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Minister of Public Works REPORT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1971/72 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1973

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Minister of Public Works
REPORT
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
1971/72
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1973
  Hon. W. L. Hartley, Minister of Public Works:
  To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor oj the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Public Works for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1972, in compliance with the
provisions of the Public Works Act.
WILLIAM L. HARTLEY
Minister oj Public Works
Office of the Minister of Public Works,
Parliament Buildings, December 30,1972.
 'We must lead, not follow."
—Department of Public Works.
 INDEX
Page
Report of the Deputy Minister   10
Report of the Director of Design  11
Report of the Director of Construction and Maintenance  18
Report of the Co-ordinator of Maintenance  22
Report of the Co-ordinator of Construction  23
Report of the Programming Section  24
Report of the Mechanical Operations and Maintenance Engineer  25
The Three E's—Ecology, Energy, and Economics  26
Report of the Civil Engineer  30
Guidelines for Environmental Planning  32
Report of the Electrical Engineer  33
Report of the Architect-Planner  35
Report of the Quantity Surveyor  38
Report of the Chief Engineer, Safety Engineering Services Division  40
Report of the Chief Boiler Inspector  41
Report of the Chief Inspector of Electrical Energy  44
Report of the Chief Gas Inspector  45
Report of the Comptroller of Expenditure  48
Tenders Received and Contracts Awarded for Buildings  54
  A. E. Webb, Deputy Minister of Public Works.
 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER
The Honourable William L. Hartley,
Minister of Public Works,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir: I have the honour to submit for your consideration the Annual Report of
the Department for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1972.
Elsewhere in this Report will be those of the heads of divisions. These set out
work accomplished and planned, tenders let and accepted, and Departmental
accounts.
It will be seen from these reports, sir, that the year under review has been an
exceptionally busy one. It has brought unusual demands upon a staff not large
enough to cope with the great and sudden increase in the volume of work.
I must pay a tribute to them. Although it may be considered only customary
to go "on the record" in this fashion, I would not want this to be regarded as a
commonplace gesture. The Department has a good staff. Over the years it has
built up to a highly efficient organization which has clearly demonstrated that we
do, indeed, "lead, not follow." They have supported me well and a simple "thank
you" seems hardly enough.   However, this is meant sincerely.
Yours respectfully,
A. E. WEBB
Deputy Minister
10
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1971/72
E  11
REPORT OF THE  DIRECTOR OF  DESIGN
"A man that has a taste of music, painting, and architecture is like one that has
another sense when compared with such as have no relish of those arts."—Joseph
Addison (1672-1719) in The Spectator.
It is natural, under the stress of each day's problems, to judge progress or lack
of it in purely personal terms. Any organization, however, can only achieve its full
potential when its members begin to judge their actions in terms of achievement of
group or organizational goals. In this sense much progress has been made in the
Division, yet much remains to be done.
Mention has been made in previous reports of the variety of services which this
Division is called upon to perform. These include advice in connection with the
selection of individual materials or services, extending through financial and design/construct advice to bodies within and external to the Provincial Government,
and the planning and construction of total systems.
As reported previously, and concurrent with the performance of our daily
responsibilit;es, we have been forging processes and procedures to enable design
work to be carried out more effectively by
(a) an emphasis on programming or "front end" planning;
(b) emphasizing the team nature of our problem-solving capability;
(c) organizing to use available talent more effectively;
(d) the development of more sophisticated cost-control procedures;
(e) undertaking extensive feasibility investigations;
(/)  the amplification of training opportunities.
These in themselves, however, do not constitute design. They are simply the
tools and the framework with which, and within which, design may be carried out.
The value and effectiveness of such design is measurable in many terms. In
the field of purely engineering works the value is discernible by objective appraisal
in terms of satisfaction of prime purpose, in suitable cost-benefit relationships, and
in the most effective use of modern technology, materials, and methods.
When we consider those works of an architectural nature, and which themselves form the majority of the works produced by the Division, another and more
subjective value becomes evident.
We are aware that our buildings, being products of art as well as science, have
two major influences:
First, they must satisfy their function in terms of shelter and of human
activity or need.
Second, being part of our built environment, they have an influence
simply by existing.
In this sense, the finest examples of architecture from the past have taught us
that to be good they should not only reflect the creative usage of materials and
technology of the age, but they should also reflect the spirit and aspirations of the
people of the time. A reference to the Roman public buildings, or to the Gothic
cathedrals, or, closer to our own day, the Larkin Building or the Johnson Wax
Administration Building of Frank Lloyd Wright, or the Toronto City Hall, will
emphasize this point and illustrate the satisfaction of more than purely functional
needs.
So today we, too, are concerned with this aspect of our work, and with the
ever-changing nature of the problems facing us.
 E 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
In our rapidly evolving society, with its increasing urbanization, buildings can
very seldom exist in isolation, and the "architecture" of buildings has already become,
in most cases, the architecture of the entire built environment.
Similarly, with the increasing complexity of the problems of the built environment, design is no longer the exclusive prerogative of one specialist or another. The
architect, the engineer, the planner, the social scientist, the geographer, the informed
citizen, the politician, the builder, the financier, the developer, are among those
whose skills and knowledge are essential if we are to improve our lot. We believe
that we have outgrown the luxury of having those skills used in isolation, or worse,
in opposition.
From the work which we have done in this Division, it is increasingly evident
that the most successful projects have been those in which not only was the most
co-operation exhibited between all segments of the design group, and the user group,
but more important, those in which the need for the facility was understood and
appreciated by the public.
Consistent with our belief in the effective use of all available skills, and the cooperative multidiscipline team approach to design, discussive contacts continue to
be forged with those in the private sector. We look forward with hope and enthusiasm to an extension of those contacts already made with other planning, design, and
governmental agencies, for the mutual satisfaction of problems affecting our built
environment.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1971/72
E 13
 E 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CONTRACTS AWARDED DURING THE  1971/72 PERIOD
Eighty-five principal contracts were awarded for work carried out by this Division, aggregating approximately $11.5 million dollars. Of these, approximately 26
per cent were designed for the Department of Education, 25 per cent for the Mental
Health Branch, 15 per cent for the Department of Highways, 9 per cent for the
Department of Health, 6.5 per cent for the Department of the Attorney-General,
5.5 per cent for the Department of Recreation and Conservation, while the remaining 13 per cent included projects for the Departments of Rehabilitation and Social
Improvement, Agriculture, Commercial Transport, the Provincial Secretary, as well
as for Provincial Government buildings in general.
Particulars of these contracts will be found at the end of the Report. Several
projects of particular interest are mentioned here.
1. Burnaby—B.C. Vocational School: A contract was awarded in the amount
of $250,000 to complete the Heavy Duty Diesel Mechanics Workshop.
2. Creston—A contract was awarded in the amount of $246,450 for the provision of an administration building for the wildlife management area at this location.
3. Colquitt-Victoria—Contracts were awarded totalling $266,954 for the upgrading of these facilities—replacement of the water service, conversion of the existing boiler plant, and the provision of a multi-use building.
4. Essondale—Riverview Hospital: A contract was awarded in the amount of
$445,500 for Phase 2 of the renovations to this building to improve washroom facilities.
5. Essondale—Riverview Hospital: Three contracts were awarded aggregating
$498,458 for the conversion of the existing boiler plant from coal to natural gas.
This was in accord with the policy, to minimize pollution and to provide a more economical operation.
6. Essondale—Riverview Hospital: Two contracts were awarded aggregating
$258,047 to provide fire escapes to Crease Clinic and Eastlawn Building as part of
the continuing process to upgrade these facilities.
7. Golden—A contract was awarded in the amount of $526,639 to provide a
Highways maintenance establishment at this site.
8. Haney—Alouette River Unit: A contract was awarded in the amount of
$331,933 for the provision of a new administration building to replace the present
inadequate structure.
9. Nelson—Provincial Government Building: A contract was awarded in the
amount of $306,987, being Phase 1 of the provision of a new Provincial Government
building to supplement the existing Courthouse.
10. Prince George—A contract was awarded in the amount of $233,556 to
provide a new Provincial Library facility for the Library Development Commission.
11. Prince George—B.C. Vocational School: A contract was awarded in the
amount of $192,895 to extend and modify the existing welding facilities to minimize
the noise and air pollution which is a feature of these establishments.
12. Smithers—Provincial Government Building: A contract was awarded in
the amount of $42,070 for Phase 1 of this new facility to replace the present inadequate and antiquated building structure, and to form, in close association with the
municipality, the nucleus of a new Municipal Government Centre in the downtown
area.
13. Tete Jaune Cache—A contract was awarded in the amount of $421,938
to provide a new Highways maintenance establishment at this location.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1971/72
E 15
14. Terrace—Skeenaview Hospital: A contract was awarded in the amount of
$298,043 to upgrade the present inadequate washroom facilities and being Phase 1
of the total renovation at this establishment.
15. Tranquille—Tranquille School: A contract was awarded in the amount of
$169,950 to provide new fire escapes from the Greaves Building. This installation
featured the first use in this Province of the exterior elevator system developed by a
British Columbia manufacturer.
16. Vernon—A contract was awarded in the amount of $471,224 for the
provision of a new Highways maintenance establishment.
17. Victoria—A contract was awarded in the amount of $987,443 for the
provision of a new Personal Care Home at Colquitz. This contract was awarded as
a result of a developer proposal competition, following which modifications were
negotiated jointly by this Department and the Department of Health Services and
Hospital Insurance with the developer.
18. Victoria—B.C. Vocational School: A contract was awarded in the amount
of $564,275 for the provision of a new training and feeding cafeteria seating approximately 300.
19. Vancouver—Jericho Hill School: A contract was awarded in the amount
of $979,900 for a new Cafeteria and Infirmary Building to replace the present
inadequate and obsolete frame structure.
PROJECTS PLANNED DURING THE 1971/72 PERIOD
Approximately 95 projects were in various stages of planning during this fiscal
year under review.   Major projects are outlined below.
Department of Education
1. Burnaby—B.C. Vocational School: Planning commenced on the provision
of a Horticultural Building, a new Ironworkers Shop, and a new Multi-Discipline
Building.
2. Chilliwack—-B.C. Vocational School: Planning commenced on a new vocational school facility.
3. Kamloops—B.C. Vocational School: Planning commenced on a new Central
Stores Building for this existing complex.
4. Nelson—B.C. Vocational School: Planning commenced on a modification
of the existing Kootenay School of Art and an extension to it.
Department of Highways
Highways maintenance establishments—Planning commenced on the provision
of maintenance establishments at the following locations: New Denver, Fernie, and
Grand Forks.
Department of Health
1. Burnaby—Planning commenced on the provision of a personal care home
at Burnaby to house 150 ambulatory, elderly residents. Planning was by a consultant following acceptance of his submission in a developer proposal competition.
2. Vancouver—Planning commenced on the provision of a personal care home
at Vancouver to house 150 ambulatory, elderly residents on the same basis as
Burnaby.
3. Vancouver Provincial Health Building—Planning commenced on extensive
renovations to the Provincial Health Laboratories in this building.
 E  16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
4. Vancouver Willow Chest Centre—Planning commenced on the upgrading
of the cardio-thoracic facilities to provide a greater bed capability or the provision
of this much needed service at Vancouver General Hospital.
5. Kamloops Personal Care Home—Planning commenced on the construction
of a new 250-bed personal care home to house ambulatory, elderly residents and to
replace the present inadequate and unsuitable Provincial Home.
Mental Health Branch
1. Essondale Riverview Hospital—Planning continued on the provision of fire
escapes to the Northlawn Building and on alterations to East and Centre Lawn
Buildings to provide improved patient and staff accommodation.
2. New Westminster—The Woodlands School: Planning commenced on the
conversion of the existing Nurses Home to convert it to an Academic and Activity
Building, thus to allow the demolition of the antiquated occupational therapy and
classroom facilities.
