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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES AND HOSPITAL INSURANCE Mental Health Branch PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1973

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 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES
AND HOSPITAL INSURANCE
Mental Health Branch
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
1972
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1973
  To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor oj the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Annual Report of the Mental Health
Branch, Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance, for the year 1972.
DENNIS G. COCKE
Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance,
Office oj the Minister oj Health Services and Hospital Insurance,
Victoria, B.C., January 25,1973.
 Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance,
Mental Health Branch,
Victoria, B.C., January 25, 1973.
The Honourable Dennis G. Cocke,
Minister oj Health Services and Hospital Insurance,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir: I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Mental Health
Branch for 1972.
F. G. TUCKER, M.B., B.S., C.R.C.P., M.Sc.
Deputy Minister oj Mental Health
 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES
AND HOSPITAL INSURANCE
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH
The Honourable Dennis G. Cocke, Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance.
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
F. G. Tucker, M.B., B.S., C.R.C.P., M.Sc,
Deputy Minister of Mental Health.
A. Porteous,
Assistant Deputy Minister of Mental
Health.
J. S. Bland, B.A., M.B., B.Chir.,
M.R.C.Psych., D.P.M.,
Co-ordinator of Mental Retardation and
Children's Psychiatric Services.
H. W. Bridge, M.A., M.B., B.Ch., B.A.O.,
M.Sc, C.R.C.P.(C),
Co-ordinator of Adult Psychiatric Services.
F. A. Matheson,
Departmental Comptroller.
R. H. Goodacre, B.A., M.A., C.P.H.,
Sociologist.
Miss M.  M.  Lonergan,  B.S.N.Ed., M.N.,
Nursing Consultant.
R. S. McInnes, B.A., B.D., M.P.H.,
Co-ordinator of Mental Health Centres.
A. G. Devries, Ph.D.,
Consultant in Psychology.
Mrs. F. Ireland, B.A., M.S.W.,
Co-ordinator of Boarding-homes.
P. Bingham, M.S.W.,
Assistant Co-ordinator of Boarding-homes.
G. L. Tomalty, B.A., M.P.A.,
Departmental Personnel Officer.
A. Bishop, B.Ed.,
Assistant Personnel Officer.
K. Denecke, B.Com.,
Statistician.
W. A. Blair,
Management Analyst.
R. H. Thompson,
Director, Information Services.
N. W. Wylie,
Administrative Officer.
Mrs. P. A. West, R.R.L.,
Consultant in Medical Records.
COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH CENTRES
P. Adrian, M.S.W.,
Administrator, Chilliwack Mental Health
Centre.
A. L. Aranas, M.D., D.Psych.,
Director, Victoria Mental Health Centre.
Y. Bledsoe, M.S.W.,
Administrator, Powell River Mental
Health Centre.
J. S. Brown, M.S.W.,
Administrator, Whalley Mental Health
Centre.
V. N. Brown, M.S.W.,
Administrator, Port Alberni Mental
Health Centre.
R. L. Cameron, M.S.W., R.S.W.,
Administrator, Trail Mental Health
Centre.
G. G. Ellis, M.A., B.M., B.Ch., D.P.M.,
F.R.CP.(G), M.R.C.Psych.,
Director, Kamloops Mental Health Centre.
A. Geddes, B.S.N.,
Administrator, Cranbrook Mental Health
Centre.
F. J. Hannah, M.A.,
Administrator, New Westminster Mental
Health Centre.
A. I. Holmes, B.A., M.S.W.,
Administrator, Kelowna Mental Health
Centre.
W. C. Holt, B.A., M.D., CR.C.P.(C),
Director, Burnaby Mental Health Centre.
P. Humphrey, B.A., M.S.W.,
Administrator, Williams Lake Mental
Health Centre.
 J. A. Hutton, M.S.W.,
Administrator, Duncan Mental Health
Centre.
J. L. Kyle, M.A.,
Administrator, Courtenay Mental Health
Centre.
F. R. Linge, M.A.,
Administrator, Penticton Mental Health
Centre.
E. Little, B.S.N.,
Administrator, Fort St. John Mental
Health Centre.
S. G. Little, M.D.,
Director, Port Coquitlam Mental Health
Centre.
E. Luke, M.B., Ch.B., D.P.M., F.R.C.P.,
M.R.CPsych.,
Director, Maple Ridge Mental Health
Centre.
D. L. Mitchell, B.Ed., M.A.,
Administrator, Surrey Mental Health
Centre.
J. Snyder, B.Sc., B.S.W., M.S.W.,
Administrator, Prince George Mental
Health Centre.
E. J. Sopp, M.S.W.,
Administrator, Nelson Mental Health
Centre.
S. G. Travers, M.S.W.,
Administrator, Terrace Mental Health
Centre.
R. D. Turner, B.A., B.S.W., M.S,W.,
Administrator, Nanaimo
Mental Health Centre.
J. T. Wood, M.D.,
Director, Saanich Mental Health Centre.
S. Zimmerman, B.S.W.,
Administrator, Vernon Mental Health
Centre.
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
J. C. Johnston, M.D., F.A.C.H.A.,
Superintendent, Riverview Hospital.
W. J. G. McFarlane, B.A., M.D.,
D.Psych., C.R.C.P.,
Clinical Director, Riverview Hospital.
W. W. Black, M.B., B.Sc, D.P.M.,
C.R.C.P.(C),
Superintendent, Geriatric Division.
J. Bower, M.D., M.R.C.Psych., D.P.M.,
Superintendent, The Tranquille School.
A. P. Hughes, M.D., B.Sc, C.R.C.P.,
Superintendent, The Woodlands School.
Mrs. E. Paulson, B.S.N.,
Acting Director of Nursing Education.
BRITISH COLUMBIA YOUTH DEVELOPMENT CENTRE
M. E. Campbell, R.N., B.N., M.A.,
Acting Director, Residential Unit.
D. C. Shalman, Ph.D.,
Director, Psychological Education Clinic.
A. A. Cashmore, M.D.(Lond-),
Director, Family and Children's Clinic.
L
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION page
The Year in Review  11
Construction, Maintenance, and Business Review  14
Personnel  16
Adult Psychiatric Services  18
Retardation and Children's Psychiatric Services  20
Nursing Consultation Services  2 3
Boarding-home Programme  21
Special Studies and Continuing Education  25
Psychology Consultation Services  27
Management Analyst Consultation Services  28
Statistics and Medical Records  29
Information Services  31
COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
Burnaby Mental Health Centre  35
Chilliwack Mental Health Centre  37
Courtenay Mental Health Centre  37
Cranbrook Mental Health Centre  38
Duncan Mental Health Centre  39
Fort St. John Mental Health Centre  40
Kamloops Mental Health Centre  40
Kelowna Mental Health Centre  41
Maple Ridge Mental Health Centre  42
Nanaimo Mental Health Centre  44
Nelson Mental Health Centre  45
New Westminster Mental Health Centre  45
Penticton Mental Health Centre  46
Port Alberni Mental Health Centre  47
Port Coquitlam Mental Health Centre  48
Powell River Mental Health Centre  49
Prince George Mental Health Centre  49
Saanich Mental Health Centre  50
Surrey Mental Health Centre  51
Terrace Mental Health Centre  51
Trail Mental Health Centre  53
Vernon Mental Health Centre  54
Victoria Mental Health Centre  55
Whalley Mental Health Centre  56
Williams Lake Mental Health Centre  56
IN-PATIENT SERVICES
Department of Nursing Education  59
Riverview Hospital  61
Geriatric Division  66
The Woodlands School  69
The Tranquille School  74
British Columbia Youth Development Centre  77
PATIENT MOVEMENT
Patient Movement Trends  8 5
Patient Movement Data  8 6
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS  89
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 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
The Year in Review
Construction, Maintenance, and Business Review
Personnel
Adult Psychiatric Services
Retardation and Children's Psychiatric Services
Nursing Consultation Services
Boarding-home Programme
Special Studies and Continuing Education
Psychology Consultation Services
Management Analyst Consultation Services
Statistics and Medical Records
Information Services
A
mental
health
branch
  GENERAL
ADMINISTRATION
THE YEAR
IN REVIEW
F. G. Tucker, M.B., B.S., C.R.C.P., M.Sc.
Deputy Minister oj Mental Health
The accelerating rate of social change and the attendant problems, together with
mounting concern over the cost of health care, have had a particular impact upon
the field of mental health. The complexity of devising and implementing a programme which crosses so many established boundaries increases each year. Nevertheless, major advances continue to be made in services to the mentally ill and
retarded of the Province.
Details of the various programmes are contained in the body of this Report,
and at this point I wish only to emphasize developments of special significance.
The community programme has expanded in the past year and we are on the
threshold of major and exciting changes in the Greater Vancouver region. An Advisory Mental Health Committee to the Metropolitan Board of Health has been
appointed to co-ordinate and plan a composite community mental health programme
for this region, with a special emphasis on alternative methods of care and provision
of "back-up resources." The necessary planning and research staff will be made
available through the Mental Health Branch.
In May the Riverview Hospital Out-patient Department was transferred from
Burnaby to East Broadway and expanded its ability to provide pre-admission assessments and limited out-patient services. The programme was augmented by the
Home Treatment Programme. An extensive scientific evaluation is in process, but
it would appear that this has been a successful project which, at its peak, with a team
of nine, maintained 180 patients in the community who would otherwise have been
admitted to hospital.
New mental health centres have been established at Port Alberni and Williams
Lake and as soon as staff can be recruited a centre will be opened at Prince Rupert.
This brings to 26 the number of mental health centres in the Province. A lack of
psychiatrists in outlying areas remains a problem, although there are signs that this
may be improving. Admissions to Riverview Hospital have declined from 288 per
100,000 population in 1966/67 to 139 per 100,000 in the year 1971, and there are
indications that the new mental health centre programmes, backed up by psychiatric
beds in general hospitals, have been a significant factor in this improvement.
At the end of the year there were approximately 1,300 patients in boarding-
homes supervised by the Mental Health Branch. While many were formerly in our
major institutions, an increasing percentage are placed directly from, and within,
their community. An occupational therapy supervisor and four activity therapists
were appointed to the Lower Fraser Valley region and I hope that similar programmes can be established in other regions of the Province. A successful boarding-
home programme requires constant strict surveillance if it is not to deteriorate
11
 O  12
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
rapidly. It also requires many and varied resources, and more flexible funding than
is at present readily available.
In June, Dr. Bruce Bryson retired from the superintendency of the Riverview
Hospital after 33 years of service. I would like to pay tribute to his dedication and
to the care that he gave the many patients for whom he was responsible during his
long career. We were glad to welcome Dr. J. C. Johnston, formerly Executive Director of the Calgary General Hospital, to replace Dr. Bryson. His extensive experience
and zeal will be invaluable in the reorganization of this facility.
Riverview Hospital has faced a critical situation for most of this year due to the
acute shortage of trained psychiatrists on staff. This caused a serious reduction
of admissions, especially from the Vancouver area, and reduced the effectiveness of
the new Out-patient Department. I trust that the revised salary scales will enable
us to recruit adequate numbers of trained staff, and that, by tying the various divisions
of the hospital more closely with the communities they serve, all staff will find they
have a stimulating and satisfying job. An Advisory Board was appointed in
August, consisting of Dr. Milton H. Miller, Head of the Department of Psychiatry,
University of British Columbia; Mrs. H. Gemeroy, Director of Nursing, Health
Sciences Centre; S. T. Richards, Director of Medical Options, B.C. Institute of
Technology, together with Dr. H. W. Bridge, Dr. J. H. Cumming, and A. Porteous
of this Branch, and I am grateful to them for their invaluable advice and assistance.
The retardation programme has developed very satisfactorily and The Woodlands School and The Tranquille School have provided a high-quality service. The
expansion of community resources has enabled these schools to limit admissions to
individuals who really require this particular level of care. During the year, grants
were made to the following retardation facilities:
Cloverdale Association for the Mentally Retarded.
Dawson Creek Society for Retarded Children.
Greater Victoria Association for Retarded.
Nanaimo Association for Retarded.
New Westminster and District Society for the Retarded.
North Shore Association for the Mentally Retarded.
Quesnel and District Association for Retarded Children.
Vancouver Association for the Mentally Retarded.
To ensure that these services are effectively used, a Mental Retardation Coordinator was added to the Lower Fraser Valley region, and other regions will be
covered in the coming year. Great credit is due the British Columbia Association
For the Mentally Retarded, which continues to operate residential, school, and workshop facilities for the retarded. Excellent services are also provided by the Bevan
Lodge Society, which operates Bevan Lodge in Courtenay, and the Glendale Lodge
Society, operators of the Glendale Lodge, Victoria. Glendale Lodge is now in full
operation and will increase its out-patient services and travelling clinics in the coming
year, with funds made available by the Mental Health Branch.
An effective psychogeriatric programme has been maintained with increased
emphasis on activation. We look forward to expanding in the community consultation service. Of note was the incorporation of the Skeenaview Lodge Society,
which, it is anticipated, will take over the operation of the Skeenaview Hospital on
April 1,1973.
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
O 13
The needs of emotionally disturbed children remain a priority and grants for
community agencies were made as follows:
$
Cedar Lodge Society  43,314.00
Gateway School   20,000.00
Kelowna Group Living Home Society     2,333.33
Mennonite Receiving Committee     8,000.00
Prince George Receiving Home Society  58,933.00
This programme especially involves many Government departments and agencies and the co-ordination of planning and the delivery system remains unsatisfactory.
Dr. Milton Miller was appointed as Professor and Head of the Department of
Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, in January. This was an event of major
significance not only to the university but to the Mental Health Branch, and, during
the past 12 months, Dr. Miller has never failed to meet our requests for advice or
assistance. We look forward to working in close association with him and his
colleagues.
In September, the responsibility for training the psychiatric nurses was transferred from the Mental Health Branch to the B.C. Institute of Technology. While
the Branch facilities will still be used, the responsibility for the programme will be
vested in the Department of Education. I am particularly pleased that the new
curriculum provides the psychiatric nurse with further avenues of advance.
Two new members have joined the Branch staff, Dr. A. G. Devries, as Consultant in Psychology and A. Blair, as Management Analyst. They are making a
valuable contribution to the Branch administration and operation. In June, Miss
Alice Carroll, Consultant in Social Work, retired. Her accomplishments in the
mental health field in the more than 20 years with the Mental Health Branch are
too numerous to list. The successful programmes she initiated are testimony enough.
I know that I and my colleagues throughout the Branch will miss the benefit of her
advice and the warmth of her friendship.
 CONSTRUCTION, MAINTENANCE,
AND BUSINESS REVIEW
Riverview Hospital, Essondale
The renovation of rented quarters to house the Out-patient Department in
Vancouver was completed and the new facilities came into operation on
January 18, 1972.
Conversion of the boilerhouse from coal to gas was completed during the year.
Contracts totalling approximately $300,000 were awarded for fire escapes in
the Crease Unit and the East Lawn Building.   Planning was continued
for additional fire escapes in the other buildings, as recommended by the
Fire Marshal.
Renovations to the Riverside Building and the recreational therapy addition
were out to tender at the year-end.
Renovation of the West Lawn Building (planning of phase 3 of this project)
was still under way.
Tenders were called for alterations to Nurses' Homes 6, 7, and 8, to provide
patient accommodation and office space.
Planning for a new laundry continued.
The Woodlands School, New Westminster
Tenders were called for the renovation of Nurses' Home 3 to an academic and
activity building.
A contract in the amount of $379,300 was let for the completion of the industrial therapy building.
The contract for the ventilation of Cedar, Pine, Birch, and Willow Cottages
was completed, and planning continued on the five new 20-bed units.
The Tranquille School, Tranquille
Installation of fire escapes in the Greaves Building was completed.
Planning continued on the four 20-bed units and Training Centre.
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace
The contract for phase 1 in the renovation programme for this unit was completed and planning for phase 2 continued.
In addition to the foregoing, a large number of minor projects were carried out
by the Department of Public Works.
BUSINESS
During the year under review there were a number of changes in the business
administration of the institutions, as follows:
Dellview Hospital, Vernon—L. W. Fox, Supervisor, retired and was succeeded
by V. Phillips, formerly the Supervisor at the Skeenaview Hospital in
Terrace.
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace—V. Phillips, Supervisor, transferred to the Dellview Hospital, Vernon, and was succeeded by W. G. W. Fraser.
The Tranquille School, Tranquille—E. V. R. Merrick, Business Administrator,
retired and was succeeded by Mrs. Corine Lindsay.
14
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
O 15
British Columbia Youth Development Centre, Burnaby—R. McCallum retired
and was succeeded by L. McClintick.
The Assessment Committee again had a very active year, with a large increase
in the number of cases referred to it.
The Department of Highways completed work on the new four-lane highway
adjacent to the Riverview Hospital grounds.
A new Public Works Order in Council was passed to provide improvement in
traffic control and parking at all Government institutions.
Patients from the Provincial Home, Kamloops, were transferred to temporary
quarters at The Tranquille School during the year. This was necessary as the Department of Public Works were demolishing the existing Provincial Home, which
will be replaced by a new building.
Three new mental health centres were opened at Port Alberni, Prince Rupert,
and Williams Lake.
 PERSONNEL
During the year, Branch personnel regulations and procedures were promulgated throughout the Service by means of personnel circulars. Twenty-eight circulars
were issued in 1972, including detailed instructions concerning employee appraisals,
requisitions for appointment to a Civil Service position, an on-call system for inpatient care, part-time continuous employees, and the procedures for handling cases
of disabled employees.
Fifty-one requests for classification reviews were received, and 35 were reviewed
by Branch personnel officers, who turned down five and forwarded 29 to the Civil
Service Commission with recommendations for upgrading. Of these, the Civil Service Commission refused two, approved 11, and had 16 under review at the year-end.
The review of all Child Care Counsellor job specifications, which started in
1971, was finalized during the year. The new series will also replace the child care
worker series.
The statistics given in Tables 1 and 2 were based on the fiscal year ending
March 31, 1972. During that period, the establishment of permanent positions
increased by one.
The staff turnover for the fiscal year 1971/72, temporary staff excluded, was
13.36 per cent, down from the 21.82-per-cent turnover for 1970/71. No obvious
reason could be determined for the decrease.
A serious shortage of registered nurses and psychiatric nurses developed during
1972, and advertising across Canada and in the United Kingdom was continuing at
the year-end.   Some success was evident by the fall and late in the year.
The recruitment of psychiatrists, psychologists, psychiatric social workers, and
occupational therapists remained a problem, although the situation, with the exception of psychiatrists, had shown some improvement. Extensive advertising was being
carried out for these professional classifications.
Twelve grievances were considered at the second step in 1972. Five were
settled or turned down at the Deputy Minister level, and the remainder were referred
to the Chief Personnel Officer of the Civil Service Commission for further action.
An on-call system project, started in 1971 for nursing staff, was completed at
The Woodlands School. Regulations and procedures were subsequently issued, and
late in the year other facilities were using the on-call system as a means of meeting
day-to-day deficiences in staff due to minor illness, recruitment lag, and short-term
WCB injuries.
The psychiatric student nurse enrolment decreased in 1971/72 from 143 to
87, as of March 31, 1972. The class intake for February 1972 was the last for the
Mental Health Branch's Division of Nursing Education. The training of psychiatric
nurses was transferred to the B.C. Institute of Technology, Burnaby, and their first
class started in September 1972.
The Departmental Personnel Officer, G. L. Tomalty, was appointed to a special
Commission of Inquiry, which was formed to study and report on employer/employee relations to the office of the Provincial Secretary.
As at November 1, 1972, the Branch employed 123 handicapped persons.
Sick leave granted with pay in 1972 averaged 8.44 days per employee, and
without pay averaged 1.5 days.
16
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
O 17
Table 1—Comparison of Staff Totals, Showing Totals for the
Preceding Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year 1970/71
Positions in
Establishment,
March 31,
1971
Number
on Staff,
March 31,
1971
Fiscal Year 1971/72
Positions in
Establishment,
March 31,
1972
Number
on Staff,
March 31,
1972
61
71
141
53
62
139
60
68
166
58
Department of Nursing Education	
Mental Health Centres and Boarding-home Programme-
59
155
Subtotals   	
273
254
294
272
In-patient care—
1,685
924
395
449
98
74
156
1,759
955
404
482
100
77
136
1,677
924
396
449
98
74
143
1,777
The Woodlands School.....
990
411
492
100
Skeenaview Hospital—	
73
140
3,781
3,913
3,761
3,983
Total Civil Service positions  	
4,054
325
4,167
143
4,055
325
4,255
87
Totals    	
4,379
4,310
4,380
4,342
Table 2—Breakdown by Classification of Recruitment and Separation
Activity for the Mental Health Branch, Excluding Student Psychiatric Nurses and Temporary Relief Staff.
Recruited
38
12
75
Physicians 	
Medical interns	
Registered nurses	
Psychiatric nurses      186
Female psychiatric aides      339
Male psychiatric aides	
Teachers 	
Occupational therapists
Seamstresses	
Recreational therapists 	
Psychologists 	
Psychiatric social workers _.
Dietitians 	
Cook's helpers	
Clerks 	
Clerk-Stenographers 	
Laundry workers	
Child care counsellors	
Miscellaneous professional
Miscellaneous technical .....
