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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA One Hundred and First Annual Report 1971/72 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1973

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 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
One Hundred and First Annual Report
1971/72
By the Honourable the Minister of Education
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1973
  The Honourable Eileen E. Dailly, Minister of Education.
    To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the One Hundred and First Report of the Public
Schools of the Province.
EILEEN E. DAILLY
Minister of Education
January 1973.
  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION,  1972
Minister of Education:
The Honourable Eileen E. Dailly
Deputy Minister of Education:
J. Phillipson, B.A., B.Ed.
Superintendents of Educational Services:
Administrative Services: Instructional Services:
J. L. Canty, B.A., M.Ed. J. R. Meredith, B.A., M.Ed.
Field Services:
W. D. Reid, B.A., M.Ed.
Financial Services:
S. E. Espley
Post-secondary Services:
A. E. Soles, B.A., M.Ed.
Technical and Vocational Services:
J. S. White
District Superintendents, Superintendents, and Inspectors of Schools:
K. F. Alexander, B.Sc, B.Ed., Mission City.
N. A. Allen, B.A., West Vancouver.
W. W. Baldry, B.A., M.Ed., Kitimat.
J. E. Beech, B.A., B.Ed., Surrey.
G. C. Bissell, B.A., B.Ed., Castlegar.
R. S. Boyle, B.A., B.Ed., Victoria.
C. A. Bruce, B.A., B.Ed., Kamloops.
A. D. Campbell, B.A., B.Ed., Vanderhoof.
D. H. Campbell, B.A., B.Ed., Oliver.
R. B. Cox, B.A., Courtenay.
H. E. Cullis, B.Sc, M.A., Squamish.
C. Cuthbert, B.Acc, B.Ed., M.Ed., Langley.
D. E. A. Eldred, B.Ed., M.Ed., Grand Forks.
J. M. Evans, B.A., M.Ed., Port Alberni.
D. L. Feir, B.A., M.A., Quesnel.
H. C. Ferguson, B.A., Powell River.
R. E. Flower, B.A., B.Ed., Williams Lake.
W. B. Fromson, B.A., B.Ed., North Vancouver.
G. W. Graham, B.A., Richmond.
S. J. Graham, B.A., New Westminster.
P. C. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Vernon.
R. R. Hanna, B.A., B.Ed., Sechelt.
W. L. B. Hawker, B.A., B.Ed., Haney.
J. Holden, B.A., M.Ed., Fort Nelson.
C. Holob, B.S.A., M.Ed., Sidney.
C. Hopper, B.Ed., M.Ed., Dawson Creek.
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.P^d., Victoria.
W. B. Johnston, B.Ed., M.Ed., Trail.
E. E. Lewis, B.A., B.P/ED., Duncan.
W. J. Logie, B.A., Victoria.
A. J. Longmore, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Victoria.
R. F. Lucas, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Prince Rupert.
W. E. Lucas, B.A., B.P^d., North Vancouver.
R. G. Lyon, B.Ed., M.Ed., Hope.
D. E. McFee, B.A., M.A., Merritt.
A. P. McKay, B.Com., M.Ed., Revelstoke.
C. S. McKenzie, B.A., Delta.
P. G. McLoughlin, B.A., Dip.Ed., B.Ed.,
Fort St. John.
D. H. McKtrdy, D.F.C., B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed.,
Ladysmith.
J.   I.   Macdougall,   B.A.,   M.A.,   M.Ed.,
D.PjED.,   Chilliwack.
E. Marriott, B.A., Surrey.
F. T. Middleton, B.A., B.Ed., Creston.
W. J. Mouat, B.A., M.Ed., Abbotsford.
G. H. Nelson, B.A., B.Ed., Penticton.
F. J. Orme, B.A., B.P^d., Kelowna.
G. M. Paton, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Coquitlam.
P. B. Pullinger, B.A., B.Ed., Cranbrook.
W. F. Ramsay, B.A., B.Ed., Campbell River.
C. T. Rendle, B.A., Burnaby.
A. C. Rutledge, B.Ed., M.Ed., Kimberley.
R. F. Sharp, B.A., D.P^ed., Superintendent,
Vancouver.
P. E. Slinn, BA.Sc, M.Ed., Port Hardy.
E. C. Stewart, B.A., B.Ed., Terrace.
M. V. Thorsell,  B.A.,  M.Ed.,  Qualicum
Beach.
D. P. Todd, B.A., B.Ed., Prince George.
J. Walsh, B.Sc, M.Ed., Jericho Hill Schools.
D. N. Weicker, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Nanaimo.
C. C. Wright, B.A., Salmon Arm.
W. J. Zoellner, B.A., B.Ed., Nelson.
 SPECIAL OFFICIALS
Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment: P. J. Kitley, M.A.
Supervisor of School Construction: H. Dickinson.
Assistant Director of Technical and Vocational Education: V. E. Rickard, B.Ed.
Inspectors of Technical Classes: M. J. Ttdmarsh and R. Smith.
Inspector of Technical and Vocational Education: P. C. MacGregor.
Registrar and Director of Examinations and Teacher Certification: E. A. Killough, B.Ed., M.A,
Director of Home Economics: Miss J. R. Irvine, B.Sc(H.Ec).
Inspectors of Home Economics:
Miss J. Campbell, M.A., B.Sc(H.Ec), Dip .Ed., and Mrs. H. Krueger, B.Sc(H.Ec).
Director of Curriculum Development: W. B. Naylor, B.A.
Director of Audio-Visual Services: B. A. Black.
Director of Research and Standards: C. W. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.P/ED.
Director of Correspondence Education: J. R. Hind, B.A., B.P^ed.
Director of Curriculum Resources: D. W. C. Huggins, C.G.A.
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Report by the Deputy Minister	
Reports by Superintendents of Educational Services:
Superintendent of Administrative Services	
Superintendent of Field Services	
Superintendent of Instructional Services	
Superintendent of Post-secondary Services	
Superintendent of Special Services	
Superintendent of Technical-Vocational Services	
Statistical Tables:
See page 91 for details.
Page
.   13
16
21
32
47
55
64
11
  Report of Deputy Minister of Education, 1971/72
The Annual Report of the Department of Education consists of two major
sections—the first being the reports of the Superintendents of departmental divisions
and the second section being the statistical reports. The Deputy Minister's report
will, to avoid repetition, be succinct and will endeavour to highlight significant trends
or changes
Curriculum is under constant revision, with textbooks, films, and related teaching aids being revised to keep pace with the curriculum trends. For example, during
the past year, work continued on the development of a new Kindergarten programme and revised programmes in Social Studies for elementary schools. At the
secondary school level, revisions are proceeding in English, Mathematics, the
Sciences, Social Studies, Commerce, and Industrial Education.
An extremely important change in philosophy is reflected in the announcement
of changed requirements for secondary school graduation to become effective in
1974. In capsule form, this change provides increased opportunity for schools
and pupils to plan appropriate programmes to meet graduation requirements. In
addition to the general education requirements and selected studies in particular
fields, provision is made for schools to offer different combinations of courses related to the abilities and future plans of students. Responsibility for planning such
programmes and for certifying that graduation requirements have been met will rest
with the local school authorities.
The Department is planning to discontinue the present system of requiring that
a minimum of two centrally administered examinations be written by students not
recommended for graduation standing by the school. This will be replaced by a
new programme of survey testing designed to provide schools with valid and reliable
information in respect of Provincial standards.
A major revision in the process of accrediting senior secondary schools was
completed. Chief features in the new process include a study of the school's objectives, its relationships with the community, its administration and teaching, and its
standards of pupil achievement. The new process calls for an internal evaluation
by the school staff and administration and an external evaluation by the District
Superintendent of Schools or by an external evaluation committee. The sole objective is to assist schools in a continuing programme of self-improvement.
In school construction, two significant patterns have emerged during the current
year. Both are related to the drop in enrolment in several districts of the Province
and a sharply reduced rate of growth in most others. With the decrease in enrolment in certain districts, school boards are turning their attention to the desirability
of extensively remodelling and renovating schools to provide a variety of instructional facilities ranging from small seminar rooms to new large multiclass areas.
The establishment of the library/resource centre in a school, with one or more
classroom spaces operating in conjunction with it, is a frequent proposal.
The second pattern is that, despite a drop or decreased rate of growth of enrolment in some districts, the demand for new school facilities persists. This has been
caused by the distribution of pupils in the area, which does not coincide with the
location of schools.
The Division of Field Services has continued to emphasize the involvement
of members of the field staff in zone conferences, committee work on behalf of the
13
 D 14 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
Department, and Departmental conferences, all with a view to the active participation of these officers in the operation of our far-flung organization.
During the past year there has been a very considerable change in assignments
of the members of the field staff. This has been brought about by a conscious
attempt to make use of particular skills and experience of members of the staff in
several assignments and in part, at least, by the fact that normal retirements from
the Service have increased in recent years.
The Division of Post-secondary Services has continued in its efforts of coordinating post-secondary education and administering all Student Aid in the Province. The melding of the colleges and vocational schools is continuing, with seven
such melds having taken place.
Specific reports with respect to the operation of each Division of the Department will provide details in each case.
The statistical tables which follow the Division reports indicate a number of
trends and highlights which are of general interest and which are noted here.
1. Net Enrolment (highest register number minus transfers to another
British Columbia public school or class) (534,523 in June 1972)
The percentage increase of 1.4 per cent in total enrolment from June 1971
to June 1972 was the smallest increase of the past 30 years, the lowest since total
enrolment actually declined by 1,229 from June 1941 to June 1942.
Total elementary (K-VII) enrolment decreased by 141 from June 1971 to
June 1972 (I-VII enrolment decreased by 742), the first drop since that from June
1939 to June 1940.
Total secondary (VIII-XII) enrolment increased by 4.1 per cent or 7,818
pupils over last June's enrolment. This is the smallest numerical increase since
the 7,759 increase from June 1966 to June 1967 and the smallest percentage
increase since the 3.7-per-cent increase from June 1949 to June 1950.
Grade I enrolment dropped by over 3,000 to 39,977 from June 1971 to June
1972 as a result of the decreasing births which began in 1961. Further decreases
in Grade I are forecast for the next two years, which should result in elementary
(K-VII) enrolment continuing to decrease until June 1977.
2. Numbers of Public School Teachers (including all school-attached and
district-wide supervisory, administrative, and instructional staff; excluding District Superintendents)
Total teachers—The numerical increase of 556.4 (2.5 per cent full-time equivalent teachers from the 22,334.7 of June 1971 to the 22,891.1 of June 1972 is the
smallest since the June 1953 to June 1954 increase of 469 (a 6.6-per-cent increase
then).
Elementary teachers (excludes district-wide instructional and supervisory personnel)—Estimate elementary teachers increased by approximately 100 from June
1971 to June 1972; a very small increase, indeed, brought out by the decline in
elementary enrolment.
Secondary teachers (excludes district-wide instructional and supervisory personnel)—Estimate secondary teachers increased by approximately 420 from June
1971 to June 1972.
 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER
D 15
3. Teachers With a University Degree
For the first time our percentage of teachers (including part-time teachers)
with at least one university degree has gone over 60 per cent (60.4 per cent in
June 1972 vs. 56.9 per cent in June 1971). Note—Of the other Canadian provinces, only Alberta has a higher percentage of teachers with at least one university
degree.
4. Teachers With a Professional Certificate or Equivalent
The percentage of teachers (including part-time teachers) with a Professional
Certificate (or its equivalent) increased 4 per cent from 61 per cent in June 1971
to a new high of 65 per cent in June 1972.
5. One-teacher or One-room Schools
The trend in the decrease of one-room schools continued in 1971/72. Only
93 or 6.1 per cent of the 1,515 schools operating in June 1972 had one teacher, a
decrease from the 233 or 17.9 per cent of 1,299 that existed in June 1962.
 D 16 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES
REPORT OF J. L. CANTY, B.A., M.Ed;, SUPERINTENDENT
During the school-year this Division has been involved in surveys of essential
school building needs of each of the school districts of the Province.
These surveys have provided this Division with a broader knowledge of the
individual school district problems and provided an opportunity to discuss with
school trustees methods of solving some of the problems and of alleviating others
in the provision of essential school facilities.
By such involvement, an appreciation of the over-all problems is gained by all
parties and this Division is able to maintain an up-to-date picture of each individual
school district situation in respect to the provision of buildings and additions necessary to provide accommodation in a particular area of a district. The accommodation needs are sometimes dictated due to changes in population distribution or to
increased enrolments in an existing area of the district, or sometimes by the necessity to provide added space by remodelling or renovating existing buildings to meet
the needs of the modern curriculum.
This Division has maintained close contact with changing methods and techniques in the building construction field by representation at various seminars and
conferences. The adaption of some of these new techniques to school construction
has been the subject of study by our School Planning Branch and is reflected in the
attractive but functional design of some smaller schools built in various areas of
the Province at a cost retarding the general escalation of construction costs being
experienced.
Fire Loss
Losses or extensive damage to schools by fire is still a matter of great concern
to all school boards and to the Department, not only because of the problems of
insurance-premium increases, but the capital-costs portion invariably involved,
creating an additional burden of debt, both locally and Provincially borne.
Further, problems of providing temporary accommodation in other schools,
often by going to a shift system, creates difficulties to parents and to school district
staff alike, and cannot be said to contribute to an atmosphere conducive to the
education of the individual pupil unfortunate enough to be suddenly transferred
to a new and different school environment.
It is for these reasons that the capital costs involved of installing fire and intruder alarm systems in the secondary and larger elementary schools in the Province
has been accepted by the Department as a "shareable" expense. This emphasis on
fire prevention by the Department and the school boards will, it is to be hoped,
contribute to the reduction of fire losses.
Staff
A press release in December 1971 announced the retirement of my predecessor,
Chris. Taylor, who retired after a long and successful career in education. Mr.
Taylor joined the Department as an Inspector of Schools in 1946 in the Kimberley,
Windermere, and Golden Inspectorate, joining headquarters staff in 1968 from
Burnaby, where he was the District Superintendent of Schools. At headquarters
he served as Assistant Superintendent of Field Services, and from 1970 as Superintendent of Administrative Services. Mr. Taylor will be missed by all his colleagues and friends in the Department and the Province.
 DIVISION of administrative SERVICES D 17
School Board Organization
During the school-year ended June 30, 1972, School District No. 82 (Chilcotin) was amalgamated with School District No. 27 (Williams Lake) and School
District No. 83 (Portage Mountain) was amalgamated with School District No. 60
(Peace River North).
The effect has been to reduce the number of school districts in the Province to
75, all of which have elected school boards, with the exception of one school district
which has an Official Trustee.
School district organization at the end of the 1971/72 school-year was as follows:
Municipal school districts   70
Rural school districts     5
Total  75
and the school boards were organized as follows:
Three-member board  Nil
Five-member board   20
Seven-member board   38
Nine-member board  16
Official Trustee     1
Total ~75
Sites, Buildings, and Equipment
Capital expenditures (section 190 approvals, calendar year 1971):
$
Site purchase and improvement     5,867,421
Buildings (construction)  47,968,262
Equipment       7,472,219
Plans and supervision     2,946,725
64,254,627
Referenda
During the fall of 1971 a survey of essential building needs for the Province
was conducted by this Division. Discussions took place with all school boards and
most areas of the Province were visited during the course of the survey.
This resulted in the school boards placing referenda before their owner-electors,
of which $58,690,795 received the necessary affirmative votes. Not re-presented to
the owner-electors during the 1971/72 school-year ending on June 30, 1972, were
$4,178,050 of the total of defeated referenda. The balance of the necessary capital
funds for the approved essential projects was available from previously approved
referenda.
 D 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
Kindergarten class is not "stumped" by the adventure playground (Hobbs Elementary, Victoria).
 division of administrative services d 19
Transportation, Conveyance of Pupils
The following statistics indicate details connected with the conveyance of
school-children during the school-    ar 1971 /72:
1. Number of large school districts providing transportation  72
2. Total number of vehicles        860
(a) District-owned    625
(b) Contract   229
(c) Other (water taxis, etc.)       6
3. Total daily approved mileage  64,641
4. Total number of pupils carried daily  87,807
Transportation Assistance
Transportation assistance is made available to the parents of pupils who reside
in isolated areas of the Province where there are insufficient pupils to establish a bus
route or a school of the appropriate grade. In the school-year 1971/72 the Province shared in $420,016 of transportation assistance for 2,363 pupils in 63 school
districts.
Boarding Allowances
A school board may provide boarding allowances for pupils who are not able
to utilize transportation or dormitory facilities. An allowance of up to $40 a month
per pupil is shared by the Province in all approved cases.
In the school-year ended in 1972 the Province shared in boarding allowances
for 498 pupils in 39 school districts, amounting to $187,180.
Dormitory Operation
Dormitory facilities are operated by seven districts to provide accommodation
to over 500 pupils in various areas of the Province to enable these pupils to receive
a secondary education. Dormitory data will be found among the statistical information, Table 3.7.
School Planning
The School Planning Branch maintains a close liaison with many school boards
and serves in the original planning of school building in an advisory capacity in
many other aspects of school planning to school district staff, architects, and construction personnel.
The Department lost the services of Henry Dickinson, who joined the Department in September 1954, and for many years was the Supervisor of School Planning.
Mr. Dickinson left the service in April 1972.
STRATHCONA TRUST
(Report of Thomas H. Buckham, B.Com., Secretary, Local Committee)
The Strathcona Trust Fund was created in 1908 by Lord Strathcona, then
High Commissioner for Canada. Lord Strathcona gave $500,000 to the trust, with
the yearly interest of $20,000 being apportioned to the provinces, according to the
school enrolment.
The Province has participated in the Strathcona Trust since 1917. An annual
grant of approximately $1,800 has been received in recent years. The money has
been utilized to encourage physical fitness in the schools, as well as cadet training.
 D 20 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
The Local Committee, Strathcona Trust for British Columbia, administers the
money received and consists of military representatives and representatives of the
Department of Education. The annual meeting was held on April 21, 1972, at
Headquarters, Maritime Forces Pacific, Department of National Defence, in Victoria.
The Local Committee gave its support to Strathcona Trust Shoot and Proficiency Awards for cadets, the British Columbia Federation of School Athletic Associations for the Sports School Handbook; Outward Bound; and a curriculum-
development conference by the Provincial Representative Committee. Through
the support of these organizations and (or) events, we hope to achieve Lord Strath-
cona's intention of the trust fund.
 DIVISION of field services D 21
DIVISION OF FIELD SERVICES
REPORT BY W. D. REID, B.A., M.Ed., SUPERINTENDENT
Staff
The Division of Field Services is primarily concerned with the operation of
school districts in the Province of British Columbia. The Division is staffed in the
field by 57 District Superintendents of Schools assigned to various superintendencies
in the Province.
The headquarters staff consists of the Superintendent, the Director, and two advisers in Home Economics, and the Co-ordinator of Industrial Education and two
Inspectors of Technical Education.
At the end of the school-year 1971/72, the Department of Education lost the
service of six members of the Field Staff through retirement.   Those retiring were
G. W. Graham, District Superintendent of Schools, School District No. 38
(Richmond);
E. A. Marriott, District Superintendent of Schools, School District No. 36
(Surrey);
W. J. Logie, District Superintendent of Schools, School District No. 26 (Birch
Island), who also acted as Relieving District Superintendent;
and three officials from the Vancouver School District:
J. V. Grant, Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Vancouver;
E. J. Irwin, Inspector of Schools, Vancouver;
N. Clark, Inspector of Schools, Vancouver.
These gentlemen have given long, dependable, and effective leadership in
their school districts, and their presence and influence will be missed in the coming
school-year.
In August 1971, W. W. Baldry, P. G. McLoughlin, and P. E. Slinn joined the
Department of Education and began their service as District Superintendents of
Schools in the Department of Education and were appointed to Kitimat, Peace River
North, and North Vancouver Island superintendencies respectively. At the end of
the school-year 1971/72, P. E. Slinn resigned his appointment as a District Superintendent of Schools, for personal reasons, and accepted an appointment in a school
district in the Province.
John Holden, District Superintendent of Schools, School District No. 81 (Fort
Nelson) and School District No. 87 (Stikine), was granted leave of absence for a
period of three years to serve as Superintendent of Schools for the Yukon Territory.
In-service Training
Zone Conferences
This Division has continued with its long-standing plan to provide basic workshops for the members of the Field Staff in the Province. Workshops are organized in six zones in the Province and were held in both the spring and the fall of
the school-year 1971/72, as shown in the table following:
 D 22 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
Zone Location Dates
Island Gold River October 21, 22
Nanaimo February 24,25
Fraser Valley Powell River October 14, 15
Kootenay Fernie September 27, 28
Okanagan Revelstoke October 28,29
Merritt March 2, 3
Northern Prince George November 4, 5
Prince George April 18,19
Metro Vancouver November 29
Sechelt April 27,28
These are organized and chaired by District Superintendents. Senior officers of
the Department of Education, as well as other officials from the Department headquarters, attend these workshops in order to discuss and consider problems which
are of particular interest in the several zones. It is the responsibility of the Superintendent, Field Services, to attend all of these conferences to represent the headquarters of the Department of Education. From an intimate knowledge of these
conferences, it is the opinion of the writer that they have particular value for members of the Field Staff, who are able to meet in small groups and discuss problems
which are common to the zones in which the District Superintendents serve.
Seminar for District Superintendents
(Sponsored by the University of Victoria)
The fifth annual seminar for District Superintendents was held at Harrison on
January 12 to 14, 1972. Twenty-nine District Superintendents attended. The
theme of the conference was "The Politics of Management," with papers provided
by Dr. Harold J. Dyck, Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation; Dr. Gordon
L. Mowat, University of Alberta; and James W. Singleton, Director of Education,
Halton County Board of Education, Ontario. The speakers were particularly practical in their suggestions for the application of theory, and the conference was, in
the opinion of those attending, successful and valuable. The Department is indebted
to Dr. H. E. Farquhar, Dean of Education, University of Victoria, for the continued sponsorship of this valuable seminar.
Field Services Conference
On April 5 and 6, 1972, the Department sponsored a conference for all Field
Services staff and senior officers of the Department of Education, which was held in
the Museum Complex in Victoria. The conference devoted itself mainly to changes
in legislation, which were particularly significant in this year with the many changes
in teacher tenure and a complete revision of the regulations of the Public Schools
Act; discussion of problems and policies with respect to curriculum and changes in
the accreditation process; other recent changes with respect to the Public Schools
Act, with some emphasis on financial considerations; and one session which devoted itself to professional topics which were presented by J. Perry, the President of
the Canadian Association of School Administrators. The purely professional topic
section was organized by the President of the British Columbia Association of Dis-
 DIVISION OF FIELD SERVICES D 23
trict Superintendents and Inspectors of Schools, C. A. Bruce; and the chairman of
the In-service Committee of that association, D. N. Weicker.
In keeping with recent changes in policy in the Department of Education, the
conference was designed so that members of the Field Staff participated fully, not
only in its planning and organization, but in the conduct of the conference.
Induction of Newly Appointed District Superintendents of Schools
This school-year the Division of Field Services changed its plan of induction of
newly appointed staff members to a pattern which is believed to be more satisfactory. Newly appointed members to the staff of District Superintendents come to
the Department of Education on the date of their appointment in August and meet
and have discussions with senior officials of the Department. They then proceed
to their assigned duties as District Superintendents of Schools and return later in
the year, usually in November, for a four-day period in which they have an opportunity for a detailed study of the Department and discussion with not only Divisional heads, but Branch heads, directors, and other officials of the Department of
Education.
This plan has proven to be more effective, in that when returning to the Department in November for a four-day period, the men in the field have some personal knowledge of the problems of the superintendencies in which they are serving.
In this school-year the plan involved six participants, and it is planned that six participants in the coming school-year will be given the same basic in-service training.
Canadian International Development Agency
The Department of External Affairs in Ottawa again requested that the Field
Services Division of the Department of Education conduct interviews for the selection of British Columbia teachers for overseas service in the developing nations in
the West Indies, in Africa, and in Southeast Asia.
A total of 26 interviews was conducted between January 5 to 7 and February
3 and 4,1972, in Victoria and Vancouver.
The teachers going abroad for this service normally spend a minimum of two
years and, on their return to their school districts in British Columbia, are more
knowledgeable of the very important countries which are developing in the areas
mentioned above, and consequently are better equipped for their day-to-day work
in our schools.
The Interview Team was chaired by the Superintendent, Field Services. The
members of the team were W. E. Lucas, District Superintendent of Schools, North
Vancouver; K. M. Aitchison, Director of Communications, The British Columbia
Teachers' Federation; and J. S. White, Superintendent, Technical-Vocational Services, of the Department of Education.
It has been the aim of the Interview Team to make certain that British Columbia and Canada are represented abroad by very able and competent teachers.
Additional Duties Performed by District Superintendents in
Behalf of the Department of Education
In following an earlier established policy, the Department of Education has
continued to expand and concentrate on its policy of involving members of the Field
Staff intimately in matters which are of concern to education as a whole in the Prov-
   s  .       .
DIVISION of field services
D 25
ince of British Columbia. It may be of interest to note the variety of tasks which
various District Superintendents have performed in behalf of the Department during
this school-year and which are, of course, in addition to their regular duties as District Superintendents of Schools.
Three District Superintendents served as an External Evaluation Team with
respect to the accreditation of secondary schools.
One District Superintendent acted as a member of a committee to evaluate a
new junior secondary programme.
Three District Superintendents continued to serve as a committee to review
and recommend changes in the occupational programme.
One District Superintendent served, and continues to serve, as an evaluator for
an Autistic Class which has been established in one of our school districts.
Six District Superintendents serving in various zones in the Province are acting as advisers to the Drug Use Committees which has been established by the
Honourable the Minister of Education. This service is in reference to the Minister's general committee on drugs, alcohol, and tobacco.
One District Superintendent is serving as a member of the Task Force on Environmental Education which has been established by the British Columbia Teachers'
Federation.
Three District Superintendents have recently served as a committee to organize
a competition for advertising slogans and scripts which were submitted by pupils in
the secondary schools with respect to the drugs, alcohol, and tobacco programme.
Nine District Superintendents have continued to serve as members of college
councils.
One District Superintendent serves as a member of the Senate of the University
of British Columbia.
Two District Superintendents continue to serve on the Central Curriculum
Revision Committees.
Annual and Monthly Reports of District Superintendents of Schools
Members of the Field Staff who serve as District Superintendents of Schools in
the school districts of the Province of British Columbia are deeply involved in administrative work of school boards, as well as being primarily concerned with the
operation of schools in the school districts. They bear the responsibility for the
supervision of all educational staff and for the operation and effectiveness of all
schools in their districts.
The number of meetings attended by District Superintendents of Schools during the school-year was 6,412. These represent board, committee, and district
staff meetings which take a considerable amount of the time of each District Superintendent. Written reports on teachers totalling 2,533 were submitted by the District Superintendents to the Department of Education in the school-year 1971/72.
From a study of annual reports submitted by District Superintendents, the following trends are those which are reported most frequently:
1. Many districts are still reporting declining elementary enrolments, with increases at the secondary level. However, introduction of Kindergarten classes, or
expansion of these classes in some districts, has tended to stabilize over-all enrolments from the previous year. Nevertheless, some districts continue to show considerable growth.
  DIVISION OF FIELD SERVICES D 27
2. Many District Superintendents report a reduction in the teaching staffs of
their districts and a decline in the percentage of staff turnover. The District Superintendents report that the improved quality of the teachers and the continuity of
employment are factors that are tending to improve instruction in the classrooms.
3. The following course developments are to be no ted:     •
(a) Outdoor education.
(b) Extended field trips.
(c) Exchange visits between schools and (or) districts.
(d) Driver training.
(e) Development of adventure playgrounds. r,   ,
(f) Use of video tapes.
(g) Enrichment programmes.
(h) Swimming programmes.
(i) Remedial instruction for children with learning disabilities.
(/') Use of volunteer aides and para-professionals.
(k) Involvement of the Indian population in educational matters.
(/) Secondary schools operating on a semester system or a partial semester system of organization.
(m) The development of resource centres. {
4. The Coquitlam District reported some auxiliary services were made available through agencies which had received grants under the Local Initiative Programme, e.g., secretarial interns, library technicians, helpers in schools for the retarded, and a speech and hearing therapist for the summer.
5. In-service training activities of many types are reported, which emphasizes
the fact that the Boards of School Trustees are providing incentive for the development of in-service training under the guidance of the District Superintendents and
with the co-operation of teachers and supervisory personnel.
6. Special Education programmes receive some prominence in the reports.
Although many districts still operate special classes for the children with learning
difficulties, the trend toward integration of these pupils into regular classrooms con->
tinues. Many districts report that itinerant specially trained teachers are providing
assistance for the regular classroom teacher in the instruction of these children.
7. Two districts, Surrey and Kamloops, report the operation of classes at the
junior secondary level for students who are ill-prepared to cope with secondary
education. Members of these classes are those students who have been dismissed
from school or who are behaving in such a manner that dismissal is imminent.
8. Some interesting research projects are reported, e.g., "More Effective Use
of Personnel in Elementary Schools" in School District No. 24 (Kamloops); "Canada West Project" in which 12 primary teachers in Powell River were involved in
a study in depth of pupil attitudes and learning experiences in the area of Social
Studies.
9. District Superintendents report that the new Accreditation Booklet, with its
emphasis on self-evaluation, has been well received and, although time consuming,
they thought that the staffs of the schools involved had appreciated the opportunity
to participate more actively in the accreditation process.
HOME ECONOMICS
(Report of Miss Jean R. Irvine, B.Sc, Director)
In the 1971/72 school-year, an increase of 8,865 over the previous year resulted in a total course enrolment of 93,810 in Home Economics and Community
Services.   Home Economics 8, which is a constant subject for girls in Grade VIII,
 D 28 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
increased in enrolment by 1,358. The greatest numerical increases in enrolment
were in Foods and Nutrition 9 and in Foods 11.
Home Economics departments were located in 272 public schools. Home
Economics was offered for the first time in the following communities: Houston,
School District No. 54 (Smithers); Tahsis, School District No. 84 (Vancouver
Island West); Holberg and Beaver Cove, School District No. 85 (Vancouver Island
North); and Cassiar, School District No. 87 (Stikine). Home Economics departments were included in new schools in the following school districts: No. 23 (Central Okanagan), No. 34 (Abbotsford), No. 37 (Delta), and No. 42 (Maple Ridge).
Home Economics classes were discontinued at Bralorne, School District No. 29
(Lillooet) and Grassy Plains, School District No. 55 (Burns Lake).
There were 747 teachers of Home Economics, which was an increase of 76
over the preceding year. Of the total number of Home Economics teachers, degrees were held in Home Economics by 52 per cent, including 14 teachers with a
master's degree; in Education by 19 per cent; and in other disciplines by 6 per cent.
Twenty-five men were instructing in one or more Foods courses.
The Director of Home Economics and the Home Economics Advisers had consultative visits with 224 teachers in 52 school districts and participated in meetings
of Home Economics teachers at Kamloops, Kelowna, Langley, Merritt, Salmon
Arm, and Quesnel.
The Home Economics Branch prepared and sent, in September, a bulletin
and a supplementary library list to each teacher of Home Economics. Later in
the school-year, two foods and nutrition booklets were obtained from the Provincial
Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance in sufficient quantity to
make it possible to forward both booklets to these teachers. The aforementioned
articles, as well as teaching aids which were sent on request, made a total of 4,695
items mailed to Home Economics teachers throughout the year.
In December, a meeting was held at Victoria with the following: Superintendent of Field Services, Superintendent of Instructional Services, Director of
Curriculum, Co-ordinator of Home Economics in Vancouver Schools, Home Economics Consultants in Victoria Schools, and members of the Home Economics
Branch.
Upon invitation, the staff of this Branch attended The Teachers of Home
Economics Specialist Association annual meeting. Liaison has been maintained
with the following: School of Home Economics, University of British Columbia;
Home Service Department, British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority; Bureau
of Consumer Affairs, Department of Consumer and Corporate Affairs; Health
Branch, British Columbia Health Services and Hospital Insurance; Markets and
Statistics Branch, British Columbia Department of Agriculture; and the British Columbia Nutrition Co-ordinating Committee.
Arrangements were made for Miss Jean Peacock, Secondary Inspector, Home
Economics, Department of Education, New South Wales, Australia, to make a two-
week visit to various educational institutions in the Lower Mainland and Victoria.
The shortage of fully qualified teachers of Home Economics and Community
Services has remained critical.
VOCATIONAL AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
(SECONDARY SCHOOLS)
(Report of J. Jupp, Co-ordinator)
Industrial Education
The number of Industrial Education courses taken by students in secondary
schools during the 1971/72 school-year totalled 119,474.   This represents an in-
 DIVISION OF FIELD SERVICES
D 29
crease of 8 per cent over the previous year. Although lower than the 14-per-cent
increase a year earlier, the enrolment has risen steadily since the introduction of
the reorganization of the senior secondary schools in 1964. The total enrolment
for students taking Occupational courses decreased slightly. The number of
students taking Programmes for Particular Occupations (Specifics) increased by
22 per cent and the 11- and 12-course enrolment increased by 8 per cent. Grade
IX course enrolment showed a marked increase of 10 per cent.
The number of teachers instructing Industrial Education for the school-year
was 1,031.   This represents an increase of 50 teachers over the previous year.
The two Technical Inspectors, Rozell C. Smith and M. J. C. Tidmarsh, carried
out their duties within the reorganized terms of reference for Field Service and
filled all of the requests from school districts. With over a thousand teachers and
only two inspectors, service is rendered where needed and the balance of time is
devoted to leadership, group seminars, workshops, and keeping the course content
abreast with industry. Improvements are constantly being introduced to the
courses, particularly in the field of industrial finishes and procedures, i.e., plastics,
aluminum alloys, electrical equipment, and construction techniques.
Safety
The most important section of all Industrial Education shop courses is safety
education. Current attitudes in education tend to weaken the discipline within the
shop areas, and it is desirable to provide a safety guide for the benefit of all teachers
and students. The Workmen's Compensation Board, the Provincial Fire Marshal's
office, the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, the Teacher Training Unit, and
others are assisting the Branch in preparing the safety guide for Industrial Education. This guide will be approved through the usual Departmental channels and
should be available for distribution during the 1972/73 school-year.
Inventories
With the introduction of new curricula, the capital equipment investment in
secondary schools has increased considerably. Care and maintenance of equipment
is of paramount importance, and the Industrial Education Branch has provided
all schools with copies of prepared inventories to assist in maintaining close management of equipment in shop areas.
The Industrial Education Advisory Committee
All of the Industrial Education programmes and courses are under review, and
the committee has held four meetings to date under the chairmanship of W. B.
Naylor, Director of Curriculum. This committee was formed jointly by the British
Columbia Teachers' Federation and the Department of Education, and the members
are as follows:
W. D. Oliver, Assistant Director of Curriculum.
B. F. Walton, Industrial Education teacher and President of the BCTF Shop
Teachers' Association.
R. H. Graham, Industrial Education teacher.
J. T. McCammon, Principal, Royal Oak Junior Secondary School.
J. D. Wilkinson, Industrial Education teacher.
L. D. Wrinch, Industrial Education teacher.
J. Jupp, Rozell C. Smith, and M. J. C. Tidmarsh, Department of Education.
Necessary improvements to meet the current educational objectives are anticipated, and the committee's recommendations will be sent forward for approval.
 d 30 public schools report, 1971/72
In-service Training
Industrial Education
Half-day workshops were held in six areas centred in Terrace, Dawson Creek,
Cranbrook, Trail, Williams Lake, and Nanaimo. All of the Industrial Education
teachers employed in each area attended, and District Superintendents and principals were provided with copies of the agenda. The topics presented and discussed
at the workshop were as follows:
1. The current role of the Technical Inspectors.
2. Industrial Education safety—the development of a safety manual.
3. Recruiting Industrial Education teacher trainees. Canada Manpower no
longer sponsors clients into training.
4. The new secondary school structure, related to Industrial Education only.
5. The Provincial Industrial Education Advisory Committee.
6. The Accreditation Booklet for secondary schools, Industrial Education
section only.
7. The future of industrial science and industrial power.
8. Interpretation of the automotive option.
9. Junior courses.
10. Individual reactions, problems, and comments.
Concurrently with the workshops, evening or Saturday meetings were held to
recruit persons from industry into teacher training as Industrial Education teachers.
Approximately 50 men and their wives attended the meetings, and these men may
eventually make application to become Industrial Education teachers.
Graphic Communications
The Visual and Performing Arts programme offers many opportunities for
students entering the entertainment and service industries, and the number of
students enrolled in the programmes is increasing at a very high rate. A few
schools have been offering Graphic Communications under a special authority
because no structured curriculum is available. These courses have been well
received, and the Industrial Education Branch organized a two-day workshop with
emphasis on the following topics:
1. The study of the objectives of Graphic Communications and the method
of presenting the course to students of varying ability.
2. To identify the "core" work that should be required and the essential equipment necessary to teach these units.
3. Safety practices and instruction in using certain equipment and materials.
4. Production procedures. Live projects would appear to be an essential
part of Graphic Communications and, although competition with the private sector
is to be discouraged, liaison is both desirable and essential.
5. Graphic Communications would appear to complement and perhaps overlap other subject areas, i.e., Commerce, Art, and Industrial Education. An exchange of experiences and recommendations may prove to be extremely valuable to
the total operation of the school.
Approximately 50 persons attended the two-day workshop, and the cost to the
Department of Education was approximately $350 or $7 per person. A Curriculum Committee has now been formed under Mr. Naylor, Director of Curriculum,
in co-operation with the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, which will prepare
a curriculum outline based on the experiences gained from the recent workshop.
 division of field services
Miscellaneous Activities
D 31
The Branch was engaged in numerous additional activities which add to the
effectiveness of the Department of Education, such as active membership on the
Aviation Technology Advisory Committee at Selkirk College, the Education Media
Standards Committee, and the Provincial Education Media Centre Committee,
liaison with B.C. Hydro in developing efficient house construction (many schools,
as part of Construction 11 and 12 in general education, build full-size homes,
band rooms, portable classrooms, and similar buildings), advertising for and interviewing potential candidates for entry to Industrial Education teacher training, the
initial organization of the Post-secondary and Adult Instructors Training (two
weeks) seminar, and the processing and approving of capital equipment for British
Columbia colleges under a similar pattern to the Vocational Schools Assistance Act.
New Capital Buildings and Equipment
Through the Division of Technical and Vocational Services and the Division
of Administrative Services, the Industrial Education Branch provides assistance
in recommending and approving new capital projects under the Vocational Schools
Assistance Act for secondary schools. The progress under this programme is reported under the Division of Technical and Vocational Services.
CONCLUSION
The Superintendent, Field Services, has continued to represent the Department
of Education on the Educational Research Institute of British Columbia as a member of the Board of Directors, and has served as a member of the Nancy Greene
Scholarship Selection Committee, the Premier's Athletic Awards Committee, and
the British Columbia Athletic Awards Committee. He has also served as a member
of the Department of Education Examination Committee, as a member of the
British Columbia Student Aid Committee, as a member of the Senate of Simon
Fraser University, and as a member of the Provincial Accreditation Committee.
In May of this year, at the request of the Honourable the Minister of Education, this Division undertook the over-all supervision of a Special Conference for
Senior Secondary School Counsellors. The detailed organization of the conference
was carried out by the Director of Guidance and Teacher Recruitment, and specific
comments concerning the conference will no doubt be mentioned in his annual
report. It is the observation of the Superintendent, Field Services, who acted as
general chairman, that the conference was indeed of value to senior secondary
counsellors in assessing their comments and communications.
The writer wishes to express appreciation to his senior colleagues in the
headquarters of the Department of Education, to other officials in the Department
of Education, to all members of the Field Staff, to School Trustees and secretary-
treasurers, as well as to officials of other groups with whom this Division deals, for
the many generous courtesies and the kind co-operation which has been offered
to this official.
 D 32 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
DIVISION OF INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
REPORT OF J. R. MEREDITH, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., SUPERINTENDENT
There is considerable evidence in the reports of the various Branches in the
Division of Instructional Services to support the general conclusion that public
school education is changing and developing in response to the new demands of a
changing society. Specific indications of this response are found in the reorganization of the senior secondary school curriculum; course revisions and textbook
changes at all levels, including the development of new drug education materials; the
establishing of a new Instructor's Diploma training programme; the development of
a new evaluation and accreditation process for senior secondary schools; the expansion of educational television services; and the improvement of the data collection and retrieval system in consultation with Federal authorities. Detailed information on most of these and other matters will be found in the reports of the
Directors of the Branches concerned.
Major attention was given to the matter of accreditation. A Revision Committee representative of school administration and teaching was established to review and recommend changes in the concepts and processes of accreditation. The
recommendations were received and accepted. An expanded Provincial Accreditation Committee was appointed to review the school evaluation reports and recommend to the Department on the accreditation status of the schools concerned. To
date 20 school evaluations have been studied. Accreditation has been recommended for 16 schools and provisional accreditation has been recommended for
two schools. In making recommendations, the Committee takes into account the
school's philosophy and objectives, relationships with the community, staffing and
administration, curriculum, teaching and counselling, facilities and resources, and
student activities. When a school is accredited, that school is considered competent
to manage certain essential services for itself. Provisional accreditation is granted
when in the judgment of the Committee specific matters require further study, revision, and report, the objective being to bring the school to accreditation status. A
decision not to accredit a school signifies that there is need for direct attention and
supervision of the school from the Department and the local school authorities.
Such a decision may be the result of factors which are not necessarily all under the
control of the school itself.
The new accreditation process, which gives more authority and responsibility
to the school, is in keeping with the general trend to decentralize the decision-making process in specific areas. Further indications of this trend can be found in other
areas. For example, in school organization there is a semester-type of organization
operating in 79 secondary schools and in modified form in 22 additional schools.
There are locally designed, school board approved pupil report cards in one or more
schools in 65 school districts. There are at present 39 locally developed courses
being offered with the approval of the Boards of School Trustees and the Department of Education. The reorganization of the senior secondary school curriculum
and the plans for substituting a programme of survey testing for the system of Grade
XII examinations are also indications of the policy of increasing the opportunities
for schools to respond in different ways to the educational needs of their students
and community within a Provincially determined, general framework of curriculum
and standards.
 DIVISION OF INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
D 33
This Division is also responsible for providing secretarial service to the Advisory Council on Drugs, Alcohol, and Cigarettes and for convening the subcommittee appointed to analyse and advise on various submissions received from individuals and organizations. The Council held 13 meetings and the subcommittee
held 12 meetings during the year under review. A total of 102 submissions was
analysed.
In addition to these responsibilities, the following were undertaken: Representation at the meetings of the Joint Board of Teacher Education, attendance at
special regional meetings of District Superintendents of Schools called in connection
with the reorganized curriculum, convening regular meetings of the Provincial Curriculum Advisory Committees, and acting as chairman of the Soldiers' Dependent
Children Act Commission.
RESEARCH AND STANDARDS BRANCH
(Report of C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Pced., Director)
The school-year which ended the first century of public education in British
Columbia provided a series of additional challenges to the Research Branch
merely because of the date. Not only were the collection dates advanced for
current statistics but old reports and documents were combed for comparable data
that, whenever possible, extended back to 1872. The results were more than a
dozen "Then and Now" tables with accompanying graphs, charts, and commentary
that were published in One Hundred Years: Education in British Columbia in
January 1972. At the same time, Statistics Canada was bringing its information
on British Columbia education up to date in a special publication A century of
education in British Columbia: 1871-1971 and much of the historical information
and many quotations originated in this office. A considerable section on schools
for the blind and deaf was prepared by Dr. C. E. MacDonald, former Superintendent of Jericho Hill.
Another study with which the Branch had intensive involvement was one
financed chiefly by the B.C. School Trustees Association through the Educational
Research Institute of British Columbia and directed by Dr. W. J. Hartrick of the
Administration Study Centre of the UBC Faculty of Education. It has been published in two ERIBC reports: A Study of Teacher Supply and Demand and Some
Related Factors, and Teacher Surplus: Fact or Fantasy, the latter by Mrs. D. Claire
Hurley of UBC.
Most of the information on teacher origin, qualifications, turnover and retention, sex, age, and experience was obtained by close collaboration with the computer
programme section of Statistics Canada Education Division. Liaison also has
been maintained with the Statistics Committee of the Council of Ministers of Education, the B.C. Research Council, the Educational Research Institute of B.C., and
the Lower Mainland Data Processing Committee. Many hours have been devoted
to attempts to simplify and refine the data that are being collected, to define and
make compatible such terms as "retention," "retardation," "pupil/teacher ratios,"
or "expenditure growth rates," and almost constant revision of forms and adaptation of computer programmes is involved.
Refinement of forecasting methods continued during the year, with excellent
co-operation from A. Tunner, of the B.C. Research Council. Changing birth-rate
retention and immigration patterns will, of course, require modification of long-
term extrapolations, but the short-term forecasts are proving to be very accurate
and useful for practical application.   In view of the disbelief and dismay that re-
 D 34
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
 DIVISION OF INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
D 35
suited from the news this year that in urban areas there was a surplus of elementary
teachers without special qualifications, we cannot resist quoting the final paragraph
of the report of the Division of Tests and Standards published seven years ago
in the Public Schools Annual Report (1964-65, p. D 55):
"New estimates of future enrolment have been prepared during the current
year, and for the first time in a generation a decrease is forecast. Total elementary-
school enrolment will continue to rise until 1970 and secondary enrolment until
1977, but in spite of the fact that interprovincial immigration is currently at record
levels, both birth rates and birth numbers have fallen so steeply during the past four
years that it is impossible to forecast a mere levelling-off. The low birth rates of
the 1930's have resulted in a shortage of potential mothers aged 25 to 29, and the
true birth rates based on the reproductive age-groups in the female population have
declined 10 to 15 per cent."
To this we should add that, although age-specific-fertility rates have now
decreased about 40 per cent and Grade I enrolment will decrease for two more
years, we are forecasting an increase in the number of Grade I pupils for September
1974.
During the current year it was noticed that a reversal had occurred in the
continuously rising retention rates in the higher grades.
Secondary School Grade Enrolments as Fractions of the Preceding Grade
the Preceding Year
School Years
Ending
X/IX
XI/X
XII/XI
Cumulative
XU/LX
1971/70-
1972/71-
.970
.963
.979
.949
.951
.932
.903
.852
It is not known whether the change represents a reversal of the previous trend and
a possible extention downward of university nonattendance or merely one of the
chance variations that occur so frequently in educational data.
At the request of the Economics Curriculum Committee, an investigation of
pupils' knowledge of Economics was carried out at the Grade XI level. Two
forms of a test which was rather traditional in its approach to Economics were
administered to a total of 25,924 students. Because of the complications introduced by the semestering of schools and the duplicate analyses required for those
who had and had not studied the Economics course, the programme is presently
incomplete, but preliminary study indicates that the scores are very low.
Three forms of a test based upon the Chemistry 11 course and text were
administered to 8,898 students who were taking Chemistry 11 in the second
semester or had taken it in the first semester. It is intended that this be an ongoing programme that with additional testing may shed some light on the value
of semestered vs. nonsemestered programmes.
A small study also was conducted in which a comparison of English usage,
spelling, and vocabulary scores in 1972 was made with ones obtained in 1953.
General conclusions cannot be drawn as it covered only one urban school district,
but it has indicated the stability and reliability of norms in these aspects of English
that were obtained 19 years earlier.
 D 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT BRANCH
(Report of W. B. Naylor, B.A., Director)
The Curriculum Development Branch has general responsibility in the areas of
the continuing review and revision of existing courses, the development of new
courses, and the provision of basic guidelines for the organization of the curriculum
in both elementary and secondary schools. Associated tasks performed include the
preparation and publication of curriculum guides outlining courses prescribed for
the public school system, the preparation and publication of administrative bulletins
and Departmental circulars outlining policy regarding curriculum organization and
administration, and the identification of textbooks to be adopted to support prescribed courses. A close liaison is maintained and advice and assistance provided
on matters related to curriculum to other Divisions and Branches within the Department.
The Branch, in performing its duties, is given valuable assistance and advice
from a number of advisory committees of teachers and other experts. The extent
of this assistance is illustrated by the fact that during the year under consideration
a total of 14 committees, comprising 121 members, held 139 meetings on curriculum matters. An estimated 6,441 hours of members' time was devoted to this
work. It is significant to note that the assistance extended by the members of these
committees is voluntary. The policy of providing released time for teacher members
was continued.
Course development and revision work were continued in the following curriculum areas: Kindergarten, Social Studies, Mathematics, French, English, Commerce, and Science, including physics and biology. A total of 107 new titles has
been added to the list of texts prescribed and provided to schools and 17 new or revised courses have been prepared for introduction in September 1972.
An additional service provided by the Branch is in the area of identification of
suitable school library books. Two library-book review committees have reviewed
a large number of books this year and as a result two annotated lists of recommended books have been provided to both secondary and elementary schools.
A major development during the year has been the approval and subsequent
announcement of a new organizational pattern for the senior secondary school
curriculum which became effective for pupils entering Grade XI in September 1972.
This reorganization is the result of a 2Vi-year study conducted with the assistance
and guidance of the Provincial Advisory Committee on the Secondary School Curriculum. The two major objectives of the reorganization are to make more definite
the distinction between graduation requirements and requirements for admission to
post-secondary institutions, and to provide for an increased measure of flexibility in
student programming. While the opportunity for a pupil to study in depth in a
major field of learning, a feature of the previous organization, has been retained,
provision has been allowed for the design of more individualized pupil programmes
suited to meet particular pupil needs or future aspirations. In keeping with the
policy of decentralization of authority in curriculum matters, increased authority
has been provided for local decision-making in the areas of graduation requirements
and pupil programming.
As an integral part of the reorganization, increased opportunity has been
provided for the inclusion within pupil programmes of locally developed, Provin-
cially approved courses. Guidelines for the preparation of locally developed courses
have been issued and procedures, involving the Provincial Advisory Committee on
the Secondary School Curriculum, for the review of courses submitted have been
 DIVISION OF INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
D 37
developed. A total of 73 submissions for approval was reviewed. Of this total, 39,
including 17 courses approved in previous years as experimental courses, were
approved for the 1972/73 school-year; seven were referred back to local authorities
for further development for possible resubmission; 15 were considered to be variations of content presently included in existing courses and, as a result, were not
approved as separate courses; and 12 were rejected as not suitable for inclusion in
the curriculum offerings of a public school.
Of particular note also, has been the development of the experimental course,
