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REPORT of the LANDS SERVICE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1972 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1973

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Hon. R. A. Williams, Minister D. Borthwick, Deputy Minister of Lands
REPORT
of the
LANDS SERVICE
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1972
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1973
  Victoria, B.C., February 19, 1973.
To the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the British Columbia Lands Service of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources for the
year ended December 31, 1972.
R. A. WILLIAMS
Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources
 Victoria, B.C., February 19, 1973.
The Honourable R.A. Williams,
Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources,
Victoria, B.C.
SiR: I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the British Columbia
Lands Service of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources for the 12
months ended December 31, 1972.
D. BORTHWICK
Deputy Minister of Lands
 Ecological reserve, Westwick Lake, near Williams Lake.
  Page
CONTENTS
Introduction by the Deputy Minister of Lands     9
Accounting Division  13
Lands Branch—
Director of Lands	
Land Inspection Division-
Surveys and Mapping Branch—
Surveyor-General	
Legal Surveys Division	
Field Operations Division-
Map Production Division..
University Endowment Lands_
Personnel Office	
Mail and File Room.
21
30
43
46
50
58
67
73
77
COVER PHOTO
Survey station west of Aiken Lake,
Swannell Ranges.
—Photo by A. Sutherland
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_1
 Report of the British Columbia Lands Service
D. Borthwick, B.S.A., B.Ed., A.A.C.I., Deputy Minister of Lands
Over the past several years the Lands Service has experienced the pressures
resulting from the change in public attitude toward the environment. Various levels
of government, public organizations, and individual citizens have become very interested and involved in the adjudication of Crown land applications. This has resulted
in extending the time necessary for the inspection and investigation processes and
increased the burden of administration. Additional professional and administrative
personnel are required to enable the Department to maintain an adequate level of
service to the public.
In order to keep abreast of the demand for technical assistance in the field of
environmental studies, the Surveys and Mapping Branch is being pressed to provide
specialized mapping and air photography for such agencies as the Pollution Control
Branch, Canada Land Inventory Programme and the B.C. Forest Service Inventory
Division.
The University Endowment Lands at Point Grey, which comprise approximately 1,700 acres of prime land adjacent to the boundary of the City of Vancouver,
should be evaluated to determine their best use from both an economic and a social
point of view. The area presently subdivided has over 400 high-quality residences
which are privately owned. Notwithstanding the general affluence of this community, it has remained unincorporated and is administered by the Department through
the local office of the Manager, University Endowment Lands. This situation leaves
much to be desired and some consideration should be given to the future role of the
University Endowment Lands relative to the University of British Columbia and the
City of Vancouver.
There has been a growing awareness and public concern regarding the control
and ownership of land by aliens. The Land Act of 1970 effectively prevented the
purchase of Crown lands by non-Canadians, but did not prohibit alienation by lease
or permit. In the private-land sector, which is administered under the provisions of
the Land Registry Act, no restrictions exist to prevent or control the transfer of
private lands to aliens. The entire matter of land ownership well warrants careful
study by government.
The Ecological Reserves Programme is progressing satisfactorily. During the
past year an additional 15 reserves were gazetted, bringing the total created to date
to 43. The second edition of a booklet entitled Ecological Reserves in British Columbia was published in October.
The writer attended the annual meeting of the Canadian Committee, International Biological Programme—Conservation of Terrestrial Ecosystems, at Laval
University on November 30 and December 1 and addressed the meeting on problems
regarding the creation and administration of ecological reserves in British Columbia.
The following pages present in some detail the reports of the Director of Lands
and the Director of Surveys and Mapping and their senior officers.
  ACCOUNTING DIVISION
  ACCOUNTING DIVISION
X 13
ACCOUNTING DIVISION
M. B. Maclean, Departmental Comptroller
This Division provides the accounting function for Water Resources Service as
well as Lands Service, and with the ever-increasing work load has again experienced
a very active and productive year. Our responsibilities include the preparation and
distribution of all payroll data, processing of all accounts payable, and interdepartmental charges, collection and billing of Water Rights, Lands Branch and Surveys
and Mapping revenue, processing of requisitions, and expenditure control. In addition to the accounting function, fairly extensive statistical information is supplied to
the various branches as and when required.
As has been the case for many years, our lease accounts continue to increase—
14,952 at January 1, 1972, to 15,537 December 31, 1972; 1,748 new leases were
issued by our lease section and 1,163 cancellations were processed.
Statistical Tables
Table 1—Summary of Lands Service Net Revenue Collections for the
Year Ended December 31,1972
$
Land leases, rentals, fees, etc.  3,268,205.08
Land sales   1,411,178.27
Sale of maps and air photos      199,282.94
Net revenue collections
4,878,666.29
Table 2—Comparison of Revenue Collections for 10-year
Period, 1963-72, Inclusive
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
$
2,034,841.80
2,587,110.34
2,594,341.32
3,343,672.46
2,985,996.61
3,367,912.14
3,999,273.13
3,025,000.24
4,580,312.19
4,878,666.29
Table 3—Classification of Revenue Collections for the Year Ended
December 31,1972
Land sales $
Country lands  1,263,173.82
Town lots      161,194.52 $
  1,424,368.34
 X 14        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 3—Classification of Revenue Collections for the Year Ended
December 31,1972—Continued
Land leases, rentals, fees, etc.—
Foreshore leases— $
Booming and log storage   499,482.04
Commercial (marinas, etc.)   636,546.52
Oyster     14,855.50
Miscellaneous (foreshore protection,
etc.)        6,637.25 $
  1,157,521.31
Land leases—
Grazing and (or) agriculture  519,307.54
Quarrying   (limestone,  sand,   and
gravel)      51,267.43
Camp-site (lodge, fishing)      12,283.50
Home-site        1,286.88
Residential   507,254.24
Miscellaneous      75,611.50
  1,167,011.09
Land-use permits   726.00
Licences of occupation        36,337.00
Royalty collections      469,179.47
Bonus bids (lease tenders and auctions)         59,082.15
Easement collections—■
Annual rentals       3,481.00
Outright considerations  132,773.40
 136,254.40
Fees—
Crown grant       14,131.13
Assignment      16,055.00
Miscellaneous (lease, search, etc) __.    30,761.00
        60,947.13
Sundry collections  (occupational rental, survey
charges, etc.)      206,457.88 $
  3,293,516.43
Sale of maps and air photos—maps, air photos, survey posts, etc.      228,229.23
Gross revenue for year  4,946,114.00
Less refunds and taxes        67,447.71
Net revenue for year  4,878,666.29
 ACCOUNTING DIVISION
X 15
Table 4—Comparison of Land Leases, Rentals, Fees, Etc., Revenue for
10-year Period, 1963-72, Inclusive
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1,149,650.45
1,485,539.13
1,462,024.93
1,514,749.69
1,917,435.31
2,189,055.75
2,553,351.23
2,283,719.11
3,093,281.59
3,268,205.08
Table 5-
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
-Comparison of Land Sales Revenue for 10-year Period, 1963—72,
Inclusive
787
982
1,017
1,692
916
1,024
1,251
518
1,297
1,411
$
,184.11
,137.88
893.16
,861.14
,098.98
,410.93
,111.88
,015.63
,075.28
178.27
  LANDS BRANCH
 THE LANDS BRANCH
At the time of the Fraser River gold-rush in 1858 the demand for land in British
Columbia was greatly intensified and pre-emptions predated surveys. Within four years
254 pre-emptors had taken up more than 50,000 acres of land. To facilitate the transfer
of real estate and provide for the registration of titles, the Land Registry Act was passed in
1860. The Government of the Province of British Columbia was now in the real estate
business in a big way; the more than 366,000 square miles of land and water that constitutes British Columbia was the real estate in question.
