28
48
41
53
74
64
13
12
64
36
16
22
30
20
27
VI
44
25
53
45
112
" 65
45
9
12
47
29
15
23
40
16
25
125
60
37
24
6
32
876
889
21
	
8 .
14
11
10
27
19
15
16
61
63 ,
24
34
i  145
178
VII
Intermediate
Special
34
37
58
143
67
38
56
32
19
28
38
13
26
115
46
55
28
"".0
853
29
16
14
65
23
147
36
34
60
71
44
22
80
82
39
36
94
82
11
12
6
3
64
66
17
17
8
5
31
27
54
"12
33
78
36
70
34
87
..—
73
16
3
30
39
17
Occupational
17 I  43 ]  31 I   17
Grade
VIII
IX
12
19
12 I   19 I
22
27
21
863 I  869
816
54
140
76
194 I  160
168
XI
XII
XIII
776 I  674
147 I  102
168
219
251
247
51
170
255
216
38
194
139
83
117
27
147
102 |
533
344
27
22
	
	
45
 C 156
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLE 1.10   SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total
Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 70 (Alberni)-
Elementary—Continued
Maebelle —	
-Continued
Maquinna—
Redford	
River Bend-
Sproat	
Tofino	
Wood	
Totals, District No. 70..
District No. 71 (Courtenay)
Senior Secondary—Georges P. Vanier..
Junior Secondary—
Comox   — 	
Courtenay. —	
Cumberland..   — —
Lake Trail 	
Elementary—
Arden..
Beaufort	
Black Creek.
Brooklyn	
Comox..
Comox Airport ..
Courtenay—	
Cumberland	
Denman Island .
Glacier View—
Hornby Island....
Puntledge Park..
Royston—	
Sandwick	
Tsolum	
Union Bay   	
Village Park-
Totals, District No. 71.
District No. 72 (Campbell River)
Secondary—Campbell River  	
Junior Secondary—Campbell River	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Mansons Landing — _
Sayward - 	
Elementary—
Arbutus
Campbellton.
Cedar..
Cedar Annex	
Central 	
Discovery Passage.
Elm _
Evergreen	
Maple	
Ocean Grove 	
Pinecrest.	
Quadra	
Rockland    	
Stuart Island
Surge Narrows .
Whaletown  	
Willow Point ...
Totals, District No. 72 __
District No. 75 (Mission)
Secondary—Mission 	
Elementary—
Bell Road 	
115
467
332
81
196
138
307
57
239
173
31
104
72
164
9,031 | 4,626
971
547
500
199
444
283
34
164
225
686
519
707
368
16
150
15
616
319
16
432
128
320
844
1,118
61
220
13
419
373
166
198
215
229
142
211
52
226
170
238
10
9
16
299
5,229
Cedar Valley-
1,375
62
168
526
260
255
100
233
141
18
92
111
356
246
364
181
9
82
7
312
165
6
227
73
163
58
228
159
50
92
66
143
4,405
430
558
216
177
78
99
114
113
76
101
23
122
87
126
7
4
9
150
2,628
707
29
89
445
287
245
99
211
142
16
72
114
330
273
343
187
7
68
8
304
154
10
205
55
157
7,659 | 3,927 | 3,732
414
560
30
121
5
203
196
88
99
101
116
66
110
29
104
83
112
3
5
7
149
2,601
668
33
79
41
26
17
58
40
19
24
18
50
648
701 |  789 |  773
84
54
100
33
70
40
47
59
487
34
12
47
32
"24
32
88
68
95
52
1
17
3
74
37
7
33
12
29
36
26
26
90
77
83
47
1
31
3
72
50
9
34
10
32
38
28
28
77
70
83
43
3
24
3
75
42
55
16
45
604 |  627
630
5
23
63
61
29
35
28
22
28
"24
22
35
1
2
6
43
427
4
29
44
62
22
37
19
23
28
"32
21
30
1
3
34
389
7
24
68
68
18
22
27
25
22
41
35
21
37
2
2
36
458
7
21
14
24
87
34
12
11
9
66
13
25
18
56
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C 157
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
20
93
36
19
25
13
46
18
81
29
13
18
9
48
15
83
34
23
14
39
~79
50
~~30
14
46
35
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
111
760 |  697
721
57
  |  27
21
769
679
560
560
366
45
49
25
34
72
75
93
43
2
27
83
40
51
16
37
47
28
35
86
73
84
59
9
25
3
75
30
"To
19
48
38
33
40
84
58
86
38
"26
3
80
34
35
19
36
43
_30
82
44
66
44
~~76
46
720
36
34
12
18
11
220
179
64
153
174
165
73
124
153
156
62
137
466
467
27
	
11
6
	
11
17
647
661
610
621
45
12 |   18
11
616
536
508
466
467
27
6
29
68
58
27
23
34
20
42
21
1
54
8
20
64
80
26
26
26
17
21
16
34
21
37
1
44
3
24
53
74
32
26
29
14
30
19
29
27
38
2
1
2
40
9
27
7i
75
40
27
34
24
21
17
29
25
27
1
1
2
48
17
8
45
15
41
15
~4li
6
22
388
7
16
278
5
4
544
197
	
18
14
	
448
441 |  443
466
32
25 |  60 |  56
442
411
287
544
197
	
8
16
8
25
9
30
9
33
16
14
7
319
319
294
233
173
	
	
 C 158
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total   I   Boys   |   Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 75 (Mission)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Deroche..
Dewdney..
Ferndale..
Hatzic
Hatzic Prairie	
Lake Errock—	
McConnell Creek.
Manson..
Mission Central	
Nicomen Island	
Edwin S. Richards _
Silverdale	
Silverhill.
West Heights.
Windebank —
Totals, District No. 75..
District No. 76 (Agassiz)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Agassiz _
Elementary—■
Bear Creek _ 	
Harrison Hot Springs.
Harrison River _
Kent  —
McCaffrey—	
Seabird Island	
Totals, District No. 76-
District No. 77 (Summerland)
Secondary—Summerland	
Elementary—
MacDonald __	
Trout Creek  	
Totals, District No. 77 .
District No. 80 (Kitimat)
Secondary—Mount Elizabeth 	
Elementary—
Alexander 	
Cormorant  	
Kildala   	
Nechako 	
Whitesail  	
Totals, District No. 80..
District No. 81 (Fort Nelson)
Secondary—Fort Nelson 	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Camp Mile 456
Elementary—
Camp Mile 392.._  	
G. W. Carlson  _
Streeper Annex  ~ _	
Totals, District No. 81	
District No. 82 (Chilcotin)
Elementary-Junior   Secondary   —   Tatlayoko
Lake  _ _  	
Elementary—
Anahim Lake  	
Chezacut  _  	
Kleena Kleene	
Poplar Grove	
Puntzi Mountain _
Totals, District No. 82..
40
157
76
95
73
14
41
90
508
37
171
95
24
315
204
18
75
38
46
40
6
17
44
272
24
84
45
11
168
106
545
1,819
474
237
8
4
83
41
37
23
337
185
59
31 .
43
24 |
1,041
545
596
530
176
1,110
582 [
309
159
299
148
856
442
623
319
407
212
231
38
10
527
228
124
22
3
278
121
1,034
548
33
50
17
12
11
46
18
21
5
6
9
26
169
85 I
22
82
38
49
33
8
24
46
236
13
87
50
13
147
98
1,726
237
4
42
14
152
28
19
496
306 |
264 I
100 1
290
266
76
1,302 |  670 | - 632
528
150
151
414
304
195
3,604 i 1,862 | 1,742
107
16
7
249
107
486
15
29
12
6
2
20
84
6
9
16
16
10
7
8
10
7
8
4
4
7
7
10
12
54
68
4
6
20
23
7
9
8
9
46
49
16
25
9
12
13
15
5
6
7
13
62
9
26
12
7
53
36
256
293
313
36
15 j
2
15
7
30
23
4
48
28
1
19
8
59
51
77 |  90 |
87
76
65
55
23
26
30
99
91 |
85
50
49 I 39
133 I 121
109 I 69
47   47
50
40
36
35
100
86
68
72
54
51
338
326
284
94
5
5
7
3
101
1
100
3
106
94 |  109
106
116
7
3
6
19
5
1
2
2
4
3
4
1
1 !
9
7
5
40
21
18
15
23
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C  159
 C 160 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 83 (Portage Mountain)
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Hudson Hope-
239
283
132
143
107
140
55
57
61
~61
	
Totals, District No. 83
522
275
247
55
57
61
61
District No. 84 (Vancouver Island West)
Secondary—
159
89
19
452
13
19
219
26
81
46
8
238
7
119
13
78
43
11
214
5
12
100
13
59
38
5
60
1
4
1
5
72
3
5
31
4
1
3
4
25
4
Elementary—
996
520
476
97
100
120
87
District No. 85 (Vancouver Island North)
310
364
13
273
194
196
178
135
27
14
104
70
49
17
202
431
146
18
145
191
5
128
104
107
88
68
16
5
43
36
28
10
101
226
87
9
165
173
8
145
90
89
90
67
11
9
61
34
21
7
101
205
59
9
30
28
30
60
34
5
44
27
41
13
~"12
17
6
4
34
52
28
5
42
14
48
7
2
15
23
12
2
24
69
49
1
17
2
35
22
46
7
1
23
19
7
3
22
51
35
2
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Quatsino   _	
Elementary—
A J Elliott
Port McNeill	
Robert Scott ._	
13
Winter Harbour	
	
Totals, District No. 85	
2,741
1,397
1,344
182
288
308
292
13
District No. 86 (Creston-Kaslo)
Secondary—
Crawford Bay	
131
885
296
100
181
794
185
41
71
74
189
134
51
75
425
163
53
99
394
92
22
33
49
91
68
20 i
56
460
133
47
82
400
93
19
38
25
98
66
31
105
~30
22
21
68
27
11
12
»
43
15
9 ,
~26
13
20
67
29
11
8
46
17
10
~30
20
22
78
23
12
10
12
35
20 i
8
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Kaslo	
Elementary—
J. A. Cochran 	
14
Jewett  	
Lister    — —
	
Yahk   	
Totals, District No. .6	
3,132
1,584
1,548
105
269
256
270
14
District No. 87 (Stikine)
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Atlin 	
44
228 .
15
25 i
31
58
25
106
9
16
16
38
19
122
6
9
15
20
;
25
6
21
3
7
12
8
28
I
7
13
4
21
4
4
3
Elementary—
Totals, District No. 87.	
401
210
191
25
55
62
38
	
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C 161
Grade
IV
VI
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
VIII   IX
XI   XII  XIII
	
49
49
39
47
49 |  49
39
47
3
62
3
3
26
3
100 ii
30
12
23
49
26
7
9
13
37
18
12
236
51
3
51
"7
26
6
1
47
1
2
21
2
1
51
2
~26
3
87
74 |
83
50
43
1
29
27
34
29
18
19
5
20
16
7
9
4
1
18
30
78
60
I   2
2
57
2
23
57
27
12
25
279 |  266 1  236
220
21
23
31
63
44
15
16
28
17
7 .
19
10
32
127
36
13
24
32
209
265 |  279 |  292
7
20
2
3
2
5
~39~
4
23 i
5
3
9
44
3
20
3
1
5
6
18
18
14
14 |   4
30 i  42
-1	
30
49
43
1
14
25
22
17
1
22
42
42
2S
56
22
58
33
14
24
28
207
184
28
33
	