Civilization 12E, based upon Dr. Kenneth Clark's popular television series, "Civilisation." This project, initiated by the Department, was developed and taught experimentally at Claremont Secondary School in Saanich and Lord Byng Secondary
School in Vancouver during the 1971/72 school-year. The success of this audiovisual approach to the cultural background to Western civilization, as interpreted by
Dr. Clark, has prompted the Department to extend the project to eight other schools
in the Victoria, Lower Mainland, and Okanagan areas. The feasibility of a further
extension of the project in succeeding years is presently under study.
Acknowledgment
Grateful acknowledgment is extended to the British Columbia Teachers' Federation and to the three public universities for their co-operation, specifically to those
teachers and members of university faculties who served on committees. Particular
acknowledgment is extended to the two advisory committees on school curriculum,
whose membership includes teachers, principals, District Superintendents, and representatives of the British Columbia School Trustees Association. They met regularly
to advise on matters affecting the curriculum for the elementary and secondary
schools of the Province. Their help and advice has been most valuable.
Curriculum Consultants
The practice was continued whereby two outstanding teachers in the Province
are released on loan by Boards of School Trustees to work with the Curriculum
Development Branch. This year's appointees were J. S. Clark (Saanich), who completed a second year of appointment in this capacity and L. C. Mendoza (Trail).
Their enthusiasm and knowledge, combined with their practical experience and
professional training, made an invaluable contribution to the work of the Branch.
Information and Related Services
Services related to curriculum were also provided by the staff of the Curriculum
Development Branch. The Director participated in national and regional conferences involving curriculum officials from other provinces. In addition, members
of the Branch represented the Department at various teachers' conferences and
symposia convened by universities and other organizations for the purpose of discussing educational developments and problems.
CURRICULUM RESOURCES BRANCH
(Report of D. W. C. Huggins, C.G.A., Director)
Although the statistics of the activities of the Curriculum Resources Branch
indicate a decline from the activities of the previous year, the continuing review of
the curricula brings about the addition of new titles far in excess of those previously
handled.  The shelves of the Curriculum Resources Branch now carry over 1,500
 D 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
book titles to meet the demand of schools and students. Alternative programmes for
some courses and multiple prescriptions with selection at school level complicates
the design of the documents needed to convey the wishes of the schools to the
Branch and to effect the proper controlled outflows of these selected materials. The
complexity of order filling has reached a stage where it has become necessary to
revise procedures in order to fill all requisitions in as short a time as possible.
At the time of compilation of this report, adjustments to the form of the 1973
requisition have already been effected. The annual requisitioning process of the
schools will be brought forward in order to ensure completion of requisitions before
the opening of the ensuing school-year. Multiple prescriptions for elementary
mathematics, which will be previewed in the 1972/73 school-year, will add to the
order-filling problems next summer. The completion of elementary Social Studies
revisions with additional multiple-choice areas will necessitate very careful review
and planning to ensure the availability of resource materials to the schools without
danger of a loss in continuity in instruction or a decline in the high levels of teaching
presently enjoyed.
In the 1971/72 fiscal year we experienced a decline in expenditures of approximately 6 per cent to $5,063,730. This dollar volume of purchasing was effected
through the issuance of 2,617 purchase orders, which was 412 more than the
previous year, representing approximately 19 per cent increase in activity. The
increase in purchase order issues is largely attributable to the greater activity of
vocational schools and the B.C. Institute of Technology in the procurement of their
resource material. As the value of purchase orders processed on behalf of these
institutions is not included in the statistics of this report, the increased activity is not
reflected in the comparisons made of the dollar measure of purchases during this
fiscal year.
The processing of school requisitions also declined by approximately 12 per
cent with the total for this fiscal year being 6,272. It is reasonable to assume from
this statistic that schools are using greater discretion in placing their orders, with a
consequent drop in the number of supplementary requisitions submitted. Some
credit must also be assumed for the efficacy of the procedures and the improved
designs in order forms, both for the indication of selections and the identity for
order-filling. It is hoped that this condition can be sustained as the number of
titles prescribed expands and the problems of supply increase. A general decline
in requisitions was also experienced in the sales department. Twelve thousand and
fifty-one invoices were prepared, representing a 16-per-cent decline over the previous year, and efficient planning of orders can be considered a contributing factor to
this situation.
The order-filling activities of the warehouse section of the Branch required
83,281 cartons and parcels to be processed during the year, totalling 2,260,398
pounds in weight. Improvements and expansion of the textbook repair programme
during the summer recess have eased the burden of supply in the central warehouse.
Under this procedure the repair agency is able to pick up, repair, and return books
to the school during the summer break in instruction. Those schools located in
districts not within reasonable distance of the repair agency surrender repairable
texts and add their consequent shortages to the orders placed with the Curriculum
Resources Branch in Victoria. The reduction in order levels for those schools on
the "summer" repair programme approximates 200,000, books.
It is with deep regret that this report notifies the passing of Alexander Bennett
in May of this year. Mr. Bennett joined the Government service and this Branch
on June 1, 1943.   He had served 28 years with the Branch and was within two
 DIVISION OF INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
D 39
years of retirement age at the date of his untimely death. As the supervisor of the
warehouse section, Mr. Bennett was outstanding in his contributions, which were
given with enthusiasm and devotion in loyal service. His cheerful nature and compassion for his fellow man will not soon be forgotten.
AUDIO-VISUAL SERVICES BRANCH
(Report of Barrie A. Black, Director)
Recent developments in the audio-visual field have begun to restructure the
kinds and numbers of services offered. Changes in distribution techniques and
modes, changes in the available technology, and changes in the interests, needs, and
objectives of schools have all carried implications for the work of the Branch. For
convenience, this report covers the various activities of the past year in separate
categories. In operation, the activities are closely integrated to form a comprehensive service.
Distribution Services
The circulation report for motion pictures, filmstrips, picture sets, and dioramas
may be found in Table 2.20. Teacher demand for audio-visual material went up
significantly this year, with this Branch processing over 133,000 individual requests.
A major revision of library materials was carried out with the removal of many
dated and damaged films. Many of the older films were placed in an archives
collection for teacher and student use. New policies for teacher requisitioning were
instituted to facilitate ordering and distribution, and new services were provided
with the loaning of complete filmstrip kits. Two new catalogues—one for motion
pictures and one for filmstrips—were distributed to all schools. Special assistance
was provided in the distribution of a series of films and related material which formed
the core of an experimental course, Civilization 12E. The project has been expanded
to include more schools for the 1972/73 school-year.
Broadcast Services
The traditional pattern of co-operative production of radio and television
broadcasts with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation was continued in the 1971/
72 school-year. More than 300 school programmes were carried throughout the
Province by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, with the majority being planned and prepared by the Audio-Visual Services Branch. Emphasis in television
broadcasting was placed upon Science and the Social Studies for all grades, while
radio programming stressed Music and Art for elementary schools and languages for
secondary grades. Complete statistics of programming and use may be found in
Table 2.19.
Information and Related Services
The Director represented the Department at meetings of the Joint Programming
Committee of the Council of Ministers of Education, served as a member of the steering committee for the formation of the Subcommittee on Educational Broadcasting,
served as chairman of the Western Regional Conference on Educational Broadcasting, and of the English Language section of the Subcommittee on Media Programming.
The work of the Educational Media Standards and Specifications Committee
was also continued under the chairmanship of the Director. Guidelines and advice
on the purchase and use of new educational technology are being provided to school
districts through the efforts of this committee.
 D 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
The Branch has also played a major role in the planning and design of new
television production and duplicating facilities established at the British Columbia
Institute of Technology under the guidance of the Provincial Educational Media
Centre Committee.
Approximately 1,000 new films were previewed for possible inclusion in the
film library, with 240 of these being purchased. Information on all films previewed
is available to school district personnel on request. Special emphasis was placed
on the previewing of drug education films for consideration by the Provincial Advisory Council on Drugs, Alcohol, and Cigarettes.
Photographic Services
During the past year, extensive still and motion-picture photography was
carried out for use in educational television productions. Original photographs
were taken for a variety of Federal and Provincial Government reports on education,
and for several Department of Education publications, including curriculum guides,
film and filmstrip catalogues, and Teachers' Guidebooks for Radio and Television
Broadcasts. Original photography, enlargements, and artwork were done for educational displays, including the Department of Education display at the Pacific National Exhibition. Selected photographs from the archives collection of the Branch
have also been made available on request for projects at two universities.
ETV Project
A report on the Penticton ETV project was completed and circulated to school
district Superintendents. The success of the project was illustrated by the decision
of the Penticton School Board to continue the service after the completion of the
one-year trial period.
Departmental involvement in the second year of operation has been directed
to the problems of obtaining suitable programmes for use in the system. These programmes will also be available to other school districts in the future.
EXAMINATIONS AND TEACHER CERTIFICATION BRANCH
(Report of Edward A. Killough, B.Ed., M.A., Registrar and Director)
The Registrar's Branch has two primary functions—
(a) To evaluate the academic and professional qualifications of all applicants for British Columbia teaching certificates, to issue appropriate
certificates to those who qualify under current regulations, and to
maintain a Provincial registry of all certificated teachers:
(b) To prepare and administer all senior secondary school Department
of Education regular and scholarship examinations, to issue statements of standing or transcripts to all Grade XII Academic and
Technical Programme students, and to maintain a Provincial registry
of these senior secondary school students.
Provincial Government scholarship awards to Grade XII students also are administered by this Branch. The report on Examinations, the second of these functions,
immediately follows the Teacher Registration and Certification report.
Teacher Registration and Certification
Each teacher employed in the public schools must hold a valid teaching certificate.   Eligibility for certification is determined by the Registrar's Branch.
 DIVISION OF INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
D 41
Under current regulations there are three types of regular teaching credentials
available—the Professional Certificate, the Standard Certificate, and the Teaching
Licence. The Professional and Standard are both certificates of the type that may
be made permanent following at least two years of satisfactory teaching service in
British Columbia schools. The Professional Certificate requires completion of a
minimum four-year programme, normally including an acceptable university degree,
and the Standard Certificate, a minimum three-year programme of post-secondary
professional and academic or specialist studies, including appropriate basic teacher
education. The Teaching Licence, a credential which cannot be made permanent,
requires completion of an approved two-year post-secondary programme of studies,
including basic teacher education. It is anticipated that the Teaching Licence for
teaching elementary grades will be phased out of the certification structure by June
1975.
Modifications in office administration have made possible improved service to
those applying for teaching certificates. During the 1971/72 school-year, 23,080
letters were received concerning teacher certification, of which 5,455 were initial
inquiries. Table 2.5, Teacher Statistics, provides a composite by area of these
inquiries, and indicates the return, on teacher certification evaluations performed,
as measured in terms of the number of certificates issued as a percentage of both
the new and total teaching population. Conclusions based on these statistics must
take into account current policy whereunder, in view of the reduced general demand
for additional teachers, applicants for certification from other jurisdictions, and, in
particular, those from outside Canada, are not encouraged to come to British Columbia unless they possess specialist qualifications of a type known to be in short supply.
Further, teaching certificates are not issued other than to qualified applicants resident within the Province.
As may be determined from the table, more than one-half of all initial certification inquiries received during the 1971/72 school-year were from persons residing
in British Columbia, and more than 85 per cent of all new interim certificates granted
were to this group. Approximately 95 per cent of the total number of new certificates
granted were to persons who made initial inquiry from British Columbia or another
Canadian province and who, at the time of certificate issue, were resident in this
Province.
Table 2.5 reveals that 77 per cent of all new appointees for September 1971
obtained their first teaching certificate in British Columbia, and a similarly high
percentage of the total full-time teaching force for the school-year 1971/72 was
provided by teachers initially certificated within British Columbia. It may be
concluded that a significant majority of British Columbia's teachers, both continuing
and new appointees, are products of the Province's own teacher education institutions. There is a corresponding trend toward reduced reliance upon teachers from
the United Kingdom, Australia-New Zealand, and the United States, long the most
significant non-Canadian sources of British Columbia teachers.
Table 2.5 also reflects the close relationship between the number of new teacher
appointees from various jurisdictions as a percentage of total new teachers for 1971/
72, and the number of teachers originating from various jurisdictions as a percentage
of total full-time teaching population in the same school-year. This suggests that
most teachers moving to British Columbia tend to remain in the Province. As might
be expected, those first certificated in British Columbia tend to remain within our
schools as teachers for a longer period of time than do most other groups. Teachers
from Australia-New Zealand and the United States apparently are less likely to
provide long service in British Columbia, although the average number of years of
 D 42 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
British Columbia teaching experience of these groups is significantly influenced by
the number of teachers from these jurisdictions.
In September 1971, the full-time teaching force of the Province numbered
22,591, a net increase in teaching positions of 701 or 3.2 per cent over last year's
corresponding total of 21,890. Of the 1970/71 total teaching force, 19,924 or
88.2 per cent again were teaching in British Columbia in the new school-year, while
1,967 or 9 per cent retired or otherwise left teaching between September 1970 and
September 1971. Exclusive of staff changes during the school-year, new teacher
appointees in September 1971 therefore numbered 2,667 (1,967 to replace last
year's "drop-outs" and 701 to staff additional positions). The source of supply of
the 2,667 new appointees may be determined from Table 2.6. Increases in teacher
population (full-time and part-time) during the school-year, and between June 30,
1971, and June 30, 1972, may be determined from Table 2.7.
Table 2.6 also discloses that 1,540 or 57.7 per cent of the 2,667 new additions
to the September 1971 teaching population came directly from the Province's
teacher-education institutions. Undoubtedly, further significant numbers of new
appointees were products of these same universities in an earlier year, but during
the interim they had been housekeeping, employed in nonteaching occupations, or
otherwise involved. Table 2.8 shows that 77 per cent of those beginning to teach
in this Province for the first time had attended British Columbia teacher-training
institutions, 80.7 per cent of the elementary beginners and 72.7 per cent of the
secondary beginners. This represents a 9-per-cent annual increase in the proportion
of beginning teachers trained in Provincial universities. Of the total appointments
for 1971/72,91 per cent of the elementary teachers and 86 per cent of the secondary
teachers were trained in Canadian colleges or universities.
Detail concerning the numbers of trainees prepared by each university in 1970/
71, and the types of certificates authorized for issue, is shown in Table 2.9. Significant is the fact that some 67.4 per cent of the total group completing certification
programmes qualified at the Professional Certificate level, compared with approximately 25.2 per cent and 7.4 per cent for the Standard Certificate and the Teaching
Licence respectively. Compared with the previous year, there has been a decrease
of 51.3 per cent in the number of Teaching Licences issued in 1971/72, reflecting
the continuing shift to three-year teacher training programmes as a minimum requirement for teaching at the elementary level. Further, fully 62.5 per cent of those
qualifying for the Professional Certificate began teaching on September 1, 1971,
while 48.2 per cent of those qualifying for the Standard Certificate and 64.1 per cent
of those qualifying for the Teaching Licence did not begin teaching in the 1971/72
school-year. In summary, approximately half of those qualifying for lower certification at the Standard Certificate and the Teaching Licence levels were not teaching
in September, and of these, the majority presumably remained at university to complete additional studies leading to higher certification.
Data in Tables 2.10, 2.11, and 2.12, confirm that this trend toward higher
certification is applicable to the general teaching population. Of the 6,600 certificates issued in the 1971/72 school-year (Table 2.10), 4,197 or 63 per cent
were Professional Certificates (including Permanent Professional Basic and Professional Advanced Certificates). An additional 29.4 per cent were Standard Certificates, each requiring a minimum three-year university programme. All 3,050 permanent certificates authorized were granted to certificated applicants now qualifying
for permanent certification at the same, or at a higher level than that previously held.
That 65.3 per cent of these were Permanent Professional Certificates reaffirms the
trend toward higher certification.
 DIVISION OF INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES D 43
As might be anticipated, there also is a relationship between level of certification
and average number of years of teaching experience, with higher average teaching
experience normally reflected by those possessing higher qualifications. As indicated
in Table 2.11, teachers with Professional Certificates (including Professional Advanced, Professional Basic, and Professional C Certificates) have an average of 8.91
years of British Columbia experience compared with an average of 5.86 for those
with Standard Certificates (including Elementary A Certificates). The high average
of 8.98 years for those with Teaching Licence qualifications is accounted for by the
large number of teachers with lengthy experience who hold Permanent Elementary
B Certificates which are included in this category. Those few active teachers still
possessing Elementary C Certificates (only one-quarter of 1 per cent of the total
teacher population and down 33 to 59 compared with 92 in 1970/71) presumably
have remained in demand during the current school-year largely because of their
long British Columbia experience.
Table 2.12 provides the numbers and percentages of full-time teachers possessing each type of certificate, and equivalent data for those with no degrees, undergraduate degrees, and graduate degrees for the school-years 1970/71 and 1971/72.
Significant increases are discernible in the number and proportion of active teachers
holding both higher certification and degree qualifications. Of the total number of
teachers employed during the 1971/72 academic year, 13,668 or 60.5 per cent
hold undergraduate or postgraduate degrees.
Teacher Exchange
Teacher exchange applications also proceed through the Registrar's Branch.
Although the number of applications from British Columbia teachers annually exceeds that of exchange positions available, the relatively small number of exchanges
completed for 1971/72 was disappointing. In the 1971/72 school-year, 16 Provincial teachers were on exchange to the United Kingdom and one to the United
States. The interprovincial teacher exchange programme did not function during
this school-year.
Examinations
For the school-year 1971/72, Grade XII Regular Departmental Examinations
covering 13 courses were prepared for each of January and June, and an additional
11 Grade XII Scholarship Departmental Examinations were provided for June only.
No Grade XIII Departmental Examinations were prepared or administered, since
the 1970/71 school-year was the last during which certain senior secondary schools
offered instruction at this level. In January 1972, examinations were written at
some 81 regular examination centres located at secondary schools in the Province,
and in June 1972, at 164 regular British Columbia examination centres and a
further 10 special examination centres established outside the Province in places as
far removed as South America and the United Kingdom.
Senior secondary school students who did not qualify for recommendation
standing in an examinable course were required to write the appropriate Regular
Grade XII Departmental Examination available in both January and June, and
had their final standing in that course based on the average of the mark determined
by the school plus the mark achieved on the Regular Departmental Examination.
As indicated in Table 1.6, the number of Grade XII Academic and Technical Programme students registered with the Department of Education has remained relatively constant during the last two school-years, although the proportion of registered students who completed their programmes has continued to increase.   Of the
 D 44
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
 DIVISION OF INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES D 45
total number of Regular Departmental Examinations written each school-year, the
proportions attempted in each of January and June similarly appears to have stabilized at approximately one-third and two-thirds respectively.
Grade XII students competing for Provincial Government scholarships are
required to write the Scholarship Departmental Examinations in two courses. While
the Regular Departmental Examinations are entirely objective in format and machine-scored, the Scholarship Departmental Examinations are predominantly subjective and are marked by experienced senior secondary school teachers of these
courses who have been appointed as Assistant Examiners. In June 1972, Provincial
Government scholarships were awarded on a rank basis to all qualifying students
who wrote the Scholarship Departmental Examinations and achieved averages of 70
per cent or higher. Of the 2,598 Grade XII students who wrote for scholarships,
533 qualified for three-quarters, 557 for one-half, and 370 for one-third of their
basic tuition fees in the first semester or academic year of post-secondary school
education.
Judith Anne Brown, of Delbrook Senior Secondary School in North Vancouver,
ranked first in the 1971/72 Grade XII Provincial Government Scholarship competition and won the Governor General's silver medal. The Governor General's bronze
medal was awarded to Linda Svendsen, a Grade XII student at Centennial Senior
Secondary School, Coquitlam.
EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT
(Report of Mrs. Betty Leech, Secretary to the Commission)
During the school-year 1971/72 a total of 289 applications was considered by
the Commission. Of these, 48 were turned down, the main reason being due to
unsatisfactory school progress, attendance, and punctuality.
For the first payment of the grant, 241 students were approved; for the second
payment of the grant, 207 applications were approved. Of the 34 students who
became ineligible for the second payment, 19 had withdrawn from school and 15
were turned down because of poor reports.
The students who were eligible for the second payment of the grant were
distributed by grades as follows: Grade IX, 48; Grade XI, 55; Grade X, 49; Grade
XII, 52; Occ. 2, 1; Occ. 3, 1; Occ. 9, 1.
The students in the greatest financial need received $190.92 for the year and
the balance received $170.92.
  DIVISION OF POST-SECONDARY SERVICES D 47
DIVISION OF POST-SECONDARY SERVICES
REPORT OF ANDREW E. SOLES, B.A., M.Ed., SUPERINTENDENT
The Division of Post-secondary Services continues to be responsible for education at the university and college levels, and for the administration of financial
aids and awards in the Province. The responsibilities are expanding with the
amalgamation of the colleges and vocational schools, the commencement of operation of Camosun College in Victoria, and the increasing numbers of programmes
offered by the colleges.
A major event in the universities in the past year was the appointment of Hugh
E. Farquhar, Ph.D., as President of the University of Victoria. The university
presidents have begun to hold regular meetings to discuss issues of mutual concern;
a move which this Division views as a very healthy development. During the past
year the universities have acknowledged the need for integrated planning among the
three universities in the Province. The universities have continued to co-operate
with and give valuable assistance to the developing colleges in the Province.
At present there are nine colleges in the Province, seven of them melded with
vocational schools. The latest amalgamation, which occurred in June 1972, involved
Selkirk College, the British Columbia Vocational School at Nelson, and the Kootenay School of Art. Efforts are being made within these institutions to articulate and
integrate the vocational and other college programmes, and in some, programmes
that include both vocational and college courses are being developed. This reorganization has resulted in the development of a group of fully comprehensive post-
secondary educational facilities.
In September of 1971, Camosun College commenced classes with an initial
enrolment of 1,397 students. Camosun College is unique in that it began as a
melded college joining with the British Columbia Vocational School, Victoria. The
college offers a large number of programmes, including programmes for native
Indians and a very large evening programme.
The number of courses and programmes offered in the colleges continues to
increase. Although a majority of students are still entering university transfer
courses, an increasing proportion of students are choosing career and technology
programmes of one or two years' duration, which will prepare them for direct employment. The success of the career offerings is attested to by the fact that upward
of 80 per cent of the graduates found employment within 10 weeks of graduation.
The academic upgrading or college preparatory courses remain popular.
In order to meet more adequately the particular educational needs of students
and the community, colleges are experimenting with a number of curricular and
instructional innovations. Some examples are learning packages, auto-tutorial
instruction, and individually selected programmes. Other innovations include offering duplicate courses day and evening to accommodate students who are employed.
The colleges continue to expand their evening programme offerings for part-time
students.
With the exception of Vancouver City, Selkirk, and Cariboo, the colleges continue to operate largely in temporary quarters. The melding has eased the situation
somewhat for some of the colleges, notably Cariboo, but there is still a pressing need
for campus construction in most of the remaining colleges. Several are actively
working on plans for campus construction.
  DIVISION OF POST-SECONDARY SERVICES
D 49
In order to make the educational opportunities afforded by the colleges and
British Columbia Institute of Technology more visible to prospective students, the
Division prepared a brochure listing the programme offerings in the various institutions. The brochure has been very well received and the first printing of 10,000
copies was quickly exhausted. A further effort in a sinrlar direction planned for
next year is a film which would be available to schools and other interested groups,
showing the work which goes on at the community college level.
Division personnel participated in a number of conferences and workshops
during the past year, including two counsellors' conferences, two continuing education conferences, an instructional technologies workshop, and a number of professional development workshops with college faculties.
The Division has been represented on the Provincial Educational Media Centre
Committee, which has guided the establishment of the Provincial Educational Media
Centre on the BCIT campus.
Last year enrolments in post-secondary education across Canada tended to
slow down in its growth and in some cases enrolments dropped. In British Columbia
there was a slight decrease in university enrolment and a small increase in college
enrolment.  The enrolment statistics are shown in Tables 5.1 and 5.2.
The success of the colleges in their continued development is primarily due to
the efforts of college council members, administrators, and faculties. Individually
and through their respective associations, they have made great progress in furthering
college development. I would like to thank these groups for their efforts and for
their co-operation with this Division over the past year.
Academic Board
The Academic Board has continued to assist the colleges in their development
over the past year with visitations and advice. The Board has also been working
with the universities in developing co-ordination between them. The members of
the Academic Board are to be commended for their excellent work in assisting post-
secondary education in the Province.
Provincial Consultative Committee
The Provincial Consultative Committee for Technical, Vocational, and Career
Education was formed in November 1971 to advise the Minister on the co-ordination and orderly development of education directed to preparing students for entry
into careers. The Committee, chaired by S. M. Rothman, Vice-President and General Manager of Cominco, has nine members broadly representative of various industrial and professional sectors of the economy of the Province. The Committee has
made significant progress during its first year of operation, and has contributed much
to the co-ordination of career education in the Province.
College Principals
The college principals have continued to include the Superintendent in their
meetings, which has resulted in a mutually beneficial channel of communication.
This courteous gesture on their part has enabled frequent exchanges of views and
co-operation to occur, which has greatly assisted the work of the Division.
British Columbia Forecasting Committee
The British Columbia Forecasting Committee was established during the past
year under the sponsorship of the Academic Board to develop post-secondary enrol-
 D 50 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
ment forecasts. The universities are to be commended for financing the first year of
the Committee's work. The Division participated actively with the Committee and
views its work as a positive step toward various types of planning.
Organization of the Division
The Division has been reorganized during the past year and two senior officials
have joined the staff. J. F. Newberry, Ph.D., came to the Division as Co-ordinator
with responsibility for all curricular and instructional matters. R. A. Munro,
B.Comm., C.A., has assumed responsibility for administration and finance. The
three areas of responsibility in the Division are Instruction, Administration and
Finance, and Student Services.
STUDENT AFFAIRS BRANCH
(Report of H. S. C. Archbold, CD., BSc, M.A., Director)
During the course of the past year, with a continuing expansion of the responsibilities of the Division of Post-secondary Services, it became necessary to consolidate all administration concerned with student services in one centre. For that
purpose a separate Student Affairs Branch was established, consisting of a Director
and a clerical staff of four. This Branch is to be responsible for advice and coordination in all programmes of student services in the post-secondary institutions
of the Province. To date the greater part of the operation of this Branch has been
devoted to administration of the several programmes of financial assistance available to post-secondary students in British Columbia. Considerable progress has
been made in the consolidation and integration of the Provincial Bursaries Plan
with the Canada Student Loans Plan, and an extended review has been undertaken
in the Provincial scholarships programme with a view to obtaining integration with
other scholastic awards granted in this Province. This year, for the first time, the
Division has been involved directly in the operation of the Summer Language Bursaries Programme instituted by the Secretary of State for Canada, and with the
Summer Work Grants awarded by Imperial Oil Limited.
Student Aid Committee
Authority for administering and operating the several programmes of financial
assistance for post-secondary students is vested in the British Columbia Student Aid
Committee. This committee met regularly throughout the year to determine policy,
to rule on appeals and requests for review in applications for financial aid, and to
consider requests for official designation of institutions under the student aid programmes. As the Provincial authority charged with the conduct of the Canada
Student Loans Plan in British Columbia, the Committee maintains a close liaison
with the Federal Guaranteed Loans Administration in Ottawa and with the authorities of the other participating provinces.
The Canada Student Loans Plan
The total amount of Canada Student Loans authorized for British Columbia
students during the past year was $6.55 million, a decrease from the previous year.
Table I shows the corresponding figures relative to Canada Student Loans for
the past two years. Figures quoted include students attending recognized institutions
both in and out of this Province.
 DIVISION OF POST-SECONDARY SERVICES
D 51
tffs.:-. a%3S-f^iS
A 150-member team of students in UBC's Faculty of Applied Science designed and
built the urban vehicle shown above, which won the over-all award for excellence in an
international competition at the General Motors Proving Grounds in Michigan in August
1972. The UBC car, which competed against entries from 60 other North American universities, was judged on the basis of the purity of engine emissions, safety features, space
utilization, driving characteristics, fuel efficiency, the ability to withstand collisions, and
other performance tests. The UBC vehicle included several unique features, including a
stylish olive-green Fiberglas body, a frame that tolerates front- and rear-end collisions of
up to 7 miles per hour, an electronic connection between the seat belts and ignition so
that the car won't start unless the seat belts are fastened, and a hidden service module that
monitors engine temperature, battery-water level, oil pressure, and battery charge.
The car was named the "Wally Wagon" for UBC's President, Dr. Walter H. Gage.
—Picture by the UBC Photo Department
 D 52
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
Table I—Financial Assistance Authorized for British Columbia Students
Under the Canada Student Loans Plan, 1971/72
Number Issued
Total Amount
Authorized
Average Loan
Amount
1970/71	
9,796
9,714
$
7,307,598
6,550,427
$
746
1971/72	
675
Provincial Bursaries
The Government of the Province of British Columbia provides annually for the
granting of bursaries to needy students of satisfactory academic standing to enable
them to proceed in an eligible programme of post-secondary studies. The grant of
a Provincial bursary (a sum that does not have to be repaid) requires that a student
establish financial need under pre-determined criteria and have completed successfully in his last previous full-time academic year a full programme of courses with
an average standing of 65 per cent. This form of assistance is provided for study at
institutions within the Province, including the universities, public colleges, the British Columbia Institute of Technology, and designated schools of nursing. Table II
below shows figures relevant to Provincial bursaries over the past two years.
Table II—Bursaries Granted by the Government of British Columbia, 1971/72
Academic Year
Number Granted
Amount
Authorized
Average
1970/71
1971/72
5,598
4,877
1,165,600
1,021,000
208
209
Government of British Columbia Scholarships
Administration of the scholarship programme instituted by the Government of
this Province is undertaken by the Student Affairs Branch under authority delegated
to the Student Aid Committee. These awards are granted to qualifying students
solely on the basis of scholastic attainment, on the recommendation of the designated
educational institution they attend. Allocation of scholarships depends upon the
total registration of full-time students registered in each institution who complete the
full academic year (undergraduate or equivalent). Of the top 17 per cent of all
qualifying students in each eligible institution, the top 5 per cent may be awarded
scholarships granting a remission of three-quarters of the basic tuition fee for the
next ensuing undergraduate or equivalent academic period at a designated institution in this Province. The next 6 per cent may be granted awards entitling them to
one-half of the next year's tuition fee. The next following 6 per cent may receive a
remission of one-third of the fees for the next session.
 DIVISION OF POST-SECONDARY SERVICES
Table HI—British Columbia Scholastic Awards, 1971/72
D 53
Awards Authorized and Used
Actual
Award Year
Three-
quarters
One-
halt
One-
third
Total
Amount
Expended
1970/71	
3,163
2,573
3,748
2,731
2,537
2,255
9,448
7,559
$
1,793,532
1971/72 	
1,390,174
With the increase in the number of eligible institutions and the expansion of
their curricula administration, the scholarship programme has become more complex. This Division recognized the increased work load that the programme has
imposed on the staffs of the institutions concerned and is grateful for their continued
co-operation.
Second Language Bursary Programme
This year British Columbia became a participating Province in the Summer
Bursary Programme instituted by the Government of Canada for immersion study
of the Second Official Language. Ninety-four British Columbia students were
granted bursaries to undertake a six weeks' course of study of the French language.
They attended various institutions in this Province, in Alberta, Ontario, and Quebec.
At the same time, 115 students attended courses in the English language at the University of British Columbia. These came from other provinces, the majority being
from the Province of Quebec. Co-ordination of the programme within British Columbia was a responsibility of the Division of Post-secondary Services.
Imperial Oil Summer Work Grants
The Division administered twenty-seven $1,000 Summer Work Grants given
by Imperial Oil Limited. The recipients—college, university, and British Columbia
Institute of Technology students—each received the grant to carry out a 10-week
work project related to their studies.
 D 54
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
 DIVISION OF SPECIAL SERVICES
D 55
DIVISION OF SPECIAL SERVICES
REPORT OF R. S. BOYLE, B.A., B.Ed.
General
Special education programmes operated by Boards of School Trustees under
section 180 of the Public Schools Act received 1,220 approvals in 1970/71, and
1,272 approvals in 1971/72.
During this year it was decided that remedial and educationally retarded programmes would be joined together under the title "Learning Assistance Programmes." This step shows a recognition of the need for local flexibility in the use
of special grants, a movement away from labels and an increasing attempt to keep
as many children as possible integrated into the main stream of education.
The occupation programmes set up originally to provide a three-year, work-
oriented terminal course for students of apparently low scholastic aptitude has, over
the years, become to some degree an umbrella for secondary students with other
special needs. An examination of special needs at the secondary levels was begun
and should be intensified during the 1972/73 school-year.
The provision of tutorial assistance to pupils living in isolated areas is authorized under section 20 of the Public Schools Act. Seventy-six pupils, of whom 68
were elementary and eight were secondary, were provided such assistance in cooperation with the Correspondence Branch.
The education and training of trainable mentally retarded children was carried
out in schools operated by the British Columbia Association for the Mentally Retarded, supported by grants made through Boards of School Trustees and in classes
operated as part of the regular public school system.
Schools Operated by Chapters of the British Columbia Association
for the Mentally Retarded
Districts
Schools
Enrolment of Pupils in Relation to Grants
Year
Fully
Eligible
Kindergarten
Ineligible
Total
1969
197(1
35
35
43
35
35
35
417
430
474
29
22
23
29
24
19
475
476
1971	
516
Classes Operated by School Districts
Year
Districts
Schools
Enrolments
1969	
22
22
25
24
24
24
916
1970   	
957
1971                         .
1,089
 D 56
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
An art student at the Jericho Hill School is encouraged by the teacher.
 DIVISION OF SPECIAL SERVICES
D 57
Liaison with other Government departments and private agencies continued
to grow as we recognize more and more the vital need of a spectrum of services
rather than a single service for children with learning disabilities. Two vehicles for
the co-ordination of services are
(a) the Provincial Youth Resources Committee;
(b) the Community Care Facilities Board.
With reference to the latter, it should be noted that 500 centres are now licensed to
give pre-school care to children.
In this respect, we take the opportunity of expressing thanks to the many private and public agencies who have co-operated with us and with each other in the
provision of special help and services to children with learning disabilities.
CORRESPONDENCE BRANCH
(Report of J. R. Hind, B.A., B.Pced., Director)
The 1971/72 booklet Correspondence Education was released in July 1971.
It described the 192 courses which were available to British Columbia residents who
range in age from 5 to the twilight years. This was a gain of approximately
20 courses over the previous year. The largest gain in new courses was at the elementary (Grades I—VII) level. New and revised courses at the secondary and
special vocational levels occurred in Basic Astronomy, English 8, English for Adults
1, English for New Canadians (Intermediate), Geography 12, General Business 11,
and Latin 12.
Our Annual Report has never before dealt specifically with the writing of
courses, and this report will deal with this as a major item of information.
The duty of writing correspondence courses has rested with five Course Writers
and 12 Elementary Instructors—all of whom are civil servants—and certain "outside" specialists work on a contract basis and write courses in such special fields as
Geology, Air Navigation, Astronomy, Law, and Library Work. Civil Service Course
Writers compile and revise courses in the major subject fields of English, Social
Studies, Mathematics, Science, and the second languages, all at the secondary
(Grades VIII-XIII) level. Elementary Instructors, who are primarily responsible
for the grading of student work at the Grades I-VII level, also write or revise courses
at this level as part of their duties. A senior staff member, the Supervisor of Course
Writing, is responsible for ensuring that the material appears in a form which is
educationally and administratively acceptable, and for maintaining schedules connected with the preparation of illustrations and plates, and the printing of the
material.
The lesson material of a course is divided into papers—30 in number for Grades
I-VII, 18 to 20 for secondary and most vocational courses, and 5 to 10 for certain
special courses. Tests follow at stated intervals in the first two categories of courses.
The Grades I-VII papers are more numerous and shorter in length to accommodate the attention span of a younger student and the narrower treatment of material
in these preliminary grades. The average student of school age can complete a
course in 10 months or a school-year. An adult or a better student of school age
may do the work of two school-years or more in a single year if he is so motivated
and sufficiently well organized.
The purposes of any instructional device are, among other things, to teach a
student how to study in a systematic and logical manner and to enable him to master
certain concepts which are the building blocks for future more advanced study. To
accomplish these aims, a correspondence paper is arranged in three parts—theory,
 D 58 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
which is broken into assignments, followed by a practice exercise for which the
answers are provided, and finally, an exercise section which must be forwarded to
Victoria for correction. When a student has studied the theory of an assignment,
he is then directed to do the practice exercise. This is a self test of the amount of
the material that he has retained. When he has completed all the assignments of a
paper and has satisfied himself that the practice exercise effort has been successful,
he is then in a position to do the exercise section. This must be submitted to Victoria for scrutiny, grading, and comment. To make certain that the rate of input
has not been too fast for the student, a test on the material of a number of papers
occurs at stated intervals.
The Branch seeks through its courses to do more than prepare young people
for graduation or the business of better living in a work-a-day world. It also hopes
to bring extra richness to the lives of others who now rest from their labours, tired
physically but active mentally.
The longer, more involved course has not always been an answer for the middle-
aged or for those advanced in age. A new short course entitled "British Columbia—
Canada's Pacific Province," consisting of five fast-moving papers complete with
exercise sections was offered free in the 1971 Centennial Year. By the end of the
year under consideration, 2,112 adults, most of whom had never previously enrolled for a course via mail, had completed the course, received recognition for their
efforts, and were looking for other courses of a similar nature. As a result, the
Branch extended its programme in special short courses to include English for
Adults, Mathematics for Adults, Astronomy, and similar adult-interest courses.
The following are enrolment figures for the year:
General enrolment—
Grades VIII-XIII and special vocational courses  15,409
Grades I-VII (Victoria)       694
Grades I-VII (Pouce Coupe)        115
Total students  16,218
Certain groups for whom free instruction was provided—
1970/71 1971/72
Inmates of institutions  765 796
Social assistance cases  277 211
Special illness cases  460 462
Recent immigrants  18 13
Needed at home     8
Distance cases  288 336
Total students  1,808 1,826
GUIDANCE SERVICES, TEACHER RECRUITMENT,
YOUNG VOYAGEUR PROGRAMME
(Report of Philip J. Kitley, M.A.)
The work of this Branch continues to be widely diversified and includes details
of teacher recruitment, resources for, and direction of the school guidance and counselling programme, and the co-ordination and administration of the Federal-Provincial student travel and exchange project.
 DIVISION OF SPECIAL SERVICES
D 59
Guidance Services
Routine services of the Branch were continued, including the preparation and
issuing of three Guidance Bulletins to school counsellors and the distribution of
over 27,000 separate pieces of Guidance material.
For the first time a complete list of library books available to school guidance
workers was prepared and distributed to schools. Over 200 volumes are available
and the number of teachers using them is growing, books having gone out on nearly
150 occasions this year. In addition, attention is being given to the growing list of
available films, filmstrips, and Guidance cassettes.
The programme of Business Education conferences was maintained, with successful events at Kelowna and Port Moody. These are arranged with the cooperation of the British Columbia Chamber of Commerce and local officials. There
was an extensive Careers Conference held in the Nanaimo Secondary School.
Planning was carried on for continuous revision of the very successful 1971
publication Careers for the Seventies. There is every prospect that further revisions
and additions will be possible, with the support of the Department of Manpower and
Immigration, under whose auspices the book was produced.
The year saw the beginning of a critical examination of the whole structure,
purpose, and function of the school Guidance Services. In May, a two-day conference was held for counsellors at the British Columbia Institute of Technology at
the invitation of the Minister of Education, who attended the sessions. The conference aimed at giving school counsellors first-hand information about post-secondary educational opportunities in the vocational schools, the British Columbia Institute of Technology, and the universities, as well as details of available student assistance. Two hundred and twenty-four counsellors attended, representing 124 senior
secondary schools.
In the course of the year a committee was set up under the chairmanship of
G. M. Paton, District Superintendent of Schools, to collect and assess the views of
District Superintendents on the present school-counselling organization.
The impact of the revised curriculum guide for Guidance was beginning to be
felt. A number of meetings were held with school Guidance personnel to prepare
supplementary notes to accompany the curriculum booklet.
Teacher Recruitment
With the changes in the teacher-supply situation, emphasis in this Branch has
undergone necessary changes. One meeting of the Advisory Committee on Teacher
Recruitment was held during the year, it having been decided to maintain it in an
evaluating capacity. The Department of Education continued to be represented on
the Joint Board of Teacher Education.
Consultation was held with the students' committee at the University of Victoria
responsible for organizing the two-day Future Teachers Conference in early February 1972. Assistance was also given the Future Teachers Clubs organizing the
South Vancouver Island club rally in December 1971.
There was continuing consultation regarding the special programme for the
preparation of teachers of Commerce and the realignment of the programme for
the preparation of Industrial Education teachers.
The Selection Committee for teachers' scholarships awarded scholarships of
$2,000 each to Melvyn D. Rainey, of Vernon, and William Y. Hoshizaki, of Kelowna, for specialized studies in Library and Industrial Education respectively. A
scholarship of $1,000 was awarded to Mrs. Lillian E. Strachan, of Victoria, for
specialized study in reading instruction.
 D 60
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
A recommendation by the Committee to discontinue the scholarships was
accepted.   In their place a system of 10 annual $500 awards is to be set up.
As last year, the State of Victoria, Australia, offered to this Province two two-
year teaching fellowships for qualified Science and Mathematics teachers. G. Mil-
lett, of New Westminster, and E. Jackson, of North Vancouver, were selected.
Young Voyageur Programme
In honour of the Province's Centennial Year, the number of students involved
in the programme was increased by almost 50 per cent. This included 27 groups of
21 students each during the summer, and, as an experiment, three groups of students
during the in-school period. Six hundred and thirty students travelled out of the
Province, an equal number coming as visitors from other provinces.
In-school exchanges were made between Victoria and Medicine Hat, Burnaby
and Inuvik, and Kamloops and Charlottetown. In each case the exchange was
treated as a Social Studies project.
This year the summer travel programme was on a completely reciprocal basis.
The following table gives the British Columbia centre followed by the centre to
which students travelled and from which student visitors were received:
British Columbia Centre
Abbotsford	
Burnaby..
Reciprocating Centre
-Rimouski, Que.
.St. Iohn, N.B.
British Columbia Centre
Reciprocating Centre
Chilliwack Peterborough, Ont.
Cloverdale Montreal, Que.
Coquitlam Whitehorse, Y.T.
Courtenay Ottawa, Ont.
Cranbrook Alma, Que.
Dawson Creek North York, Ont.
Kelowna Richmond, Ont.
Ladner Toronto, Ont.
Langley Amos, Que.
Nanaimo Montreal, Que.
North Vancouver Inverness, N.S.
Penticton Winnipeg, Man.
Powell River Carleton, Que.
Prince George Montmagny, Que.
Prince Rupert Melf ort, Sask.
Richmond Hull, Que.
Sooke Ottawa, Ont.
Trail Quebec, Que.
Vancouver Val d'Or, Que.
Stephenville, Nfld.
Welland, Ont.
Vernon Port Hope, Ont.
Victoria Midland, Ont.
West Vancouver St. Stephen, N.B.
Williams Lake Scarborough, Ont.
Thirty student groups (a much greater number than ever before) visited Victoria and Vancouver during the summer, as part of their programme.
British Columbia was host to the annual Federal-Provincial Conference on
Student Travel and Exchange during the last week in September. At these meetings
an assessment of the year's programme is made, and plans are laid for the programme for the forthcoming year. A special word of thanks is due the staff of the
Deputy Provincial Secretary's office for assistance in the preparation of this conference.
During the year, plans were developed for the sending and hosting of 60
student units during the summer of 1972. Although by tradition students remain
for seven days in the host community, several extensions of time were made to
permit including a visit to the Provincial Capital by many more units than formerly.
For the first time it was possible to hold briefing sessions, in late spring, with those
who had been chosen as group leaders.
Participants in the Young Voyageur Programme are chosen by local committees, usually from a list of student applicants, as those most likely to benefit from
the visit. Local committees are also responsible for developing a reception programme for visitors, and for selecting suitable group leaders to travel with British
 DIVISION OF SPECIAL SERVICES D 61
Columbia students. Visitors are billeted, whenever possible, in local homes where
there is a student of the same sex and approximate age. Interested community
organizations co-operate fully in the presentation of the programme. Its growing
popularity bears testimony to the contribution it is making to the education of the
individual and the strengthening of Canadian unity.
JERICHO HILL SCHOOLS AND SERVICES
A Government Resource for Aurally and Visually Impaired Children
of Our Province
(Report of J. Walsh, B.Sc, M.Ed., District Superintendent)
The enrolment for the 1971/72 school-year was divided
as follows:
Day
Resident
Total
116
17
111
47
227
64
Totals _	
133
158
291
School for the Deaf
The extension and refinement of services has continued. Help to pre-school
children and their parents was extended significantly. Week-long workshops were
held at Jericho Hill School for parents of pre-school deaf children. Twenty-four
parents in total attended the three workshops and lived at the school for one week
studying deafness and its effects upon children.
Assessment has continued to be largely through the Children's Diagnostic Centre. Educational placement, based upon this assessment, is either locally or at
Jericho Hill School. Local facilities are to double in Prince George and Victoria
by September 1972. At Jericho, almost half of the children are integrated into off-
campus classes. These are special classes for the deaf conducted in the normal
public schools, with special help and equipment being provided. They range from
kindergarten to senior secondary.
The pre-vocational programme has continued and now leads naturally into
the Careers Programme, post-secondary education for the deaf. Nearly half the
graduates proceed to a university for the deaf, Gallaudet College. Most of the
remainder attend a special orientation course and then enrol in individual courses
at the Vancouver City College. This first year's operation has proved to meet a
very real need. The programme is jointly sponsored by the Department of Social
Improvement and Rehabilitation, Canada Manpower, and the Western Institute for
the Deaf, with Jericho Hill staff advising and assisting with counselling. The strong
support of the administration and staff of the Vancouver Vocational Institute has
been a vital factor in the successful first year of operation.
School for the Visually Impaired
The decrease in enrolment noted last year has continued. Visually impaired
children are being prepared for earlier integration in the regular public school system. Once children are in public schools, the Jericho School provides large print or
brailled copies of prescribed books. This service is possible thanks to the fine work
carried out by the Pioneers, a British Columbia Telephone voluntary group, the
CNIB, and the school.
  tfjpS^P^pp^^sSP^PP?^
DIVISION OF SPECIAL SERVICES D 63
General
Extensive renovations of the residential and classroom areas of Lawrence Hall
have been carried out. The new dining room/hospital complex is about half completed. A new gymnasium is also under construction.
The interest shown in Jericho Hill resources has continued at a high level.
Over 200 regular volunteers and scores of special occasion volunteers have given
excellent help to the school.
We wish to acknowledge with thanks the support and co-operation of the
Department of Education, the Department of Public Works, Vancouver School
Board, Victoria School Board, the PTA's of the two schools, the Western Institute
for the Deaf, the CNIB, and the Metropolitan Health Department, and all those
private citizens who have helped so much.
 D 64 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
DIVISION OF TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL SERVICES
REPORT OF J. S. WHITE, SUPERINTENDENT AND REGIONAL
DIRECTOR FOR CANADIAN VOCATIONAL TRAINING
The fall of 1971 saw a further step in the melding of vocational schools at
Nanaimo, Victoria, Kelowna, Prince George, and Kamloops with their local colleges,
when formal agreements were signed to provide operating over a trial period not to
exceed three years.
The planning processes for the new school to be constructed at Chilliwack
continued to move ahead.
As in earlier years, requests by Canada Manpower for increased training programmes continued.
Curriculum Development Branch
During the year the Branch's responsibilities centred around the development
and publication of course outlines, instructional materials, manuals, examinations,
and publicity materials.
1. Course Outlines
Course outlines were developed in the 33 fields of apprenticeship and pre-
apprenticeship training and nine pre-employment courses.
2. Instructional Materials
(a) Printed instructional materials were developed for almost all the pre-
employment and pre-apprenticeship courses offered in the British Columbia vocational schools. In addition, the Division developed instructional materials for
almost all the technologies offered at the B.C. Institute of Technology.
Printed materials were also developed for use at Summer School (Vocational
Instructor Certificates), and for numerous apprenticeship and night school courses
offered at both the British Columbia vocational schools and the B.C. Institute of
Technology.
(b) Manuals were developed for the following—Survey Technology, Level
and Transit, Forest Science and Utilization, Roads and Transportation, SCM Operation, Fuel Injection and Tune-up Procedures, Glossary of Definitions, Stenotype
Theory, Sign Painting Work Book 1, Chemistry Laboratory, Unit Operations
(Mining), Microbiology Methods, Theory of Culinary Training, Instrumentation in
Clinical Chemistry, Instrumental Methods of Analysis, Travel Tariffs, Unit Operations in Mineral Processing Part 2, Electric Adding Machine Operation, 30 Cruise
Design, Serving of Alcoholic Beverages, Mechanical Shop Practice, Clinical Chemistry Laboratory, Polyconic Projection, Intermediate Meat Processing, Welding
Safety, Primary Meat Processing, Basic Technical Mathematics, Splicing Wire Rope,
Waiter/ Waitress Training, Hotel and Restaurant Food Service, Mobilearn Hydraulics Unit 1, Labour Relations in British Columbia, Diesel Dictionary, Rigid Roofing,
Diesel Engine Power Calculations.
(c) Other publications—The following publications were also developed and
produced:  Industrial Education Inventory booklets, 2nd Annual Report of the
 DIVISION OF TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL SERVICES D 65