With the entrance of British Columbia into Confederation in 1871, the demand for
land quickened to a rush, and over the next 30 years the land-settler (and the promoter)
succeeded the gold-miner in importance. Railroads were built and land grants passed,
cities came into being, and companies became established. Land was at the core of all
developments.
The task of land administration became very heavy and necessitated the formation of
a Department of Lands in 1908. In 1912 a Forest Branch was included in the Department
of Lands. Today the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources exercises control of more than 90 per cent of the surface of British Columbia.
How does the Lands Branch fit into the total organization of the British Columbia
Lands Service of today? The relation may be expressed briefly. The Lands Branch
has jurisdiction in matters pertaining to the disposition of Crown land, and is
charged with administering and disposing of the land that the general welfare,
present and future, of the Province is protected at all times.
When an individual, or group, desires to purchase or lease Crown land, the application is directed to the Director of Lands, head of the Lands Branch. His authority
governs the following matters:
Lease and sale of Crown lands for such purposes as agricultural, industrial,
commercial, and home-sites.
Preparation and issuance of right-of-way easements for power, telephone, pipelines, etc.
Preparation and issuance of Crown grants under the Land Act and the Mineral
Act.
Reservation of suitable Crown lands and foreshore for national defence, use
and enjoyment of the public, forestry experimentation, fisheries research,
highways, and ecological research.
Granting railway rights-of-way under various Statutes.
Protection of historic sites from alienation.
Reservation and conveying of Crown lands for such purposes as school-sites,
cemeteries, and fair grounds.
Leasing of land and foreshore for such varied purposes as wharf-sites, booming-
grounds, canneries, oyster and other mollusc fisheries, and for boat-houses,
quarry-sites,  cattle-ranching,  trappers'  cabins,  ship-building,  and  aircraft
bases.
To perform these and other functions efficiently, the Lands Branch works in close
co-operation with a great number of other agencies, such as municipal and regional
administrations, town-planning authorities, the British Columbia Forest Service, the Water
Resources Service, the Surveys and Mapping Branch within the British Columbia Lands
Service, and all the departments in the Government of the Province, notably Highways,
Education, Attorney-General, Agriculture, and Municipal Affairs.
Outside the Provincial departments there is much business transacted with Federal
departments, such as the Department of National Defence, the Public Works Department, and the Indian-Eskimo Branch of the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern
Development.
Direct service to the people of British Columbia is the first duty of the Lands Branch
and this takes the bulk of the time of the Lands Branch personnel. Associated with this
prime duty is the important function of the maintenance of the records, which in many
cases are the only ones in British Columbia showing the correct legal status of the surface
of the Province.
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COURTENAY                 -J. P Egan
NEW WESTMINSTER-H.K.Boas
PRINCE RUPERT          -R.WAvis
VANCOUVER                 -R.F.Gilmour
VANCOUVER  NORTH-A.G.Anderson
VICTORIA                        -J.A.Esler
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KELOWNA                  -G.Huva
NELSON                      -H.L.Wenschlag
WILLIAMS   LAKE     -L.M.Warner
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 LANDS BRANCH
X 21
LANDS BRANCH
Walter R. Redel, B.A.Sc, P.Eng., P.Ag., A.A.C.I., Director of Lands
During 1972 the net revenue of the Lands Branch increased to a new high of
$4,679,383, an increase of 5.45 per cent over the 1971 revenue figure. The annual
increase in revenue over the last two years is considered to be partly the result of a
change in emphasis with more stress being placed on a lease-only policy and partly
to higher market values for real property which are directly reflected in increased
rentals.
The change in Government last September made 1972 a very significant year.
Under former Governments, and certainly up until 1958, Crown land was in many
instances treated as a commodity rather than the prime resource of the Province.
In 1958 new ground was broken when the Lands Branch adopted a policy of disposing of lake-frontage and sea-frontage on a leasehold basis only, except in the
case of major industries, where capital investment to be placed on the land required
a title for mortgage purposes. In 1962 the Branch altered its policy of issuing
new grazing leases. It was considered that in future grazing on Crown range should
be handled on a permit basis only because the Crown could exercise better control
over the forage.
In 1962 the Lands Branch restricted the maximum area that could be held
under agricultural lease by any one person to 1,280 acres, and all agricultural
leases had to contain a minimum of 50 per cent arable land. In 1964 the Branch
adopted a lease-develop-purchase policy for agricultural leases to curtail speculation. All lessees were required to clear and cultivate 80 per cent of the arable
acreage before a Crown grant would issue. No assignment could be made until the
lessee cleared and cultivated 20 per cent of the arable acreage. In 1968 the assignment requirement for agricultural leases was tightened to require the lessee to clear
and cultivate 50 per cent of the arable acreage to qualify.
In order to keep ahead of rapidly changing developments within the Province,
the Land Act was completely rewritten and a new Land Act was brought into force
on May 1, 1970.   The major changes may be cited as:
The pre-emption section of the former Act was deleted.
Home-site leases with a residence requirement were eliminated.
The interest rate on all overdue accounts was increased from 4Vi per cent
to 8 per cent.
The age limit for applicants for Crown land was reduced to 19 years.
Crown grants were restricted to Canadian citizens only.
In recent years there has been a growing realization that important social and
environmental goals require more specific controls on the use and development of
the Crown land resource. The present Government in the last quarter of the year
strengthened the leasehold policy of the Branch by eliminating the purchase option
formerly included in industrial and commercial leases. In addition, in order to
ensure a fair return for the use of resources belonging to the Crown, the Lands
Branch will undertake a review of rental and royalty charges currently in use. Lease
assignments will also be carefully scrutinized to ensure the lessee is actually assigning
his interest in the Crown lands and not merely attempting to trade in the land
resource. In future, major developments proposed on the Crown land resource will
be conditional on the posting of a substantial deposit to ensure that the development
proceeds according to plan and schedule.
During the year a number of sites formerly used as Ranger Stations by the
Forest Service throughout the Province and the improvements to the land thereon
 X 22        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
were disposed of by auction. It is usual in instances where older Ranger Station
sites have outlived their usefulness to dispose of same by public competition following advertising in local papers in the area in which the land is situate.
The British Columbia Television Broadcast'ng System is expanding its television coverage for CTV network programmes in communities north and west of
Kamloops, including Williams Lake, Quesnel, and Prince George. To facilitate this
expansion, CTV applied for transmitter-sites on Timothy, Dragon, Tabor, Greenstone, and Milburn Mountains.
The British Columbia Railway has submitted 12 applications for microwave-
sites in conjunction with the extension of the railway to Dease Lake. As a point of
interest, the Lands Branch is at present engaged in initial planning and feasibility
studies with respect to a future townsite in the Dease Lake area. The work is being
carried out in conjunction with the Department of Municipal Affairs and the Water
Resources Service. The Department of Highways and the Fish and Wildlife Branch
of the Department of Recreation and Conservation are also contributing basic
information preparatory to the drafting of a townsite plan.