32
"32"
35
17
57 I  70 |  52
39
21
36
11
11
171 |  183 |  118
34
188
26
259 ]  245 I  248
15    10
23 t   16
10
27
98
98
24
161
15
16
15    11
42 I-  27
68
68 j
12
145
14
200 !  171
 C 162
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
TABLE 1.10    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total  I   Boys   |   Girls
District No. 88 (Skeena-Cassiar)
Secondary—
Caledonia —	
Hazelton  -   —
Junior Secondary—Skeena	
Elementary-Senior Secondary-
Elementary—
Cedarvale	
Copper Mountain	
-Stewart.
Cranberry River..
John Field	
Graham 	
Cassie Hall	
Kalum  	
E. T. Kenney	
Kiti-K'Shan	
Kitsault	
Kitwanga— -
Clarence Michiel.
Nass  	
New Hazelton...
Parkside.. .-
South Hazelton .
Stewart 	
Thornhill .-
Thornhill Primary .
Two Mile 	
Uplands	
Totals, District No.
District No. 89 (Shuswapi
Senior Secondary—Salmon Arm	
Junior Secondary—
Enderby—   	
Shuswap..
Elementary-Junior Secondary-
Eagle River 	
J. L. Jackson _	
North Shuswap	
Elementary—
Ashton Creek 	
Bastion	
M. V. Beattie	
Carlin—  	
Centennial	
Deep Creek	
Falkland— 	
Grandview Bench..
Grindrod	
Kingfisher _ -
Malakwa 	
Mara _ _	
Mount Ida 	
North Broadview-
North Canoe	
Notch Hill	
Parkview 	
Salmon Arm	
Salmon Arm West-
Silver Creek-	
Sorrento	
South Broadview-
South Canoe —
Totals, District No. 89-
Kin-
der-
garten
Grade
III
545
288
815
102
13
150
20 |
262 |
15 I
363
123
341
206
51
55
515
41
77
176
101
239
444
298
42
391
295
155
425
50
81
12
145
7
172
61
179
113
32
25
248
19
37
87
53
125
229
156
23
208
652
239
314
461
564
181
56
221
395
202
17
18
165
18
107
24
85
28
42
42
179
13
55
483
190
54
120
217
170
308
119
166
234
293
101
28
104
204
116
10
12
90
11
50
11
38
15
22
25
98
6
30
251
94
24
47
106
87
5,312 I 2,700
250
133
390
52
5
69
8
117
8
191
62
162
93
19
30
267
22
40
89
48
114
215
142
19
183
5,673 |' 2,945 | 2,728
344
120
148
227
271
80
28
117
191
86
7
6
75
7
57
13
47
13
20
17
81
7
25
232
96
30
73
111
83
2,612
50
92
56
33
31
122
45
2
30
6
31
8
16
38
11
38
116
10
47
5
31
2
22 il
32
81
62
7
7
2
16
50
10
36
116
5
61
4
32
71
32
77
6
11
55
19
36
15
60
5
42
Primary
Special
429
562 1  545 '|  493 |
36
15
■  46
19
19
17
6
7
11
37
21
18
22
44
48
57
48
	
23
32
30
	
	
17
4
12
2
26
23
■  25
5
6
3
20
18
17
2
4
7
14
11
14
  i
4
3 '
7
'
10
5
8
26
22
21
13
6
4 i
3
23
7
25
58
70
68
69
7
	
26
21
20
16
14
11
i
15
14
12
30
34
15
18
24 ,
13
11
15
16
43
188
448 i
455 ,|  413 |  24
1     1
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
C  163
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
1
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
21
1
21
34
.—
9
112 :
7
13
10
34
92
7
60
21
3
20
80
6
10
142
7
10
12
30
78
7
51
23 i
1
25
73
6
9
123
5
11
14
34
76
7 I
49
22
16
3
50
59
5
6
125
5
14
67
36
19
16
	
17
5
1
I
1
81
326
23
~7s
319 ,
26
_
123
55
148
22
I
247
32
9
175
19
—
	
	
13
13
(
10
1
	
494
477 |  456
408
37
35 |  22 |   1
430
411
348
288
194 j
62
26
9
22
40
24
17
4
14
2
14
6
10
24
53
36
13
20
27
32
53
16
12
30
55
30
"~3_
9
3
10
14
11
9
28
63
25
57
25
11
38
41
34
23
12
6
9
14
11
22
71
31
25
65
26
33
62
29
20
17
13
23
~~io
31
19
40
30
	
4
	
	
1
1
"""" I 	
75
89
57
171
21
84
106
57
163
12
80
119
53
141
348
304
	
—
	
	
	
7
13
	
14
 - 1 	
21
19
34 |  37
22 |  31
455
476
492
443
1
14
4|   7 1  13
1     1     1
413
422
393
1
348
304 |
!     1
 C 164 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
TABLE 1.11    RECAPITULATION OF NET ENROLMENT,* 1970/71
Grade
Elementary
Elementary-
Junior Secondary
Elementary-
Senior Secondary
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
XIII         	
	
	
717
1,158
1,263
54
34
47
763
1,114
1,186
38
26
19
1,480
2,272
2,449
92
60
66
482
565
712
727
746
48
35
142
XII               	
	
460
557
618
699
716
18
31
60
942
XI
I
1,122
X                —   - -	
1,330
IX                  -	
2
1
2
4
1,426
VIII                       	
1,462
66
	
66
202
Subtotals-—	
3
3
6
3,273
3,146
6,419
3,457
3,159
6,616
2,181
20,392
21,816
22,171
21,674
2,103
21,963
22,235
21,955
10,641
1,171
19,711
20,688
21,061
20,842
1,156
21,015
20,856
20,257
9,998
3,352
40,103
42,504
43,232
42,516
3,259
42,978
43,091
42,212
20,639
176
912
527
508
553
64
429
434
425
174
68
856
478
523
501
43
426
408
382
150
244
1,768
1,005
1,031
1,054
107
855
842
807
324
29
364
120
77
81
9
75
78
70
50
28
379
101
48
60
7
61
67
56
43
57
VII
743
VI                       	
221
V _                   	
125
TV
141
16
III
136
II 	
145
I               	
126
Kindergarten	
93
Subtotals	
167,131
156,755
323,886
4,202
3,835 |    8,037
953
850
1,803
Totals _ 	
167,134
156,758
323,892
7,475
6.981  1  14.456
4,410
4,009
8,419
i Net enrolment is the total number of students on the register on the first day of school plus new arrivals
2 Vocational school, district and regional college, correspondence, adult and night school enrolments are
 STATISTICAL TABLES
C 165
BY TYPE OF SCHOOL, GRADE, AND SEX OF PUPILS
Junior Secondary
Secondary
Senior Secondary
Totals
,2 Public Schools
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
101
69
170
65
25
90
166
94
260
	
-   ..
11,441
10,487
21,928
4,158
3,802
7,960
16,081
14,749
30,830
	
	
	
13,061
12,277
25,338
4,636
4,271
8,907
18,262
17,105
35,367
8,541
8,276
16,817
9,495
9,178
18,673
	
	
19,465
18,835
38,300
11,181
10,706
21,887
7,766
7,637
15,403
	
20,832
20,158
40,990
11,882
11,525
23,407
7,545
7,504
15,049
	
	
21,439
20,932
42,371
343
205
548
279
203
482
39
18
57
763
482
1,245
550
252
802
408
258
666
1,027
567
1,594
634
299
933
649
347
996
	
	
	
1,472
725
2,197
33,131
31,285
64,453
50,745
47,960
98,705
8,898
8,116 | 17,014
99,507
93,647
193,154
37
22
59
85
82
167
	
	
	
2,508
1,371
3,879
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
21,668
20,946
42,614
.	
.	
	
	
	
22,463
21,267
43,730
	
	
	
	
	
	
22,756
21,632
44,388
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
22,308
2,176
21,403
1,206
43,711
3,382
	
	
	
	
	
22,467
21,502
43,969
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
22,747
22,450
21,331
20,695
44,078
43,145
	
	
...
	
	
	
	
	
10,865
10,191
21,056
37
22
59
85
82
167
	
	
	