Miscellaneous 	
94
9
13
3
9
26
47
4
72
31
70
60
15
16
49
295
Separated
35
12
69
221
270
94
6
17
4
8
23
21
3
59
30
42
72
17
6
44
270
Totals   1,463
1,323
 ADULT
PSYCHIATRIC
SERVICES
1972 was the first complete year of the existence of the position of Co-ordinator
of Adult Psychiatric Services.
Early in the year, much time was spent in consulting at Riverview Hospital,
not only in regard to the development of a regionalization programme, but in consultation with the Executive Director on a variety of administrative matters. Meetings of boards and committees were numerous and time-consuming, as was the
correspondence related to medical staff recruitment. In conjunction with Dr. J.
Cumming, R. S. Mclnnes, and R. H. Goodacre, some progress was made on the
regionalization programme based on the Centre Lawn Unit of Riverview Hospital.
In late July the function of the Co-ordinator's position was reviewed and an
attempt made to delineate responsibilities and establish priorities. As a result, the
Co-ordinator's function became more useful in its contribution to the total activity
of the Branch.
SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES OF THE CO-ORDINATOR
Boards and committees—
(1) Riverview Advisory Board.
(2) B.C. Youth Development Centre Board of Management.
(3) Graduate Training Committee, Department of Psychiatry, UBC.
(4) Task Committee, Section of Psychiatry, B.C. Medical Association.
Although not officially appointed by the Branch, membership on this
temporary committee appeared to be a legitimate function in the
Branch interest.
Riverview Hospital—Following the appointment of Dr. J. C. Johnston as
Executive Director, involvement with Riverview Hospital was considerably reduced
and was restricted to
(1) Advisory Board membership;
(2) Regional Programme, Centre Lawn;
(3) medical staffing.
Medical staffing—Changed circumstances and revised routines greatly reduced
the time required for this function. Recommendations for basic changes in various
areas were documented and the prospects for improving medical staff quantity and
quality appeared excellent.
Mental health centres—After a preliminary series of visits, contacts with mental
health centres were limited and mostly problem-solving in nature. The centres
were becoming increasingly aware that the Co-ordinator was available for consultation in various roles, and this activity appeared likely to expand into a major function
of the Co-ordinator. Particularly in matters related to general hospitals, the medical
profession, and community agencies, many centres required guidance and assistance,
and in some instances this could be coupled with limited direct clinical service
where no psychiatrist was available to the centre. Psychiatric units of general
hospitals appeared to show little uniformity of function, and it seemed they may
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
O 19
be treating different patient populations of lesser urgency. A study of this topic,
and the introduction of steps to ensure the provision of services to those patients
most urgently in need of them, would probably constitute a major responsibility
for the Co-ordinator in the near future.
Projects—Two projects were outstanding at the year-end:
(1) The development of the combined In-patient and Day-care Programme involving the hospital and the mental health centre in
Burnaby.
(2) The Forensic Programme project was in process and a draft proposal was close to completion.
 RETARDATION AND
CHILDREN'S
PSYCHIATRIC SERVICES
During 1972 there was improved co-ordination and a better use of existing resources for the retarded and children with emotional disorders, but little in the development of new services.
The institutions for the retarded had very short waiting-lists. They offered
out-patient services, both for initial assessment and for follow-up advice on care
and management. These services acted as adjuncts to improving community ability
to sustain a handicapped child, and enabled many parents to continue home care
whereas previously they would have requested admission to an institution. One
exciting innovation was the initiation of an infant-stimulation programme in Vancouver, which was co-sponsored by the Metropolitan Public Health Department and
the Vancouver Association for the Mentally Retarded. More pre-school programmes were available throughout the Province, and the "Carefree" organization
provided much-needed parental relief. The principal lack was adequate co-ordination of programmes for the adult handicapped. A greater variety of residential
accommodation was needed, but even more important was the development of additional workshop and activity centres with sound financial backing, and a transportation system to enable the handicapped to attend regularly.
The CELDIC Report was a focus for reconsidering services to children, and
the B.C. CELDIC Committee was active in catalysing many group discussions in
communities. In addition, there were two major workshops on the delivery of services to troubled children. All authorities seemed to agree that, to be effective, services to children must be available in a co-ordinated way, and in the local community.
Some special centres might be required on a Province-wide basis, but these should
be minimal. This thinking fits in well with the Branch's policy to regionalize mental
health services, and it was anticipated that considerable progress would take place
in the next year.
The Co-ordinator acted as a resource person to communities and agencies which
were involved in providing care for the retarded, and for children with emotional
disorders. In addition, he played an "ombudsman" role, both within the Department and in discussions with other departments of Government, in an effort to
ensure that the needs of people with these problems were vigorously represented.
20
 NURSING
CONSULTATION
SERVICES
The functions of the Consultant in Nursing during 1972 were to (a) provide
the Deputy Minister with information, counsel, and assistance as required; (b)
undertake studies, surveys, and projects as directed; (c) supply information, counsel,
and assistance to Mental Health Branch institutions, community centres, agencies,
and individuals on request; and (..) participate with administrators, educators,
health workers, and other personnel in planning and evaluating mental health programmes and services.
In accord with these purposes, individual nursing visits were made to mental
health centres at New Westminster, Saanich, Vernon, Penticton, Kelowna, Chilliwack, Nelson, Whalley, Maple Ridge, Port Coquitlam, Surrey, and Trail. In conjunction with other consultants, several visits were made to the centre at Cranbrook,
which underwent changes in staffing and programme. Visits to the various centres
also provided opportunities to meet with nursing staff in psychiatric units of local
general hospitals when one was located in the vicinity. It was gratifying to note a
distinct acceleration in co-operation and collaborative planning between these hospital units and the corresponding mental health centres, especially in the Interior of
the Province.
Within the Service, consultation was provided on request to Directors of
Nursing concerning matters specific to their hospitals. Considerable time was
allotted to Civil Service Commission personnel at both Victoria and Essondale with
respect to recruitment and selection of staff, and review and revision of job specifications and position classifications. Similarly, counselling was afforded to a number
of nurses concerning problems affecting employment, education, and trends in current nursing practice. Information concerning nursing service, nursing administration, and community mental health nursing was compiled and made available to a
variety of individuals and groups studying health care, treatment of illness, and continuity of services. Recommendations were made to the Deputy Minister with respect to nursing practice, nursing education, and personnel policies affecting nursing.
A one-day conference for the three senior staff education nurses was arranged, and
a two-day conference for mental health nurses.
A number of projects were undertaken, studies conducted, and recommendations made.   Among these were
(a) identification of criteria for the utilization of beds at Riverview Hospital, collaboratively with the Co-ordinator of Adult Psychiatric
Services;
(b) effectiveness of the use of two part-time nurses in one mental health
nurse position;
(c) studies of nursing categories, classifications, and job specifications,
one for direct care and the other for supervisory levels of nursing
staff;
(d) identification of factors in institutions which appeared to be impeding
the transfer of in-patients to boarding-homes;
(e) inspection of a psychiatric facility collaboratively with other Government inspectors;
21
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MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
(/)  investigation of complaints regarding provision of nursing services
and of unusual occurrences affecting nursing staff;
(g) development of a proposal and plan for a comprehensive study to
define required nursing standards and effective utilization of nursing
staff;
(/_) promotion of a proposal to study what nursing functions are required
from a multidisciplinary regional team in liaison between community
and hospital;
(.)  exploration of the possibilities for a postbasic clinical programme in
psychiatric nursing being developed in this Province;
( j)  computation of nursing staff requirements for all nursing departments
according to arbitrarily set standards of nursing care hours.
Continuing direction was provided to the Department of Nursing Education at
Essondale, the management of which rested in the capable hands of the Acting
Director, Mrs. E. Paulson.   Major changes in that department concerned the transfer of the psychiatric nursing programme from the authority of the Department of
Health Services and Hospital Insurance, Mental Health Branch, to that of the Department of Education, B.C. Institute of Technology.
Of interest to nursing services within the Branch was the availability for the
first time of a number of special projects supported financially by the Branch.
A total of 13 was awarded to nursing departments.
Various methods were used to reaffirm communication and liaison with professional organizations, health care and education institutions and agencies. Contributing toward this goal were the several meetings of the Nursing Liaison Committee, attendance at a variety of university-connected nursing events, and meetings
with nurses and educators representative of various agencies. Among these, it was
of value to participate in sessions of the Public Health Service Staff Conference held
at the University of British Columbia, the Psychiatric Nurses' Association Silver
Anniversary programme in Burnaby, and the Registered Nurses' Association of
British Columbia annual meeting in Vernon. Arrangements were facilitated for
public health nurse students at the University of British Columbia to have field work
in mental health centres. Mental health nurses were also enabled to provide some
orientation to their work for faculty teaching courses, to prepare nurses for community health and mental health work.
Support was received from the Mental Health Branch for a number of bursaries
to assist nurses to further their professional education. Five nurses were undertaking
university graduate work studies; 10 nurses enrolled in the B.C. Institute of Technology or Vancouver City College registered nurse courses; and five nurses enrolled
in the Extension Course on leadership sponsored jointly by the Canadian Nurses'
Association and the Canadian Hospital Association.
At the year-end, plans for increasing the availability of mental health programmes and services to the populations of both urban and rural areas in the
Province were expanding and showed promise of realization. The impact of far-
reaching changes on the nursing departments of the various facilities would continue
to provide a never-ending challenge to the competence, endurance, and innovative
skills of the over 2,000 nursing personnel in the Mental Health Branch.
 BOARDING-HOME
PROGRAMME
Activity in the Boarding-home Programme in 1972 was centred on problem
solving, and policy and procedural matters, following extensive expansion and
regionalization of the programme in the middle of 1971. Much of this activity was
directed toward the development of co-operation for the programme between staffs
of the Mental Health Branch, Health Branch, Department of Rehabilitation and
Social Improvement, and community volunteer agencies. Procedures regarding
selection and placement of candidates from the Mental Health institutional facilities
were defined; a systematic reporting system designed to facilitate data retrieval was
developed; a brochure for general distribution describing the programme was produced; and a proposed set of Regulations and Standards for Homes for Mentally
Handicapped Persons, including those for an intermediate level of care, was presented to the Community Care Facilities Board for consideration.
At the end of the year approximately 1,300 persons were being supervised by
the Mental Health Branch, in 118 licensed boarding-homes and 64 unlicensed two-
person homes. Four hundred and seventy placements were made through the
Boarding-home Programme, 157 of these were persons placed into homes directly
from the community, usually avoiding an institutional admission. The rate of return
to the institutions from the programme was consistently less than 1 per cent each
month, reflecting the provision of considerable community back-up service to the
programme. Approximately 110 persons were discharged from the programme to
more independent forms of living arrangement.
It was increasingly evident that many of the persons remaining in the institutions would require a higher level of care in the community than that provided for
in the programme.
One of the major developments during the year was the provision to the programme of staff positions for one occupational therapist and four activity therapists.
The pattern of development of this programme took the form of a demonstration
project in the Lower Mainland, in view of the fact that a comprehensive community-
based occupational therapy service was a fairly new concept. By the year-end it
had already proved most valuable in helping to achieve one of the goals of the
Boarding-home Programme, i.e., that of a meaningful community life for mentally
handicapped persons, as opposed to a repetition of sedentary institutional living
experiences.
Other developments throughout the year included favourable newspaper coverage at local levels, which helped to open up the programme; the continuation of
monthly workshops for boarding-home operators in the Lower Mainland, and the
initiation of these in other parts of the Province; two conferences for the Boarding-
home Programme staff, one of which was on mental retardation; and an assistant to
the Boarding-home Co-ordinator was appointed.
Miss A. K. Carroll, formerly the Consultant in Social Work, Mental Health
Branch, who initiated the Boarding-home Programme in British Columbia in 1959,
and who devoted a great deal of time and energy to its development, retired in
June of 1972.
23
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MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
Approximate Distribution of Placements Made and Case
Load, Boarding-home Programme, 1972
Placements Case Load
Made, 1972 Dec. 31,1972
Region 1 (Kootenay)      19 48
Region 2 (Okanagan-Thompson)   162 322
Region 3 (Fraser Valley)   150 619
Region 4 (Skeena)     10 7
Region 5x (Greater Vancouver)        7 35
Region 6 (Cariboo-Peace River)     26 33
Region 7 (Georgia Strait)      51 102
Region 8 (South Vancouver Island)      45 134
Totals   470 1,300
1 Burnaby and North Vancouver are the only municipalities of the Greater Vancouver area where placements are made through the Mental Health Branch Boarding-home Programme.
 SPECIAL STUDIES
AND
CONTINUING EDUCATION
PSYCHIATRIC HOME TREATMENT RESEARCH PROJECT
A study of home treatment as an alternative to hospitalization began during
the summer of 1971 with the recruitment of research and treatment staff. The
first patient was admitted to the study in August 1971. The last patient to be
admitted for treatment and follow-up for a one-year period was entered into the
study in September 1972.
For a period of one year, patients were admitted to the project on one of
three bases:
(1) Patients actually awarded an admission to hospital, but assigned
directly to the Home Treatment Service.
(2) Patients admitted to hospital, then to home treatment on discharge.
(3) Patients admitted to hospital, but not to home treatment on discharge.
Analyses of the final results, scheduled for October 1973, would be undertaken
for the purposes of
(1) evaluating home care as an alternative to hospital care, in which it
would be determined, by patient category, the extent to which
hospital-bed days could be reduced by such a service; the comparability in effect of care provided in the home and that provided in
hospital; and cost-effectiveness analysis of the services provided;
(2) developing a screening instrument for the systematic selection of
patients who would be predicted to benefit from admission to a
home-care programme.
PATIENT CATEGORIZATION
A repeat of the 1970 survey was carried out in March 1972 of all patients
occupying beds in Branch institutions, to determine the category of community care
facility most appropriate to the management of their physical and behavioural
service requirements. Of the 5,029 patients surveyed, 2,329 exhibited characteristics considered to be manageable only in a psychiatric facility. Of the balance,
2,332 required personal care and attention, rising from minimal 24-hour supervision
provided in a basic licensed boarding-home to high-level, intensive care. An additional 121 required 24-hour skilled nursing care, as well as 247 who, in addition,
were nonambulatory, and whose behavioural characteristics were of a secondary
nature.
The 2,332 patients requiring only personal care and attention were further
surveyed individually by institutional staff to determine not only which level of
community care was required, but also how long it would be before discharge
could be anticipated.
GENERAL PLANNING
Draft standards for use as guidelines to determine community requirements for
mental health facilities were completed and reviewed with mental health centre
25
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MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
administrators as to their application locally. Further meetings were planned, with
the objective of drafting planning blueprints for each of the eight mental health
planning regions.
CONTINUING EDUCATION
Three committees established late in 1971 to prepare recommendations to meet
mental health centre staff educational requirements in the fields of retardation,
psychogeriatric, and children's services had submitted their reports by the year-end.
Priorities in terms of Branch programme requirements were in the process of being
developed in order to plan for an integrated programme of continuing education
for the coming year.
Three workshops arising from recommendations of these committees were
organized, one in retardation for the boarding-home social workers, case aides, and
activity therapists; and two in psychogeriatrics for Lower Mainland mental health
centre, public health, and Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement
staff.
 PSYCHOLOGY
CONSULTATION
SERVICES
The position of Consultant in Psychology was filled on April 1, 1972. During
the first six months the Consultant visited the various mental health facilities throughout the Province. A total of 26 mental health centres had been developed in the
Province by the end of 1972. Twenty-one of the centres had opened within the
past five years, including three in 1972. In addition, there were eight major residential facilities for treatment of the mentally disordered, the emotionally disturbed,
and the mentally retarded. As mental health programmes and services evolved in
this period of rapid growth, they were primarily responsible for meeting the specific
needs of the people in their respective catchment areas. This was achieved by close
co-operation with local resource people, and by encouraging local initiative in the
field of mental health. As a result, special attention was given to the development of
consultation services for local resources, and to the training of mental health
personnel, with the ultimate aim to assist local people at different levels in the early
identification and prevention of mental health problems.
During the year the Provincial Government entered into an agreement to support the Granville Centre for Children, Vancouver, a day treatment centre for
children up to age 12 who, for reasons of emotional disturbance, behavioural problems, or deliquency, had been expelled from the normal school system, but who
were still able to remain in their home setting. It was apparent from the many
referrals that this facility provided a much-needed service. In addition to providing
specialized treatment services, the aim of the Granville Centre was to document and
package different treatment techniques and make these available to teachers and
other interested people throughout the Province.
The agreement of the Government to support the Granville Centre was part of
the general concentration on developing new facilities with specialized treatment
programmes in the area of child care. Specific attention was given to the integration
of various child care services throughout the Province, and in the development of
facilities in areas of special need. At the year-end, several proposals were being
considered and discussed for implementation. The emphasis on providing Province-
wide integrated child-care services, together with the increasing knowledge about
individual community needs for adult treatment and prevention services, made the
past year one of much progress in the mental health field, and promised further
improvements in the years to come in the total mental health delivery system.
27
 MANAGEMENT ANALYST
CONSULTATION
SERVICES
The position of Management Analyst was added to the Headquarters staff in
February 1972.
Major responsibilities involved various studies, systems analysis, establishment
of standard methods and procedures, and forms design.
Assignments were generally established on a priority basis.
In co-operation with the Pharmacist Consultant, a study of drug dispensing and
distribution practices relative to mental health centres was carried out. An alternative method for requisitioning medications was proposed, and a Narcotic and Controlled Drugs register produced, to standardize recording requirements of the Division of Narcotic Control.
The format of the Mental Health Branch Drug Formulary was revised to provide a standard and comprehensive reference facility which could be readily updated
with minimal effort.
A system of reporting boarding-home referral, recording after-placement activity and required statistical information, was implemented.
Studies were carried out at The Woodlands School which involved the Medical
Records area and the Volunteer Services Department, and, at the year-end, there
was considerable involvement regarding the production of a branch-wide Management Information System.
The design and submission for production of new and revised forms was carried
out through this office.
Preparation of data processing specifications, layouts, and the liaison between
the Data Centre and the Branch relative to the production of required output from
the Patient/Residence Categorization Study, was also handled from this area.
A system, along with associated forms, was designed to accommodate the need
for a standard approach in requesting funds for special projects (available through
recruitment savings), and, if approved, to provide adequate budgetary controls.
The Management Analyst was appointed to the Forms Control Committee and
attended several meetings during the year.
28
 STATISTICS AND
MEDICAL RECORDS
A major objective during the year was to achieve a smoother flow of statistical
data from all facilities. One product of this effort was the compilation of a Preliminary Patient Movement Report. Emphasis was also placed on developing a statistical
programme easily adaptable to computer data processing. A number of research
projects was carried out, including an analysis of first admissions to Riverview
Hospital, a study of patient characteristics for the Riverview Hospital Out-patient
Department, and an analysis of patients seen in mental health centres. Three additional mental health centres commenced operation during the year and were incorporated into the statistical reporting system. The Medical Records Consultant was ill
for the first five months of the year, and the resulting work load was carried out by
the Statistician and by temporary assistance. Renovation of data processing facilities
in the Division of Vital Statistics limited the flow of statistics from June until late
August.
During the year a representative of Statistics Canada visited the office to discuss
collection and publication of out-patient statistics from all provinces. The Riverview Hospital Out-patient Department commenced operations in Vancouver in
April, requiring incorporation into the statistical reporting system and the assistance
of the Medical Records Consultant to set up medical records.
DEVELOPMENT OF THE STATISTICAL SYSTEM
Keeping in mind the principal objective of developing a statistical system easily
adaptable to computer usage, steps were taken to clarify a number of problems
encountered in the use of statistical forms. A major project involved converting the
storing of medical records in mental health centres from a numerical to an alphabetical filing system. This resulted in greater efficiency in the identification and
retrieval of patient files in each centre. To incorporate the Riverview Hospital Outpatient Department into the statistical reporting system, the mental health centre
statistical form was temporarily used to record patient data. Lists showing psychiatric nomenclature and statistical codes were reprinted in single-page form, for better
perception and greater accuracy in recording diagnoses. Improvements were also
made in the waiting-list statistical form, and the new form will be used in 1973.
Reporting forms and related instructions were developed for the Boarding-home
Programme. The Tranquille School Out-patient Department was opened, and incorporated into the statistical system.
The Medical Records Consultant visited a number of facilities to offer advice
and orientation concerning improvements made in the medical records and statistical
system.
ROUTINE DATA RETRIEVAL
A Preliminary Patient Movement Report was introduced during the year. This
report showed patient data from all facilities within two weeks from the end of the
reporting month. Although the report contained preliminary data only, it was a
timely record of patient movement in branch facilities. The Monthly Statistical Bulletin was continued, however, as a more accurate report of patient movement. Other
statistical reports prepared included the 1971 Annual Statistical Report and routine
data submissions to Statistics Canada. Numerous requests for Mental Health Branch
29
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MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
data were received from the facilities and public sources, to aid in research and
planning studies. Admission data for patients of Indian and Eskimo origin were
prepared for the Director, Indian Advisory Act.
ADMINISTRATIVE AND PLANNING STUDIES
Major projects included an analysis of first admissions to Riverview Hospital
to identify the regions and school districts patients were admitted from, and an
analysis of patients seen at the Riverview Hospital Out-patient Department. Also
completed was an inventory of mental health facilities in British Columbia and a
study of characteristics of patients seen in mental health centres.
Population data by school districts, including school district maps, were sent
to all Branch facilities. Case-load listings were sent to all centres to verify medical
record inventories. A pilot study to determine reasons why physicians refer patients
to the Riverview Hospital was initiated by the Director of the Kamloops Mental
Health Centre. This study may be enlarged to include all admissions to Riverview
Hospital, other than from metropolitan Vancouver.