3. Tranquille—Tranquille School: Planning commenced on the construction
of five 20-bed units to provide up-to-date patient facilities and to replace the inadequate and obsolescent Centre Building.
Department of the Attorney-General
1. Victoria—Colquitz Vancouver Island Correctional Centre: Planning continued on the upgrading of these facilities in the complete renovation of laundry and
kitchen facilities and the provision of suitable central stores.
2. Haney Alouette River Unit—Planning commenced on the provision of a
new dormitory to house 50.
3. Motor-vehicle inspection stations—Planning commenced on the provision
of new facilities at Nanaimo and Surrey to extend the present mo tor-vehicle inspection Programme.
4. Langley—Planning commenced on the provision of a new Borstal Unit to
replace the present unit in Burnaby which was severely damaged by fire.
Provincial Government Buildings
1. Planning continued on the replacement of the present Provincial Government buildings at Smithers and Nelson.
2. Planning commenced on the provision of a new Provincial Government
building to supplement or replace existing facilities at Powell River, Dawson Creek,
Trail, Fort St. John, Kimberley, and Burns Lake.
3. New Westminster—Planning commenced on the conversion of existing
space to provide added Court facilities.
4. Penticton—Planning commenced on the total renovation of the existing
building to provide air-conditioning and to upgrade existing facilities.
5. Revelstoke—Planning commenced on the renovation of the existing building to replace services and to provide an elevator.
Department of Recreation and Conservation
Planning commenced on the construction of a fish hatchery in Abbotsford.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1971/72
E 17
Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement
Planning commenced on the construction of a special unit for adolescents to
be located at Burnaby.
GENERAL
During this fiscal period the demand for professional consultation and advice
on design and cost matters by other departments increased. These requests included:
Provincial Secretary—Thirty-two submissions of plans for senior citizens' housing were made, plus six senior citizens' recreational facilities and one special care
facility. Constructive criticism was given on all those projects, followed by recommendations to the Provincial Secretary.
Municipal Affairs—Assistance was given in evaluation and technical review of
five proposals under "Design and Construct Contracts."
Engineering services—The Department continued to provide specialized engineering advice on a variety of matters, including to the Purchasing Commission, to
the Liquor Control Board, and to the Public Utilities Commission.
Education—Two members of the staff were appointed to the Consultative Committee on College Construction. Assistance was g,ven in the preparation of procedures and data for the evaluation of regional college proposals. This participation
in the area of college programming is continuing.
OTHER DEPARTMENTS
The principle of establishing personnel of this Department in active liaison
with other departments is continuing, and has been found to be of considerable value.
In conclusion I would again take pleasure in recording the dedicated and
creative participation of all sections of the Design staff. The loads which have been
placed upon them this year have been great; their response to these loads has been
in accordance with the highest professional standards, and a continual source of satisfaction and inspiration to myself.
I would again record the excellent relations which exist between this Division,
the Construction and Maintenance Division, the field personnel, and personnel of all
Government departments with whom we come in contact, and whom it is our
privilege to serve.
G. L. Giles, F.R.A.I.C, Dip.Pub.Admin.
Director of Design
 E 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE  DIRECTOR OF CONSTRUCTION
AND MAINTENANCE
"They are never alone that are accompanied by noble thoughts."—Sir Philip Sidney.
The individual reports of the Co-ordinator of Construction and the Co-ordinator
of Maintenance have this year been supplemented by a report from the Division's
Mechanical, Maintenance, and Operational Engineer.
Although this section's activities are primarily concerned with the maintenance
and continuity of operation of both heating, ventilation, and cooling systems, it is
frequently called upon for advice to resolve problems in connection with a variety
of mechanical equipment, and therefore forms an important arm of this Department's total maintenance operation. It is also appropriate at this time to add that
the increasing use of sophisticated control systems in connection with engineering
equipment is a growing challenge on the technical skills of this Branch's personnel.
As the reports from the Branch heads will, I believe, build a composite picture
of the major portion of this Division's work, I have confined my report to items of
interest and general activities which do not always relate to our building-maintenance
programme.
Early in this fiscal period the Division was charged with the responsibility
of making operative the new Glendale Laundry. The opening of the Glendale
Hospital and the entry of patients necessitated engaging personnel with experience to operate this well-designed and efficient laundry plant. It is interesting
to note that the present installed laundry machinery is capable of processing,
on a single-shift basis, 2.6 million pounds of laundry a year. In addition, facilities are available to provide our clientele with a minor linen-mending service,
marking of articles with the client's symbol, and a pick-up and delivery service.
Although a relatively small quantity of linen was initially processed, the laundry
load is rapidly increasing as the Glendale Hospital reaches its ultimate patient capacity and new hospitals avail themselves of the service. Currently, service is
now being provided to the Gorge Road Hospital in addition to laundry being processed for the Lower Mainland Correctional Unit and camps. As considerable
economies can be made in the unit cost per pound by using the present facilities to
their maximum capacity, this Department has been working in co-operation with the
Hospital Insurance Service to encourage potential users from the Victoria Regional
Hospital District to benefit from this new service. The early completion of the 150-
bed personal care home on the Wilkinson Road site in addition to current negotiations taking place to accept laundry from other local hospitals will, we hope, within
a short time, significantly increase the poundage of laundry processed. Currently,
approximately 4,100 pounds are being cleaned per day, which provides for the needs
of approximately 550 persons.
It is becoming increasingly apparent, as buildings become larger and more complex, that management must develop comprehensive plans for meeting the various
emergencies which arise in connection with the day-to-day operation of the facility.
In this regard, it is common for owners of major properties to have to cope with fire,
bomb threats, civil disorders, aircraft disasters, vehicle collisions, etc., in addition to
persons becoming the victims of physical disorders (heart attacks, strokes, etc.). In
buildings where this Department employs security staff, these personnel, in addition
to their prime role of protecting the building, are often called upon to control traffic
parking, supply information and guidance to the visiting public, and deal with inci-
 r
PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1971/72
E 19
Glendale Hospital, Victoria.
 E 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
dents and events unlimited. Throughout the period under review, our Chief Security
Officer has been endeavouring to find suitable training courses to provide our Security Force with additional experience to meet the very many diversified emergencies
they encounter in the normal performance of their duties. It is gratifying to add a
number of these employees have received and passed first aid training courses which
have proved invaluable in coping with casualties encountered by tourists and others
visiting the Provincial Buildings, both in Victoria and other locations. As the successful implementation of emergency plans place reliance upon the participation of
others working in the buildings, recognition of this Department's role at senior level
is mandatory for the successful involvement of other department's personnel in our
plans. Although the present staff complement engaged in security duties is not adequate to provide for the development of comprehensive building emergency plans, it
is generally accepted that management should be responsible and organize in the following manner:
(a) Develop comprehensive plans for each conceivable emergency.
{b)  Appoint leaders on each floor or section of a building.
(c) Supply instruction to floor leaders on emergency plans.
(d) Set up a system of informing building personnel in the event of an
emergency.
(e) Establish routines for notifying police, fire, and other officials.
(/) Maintain a list of physically handicapped persons in the building and
provide for their evacuation.
In larger buildings, where Public Works staff are available, our personnel have
assumed the responsibility for the shutdown and adjustment of any ventilation or mechanical equipment. In addition, attention of our Design Division is being focused
upon the desirability in larger buildings of being able to recall elevators to low floor
levels and change to manual operating procedures to allow police and firemen to use
same in the event of emergency. Currently, where security personnel are available
on a continuous basis, they are monitoring both intruder and fire smoke-alarm systems. As a first line of defence our personnel are available to conduct searches for
explosives or foreign material until help from outside sources becomes available.
Th s and many other aspects of security have received our close attention this year
and will continue to be of concern to us.
The development of working drawings for the British Columbia Building by the
Department's Consultant required input from this Division on matters pertaining to
the management and maintenance of Government buildings. As the user experience
is the ultimate test of a building, Departmental experience and every available source
of knowledge must be tapped prior to construction. In this regard, magnitude of the
scheme, and the special operating problems arising from the management of major
high-rise projects, makes it imperative for this Department's representative to profit
from the experience of others who have managed similar buildings. To achieve this
objective, it is recommended on-site visits and individual inspections of similar projects is the best method of achieving these objectives. Specific recommendations to
date have included the composition of the management staff organization and the
methods to be employed in providing tenant services. In this regard, probable operating patterns derived from the experience gained by this Division in managing
Government properties have formed the basis for answering many questions posed
by our Consultants.
Recent discussions have been held with the architects and the number and composition of workshops, storage-space requirements, etc., for the complex determined.
As the operation of the building will ultimately require the selection and training of
staff, the early recruitment of a manager is considered advisable.   Details are now
 .
PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1971/72
E 21
under discussion in respect to the design of a control panel which will have the
capability of monitoring and operating the many building systems. These systems
include heating and cooling of the building, water and sewerage services, elevators,
fire alarm annunciator and smoke-detection systems, security alarms, etc. Reliance
upon this nerve centre under normal and emergency conditions is an operational
necessity.
I would like to conclude this report with an acknowledgment of the co-operation
and help we have received from the Design Division, and indeed, all personnel in
Government departments whom we hope we were able to assist or render a service.
In addition, I would like to express my appreciation for the high standard and volume
of work carried out by all Branches of the Division, who responded so well to the
demands made upon them.
Stanley Lloyd, M.R.A.I.C, A.R.I.B.A., Dip.Pub.Admin.
Director of Construction and Maintenance
 E 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CO-ORDINATOR OF MAINTENANCE
"Criticism comes easier than craftsmanship."—Zeutis.
The responsibility for maintenance of Provincial Government buildings and
grounds is assigned to the Maintenance Branch of the Construction and Maintenance
Division, S. Lloyd, Director.
For administrative purposes, the Province is divided into zones, numbered 1
to 6, with headquarters at Victoria, Burnaby, Essondale, Kamloops, Nelson, and
Prince George respectively. Each zone is headed by a Superintendent of Works,
who has a staff of tradesmen, building service workers, etc., under him. Branch
headquarters is in Victoria and includes the offices of the Co-ordinator of Maintenance.
The distribution of maintenance personnel by trades among the six zones was
as follows:
Distribution of Maintenance Personnel by Trades
Trade
Zone 1,
Victoria
Zone 2,
Burnaby
Zone 3,
Essondale
Zone 4,
Kamloops
Zone 5,
Nelson
Zone 6,
Prince
George
Total
Building Service Workers..
Carpenters	
Drivers	
Electricians	
Fire-fighters „	
Gardeners.— 	
Labourers —	
Office staff  _	
Painters 	
Plasterers 	
Plumbers -	
Stationary Engineers	
Switchboard Operators..
Watchmen	
Miscellaneous 	
Totals..
196
20
6
15
14
43
10
17
4
6
57
24
19
48
I
109
12
2
6
9
14
9
11
7
70
14
2
479
273
17
14
8
16
16
8
14
10
21
6
11
51
_10_
202
35
10
2
4
8
7
20
6
12
3
4
32
3
4
1
T51~
30
7
54
7
3
14
5
6
30
3
441
70
18
44
24
41
109
45
71
13
28
245
44
28
70
60      126     1,291
Maintenance Expenditures by Zones, 1971/72
Zone 1,
Victoria
Zone 2,              Zone 3,
Burnaby         Essondale
Zone 4,      j       Zone 5,
Kamloops           Nelson
Zone 6,
Prince
George
Salaries and wages	
Heat,   light,   power   and
water .      .___	
Maintenance of buildings .
i            i
$           $           $
2,782,830.54 [ 2,065,907.75  |  1,998,692.09
i                        1
664,579.16 |     694,986.71  |     843,730.30
364,991.13  |     541,546.56 j      512,611.70
i
$            $
1,214,270.24        413,618.83
1
398 773.94 |       93,751.89
228,782.75        121,971.73
$
957,173.86
297,115.05
257,202.26
Totals _	
3,812,400.83 | 3,302,441.02 | 3,355,034.09
1                         1
1,841,826.93 j     629,342.45 |  1,511,491.17
1                         1
Grand total, $14,452,536.49.