A number of requests during the year was received from groups wishing to
construct hiking trails and carry out other projects of a recreational nature on Crown
lands. The Branch approved several of these requests, which were financed under
the Federal Opportunities for Youth and Local Initiatives Programme.
Fourteen ecological reserves were established during the year. This brings to
43 the total number of reserves established under the Ecological Reserves Act
throughout the Province during the last two years.
As in previous years the Branch entered into a number of exchanges with individuals and companies in order to acquire certain lands required in the public interest
by cities, towns, villages, and regional districts. These lands are generally conveyed
to the municipal authority by a free grant of the Crown lands restricted as to use.
During 1972, 16 exchanges were carried out. Three free grants were issued to
School Boards to provide land needed for school purposes. Six free grants restricted
as to use were issued to villages for park, municipal, and sewage-disposal purposes.
As well, three towns, five districts, and three cities acquired land in this way for park,
municipal, industrial, residential parking, and sewage-disposal purposes. Crown
land for park purposes was conveyed by free grant to the Regional Districts of
Greater Vancouver, Capital, Powell River, and Mount Waddington. The Nanaimo
Regional District acquired land for a new administrative centre in this manner,
Comox-Strathcona acquired a firehall-site, and the Peace River-Liard Regional District acquired land for commercial purposes.
The subdivision of Crown land continues to be an active function of the Lands
Service. In keeping with a policy to discourage land sprawl throughout the Province,
subdivision proposals are geared to public demand and developed in concurrence
with the respective regional district in which the Crown land is located. In addition,
the proposed subdivisions must meet the requirements of the Department of Highways and the Health Branch before being undertaken. The road construction
is undertaken by personnel of the Department of Highways and the survey is
completed by personnel of the Legal Surveys Division. The standard of subdivisions
has been upgraded in some instances by the inclusion of paved roads, and in isolated
instances services such as water and sewerage have been installed. The extra cost of
providing these services is reflected in a higher value for individual lots. However,
the increased cost of supplying services such as water and sewerage restricts the
number of subdivisions developed with the present funds available. In view of rising
development costs and an upgrading of the standard of Crown subdivisions, addi-
 LANDS BRANCH
X 23
tional funds will be required next year if the present rate of development of Crown
subdivisions is to be maintained. Subdivisions commenced in 1971 at Vanderhoof,
Comox, and Sulphurous Lake were completed in 1972. Recreational subdivisions
were completed this year at Summit, Mahood, Nicola, Shuswap, and Heffley Lakes,
Smithers, and Cordero Channel. Residential subdivisions were completed this year
at Devine, Dokie Siding, Qualicum, Quesnel, Dawson Creek, Courtenay, Port Hardy,
Williams Lake, and Fort Nelson. Miscellaneous work undertaken during the year
included the extension of a water-line to serve existing Crown lots in the Coldwater
Improvement District, upgrading roads to serve Crown lands at Purden Mountain
and Hosmer, a contribution to the Tatalrose Rural Electrification Programme, and a
clean-up of debris on Alpha Lake.
During the year, agreement was reached with the Federal Government in
respect to the administration of lands covered by water in the Prince Rupert harbour
area. As a result of this agreement the administration and control of the Prince
Rupert harbour has been turned over to the Federal Government for the purpose of
operating a national harbour.
The Branch published a revised Land Use Code for the University Endowment
Lands during 1972. The code was gazetted under Part II of The British Columbia
Gazette on September 21, 1972. The regulations set forth zoning and building
requirements in the University Endowment Lands, including the installation of
plumbing, electrical, gas, and oil facilities. As a matter of interest the last printing
of the code was in 1950.
In 1972, Lands Branch personnel participated actively in the Environment and
Land Use Study of the East Kootenay area. This study resulted in the preparation
of a resource atlas by Canada Land Inventory personnel, copies of which will be
made available to the field staffs of the various resource departments. These atlases
and the supporting material will be of assistance in reaching resource management
and administrative decisions, both on an individual basis within the departments and
on a joint basis after consultation between departments.
A good deal of time during the year was devoted to committee work. The staff
of the Branch participated in meetings such as the following: Mines Reclamation
Committee, various ARDA meetings, Environment and Land Use Technical Subcommittee, Regional District Technical Planning Committee, Indian Advisory Committee, Water Environment Quality Studies now under way at Comox and Prince
Rupert Harbours, Libby Committee, Interdepartmental Committee on the Human
Environment, and Man and Resources Programme.
 X 24        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Hunting guide camp at Fox Lake, north of Ware.
Valley west of Alaska Highway, Peace River District.
 LANDS BRANCH
X 25
A brief summary of the various sections of the Administrative Division of the
Lands Branch is set out hereunder:
Lease Section—The number of new applications received to lease Crown land
remained relatively the same as the previous year, with 3,233 applications being
submitted for processing. This Section renewed 952 leases and in addition assigned
1,083, of which 1,050 were assigned to Canadians and 33 to other than Canadians.
Purchase Section—Due to the Department's policy of lease-develop-purchase,
the number of applications to purchase received continues to decline, with only 62
received as compared to 84 the previous year. However, the number of lessees who
have completed sufficient improvements to exercise the purchase option contained
in the lease indenture increased to 292 from 246 in 1971. This section also
processed 420 waterfront and 396 inland residential leases.
Crown Grants Section—The number of Crown grants issued in 1972 totalled
694 as compared to 735 the previous year. Although these figures reflect a decrease
of approximately 6 per cent, the number of certificates of purchase issued increased
to 433 from 383 in 1971, or approximately 13 per cent. This section is also
responsible for clearing applications for reverted mineral claims, of which there
were 631, an increase of 22Vi per cent over 1971. As well, this Section prepared
and processed 33 free grants and 16 exchanges of land.
Reserve Section—During 1971 there were 316 reserves established and this
Section processed 29 applications for accreted land. In addition, the Section
processed 14 ecological reserves which were established by Order in Council under
the Ecological Reserves Act. General inquiries regarding the availability of Crown
land handled by this Section numbered 8,098.
Clearance Section — The number of parcels of land cleared by this Section
totalled 17,211. In addition, the Section prepared 38 maps showing the status of
the land thereon. There are now 112 maps prepared which are constantly being
revised to show the current status of the land.
Easement Section—This Section granted 148 easements in 1972, which is 44
less than in 1971. This reduced number of approved easements can be attributed
in part to the fact that in the latter part of the year the issuance of easements was
withheld pending a review of our policy in this respect.
GENERAL ACTIVITY
During 1972 a total of 11 units was tendered for lease and the bonus bid
revenue realized was $6,782.00. In addition, 178 lots were offered for lease by
auction. Of this number, 107 parcels were leased and the bonus bid realized at the
time of auction amounted to $31,369. Five former Ranger Station sites were
offered at auction sale, three of which were sold for a total value of $28,701.