MEDICAL RECORDS DEVELOPMENT AND REPORTING CONTROL
Consultative and orientation visits were arranged with existing and newly
opened mental health centres. Medical record reference kits and instructive manuals
were made available to all new centres. Following a study of the Medical Records
Consultant's work load, a large segment of routine data processing and the Mental
Health Centre Master Patient Index were transferred to head office in Victoria.
Consequently, more time was available to instruct staff in facilities on medical record
systems, and to uphold standards in record-keeping. This included assisting the
Riverview Hospital Out-patient Department to bring the medical record system up-
to-date, resolving patient accounting in the Boarding-home Programme, and procedural changes at Riverview Hospital to process "escapes." Procedural memoranda
were sent to all centres concerning the transfer of medical records between facilities.
A statistical reporting system and medical records were set up for The Tranquille
School Out-patient Department. Discussions were held with The Woodlands School
concerning modification in medical record filing, and an improved method of filing
was introduced. At the year-end, discussions were under way concerning medical
record-keeping for patients on the Boarding-home Programme.
 INFORMATION
SERVICES
The progressive development of a branch programme of information services
continued in 1972.
There was a continuing emphasis on the need for published informational
literature. A new pamphlet for The Woodlands School was printed in April, and at
the year-end a pamphlet explaining the Boarding-home Programme, and a Tranquille
School pamphlet for professional personnel, were at the printers. In addition, reprints of existing pamphlets were under way, and the Volunteer's Handbook, used by
Riverview's Volunteer Services Department, was being revised.
A beginning was made on the development of audio-visual material for both
in-service and public use. Two 15-minute 8-mm. films, produced by the Bevan
Lodge Society and showing activities of the residents at the Lodge, were edited into
one 15-minute film. The script and choice of film locations were completed for the
production of an 8-mm. film dealing with the Boarding-home Programme. Assistance was given in planning a 30-minute programme on the boarding-home plan,
which was taped in November for presentation on Victoria's cablevision station early
in December. Final editing was completed of the 16-mm. colour-sound film production by the Audio-Visual Section of Riverview Hospital, titled "Safe Is Cool," for
use in the Branch's accident-prevention programme. The film was also recommended for use in the Province's general hospitals by the Accident Prevention
Division, Civil Service Commission.
Assistance was given in planning the official opening in April of the new Outpatient Department for Riverview Hospital. Numerous press releases were issued
during the year. Articles were submitted for publication in the British Columbia
Medical Journal, and special features were written for newspapers. In co-operation
with the Canadian Mental Health Association, an Open House programme was developed for use by the mental health centres in observance of Mental Health Week
in May. The programme was highly successful and consideration was being given
to making it an annual event. The travelling display was set up in 18 communities
throughout the Province, in department stores, shopping malls, and other public
areas. Major revisions to the branch exhibit in the B.C. Building at the Pacific
National Exhibition were completed in 1972.
Eleven issues of the Newsletter, an in-service publication, were published, and
material for the Physicians' Administrative Manual was revised. An orientation kit
was prepared and provided to all new senior staff. The Director continued to
serve as a member of the Forms Control Committee. Other duties included serving as public relations consultant to the facilities, replying to general correspondence,
and publishing the Annual Report.
31
  COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
Mental Health Centres
lil
mental
health
branch
  COMMUNITY
MENTAL HEALTH
SERVICES
During 1972, with the addition of mental health centres at Port Alberni and
Williams Lake, local services became more widely available than ever. Facilities
for a new centre at Prince Rupert were also made available, but considerable difficulty was experienced in recruiting the necessary staff. These additions brought the
number of mental health centres to 26. Previously existing centres were located in
Burnaby, Chilliwack, Courtenay, Cranbrook, Duncan, Fort St. John, Kamloops,
Kelowna, Maple Ridge, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster, Penticton, Port Coquitlam, Powell River, Prince George, Saanich, Surrey, Terrace, Trail, Vernon, Victoria,
and Whalley. There were approximately 6,500 admissions to service at these centres
in 1972. The standard staff of a mental health centre consisted of a psychiatrist,
psychologist, social worker, mental health nurse, and clerical positions, and in many
centres, a boarding-home social worker. In some of the newer centres a smaller
complement of staff was established. All centres provided direct services to persons
with emotional and behavioural problems, and assisted various community organizations and services in the promotion of mental health and the alleviation of mental
illness. Most of the centres reported a wide spectrum of involvement with community agencies and organizations during the year. Since mental illness is a "social
disease," this involvement with others in the community was a prerequisite for effective service. Provision of the services of a psychiatrist in some of the outlying areas
of the Province remained a problem. However, 1972 saw the addition of these
specialists to a number of areas not previously covered, and an increase in some of
the centres previously covered by only one psychiatrist.
BURNABY
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
The Burnaby Mental Health Centre, an out-patient community psychiatric
facility, located in the approximate geographic centre of the Lower Mainland at the
junction of Willingdon Avenue and Canada Way in Burnaby, consisted in 1972 of
adult and child out-patient teams and a Day Hospital facility. The functions of the
Centre were
(1) to provide adults and children from the Burnaby community with
comprehensive diagnostic services through interviews, psychological and laboratory investigations;
(2) to provide the most effective possible treatment methods for those
in distress, using both somatic and psychological methods, including
individual, marital, family, and group methods of physcotherapy,
behaviour therapy, and, through the Day Hospital Programme, milieu
therapy;
35
 O 36
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
(3) to provide consultative services to personnel in schools and other
community agencies;
(4) to engage in the training of health care personnel and research
on emotional illnesses and their treatment;
(5) to employ the knowledge and skills of multidisciplinary teams to
develop and implement a wide variety of community-oriented preventive programmes in the mental health field, using the broadest
possible definition of mental health and prevention.
Many previously existing special programmes and services were continued
during the year, including the Tuesday Evening Social Club, the follow-up care of
Riverview boarding-home patients, the consultation programme to the Burnaby
schools, and assistance to the Burnaby Family Life Institute with its marriage preparation programme. The SeCure programme for agoraphobics again expanded its
sphere of operations to include other parts of the Fraser Valley. This expansion was
assisted by staff appearances on radio and television broadcasts, and an ongoing
back-up service to individual members of the organization provided by the Centre's
social service department.
One of the features of the social scene in 1972 was a continued expansion in
community volunteer and self-help programmes. The Burnaby Information Centre,
which was developed under the auspices of the Burnaby United Community Services
Co-ordinator with assistance from staff of the Burnaby Mental Health Centre, vastly
expanded its services in 1972, assisted by a Local Incentives Programme grant. At
the year-end the opening of a second centre in North Burnaby was being planned.
The original South Burnaby Centre expanded from a minimal number of calls to
more than 500 calls per month.
Another community development in Burnaby during the year was the opening,
on a part-time basis, of a Burnaby branch of the Volunteer Bureau. Opportunities
for Youth, and Local Incentives Programme grants, also resulted in numerous
human services programmes being started in the Burnaby community. These offered
a variety of visiting, babysitting, transportation, and counselling services in the community.
An additional encouraging development during 1972 was an obvious increase in
awareness of the need and willingness to provide for comprehensive planning for
mental health resources on a regional basis. Evidence of this was the holding of regional planning meetings by Mental Health Branch staff, the formation of the Greater
Vancouver Metropolitan Mental Health Advisory and Planning Committee, and a
Task Force of the Section of Psychiatry to advise the new Minister of Health Services
and Hospital Insurance regarding priorities in the provision of mental health services.
The Burnaby Mental Health Centre was well represented in all these bodies.
Educational programmes for nursing, psychology, social work, and rehabilitation medicine students continued at the Centre during 1972. With the appointment of a new head of the Department of Psychiatry at UBC, the Centre looked
forward to the prospect of providing educational experiences for UBC medical
students and psychiatric residents in the future.
Centre staff were asked during the year to provide a variety of educational and
public relations presentations to a broad spectrum of community organizations and
institutions, including the schools, church groups, night school programmes, social
clubs, and professional societies.
Continued effort was expended in the development of the Day Hospital milieu-
therapy programme, and workshops on the programme were held in March and
December.   The Centre continued to receive a great deal of positive reaction from
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
O 37
individual professionals and agencies in the community concerning the effectiveness
of this type of treatment approach, and efforts were continued to improve techniques
in group therapy in the application of transactional analysis principles. The Day
Hospital was under a great deal of pressure to provide educational experiences for
a variety of nursing and occupational therapy students, as well as personnel from
other institutions throughout the Province and in Washington State who were interested in or developing similar programmes.
Further negotiations took place with the B.C. Hospital Insurance Service, with
the Burnaby General Hospital, and with the Greater Vancouver Regional Hospital
District, directed toward the development of comprehensive in-patient, out-patient,
and day-treatment facilities for psychiatric patients in Burnaby.
During 1972 the staff of the Centre continued to search out and apply the
latest and most effective techniques to aid the emotionally ill, to develop a community
structure and institutions to prevent emotional disorders, and to transmit this knowledge and skill to others.
CHILLIWACK
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
This Centre functioned throughout the year with a full staff complement and
served the communities of Chilliwack, Abbotsford, Hope, and Agassiz. The policy
of an open referral system, along with significant involvement in provision of direct
services, was maintained. There was constant effort to offset direct treatment
demands with greater involvement of the front-line agency personnel, and to employ
group methods of intervention whenever feasible.
The Centre staff were instrumental in the establishment of several new community resources and services in the area during the year. "The Fish," an emergency 24-hour, good-neighbour service, went into operation in Chilliwack. The
Centre also assisted in the organization of a local chapter of the SeCure organization,
a self-help programme for people suffering from agoraphobia.
Of great interest to the Centre was the opening of a new 22-bed psychiatric
unit in the Chilliwack General Hospital. The Centre staff were active in the orientation and training of hospital staff in the early stages of its functioning, and continued
to provide weekly consultation to the ward and also endeavoured to integrate the
services of the Centre with the hospital. The new mental health addition to the
Abbotsford Health Unit was slated for official opening early in 1973.
The Boarding-home Programme was strengthened with the employment of
an activity therapist and half-time case aide to the boarding-home social worker.
There was sustained interest in community care facilities, and several new resources
were added to the Boarding-home Programme.
COURTENAY
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
As in previous years, Centre operations in 1972 were divided between direct
client contact and the more indirect community consultative work. Centre staffing
remained complete and included sessional psychiatric, pharmaceutical, and pediatric
services. During the first half of the year, direct services for the northern island area
primarily  involved paediatric  and  neuropsychological  evaluations,  coupled with
 O 38
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
parent-teacher counselling. The establishment of a local CMHA chapter appeared
likely, but the rather transient nature of the population and the geographical barriers
impeded the progress.
The Boarding-home Programme became functional and, due to the preparatory
ground work by the boarding-home team, community acceptance appeared to be
good.
During the year this Centre and various other community agencies participated
in several co-operative ventures which were aimed toward identifying and alleviating unmet community needs. During the spring the local Family Court Committee
created a subcommittee to explore the question of summer activities for the youth of
the Comox Valley. This group, which included a representative from the Centre,
was instrumental in planning and developing a Drop-in Centre, which was housed
in the Courtenay Recreation Association hall, and a wide range of activities throughout the summer. The Courtenay Recreation Association proved to be a valuable
resource in the community as it provided not only the standard recreational
opportunities, but also specialized services; perceptual motor training for the Special
Education Classes; and intergrated recreational facilities for Bevan Lodge.
Also, during the spring, the Adult Education Service of the Courtenay School
District requested help in developing something "new and different" to be presented
during the spring semester. To meet this challenge, representatives from the
School Counselling Service, Public Health, Mental Health, and the Ministerial
Association jointly created a Parent Study Group which was conducted by one of
the school counsellors. At the conclusion of the sessions many of the parents who
had participated elected to continue their independent sessions. Two staff members were also instrumental in the development and ongoing support of the Single
Parents' Group.
The Upper Island Mental Health Society sponsored an open house at the
Centre during National Mental Health Week which aided in increasing public awareness of Centre functions. The society was involved with exploring and initiating
several community mental health projects which would be beneficial to the members
of the various communities.
Communication between the mental health centres on Vancouver Island increased during the year and the Nanaimo, Duncan, and Courtenay centres began
an evaluation of the common needs of their entire region. The initial step was to
survey the needs and expectations of those individuals and agencies who work with
children in the area. The ultimate goal would be to identify gaps in service and
explore possible remedies.
CRANBROOK
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
The Cranbrook Mental Health Centre experienced much activity and change
in 1972.
There was a lot of involvement in the schools on the part of the psychologist,
particularly in Kimberley, Creston, and Cranbrook. A good deal of attention was
given to children with learning disorders and with emotional disturbances. Other
than assessments, most of the work was directed toward consultation with teachers,
counsellors, and supervisors.
Centre staff participated in consultation, direct service, and assessment for Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement staff, and co-operation between
the two offices continued.
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
O 39
Mental health staff initiated, in conjunction with the Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement and other community representatives, an expanded
Child Care Society to cover the East Kootenays. The society was instrumental in
creating a special foster-care home for disturbed children under the age of 12. All
children were placed on a voluntary basis by the family, and the family was involved
throughout the stay of the child in the foster home. A home for adolescents was
being established in Kimberley under the auspices of the society.
In conjunction with the Cranbrook Mental Health Association, a Grandmother Surrogate Programme was in operation since March and worked intensively
with 14 different families. Centre staff, social improvement officials, schools, and
public health were involved in some of the assessments.
A psychiatrist was appointed to the Centre in April and contributed greatly
to the psychiatric aspects of the mental health programme in the East Kootenays.
She was intensively involved in work with the Kimberley, Cranbrook, and Fernie
hospitals, and held clinics in these communities, as well as in Creston.
The Centre underwent a major change in staff in October. The social worker
and the psychologist moved to Port Alberni, a nurse administrator arrived from
Prince George, the mental health nurse on staff resigned, and the psychiatrist went
on leave of absence because of illness. By November the major changes had settled
down and a new psychiatric social worker commenced employment.
The programme of direct service and community consultation continued and
arrangements were made to visit the outlying communities regularly.
DUNCAN
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
During the year the Duncan Mental Health Centre continued to expand, both
in terms of staff and in the amount of service offered. In addition to the Administrator and the psychiatrist, new members included the appointment of a Regional
Boarding-home Co-ordinator, and a case aide, who commenced service in Duncan
in June.   The Centre moved to new offices on Gibbins Road in October.
The Centre also obtained further part-time assistance from a psychiatrist in
April, and this developed into a full-time position as of August 1.
Psychological services were provided on a bi-monthly basis by the psychologist
and his staff from the Victoria Mental Health Centre.
The Centre operated on an open referral system, which proved to be most satisfactory. Staff endeavoured to provide an immediate source of help to those in severe
stress, while at the same time they encouraged the greater use of existing facilities,
where applicable. Where necessary, the Centre helped to create new services. The
catchment area was concentrated in the Cowichan Valley, and staff energies were
focused on the two largest population bases—Duncan and Lake Cowichan.
In Duncan the Centre participated in the development of the Cowichan Crisis
Centre.
In Lake Cowichan, consultative services were provided, as well as weekly visits
to the Community Activity Centre, which provided programmes and activities to
people of all ages. It has been most successful as a model of preventive community
health activity.
All staff members were active in working toward a more effective pattern of
community service through close liaison with other organizations and agencies.   This
 O 40 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH  REPORT,   1972
included work with existing Government agencies, Family Counselling Service, the
Cowichan District Hospital staff, Crisis Centre Volunteers, school counsellors, and
many others.
At the year-end the most intensive demand was for direct treatment services. It
was felt that a great deal of effort must be made to insure an expansion of indirect
services through the organization of a day-care centre and an activity centre.
FORT ST. JOHN
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
In October the Fort St. John Mental Health Centre completed its first full
year of service. The Centre served the geographical area covered by School Districts Nos. 59, 60, and 81, which contained an area population of approximately
48,000.
The initial objective of the Centre was to determine community needs and to
become acquainted with community agencies and resources. Effective working
relationships were established with community agencies, and the Centre worked
closely with the local health units and the public health nurses.
Provision of direct service formed a large part of the Centre's programme,
which operated under an open referral system, accepting self-referrals or referrals
from any agency. A wide range of problems was dealt with in direct treatment,
including children with emotional or learning disabilities, acute emotional problems,
chronic mental illness, and marital and family crisis. The Centre was involved in
assessment prior to hospitalization, and in the follow-up of patients after hospital
discharge. Staff were requested to assess people with emotional problems who were
hospitalized in the local hospital. As of November 1972, the Centre had an active
case load of 123.
During the year, Centre staff participated in travelling clinics, with Dawson
Creek being visited one day per week, and visits to Chetwynd, Hudson Hope, Pouce
Coupe, and Fort Nelson as required.
A considerable amount of time was spent in a consultative capacity to agencies
and organizations, and in specific case conferences with staff from other disciplines
and agencies.
The staff psychologist conducted two series of workshops, one in Fort St. John
and one in Fort Nelson, to instruct teachers in testing methods. The aim of the
workshops was to increase the number of people who could assess children with
learning disabilities.
Educational talks were given to numerous groups in the community, on different aspects of mental health and the Centre's function and services.
KAMLOOPS
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
The population of Greater Kamloops continued to increase rapidly during the
year, as did the prevalence of family problems and marriage breakdown. The
Centre's time was evenly distributed between direct and indirect service, but over-all
pressures led to increasing emphasis of the indirect role.
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
O 41
The available service to schools was reduced for four months in the summer,
in the absence of a psychologist, but the other staff positions remained filled, and
there was a full complement at the year-end. There were regular Travelling Clinics
to two outlying communities, and on request to two smaller ones. There was little
demand for free medication from local physicians, and the nurse was able to dispense for the chronic patients without the need for a pharmacist.
The Director became head of the Psychiatry Section of the Royal Inland Hospital and a member of the Hospital Planning Committee. The Centre's staff became
more involved in the continuing education of the psychiatry ward nurses. During
the year there was a steady movement toward closer working arrangements between
the Centre and the hospital.
Volunteer counselling services expanded in 1972. Centre staff became members of the board of the Crisis Centre and the Family Life Association, and instituted
counselling training sessions.
Heroin usage among young people increased during the year. The Narcotic
Foundation offered to help set up a facility, but the project was dropped when no
local physician applied for a part-time position with the facility. The Centre did
not plan to become directly involved in treatment of narcotic addicts, but consulted
with the Public Health Officer on the matter. If programme evaluations which were
under way in other areas showed success, a further approach to the Foundation
would be made next year, as the physicians-community polarization on the issue was
lessening following a symposium on drug abuse, sponsored by the former.
The spread of volunteer organizations during the year led to fears of lack of
control, overlapping of effort, and increasing fragmentation. The year ended on a
positive note with the formation of a six-man health planning committee, which included the Director, whose role was to advise the regional district on future health
needs and to co-ordinate and ensure the most efficient use of facilities already available in the area.
KELOWNA
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
This Centre opened in the summer of 1962, serving the North and South Okanagan Health Units and the South Central Health Unit. It was the first regional
mental health centre to be established outside of the Lower Mainland-Victoria area,
and heralded the new approach to the provision of mental health services to the
people of British Columbia. During the past 10 years the geographic area
served by the Okanagan Mental Health Centre gradually decreased. In 1972 the
catchment area was the Central Okanagan, with a population of approximately
50,000 people.
The former Director, a psychiatrist, went to half-time service at the Mental
Health Centre in January 1972 and a psychiatric social worker became the Centre
Administrator. At the year-end, three psychiatrists worked half-time at the Centre
and half-time in private practice. A child psychiatrist was actively engaged in providing educative and consultative services to professionals in the community, as well
as direct service.
An excellent rapport with other professional personnel in the community continued during the year, and the Centre spearheaded discussion locally toward the
idea of geographic proximity of health and welfare services.
 O 42
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,   1972
Close liaison was maintained with the Psychiatric Ward of the Kelowna General
Hospital, with members attending weekly ward rounds and a monthly dinner meeting of all Centre staff members, off-duty nurses from the Psychiatric Ward, and two
senior public health nurses. Two of the psychiatrists alternated yearly as the physi-
cian-in-charge of the Psychiatric Ward. Early in 1973 the new Psychriatric Ward
will be opened, providing 23 beds and including a holding area to settle the more
disturbed patients. In the present ward many patients were being seen on an informal out-patient basis, and it was felt that the new ward will require Day Hospital
services in the near future.
The Centre, together with Branch Administration, had discussions with the
Department of Psychiatry of the University of British Columbia, concerning the
placement of a psychiatric resident in Kelowna, and this could conceivably begin
in 1973. This exposure in training seemed vital for psychiatrists to understand
what benefits and satisfactions are found in community psychiatry.
During the year staff members provided more specialized services such as
family therapy and marriage counselling, and more diversified activities such as
community organization, preventive and educative programmes, and consultation.
The Centre's psychologist was very involved in research projects, and was invited
to present a paper to the annual meeting of the American Public Health Association
in Atlantic City, New Jersey.
The Boarding-home Programme, in its first full year of operation, was quite
successful, and the boarding-home social worker, who was shared with the mental
health centre in Penticton, was involved in more placements than any other area.
This provided an opportunity for many people to return to the community and also
served the local area by providing alternative living arrangements. One of her responsibilities, along with Public Health personnel and Department of Rehabilitation
and Social Improvement staff, was to help upgrade the facilities and services to
people living in boarding-homes.