172,408
161,544
333,952
33,168
31,285
64,453
50,830
48,042
98,872
8,898
8,116
17,014
271,915
255,191
527,106
during the school-year minus those who transfer to another British Columbia public school or class.
not included.
  STATISTICAL TABLES                                                C
; 167
TEACHERS
Table
Page
2.1
Distribution of Instructional Staff and Pupil/Teacher Ratios	
168
2.2
Teachers' Certificates                       __      	
169
170
2.3
Teachers and Principals With and Without University Degrees	
2.4
Highest Degree by Faculty and Level (Teachers, Principals, Administra
tive and Supervisory Staff)	
170
2.5
New Inquiries, First Certificates, Proportions of Full-time Teaching
Force.    _ __   __   _ _      __   _ _          _   _
171
2.6
British Columbia Public School Full-time Teacher Flow, September 1969
to September 1970	
172
2.7
Increases in Staff During the School-year and from June 30 to June 30	
173
2.8
Sources of Teachers Beginning in British Columbia, September 1970
(Those With Less Than One Year of British Columbia Experi
ence)               	
173
2.9
Numbers of Trainees Completing Certification Programmes at British
Columbia Universities in 1969/70 and Teaching/Not Teaching in
September 1970        	
174
2.10
Types of Certificates Issued During the 1970 Calendar Year	
174
2.11
Numbers of Teachers' Certificates, by Type, With Average Years of
British Columbia Experience	
175
2.12
Certificates and Degrees of Full-time Teachers, Principals, and Super
visors, September 1969 and 1970	
175
2.13
Current British Columbia Certificates and Sources of Original Certifi
cate of Full-time Teachers and Principals, September 1970	
176
Teachers' Salaries by Type of School—
2.14
Supervising Principals (Principals Not Enrolling a Division) 	
177
2.15
Full-time Teachers and Teaching Principals	
178
2.16
Part-time Teachers	
179
2.17
District-employed Instructional Staff	
180
2.18
District-employed Instructional Staff (Not Assigned to Specific Schools)
Audio-visual Services—
181
2.19
Broadcast Services                   __ 	
181
182
2.20
Circulation Report	
r
 C 168
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLE 2.1    DISTRIBUTION OF INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF AND
PUPIL/TEACHER RATIOS, BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
The number of teachers employed in the different types of schools and the
average number of pupils per teacher are shown in the following table. The average number of pupils per staff member increased in all types of schools, except
elementary and elementary-junior secondary. The over-all average number of
pupils per staff member, however, decreased from 23.89 in June 1970 to 23.64 in
June 1971.
Type of School
Number
of
Schools
Supervising
Principals
Instructional Staff
Enrolling
Divisions
Special
Staff
Total
Instructors
Total
School
Staff
Average Number of Pupils
per Staff Member
Enrolling a
Division
Instructing
On Total
Staff
Senior secondary-
Secondary _—
Junior secondary...
Elementary-senior
secondary	
Elementary-junior
secondary	
Elementary 	
District-employed
teachers	
Totals	
17
118
97
52
1,210
16
116
97
12
32
466
543
3,290
2,195
284
528
10,608
243
1,360
869
106
113
1,205
218
786
4,650
3,064
390
641
11,813
218
802
4,766
3,161
402
673
12,279
218
31.33
30.05
29.36
29.64
27.38
30.53
21.65
21.26
21.04
21.59
22.55
27.42
21.21
20.75
20.39
20.94
21.48
26.38
1,507
739
17,448
4,114
21,562
22,301
30.21
24.45
23.64
District administrative and supervisory staff members totalling 377 persons are
not included.
 STATISTICAL TABLES
C 169
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 C 170
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLE 2.3    TEACHERS AND PRINCIPALS WITH AND WITHOUT
UNIVERSITY DEGREES
Highest Degree
No Degree
Total Teachers
Type of School
Bachelors
Masters or
Doctorates
Per Cent of
Teachers
in School
Type
Number
Per Cent of
Teachers
in School
Type
Number
Per Cent
of All
Teachers
604
3,359
2,225
262
317
4,310
88
101
662
259
42
29
281
23
87.9
84.4
78.6
75.6
51.4
37.4
50.9
97
745
677
98
327
7,688
107
12.1
15.6
21.4
24.4
48.6
62.6
49.1
802
4,766
3,161
402
673
12,279
218
3.6
Secondary  _
Junior secondary	
Elementary-senior secondary
Elementary-junior secondary
Elementary 	
District-employed instructors  	
21.4
14.2
1.8
3.0
55.1
1.0
Total instructional staffs
District supervisory staff	
11,165
230
1,397
115
56.3
91.5
9,739
32
43.7
8.5
22,301
377
100.0
(100.0)
Total staff
11,395
1,512
56.9
9,771
43.1
22,678
(100.0)
i Part-time teachers and 16 exchange teachers are included.
TABLE 2.4    HIGHEST DEGREE BY FACULTY AND LEVEL (TEACHERS,
PRINCIPALS, ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY STAFF)
Faculty
Bachelors
Masters
Doctorates
Totals
P&Ti
A&S2
P&T
A&S
P&T
A&S
P&T
A&S
Combined
Education  _ —
Arts   	
Science 	
Physical Education	
5,581
3,590
1,078
230
246
129
91
54
21
6
13
7
5
6
20
186
97
13
6
1
A
A
5
2
748
440
107
13
6
5
14
14
2
1
4
4
87
33
7
1
~3
~1
4
1
11
1
5
6,333
4,030
1,185
243
246
135
96
69
35
19
14
11
9
6
20
274
130
20
6
1
5
4
8
5
" 3
6,607
4,160
1,205
249
247
Commerce and Business Ad-
140
Agriculture   	
Music   	
100
77
35
Philosophy _  _.
Forestry 	
Social Work
24
14
14
9
6
Other.       .
20
Totals 	
11,077
318
1,358
132
16
6
12,451
456
12,9073
i P & T__Principals and teachers attached to specific schools.
2 A & S—Administrative, supervisory, and instructional personnel attached to districts.
3 Includes four degrees belonging to exchange teachers.
 STATISTICAL TABLES
C 171
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 STATISTICAL TABLES
C 173
TABLE 2.7    INCREASES IN STAFF DURING THE SCHOOL-YEAR
AND FROM JUNE 30 TO JUNE 30
Sept.
1969
June
1970
Increase,
Sept.-June
Sept.
1970
June
1971
Increase,
Sept.-June
Increase,
June-June
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Full-time   	
21,102
422
21,272
556
170
134
0.8
31.8
21,890 j 22,053
499 |       625
163
126
0.7
25.3
781
69
3.7
24.1
Totals	
21,524
21,828
304
1.4
22.389  1  22.678
289
1.3
850     1       .-..9
1
TABLE 2.8 SOURCES OF TEACHERS BEGINNING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, SEPTEMBER 1970 (THOSE WITH LESS THAN ONE YEAR
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA EXPERIENCE).
Elementary Beginners
Secondary Beginners
Location of Teacher-training
Institution
Number
Per Cent
of Elementary
Beginners
Per Cent
of AU
Beginners
Number
Per Cent
of Secondary
Beginners
Per Cent
of AU
Beginners
Total
British Columbia—
TJBC                                  	
483
282
234
28
13
35.1
20.5
17.0
2.0
0.9
19.8
11.5
9.6
1.1
0.5
384
116
118
7
6
37.4
11.3
11.5
0.7
0.6
15.7
4.7
4.8
0.3
0.2
867
UVic
398
SFU _	
352
NDU 	
35
19
1,040
75.6
42.5
631
61.4
25.8
1,671
31
53
13
31
12
12
2.3
3.9
0.9
2.3
0.9
0.9
1.3
2.2
0.5
1.3
0.5
0.5
53
49
11
28
15
22
5.2
4.8
1.1
2.7
1.5
2.1
2.2
2.0
0.5
1.1
0.6
0.9
84
102
Manitoba _	
24
59
27
34
Total, other provinces	
152
11.0
6.2
178
17.3
7.3
330
74
38
7
8
24
19
5.4
2.8
0.5
0.6
1.7
1.4
3.0
1.6
0.3
0.3
1.0
0.8
66
71
4
1
31
16
6.4
6.9
0.4
0.1
3.0
1.6
2.7
2.9
0.2
0.0
1.3
0.7
140
109
Africa                                  ...
Asia 	
11
9
55
35
Total, non-Canada	
332
23.4
13.2
367
35.7
15.0
359
13
0.9
0.5
31
3.0
1.3
44
1,376
100.0
56.31
1,028
100.0
42.01
2,404
i Remainder (1.7%) employed as "district" rather than "school" personnel.
J
 C 174
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
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 STATISTICAL TABLES
C  175
TABLE 2.11    NUMBER OF TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES, BY TYPE,
WITH AVERAGE YEARS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA EXPERIENCE
Certificate
Professional
Standard
Teaching
Licence
Elementary C
Letter of
Permission
Totali
13,349
8.95
4,580
5.48
3,546
8.07
92
10.01
306
2.47
21,890
Average years of British Columbia ex-
7.99
i Including 17 Vocational Certificates.
TABLE 2.12    CERTIFICATES AND DEGREES OF FULL-TIME TEACHERS, PRINCIPALS, AND SUPERVISORS, SEPTEMBER 1969 AND 1970
September 1969
September 1970
Changes in Qualifications
of Staff, Sept.-Sept.
Number
Percentage
of Total
Full-time
Teachers
Number
Percentage
of Total
Full-time
Teachers
Number
Per Cent
Certificate—
Professional!	
Standarda  _..
Teaching licence3	
12,311
4,289
4,072
153
16
261
58.7
20.7
19.6
.7
.1
1.2
13,349
4,580
3,546
92
17
306
60.2
20.2
16.4
.4
.1
1.9
1,038
291
—526
—61
1
45
6.3
—7.3
—0.1
Elementary C  	
—40.0
29.1
Letter of Permission 	
10.2
Totals..	
21,102
100.0
21,890
100.0
788
3.7
Degree—
Doctorate	
Master's  	
Bachelor's	
164
1,2224
9,9464
9,6314
.1
5.2
47.2
46.6
24
1,464
11,072
9,330
.1
6.7
50.6
42.6
8
242
1,126
—301
50.0
19.8
11.3
—3.1
Total full-time teachers
20,8154
100.0
21,890
100.0
1,075
5.24
i Including Professional Advanced, Professional Basic, and Professional C.
2 Including Elementary A.
3 Including Elementary B.
4 Exclusive of 287 special-subject teachers in September 1969.
 C 176
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
TABLE 2.13 CURRENT BRITISH COLUMBIA CERTIFICATE AND
SOURCES OF ORIGINAL CERTIFICATE OF FULL-TIME TEACHERS
AND PRINCIPALS, SEPTEMBER 1970.
Current British Columbia
Certificate
N
Professional*
A _           	
B
C	
Standard^
N  	
A 	
B	
C	
N	
Teaching Licences
A     -    .
B
C
N	
Elementary C
A                                               ....
B 	
C            .     	
TvT
Letter of Permission
A                      - „_
B       —       _  _
c
N.     ...   ..
Total Certificates
A
B                                                    	
C 	
  	
First Teaching Certificate Received From—
British
Columbia
Other
Canadian
Provinces
9,877
64.3
74.0
45.1
3,242
21.1
70.8
14.8
2,038
13.3
57.5
9.3
60
.4
65.2
.3
129
42.2
.6
15,361
100.0
70.2
1,899
53.9
14.2
8.7
611
17.3
13.3
2.8
948
26.9
26.7
4.3
22
.6
23.9
.1
42
1.2
13.7
.2
3,522
100.0
16.1
Other
Countries
Not
Reported
1,497
53.8
11.2
6.8
689
24.8
15.0
3.1
530
19.1
14.9
2.4
7
.3
7.6
57
2.1
18.6
.3
76
33.5
.6
.3
38
16.7
.8
.2
30
13.2
3
1.3
3.3
78
34.4
25.5
.4
2,780
100.0
12.7
227
100.0
1.0
Totals
13,349
100.0
61.0
4,580
100.0
20.9
3,546
100.0
16.2
92
100.0
.4
306
100.0
1.4
21,8904
100.0
100.0
100.0
N=Number of full-time teachers from that jurisdiction who hold the type of certificate shown expressed as
a percentage of:
A—Total teachers from that jurisdiction holding all types of certificates.
B—Total teachers from all jurisdictions holding that type of certificate.
C—Total teachers from all jurisdictions holding all types of certificates,
i Including Professional Advanced, Professional Basic, and Professional C certificates.
2 Including Elementary A certificates,
s Including Elementary B certificates.
4 Including 17 Vocational certificates.
 STATISTICAL TABLES C 177
TABLES 2.14-2.16    TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL*
Table 2.14   Supervising Principals (Principals not Enrolling
a Division)
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Junior
Sec.
Elem.-
Senior
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
per Cent
$
24,250-24,749           .
1
1
2
1
4
1
3
3
4
1
2
1
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
"~2
3
2
9
10
13
14
12
13
7
3
3
3
1
1
~~ 1
4
9
3
7
13
11
8
11
8
8
6
5
5
4
3
4
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
4
3
1
1
5
12
6
10
17
21
22
31
67
61
91
49
57
55
45
49
34
21
20
11
16
13
8
6
4
3
3
1
100.0
23,750-24,249 	
	