Librarian, Guidelines for Audio Visual Presentations, Careers in Logging brochure,
Student Information brochure, Health Services booklet, Industrial Education Record
Book, Aircraft Technical Log Book, Importance of Industry to British Columbia
booklet, Workbook of Human Sexual Behaviour, BCIT Film Catalogue, Glossary of
Medical Terms, Welcome to the Library.
3. Photography
A considerable amount of photographic work was undertaken during the year,
and several 35-mm. colour-slide sequences and filmstrips were developed for use by
instructors as instructional material.
The Division was also called upon to assist in the development and in the production of 8-mm. film loops for use by instructors at both the British Columbia vocational schools and the B.C. Institute of Technology.
Several thousand black and white photographs and colour slides were taken in
various areas of the British Columbia vocational schools, the B.C. Institute of Technology, the Industrial Education Teacher Training Centre, the Jericho Hill School
for the Blind, and many other locations in the community. These photographs are
filed, and are used for record, instructional, or publicity purposes.
4. Examinations
(a) Tradesmen's qualification examinations—Tradesmen's qualification examinations were developed in the following areas: Industrial Electricity, Bricklaying,
Sheet Metal.
(b) Provincial examinations—The following examinations were developed and
produced: Motor-vehicle Inspector 1; Dental Assistant Series 1, 2, 3, and 4; Electronics Apprenticeship; Welding Upgrading; Practical Nursing Series 5, 6, 7, and 8.
(c) B.C. Institute of Technology examinations—Examinations were produced
for almost all technologies and options.
5. Publicity Materials
Publicity materials produced by this Division were distributed to many offices
and agencies throughout the Province, and to educators in other parts of Canada,
the United States, and in numerous foreign countries.
Some of the major pieces of publicity developed and produced by the Curriculum Development Branch during the year were:
B.C. Institute of Technology—Flyers for 10 different programmes in the B.C.
Institute of Technology were developed and produced together with BCIT posters
and extension programmes posters, plus Extension Programme bulletin, Student
Information brochure, Forest Resource Technology brochure, Broadcast Communication brochure, and Convocation programmes and invitations.
B.C. Vocational Schools—The following flyers were revised and (or) produced
in addition to those already referred to: All pre-apprenticeship course flyers revised
and reissued; Master flyer, revised and reissued, 6th and 7th editions; Apprenticeship
Training for Skilled Trades flyer; Refrigeration Appenticeship flyer; Telecommunication Upgrading flyer; Electrical Appenticeship flyer; Credit for Vocational Train-
 D 66 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
ing flyer; Management Courses flyer; Fundamentals of Management flyer; Mining
Equipment flyer; Night School flyers for the B.C. Vocational School, Victoria;
Piping Trades flyer; Sheet Metal Trades flyer; Carpentry Trades flyer; Nautical
Training Programme flyer; Food Trades flyer; Construction Labourers flyer; Trade
Extension and Upgrading flyer; Welding flyer; Automotive flyer; Cook Training
flyer; Heavy Duty flyer; Tourist Services flyer; Plumbing Apprenticeship flyer;
Machinist Apprenticeship flyer; Automotive Body flyer; Travel Counsellor flyer;
Parking Information flyer; Masonry Apprenticeship flyer; Colleges of British Columbia flyer; Oil-burner Mechanic Apprenticeship flyer; Millwright Apprenticeship
flyer; Electronics Apprenticeship flyer; Industrial Instrumentation Apprenticeship
flyer; Apprenticeship Branch posters; Aircraft Maintenance brochure; Prospectus
for B.C. Vocational School, Terrace.
6. Other Projects
The Branch continued to assist with the refurbishing of the Department of Education display at the PNE and supplied photographs, drawings, etc., for this project,
as well as B.C. Mining School Certificates; BCIT Technology Award Certificates;
honorary diploma for the Premier; BCIT Extension Division Certificates; B.C. Mining School opening programmes and invitations; B.C. Vocational School, Kamloops,
opening programmes; BCIT Convocation programmes and invitations.
Co-ordination With Industry and Other Agencies
During the past year the Co-ordinator attended a variety of meetings at which
interested representatives of business, industry, and labour considered new programmes proposed for various British Columbia vocational schools or modifications
of existing programmes.
Of special importance are the following:
The work of the Provincial Stationary Engineering Advisory Committee: This
committee, composed of representatives from all agencies concerned with the field
of stationary engineering in British Columbia, has been very active during the past
year. The culmination of their work has been an agreement between the four western
provinces to adopt a uniform curriculum and examination structure. This will
permit complete mobility of such engineers between the participating provinces as
well as proving a financial saving.
Increased activity in short upgrade courses for the agriculture industry resulted
in the need for a small co-ordinating committee for these courses. This committee,
established under the Federal-Provincial Agricultural Manpower Agreement, consists of representatives from the B.C. Department of Agriculture, the B.C. Federation
of Agriculture, Canada Manpower, and the Department of Education.
Appointment of a Co-ordinator of Mobilearn programmes under "Special Projects" will result in greatly increased activity in the upgrading of mechanics in the
forest industries.
The Provincial Committee on Nautical Training and Certification continues
to be active. Extensive work of late has been the proposed B.C. Nautical School.
It is hoped this much needed institution will be well under way by the spring of 1973.
The opening of our new facility at Kamloops has reduced the pressures experienced in recent years at Prince George and Kelowna.
 DIVISION OF TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL SERVICES
D 67
A summary of topics covered at other
follows:
Agricultural Mechanics.
Air Brake Training.
Aircraft Maintenance.
Carpentry.
Commercial Courses.
Commercial Truck Driving.
Cook Training.
Dental Assisting.
Electrical Training.
Fisherman Upgrading.
Greenhouse Vegetable Growing.
Hairdressing.
committee meetings attended is as
Hearing-aid Dealers Training.
Heavy Equipment Operating.
Hospitality Industry.
Indian Affairs Training Programmes.
Logging.
Pipe-line Welding.
Practical Horticulture.
Pre-school Teacher Training.
Supervisory Training.
Tire Repair.
Warehouseman Training.
Welding.
Additional Courses
As a result of the many meetings and other contacts, a total of 133 new or
additional vocational programmes was offered at the various British Columbia
vocational schools and colleges.
Vocational Training for the Handicapped
The past year has seen much better working relations established between the
Training and Selection Committee for Aid to the Handicapped and Canada Manpower. As a result, it is felt an improved service is now offered to handicapped
persons in the Province.
Evening and Part-time Vocational Training
The melding of the vocational schools with the colleges in certain locations has
produced some administrative problems, but it is hoped these will diminish as an
established pattern develops. In general, the evening classes are fulfilling a need at
relatively low costs to the taxpayer, and it is expected this service will continue in the
melded institutions.
Basic Training for Skill Development
For many years this programme had operated with no actual Provincial input or
co-ordination. In the six months since Mr. Cartier has been with this Division he has
implemented many desirable policies and procedures which will provide a better
learning situation for the students.
Inspection Report, Vocational Schools
Schools at Burnaby, Dawson Creek, Nelson, and Terrace were visited during
this past year. One hundred and four supervisory and inspection visits were made
with instructional staff, and varying amounts of time spent with the administrative
staff in each school.
Selection of Staff
During the year, interviews were conducted for 36 instructor competitions
at Burnaby, Kamloops, Kelowna, Nanaimo, Nelson, Prince George, Terrace, and
Victoria.
 D 68
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
Heavy-duty mechanics recondition this road grader as part of their
course of studies (Nelson Vocational).
 DIVISION OF TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL SERVICES D 69
Vocational and Industrial Education
Secondary Schools
The Technical and Vocational Services Division provides initial capital assistance for approved programmes in technical, industrial, commercial, agricultural,
community services, visual and performing arts, occupational, and other programmes
for particular occupations.
Construction and Equipment
Capital projects under the Federal-Provincial AOTA Capital Agreement are
continuing within the Accelerated Phase-out Programme. The Vocational Schools
Assistance Act Amendment Act, 1965 requires that where the Federal-Provincial
sharing is 50/50 the school board provides 20 per cent, the Province 40 per cent,
and the Federal Government 40 per cent of the capital costs.
Staffing
The graduating class from the Industrial Education Accelerated Programme at
the University of British Columbia numbered 41 (31 were sponsored by Canada
Manpower and 10 by the Province of British Columbia). Most graduates have found
suitable employment in the Province and will bring the total number of Industrial
Education teachers employed to 1,072.
Recruitment
Canada Manpower has ceased to sponsor clients to become teachers of Industrial Education, and the structure of the Industrial Education teacher training division
has been reorganized.
The Department of Education now sponsors selected tradesmen or the equivalent as students by financing the operation of the training division while regular
programme students attend two winter sessions and pay the usual university tuition
fees. Fifty-two sponsored students have been recruited for training during the
1972/73 year for the 12-month period. Sixteen Regular Programme students will
be enrolled for the first winter session.
Education Media Standards and Specifications Committee
The committee is currently assessing audio-tape "hardware" and will recommend specifications to be considered when purchasing new equipment.
Education television hardware in colour is also being studied, although recommendations are not planned for the immediate future.
Supervisory and Management Training
Full-capacity enrolment in the Provincially sponsored Management Level
courses occurred again in the 1971/72 term. The demand for this training by both
small and large firms continues to bring together a variety of management people
in industry and government.
There is little doubt that the objectives of the programme are being realized.
Managers, engineers, foremen, and superintendents are achieving a real measure of
success in the courses and in subsequent application.
Variety in the occupations of candidates was again one of the important features of the programme, e.g., steel, paper, wood, hydro, and many secondary industries; newspapers, construction, mining, and Government agencies from municipal
engineering departments to Provincial and Federal departments.
 D 70 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
To many companies the most important feature of the programme was once
more an opportunity to expose young, potential supervisors to the principles of good
management practice and a chance to work with experienced professional management people.
Province-wide coverage, especially in the lumber and logging industry, is still
being maintained as those training in this programme continue to hold courses in
remote areas of the Province.
Enrolment
Communications and Human Relations  259
Work Study  150
Conferences conducted within industry     49
458
Tourist Services
Some 460 students enrolled in 21 separate courses conducted under the authority of various school districts.
The development of all the courses, conducting and supervising of the courses,
supplying of course material, uniforms where necessary, recruiting and selecting of
people to instruct the courses, marking of examination papers and issuing of certificates, were all done by this office.
Miscellaneous
Assistance was given throughout the year to various private establishments in
organizing, setting up, and conducting in-service training programmes for cooks,
waitresses, kitchen staff, and others involved in food services.
Travel Counsellors' Course
The Annual Travel Counsellors' course was held on campus in Burnaby, May
6-12, 1972, and organized jointly with the Department of Travel Industry. Two
classes were held, with a total enrolment of 33.
The Travel Counsellors' course for the Central and Eastern Regions was held
in Three Valley Gap from June 8-11, 1972, with a total enrolment of 50.
Much time was spent on the development of visual aids and overhead transparencies for the course.
Advisory Committees
This office was instrumental in the founding of the Provincial Advisory Committee for the Cooking Trade. The committee is dealing with all aspects of training
which pertain to the cooking trade. An annual meeting with a one-day conference
for instructors of Cook Training courses will henceforth be held in February.
Other advisory committees attended were The Food Trades and Accommodation Industries Training, Provincial Tourist Advisory Council, BCIT Hotel-Motel-
Restaurant Management Technology, and the Cook Advisory Committee.
In order to obtain first-hand information for the development of curriculum for
Towboat Cook Upgrading Programme, a trip was taken on a towboat under normal
operating conditions.
 DIVISION OF TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL SERVICES D 71
Development of Curriculum Material and Visual Aids
1. Waiter/Waitress Training Manual—Continuous updating and development.
2. The Knowledge and Serving of Alcoholic Beverages—This manual is completely new and was written and compiled jointly with the Curriculum Division.
3. Careers in the Hospitality Industry—Updating of booklet for reproduction.
Career Counselling in Schools
Assistance was given to the B.C. Hotels' Association, Canadian Restaurant
Association, and other organizations in setting up career days in schools.
Special Projects Division
The number of special projects organized by the Department increased from
197 in the fiscal year 1970/71 to 258 during the same period in 1971/72. The total
number of students enrolled during the school-year 1971/72 was 3,609.
Successful courses in Argillite Carving and Silver Carving were put on for the
Indians in the Queen Charlottes in the hope of improving their skills and thus improve their employment opportunities or at least supplement their income. Four
hundred and three people were enrolled in Basic Training Skill Development courses
in various outlying places throughout the Province. These students were trying to
upgrade their academic education in order to enrol in a vocational course of their
choosing.
In the Mobilearn division, two course outlines in Hydraulics and one in Metallurgy were completed and it is expected that there will be a considerable expansion
in this area during the coming year.
Continuing Education
School district continuing education programmes have expanded again in most
areas, although the total enrolment for the Province is down by 13 per cent. The
apparent downward trend is due to colleges having taken over the programmes in
three areas—Kamloops, Victoria, and Vancouver. Participation in school district
continuing education programmes in British Columbia is at the rate of 72 per 1,000
persons over 16 years of age. The participation rate in other provinces of Canada
varies from 25 to 40 per 1,000 persons of 16 years or older.
In those college regions where college and school district adult education programmes have not been melded, arrangements have been worked out to co-operate
in programme planning and advertising. Co-operative programme planning takes
the form of mutual decisions about who has the better resources to handle each type
of programme, and then of dividing the work on that basis.
During the year, public school continuing education has been moved from the
Post-secondary Division to the Division of Technical and Vocational Services. This
has made it possible for better co-ordination between the vocational and nonvoca-
tional sectors. The move has also facilitated better communication between school
district programmes and our Special Projects Branch.
The Co-ordinator of Continuing Education has also assumed the task of coordinating the development of the Basic Training for Skill Development programme.
Detailed statistics of the school district continuing education programme will be
found in the statistical section.
 D 72 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
B.C. Vocational School—Burnaby
Day School Report
Administration—Lome Smith, Principal, returned to the school in October
1971, serving as Project Manager for the Canadian International Development
Agency Teacher Training project in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
D. A. Pedersen, Vice-Principal, replaced Mr. Smith as the Project Manager.
The appointment of Department Heads in the eight distinctive training divisions
has proven to be of great value in strengthening the administration of the school and
improving communications among all concerned. It is anticipated that the role of
Department Head will have an increasing importance in future operations.
Enrolments—The enrolment in Day School programmes rose slightly from
6,091 in 1970/71 to 6,198 in 1971/72, for an increase of 1.86 per cent.
Night school enrolment increased considerably from 2,906 in 1970/71 to 3,199
in 1971/72, an increase of 10.1 per cent.
Operations—BTSD Classes: Additional classes were instituted on an afternoon-
shift basis to meet the increasing demand. A Level 1 class was introduced by the
school at the Squamish Indian Administrative Centre in North Vancouver from
February 14 to June 30.
Research was conducted into Developmental Reading equipment. Both the
EDL and psychotechnic types were investigated. As a result, it is proposed as a pilot
project to obtain a reading laboratory with a Dacum-style curriculum developed for
each subject, and to prepare individualized instructional material.
A survey made of Indian Affairs students enrolled in 1971 revealed that only a
small percentage of them completed the course successfully; accordingly, certain
recommendations were made to the Department of Indian Affairs with respect to
improved selection, counselling, and assessment procedures.
Building trades—A new upgrading course was offered this year, namely, Side-
wall Shingle and Shake Application, while Practical Horticulture was again offered to
pre-apprentices.
Some of the projects undertaken by this Department were the construction of a
Mobile Library Booth for the Library Commission and the building of two portable
cottages for church summer camp organizations.
The Bricklaying classes took part in the annual "Home Show," where they
attracted a great deal of public interest.
Commercial Department—This Department continued to expand in terms of
students taking training. Excellent results are being achieved, and employment
opportunities for graduates are most encouraging.
Several classes have had to operate on an afternoon-shift basis due to a shortage
of classroom facilities.
Secretarial, Bookkeeping, Accounting, and General Clerical training are offered.
Electrical/Electronics—An Electronics (Apprentice) course was introduced
and in the Electrical Department additional classrooms were constructed and study
rooms provided.
Food-training services—A new afternoon Cook Training programme has been
introduced and, as part of their training, these students prepare and serve evening
meals to staff and students of evening classes on the campus.
Upgrading courses for tugboat cooks were also introduced this year, and space
and instructional assistance provided for short training programmes for the industry.
The annual Culinary Show of the British Columbia Chefs' Association saw our
students well represented.
 DIVISION OF TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL SERVICES D 73
A booth was installed at the Canadian Restaurant Association Show, where
performances demonstrating various cooking techniques were given, and we assisted
the New Zealand Lamb Council in setting up a lamb-cooking contest which was won
by one of our students.
Instructors and students participated in the Food Service Executives' Association's annual Father's Day Pancake Breakfast. In the space of four hours, 1,100
guests were served, with the proceeds going to the Food Training Centre Scholarship
Fund.
A meat-cutting workshop was conducted in Prince George this year for the
Canadian Restaurant Association.
A baking display was submitted to the Northwest Bakers' Association convention in Portland, Oreg., and it won the Best-of-the-Show Award.
Mechanical Department—Due to adverse weather conditions, as well as construction strikes and lock-outs, the completion of the new Heavy Duty training
facilities has been seriously delayed, resulting in our having to curtail planned expansion of programmes.
With the addition of an extra Millwright Apprentice class, the Machine Shop
and Millwright Department is operating to capacity.
The Refrigeration programme will commence again this fall. It is not yet a
full-time programme, but the industry is presently preparing a submission in support
of a pre-apprentice course which will provide the necessary continuity.
Steel trades—It is proposed that a new steel storage and automatic cutting shed
be erected and that additional semi-automatic welding machines be purchased to
meet the increased demand by industry for semi-automatic welding.
Additional classes—During the peak period of seasonal unemployment, many
short-term upgrading courses were offered covering a very broad spectrum of British
Columbia's industry, e.g., Heavy Duty T.Q., Roofing, Draughting Conversion,
Fishermen, Boilermakers, and others.
All the courses were well supported by industry and we are receiving requests
daily to repeat them again during the fall and spring seasons of 1972/73.
Current status of the building programmes—1. Greenhouse, classroom, and
work areas for Practical Horticulture—contract awarded.
2. Steel Trades Building for Ironworkers, Boilermakers, and Steel Fabrication
—final plans and specifications are completed.
3. Multipurpose building—this building will complete the major construction
programme for this area and has been accepted in principle, a serious preliminary
design programme having been under way since early in 1971.
The building will house Electrical, Electronics, Sheet Metal, Household Appliance Repair, BTSD, Commercial, Draughting, Building Service Workers, and
Practical Nursing courses with the necessary work areas, classrooms laboratories,
and a cafeteria.
Construction of this building will eliminate the need for the leased facilities at
Burnaby Lake and consolidate the school on one campus.
Night School Division
With the apprentice training being changed to Day School at an ever increasing
rate, we have been able to broaden our scope of Trade Extension programmes. Night
apprentice and pre-apprentice enrolment dropped by 36.15 per cent, while Trade
Extension increased by 42.88 per cent.
4
 D 74
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
 DIVISION OF TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL SERVICES
D 75
Training the work force of British Columbia must be a co-operative effort
between industry and departments of Government.
New courses offered during the year:
(1) Basic Electricity and Refrigeration Service—these two courses were
provided to upgrade people in the household appliance service field
and were very well received.
(2) Welding Technology—a course to acquaint engineers and project
managers with welding techniques and testing procedures that were
available to them on steel construction jobs.
(3) Cedar Shakes and Shingles—an almost forgotten art that has returned
to popularity and found a lack of persons trained in the proper
methods of application.
(4) Welding Blueprint Reading—dictated by the needs of industry.
(5) Air Brakes—the new Motor-vehicle Regulation requires persons to
hold an air ticket for on-highway operation of vehicles.
(6) Automatic Transmissions—a broad course covering basic principles
and operation of all makes.
(7) Basic Plumbing and Heating Estimating.
(8) Rigging, Slinging, and Signalling—a fatal accident on a construction
site showed the need for thorough training in this area.
The conference room in our Administration Building was again used regularly
for meetings, seminars, and conferences by a large number of local professional,
technical, industrial, and sports organizations. This use of the facility provides the
school with many very useful contacts in the areas of business and industry and gives
us good public relations with local sports and service organizations.
B.C. Vocational School—Dawson Creek
The total enrolment of this school continues to grow as the existing courses
reach their maximum capacity. No new courses have been implemented in the past
year.
The completion of a paving programme on all school roads and accesses has
vastly improved the appearance and utility of the school grounds. The addition of
a bake shop and classroom to the food-training centre, which was opened in November, has provided excellent facilities for the Cook Training course.
A variety of agriculture short courses were conducted during the winter in cooperation with the British Columbia Department of Agriculture. These courses
included Agriculture Mechanics, Combine Operation and Maintenance, Beef Production, and Crop Production.
The beef-feeding project on the school farm has once again come to a successful
conclusion. Sponsored jointly by the B.C. Department of Agriculture and the
school, the project has realized some very positive results and information for the
beef-cattle industry.
Day school and night school courses for tradesmen wishing to upgrade their
skills were offered this past year. Upgrading courses in Carpentry, Heavy Duty
Mechanics, and Automotive Mechanics were offered during the winter at a time
when local tradesmen could participate.
A new approach to practical training for pre-apprentice Carpentry and Joinery
students has been initiated, with a house-building project in the City of Dawson
Creek. This project is receiving enthusiastic support from the local construction
industry and very practical training is resulting from the students participating in the
project.
 D 76 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
A general observation indicates that applicants for all courses offered at this
school are applying with a higher standard of secondary education, compared to
several years ago. This trend marks a significant change in the professional goals of
many young people.
Over the past six years of operation, this school has enjoyed a very stable
instructional staff. With few changes in instructors and support staff, this school has
realized a healthy growth and expansion in serving the needs of the Peace River
region.
Cariboo College (Kamloops)—Vocational Division
On July 1, 1971, the initial agreement for melding of the B.C. Vocational
School, Kamloops, and Cariboo College came into force. Cariboo College assumed
the responsibility for the administration of vocational training as a division of the
college. On that date those vocational courses which had been administered by the
Adult Education Division of School District No. 24 under the direction of the Kamloops Business School became the first vocational programmes of the college.
D. S. Goard, formerly Acting Principal of the B.C. Vocational School, Nelson,
was appointed to the position of Dean of Vocational Training, and on September
27, 1972, the college moved from its various locations in Kamloops to the new
complex. There were relatively few teething problems and instruction continued
smoothly in the vocational courses.
During the evening and occasionally for short day programmes the Continuing
Education Division of the college operated some 63 vocational programmes in Kamloops, Logan Lake, Clearwater, and Ashcroft. These courses included a wide variety
of programmes such as Welding, Cable Splicing, Instrumentation, Medical and Legal
Terminology, Telecommunication Engineering Science, Fire Prevention, Bookkeeping, and Shorthand. The Vocational Division, through the Continuing Education
Division in Williams Lake, offered full-time vocational courses (BTSD, Commercial,
Equipment Maintenance) in the Cariboo-Chilcotin area and many short-term
courses.
Melding
The Vocational Division of the college is involved to a large extent with the
total college and, as the melding progresses, close working arrangements have been
made between college career and similar vocational courses. To that end all Business and related programmes now are administered in the Vocational Division. The
students in the Vocational Division are receiving the benefits of more counselling,
a wider variety of student activities, a larger library, and an opportunity to broaden
their education by attending optional academic courses.
At present the limited number of programmes for young women entering the
world of work is a main area of weakness and the college will have to develop, in
co-operation with business, industries, and schools, programmes designed to serve
this group of students.
Okanagan College (Kelowna)—Vocational Division
On July 12, 1971, an agreement was signed among the College Council, the
Minister of Education, and the Minister of Public Works which placed the B.C. Vocational School, Kelowna, under Okanagan College for a trial period not to exceed
three years. The transition has been without any notable difficulty. All staff on the
Provincial payroll have been retained as civil servants; new appointments have been
made by the College Council.
 DIVISION OF TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL SERVICES
D 77
All departments and sections of the Vocational Division worked to capacity
during the academic year. Large enrolments were registered in all courses and
additional evening shift classes were required in welding and BTSD. These classes
were well attended and instructors reported no special problems on this point.
Job placement has been good from all courses, particularly in such programmes
as Practical Nursing, Cooking, Welding, and Industrial First Aid, virtually all graduates seeking employment in these four vocations having found jobs. Placement of
Commercial graduates presented no significant problems, though some students who
wished to remain in the Okanagan area because of family responsibilities or personal
preference found some difficulty in obtaining suitable employment.
Night school courses were also well attended. Most classes were specifically
directed to particular trades and vocations and intended to improve the skills of the
students. Air Brakes courses were also offered at Keremeos and Oliver and proved
to be very popular.  A total of 664 students attended 26 different courses.
Several short courses for orchardists and other agricultural workers were offered
in co-operation with the B.C. Fruit Growers' Association and Canada Manpower.
Attendance was good and we have been requested to offer a similar series during the
1972/73 winter.
Many projects were completed during the year for community agencies. Especially noteworthy was the award to Chief Instructor Adam McCormack, Welding
Department, of Centennial Committee scrolls for the Welding Department and to
him personally. Other instructors and students also participated in Centennial
activities.
The Practical Nursing Department has continued with the experimental 10-
month programme; to date, no negative reports have been received from hospitals
employing graduates of the experimental courses. A survey is planned for this fall
which should elicit pertinent data regarding the performance of these graduates.
A new approach to safety training within the Division has been tried through
the Industrial First Aid and Timekeeping course. This class acts as the Safety
Committee for the Vocational Division and carries out regular safety inspections of
all areas in the Division. Reports are submitted on a monthly basis and it has become
apparent that all instructors and students are becoming much more safety conscious.
The Commercial Department has had a busy year. Two additional instructors
were employed for most of the year and one additional instructor offered a special
secretarial upgrading course during April, May, and June. This latter group evolved
a project method of learning which proved highly successful.
Secretarial classes have been using a simplified version of classic Pitman Shorthand: "Shorterhand." Many students have found "Shorterhand" easy to master and
are subsequently able to change to classic Pitman to achieve high dictation speeds.
Further evaluation of this shorthand system will be made during the coming year.
The Cook Training course was established in May 1971. The students prepare
a lunch meal daily for all those wishing to eat in the cafeteria. During the peak
training period during the winter, nearly 400 people eat lunch in the cafeteria. As
part of the training programme, several buffets and banquets were prepared during
the year for the College Council, staff groups, and student parties.
Apprentice and pre-apprentice classes operated at capacity during most of the
1971/72 year.
Basic Training for Skills Development classes have shown increased enrolments
during the year. Two classes, Level 1-2 and Level 2-3, were held on afternoon shift
from November 1971 through April 1972. Most of the Level 1 students were native
Indians and they seemed to have made significant gains during the training period.
 D 78
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
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 DIVISION OF TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL SERVICES D 79
All students who completed this course were able to read and write fairly fluently at
the end of the programme and several were advanced through the Level 3 programme
in the regular day school classes. In all BTSD courses, significant experiments in
teaching and learning techniques have been attempted; some have proven to be
effective and further studies will be made during 1972/73.
Co-operation with the Academic Departments of the college has made the
BTSD programme much more effective by the interchange of some students in
certain subjects.
Many BTSD graduates are able to secure better jobs than those held before the
training, and there is no doubt that this programme is fulfilling a real need for
educational advancement among some groups of disadvantaged adults.
Malaspina College (Nanaimo)—Vocational Division
The following points are of special interest:
(1) Day school enrolment increased by 250 to 2,436.
(2) Night school enrolment decreased by 107 to 732.
(3) The Vocational School became a Division of Malaspina College.
(4) Four groups of sideboom operators were trained for the pipe-line
industry.
(5) A Log Scaling course was instituted.
(6) A series of short courses for Automotive and Heavy Duty Mechanics
was offered.
(7) A second section of Dental Assistants was enrolled.
(8) The intake and completion dates for the two classes of pre-apprentice
Heavy Duty Mechanics is in the process of being changed so that
only one class graduates at a time. This should provide more opportunities for graduates to locate apprenticeships, as there will be one
class graduating every three months.
B.C. Vocational School—Nelson
AND
Kootenay School of Art
Highlights of Year's Activities
Staffing—On September 15, 1971, D. S. Goard, Acting Principal, transferred
to Cariboo College and D. O. MacGregor, Director, Kootenay School of Art Division, was appointed Acting Principal.
Visitors, tours, public relations—During the past year the school was toured
by a record number of local and regional high school students and groups of visitors.
A continuous liaison has been in effect with officials at both Selkirk Regional College
and Notre Dame University, which has created a climate favourable for the new
melding situation. Numerous trips have been made by the Administration and staff
speaking at high schools and various service clubs.
Divisional highlights—The team-teaching approach in BTSD III is working out
well and both instructors are enthusiastic about the programme.
Our students have found very good acceptance in all walks of life—vocational,
technical, and academic. One of our former students completed her first two years
of college with excellent marks.   Others are reportedly doing well at UBC, BCIT,
 D 80 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
and various vocational courses throughout the Province. Numerous field trips were
undertaken to broaden the scope of the programme and give a more meaningful
understanding of education to the students.
Heavy Duty Mechanics—The Heavy Duty shop was again used to full capacity
with the regular pre-apprentice training and a number of special short courses for
journeymen needing trade qualification upgrading.
Kootenay School of Art—Due to the prevailing economic situation, there was
a slightly higher withdrawal rate at the beginning of the term, but our waiting-list
was brought into use and generally the enrolment held up well for the 1971/72
session.
In July 1971 the jurors of the 28th Annual Exhibition of Ceramic Art in
Faenza, Italy, awarded a third silver medal for Gillian Hodge's Third Prize work.
Walter Dexter, our Ceramics Instructor, conducted a series of pottery seminars in
Creston and Williams Lake during the fall and spring of the year.
The senior sculpture students participated in a showing of steel sculpture held
at Harrison Hot Springs on May 16 and 17, 1972, and sponsored by the Canadian
Institute of Steel Construction. The school won two awards and a good deal of
publicity as a result of this project.
Students have again entered the International Ceramic Exhibition in Faenza,
Italy. The results should be announced sometime during July or August.
The Annual Tea and Sale was held at the Eagles Hall and was an outstanding
success.   Over $700 was collected for scholarship purposes.
All other divisions operated smoothly and mostly to capacity, with a high
percentage of graduates finding employment.
The school facilities have been utilized by a number of government and private
agencies for short seminars and short courses. As a result, the Board Room and
all available classrooms have been used to capacity during the year.
Night school—The night school catered to a record number of students, and all
courses were booked to capacity.
All in all the B.C. Vocational School, Nelson, and Kootenay School of Art have
had an extremely successful year of operation. Training has been provided to over
900 students. In most instances graduates are eagerly sought after, so that we have
a surplus of job opportunities in many of the areas of instruction.
College of New Caledonia (Prince George)—
Vocational Division
The first year of operation as the Vocational Division of the College of New
Caledonia has been successful.
Few short-term upgrading day courses were offered during the year, which
reduced the total enrolment from that of last year. In addition, high employment
in this area during the winter months reduced the number of tradesmen available for
training, and crowded, limited facilities made it impossible to offer more than a few
courses at any one time. (Many tradesmen are only available for training during the
first three months of the year when employment is low in the construction field
because of seasonal conditions.) Continuing demand by employers for trained personnel has provided employment opportunities for graduates from vocational
training.
Requests for graduates from Dental Assisting, Practical Nursing, and the Commercial programmes have exceeded the number of students completing training.
Approximately 60 per cent of the students completing BTSD training have gone
 DIVISION OF TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL SERVICES
D 81
directly into employment, and there have been ample job opportunities for graduates
from the pre-apprentice and trades training courses.
Utilization of facilities was at a maximum and several courses were held on
week-ends to accommodate persons who work, and because space in the college was
available only at that time. Extension and night school courses for the college were
offered through the Extension Division. Enrolment in the extension vocational
classes increased and several new courses were offered both on and off the campus.
Approximately one-third of night school students were sponsored by Canada
Manpower. A refresher Millwright tradesmans' qualification class and a River Boat
Building class were conducted at Fort St. James. These were arranged through the
Special Projects Division. Assistance was given to adult education directors in the
regional college district in organizing and providing instructional materials for
several trades training courses.
On request from Canada Manpower, a second General Welding course was
enrolled in January. This class had to work on an 11 p.m. to 6 a.m. shift, which
was the only time when space was available. Upgrade Welding was also offered in
that same time slot from January 4 until April 30.
Building and services—The interiors of the buildings have been repainted and
in February 1972 a $200,000 contract was awarded to expand and renovate the
welding shop. This will provide additional training space and a separate enclosed
grinding-room with a dust-collection system and noise-control features. Modifications to the welding booths will improve smoke removal and reduce the noise level.
A shortage of trained and skilled workers continues to exist in this area. Forecasts indicate this will continue as the northern half of this Province is opened and
developed. Demands for training and upgrading will increase, and additional
facilities will be needed to meet the demands from both people and industry.
B.C. Vocational School—Terrace
The year of 1971/72 proved to be a stabilizing period for the school as well
as the municipality and region which it serves. This was the "slow-down" period
following four years of rapid expansion in the area and, although this change was
reflected in a drop of student enrolment to 712 full-time students, the number of
training-days increased to a new high of 45,784 days, which resulted from a greater
utilization of the training facilities.
The revision of course content into self-contained units of instruction, started
earlier, was carried on during the past year. Along with other benefits, these revisions permitted additional student intakes, which were an advantage not only to
the student but also the school and the various sponsoring agencies. It meant that
the "drop-outs" could be replaced at frequent intervals and provided the student with
an opportunity for rapid advancement through the training programme, as well as
greater employment possibilities.
The one disappointing note of the year was the failure of the Nautical Division
to attract enough students to keep it functional, and as a result both the Instructor
and the course materials were transferred to Camosun College in Victoria.
Two off-campus courses as well as a special course for native Indian students
were conducted for the first time, namely, a Fisherman Upgrading course in Prince
Rupert and, even though we were plagued with adverse weather, the course proved
a success and we have been asked to repeat the training this coming winter and an
Air Brakes course which necessitated the construction of special mobile training
equipment.   An experimental eight-week Repair and Maintenance Construction
  DIVISION OF TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL SERVICES
D 83
course was set up with the help of the Department of Indian Affairs, whereby the
latter suggested the curriculum as well as providing the instructors. This course was
designed to give basic training in the repair and maintenance of home and community equipment of remote villages. The student body consisted of 20 selected
individuals, one from each village, and of the 20 who commenced, 19 were
graduated.
Night school attendance increased during the year with Welding and Air Brakes
courses being the most popular, followed by a variety of other mechanical courses.
We offered a total of 20 night courses, and of the 284 night school students who
commenced training, 253 completed their course and were issued certificates. This
was a significant improvement over the previous year.
To further involve the community and industry in vocational education we
have taken every opportunity, during this year, to have these groups either visit the
school or use our facilities. As a result of a fire that destroyed the local Civic Centre,
outside civic groups used our cafeteria facilities more than normal and most of these
banquets were used to enhance the Cook Training programme. Good use was made
of the dormitory facilities and, although we did not reach maximum capacity, we
did accommodate to upward of 200 students at peak periods.
Camosun College (Victoria)—
Vocational Division
Both day and night enrolments increased over the previous year.
The melding of the vocational school and college is progressing smoothly and
promises to produce an educational environment that should enrich all students. In
addition to the benefits received by the students, faculty members should also attain
a greater understanding of their role in preparing students to seek and maintain
employment.
Dual use of facilities is taking place. However, due to the distances separating
the four campuses, and in particular the lack of adequate public transportation to
the Interurban Campus, a more efficient use of facilities is difficult to schedule,
though efforts are being made in this direction.
New buildings—The cafeteria is expected to be officially turned over to the
college within the next two or three weeks and Cook classes are scheduled to commence on September 5, 1972. In addition to training, the cafeteria will provide
meals to those students enrolled at the Interurban Campus, while the 300-seat dining-
room will be used for evening functions by all students enrolled in the various
campuses.
A considerable number of tours for secondary school students and their teachers
were conducted during the year. These tours of from three-quarter to one hour
duration are generally followed by a 30-minute question and answer period. It
has been found that a great number of students participating in the shop tours often
return to the campus for further specific trades training information and career
counselling. In addition to the students' tours, secondary school counsellors have
also responded to an invitation to tour the various shops.
New courses—One new course was offered—Child Care Aide. This three-
month training course, with the emphasis placed on behaviour modification, was
designed to prepare students for employment in the Glendale Lodge Hospital for the
mentally retarded.
A total of 90 students graduated from the programme and are now employed
on a full-time or a part-time basis.
 D 84
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
A student of the mechanical technology at BCIT uses an "Orsat" fuel analyser in a
study of fuel consumption.
 DIVISION OF TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL SERVICES
D 85
Student employment—Employment of graduates from all training courses has
been much higher than anticipated. In some areas, particularly Practical Nursing,
Nursing Orderly, and Office Machine Mechanics, we have been unable to meet the
demand from employers for graduates.
Faculty and administrative personnel continue to play an important role in
securing employment for the students. Potential employers are contacted, by either
mail or telephone, advising them of the number of graduates and the date of graduation.  As a result of this personal contact, interviews for students are then arranged.
B.C. Institute of Technology
Construction Programme
The most important project for the B.C. Institute of Technology for 1971 was
the preliminary planning for the Expansion Programme that will take place by
1975/76. A projected increase in student enrolment based on present trends and
future growth of the technologies and options provides for the addition of a few new
training options and indicates a student enrolment increase from the present 2,900
to between 4,500 and 5,000 by 1975.
The over-all expansion plan is being developed in conjunction with the Department of Public Works and included in the plan are alterations to the 1962 and 1967
buildings, the Food Service Building, and the Mechanical Building, which will result
in the transfer of the Business Division and part of the Health Division to the new
classroom and laboratory building when completed. The alterations will also accommodate the increased space required by the Engineering Division and by the Health
Division.
Student Activity Centre—An addition to the fine Student Activity Centre building, which has proved to be such an asset to the students of the BCIT and B.C.
Vocational School, is presently under construction and will consist of building blacktop tennis courts, volleyball courts, and basketball courts.
Also in connection with the Student Activity Centre, tenders are being called
for the construction of an addition to the centre to house the student store and barber
shop, both of which are now located on the north colonnade.
Landscaping work around the Student Activity Centre and other parts of the
campus is presently under way and will be completed this summer.
Student residences—During the past year a great deal of planning activity was
engaged in by the Executive of the Student Association in the hope that a student
residence would be built on the campus. A leading architectural firm of Vancouver
co-operated with the students in submitting a plan for building a 21-storey residence
on the campus to house 500 out-of-town students attending BCIT and B.C. Vocational School.
The high-rise residence would be similar in design to three residences recently
erected on the campus of the University of British Columbia. The student executive
proposed that the money for the construction of the residences should be borrowed
from Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation. The main contribution of the
Government of British Columbia would be providing the land on the campus on
which the residence would be built.
Parking on the campus—One of the problems that has given BCIT and B.C.
Vocational School a great deal of concern has been the provision of adequate parking
on the campus. As a result of the increasing number of students enrolled, the
Department of Public Works gravelled the area between Perimeter Road and Way-
burn Drive to accommodate 120 extra cars.
 D 86 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
The Advisory Council also requested that Perimeter Road around the south
end of the campus should be paved to provide for approximately 500 more cars.
This project has received favourable consideration by the Government, and it is
hoped that the road will be paved this summer. Another parking project under
consideration is the conversion of the third playing field on the campus into a
gravelled parking-lot to provide for about 240 cars.
Campus road construction—Two small projects are under way—the widening
of the access road to the campus from Canada Way, and the widening of the dispersal
road on the west side of the parking-lot. Both of these projects are to be done this
summer.
Other alterations and additions—
The following is a list of the projects in progress:
(1) Division of two large classrooms into four smaller ones to be used by
the Extension Division.
(2) Addition to the Nuclear Laboratory of the Health Division.
(3) Improved air-conditioning for the Data Processing Laboratory.
(4) Improved lighting in the Library Building.
(5) Several other small projects are in the planning stage.
In a busy educational institution, alterations are required from time to time to
keep our technologies up to date. We have found a receptive attitude by the Department to soundly based recommendations that will promote efficiency or reduce
operating costs.
Employment for Graduates
The graduating class of 1971 faced the poorest employment picture in the
history of BCIT. Unemployment was at an extremely high level in Canada and the
demand for post-secondary graduates was much less than the supply. This situation
was definitely reflected in our placement position of graduation time in 1971. Instead
of our usual 70 to 75 per cent placement figure, we were in the neighbourhood of
55 to 60 per cent. However, the fall of 1971 and the early months of 1972 have
been very productive as the result of continuing demand for graduates of every discipline. The main factor here is that the graduates are immediately available, there is
no two or three months' wait for them to finish their final term. It is interesting to
note that our current placement figure for 1971 is about 98 per cent of our graduates
placed, which is about the same as the figure for 1970.
Manpower Centre was contacted this spring by more than 400 employers, and
the distribution of these contacts is as follows: Business, 35 per cent; Engineering,
55 per cent; Health, 5 per cent; General, 5 per cent. Arising from these contacts,
182 employers, or their representatives, came to the campus to interview students.
An estimate of over-all placement of our 1972 graduating class at the end of
June 1972 is that 65 per cent are placed.
New Programmes Added During the Year
One training programme that had been given formerly in BCIT and discontinued was revived in 1971. This was the Health Data or Medical Records Technology. There is a strong demand in the hospitals for graduates of this programme,
and it is planned to continue it.
Early in 1972, plans were approved to transfer the training of psychiatric nurses
from Riverview Mental Hospital in Essondale to BCIT. This new training programme will come under the direction of the Nursing Technology.
 DIVISION OF TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL SERVICES
D 87
Extension Classes
Regular evening classes again grew in number of students and course offerings.
The area of Industry Services, where specialized courses are designed to meet
the needs of industry, has expanded tremendously and the concept that one receives
a training for life is rapidly dying.
Today we face another challenge. Industries and personnel in such rapidly
changing technologies as electronics want help with their training problems. The
Advisory Council at BCIT endorsed the Industry Services concept to aid these
individuals and organizations, and the demand by Industry Services for more training has continued to grow rapidly.
BCIT Industry Services serves as a nerve centre to facilitate, co-ordinate, and
develop advanced technical training where requested. The importance of the service
is rapidly becoming recognized by individuals, companies, government agencies,
societies and associations, regional colleges, and universities.
By operating in this manner, BCIT assists groups in providing training and
avoids costly duplication of programmes.
Industry Services caters to the needs of both industry and individuals by working with industry to produce tailor-made programmes at a more advanced technical
level, thus catering to the needs of the more technical or service-oriented society
which we are becoming. The programmes take into account new technical knowledge and increased skills and are based on sound adult education principles of individual learning patterns and requirements.
  STATISTICAL TABLES
  STATISTICAL TABLES
D 91
STATISTICAL TABLES
1.    Pupils.
2.    Teachers.
3. Financial Data..
4. Schools	
5. Post-secondary and Adult Education.
6. Technical and Vocational Education..
Page
. 92
- 173
_ 189
_ 197
_ 207
__ 211
Table
PUPILS
1.1 Net Enrolment and Average Daily Attendance..
1.2 Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex ..
1.3 Special Education Programmes	
1.4 Home Economics and Community Services Enrolment..
1.5 Net Enrolment by Programme, Grades XI and XII	
1.6 Grade XII Departmental Examinations	
1.7 Summary of Net Enrolment	
Page
92
93
94
94
95
113
114
1.8    Recapitulation of Net Enrolment by Type of School, Grade, and Sex of
Pupil :  170
 D 92
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.1    NET ENROLMENT1 AND AVERAGE DAILY
ATTENDANCE
Enrolment in the public schools rose from 527,106 to 534,523, with almost
all of the increase occurring in the secondary grades. Enrolment in elementary
schools would not have increased at all if new kindergartens had not been opened,
and in several urban centres a dramatic drop in enrolment has occurred in the
primary grades.
Type of School
Number
of
Schools
Net Enrolment of Pupils
Boys
Girls
Total
Per Cent
of Total
Attendance of Pupils
Mean Daily
Attendance
Per Cent
of Enrolment
Senior secondary-
Secondary ..
Junior secondary	
Elementary-senior secondary.
Elementary-junior secondary.
Elementary	
Totals	
20
117
105
12
49
1,212
10,775
50,238
35,952
4,378
6,256
167,339
10,171
48,307
34,193
3,949
5,685
157,280
20,946
98,545
70,145
8,327
11,941
324,619
1,515
274,938
259,585
534,523
3.9
18.4
13.1
1.6
2.2
60.7
16,550.8
83,126.7
62,107.2
7,053.6
10,567.2
301,948.0
79.02
84.35
88.54
84.71
88.50
93.02
100.0
481,353.4
90.05
1 Net enrolment is the total number of students on the register on the first day of school, plus new arrivals
during the school-year, minus those who transfer to another British Columbia public school or class.
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled:
Secondary School Correspondence classes, regular students (exclusive of the 3,915 officially registered in other schools)	
In the Elementary School Correspondence classes, regular students  	
Under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, pupils receiving
instruction 	
1,932
713
63
Adult Education
Canadian Vocational Training Programme—
Day 	
Night 	
Public School Adult Education	
Secondary School Correspondence (adults only) 	
Elementary School Correspondence (adults only) 	
Public colleges and British Columbia Institute of Technology—
Full time._	
Part time	
2,708
32,609
14,948
156,6212
9,562
96
10,562
8,587
235,693
2 Includes 121,352 nonvocational.
 STATISTICAL TABLES D 93
TABLE 1.2    DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
The following table provides a distribution of pupils by grade and sex for the
school-year 1971/72 and a comparison of the totals with 1970/71. Grade I decreased by about 3,200 from June 1971 to June 1972 and should continue to decline
until September 1974. This reflects the dip in the number of births which began in
1961 and would have caused much greater decreases in enrolment in the primary
grades if immigration had not been so high.
Grade
Boys
Girls
Total,
1971/72
Total,
1970/71
Ratio,
1972:1971
Grade XIII-
Grade XII2-
Grade XI	
Secondary
Totals, senior secondary grades*-
Grade X	
Grade IX	
Grade VIII-
Totals, Grades VIII to X..
Occupational 3	
Occupational 2	
Occupational 1	
Totals, occupational classes	
Totals, junior secondary grades-
Totals, secondary grades	
Elementary
Intermediate Special-
Grade VII	
Grade VI 	
Grade V 	
Grade IV	
Totals, intermediate grades	
Primary Special	
Grade III... 	
Grade II	
Grade I	
Kindergarten-
Totals, primary grades	
Totals, elementary grades-
Grand totals	
17,113
18,344
15,865
17,921
35,457
33,786
19,946
21,261
22,304
19,559
21,003
21,787
63,511
62,349
884
1,231
1,577
533
662
722
3,692
1,917
67,203
64,266
102,660
98,042
2,632
22,649
23,073
22,626
22,440
32,978
36,265
2601
30,830
35,367
1,430
21,599
21,996
21,739
21,520
4,062
44,248
45,069
44,365
43,960
3,879
42,614
43,730
44,388
43,711
93,420 |  88,284
181,704
178,322
2,005
1,102
3,107
3,382
22,844
21,667
44,511
43,969
22,155
20,700
42,855
44,078
20,725
19,252
39,977
43,145
11,129
10,528
21,657
21,056
f
78,858 [  73,249
172,278 | 161,533
333,811 | 333,952
274,938
259,585
534,5232
527,1062
i
1.070
1.025
69,243
66,457
1.042
39,505
42,264
44,091
38,300
40,990
42,371
1.031
1.031
1.041
125,860
121,661
1.035
1,417
1,893
2,299
1,245
1,594
2,197
1.138
1.188
1.046
5,609
5,036
1.114
131,469
126,697
1.038
200,712
193,154
1.039
1.047
1.038
1.031
0.999
1.006
1.019
0.919
1.012
0.972
0.927
1.029
152,107    |    155,630    |      0.977
1.000
1.014
i See pages 95 to 112 for enrolment by programme in Grades XI and XII.
the end of June 1971.
2 Includes January graduates.
Grades XIII was discontinued at
 D 94 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
TABLE 1.3    SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMMES
Type
Function
Number of
School
Districts
Number of
Approvals
Number of
Pupils
1970
1971
1970
1971
1970
1971
1
56
22
63
7
8
13
1
11
1
6
6
24
63
60
25
67
7
12
16
1
13
1
8
10
24
64
298
96
298
39
15
58
1
16
2
8
3
62
324
275.0
99.0
351.0
41.5
26.5
52.0
1.0
17.0
2.0
11.5
10.5
52.5
332.5
3,726
957
4,810
518
C1)
813
8
123
18
C1)
93
579
5,295
4,009
2
1,437
3
6,853
687
4
5
(!)
840
6
7
5
8
176
9
52
10
316
11
12
505
Orrnpafinnal
Totals                	
6,360
281
308
1,220
1,272.0
16,940
21,240
i Enrolment varies greatly.
TABLE 1.4    HOME ECONOMICS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES
ENROLMENT, 1971/72
Senior
Foods 11 	
Foods 12a 	
Foods 12b 	
Textiles 11 	
Textiles 12a 	
Textiles 12b 	
Management 11 	
Home and Industrial Services 12 _.
Child Care 12	
Community Recreation 12
9,188
2,240
1,251
5,273
1,648
941
2,590
350
2,828
5,585
Junior
Home Economics 8	
Foods and Nutrition 9} _
Clothing and Textiles 91
Child Care 9	
Cooking and Food Services 9
Occupational
Home Economics I ._
Home Economics II _
Home Economics III
22,633
14,047
13,022
3,247
6,868
646
916
537
1 In many cases these courses are combined and taken over a two-year period.
 STATISTICAL TABLES
D 95
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 D 114
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
I
Total   I   Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
II III
Secondary-
Fernie	
District No. 1 (Fernie)
Sparwood-
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Jaffray_
Elementary—■
Baynes Lake-
Isabella Dicken-
Elkford	
Elko	
Grasmere—,	
Ridgemont	
Sparwood	
Totals, District No. 1	
District No, 2 (Cranbrook)
Secondary—Mount Baker- _	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Laurie     _
Parkland-
Elementary—■
Muriel Baxter..
Cranbrook Central-
Moyie	
T. M. Roberts	
Tenth Avenue	
Wardner	
Amy Woodland-
Totals, District No. 2	
District No. 3 (Kimberley)
Secondary—Selkirk-
Junior Secondary—McKim-
Elementary—
Blarchmont  —
Chapman Camp-
Lindsay Park	
Marysville	
Meadowbrook	
Ta Ta.	
Wasa 	
A. A. Watkins..
Totals, District No. 3-
District No. 4 (Windermere)
Secondary—David Thompson	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Canal Flats  	
Edgewater  	
Elementary—
Brisco	
Invermere	
J. Alfred Laird-
Radium	
Wilmer	
Windermere-
Totals, District No. 4-
District No. 7 (Nelson)
Secondary—L. V. Rogers-
Junior Secondary—Trafalgar	
Elementary-Senior Secondary—
Mount Sentinel 	
Salmo-
Elementary-Junior Secondary—W. E. Graham-
525
350
282
16
479
149
43
37
592
763
253
170
142
10
272
76
20
23
300
418
272
180
140
6
207
73
23
14
292
345
51
30
3
93
24
9
6
33
121
17
3
65
27
14
2
65
91
3,236 | 1,684 | 1,552
944
526
566
287
496
252
325
164
643
330
10
4
553
277
358
182
14
6
514
273
418
279
244
161
313
6
276
176
8
241
93
61
—
	