Community response to meeting local requirements was seen in the new services begun during the year. Centre staff were considerably involved in some of
these new services, which included Family Planning Clinic, Big Sisters, Elizabeth
Fry Society, Health Educator Programme, R.S.Q. Centre, Methadone Maintenance
Programme, and the Discovery Club. The position of Health Educator, funded by
the Vancouver Foundation as a pilot project, was used to develop an integrated
Family Life Programme in the schools and community. The R.S.Q. Centre was
established as a resource for young people experiencing "bad trips" and problems
with drugs. The Methadone Maintenance Programme was a controlled service for
narcotic addicts, handled co-operatively by local professional people. The Discovery
Club was established by the local chapter of the Canadian Mental Health Association to provide social and recreational opportunities to handicapped people.
MAPLE RIDGE
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
During the year it was found that, in the field of direct services, general practitioners were making greater use of the Centre to assess their acute psychiatric
emergencies. As a result of this assessment, hospitalization might be prevented and
follow-up could take place on an out-patient basis. It was equally important, of
course, to follow-up patients after hospitalization.   In general, the family physician
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
O 43
in most cases preferred to carry on with this aspect of care himself, unless it was a
difficult or severe condition which needed more specialized review.
On May 6 the new offices for the Centre were officially opened. Staff were
involved in discussions concerning the regionalization of Riverview Hospital. This
included psychiatric and social assessment before admission, and suitable planning
between the hospital and community centre as to the type of follow-up required.
During the year there were approximately 200 patients in boarding-homes in
the Central Fraser Valley region. The regional boarding-home social worker arranged meetings with Public Health officials and the Department of Rehabilitation
and Social Improvement, so that a closer liaison could exist between the departments
in respect to the ongoing care of boarding-home residents and the regulation of
facilities. The appointment of an activity therapist facilitated the provision of a
workshop milieu for the boarding-home residents.
A successful summer camp was held for the residents near Hope, and plans
were being developed to provide this type of vacation for the residents every summer.
Efforts were under way to expand the use of volunteers in all aspects of the Boarding-
home Programme, and to also increase community involvement and understanding
through knowledge and education. The residents themselves were encouraged to
organize and promote social activities and group-therapy discussions, and form their
own executive. Workshops were held with the boarding-home operators, and
others were being planned.
In addition to the assessment of disturbed school-children, the Centre's psychologist and the mental health nurse attended the schools to observe children and
to set up programmes. These included an early screening of children with specific
language disability, and a conditioned learning approach to behaviour modification
for a child whose behaviour pattern in school was disruptive. The Director attended
a meeting with the Parent-Teachers' Association to deal informally with parental
problems in relation to children's emotional disturbances. Group therapy was conducted with a special class at a local school and a group for mothers and children
called Parent-Effectiveness Training was held weekly at the Centre. There was also
a class for disturbed boys involving play therapy with the object of discussing feelings
and attitudes as displayed and highlighted during play.
During the year a Homemaker Service was developed in Maple Ridge which
proved to be a valuable service in fulfilling a real social need, for example, when
mothers were ill or when recovering from mental illness.
A Crisis Centre was also started in Maple Ridge. The original concept was
the involvement of young people with particular emphasis on drugs, but it was
altered somewhat to include family and marital therapy.
An Interne Training Programme in community mental health centres commenced in the month of July. The internes were from the Royal Columbian Hospital and, as part of their orientation in psychiatry, spent three weeks at Riverview
Hospital and one full day at the community Mental Health Centre.
A new extended-care unit for the general hospital in Maple Ridge was being
planned, and the Director approached the planning committee regarding the desirability of having a psychiatric unit in the hospital.
Staff were actively engaged in the evaluation of alcoholics at the Halfway
House, and a consultative service was provided to Twin Maples and the Haney Correctional Centre.
 O 44
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
NANAIMO
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
Staff of the Nanaimo Mental Health Centre consisted of a social worker Administrator, a clinical psychologist, a stenographer, and a medical records clerk-
receptionist. There was also a part-time pharmacist and a part-time boarding-home
social worker. At the beginning of August the Centre secured the services of a
psychiatrist for two days a week as a consultant, and to assist in the provision of
in-service education to community agencies.
Concurrent with the establishment of the Port Alberni Mental Health Centre
on October 2, 1972, Nanaimo's catchment area was reduced. At the year-end the
Centre serviced a population of 48,000, extending from Nanaimo to Qualicum and
south to Ladysmith. Generic services to the Parksville-Qualicum area were being
increased.
The Centre's activities were focused on the establishment of a preventive community-based mental health programme utilizing existing resources, and enabling
the establishment of facilities in response to changing community needs and priorities. In accordance with the Centre's primary role of prevention, the staff emphasized the promulgation of sound mental health concepts to mental health carriers
within the catchment area. This was being implemented through educational programmes, group training for professional and lay personnel, and consultative services.
The Centre provided direct treatment and assessment services to individuals
and families. The demonstrated need by several agencies resulted in an increased
amount of time allocated to the treatment of teen-agers and adults. Consultation
and assessment services were provided on request. When appropriate, staff members stressed the need to treat the individual within his family situation and, if
necessary, intervened on the community level to prevent similar incidents reoccur-
ring.
Correlating with the current emphasis on community care of the mentally ill,
the Centre worked with Public Health to develop a supportive programme, specifically related to the follow-up of discharged patients who have been under treatment
in a Provincial hospital.
Ongoing liaison was established with the Nanaimo Regional Hospital's psychiatric ward in order to provide a complementary community-oriented treatment
service. Also, communication among the Provincial hospitals, the community, and
the Nanaimo Regional Hospital was being facilitated through the Centre's involvement in the Mental Health Branch's regionalization programme.
The Centre was shifting priorities in accordance with a growing number of
requests from the schools to provide more assistance and consultation in the area of
preventive mental hygiene on the part of parents, families, and teachers, particularly
within the school-age population. The direct treatment of elementary school children was slowly being reduced in the area of learning disabilities, while there will be
an expansion in services to emotionally disturbed children. This move resulted from
the recent appointment of two special counsellors to the Nanaimo School District.
The Centre was, therefore, increasingly aware of the need to work with diverse
agencies, thereby reaching indirectly a greater number of people. The support and
co-operation provided by the Central Vancouver Island Health Unit proved of great
value throughout the year.
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
O 45
NELSON
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
1972 was an extremely busy year in all fields of direct client therapy, consultation to agencies, educational programmes, and community development. The
Selkirk area was going through a period of steady growth, and would soon face very
rapid expansion with new industrial projects. Drug-related problems continued to
be a major concern. The area was considered by some to have one of the highest
drug-use ratios in the west, and the reported drug-related suicide attempts rose from
three cases per year in 1966 to somewhere in the order of four or five cases per week
in 1972.
Time-consuming but, hopefully, the most fruitful efforts of the Centre in the
long run, involved community development. The list was very lengthy and each
area absorbed a tremendous amount of time and energy on the part of the Centre's
staff.
A Volunteer Bureau was established under the Canadian Mental Health Association to provide spot service, case aides (in operation since January 1972), and
staff for the Nelson Community Service Centre. By the year-end the NCSC was on
a firm administrative and programme basis, involving crisis and short-term counselling, Big Brothers, Single Parents' Groups, Legal Aid, and so on.
The recently reactivated Nelson Branch of the Canadian Mental Health Association was involved in establishing an Activity Centre and programme for the
area. The Centre was also involved in Hospital and Public Health Unit in-service
education programmes, and provided continuing consultation to the New Denver
Youth Centre, the Dr. Endicott Home, and other organizations.
Innumerable reports were prepared and meetings of the Psychiatric Facilities
Committee attended, favouring integrated treatment services in the soon-to-be-established 12-bed psychiatric ward at Kootenay Lake District Hospital.
Staff were also involved in the considerable preparation required for the establishment of the position of health resources worker, later to become Community
Health Educator, which was filled by the year-end.
The cataloguing of children in the area by age, for varying learning disabilities
and needs, took place during the year.
The Centre also provided consultation to the Ministerial Association on the
preparation for six-session Premarital Workshop, and organized a three-day Family
Counselling Workshop for clergy. Advice on behavioural training and techniques
was given at a Selkirk College Workshop, and consultation services were available
to all schools.
During the year the Centre held a number of mental health clinics in all communities throughout the area.
NEW WESTMINSTER
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
This Centre continued to operate under a flexible intake system for both direct
service (individual and (or) group approaches) and consultation.
There was an increasing participation in community services intended to maintain and enhance the psychosocial well-being of people within the Centre's catchment area.   Included among the Centre's efforts to assist the community during the
 O 46
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
year were the following: Participation in the establishment of a residence as a local
receiving home for children; the initiation of effort toward developing a local branch
of the Association for Children With Learning Disabilities; the arrangement of a
classroom behaviour-modification workshop for teachers, co-sponsored by Douglas College; experience of the struggle for survival and then the deterioration of a
local crisis centre ("Togetherness"); involvement with the Branch Psychogeriatrics
Committee; participation in the Coquitlam Share Society (particularly the Lifeline
section;) organization of a detached youth worker programme; consultation with an
interprofessional ad hoc committee to develop a sense of community in Coquitlam;
contribution to Riverview Hospital's regionalization planning; work with the Mental
Health Centre-Douglas College "Camp Pilot" for children, held in Chase; participation in the UGN-UCS Budget Review Committee; development of a discussion
group for parents; liaison with Riverview Psychology Department regarding assistance with behaviour-modification programmes for adults; strengthening the liaison
of the Centre with the local branch of the Canadian Mental Health Association and
local Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement staff, resulting in the
co-ordination of a camp for adults held on Gossip Island; field placement of two
UBC master students in social welfare, and their Faculty Field Instructor for two days
per week at the Centre; liaison with a local workshop for adults who are mentally
retarded; attendance at a meeting of health and welfare agencies and volunteers, the
most well-represented gathering in 18 months. Other activities involved participation in workshops and meetings in a variety of capacities.
Projections for 1973 commitments included the general promotion of co-operative mental health services and programmes in the area, and co-ordinated efforts
in serving others.
PENTICTON
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
By October 1972, the Penticton Mental Health Centre had been in operation
for one full year. The area served by this Centre was the Regional District of Oka-
nagan-Similkameen, bounded roughly by the area contained south of Peachland to
the border, on the west to the east gate of Manning Park, and on the east to Anarchist Mountain. The 1971 statistics showed the region to have 42,129 people with
a 3-per-cent yearly increase in population since 1966. In other words, the population was relatively stable with the exception of Princeton, which was growing very
rapidly because of mining interests.
At the year-end the Centre had four part-time medical/psychiatric consultants,
a part-time community mental health nurse, social worker, boarding-home social
worker, and pharmacist, and a Psychologist/Administrator. With the addition of
a third psychiatrist in the Penticton area, and one paediatrician with extensive knowledge of child emotional and learning disorders, the Centre felt that direct service
could be minimized and the staff psychiatrists could be used primarily for consultation and indirect services. The non-psychiatric Mental Health staff provided
direct service, limited primarily to brief crisis intervention, and assistance with other
treatment plans where their special skills were required.
During the year there was a shift of emphasis in the functions and services provided by the Penticton Mental Health Centre. Centre staff were endeavouring to
establish and direct facilities and programmes, to practise and promote the concept
of community mental health.   This concept required a comprehensive service inte-
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
O 47
grating treatment, consultation, education, prevention, and research into a meaningful and humane service to people.
In a broader sense the Centre viewed itself as a catalyst which, with a number
of other agencies, could effect changes in attitude, making it easier to act. The
Centre was concerned about overlapping services, preventive services, treatment
resources, and gaps in services, as well as the expressed needs of the community.
The increase in staffing made it easier to provide consultative services to the
more outlying areas. The mental health nurse regularly visited certain outlying areas
which generated a large number of referrals to the local hospital's Psychiatric Unit,
to determine possible causes.
Under the auspices of the Canadian Mental Health Association, staff members
participated in two "Parenting in the 70's" forums, which consisted of eight sessions
each and focused attention on the problems that parents have in raising their children in today's society.
All staff members served on various professional Advisory Boards throughout
the community. The two primary bodies were the Okanagan Neurological Association, which attempted to co-ordinate the best possible services for the neurologically
impaired, and the Okanagan-Similkameen Society for Community Mental Health.
This registered society had board members drawn from every geographical region
in the area and every sector of the community. The society and the Centre worked
together on an epidemiological survey of existing and aniticipated needs in this area.
Staff also provided regular consultative services to Probation, the Department of
Rehabilitation and Social Improvement, City Welfare, the Penticton Hospital, the
Penticton Training Centre, and the Human Resources Society.
In January 1972 a boarding-home social worker began working out of the
Centre two days a week. She devoted a great deal of time in the Oliver/Osoyoos
area, where there were five boarding-home programmes in operation.
Regular consultation was given to all schools in the Penticton area, and to a
lesser extent in the outlying areas. Schools made specific requests for assistance in
developing behaviour-modification programmes, and for staff training for their
counsellors in group-therapy processes.
The Centre assisted local physicians in setting up a Methadone Maintenance
Clinic. There was some concern that this would attract addicts from other areas in
the Province, but this did not develop.
During 1972 the Centre attempted to determine the priorities and needs in the
area, in order to avoid any duplication of services in this very highly organized community.   Increasing emphasis was placed on indirect services.
PORT ALBERNI
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
The Administrator arrived to open the Port Alberni Mental Health Centre on
October 2, 1972. Prior to this time the Nanaimo Mental Health Centre had provided a travelling clinic to the area. At the year-end negotiations were under way to
acquire the services of a psychiatrist, beginning January 1, 1973. In the meantime,
a Consultant from Nanaimo had visited the Centre twice a month for this purpose.
The Port Alberni community needs appeared to fall into three general areas—
Care and treatment oj chronic cases—Approximately 30 admissions from the
Port Alberni area were made to Riverview each year.   It was the opinion of social
 O 48
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
agencies and medical people in the area that a large percentage of these cases were
chronic, and plans were being developed for their care in the community. A number of discussions took place with medical personnel, hospital personnel, and members of social agencies.
Children—In 1972 there were approximately 9,000 school-children in the
Port Alberni area. School counsellors and special teachers were concerned regarding the provision of treatment, educational, and consultative services.
Community organization—-Port Alberni, an extremely vital community, had
a great many groups which were active and interested in a mental health programme.
It was apparent that a good deal of the Centre's time would have to be devoted to
integrating, co-ordinating, and working with these groups.
PORT COQUITLAM
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
1972 was the Centre's first full year of operation, and staff members operated
out of two locations—the Centre's offices in Port Coquitlam and the Simon Fraser
Health Unit in Coquitlam.
The two main service areas were direct service to individual patients and those
workers involved with them in the community; and in community development work.
Major emphasis was on direct service, especially with regard to services for children,
due to the fact that the Centre offers the best, the most economical and, in some
cases, the only, such service. During the year the Centre was instrumental in launching the summer camp for emotionally disturbed children, and staff contributed a
great deal of time to the planning and actual operation. Staff also participated in
planning the organization of a Sheltered Workshop for the area, which would serve
Centre patients as well as those with other handicaps. The Centre gave support to
the SHARE Society, which is a broadly based community organization trying to
develop socially useful resources for the area, and encouraged the Family Court
Committee to try to develop a residential treatment centre for children.
With regard to direct service to patients, the Centre projected its new patient
assessment to be 217 by the end of the year, of these 175 would be children. Many
of the adults seen were referred from Riverview for follow-up, and the rate of this
was increasing measurably at the year-end. Centre staff felt that every case assessed
must have follow-up service if required and that this took precedence over further
new assessments.
The Centre was also involved in the Boarding-home programme for ex Riverview patients, and assessed 80 patients at least once during the year. A good
integration of the boarding-home worker's activities and those of the rest of the team
had taken place and the programme was developing well. Most of the referrals
needed intensive or sustaining treatment. The community workers who referred
these cases were able to screen those they could carry and those with whom additional assistance was needed. They used the Centre on a consultative basis for their
case load.
The Centre used a variety of approaches in treatment. Considered one of the
most effective methods for difficult cases was total team involvement in family therapy. The more traditional approach of one team member seeing the child and another seeing the family was also used. The Centre provided a good deal of marital
therapy. At the year-end a group of girls aged 9 to 12 was attending weekly
therapy, and the staff intended to organize additional groups.
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
O 49
POWELL RIVER
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
The Powell River Mental Health Centre completed its first full year in 1972.
For the first six months the staff consisted of a psychiatric social worker, and administrative and psychiatric consultation was provided by the Courtenay Mental
Health Centre.   A full-time psychiatrist joined the Centre in July.
The initial tasks of the Centre were those of any new service—surveying needs
and establishing working relationships in the community. Direct service was focused
at first on treatment of families. With the coming of a full-time psychiatrist, the
direct treatment load maintained a steady intake increase of about 21 a month. An
attempt was made to create a balance with indirect service, emphasizing the consultative services to the major community agencies. Centre staff consulted regularly
with representatives of Public Health, Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement, Probation, Crisis Centre, and Youth Services, and occasionally with
schools, workshops, and the boarding-home for retardates. The Centre was endeavouring to keep up with demands for service by using volunteers and trying to
increase the effectiveness and acceptability of the Crisis Centre. Mental Health
Centre staff also were encouraging new community services, in particular a family
and marital counselling service.
The Centre instituted a questionnaire type of evaluation to be used at intake,
at the end of active treatment, and at a later follow-up. Other community agencies
were contacted to determine ways of improving service, in order to obtain maximum
effectiveness.
PRINCE GEORGE
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
1972 was a busy and varied year for the Prince George Mental Health Centre.
Continued emphasis in programme was directed toward prevention and public
education. Good progress was made, including consultation to a local group regarding creative drama as a therapeutic approach in working with psychiatric in-patients;
and an excellent relationship with local representatives of the Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement with respect to consultation in family, marital,
and group therapy, and so on.
The staff continued their involvement in local organizations, with Centre representation on boards and committees, in order to be actively involved in local community planning. In general, more staff time was devoted to educative and consultative tasks, and less into direct treatment.
The Boarding-home Programme saw progressive changes during the year, with
the addition of a part-time case aide and the opening of a new boarding-home in
October for seven mildly retarded adults. The boarding-home social worker initiated
a number of imaginative programmes, including a monthly social for boarding-home
residents, with their own band supplying dance music; and conferences of boarding-
home operators with emphasis on their education in various areas of mental illness
and retardation.
Williams Lake and Quesnel were each visited once a month in 1972, until the
new mental health centre was established in Williams Lake at the beginning of October. Extra visits were made in August and September to introduce the new team
to the community and assist them in getting oriented.   The team consisted of a psy-
 O 50
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,   1972
chologist and a social worker, and served the Cariboo and Chilcotin areas. Major
outlying communities visited included Quesnel and 100 Mile House, where the service emphasis was consultative and community involvement.
Regular monthly visits were made to Vanderhoof. Occasionally meetings were
called to include doctors and school personnel in addition to Public Health and
Government welfare representatives.
Arrangements were made to visit Burns Lake for two days every two months,
and were also made to visit McBride, Valemount, and Mackenzie once or twice each
year.
The Centre's Administrator transferred to the Cranbrook Mental Health
Centre in September.
SAANICH
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
In 1972 the Saanich Mental Health Centre completed its third year of operation
at the Royal Oak location near the intersection of important crossroads, close to
the demographic centre of the region it served. It provided assessment services and
some treatment to residents of Saanich, Central Saanich, North Saanich, Sidney,
and the Gulf Islands. This centre worked in close collaboration with all other public
and private agencies serving this population, and steps to further improve this
collaboration were in progress at the year-end.
The Centre provided services to agencies and individuals in the area, in an
effort to reduce the incidence of emotional disturbance. Staff worked in the development of community mental health projects with the following agencies: School
Districts Nos. 61, 62, and 63; the Greater Victoria Metropolitan Board of Health;
Probation Officers, and staff members of the Family Court; the John Howard
Society; the Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement; Family and
Children's Services; the Canadian Mental Health Association; and the Citizens
Counselling Centre. During the year the Saanich Peninsula Guidance Association
emerged to serve the outer end of the peninsula from Brentwood to Sidney. The
mental health nurse was closely associated with this development and served as a
member of their Board of Directors, and the Centre's Director served as a consultant.
A programme was developed by this group for training participants in volunteer
counselling skills.
An in-service training programme for staff of the Saanich Mental Health Centre
was developed. Members of other agencies were invited to participate, including
the staff of the Family and Children's Services, Saanich Social Services, and members
of the Saanich Peninsula Guidance Association.
Centre staff worked with professionals and volunteers from a number of
agencies in the Sidney area in developing the Community Co-ordinating Council,
an interagency luncheon meeting of professionals and volunteers involved in helping
people. Steps toward the development of a similar programme in Victoria were
initiated by Family and Children's Services. Consultative planning involving the
staff psychologist resulted in the sponsoring of a series of five lectures, in School
District No. 63, on children with learning disabilities.
"Cornerstone," one of the most exciting developments during the year, was the
result of conjoint efforts by the volunteer group known as Cordova Bay Irregulars,
and the Canadian Mental Health Association. Staff members of the Centre participated in the planning and development of the programme and in providing ongoing
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
O 51
consultation services. "Cornerstone" was a rehabilitation and activity centre designed to help in the resocialization of isolated persons, including patients in boarding-homes, former mental patients, and elderly people. The programme had two
staff members employed under the Local Initiatives Programme and the majority
of its staff were volunteers from the Cordova Bay Irregulars.