99.9
23,250-23,749	
99.2
22,750-23,249        -   .
97.6
22,250-22,749.._	
21,750-22,249        	
96.8
95.4
21,250-21,749        	
93.1
20,750-21,249       	
2
2
39
39
69
32
47
45
36
38
29
18
18
7
13
10
6
6
4
3
3
90.3
20,250-20,749 —
87.3
19,750-20,249...	
83.1
19,250-19,749         	
74.0
18,750-19,249        - .
65.8
18,250-18,749	
53.5
17,750-18,249	
46.8
17,250-17,749	
16,750-17,249        	
39.1
31.7
16,250-16,749	
25.6
15,750-16,249   .    -	
18.9
15,250-15,749        	
14.3
14,750-15,249        	
11.5
14,250-14,749	
13,750-14,249 	
8.8
7.3
13,250-13,749       	
5.1
12,750-13,249   	
3.4
12,250-12,749 —
2.3
11,750-12,249 -   .
1.5
11,250-11,749.   . . .
0.9
10,750-11,249         	
0.5
10,250-10,749       	
0.1
Totals	
466
32
12
97
116
16
739
•—
Total principals not enrolling a division, 739; median salary, $18,489; mean salary, $18,231.
i All salaries are as of June 30.
 C 178 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
Table 2.15    Full-time Teachers and Teaching Principals
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Junior
Sec.
Elem.-
Senior
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
per Cent
$
20,750-21,249..	
20,250-20,749	
19,750-20,249	
19,250-19,749	
18,750-19,249	
18,250-18,749	
17,750-18,249	
17,250-17,749.	
16,750-17,249.	
16,250-16,749	
15,750-16,249	
15,250-15,749.	
14,750-15,249.	
14,250-14,749	
13,750-14,249	
13,250-13,749	
12,750-13,249.	
12,250-12,749	
11,750-12,249	
11,250-11,749	
10,750-11,249	
10,250-10,749	
9,750-10,249	
9,250- 9,749	
8,750- 9,249	
8,250- 8,749	
7,750- 8,249	
7,250- 7,749	
6,750- 7,249	
6,250- 6,749	
5,750- 6,249	
5,250- 5,749	
4,750- 5,249	
4,250- 4,749	
3,750- 4,249	
Totals-
Medians
1
3
11
26
50
31
43
41
73
114
81
121
340
134
156
552
296
319
534
983
1,483
1,486
1,207
996
1,181
733
238
31
13
2
11,281
$8,667
4
4
3
7
5
8
7
7
28
20
17
25
25
33
59
59
67
61
60
49
40
24
6
620
10
8
34
15
19
43
6
13
29
14
16
28
27
30
42
19
11
7
3
2
384
$9,275
$11,000
3
3
10
2
3
18
17
9
28
39
71
92
93
306
96
103
226
182
149
220
210
291
345
302
130
67
15
3
3,033
$10,098
1
1
10
7
8
9
17
15
12
13
11
128
91
427
225
189
587
205
172
291
229
226
259
256
318
414
290
104
65
14
6
1
4,602
$ITi452~
6
3
6
1
7
13
53
55
36
115
49
31
49
38
37
40
48
38
74
51
14
9
1
1
2
2
16
11
16
25
31
51
89
71
67
221
229
707
475
465
1,419
510
492
1,172
784
780
1,140
1,583
2,227
2,422
1,929
1,304
1,369
789
256
33
13
2
1
783      |    20,703
$11,663
$9,252
100.0
100.0
100.0
99.9
99.9
99.8
99.7
99.5
99.3
98.8
98.5
98.2
97.1
96.0
92.6
90.3
88.0
81.2
78.7
76.3
70.7
66.9
63.1
57.6
50.0
39.2
27.5
18.2
11.9
5.3
1.5
0.2
0.1
0.0
0.0
Total full-time teachers, 20,703, excluding district employed and supervising principals; mean salary, $9,971.
 statistical tables
Table 2.16   Part-time Teachers
C 179
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Junior
Sec.
Elem.-
Senior
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
per Cent
9,250^9,749	
8,750-9,249.	
8,250-8,749	
7,750-8,249	
7,250-7,749	
6,750-7,249	
6,250-6,749-	
5,750-6,249	
5,250-5,749	
4,750-5,249	
4,250-4,749	
3,750-4,249	
3,250-3,749	
2,750-3,249	
2,250-2,749-	
1,750-2,249	
1,250-1,749.	
750-1,249	
250-   749	
Totals..
3
1
1
5
7
12
10
14
29
42
87
68
80
55
32
31
32
9
3
521
21
30
44
4
1
5
8
9
22
19
23
35
53
95
77
85
62
34
35
40
13
5
625
100.0
99.4
99.2
98.4
97.1
95.7
92.2
89.1
85.4
79.8
71.4
56.2
43.8
30.2
20.3
14.9
9.3
2.9
0.8
Total part-time teachers, 625; median salary, $4,000; mean salary, $4,070.
 C 180 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
Table 2.17   District-employed Instructional Staff
Salary Range
Salary
Mid-point
Number of Instructors
Full Time
Part Time
Persons
Full-time
Equivalents
Cumulative
per Cent
F.T.E.
Salaries
17,250-17,749	
16,750-17,249—
16,250-16,749—
15,750-16,249—
15,250-15,749.....
14,750-15,249	
14,250-14,749—
13,750-14,249—
13,250-13,749	
12,750-13,249—
12,250-12,749	
11,750-12,249—
11,250-11,749--
10,750-11,249	
10,250-10,749	
9,750-10,249—
9,250- 9,749	
8,750- 9,249—
8,250- 8,749—
7,750- 8,249....
7,250- 7,749 -
6.750- 7,249—
6,250- 6,749	
5,750- 6,249—
5,250- 5,749—
4,750- 5,249 —
4,250- 4,749.._
3,750- 4,249	
3,250- 3,749—
2,750- 3,249—
2,250- 2,749....
1,750- 2,249 —
1,250- 1,749—
750- 1,249—
250-    749—
Totals-
,500
000
,500
,000
,500
,000
,500
,000
,500
,000
,500
,000
,500
,000
500
,000
,500
,000
500
,000
500
000
500
000
,500
,000
,500
,000
,500
,000
,500
,000
,500
000
500
1
1
1
2
3
4
9
2
11
6
11
19
10
10
15
13
20
17
11
7
7
8
2
1
0.5
0.6
0.5
0.6
1.5
1.5
2.0
1.6
0.4
0.9
0.6
0.6
27
11.3
100.0
99.5
99.1
98.2
97.2
95.9
94.0
89.9
89.0
83.9
80.7
75.7
67.0
61.9
56.9
49.1
42.7
32.1
22.5
15.1
9.2
6.0
1.8
0.5
218 persons
202.3 F.T.E.s
Medians: Full time, $10,066; part time, $3,812; all F.T.E.s, $9,808.
 STATISTICAL TABLES
C 181
TABLE 2.18
DISTRICT-EMPLOYED INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF
(Not Assigned to Specific Schools)
District Number
and Name
Number
of
Teachers
District Number
and Name
Number
of
Teachers
District Number
and Name
Number
of
Teachers
6
1
1
1
7
1
2
9
6
1
11
1
5
4
35.
36.
38.
39.
42.
44.
45.
46.
49.
52.
54.
56.
57.
59.
Langley	
Surrey    -	
Richmond —	
Vancouver 	
4
25
3
5
2
6
5
2
1
3
2
1
10
4
61.
62.
63.
65.
66.
68.
70.
71.
75.
76.
80
25
8
7. Nelson
1
13. Kettle Valley
4
3
North Vancouver	
Nanaimo   	
8
22. Vernon
18
23. Kelowna
Sechelt   _	
Courtenay	
2
24. Kamloops	
27. Williams Lake   -
2
Agassiz _	
1
28. Quesnel
2
31. Merritt	
33. Chilliwack	
Vanderhoof      —
Prince George—   -	
Peace River South
84.
88.
89.
Vancouver Island West
Skeena-Cassiar	
1
10
4
Fulltime, 191.   Part time, 27.  Total, 218.  Total full-time equivalents, 202.3.
TABLES 2.19, 2.20    AUDIO-VISUAL SERVICES
Table 2.19    Broadcast Services
Radio
Programmes prepared and presented  205
Schools using radio broadcasts  703
Divisions using radio broadcasts  3,165
Students using radio broadcasts  93,401
Television
Programmes prepared and presented .
Schools using television broadcasts __.
Divisions using television broadcasts .
Students using television broadcasts _.
172
791
_    4,971
.153,179
Supplementary Materials (Prepared and Distributed)
Teachers' Bulletins  15,000
Radio Calendars  15,000
Television Calendars   15,000
Primary Music booklets  70,000
Intermediate Music booklets  75,000
French Language booklets 18,000
 C 182
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
Table 2.20   Circulation Report
District and Name
1.
2.
3.
4.
7.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
21.
22.
23.
24.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
Fernie 	
Cranbrook __.
Kimberley __.
Windermere
Nelson 	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes
Trail	
Number
Motion
Pictures
279
415
222
318
608
228
140
222
196
74
330
235
35
        115
       320
        768
  214
  707
  476
  725
  87
  1,383
  561
  346
  294
  220
Fraser Canyon  259
Chilliwack    2,262
Abbotsford  326
Langley  723
Surrey   3,993
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan
Penticton 	
Keremeos 	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Armstrong-
Spallumcheen	
Vernon 	
Kelowna 	
Kamloops	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake	
Quesnel	
Lillooet  	
South Cariboo
Merritt	
Delta
Richmond	
Vancouver 	
New Westminster.
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam.
North Vancouver .
West Vancouver __
162
2
793
1,217
18
378
632
621
435
Supplied
Film-
strips
263
278
443
234
957
699
102
350
256
66
3
178
28
212
762
391
1,249
397
370
68
1,372
523
426
429
163
264
1,502
637
781
4,963
53
73
418
472
524
846
208
85
District and Name
Number Supplied
Motion Film-
Pictures      strips
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
52.
54.
55.
56.
57.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71
72.
75.
76.
77.
80.
81.
82.
83.
84.
85.
86.
87.
88.
89.
Sechelt	
Powell River
Howe Sound _
Ocean Falls .
444
500
404
519
Queen Charlotte       480
Prince Rupert.
Smithers	
Burns Lake
Vanderhoof
Prince George	
Peace River South __
Peace River North
Greater Victoria	
Sooke 	
Saanich 	
Gulf Islands	
Cowichan   	
Lake Cowichan
Ladysmith 	
Nanaimo 	
Qualicum	
Alberni 	
. Courtenay	
Campbell River	
Mission	
Agassiz 	
Summerland 	
Kitimat	
Fort Nelson	
Chilcotin 	
Portage Mountain .
Vancouver Island,
West	
Vancouver Island,
North  	
Creston-Kaslo
Stikine 	
Skeena-Cassiar
Shuswap 	
Miscellaneous _
183
208
276
186
223
718
222
460
533
971
495
296
46
93
530
369
1,481
355
216
451
49
193
299
264
78
141
479
579
444
155
626
302
818
457
15
136
645
343
312
244
210
366
168
837
307
189
866
611
325
6
3
176
887
813
607
531
569
81
73
67
915
137
135
267
464
249
132
1,173
207
170
Totals   36,425 34,738
 STATISTICAL TABLES
C  183
Table
FINANCIAL DATA
3.1 Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education.
3.2 Expenditure for Education, Calendar Year 1970	
Page
184
185
3.3 Cost per Pupil Based on Average Daily Attendance, Calendar Year 1970
3.4 Expenditure by School District for Calendar Year 1970  186
3.5 Revenue by School District for Calendar Year 1970  188
3.6 Transportation Costs  190
3.7 Summary of School Dormitory Data, 1970/71  190
 C 184
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLE 3.1    COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE
FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for the various years since
1877/78 and also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:
School-year
Number
of
Teachers
Employed
Number
of
School
Districts
Aggregate
Enrolment
Average
Daily
Attendance
Percentage of
Attendance
Government
Expenditure
for
Education
Total
Public
Expenditure
on Education
1877/78-
1882/83-
1887/88-
1892/93.
1897/98-
1902/03-
1907/08-
1912/13..
1913/14-
1917/18-
1922/23-
1927/28-
1928/29-
1929/30-
1930/31-
1931/32-
1932/33-
1933/34-
1934/35-
1935/36.
1936/37-
1937/38-
1938/39-
1939/40..
1940/41_
1941/42-
1942/43-
1943/44...
1944/45-
1945/46.
1946/47-
1947/48..
1948/49...
1949/50..
1950/51-
1951/52..
1952/53...
1953/54-
1954/55-
1955/56..
1956/57-
1957/58-
1958/59..
1959/60.
1960/61...
1961/62_
1962/63_
1963/64-
1964/65-
1965/66..
1966/67-
1967/68..
1968/69-
1969/70-
1970/71-
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
1,597
1,859
2,246
3,118
3,668
3,784
3,854
3,948
3,959
3,912
3,873
3,942
3,956
4,025
4,092
4,194
4,220
4,248
4,224
4,055
4,162
4,354
4,512
4,833
5,116
5,496
5,873
6,272
6,598
7,105
7,574
8,185
8,690
9,474
10,171
10,839
11,513
12,137
12,772
13,571
14,415
15,327
16,173
17,457
18,889
20,140
21,481
22,301
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741
721
720
730
696
661
654
650
86
89
93
97
97
98
101
100
104
104
102
103
102
101
98
97
99
100
100
93
93
87
85
85
85
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
164,212
173,354
183,112
195,290
210,174
223,840
240,674
260,069
277,070
291,223
305,837
321,760
340,290
358,905
378,641
400,064
420,790
445,228
467,486
489,596
513,079
527,106
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102,085
93,473
102,999
107,599
114,590
121,334
129,859
138,941
147,583
154,077
163,364
176,138
191,061
204,239
218,303
235,396
252,490
267,052
281,513
298,175
312,173
332,585
348,472
367,718
379,045
408,452
425,514
447,643
466,264
476,643
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
85.99
87.74
88.03
88.51
89.34
89.87
88.88
89.21
90.19
90.91
91.24
90.70
90.51
91.13
91.70
92.05
92.67
91.74
92.67
92.03
91.91
90.98
91.74
91.02
91.43
90.88
90.43
48,411.141
60,758.751
113,679.361
174,775.43
290,255.26
473,802.29
544,671.60
1,663,003.34
1,885,654.11
1,653,796.60
3.176,686.283
3,532,518.95
3,765,920.69
3,743,317.08