The following tables indicate in detail the work carried out by the various
sections of the Lands Branch in 1972:
Table 1—Country Land Sales, 1972
Acres
Unsurveyed  228.25
Surveyed  258.97
Total .._:  487.22
 X 26        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 2—Certificates of Purchase Issued, 1972
Agency Number Acreage
Alberni  14 39.96
Atlin  3 2.00
Burns Lake  7 30.21
Clinton  17 429.51
Cranbrook  6 157.75
Fernie  21 289.125
Fort Nelson  20 48.78
Fort St. John  38 14,223.53
Golden  5 90.0913
Kamloops  11 178.826
Kaslo  2 Nil
Nanaimo  59 260.0617
Nelson  14 78.79
New Westminster  11 126.267
Penticton  27 403.427
Pouce Coupe  29 9739.34
Prince George  18 755.76
Prince Rupert  10 31.30
Quesnel  16 260.16
Revelstoke  4 40.37
Smithers  25 205.553
Vancouver  25 247.07
Vernon  1 3.56
Victoria  17 53.37
Williams Lake  33 1043.41
Totals  433 29,745.98
Table 3—New Leases Issued, 1972
J_.ana Number Acreage
Agriculture   239 75,393.89
Hay and grazing (pasture and hay-cutting) 147 64,068.40
Quarrying (sand, gravel, limestone, etc.)  19 944.45
Residential (waterfront)   420 244.79
Residential (inland)   396 959.43
Miscellaneous (resorts, service-stations,
camp-sites)   141 5,425.72
Foreshore—
Booming, log storage, log-dumping, etc.  111 3,396.36
Oyster and other shellfish  11 206.16
Industrial (canneries, mill-site, wharves,
etc.)   4 68.77
Quarrying (sand, gravel from sea or river
beds)   3 136.60
Commercial (boat rentals, marinas, marine
service-stations, etc.)   33 118.10
Miscellaneous (private wharves, boathouses,
etc.)   60 1,013.54
Totals  1,584 151,976.21
 LANDS BRANCH
Table 4—Licences to Occupy Issued, 1972
X 27
Number
37
Acreage  460.04
Table 5—Assignments Approved, 1972
Leases, land-use permits, licences of occupation	
1,083
Table 6—Easements Granted, 1972
Number
Miles
Acres
Foreshore
Submarine power cables      	
Overhead power-lines  	
7
5
2
1
5
1
2
1
10.597
0.527
2.651
0.051
2.524
0.214
787.895
3.817
15,050
0.120
21.650
1.301
0.114
6.449
Totals    . —   	
24
16.564
836.396
Land
50
30        |
5
4
15
4
1
2
4
4
1
2
75.217
160.454
3.087
640.835
4,655.174
Telephone-lines and underground cables    	
12.707
5.371
7.149
10.184
41.220
2.040
1.622
1.548
0.880
0.434
2.045
8.746
4.962
6.180
7.152
Tntql-
122        |
253.849        |
5,393.158
Southern Okanagan Lands Project
1
1
0.031
0.485
0.076
Power-line— .        —   	
1.175
148
270.929
6,230.80
In line with current Departmental policy, 58 letters of consent for the construction of access roads were issued during the year.
Table 7—Crown Grants Issued, 1972
Purchases (country lands)   466
Purchases (town lots)   125
Pre-emptions   24
Public Schools Act  3
Veterans' Land Settlement Act  10
Home-site leases  5
British Columbia Railway Company  12
Miscellaneous   49
Total
694
Certified copies of Crown grants issued       9
 X 28        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 8—Crown Grants Issued for Past 10 Years
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
Ten-year Average, 931.
1,042
1,163
1,087
1,020
980
957
931
708
735
694
9,317
Table 9—Total Area Deeded by Crown Grant, 1972
Purchases (country lands)
Pre-emptions
Public Schools Act	
Veterans' Land Settlement Act	
Home-site leases	
British Columbia Railway Company.
Miscellaneous 	
53
3
1
Acres
,329.60
,600.36
26.27
808.97
56.96
253.88
,203.41
Total
59,279.45
Table 10—Reserves, 1972
Use, recreation, and enjoyment of the public
Applications
Received
-    59
B.C. Department of Highways (rights-of-way, gravel
pits, bridge-sites, etc.)  114
Federal Government (defence purposes, wharf-sites,
etc.)      52
B.C. Forest Service (Ranger Stations, grazing, radio-
sites, reforestation, etc.)     38
Miscellaneous  (Game Branch, water-power projects,
garbage dumps, school-sites, cemeteries, etc.)  156
Totals
419
Reserves
Completed
56
93
38
30
99
316
 LANDS BRANCH
X 29
,406
594
0.21
,663
,679
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12
 X 30        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
LAND INSPECTION DIVISION
G. H. Wilson, B.S.A., P.Ag, A.A.C.I., Chief
The Land Inspection Division in 1972 continued to develop as the examining
authority for the Director of Lands in the administration of Crown Provincial lands
in British Columbia. Prior to 1946 this responsibility had been carried by the
Forest Service. In 1946 a Chief Land Inspector was hired and, later in 1947, six
graduates in agriculture were taken on staff as Land Inspectors, thereby laying the
foundation of the current Land Inspection Division. When the Division was first
formed to perform the examining function as aforementioned, the land applications
were for the most part of a noncomplex agricultural type. Today, conditions are
quite different, with a variety of types of inspections involving a multiplicity of
problems complicated by numerous and at times conflicting resources uses. The
following annual report on the Division's activities in 1972 serves to illustrate the
responsible role now played by the Inspection Division in the administration of the
Crown land resource.
Some indication of the performance of the Division in 1972 can be determined
numerically by reference to Tables 1, 2, and 3. Numerical comparisons are, however, becoming less meaningful because land examinations are now considerably
more time-consuming than in the past.
Table 2 provides an analysis of the land inspections completed as well as outstanding inspections for the years 1968 to 1972, inclusive. The 1972 figure for
total examinations completed is the lowest in the last five years. This is attributed
in part to the length of time required to sort out resource conflicts, real and imaginary,
that alienation of the land may create. Referrals to the various agencies concerned
with land use as well as rising land values are other factors which contribute to the
increasing amount of time required to complete inspections. Agricultural lease
applications in the moratorium area not only require an inspection of the Crown
lands in question but also of the applicant's existing holdings to determine if he can
qualify for additional Crown land. Since in all cases only one examination request
is recorded for the examination made, it will be realized that care must be exercised
when comparing year-to-year figures for the total annual inspections completed.
Finally, due to a need to attend Livestock Association, regional district technical
planning committee and other meetings, the Land Inspector's time is more at a
premium now than ever before. It is for these reasons that the total number of
examinations completed is down in relation to past years.
Table 3 gives an analysis of the numbers of inspection requests processed by
this Division for the years 1968 to 1972, inclusive. Notable are the actual numbers
of inspection requests received by each of the regions and districts and the percentage changes from 1972 over 1971 and from 1972 over 1968. Significant points
indicated in this table are, first, the 14.6-per-cent general total decline in requests
between 1968 and 1971 and, secondly, the large fluctuations in individual region
and district numbers. In the Prince George Region, new requests are up over 1971
by 17. 7 per cent and down over 1968 by 38.5 per cent. The two historically heavy
work load districts in this region, Prince George and Fort St. John, have incurred
significant increases in 1972 over 1971 of 29.1 per cent and 46.9 per cent respectively. Despite these increases, however, the over-all work load in this region, as
expressed in numbers of new requests, is well below the figure for 1968. Table 3
indicates that the number of new requests in the Kamloops Region appears to be
levelling out. The totals for each of the last five years are about the same, with
only a 2.5-per-cent change recorded for 1972 over 1968.    The exception to this
 LANDS BRANCH
X 31
moderate decline is seen in the Nelson District, which received the highest number
of new requests ever recorded for that district. The increased interest in Crown
land in this area is no doubt a result of the influx of new people coincident with
expansion of the coal-mining industry. Although the total volume of work in the
Coast Region remained relatively the same as in 1971, two of the districts did show
significant changes. Incoming requests for Vancouver were down from 249 in
1971 to 182, possibly due to land-policy changes which restricted the filing of
some land applications. On a regional basis this decrease was offset by additional
work in the New Westmintser District resulting from the transfer to the Coast Region of an area encompassing Bella Coola, which formerly was part of the Kamloops Region.