Tenders were invited for 235 projects during the year. During the 1971/72
fiscal period, new buildings with a total capital cost of $3 million were accepted from
contractors as substantially complete, and maintenance responsibility was assumed
by the Branch.
H. J. Greig, B.A.Sc, P.Eng., Dip.Pub.Admin.
Co-ordinator of Maintenance
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1971/72
E 23
REPORT OF THE CO-ORDINATOR OF CONSTRUCTION
"Whoever undertakes to hew wood for the master carpenter rarely escapes injuring
his own hands."—Lao Tztt.
The Construction Branch was responsible for the construction of a greater number of projects this year than ever before. Although the majority of the projects
were of smaller size, the increase in number, in addition to the fact that they were
located away from Vancouver Island and the Lower Mainland, provided us with an
interesting administrative problem. It was necessary to add three additional Inspectors to the staff as a result.
The Inspectors' training programme was continued, with several completing
the "Human Relations and Communications" course at BCIT; all Inspectors will
eventually complete the course as places become available.
It would appear that the construction industry in this Province would benefit
from a greater sense of responsibility at many levels; too often the lack of this seems
to have caused delays, disputes, and, in some cases, outright failure. Problems of
this type are obviously of great concern to the Construction Branch, whose duty it is
to ensure that the best standards of workmanship and quality are obtained.
We are taking particular interest in the expanded use of synthetic building materials, since their inherent limiting conditions, such as temperature and humidity, are
very critical and often difficult to obtain, particularly in the severe climate of the
north. This, together with the site installation being often left in the hands of untutored field staff, has led us to review carefully the performance of many synthetic
materials in certain areas of the Province.
The type of work supervised included fire-alarm systems, fire escapes, sound
systems, boiler plant renovations, gymnasia, cafeterias, vocational schools, sewage-
treatment plants, Courthouses, Motor-vehicle Inspection Stations, and personal care
homes, as well as a very large number of minor alterations and renovations.
I wish to record that we received excellent co-operation from the Director of
Design and his staff; the success of this Branch is in no small measure attributable to
the harmonious relations which exist with them.
D. Grey, M.C.I.Q.S., Dip.Pub.Admin.
Co-ordinator of Construction
Port Alberni Government Building.
 E 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE PROGRAMMING SECTION
"Promise is most given when the least is said."—George Chapman.
The Public Works Act has given this Department responsibility to design, construct, and maintain all Government buildings. While the Act remains relatively
static, the problems arising from that responsibility change quantitatively and qualitatively.
Budgets have increased from a total of $3 million to, at times, $15 million for
one department. Size of projects have increased, from $1 million for a large project
20 years ago, to from $6 to $8 million now. The technical complexity of each project
has increased. Immediate postwar structures were being built with no insulation,
no mechanical ventilation, elevators with speeds of 50 feet per minute, and lighting
levels of 20 and 30 foot-candles.
To meet these quantitative changes, Public Works has been in a continual state
of reorganization. Some sections have been expanded, other sections have been
broken up, and new sections have been added.
Qualitative problems have arisen along with the quantitative ones. It is now
necessary to solve problems in depth. Specialties other than those present in the
Department of Public Works are required to reach valid solutions. The Departments
of the Attorney-General; Agriculture; Education; Finance; Health; Mental Health;
Highways; Industrial Development, Trade and Commerce; Lands, Forests, and
Water Resources; Municipal Affairs; Recreation and Conservation; and Rehabilitation and Social Improvement have all contributed valuable expertise toward the
solving of architectural problems. With this amount of people and organizations
contributing to a solution, and possibly many contributing in a restricted area
of the problem, it has become imperative to ensure that all persons know what the
total problem is, and how it may relate to the area in which they are contributing.
Further, within each area of expertise, appropriate people should solve the problem.
Some decisions should be made by technicians, some by professionals, some by
administrators, and some over-all revue should be able to be made by the Ministers
concerned.
It was to meet this qualitative change in Public Works procedures that the
Programming Section was formed. "The programme is the definition of the problem." It is a quantitative and qualitative statement of the spaces, activities, and
personnel that are required to fulfil the directives of the Government to the departments concerned.
The client departments' operations are examined and broken down into their
component systems and parts. A physical description of each part and its environment is agreed upon. Each part is sized for growth and fitted into its own system,
and all systems made compatible. Conflicting systems within a department or
between departments, together with common activities that could be shared within
or between departments, are raised for resolution.
The literature is searched for information on specific activities and for similar
total problems. The policies of other regulatory agencies and the expertise of other
departments are sought on such matters as growth, health, maintenance and operating
problems. All the information that is considered pertinent is put together in a document. The document is priced by the estimating section and this whole is called a
programme.
W. W. Ekins, B.Arch., Dip.Pub.Admin.
Assistant Director of Design
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1971/72
E 25
REPORT OF THE MECHANICAL OPERATIONS AND
MAINTENANCE  ENGINEER
"Hope is a good breakfast, but it is a bad supper."—Francis Bacon.
This Branch is responsible for the operation and maintenance of plants and
systems providing mechanical services in Provincial Government institutions and
office buildings.
In exercising this responsibility, headquarters and field staff work toward
establishing operating procedures and maintenance programmes which will maintain
the functional effectiveness of equipment and systems, provide uninterrupted service,
extend the useful life of equipment, provide for the safe functioning of plants and
systems, and provide optimum operational efficiency with minimal operating and
maintenance cost.
In addition to providing technical direction and supervision of field operating
and maintenance staff, the Branch headquarters staff prepared plans and specifications for 32 projects involving renovations and alterations to mechanical systems.
One such project was the conversion of the steam boilers at the Prince George
Regional Correctional Centre from coal-firing to gas/oil-firing.
Over the past several years this Branch and the Mechanical Engineering Branch
of the Design Division have worked together in carrying out a co-ordinated programme of converting coal-burning plants to natural gas or oil-firing. This year
marks the completion of this programme.
The Branch also prepared mechanical drawings and specifications for incorporation into general contracts on a number of building-alteration projects initiated by
the Co-ordinator of Maintenance.
The successful operation of mechanical systems is, in large measure, dependent
on the day-to-day attention provided by our field staff, and commendation is due
them for the good work they are doing.
F. D. Sturdy, P.Eng.
Mechanical Operations and Maintenance Engineer
Automotive Workshop, Nanaimo Vocational School.
 E 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE THREE ES—ECOLOGY,  ENERGY, AND  ECONOMICS
"Appetite comes with eating, but the thirst goes away with drinking."—Rabelais.
In the past, manufacturers have designed and produced equipment primarily
to provide the most favourable first costs possible. They have been guided by what
they believed customers wanted and would willingly pay for in equipment and
systems.
Today, we are all aware of the increasing demands for energy, the mounting
concern over ecology, and the continuing desire for economy in the initial and operating costs. In the future we can expect the demand for energy to increase many fold
as indicated on the typical load-growth curves for electric energy (Fig. 1), while
ecological concerns become increasingly important, and economy continues to be a
necessary concern.
Ecology and energy must now be taken into account when various types of
air-conditioning equipment and systems are discussed.
Refrigeration and air-conditioning system design can be used to develop a good
ecological picture by minimizing adverse effects of heat dissipation, equipment
noise, and the power used for the electrically driven equipment.
Consideration must be made also, for ways to develop the best total energy
picture from the standpoint of availability, and the best economic picture based upon
owning and operating costs.
The three E's—ecology, energy, and economics—are so inter-related that,
generally, a better ecological and energy situation will provide economic benefits to
user and owner.
These thoughts suggest that heat reclaiming and a variable-volume air distribution represents one effective way to cope with the three E's. Owners, architects, and
engineers must indicate to manufacturers their demands for higher performance
systems and equipment.
The owning and operating cost approach to designing and buying would immediately begin to curb future demands for energy and, consequently, reduce thermal
and air pollution.
As a part of the group of specialists to produce buildings for Government use,
the Mechanical Branch participated in most of the projects that are listed elsewhere
in this Report. Our specialty, of course, is producing environmental comfort conditions for the occupants of these buildings.
We are pleased to announce that a start was made this year on the conversion
to natural gas and fuel oil as standby fuel at the boiler plant of the Riverview Hospital. This is a complex job in that steam service to the hospital has to be maintained at all times. To accommodate the continuity of service, the conversion from
coal fuel required that the project be broken down into five phases. Three of the
five phases were contracted in 1972, and the plant was on natural gas fuel by
November.
The Instrumentation Laboratory at the British Columbia Vocational School in
Burnaby was put into operation in 1972, culminating several years of planning and
building. It is a teaching medium where as many diverse types of commercial instruments as possible were applied to six different fluid-flow systems. These systems are
typical of those found in industrial processes in British Columbia.
Finally, I would like to thank the Project Inspectors and the Operating Engineers for helpful suggestions and co-operation given to us during the year.
W. E. Mills
Senior Mechanical Engineer
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1971/72
E 27
REGIONAL POWER GENERATION,  1958-72, BRITISH COLUMBIA,
YUKON, AND NORTHWEST TERRITORIES
Millions
of KWH.
30,000
29,000
28,000
27,000
26,000
25,000
24,000
23,000
22,000
21,000
20,000
19,000
18,000
17,000
16,000
15,000
14,000
13,000
12,000
11,000
GO
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as
vi
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o
VO
as
VD
OS
rs
VO
as
cn
Os
VO
Os
VC
Os
VO
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Figure 1.
Department of Highways maintenance establishment, Vernon.
 E 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1971/72
E 29
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 1
E 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CIVIL ENGINEER
"To conquer without risk is to triumph without glory."—Corneiile.
The work of the Branch covers most of the diverse specialities of civil engineering plus the landscaping design of Government buildings. The year found the
Branch divided between administering the many projects under design by outside
consultants, or under construction, and carrying out preliminary investigations and
detailed design on new work.
Involvement with municipalities on the provision of sewage and water services
to Government buildings intensified. Because of stricter pollution control standards, municipalities in general found themselves faced with higher expenditures for
sewerage services. New Government building sites generally lie on the outskirts of
built-up areas requiring decisions on whether to extend municipal services or to develop on-site sewerage and water facilities. Wherever possible the policy of the
Branch is to utilize municipal services and to assist municipalities in the extension of
services rather than develop on-site services.
Construction of Justice Court in Vernon was largely completed under "construction management." This is an imaginative landscaping scheme requiring close
attention to detail. The project was tendered initially by the traditional method;
however, the bids received proved to be unreasonably high. The decision was made
to engage an experienced construction superintendent to co-ordinate the work of
subcontractors and provide on-site supervision to achieve the desired effects. Work
was successfully completed within the estimated cost.
Preservation of the environment and increasing competition for rights to natural
resources were responsible for pushing the Branch into highly specialized fields of
biochemistry. Planning of the Abbotsford Trout Hatchery reached a crucial stage
requiring decisions on water usage, effluent treatment, and hatchery production.
Close liaison was established with the client, the Department of Recreation and Conservation, and specialists from the Branches of Health and Water Resources. A tour
of existing production and research facilities in the United States was made in late
1971. Alternative solutions to water recirculation and treatment problems were investigated and checked out in existing plants. It was reluctantly concluded, following these investigations, that many problems in connection with water reuse systems
in fish hatcheries still remained to be solved. Rather than risk the construction of a
full-scale system based on existing design data, it was decided to design and construct
a pilot plant and to commission B.C. Research to handle the research involved.
Fish growth is closely related to water temperature. For example, fish will
grow approximately twice as fast if the water temperature is raised from 42 to 48 °F.
Ability to control water temperature will enable hatchery operators to plan production, fish size at release, and time of release. Higher temperatures will lead to increased production from a given plant size. The cost of heating water is such that it
only becomes feasible if the water can be reused many times and the heat conserved.