3,834,727.19
4,015,074.37
2,849,972.02
2,611,937.80
2,835,040.74
2,972,385.04
3,277,660.23
3,524,962.69
3,630,670.78
3,585,769.00
3,963,848.24
4,028,397.88
3,924,243.53
4,244,898.82
5,022,534.59
5,765,205.50
9,398,473.46
12,468,653.18
17,363,430.94
22,809,631.23
25,830,076.88
26,885,980.43
26,555,080.24
24,060,233.15
34,279,302.27
41,067,740.34
43,989,524.32
50,861,473.63
53,288,028.94
59,472,055.06
70,174,999.84
77,632,903.48
83,782,121.79
95,497,375.16
105,017,594.75
119,871,278.31
144,702,607.40
181,854,578.21
215,056.222
425,555.10
604,357.86
1,220,509.85
4,658,894.97
4,634,877.56
3,519,014.61
7,630,009.543
9,261,094.98
11,149,996.27
10,008,255.66
10,061,387.99
9,719,333.81
8,941,497.34
8,213,369.04
8,458,156.00
8,775,353.78
9,593,562.64
10,193,367.08
10,640,740.47
10,521,684.92
10,982,364.49
11,120,801.94
11,502,291.35
12,231,029.35
13,683,538.18
14,818,625.81
20,176,930.53
25,768,392.09
35,538,079.88
47,726,750.37
54,195,133.95
57,881,559.48
58,401,121.15
70,791,844.25
80,823,263.713
69,314,181.244
77,653,192.32
90,483,765.63
101,351,107.94
115,941,018.06
133,401,622.84
145,535,715.48
157,614,783.79
177,539,584.16
199,114,313.75
227,937,392.31
269,217,969.40
332,702,367.21
|251,827,287.92 |384,336,617.68
1292,556,398.293 437,743,656.54
354,470,298.48   516,309,118.90*
1 The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
2 Excluding unknown expenditure made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
3 Since 1922/23 this amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial universities
and since 1963/64 to school district and regional colleges.
* Since 1955/56 this amount is exclusive of capital expenditures from by-law funds.
 STATISTICAL TABLES
C 185
TABLE 3.2 EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION,
CALENDAR YEAR 1970
(Exclusive of Capital Expenditures From By-law Funds)
$
Total expenditure by school districts (including colleges)  375,435,003.00
Add—Department of Education expenditures
for administration, correspondence schools,
Teachers' Pension Fund, free textbooks and
maps, adult education, vocational and technical schools, grants to colleges, universities,
and school districts, etc.	
Less—Government grants to
354,470,298.48
school districts included in school district expenditure:
Direct grants 	
Grants to reduce
$
159,329,650.00
local
taxation __           54,266,532.58
Total Government grants to
school districts   213,596,182.58
Gross total, other Department of Education ex
penditures
140,874,115.90
Grand total expenditure  516,309,118.90
TABLE 3.3    COST PER PUPIL, CALENDAR YEAR 1970
$ $ $
Grand total cost of education  516,309,118.90
Deduct—School district expenditures not affecting pupil cost:
Colleges and other non-
operating expenditures 	
Debt charges
20,609,900.00
41,629,587.00
Current nonshareable capital        3,453,968.00
Total school district deduction  65,693,455.00
Department of Education expenditures for
post-secondary and adult education,
correspondence schools, technical and
vocational schools, grants to colleges
not included in school district deduction, universities, etc  125,776,816.01
Total operating costs	
Operating cost per pupil for year based on daily average attendance
of 476,643	
191,470,271.01
324,838,847.89
681.51
 C 186
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
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 C 190
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLE 3.6    TRANSPORTATION COSTS
Calendar Year
Total District
Expenditures
Conveyance
Costs
Conveyance
Costs as a
Percentage
of District
Expenditures
1959	
$
105,044,901
118,269,991
127,616,486
136,432,687
150,790,702
165,814,555
185,566,119
214,156,353
248,031,667
285,686,761
323,153,465
361,429,563
$
2,340,813
2,477,202
2,611,370
2,721,510
2,886,696
3,125,447     i
3,475,895
4,009,393
4,610,089
5,355,378
5,'891,894
6,556,422
2 2
1960    _        .   .              	
2 1
1961 	
2.0
1962      	
2.0
1963	
1.9
1964           	
1965 - 	
1.9
1.9
1966
1.9
1967
1.9
1968                     	
1.87
19691 _	
1.82
19702 	
1.81
i Excluding college expenditures of $8,740,549.
2 Excluding college expenditures of $14,005,440.
TABLE 3.7    SUMMARY OF SCHOOL DORMITORY DATA, 1970/71
School District
Capacity
Occupancy
Staff
Grade Limits
or School
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Fulltime
Part-
time
From
To
24. Kamloops.-
15
12
40
30
30
18
43
16
68
15
32
14
12
40
30
24
32
47
12
58
19
20
11
12
32
26
26
14
43
9
53
14
32
6
g
30
25
24
12
47
7
50
19
18
1
2
2
3
4
3
5
2
6
3
2
Nil
Nil
3
2
1
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
1
8
8
8
8
8
9
8
8
8
8
8
12
12
12
27- 100 Mile House 	
12
29. Lillooet..	
55. Burns Lake	
12
12
12
S7. Mr-Bride
12
12
64. Gulf Islands                 _   	
12
12
Trials
319
308
272
246
33
7
 STATISTICAL TABLES C 191
.
SCHOOLS
Table Page
4.1 Number of Public Schools in Operation by Type, June 1966-71  192
4.2 Senior Secondary Schools  192
4.3 Secondary Schools  193
4.4 Junior Secondary Schools  194
4.5 Elementary-Senior Secondary Schools  195
4.6 Elementary-Junior Secondary Schools  195
4.7 Elementary Schools  196
4.8 Summary of All Schools  198
 C 192
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLE 4.1    NUMBER OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN OPERATION
BY TYPE, JUNE 1966-71
Type
No.
Numbers Open in June
Change
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1971-66
6
5
4
3
2
1,0
15
99
56
44
44
1,114
18
105
71
24
47
1,164
17          18
109        108
82          85
20 \      17
43          53
1,182 | 1,172
19
110
96
18
60
1,179
17
■     118
97
13
52
1,210
+2
+ 19
+41
31
Secondary
Elementary-junior secondary	
+8
+96
    | 1,372
1,429 i| 1,453 | 1,453
1,482
1,507
+ 135
Total net enrolment in thousands _  .
il     421
'    445
467
490
513
527
+ 106
In June 1971, 26 schools enrolled only children in special classes. Excluding
Kindergarten children, their total enrolment was 1,491, an increase of 197 from
1970. As the pressure of expanding enrolment is at present almost entirely in the
secondary grades, the demand for elementary schools should decrease during the
next five years. The average enrolment in schools of all types is now 350, an increase of 14 per cent in five years. Additions to large secondary schools are the
chief reason and the small schools enrolling pupils in all grades through to XII are
now rapidly disappearing.
TABLE 4.2    SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
Schools that enrol one or more classes below the Grade XI level are re-
categorized as "secondary" rather than "senior secondary" although their names
may not be changed officially. Three schools were recoded as "secondary" during
the year and one was recoded as "senior secondary"; thus there was an apparent
loss of two schools.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
22. Vernon	
29
24
32
106
66
44
70
49
20
26
27
29
21
45.0
38.0
50.0
154.0
98.0
68.0
103.5
64.0
24.0
35.0
44.5
43.5
33.0
896
809
34. Abbotsford                               -
1,087
3,181
38. Richmond   	
2,121
1,379
2,291
1,599
523
742
763
71. Courtenay  -	
971
652
Totals
17
543
800.5
17,014
 STATISTICAL TABLES
TABLE 4.3    SECONDARY SCHOOLS
C 193
Enrolment in Grades XI and XII, including those who graduated or left at
the end of the first semester, increased 4,600 during the year, and Grades VIII to
X increased almost 5,500. One effect was a sharp increase from 110 to 118
secondary schools, including those that were recategorized. If other types of
secondary schools are excluded, the "secondary school" enrolment increased 10.5
per cent. Enrolment in Grade XIII decreased from 897 to 260 in 1970/71 and
"senior matriculation" was phased out completely in August 1971.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
2
1
1
1
1
1
i
i
i
i
1        ;
1
1
1
5
3
1
2
1
1
3       i
1
1
2
2
1
2
15
1
4
3
2
6
3
2
1
30
27
23
15
24
27
11
55
20
10
28
39
10
20
25
16
148
52
12
40
29
13
27
29
21
75
60
20
91
752
112
153
93
49
201
116
30
29
32
14
17
24
18
21
8
32
22
179
14
10
20
38
46
17
39
20
44
16
37
41.0
44.0
30.3
22.8
36.0
41.0
16.0
83.4
30.0
14.0
36.5
59.5
13.0
29.0
39.0
21.5
205.5
81.0
16.3
61.3
44.1
16.5
34.0
39.0
29.0
109.0
83.5
30.0
127.0
1,083.0
127.0
230.0
130.0
78.0
303.3
159.1
42.0
42.0
47.0
22.0
24.0
29.0
24.0
32.0
12.0
35.0
30.0
266.3
20.0
16.0
31.8
57.0
68.0
27.0
58.0
33.0
69.0
29.4
54.0
774
831
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere 	
615
441
736
830
283
11. Trail 	
12, -.rand Forks
1,555
618
13. Kettle Valley         ..                                     	
245
785
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos  , -	
18. Golden             ...         .                  	
1,130
246
540
750
445
4,107
24. Kamloops   —
1,521
296
27. Williams Lake 	
1,368
28. Quesnel
29. Lillooet -	
30. South Cariboo                                               	
877
299
603
31. Merritt..  	
767
32. Hope 	
33. Chilliwack                                                        	
565
2,413
35. Langley „   — _
36. Surrey 	
37. Delta 	
1,768
682
2,719
39. Vancouver —	
23,838
2,930
41. Burnaby —	
4,715
2,709
1,580
6,246
3,498
46. Sechelt           	
841
859
875
49. Ocean Falls 	
308
541
541
432
666
177
59. Peace River South 	
733
666
61. Greater Victoria   	
62. Sooke  	
64. Gulf Islands                                                 	
5,703
400
331
608
67. Ladysmith	
1,044
1,548
547
70. Alberni  	
1,164
844
75. Mission
1,375
596
80. Kitimat               -           	
1,110
 C 194
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
SECONDARY SCHOOLS—Continued
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
RI   F"t NrllW™
1 i
2
1
2 1
2
9
12
13
35
31
12.0
16.2
16.0
52.0
42.0
231
248
310
1,016
833
Totals
118
3,300
4,750.3
98,872
TABLE 4.4    JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The rate of enrolment increase in Grades VIII to X decreased to 4.7 per cent
in 1970/71 and it is not expected to exceed 2.5 per cent in 1971/72. The reason
is that the long elementary plateau is now entering the junior secondary grades. As
a result, only one additional junior secondary school was opened last year although
the total enrolment increased by 2,695 students.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
3.
7,
9.
11.
15.
22.
23.
24.
27.
28.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
41.
43.
44
47
52
54.
57
59.
60,
61.
62.
63.
65.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
88.
89.
Kimberley-
Nelson	
Castlegar.—
Trail	
Penticton.—
Vernon	
Kelowna.—
Kamloops	
Williams Lake..
Quesnel	
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey—	
Delta 	
Richmond	
Burnaby	
. Coquitlam .
North Vancouver-
Powell River	
Prince Rupert	
Smithers 	
. Prince George	
Peace River South .
Peace River North ..
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Saanich	
Cowichan 	
Nanaimo	
Qualicum _
Alberni 	
Courtenay.— 	
Campbell River... _
Skeena-Cassiar	
Shuswap	
Totals	
13
24
11
31
34
42
17
83
25
23
51
75
27
225
45
142
156
151
95
33
30
13
105
43
31
223
38
44
60
90
11
57
61
38
27
21
21.0
36.8
16.0
45.0
48.0
57.0
25.0
128.0
35.0
31.0
75.5
90.5
39.3
342.1
64.0
192.5
227.0
224.0
130.0
42.9
43.0
20.0
159.2
63.0
41.0
316.0
54.0
67.0
76.8
126.0
15.0
85.0
83.2
55.0
40.0
31.0
398
701
285
915
936
1,100
482
2,632
691
682
1,534
1,916
770
7,035
1,328
4,126
4,532
4,397
2,658
893
896
399
3,508
1,285
837
6,853
1,132
1,311
1,552
2,541
255
1,697
1,690
1,118
815
553
97
2,195
3,145.8
64,453
 frS
STATISTICAL TABLES C 195
TABLE 4.5    ELEMENTARY-SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