The Centre continued to have a heavy commitment in the area of providing
patients with diagnostic assessments and with treatment in selected cases. There
was an open referral system and the Centre received patients from physicians and
from agencies. A large number of people reached the Centre through their own
efforts. A number of new programmes were in development at the year-end and
the majority of the established projects were flourishing. The Centre provided
prompt back-up service with its clinical facilities for those programmes needing
assistance.
SURREY
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
During the year the staff worked to reduce the time they spent in direct service,
and to develop alternatives. Approximately two-thirds of the time was spent in
consultation about direct service to clients, and one-third in co-operative work with
other community people in developing mental health services for the area (such as
Deltassist, Family Life Association, a special Canadian Mental Health Association
committee, and a community counselling service agenda).
The Centre's psychiatrist divided her sessional time between the assessment of
new clients, and ongoing assessments of regional boarding-home residents. The
regional social worker devoted the majority of his time to consultation and group
work with clients, and also assisted in developing community services. The mental
health nurse had similar work interests, and was very much involved in developing
the local Canadian Mental Health Association committee.
The Administrator's time was spent in a consultative capacity, as weU as in
group and individual work with clients. Her interests included community projects
(e.g., mental health workshops, learning disabilities treatment project, developing
a Family Life Association, and co-ordinated counselling services agenda) and
administration responsibilities.
During the year there was an expansion of services to the regional Boarding-
home Programme in the area.
The mental retardation social worker began a survey of services to the retarded
and assumed some direct service responsibilities, as well as serving as liaison between
The Woodlands School and the community.
In 1972 the Surrey Mental Health Centre team worked toward providing a
balance between direct and consultative services to clients and service to the community. Staff anticipated dividing their time evenly between direct and community
service in 1973, and envisaged training more volunteers to assist in achieving this
goal.
TERRACE
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
The focus of the Terrace Mental Health Centre during the year was directed
toward making it a more integral part of the community. The question of direct
service versus indirect service was a continuing one, and it was difficult to establish
 O 52
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
priorities in terms of community demand and results. The development of a comprehensive centre programme which met the needs for all mental health services was
complicated by the large geographic area that the Centre served and the particular
patient population. The traditional mental health service did not seem appropriate
for the north, and efforts were made to have a more creative and innovative approach.
The area the Centre geographically covered included the Queen Charlotte
Islands in the west, through to Houston in the east. At the year-end Prince Rupert
was in the process of opening a mental health centre, and visits to that community
were discontinued. The staff and travelling clinics covered as far south as Ocean
Falls and as far north as Stewart. The population of the area was 64,426 in 1971,
and in 1972 it was thought to be between 70,000 and 75,000.
Staff members included a psychologist, a psychiatric social worker, a boarding-
home social worker, and a stenographer.
Psychological and psychiatric consultation were provided by the Director of
the Victoria Mental Health Centre and by staff of the British Columbia Youth
Development Centre.
The Centre's main priority was the strengthening of resources in the community
and the development of new ones, in a more widespread attempt at the prevention
of mental disorders. Centre staff spent a great deal of time studying the needs and
resources of the communities served, and developing comprehensive plans to fill the
needs with the optimum amount of community involvement. This was particularly
evident in the outlying areas visited on a travelling clinic basis. For example, in the
Queen Charlotte Islands, which most agencies visited only on a monthly basis, there
was a definite need to have people on the Islands providing counselling services,
psychological assessments, and other services that a mental health centre would
provide in a local community. There was also a need to co-ordinate the existing
resources in order to get maximum output from them.
There was a constant attempt by the communities to turn over the responsibility
for their so-called mental health problems to the Centre. Centre staff encouraged
their involvement, and this was evident in the approach and basic policies which
contributed to a greater effectiveness of both community resources and Centre personnel. An example of this was the consultative service which the Centre provided
to the agencies in the Hazelton and Houston areas. Centre personnel met with these
resource people on a once-per-month basis, providing consultation both for individual problems and a more global consultation for larger community problems.
During the year there were requests for a great deal of direct service from the
Centre. The patient count at the end of October was 155, but this was not representative of the request for direct services, as the waiting period was approximately
one month for other than emergency cases.
Centre personnel were involved in many community education and planning
groups, for example, family life education; in-service education for hospital personnel, physicians, and the clergy in the areas that were served; a homemaker's service in Prince Rupert; the Northern Training Centre in Smithers, and the Alice Olson
Home for the Retarded in Terrace. The Terrace Hospital Board and Regional District requested Centre staff to participate in the planning stages of in-patient psychiatric care in Terrace, and the Union Board of Health requested input for their
future planning in the area of mental health.
By the year-end the Centre's main priorities were those of indirect services
through consultation and community organization. It was anticipated that the
Centre could assist the community in the establishment of other resources and upgrade existing ones, in efforts to deal with direct services.
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES O 53
TRAIL
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
During 1972, Centre staff attempted to improve the deliveries of mental health
services to its region (with a population of 50,000) by adding certain programme
elements and changing others. It was found that the requirements of the Greenwood-
Grand Forks and Castlegar-Kinnaird areas could only be effectively met by the
provision of residential staff. The demand for direct services for all areas during
1972 increased considerably. In spite of the consultative and treatment support
provided to other community agencies and professionals, the greatest over-riding
need was for trained, experienced practitioners.
Experience during the year indicated that further development in the Boarding-
home Programme was possible, and at least 25 new placements were available prior
to the end of the year.
Priority in direct services during 1972 were parent, family, and marital counselling; preventive follow-up of persons discharged from mental health facilities and
psychiatric units; and individual and group counselling for adolescents and adults.
In connection with the latter, two group-therapy programmes (for pre-adolescent
boys and adolescent girls) were initiated prior to the end of the year. Interagency
communication and co-operation remained at a high level with two additional programme elements initiated to facilitate this process: monthly interagency conferences,
including the UBC Education Clinic Team, in Grand Forks; and twice-monthly
clinics and monthly interagency case conferences in Castlegar. The key programme
toward co-ordinating community effort was the Annual Trail Community Agency
Workshop, held in November, and focused around the CELDIC recommendations
and the needs of local children and youth. This was highly successful, largely due to
the organizational efforts of the Centre's clerical staff.
In all areas, the need for consultation to schools, Public Health personnel,
Family Court and Probation Officers, police officers, physicians, district social
workers, clergy, and volunteers placed considerable demands upon the skills of the
professional staff. In most instances this effort added to a greater understanding
of mental health problems, needs, and services on the part of other agencies, as well
as to their ability to provide direct services to their clients. Staff were involved in
providing regular advisory and consultative services to the following groups: Trail
Regional Hospital Psychiatric Unit; Canadian Mental Health Association in Trail
and Grand Forks; Trail and Grand Forks and District Societies for the Handicapped;
Family Court Committee; Trail Methadone Clinic; Association for Community Planning; Union Board of Health; Aid to the Handicapped Committee; Trail and District
Youth Liaison Committee; and Trail and Castlegar Crisis Centres.
All staff were involved in an extremely wide scope of professional and public
activities. These included a two day training workshop for 125 elementary and
secondary teachers and counsellors in School District No. 9 (Castlegar-Kinnaird);
an evening workshop for 25 elementary teachers in Grand Forks; participation in
five of 10 weekly sessions of the Selkirk-Manpower Mental Health Rehabilitators
course initiated by this Centre; two seminars for nursing students at Selkirk; the
organization of and participation in three of the six weekly sessions of the "Coping
or Crying" series sponsored by the Adult Education Department in Trail; training
workshops for high school students and the staff of the Trail Crisis Centre; preparation of eight "Health Forum" radio programmes sponsored by the Health Unit.
In addition, staff gave talks to such groups as the One Parent organization, women's
and men's church groups, family life groups, public forums sponsored by the Cana-
 O 54
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
dian Mental Health Association, etc., on a variety of topics (child-raising, parenting,
marital relationships, follow-up care to the mentally ill, and other areas related to the
prevention of mental health problems). Over all, the Centre continued to make a
significant contribution to the level of awareness of mental health needs within the
region.
The staff also continued to develop professionally through participation in
workshops and seminars in such areas as chemotherapy, personality development,
family treatment skills, interprofessional meetings, and administrative courses. In
addition members of the staff served on Branch committees dealing with areas relating to regionalization, classification of social work positions, and the development of
mental health nursing programmes.
The goals for 1973 would be to consolidate the existing programme, with particular emphasis on increasing the effectiveness of direct services. Centre staff
expected to improve their consultative services through closer liaison with individual
teachers, physicians, and other agency personnel. An indication of the continued
role of the Centre in the region was the increasing number of individuals, groups,
and communities requesting treatment, and consultative and development services.
VERNON
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
The Vernon Mental Health Centre served the same region as in previous years,
which coincided with the North Okanagan Health Region and included Golden.
The population served was approximately 58,000.
During the year the Centre attempted to maintain a balance between direct treatment and indirect services. Treatment emphasis was on reality-oriented brief
service. Marriage and family therapy were used whenever possible, and the group-
therapy services were expanded. Behaviour modification was used a great deal since
the arrival of the Centre's psychologist in September. The psychiatrist and the Administrator continued to be involved in the group-therapy programme of the Psychiatric Unit of the Vernon Jubilee Hospital.
In the area of indirect services the staff continued to provide consultation to
Public Health, Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement, general practitioners, and others.
The Centre's open door policy continued to be met with wide community
approval.
An attempt was made to enhance the co-ordination of the helping agencies in
Vernon, and all agencies were asked to meet regularly so that services could be
co-ordinated in a more efficient manner. Monthly meetings of this nature in Salmon
Arm were successful.
A whole new field of consultation was opened up through the psychologist's
contacts with the schools. Many of the teachers and counsellors in the area became
interested in behaviour modification and its application.
The Boarding-home Programme was very active. There were 13 licensed and
13 unlicensed boarding-homes in the area, providing care for 121 patients.
The mental health nurse began a project during the year in one of the schools
in Sicamous (a small community just outside Salmon Arm). She was used as a consultant by that school for problem children and their parents, and spent a half day
there twice a month.
The travelling clinics to Revelstoke and Salmon Arm continued throughout the
year with twice monthly visits to each of these communities.
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
O 55
VICTORIA
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
During the year the Victoria Mental Health Centre continued to maintain its
various functions in meeting the needs of the community.
The multidisciplinary professional staff of the Centre were busy in providing
both direct and indirect treatment services to the many individuals and agencies in
the area.
Through the numerous contacts made by the staff with community organizations, agencies, and so on, people began to overcome their reticence and to seek
psychiatric assistance in times of crisis. More than 50 per cent of the cases were
self-referrals.
The demand for direct treatment made it necessary to focus efforts in this direction, rather than to expand the consultative services.
The art-therapy programme in the Centre proved to be most rewarding. In
the Geigy Psychotherapeutic Art Competition, national and regional awards for
artistic merit and self expression were given to seven patients participating in the
programme.
The psychiatrists and psychologists at the Centre were very busy in the assessment of cases referred by the Provincial Court, Family Court, County Court, and
Probation Officers.
Consultative services were also provided to the supervisors at the Attendance
Centre, which is under the jurisdiction of the Family Court of the Province of
British Columbia. It is a dynamic youth resource for children and adolescents between the ages of 10 and 17 who are on probation.
Regular meetings with the Family Court Probation Officers were held due to
increased involvement with their clients and families.
Staff psychologists were extremely busy in providing neuropsychological and
educational evaluations to schools in School Districts Nos. 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, and
66. They also tested patients referred from other Centres, and from physicians on
Vancouver Island and remote regions in British Columbia. Although the Duncan
Mental Health Centre became autonomous in its functioning and services, the psychology staff of the Victoria Mental Health Centre continued to provide services.
On May 4 the Victoria Mental Health Centre held Open House in observance
of National Mental Health Week.
Participation in group discussions, talks, lectures, in-service training, and consultations with staff of local agencies and schools played a major role in the Centre's
indirect mental health service. Senior professional staff provided lectures and orientation on "Community Mental Health" to students from the University of British
Columbia and the University of Victoria.
Three of the staff were actively involved with the Committee for In-service
Education in Retardation, and a staff-development programme was instituted.
Group therapy with patients was conducted regularly in various areas, both within
and outside the Centre.
During the year the Director made several visits to the Mental Health Centre
in Terrace to assist the staff in the assessment of psychiatric cases and to consult with
local physicians. Lectures and group discussions on subjects related to community
psychiatry were given to the staffs of local agencies in that area.
 O 56
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
WHALLEY
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
In 1972 the Whalley Mental Health Centre was responsible for promoting
mental health and alleviating mental disorder within its catchment area. The Centre
was staffed by a social worker/Administrator, a psychologist, a mental health nurse,
and a sessionally appointed psychiatrist.
The provision of direct treatment and rehabilitation during the year tended to
be short term, crisis oriented, i.e., staff attempted during one or two interviews to
mobilize the client to find his own direction out of crisis, and to provide him with
the knowledge of and the ways and means of connecting with relevant supportive
resources in our community.
After one year of complete operation, Centre staff were beginning to appreciate
that the area epitomized a problem inherent in "urban sprawl." The area was not
a "community" as such, because most of the 60,000 residents worked and enjoyed
recreation elsewhere. Doctors, schools, and social agencies were inclined to work
somewhat autonomously with some overlap, and this fragmentation of community
resources inhibited the development of a sense of community.
The Centre team made a concerted effort to work with the professionals of
the area, and to participate in the task of co-ordinating existing counselling services.
The staff also made themselves available as consultants to emergent self-help groups.
WILLIAMS LAKE
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
Located in one wing of the Cariboo Health Unit, the Williams Lake Mental
Health Centre was formally opened on October 2, 1972. The staff consisted of a
clinical psychologist, a psychiatric social worker, and a secretary, and serviced
Williams Lake, south to 100 Mile House, north to Quesnel, and west to Bella Coola.
The travelling team from the Prince George Mental Health Centre, which previously
serviced these communities, had established excellent working relationships and,
as a result, the new team received a friendly and co-operative welcome.
The model that the Williams Lake staff attempted to establish was one of
consultation rather than a direct service.
The initial period was spent in meeting with members of the professional community in Williams Lake, Quesnel, 100 Mile House, and Lac la Hache. Visits were
made to Probation, Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement offices,
several schools, and to Public Health and community physicians. The staff endeavoured to communicate the Centre's philosophy and policies, and to evolve
methods of working co-operatively with the established agencies and personnel.
Several consultations developed from these contacts, particularly with the public
health nurses and school counsellors. Early in October the Centre was seeing some
clients for direct treatment.
Staff attended a meeting of the local Mental Health Association and were
introduced to local resource personnel at a Community Council meeting. The
clinical psychologist was named to a committee to explore the possibility of Williams
Lake getting a detoxification centre. Centre staff also participated in the regional
conference attended by Mental Health personnel from Terrace, Fort St. John, and
Prince George.
At the year-end the Centre was consulting with community representatives, and
endeavouring to determine its objectives for 1973.
 IN-PATIENT SERVICES
Department of Nursing Education
Riverview Hospital
Geriatric Division
The Woodlands School
The Tranquille School
British Columbia Youth Development Centre,
The Maples, Burnaby
rli
mental
health
branch
  IN-PATIENT
SERVICES
DEPARTMENT OF
NURSING EDUCATION
Rapidly developing changes in patterns of care for the mentally ill necessitated
a revision of the psychiatric nursing curriculum during the year. It was believed
that modification of the existing programme could be achieved more effectively
through the diversified resources of an educational facility than from within the
limits of a service organization. Consequently, in March, the Mental Health Branch
transferred the responsibility for training psychiatric nurses to the B.C. Institute of
Technology, under the auspices of the Provincial Department of Education.
As soon as plans for the transfer were finalized, applicants who had applied to
this Department for the September 1972 enrolment class were advised to submit
applications to the B.C. Institute of Technology. Students of the February and September 1973 classes currently enrolled in the programme were informed that they
would complete their training in this Department.
Classroom facilities and residence accommodation were made available to
students of the B.C. Institute of Technology. In September, 212 students commenced classes in this Department; of these, 104 enrolled in the psychiatric nursing
programme and 108 in the registered nursing programme. Thirty-three students
requested residence accommodation.
Bursaries of $175 were made available to the students of the psychiatric nursing
programme by the Mental Health Branch. Sixty bursaries had been granted by
early November.
The psychiatric nursing programme students totalled 131 at the beginning of
the year. Of these, 60 students of the February and September 1972 classes completed the programme, 16 withdrew, and the remaining 55 students of the February
and September 1973 classes were completing the programme.
As planned in the curriculum revision, this Department assumed total responsibility for the education and related clinical experience of the psychiatric nursing
students. Concurrent teaching and clinical experience were put into effect at the
Riverview and Valleyview Hospitals and The Woodlands School; nursing service
assisted with the implementation of both. Commencing with the September 1972
class, an elective experience was introduced for senior students to provide them with
an opportunity to function as beginning graduates in an area of their choice. Of
the 26 students, seven chose to work at the Riverview Hospital, seven at the Valleyview Hospital, and 12 at The Woodlands School. Nursing service assumed responsibility for the students' experience and evaluations. The results were encouraging;
students indicated that they had achieved their objectives, evaluations were positive,
and several areas requested that the students be assigned to them as graduates.
One hundred and fifty students completed the eight-week affiliation in psychiatric nursing during the year. Sixty-seven students from the Royal Columbian Hospital were enrolled in six rotations, and 83 from the St. Paul's Hospital were enrolled
in seven rotations.  The annual review of terms of agreement between the Mental
59
 O 60
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
Dr. M. H. Miller, Head of the Department of Psychiatry at UBC, delivered the major
address at the graduation exercises held in April.
Health Branch and the General Hospital Schools of Nursing was held in March.
The agreement was renewed; it was also agreed that the Acting Director should continue as Co-ordinator of the programme.
Residence accommodation was provided for 310 residents; this number included
242 students, 28 staff, and 40 transients. Residence supervisors continued to provide accommodation and lecture-room facilities for educational conferences, seminars, and workshops for Mental Health Branch staff of the various disciplines.
Eighty such sessions were held during the year; there were approximately 2,000
participants and, of these, 115 used residence accommodation.
Concurrent with the transfer of the psychiatric nursing programme to the B.C.
Institute of Technology, modification of this Department's establishment was initiated and would be completed by September 1973. This process required the release,
for the use of the B.C. Institute of Technology, of 15 faculty positions. The positions
were being released as they became vacant.
It was anticipated that the graduates of the new programme would seek employment within the Mental Health Branch facilities and contribute substantially to its
expanding mental health programmes.
 RIVERVIEW HOSPITAL
CLINICAL SERVICES
Special efforts to broaden the base of Riverview Hospital's operations were pursued diligently during the year and were expanded from
mid-year on. This applied particularly to the
development and opening of mental health centres in new areas. These newly created centres
would continue to be directly related to the
operations of Centre Lawn Unit, in a manner
similar to the centres outside the Greater Vancouver area. This programme enhanced the
value of Riverview Hospital to local community
projects, in that it brought the local resource
people into a close and continuing working relationship with Riverview. The major significance
of the programme was that it enabled more
people to be better cared for in Riverview Hospital, with a more rapid return to home for continued care. The plan created local initiatives
and responses not previously existing.
The Vancouver Out-patient Service at East
Broadway came into operation in mid-January
and provided a new extension of Riverview
Hospital operating in that community. The services were unique and included (1) a preadmission assessment and service to patients
referred to Riverview Hospital from the Vancouver area; (2) brief out-patient treatment
and (or) referral to other resources as indicated; (3) a Home Treatment Service; (4)
after-care for patients discharged from Riverview Hospital; (5) consultation and liaison with
the Metropolitan Board of Health and other
agencies in Vancouver City; (6) participation
in education and research. Dr. Donald B.
Coates was appointed to the position of Director of the Out-patient Service in April 1972. In
order to facilitate the pre-admission assessment
of patients, all calls for the admission of patients
from the Vancouver area were being directed to
the Out-patient Service.
The Home Treatment Service, begun in 1971,
continued to increase and extend Riverview
Hospital's community enterprises. As the year
developed, the programme gave evidence of the
need for expansion, and it was likely to be
recommended that the Home Treatment Ser-
The Hillside Unit provided rehabilitation services for patients
awaiting discharge.
_»>^^___>'__i
New fire-escape stairwells were
added to the Crease Unit.
The Volunteer Centre was
"headquarters" for the more than
250 volunteers.
61
 O 62
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
The new outdoor swimming-
pool was a popular spot during
the hot summer.
The Education Centre of the Department of Nursing Education.
A volunteer trained in remoti-
vation accompanies patients during a "singalong."
vice be continued, not as a research project, but
as a treatment programme, which would be part
of the external services of Riverview Hospital.
A new, co-operative development was the
Greater Vancouver Regional Mental Health
Planning Committee. This joint committee was
established to co-ordinate and facilitate mental
health planning and operation for the area. It
had an impressive start and should be a most
useful agency in assisting Riverview Hospital,
and other components, in providing optimal
mental health care and services. The Executive
Director and the Director of the Out-patient
Service were regular members.
The Regionalization Programme, begun in
July 1972, proved to be of considerable value for
those patients referred from outside the Greater
Vancouver area. In this plan, treatment teams
were established on each floor of Centre Lawn
Unit, which were responsible for the care of the
patients from defined areas of the Province, i.e.,
the mental health centres. This plan enabled
the unit staff to have more effective liaison with
their counterparts in the community, in the
better planning and implementation of mental
health care.