35
63
83
73
3
3
66
90
62
60
3
4
84
58
4,423 | 2,301 | 2,122
275
560
409
210
104
150
201
81
33
48
528
282
219
105
54
70
99
49
12
24
279
2,324 | 1,193
230
148
12
195
172
46
36
118
224
120
80
4
108
92
24
13
64
278
190
105
50
80
102
32
21
24
249
	
	
40
42
14
18
33
34
25
29
21
15
17
13
44
32
1,131
227
110
68
87
80
22
23
54
24
31
6
9
2
2
17
27
24
24
10
14
6
9
23
16
408
729 |
766
393
738
365
215
114
343
182
126
70
679
|  112
132
373
373
101
161
56
25
64
17
11
10
67
95
197 |  319 |  284 |  289
61
82
3
101
67
2
68
336 1  351 |  384
31
14
42
30
14
18
41
 |  194 |  183 |  190
29
12
8
25
30
8
9
23
144
School Districts Nos. 5 and 6 were merged to form School District No. 86 on January 1, 1966.
 STATISTICAL TABLES
D 115
OF NET ENROLMENT
Pri
Grade
Inter-
Occupational
Grade
mary
Special
IV
V
VI
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
17
1
116
101
97
111
82
97
95
74
53
31
	
18
28
32
33
	
	
	
	
40
29
30
	
4
1
5
_
„
	
	
8
66
61
33
38
	
	
	
	
25
14
23
19
	
	
-	
	
	
	
	
	
9
	
	
 -	
	
	
	
	
	
	
4
7
8
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
69
91
97
111
9
	
	
	
	
	
„ -
102
92
96
70
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
8
297
294
294
271
9
"1   1 I 	
253
225
201
164
113
11
8
11
337
327
250
227
30
162
147
	
	
	
162
27
	
161
146
	
	
82
49
35
.	
	
	
	
	
82
104
112
	
14
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
1
	
	
 .—
	
	
	
	
	
 —
73
70
92
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
37
36
36
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
5
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
75
82
86
	
	
	
	
	
_—
-
355
341 |  361
389
14
68 |   8 |  11
323
293
337
327
250
198
185
177
—
	
	
	
15
13
	
189
192
	
	
	
i
36
27
33
	
.
	
16
16
26
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
31
10
	
	
	
	
	
32
30
30
25
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
10
21
	
	
	
	
,	
	
—
15
18
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
32
78
113
188
	
	
	
	
	
	
i
172
200 |  202
213
  1  15 1  13 | -	
189
192
198
185
177
10
8
2
66
91
108
88
78
34
37
33
19
23
	
	
—
19
21
33
26
	
	
22
	
	
	
	
—
~~28
15
33
50
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
25
27
22
20
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
_ _
8
6
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—,—
	
6
6
	
	
	
.	
—
24
12
20
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
144
124 ]  141
115
  1  10 |   8 |   2
Ill
91
108
88
78
159
261
346
—
	
	
	
	
	
6
8
5
304
277
138
——
	
40
24
52
25
43
31
60
4
1
2
43
104
67
35
27
__,._
	
37
	
	
28
33
28
	
	
 D 116
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total       Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
II     I   III
District No. 7 (Nelson)—Continued
Elementary—
Balfour 	
Blewett	
A. I. Collinson	
Crescent Valley	
Harold Lakes	
Hume— 	
Nelson Central- _ —.	
North Shore 	
Procter—   	
Rosemont  _ 	
Salmo—- — 	
Gordon Sargent 	
Slocan-— _ -   -
Slocan Park 	
South Nelson - 	
South Slocan- _ — —
W. E. Wasson  - 	
Willow Point   	
Winlaw   — 	
Winl aw Annex . —
Ymir  	
Totals, District No. 7	
District No. 9 (Castlegar)
Secondary—Stanley Humphries 	
Junior Secondary—Kinnaird	
Elementary—■
Blueberry Creek  	
Castlegar 	
Kinnaird   —
Ootischenia — -   -
Pass Creek  	
Robson  	
Shoreacres  	
Tarrys   	
Twin Rivers  -
Valley Vista  - 	
Woodland Park _ —	
Totals, District No. 9 _	
District No. 10 (Arrow Lakes)
Second ary—N akusp 	
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Lucerne 	
Elementary—■
Burton  - 	
Edgewood  -  	
Fauquier  —	
Glenbank  	
Nakusp — 	
New Denver    	
Totals, District No. 10	
District No. 11 (Trail)
Secondary—
J. Lloyd Crowe 	
Rossland	
Junior Secondary—
Beaver Valley 	
Trail — 	
Elementary-
Cook Avenue  	
Fruitvale  	
Genelle  	
Glenmerry   	
Maclean 	
Montrose	
34
187
157
110
13
408
376
103
64
216
332
93
73
51
280
47
7
51
72
26
42
15
96
82
58
7
198
195
52
28
101
172
45
42
29
145
25
4
27
34
14
20
4,930
815
286
103
160
376
42
40
204
42
169
378
77
128
419
148
53
84
217
20
17
96
20
78
196
46
63
282
120
43
54
37 |
146 |
254 |
139
1,075
570 |
1,177
622
414
207
263
143
615
332
264
148
508
280
44
19
287
140
335
168
229
115
19
91
75
52
6
210
181
51
36
115
160
48
31
22
135
22
3
24
38
12
22
2,513 |    2,417
396
138
50
76
159
22
23
108
22
91
182
31
65
2,820 |    1,457 |    1,363
154 |
75 |
27 |
28 I
23 |
71 |
120 |
72 I
128
45
16
26
14
75
134
67
505
555
207
120
283
116
228
25
147
167
114
33
51
43
36
29
28
5
25
29
10
53
29
6
9
34
30
27
6
28
~ 3
23
11
10
3
16
21
20
3
53
29
19
2
27
53
14
15
7
27
1
~n
	
	
16
15
62
73
30
28
9
7
7
10
28
37
11
13
16
24
29
22
17
18
225 |     247
29
12
S
6
22
23
20
10
6
6
24
25
22
29
91
93
31
77
14
30
39
21
47
72
9
31
51
48
7
15
26
21
51
43
18
16
31
48
52
14
13
31
3
lii
5
220 |     338 |     339 |     405
21
25
27
7
10
33
7
16
57
26
26
255
5
23
28
17
36
59
15
48
45
29
School District No. 8 was divided and merged with School District Nos. 7 and 10 on September 1, 1970.
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 117
Pri-
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
Special
rv
I1 V
1
VI
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
1 IX
X
XI
XII
-
5
31
5
23
9
21
23
_
_
-_-
—
24
28
17
20
49
12
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
44
46
56
54
	
	
	
	
	
	
67
40
67
58
	
	
	
15
14
16
15
	
	
	
..
	
	
12
12
13
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
28
35
32
29
	
	
	
.
7
54
53
44
	
7
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
~~13
14
31
33
11
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
15
34
38
47
30
15
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
17
12
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
8
18
	
	
	
	
	
	
5
7
7
	
	
	
	
	
22
377
350 |  399
395
34
10 |   9
7
399
466
417
339
404
5
2
8
161
237
198
204
	
	
	
	
226
60
	
	
	
17
12
22
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
64
54
60
100
13
	
5
6
32
10
7
39
4
	
	
	
	
	
35
	
	
	
	
	
	
11
	
	
	
	
	
	
22
36
28
27
	
	
.	
	
67
67
72
115
	
	
	
	
	
5
22
_ 16
~~24
_
.-...
	
	
	
5
246
241
245
242
13
5 |   2
8
226
221
237
198
204
58
71
53
61
39
	
	
	
34
	
25
15
18
19
9
5
9
	
	
	
10
10
8
4
	
	
	
	
	
4
5
8
3
	
	
	
	
	
30
25
22
_ .
	
	
	
	
	
.	
26
29
31
63
_
	
	
	
	
	
30
25
25
	
	
	
	
	
■	
	
	
105
103
94
104
  1   1   1 	
83
86
71
80
48
12
365
414
386
	
	
	
	
	
	
4
4
2
104
93
74
69
64
113
100
50
	
	
	
	
	
20
18
	
286
291
	
	
	
43
40
36
31
11
59
6
35
92
68
70
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
48
45
50
~
_
39
53
54
54
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
37
35
28
31
	
	
	
	
	
	
 ■
	
	
 D 118
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total   I   Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
II
in
District No. 11 (Trail)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Laura J. Morrish	
Sunningdale _ 	
Tadanac  	
Trail Central	
James L. Webster-
Totals, District No. 11..
District No. 12 (Grand Forks)
Secondary—Grand Forks	
Elementary—
Christina Lake 	
John A. Hutton....
Dr. D. A. Perley..
Totals, District No. 12-
District No. 13 (Kettle Valley)
Secondary—Boundary Central- 	
Elementary—
Beaverdell 	
Bridesville	
Greenwood	
Kettle Valley-
Midway	
Westbridge	
Totals, District No. 13 	
District No. 14 (Southern Okanagan)
Secondary—Southern Okanagan 	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Osoyoos	
Elementary—
Okanagan Falls-
Oliver Intermediate-
Oliver Primary	
Osoyoos Primary	
Totals, District No. 14-
District No. IS (Penticton)
Secondary—Penticton	
Junior Secondary—
McNicollPark  .._
Princess Margaret	
Elementary—
Carmi Avenue	
Columbia 	
Kaleden	
Learning Centre	
Learning Centre Annex„
N aramata—	
Nkwala— 	
O'Connell	
Queens Park-
Snowdon	
Uplands	
West Bench-
Totals, District No. 15	
District No. 16 (Keremeos)
Secondary—Similkameen	
Elementary—
Cawston 	
Hedley-
Keremeos _	
Keremeos Kindergarten-
Totals, District No. 16-
392
148
74
419
307
204
81
33
201
161
188
67
41
218
146
5,476 | 2,854 | 2,622
600
298
62
31
273
140
612
318
302
31
133
294
1,547 |
787
760
237
39
36
266
48
39
34
109
19
22
124
24
19
21
128
20
14
142
24
20
13
699
338 |
730
367
607
330
109
52
538
292
207
105
116
71
363
277
57
246
102
45
2,307 | 1,217 | 1,090
1,165
592
480
244
472
229
528
267
125
62
97
47
52
35
21
10
127
66
347
166
454
224
517
264
477
243
227
132
105
52
573
236
243
261
63
50
17
11
61
181
230
253
234
95
53
5,194 | 2,633 [ 2,561
251
149
68
192
32
131
66
34
105
17
120
83
34
87
15
692 [  353
339
47
15
10
37
34
49
16
15
45
53
35
46
13
13
34
38
63
73
81
110
124
30
4
8
12
9
25
32
16
12
2
5
30
31
11
16
91
116
59
57
58
27
56
56
55
—
	
39
40
35
36
13
9
14
15
34
47
41
44
48
57
55
58
28
22
19
16
32
19
22
12
8
24
25
	
	
46
27
17
47
37
|  355 |  436 |  406
10
31
83
124
4
15
23
Aii
6
59 |  66 j
59
62
14
106
161 |  220 |  182
55
27
10
19
42
44
68
70
28
11
252 |  326 |  344 |  374
18
10
27
32 |  55 |
55
55
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 119
Pri-
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
Special
TV
1  V 1 VI
1     1
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
1 IX
X
XI
XII
12
49
63
52
74
	
14
20
53
21
12
50
25
30
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
11
~~72
72
32
| 	
	
27
42
61
53
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
34
382
456 |  441
465
32 |  24 |  22
14
503
484
489
483
450
	
	
	
5
11
8
130
126
125
105
90
	
13
32
13
35
37
31
	
	
	
	
	
2
69
75
95
88
18
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
2
114
123 1  132
119
18 |   5 |  11 |   8
130
126
125
105
90
	
6
~42
8
29
5
40
4
45
	
	
	
	
61
46
45
42
43
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
13
17
8
10
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
6
5
3
7
	
,
	
	
	
-
67
59 |  56
66
. |   | .  . |
61
46
45
42
43
11
9
5
117
129
134
169
156
	
63
78
71
88
	
	
	
66
80
68
	
	
23
16
15
14
11
108
97
105
99
12
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
-
	
	
11
194
191 |  191
201
12 |   11 |   9 |   5
183
209
202
169
156
78
116
101
130
430
310
161
166
153
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
166
155
151
	
	
	
61
27
15
92
98
85
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
21
13
18
19
31
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
15
25
21
18
21
	
	
	
	
	
■	
 ■
	
59
39
49
50
	
.	
62
54
83
70
	
	
	
...
	
64
69
76
79
	
	
	
	
,	
70
52
55
62
	
	
	
.	
31
37
37
44
...
	
	
	
	
	
10
18
14
17
	
	
	
	
	
	
21
414
399 |  451
444
130 |  | 	
	
443
422
434
430
310
58
65
48
47
33
28
23
20
19
	
12
8
8
10
5
23
28
19
33
8
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
5 1
63
59 |  47
62
8 | 	
	
	
58
65
48
47
33
 D 120
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
III
District No. 17 (Princeton)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Princeton-
Elementary—
Allison Pass	
Tulameen   -	
Vermilion Forks..
Totals, District No. 17-
District No. 18 (Golden)
Secondary—Golden 	
Elementary—■
Alexander Park  ...
Columbia Valley-
Donald 	
Field	
Golden	
Nicholson	
Totals, District No. 18-
District No. 19 (Revelstoke)
Secondary—Revelstoke  	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Mica-
Elementary—■
Big Eddy  : _	
Farwell 	
Mount Begbie	
Mountain View..
Selkirk	
Trout Lake	
Totals, District No. 19-
District No. 21 (Armstrong-Spallumcheen)
Secondary—Armstrong _ 	
Elementary—
Armstrong	
Len W.Wood—  	
Totals, District No. 21-
District No. 22 (Vernon)
Senior Secondary—Vernon..
Junior Secondary—
Charles Bloom	
Clarence Fulton	
W. L. Seaton 	
Elementary—■
B.X - 	
Beairsto _	
Cherryville -
Coldstream	
Harwood—	
J. W. Inglis -.
Lavington	
Lumby Primary-
Mission Hill	
Okanagan Landing-
Silver Star	
South B.X	
West Vernon 	
Totals, District No. 22 —
District No. 23 (Central Okanagan)
Secondary—•
George Elliot 	
Kelowna  	
Dr. Knox     	
George Pringle..
Rutland	
792
11
43
178
438
6
19
82
354
5
24
96
024
545
608
309
267
143
113
65
25
11
59
30
518
263
189
94
479
299
124
48
14
29
255
95
1,779 |  915 |
864
755
322
97
292
268
409
258
17
384
164
52
151
147
222
135
10
371
158
45
141
121
187
123
7
2,418 | 1,265 | 1,153
470
427
316
234
203
168
1,213 |  605
932
330
730
876
238
577
101
380
535
372
136
102
167
351
568
77
541
236
224
148
608
463
169
367
451
139
299
50
195
291
182
55
64
86
184
276
46
255
469
161
363
425
99
278
51
185
244
190
81
38
81
167
292
31
286
7,013
3,572 |
288
151 |
1,809
908 |
748
347
519
286 |
953
438 1
3,441
137
901
401
233
515
63
44
4
6
25
45
1
5
27
63 |  79
47
20
12
8
57
28
42
19
5
10
63
24
27
51
52
56
186
52
192
94
52 |  94
26
57
15
44
81
24
67
32
49
60
10
68
|  533
26
24
56
29
54
5
80
33
88
16
43
72
25
9
35
33
45
97
12
59
58
1
6
34
99
49
20
3
10
63
49
172 |  163 |  194
39
23
61
30
75
1
194 |  229
94
80 |  94
33
75
7
43
79
62
14
A)6
49
74
9
75
567 |  556
School Districts Nos. 20 and 78 were merged to form School District No. 89, January 1, 1968.
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 121
Primary
Special
Grade
IV I  V  I VI   VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
I
VIII I IX   X    XI   XII
52
3
12
28
45
2
7
30
95
  |
13
13
10
10
30
16
2
6
70
21
84
36
19
1
6
76
33
48
7
34
78
89
78
33
19
2
9
64
34
30
161
138
40
20
51
62
35
36
30
6
33
31
34
90
116
3
4
30
157
209 |  199 |  184 |  189
107
98
109
109
|  107 |  98 |  109
109
—
30
35
32
74
88
78
20
18
15
61
54
57
66
74
74
70
66
82
27
16
24
37
29
49
53
51
85
76
92
17
9
20
75
79
96
49
91
10
78
75
67
22
55
84
89
29 |  611 |  597 |  621
620
19
19 |
14 |   2 |   5 |
11
11 |  11 |   4 |   9
3 |   2
5
"36
2
14
28 |  41 |  20 |  16
14
22
39
33
69
69
155
155
159
29
108
108
122
266
260
90
78
90 |  78
135
124
135 |  124
169
19
156
12
188 1  188 [  168
112
100
112 |  100
107
215
305
648 |  627
77
169
215
166
255
74
200
193
124
244
91
232
244
567
77
234
200
125
233
51
46
51 |  46
93
93 |  88
134
113
134 |  113
57
80 |  57
488
444
488 |  444
29
629
58
144
31
469
140
46
77
 D 122
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
1
III
District No. 23 (Central Okanagan)—Continued
Junior Secondary—K.L.O   	
Elementary—
Bankhead 	
Belgo-
Black Mountain-
Central _	
Dehart _.
East Kelowna-
Ellison	
Ellison Primary ~
Glenmore -
Glenn Avenue—
Gordon-	
Graham 	
Lakeview Heights..
Martin 	
A. S. Matheson.	
Mission Creek.	
Mountainview	
North Glenmore	
Okanagan Mission..
Oyama— -
Peachland—	
Peachland Primary..
Quigley Road	
Raymer Avenue	
Rutland	
South Kelowna	
South Rutland	
Dorothea Walker-
West Rutland	
Westbank	
Winfield 	
Wood Lake	
Totals, District No. 23-
District No. 24 (Kamloops)
Secondary—
Barriere      	
Chase 	
Kamloops   	
Norkam	
Junior Secondary—■
Brocklehurst 	
McArthur Park.— —	
John Peterson —  	
Valleyview   	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Red Lake..
Elementary—
Adams Lake 	
B arnhartvale — -	
Barriere 	
Beattie 	
Ralph Bell 1	
Kay Bingham—   —
Brennan Creek	
Brocklehurst	
Chase	
ChuChua	
Crestline  -
Dallas 	
Bert Edwards  	
Fitzwater  	
Haldane	
Arthur Hatton   	
Heffley Creek	
George Hilliard	
612
444
116
20
334
89
81
144
70
348
67
127
56
382
352
411
85
374
125
164
76
135
98
584
545
417
151
634
406
220
488
183
354
310
203
71
6
173
47
44
75
38
179
54
63
19
196
195
203
38
194
66
98
39
71
45
280
286
216
86
327
202
114
265
83
208
302
241
45
14
161
42
37
69
32
169
13
64
37
186
157
208
47
180
59
66
37
64
53
304
259
201
65
307
204
106
223
100
146
43
28
13
37
12
45
4
31
38
55
3
47
11
58
26
74
19
29
101
61
74
23
59
40
73
55
55
44
7
52
15
~~25
31
39
18
64
25
54
16
74
35
80
18
33
104
72
74
21
37
28
65
72
62
44
63
37
27
51
48
42
26
88
29
10
19
36
89
56
52
15
72
69
38
82
56
3,009
6,624
275
139
379
199
1,033
558
1,228
612
841
409
1,052
554
934
490
611
300
13
6
10
6
15
11
361
194
463
245
339
162
808
398
15
9
234
126
271
145
21
11
39
21
352
162
518
265
71
43
221
112
480
252
50
23
617
323
6,385
| 1,059 | 1,158 | 1,111
136
180
475
616
432
498
444
311
7
4
4
167
218
177
410
6
108
126
10
18
190
253
28
109
228
27
294
59
	
1
1
1
3
4
5
51
39
60
68
43
39
68
92
2
3
34
61
53
62
3
2
17
22
46
43
67
70
~62
~56
22
28
74
91
6
6
40
71
46
83
3
68
65
5
51
77
61
103
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 123
Pri-
Grade
Inter-
Occupational
Grade
Special
IV
1
VI
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
218
231
163
	
49
56
77
102
	
	
60
55
67
76
13
-
	
	
54
34
37
36
	
	
	
	
36
23
140
114
14
30
	
	
53
	
	
	
	
	
69
59
46
38
	
	
	
56
75
76
69
	
	
	
	
	
46
107
56
32
59
	
	
	
	
■- 48
106
	
.35
	
	
20
33
37
33
32
	
	
	
	
82
78
64
66
	
88
91
89
88
	
	
	
	
	
45
56
39
77
	
	
	
	
	
24
21
47
	
	
	
18
116
104
88
140
	
	
86
37
69
91
27
68
84
50
58
76
73
	
	
7
67
94
92
85
9
	
	
	
	
39
1,160
1,188 |  1,148
1,142
89
22 |       39 |       33
1,100
1,066
1,032
860
763
72
78
56
49
20
13
63
83
86
79
55
	
	
	
	
	
	
157
225
498
553
378
450
20
285
284
252
23
39
22
35
390
375
168
	
34
11
21
23
346
199
323
195
187
206
	
	
3
	
2
1
3
	
	
10
60
57
40
~~64
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
67
68
58
71
	
	
	
	
	
	
54
55
53
49
	
	
95
170
141
159
	
	
	
	
	
1
71
5
1
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
32
4
4
3
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
57
48
~~59
48
68
73
88
75
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
9
62
	
	
	
	
	
31
52
66
72
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
14
73
74
66
74
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
99
87
77
86
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
 D 124
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total       Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
III
District No. 24 (Kamloops)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Little Fort 	
Lloyd George	
Logan Lake	
Louis Creek	
Allan Matthews—
North Kamloops..
Overlander	
A. E. Perry	
Rayleigh	
Savona  „
Marion Schilling...
George Slater	
Arthur Stevenson-
John Tod	
Westsyde..
Westwold	
Stuart Wood-
Totals, District No. 24-
District No. 26 (Birch Island)
Secondary—Clearwater	
Elementary—
Avola 	
Birch Island   	
Blue River	
Dutch Lake   	
Star Lake  	
Vavenby  	
Totals, District No. 26-
District No. 27 (Williams Lake)
Secondary—
Columneetza..
100 Mile House-
Junior Secondary—Williams Lake..
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Alexis Creek   	
AnahimLake	
Boss Mountain	
Bridge Lake..	
Canim Lake East-
Horsefly  	
Likely-
•   Puntzi Mountain..
Elementary—
Big Creek	
Big Lake..
Buffalo Creek	
Chezacut 	
Chilcotin Road	
Crescent Heights..
Deka Lake	
Dog Creek	
Eagle Creek	
Empire Valley	
Forest Grove	
Gang Ranch	
Glendale	
Kleena Kleene	
Kwaleen	
Lac la Hache	
Lakehill	
Lone Butte	
McLeese Lake-
Mountview	
Poplar Glade—
Riske Creek	
36
477
144
48
225
506
207
522
259
151
522
250
417
482
445
144
237
19
250
67
24
108
276
111
263
124
78
271
126
222
261
231
62
124
17
227
77
24
117
230
96
259
135
73
251
124
195
221
214
82
113
5
56
27
12
33
53
23
60
11
19
57
28
51
59
55
19
30
6
69
27
5
32
52
29
88
26
30
62
34
82
59
65
23
38
11
56
22
14
29
74
22
88
50
16
87
33
76
71
65
19
38
323
8,392
341
170
47
27
61
28
83
42
367
196
126
55
75
30
7,931
59 | 1,206 | 1,412 | 1,458
171
20
33
41
171
71
45
7
13
7
10
15
18
62
64
12
8
1,100 I  548 |  552
825
761
753
69
55
50
79
11
101
42
39
16
22
85
13
174
270
15
17
26
15
173
13
283
11
124
171
36
46
53
341
466 |
37 |
404
385
376
36
25
25
46
3
57
20
26
9
13
45
4
104
154
11
9
15
9
95
7
158
4
61
82
22
19
20
157
233
22
421
376
377
33
30
25
33
8
44
22
13
7
9
40
9
70
116
4
8
11
6
78
6
125
7
63
89
14
27
33
184
233
15
20
	
13
3
13
10
7
14
5
2
14
11
10
4
6
5
1
3
4
3
13
11
4
19
27
32
38
3
1
4
3
8
1
3
19
24
3
4
35
62
3
2
26
14
21
22
6
5
7
5
9
5
49
50
64
57
6
5
7
12
16
72
103 |  113 |  116
6
16
3
14
2
9
4
2
17
1
33
30
1
2
1
4
31
2
49
3
16
18
9
10
8
52
69
7
School District No. 25 was merged into School District No. 24, January 1, 1971.
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 125
Pri-
Grade
Inter-
Occupational
Grade
Special
IV
V
!
1   VI
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
	
6
64
5
71
3
82
79
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
13
22
6
22
20
11
22
13
	
	
18
33
23
13
84
67
83
80
13
	
_
	
	
	
	
4
28
27
34
37
3
_
	
.
	