Schools enrolling pupils in some or all of the grades from I to XII are rapidly
disappearing as the population density increases and transportation facilities are
improved. During the past 10 years their number has decreased from 42 to 13 and,
if it were not for three large Vancouver schools that still enrol Grade VII, total
enrolment would have dropped from 11,926 in 1960/61 to 3,631 in 1970/71.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
2
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
22
6
26
153
11
17
17
16
11
5
28.3
7.0
33.9
222.0
14.0
24.0
21.6
26.0
15.0
7.0
573
125
855
4,788
50. Queen Charlotte                       .
227
59. Peace River South	
494
70. Alberni          .                        .   ..
485
76. Agassiz	
474
296
102
Totalvs
13
284
398.8
8,419
TABLE 4.6    ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
Elementary-junior secondary schools are decreasing in number and there were
eight fewer in 1971 than in 1970. Those that remain are usually elementary schools
in which, for convenience or economy, one or two Grade VIII classes are retained.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
,        1
1
1
3
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
6
2
3
8
33
15
4
17
10
5
12
25
30
11
4
8
8
43
8
19
11
28
48
17
14
23
12
2
2
9
51
12
40
10.0
44.0
17.0
5.0
26.7
11.0
5.0
13.7
35.0
43.0
11.0
5.0
9.0
9.0
58.0
10.8
22.2
13.0
33.5
57.3
17.5
20.0
26.0
13.0
2.0
2.0
12.0
60.5
12.0
56.8
238
989
4. Windermere „   	
362
104
594
15. Penticton
18   nnlrtpn
121
82
19. Revelstoke ...             	
22. Vernon           	
312
719
851
244
28. Quesnel—              ...               .   .  _
112
?9. T.illnnpt
115
.?..  Hope
208
1,348
220
442
331
56. Vanderhoof
845
1,215
468
448
62. Sooke                        	
801
72. Campbell River     .  -        	
281
81. Fnrt Nelson
38
82. Chilcotin..                      . _      ...          	
33
239
1,218
87.  Stikinp
272
89. Shuswap.—                         	
1,206
Totals
52
529
661.0
14,456
 C 196
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
TABLE 4.7    ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
The number of schools enrolling pupils in the Kindergarten or Grade I to Grade
VII range increased from 1,179 to 1,210 during the year. As enrolment increased
only 1.8 per cent, the increase in the number of elementary schools is largely the
result of internal migration and the reclassification of former elementary-junior and
elementary-senior schools. The total includes 29 schools that enrol only special-class
students. Recent increases in elementary enrolments have been inflated by increases
in the number of kindergarten classes. That did not happen in 1970/71 and the first,
although very slight decrease in Kindergarten enrolment occurred. A decrease in
Grade I enrolment had been forecast to begin in 1968. Instead of that, Grade I
merely levelled off because pre-school immigration from other countries and other
provinces was unusually heavy. Grade I finally started down in 1971 and evidence
is accumulating that further declines will occur between 1971 and 1974. After that
Grade I should resume its upward trend and there will be increasing demands for
primary classrooms and teachers.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1.
2.
3.
4.
7.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
21.
22.
23.
24.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
52.
54.
55.
Fernie	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere .
Nelson	
Castlegar..
Arrow Lakes
Trail 	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan -
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton  -
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen-
Vernon	
Kamloops	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake..
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo..
Merritt— —
Hope.
Chilliwack-..
Abbotsford-
Langley	
Surrey.—	
Delta 	
Richmond—
Vancouver-
New Westminster-
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam-
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver—.
Sechelt	
Powell River-
Howe Sound-
Ocean Falls_
Queen Charlotte .
Prince Rupert	
Smithers—	
Burns Lake —
7
7
8
7
20
12
7
12
3
6
4
11
3
3
5
6
2
13
34
34
6
29
21
5
9
7
4
28
31
26
60
21
35
93
9
39
20
38
36
13
10
14
9
5
3
9
6
7
54
69
49
23
104
64
28
117
29
18
33
97
16
3
38
44
22
127
235
299
23
129
102
23
59
56
35
194
172
153
578
237
347
1,496
125
581
144
551
427
162
57
101
60
30
19
99
54
32
59.0
80.0
51.0
25.1
112.2
67.6
29.0
131.3
32.5
19.5
37.0
105.0
17.5
3.0
43.0
49.0
26.0
146.0
261.3
358.0
23.8
143.2
107.6
27.0
67.2
62.0
40.5
208.1
186.1
171.0
638.6
290.0
393.2
1,706.7
138.5
672.3
165.5
643.3
505.3
191.6
64.7
116.8
70.8
33.0
20.0
116.0
59.7
33.6
1,826
2,240
1,393
603
2,800
1,685
692
3,231
953
469
991
2,918
446
44
1,104
1,359
709
3,924
7,592
9,353
648
3,787
3,077
683
1,709
1,715
1,095
5,913
5,361
4,830
17,494
7,859
10,424
46,454
3,898
17,679
4,409
17,033
13,574
5,374
1,613
3,009
1,785
650
505
3,096
1,708
922
 STATISTICAL TABLES
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued
C 197
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
10
45
20
15
42
15
14
5
24
7
10
30
8
20
17
17
17
6
2
5
3
5
1
6
11
10
4
21
23
45
368
140
106
603
124
114
20
135
41
56
232
41
199
160
106
84
21
23
75
26
7
9
30
46
61
7
135
100
48.0
428.9
160.6
112.7
698.1
127.0
125.7
22.1
144.4
44.6
59.3
248.0
47.0
212.2
183.2
114.6
89.9
24.0
25.2
91.2
27.5
7.0
9.5
33.0
50.3
64.0
7.0
137.0
108.1
1,371
11,188
4,150
60. Peare River North
2,981
19,642
62. Sooke-	
3,956
3,330
64. Gulf Islands
65. Cowichan
520
3,911
1,130
1,616
6,768
1,169
5,685
70. Alberni—  ....           _   .
71. Courtenay          	
4,998
72. Campbell River...	
2,986
2,170
567
77. Summerland ...   	
80. Kitimat
706
2,494
81. Fort Nelson
765
83.  Chilrotin
136
283
748
85. Vancouver Island North
1,213
1,820
129
87. Stikine
3,923
2,901
89   Shuswap
Tntala
1,210
10,629
11,999.2
323,892
 C 198
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
TABLE 4.8    SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
The total number of schools in operation in June 1971 was only 1.7 per cent
greater than in June 1970 and 9.8 per cent greater than in 1966. During the same
one-year and five-year periods, enrolment increased 2.7 per cent and 25.3 per cent
respectively. That is an indication of how rapidly the schools are increasing in size,
by additions and extensions and by the replacement of two or three small schools by
one larger one. In 1966 the average school of all types enrolled 307 pupils; in 1970,
346 pupils; and in 1971, 350 pupils. In 1966 the average school had 11.8 teachers;
by 1971 the average had increased to 14.4 and one-teacher schools, once the commonest of all, are now attended by less than 0.5 per cent of the pupils. Only 101
of the latter were operating in June 1971 vs. over 400 at the end of World War II.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1.
2.
3.
4.
7.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
21.
22.
23.
24.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
52.
54.
55.
56.
57.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
Fernie	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere-
Nelson	
Castlegar.-
Arrow Lakes..
Trail. 	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan..
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen-
Vernon	
Kelowna	
Kamloops.—
Birch Island-
Williams Lake..
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo..
Merritt	
Hope.
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta. 	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster-
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam..
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte-
Prince Rupert	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof——..
Prince George	
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke 	
Saanich	
10
10
10
10
25
14
9
16
4
7
6
15
4
4
7
8
3
17
40
43
7
35
24
7
12
8
6
33
34
30
74
25
42
111
10
50
23
48
45
16
12
17
11
7
7
11
9
10
13
55
24
20
58
20
18
92
129
85
53
178
102
45
203
49
28
78
180
26
29
63
81
38
223
400
488
35
205
158
44
86
85
64
320
279
240
929
373
555
2,401
237
977
237
821
723
278
87
171
92
44
49
146
91
61
94
578
232
176
1,019
219
184
110.0
2,838
168.0
4,060
102.3
2,406
64.9
1,406
218.3
4,914
124.6
2,800
52.0
1,100
259.7
5,701
62.5
1,571
33.5
714
100.2
2,370
223.5
5,105
30.5
692
36.9
899
77.0
1,726
101.7
2,421
47.5
1,154
283.0
6,639
491.8
12,181
648.0
15,166
40.1
944
250.5
6,090
187.7
4,748
52.5
1,097
101.2
2,312
101.0
2,482
78.5
1,868
392.6
9,860
326.6
8,364
293.8
7,368
1,164.7
28,392
481.0
11,906
683.7
16,671
3,011.7
75,080
265.5
6,828
1,255.3
29,653
295.5
7,118
1,048.8
25,301
938.6
22,478
350.7
8,872
106.7
2,454
212.5
4,981
117.8
2,660
55.0
958
56.2
1,174
183.0
4,533
108.7
2,648
70.6
1,685
113.5
2,882
721.4
17,687
282.6
6,662
201.2
4,952
1,300.4
32,646
251.0
6,812
227.7
5,383
 STATISTICAL TABLES
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued
C 199
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
64. Onlf islands
6
28
8
12
35
10
25
22
21
18
7
3
6
5
6
2
8
18
13
6
25
29
30
222
61
94
368
69
312
250
176
128
37
39
112
37
9
18
42
110
107
19
198
182
38.1
265.7
76.4
116.3
442.0
89.0
376.8
309.9
215.6
158.9
50.0
54.6
145.2
41.5
9.0
21.5
49.2
126.8
131.0
19.0
226.0
228.9
851
6,226
1,738
2,660
10,857
1,971
70. Alberni
9,031
7,659
72. Campbell River
5,229
3,545
1,041
1,302
3,604
1,034
169
80. Kitimat
81. Fort Nelson    _	
82. Chilcotin
522
84. Vancouver Island West
996
2,741
86. Crestnn-K^sln
3,132
87. Stikine.	
88. Skeena-Cassiar
401
5,673
89. Shuswap
5,312
Totals
1,507
17,480
21,755.6
527,106
  STATISTICAL TABLES
C 201
POST-SECONDARY AND ADULT EDUCATION
Table Page
5.1 Degree Enrolment in British Columbia Universities, 1970/71  202
5.2 Enrolment in the Public Colleges and British Columbia Institute of Tech
nology, 1970/71  202
5.3 Summary Showing Trends in Adult Enrolment, Number of Classes, Num
ber of Instructors, and Number of School Districts Participating  203
5.4 Classification of Adult Education Courses and Enrolment  204
 C 202
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
TABLE 5.1    DEGREE ENROLMENT* IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
UNIVERSITIES, 1970/71
University
Degree Enrolment
British
Columbia
Victoria
Simon
Fraser
Notre Dame
of Nelson
Total
Full time—
17,615
2,542
4,936
285
4,048
705
647
27,246
3,532
Totals
20,157
5,221
4,753
647
30,778
Part time—
780
1,225
344
6,046
433
217
1,397
"_36
3
55
149
780
1,997
616
7,592
Totals            	
8,395
2,047
336
207
10,985
28,552
7,268
5,089
854
41,763
i Excluding those enrolled in noncredit and other courses not leading toward a university degree.
TABLE 5.2    ENROLMENT IN THE PUBLIC COLLEGES AND BRITISH
COLUMBIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, 1970/71
College
Full Time
Part Time
Total
Academic
Career
Subtotal
Academic
Career
Subtotal
BCIT             -  -
422
247
811
421
182
432
417
1,876
2,773
141
119
346
164
47
107
211
740
2,773
563
366
1,157
585
229
539
628
2,616
"iii
116
180
161
167
284
220
1,751
3,447
167
80
225
422
52
25
6
3,447
700
196
405
583
219
309
226
1,751
6,220
1,263
562
1,562
1,168
448
848
Selkirk
854
4,367
Totals
4,808
4,648
9,456
3,412
4,424
7,836
17,292
 STATISTICAL TABLES
C 203
TABLE 5.3 SUMMARY SHOWING TRENDS IN ADULT ENROLMENT,
NUMBER OF CLASSES, NUMBER OF INSTRUCTORS, AND NUMBER
OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS PARTICIPATING.
(These statistics are gathered from annual reports submitted by the directors