Table 1 shows the types of inspections completed by the Land Inspection
Division in 1972. Apart from the general decline in the numerical standing at year-
end as shown in Table 2, the numbers of inspections within each of the major
subheadings given in Table 1 are proportionately similar to those of 1971. As in
last year's annual report, applications to lease totalling 4,062 or 73.2 per cent continue to dominate the work load of the Inspection Division. A breakdown of this
figure reveals 3,410 land-lease inspections or 61.5 per cent of the total, and 652
foreshore lease inspections or 11.7 per cent of the total. Although proposals to
provide multilot subdivisions of Crown land remained at much the same level this
year (34) as last year (32), it is anticipated that an increase in this type of
inspection will be incurred during 1973. This forecast is based on a growing public
demand for small land parcels, particularly for recreation purposes. Inspections
involving land exchanges and inspections done for other agencies, although not large
in number in relation to the total inspections completed, were, nevertheless, significant because of the high land values involved and the time required to complete
these inspections. These were essentially appraisals involving lands held by the
private sector and in every case were undertaken to assist other departments or
authorities in determining the value of real estate as of a given date. Table 1 shows
there were 19 inspections made under "Land exchanges" and 34 inspections made
under the heading of "Other agencies." In 1971 the corresponding figures were 10
and 9 respectively. Significant among the 34 examinations made for other agencies
were the 24 undertaken in connection with the Green Belt Protection Fund Act. It
is anticipated that inspections of this type will continue to increase in 1973.
In the Prince George Region, new requests received were up over the number
received in 1971. The inspections completed were lower and the outstanding examinations at year-end were much higher. This is considered to be the direct result
of staff changes and transfers made during the field season. Of the inspections
completed, the majority were lease reviews (368), applications to lease for agriculture (299), and applications to lease for permanent home-sites (208). This is
essentially the same division of the work load as in 1971. Noteworthy in the inspection output are the land-capability studies of large areas of vacant Crown land
located at Fort Nelson and in the Upper Kispiox Valley northwest of Hazelton.
Other similar inspections of significance which were carried out were the studies
involving the Stewart-Cassiar Highway, the British Columbia Railway extension
from Fort St. James to Dease Lake, two multi-use reserve proposals in the Quesnel-
Prince George area, and three land-capability studies in the Burns Lake and Vanderhoof Land Inspection Districts.
The Department's policy of alienating only those lands which are suitable for
development for agricultural purposes to "established farmers" is having the desired effect within that portion of the Prince George Region which is covered by
 X 32        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
the moratorium policy. This policy is resulting in the establishment of more viable
farm units. Because of certain problems which appear to be developing as a result of renewing agricultural leases after the initial three-year period solely on
declarations filed by the lessee, it may be necessary to reactivate the three-year
inspection review procedure and again undertake field examinations of those agricultural leases where the lessee claims to have completed the required improvements.
Reactivation of the three-year inspection requirement in the case of agricultural
leases and localized developments, particularly in the Fort St. John and Vanderhoof
Land Inspection Districts, could result in an increase in the over-all work load
for the Prince George Region.
Of the three regions, Kamloops received the highest number of new requests.
The total received was 2,066, down 7.9 per cent from 1971 and 93 less than the
five-year average for the period 1968 to 1972, inclusive. Notable is the marked
decline in summer-home-site applications and the rise in permanent home-site
applications. Summer-home-sites were recorded in 1971 at 474 and in 1972 at only
87, whereas permanent home-sites were recorded at 309 in 1971 and 381 in 1972.
Of the five districts in the Kamloops Region, Nelson was the only one to register a
significant increase in new requests received.
Problems concerning the use of Crown land in the Kamloops Region are becoming more numerous and more contentious than ever before. A large-scale study
in the Lac du Bois area north of Kamloops is being carried out in co-operation
with the Federal Range Experimental Station staff, private ranchers, and officials
of the City of Kamloops in an attempt to resolve problems concerning the future
use of a large tract of valuable Crown land. In the Princton area a parcel of some
200 acres of open range presently reserved for the grazing of live stock is in strong
demand for home-site purposes arising as a consequence of a recent upsurge in
mining activity in the near vicinity.   In cases such as these, the Land Inspection
K ■::...:-.
On road along Dean River, north of Anahim Lake.
 LANDS BRANCH
X 33
staff must exercise a great deal of care and judgment in reaching plausible solutions to complicated land-use problems.
New requests in the Coast Region continued at about the same level as in previous years. While the Vancouver District is shown at a record five-year low, there
were some boundary changes made between the Coast districts and, as a consequence, no significant trends can be determined at this time. The number of examinations made in the Coast Region is the lowest of the three regions, but in total
is only 94 less than the figure shown for the Prince George Region. The outstanding inspections in the Coast Region at the end of 1972 were 260. Although the
Courtenay District had 103 outstanding inspections at the end of the year, this
district was also the heaviest recipient of new requests of any district in the Coast
Region during the past five years.
As in former years, examinations principally relating to foreshore use and
upland home-sites, both in the summer and permanent home-site categories, predominated. Applications for the use of foreshore accounted for 31.3 per cent of
the total output, while summer and permanent home-site examinations accounted
for 22.0 per cent of the total. Also noteworthy were the 22 appraisals made in
connection with the Green Belt Protection Fund Act, 14 of which were carried out
in the New Westminster District.
Although the numbers of inspections in the Prince George Region are expected to increase in 1973, no increase is anticipated in the Kamloops and Coast
Regions. In these two regions the numbers of inspection requests will likely remain about the same as in 1972. However, it is expected that in all three inspection regions the proportion of controversial and complicated examinations will increase with the strong possibility of a larger backlog of outstanding inspections at
the end of 1973 than is shown for 1972. To offset the greater amount of time
required to deal with each land examination, a moderate increase in field staff
together with more aircraft use appear to be necessary. The Field Operations
Division of the Surveys and Mapping Branch has been exceedingly co-operative in
flying Land Inspection personnel to many of the remote sections of the Province.
With a continuation of this support, hopefully the Inspection Division will be in a
strong position to cope with the work load in 1973.
TRAINING
The award, Accredited Appraiser Canadian Institute, or A.A.C.I., was presented by the Governing Council of the Appraisal Institute of Canada to two members of the Division after they had completed all of the requirements prescribed by
the regulations of the institute. Two accredited members of the field staff resigned
in 1972 and, as a consequence, at the end of the year only 13 members of the field
staff were fully accredited appraisers.
Twenty-four Inspectors continue to be actively engaged in taking courses, writing examinations, and completing demonstration appraisals in order to become accredited (A.A.C.I.). In this group, nine men are on the old study programme and
15 are on the new study programme. All of the nine men on the old programme
have passed the three appraisal examinations. To date, three of these men have
each had one of the required three demonstration reports approved. Among the
15 men on the new programme, 12 have passed the Appraisal III examination,
eight have passed the Economics I examination, and six have passed the Economics
II examination.
2
 X 34
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
In 1972, one member of the Division graduated and another enrolled in the
three-year Executive Development Training Plan. To date, four members of the
staff have completed this course and have received diplomas.