One hundred pounds of fish produce about as much organic waste matter as six
people. The waste products from a medium-sized hatchery are equivalent to that
of a small town. Treatment of hatchery effluent is essential. It follows that if waste
products are to be removed before discharge to surface waters is permitted, then it is
logical to provide a sufficient degree of treatment so that the water can be recirculated
and reused.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1971/72
E 31
Recirculation then leads to benefits and increased growth due to higher water
temperature, increased production for a given plant size, increased control of production, reduction in water usage, and a high standard of waste removal. All the issues
have not yet been resolved. Hatchery operation will become more complex as the
environmental controls become more sophisticated. The direction of advance is
dictated by economics, and it seems certain that the increased demand for sport fishing will be met by fish production in partially closed environmental systems.
Automation, rapid communication, and the involvement of larger numbers of
participating specialists have caused a change in emphasis in the day-to-day work of
the design office. Design, draughting, and specification writing still constitute the
major part of the visible production of the office. However, with more work being
handled by consultants and a correspondingly larger number of projects under construction, the staff members are called upon to spend much time resolving contractual
problems, in negotiations with municipalities, and in two-way consultations with
other disciplines. Higher technical qualifications are a definite advantage in this
type of operation. Draughtsmen are taking upgrading courses in engineering design.
It is also preferable if new employees have the basic education to benefit from upgrading courses. Graduates from BCIT and other technical schools have proved
their worth during the past two years.
J. R. Simpson
Senior Civil Engineer
Creston Valley Wildlife Management Area Building.
 E 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
GUIDELINES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING
"I call architecture frozen music."—Goethe, in a letter to Eckerman.
The criteria for building our environment in the 20th century are that those
responsible for planning should never forget that the most important thing about a
town, city, or region is the people who live there.
This means more than deriving a specification for the area from human needs.
The planner must provide a suitable container for the people's activities. It also
means that, for good or bad, it is the activities themselves that shape the total
development.
In a way, human geography is the history of the organization of man and his
environment. Yet man's settlement of the land, whether urban or rural, was not
environment planning in today's sense. What it lacked was the specific determination
of a notion that conceives its over-all organization on the basis of its material
resources. Thus, spontaneous settlement of the land for economic reasons, which
was subject to natural laws independent of man's free will, has given way to conscious, voluntary reorganization of regional, natural, or even international space for
the well-being of the society that lives in it.
Environment planning is therefore the geographic expression of an area's
economic and social policy, and it can be defined as the voluntary redistribution of
agriculture, industry, and services for a better use of the region's space, people and
resources.
There must be a constant dialogue, a space-time continuum in planning—t'me
past, present, and future. We cannot refashion a region, town, or even a landscape
without being subject to the limitations of the past. Conversely, the planner who is
engaged in mapping out the region's environment cannot think only of the present
but must also be a step ahead of his associates and project into the future. Because
of the scope of the task, fundamental choices have to be made for the long term, and
these must be made on the basis of what is foreseeably desirable.
The reasons for environment planning are to be found in the changes in the
making that may alter the geographic distribution of people and activities in the
coming decades. If plans are not made to adapt to these changes, they will accentuate all kinds of imbalances, especially econom c and demographic, and might
endanger the life of the general population and perhaps, eventually, national unity.
The changes in individual activities and social patterns to be expected in this
century's technological revolution will be so vast that they will ult.mately mean
revising today's standards of values, for ideas, like methods and structures, can grow
obsolete. The 19th-century industrial revolution proved that the simple recognition
of obsolescence does not bring about immediate elimination of the old. Man does
not adapt spontaneously to progress, and progress, so called, entails hardsh.ps. To
ease the hardships of destruction or demolition that are the price of social costs—the
annoyances of urban life and the burdens of reconversion—a policy is required that
facilitates the adaptation of both man and his new environment.
In short, the goal of planning our environment is to develop a harmonious
society wherein urban life, with its broader role, would satisfy the new requirements
of higher living standards and increased leisure time, and wherein rural life, while
representing a much smaller proportion of the population, would assume a new
shape with demands very much like those of city life and would have not only its
fair share of wages and income but also of leisure and culture.
W. D. Lougher-Goodey, F.R.T.P.I., M.T.P.I.C, M.I.F.L.A.,
F.I.L.A., M.A.S.P.O., A.I. Struct.Eng.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1971/72
E 33
REPORT OF THE  ELECTRICAL ENGINEER
"Light, God's eldest daughter, is a principal beauty in a building."
—Thomas Fuller (1608-61).
The men and women of the Electrical and Communications Branch were fully
employed in a large number of projects, with the usual wide variation in size and
complexity, many with considerable special interest.
Because the total number of projects was greater than in previous years, a
larger percentage of the work was carried out by using the services of consulting
engineers. This has resulted in a useful flow of ideas in both directions.
The number of projects completed on behalf of the Construction and Maintenance Division totalled approximately 60. This work required a varying effort at
different times of the year. It is estimated that the average employment on a full-
time basis was an engineer and three technician/draughtsmen. The proximity of
these personnel to those working on similar Design Division projects was a significant
factor in their efficiency.
The Branch continued to respond to requests for assistance in the technical
aspects of electrical maintenance of all kinds throughout the Province. In this work,
also, proximity and familiarity with the work of design personnel is a significant
advantage.
In the field of communications, Branch personnel were engaged in a particularly
wide variety of projects. Fire-alarm systems were scheduled for modernization in
many buildings and establishments. Designs were completed or under way for
such projects as an integrated communications system at the Eric Martin Institute,
a closed circuit television system at the Youth Development Centre, a CATV system
at Riverview and Valleyview Hospitals, an extensive sound and control system for
the new Human History exhibits at the Provincial Museum, a security system for the
main Legislative Building, office inter-communications systems in various buildings,
a telemetry and control system at Riverview, and many others.
A major part of the communications effort of the Branch is devoted to all
aspects of the telephone systems used by Government personnel. Additions have
been required because of increases in Government commitments and personnel. New
lines have been added to the "Telpak" intercity system of private lines. Planning
has progressed to make this system more automatic and efficient, and the first step
was implemented when provision was made for direct dialing to Vancouver numbers.
New telephone exchanges were installed at the Health Unit at Haney, the Alouette
River Unit, the B.C. Vocational School at Kamloops, Glendale Hospital, and the
Government building at Williams Lake. The exchanges at the Haney Correctional
Centre and the Provincial Health Building in Vancouver were replaced with modern
equipment. Over 1,500 requests for alterations and (or) additions to Government
telephone installations were scrutinized, approved where justified, and orders placed
with the telephone companies. Cost control continues to be emphasized, with the
object of meeting all real communication requirements as efficiently as possible.
The telephone switchboard supervisors and operators have continued to provide
superior service, often under very difficult conditions during peak traffic periods.
Some switchboards have reached the limits of their capability. Changes are under
way, but in the meantime it is the operators who must carry the extra load. This they
have done with courtesy and efficiency.
J. B. Hall, CD., B.A.Sc, P.Eng., M.E.I.C
Senior Electrical Engineer
 E 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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Night view, Vernon Courthouse, with Justice Court in foreground.
Administration Building, Alouette River Unit.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1971/72
E 35
REPORT OF THE ARCHITECT-PLANNER
"Nothing is so firmly believed as what we least know."—Montaigne.
The period of time covered by this Report has been marked by an increasing
tempo of activity and a demand for an augmentation of work load and priorities.
The demand for space throughout the Province proceeds without any signs
of abating, and is not confined to office accommodation, for lack of storage
facilities is running a close second. Increases of 11 per cent over all during the last
12 months are taxing staff capabilities to the limit of efficiency.
Before leaving the subject of leases and space requirements, special mention
should be made of the decision that two new buildings are necessary for the
Legislative core, and this programme is well under way. Properties have been
purchased systematically over the past 10 years in preparation for such a decision.
The construction of a project on a designated site will assist in not only arresting
the spiral of leasing commitments, but permit this Division to scale down the
Government's heavy lease programme in the Greater Victoria area. The second
building will allow the demolition of all the old residential units now used as overcrowded offices and afford the opportunity of planning the Legislative Building for
its proper function, in accordance with the Precinct Reports of 1963, 1964, and
1971.
In a very heavy design and building programme, sites had to be chosen, and
obtained, prior to the second stage coming into force. This has not been accomplished without a deal of consultation with public and private sources, and could
not be achieved without professional assistance, owing to a deficiency in office personnel.
Land was chosen to support programmes for new Government offices, Courthouses, Highways Department garages and yard-sites, weigh-scale stations, motor-
vehicle inspection stations, departmental laboratories, Educational, Health, and Welfare buildings, and residential units.
The special committee set up to advise on gaol and reform centre sites is still
engaged in a search for land for such specific uses. The demand for this commodity
by users who are in many instances in conflict amplifies the need for concentrated
and alert action. Sites have been lost after extensive negotiations because owners
have become impatient of delays in Departmental activity. The search meanwhile
proceeds for alternates, no simple task.
All properties becoming surplus to requirements are sold by tender or auction
or may be leased for a period of time as in the case of disused Highways yard-sites,
which in most cases become an interest to the municipal authority. All these duties
fall under the purview of this Division.
Master plans drawn up by this Division in previous years are now being implemented at various centres throughout the Province, the latest to move being the precinct at Columbia Street, Kamloops. Where the Crown Provincial is in possession
of land assembly there is a constant pressure from outside sources to "chip away"
this resource, and to emasculate its potential by way of easements, rights-of-way, and
other means of connection. Dealing with these approaches points up the need for
preservation and planning our land potential, which can last for only a limited time,
certainly not beyond the next decade.
Mention was made in last year's Report of the acquisition of the former HBC
Warehouse.   Contracts are now under way to prepare the lands for storing all De-
 E 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
partmental vehicles in the Victoria area, thus releasing other rentals that have been
in force for the past 15 years, and work has commenced to convert the first half of
the building for the use of the Department's Maintenance Branch.
Now that the Museum Complex has been in existence long enough to have received its first million visitors, it would appear appropriate to remark on the inadequacy of parking arrangements for visitors.
Observations taken over the same period now confirm that 150 vehicles and
their passengers are turned away each day owing to this deficiency, compounding the
traffic congestion in the area of the Legislative Buildings.
W. D. Lougher-Goodey, F.R.T.P.I., M.T.P.I.C, M.I.F.L.A.,
F.I.L.A., M.A.S.P.O., A.I.Struct.E.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1971/72
E 37
Members of the Legislative Assembly offices before renovation.
Members of the Legislative Assembly offices after renovation.
 E 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE QUANTITY SURVEYOR
'As a well-spent day brings happy sleep, so life well used brings happy death.'
—Leonardo da Vinci.
The system of cost control in the design process has now been operating for a
period of approximately two years and its effectiveness has been well demonstrated.
This is of particular value when the programmatic requirements or the design parameters of a building are changed and the budget must be maintained. The objective
of cost control is to obtain not the cheapest possible solution but the "best buy," that
is, the building from which can be obtained the most benefits in efficiency, appearance, and user satisfaction, commensurate with an acceptable price.
The format of estimates used for cost control differs from that used by contractors when assembling their tenders. A general contractor estimates on a trade
basis, obtaining prices on much of the work from subcontractors whose estimates
cover the cost of the work done by particular trades, regardless of their location in
the building. The estimates prepared within the Department are based on building
"elements," such as exterior walls and floor or roof structures. When these are
incorporated in a cost plan for a building, it is relatively easy to find where, in the
design, any changes in cost are occurring.
These element prices are invaluable when preparing preliminary estimates that
are based on very brief sketches or a written programme. There is now in existence
a Standard List of Elements which provides a common basis on which quantity
surveyors throughout Canada can prepare their estimates. The next step is to prepare a Provincial cost-information service that collects estimates of buildings as they
are prepared, and publishes them at regular intervals. The information obtained
from such a service would enable users to compare the cost of the design on which
they are working with other buildings that serve a similar function. Also, the increase
in the general knowledge of element costs would be of great value to the construction
industry. At present a service of this kind is not economically feasible and Government participation would be required to enable it to be operated successfully.