	
78
56
83
69
	
	
	
	
40
44
37
51
	
	
	
	
	
7
11
17
18
33
.	
	
	
	
81
67
95
73
	
41
37
42
35
	
	
44
49
59
56
	
.
	
70
73
79
71
	
	
	
71
90
43
56
. „
    _
....
	
19
17
23
24
	
.
	
	
25
36
34
36
	
	
	
	
	
62
1,420
1,402
1,420
1,436
114 |      117 |       43 |       58
1,356
1,341
1,337
1,179
903
90
78
86
51
36
13
7
11
9
73
12
8
49
9
8
71
9
85
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
10
7
-
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
13
16
5
8
4
	
„
	
	
	
10
119
92
93
102
11 |     |     |      .-
90
78
86
51
36
349
254
222
.
14
13
179
174
143
126
112
	
	
404
349
	
	
10
13
10
7
7
11
6
9
11
5
4
5
_.
5
_
9
5
13
4
2
13
1
3
3
	
14
13
12
17
9
2
6
1
4
7
6
4
9
4
6
	
	
4
	
	
1
3
11
1
4
15
5
6
10
1
	
	
	
	
	
	
8
3
2
1
2
.
.
23
26
25
21
	
44
2
44
2
41
4
41
3
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
4
3
1
13
1
26
1
5
3
17
1
2
4
4
3
25
3
34
	
	
	
	
..
	
	
	
	
24
	
...
	
 .
	
	
	
45
~~ 32
3
19
	
	
	
	
	
	
._
	
18
17
14
	
22
7
11
9
45
20
9
7
10
55
30
5
7
42
38
1
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
5
48
	
	
	
	
	
73
59
77
67
	
	
	
	
	
	
6
9
1
3
 D 126
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
I
Total   I   Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
III
District No. 27 (Williams Lake)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Marie Sharpe    	
Tatlayoko Lake   , _	
Wildwood     	
93 Mile _ 	
100 Mile House..
150 Mile House-
Totals, District No. 27..
District No. 28 (Quesnel)
Secondary—Quesnel— 	
Junior Secondary—Cariboo _ -	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Wells-Barkerville-
Elementary—■
Alexandria -	
Australian	
Baker   -
Barlow Creek-
Bouchie Lake-
Carson	
Helen Dixon „
Dragon Lake—
Kersley ..	
Lakeview —
Le Bourdais	
Narcosli 	
Nazko Valley—
Pinecrest	
Quesnel View...
Red Bluff	
Rich Bar	
Riverview	
Strathnaver	
West Fraser—
Totals, District No. 28„
District No. 29 (Lillooet)
Secondary—Lillooet	
Elementary—
Bridge River   —	
Cayoosh
Gold Bridge-
Pavilion	
Riverview—
Seton Lake-
Totals, District No. 29..
District No. 30 (South Cariboo)
Secondary—
Ashcroft	
Kumsheen _
David Stoddart-
Elementary—•
Ashcroft 	
Big Bar Creek-
Cache Creek	
Clinton 	
Green Lake	
Lytton	
Scotty Creek.	
Spences Bridge..
70 Mile House—
581
17
145
52
478
293
314
10
83
32
268
155
6,758
890
820
120
44
8
429
153
281
224
310
134
137
235
60
45
60
187
25
280
129
252
110
146
415
433
55
27
3
215
95
152
118
129
65
67
131
25
24
40
93
12
165
67
119
75
63
079
2,588
305
157
70
35
435
230
18
13
22
9
132
64
45
26
Totals, District No. 30-
340
171
204
101
166
89
489
237
18
7
345
169
331
162
9
7
353
187
34
21
54
24
82
45
2,425
1,220
267
7
62
20
210
138
3,518 [ 3,240
475
387
65
17
5
214
58
129
106
181
69
70
104
35
21
20
94
13
115
62
133
35
83
2,491
148
35
205
5
13
68
19
1,027 |  534 |  493
169
103
77
252
11
176
169
2
166
13
30
37
1,205
21
69
69
56
32
28
25
81
2
23
3
62
36
605
106
84
25
10
76
56
651
17
16
8
7
2
2
70
56
31
23
52
35
30
29
37
39
30
17
15
14
40
34
12
5
6
13
16
10
13
23
7
16
37
43
19
31
48
36
8
18
13
15
82
3
3
4
64
21
15
141
	
60
46
4
1
69
56
37
44
1
1
61
47
7
4
12
11
8
12
259
222
76
3
18
2
74
49
646
11
9
1
66
18
57
23
38
17
18
30
7
5
9
38
2
42
13
33
16
20
|  511 |  482 |  473
86 |  99
62
5
45
46
4
35
4
7
7
215
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 127
Pri
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
mary
Special
rv
.  V j VI
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
79
77
87
83
14
4
6
1
	
	
20
21
19
19
	
4
11
10
12
	
	
	
13
55
37
65
55
70
28
63
32
	
	
13
580
632 [  607
588
18
14 |   13
	
639
525
492
380
334
149
231
292
218
_
507
222
91
	
	
11
18
7
12
	
12
12
4
	
	
	
9
3
86
7
4
	
	
	
	
	
	
47
61
43
18
21
21
21
. .
	
	
27
37
35
38
	
	
. 30
35
41
36
42
40
60
39
15
	
	
17
23
10
20
_.
15
19
20
36
	
33
30
38
30
	
	
13
11
12
	
	
.
6
9
6
6
12
1
6
	
	
29
22
24
38
	
	
	
13
37
36
35
37
16
24
12
14
■
35
14
20
37
16
29
34
23
24
29
15
25
	
	
=
=
	
13
467
473 |  468
439
15
  1 	
	
519
383
326
292
218
11
4
1
77
64
74
55
19
15
16
9
16
	
68
1
7
77
1
1
65
5
3
74
1
3
	
. ...
	
	
	
91
95
82
94
11 1   4 |    1
77
64
74
55
19
86
85
66
65
38
8
8
5~
49
56
32
32
14
	
	
	
	
	
	
55
49
41
21
	
14
79
3
57
51
3
49
2
15
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
34
36
31
42
3
40
3
44
39
47
40
7
	
	
	
	
	
	
12
32
39
46
12
	
9
7
11
5
11
14
5
6
18
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
12
	
	
	
	
29
230
194
200
191
34
8
8
5
190
190
139
118
52
 D 128
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
I
Total   I   Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
III
District No. 31 (Merritt)
Secondary—Merritt 	
Elementary—
Collettville 	
Diamond Vale -	
Kengard —   — 	
Merritt Bench   _	
Merritt Central 	
Nicola Lake —	
Nicola-Canford 	
Totals, District No. 31	
District No. 32 (Hope)
-Hope..
Secondary-
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Boston Bar-
Elementary—
Coquihalla 	
North Bend    	
Silver Creek  -	
Tillicum . 	
Yale.: _   	
Totals, District No. 32..
District No. 33 (Chilliwack)
Secondary—
Chilliwack-
Sardis	
Junior Secondary—
Chilliwack 	
Rosedale...	
A. D. Rundle- -
Elementary—■
Atchelitz	
Bernard 	
Camp River	
Chadsey.	
Cheam	
Chilliwack Central-
Cultus Lake—	
East Chilliwack	
Evans —  	
Fairfield Island	
Greendale—	
Kipp 	
F. G. Leary	
Little Mountain	
Lotbiniere	
McCammon	
Miller.	
Robertson.	
Robertson Annex-
Rosedale... 	
Ryder Lake „.
Sardis 	
Strathcona	
Sunshine Drive	
Unsworth -
Vedder 	
Watson 	
Yarrow	
Totals, District No. 33-
District No. 34 (Abbotsford)
Senior Secondary—Abbotsford	
Junior Secondary—
Abbotsford  	
Clearbrook  —
Yale	
874
440 |
182
80 |
359
187 |
181
100 |
129
73 |
525
272 1
34
18 |
305
152 |
434
102
172
81
56
253
16
153
589
1,322
568
297
190
97
638
348
79
39
297
143
8
5
76
40
1,267
271
93
290
40
154
3
36
1,856
969 |
1,213
616
1,143
591
721
365
385
196
515
258
114
71
318
156
51
28
69
38
118
61
539
277
131
66
106
54
82
38
89
43
212
113
95
52
209
102
506
263
67
32
239
117
61
37
208
115
169
83
247
128
68
32
379
178
396
191
51
34
102
54
195
112
638
324
341
181
887
597
552
356
189
257
43
162
23
31
57
262
65
52
44
46
99
43
107
243
35
122
24
93
86
119
36
201
205
17
48
83
314
160
9,777 | 5,006 | 4,771
1,117
885
682
487
570
481
333
242
547
404
349
245
26
45
21
19
47
17
45
24
62
27
20
49
13
48
|  220 |  243
37
16
47
17
7
77
77
10
8
39
40
13
9
108
156
141
36
48
48
49
40
24
24
50
91
24
20
30
11
36
16
13
16
8
17
23
16
53
11
27
8
20
20
23
4
39
36
12
30
67
44
17
38
8
10
15
47
22
19
10
11
20
37
33
49
13
36
7
41
8
27
8
62
54
AS
27
77
38
475
616
758
39
49
34
24
77
4
54
281
26
79
9
32
17
163
14
46
8
13
23
45
14
12
12
12
27
35
27
55
12
42
6
54
21
3
35
53
13
23
71
41
717
 STATISTICAL TABLES
D 129
NET
ENROLMENT-
-Continued
Pri-
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
Special
IV    1     V
1
VI
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
26
53
40
51
27
53
46
19
19
14
239
216
134
125
108
33
35
31
27
21
18
	
13
53
67
39
154
26
	
	
	
47
41
34
36
	
13
239 |     255
202
236
26 |       19
19
14
239
216
.    134
125 |     108
10
9
6
113
118
120
109
83
	
13
18
27
29
	
25
28
	
97
104
73
94
	
15
35
12
33
9
36
35
	
	
	
2
*
6
	
11
9
9
	
2
171 |     176 |     154
158
6 |       10 |         9 |         6
138
146
120
109 |       83
21
34
20
26
28
138
237
129
288
264
122
85
265
186
114
535
243
539
188
16
37
7
15
55
10
14
35
10
18
41
20
_
	
228
146
121
11
10
17
14
17
24
14
80
99
92
78
14
„
	
28
14
19
18
13
19
17
13
17
12
15
	
12
17
10
19
	
	
25
18
26
38
	
24
21
18
22
30
57
12
28
67
11
33
74
8
35
72
38
	
	
	
13
7
7
13
	
45
48
58
43
	
	
41
12
33
9
35
14
43
18
	
52
51
48
68
	
	
47
59
55
42
	
32
19
	
	
	
	
	
	
13
26
14
36
17
31
9
22
	
13
83
40
79
44
76
49
67
61
14
	
75
753 |     798
804
757
47 |       95 |       26 ]       28
732
820
771
778 |     727
615
502
17
40
24
291
242
271
12
4
1
236
215
214
|
	
	
191
148
148
1
 D 130
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
I
Total   I   Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
II
III
District No. 34 (Abbotsford)—Continued
Elementary—•
Abbotsford  	
Aberdeen  	
Alexander	
Arnold	
Barrowtown..
Bradner	
Centennial Park-
Clayburn	
Clearbrook	
Dunach	
Glenmore	
Godson	
Good Shepherd-
Huntingdon	
Jackson	
Jubilee 	
King —	
McMillan	
Matsqui...
Mount Lehman North-
North Poplar	
Peardonville	
Ridgedale _.	
Ross.   	
Philip Sheffield-
Simpson- „.
South Poplar-
Margaret Stenersen..
Swensson	
Ten-Broeck	
Upper Sumas	
Totals, District No. 34-
Secondary—
Aldergrove.
Langley..
District No. 35 (Langley)
Junior Secondary-
Fort Langley—
H. D. Stafford...
Elementary—
Aldergrove	
Anderson	
Belmont —
Coghlan..
County Line-
Fort Langley-
Glenwood	
Langley Central..
Langley Prairie—
Lochiel -
Mclnnis	
Milner	
Murrayville	
North Otter	
Otter	
Parkside Centennial-
Patricia 	
Peterson Road	
Simonds 	
South Carvolth..
South Otter	
Sperling 	
Tillicum 	
Topham Road-
West Langley.—
Willoughby	
Wix-Brown 	
Totals, District No. 35-
229
1
94
217
107
373
198
32
15
105
60
213
113
412
218
17
9
101
45
105
46
52
28
635
322
21
13
75
45
144
73
22
13
92
42
82
38
236
129
99
50
444
232
98
60
46
25
74
41
221
124
241
134
229
115
243
120
20
8
224
109
299
163
8,572
4,415
749
414
1,229
605
453
243
417
230
214
124
117
62
401
213
113
53
139
79
467
235
272
149
308
161
287
143
115
54
66
39
108
52
285
157
242
128
265
135
220
119
47
23
187
108
280
137
98
50
36
22
74
44
32
17
106
59
222
117
186
97
157
84
135
110
175
17
45
100
194
8
56
59
24
313
8
30
71
9
50
44
107
49
212
38
21
33
97
107
114
123
12
115
136
335
624
210
187
90
55
188
60
60
232
123
147
144
61
27
56
128
114
130
101
24
79
143
48
14
30
15
47
105
89
73
7,892 | 4,153 | 3,739
41
30
40
32
27
52
33
25
45
44
44
56
20
30
15
19
43
5
9
10
5
55
~4
16
6
11
14
23
12
46
16
6
18
24
25
32
9
38
45
40
16
40
15
14
48
7
13
14
5
70
9
21
9
15
10
21
13
63
13
6
23
35
27
37
5
28
44
495 |  612 |  661
50
61
46
37
42
48
42
—
	
14
18
36
42
11
9
13
20
38
43
21
28
38
31
51
45
14
15
24
18
16
12
30
39
34
25
31
29
53
57
14
9
14
31
32
41
8
15
11
9
11
31
19
14
22
23
30
29
15
23
55
14
57
17
21
54
5
16
5
12
61
12
22
7
16
10
18
11
53
18
8
17
22
28
33
6
30
43
671
14
62
18
23
58
24
35
49
19
24
18
34
28
33
62
15
28
44
19
8
16
20
28
29
31
412 |  600 |  656 |  739
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 131
Primary
Special
Grade
TV    I     V
I
VI    I   VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
VIII
IX
XI
XII
34
14
1
10
37
24
35
6
30
49
22
17
11
71
13
21
6
20
22
13
69
6
10
16
30
37
20
42
18
34
40
38
19
34
55
12
17
10
65
17
20
19
11
28
14
66
13
16
52
34
21
29
18
38
35
50
21
41
64
Al4
22
9
59
10
18
12
17
40
20
64
18
58
28
30
26
19
51
38
49
12
27
47
15
20
89
10
26
13
51
16
69
14
81
36
33
29
44
74 |  679 |  686 |  726 |  719
78 |  29
44
25
718 |  605 |  633
615 I  502
61
16
58
17
16
44
34
41
40
17
20
35
24
29
__
22
42
15
8
16
12
25
25
26
62
44
16
16
51
52
31
27
19
12
68
77
41
48
22
68
41
18
18
15
17
32
41
37
33
32
29
30
34
39
44
13
15
16
14
25
30
24
27
21
21
19 |  652 |  653 |  667
47
23
50
36
89
40
57
14
10
28
24
26
28
38
13
27
22
20
592
14
22
11
27
51
14
2
15
148
146
173
158
156
188
152
142
140
169
128
103
141
342
130
298
54 |   92
25
17   625 |  638 |  540    483 |  428
 D 132
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total
J Boys
Girls
744
384
360
774
440
334
1,227
632
595
599
346
253
503
251
252
617
364
313
1,004
507
497
792
428
364
684
338
346
928
476
452
827
444
383
644
328
316
700
346
354
1,011
533
478
205
106
99
561
309
252
172
89
83
303
152
151
513
261
252
313
180
133
356
188
168
424
237
187
557
305
252
198
109
89
518
261
257
49
26
23
496
261
235
274
160
114
16
13
3
97
48
49
112
55
57
20
8
12
387
224
163
214
118
96
430
227
203
436
234
202
124
67
57
358
191
167
270
148
122
129
56
73
324
182
142
178
104
74
195
91
104
260
123
137
226
109
117
611
304
307
170
89
81
171
101
70
176
99
77
655
336
319
450
228
222
236
124
112
129
57
72
720
354
366
332
188
144
737
379
358
223
125
98
261
130
131
619
304
315
345
175
170
423
228
195
591
311
280
39
19
20
120
65
55
41
25
16
396
192
204
Kindergarten
Grade
HI
District No. 36 (Surrey)
Senior Secondary—
North Surrey-
Princess Margaret-
Queen Elizabeth—
Semiahmoo 	
Lord Tweedsmuir—
Junior Secondary—
William Beagle	
Cloverdale 	
Johnston HeightS-
L. A. Matheson	
Newton 	
Mary Jane Shannon-
Len Shepherd	
West Whalley	
White Rock.	
Elementary—
Anniedale	
James Ardiel	
Bear Creek	
Harold Bishop-
Henry Bose	
David Brankin..
Bridgeview	
J. T. Brown-
Cedar Hills	
Clayton  	
Cloverdale —	
Colebrook	
Crescent Park	
Simon Cunningham-
Dawn 	
East Clayton	
East Kensington	
Elgin .
Fleetwood 	
Grandview Heights..
Green Timbers	
Grosvenor Road	
Hall's Prairie	
Hjorth Road 	
Holly..
Invergarry	
Johnston Heights-
Johnston Road —
Kensington Prairie	
Latimer Road	
McLeod Road	
A. H. P. Matthew	
General Montgomery-
Newton  :	
Mary Jane Norris..
Old Yale Road	
Peace Arch	
Port Kells 	
Port Mann	
Prince Charles..
Senator Reid	
Riverdale	
Royal Heights	
T. E. Scott	
Mary Jane Shannon-
Lena Shaw 	
Ray Shepherd	
Dr. F. D. Sinclair	
South Westminster..
Erma Stephenson.—
Strawberry Hill	
Sunnyside	
62
60
68
68
47
69
47
66
56
63
67
61
66
70
34
78
24
32
69
42
61
41
76
37
17
74
21
25
11
10
57
14
38
45
11
35
42
95
32
17
34
34
26
77
14
22
46
62
62
38
22
68
30
38
80
37
30
44
18
15
14
45
23
84
32
36
73
39
35
43
53
52
16
68
15
30
11
5
48
28
4S
70
23
47
51
34
38
24
29
33
36
86
27
27
61
70
57
26
17
69
42
84
33
89
48
50
56
12
17
17
47
25
77
29
41
76
54
44
35
64
56
16
69
20
42
25
5
53
22
69
53
19
43
56
24
31
16
42
34
83
24
25
69
75
84
36
21
101
63
114
1
32
99
56
50
85
9
16
10
58
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 133
Pri-
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
Special
IV
I1 V
1
1 VI
1
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
361
383
481
293
576
651
_
.
317
282
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
276
227
13
18
13
200
235
198
,	
	
	
11
15
11
350
313
304
	
	
	
13
19
15
264
258
223
	
	
	
225
237
222
	
	
	
—
15
9
3
319
319
263
	
	
	
.
20
6
4
266
280
251
	
	
	
	
„
.._
232
221
191
	
	
	
	
	
	
9
12
7
197
260
215
	
	
7
15
18
305
332
334
—
32
36
25
30
86
89
78
69
	
	
28
21
23
15
	
	
	
30
33
38
31
	
14
89
67
61
64
	
	
50
40
45
43
	
	
. ,.
39
45
34
38
	
	
64
50
50
73
M.    ...
	
	
70
70
79
77
... .
	
33
43
36
39
	
19
70
64
62
59
30
	
	
—
72
67
76
70
"
64
16
13
26
15
19
81
	
	
	
——
16
15
21
—
	
	
	
	
—
15
51
62
57
44
22
22
35
24
	
...
54
52
48
55
	
24
43
46
46
53
.._
21
10
23
17
	
.
	
.
45
54
50
71
13
45
44
32
	
	
	
	
—
14
33
18
26
27
37
28
32
33
25
	
	
	
—
..
26
40
17
33
..
26
36
52
37
	
	
	
19
38
32
41
	
28
72
86
97
82
	
20
23
25
23
14
	
23
29
27
18
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
13
77
80
88
93
30
	
58
73
59
57
33
39
34
30
15
16
22
16
103
116
110
92
45
43
50
33
26
139
127
135
138
42
52
63
65
.. .
35
55
33
35
14
85
76
83
93
55
46
42
48
13
64
63
60
40
14
83
81
78
80
	
	
	
	
—
19
11
20
22
	
...
—
	
57
61
63
65
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
 D 134
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total       Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
3rade
II
III
District No. 36 (Surrey)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Surrey Centre  — 	
H. T. Thrift - _	
Tynehead .
Georges Vanier...
William Watson-
White Rock	
K. B. Woodward	
K. B. Woodward Annex.—
Totals, District No. 36-
Secondary—
Delta	
North Delta	
Junior Secondary-
Delta	
District No. 37 (Delta)
Delview	
Tsawwassen-
Elementary—■
Annieville	
Beach Grove	
Boundary Bay—
Boundary Beach-
Chalmers 	
Cliff Drive	
Delta Manor	
Devon Gardens—
East Delta	
English Bluff	
Gibson	
Gray —
Hawthorne	
Heath _	
Hellings	
Kennedy..	
Ladner—	
Pebble Hill	
Richardson	
South Park	
Sunbury	
Sunshine Hilis-
Totals, District No. 37..
District No. 38 (Richmond)
Senior Secondary-
Richmond 	
Steveston. - 	
Junior Secondary—■
Hugh Boyd	
J. N. Burnett	
Cambie—	
Hugh McRoberts...
Robert C. Palmer..
Elementary—■
Blundell	
William Bridge..
Bridgeport-
Samuel Brighouse..
Lord Byng 	
William Cook	
Crestwood	
General Currie	
Howard De Beck-
Alfred B. Dixon	
Harry Eburne	
John T. Errington..
W. D. Ferris	
187
369
177
253
199
276
676
231
96
187
92
129
95
127
344
131
91
182
85
124
104
149
332
100
9,642
15,493
1,095
588
1,265
640
556
279
852
433
864
435
595
301
269
155
251
145
43
21
416
203
746
375
613
327
511
268
39
20
299
157
317
169
317
163
487
245
641
338
605
307
123
63
660
340
89
38
621
335
567
273
74
38
340
178
3,255
6,834
1,110
567
1,178
583
940
467
778
415
650
340
1,038
552
842
417
417
223
400
204
355
182
677
347
555
296
484
262
41
22
51
21
46
25
529
280
102
63
432
222
146
67
507
625
277
419
429
294
114
106
22
213
371
286
243
19
142
148
154
242
303
298
60
320
51
286
294
36
162
6,421
543
595
473
363
310
486
425
194
196
173
330
259
222
19
30
21
249
39
210
79
61
58
59
21
32
28
26
25
34
49
54
23
35
20
19
23
36
67
52
21
35
25
37
22
37
80
51
1,048 I 2,163 I 2,334 I 2,559
79
80
35
35
29
33
13
11
56
69
91
108
83
89
70
65
10
10
44
33
41
27
55
47
77
72
99
102
78
94
38
43
84
102
20
25
85
115
70
73
12
9
37
45
70
36
31
13
56
118
97
87
12
40
33
48
84
112
91
42
102
28
84
73
12
47
| 1,206 | 1,287 | 1,316
71
24
77
52
51
21
23
60
22
29
38
23
78
20
37
32
11
85
26
118
75
59
22
~63
17
40
41
 STATISTICAL TABLES
D 135
NET ENROLMENT-
-Continued
Pri-
Grade
Inter-
Occupational
Grade
Special
1
IV   1     V
1
VI
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
1
XI    1   XII
1
26
41
26
29
1
1
13
43
26
39
34
59
23
38
21
14
	
	
	
— 1  -
23
37
24
37
36
29
30
26
	
	
	
43
48
39
39
	
	
— 1 —
13
102
111
121
125
8
	
	
15
	
	
	
 1
276 | 2,417 | 2,535 | 2,516
2,426
254 |       88 |       94 |       71
2,358
2,455
2,201
2,011 | 1,836
7
5
262
418
403
	
	
6
6
6
193
149
214
387
304
9
280
267
7
3
351
300
191
—
	
	
2
6
6
306
294
250
	
2
93
83
85
93
10
AAA
47
22
6
70
44
37
38
46
34
53
	
	
	
55
55
55
116
110
117
86
95
87
90
72
71
7
38
71
85
62
	
	
	
42
52
50
58
54
55
49
	
_
.      50
86
46
63
34
64
37
41
	
	
5
88
72
90
67
6
	
_
	
	
	
8
98
74
90
72
	
	
	
	
	
	
4
103
16
92
86
82
5
	
81
82
93
81
.
	
6
78
88
84
95
10
8
9
14 |   —
	
54
57
53
47
  1   	
	
	
	
	
35 |  1,285 |  1,166
1,217
1,076
35 |       24 |       22 |       17
1,130
1,010
917
805 |     707
50
601
459
	
	
	
617
561
18
14
323
311
274
5
13
291
251
218
13
5
212
208
212
_
18
14
382
334
290
	
17
10
260
280
275
56
96
112
120
83
71
	
22
64
91
88
12
■
113
80
96
94
104
103
83
92
	
	
	
	
	
	
6
61
88
74
82
5
.
18
23
	
	
14
76
19
66
35
81
14
91
63
88
78
81
16
10
	
	
	
1
 D 136
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
District No. 38 (Richmond)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
433
86
731
420
108
48
345
225
543
75
91
201
85
516
235
174
297
110
310
40
535
489
235
40
366
200
50
22
169
102
294
35
45
116
49
273
128
86
150
56
159
17
266
260
198
46
365
220
58
26
176
123
249
40
46
85
36
243
107
88
147
54
151
23
269
229
22
30
85
26
21
13
43
45
77
29
19
17
16
67
37
20
45
25
25
10
52
78
29
31
92
40
11
11
55
45
73
19
9
32
22
80
38
23
47
27
39
9
64
59
57
B. W. Garratt	
25
122
43
9
Austin Harris	
9
52
49
Walter Lee	
Charles E. London
83
27
18
Donald E. McKay 	
23
17
Mitchell .„
81
Sea Island	
Sidaway - -  - —	
35
26
39
Tait	
39
41
F. A. Tomsett
James Whiteside....	
11
58
78
Totals, District No. 38.	
16,868
8,673
8,195
1,278
1,388
1,499
District No. 39 (Vancouver)
Secondary—■
1,341
1,545
1,617
1,810
1,835
1,950
510
1,637
1,016
2,391
1,241
1,083
2,063
1,850
329
1,753
2,206
2,367
104
455
567
724
552
231
422
759
561
391
421
448
228
556
373
693
157
674
143
782
373
713
768
792
922
890
979
260
872
516
1,245
607
537
1,041
920
171
891
1,060
1,321
40
225
312
384
271
118
224
383
273
193
233
210
108
283
203
356
65
336
69
402
174
628
777
825
888
945
971
250
765
500
1,146
634
546
1,022
930
158
862
1,146
1,046
64
230
255
340
281
113
198
376
288
198
188
238
120
273
170
337
92
338
74
380
199
51
50
68
51
51
49
76
60
45
47
21
46
84
76
56
39
41
27
71
26
56
64
80
51
57
41
79
58
38
53
29
65
72
33
62
45
39
38
72
47
48
73
86
53
52
51
88
61
41
55
26
54
61
23
69
25
64
31
87
37
Gladstone
Kitsilano	
Magee	
Windermere —	
Elementary-Senior Secondary—
Templeton	
	
Elementary—■
61
60
Sir Matthew Begbie	
62
49
56
Graham Bruce 	
57
92
73
36
Edith Cavell    -	
49
37
63
George T. Cunningham -	
64
23
65
42
65
29
85
61
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 137
Pri-
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
Special
rv
V
1
VI
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
„
X
XI
XII
3
73
83
84
77
cv
5
102
113
93
124
■
52
15
15
65
16
105
18
89
18
	
53
39
53
50
	
	
52
84
34
62
95
69
	
	
15
29
30
19
26
11
40
34
	
72
30
26
44
19
56
10
66
63
71
23
23
40
42
61
73
68
29
29
48
53
120
73
77
43
27
34
54
114
65
	
	
41
1,517
1,485 | 1,554
1,499
71
71 |  56
50
1,468
1,384
1,269
1,218
1,020
24
26
269
283
272
221
246
284
320
332
313
296
3
5
7
305
335
290
353
319
43
27
348
379
331
375
307
22
17
33
297
358
348
383
377
8
35
435
401
392
329
350
96
95
115
109
95
40
20
249
291
335
324
378
200
188
204
189
235
117
11
9
533
415
510
413
383
26
252
232
273
249
209
197
207
227
220
232
22
18
420
421
444
377
361
44
55
26
398
365
377
316
269
93
83
46
59
48
25
16
370
376
357
303
306
68
45
90
41
20
422
422
403
342
353
	
15
22
139
27
25
107
63
44
440
17
405
14
464
9
372
308
58
64
60
57
20
79
69
70
59
23
89
98
102
139
80
90
85
81
12
. ..
15
49
61
57
57
16
104
66
92
85
83
78
100
80
29
	
	
	
57
33
52
43
34
12
„
10
37
71
51
97
64
81
55
86
	
■	
	
63
79
63
70
...._-
1
22
22   26
27
120
5
6
103
109
106
108
10
90
94
98
107
76
18
117
114
119
117
	
53
44
56
49
	
	
 D 138 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
District No. 39 (Vancouver)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
522
43
547
597
16
541
786
572
178
372
447
796
166
561
742
500
155
591
443
69
526
601
224
515
442
342
689
833
413
202
787
218
403
934
282
511
551
795
215
359
456
642
752
192
629
286
407
587
105
459
618
675
861
254
218
684
723
605
354
446
194
1,019
695
189
462
462
301
261
24
285
327
14
271
410
303
92
194
226
380
89
281
385
236
94
320
223
30
290
307
122
274
236
183
343
416
217
95
408
117
215
474
152
283
284
414
124
175
236
309
370
90
321
153
217
299
55
232
286
380
463
122
116
356
389
325
183
222
97
522
349
98
242
240
149
261
19
262
270
2
270
376
269
86
178
221
416
77
280
357
264
61
271
220
39
236
294
102
241
206
159
346
417
196
107
379
101
188
460
130
228
267
381
91
184
220
333
382
102
308
133
190
288
50
227
332
295
398
132
102
328
334
280
171
224
97
497
346
91
220
222
152
69
64
70
56
56
52
33
48
29
55
34
47
77
32
40
52
40
50
32
48
58
44
45
71
79
25
48
75
51
36
96
58
62
58
71
26
30
75
63
41
56
60
51
39
20
25
59
85
74
51
67
50
70
53
46
57
103
37
42
63
52
80
69
25
73
90
65
55
68
33
37
47
63
43
50
66
35
47
50
45
23
67
33
47
61
62
30
61
64
39
42
83
44
45
110
50
64
70
78
36
48
88
69
50
58
57
34
53
27
37
101
58
69
55
42
52
91
53
40
65
98
44
47
53
63
62
59
9
61
68
61
59
61
50
51
47
83
46
47
80
54
38
80
31
22
65
31
74
57
43
27
94
97
28
37
101
30
41
110
58
63
72
100
42
60
61
95
50
82
67
53
55
13
37
109
74
84
62
61
74
101
67
37
72
'112
66
47
54
53
69
62
9
71
69
81
64
73
31
39
49
88
43
76
104
34
30
59
61
24
47
31
55
59
51
31
71
109
39
48
82
44
42
89
64
52
62
91
~49
59
67
87
51
78
66
46
49
34
21
90
89
63
41
48
57
82
85
43
71
121
65
41
62
78
76
Sir Wilfred Grenfell	
Annie B. Jamieson	
Dr. A. R. Lord  	
Dr. H. N. MacCorkindale  .	
Dr. R. E. McKechnie	
Moberly Annex	
Sir William Osier  .	
Queen Mary	
Quilchena	
Renfrew	
Lord Selkirk	
South Hill .       	
Southlands	
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 139
Pri-
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
Special
IV
j V  | VI
VII
1
Special
1  1  2
1
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
58
71
66
68
70
70
69
69
59
85
77
79
	
68
82
67
61
16
—
—
15
129
135
127
131
15
_
12
63
76
90
77
31
10
52
41
39
42
13
	
64
119
60
122
72
142
71
124
8
	
83
89
76
79
119
81
s 81
112
77
98
95
111
—
83
100
74
93
	
69
57
59
81.
13
76
67
71
70
	
19
97
108
116
134
66
69
78
67
16
73
67
71
15
42
81
110
68
27
84
57
96
103
70
127
60
110
153
71
106
50
105
118
73
129
—
17
32
	
26
49
104
54
147
29
152
33
126
48
	
15
37
11
44
78
63
61
54
80
54
70
44
	
14
114
102
113
97
15
_
108
107
5
48
57
49
74
45
53
44
75
15
—
11
63
95
90
116
83
123
78
104
26
	
79
36
93
93
90
13
53
89
52
85
51
86
54
97
34
	
11
57
24
24
38
37
159
56
72
60
71
15
95
121
138
10
110
152
132
156
11
	
	
45
	
24
104
90
105
101
27
10
78
89
78
81
108
94
81
83
24
9
39
92
54
97
43
95
43
91
11
126
99
119
114
119
127
119
123
91
20
12
22
52
58
42
46
10
.
90
62
64
14
	
 D 140
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total   J   Boys      Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
II    I    III
I	
District No. 39 (Vancouver)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Trafalgar-
Trafalgar Annex-
University Hill-
Sir William Van Horne..
Waverley 	
Waverley Annex	
Dr. George M. Weir-
General Wolfe	
Totals, District No. 39	
District No. 40 (New Westminster)
Secondary—New Westminster	
Elementary—■
Connaught Heights... —	
F. W. Howay .
Hume Park Annex-
Lord Kelvin _.	
Sir Richard McBride-
Queen Elizabeth	
John Robson	
Herbert Spencer	
Lord Tweedsmuir	
Totals, District No. 40-
District No. 41 (Burnaby)
Senior Secondary—Burnaby South	
Secondary-
Alpha-
Burnaby Central—
Burnaby North	
Cariboo Hill	
Junior Secondary—
Burnaby Heights-
Kensington	
McPherson Park...
Moscrop.-
Royal Oak-
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Edmonds-
Elementary—■
Armstrong 	
Aubrey _ _	
Brantford  —  	
Brentwood Park-
Buckingham 	
Cameron Road	
Capitol Hill —	
Cascade HeightS-
Chaffey-Burke—
Clinton..	
Confederation Park-
Douglas Road	
Duthie-Union	
Gilmore Avenue	
Gilpin—	
Glenwood	
Inman 	
Kitchener	
Lakeview —
Lochdale	
Lyndhurst	
Marlborough 	
May wood	
Morley Street-	
Nelson 	
Parkcrest	
Riverside	
541
101
401
718
449
138
462
593
2,869
191
246
78
535
606
375
492
598
565
249
54
211
365
210
60
239
327
292
47
190
353
239
78
223
266
32
24
56
84
35
29
52
64
53
24
63
74
42
29
44
57
46
28
41
70
37
25
47
70
46
25
61
87
52
29
54
66
73,322 | 37,477 | 35,845
4,747 | 5,049 | 5,341 | 5,402
1,472
92
117
41
261
338
201
250
302
300
1,397
99
129
37
274
268
174
242
296
265
25
24
60
56
55
71
53
50
20
22
25
23
25
24
71
75
54
61
51
49
63
47
57
68
73
67
6,555
3,374 |
1,270
637
1,094
484
1,537
857
1,197
644
1,052
502
628
323
1,213
594
1,106
547
963
486
601
321
1,242
619
629
322
521
278
227
108
588
293
250
136
378
182
699
375
524
276
545
280
603
313
294
144
416
228
126
62
658
354
333
182
211
106
549
296
672
326
370
205
499
254
198
95
567
290
528
269
501
258
498
255
451
233
151
76
3,181
633
610
680
553
550
305
619
559
477
280
623
307
243
119
295
114
196
324
248
265
290
150
188
64
304
151
105
253
346
165
245
103
277
259
243
243
218
75
54
48
78
54
25
71
55
58
51
49
42
42
50
28
29
57
79
49
54
49
65
61
39
—
	
25
31
61
66
54
62
20
26
72
68
27
24
41
47
64
98
50
56
52
63
60
76
36
40
51
57
73
79
31
35
26
20
69
59
70
100
39
36
54
60
22
23
58
63
64
85
50
60
50
63
48
50
18
22
22
26
29
70
61
37
70
85
84
394 |  439 |  436 |  484
42
76
70
23
61
26
61
80
59
73
82
39
51
40
80
55
27
75
79
41
64
36
58
84
52
62
49
24
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 141
Pri-
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
Special
TV
1  V  I VI
I     1
VII
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
64
72
100
113
15
-
48
44
45
43
	
93
89
107
97
17
_
	
47
26
69
86
81
	
	
	
	
	
	
,,.
50
63
65
87
9
77
73
85
73
19
	
	
	
	
657
5,433
5,696 | 5,816
5,773
1,212 |  446 |  249
238
5,625
5,590
5,729
5,247
5,072
25
26
35
562
564
579
553
525
8
28
22
24
20
	
23
34
36
42
13
	
	
	
	
	
	
74
55
67
63
14
65
94
93
94
14
8
45
47
39
44
9
53
52
66
61
	
70
82
87
96
	
60
70
72
75
14
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
39
418
456 |  484
495
41 |   25
26 |  35
562
564
579
553
525
675
595
219
248
215
203
209
	
	
	
	
 „
	
	
	
224
563
750
	
-
_
	
-
37
48
	
630
482
	
	
	
	
261
273
226
174
118
215
220
193
	
—
404
447
362
	
.
	
„
399
374
333
	
	
	
43
57
	
372
180
360
174
231
147
	
	
30
41
36
63
	
	
354
346
274
	
83
75
87
127
60
73
70
84
	
32
67
14
70
34
101
95
	
	
	
35
34
46
33
36
46
41
35
11
89
93
87
99
23
16
73
67
70
67
8
_ —.
73
87
71
75
	
	
63
75
98
92
8
	
	
33
38
34
32
43
50
48
74
42
44
10
76
88
99
103
	
43
52
36
53
25
22
31
31
47
84
74
84
82
91
81
90
	
15
42
46
58
34
10
55
69
72
71
32
30
30
25
75
82
85
89
8
—
52
60
60
64
62
72
56
82
	
	
	
83
74
89
77
62
61
73
69
	
13
12
23
21
18
	
	
	
	
	
 D 142
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
District No. 41 (Burnaby)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Riverway West- -	
216
363
182
466
449
681
519
291
324
474
509
500
104
207
89
252
225
357
266
162
161
240
261
248
112
156
93
214
224
324
253
129
163
234
248
252
39
37
55
62
62
47
60
61
65
22
38
28
56
51
75
62
29
28
59
70
58
27
44
29
57
61
91
65
28
35
59
71
67
25
45
21
62
72
92
68
41
26
61
46
75
Stride             	
Suncrest   —	
Twelfth Avenue — —	
Westridge - - -	
Totals, District No. 41	
28,863
14,782
14,081
1,675
1,861
2,103
2,203
District No. 42 (Maple Ridge)
Secondary—
692
1,523
418
216
101
52
265
260
353
243
301
49
491
284
76
152
503
413
147
100
90
216
203
288
357
789
205
101
47
25
137
129
192
116
142
33
240
136
34
78
252
205
76
53
51
117
107
156
335
734
213
115
54
27
128
131
161
127
159
16
251
148
42
74
251
208
71
47
39
99
96
132
58
59
56
58
50
61
34
15
12
28
31
39
31
28
65
24
15
18
54
55
16
17
14
20
17
32
19
25
27
33
32
33
31
52
26
11
20
69
47
13
13
11
32
26
22
13
15
30
36
39
38
42
57
44
26
59
51
32
9
18
28
21
30
Elementary—■
Meadowland - -	
Pitt Meadows - -
Thornhill              	
Totals, District No. 42-. —- -
7,436
3,778
3,658
376
531
542
588
District No. 43 (Coquitlam)
2,550
633
977
792
762
595
604
813
557
700
457
718
63
407
472
333
471
313
336
1,330
341
477
413
390
303
315
420
300
307
242
357
26
207
227
171
255
170
170
1,220
292
500
379
372
292
289
393
257
393
215
361
37
200
245
162
216
143
166
73
88
50
41
44
57
37
37
54
89
7
42
51
41
49
35
33
58
83
11
49
46
30
54
43
53
67
100
11
57
60
46
51
48
39
Secondary—
Junior Secondary—
Dr. Charles Best       -	
Mary Hill           	
Elementary—-
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 143
Inter-
Occupational
Grade
Pri-
Special
IV
V
1
VI
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
24
38
29
51
45
40
43
57
12
_.
27
24
33
20
:.
	