of adult education of the participating school districts.)
Year
Number of
School
Districts
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
1959/60-
1960/61-
1961/62..
1962/63-
1963/64-
1964/65..
1965/66-
1966/67..
1967/68-
1968/69..
1969/70..
1970/71-
58
64
65
68
70
70
71
69
671
631
69
73
40,867
40,917
46,548
70,405
78,461
91,579
100,292
112,105
127,659
141,217
162,140
180,282
1,796
1,945
2,273
2,949
3,454
3,828
4,141
4,982
5,610
6,394
7,045
8,601
1,578
2,220
2,219
3,070
3,964
4,261
5,067
5,637
6,230
7,406
7,855
9,604
i The number of districts is smaller due to amalgamation of school districts.
Vocational Programme
Year
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
1959/60-
1960/61-
1961/62..
1962/63-
1963/64-
1964/65-
1965/66-
1966/67-
1967/68-
1968/69-
1969/70-
1970/71-
13,539
12,530
9,783
14,317
17,510
21,393
25,477
28,556
29,977
31,482
34,319
42,937
540
552
518
685
880
1,029
1,194
1,432
1,479
1,554
1,649
2,191
322
552
512
681
910
1,116
1,384
1,511
1,566
1,767
1,785
2,085
Nonvocational Programme
1959/60-
1960/61-
1961/62...
1962/63..
1963/64-
1964/65-
1965/66..
1966/67..
1967/68...
1968/69-
1969/70-
1970/71-
27,328
28,387
36,765
56,008
60,951
70,186
74,815
83,549
97,682
109,735
127,821
137,345
1,256
1,393
1,755
2,264
2,574
2,799
2,947
3,550
4,131
4,840
5,396
6,410
1,256
1,648
1,707
2,389
3,054
3,145
3,683
4,126
4,664
5,639
6,070
7,519
 C 204
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1970/71
TABLE 5.4    CLASSIFICATION OF ADULT EDUCATION COURSES
AND ENROLMENT
Vocational Programmei
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
Business Management-
Commercial	
Automotive  	
Machine Shop	
Construction Trades-
Electronics	
Lumbering and Forestry-
Engineering _
Service Trades	
Agriculture-
Vocational Preparatory-
Miscellaneous	
Totals-
6,073
9,455
1,445
1,526
2,250
1,753
2,156
4,186
2,120
348
5,793
5,832
42,937
314
502
86
94
145
97
69
59
136
18
337
334
2,191
324
538
81
101
147
101
98
53
129
18
141
354
2,085
i These are vocational courses sponsored by night schools operated by local school districts only.
Nonvocational Programme
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
19,968
4,698
8,535
13,576
19,914
17,575
1,632
21,292
12,185
17,970
918
895
376
635
985
742
72
810
344
633
992
955
407
807
1,198
827
74
995
510
754
Totals
137,345
6,410
7,519
180,282
8,601
9,604
 STATISTICAL TABLES
C 205
TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
Table Page
6.1    Enrolments by Courses in Regional Vocational Schools  206
Vocational Night School Enrolments—
6.2 Regional Schools	
6.3 School Districts	
210
210
British Columbia Institute of Technology—
6.4 Day Enrolments	
6.5 Extension (Night School) Enrolments	
__ 211
._ 212
 C 206
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
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 C 210
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
TABLES 6.2, 6.3    VOCATIONAL NIGHT SCHOOL ENROLMENTS
Table 6.2   At Regional Vocational Schools
School
1968/69
1969/70
1970/71
Burnaby  _.    _   	
3,138
201
574
651
154
690
176
32
59
4,445
258
3,718
92
702
634
231
534
231
356
129
5,152
6191
2,906
178
618
839
241
810
158
735
158
6,400
6251
Tntale
10,378
12,398
13,668
i Includes some nonvocational classes.
Table 6.3    At School District Vocational Night Schools
1968/69
1969/70
1970/71
Commercial
7,449
12,216
338
6,277
11,695
9,334
529
4,986
14,593
11,424
262
3,266
Totals
26,280
26,544
29,545
 STATISTICAL TABLES
C 211
TABLES 6.4, 6.5    BRITISH COLUMBIA INSTITUTE
OF TECHNOLOGY
Table 6.4   Day Enrolments
Course
Year
Male
Female
Total
Business Management
Administrative-
Broadcast Communications-
Computer Programming and Systems..
Financial ,
Hotel, Motel, and Food Service.
Marketing- 	
Technical	
Health
Biomedical Electronics _
Medical Laboratory	
Medical Radiography-
Nuclear Medicine	
Nursing	
Environmental—Public Health„
Biological Sciences .
Engineering
Building-
Chemical and Metallurgical .
Civil and Structural	
Electrical and Electronics..
Forest Resource—Forestry-
Forest Products 	
Instrumentation	
Mechanical.
Mining	
Natural Gas and Petroleum-
Surveying 	
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
87
70
31
24
30
25
44
40
61
47
85
92
35
22
20
11
4
2
6
3
3
A
5
28
27
39
26
68
64
60
50
70
43
165
145
132
104
28
22
48
27
77
57
53
28
20
14
60
48
Totals .
2,254
6
5
26
14
12
10
14
7
27
13
1
1
3
4
88
85
51
39
16
9
89
91
5
7
29
18
2
2
5
1
93
78
37
29
56
39
56
50
75
54
112
105
36
23
23
15
92
87
57
42
19
9
93
96
33
34
68
44
70
66
65
51
70
43
167
145
134
104
28
22
48
27
77
57
53
28
20
14
60
48
698
2,952
Number discontinued training
Number completed	
668
1,044
 C 212 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1970/71
Table 6.5    BCIT Extension (Night School) Enrolments
Administrative Management  452
Accounting  307
Financial Management  32
Industrial Marketing  234
Retail Merchandising  43
Advertising and Public Relations  64
Travel Marketing and Management  58
Personnel Management  76
Business Secretaries .    31
Hotel, Motel, and Food Services Management  134
Executive Housekeepers  86
Municipal Administration  16
Computer Programming  471
Broadcast Administration  55
Technical Management  167
English  125
Mathematics .  173
Physics  35
Building  158
Chemical and Metallurgical Technology  156
Civil and Structural Technology  155
Electrical and Electronics Technology.  516
Biological Sciences  8
Forest Resource Technology  30
Instrumentation and Systems Technology  64
Mechanical Technology  148
Mining Technology  35
Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology.  15
Surveying Technology.  118
Industry Services  250
Landscape Technology  5 5
Health Technology  25
Medical Laboratory  15
Medical Radiography  8
Total  4,315
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1972
7M-971-7300
 ONE     HUNDRED   YEARS
kwV"
:
/
.y .. •«_.
!
*r>
* _^
fflj
.4 VJ
Education
in British Columbia
Department of Education
  ONE
HUNDRED
YEARS
/■*&•
f
v..
ucation
in
British
Columbia
-
DEPARTMENT of EDUCATION
  Contents
Prologue        1
The First Superintendent        5
Restless Giant ,
The Last Superintendent      16
Once There were 830      19
Architecture      23
The Inside Story
30
Deputy Ministers      36
Vocations and Avocations      39
Getting There      44
Teachers
48
Phys. Ed    53
Ups and Downs      59
V.I.P.'s      63
Then and Now (Tables)      67
Who's Who      91
Acknowledgements   110
  Preface
The annual report of the Public Schools in British Columbia for the
1970-71 school year is the hundredth to be issued. Because its actual
publication comes just a few months prior to the centenary of the 1872
passage of An Act Respecting Public Schools, which was the first
education legislation passed by the 10-months old Province of British
Columbia, it seems appropriate to add to this annual report a historical
supplement covering the period from 1872 to the end of the 1970-1971
school year.
The supplement does not profess in any way to be a history of
education. Very full details of the development of public education are
available to students in the 100 existing annual reports, and in other
scholarly and carefully researched documents. One, A History of Public
Education in British Columbia, by Dr. F. Henry Johnson, (Vancouver,
University of British Columbia Publication Centre, 1964) has been
liberally used as a reference book in the preparation of this small
volume, as has an unpublished thesis by D. L. MacLaurin, The History
of Education in the Crown Colonies of Vancouver Island and British
Columbia and in the Province of British Columbia.
What the following pages constitute, in fact, is a largely pictorial and
anecdotal look at a few interesting aspects of education over 100 years,
with a number of then-and-now comparisons. Though most school
districts were kind enough to respond generously to a request for
interesting material, limitations of space and time have made it
impossible to use all of it. And though there are many educators whose
contributions are a matter of record, the same limitations have made it
impossible to refer to more than a small portion of them. For the same
reason many significant aspects of education — the development of
curriculum, financial formulae and legislation among them — have been
given only passing mention.
In other words this is a very incomplete but, hopefully, entertaining
glimpse at a few sides of a century-old education system. To all who
sent material, whether it was finally used or not, I and members of the
Department of Education who prepared the supplement offer sincere
thanks.
Johann Phillipson,
Deputy Minister of Education.
  Prologue
The year was 1836. The Hudson's Bay Company had outposts at such
widely separated places as Fort McLeod and Fort St. James in the north
and Fort Langley in the south. In between lay Fort George, Fort
Kamloops and Fort Alexandria. Though home and civilization were a
continent and an ocean distant, the patriarch that was the Company
even then showed concern for the welfare of the children of the
handful of fur traders, adventurers and staff members who were its
charges. In that year it admonished the white fathers of the children at
the various posts to "devote part of their leisure hours to teach the
children their A B Cs and Catechism, together with such further
elementary instruction as time and circumstances may permit." The
resolution, recorded in the Standing Rules and Regulations of the
Hudson's Bay Company, represents the first known interest in
education in the land that was to become, 35 years later, Canada's most
westerly Province.
In the intervening period, between 1836 and the passage of An Act
Respecting Public Schools in the spring of 1872 both the Company and
the colonial government took an increasing though perfunctory interest
in the provision of schools. James Douglas established a trading post at
Victoria in 1843. By 1849, when the Company was given a crown grant
over the newly-formed colony of Vancouver Island, Douglas was ready
to import Rev. Robert J. Staines to serve not only as chaplain but as
schoolmaster for the children of his officers as well.
This was the first formal school in British Columbia. Later, as settlers
moved to the promising new colony Douglas determined to start more
schools, but for the "labouring and poorer classes." The children, for a
fee, were to get "moral and religious training and a good sound English
education and nothing more." John Jessop, who was the real author of
the Public Schools Act of 1872 which established the permanently free
and non-sectarian public school system we know today, and who
became its first superintendent, told more about the history of
education as background for his first annual report.
He wrote: "Periodical reports are indispensable wherever Public School
systems prevail; as statistical returns enable us to record from time to
time with perfect accuracy the educational progress of the Province. A
brief retrospect of what had been accomplished before the present
School Act came into force, may not, at this juncture be out of place.
In 1855, the Honorable the Hudson's Bay Company established public
schools under the supervision of Rev. E. Cridge, M.A., in Victoria,
Craigflower and Nanaimo; each of the teachers being paid S750.00
salary from the Colonial exchequer, together with fees ranging from
S60.00 to $35.00 per annum. For several years these schools supplied
the educational wants of the community; but as early as 1861 the