Pricing research of both individual prices and pricing methods is a constant
necesssity if estimates are to reflect accurately the probable cost of a project. Price
indexes reflect the movement of prices, but there is no index in North America that
can be regarded as satisfactorily serving the construction industry. To overcome
this, the Department during the past year has devised a method of preparing indexes
on several types of buildings, relating them to tender prices and the tender climate
at the time of bidding. Indexes refer to historic prices and are used in updating
them to the present, but projecting future prices presents a more difficult problem,
particularly when predicting changes in element prices, each of which contains several
trades, with their differing wage rates. A method of predicting changes in element
prices has been devised by the Department. This will be developed during the
coming year.
A factor of increasing importance in design is the cost of maintaining and
running buildings. These costs are labour intensive and are escalating rapidly. A
detailed knowledge of them is desirable. Discussions have been held on how they
can be obtained and it is to be hoped that practical results will be forthcoming.
S. R. Toller, M.C.I.Q.S.
Senior Quantity Surveyor
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1971/72
E 39
Kamloops Weigh-scale Station.
 E 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CHIEF  ENGINEER,
SAFETY ENGINEERING SERVICES  DIVISION
"A man and what he loves and builds have but a day and then disappear; nature
cares not—and renews the annual round untired. It is the old law, sad but not bitter.
Only when man destroys the life and beauty of nature, there is the outrage."—
George Macauley Trevelyan (1876-1962).
On April 30, 1971, the Honourable W. N. Chant, former Minister of Public
Works, appointed the Safety Inspection Acts Amendment Committee. The committee consisted of C. W. MacSorley (Chairman), the Chief Engineer, the Chief Electrical Inspector, the Chief Boiler Inspector, and the Chief Gas Inspector of the
Safety Engineering Services Division.
It was to undertake a study of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act, the Electrical
Energy Inspection Act, and the Gas Act, and advise the Honourable Minister regarding any amendments to and (or) consolidation of the Acts.
After publicizing the terms of reference of the committee and that hearings
would be held in areas where interest was shown, hearings were held during June
in the cities of Victoria, Vancouver, Trail, Prince George, and Prince Rupert.
A total of 52 briefs was submitted by all segments of the general public to the
committee. The unanimous recommendations of the Committee were submitted to
the Honourable Minister on November 1, 1972.
During the Spring Session of the 1972 Legislature, a Bill (No. 67), the Safety
Engineering Services Act, was introduced and passed. This Act will come into force
on a date to be fixed by the Lieutenant-Governor by Proclamation.
Much of the coming year will be spent in preparing recommendations to the
Government as to regulations pursuant to the Safety Engineering Services Act.
During 1972 an Order in Council was passed amending the Regulations
Governing Mechanical Refrigeration Plants.
The work load of this Division continues to increase at a very fast rate. The
over-all revenue increase was in excess of 14 per cent from the previous year. The
indications are that the increase in the coming year will exceed that of this year.
The reorganization of the Division, which will decentralize many of the technical and clerical functions of the Branches, is proceeding in accordance with the
over-all plan and is expected to be completed in the next year.
A. G. Kaneen, P.Eng.
Chief Engineer
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1971/72
E 41
REPORT OF THE CHIEF  BOILER INSPECTOR
"I am not willing that this discussion should close without mention of the value
of a true teacher. Give me a log hut, with only a simple bench, Mark Hopkins on one
end and I on the other, and you may have all the buildings and apparatus and
libraries without them."—James Abram Garfield (1831-81) in an address to Williams
College Alumni, New York, in 1871.
We have experienced yet another year of growth of plants using boilers and
pressure vessels. Along with burgeoning industrial plant and equipment, our services
are more and more in demand, so much so that we are now oversaturated with tasks,
and we have graphically tried to show this. Our policies have been to offer our services for all boilers and pressure vessels in all locations and to treat each person in
like manner, in compliance with our Act; however, it has been continually brought
to our attention of late that many pressure vessels, in particular, have not been
inspected since construction some 20 to 25 years previously, as well as new installations that we have not yet examined. To effectively and economically serve the
industrial community, additional staff will be required, costs of which could be
largely recovered by additional revenues.
ACCIDENTS
We investigated four fatalities, one of which involved "code" equipment.
One occurred at an oxygen-acetylene manufacturing plant where a welder was making repairs to a vessel which had been inadequately purged, causing the tank to
explode, killing the welder and seriously injuring his helper.
Two of the other deaths occurred because a fuel barge being repaired was
poorly vented and the welding activity triggered off an explosion.
The fourth fatality was caused by insufficient cover-plate fastening at the end
of a large water main undergoing hydrostatic tests. Our Inspector appeared at the
inquest.
Two recovery boilers were extensively damaged by explosions during the year.
Procedures for quickly securing the units in such emergencies effectively reduced the
exposure of personnel to hazards.
Full reports of these and the other accidents we investigated are on file. Recommendations were put forward in each case and were put into effect.
One accident we investigated involved a steam-engine governor valve which
broke, causing the engine to overspeed and consequently the cast-iron engine flywheel (8 feet diameter by 32 inches wide) to disintegrate; the radial sections of cast
iron were hurled in the opposite direction to the two boilers that were supplying
steam to the engine. One piece of cast iron passed through a concrete wall, travelled
60 feet, and eventually landed on the roof of an adjacent building.
In another case, a hot-water boiler exploded and hurled the wrapper sheet 300
feet from the site of the explosion to land a few feet in front of a duplex dwelling.
This particular boiler was an improper installation. There were no injuries to personnel in each of the above accidents.
S. Smith
Chief Inspector
 E 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAJOR ACTIVITY CHARTS
Boiler Inspection Branch
INSPECTIONS, SURVEYS, EXAMINATIONS
Boiler Inspections (1,000's)
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiimi       |
2 4 6
Pressure Vessel Inspections (100's)
3 6
Shop Inspections (100's)
I 2 4
Welders'Examinations (1,000's)
I 1 2
Engineers'Examinations (100's)
! 2 4
Refrigeration Surveys (10's)
Accidents (100's)
1 2
Design Surveys (100's)
12
10
15
10
10
18
12
10
1971
1972
UlffllE
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1971/72
E 43
-S"*!
^
f                   \
/  A
\     \ / ■
\ Li /
" ~ *2i n^ $^
hi. i
■■■ ..  :.■.....                  ~'                                     ■   ...
::; ■  : ■-:■"--.-■■■   '■■:'..  ■■■.■■■ "                                                                                        '■'    .■
Fuel-tank explosion on barge.
Torn plates after fuel-tank explosion.
 E 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CHIEF  INSPECTOR OF
ELECTRICAL ENERGY
"Don't put too fine a point on your wit for fear it should get blunted."—Cervantes.
The fiscal year 1971/72 was a difficult one for the Electrical Energy Inspection
Branch. The explosive increase in work load from 1970 strained the resources of
the Branch to their utmost, and created some severe administrative problems. Some
of these still remain unsolved.
Statistically, the increase is well illustrated by the following figures:
The number of examinations given increased 24.5 per cent, which may indicate
that many electricians have decided that they need a certificate.
The number of permits issued increased 32.8 per cent, which is a phenomenal
increase.
The number of pieces of electrical equipment approved during the year increased by over 82 per cent. During the previous year this increase was 119 per
cent.
The number of drawings examined was up 26 per cent. The Plans Approvals
section is once more behind schedule, due to the large increases in the work load of
the Head Office staff in other areas.
Finally, the average work load of the Inspectors in the field increased 15.5 per
cent, indicating again the need for increases in the field staff.
One of the major projects occupying the time of the Chief Inspector was his
participation in the work of the Safety Inspection Acts Amendment Committee under
the chairmanship of C. W. MacSorley. This committee held public hearings in the
cities of Prince George, Prince Rupert, Trail, Victoria, and Vancouver, and received
numerous submissions and briefs. Written briefs were also subsequently received
by mail.   All these were considered by the committee.
Following the hearings, the committee spent three months preparing recommendations to the Honourable Minister.
The fire and accident record for the year was not good. The Branch investigated 139 incidents involving 120 fires, 12 fatalities, and 9 injuries. Only 3 of the
12 fatalities involved electrical workers. The others included an 87-year-old woman,
a 12-year-old child, a 21-year-old suicide, a young housewife, and five workmen
whose normal work was not electrical. Two of these died in explosions, one was
crushed, and the other two were electrocuted.
The Advisory Board for the Qualification of Electrical Contractors held five
meetings and considered 12 charges against contractors for violations of the regulations. Nine contractors appeared before the Board and the other three were considered in absentia. One certificate of competency was cancelled irrevocably, one
was suspended for 30 days, two were suspended pending appearance of the contractor before the Board, charges against one contractor were dropped, and one contractor was required to pass a new examination; five received reprimands, and one
had his privilege of drawing permits suspended pending correction of all outstanding
objections to his work.
G. A. Harrower, P.Eng.
Chief Electrical Inspector
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1971/72
E 45
REPORT OF THE CHIEF GAS  INSPECTOR
"The surest test of the civilization of a people—at least, as sure as any—afforded
by mechanical art, is to be found in their architecture, which presents so noble a field
for the display of the grand and the beautiful, and which, at the same time, is so
intimately connected with the essential comforts of life."—William Hickey Prescott
(1796-1859) in The Conquest of Peru.
THE ACT
The Gas Act has been combined with the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act and
Electrical Energy Inspection Act into the Safety Engineering Services Act, to come
into force on a date to be fixed by Proclamation of the Lieutenant-Governor. No
amendments were made to the pursuant regulations.
THE BRANCH
Gas inspection services are extended into the Village of Elkford. There has
been an increase n gas-service extensions in most of the larger Interior centres, and
the major gas utilities expect an increase of over 20 per cent in the number of customers by the end of 1972. The number of permit applications on all types of
equipment increased by 20 per cent. Field approvals increased by 7 per cent, and
the number of new designs checked increased by 35 per cent.
The liquid natural gas plant in Richmond, completed the previous year, was
used to its full capacity for the first time during the extreme cold spell in February
of this year.
The giant plant at Alcan in Kitimat was converted over to natural gas during
the past year.
ACCIDENTS
There were 17 fires of a minor nature and four major fires investigated by this
Branch, none of which resulted in serious injuries. Two persons were admitted to
hospital for treatment as a result of asphyxiation and were released a few hours later.
W. R. Montgomery, P.Eng.
Chief Gas Inspector, Safety Engineering Services
 E 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Control room, liquid natural gas plant,
Tilbury Island.
B.C. Hydro and Power Authority,
Tilbury Island.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1971/72
SUMMARY OF WORK
E 47
2,300
2,200
2,100
2,000
1,900
1,800
1,700
1,600
1,500
1,400
1,300
1,200
1,100
1,000
900
800
700
Year 68/69
y
y
y
..-■■■"
r
*****           A
----*"'
35 per cent increase,
new designs checked.
\Vi per cent increase,
gas-fitters' licences issued.
7 per cent increase,
appliance certifications.
69/70
70/71
71/72
25,000
24,000
23,000
22,000
21,000.
20,000
Year 68/69
69/70
70/71
71/72
 E 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF  EXPENDITURE
"The first step toward madness is to think oneself wise."—Fernando de Rojas.
The following pages present in detail the expenditures relating to the construction, alterations, and repairs on the various Government buildings and institutions,
etc., coming under the management, charge, and direction of the Minister of Public
Works.