	
56
58
75
65
	
63
76
71
	
_
	
	
86
92
88
95
	
66
64
54
63
15
	
29
33
45
39
	
	
	
-	
15
46
25
40
49
.
	
	
	
54
40
57
36
65
93
58
88
	
	
15
54
57
67
84
23
	
	
	
95
2,095
2,253 | 2V409
2,427
107
43 |  94 |  48
2,404
2,442
2,205
2,245
2,154
226
173
156
81
56
11
45
35
27
203
204
284
384
330
124
114
95
47
38
	
	
	
	
	
116
100
	
	
12
13
16
13
	
	
	
	
	
	
24
35
29
38
32
41
22
46
15
	
	
	
44
44
39
57
_
29
36
37
39
	
33
34
42
35
	
22
27
  _
27
54
56
62
60
	
	
46
47
56
41
	
25
16
26
21
84
83
72
82
	
 _
49
53
51
46
	
18
21
24
23
	
17
16
14
14
	
18
10
5
14
	
30
37
36
33
	
	
29
52
25
54
19
43
32
55
	
	
49
599
612 |  615
633
53
45 |  35
27
669
591
535
512
424
1,177
1,373
2
9
6
205
177
172
62
14
4
6
74
263
119
288
125
217
358
301
	
	
	
313
244
205
	
	
	
9
9
11
183
199
184
	
	
15
11
8
232
194
144
15
19
272
264
243
. .
26
15
8
210
158
140
_
	
14
25
15
247
203
196
53
53
46
39
14
16
74
82
83
83
20
..
13
11
10
	
13
38
44
41
58
15
59
69
62
71
13
51
36
36
45
4
11
54
31
63
46
62
38
64
35
6
	
	
49
49
36
40
	
 D 144 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Total
1
1   Boys
Girls
I
II
III
District No. 43 (Coquitlam)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
598
363
118
258
436
582
515
574
56
587
569
642
194
512
607
359
589
502
438
591
585
131
675
529
483
639
454
79
32
643
154
327
197
72
140
231
285
261
302
30
280
298
322
94
259
326
184
280
264
233
315
312
77
371
274
259
334
233
42
20
333
76
271
166
46
118
205
297
254
272
26
307
271
320
100
253
281
175
309
238
205
276
273
54
304
255
224
305
221
37
12
310
78
73
33
25
48
50
69
43
52
60
69
96
45
59
55
46
42
55
67
59
61
66
59
81
67
70
28
77
33
41
31
47
59
62
55
12
64
62
89
25
61
73
51
56
59
44
70
59
7
62
64
58
85
52
64
20
84
42
26
32
52
82
55
65
8
80
73
83
27
65
97
36
72
70
49
70
75
16
89
70
79
55
61
74
25
77
46
26
22
53
76
70
90
11
80
84
96
34
67
83
51
83
78
51
81
75
13
97
68
62
65
67
84
40
Glen   	
Leigh    	
Mary Hill                	
Miller Park 	
Montgomery	
Pleasantside - - - - -	
Porter Street... „  	
Totals, District No. 43    	
26,047
13,452
12,595
1,905
1,943
2,139
2,309
District No. 44 (North Vancouver)
Secondary—
1,354
956
1,344
1,318
799
992
875
917
705
362
213
454
566
340
641
404
485
612
337
679
387
464
224
365
335
56
238
308
129
417
707
479
721
678
407
496
445
542
354
207
104
225
280
172
323
188
235
308
177
330
207
221
127
191
165
26
116
145
68
214
647
477
623
640
392
496
430
375
351
155
109
229
286
168
318
216
250
304
160
349
180
243
97
174
170
30
122
163
61
203
50
40
28
62
37
60
42
41
71
51
89
47
60
26
52
6
47
23
48
38
50
66
41
44
72
54
66
59
70
70
37
107
44
56
31
51
27
9
38
41
42
65
68
49
38
60
44
68
58
61
81
52
91
49
60
33
44
58
31
58
49
53
Carson Graham - 	
Windsor      	
Junior Secondary—
Elementary—
Blueridge -	
Carisbrooke     	
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Cdntinued
D 145
Pri-
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
Special
IV
1 V
1
!
VI
1
VII
1  1  2
1
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
78
72
71
66
15
44
54
43
53
—
	
—
-  -
	
	
28
30
18
35
14
60
42
72
60
-
.
76
87
71
62
	
7
82
66
64
66
	
	
15
70
6
93
77
8
79
77
11
72
73
59
	
	
	
14
68
77
36
61
78
22
59
65
23
63
58
27
16
	
	
68
73
55
66
12
,.
	
15
68
57
65
75
15
9
48
86
63
32
82
61
39
81
61
38
69
68
14
	
—
"
52
63
56
68
	
	
81
84
79
59
	
83
86
80
68
.;,
	
24
13
16
42
.
	
104
61
75
53
84
75
89
62
14
10
—
	
	
11
60
60
50
44
	
	
99
64
95
56
87
47
72
40
-	
	
- -
	
25
54
	
	
14
18
.
90
78
96
87
	
	
20
21
165
2,211
2,118
2,031
2,004
248 |   95 |   83 |   54
1,999
1,846
1,626
1,597
1,674
	
	
	
217
141
286
208
276
325
193
112
271
205
222
318
228
151
92
273
181
221
232
361
280
643
251
115
154
355
272
609
237
90
119
	
	
85
89
102
208
273
225
241
208
191
61
39
86
100
57
99
48
44
79
91
53
122
69
93
96
46
121
86
85
49
105
	
	
66
50
62
67
	
	
62
70
82
91
83
99
86
130
	
	
12
46
40
53
46
	
9
108
69
101
93
12
54
58
64
71
	
	
	
	
70
75
77
62
4
33
26
40
35
	
56
45
53
64
	
..
6
64
58
64
52
	
	
	
	
28
37
37
44
50
36
40
35
	
	
	
	
	
60
72
55
62
	
	
 D 146
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total       Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
II
III
50
49
37
65
45
68
39
41
50
109
92
77
47
49
46
26
59
101
53
27
60
68
69
46
43
49
53
49
59
55
84
79
25
17
22
25
40
38
	
District No. 44 (North Vancouver)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Norgate - — _	
North Star   _  	
Plymouth   	
Prince Charles _	
Queen Mary _ 	
Queensbury   - 	
Ridgeway _ 	
Ridge way Annex     	
Ross Road  	
Seymour Heights  	
Sherwood Park   —	
Upper Lynn—   _
Westover - 	
Westview - _ — 	
Youth Resources Centre-
Totals, District No. 44-
District No. 45 (West Vancouver)
Secondary—■
Hillside	
Sentinel	
West Vancouver-
Elementary—
Caulfeild	
Cedardale	
Chartwell- _
Cypress Park	
Eagle Harbour	
Gleneagles—	
Glenmore	
Hollyburn	
Irwin Park-	
Pauline Johnson-
Ridgeview	
West Bay	
Westcot	
Totals, District No. 45-
District No. 46 (Sechelt)
Secondary—■
Elphinstone _ -	
Pender Harbour. 	
Elementary—■
Bowen Island	
Davis Bay _	
Egmont— 	
Gibsons   	
Half moon Bay —	
Langdale...	
Madeira Park   	
Roberts Creek	
Sechelt - — —	
West Sechelt	
Totals, District No. 46	
District No. 47 (Powell River)
Secondary—Max Cameron	
Junior Secondary—Brooks	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Texada	
Elementary—
Cranberry Lake _. 	
J. P. Dallos  	
Edgehill 	
False Bay   _	
Gillies B ay    	
285
508
177
79
602
377
558
80
479
475
394
518
175
308
14
139
275
84
46
309
208
283
39
256
253
205
270
105
168
14
146
233
93
33
293
169
275
41
223
222
189
248
70
140
2,305
11,512
1,059
545
973
506
1,599
811
546
260
260
150
280
162
164
95
152
68
471
257
479
245
443
218
462
236
392
192
438
224
469
234
495
259
10,793
1,621 | 1,753 | 1,800
514
467
788
286
110
118
69
84
214
234
225
226
200
214
235
236
49
27
52
45
55
48
26
43
28
54
—
43
47
20
30
30
32
29
38
27
19
49
61
46
47
39
55
52
51
37
38
33
46
50
36
45
53
8,682 | 4,462 | 4,220
427 [  500 |  553
764
119
11
56
8
553
17
176
202
140
370
52
423
65
9
31
4
288
6
98
93
65
194
24
341
54
2
25
4
265
11
78
109
75
176
28
77
23
43
_
4
17
7
3
56
53
9
6
18
24
22
21
16
16
28
31
11
10
468
1,300 1
843
401
858
471
240
126
278
143
497
266
234
118
14
10
69
33
1,168
143 |  184
168
442
387
114
135
231
116
4
36
21
46
25
23
—
	
38
25
57
59
20
34
4
3
21
25
62
29
37
33
35
62
61
55
55
51
53
55
64
652
3
7
2
63
2
31
30
22
36
13
209
26
41
54
23
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 147
Pri-
Grade
Inter-
Occupational
Grade
Special
TV
V
1
VI
1
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
1 IX
X
XI
XII
51
34
29
35
63
80
88
76
23
47
.
43
36
	
11
66
46
68
44
75
72
78
73
26
	
	
	
	
78
98
110
86
	
	
	
62
73
69
67
11
50
62
104
121
	
_	
52
62
65
54
	
	
53
71
79
71
26
	
17
38
27
29
	
7
29
56
53
39
21
14
	
	
	
	
88
1,823
1,862
2,024
1,901
173
85 |  89 |  102
1,934
1,787
1,777
1,804
1,682
208
205
195
234
217
224
230
186
169
164
	
	
15
14
35
16
304
310
300
326
279
60
67
115
103
	
34
39
53
55
	
	
	
38
38
44
61
	
	
	
37
37
34
	
	
	
	
	
.
61
61
66
59
	
	
	
,
67
71
79
63
	
	
	
	
	
56
55
65
48
15
 „
	
6
59
75
58
58
	
	
47
61
66
66
	
	
	
	
10
58
67
55
73
	
	
	
	
63
55
88
94
	
	
	
	
67
71
70
71
	
16
684
694
759
751
30
14 |  35 |  16
736
745
681
729
660
18
17
170
139
161
131
128
	
3
25
2
1
	
30
27
28
17
17
	
1
	
	
	
7
70
68
95
64
	
	
	
	
23
24
24
18
23
30
33
34
	
	
20
28
18
20
	
	
	
48
58
67
59
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
18
	
	
7
233
197
234
210
  1   18 I   17 | 	
200
166
189
148
145
238
328
277
15
10
6
323
401
103
	
33
36
33
30
29
30
23
	
	
41
32
44
36
14
55
49
75
73
15
	
	
	
	
32
1
31
3
36
3
33
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
-
	
 #
D 148
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total
Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
II
III
District No. 47 (Powell River)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Gordon Park  	
Grief Point 	
Henderson	
J.C.Hill      	
Kelly Creek-
Lund	
Stillwater-	
James Thomson-
Toba	
Totals, District No. 47-
District No. 48 (Howe Sound)
Secondary—
Howe Sound   	
Pemberton	
Elementary—
Blackwater Creek 	
Brackendale—   _
Britannia Beach..
Mamquam	
Signal Hill	
Squamish	
Stawamus	
Woodflbre	
Totals, District No. 48..
District No. 49 (Ocean Falls)
Secondary—
Charleson 	
Sir Alexander Mackenzie _	
Elementary—
Bella Coola. 	
Nusatsum _ 	
Ocean Falls   	
Owikeno   -
Shearwater 	
Totals, District No. 49	
District No. 50 (Queen Charlotte)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—George M. Dawson..
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Agnes L. Mathers — 	
Queen Charlotte _   	
Tasu 	
Elementary—■
Moresby-Sewell - 	
Port Clements  	
Tahayghen  	
Totals, District No. 50 	
District No. 52 (Prince Rupert)
Secondary—Prince Rupert —	
Junior Secondary—Booth Memorial  —
Elementary—
Conrad Street 	
Kanata 	
King Edward-—
Oona River	
Port Edward-
Roosevelt Park-
Seal Cove	
Westview	
Totals, District No. 52..
373
332
245
305
145
36
73
364
13
172
177
121
153
80
25
33
183
9
201
155
124
152
65
11
40
181
4
4,919 | 2,521 | 2,398
694
187
16
235
171
377
305
370
242
44
338
92
9
122
89
206
151
204
122
24
2,641 | 1,357
140
155
179
172
227
23
7
356
95
7
113
82
171
154
166
120
20
1,284
75
83
90
86
107
65
72
89
86
120
15
5
903
452
296
82
274
53
30
98
478
146
42
143
25
16
46
268
150
40
131
28
14
52
210
1,311 |   686 |
625
507
298
915
468
519
286
317
174
472
231
8
7
380
202
614
313
347
169
377
180
4,456
2,328
209
447
233
143
241
1
178
301
178
197
2,128
33
42
27
38
22
35
35
33
34
38
27
5
58
2
53
34
30
37
26
7
35
3
312 |  372
371
13
21
49
22
33
26
	
4
6
33
34
20
22
54
38
23
33
48
46
32
31
10
7
224
| ._..
38
24
27
16
27
7
19
19
28
1
1
77 |
68
33
10
31
6
3
23
61
11
27
4
7
6
73
33
42
38
55
28
86
46
51
346 |
	
	
75
48
26
51
66
74
44
50
70
81
40
57
37
47
|  358
408
43
44
31
50
33
4
56
2
407
6
25
23
45
41
46
36
7
217 [  229
26
14
32
2
1
75
42
9
4
18
83
134 |  128 |  164
73
34
62
2
48
68
49
44
380
School Districts Nos. 51 and 53 were merged to form School District No. 88, January 1, 1968.
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 149
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
1
1
VI
42
68
56
53
36
33
28
28
35
36
41
30
29
8
	
6
3
7
22
25
43
43
51
3
	
2
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
VIII       IX        X
XI        XII
43
57
32
35
4
26
43
1
14 |     402 |     400 |     430 |     413
—
	
~~ 38
28
~36
23
30
18
43
47
47
40
49
47
45
40
52
36
32
21
8
6
6
28
14
54
50
47
28
8 [     233  |     232
227
221
15
23
27
32
2
15
84
16
10
21
11
4
10
58
27
22
33
4
15
20
25
4
3
27
16
26
3
2
86
67
10
8
29
30
6
2
5
3
21
10
77
77
74
57
5
27
5
4
10
16
114 |     148 |     130 |     108
18
18
	
	
	
71
63
65
56
35
34
55
59
42
1
2
_ —
54
55
48
75
74
74
33
39
44
51
60
56
396
387
363
67
43
59
3
53
68
39
31
363
15 |
10
352 |     431 1     364
328 |     277
172
156
43
48
	
	
128
34
112
26
88
30
19 [      16 | 9
215 |     204 |     162
138 |     118
20
	
29
42
32
27
24
23
27
18
20 |
15
15
15
53
71
66
57
10
6
26
19
6
3
—
	
59
47 I       45
42
4
22
1
36
23
15
108 |       85 |       69
22
22
348
348
334
334
70
211
36
236
23
201
281
236
201
 D 150
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total
I
Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
III
District No. 54 (Smithers)
Secondary—
Houston _
Smithers 	
Junior Secondary—Chandler Park. 	
Elementary—■
Lake Kathlyn..
Muheim Memorial-
Quick 	
Silverthorne	
Telkwa  	
Walnut Park _....
Totals, District No. 54	
District No. 55 (Burns Lake)
Secondary—Lakes District	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—■
Babine   _	
Grassy Plains  _ -	
Elementary—
Burns Lake	
Francois Lake —  	
McKenna-Decker Lake-
OotsaLake	
Southbank	
Topley— 	
Totals, District No. 55..
District No. 56 (Vanderhoof)
Secondary—Nechako Valley.	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—■
Fort St. James.. —
Fraser Lake — —
Elementary—•
Braeside— 	
Carman Hill	
Evelyn Dickson..
Endako -	
Fort Fraser	
David Hoy	
Mapes	
Prairiedale	
Sinkut View	
Vanderhoof	
Totals, District No. 56..
District No. 57 (Prince George)
Senior Secondary—Prince George	
Secondary—
McBride..-	
Mackenzie     —
Junior Secondary—■
Blackburn Road	
Connaught 	
Duchess Park    —
Kelly Road	
Lakewood — _ -
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Valemount-	
Winton  	
Elementary—■
Austin Road _	
Bear Lake _	
Beaverley-
Blackburn Road-
Buckhorn —
Carney Hill	
College Heights—
263
372
370
133
560
33
472
218
276
129
179
190
68
308
16
247
104
146
134
193
180
65
252
17
225
114
130
109
50
28
22
7
63
29
85
12
6
58
25
86
697
1,387
407
1
1
219
147
82
207
119
484
257
47
27
142
66
38
21
16
10
141
82
188
65
227
20
76
17
6
59
19
19
21
14
65
86
5
8
23
20
6
5
6
23
26
1,629 |  883
746
695
343
506 |
340
180
282 |
52
25
83
43
88
47
39
16
124
65
304
158
41
25
77
36
82
35
521
280
355
163
224
27
40
41
23
59
146
16
41
47
241
	
44
49
6
10
11
8
30
27
9
8
20
15
70
69
7
10
7
13
10
18
32
56
2,955 | 1,532 | 1,423
1,738
183
265
430
544
1,253
560
877
385
423
671
140
329
446
169
534
202
863
92
127
222
271
627
283
445
214
288
372
66
152
217
80
238
93
875
91
138
208
273
626
277
432
171
135
299
74
177
229
89
296
109
25
—
	
33
36
93
84
18
19
41
58
62
65
22
22
84
100
29
26
30
7
71
29
95
187 |  206 |  187 |  232
19
9
82
7
16
7
6
22
4 |  162 |  184 |  168
42
7
9
31
7
22
76
6
11
11
68
246 |  283 |  290
38
98
28
66
68
27
71
36
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 151
Pri-
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
Special
IV
V
1
VI
VII
Special
1  ,  2
3
VIII
>«
X
XI
XII
64
61
57
48
33
	
104
122
146
	
	
12
6
5
146
142
59
	
	
27
28
14
96
100
9
48
124
4
73
119
12
	
	
	
	
54
55
—
31
25
25
26
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
10
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
10
208
210 |  240
200
12
12 |   6 |   5
210
203
220
170
179
6
6
8
107
85
69
71
55
15
18
21
12
10
10
4
	
16
16
15
30
	
32
26
28
	
	
50
54
70
60
17
	
	
10
7
10
,
	
	
	
	
25
17
23
18
	
	
	
6
7
7
	
	
	
28
11
17
14
	
	
—_
	
150
130 |  163
134
17
6 |   6 |   8
149
121
101
71
55
16
12
125
126
124
163
129
47
46
67
8
63
57
55
	
41
52
39
42
65
79
53
	
13
10
6
	
16
11
9
19
	
	
	
	
10
2
3
11
27
10
19
. .
	
	
61
7
28
6
5
	
	
	
	
8
7
8
23
	
	
16
14
13
	
	
	
—_
12
68
82
88
102
13
	
12
251
286 |  227
272
21
16 |   12 | 	
253
262
232
163
129
805
933
49
32
37
43
22
	
	
	
	
	
87
72
47
48
11
181
138
111
	
198
183
163
	
	
	
465
467
321
	
	
227
173
160
 	
	
	
	
336
293
248
	
	
32
47
40
37
31
42
24
63
	
	
172
43
105
40
	
	
	
	
	
14
84
92
80
106
20
15
26
17
17
	
49
34
37
44
	
- -
	
,	
	
	
67
70
47
67
	
	
	
	
23
27
19
29
..
_
	
	
	
 ,
	
94
66
70
49
	
	
	
32
30
26
23
	
	
	
	
■	
	
~—
 D 152 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Total
1
1   Boys
Girls
I
II
1    III
District No. 57 (Prince George)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
477
7
43
441
187
36
182
345
591
265
429
156
31
474
325
595
68
114
248
129
366
304
623
42
28
53
483
78
14
838
30
12
85
313
411
313
264
226
4
30
222
100
20
93
182
318
149
210
65
14
255
173
311
30
62
117
63
183
168
336
20
18
27
240
45
11
427
18
10
43
160
216
161
126
251
3
13
219
87
16
89
163
273
116
219
91
17
219
152
284
38
52
131
66
183
136
287
22
10
26
243
33
3
411
12
2
42
153
195
152
138
13
39
46
1
7
46
36
4
27
58
91
42
58
23
18
71
35
91
6
33
41
16
50
42
96
11
3
13
61
9
2
102
4
3
18
47
53
44
40
60
5
54
27
11
29
42
82
54
68
13
74
45
103
12
27
45
19
48
41
95
6
2
10
65
15
1
126
2
4
20
49
70
59
50
50
1
5
56
23
8
30
56
99
34
76
16
62
48
84
10
21
37
15
53
62
78
10
7
8
64
13
3
133
7
1
4
55
77
53
54
McBride Centennial	
Peden Hill
Red Rock                   	
Shady Valley                         	
Spruceland - -	
Totals, District No. 57	
18,549
9,503
9,046
77  |   1,730
1,843
1,845
District No. 59 (Peace River South)
Secondary—South Peace   	
Junior Secondary—
742
797
534
510
360
244
434
39
123
84
457
79
129
55
425
40
244
115
91
82
228
469
52
210
380
425
270
265
180
117
209
18
64
42
237
41
61
26
228
24
137
65
48
39
116
224
25
109
362
372
264
245
180
127
225
21
59
42
220
38
68
29
197
16
107
50
43
43
112
245
27
101
1
53
26
51
8
15
9
43
15
26
12
56
11
25
18
10
9
38
54
6
50
31
40
46
5
26
9
69
15
14
13
61
8
42
22
8
10
46
57
15
25
46
36
53
8
20
18
63
8
23
13
47
10
27
15
15
17
40
74
9
50
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Chetwynd -	
Elementary-
Kelly Lake -
Parkhill                       	
James Paul	
Rolla                                   	
Windrem	
Totals, District No. 59       	
6,543
1
3,350
3,193
1
535
562
592
School District No. 58 was merged into School District No. 57, July 1, 1970.
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 153
Pri-
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
XII
Special
IV
1  V  1 VI
1     1
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
49
3
5
86
1
6
85
1
10
101
5
	
63
68
77
77
	
32
4
33
20
5
23
27
4
21
22
	
	
	
—
	
	
19
49
52
38
50
	
	
	
	
80
83
87
69
	
	
	
	
	
13
36
30
29
25
2
.
	
	
	
_
59
60
59
49
	
	
	
	
	
	
20
25
28
31
	
	
—
—
—.
	
13
63
71
56
64
.,
47
44
27
40
	
	
	
	
	
	
102
60
92
63
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
12
33
33
8
9
11
—
	
—
—
	
	
37
32
23
	
	
21
27
14
17
	
	
	
	
	
	
,
57
54
57
47
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
.
42
31
54
32
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
109
98
69
78
	
	
	
	
. .
5
4
6
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
4
6
87
4
11
73
5
5
79
3
—
	
—
—
—
—
	
	
54
	
—
12
2
113
19
4
125
10
~2
114
—
	
—
	
—
■—
—
	
	
125
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
—
6
4
18
6
5
	
—
	
—
	
—
	
	
	
	
7
9
9
	
	
	
	
38
56
28
40
	
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
14
48
62
47
40
	
	
- „
	
	
40
41
39
37
	
	
,
	
—
	
	
	
.	
—
42
44
34
	
—
—
117
1,773
1,737 | 1,604
1,494
194
43 J  105
40
1,574
1,400
1,111
896
966
59
347
336
30
15
6
279
249
218
	
195
200
139
	
-
	
92
88
	
	
	
	
92
85
70
46
37
35
53
60
82
39
38
27
38
	
	
	
	
	
	
.	
24
56
6
23
45
7
19
59
5
20
77
23
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
,
15
8
13
11
	
	
	
.- .
	
	
	
	
	
	
74
76
54
78
	
	
	
.	
	
	
	
	
	
13
6
8
14
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
14
16
20
16
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
17
	
	
.	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
13
67
55
49
66
11
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
11
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
36
32
41
41
...
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
12
23
25
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
 .
15
14
17
12
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
16
51
66
13
53
76
9
8
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
„
79
~~63
	
	
	
	
	
.	
	
	
	
8
5
9
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
.	
.	
2
38
34
	
	
11
	
	
.	
	
	
	
	
39
612
573
587
594
45
30
15
6
566
534
486
393
373
 D 154
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total       Boys      Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
II
III
District No. 60 (Peace River North)
Secondary—North Peace	
Junior Secondary—Bert Bowes	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Clearview	
Hudson Hope-
Mile 18 Beatton River Road-
Prespatou Valley	
Elementary-
Airport —
Ambrose	
Attachie  	
Charlie Lake	
Fort St. John Central-
Grandhaven	
Alwin Holland 	
Montney	
North Pine 	
Robert Ogilvie  _
Osborn	
General George R. Pearkes-
Peejay Camp	
Taylor—   —
Upper Pine 	
Wonowon	
Totals, District No. 60„
District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)
Senior Secondary—Mount Douglas 	
Secondary—■
Esquimalt..
Mount View-
Oak Bay	
Reynolds	
Victoria.,	
Junior Secondary—
Arbutus 	
Cedar Hill-
Central	
Colquitz	
Dean Heights..
Highrock	
Lansdowne	
Oak Bay	
Shoreline 	
S. J. Willis-
Elementary—■
Bank Street-
Beacon Hill..
Blanshard—- _.
Blanshard Annex ..
Braefoot 	
Burnside —
Campus View.-
Cloverdale	
Craigflower	
Doncaster	
Sir James Douglas..
Fairburn	
Glanford _
Gordon Head	
Hampton 	
Hillcrest	
Frank Hobbs	
James Bay	
George Jay-
Margaret Jenkins-
Lake Hill	
Lampson Street-
811
746
259
225
60
155
80
237
14
249
833
204
490
59
27
341
30
235
18
201
97
61
429
374
135
130
30
81
38
134
5
114
440
117
246
28
12
178
18
115
11
103
48
33
5,432
2,819
914
459
770
390
842
451
1,090
546
876
459
1,301
667
679
358
713
330
898
468
958
514
66
41
792
401
891
467
985
484
425
208
955
503
238
112
53
27
500
237
87
35
500
257
330
151
524
264
591
302
489
258
744
363
650
341
611
302
432
206
554
271
385
204
406
210
553
285
208
108
904
487
559
292
603
285
573
280
382
372
124
95
30
74
42
103
9
135
393
87
244
31
15
163
12
120
7
98
49
28
2,613
455
380
391
544
417
634
321
383
430
444
25
391
424
501
217
452
126
26
263
52
243
179
260
289
231
381
309
309
226
283
181
196
268
100
417
267
318
293
35
26
~6
13
11
24
2
27
99
44
86
4
3
71
5
54
2
38
10
16
37
"Aw
22
16
36
2
35
145
19
80
5
6
52
7
50
6
31
10
4
35
541 |
	
28
	
10
60
75
33
~~44
34
36
52
46
62
55
59
64
77
56
64
35
79
36
40
41
56
44
54
25
46
44
52
47
51
78
114
48
59
46
64
 _
61
577
32
16
59
51
54
54
68
72
76
87
78
55
68
44
51
59
41
106
55
61
74
26
9
17
18
39
2
41
111
34
78
14
3
65
~47
1
20
13
 9_
547
34
12
71
"A56
38
75
77
50
102
71
94
47
92
47
44
78
34
117
75
78
85
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 155
Pri-
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
Special
IV
M
VI
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
DC
X
XI
XII
	
	
—
	
'
	
13
18
8
365
Tss
280
250
255
19
21
40
34
29
27
	
30
36
33
20
._
46
29
31
	
10
8
3
7
	
	
3
	
	
..
	
23
18
19
23
	
	
	
15
4
1
	
	
	
16
40
1
34
19
31
3
37
~35
2
36
32
2
39
	
	
	
,	
	
	
	
	
	
30
99
97
119
105
28
	
	
.	
	
.	
	
	
	
	
22
28
26
31
	
	
 .
 .
.	
 .
	
56
73
62
55
	
	
	
	
	
.	
.	
	
	
15
6
28
7
3
55
6
3
43
8
3
27
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
4
49
6
5
3
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
5
2
1
1
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
23
30
32
27
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
7
9
7
14
12
15
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
8
12
6
6
	
	
	
	
 .
	
	
	
56
469
506
482
443
63
13 |  18 |   8
456
401
312
250
255
28
447
439
	
	
	
	
	
	
149
100
336
381
285
361
	
131
508
451
195
158
198
175
150
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
124
632
545
244
217
218
4
16
1
260
246
186
	
	
18
17
13
330
301
219
	
17
17
15
341
345
223
	
	
23
22
21
	
	
..
	
19
14
16
291
293
159
.
	
8
8
8
282
291
294
_
352
381
252
	
	
139
152
134
	
	
19
18
21
22
291
296
288
	
	
	
35
15
78
42
34
33
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
16
69
60
15
81
72
86
12
	
	
	
	
	
4
58
66
11
__
	
5
43
50
48
51
7
	
	
	
	
	
 —
74
62
82
89
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
80
72
89
97
.. .
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
67
48
58
65
15
	
	
	
	
	
.	
„	
	
	
109
99
106
111
	
	
	
	
	
	
-
87
90
97
90
8
	
	
	
	
.	
	
	
	
..
88
82
78
77
	
	
. .
	
.	
48
41
83
82
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
. ...
71
65
94
67
	
	
	
	
	
...
	
	
	
	
55
40
43
58
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
71
63
53
81
55
83
61
93
ZZ
	
	
	
,	
	
35
	
	
 .
	
	
	
	
	
	
——
12
115
109
118
110
25
	
.	
	
	
	
	
_
61
76
92
82
11
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
78
85
98
93
	
.	
	
	
.	
	
.	
	
	
99
62
87
105
	
■	
	
	
	
■	
	
 .
 D 156
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total       Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
II
III
District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)-
Elementary—Continued
Macaulay -
-Continued
McKenzie Avenue-
Marigold	
Monterey-
Northridge 	
Oaklands 	
G. R. Pearkes Clinic-
Quadra 	
Richmond 	
Rockheights	
Solarium	
South Park 	
Strawberry Vale..
Tillicum	
Tolmie-	
Uplands	
Victor. —
Victoria West-
View Royal	
Willows—	
Totals, District No. 61-
District No. 62 (Sooke)
Senior Secondary—Belmont-
Secondary—Edward Milne	
Junior Secondary—■
Dunsmuir 	
Elizabeth Fisher..
Girls Club	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—John Stubbs Memorial.
Elementary—
David Cameron	
Colwood — 	
Dogwood  	
Glenlake.
Happy Valley-
Hans Helgesen..
Jordan River	
Langford	
Metchosin	
Millstream	
Port Renfrew..
Sangster	
Saseenos	
Savory	
Sooke 	
Wishart	
Totals, District No. 62..
District No. 63 (Saanich)
Senior Secondary—Claremont-
Junior Secondary—
Mount Newton	
North Saanich 	
Royal Oak	
Elementary—•
Beaver Lake	
Brentwood	
Cordova Bay  —
Deep Cove..
Durrance Road-
Elk Lake	
Keating—	
Lochside 	
McTavish —
620
463
302
619
171
872
49
682
599
508
27
182
272
488
507
299
72
524
413
857
337
245
159
297
92
455
27
360
305
276
14
90
142
254
281
145
40
271
229
432
283
218
143
322
79
417
22
322
294
232
13
92
130
234
226
154
32
253
184
425
,175
16,474
605
317
424
230
411
201
819
445
1?
726
362
117
61
517
258
19
10
403
242
248
129
71
35
20
9
601
297
208
115
237
119
100
44
64
34
393
205
222
118
447
231
345
172
107
59
15,701
I
735
466
482
552
126
311
427
236
93
75
423
220
144
409
240
219
281
61
164
233
109
47 |
42 |
211 j
119 j
76 I
288
194
210
374
12
364
56
259
9
161
119
36
11
304
93
118
56
30
188
104
216
173
48
7,116 | 3,693 | 3,423
326
226
263
271
65
147
194
127
46
33
212
101
68
64
51
51
36
90
68
55
87
55
51
76
51
27
70
23
74
72
72
56
33
48
57
27
59
46
84
72
60
35
67
28
138
81
67
47
36
61
56
39
74
74
84
101
106
166
54
98
27
44
38
28
10
3
85
23
24
23
11
59
26
31
33
19
76
9
55
33
39
15
3
86
26
41
13
9
47
31
38
30
27
427 |  582 |  578
46
50
42
	
39
32
27
36
23
27
17
10
17
29
47
54
25
26
22
19
74
71
39
63
24
111
85
84
65
31
55
40
36
57
59
1,537 | 2,056 I 2,280 | 2,369
85
22
56
43
38
16
3
79
23
39
20
7
38
41
51
39
21
621
44
35
31
9
29
57
23
26
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 157
Primary
Special
Grade
TV   I     V
VI
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
VIII 1    IX    I     X
I 1
XI
XII
13
22
22
14 |
5 I
72 |
99
62
39
87
28
96
89
71
68
37
68
66
41
75
49
119
71
71
38
85
32
105
95
95
57
93
66
36
88
121
86
75
72
52
32
55
52
48
~~74
58
135
47
32
65
73
50
"60
54
120
71
82
37
108
124
84
80
56
70
41
68
73
53
70
73
142
208 | 2,524 | 2,447 | 2,639 | 2,754
91
48
33
15
2
83
32
41
25
12
59
34
34
28
23
—
	
76
64
25
52
76
57
59
33
43
15
2
2
82
99
23
45
33
31
19
11
7
44
73
24
35
36
44
33
65
17
....
52
62
53
34
" 5
87
36
28
7
73
31
47
52
57
660
643
567
15
—
	
34
30
31
32
26
34
62
73
68
33
41
39
16
15
13
55
~~ 55
56
34
36
27
21
19
23
31
33
76
42
13
50
33
14
27
17
34
225
107
115 |
96
6
6
11
12
12
	
	
13
29
2,715 | 2,680 | 2,703
96
144
273
57
93
132
273
26
78
135
237
10
13
570 I  524
450
171
184
149
134
149
181
135
143
184
2,479 | 2,231
226
85
379
55
311 |  434
401
334
 D 158
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total   I   Boys
Girls
Kin-
Grade
garten
I
11
33
26
27
25
25
15
17
	
33
25
107
67
58
III
District No. 63 (Saanich)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Prospect Lake	
Royal Oak—   	
Saanichton  	
Sansbury   	
Sidney-
Totals, District No. 63-
District No. 64 (Gulf Islands)
Secondary—Gulf Islands .	
Elementary—■
Galiano Island   	
Mayne Island	
Pender Island  	
Saltspring .
Saturna Island-
Totals, District No. 64-
District No. 65 (Cowichan)
Senior Secondary—Cowichan..
Junior Secondary—
George Bonner 	
Mount Prevost	
Quamichan 	
Elementary—
Alex Aitken	
Alexander	
Arcadian 	
Bay view	
Bench 	
Cobble Hill No. 1..
Cobble Hill No. 2„
Cowichan Station...
Crofton 	
Drinkwater	
Duncan 	
Gibbins Road.
Glenora	
Charles Hoey V.C..
Khowhemun	
Koksilah	
Koksilah Annex..
Maple Bay	
Mill Bay-
Old Koksilah Annex..
Sahtlam Annex	
Shawnigan Lake	
Somenos	
Tansor...
Westholme Annex..
Totals, District No. 65..
District No. 66 (Lake Cowichan)
Secondary—Lake Cowichan	
Elementary—
J. H. Boyd	
Caycuse..
Stanley Gordon....
A. B. Greenwell—
Honeymoon Bay..
Nitinat	
Yount 	
Totals, District No. 66_
114
229
117
246
595
65
124
64
123
306
49
105
53
123
289
5,591 | 2,893 | 2,698
315
148
49
25
18
9
26
13
389
174
17
9
606
1,697
167
24
9
13
215
814
' 378
782
381
382
190
632
322
570
295
115
63
531
259
15
9
54
24
298
157
42
22
83
48
140
75
205
103
205
99
456
241
103
51
41
29
73
49
202
95
215
123
29
13
189
94
219
113
21
9
49
25
122
68
249
130
197
100
27
15
436
401
192
310
275
52
272
6
30
141
20
35
65
102
106
215
52
12
24
107
92
16
95
106
12
24
54
119
97
12
6,246 I 3,202 | 3,044
314
141
83
41
14
403
198
196
108
80
40
26
12
204
102
871
292
58
27
205
88
40
14
102
826
26
8
6
1
3
4
5
47
55
1
3
26
20
41
42
38
49
45
27
51
27
	
12
9
79
68
54
35
39
43
23
16
17
29
25
33
21
38
10
10
50
50
27
31
16
22
15
8
19
18
31
34
14
24
340 |  448 |  472
34
44
23
101
36
35
9
6
38
53
20
11
7
6
22
24
132
135
28
31
15
41
81
278 |  383 |  385 |  450
12
4
5
60
3
61 |  72 |
84
25
68
36
40
22
30
35
23
11
57
29
20
~12
15
28
29
29
509
28
6
""61
10
3
30
138
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 159
Pri-
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
Special
IV
V
VI
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
	
37
~Ii
31
45
-...
	
	
	
-
-
	
„-
19
18
14
19
_
35
38
36
38
	
...
..
	
70
70
68
74
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
	
31
448
456 |     440
468
17
35 |       21 |       14
504
464
462
401
334
	
	
	
	
5
4
2
65
64
61
58
56
	
6
3
4
51
4
1
5
52
6
2
3
49
7
4
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
.49
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
2
3
1
3
1
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
66
65
61
63
1
5 |         4
2
65
64
61
58
56
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
136
138
108
426
356
42
24
22
182
187
175
.
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
209
184
177
	
	
12
15
7
68
15
68
21
76
26
60
12
	
	
	
	
	
	
 .
	
41
~39
31
36
	
	
	
	
___
18
20
~A5
	
	
	
	
	
	
..
35
36
22
36
..
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
20
28
34
30
.
	
	
	
	
27
103
10
70
99
110
30
	
	
	
	
	
'	
—
24
29
19
34
35
40
	
	
	
	
	
—
21
24
32
27
	
54
9
54
56
55
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
	
11
18
21
18
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
	
39
43
38
35
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
16
21
19
23
	
	
	
	
	
....
	
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
107
487
471 |     501
503
42
42 |       24 |       22
527
509
460
426
356
8
	
	
	
	
	
6
7
3
153
133
111
111
82
9
88
4
94
7
108
113
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—r-
	
14
4
7
2
18
4
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
24
22
32
27
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
8
139
129
169
140
	
6
7
3
153
133
Ill
Ill
82
 D 160
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total
I Boys
527
280
534
271
289
155
49
28
122
65
46
25
291
138
220
109
264
145
77
43
200
100
10
7
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
II
III
District No. 67 (Ladysmith)
Secondary—
Chemainus 	
Ladysmith	
Elementary—
Chemainus Intermediate	
Crozier Road 	
Davis Road  	
Diamond-   	
Ladysmith Intermediate..
Ladysmith Primary	
Mount Brenton —
North Chemainus Primary—
North Oyster 	
Thetis Island   	
Totals, District No. 67..
District No. 68 (Nanaimo)
Senior Secondary—Nanaimo District-	
Junior Secondary—
John B arsby.   —
Cedar 	
Wellington	
Woodlands 	
Elementary—
Bayview 	
Brechin. 	
Chase River	
Christopher Robin-
Cilaire	
Departure Bay.	
Dufferin Crescent-
Extension —
Fairview 	
Forest Park 	
Gabriola -
Georgia Avenue-
Pauline Haarer	
Hammond Bay	
Harewood 	
Mount Benson	
Mountain View.—
North Cedar	
-Park Avenue	
Pleasant Valley.—
Princess Anne	
Princess Royal	
Quarterway—-	
Quennell	
Rock City-.	
Rutherford	
Seaview	
South Wellington-
Waterloo	
Woodbank	
Totals, District No. 68-
Secondary-
District No. 69 (Qualicum)
-Qualicum Beach-
Junior Secondary—Parksville..
Elementary—
Bowser	
Errington	
French Creek-
Hilliers -
Home Lake 	
Little Qualicum Annex..
N anoose	
Parksville	
Qualicum Beach-
Totals, District No. 69-
247
263
134
21
57
21
153
111
119
34
100
3
30
40
32
38
16
9
7
55
21
39
27
1
30
11
17
9
75
35
23
1
2,629 | 1,366 | 1,263
140 |  175
201
1,548
797
860
447
336
160
498
243
924
472
203
94
419
215
245
118
39
19
342
179
316
171
517
260
13
7
616
337
370
197
86
43
132
73
136
75
79
40
274
139
250
133
109
63
222
122
262
139
114
63
233
106
171
94
207
111
308
155
488
256
89
48
237
119
114
63
42
16
162
88
961
5,662
507
249
318
176
46
25
83
43
163
101
28
20
17
7
28
14
94
51
500
261
222
116
751
413
176
255
452
109
204
127
20
163
145
257
6
279
173
43
59
61
39
135
117
46
100
123
51
127
77
96
153
232
41
118
51
26
74
5,299
258
142
21
40
62
8
10
14
43
239
106
36
51
35
36
40
38
64
32
686
33
40
43
50
25
43
30
44
7
71
77
43
37
9
38
43
.
25
	
13
40
23
19
35
25
25
30
19
40
36
34
32
28
24
	
49
11
24
16
4
19
32
57
28
36
39
45
2
90
45
12
51
37
13
24
10
29
29
17
36
48
21
"69
17
19
18
7
23
777
854
2,006 | 1,063 |  943
73
—
	
IS
14
15
16
5
12
8
14
61
49
29
28
|  133
133
42
11
39
50
23
23
 2_
190
38
44
23
53
33
50
4
78
54
16
26
17
60
34
14
32
39
18
40
24
22
57
14
23
18
9
18
858
8
11
21
14
67
29
150
School District No. 67 was divided and merged with School District Nos. 65 and 68, July 1, 1972.
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 161
Pri-
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
Special
IV
V
1
VI
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
15
15
4
125
100
102
81
85
	
	
	
	
117
122
111
92
92
	
43
11
25
64
57
53
	
	
	
	
	
12
20
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
67
69
63
92
	
	
	
.._.-
27
31
34
26
16
	
	
	
	
	
	
. 	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
 .
	
33
33
31
30
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
1
3
2
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
19
207
212 |  207
201
16
15 |  15 |   4
242
222
213
173
177
9
795
744
30
13
297
270
250
16
97
121
102
	
175
170
153
	
	
	
8
10
	
306
307
293
31
23
63
50
59
45
. 	
	
.. ..
	
	
-.
35
33
33
33
	
	
	
	
	
16
23
	
44
38
57
35
	
. ...
35
45
41
53
„ ..
	
12
54
56
78
140
	
	
	
	
80
73
77
70
48
50
59
34
_
	
...
.	
  _
,.,....
	
10
16
12
11
	
	
	
	
	
31
17
	
	
	
	
12
11
13
	
	
	
	
	
59
41
63
51
	
	
	
35
32
35
27
	
  .
	
	
14
20
17
15
	
	
	
	
	
	
 .
22
34
22
23
_
. ...
	
	
	
36
30
37
36
	
.
	