The medical staff had a somewhat uncertain year, from several points of view. There
was a large turnover, with 18 appointments and
25 resignations, in all categories. This produced
a marked shortage, with heavy burdens from
increased work loads. The problems attendant
forced curtailment of admissions to Crease and
Centre Lawn Units. Indications of an improving situation were becoming apparent at the
year-end.
Again, as in former years, a number of
physicians undertook the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada Certification
Examinations. Unfortunately, the failure rate
was high for the specialty of psychiatry, and the
future employment of these persons was in
doubt. It was hoped that additional, qualified
psychiatrists could be attracted to Riverview
to complete the complement at competitive
career opportunities.
The Clinical Teaching Unit had to be
relocated in Crease Unit because of building
changes, however, the teaching programme for
most graduate physicians in psychiatry continued.   Indeed, the programme was able to be
 IN-PATIENT SERVICES
O 63
extended by having residents at the Out-patient
Service for a broader learning of community
psychiatry.
The finalizing of an affiliation agreement was
a step on the way to accreditation.
The general area of education in mental
health care covered many areas and in varying
degrees. As an example, Riverview Hospital
had students in laboratory technology, undergraduate medical students, psychology rehabilitation medicine, nursing students (several
hospitals), recreational therapy students, social
work, education, pastoral care, physicians, and
others. These demonstrations of community
awareness were vital to good community health
programmes.
-j;     ;:;            .1
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New bed assemblies, manufactured by the Industrial Therapy
Division, were set up in West
Lawn.
DEPARTMENT OF NURSING
The Department of Nursing continued its
policy of improving nursing service and the
raising of standards of care.
The ongoing and intensive Staff Development
Programme, aimed at improving the quality of
nursing, helped in the provision of patient care
and was a stimulus in the difficult days of
summer.
The general level of nursing care and nursing
involvement throughout the wards was high.
There were four senior levels of nursing staff
changes in the year, with some minor adjustments in organization; these latter were directed
toward improving responsibility and activities,
and proved to be valuable.
Generally, an improved protective programme, with better recreational opportunities,
added to the reduction of incidents. The provision of above-ground swimming-pools at Pennington Hall and Riverside Unit were examples
of the improvements that could be made.
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DIVISION
Dr. B. F. Bryson, Superintendent, retired
early in 1972 after many years of devoted service to mental health care and Riverview Hospital. He was succeeded by the appointment of
Dr. J. C. Johnston.
A typical Nurses Station in the
West Lawn building.
Group meetings are held regularly between patients and staff.
 O 64
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
The Administrative Services Division included a large group of people providing vital and supportive services to the nursing and clinical divisions. The departments concerned continued to meet most of their planned objectives for 1972,
while at the same time strove for improvements such as expanded pharmaceutical
services to keep up-to-date drugs, and drug checks, on all wards; additional coverage
to the Out-patient Service; and a review of the quality of all drugs used. The Business Office developed more efficient accounting routines. Additional training courses
in driver techniques (for Transport staff); fire prevention and control; and ongoing
interdepartmental updating programmes were further indications of continuing improvements.
The Department of Dietetics continued to provide high-quality meals and services to patients and to the staff cafeterias, and a new relief programme was developed. Approximately 20 per cent of all patient meals were for special diets to meet
medical needs. The dietetic control of food preparation and handling was improved
by new programmes for total processing, and new equipment was being installed.
The Industrial Therapy Department provided a very useful service for the
hospital in the areas of furnishings and furniture, upholstery, metal-smithing, and
reproduction. The Audio-Visual section had ever-increasing demands for both
therapeutic and educational services for Riverview Hospital and other Mental Health
Branch services in the Province. A major film production dealing with Riverview's
accident-prevention programme was completed during the year. A committee was
established to develop policies, procedures, and programmes to ensure maximum
utilization of the Department's services.
The Standards Committee and the Traffic Committee typified other groups
which provided valuable administrative assistance during the year.
The activities generated and directed through the Department of Personnel included the preparation of bulletins and newsletters, the handling of staff complaints,
maintaining liaison with other Mental Health Branch services, initiating safety activities, and providing detailed attention to employee documentation.
In April 1972 the Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance created
the Riverview Hospital Advisory Board for the purpose of assisting the Deputy
Minister in the operation of the hospital. The Board concerned itself with developing its own philosophy, goals, and operating objectives, and dealt with the required
standards for approval and accreditation, so that the hospital would continue to
strive for excellence in all its functions.
A Master Planning Committee was created in mid-year. This group of seven
hospital staff, joined by a representative of the medical staff, the Assistant Deputy
Minister, and the Programme Consultant and Analyst of the Mental Health Branch,
was charged with preparing a comprehensive study of Riverview Hospital in order
to develop useful plans for the hospital over five-year intervals. The committee met
weekly and would prepare its report (having broad input from many related services) and make its recommendations to the Deputy Minister and the Riverview
Hospital Advisory Board.
1972 was the 19th year of volunteer services under the auspices of the Canadian
Mental Health Association. During the year the 262 volunteers recorded a total of
21,105 hours of work. Their broad programmes were most helpful to the patients
and included the provision of clothing; book distribution; tea and anniversary parties;
 IN-PATIENT SERVICES
O 65
aid to activities of daily living; aid to physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and recreational therapy; handicraft help; and so on. An innovation was the development
of free legal aid assistance by a group of young Vancouver lawyers. This was of
tremendous help to many of the patients, and plans were being made to expand this
service.
 Several patient functions took
place during the year in the lovely
Valleyview Auditorium.
New skills in the arts and crafts
are learned in Skeenaview's Activity Room.
Safety Council awards of merit
are proudly displayed by Dell-
view's departmental heads following the presentation in February.
GERIATRIC
DIVISION
This Division, comprised of three separate
facilities, had a total complement of 1,306 beds
during 1972. Valleyview Hospital, the largest
of the three units, with 767 beds, accepted
patients from the Lower Mainland and adjacent
areas, and from Vancouver Island and the Gulf
Islands. Dellview Hospital, Vernon, consisting
of 239 beds, accepted patients from the Okanagan and Kootenay areas. Skeenaview Hospital,
Terrace, with 300 beds, all male, provided care
for patients from the northwestern part of the
Province. Patients from the extreme northern
areas were, on occasion, admitted to Valleyview
Hospital.
Persons aged 70 years and over, suffering
from psychiatric illness and in need of treatment, or whose behaviour due to psychiatric illness was so disturbed that they could not be
adequately cared for elsewhere in the community, were accepted for admission. Organic
deterioration leading to dependency, without a
behaviour problem, was not considered sufficient to warrant committal to a Geriatric Mental
Health facility.
VALLEYVIEW HOSPITAL
The rate of admissions and discharges continued at about the same level as in the previous
year. The trend noted in the reduction in hospital population did not continue. During the
first few months of the year there was virtually
no waiting-list, but in late spring and early summer there was a sudden increase in applications.
This increase, coupled with a lower-than-aver-
age death rate during the period, produced a
waiting-list of between 60 and 70 people within
a few weeks. The surge of applications was not
sustained, however, and the waiting-list was
gradually disappearing by the year-end. There
were a number of indications that the percentage of patients so infirm as to require total nursing care was gradually increasing.
The pre-admission screening programme continued during the year and was found to be a
valuable activity.
The position of Assistant Superintendent was
filled in October.
66
 IN-PATIENT SERVICES
O 67
New staff for pre-admission screening became
possible under a system of limited time projects
made available during 1972, which allowed the
hospital to try out several schemes. One was
the appointment of a Co-ordinator of Volunteers to explore the possibilities of developing a
core of regular volunteers, and to provide helpful services to the patients. Other projects included providing extra staff to expand the programme of physical activities to reactivate disabled patients, and developing a programme of
patient remotivation.
Occupational therapy and recreational therapy programmes continued at their usual level.
Occupational therapy was conducted in the
main department in the mornings and there was
also an individual programme on a number of
the wards. The recreational therapist organized
many forms of recreational programmes, including bus trips, outings, and volunteer entertainment.
The hospital's dentist retired prematurely
because of ill health, and this curtailed the work
of the dental department. Emergency and
urgent matters were dealt with in the interim by
the Riverview dentists, and a replacement commenced work early in November.
The Pathological and X-ray Laboratories
continued their high-calibre work at a level
greater than in the previous year. The physiotherapist provided excellent services to patients
and made herself available to all nursing staff
to offer guidance in the best ways to lift and
move patients.
The nursing division of the hospital continued
to operate at a high level of efficiency. Nursing
staff were difficult to recruit and the proportion
of nurses to aides dropped somewhat below the
optimum level. Some wards, at the request of
the nursing staff, carried out experiments with
medication-free days. This continued over
periods of several months with generally good
results, and showed that it could be done without interference with the patients' treatment and
was of benefit to both patients and staff.
The Social Service Department went through
the year with its full complement of five workers
and discharged its duties very satisfactorily.
One member was involved full-time in the admissions service, while the others were mainly
engaged  in  discharge  planning  and  arrange-
mm
Certificates were awarded to
Valleyview's volunteers at their
annual banquet, held in October.
For Skeenaview patients, an
outdoor barbecue is just what the
doctor ordered.
Rug-hooking is a popular activity and provides a feeling of
accomplishment.
 O 68
MENTAL HEALTH  BRANCH REPORT,  1972
ments, and patient follow-up after their release from hospital. The calibre of
patients, tending toward greater infirmity than in former years, presented greater
difficulties in achieving discharges. During the year some patients were placed in
extended-care units outside of the Lower Mainland area where beds were available.
Chaplaincy services were provided, mainly by the resident chaplain, and services on the individual wards were held on a weekly basis.
The hospital's safety committee met regularly throughout the year under the
chairmanship of the Housekeeper.
Arising out of activities of the Psychogeriatric Education Committee, Valleyview Hospital staff members conducted three half-day orientation programmes for
professionals in the community. This aimed to give an outline of Valleyview's work
and its relation to other community facilities. It was made available to staff of the
mental health centres, to public health nurses, V.O.N., social workers from the
Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement offices, and others. Total
attendance numbered around 75 to 80 people, and the sessions were well received.
The Business Administrator, a valuable member of the administration of the
hospital, was responsible for the various nonclinical departments, and also functioned
as personnel officer.
DELL VIEW HOSPITAL, VERNON
The long-time Administrator retired early in the year. His replacement,
formerly Administrator of Skeenaview Hospital at Terrace, assumed his new duties
at the beginning of September.
The demand for beds continued at the usual rate of approximately 8 to 10 a
month. The medical work of the hospital was carried out by a local surgeon, and
psychiatric service was provided on a part-time basis by the Vernon Mental Health
Centre.
The Dellview safety committee continued to be active and was gratified that
the dietary and culinary services of the hospital received the gold safety award of
1972.
SKEENAVIEW HOSPITAL, TERRACE
Some changes from the pattern of past years were evident at Skeenaview in
1972. The supervisor of the hospital transferred to a similar position at Dellview,
and his replacement was appointed in September. During the year there were no
transfers of patients from Valleyview to Skeenaview, resulting in a decrease in the
patient population to a total of 210. This resulted from the fact that the Valleyview
Hospital no longer had the type of patient suitable for placement in Skeenaview.
This, and other considerations, prompted an in-depth study of the function of Skeenaview, and plans were advanced for a possible change to a community residential
care unit for a broader category of patient.
Despite the gradually declining population in this unit, there was an increasing
proportion of infirm patients, and this created greater pressures on the nursing staff.
A new programme of reactivation and remotivation was started in 1972 under a
full-time co-ordinator, which proved to be a most useful programme for involving
elderly patients. Occupational therapy and recreational programmes were also
actively pursued by the staff.
Major Public Works projects were under way in 1972. The kitchen and the
bathrooms in Westlynn and Infirmary Wards were completed, and exterior coverings
constructed on fire exits.   The Infirmary was also renovated and redecorated.
 THE
WOODLANDS
SCHOOL
The Woodlands School, a residential facility
for the mentally retarded of all ages, many of
whom have additional physical or emotional
handicaps, served as a specialized back-up resource during the year to community facilities
of the western half of the Province. Diagnostic,
treatment, and training services were offered.
With an increasing complement of community
services, only those retarded presenting complex
problems were considered eligible for admission
to The Woodlands School. As soon as suitable
alternate planning, whether it be their own
home, foster home, boarding-home, or extended-care facility, could substitute for institutional care, the retarded were returned to their
own communities.
During the year the resident population was
slightly reduced at 1,100, but what was even
more gratifying was the reduction in the waiting-
list to under 40. Admissions for the first nine
months of 1972 averaged 12 per month, as compared with eight per month for the same period
in 1971. Returns to the community averaged
23 per month, as opposed to 15 per month last
year for the same nine months.
Before the end of 1971, the Programme Committee, the senior multidiscipline administrative
planning body of The Woodlands School, set a
number of specific priorities which would assist
the mentally retarded in achieving social, emotional, intellectual, and physical maturation, so
as to be able to function at maximum potential.
It was recognized that the foremost priority
must be in-service education, and that the major
emphasis must be multidiscipline in approach,
and service-oriented. Each of the three Units
(Hospital, Training, and Psychiatric) chose the
ward programme considered most exigent for
this approach. Although innovative programmes were not limited to these three areas, staff
time and competence were concentrated on
them.
Energies were mobilized to speed up and improve the delivery of service to the residents of
Clowns added to the merriment of
the annual carnival and parade.
The School's beauty parlour is
a popular spot for the young residents.
; % .■ * 4
>?i^9R_______i
_/ n___-^H_______K
■■■,■     :-■■■     ■■■
* ^S
■■      ^■■-   ...-.■■::■■.■...   .   ■.   ..:.;.■■.:.
IS
■ i>
Sral^H                    B
■':
$H*      Ww**
TjBk      fi
This little girl is all smiles as
she and her nurse take a minute
to visit.
69
 O 70
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
■■.:■■.■.■ - v   •
.•
The art of weaving is one of
several crafts taught in Occupational Therapy.
A work-out on the exercise ball
is part of the physiotherapy programme.
Getting the pegs in the right holes
takes a lot of thought.
The Woodlands School. By the end of the
year, ward clinical teams of nurses, psychiatric
aides, doctors, and social workers, also included,
whenever it was appropriate to the resident
population, such persons as psychologists, occupational therapists, instructional aides, recreational therapists, rehabilitation officers, handicraft instructors, and teachers. The provision of
this additional service showed an increase of
between 40 to 45 per cent at the end of 1972
as compared with the end of 1971. These
changes were made possible by an approximate
30-per-cent increase in the availability of
trained staff to fill empty positions in the Training and Education Department. The chronic
shortage of professionals with experience and
training in mental retardation was overcome by
very active recruitment, followed by intensive
in-service training.
The new Co-ordinator of In-service Education, together with the assistance and co-operation of other senior staff, made it possible to
meet the key priority of in-service education.
The Hospital Unit selected Ward 32, toddlers
and pre-schoolers, as their top priority area.
The project had, as its goals, normalization for
the residents, and intensive training for the staff.
A more home-like atmosphere and a stimulating
kindergarten were taking shape within the Hospital Unit.
Programmes similar to that on Ward 32 were
also started on a much more limited scale on
three other wards in the Hospital Unit. All but
one ward in this unit were integrated with both
male and female residents. Multihandicapped
residents of the Hospital Unit, many blind or
confined to wheel-chairs, discovered the joy of
going swimming or out into the community on
frequent bus rides. These programmes were
possible because a full-time recreational therapist was assigned to the Hospital Unit, and
even more so because of the volunteer help from
Columbia Bible College, from Twin Maples
Correctional Centre, and from a University of
British Columbia Opportunity for Youth Group.
The Psychiatric Unit measured their programme with the yardsticks of "normalization"
and "communication." Progress in normalization was made by integrating social and programmed activities and living areas and young
adults, adolescents, and school pupils.
 IN-PATIENT SERVICES
O 71
The use of the Therapeutic Community meetings was expanded and became central to the
programmes on the four wards where the moderately and mildly retarded adolescents and
young adults reside. A special programme was
instituted on the priority wards to teach the
residents how to administer their own medications.
The Woodlands School was involved in follow-up of all homocystinurics in the Province of
British Columbia, and the same structure was
devised as for phenylketonurics. Special diet,
paid for by the Province of British Columbia,
was supervised from The Woodlands School on
an out-patient basis.
Reorganization and full staffing of the Vocational Services Department had its effect on
the more capable Psychiatric Unit residents
through incentive pay for jobs, opportunities to
learn to manage money before discharge, a
bachelor survival course, and evening adult education. The Opportunity Rehabilitation Workshop in Vancouver continued to accept training
applicants and often hired the applicant on completion of training. The Variety Farm in Ladner
provided nonresident training and employment
for four residents, and four other residents commuted daily to the Clarke Drive Workshop in
Vancouver for training. Woodlands was indebted to the assistance provided by the Vocational Rehabilitation Department of Riverview.
Normalization in the Occupational Therapy
Department brought older, more disturbed
women from their wards for cooking and social
party sessions. The Academic School programme, which served primarily the severely
disturbed boys and girls, continued to expand
its individual programming for well over 100
pupils from pre-primary to vocational training
levels. A behaviour modification approach
made it possible to make learning a pleasant
event for children who had been excluded from
community schools because of uncontrollable
behaviour.
In order to maximize the delivery of service
by all departments, efforts were made to improve communications and to introduce as
much efficiency into administrative duties as
possible.
More than 3,000 visitors attended the highly successful Open
House, held in May.
V;..V:
An electronic "talking dog"
provides great excitement in the
speech-therapy classes.
An Alder Lodge resident receives instruction on the use of a
coin-operated telephone.
 O 72
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
A major source of support during the year was the provision of "on call" nursing
personnel to provide relief coverage for short-term staff illness and periods of recruitment lag. This resulted in an improved standard of care to residents and increased
staff morale. The new policy was credited with the improvement in the sickness rate
seen in the Nursing Department in 1972. The use of part-time nursing staff to cover
more efficientiy peak periods of residents' training, treatment, and care was partially
implemented.
In 1972 approximately 300 volunteers gave over 15,000 hours of service to the
residents. They played a very central part in many of the special occasions such as
Open House and Carnival Day, but their major involvement was the assistance given
in the ongoing day-to-day programmes.
A successful Open House was held on May 3, when over 3,000 visitors toured
the school's facilities. Orientation tours for Grade XII students of the Lower Mainland were held in the spring and fall, with 450 in attendance.
1972 saw an expansion of inter-relationship with community educational
centres. Close liaison continued with various faculties at the University of British
Columbia, such as Social Work, Nursing, Special Education, Recreational Therapy,
Rehabilitative Medicine, and the Department of Paediatrics. Limited use was made
of the facility by the Department of Education at Simon Fraser University, and the
Psychology Department at the University of Victoria. Schools of Nursing at St.
Paul's and the Vancouver General Hospital continued to use Woodlands for educational visits. During the year there were field placements two days per week by
Douglas College for their child-care students.
The Superintendent was honoured by being elected Chairman of the North-west
Region of the American Association on Mental Deficiency. This region stretches
from the Northwest Territories to Alaska, Hawaii, Oregon, and Idaho. The Association held its conference in Vancouver this year, bringing in many outside
speakers of world-wide renown.
Together with SPARC and the CELDIC Committee, Woodlands sponsored a
conference on the CELDIC Report, which brought over 350 representatives from
community for a one-day conference in November. As well as emphasizing Woodlands determination to co-operate in the provision of community services, the conference sensitized many staff at Woodlands to the complexities of the delivery of
service in the community.
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Staff establishment at The Woodlands School remained at 924 positions. While
there was an increase in the turnover of male psychiatric nurses, the over-all turnover
showed a substantial reduction from the previous year.
The Workmen's Compensation Board inspected The Woodlands School, and all
unsafe conditions noted in the report were remedied.
Through the Patients' Comfort Fund it was possible to purchase a hydraulic
lift for the Cerebral Palsy Bunny Bus, as well as some smaller audio-visual items.
Considerable time was spent in preparing plans to renovate the Nurses' Home
in order to accommodate training and education programmes such as academic
classes, vocational programmes, a Sheltered Workshop, a volunteers' area for the
Apparel Shop, and storage of donated toys and other gifts. It would be necessary
to include in this building numerous offices to accommodate in-service education,
liaison personnel with university programmes, and clinical staff for the Training Unit.
This would permit the demolition of the present academic school building, con-
 IN-PATIENT SERVICES
O 73
structed in 1945, and a shops building created many years earlier. A number of
departments housed in the latter building would be relocated in the new Industrial
Therapy Building.
The addition to the Industrial Therapy Building and the playground for two
areas were completed late in the year.
Regular meetings were held with local representatives of the British Columbia
Government Employees' Union and the Psychiatric Nurses' Association. Relationships between administration and these staff groups were most constructive.
The Psychiatric Nurses' Association sponsored, through Canada Manpower, a
number of excellent refresher and administrative courses at Douglas College and
the B.C. Institute of Technology.
It was anticipated that Gold Creek Camp near Alouette Lake would gradually
become a more significant part of the school's programme, and a full-time caretaker
was appointed during the year.
 Wheel-chair patients enjoy the
shade of the oak trees in front of
the Central Building.
Crafts taught in Occupational
Therapy include the making of
rugs and pegboards.
Tranquille's modern fire department includes two fire trucks and
a staff of nine.
THE
TRANQUILLE
SCHOOL
During the year there was a considerable extension of services within The Tranquille School.