A. E. Rhodes
Comptroller of Expenditure
STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES, FISCAL YEAR 1971/72
ADMINISTRATION AND MAINTENANCE VOTES
(For details, see Public Accounts)
$
Vote 220—Minister's Office   33,362.12
Vote 221—General Administration   410,497.51
Vote 222—Government Buildings (maintenance)  (gross) 16,452,014.96
Vote 224—Rentals    (gross) 3,142,726.49
Vote 225—Safety Inspection Division     1,255,576.67
Less credits—
Items recovered from the Department of Education re technical and
vocational schools (Government Buildings Vote)   2,337,284.94
Items recovered re Vocational Training, Text Book Branch, Mediation
Commission, Energy Board, etc. (Rental Vote)         463,350.37
18,493,542.44
CAPITAL
Vote 223—Construction of Provincial Buildings {see expenditure of building)
 (gross)   15,660,992.03
Less credits—■
Items recovered from the Department of Education re technical and
vocational schools      2,517,627.02
13,143,365.01
SUMMARY
Gross expenditure, Department of Public Works—
Administration and maintenance   21,294,177.75
Capital   15,660,992.03
36,955,169.78
Less credits—
Maintenance        2,800,635.31
Capital       2,517,627.02
Net expenditure   31,636,907.45
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1971/72
E 49
Project No.
242-B-4
631-B
763-B
461-B-l
517-B-l
599-B-l
599-B-2
30-B-4
30-B-5
30-B-8
539-B
636-B
656-B
699-B
716-B
716-B-l
548-B
6-B-38
6-B-39
6-B-40
661-B
705-B
707-B
762-B
468-B-l
754-B
5-B-121
619-B
752-B
744-B
745-B
694-B
708-B
749-B
751-B
289-B
289-B-l
384-B
700-B
729-B
123-B-22
123-B-23
VOTE 223—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS
Description
Abbotsford—
Brooder House Random Sample Poultry Testing Station ...	
Fraser Valley Trout Hatchery	
Tourist Information Centre	
Alberni—Government buildings (renovations)	
Allison Pass—Living accommodation (Department of Highways personnel)   ....	
Alouette River Unit, Haney—
Kitchen stores building 	
Administration building	
Brannan Lake School—
Special unit  	
Maintenance building	
Reroofing dormitories 	
Burnaby—
British Columbia Youth Development Centre	
Dairy Laboratory 	
Motor-vehicle Inspection Station 	
Special Unit for Adolescents, Willingdon Avenue	
Burns Lake—
Provincial Government building    	
Courthouse extensions—acquisition of properties and contingencies      	
Charlie Lake—Alterations to Department of Mines building	
Colony Farm—
Dormitories    ....
Riverside Building—alterations and extensions  	
Riverside Unit—improve security measures __  i	
Coquitlam—Remand Centre       	
Creston—Wildlife Management Area Administration Centre	
Dawson Creek—Provincial Government building _..  	
Douglas—Tourist Information Centre  	
Duncan—
Provincial buildings     _
RCMP detachment—renovations     	
Essondale—Structural alterations, Zone 3      ...
Fernie—
Government Agent's residence     	
Purchase of property     _	
Fort Nelson—
Living accommodation—Department of Health     ... 	
Living accommodation—Department of Commercial Transport ..
Fort St. John-
Storage building 	
Provincial Government building	
Purchase of property (Department of Highways District Superintendent's residence) 	
Purchase of property (Government Agent's residence) 	
General—
General expenses 	
Wages and expenses—Casual Design staff 	
Grounds improvement to various Government buildings
Golden—
Weigh-scale station	
Highways establishment	
Haney—
Correctional Institution—roof replacement	
Correctional Institution—boiler renovations 	
Expenditures
$
1,925.04
55,112.65
37,552.98
41,846.57
4,353.78
3,302.62
406,119.87
2,173.76
62,871.24
14,402.33
51,448.35
2,197.23
396,913.27
1,302.40
22,553.61
23,493.37
145,155.93
98,745.50
13,033.59
30.92
2,385.50
218,867.95
21,389.84
44,115.32
4,450.05
14.57
89,260.64
6,088.74
32,460.00
12,697.48
11,904.38
37,236.37
15,623.57
27,204.00
26,799.95
116,365.80
532,092.36
42,799.58
39,293.75
129,455.19
2,003.91
9,686.00
 E 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOTE 223—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project No.
79-B-10
79-B-15
79-B-16
79-B-17
79-B-18
79-B-19
10-B-56
701-B
718-B
723-B
733-B
733-B-l
733-B-2
743-B
736-B
421-B
735-B
640-B
714-B
202-B-2
711-B
727-B
97-B-4
625-B
641-B
698-B
519-B
728-B
737-B
741-B
98-B-l
746-B
39-B-62
39-B-70
39-B-73
39-B-75
39-B-76
647-B
31-B-9
695-B
726-B
715-B
201-B-2
479-B
646-B
720-B
720-B-l
724-B
742-B
Description
Jericho Hill School—
Dormitory unit and development	
Principal's residence   	
Kitchen-dining-infirmary  building 	
Renovations of existing building	
Centennial Gymnasium—preliminary design	
Swimming-pool 	
Kamloops—
Structural alterations, Zone 4 	
Weigh-scale station	
Provincial Government building	
Personal Care Home 	
Regional Correctional Centre—alterations	
Regional Correctional Centre—heating plant :	
Regional Correctional Centre—recreational building	
Public Works maintenance building  .    	
Keremeos—Purchase of site for temporary Court facilities	
Kootenay—Trout Hatchery, Bull River—improvements 	
Lytton—Purchase of site for temporary Court facilities	
Maillardville—Purchase of property and renovations	
Merritt—Liquor Store conversion (includes purchase of property) ....
Nanaimo—
Courthouse—renovations 	
Motor-vehicle Inspection Station     	
Department of Public Works Building—replacement of electrical
and heating systems	
Nelson—
Courthouse retaining-wall 	
Employee housing   	
Structural alterations, Zone 5 	
Provincial Government building 	
New Denver—
Dormitory—alterations   	
Highways establishment	
Nakusp Garage extension 	
Purchase  of property  (District Superintendent, Department of
Highways,  residence)   ....    	
New Haven—Borstal School—fire damage repairs	
New Westminster—Courthouse renovations 	
Oaka'la (Lower Mainland Regional Correctional Centre)—
Roads .... ....      ....	
Central Classification Section—alterations and improvements „..
Security _.    .   	
Licence Shop—revisions      	
East Wing Unit—plumbing 	
100 Mile House—Highways maintenance establishment	
Pearson TB. Hospital—Modifications 	
Penticton—Storage building 	
Port Hardy—Purchase of house-trailer ,	
Powell River—Provincial Government building  	
Prince George—
Courthouse—roads and paving	
Structural alterations, Zone 6 	
Libiary Development Commission	
Regional Correctional Centre—services connection
Regional Correctional Centre—heating system	
Prince Rupert—
Courthouse—heating system 	
Courthouse—new Court facilities and roof repairs .
Expenditures
$
7,533.80
5,044.89
533,262.65
104,368.83
35,347.72
15,956.83
48,769.10
28,277.83
6,419.12
297.95
4,164.16
8,384.10
248.17
7,760.14
8,109.10
166,592.91
3,500.00
22,675.69
100,717.27
1,820.11
9,935.47
22,068.63
28,129.02
42,590.17
49,955.69
425,347.34
11,681.29
13,194.87
19,436.47
22,172.20
33,521.36
2,096.44
896.86
1,254.00
21,703.50
3,834.18
60,079.26
448.60
17,491.68
27,374.77
7,560.00
16,927.16
5,059.77
47,873.36
173,194.34
21,178.52
34,302.61
113,118.22
31,126.64
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1971/72
E 51
VOTE 223—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project No.                                                   Description Expenditures
Quesnel— $
658-B                 Highways maintenance establishment  37,629.83
658-B-l               Department of Highways—dry storage building  12,000.00
611-B         Richmond Municipality—Motor-vehicle Inspection Station  4,192.46
Riverview—
5-B-116          Landscaping, roads, parking, etc.   7,167.78
5-B-134          Fire-alarm system   28,612.91
5-B-138          West Lawn Building—alterations     477,854.96
5-B-143          Essondale—fire protection and escapes   113,602.59
5-B-146          Conversion of boiler plant  699,565.44
5-B-147          Cable television connections   29,273.65
5-B-148          Centre Lawn Building—renovations  89,236.86
5-B-149          East Lawn Unit   11,342.79
5-B-150          North Lawn (TB. isolation suite)   14,599.40
5-B-152          Crease Clinic   832.91
659-B         Salmon Arm—Highways maintenance establishment  26,676.27
24-B-10    Skeenaview Hospital—Alterations and renovations   322,663.78
Smithers—
688-B                 Provincial Government building  181,197.44
693-B                 Storage building   33,327.00
750-B         Surrey—Motor-veh.cle Inspection Station   15,604.67
Tete Jaune Cache—■
655-B                 Weigh-scale   226.60
730-B                 Maintenance establishment   111,626.47
717-B         Trail—Provincial Government building  26,858.85
Tranquille—
10-B-12            Water supply and sewage disposal  1,332.90
10-B-51             104-bed unit     5,353.21
10-B-57            Renovations—fire-alarm system   4,357.74
10-B-60            Greaves Building—Fire escapes   163,956.65
712-B         Valemount—Purchase of property     6,072.00
5-B-151  Valleyview—Hospital alterations     1,206.83
Vancouver—
89-B-3              Provincial Health Building—renovations  67,852.16
408-B                 Structural alterations, Zone 2   75,4*5.05
546-B-l              Willow Chest Centre—West elevator replacement  1,394.32
546-B-2              Willow Chest Centre—renovations  15,980.45
610-B                 Courthouse—Courtroom facilities   247,297.30
634-B                 British Columbia Building  1,338,966.19
649-B                  Roads, paths and parking areas  18,773.00
721-B                   Personal Care Home   62,808.85
502-B          Vanderhoof—Highways maintenance establishment  121.07
Vernon—
411-B-l              Highways maintenance establishment   474,200.28
604-B                 Courthouse—purchase and demolition of property  5,207.46
617-B                 Courthouse—elevator and alterations  77,692.33
617-B-l              Provincial buildings—landscaping, headquarters  16,761.16
617-B-l              Provincial buildings—landscaping. Zone 4   107,164.10
Victoria—
9-B-19            Colquitz, Vancouver Island Unit—renovations  310,954.09
211-B-l              Materials Testing Laboratory—extension   45,087.01
292-B                 Structural alterations, Zone 1   113,935.94
385-B                 Parking facilities, Parliament Buildings   41,949.69
464-B                 Eric Martin Institute   25,243.16
486-B                 British Columbia Museum and Archives Building  152,034.91
487-B                 Acquisition of property, Parliament Buildings Precinct  101,381.43
492-B                 Motor-vehicle Building, Data Processing Centre  2,521.04
518-B                 Dogwood Building, 1019 Wharf Street  15,928.21
536-B                 Parliament Buildings—new electrical distribution system  16,979.56
552-B                  Windermere Building—purchase    20,000.00
 E 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOTE 223—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project No.
554-B
601-B-2
629-B
639-B
690-B
704-B
709-B
722-B
731-B
732-B
734-B
738-B
755-B
607-B-l
657-B
7-B-26
7-B-40
7-B-49
7-B-50
7-B-51
7-B-56
7-B-57
7-B-59
7-B-60
7-B-61
614-B
Description
Victoria—Continued
Glendale Hospital         	
International Airport—roof repairs to hangars 	
Windermere Building—roofing, parapets, and renovations
Legislative Chamber—sound-amplifying equipment	
Parliament Buildings—renovations   	
Langford welding and fabricating shop	
No. 4 temporary building (B.C. Hospital Insurance Service accommodation)—renovations 	
Personal Care Home    	
Cafeteria—renovations  	
Dougias Building—renovations (includes several jobs) 	
Langford storage building, Department of Highways	
Provincial   Government  Service  Centre   (ex  Hudson  Bay  Co.
warehouse)  _     	
Colquitz—purchase of property 	
Williams Lake—
Courthouse   	
Highways maintenance establishment 	
Woodlands School, The—
Motor Transport Btanch—quonset hut conversion	
Land caping, fei.c.ng, and paving, etc.  	