	
20
19
21
	
	
	
...
32
49
	
	
	
	
	
	
33
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
10
29
22
25
26
	
	
	
	
	
13
66
106
111
12
	
	
	
	
	
74
64
52
59
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
.
19
12
16
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
21
27
20
71
	
_
	
	
9
14
14
25
	
	
	
	
	
6
4
12
	
	
	
	
	
	
21
28
17
36
	
	
	
	
51
873
874 |  886
901
35
54 |   23 |   9
875
868
798
795
744
61
69
84
164
129
	
	
	
20
13
7
79
107
92
	
14
8
16
12
16
15
....
	
	
	
	
	
16
36
12
47
	
	
	
	
28
	
 —
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
1
27
	
	
	
 .
12
16
11
19
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
16
60
61
73
63
17
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
. .
23
36
	
37
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
16
137
173 |  156
193
17
20 |  13 |   7
140
176
176
164
129
 D 162
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE
1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
1
III
District No. 70 (Albemi)
1,154
530
597
601
487
38
570
257
619
236
598
74
29
441
160
218
267
380
124
458
328
59
193
248
325
575
267
328
293
241
20
297
133
304
128
299
37
16
231
78
104
125
204
61
226
179
22
99
124
168
579
263
269
308
246
18
273
124"
315
108
299
37
13
210
82
114
142
176
63
232
149
37
94
124
157
42
89
38
128
63
135
39
32
27
27
6
64
32
58
27
73
17
5
54
14
23
30
45
26
35
48
13
18
45
46
44
8
77
25
65
22
80
10
4
42
15
45
48
59
22
37
41
14
16
34
33
Junior Secondary—
A   W, Ne.ill
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Ucluelet	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Eric Godson Memorial-
Elementary—
45
8
69
44
59
31
87
17
5
Gill  - -	
35
28
G. W. Gray	
28
C. T. Hilton	
38
51
19
44
Redford          	
37
14
22
42
Wood  - -
45
Totals, District No. 70	
8,991
4,559
4,432
593
706
741
768
District No. 71 (Courtenay)
1,061
577
533
211
450
283
31
175
242
564
539
685
336
9
156
21
582
290
19
12
499
116
341
560
296
261
99
232
150
19
103
125
272
263
363
169
5
87
13
295
137
4
9
274
70
186
501
281
272
112
218
133
12
72
117
292
276
322
167
4
69
8
287
153
15
3
225
46
155
49
54
53
25
76
38
45
39
40
21
22
71
69
86
32
2
19
5
47
32
12
43
15
41
34
27
32
65
76
89
48
1
20
2
72
37
7
"  53
14
38
Junior Secondary—
Elementary—
38
Beaufort—            —          ...      -           - -    —
~ 33
29
70
Comox Airport	
86
85
43
2
35
4
69
38
59
12
Village Park —
35
Totals, District No. 71. 	
7,732
3,992
3,740
379
557
615
638
District No. 72 (Campbell River)
873
1,226
84
228
15
449
382
444
620
38
110
10
229
184
429
606
46
118
5
220
198
18
50
11
27
50
7
22
60
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
5
20
Elementary—
38
65
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 163
Primary
Special
Grade
IV
I
VI
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
VIII   I    IX X
XI
XII
13
19
I
31
10
15
43
5
68
24
58
45
94
9
4
45
14
34
16
51
18
67
39
18
26
22
56
43
3
68
30
83
24
87
10
2
68
28
31
44
21
98
40
~24
28
46
35
3
60
43
81
39
94
11
6
69
16
33
56
18
88
30
At9
20
54
29
2
75
21
74
48
83
3
65
18
24
35
89
35
36
30
45
22
39
130
134
187
237
292
62
3
202
196
178
40
141
164
131
35
483
23
407
19
37 |  756 |  778 |  775
712
61
--.. |  130 |  134
37
51
46
32
29
33
41
34
40
70
71
66
65
68
67
86
101
85
38
41
56
2
2
27
27
28
4
6
72
77
75
40
39
35
70
63
52
16
15
22
42
44
53
37
44
85
54
86
38
85
31
101
22
49
9
12
13
16
	
	
16
781
192
184
79
175
616 |  471
498
426
518
209
191
66
158
176
158
66
117
75 |  642 |  662 |  664 |  632
36 |   13 |  16 |  16
	
12
7
8
27
23
21
63
71
62
68
68
87
4
21
55
73
21
19
44
50
42
630
429
12
20
624 |  517
498
478
518
309
384
10
15
344
14
 D 164
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total
Boys
Girls
Kinder
Grade
garten
I
II
57
55
59
30
19
40
29
22
24
18
23
23
18
22
21
26
33
33
24
26
31
17
16
30
28
27
26
1
1
1
2
3
38
44
39
III
District No. 72 (Campbell River)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Cedar Annex   	
Central 	
Discovery Passage-
Elm - 	
Evergreen	
Maple 	
Ocean Grove— —.
Pinecrest 	
Quadra 	
Rockland	
Stuart Island	
Whaletown	
Willow Point 	
Totals, District No. 72-
District No. 75 (Mission)
Secondary—Mission-
Junior Secondary—Hatzic.
Elementary—
Bell Road—	
Cedar Valley	
Deroche	
Dewdney	
Ferndale	
Hatzic —
Hatzic Prairie-
Lake Errock—
McConnell Creek	
Manson	
Mission Central	
Nicomen Island—	
Edwin S. Richards	
Silverdale 	
Silverhill 	
West Heights	
Windebank -.
Totals, District No. 75-
District No. 76 (Agassiz)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Agassiz...
Elementary—
Bear Creek — _
Harrison Hot Springs-
Harrison River	
Kent _	
McCaffrey _	
Totals, District No. 76..
District No. 77 (Summerland)
Secondary—Summerland 	
Elementary—MacDonald	
Trout Creek	
Totals, District No. 77	
District No. 80 (Kitimat)
Secondary—Mount Elizabeth  	
Elementary-
Alexander  	
Cormorant ..
Kildala-	
Nechako	
Whitesail	
Totals, District No. 80..
193
99
260
129
225
118
176
90
166
87
264
128
46
21
272
152
176
91
268
133
10
6
10
7
311
156
94
131
107
86
79
136
25
120
85
135
4
3
155
5,634
2,852
1,242
651
268
133
61
25
172
86
28
9
161
78
110
59
142
70
58
32
12
4
44
22
108
47
572
296
38
20
164
77
105
46
25
14
356
180
195
99
2,782
591
135
36
86
19
83
51
72
26
8
22
61
276
18
87
59
11
176
96
3,861 |  1,948 | 1,913
514
13
90
34
352
57
271
6
47
20
194
30
243
7
43
14
158
27
1,060
492
609
543
173
317
277
87
292
266
86
1,325
681
1,182
630
312
167
254
129
849
427
650
330
412
221
3,659
1,904
644
552
145
125
422
320
191
1,755
35
45
110
190
61 |
61
22
	
16
11
15
20
5
1
15
17
9
12
12
9
6
8
4
4
7
5
15
10
52
61
7
4
16
22
11
11
6
8
52
59
17
23
3
2
15
16
4
6
26
56
19
78
23
83 |  101
31
117
102
47
297
45
23
114
90
51
323
51
39
121
74
55
340
30
29
14
22
36
41
18
30
1
1
29
354 |  378 ]  419 |  379
5
27
9
11
11
12
8
4
9
13
61
6
18
9
11
58
22
265 |  285 |  294
2
9
5
78
94
72
23
95
50
32
97
69
55
303
School Districts Nos. 73 and 74 were merged to form School District No. 85, January 1, 1965.
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 165
Pri-
Grade
Inter-
Occupational
Grade
Special
IV
1
1     V
1
I
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
1
1    IX
X
XI
XII
22
30
38
31
42
...
10
23
24
32
28
4
	
	
	
20
27
23
28
	
	
	
23
24
18
18
	
	
	
38
41
24
33
...
	
	
13
14
19
-   .
	
	
	
41
31
37
40
1
	
	
	
	
21
21
23
30
	
	
15
42
33
33
34
	
	
2
2
2
	
	
1
1
2
	
	
13
30
38
44
36
	
	
	
75
440
462
458
465
26
19 |       94 |       42
461
409
366
478
309
17
13
11
226
200
305
249
221
	
148
120
	
8
6
9
6
	
26
13
14
18
25
41
	
	
39
35
30
14
20
9
	
	
	
	
_
16
8
27
13
	
	
5
7
9
15
	
	
	
	
6
15
9
18
8
19
18
	
	
	
	
	
16
65
11
52
10
59
60
36
	
	
	
	
10
21
24
22
31
	
	
	
	
25
13
21
15
	
	
	
	
	
	
65
42
41
39
7
35
37
24
30
	
	
	
	
33
339
303
308
298
36
17 |       13 ]       11
374
320
305
249
221
	
	
28
93
95
88
78
81
51
2
3
1
17
13
20
	
	
9
7
3
	
	
	
63
72
34
	
	
	
	
91
95
85
94
-  1     II   -
95
88
78
81
51
	
6
5
4
113
131
111
119
120
61
99
96
76
	
	
	
	
	
35
21
20
29
	
	
	
-  1       %
120
116
105
— |         6 |         5 |         4
113
131
Ill
119
120
23
20
10
288
255
218
200
168
42
37
44
43
.....
31
35
27
36
	
89
107
107
97
	
74
84
60
76
21
	
6
54
53
40
51
	
	
6
290
316
278
303
21
23
20 |       10
1
288
255
218
200
168
School District No. 79 was merged into School District No. 70, January 1, 1970; School District No. 82 into
School District No. 27; and School District No. 83 into School District No. 60, January 1, 1972.
 D 166
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total       Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
III
District No. 81 (Fort Nelson)
Secondary—Fort Nelson 	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Camp Mile 456-
Elementary—
R. L. Angus 	
Camp Mile 392 	
G. W. Carlson     —
Fireside   	
Totals, District No. 81-
District No. 84 (Vancouver Island West)
Secondary—
Gold River — 	
Captain John Meares... 	
Elementary—
Gold River— 	
Kauwinch   	
Kendrick Arm.
Kyuquot _	
Tahsis River	
Zeballos	
Totals, District No. 84-
District No. 85 (Vancouver Island North)
Secondary—North Island	
Elementary-Junior Secondary-
Alert Bay-
Port Hardy..
San Josef-
Sea View Annex	
Woss Lake. 	
Elementary—
Alert Bay Primary-
Coal Harbour	
Echo Bay..
A. J. Elliott-
Fort Rupert..
Kokish	
Mahatta River-
Port McNeill.—.
Quatsino-
San Josef Annex..
Robert Scott:	
Sea View	
Winter Harbour-
Totals, District No. 85	
District No. 86 (Creston-Kaslo)
Secondary-
Crawford Bay..  	
Prince Charles. _	
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Kaslo	
Elementary—
Canyon	
J. A. Cochran 	
Creston  	
Erickson	
Gray Creek-
Jewett —
Lister	
South Creston-
Wynndel—	
Yahk	
Totals, District No. 86-
District No. 87 (Stikine)
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Cassiar—
Elementary—
Atlin 	
247
32
419
10
371
13
130
18
228
2
191
7
117
14
191
8
180
6
092
576 |
176
1
91 |
89
48 |
408
202 [
9
2 1
9
6  1
26
11 1
208
106 |
42
21 |
516
85
41
206
7
3
15
102
21
967 |   487
480
307
353
217
230
207
177
138
16
19
101
74
55
17
229
13
90
492
141
19
99
938
329
99
126
744
175
38
68
80
174
132
41
Dease Lake„
250
42
23
144
179
106
122
114
90
73
7
9
38
43
25
9
113
4
54
259
80
13
2,895 | 1,482
49
468
180
60
61
355
93
23
31
48
88
77
21
163
174
111
108
93
87
65
9
10
63
31
30
8
116
9
36
233
61
6
1,413
50
470
149
39
65
389
82
15
37
32
86
55
20
3,043 |  1,554 | 1,489
121
25
17
129
17
6
74
52
1
71
4
33
2
83
2
56
27
55
48
1
3
1
1
11
3
34
32
6
5
83
108
92
35
69
38
	
	
21
27
23
15
25
36
48
6
10
2
2
9
15
18
13
11
9
2
4
35
30
4
3
30
25
25
37
35
26
4
5
205
253 |  302
94
26
29
13
17
20
9
62
62
30
25
7
9
14
10
13
12
33
32
11
19
8
9
94
237 |  233
22
22
9
7
5
5
58
2
48
2
74 |  131 |  124 |  114
59
1
2
5
29
 9_
T05~
32
16
54
3
14
25
11
2
30
68
42
 2_
299
33
14
18
75
33
9
9
11
53
17
 4_
~276~
31
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 167
Pri-
Grade
Inter-
Occupational
Grade
Special
IV
f V
1
VI
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
DC
X
XI
XII
77
66
46
38
20
	
5
5
4
2
	
	
5
	
	
	
	
50
3
47
56
47
1
46
49
1
29
-	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
47
	
1
2
2
	
	
	
	
—_
	
106
110 [  100
81
-  1     1   1 —
82
66
46
38
20
49
40
39
29
19
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
26
18
21
17
7
49
53
47
41
	
	
.	
	
	
	
	
2
3
1
3
2
3
	
	
	
	
.	
	
1
1
	
	
__
25
21
22
18
.... |  . „
.
	
	
_. ...
	
6
7
6
3
 | 	
. ..
	
	
	
	
85
87 |  79
63
  |   |   | 	
75
58
60
46
26
39
44
61
85
78
50
61
48
43
15
12
5
1
42
19
16
	
26
	
58
47
38
	
	
38
34
30
25
	
22
16
10
	
	
38
34
35
29
	
	
27
23
21
	
	
	
19
25
16
18
	
	
	
12
19
12
	
	
	
4
2
5
	
1
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
10
18
8
2
31
1
16
9
3
20
2
21
~7
3
22
3
16
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
1
39
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
15
64
76
78
60
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
	
.. „
2
4
1
1
	
	
	
	
	
15
285
286
269
232
16 |  38 1   5 ]   1
200
168
158
85
78
1
1
22
19
24
22
12
1  	
.
251
212
175
173
127
	
30
30
30
23
	
	
	
30
30
28
29
11
20
15
20
16
14
25
24
	
	
15
74
22
7
7
14
26
21
62
29
6
9
11
30
20
99
36
11
19
13
189
8
31
12
	
	
	
■	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
7
8
5
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
15
244
234 |  258
275
12 |  ... |  .
303
261
227
224
150
22
29
19
26
-  I 	
1
	
	
23
18
13
	
	
	
4
2
8
3
5
3
3
  | 	
  | .	
	
-	
	
	
	
	
ZZ
	
 D 168
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 1.7    SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total   J   Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
1 I
I    II    I   III
District No. 87 (Stikine)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Good Hope Lake    _	
Lower Post 	
Telegraph Creek 	
Totals, District No. 87	
District No. 88 (Skeena-Cassiar)
Secondary—
Caledonia 	
Hazelton 	
Junior Secondary—Skeena 	
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Stewart-	
Elementary—
Cedarvale 	
Copper Mountain   	
Cranberry River.... 	
John Field  	
Graham 	
Cassie Hall   	
Kalum 	
E. T. Kenney	
Kiti-K'Shan 	
Kitsault  	
Kitwanga 	
Clarence Michiel	
Nass   	
New Hazelton	
Parkside  ...
South Hazelton 	
Stewart     	
Thornhill 	
Thornhill Primary  	
Two Mile  	
Uplands „ 	
Totals, District No. 88 	
District No. 89 (Shuswap)
Senior Secondary—Salmon Arm 	
Junior Secondary—
Enderby 	
Shuswap 	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Eagle River  	
J. L. Jackson 	
North Shuswap	
Elementary—■
Ashton Creek - 	
Bastion—   	
M. V. Beattie ,	
Carlin 	
Centennial  _.  	
Deep Creek   —
Falkland.  	
Grandview Bench  _
Grindrod 	
Kingfisher  _.	
Malakwa 	
Mara 	
Mount Ida 	
North Broadview 	
North Canoe—   	
Notch Hill	
Parkview. 	
Salmon Arm  —
Salmon Arm West  —
Silver Creek  	
Sorrento 	
South Broadview	
South Canoe  	
Totals, District No. 89	
21
32
54
13
17
32
15
22
422
225
588
302
318
161
881
473
148
85
9
5
214
110
9
6
258
153
15
7
345
159
88
53
330
172
210
115
12
10
62
30
505
240
47
22
71
35
189
90
88
41
285
158
442
219
247
129
39
21
377
198
197
25 |  57
55
286
157
408
63
4
104
3
105
8
186
35
158
95
2
32
265
25
36
99
47
127
223
118
18
179
20
40
42
38
73
42
2
43
1
37
31
65
83
2
9
7
12
31
17
44
102
5
40
5,777 | 2,994 | 2,783
225
337
403
552
193
54
235
369
201
15
16
154
17
131
14
86
33
46
48
157
11
125
482
184
52 |
130 |
212 |
199 I
109
180
205
288
106
30
121
188
111
8
10
91
9
65
6
38
15
24
27
86
4
76
247
78
26
60
95
95
116
157
198
264
87
24
114
181
90
7
6
63
8
66
8
48
18
22
21
71
7
49
235
106
26
70
117
104
50
32
6
25
42
22
22
4
4
24
23
7
5
20
23
1
3
10
16
5
6
	
2
13
24
18
3
5
31
24
50
54
47
68
16
20
7
10
17
13
	
31
24
19
24
2
20
2
22
26
75
66
3
7
9
17
38
11
40
62
52
11
43
23
5
19
47
56
3
34
1
24
63
31
70
1
8
4
11
49
9
42
55
20
6
55
394 |  531 |  506 |  486
21
5,367 | 2,740 | 2,627
167
370
441
21
11
21
49
34
8
20
5
23
4
10
~~12
5
17
3
20
72
24
4
20
37
28
469
 STATISTICAL TABLES
NET ENROLMENT—Continued
D 169
Pri-
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
Special
TV
1 " 1 VI
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
3
2
2
3
V
	
2
3
4
4
	
	
	
	
8
8
5
7
	
	
	
41
53 |  38
43
  | ........ |   | 	
23
18
13
  |
135
238
215
16
10
86
82
59
37
28
18
17
2
384
312
148
	
	
	
	
40
32
27
24
20
5
	
2
28
27
.....-
23
	
	
1
1
2
1
	
7
29
22
19
65
8
	
	
	
71
67
78
66
	
	
16
26
	
-	
	
	
	
	
	
1
2
1
2
8
11
11
8
	
	
	
	
84
141
149
115
16
	
..
	
	
	
8
8
6
4
..
. .
.
1
	
	
	
12
12
7
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
29
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
21
8
9
13
	
	
	
	
	
	
.-
53
33
35
	
15
82
79
79
70
	
	
	
	
5
5
7
	
	
	
42
60
46
49
	
38
502
476 |  468
456
24
34 |  27
2
502
422
366
295
248
__
383
303
73
75
77
	
	
	
	
6
125
97
109
	
44
58
49
61
46
63
61
46
8
10
7
176
155
150
	
20
26
19
27
	
21
22
	
12
8
12
26
21
36
37
	
	
	
	
	
	
47
40
57
55
	
	
	
15
26
29
29
39
	
	
	
	
	
24
14
28
21
	
	
	
	
	
.	
	
	
24
11
30
	
	
	
	
	
	
5
1
	
	
	
	
	
 ..
	
—
15
15
8
5
10
25
10
10
	
	
	
	
	
8
9
11
8
	
	
	
	
—
17
28
34
19
	
	
	
	
	
	
12
67
58
Z58
36
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
15
15
16
36
16
22
29
44
	
	
	
26
~~ 16
 _
21
28
36
35
	
	
_
_
26
37
27
38
	
	
	
27
437
472
503
514
6
8 |  10
7
441
412
397
383
303
 D 170 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
TABLE 1.8    RECAPITULATION OF NET ENROLMENT,! 1971/72,
Grade
Elementary
Elementary-
Junior Secondary
Elementary-
Senior Secondary
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
XTT
	
495
821
980
39
77
90
519
776
903
9
43
56
iA>14
1,597
1,883
48
120
146
461
564
662
728
693
46
76
161
459
533
670
687
707
20
29
74
920
XT
	
1,097
1,332
X
IX
1
1
1,415
VITT
1,400
66
	
105
	
235
Subtotals   .
1
1
2,502
2,306
4,808
3,391
3,179
6,570
Intermediate Special	
VTT
2,234
21,459
22,434
21,978
21,909
1,948
22,351
21,742
20,330
10,954
1,238
20,527
21,411
21,190
21,039
1,071
21,233
20,308
18,901
10,361
3,472
41,986
43,845
43,168
42,948
3,019
43,584
42,050
39,231
21,315
156
785
509
585
456
51
414
347
341
110
61
728
482
494
431
31
377
340
308
127
217
1,513
991
1,079
887
82
791
687
649
237
44
405
130
63
75
6
79
66
54
65
26
344
103
55
50
57
52
43
40
70
749
VI
233
V
118
TV
125
6
TIT
136
TT
118
T
97
105
167,339
157,279
324,618
3,754
3,379
7,133
987
770
1,757
Totn's
167,339
157,280
324,619
6,256
5,685
11,941
4,378
3,949
8,327
i Net enrolment is the total number of students on the register on the first day of school, plus new arrivals
2 Vocational school, district and regional college, correspondence, adult and night school enrolments are not
 STATISTICAL TABLES D 171
BY TYPE OF SCHOOL, GRADE, AND SEX OF PUPILS
Junior Secondary
Secondary
Senior Secondary
Totals
fl Public Schools
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
8,850
11,929
12,634
160
261
337
11,342
12,436
9,556
7,643
7,705
388
476
544
V
10,631
12,089
9,506
7,610
7,543
296
301
250
21,973
24,525
19,062
15,253
15,248
684
777
794
5,310
5,344
14
69
32
8
4,775
5,299
14
48
28
5
10,085
10,643
28
117
60
13
17,113
18,344
19,946
21,261
22,304
884
1,231
1,577
15,865
17,921
19,559
21,003
21,787
533
662
722
32,978
18,069
23,998
25,560
502
831
1,111
36,265
9,219
12,069
12,926
342
570
774
39,505
42,264
44,091
1,417
1,893
2,299
35,900
34,171
70,071
50,090
48,226
98,316
10,777
10,169
20,946
102,660
98,052
200,712
52
22
74
146
83
229
	
• ■
	
2,632
22,649
23,073
22,626
22,440
2,005
22,844
22,155
20,725
11,129
1,430
21,599
21,996
21,739
21,520
1,102
21,667
20,700
19,252
10,528
4,062
44,248
	
	
45,069
44,365
43,960
3,107
44,511
42,855
39,977
21,657
52
22
74
146
83
229
—
	
	
172,278
161,533
333,811
35,952
34,193
70,145
50,236
48,309
98,545
10,777
10,169
20,946
274,938
259,585
534,523
during the school-year, minus those who transfer to another British Columbia public school or class,
included.
  STATISTICAL TABLES D 173
TEACHERS
Tables Pace
2.1 Distribution of Full-time Equivalent Professional Staff and Pupil/Teacher
Ratios by Type of School  174
2.2 Teachers' Certificates  175
2.3 Teachers and Principals With and Without University Degrees  176
2.4 Highest Degree by Faculty and Level (Teachers, Principals, Administra
tive and Supervisory Staff)  176
2.5 New Inquiries, First Certificates, Proportions of Full-time Teaching Force 177
2.6 British Columbia Public School Full-time Teacher Flow, September 1970
to September 1971  178
2.7 Increases in Staff During the School-year and From June 30 to June 30— 179
2.8 Sources of Teachers Beginning in British Columbia, September 1971
(Those With Less Than One Year of British Columbia Experience)  179
2.9 Numbers of Trainees Completing Certification Programmes at British
Columbia Universities in 1970/71 and Teaching/Not Teaching in
September 1971  180
2.10 Types of Certificates Issued During the 1971/72 School-year (July 1,
1971, to June 30, 1972)  180
2.11 Number of Full-time Teachers by Type of Certificate and Average Years
of British Columbia Experience  181
2.12 Certificates and Degrees of Full-time Teachers, Principals, and Super
visors, September 1970 and September 1971  181
2.13 Current British Columbia Certificate and Sources of Original Certificate
of Full-time Teachers, Principals, and Supervisors, September 1971  182
Teachers' Salaries by Type of School:
2.14 Supervising Principals (Principals Not Enrolling a Division)— 183
2.15 Full-time Teachers and Teaching Principals  184
2.16 Part-time Teachers  185
2.17 District-employed Instructional Staff  186
2.18 Full-time Equivalent District-employed Instructional Staff (Not Assigned
to Specific Schools)  187
AUDIO-VISUAL SERVICES
2.19 Broadcast Services  187
2.20 Circulation Report  188
 r
D 174
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 2.1 DISTRIBUTION OF FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT PROFESSIONAL STAFF AND PUPIL/TEACHER RATIOS* BY TYPE OF
SCHOOL.
The number of teachers employed in the different types of schools and the
average number of pupils per teacher are shown in the following table. Prior to this
report, the pupil/teacher ratios in the table were calculated by dividing the June net
enrolment by the June total of full- and part-time teachers. Comparable F.T.E.
data for June 1971 were, for total instructional staff, 23.52; for total professional
staff, 23.13. Therefore, the net pupil/teacher ratio decreased about one-quarter
pupil during the year. The greatest decrease in ratio occurred in elementary schools,
where decreases in enrolment were not accompanied by equivalent decreases in
teaching staff.
Number
of
Schools
Supervising
Principals
Instructional Staff
Total
Professional
Staff
Average Number of Pupils
per F.T.E. Staff Member
Type of School
Enrolling
Divisions
Special
Staff
Total
Instructors
Enrolling a
Division
Instructing
On Total
Staff
Senior secondary	
Secondary	
Junior secondary	
Elementary-senior
secondary	
Elementary-junior
secondary —
20
117
105
12
49
1,212
20
116
103
11
27
507
784
673.5
3,319.2
2,425.0
280.0
434.7
10,589.5
17,721.9
293.3
1,346.9
906.8
104.7
78.8
1,044.4
224.6
3,999.5
385.7
966.8
4,666.1
3,331.8
384.7
513.5
11,633.9
224.6
21,721.4
385.7
986.8
4,782.1
3,434.8
395.7
540.5
12,140.9
224.6
22,505.4
385.7
31.10
29.69
28.93
29.55
27.20
29.65
29.54
21.67
21.12
21.05
21.51
23.02
26.99
24.10
21.23
20.61
20.42
20.91
21.87
25 86
District-wide
teachers	
Total instructional
start	
District-wide
23.27
Totals	
1,515
784
17,721.9
4,385.2
22,107.1
22,891.1
29.54
24.10
22.88
* Obtained by dividing the June F.T.E. net enrolment (each Kindergarten student counted as 0.5) by the
June F.T.E. teachers.
 STATISTICAL TABLES
D 175
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 D 176
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 2.3    TEACHERS AND PRINCIPALS WITH AND WITHOUT
UNIVERSITY DEGREES (JUNE 1972)
Highest Degree
No Degree
Total Teachers
Type of School
Bachelors
Masters or
Doctorates
Per Cent of
Teachers
in School
Type
Number
Per Cent of
Teachers
in School
Type
Number
FerCent
ofAU
Teachers
716
3,429
2,503
258
292
4,774
113
159
681
303
45
23
342
25
88.4
85.5
81.3
75.9
57.1
41.2
59.5
115
696
647
96
237
7,292
94
11.6
14.5
18.7
24.1
42.9
58.8
40.5
990
4,806
3,453
399
552
12,408
232
4.3
Secondary.	
21.0
15.1
Elementary-senior secondary
Elementary-junior secondary
1.7
2.4
54.3
District-employed ins true-
1.0
Total instructional staff2	
12,085
1,578
59.8
9,177              40.2
22,840
100.0
District supervisory staff!	
215
144              93.5
25                6.5
384
(100.0)
Total staff2     	
12,300
1,722
60.4
9.202       1         39.6
23,224
(100.0)
1 Excludes any district-wide personnel who were also reported as part-time school personnel.
2 Part-time teachers and 13 exchange teachers are included.
TABLE 2.4 HIGHEST DEGREE BY FACULTY AND LEVEL (TEACHERS,
PRINCIPALS, ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY STAFF),
JUNE 1972.
Faculty
Bachelors
Masters
Doctorates
Totals
P&Ti
A&S2
P&T
A&S
P&T
A&S
P&T
A&S
Combined
6,079
3,818
1,190
269
262
126
87
64
20
1
14
11
6
7
18
195
92
10
7
1
3
4
15
1
841
497
124
16
1
5
6
11
17
3
2
4
5
100
49
7
1
2
1
4
1
16
1
8
6,924
4,315
1,314
285
263
131
93
76
37
20
16
15
11
7
18
296
141
17
7
1
4
4
17
8
2
7,220
4,456
1,331
292
Arts—	
264
Commerce and Business Ad-
135
Agriculture  	
97
93
37
28
Forestry   _
16
15
Social Work	
Pharmacy 	
Other
13
7
18
Totals	
11,972
328
1,532
160
21
9
13,525
497
14,0223
i P & T=Principals and teachers attached to specific schools.
2 A & S^School  district  administrative,  supervisory,   and instructional  personnel   (including  any reported
part time in a specific school).
3 Includes two degrees among 13 exchange teachers.
 STATISTICAL TABLES
D 177
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 D 178
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 STATISTICAL TABLES
D 179
TABLE 2.7    INCREASES IN STAFF1 DURING THE SCHOOL-YEAR
AND FROM JUNE 30 TO JUNE 30
Sept.
1970
June
19712
Increase,
Sept.-June
Sept.
1971
June
1972
Increase,
Sept.-June
Increase,
June-June
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Full time .	
21,890.0
499.0
237.5
22,017.0
649.0
317.7
124.0
150.0
80.2
0.6
30.1
33.8
22,590.0
498.0
242.0
22,564.03
660.0
327.1
-26.0
162.0
85.1
-0.1
32.5
35.2
547.0
11.0
9.4
2.5
1.7
Part-time F.T.E.s*.-.
3.0
Total staff	
22,389.0
22,666.0 | 274.0    |      1.2
23,088.0 |23,224.0
136.0
0.6
558.0    |     2.4
Total F.T.E.s*.
22,127.5
22,334.7
204.2
0.9
22,832.0
22,891.1
59.1
0.3
556.4    1      2.5
i Includes district-wide as well as school-attached professional staff.
2 Revised data.
3 Includes seven full-time district-wide staff whose duties are divided between two districts.
* F.T.E.s=full-time equivalents.
TABLE 2.8 SOURCES OF TEACHERSi BEGINNING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, SEPTEMBER 1971 (THOSE WITH LESS THAN ONE YEAR
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA EXPERIENCE).
Elementary Beginners
Secondary Beginners
Location of Teacher-training
Institution
Number
Per Cent
of Elementary
Beginners
Per Cent
ofAU
Beginners
Number
Per Cent
of Secondary
Beginners
Per Cent
ofAU
Beginners
Total
British Columbia—
UBC	
375
213
212
30
14
36.0
20.3
20.2
2.9
1.3
19.7
11.1
11.1
1.6
0.7
391
90
131
15
3
45.1
10.4
15.1
1.7
0.3
20.4
4.7
6.8
0.8
0.2
769
UVic
303
SFU   	
343
NDU _	
45
17
847
80.7
44.2
630
72.7
32.9
1,477
24
34
9
27
6
9
2.3
3.2
0.9
2.6
0.6
0.9
1.3
1.8
0.5
1.4
0.3
0.5
36
16
7
39
6
10
4.2
1.8
0.8
4.5
0.7
1.2
1.9
0.8
0.4
2.0
0.3
0.5
60
50
16
Ontario - —
Quebec        	
66
12
19
Total, other provinces	
109
10.4
5.7
114
13.2
6.0
223
26
32
2
10
9
2.5
3.1
0.2
1.0
0.9
1.4
1.7
0.1
0.5
0.5
30
44
1
6
3
3.5
5.1
0.1
0.7
0.3
1.6
2.3
0.1
0.3
0.2
56
76
3
16
12
79
7.5
4.1
84
9.7
4.4
163
14
1.3
0.7
38
4.4
2.0
52
1,049
100.0
54.8
866
100.0
45.2
1,915
i Includes all instructional and administrative educational staff attached to specific schools, but excludes 23
district-wide personnel.
 D 180
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
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I
in cs
CO t-
Os Os
r^
m
q
O
1
'rl
Tf        1
CO     1
Tf
tn
CO
Q.
ti
G
U
Ph
a
0
H
IH   ^^
S      IH
gs
8§
•3 S
ro TJ
3   rt
 STATISTICAL TABLES
D 181
TABLE 2.11 NUMBER OF FULL-TIME TEACHERS BY TYPE OF
CERTIFICATE AND AVERAGE YEARS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
EXPERIENCE.
Certificate
Professional
Standard
Teaching
Licence
Elementary C
Letter of
Permission
Totall
14,729
8.91
4,557
5.86
3,065
8.98
59
11.83
169
3.32
22,591
8.27
Average years of British Columbia ex-
i Including 12 Vocational Certificates.
TABLE 2.12 CERTIFICATES AND DEGREES OF FULL-TIME TEACHERS, PRINCIPALS, AND SUPERVISORS, SEPTEMBER 1970 AND
SEPTEMBER 1971.
September 1970
September 1971
Changes in Qualifications
of Staff, Sept.-Sept.
Number
Percentage
of Total
Full-time
Teachers
Number
Percentage
of Total
Full-time
Teachers
Number
Per Cent
Certificate—■
13,349
4,580
3,546
92
17
306
60.2
20.2
16.4
0.4
0.1
1.9
14,729
4,557
3,065
59
12
169
65.2
20.2
13.6
0.3
0.1
0.7
1,380
—23
-481
—33
-5
— 137
10.3
Standards
—0.5
—13.6
Elementary C	
—35.9
—29.4
—44.8
Totals       	
21,890
100.0
22,591
100.0
701
3.2
Degree—
24
1,464
11,072
9,330
0.1
6.7
50.6
42.6
32
1,647
11,989
8,923
0.1
7.3
53.1
39.5
8
183
917
—407
33.3
12.5
8.3
—4.4
Totals
21,890
100.0
22,591
100.0
701
3.2
i Including Professional Advanced, Professional Basic, and Professional C.
2 Including Elementary A.
3 Including Elementary B.
 D 182
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 2.13 CURRENT BRITISH COLUMBIA CERTIFICATE AND
SOURCES OF ORIGINAL CERTIFICATE OF FULL-TIME TEACHERS,
PRINCIPALS, AND SUPERVISORS, SEPTEMBER 1971.
Current British Columbia
Certificate
First Teaching Certificate Received From—
British
Columbia
Other
Canadian
Provinces
Other
Countries
Not
Reported
Totals
N
Professional>-
11,101
68.5
75.4
49.1
3,256
20.1
71.5
14.4
1,756
10.8
57.3
7.8
40
0.2
67.8
0.2
51
0.3
30.2
0.2
1,949
56.7
13.2
8.6
593
17.3
13.0
2.6
864
25.1
28.2
3.8
11
0.3
18.6
0.0
19
0.6
11.2
0.1
1,531
58.2
10.4
6.8
662
25.2
14.5
2.9
407
15.5
13.3
1.8
5
0.2
8.5
0.0
26
1.0
15.4
0.1
148
47.9
1.0
0.7
46
14.9
1.0
0.2
38
12.3
1.2
0.2
3
1.0
5.1
0.0
73
23.6
43.2
0.3
14,729
A                                                  - -
B                            _ —   -
100.0
C.                              	
65.2
N    	
Standard*
4,557
A
B
100.0
r.                                 .         -
20.2
N    	
Teaching Licence^
3,065
A
B	
100.0
r.
13.6
N
Elementary C
59
A - -	
B
100.0
r*
0.3
N
Letter of Permission
169
A
B
100.0
r
0.7
Total Certificates
N      ___
16,215
100.0
71.8
3,436
100.0
15.2
2,631
100.0
ATi
309
100.0
1.4
22,591*
A
100.0
TI
100.0
c.
100.0
N=Number of full-time teachers from that jurisdiction who hold the type of certificate shown expressed as :
percentage of:
A—Total teachers from that jurisdiction holding all types of certificates.
B—Total teachers from all jurisdictions holding that type of certificate.
C—Total teachers from all jurisdictions holding all types of certificates,
i Including Professional Advanced, Professional Basic, and Professional C Certificates.
2 Including Elementary A Certificates.
3 Including Elementary B Certificates.
* Including 12 Vocational Certificates.
 STATISTICAL TABLES
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL1
D 183
Table 2.14   Supervising Principals (Principals Not Enrolling
a Division)
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Junior
Sec.
Elem.-
Senior
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
per Cent
$
26,250-26,
25,750-26,
25,250-25,
24,750-25,
24,250-24,
23,750-24,
23,250-23,
22,750-23,
22,250-22,
21,750-22.
21,250-21,
20,750-21
20,250-20
19,750-20
19,25(M9
18,750-19
18,250-18,
17,750-18.
17,250-17
16,750-17
16,250-16
15,750-16,
15,250-15
14,750-15
14,250-14.
13,750-14
13,250-13
12,750-13
12,250-12,
749-
249-
749-
249-
749-
249—
749-
249...
749-
,249-
,749-
,249-
,749-
,249-
,749-
,249-
,749—
,249-
,749-
,249—
,749-
,249-
,749-
,249-
,749-
,249-
,749-
,249-
,749-
Totals-
Medians-
2
2
21
19
70
56
13
41
56
40
32
42
20
28
22
13
7
9
8
3
2
1
507
$18,986
27
2
4
3
.
9
..
11
18
14
1
12
2
10
9
3
5
1
2
	