Drawings and specifications for the five 20-bed
units were completed and it was expected that
this major project would go to tender by the
year-end. An outside elevator system was being
installed in the Greaves Building, and when it
comes into operation early in 1973 it will add
considerably to the safety of the building. Work
was also proceeding on improving the fire-alarm
system.
An important innovation that occurred during
the year was the introduction of regular monthly
visits to Victoria by senior personnel, for a conference with the Deputy Minister and branch
consultants. Discussions centred around policy,
staffing, and other major issues, and proved to
be a most effective means of communication.
TREATMENT SERVICES
Meetings of the professional staff were held
regularly. The clinical team, which consisted
of all clinical departmental heads, plus the dietician, met every week, frequently with the Superintendent and occasionally with the Business
Administrator. Each ward had a professional
team which gave advice to the nurse in charge
of the ward and worked with the individual in
an integrated way. Other meetings were held
for the benefit of physicians, nursing supervisors, and nurses, and the various departments.
The Out-patient Department continued to
function effectively, and different types of family
therapy were introduced. One method involved
using a home in which a disturbed child could
live with professionals and his own family, in
an effort to explore methods for quietening the
disturbed behaviour or treating unwanted symptoms. Home visits by a team were also made
to families in need of on-site assistance, and this
proved to be very successful. Tranquille concentrated on a very direct clinical type of advice
to a family, or to an agency, rather than presenting a large amount of academic observation
and speculation, which is often confusing to its
74
 IN-PATIENT SERVICES
recipients. There was some evidence that these
services would have to be extended considerably
in the not-too-distant future.
The school continued to work on a collegiate
basis. Ward teams were allocated to each clinical area and there was also a clinical team which
acted in a general supervisory and advisory
capacity for the Superintendent. This team had
many administrative as well as clinical duties,
and consisted of the Clinical Director and the
Directors of Nursing, Training, Dietetics, Psychology, and Continuing Education, together
with the Business Administrator.
During the year a large number of patients
went into boarding-homes and some were accommodated at the new Glendale Hospital in
Victoria. There were 39 informal admissions
and six 30-day admissions during 1972.
STAFF CHANGES
Several staff changes took place, and some
members were attracted by positions on Vancouver Island and the Lower Mainland. The
Office Manager, who was also Assistant Business Administrator, left the school in October
to take up a position with the Glendale Hospital
in Victoria. Early in the year the Business
Administrator retired and the position was filled
during the summer. At the beginning of the
year a diplomate of the American Board of
Pediatrics was appointed Director of Clinical
Services. He resigned within six months and the
duties were assumed by a certified paediatrician.
During the summer two senior medical students
from Glasgow University spent three months at
Tranquille and performed very valuable service
while receiving instruction in clinical medicine,
psychiatry, and the treatment of mental retardation. In the latter part of the year the psychologist left Tranquille in order to join the
staff of the mental health centre in Vernon.
Toward the end of the year a psychiatrist
arrived from England and assumed duties at
Tranquille in the psychiatric service. His appointment completed the resident medical team.
GENERAL
During the course of the year, programmes
were set up with the Cariboo College. These
were useful to the students and also provided
o 75
Lamps and coffee tables are included in the work turned out in
the Woodwork Shop.
The Greaves Building accommodates extended-care patients
and a small paediatric ward.
The Sage Building houses profoundly retarded adults and a 20-
bed paediatric ward.
 O 76
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
certain Tranquille School staff with continuing education. Further involvement
with the Cariboo College resulted in the presentation of teaching for embryonic
social workers, case aides, and other health-care personnel.
Kamp Kiwanis presented some difficulties during the year because of the changing character of the patient-trainee at Tranquille. Toward the year-end a series
of meetings was held with Kamp Kiwanis officials and several of the problems were
resolved.
The Laundry staff worked all summer on a five-day-a-week basis. This was
being monitored by a special committee and by the Business Administrator, and
if the five-day-week proved to be successful it would be continued.
At the beginning of the year, Tranquille was asked to accommodate the personnel and residents of the Provincial Home in Kamloops while it was being rebuilt.
This was to be a temporary measure for approximately 18 months. Some of the
elderly men were housed in the Cedar Grove Ward, while others were housed in a
men's residence.
Many of the children at Tranquille attended Fitzwater School, a facility for
the mentally retarded in Kamloops, while some of the brighter children attended
local grade schools in the city. The Tranquille School was grateful for the cooperation extended by the Superintendent of Schools, the Principal of the Fitzwater
School, and also by the South Central Health Unit.
The Superintendent and two senior colleagues—the Director of Nursing and
the Head of the Social Work Department—were involved to a considerable extent
with the work of the Retarded Children's Association. The Superintendent served
on the Advisory Board of both the Association and the Pleasant Services Workshop,
while his colleagues were appointed as directors. Both The Tranquille School and
the local associations benefited from these relationships.
At regular intervals the Business Administrator, together with the Director of
Nursing and the Superintendent, met with the Psychiatric Nurses Union executive,
and with the executive of the B.C. Government Employees' Union.
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
YOUTH DEVELOPMENT CENTRE, BURNABY,
THE MAPLES
D. R. McCallum, Business Administrator,
retired early in the year and L. S. McClintick
was appointed to the position, effective April 1,
1972.
Dr. A. G. Devries, Consultant in Psychology,
Mental Health Branch, was appointed a member of the Board of Management, effective April
19,1972.
The following constituted the Board of Management in 1972:
Chairman—
Dr. J. S. Bland, Co-ordinator of Retardation and Children's Psychiatric Services.
Members—
T. D. Bingham, Director of Programmes, Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement.
Dr. H. W. Bridge, Co-ordinator of
Adult Psychiatric Services.
Dr. A. N. McTaggart, private practitioner.
Executive Secretary—
L. S. McClintick, Business Administrator.
FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S CLINIC
During the year it became increasingly clear
to many workers in the field that the future of
the mental health movement would be influenced as much, if not more, by lay and professional persons, not designated as mental health
workers, as by the members of the established
mental health professions. At the same time, it
was equally clear that specialist treatment skills,
as offered by traditional therapists, were needed
for a significant population of disturbed individuals, especially in urban communities, and
that some of the specialized treatment was best
provided in a central facility. It was hoped that
the trend toward decentralization, with the goal
of bringing treatment and preventive services
Staff act out situations encountered with residents in role-playing.
Modelling in clay helps the young
residents to communicate.
Equipment is readied for summer camp, which proved highly
successful.
77
 O 78
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
Each cottage has its own dining-room for staff and residents.
Self-expression takes many forms,
music is one of them.
Play
part of
in the
Clinic.
therapy is an important
the programme conducted
Family   and   Children's
closer to the family home and community, could
be pursued without loss of quality of service and
without attenuation of communication between
the personnel involved.
Experiments with solutions to these contemporary problems were attempted by the Family
and Children's Clinic in 1972. Some of the
staff had already been deployed on a maximum
part-time assignment to the community; others
made sorties into community with "specialist"
skills; and other stayed at home with the responsibility for the maintenance of the "central"
treatment programmes. The clinic's experience
with this model indicated that the concept of a
centralized regional unit with "satellite" staff
groups radiating into communities was valid,
and needed refinement only in terms of numbers
of staff, size of population served, and the geographical accessibility of the "central" unit.
The principal functions of the "central" clinic
group were to provide
(1) treatment for seriously disturbed children and their families;
(2) training of other persons, including
mental health professionals, in psychotherapy or first-line counselling
(the operational maxim was that
there should be no treatment without
training, and no training without
treatment).
The treatment population of disturbed children, and their families, comprised
(a) all children in the pre-school Day
Centre programme, and a number in
The Maples School and the residential programme (this group was given
priority);
(b) families referred by mental health
centres;
(c) families from the area in Vancouver
served by the community team who
required more specialized facilities at
the clinic;
(d) families identified during the course
of consultation to other agencies.
The treatment methods were both traditional
and innovative. The practice of individual child
psychotherapy was maintained, and regular discussion groups were held for interested thera-
 IN-PATIENT SERVICES
O 79
pists. A staff psychologist introduced the theories and practice of "holding" techniques in the treatment of disturbed children and in normal child-rearing. Group
and family group therapies were also subjects of regular discussion, and provided
the main content of training programmes.
The three-week workshops for public health nurses were continued, as well as
brief "demonstration" sessions for other Public Health staff (Provincial Supervisors,
local health units). Programmes of one to five days were provided for homemakers,
Probation Officers, Family Life Education Groups, in-service trainees of the Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement, and counselling students from the
University of British Columbia. Seminars were conducted with pediatric and psychiatric nursing students from the B.C. Institute of Technology, social workers from
private and Provincial agencies, pre-school education students from Vancouver City
College, and paediatric nurses at Vancouver General Hospital. Students in various
numbers were in almost daily attendance as observers in the pre-school day centre,
and some of these from Simon Fraser University became available as volunteer
helpers, or used the programmes for research in communication, classroom behaviour, and treatment methods. Staff conducted in-service development workshops
at The Woodlands School and the Northern Training Centre (Smithers).
Consultation was provided to other agencies, including Willingdon School, the
Brannan Lake School, and the Family Court. Several staff from The Maples visited
the New Denver Youth Centre for consultation and ongoing staff training. Significant community developments occurred in the Terrace Mental Health Centre area
with the formation of an active Youth Resources Committees in Kitimat and Smithers. Consultation and training workshops were provided by The Maples staff
together with representatives of the Terrace Mental Health Centre, for groups in
Kitimat and Smithers, as well as for others in Terrace, Houston, Masset, and Tlell.
The functions of a "satellite" clinic group were demonstrated by a team of social
workers deployed to the Health Unit 4 area in South Vancouver. This model
appeared to work well, and there was a considerable enlargement of activities related
to schools during the year, and the training, educational, and consultative aspects
steadily increased as team members gained experience.
Activities included:
(a) Direct treatment—Children and families, individual, conjoint, and
group methods. Approximately 100 cases were open on an average,
and in addition, there were a number of therapy-oriented groups
related to schools and other agencies.
(£>) Activity Groups—An extensive programme was developed with 12
such groups in five schools using volunteer leadership. About 30
university students were trained and supervised by Clinic staff, in
co-operation with YWCA staff.
(c) Human Relations Groups—Eighteen groups operated in several
schools with staff working with other personnel in the community
to develop this type of programme within the structure of the school.
(d) Consultation, education, training, and community organization—
Contributions in this area grew out of daily activities in both direct
service and programme development, which were shared with workers in the community. Apart from the educational influences of
sharing cases, some more formalized programmes emerged, such as
leadership of groups in pre-school mother and child programmes;
 O 80
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
prenatal classes; participation in workshops and staff development
programmes; training of volunteers and staff in OFY and LIP
projects and other areas; and shared treatment activities with other
professionals.
Some of the Clinic staff co-operated with a number of professionals in the
Lower Mainland mental health centres to provide training, supervision, and service
to a camp for disturbed children.   This camp was largely staffed by a group of
students under the Opportunities for Youth Programme, and was located in the
Kamloops area.   Seventy-five children from 8V2 to 13 years were accommodated in
three programmes of 18 days each.
PSYCHOLOGICAL EDUCATION CLINIC
The Psychological Education Clinic offered a variety of services to the community, including direct service, travelling clinics, consultation, training, and research. Direct service was provided in classroom placement, assessments for specific
learning disturbances, and through treating behavioural problems. There was also
a series of neuropsychological tests that was being expanded to make it more complete. Referrals came primarily from the Lower Mainland, but extended throughout
the Province.
The Maples School consists of a seven-classroom building, and at the year-end
six of these classrooms were being used by the Psychological Education Clinic. The
seventh classroom was used by the Residential Unit, along with one teacher seconded
to them. The age-range of the children was from 6 to 13 years, and approximately
45 were attending the school programme. One class had two teachers, while the
others had one teacher. An educational consultant and a psychologist, as well as the
Director, comprised the functional unit responsible for the educational and treatment
programme. The average length of stay for the child was about nine months, during
which time the staff endeavoured to discover what constituted the specific learning
disability, and ways to remediate it effectively. The child's emotional problems were
also worked with through classroom treatment and parental counselling. An additional part of the school programme was a camp experience, which provided intense
involvement with the children. Experience indicated that the children's deviant
behaviour came under better control following the camp. A secondary benefit to
the children from camping was concerned with the process of education, as well as
attempting to train them in specific skills. Children in the school programme had
difficulty with competitive situations, and staff were able to minimize the peer competition primarily through gymnasium and swimming programmes. They established
an environment in which the child could function without indicating to him that success or failure was implicit in his performance. As with the total school programme,
the staff concentrated on success and accomplishments, with no attention paid to
failures and negative consequences.
There was a continual move to work more directly with the community on
preventive programmes. Staff were involved in several parent effectiveness programmes, and participated in a travelling clinic to the northern part of the Province
where direct service, consultation, and training workshops were presented. Efforts
were directed toward assisting the community in managing their problems without
sending the children to the clinic. The school programme was for the very disturbed
who could not be maintained in a school setting; however, a great deal of time was
also spent with less-disturbed children who were able to stay with their family and
in their community school. This was the area the staff considered to be their prime
involvement. Working with community groups, including teachers, would ultimately be the most beneficial way to utilize their time and prevent mental illness.
 IN-PATIENT SERVICES
O  81
RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT UNIT
During the year the position of Director for the Unit remained vacant, and the
Chief Child Care Counsellor continued to act both as Chief Counsellor and Unit
Director.
Residential Cottages
The two residential cottages continued to function in much the same manner as
the previous year. The focal point for maintaining the established therapeutic milieu
was the daily community meeting held in each cottage Monday through Friday.
These meetings included all the teen-agers, together with the day and evening staff
members on duty for that day.
There was an average of 15 teen-agers per residential cottage at all times, with
two or three boys from each cottage spending several months or longer at the newly
acquired farmhouse in Aldergrove. Each residential cottage held various excursions
of four to five days each to camp-sites or cabin areas, depending on the weather and
the facilities available. These excursions, with usually four to six teen-agers and two
staff at a time, proved to be one of the most rewarding aspects of the programme and
frequently helped to stabilize or revitalize the cottage milieus at critical times.
Day Care Centre
The Day Care Centre found the semester system to be the most productive
method of working with teen-agers who were not residents. Each semester lasted
between two to four months, depending on the time of year. The teen-agers agreed
to commit themselves for the entire semester, and staff social workers, community social workers, and probation officers followed up whenever the commitment
was broken.
The tone of the centre and the degree of responsibility accepted by both counsellors and teen-agers in this setting indicated steady improvements during the first
eight months of this year. The cottage staff continued to hold monthly camping trips
and, as with the residential units, these trips proved to provide some of the most
important therapeutic situations for the teen-agers, and an important learning experience for the counsellors.
Farm
Use of The Woodlands School cabins at Golden Ears Park as a permanent
camp for youngsters from the Residential Unit was terminated at the end of June
because of requirements of the school. A farmhouse in the Aldergrove area was
rented, which worked out very well as a replacement for the permanent camp.
Educational Programme for Teen-agers
Since September, several aspects in the education programme were improved
and the teacher worked closely with the new Programme Co-ordinator so that each
teen-ager was assessed in regard to academic, recreational, arts and crafts skills, and
so on. For the first time several teen-agers were in individual gym programmes with
the recreational therapist, who catered to their specific needs regarding balance, coordination, space perception, etc. The total programme of the Activity Centre
("Turn-on Centre") was also more varied and exciting. Many interesting guest
speakers were invited to talk with teen-agers; there was a film-night weekly in
the unit, and a surprise "Happening" every Thursday afternoon; and there was a
bimonthly Saturday evening "Coffee House" which became a great success. A
weekly "Newsletter" was also published by the staff and teen-agers.
 O 82
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
Family Therapy and Follow-up Care
One of the most important aspects of the programme was the work of the three
social workers with the families of the teen-agers. Where possible, they held frequent
family conferences which included one counsellor from the teen-ager's cottage, thus
helping to provide continuity in terms of the treatment plan. When families lived
out-of-town and were unable to come to the centre, a social worker and a counsellor
often travelled to the home for family conferences.
The social workers did considerable individual follow-up care with the teenagers as required, and the teacher was actively involved in both vocational and
academic plans for the teen-agers being discharged.
In-service Training Programme for Staff
The first Training Co-ordinator was appointed during the year, to devote full
time to the in-service training programme. Many special sessions were planned for
staff in order to provide them with personal experience in group therapy, and with
knowledge concerning specific group therapy techniques. Staff had approximately
one training day every two weeks. An experienced therapist was hired on a part-time
basis (four hours per week for 10 weeks) to provide needed experience and theory
in Gestalt therapy for the morning training sessions. Each cottage also held a staff
meeting once every two weeks where staff problems, treatment plans for teen-agers,
administrative decisions, and other problems were discussed.
At the year-end a new exchange programme was introduced, where one of the
staff would exchange places for a week or two with staff from another Residential
Unit in the Province. The first of these exchanges took place the last two weeks in
October with the Human Resources Centre in Penticton, and proved highly successful for all concerned. The idea was first introduced in one of the meetings of the
Association of Child Care Services, of which the unit is an active member.
 PATIENT MOVEMENT
Patient Movement Trends
Patient Movement Data
Mi
mental
health
branch
  PATIENT
MOVEMENT
PATIENT
MOVEMENT
TRENDS
TRENDS, SEPTEMBER 1972
Yearly Sum of Entries1 From—
Resident or Case Load
Facility
Oct. 1969
to
Sept. 1970
Oct. 1970
to
Sept. 1971
Oct. 1971
to
Sept. 1972
End of
Sept. 1970
End of
Sept. 1971
End of
Sept. 1972
All mental health facilities ...   .._.
Residential programmes ...   	
Facilities for the mentally ill 	
Riverview _ 	
Youth Development Centre  	
Geriatric facilities ...   	
10,209
4,306
3,994
3,276
39
679
461
165
53
312
257
55
5,903
4,725
660
269
355
131
9,871
3,870
3,652
2,962
51
639
500
116
23
218
160
58
6,001
4,958
587
321
255
219
32
1
276
339
276
74
210
193
38
10,581
3,340
3,059
2,487
39
533
442
76
15
290
214
76
7,241
6,363
537
387
301
382
189
142
274
330
371
180
152
168
223
283
120
138
301
166
353
207
486
507
166
407
68.
28
276
57
42
12,088
5,495
3,658
2,469
19
1,170
681
228
261
1,837
1,263
574
6,593
4,965
683
243
340
108
12,179
5,290
3,506
2,336
25
1,155
685
234
236
1,784
1,217
567
6,889
5,422
572
313
178
155
32
1
255
313
404
145
210
98
38
13,003
4,785
3,207
2,110
26
1,081
655
214
212
Facilities for the mentally retarded	
The Woodlands School	
1,578
1,097
481
7,218
6,075
576
384
172
The Tranquille School   	
Out-patient programmes  _ _.„
All mental health centres	
Burnaby  —	
Chilliwack     ....
Duncan (August 1971) -  	
Fort St. John (September 1971)2 	
Kamloops   	
Kelowna  	
160
343
375
104
16
236
	
613
249
208
53
135
450
368
481
539
89
69
200
438
286
244
14
263
227
350
371
Nanaimo     	
Nelson  _ 	
New Westminster    	
Penticton (October 1971) 2  ___	
Port Coquitlam (September 1971)2    _
137
247
136
171
178
Powell River (January 1972)2      	
732
246
178
51
42
570
327
94
Prince George ...	
410
240
190
308
207
452
330
692
368
164
197
157
681
449
1,018
268
156
25
129
Surrey        	
Terrace    	
Trail   -                      	
227
147
198
601
520
Whalley (November 1971)2  	
Riverview Out-patient Department3	
116
385
1,085
821
54
Tranquille Out-patient Department5	
15
534
90
34
325
144
74
221
31
Tranquille waiting-list	
1
1 Includes permanent transfers, admissions from community, and returns from leave and escapes.
2 Month Centre/Department commenced reporting.
"• Thirty-three patients active in the Riverview Hospital Centre Lawn Out-patient case load are not included,
i March 1972.
5 May 1972.
85
 PATIENT
MOVEMENT
DATA
DATA,  19721
Entries
Exits
Facility
Cf-
>
ei
_,
.j
Total
"3_
§1
9-SS
Total
ei
VI
U
>
v\
C5
Q<
«t_,
ft.!*
Q
A
6.H
D
All mental health facilities 	
10,627
10,498
3,133
2,691
418
24
3,637
1,857
1,281
23
476
Facilities for the mentally ill	
2,828
2,492
327
9
3,206
1,727
1,023
7
449
Riverview	
2,284
1,990
292
2
2,617
1,623
890
5
99
Youth Development Centre	
37
37
	
....
40
37
3
	
Geriatric facilities  _	
507
465
35
7
549
67
130
2
350
Valleyview 	
433
395
32
6
440
57
119
264
Dellview   	
58
55
3
74
5
6
63
16
305
15
199
91
1
15
35
431
5
130
5
258
2
16
23
Facilities for the mentally retarded
27
The Woodlands School	
229
76
141
58
85
6
3
12
313
118
120
10
158
100
14
2
21
The Tranquille School  -
6
Out-patient programmes— 	
7,494
6,861
All mental health centres 	
6,498
5,694
Burnaby 	
537
533
387
316
Courtenay  _	
301
307
382
205
Duncan (Aug. 1971)2„„_ _
189
30
Fort St. John (Sept. 1971)2...
142
47
Kamloops	
274
302
Kelowna	
330
293
371
404
Nanaimo —   	
180
188
152
115
New Westminster   . 	