necessity for additional Public School accommodation, in Victoria
particularly, was keenly felt. Circumstances to which I need not now
Prologue
 revert prevented the establishment of a Free School System till 1865,
when the sum of $10,000 was set apart by the Vancouver Island House
of Assembly as a School Fund for that year, and the late Alfred
Waddington, Esq., appointed Superintendent of Education. Another
school with male and female departments, was at once provided in this
city, and similar institutions were established at Esquimalt, Lake, Cedar
Hill, Saanich, and Cowichan. For some time upwards of 400 pupils
were in attendance at those schools; reduced, however, in eighteen
months by families leaving the Colony and other untoward circumstances to about 300. At the union of the Colonies of British Columbia
and Vancouver Island in 1866, the Island Free School system was
virtually defunct, although the schools in Victoria and a few other
places were kept open for two years longer. The Common School
Ordinance, 1869 and Common School Amendment Ordinance, 1870
put educational matters on a somewhat better footing throughout the
Colony, with the exception of Victoria, where the tax called for by law
was paid for one year and then voted down; consequently the effort to
keep up the public school had to be abandoned in September, 1870.
From that date to the present no public school has had an existence in
this city. Under those now repealed Ordinances several new School
Districts, chiefly on the Mainland, were created, and a few school-
houses erected. From 300 to 350 children were in attendance at the
Public Schools at the close of 1870, exclusive of Victoria City. A few
month's experience was sufficient to demonstrate the fact that nothing
short of an absolutely Free School system would meet the requirements
of the Colony, so that when British Columbia entered the Confederacy
as one of the Provinces, she was fully prepared to receive with
thankfulness the present admirable 'Public School Act,' the machinery
under the provisions of which is just being put into motion."
So derived the legislation, rewritten and amended numerous times
since, from which the simple education system of the 1870's evolved
into the comprehensive and still growing complex of the 1970's.
"CRAIGFLOWER SCHOOL is named after a farm in England owned by Andrew
Colville, Governor of the Hudson's Bay Company.
The bell from the wrecked steamboat Major Tompkins hung at the end of the
school."
Margaret Beckwith,The Craigflower Schoolhouse, 1958.
100 YEARS
 1. Sketch plan of Fort Victoria, showing building which contained schoolroom
in lower right corner.
2. Close-up of school building within the Fort.
Prologue
 1. The   Rev.   E.  Cridge,  an  early  supervisor  of schools  for  the  Hudson's Bay
Company.
2. Alfred Waddington, superintendent of education in 1865.
3. Craigflower, the oldest school building still standing in Western Canada.
 The First Superintendent
John Jessop was being slightly immodest when he referred, in his first
annual report in 1872, to the new Public Schools Act as "admirable"
for, after all, he drafted it himself for the Provincial Secretary of the
day, Rocke Robertson. But that does not make Jessop the real founder
of the education system. In the truest sense of the word the founder
was Dr. Egerton Ryerson of Toronto. Jessop was his unwavering
disciple.
John Jessop, the first superintendent of education after the passage of the
1872 Public Schools Act, came to Canada from England as a young
man of 17. In 1853 he decided to become a teacher and entered the
Normal School, recently founded in Toronto by Dr. Ryerson. Both at
school and in five years teaching in Ontario he developed a growing
admiration for the Ryerson system of public education. Dr. F. Henry
Johnson, in a recent article in B.C. Studies, No. 10, Summer 1971,
states that for Ryerson, "Jessop had an admiration verging on hero
worship. Between Jessop and Ryerson there was also the common bond
of religion, Ryerson being the most prominent Methodist in Canada."
Despite his predilection for both education and religion, a spirit of
adventure in young Jessop was awakened by the news of the 1858 gold
discoveries in the interior of British Columbia. He travelled by Great
Lakes paddle-steamer, Indian canoe, Red River cart and on foot and
was, in fact, one of the first "Overlanders." Early in 1860 he was in
Victoria and later that same spring went to the Cariboo gold fields.
Unsuccessful there, he had a brief career as a newspaperman, but soon
returned to his first love. In 1861, back in Victoria, he opened his own
private school, called the Central School, to supplement the three
so-called colonial schools which had been started by James Douglas and
were now administered by the Rev. Edward Cridge, and some private,
sectarian schools. Central was "entirely non-sectarian and cheaper"
than any that then existed.
Soon after opening his school Jessop wrote to Dr. Ryerson. Among
other things he commented that "I am desirous of making it as efficient
as possible and for that reason I am taking the opportunity of applying
to you . . . for a supply of maps, charts, apparatus, etc., etc., for the use
of the school and for the benefit of the City of Victoria." In the same
letter he gave a suggestion of his personal ambitions. "A school,
therefore, started and conducted exclusively on non-sectarian principles
as the one under my charge is and will be, and moreover carried on
under the admirable system of Canada West (Ontario) cannot fail of
soon becoming popular and flourishing. My object is to establish its
reputation, and when the city is incorporated, to fall in with the
common system that will soon be adopted, and place myself at the
head of the common schools of Victoria and Vancouver Island."
The First Superintendent
 Jessop made progress in his ambitions. He took an active part in the
campaign to reform the Island colony's school system and was
influential in establishing a free and non-sectarian public system with
the passage of the Free School Act of 1865. That year, in fact, his
Central School did become part of the system and Jessop went on the
public payroll. In 1869, after the failure of the gold rush had brought
about the union of the Island and Mainland colonies, the non-sectarian
character of the schools was retained but not the free system. To help
fight his battles Jessop launched an unsuccessful political career. Dr.
Johnson relates that in the Kootenay "the whiskey of Jessop's electoral
opposition was more potent with the miners than a school teacher's
oratory."
Still, his reputation had been established. It was inevitable that when
public opinion forced some urgent measures on the first provincial
legislature (and urgency was required because Victoria's schools had
been closed for three years, ever since the Victoria School Board
decided to make no effort to continue to raise its share of teacher's
salaries) Jessop should be consulted. It was also inevitable that he
should help draft the new legislation and that it should be modelled
along the lines of Ryerson's Ontario legislation.
John Jessop was in — at $2,000.00 per year — as Superintendent of
Education and secretary to the six-man Board of Education responsible
to the Legislature through the Provincial Secretary.
"Cedar Hill first and only school yet to send out a teacher from among its pupils.
She received all her education in this district school."
(1874) Third Annual Report, 1873-74
"This year, for the first time in my experience I inspected the work of teachers
who received all their education in the public, high, and normal schools of the
Province, and who graduated in Arts from the University of British Columbia."
Albert Sullivan, Inspector of High Schools, Inspectorate No. 1
Fiftieth Annual Report, 1920-21
100 YEARS
 The deplorable condition of the public schools — perhaps it would be more
correct to say the absence of them — long constituted one of British Columbia's
chief grievances; and no measure was more distinctly or more unanimously
demanded than a system of free, nonsectarian education."
The British Colonist, Tuesday morning, April 23, 1872
"His pupils are noisy and disorderly; still they have made excellent progress,
which, after all, is the main object to be attained."
J. Jessop, Superintendent of Education
5th Annual Report (1875-76)
John Jessop.
The First Superintendent
 -____*«r*j5S» 'yrk'"
&■*/... .-if..,.^ %*.*~~.. v£~,A.r
_S.   Mi^,r„*J JK^_W..  «./^*A*
■_/•.«£_*/ ..
>_ s&i^ST-   _5*6-  -••!* f,*^.>*/(f.J»Y,«.
A^'n&r *wj&y -(iV^/V.-   *
_s^
^4_f>«_-_-^
1. A reproduction of the minutes of the first meeting of the Board of Education,
May 7, 1872.
2. The Civil Service in 1878. John Jessop is in the centre of the middle row.
100 YEARS
 Restless Giant
Soon after Johann Phillipson became the sixth Deputy Minister of
Education for British Columbia in September, 1970, he addressed the
Vancouver Chapter of Phi Delta Kappa, the professional fraternity
whose chief interest is the encouragement of educational progress. Mr.
Phillipson referred to education as a restless giant, sometimes charging
ahead on unmarked trails, sometimes groping, but always moving or
adapting to meet the requirements of the society it serves. He suggested
that this adaptability is the best indication we have that the current
education system, which provides for practically every need and which
involves almost half the population on a full or part-time basis, was not
legislated at a single session of the Legislature — neither in the 1870's
nor the 1970's. Such systems, he said, are not created. They evolve,
sometimes after adequate experimentation, sometimes on the basis of
trial and error, sometimes as the result of expediency. Because the
process is frequently one of growth and progression rather than
invention, few among even the most advanced present-day educational
ideas are truly original.
There are many examples. Today ungraded schools with continuous
progress and the use of open areas are very much in use. But a century
ago all the schools were ungraded. Children of various ages attended
classes together and advanced in their studies as rapidly, or as slowly, as
their abilities permitted. The system was changed primarily for financial
reasons. In his Fourth Annual Report Jessop wrote that "the Board of
Education have repeatedly urged upon the trustees of Nanaimo the
necessity of grading their school, so that the large annual expenditure
may do the greatest possible good . . . . " But in 1902, only 26 years
later but a long 70 years ago, F.H. Eaton, City Superintendent of
Schools for Victoria, reported to Superintendent Alexander Robinson
that "Under operation of the new Course of Study and Grading
Regulations school organization is less rigid, teachers are less fettered,
and instruction is more individualized than under the traditional 'lock
step system'."
In 1971 Mr. Phillipson had occasion to express some concern about
educational change — not change based on reason and experiment but
change made for the sake of change. Yet even that view is not without
precedent. In the 49th Annual Report Inspector of Schools J.T. Pollock
wrote: "There are certainly a host of new things being tried on children
these days. To mention a few there are prevocational schools, the
all-year school, supervised study . . . The general blanket excuse for all
these novelties is that progress means change. Undoubtedly it is true