11
103
$18,375
$20,000
$21,589
4
1
6
3
10
12
9
5
8
9
9
5
6
5
5
3
4
6
3
1
1
116
20
6
1
8
4
14
18
12
18
24
56
43
90
75
31
52
67
48
41
47
24
30
24
17
10
9
8
3
2
2
784
$22,250
$22,416
$19,879
100.0
99.2
99.1
98.1
97.6
95.8
93.5
92.0
89.7
86.6
79.5
74.0
62.5
52.9
49.0
42.3
33.8
27.7
22.4
16.5
13.4
9.6
6.5
4.3
3.1
1.9
0.9
0.5
0.3
Total principals not enrolling a division, 784; median salary, $19,879; mean salary, $19,737.
1 All salaries are as of June 30, 1972, and exclude the salaries of 13 exchange teachers.
 D 184 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
Table 2.15    Full-time Teachers and Teaching Principals
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Junior
Sec.
Elem.-
Senior
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
per Cent
$
,750-22,
,250-21
,750-21
,250-20
,750-20,
,250-19
,750-19
,250-18
,750-18
,250-17
,750-17
,250-16
,750-16
,250-15
,750-15
,250-14
,750-14
,250-13
,750-13
,250-12
,750-12
,250-11
,750-11
,250-10
,750-10
,250- 9
,750- 9
,250- 8
,750- 8
,250- 7
,750- 7
,250- 6
,750- 6
,250- 5
■,750- 5
,250- 4.
,750- 4
,249-
,749-
,249-
,749-
,249-
,749-
,249...
,749-
,249...
,749-
,249-
,749-
,249...
,749-
,249-
,749-
,249...
,749-
,249-
,749-
,249...
,749„
,249-
,749...
,249...
,749-
,249„
,749-
,249-
,749-
,249..
,749-
,249-
,749-
,249-
749..
249-
Totals	
Medians
2
1
3
1
12
21
39
28
26
41
46
81
115
94
129
345
156
148
533
372
296
404
1,067
829
1,799
1,116
1,025
1,064
940
478
122
32
8
4
1
1
$9,499
1
2
3
2
5
4
1
11
3
7
26
5
11
16
33
22
28
48
45
52
65
48
36
20
6
3
2
1
1
1
1
5
9
11
36
12
6
36
10
6
25
16
19
21
19
33
33
25
24
15
8
3
2
3
3
7
6
7
14
17
11
23
21
38
83
114
80
337
127
91
207
177
184
183
245
255
355
329
252
81
47
13
5
11,379      !      504
$9,994
382      |   3,315
$11,460
$10,956
2
14
7
4
12
14
11
13
8
11
75
86
91
447
207
165
588
241
157
235
230
220
232
264
293
340
313
233
69
41
4,635
$12,400
3
1
1
3
1
4
4
2
6
3
4
6
17
107
46
41
136
57
30
43
47
48
54
53
67
54
60
50
11
3
2
6
19
12
13
23
37
44
71
63
54
153
172
239
799
476
428
1,468
596
443
1,059
875
789
922
1,696
1,522
2,633
1,908
1,632
1,276
1,059
510
136
32
8
4
1
1
964
21,179
$12,633
$10,206
100.0
100.0
99.9
99.8
99.8
99.7
99.5
99.3
98.9
98.6
98.4
97.7
96.9
95.7
91.9
89.7
87.7
80.7
77.9
75.8
70.8
66.7
63.0
58.6
50.6
43.4
31.0
22.0
14.3
8.3
3.3
0.9
0.2
0.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
Total full-time teachers, 21,179, excluding supervising principals and district-wide staff; mean salary, $10,894.
 STATISTICAL TABLES
Table 2.16    Part-time Teachers
D 185
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Junior
Sec.
Elem.-
Senior
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
per Cent
$
12.750-13,249     	
2
4
4
4
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
4
2
6
3
3
2
6
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
8
6
6
5
5
2
5
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
2
5
10
13
27
27
46
59
83
83
92
46
39
28
32
23
9
1
100 0
12,250-12,749- 	
11,750-12,249     	
11,250-11,749 	
1
1
10,750-11,249    	
99.8
10,250-10,749 	
9,750-10,249     	
99.4
9,250- 9,749 	
8,750- 9,249 	
8,250- 8,749 _	
7,750- 8,249.	
7,750- 7,749   	
99 1
2
5
6
8
13
19
31
46
70
74
79
43
35
24
30
20
7
1
98.9
98.6
97.8
96.2
6,750- 7,249 .     -	
94 1
6,250- 6,749    	
5,750- 6,249	
89.9
85.6
5,250- 5,749—	
4,750- 5,249    	
78.3
69.0
4,250- 4,749	
3,750- 4,249	
3,250- 3,749	
55.9
42.7
28.2
2,750- 3,249   	
20.9
2,250- 2,749   	
14.7
1,750- 2,249	
10.3
1,250- 1,749 	
5.2
750- 1,249	
1.6
250-    749	
0.2
Totals	
515
21
6
34
50
6
632
Total part-time teachers, 632; median salary, $4,527; mean salary, $4,576.
 D 186
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
Table 2.17    District-employed Instructional Staff
(Not Assigned to Specific Schools)
Salary
Mid-point
Number of Instructors
Cumula
Salary Range
Full Time
Part Time
tive
per Cent
F.T.E.
Persons
Full-time
Equivalents
Salaries
$
16,750-17,249	
$
17,000
16,500
16,000
15,500
15,000
14,500
14,000
13,500
13,000
12,500
12,000
11,500
11,000
10,500
10,000
9,500
9,000
8,500
8,000
7,500
7,000
6,500
6,000
5.500
5,000
4,500
4,000
3,500
3,000
2,500
2,000
1,500
1,000
2
2
1
3
13
1
13
5
6
16
22
11
16
12
13
15
18
13
10
7
4
2
1
1
1
4
1
3
1
5
4
5
4
1
1
2
2
1
0.7
0.6
2.3
0.8
1.5
0.8
2.6
2.3
2.5
2.1
0.5
0.4
1.0
0.4
0.1
100.0
16,250-16,749           	
99.2
15,750-16,249
98.3
15,250-15,749	
97.1
14,750-15,249     -	
95.0
14,250-14,749	
89.7
13,750-14,249                                                   —
89.3
13,250-13,749                                                     	
83.1
12,750-13,249                         	
80.6
12,250-12,749                             	
78.1
11750-12249                                             -
71.1
11 250-11 749
60.3
10,750-11,249     	
55.4
10,250-10,749—- -  -	
9,750-10,249      —
48.8
43.8
9,250- 9,749 -  	
37.6
8,750- 9,249      -	
28.5
8,250- 8,749      -
20.2
7,750- 8,249    	
13.2
7,250- 7,749     - -
7.9
6,750- 7,249-- - - -	
6,250- 6,749 - - —	
4.5
1.7
5,750- 6,249         .                	
0.8
5,250- 5,749 - -	
4,750- 5,249    	
0.4
4,250- 4,749                     —
3,750- 4,249                                                       	
3,250- 3,749      	
2,750- 3,249     -    .                                      	
2,250- 2,749                            	
1,750- 2,249     	
1,250- 1,749                                               	
750- 1,249- 	
Totals    -	
206                36       I        18.6               	
242 persons
224.6 I
'.T.E.s
Medians: Full time, $10,999; part time, $5,499; all F.T.E.s $10,833.
 STATISTICAL TABLES
D 187
Table 2.18   Full-time Equivalent District-employed Instructional Staff
(Not Assigned to Specific Schools)
District Number
and Name
Number
of
Teachers
District Number
and Name
Number
of
Teachers
District Number
and Name
Number
of
Teachers
5.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
1.6
0.6
4.5
11.5
5.2
1.0
9.1
1.0
10.0
3.5
2.0
36.
38.
39.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
48.
52.
54.
57.
59.
60.
Surrey	
Richmond-  	
Vancouver	
Burnaby	
27.5
4.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
7.0
5.0
2.0
0.5
3.0
3.0
10.0
5.0
3.0
61.
62.
65.
66.
67.
68.
70.
75.
76
Greater Victoria1	
Sooke  -	
Cowichan -
29.5
8.5
7. Nelson   -	
2.5
13. Kettle Valley	
2.8
15. Penticton	
1.0
Nanaimo	
4.5
22. Vernon - 	
North Vancouver
West Vancouver	
Sechelt  -   —
10.7
2.0
24. Kamloops- ,   	
1.0
80.
81.
85.
86.
88.
89.
3.0
28. Quesnel
Prince Rupert	
Smithers 	
1.0
32. Hope	
33. Chilliwack	
Vancouver Isl. North
1.0
1.0
34. Abbotsford.
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Skeena-Cassiar	
Shuswap _	
11.1
4.0
Total full-time equivalents
224.6
i Includes 3.5 full-time equivalents for instructional staff attached to medical services.
AUDIO-VISUAL SERVICES
Table 2.19   Broadcast Services
Radio
Programmes prepared and presented
Schools using radio broadcasts	
Divisions using radio broadcasts	
Students using radio broadcasts	
169
628
2,781
77,498
Television
Programmes prepared and presented   160
Schools using television broadcasts  762
Divisions using television broadcasts   4,205
Students using television broadcasts   125,527
Supplementary Materials (Prepared and Distributed)
Teachers' Bulletins   15,000
Radio Calendars   15,000
Television Calendars  15,000
Primary Music Booklets   60,000
Intermediate Music Booklets  75,000
French Language Booklets   16,000
 D 188
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
Table 2.20   Distribution Services Circulation Report
District and Name
1. Fernie
Number Supplied
Motion      Film-
Pictures      strips
169         160
605 229
372 607
322 245
835 1,172
204         733
68 118
266 287
262 1,044
194 123
322 5
298         218
33 4
223 138
294 117
724         710
92 249
833 1,100
453 279
709 348
247         101
1,426 1,450
790 733
191 156
289 68
221 40
27           35
2,293 1,327
391 655
662         868
4,024 5,975
285 208
23 56
484 508
19
945 464
378 796
824      1,252
Dis
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
52.
54.
55.
56.
57.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
75.
76.
77.
80.
81.
84.
85.
86.
87.
88.
89.
trict and Name
North Vancouver
Number
Motion
Pictures
827
642
531
564
393
545
431
241
306
294
209
323
635
368
8
624
666
403
240
34
185
597
435
1,385
234
565
164
57
146
434
298
699
671
583
228
592
284
586
Supplied
Film-
strips
125
2. Cranbrook
West Vancouver
70
3. Kimberley 	
4. Windermere 	
7. Nelson
Sechelt 	
Powell River 	
Howe Sound	
174
20
158
9. Castlegar   	
10. Arrow Lakes 	
11. Trail 	
12. Grand Forks	
Ocean Falls        	
725
Queen Charlotte
Prince Rupert	
Smithers 	
Burns Lake 	
326
614
313
13. Kettle Valley
286
14. Southern Okanagan .
Vanderhoof   ....	
538
Prince George   .   .
180
16. Keremeos 	
17. Princeton  :.	
18. Golden
Peace River South
Peace River North	
Greater Victoria —	
538
492
19. Revelstoke 	
21. Armstrong-
Spallumcheen 	
22. Vernon 	
23. Central Okanagan
24. Kamloops 	
26. Birch Island 	
Sooke  	
Saanich 	
Gulf Islands 	
Cowichan 	
Lake Cowichan •	
Ladysmith   	
Nanaimo	
Qualicum 	
304
864
732
168
7
80
27. Williams Lake
386
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet 	
30. South Cariboo 	
Alberni   ..     .. 	
945
Courtenay  '
Campbell River	
Mission  	
Agassiz 	
Summerland    	
Kitimat 	
473
790
31. Merritt	
32. Fraser Canyon	
33. Chilliwack 	
34. Abbotsford 	
154
92
44
48
35. Langley 	
36. Surrey 	
37. Delta
244
Vancouver Island West
Vancouver Island North
Creston-Kaslo   .      . —
283
470
38. Richmond  	
39. Vancouver 	
93
Stikine 	
Skeena-Cassiar   . 	
266
1,298
Shuswap 	
Miscellaneous 	
Totals 	
41. Burnaby      -   —   .
158
42. Maple Ridge	
125
43. Coquitlam 	
37,205
35,400
 STATISTICAL TABLES
D 189
FINANCIAL DATA
Table Page
3.1    Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education  190
  191
  191
3.2 Expenditure for Education, Calendar Year 197 L
3.3 Cost per Pupil, Calendar Year 19 71	
3.4 Expenditure by School Districts for Calendar Year 1971  192
3.5 Revenue by School District for Calendar Year 1971  194
3.6 Transportation Costs  196
3.7 Summary of School Dormitory Data, 1971/72  196
 D  190
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 3.1    COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE
FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION
School-year
Number
of
Teachers
Employed
Number
of
School
Districts
Aggregate
Enrolment
Average
Daily
Attendance
Percentage of
Attendance
Government
Expenditure
for
Education
Total
Public
Expenditure
on Education
1877/78	
1882/83	
1887/88	
1892/93	
1897/98	
1902/03	
1907/08	
1912/13	
1913/14	
1917/18	
1922/23	
1927/28	
1928/29	
1929/30	
1930/31	
1931/32	
1932/33	
1933/34	
1934/35	
1935/36	
1936/37	
1937/38	
1938/39	
1939/40	
1940/41	
1941/42	
1942/43	
1943/44	
1944/45	
1945/46	
1946/47	
1947/48	
1948/49	
1949/50	
1950/51-
1951/52	
1952/53	
1953/54	
1954/55	
1955/56	
1956/57	
1957/58	
1958/59	
1959/60	
1960/61	
1961/62	
1962/63	
1963/64	
1964/65	
1965/66	
1966/67 	
1967/68	
1968/69	
1969/70	
1970/71 	
1971/72	
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
1,597
1,859
2,246
3,118
3,668
3,784
3,854
3,948
3,959
3,912
3,873
3,942
3,956
4,025
4,092
4,194
4,220
4,248
4,224
4,055
4,162
4,354
4,512
4,833
5,116
5,496
5,873
6,272
6,598
7,105
7,574
8,185
8,690
9,474
10,171
10,839
11,513
12,137
12,772
13,571
14,415
15,327
16,173
17,457
18,889
20,140
21,481
22,301
22,840
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741
721
720
730
696
661
654
650
86
89
93
97
97
98
101
100
104
104
102
103
102
101
98
97
99
100
100
93
93
87
85
85
85
80
75
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
164,212
173,354
183,112
195,290
210,174
223,840
240,674
260,069
277,070
291,223
305,837
321,760
340,290
358,905
378,641
400,064
420,790
445,228
467,486
489,596
513,079
527,106
534,523
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96.196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102,085
93,473
102,999
107,599
114,590
121,334
129,859
138,941
147,583
154,077
163,364
176,138
191,061
204,239
218,303
235.396
252,490
267,052
281,513
298,175
312,173
332,585
348,472
367,718
379,045
408,452
425,514
447,643
466,264
476,643
481,353
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
85.99
87.74
88.03
88.51
89.34
89.87
88.88
89.21
90.19
90.91
91.24
90.70
90.51
91.13
91.70
92.05
92.67
91.74
92.67
92.03
91.91
90.98
91.74
91.02
91.43
90.88
90.43
90.05
$
48,411
60,758
113,679
174,775
290,255
473,802
544,671
1,663,003
1,885,654
1,653,796
3,176,686,
3,532,518,
3,765,920.
3,743,317
3,834,727.
4,015,074.
2,849,972,
2,611,937.
2,835,040
2,972,385.
3,277,660.
3,524,962.
3,630,670.
3,585,769
3,963,848.
4,028,397.
3,924,243.
4,244,898.
5,022,534.
5,765,205.
9,398,473.
12,468,653.
17,363,430.
22,809,631.
25,830,076.
26,885,980,
26,555,080
24,060,233,
34,279,302,
41,067,740.
43,989,524
50,861,473
53,288,028
59,472,055
70,174,999
77,632,903
83,782,121
95,497,375
105,017,594
119,871,278
144,702,607
181,854,578
|251,827,287
292,556,398
354,470,298
382,221,877
I
141
,751
.361
43
.26
.29
.60
.34
.11
.60
.283
,95
69
.08
.19
.37
.02
.80
.74
.04
.23
.69
.78
.00
.24
.88
.53
.82
.59
.50
.46
.18
.94
.23
.88
.43
.24
.15  <
27
34
.32
.63
.94
.06
.84
.48
.79
.16
.75
.31
.40
.21
.92
.29
.48
.00
215,
425
604
1,220
4,658
4,634,
3,519
7,630,
9,261
11,149
10,008
10,061
9,719
8,941
8,213
8,458
8,775
9,593
10,193,
10,640
10,521
10,982
11,120.
11,502,
12,231
13,683
14,818,
20,176
25,768,
35,538,
47,726
54,195
57,881
58,401
70,791
80,823
69,314,
77,653
90,483
101,351
115,941
133,401
145,535,
157,614,
177,539
199,114
227,937
269,217,
332,702,
384,336.
437,743
516,309
557,875
,056.222
,555.10
,357.86
i,509.85
,894.97
■,877.56
',014.61
i,009.543
,094.98
,996.27
1,255.66
,387.99
',333.8!
,497.34
,369.04
:, 156.00
,353.78
,562.64
,367.08
,740.47
,684.92
,364.49
,801.94
,291.35
,029.35
,538.18
,625.81
,930.53
1,392.09
,079.88
,750.37
,133.95
,559.48
,121.15
,844.25
,263.713
181.24*
,192.32
,765.63
,107.94
,018.06
,622.84
1,715.48
,783.79
',584.16
,313.75
,392.31
',969.40
1,367.21
i,617.68
,656.54
,118.90
,205.004
I
1 The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
2 Excluding unknown expenditure made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
s Since 1922/23 this amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial universities
and since 1963/64 to school district and regional colleges.
* Since 1955/56 this amount is exclusive of capital expenditures from by-law funds.
 STATISTICAL TABLES D 191
TABLE 3.2    EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION,
CALENDAR YEAR 1971
(Exclusive of Capital Expenditure for By-law Funds)
$ $
Total expenditure by school districts (including colleges)   420,456,801
Add—Department of Education expenditures for administration, correspondence schools, Teachers'
Pension Fund, free textbooks and maps, adult education, vocational and technical schools, grants to
colleges, universities, and school districts, etc.   381,931,435
Less—Government grants to school districts included in school district expenditure: $
Direct grants   184,903,143
Grants to reduce local taxation     59,609,888
Total Government grants to school districts   244,513,031
Gross total other Department of Education expenditures    137,418,404
Grand total expenditure  557,875,205
TABLE 3.3    COST PER PUPIL, CALENDAR YEAR 1971
$ $
Grand total cost of education  557,875,205
Deduct—School district expenditure not affecting pupil
cost:
Colleges and other nonoperating expenditures      26,327,501
Debt charges      45,263,620
Current nonshareable capital       3,408,579
Total school district reduction     74,999,700
Department of Education expenditures for post-
secondary and adult education, correspondence schools, technical and vocational
schools, grants to colleges not included in
school district deduction, universities, etc. „.. 126,073,911
  201,073,611
Total operating costs   356,801,594
Operating cost per pupil for year based on daily average attendance
of 481,353.4  741.25
 D 192
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
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 D 196
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 3.6    TRANSPORTATION COSTS
Calendar Year
Total District
Expenditures
Conveyance
Costs
Conveyance
Costs as a
Percentage
of District
Expenditures
1960
$
118,269,991
127,616,486
136,432,687
150,790,702
165,814,555
185,566,119
214,156,353
248,031,667
285,686,761     ,
323,153,465
361,429,563
401,033,384
S
2,477,202
2,611,370
2,721,510
2,886,696
3,125,447
3,475,895
4,009,393
4,610,089
5,355,378
5,891,894
6,556,422
7,216,520
2.1
1961                          	
2.0
1962                     _    _	
2.0
1963                                -	
1.9
1964                                       -	
1.9
1965	
1.9
1966
1.9
1067
1.9
1968
1.87
19691                       -	
1.82
10701
1.81
I0711
1.80
i Excluding college expenditures.
TABLE 3.7    SUMMARY OF SCHOOL DORMITORY DATA, 1971/72
School District or School
Capacity
Occupancy
Staff
Grade Limits
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Full
Time
Part
Time
From
To
10
40
30
30
36
45
14
66
26
14
40
30
24
18
45
14
56
26
10
29
30
26
9
41
8
53
10
14
29
30
20
9
20
11
50
22
2
3
3
3
2
5
2
7
3
1
1
1
1
2
8
8
8
8
10
8
11
8
8
12
12
27   100 Mile House
12
12
12
12
57. McBride
12
12
12
Totals	
297
267
216
205
30
6
—
—
 STATISTICAL TABLES
D 197
SCHOOLS
Table Page
4.1 Number of Public Schools in Operation by Type, June 1967-72  198
4.2 Senior Secondary Schools  198
4.3 Secondary Schools  199
4.4 Junior Secondary Schools  200
4.5 Elementary-Senior Secondary Schools  201
4.6 Elementary-Junior Secondary Schools  201
4.7 Elementary Schools  202
4.8 Summary of All Schools  204
 D 198
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
TABLE 4.1    NUMBER OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN OPERATION
BY TYPE, JUNE 1967-72
Type of School
Type
No.
Numbers Open in June
1967      1968      1969      1970      1971      1972
Change,
1972-67
Senior secondary-
Secondary-
Junior secondary	
Elementary-senior secondary-
Elementary-junior secondary-
Elementary and special	
Total schools-
Total net enrolment in thousands..
6
5
4
3
2
1,0
18
105
71
24
47
1,164
17
109
82
20
43
1,182
18
108
85
17
53
1,172
19
110
96
18
60
1,179
17
118
97
13
52
1,210
20
117
105
12
49
1,212
1,429
1,453
1,453
1,482
1,507
1,515
445
467
490
513
527
535
+2
+ 12
+34
— 12
+2
+48
+86
+90
In June 1972, 37 ungraded schools enrolled only children in special classes, an
increase of 11 "Type 0" schools from the previous year. If four schools which were
kindergartens are excluded, the total enrolment in the special schools was 1,074 boys
and 653 girls, a total of 1,727. This, of course, does not include special classes in
regular elementary schools.
Average enrolment in schools of all types is now 353, an increase of 41 during
the past five years and 91 during the past 10. Some of the increase in average size
is the result of additions to existing schools, some to the closure of small rural
schools, particularly those enrolling all grades, and some to the increasing proportions of students enrolled in secondary schools.
TABLE 4.2    SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
Senior secondary schools are, by definition, those enrolling only pupils in
Grades XI and XII. Therefore, the number of this type can fluctuate as classes for
students in Grade X or lower are opened or closed. During the year, three additional
schools entered the senior secondary category and the net enrolment increased 3,932.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
F.T.E.l
Teachers
June Net
Enrolment
22. Vernon	
34. Abbotsford-
36. Surrey	
38. Richmond—
41. Burnaby.	
43. Coquitlam-
57. Prince George—
61. Greater Victoria-
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
65. Cowichan..
68. Nanaimo—
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River._
89. Shuswap	
Totals-
20
29
34
136
72
42
80
54
30
22
29
28
46
30
20
22
674
45.5
53.0
195.0
106.0
63.0
115.0
68.8
43.0
29.0
36.0
46.5
71.0
46.0
34.0
35.0
986.1
932
1,117
3,847
2,288
1,270
2,550
1,738
914
605
735
782
1,548
1,061
873
686
20,946
i In Tables 4.2 through 4.8, data on teachers are expressed in full-time equivalents and apply to school-
attached personnel only (i.e., the totals do not include district-wide professional staff).
 STATISTICAL TABLES
D 199
TABLE 4.3    SECONDARY SCHOOLS
Schools enrolling Grades VIII to XII decreased in number from 118 to 117
during the year and net enrolment decreased 327, although total enrolment in the
corresponding grades is still increasing rapidly. This paradox is the result of re-
categorization of "secondary" schools as either "senior secondary" or "junior secondary" as examination of the accompanying tables will indicate. Only in the centre
of the largest urban areas is enrolment in Grades VIII to XII showing a tendency to
decline, and the secondary-grade totals, which were 102,000 in 1961 and about
201,000 in 1972, are expected to continue upward to about 225,000 in 1978.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
F.T.E.
Teachers
June Net
Enrolment
1.
2.
3.
4.
7.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
18.
19.
21.
23.
24.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
35.
37.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
52.
54.
55.
56.
57.
59.
60.
61.
62.
64.
66.
67.
69.
70.
75.
77.
Fernie	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere-
Nelson	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes-
Trail	
Grand Forks-
Kettle Valley-
Southern Okanagan-
Penticton	
Keremeos— 	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen-
Central Okanagan	
Kamloops	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake	
QuesneL
Lillooet-
South Cariboo-
Merritt	
Hope	
Chilliwack	
Langley	
Delta	
Vancouver	
New Westminster-
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam-
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River-
Howe Sound-
Ocean Falls—
Prince Rupert	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George	
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Gulf Islands	
Lake Cowichan-
Ladysmith	
Qualicum	
Alberni	
Mission	
Summerland-
Kitimat	
2
2
2
16
1
4
3
2
6
3
2
1
2
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
5
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
32
30
21
16
24
28
12
57
20
10
26
40
9
21
25
18
148
86
14
61
27
13
30
31
21
74
65
84
791
105
157
90
50
219
113
29
29
31
14
17
24
18
24
19
18
26
165
15
10
20
38
17
40
38
18
36
45.5
46.0
29.6
23.9
34.5
42.0
16.0
82.9
31.0
14.0
36.5
63.0
13.0
29.0
40.0
25.0
207.5
143.9
18.3
71.5
42.0
18.0
37.0
42.0
30.0
106.0
92.5
113.5
1,096.4
129.0
237.0
129.0
83.0
329.9
170.5
42.0
41.5
45.5
22.0
25.0
33.0
23.0
34.0
29.0
35.0
41.0
231.9
21.0
17.0
32.0
58.0
27.0
61.4
60.0
30.0
60.0
875
944
560
451
766
815
282
1,591
600
237
730
1,165
251
608
755
470
4,317
2,915
341
1,586
890
305
710
874
568
2,356
1,978
2,360
23,971
2,869
4,880
2,633
1,610
6,763
3,631
883
843
881
295
507
635
407
695
448
742
811
4,879
424
315
606
1,061
507
1,154
1,242
609
1,182
 D 200
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
SECONDARY SCHOOLS—Continued
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
F.T.E.
Teachers
June Net
Enrolment
81. Fort Nelson           .  ...
1
2
1
2
2
12
13
12
36
34
16.0
16.1
16.0
52.0
43.8
247
265
307
1,037
906
Totals—         	
117
3,321
4.782.1          1         QS S4S
TABLE 4.4    JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
Eight more schools enrolling Grades VIII to X are listed this year with 5,692
additional pupils and 289 additional teachers. Again, this is partly due to reclassification of schools as the corresponding grade enrolment increased only 3.7 per
cent vs. 4.7 per cent in 1970/71 and 5.3 per cent in 1969/70. Increases are expected to be more modest during the next two years, after which a slow decline is
probable.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
F.T.E.
Teachers
June Net
Enrolment
3. Kimberley   _                 	
7. Nelson
1
1
1
2
2
3
1
4
1
1
3
3
2
9
3
5
5
5
2
1
10
3
3
3
4
1
3
4
1
1
1
2
14
26
11
31
36
69
20
106
25
28
56
77
33
235
73
143
164
8
165
112
33
30
13
111
44
28
239
42
50
61
97
13
67
64
42
9
29
22
21.0
38.0
17.0
45.0
49.0
96.5
30.0
167.5
36.0
39.4
78.5
96.5
46.0
349.2
105.5
195.5
221.0
13.0
241.0
129.0
43.5
43.0
19.0
167.5
66.0
40.0
344.6
59.0
73.0
83.6
133.5
18.0
90.0
90.0
61.0
14.0
42.5
32.0
409
738
286
11. Trail    —              -              -   .
878
952
22. Vernon                                  .
1,936
612
3,438
753
27. Williams Lake
2R. Quesnel
820
33. Chilliwack
1,621
34.  Abbotsford
2,054
35. Langley
870
36. Surrey
7,267
37. Delta                      	
2,272
4,248
4,511
42. Maple Ridge
216
4,823
2,497
47. Powell River—	
858
52. Prince Rupert.
915
370
3,664
59. Peace River South	
1,331
746
61. Greater Victoria-	
7,362
62. Sooke      	
1,242
63. Saanich	
1,500
1,584
2,618
318
70,   Alhemi
1,728
71. Courtenay       .   	
7?., Campbell River     	
1,771
1,226
75. Mission _	
268
881
89. Shuswap	
562
Totals
105
2,426
3,434.8
70,145
 STATISTICAL TABLES D 201
TABLE 4.5    ELEMENTARY-SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
Schools enrolling pupils in some or all of the elementary grades as well as those
in Grades XI and XII continue to decrease in number. As recently as 1966 there
were 44 schools of that type enrolling 5.4 per cent of the Provincial total. In
1971/72 there were only 12, two of which are large Vancouver schools enrolling the
former junior-senior high school Grades VII to XII. If they were excluded, only
0.7 per cent of the Provincial enrolment would be in elementary-senior secondary
schools.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
F.T.E.
Teachers
June Net
Enrolment
2
22
7
28
31.5
8.0
35.0
209.0
17.0
24.0
21.0
27.0
15.0
8.2
558
120
792
142
12
17
19
17
11
5
4,573
50. Queen Charlotte            _ _	
59. Peace River South
296
510
70.   Alhprnj
487
514
329
148
Totals                      	
12
280
395.7
8,327
TABLE 4.6    ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
Schools enrolling pupils in the junior-secondary Grades VIII to X, as well as
elementary pupils, also are decreasing in number, but they fluctuate from time to
time as accommodation for a few Grade VIII pupils may or may not be available in
existing elementary schools. The net number of such schools decreased by three
during the year and enrolment decreased 2,515.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
F.T.E.
Teachers
June Net
Enrolment
1
2
2
3
2
2
2
4
1
1
2
1
5
1
3
10
34
15
4
18
12
1
20
4
7
4
42
8
18
13
29
31
27
22
2
14
2
48
10
41
12.0
47.5
16.7
7.0
26.8
13.3
1.0
20.0
5.0
9.0
4.0
58.0
11.0
21.2
15.5
35.0
37.0
29.5
25.0
2.0
16.0
2.0
60.0
11.0
55.0
282
1,062
378
126
607
322
13
446
120
32. Hope          	
190
104
41. Burnaby .	
47. Powell River. „   .   ..          	
1,242
240
50. Queen Charlotte	
409
354
849
808
699
62. Sooke     	
726
70.   Alberni
38
312
81.  Fort Nplson
32
85. Vancouver Island North	
87. Stikine
1,184
250
89. Shuswap
1,148
Totals                                   	
49
436
540.5
11,941
 D 202
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 4.7 ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
The cumulative effect of decreasing numbers of births from 1961 to 1966 has
at last resulted in a decrease in total enrolment in the elementary grades. A decrease in Grade I enrolment had been forecast to begin in 1968, but continual immigration turned the decline into a plateau with over 25 per cent of the pupils who
entered Grade I in 1970 having been born in another province or country. Immigration is still high, but the effect of decreasing birth rates outside British Columbia is beginning to be noticed in the age-distribution of immigrant children, and
Grade I enrolment should continue to decrease until September 1974. The establishment of new kindergarten classes resulted in a net increase of 601 at that level,
which partly offset the decrease of 3,168 in Grade I. Over 55 per cent of the available 5-year-old children in British Columbia are now enrolled in public school
kindergartens.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
F.T.E.
Teachers
June Net
Enrolment
1.
2.
3.
4.
7.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
21.
22.
23.
24.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
52.
54.
55.
56.
57.
59.
Fernie	
Cranbrook—
Kimberley	
Windermere...
Nelson	
Castlegar	
Arrow LakeS-
Trail	
Grand Forks-
Kettle Valley-
Southern Okanagan-
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke 	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen..
Vernon 	
Central Okanagan..
KamloopS-
Birch Island	
Williams Lake„
Quesnel 	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo-
Merritt—	
Hope	
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta	
Richmond—
Vancouver-
New Westminster-
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge 	
Coquitlam..
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River —
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte-
Prince Rupert—
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George	
Peace River South..
7
7
8
6
21
11
6
11
3
6
4
12
4
3
6
6
2
13
32
35
6
28
20
6
9
7
5
28
31
27
60
22
35
95
9
39
20
40
36
13
10
14
8
5
3
8
6
6
10
44
20
65
72
48
23
105
63
27
107
30
18
33
104
16
9
42
44
22
128
241
326
25
135
102
25
62
59
37
194
180
160
603
258
336
1,440
120
569
147
536
417
152
53
100
58
28
23
98
55
31
48
383
132
71.0
83.5
49.8
25.1
112.6
68.7
27.4
119.7
34.4
18.0
37.0
114.9
17.0
10.3
47.5
50.1
26.0
150.2
268.2
387.6
25.8
149.7
110.3
28.0
69.2
65.1
43.0
209.7
197.3
182.0
667.6
327.0
397.5
1,643.8
135.5
652.5
169.4
630.8
494.8
186.0
59.6
119.4
68.5
33.0
26.2
114.7
61.8
32.6
51.5
448.6
157.5
2,079
2,417
1,355
579
2,742
1,719
673
3,007
947
462
970
3,077
441
232
1,171
1,341
743
4,145
8,080
9,957
759
3,973
3,249
722
1,715
1,715
1,098
5,800
5,401
5,044
18,528
8,623
10,332
44,674
3,686
16.960
4,587
17,064
13,045
5,051
1,585
2,978
1,760
608
606
3,034
1,692
868
1,411
11,891
3,960
 r
STATISTICAL TABLES
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued
D 203
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
F.T.E.
Teachers
June Net
Enrolment
60
61
62
63
64
65
66.
67
68
69
70
71
72
75
76,
77,
80.
81.
84.
85.
86.
87.
88.
89.
Peace River North	
Greater Victoria	
Sooke .	
Saanich	
Gulf Islands	
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan..
Ladysmith	
. Nanaimo	
Qualicum	
Alberni	
Courtenay	
Campbell River-
Mission	
. Agassiz	
Summerland..
Kitimat	
Fort Nelson	
Vancouver Island West	
Vancouver Island North-
Creston-Kaslo	
Stikine	
Skeena-Cassiar-
Shuswap	
Totals-
16
42
17
14
5
25
7
10
30
9
19
18
16
17
5
2
5
4
6
13
10
5
21
23
1,212
117
593
132
111
19
140
42
57
238
40
194
162
113
91
20
22
76
31
30
53
60
8
131
96
10,665
124.3
692.0
138.0
126.8
20.4
154.2
43.9
60.5
258.8
47.0
209.3
186.1
122.3
96.6
24.5
26.2
89.9
32.5
33.0
57.5
64.0
8.0
139.0
108.4
12,140.9
3,176
19,020
4,119
3,356
499
3,880
1,091
1,568
6,795
1,181
5,584
4,900
3,223
2,351
546
716
2,477
813
702
1,404
1,677
172
3,842
2,971
~324^6T9~
 D 204                                PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
TABLE 4.8    SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
The total number of schools increased during the year from 1,507 to 1,515 and
total enrolment increased by 7,417.   While that is the smallest increase in 27 years
it is still a major increase and is greater than the total enrolment, for example, in a
city the size of Vernon.   Smaller increases are expected during the next eight or nine
years, but total enrolment is expected to remain on a plateau with declines in ele
mentary enrolment being offset by further increases in the secondary grades.   Re
ports of declining birth rates and rapidly decreasing elementary enrolments in urban
centres, which are true, must be contrasted with the facts that in many other school
districts the maximum enrolments are still in the primary grades and the numbers
of births in the Province averaged 35,596 in 1969, 1970, and 1971 vs. 32,875 in
1965, 1966, and 1967.   Even if pre-school immigration decreases, Grade I should
begin to increase slowly again after September 1974 and secondary enrolment is not
expected to reach its maximum until June 1978.
The number of full-time equivalent teachers employed in schools, i.e., exclud
ing district-employed teachers and supervisors, increased during the year from
21,755.6 to 22,280.8.   Further increases may be expected as the proportion of
secondary to elementary teachers becomes larger.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
F.T.E.
Teachers
June Net
Enrolment
1. Fernie	
10
107
128.5
3,236
2. Cranbrook            .          	
10
136
177.0
4,423
3. Kimherley..
10
83
100.4
2,324
4. Windermere                           	
9
54
65.7
1,408
26
181
223.6
4,930
13
102
127.7
2,820
10, Arrow Lakes                                       .. 	
8
46
51.4
1,075
11    Trail
15
195
247.6
5,476
12. Grand Forks
4
50
65.4
1,547
13  Kettle Valley
7
28
32.0
699
6
77
100.3
2,307
15.  Penticton
15
180
226.9
5,194
Hi. Ker**-r"^'-»s
5
25
30.0
692
17. Princeton                     	
4
7
37
63
45.3
76.5
1,024
1,779
18. Golden       .                                                    	
8
81
103.4
2,418
3
40
51.0
1,213
22. Vernon
17
226
292.2
7,013
38
409
506.0
13,009
44
519
700.0
16,323
26. Birch Island             	
7
39
44.1
1,100
77. Williams Lake
39
241
277.2
6,758
78.  Quesnel
23
161
196.7
5,079
99    T illnnet
7
38
46.0
1,027
30. South Cariboo
12
92
106.2
2,425
31. Merritt
8
90
107.1
2,589
32. Hope                                                                        ...
7
65
82.0
1,856
33    rhilliwaclr
33
324
394.2
9,777
34,   Abbotsford
35
291
346.8
8,572
31
258
320.5
7,892
74
974
1,211.8
29,642
37    pelta
27
415
546.0
13,255
38. Richmond
42
551
699.0
16,868
39. Vancouver   ...
114
2,377
2,953.2
73,322
10
225
264.5
6,555
50
974
1,231.5
28,863
47, Map'e Ridge
24
245
311.4
7,436
43    rVintlitlam
50
831
1,069.8
26,047
44. North Vancouver              .              	
45
748
953.7
22,305
45. West Vancouver          	
16
265
356.5
8,682
46. Sechelt           	
12
82
101.6
2,468
47. Powell River                                                   	
17
170
215.4
4,919
10
89
114.0
2,641
 STATISTICAL TABLES
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued
D 205
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
F.T.E.
Teachers
June Net
Enrolment
49.
50.
52.
54.
55.
56.
57.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
75.
76.
77.
80.
81.
84.
85.
86.
87.
88.
89.
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte-
Prince Rupert	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George	
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria—
Sooke	
Saanich	
Gulf Islands-
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan.-
Ladysmith	
Nanaimo .—
Qualicum	
Alberni	
Courtenay ~.
Campbell River-
Mission	
Agassiz 	
Summerland	
Kitimat	
Fort Nelson 	
Vancouver Island West—
Vancouver Island North-
Creston-Kaslo	
Stikine  	
Skeena-Cassiar-
Shuswap —
Totals..
7
7
10
9
9
13
54
24
22
58
23
18
6
29
8
12
35
11
25
23
20
19
6
3
6
6
8
19
13
6
25
29
1,515
42
53
145
92
62
101
598
211
198
1,027
233
190
29
229
62
95
381
70
322
256
189
138
37
40
112
45
43
113
107
18
199
181
17,802
55.0
64.4
182.7
113.8
71.1
120.5
750.9
282.5
234.8
1,311.5
272.0
235.8
37.4
284.3
75.9
118.5
463.3
92.0
383.7
322.1
233.3
170.6
51.5
56.2
149.9
50.5
49.1
133.5
131.0
19.0
233.5
230.4
22,280.8
903
1,311
4,456
2,697
1,629
2,955
18,549
6,543
5,432
32,175
7,116
5,591
814
6,246
1,697
2,629
10,961
2,006
8,991
7,732
5,634
3,861
1,060
1,325
3,659
1,092
967
2,895
3,043
422
5,777
5,367
534,523
  STATISTICAL TABLES
D 207
POST-SECONDARY AND ADULT EDUCATION
Tables Pagb
5.1 Degree Enrolment in British Columbia Universities 1971/ 72  208
5.2 Enrolment in the Public Colleges and British Columbia Institute of Technology, 1971/72  208
5.3 Summary Showing Trends in Adult Enrolment, Number of Classes, Number of Instructors, and Number of School Districts Participating  209
5.4    Classification of Adult Education Courses and EnrolmenL.
210
 D 208
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 5.1    DEGREE ENROLMENT1 IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
UNIVERSITIES 1971/72
University
Degree Enrolment
British
Columbia
Victoria
Simon
Fraser
Notre Dame
of Nelson
Total
Full time—
Undergraduate             	
16,448
2,545
4,624
176
4,622
702
510
26,204
3,423
Totals 	
18,993
4,800        ;        5,324
510
29,627
Part time—■
Correspondence    -
689
2,017
188
5,222
739
207
1,454
869
TAT
3
47
177
689
3,628
442
6,853
Totals . 	
8,116
2,400                   869
227
11,612
27,109
72(10         1         6.1933
737
41,239
i Excluding those enrolled in noncredit and other courses not leading toward a university degree.
2 Simon Fraser University Summer Session included in "full time."
3 Simon Fraser University reported an "aggregate" enrolment calculated on the trimester system.
tive total fall semester enrolments for 1971/72 and 1970/71 are 5,205 and 5,494 respectively.
Compara-
TABLE 5.2    ENROLMENT IN THE PUBLIC COLLEGES AND BRITISH
COLUMBIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, 1971/72
College
Full Time
Part Time
Total
Academic
Career
Subtotal
Academic
Career
Subtotal
BCIT	
622
433
256
1,086
362
193
442
395
1,988
2,806
231
248
126
406
210
77
119
201
854
2,806
853
681
382
1,492
572
270
561
596
2,842
~512
465
166
318
157
258
226
119
1,787
3,394
26
173
79
599
565
71
33
7
3,394
538
638
245
917
722
329
259
126
1,787
6,200
1,391
1,319
Cariboo - .. -
627
2,409
1,294
599
820
Selkirk  	
722
Vancouver City* (Langara
4,629
Totals 	
5,777
5,278
11,055
4,008
4,947
8,955
20,010
i Fall semester.
 STATISTICAL TABLES
D 209
TABLE 5.3 SUMMARY SHOWING TRENDS IN ADULT ENROLMENT,
NUMBER OF CLASSES, NUMBER OF INSTRUCTORS, AND NUMBER
OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS PARTICIPATING.
Year
Number of
School
Districts
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
1959/60-
1960/61-
1961/62-
1962/63-
1963/64-
1964/65-
1965/66-
1966/67-
1967/68-
1968/69...
1969/70-
1970/71-
1971/72..
58
64
65
68
70
70
71
69
67
63
69
73
61
40,867
40,917
46,548
70,405
78,461
91,579
100,292
112,105
127,659
141,217
162,140
180,282
156,621
1,796
1,945
2,273
2,949
3,454
3,828
4,141
4,982
5,610
6,394
7,045
8,601
7,445
1,578
2,220
2,219
3,070
3,964
4,261
5,067
5,637
6,230
7,406
7,855
9,604
8,175
Vocational Programme
Year
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Courses
1959/60-
1960/61-
1961/62-
1962/63.
1963/64-
1964/65..
1965/66.
1966/67-
1967/68-
1968/69-
1969/70-
1970/71-
1971/72-
13,539
12,530
9,783
14,317
17,510
21,393
25,477
28,556
29,977
31,482
34,319
42,937
35,269
322
552
512
681
910
1,116
1,384
1,511
1,566
1,767
1,785
2,085
1,787
Nonvocational Programme
1959/60_
1960/61-
1961/62-
1962/63-
1963/64-
1964/65...
1965/66-
1966/67-
1967/68-
1968/69-
1969/70-
1970/71-
1971/72-
27,328
1,256
28,387
1,393
36,765
1,755
56,008
2,264
60,951
2,574
70,186
2,799
74,815
2,947
83,549
3,550
97,682
4,131
109,735
4,840
127,821
5,396
137,345
6,410
121,352
5,900
1,256
1,648
1,707
2,389
3,054
3,145
3,683
4,126
4,664
5,639
6,070
7,519
6,389
 D 210
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
TABLE 5.4    CLASSIFICATION OF ADULT EDUCATION COURSES
AND ENROLMENT
Vocational Programme
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
Business Management-
Commercial	
Automotive	
Machine Shop	
Construction Trades-
Electronics .	
Lumbering and Forestry_
Engineering	
Service Trades	
Agriculture-
Vocational Preparatory-
Miscellaneous	
Totals-
6,333
8,100
1,476
1,363
1,758
1,434
1,535
3,533
1,470
259
1,447
6,561
35,269
284
368
76
69
107
77
54
42
83
13
74
298
1,545
304
478
84
92
117
83
70
38
94
14
91
322
1,787
Nonvocational Programme
Academic (for credit)	
English and Citizenship	
Liberal Studies (noncredit)-
Fine Arts ,	
Domestic Arts	
Hobbies and Crafts-
Parent Education—
Recreation and Fitness-
Defensive Driving	
Miscellaneous ,	
Totals-
Total enrolment-
11,065
4,564
9,260
12,596
18,692
13,911
2,821
19,202
10,517
18,724
121,352
156,621
563
253
479
514
928
785
669
722
303
684
5,900
7,445
654
307
490
664
1,193
933
141
913
444
650
6,389
8,176
 STATISTICAL TABLES
D 211
TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
Tables Page
6.1 Enrolments by Courses in Regional Vocational Schools and Vocational
Divisions of Colleges  212
6.2 Vocational Night School Enrolments in Regional Vocational Schools and
Vocational Divisions of Colleges  216
6.3    Vocational Night School Enrolment—School Districts..
216
British Columbia Institute of Technology-
6.4       Day Enrolments	
6.5       Extension (Night School) Enrolments.
217
218
 D 212
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
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D 213
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 D 214
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
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 STATISTICAL TABLES
D 215
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 D 216
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1971/72
TABLE 6.2 VOCATIONAL NIGHT SCHOOL ENROLMENTS IN REGIONAL
VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS AND VOCATIONAL DIVISIONS OF COLLEGES.
School
1969/70
1970/71
1971/72
3,718
92
702
634
231
534
231
356
129
2,906
178
618
839
241
810
158
735
158
3,199
240
728
732
208
937
284
817
160
1,5811
5,152
6192
6,400
6252
5,446
616
Totals                           	
12,398
13,668
14,948
i Includes course in local school districts.
2 Includes some nonvocational classes.
TABLE 6.3    VOCATIONAL NIGHT SCHOOL ENROLMENT,
SCHOOL DISTRICTS
1969/70
1970/71
1971/72
11,695
9,334
529
4,986
14,593
11,424
262
3,266
14,463
10,041
257
3,312
Agriculture                _          	
Totals                                                               	
26,544
29,545
28,073
 STATISTICAL TABLES
BRITISH COLUMBIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Table 6.4   Day Enrolments
D 217
Course
Year
Male
Female
Total
Administrative^
Business Management
Broadcast Communications-
Computer Programming and Systems-
Financial Management	
Hotel, Motel and Food Service.
Marketing	
Technical-
Health
Biomedical Electronics-
Medical Laboratory	
Medical Radiography-
Nuclear Medicine	
Nursing	
Environmental—Public Health-
Health Data	
Engineering
Biological Sciences-
Building	
Chemical and Metallurgical-
Civil and Structural	
Electrical and Electronics-
Forestry	
Forest Products..
Instrumentation..
Mechanical _
Mining-
Natural Gas and Petroleum-
Surveying 	
Totals	
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
103
81
27
26
30
23
36
40
60
43
73
68
34
27
23
6
11
6
7
3
4
1
7
6
39
22
35
24
73
49
64
46
74
45
168
137
127
109
36
21
48
31
76
53
49
52
18
10
66
38
2,255
9
7
9
6
23
21
19
11
16
10
15
22
1
1
8
3
88
84
47
44
14
14
99
84
3
5
18
31
21
3
3
5
3
759
112
88
36
32
53
44
55
51
76
53
88
90
35
28
31
9
99
90
54
47
18
15
106
90
42
27
18
66
45
76
52
69
49
74
45
168
138
132
110
38
21
48
31
77
53
51
52
18
10
66
38
3,014
 D 218 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1971/72
Table 6.5    Extension (Night School) Enrolments
Administrative Management   713
Financial Management   414
Industrial Marketing   279
Retail Merchandising   54
Advertising and Public Relations  68
Travel Marketing and Management  102
Personnel Management   122
Business Secretaries .  31
Hotel, Motel, and Food Services Management  158
Executive Housekeepers   88
Municipal Administration   43
Computer Programming   504
Broadcast Administration   55
Technical Management  158
English   109
Mathematics   218
Physics   22
Buildings   242
Chemcial and Metallugical Technology  134
Civil and Structural Technology  194
Electrical and Electronics Technology  636
Biological Sciences Technology   10
Forest Resources Technology ... 55
Instrumentation and Systems Technology  30
Mechanical Technology  114
Mining Technology  41
Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology  22
Surveying Technology  188
Landscape Technology   53
Health Technology   29
Medical Radiography   17
Industry Services Department  1,441
Total   6,344
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1973
6,030-972-7250

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