Communication between the field staff and Headquarters improved during the
year as a direct result of the introduction in 1971 of the Prince George, Kamloops,
and Coast Regional Land Inspectors. Four meetings were held in Victoria in
1972 with these regional people, at which time problems resulting from current
policies as well as other pressing matters were reviewed. With a continuation of
these quarterly meetings with the Regional Land Inspectors and the proposed general meeting of all Land Inspection field staff in early 1973, communication should
be improved even further.
STAFF CHANGES
In 1972 the Land Inspection Division continued as in past years to incure numerous staff changes. One retirement, four resignations, four promotions, eight
transfers, and six hirings were recorded.
R. W. "Russ" Brown, Land Inspector at Pouce Coupe for the past nine years,
took early retirement on September 15, 1972. Also noteworthy were the following
resignations: W. Letourneau, Land Officer 1, Fort St. John; L. E. Lacelle, Land
Officer 1, Kamloops; P. H. Downs, Deputy Land Officer 3, Williams Lake; and
R. A. Cullis, Land Officer 3, Quesnel. The departure of employees such as Mr.
Brown, who had accumulated a great wealth of knowledge through some 23 years
of Government service, as well as employees such as Messrs. Downs and Cullis,
who are fully qualified real estate appraisers (A.A.C.I.), represents a great loss to
the Division. With the departure of these five Land Inspectors in 1972, coupled
with the personnel changes that took place in late 1971, the Division experienced
a rather hectic year. Notable in the 1972 personnel changes was the transfer of
A. Paulsen, formerly Coast Regional Land Inspector, to Victoria as Assistant
Chief Land Inspector on May 4; G. A. Rhoades, Land Officer 5, from the post of
Administrative Assistant to Coast Regional Land Inspector in Victoria, effective
April 1, 1972; D. Goodwin, Land Officer 4, from Courtenay to New Westminster,
effective January 24 and subsequently his promotion to Administrative Assistant,
Land Officer 5, in Victoria, effective February 14; H. K. Boas, Land Officer 4,
from Courtenay to New Westminster, effective April 1; A. G. Anderson, Land
Officer 4, from Fort St. John to Vancouver North, effective July 1; J. P. Egan,
Land Officer 4, from Prince Rupert to Courtenay, effective April 4; L. C. Sorken,
promoted from Land Officer 3, New Westminster, to Acting Land Officer 4, Fort
St. John, effective July 1; A. A. Hadland, Land Officer 2, from Burns Lake to
Pouce Coupe, effective November 15; A. E. W. Dean, promoted from Land Officer
1, Prince George, to Acting Land Officer 2, Quesnel, effective July 1; R. W. Avis,
promoted from Land Officer 1, Vancouver, to Acting Land Officer 2, Prince Rupert, effective September 15, and D. Berry, who subsequent to his hiring and posting to New Westminster as a Land Officer 1 was transferred to Fort St. John, effective June 19.
In addition to Mr. Berry, the following men were hired in 1972 to fill the
vacancies created by the aforementioned departures: J. W. Hazelwood, Land Officer 2, Burns Lake, effective November 2; F. A. Baxter, Land Officer 1, Williams
Lake, effective June 12; M. L. Anderson, Land Officer 1, Kamloops, effective August 28; T. J. Dielissen, Land Officer 1, Prince George, effective August 21; and
R. L. Johnson, Technical Land Officer 1, New Westminster, effective August 28.
 LANDS BRANCH X 35
The total field staff complement as of December 31, 1972, remains at 35 and
is comprised of three Regional Land Inspectors, 24 Land Inspectors, and eight
Deputy Land Inspectors.
STATISTICS
Table 1 represents a summary of the number and type of inspections completed in the Province by this Division in 1972.
Table 2 is a comparison on a year-to-year basis of the volume of field work
completed and requests outstanding at the end of each year for the period 1968 to
1972, inclusive.
Table 3 is an analysis of requests for inspections processed by this Division
for the years 1968 to 1972, inclusive.
Table 1—Types of Inspections, 1972
Purchases—
Agriculture (other than grazing)   149
Access (roads, etc.)   1
Commercial (resorts, service-stations, hotels, airfields, etc.) 11
Community (cemeteries, church-sites, parking areas, etc.) ____ 8
Grazing (pasture, range)   2
Home-sites  (permanent)     241
Industrial (mill-sites, power-sites, manufacturing plants, etc.) 11
Summer home or camp-site   3
Woodlots or tree farms   	
Others   8
Leases—
Land—
Agriculture (other than grazing)    559
Commercial (resorts, service-stations, hotels, airfields, etc.) 150
Community (parks, cemeteries, dump-sites, etc.)   55
Fur-farming   5
Grazing (pasture, range, hay-cutting, etc.)   239
Cancellations (sec. 44, Land Act, 1970)   57
Home-sites   (permanent)     660
Industrial (mill-sites, power-sites, manufacturing plants, etc.) 47
Summer home or camp-site  335
Quarrying (sand, gravel, limestone)   61
Reviews (rental and (or) diligent use)   1,213
Others   29
Foreshore—
Booming and log storage or log-dumping  220
Commercial (boat rentals, marine service-stations, wharves,
etc.)   8 8
Industrial (mill-sites, canneries, factory-sites, wharves, etc.) 33
Quarrying (sand and gravel from river beds)   6
Oyster and shellfish   15
Private (floats, boathouses)   51
Reviews (rentals and (or) diligent use)   225
Others   14
Land exchanges (sec. 85, Land Act, 1970)   19
License of occupation   77
 X 36
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 1—Types of Inspections, 1972—Continued
Easements and (or) rights-of-way 	
Pre-emptions   (Land Act,  R.S.B.C.   1960)—annual inspections
(including applications for Crown grant) 	
Subdivisions—
Valuations 	
Survey inspection 	
Plans cancellation 	
Proposals (lakeshore, residential, etc.) 	
Others  	
Reserves—
Grazing 	
Gravel pits	
Recreational 	
Others  	
Veterans' Land Act	
Doukhobor lands 	
Southern Okanagan Land Project	
B.C. Railway	
Other agencies—
Fish and Wildlife Branch	
B.C. Hydro and Power Authority	
B.C. Forest Service	
Advisory Committee (Green Belt Protection Fund)
Miscellaneous inspections—
Assignments 	
Delinquent accounts 	
Escheats A ct 	
Lake reconnaissance 	
Land-use surveys	
Land revaluations of special nature	
Protests  	
Section 53  (2), Land Act, R.S.B.C. 1960 (verifying improvements)   	
Section 65, Land Act, R.S.B.C. 1960, and section 48, Land
Act, 1970 (free grants) 	
Section 78, Land Act, R.S.B.C. 1960 (re compliance with
provisions of) 	
Section 130, Land Act, R.S.B.C. 1960 and section 97, Land
Act, 1970 (lands vested in Crown under Taxation Act)
Section 131b, Land Act, R.S.B.C.  1960, and section 53,
Land Act, 1970 (cases of doubt regarding inclusion of
body of water in Crown grant) 	
Trespass (land) 	
Trespass  (water)  	
Quieting Titles Act 	
Section 102 (2), Land Registry Act	
Others 	
25
82
30
3
1
34
10
1
1
30
18
4
9
4
2
4
4
1
25
10
7
2
15
17
58
63
223
10
12
43
91
22
90
Total   5,547
 LANDS BRANCH
X 37
Table 2—Analysis of Inspections Completed and Inspections Outstanding at
Year-end for the Years 1968 to 1972, Inclusive
Examinations Made During-
Outstanding at End of—
District
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
Coast Region
353
9
1
247
165
353
137
325
16
2
303
146
263
252
377
6
2
301
194
342
189
551
240
200
223
324
230
469
289
153
216
334
215
61
13
49
26
33
16
24
7
23
74
58
48
85
1
91
49
75
50
115
33
34
63
87
32
103
Forest Service —
6
34
29
59
Victoria 	
29
Subtotals	
1,265
1,307
1,411
1,768
1,676
198
234
351
364
260
Kamloops Region
Clinton...	