Industrial Therapy Unit _.._ 	
Revonat.ons to boiler plant 	
Fire-alarm system    	
Renovations to Wing 2, Centre Building	
Ventilation to 100-bed units    	
Playgrounds   	
Reroofing      	
Fraserview Building—ventilation       	
Various districts—Fencing Highways yards	
Expenditures
$
570,656.85
8,160.62
1,320.77
391.35
197,008.20
152,917.38
27,210.69
399,311.25
5,303.31
104,456.09
Nil
40,647.40
2,100.00
150,916.80
28,704.23
2,460.02
5,370.54
60,329.22
12,053.81
7,096.65
48,663.50
304,911.69
8,994.86
32.10
12,072.41
30,641.77
Vocational Schools*
B.C. Institute of Technology, Burnaby—
401-B-l               Additions, including Nuclear Laboratory, etc.   5,671.31
401-B-2              Library       19,803.68
40i-B-5              Underground power-distribution system  Nil
401-B-7              Roads and ancillary site work   217,306.99
401-B-8              Multipurpose Student Centre    66,665.78
401-B-9              Addition to Food Training Centre  4,597.59
401-B-12            Extension to culvert   172.94
401-B-13            Emergency power system   1,314.21
B.C. Vocational School, Burnaby—
299-B-4              Industrial Laboratory   14,071.13
299-B-5              Heavy-duty diesel mechanics workshop  226,023.55
299-B-7              Temporary Commercial classroom  40,967.46
299-B-ll            Air-compressor system  3,191.82
507-B                 Vocational Teacher College     5,225.38
756-B         B.C. Vocational School, Chilliwack—Vocational school   41,342.91
B.C. Vocational School, Dawson Creek—
481-B-2              Auto-body shop, welding-shop, and teaching-farm  1,023.72
481-B-3              Addition to food training area  104,669.24
481-B-4              Roads and site work  106,009.43
620-B-l              B.C. Vocational School, Kamloops—Vocational school   659,968.75
412-B-2              B.C. Vocational School, Kelowna—Cafeteria and training kitchen 2,773.16
* Credits were received from the Department of Education to offset part of these expenditures.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1971/72
E 53
VOTE 223—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project No. Description
B.C. Vocational School, Nanaimo—
231-B-7 Additional floor to existing classroom building	
231-B-8 New workshop building	
23 l-B-9 Welding shed	
231-B-10' Electrical distribution	
B.C. Vocational School, Nelson—
429-B-l Central Receiving and Stores Depot	
429-B-2 Completion and extension of parking areas	
B.C. Vocational School, Prince George—
312-B-l              Sawmill building and conversion of existing classrooms
312-B-2 Alterations to welding-shop  	
B.C. Vocational School, Terrace—
407-B Dynamometer shop in the workshop building	
407-B-l Dormitory and cafeteria 	
407-B-3 Central Receiving and Stores Depot	
B.C. Vocational School, Victoria—■
633-B Workshop complex	
633-B-l
Cafeteria building
Expenditures
7.
11
91.
157,
10.
11:
1.
50
13
15
20
43
563
031.74
.716.69
023.47
368.80
344.55
210.26
196.06
.402.41
.940.35
,439.19
,172.80
,484.23
,497.42
15,660,992.03
I  KNOW THIS ROOM
IS ONLY   8* 12 , BUT, WITH
YOUR INGENUITY   IM SURE THAT.... etc
 E 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TENDERS  RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS
AWARDED FOR BUILDINGS
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Remarks
631-B
763-B
421-B
401-B-7
539-B
401-B-8
299-B-7
299-B-5
656-B
401-B-l
401-B-7
39-B-77
401-B-8
ABBOTSFORD
Water Main Fraser Valley Trout Hatchery:
Quadrant Construction Ltd.	
Lindhout Bros. Contracting Ltd	
San Juan Construction Ltd 	
Century Plumbing & Heating Ltd	
Raymond Enterprises Ltd	
Maintenance of Grounds:
Hans G. Fehst    ....    _.. _
Western Landscaping Ltd	
David Hunter Landscape Nurseries Ltd..
Tourist Information Centre, Highway 401:
Fabtec Structures Ltd.  „	
Astra Trailer Manufacturing Ltd..
BULL RIVER
Improvements, Kootenay Trout Hatchery:
Ledingham Construction Ltd —	
Boundary Industries Ltd _	
BURNABY
Landscaping and Sitework (1971) B.C. Institute of Technology:
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd	
Jeckway Landscaping Ltd  	
Site Development, Youth Development Centre:
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd	
B.A. Blacktop Ltd.
Extension  and  Landscaping,   Multipurpose Student  Centre,  B.C.
Institute  of  Technology:
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd _ _.. 	
Allan & Viner Construction Ltd. 	
Temporary Commercial Classroom, B.C. Vocational School:
Seaward Construction Ltd.   	
Ste,en on Construction Co. Ltd. _ 	
Burdett Construction Co. Ltd	
Heavy-duty Diesel Mechanics Workshop, Phase 4, B.C. Vocational
School:
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd	
Mutual Construction Co. Ltd —.
Landscaping, Motor-vehicle Inspection Station:
David Hunter Landscape Nurseries Ltd 	
Alfred Schneider Landscaping Ltd 	
Bert Murray Landscaping Ltd -	
Jeckway Landscaping Ltd.     „	
Tom G. Dinesen Landscaping Ltd 	
Holland Landscapers Ltd. .
Nuclear Medicine Laboratory and Seminar Room Additions, B.C.
Institute of Technology:
Seaward Construction Ltd 	
Pacific Construction Co. Ltd  	
Roads and Ancillary Site Works, B.C. Institute of Technology:
Wm. Shortread Construction   	
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd  „   	
Ventilation,   Women's  Building,  Lower Mainland  Regional  Cor-
recreational Centre (Oakalla):
Avitan Plumbing & Heating Ltd	
Boulevard Plumbing & Heating Ltd 	
Westgate Mechanical Contractor Ltd.
Courts and Landscaping, B.C. Institute of Technology:
Seaward Construction Ltd   	
Jeckway Landscaping Ltd  	
Stevenson Construction Ltd	
20,890.00
18,531.00
22,070.00
19,800.00
24,621.00
35,000.00
45,750.00
26,520.00
40,653.00
34,462.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
165,088.00    |
159,000.00    j Awarded.
202,855.00
208,384.00
22,931.00
16,469.00
129,710.00
132,850.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Not awarded.
36,000.00      Awarded.
37,407.00
40,564.00    |
I
I
250,000.00      Awarded.
266,389.00
41,271.00
46,650.00
68,766.00
44,600.00
53,633.00
39,900.00      Awarded.
40,000.00
45,605.00
17,667.88
17,752.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
23,800.00
61,174.00    |
74,147.00    I Not awarded.
79,500.00
72,797.00
73,911.00
I
I
| Awarded.
I
I
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1971/72 E 55
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
554-B
COLQUITZ
Generator Set, Glendale Hospital:
$
31,492.00
32,271.00
41,371.00
33,325.00
9,950.00
10,974.00
11,333.00
11,985.00
34,212.00
31,877.00
31,870.00
32,486.00
31,141.00
33,000.00
34,933.00
96,218.00
100,354.00
90,864.00
101,000.00
101,478.00
93,648.00
241,892.00
223,263.00
229,554.00
901,550.00
997,956.00
1,226,444.00
1,002,456.001
836,700.001
678,000.00
1,135,594.00
1,375,000.00
64,972.00
67,600.00
61,000.00
139,800.00
22,372.00
18,788.38
246,450.00
113,577.00
136,550.00
92,800.00
44,824.00
46,622.00
55,412.00
40,141.00
46.995.00
47,368.00
57,800.00
46,846.00
Hoffars Ltd.    ..                               	
9-B-19
Water Main, Vancouver Island Correctional Centre:
Webb & Trace Ltd	
A. J. Barr Ltd..	
9-B-19
Conversion  of Boiler Plant,   Vancouver Island Regional Correctional Centre:
Rawlings Plumbing & Heating Co. Ltd  	
M. Griffin Ltd.      ...	
633-B
Alterations, B.C. Vocational School:
W. Campbell Ltd.    ._.	
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd	
G. H. Wheaton Ltd  .    	
9-B-19
Multi-use Building,  Phase 2,   Vancouver Island Regional Correctional Centre:
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd                                  	
W. Campbell Ltd.	
Awarded.
9-B-19
Renovations, Vancouver Island Regional Correctional Centre:
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd	
Awarded.
722-B
Personal Care Home, Design/Construction Proposal:
O. H. Wheaton Ltd	
Awarded.
C. J. Oliver Ltd 	
722-B
Site Services, Personal Care Home:
G. H. Wheaton Ltd         	
Awarded.
548-B
CHARLIE LAKE
Storage Building, Department of Mines:
Awarded.
548-B
New Water Supply, Department of Mines:
Awarded.
705-B
CRESTON
Wildlife Management Area, Administration Centre:
Awarded.
481-B^l
481-B-3
DAWSON CREEK
Roads and Site Works, B.C. Vocational School:
Columbia Bitulithic (division of Ashland Oil Canada Ltd.).—	
Border Paving Ltd 	
Addition to Food Training Area, B.C. Vocational School:
Awarded.
Awarded.
762-B
DOUGLAS
Addition to Tourist Information Centre, Highway 499:
A. W. Gillis Ltd     	
Awarded.
Gadicke Construction Co. Ltd	
Russ Reid Ltd     ....   	
i Estimates on a design-only basis (all figures are exclusive of design costs).
 E 56 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
5-B-146
ESSONDALE
Conversion of Boiler Plant, Phase 1, Riverview Hospital:
$
168,727.00
155,000,00
138,000.00
188,803.00
99,800.00
85,863.00
89,827.00
92,380.00
79,748.00
79,800.00
85,943.00
82,000.00
24,742.00
26,500.00
30,500.00
30,940.00
33,277.00
34,330.00
35,341.00
263,800.00
325,610.00
334,977.00
474,480.00
267,107.00
15,148.00
11,610.00
17,000.00
79,440.00
97,000.00
98,921.00
89,300.00
106,239.00
194,292.00
190,000.00
215,650.00
215,500.00
165,047.00
43,703.00
43,362.00
39,900.00
47,637.00
38,421.00
17,243.00
15,837.00
15,600.00
17,302.00
14,235.00
17,921.00
13,890.00
15,987.00
83,395.00
93,700.00
95,783.00
99,797.00
88,800.00
78,484.00
5-B-146
Conversion of Boiler Plant, Phase 2, Riverview Hospital:
Electronics Corporation of America (Canada) Ltd	
5-B-148
Alterations to Centre Lawn Building, Riverview Hospital:
Awarded.
5-B-143
Water Ma n, Riverview Hospital:
H.B. Contracting Ltd 	
Awarded.
A & A Plumbing & Heating Ltd	
McNeil Plumbing & Heating Ltd	
5-B-146
Conversion of Boiler Plant, Phase 3, Riverview Hospital:
Mathias & Nicol Mechanical Division of Commonwealth Con-
5-B-150
Alteration   to   Isolation   Suite,   North   Lawn  Building,   Riverview
Hospital:
5-B-143
Seaward Construction Ltd.        ,   _   _   	
Ratel iff e & Sons Construction Co. Ltd 	
Fire Escapes, Crease Clinic, Riverview Hospital:
Awarded.
Withdrawn.
5-B-143
Fire Escapes, East Lawn Building, Riverview Hospital:
Seaward Construction Co. Ltd  __	
6-B-39
Activity Building, Riverside Building Extension, Colony Farm:
5-B-153
Renovations to Laundry and Stores Building, Riverview Hospital:
5-B-134
Fire-alarm Systems, Riverview Hospital:
J. H. McRae Co. Ltd 	
Fred Walsh Ltd.    ..                                               	
1
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1971/72 E 57
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
5-B-151
ESSONDALE—Continued
Alterations to Freezer, Valleyview Hospital:
$
13,349.00
12,000.00
13,180.00
32,350.00
30,509.00
31,704.00
33,531.00
542,223.00
566,075.00
561,611.00
541,186.00
526,639.00
586,000.00
576,825.00
16,884.00
340,552.00
339,866.00
399,000.00
331,933.00
337,020.00
342,188.00
351,400.00
80,500.00
50,000.00
41,494.00
28,708.00
22,450.00
177,577.00
54,736.00
58,300.00
53,250.00
58,102.00
67,127.00
21,850.00
53,995.00
56,465.00
39,361.50
41,240.00
135,582.00
140,970.00
143,811.00
137,509.00
134,640.00
68,900.00
77,400.00
79,980.00
78,341.00
694-B
Fraser Valley Refrigeration Ltd	
Seaward Construction Ltd _	
FORT ST. JOHN
Storage Building, Fish and Wildlife Branch:
Awarded.