168
130
Penticton (Oct. 1971)2 	
223
68
Port Alberni (Oct. 1972) 2	
40
4
Port Coquitlam (Sept. 1971) 2„
283
143
Powell River (Jan. 1972) 2	
169
36
Prince George	
138
562
301
225
Surrey —	
166
103
Terrace	
353
403
Trail—	
207
219
Vernon	
486
566
Victoria  —   _.
507
436
Whalley (Nov. 1971)2  _.
183
56
Williams Lake (Oct. 1972) 2	
29
3
Riverview Out-patient
490
604
Woodlands Out-patient
Department	
98
26
Tranquille Out-patient
Department5 —
40
19
Youth Development Centre	
276
323
50
131
Tranquille waiting-list 	
42
64
1 Table compiled from actual data through September 1972, and projected for the remainder of year.
2 Month Centre/Department commenced reporting.
3 About 368 patients active in the Riverview Centre Lawn Out-patient area case load are not included.
* March 1972.
o May 1972.
86
 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
The following are financial reports of the Mental
Health Branch for the fiscal year ended March 31,
1972
A_
mental
health
branch
  FINANCIAL
STATEMENTS
FINANCIAL TABLES
Table A—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence Each
Year, the Total Amounts Spent for Maintenance, and the Gross
Yearly and Daily per Capita Cost, 1962/63 to 1971/72.
Institution
Average
Number in
Residence
Maintenance
Expenditure
Yearly
per Capita
Cost
Daily
per Capita
Cost
1962/63
Crease Clinic 	
236.68
2,719.32
1,365.03
307.13
214.18
724.07
232.55
296.21
$
1,371,120.17
7,058,027.01
3,817,685.18
779,642.07
478,229.75
1,939,191.04
469,458.08
441,445.13
$
5,793.14
2,595.51
2,796.78
2,538.48
2,232.84
2,678.18
2,018.74
1,490.31
$
15.87
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale
The Woodlands School, New Westminster
The Tranquille School.	
7.11
7.66
6.95
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
6.12
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale....    	
7.34
5.53
4.08
6,095.15
16,354,798.43
2,683.25
7.35
1963/64
220.63
2,791.99
1,306.35
433.92
94.07
737.69
236.51
292.83
1,442,627.00
7,534,673.00
3,916,660.00
1,077,011.00
414,787.00
2,029,118.00
512,128.00
713,594.00
6,538.67
2,698.67
2,998.17
2,482.05
4,409.35
2,750.64
2,165.35
2,436.89
17.87
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale
The Woodlands School, New Westminster
7.37
8.19
6.78
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz 	
14.41
7.52
5.92
6.66
Totals for the year...	
6,113.99
17,640,598.00
2,885.28
7.90
1964/65
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale
The Woodlands School, New Westminster
227.59
2,740.84
1,314.20
512.79
753.91
234.70
290.44
1,573,366.00
8,054,536.00
4,501,364.00
1,509,947.00
2,351,885.00
553,985.00
510,679.00
6,936.16
2,938.71
3,425.17
2,944.57
3,119.58
2,360.40
1,758.29
18.94
8.05
9.38
8.07
8.55
6.47
4.82
Totals for the year _	
6,074.47
19,055,762.00
3,137.02
8.59
1965/66
2,797.80
1,291.27
562.37
763.44
227.35
295.38
10,230,637.00
4,981,190.00
1,876,093.00
2,510,228.00
595,532.00
551,447.00
3,656.67
3,857.59
3,336.05
3,288.05
2,619.45
1,866.91
10.02
The Woodlands School, New Westminster
The Tranquille School   	
10.57
9.14
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale	
9.01
7.18
5.11
Totals for the year	
5,937.61
20,745,127.00
3,493.85
9.57
1966/67
Riverview Hospital, Essondale.....	
The Woodlands School, New Westminster
Thn Tr-nqnille School
2,760.21
1,307.53
602.46
760.73
219.13
284.32
11,162,462.00
5,376,492.00
2,267,399.00
2,668,056.00
635,710.00
589,492.00
4,044.06
4,111.95
3,763.57
3,507.23
2,901.06
2,073.34
11.08
11.27
10.31
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale 	
9.61
7.95
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace	
5.68
Totals for the year 	
5,934.38
22,699,611.00
3,825.10
10.48
89
 O 90
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
Table A—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence Each
Year, the Total Amounts Spent for Maintenance, and the Gross
Yearly and Daily per Capita Cost, 1962/63 to 1971/72—Continued.
Institution
Average
Number in
Residence
Maintenance
Expenditure
Yearly
per Capita
Cost
Daily
per Capita
Cost
1967/68
$
2,716.22         |        12,111,825.00
1,282.95                  6,001,180.00
660.10         i          2,813,051.00
755.53        |          2,948,516.00
220.07                       734,800.00
290.38        !             666,762.00
$
4,459.07
$
12.18
The Woodlands School, New Westminster
The Tranquille School	
4,677.64
4,261.55
3,902.58
3,338.94
2,296.17
12.78
11.64
10.66
Dellview Hospital, Vernon  	
9.12
6.27
5,925.25                  25,276,134.00
4,265.83                 11.66
1968/69
2,643.12                 13,072,972.00
1,283.72        |          6,364,354.00
652.61        |          3,096,131.00
746.21        |          3,165,707.00
225.56        |             808,169.00
265.58                       696,355.00
4,946.04
4,957.74
4,744.23
4,242.38
3,582.95
2,622.01
13.55
The Woodlands School, New Westminster
13.58
13.00
11.62
Dellview Hospital, Vernon	
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace	
9.82
7.18
Totals for the year...  	
5.816.80                  27,203,688.00
4,676.74
12.81
1969/70
2,506.21         ]         15,423,584.00
1,257.98                    7,534,683.00
608.46                  3,593,393.00
711.15                    3,698,227.00
225.36                       922,330.00
257.98                       814,091.00
6,154.15
5,989.51
5,905.72
5,200.34
4,092.69
3,155.64
16.86
The Woodlands School, New Westminster
16.41
16.18
14.25
11.21
8.65
5,567.14        |        31,986,308.00
5,745.55
15.74
1970/71
2,510.44        j         16,186,488.00
1,279.60        j         8,168,889.00
579.15         [          3,787,785.00
685.33                    3,824,163.00
225.60        |              974,623.00
254.28                       865,471.00
6,447.67
6,383.94
6,540.25
5,580.03
4,320.04
3,403.61
17.66
The Woodlands School, New Westminster
The Tranquille School 	
17.49
17.92
15.29
Dellview Hospital, Vernon 	
11.84
9.32
Totals for the year 	
5,534.40         |         33,807,419.00
6,108.60
16.74
1971/72
2,363.70
1,216.51
548.76
669.84
227.41
233.91
17,393,443.00
8,745,677.00
4,149,495.00
4,203,563.00
1,055,612.00
941,455.00
7,358.55
7,189.15
7,561.58
6,275.47
4,641.88
4,024.85
20.11
The Woodlands School, New Westminster
19.64
20.66
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale	
17.15
12.68
11.00
5,260.13
36,489,245.00
6,936.95
18.95
 FINANCIAL statements
O 91
Table B—Summary Statement Showing the Gross and Net per Capita
Cost of Patients in All Mental Health Institutions for the Year
Ended March 31, 1972.
Gross operating costs— $
Riverview Hospital, Essondale	
  17,393,443
The Woodlands School, New Westminster  8,745,677
The Tranquille School  4,149,495
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale  4,203,563
Dellview Hospital, Vernon  1,055,612
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace  941,455
Less collections remitted to Treasury
36,489,245
2,533,279
33,955,966
Daily average population  5,260.13
Gross per capita cost, one year  6,936.95
Gross per capita cost, one day  18.95
Net per capita cost, one year  6,455.35
Net per capita cost, one day  17.64
 O 92
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
Table C—Expense Statement of the Riverview Hospital (Includes
Out-patient Services) for 12 Months Ended March 31,1972
Salaries, Supplies, and Operating
Expenses
Vouchered
Expenditure
Services and
Supplies
From Public
Works
Department
Inventory Adjustment
Actual
Plus on Hand,
March 31,
1971
_._. on Hand,
March 31,
1972
Cost of
Operations
S
13,100,847
52,780
24,660
15,366
753,850
1,256,417
20,811
47,172
4,548
26,716
15,711
548,246
11,999
15,823
301
17,011
38,946
1,240
$
$
$
$
13,100,847
52,780
24,660
15,366
139,827
146,818
746,859
1,256,417
20,811
47,172
4,548
26,716
15,711
149,673
134,468
563,451
11,999
15,823
301
17,011
38,946
1,240
1,548,002
155,500
165,000
1,538,502
Less—•
Increase   in   inventory,   institutional
15,952,444
70,445
4,822
26,543
3,907
1,548,002
445,000
446,286
17,499,160
70,445
4,822
26,543
_.
3,907
15,846,727
1,548,002
445,000
446,286
17,393,443
Yearly per capita cost— S
Salaries  5,542.51
Expenses - 1,816.04
7,358.55
 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
O 93
Table D—Expense Statement of The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, for 12 Months Ended March 31,1972
Salaries, Supplies, and Operating
Expenses
Vouchered
Expenditure
Services and
Supplies
From Public
Works
Department
Inventory Adjustment
Plus on Hand,
March 31,
1971
Less on Hand,
March 31,
1972
Cost of
Operations
$
7,198,516
13,140
7,037
1,178
209,743
529,802
39,667
5,053
113
6,490
2,058
262,537
4,845
3,739
2,435
7,265
28,867
785
$
$
$
$
7,198,516
13,140
7,037
1,178
37,985
38,100
209,628
529,802
39,667
5,053
113
6,490
2,058
262,537
4,845
3,739
2,435
7,265
28,867
785
468,061
468,061
	
Less—
Increase   in   inventory,   institutional
8,323,270
36,481
8,710
348
468,061
37,985
38,100
8,791,216
36,481
8,710
1       	
348
8,277,731
468,061
37,985
38,100
8,745,677
Yearly per capita cost— $
Salaries  5,917.35
Expenses    -— 1,271.80
7,189.15
 O 94
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
Table E—Expense Statement of The Tranquille School,
for 12 Months Ended March 31,1972
Salaries, Supplies, and Operating
Expense
Vouchered
Expenditure
Services and
Supplies
From Public
Works
Department
Inventory Adjustment
Actual
Plus on Hand,
March 31,
1971
Less on Hand,
March 31,
1972
Cost of
Operations
$
2,985,102
9,774
5,936
1,787
96,275
325,188
11,465
4,801
78
5,318
2,131
97,197
10,657
708
884
4,292
14,214
1,515
$
$
$
$
2,985,102
9,774
5,936
1,787
11,363
96,275
11,722
325,547
11,465
4,801
78
5,318
2,131
65,095
61,856
100,436
	
10,657
708
	
884
—
4,292
14,214
599,699
1,515
599,699
Less—
3,577,322
14,434
16,690
599,699
76,817
73,219
4,180,619
14,434
....
16,690
3,546,198
599,699
76,817
73,219
4,149,495
Yearly per capita cost— $
Salaries  5,439.72
Expenses     2,121.86
7,561.58
 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
O 95
Table F—B.C. Youth Development Centre
The B.C. Youth Development Centre expenditure statement covers the following departments:
General Administration for all units of the Mental Health Branch, Burnaby;
Forensic Clinic;
Family and Children's Clinic;
Psychological Education Clinic;
Residential Unit.
General Administration covers 38 staff (salaries $249,164).   The salaries for
General Administration are divided among the following units:
Mental
Health
Centre,
Burnaby
Forensic
Clinic
Family
and
Children's
Clinic
Psychological
Education
Clinic
Residential
Unit
Total
General Administration salaries..
Unit salaries.—	
Temporary assistance  	
Unit expense  —	
49,833
1,592
Buildings and grounds-
Totals	
51,425
39,344
31.356
1,681
49,833
185,622
13,324
43,475
33,037
292,254
32,787
90,769    [    33,037    j    325,041
24,916
106,983
5,753
31,450
$
124,582
401,815
6,851
53,640
$
249,164
725,776
29,201
128,565
169,102
32,787
586,888
157,376
1,132,706
262,294
201.889
744,264
1,395,000
Table G—Expense Statement of the Valleyview Hospital, Essondale,
for 12 Months Ended March 31,1972
Salaries, Supplies, and Operating Expenses
Vouchered
Expenditure
Services and
Supplies from
Public Works
Department
Actual Cost
of Operations
$
3,514,813
8,680
4,652
2,516
166,051
286,398
19,000
2,232
86
6,333
774
122,448
2,775
1,272
3,093
1,546
180
$
$
3,514,813
8,680
4,652
2,516
166,051
Dietary	
286,398
19,000
2,232
86
6,333
774
	
122,448
2,775
	
1,272
....
3,093
1,546
180
Buildings, grounds, etc  	
90,083
90,083
Less—•
4,142,849
18,869
10,500
90,083
4,232,932
18,869
Board 	
10,500
4,113,480
90,083
4,203,563
Yearly per capita cost—
$
5,247 24
  1,028.23
6,275.47
 O 96
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
Table H—Expense Statement of the Dellview Hospital, Vernon,
for 12 Months Ended March 31, 1972
Salaries. Supplies, and
Operating Expenses
Vouchered
Expenditure
Services and
Supplies
From
Public Works
Department
Inventory Adjustment
Actual
Plus on
Hand,
March 31,
1971
Less on
Hand,
March 31,
1972
Cost of
Operations
$
747,594
1,400
462
27,157
481
93,887
3,418
70
380
1,364
37,094
604
56
2,892
3,895
$
$
$
$
747,594
1,400
462
5,522
5,817
4,268
26,862
481
3,835
93,454
	
3,418
70
380
1,364
12,218
12,891
36,421
604
56
	
2,892
141,759
i'
3,895
141,759
Less—
920,754
1,705
3,795
141,759
21,575
22,976
1,061,112
1,705
3,795
915,254
141,759
21,575
22,976
1,055,612
Yearly per capita cost— $
Salaries    3,287.43
Expenses      1,354.45
4.641.!
 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
O 97
Table I—Expense Statement of the Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace,
for 12 Months Ended March 31, 1972
Salaries, Supplies, and
Operating Expense
Vouchered
Expenditure
Services and
Supplies from
Public Works
Department
Inventory Adjustment
Actual
Plus on
Hand,
March 31,
1971
Less on
Hand,
March 31,
1972
Cost of
Operations
$
601,107
2,038
2,527
395
30,636
113,925
4,355
25
6
877
422
24,816
1,098
1,731
3,675
1,655
4,815
$
$
$
$
601,107
2,038
2,527
395
30,636
10,186
13,248
110,863
4,355
25
6
Maintenance and operation of equipment....
877
422
14,147
12,145
26,818
1,098
1,731
3,675
1,655
4,815
155,817
155,817
Less—■
794,103
4,030
3,375
155,817
24,333
25,393
948,860
4,030
3,375
Adjusted expenditure	
786,698
155,817
24,333
25,393
941,455
Yearly per capita cost—
Salaries 	
Expenses 	
2,569.82
. 1,455.03
4,024.85
 O 98
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
Table J—Expense Statement of the Community Services for
12 Months Ended March 31, 1972
Mental Health Centres-
Burnaby.
Victoria.
Saanich.
Kelowna.
Trail.
Nanaimo.
Prince George.
Kamloops.
Chilliwack.
Courtenay.
Cranbrook.
Vernon.
Nelson.
Maple Ridge.
Surrey.
New Westminster.
Terrace.
Port Coquitlam.
Whalley.
Fort St. John.
Duncan.
Penticton.
Establishment oj Community Services, Operation Expenses oj Glendale Hospital,
Development oj Psychiatric Home Treatment Services, Technical Services and
Development oj New Patient Care Programmes, and Assistance for Retarded
Children.
$
Salaries   1,444,338
Office expense        25,555
Travelling expense        45,771
Office furniture and equipment        15,588
Medical care      287,605
Dietary 	
Establishment of community services	
Maintenance and operation of equipment
Transportation 	
General supplies	
O.T. and R.T	
Patient education	
Motor-vehicles and accessories __
General expense	
Assistance for retarded children
4,348
87,866
9,641
1,392
6,280
2,196
639
8,866
5,583
44,562
Development of psychiatric home treatment services  90,000
Operation expenses, Glendale Hospital  117,593
Technical services and development of new patient care programmes   76,334
Less salary adjustments
2,274,157
70,224
2,203,933
 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS O 99
Table K—Expense Statement of General Administration for
12 Months Ended March 31, 1972
$
Salaries   535,183
Office expense      15,331
Travelling expense     28,333
Office furniture and equipment       5,191
Grant to Trustees of Patients' Comfort Fund     12,000
Printing and publications       5,929
Grant to UBC for mental health research     30,000
Audio-Visual   156
General expense       1,963
Administration of Psychiatric Nurses Act       3,035
Psychiatric Nurses Bursary Trust Fund       1,200
Mental health care and training grants  262,312
Stores equipment  744
901,377
Less salary adjustments     29,868
871,509
Table L—Expense Statement of the Department of Nursing Education
for 12 Months Ended March 31, 1972
$
Salaries   745,785
Office expense   5,462
Travelling expense  316
Office furniture and equipment  1,032
Medical care   917
Dietary  4,842
Laundry   5,000
General supplies   9,285
Audio-Visual   64
General expense  1,034
Affiliate and postgraduate training  1,592
775,329
Less salary adjustments     28,368
746,961
 O 100 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
Table M—Institutional Stores
$
Net undistributed stores as per Public Accounts  100,004
Adjustment re farm loss     18,481
81,523
Inventory adjustment, plus on hand, March 31, 1971  609,115
690,638
Less on hand, March 31, 1972  564,843
Net increase in inventory1  125,795
1 The increase in inventory has been transferred to the following institutions proportionately,  using the
vouchered expenditure as the basis of distribution:
$
Riverview Hospital (56 per cent)   _    70,445
The Woodlands School (29 per cent)   -      36,481
Valleyview Hospital (15 per cent)      18,869
125,795
Reconciliation With Public Accounts, 1971/72
Table K—General Administration— $ $
Salaries         535,183
Expenses        366,194
901,377
Less salary adjustments  29,868
As per Public Accounts        871,509
Table L—Department of Nursing Education—
Salaries         745,785
Expenses    29,544
775,329
Less salary adjustments  28,368
As per Public Accounts        746,961
Table J—Community Services—
Salaries      1,444,338
Expenses        829,819
2,274,157
Less salary adjustments  70,224
As per Public Accounts     2,203,933
 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Reconciliation With Public Accounts, 1971/72—Continued
Table C—Riverview Hospital and out-patients— $
Salaries
13,100,847
Expenses      4,292,596
Vouchered expenditure  17,393,443
Deduct— $
Buildings and grounds  1,548,002
Salary adjustments       791,556
     2,339,558
Add-
Sundry adjustments, rent, board, etc.
Increase in inventories	
15,053,885
105,717
1,286
O 101
As per Public Accounts
15,160,888
Table G—Valleyview Hospital—
Salaries      3,514,813
Expenses        688,750
Vouchered expenditure     4,203,563
Deduct—
Buildings and grounds        90,083
Salary adjustments      201,288
        291,371
Add-
Sundry adjustments, rent, board, etc.
Portion of farm loss	
3,912,192
29,369
2,816
As per Public Accounts     3,944,377
Table H—Dellview Hospital-
Salaries 	
Expenses 	
747,594
308,018
Vouchered expenditure     1,055,612
Deduct—
Buildings and grounds      141,759
Salary adjustments        45,120
        186,879
868,733
 O  102 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1972
Reconciliation With Public Accounts, 1971/72—Continued
Add— $ $
Sundry adjustments, rent, board, etc.   5,500
Increase in inventories   1,401
As per Public Accounts     7,920,667
Table I—Skeenaview Hospital—
Salaries         601,107
Expenses          340,348
Vouchered expenditure      941,455
Deduct— $
Buildings and grounds       155,817
Salary adjustments        34,512
        190,329
751,126
Add—
Sundry adjustments, rent, board, etc.  7,405
Increase in inventories  1,060
As per Public Accounts        759,591
Table D—The Woodlands School—
Salaries      7,198,516
Expenses     1,547,161
Vouchered expenditure     8,745,677
Deduct—
Buildings and grounds       468,061
Salary adjustments       408,228
        876,289
7,869,388
Add—
Sundry adjustments, board, rent, etc.   45,539
Portion of farm loss  5,625
Increase in inventory  115
As per Public Accounts     7,920,667
 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Reconciliation With Public Accounts, 1971/72—Continued
Table E—The Tranquille School— $
Salaries      2,985,102
Expenses     1,164,393
O 103
Vouchered expenditure     4,149,495
Deduct— $
Buildings and grounds      599,699
Salary adjustments      177,708
Decrease in inventories  3,598
Add—
Sundry adjustments, board, rent, etc.
Portion of farm loss	
781,005
3,368,490
31,124
8,035
As per Public Accounts     3,407,649
Table F—B.C. Youth Development Centre-
Salaries      1,004,141
Expenses        128,565
As per Public Accounts     1,132,706
Table M—Net Undistributed Stores
100,004
Special Warrants—
Special Warrant 3—Penticton District Society	
Special Warrant 8—Grant to Treatment Resources Act
Special Warrant 39—Grant to Granville School	
38,500
195,649
30,832
Total expenditure as per Public Accounts  37,388,900
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1973
750-872-6547
 

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