271
530
275
324
620
462
428
267
369
567
374
503
236
313
687
412
702
249
372
763
378
486
209
425
603
212
60
43
16
48
89
58
59
9
41
147
102
62
35
200
86
64
37
48
59
69
30
42
Nelson 	
59
62
Subtotals	
2,020
2,093
2,113
2,498
2,101
379
256
546
294
262
Prince George Region
171
1,039
607
387
266
272
401
190
858
513
406
185
244
341
206
620
273
318
179
183
305
227
439
282
362
191
182
155
115
459
150
435
243
199
169
8
162
67
52
32
25
35
56
157
27
74
14
57
61
67
86
19
111
25
88
20
13
72
7
64
46
54
12
40
Fort St. John	
209
84
33
Quesnel 	
18
Vanderhoof	
5
Subtotals	
3,143
2,737
2,084
1,838
1,770
381
446
416
268
389
Grand totals..
6,428
6,137
5,608
6,104
5.547
958
936
1,313
926
911
 X 38        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 3—Analysis of Requests for Inspection Processed by Land Inspection
Division for Years 1968 to 1972, Inclusive
District
New Requests Received During—
Per Cent Change
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1972 Over
1971
1972 Over
1968
Coast Region
Courtenay	
378
11
1
266
153
355
149
288
18
2
27?
194
288
284
438
2
369
169
359
191
581
182
185
249
271
212
457
261
153
182
306
212
—21.3
+43.4
— 17.3
—26.9
+ 12.8
Nil
+20.9
— 1.8
Nil
—48.7
+42.2
1,313 | 1,351
1,528
1,680
1,571
—6.5
+12.0
Kamloops Region
419
537
279
295
591
339
426
283
362
557
432
547
239
339
843
351
664
224
385
619
361
452
214
436
603
+2.8
-31.9
-4.0
+ 13.8
-2.6
— 13.8
—15.8
—22.9
+48.5
+2.0
2,121
1,967
2,400
2,243
2,066
-7.9
—2.5
Prince George Region
147
924
569
396
259
274
386
238
840
376
414
161
276
354
217
494
207
337
185
214
252
172
397
188
299
205
148
135
142
583
200
386
209
145
152
-17.4
+46.9
+6.3
+29.1
+ 1.9
—2.0
+ 12.6
-3.4
Fort St. John—
—36.9
-64.8
-2.5
—19.3
—47.1
Vanrler.1n.1f
—60.6
2,955 | 2,659
1,906
1,544
1,817
+17.7
—38.5
6,389
5,977
5,834
5,467
5,454
	
Average change for 1972 over 1971 for Province is —0.2 per cent.
Average change for 1972 over 1968 for Province is —14.6 per cent.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING
BRANCH
 THE SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
It is the responsibility of the Surveys and Mapping Branch, through the Boundary
Commissioner, to establish and maintain co-operatively the boundaries between this
Province and the other adjacent provinces and territories of Canada. Within the Province, the Branch has established and is even extending a basic network of triangulation
surveys which is fundamental to determining geographical locations and co-ordinating
property boundaries. The surveying procedures vary according to the intended purposes.
Topographic surveys are constantly improving the portrayal of various physical features.
Cadastral (legal) surveys, on the other hand, delineate the parcels of Crown lands subject
to alienation under the Land Act. Finally, it is necessary to show on published maps the
combined survey effort in order to give a visual account of the position of land alienation
and geographic features of British Columbia. Maps must satisfy a wide range of uses,
whether it be by the sportsman searching for an untapped valley or virgin lake, the homesteader seeking unsettled lands, or the industrialist planning new ways and new places to
develop the resources of this Province.
So much for the uses of maps and surveys and their necessity. Also interesting is the
great variety of techniques and equipment which must support our complex surveying and
mapping organization. This includes photography from aircraft using precise cameras
calibrated to less than a thousandth of an inch, modern optical surveyors' theodolites
which read directly to seconds of arc, other instruments such as the tellurometer (a
distance-measuring device which operates on a principal similar to radar), and plotting
devices which are capable of precise mapping directly from aerial photographs. Helicopters and other aircraft speed surveyors to the remotest locations. Surveying is also
expanding into the realm of electronic computers which can process the contents of field-
notes in seconds compared with hours by manual methods. In all these ways, the science
of surveying and mapping continues to serve the people by keeping pace with their needs
and with the continual technological advances of our age.
The following is a brief summary of the functions of the various units of Surveys
and Mapping Branch:
/. Administration—General co-ordination of the three divisions of the Branch, these
being the Legal Surveys, Map Production, and Field Operations Divisions; delineation,
restoration, and maintenance of the Alberta-British Columbia Boundary and the British
Columbia-Yukon-Northwest Territories Boundary through the office of Boundary Commissioner; interdepartmental and intergovernmental liaison; geographical research and
data processing and research; editing of Lands Service Annual Report.
_7. Legal Surveys Division—Survey regulations under various Provincial Statutes,
such as the Land Act, Land Registry Act, Mineral Act, and Petroleum and Natural Gas
Act; preparation of survey instructions to British Columbia land surveyors for surveys
of Crown lands and subsequent check of field-notes and plans; preparation and safekeeping of official field-notes and plans; maintenance of Departmental reference maps;
processing applications for disposition of Crown lands to determine the status of the
land; recording on maps, dispositions by other Departments such as timber sales, mineral
claims; and well-sites, reserves such as forests, roads, and parks, and all boundaries of
incorporated areas of other levels of Government; surveys of Crown lands and rights-of-
way at the request of other Government departments; computer checks of subdivision
plans for Land Registry offices; inspection surveys in areas of dispute; restoration of old
lot corners.
///. Map Production Division-—Compilation and draughting of four main programmes of mapping—planimetric, for the Forest Inventory Series and for the Land
Reference Series; cadastral, for lot overlays at all scales as well as for the Composite
Series; topographic, for all large-scale engineering maps; and derived mapping, for the
Lithographic Series. Special mapping services including geographic information, editing,
descriptions, and delineation of administration boundaries. Operation of a large reproduction laboratory of three sections—printing, photo-mechanical, and air photo to supply
a map and air photo sales office.
IV. Field Operations Division—Propagation and maintenance of Provincial network
of survey control by triangulation, traverse spirit and barometric levelling, and photo-
topographic methods; operation of two or more aerial photographic survey aircraft, fixed-
wing aircraft, and helicopters on charter; surveys for establishment of integrated survey
areas under the Official Surveys Act; field control and mapping for site plans and other
special projects; data processing and plan checking of surveys made under the Petroleum
and Natural Gas Act, 1965; survey-control records; operation of radio and electronic
maintenance section; aircraft maintenance, instrument and camera shop, and field equipment warehouse.