700-B
GOLDEN
Weigh-scale Station:
Awarded.
729-B
Highways Maintenance Establishment:
Awarded.
Cana Construction Co. Ltd  __
729-B
Live-stock Corral:
W. H. Taylor Construction Ltd _	
Awarded.
599-B-2
HANEY
Administration Building, Alouette River Unit:
Lukley Johnson Palmer Construction Ltd	
Van  Construction  Division  of Van  Vliet  Construction  Co.
Ltd.            	
123-B-22
Roofing Repairs, B.C. Correctional Institute:
Aetna Roofing (1965) Ltd.	
701-B
KAMLOOPS
Weigh-scale Station:
620-B-l
Max Daburger Contracting Ltd , —	
Landscaping, B.C. Vocational School:
Awarded.
733-B
Alterations, Regional Correctional Centre:
Wilson & Dalgleish Contracting (1970) Ltd.    —	
743-B
Public Works Maintenance Building, Foundations:
704-B
LANGFORD
Welding and Fabrication Shop:
G H Wheaton Ltd.    -                                    	
714-B
MERRITT
Liquor Store Conversion to Offices:
Seaward Construction Ltd. -	
Awarded.
Ocean Park Construction Ltd	
 E 58 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
231-B-9
NANAIMO
Welding Shop, B.C. Vocational School:
$
84,700.03
87,664.00
94,890.00
32,275.00
30,833.00
19,030.00
19,975.00
18,737.00
19,633.00
70,276.00
67,168.00
62,400.00
55,000.00
33,435.00
306,987.00
344,417.00
332,516.00
356,000.00
1,848,582.00
1,994,990.00
1,848,000.00
1,923,000.00
1,890,^00.00
1,985,741.00
584,389.00
607,000.00
597,780.00
574,473.00
555,454.00
532,000.00
278,301.00
316,700.00
319,900.00
356,000.00
49,000.00
49,727.00
391,400.00
404,866.00
383,998.00
398,800.00
379,300.00
389,999.00
35,865.00
31,196.00
24,350.00
32,400.00
31,880.00
35,940.00
30.983.00
29,365.00
31,460X0
202-B-2
Alterations to Courthouse:
727-B
Heating and Electrical Systems Replacement, Public Works Building:
R. &. A. Smith Plumbing & Heating Ltd 	
Can-Pac Installations _.._.    	
727-B
Renovations, Phase 2, Public Works Building:
625-B
NELSON
Moving Employee Housing:
698-B
Provincial Government Building, Phase I:
698-B
Provincial Government Building, Phase 2:
Doviillard Construction Ltd    ....
Awarded.
728-B
NEW DENVER
Highways Maintenance Establishment:
Cana Construction Co. Ltd.  	
7-B-57
NEW WESTMINSTER
Ventilation Work, 100-bed Units, The Woodlands School:
withorawn.
7-B-59
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd  	
Playground, The Woodlands School:
7-B-49
Addition, Industrial Therapy Unit, The Woodlands School:
E  H  Shockley & Sons Ltd	
Radcliffe & Sons Construction Co. Ltd    	
7-B-59
Playground, The Woodlands School:
Gadicke Construction Co. Ltd   ~ ——	
7-B-26
Conversion, Motor Transport Building, The Woodlands School:
Burdett Construction Co. Ltd   — —	
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1971/72 E 59
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
461-B-l
PORT ALBERNI
Renovations, Phase 2, Government Building:
$
46,910.00
40,968.00
39,900.00
43,000.00
39,700.00
32,777.00
39,797.00
46,972.00
54,092.00
37,808.52
292,145.00
268,214.00
284,672.00
254,800.00
233,556.00
192,895.00
197,400.00
207,534.00
19,400.00
41,572.50
48,500.00
91,873.00
11,858.00
7,990.00
31,000.00
22,199.00
24,500.00
25,970.00
18,397.00
21,847.00
20,497.00
16,870.00
32,241.00
32.561.00
31,600.00
42,070.00
53,800.00
306,730.00
298,043.00
Souther Construction (1968) Ltd.
720-B-l
PRINCE GEORGE
Heating System Conversion, Prince George Regional Correctional
Centre:
Manx Gas Ltd.        ....            .___         ...    	
646-B
Library Development Commission Building:
H. Erickson & Sons Ltd.   ..
312-B-2
Welding Shop Alterations (College of New Caledonia) B.C. Vo-
cct'onal  School:
Dezell Construction Co. Ltd.                   .. .
Poole Construction Co. Ltd.    ___	
201-B-2
Parking-lot Extension, Government Building:
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd	
724-B
PRINCE RUPERT
Renewal of Heating System, Courthouse:
Manx Gas Ltd.	
724-B
Renovations to Electrical System, Courthouse:
D. E. Guyatt Co. Ltd	
R. K. Pederson Ltd.         	
742-B
Alterations, Courthouse:
Rupert Building Contractors Ltd.    .
Awarded.
658-B
QUESNEL
Venti'otion Work, Highways Maintenance Establishment:
B-ookswood Plumbing & Heating Co. Ltd.—.     	
Awarded.
659-B
SALMON ARM
Ventilation Work, Highways Maintenance Establishment:
Brookswood Plumbing & Heating Co. Ltd	
Awarded.
693-B
SMITHERS
Storage BuiWng, Fish and Wildlife Branch:
Dezell Construction Co. Ltd.           	
Awarded.
688-B
Provincial Government Building, Phase 1:
Awarded.
Western Caissons Alberta (1969) Ltd	
24-B-10
TERRACE
Alterations and Renovations, Phase 1, Skeenaview Hospital:
Awarded.
 E 60 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
730-B
TETE JAUNE CACHE
Highways Maintenance Establishment:
$
438,381.00
438,650.00
421,938.00
441,800.00
446,430.00
165,950.00
229,027.00
59,936.00
64,340.00
40,000.00
53,400.00
59,800.00
34,897.68
38,280.00
45,648.00
35,376.00
1,186,700.00
1,550,000.00
935,000.00
1,549,000.00
1,295,000.00
1,688,000.00
1,484,000.00
1,300,000.00
1,725,000.00
938,934.00
184,460.00
211,286.00
88,380.00
88,000.00
126,949.00
979,900.00
1,065,500.00
1,023,400.00
1,074,000.00
1,024,000.00
994,563.00
14,909.00
21,500.00
31,000.00
44,549.00
51,000.00
48,900.00
45,500.00
47,633.00
42,164.00
693,691.00
703,360.00
653,076.00
Crawley & Mohr Ltd     .
10-B-60
Gruan Construction Co. Ltd	
TRANQUILLE
Fire Escapes, Greaves Building, Tranquille School:
10-B-57
Fire-alarm Systems, Tranquille School:
Ricketts-Sewell Electric Ltd - ,	
I.C.R. Electric Ltd 	
VANCOUVER
Janitorial Services at Various Rented and Government Premises,
Zone 2:
16-20
Construction Management Proposal, British Columbia Building:
Concordia Management Ltd *	
Awarded.
Pook Construction Co. Ltd..—  	
Smith Bros. & Wilson Ltd	
610-B
Alteration to Courthouse, Phase 7:
79-B-17
Renovations to Lawrence Hall, Jericho Hill School:
79-B-16
Cafeteria and Infirmary, Jericho Hill School:
Northern Construction Co. (division of Morrison Knudsen Co.
Inc.)	
Allan & Viner Construction Ltd	
31-B-9
Alterations to the Polio Pavilion, Pearson Hospital:
89-B-3
Renovations, Provincial Health Building:
Riverview Outpatients Department, 96 East Broadway:
R. J. Booth Contracting Ltd.                                       	
79-B-18
Gymnasium-Auditorium, Jericho Hill School:
Van Construction Division of Van Vliet Construction Co. Ltd....
Awarded.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1971/72 E 61
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
16-20
VANCOUVER—Contin ued
Demolition of Building at 822 Hornby Street:
$
4,000.00
4,135.00
4,800.00
6,200.00
6,500.00
9,163.00
12,700.00
22,995.00
171,000.00
185,293.00
42,355.00
42,705X0
74,233.00
11,500.00
50,755.00
638,645.00
476,900.00
504,732.00
471,224.00
487,900.00
489,500.00
15,000.00
17,479.00
22,810.00
22,986.00
29,100.00
32,000.00
32,944.00
28,493.00
62,915.00
58,315.00
52,500.00
20,274.00
22,028.00
24,105.00
18,944.00
73,011.00
70,574.00
46,800.00
69,545.00
68,458.00
69,986.00
69,500.00
84,233.00
68,212.00
10,965.00
11,071.00
17,432.00
16,971.00
17,965.00
Johnny Walker Bulldozing Co. Ltd „—	
N & J Contracting Ltd	
617-B-l
VERNON
Landscaping Grounds Extension, Phase 2, Courthouse:
Contract I—Excavation and Concrete:
Ocean Park Construction T tri
David Howrie Ltd —. .	
Contract 2—Water Supply and Drainage:
Contracts 1 and 2 combined:
411-B-l
Highways Maintenance Establishment:
David Howrie Ltd.	
Awarded.
518-B
VICTORIA
Alterations, Dogwood Building:
G. H. Wheaton Ltd.	
Awarded.
732-B
E. J. Hunter & Sons Ltd	
Renovations, Third Floor, Douglas Building:
P.   I. Hunter & Srms I tri
486-B
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd _	
Alterations and Additions, B.C. Archives and Museum:
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd       _	
W. Camphe.il Ltd
732-B
Elevator Renovations, Douglas Building:
Otis Elevator Co  T tri
Dover Corporation   (Canada)   Ltd.   (Turnbull Elevator Divi-
Awarded.
690-B
Mail Room Renovations, Parliament Buildings:
W. Campbell Ltd	
G. H. Wheaton Ltd. ....   _.     _	
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd.     	
464-B
Sound Systems, Eric Martin Institute:
690-B
Renovations to West Wing, Parliament Buildings:
G. H. Wheaton Ltd	
H. E. Fowier & Sons Ltd	
W. Campbell Ltd - -	
732-B
Renovations to Rooms 406 and 407, Douglas Building:
E. J. Hunter & Sons Ltd	
732-B
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd ~	
Second-floor Renovations, Douglas Building:
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd	
G. H. Wheaton Ltd -	
E. J. Hunter & Sons Ltd	
 E 62 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Location, Description of Work, and Names of Tenderers
Remarks
709-B
VICTORIA—Continued
Renovations to Hospital Insurance Building:
$
29,497.00    |
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd       	
26.910.00    1 Awarded.
30-B-5
WELLINGTON
Maintenance Building, Brannan Lake School:
19,532.00
24,252.00
13,883.00
14,847.00
26.712.00
30-B-8
Reroofing Dormitories, Brannan Lake School:
Aetna Roofing (1965) Ltd	
30-B-5
Maintenance Buildings,  Boiler Plant  Conversion,  Brannan  Lake
School:
.
39.760.00     1
31,850.00
38,000.00
25,977.00
13,412.00
19,888.99
23,360.00
21,771.00
27,517.00
30-B-5
Maintenance Facilities and Site Works, Brannan Lake School:
30-B-5
Maintenance Building and Site Work, Contract 2—Garbage Handling,  Brannan Lake School:
657-B
WILLIAMS LAKE
Ventilation Work, Highways Maintenance Establishment:
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1973
530-1172-8900

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