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 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
X 43
SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
A. H. Ralfs, B.C.L.S., D.L.S., Director, Surveyor-General,
and Boundaries Commissioner
As the result of growing demands for large-scale maps, the Surveys and Mapping Branch is being asked to provide increasing numbers of such maps either in
base form upon which extra detail may be added by the user, or as a finished product with all the detail necessary for immediate use. Among the major users of
large-scale maps, either topographic or planimetric, with or without cadastral detail, are the Water Resources Service, Forest Service, Department of Highways,
Department of Finance (Provincial Assessors), municipalities, and especially regional districts, whose entry into the regional planning field has demanded much
more sophisticated data as an aid to decision-making. These agencies often lack
the equipment and expertise to undertake complex cartographic work, particularly
in the sphere of original rather than derived mapping. Furthermore, the co-ordination of information on work being done by them and by this Branch could be
strengthened. As a step toward improving this situation the Branch began to
expand its information services. This will complement the existing contacts through
the Interdepartmental Committee on Surveys and Mapping and other interagency
committees and in particular will enlarge upon and expand services to mapping
authorities outside the Provincial Government. The Branch thus hopes to function as a central source for data on mapping projects under way and completed
both within and outside the Provincial Government. At the end of the year a set
of detailed key maps to composite/cadastral mapping was being prepared and a
list of all photogrammetric projects, published maps, and composite and reference
maps finished during 1972 was being prepared for distribution to provincial, Federal, regional, and private agencies concerned with map production and use.
The objective of the information programme is to improve the lines of communication among map-makers and users throughout the Province, to promote coordination of mapping programmes wherever possible, and to provide technical
advice and assistance on map production.
Discussions were held with officials of the Department of Indian Affairs and
Northern Development concerning transfer to the Federal Crown of land formed
by natural accretion on Indian reserves. Transfer would be accomplished by addition to the list of Indian reserves conveyed by Order in Council in 1938. A proposal to register titles to Indian reserves in Provincial Land Registry Offices was
not acceptable to the representatives of the Indian Council of British Columbia,
and other approaches are being studied.
The Legal Surveys Division advanced rapidly on the preparation of new district lot registers keyed to the National Topographic System of indexing by quadrilaterals of IVi minutes of latitude and longitude. Under the old indexing system,
district lots were more or less chronologically numbered, while locational reference
was based solely on verbal description reference to a local geographical feature or
to a neighbouring lot number. The tabulation of district lots by N.T.S. co-ordinates
had an important side effect by resulting in cancellation, through Gazette notice,
of surveys, field-notes, and official plans relating to old, defunct district lots and
timber licences.
Some of the new land district lot registers will be available in printed form for
distribution in 1973.
 X 44        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Work began on a major revision to Legal Surveys Division Manual. The
one in current use was originally applied in the early 1950's and its currency has
been eroded by changes and additions to legislation and regulations since that time.
The Field Operations Division placed a field crew in north central British
Columbia to establish control for topographic mapping in N.T. Blocks 94c, 94f,
and parts of 94k and 93n. Successful completion of this project leaves only parts
of the northwestern corner of the Province and the rugged central core of the Coast
Mountains between Kitimat and the Bridge River to be completed at the initial
density of ground control for topographic mapping at 2 inches to 1 mile scale.
In June an inspection of a 160-mile section of the British Columbia-Yukon-
Northwest Territories boundary revealed that defoliant spraying carried out in
1969 and repeated in 1971, in spite of thorough technical procedures and accurate aerial placement, was not satisfactory as a control for vegetation along the
boundary-line. The effect of the spray (Tordon 101) was very limited on the
black spruce which is a major component of the vegetation. Also, large variations
in relief with its attendent influence on the rate and period of vegetation growth
made it difficult to catch ground cover at a uniformly critical stage of development.
The Map Production Division expanded its technical capabilities by the addition of two Wild B8S Aviograph plotters in the photogrammetric section and by
acquisition of a second Log-E electronic photo printer to replace older and worn-
out units. This Division also continued to expand its output of large-scale maps,
including composite mapping, which is generally done at a standard scale of 1 inch
to 400 feet.
Additional changes were made in the lithographic mapping programme. The
scale of future 1 inch to 2 miles sheets will be enlarged slightly to 1:125,000. The
contour interval at this scale will be 100 feet on relatively level relief and 200 feet
in mountainous country (previously it was 100 feet). Also, a new colour-coding
system has been devised and road classifications simplified.
In the photogrammetric section, a programme was developed which computes
correct machine settings from a block adjustment. Orientation time at the plotting
stage is thereby slashed from up to two hours to five to fifteen minutes.
In 1972 the Surveys and Mapping Branch produced and distributed 48,000
copies of a small brochure titled Protect Your Survey Monuments. This popular
publication, which illustrates and describes the common survey monuments used in
British Columbia, was widely distributed to British Columbia land surveyors, applicants for Crown land, Department of Highways offices, municipalities and regional
districts, utility companies, heavy-equipment operators, and, in short, all offices
and agencies having an interest in the protection and preservation of survey monuments. It is hoped that this public information effort will help to eliminate needless
and thoughtless destruction and misuse of these important survey markers.
Data processing applications are expanding and Program LSM139—a general
programme produced by this Branch for a large number of different computing
and plotting operations—has continued to receive wide use throughout the Branch
and by other Government departments. A number of new routines have been
added to the system and others have been amended to keep pace with changing
requirements. Early in the year a revised edition of the User's Manual for the
programme was printed and issued.
During the year the records of some 5,000 survey control points have been
added to the Control Survey Data Bank (a magnetic-tape file), which now contains
a total of 27,000 records.   This data bank is proving its worth for the Map Pro-
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
X 45
duction Division, which uses it to extract control for mapping projects and in
conjunction with Program LSM139 to obtain computer plots of the control at the
required scale.
As a result of the development of a Control Survey Data Bank by the Federal
Surveys and Mapping Branch, a study was in progress at the end of the year to
find what changes would be necessary to the format of records in our bank to
attain desirable compatibility. The changes necessary were found to be quite small
and will be made in 1973. They include one significant feature—that every control point, for which this Branch accepts responsibility, will receive a unique seven-
character identifier. This identifier will be unique for all of Canada, it will be
stamped on the post in the ground and will provide a concise reference to the point.
Other changes include coded additions to the record of each station regarding the
date of entry to the data bank, whether or not the point is photo-identified and permanently marked on the ground. All these features will be usable as conditional
parameters for the search of the data bank for specific types of control.
The Branch's Officer in Charge of Data Processing and Research has been a
member of the Data Handling Subcommittee of the Environment and Land Use
Technical Subcommittee (ELUTSC), which completed its initial assignment in November with a report to the parent subcommittee. One of the principal recommendations was that land status records be given first priority for data processing.
This is a matter of prime interest to the Legal Surveys Division and developments
will be awaited with interest.
Order in Council 1117, dated March 21, 1972, named Donald F. Pearson
Research Officer in this Branch to succeed Mr. Young.
In September, Mr. Pearson, as the British Columbia representative, attended
the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical Names in Halifax, where he participated in discussions of concern to the
committee as a whole. These included preparation of a new cumulative supplement to the Gazetteer, problems associated with bilingual names on maps, undersea feature naming, and extending the rules of the committee to include names
for suburban communities; major bridges, dams, roads and tunnels, ferries, caves
and springs, portages and trails; view points and historic sites.
During 1972 the toponymy section recorded 246 new names and handled
1,550 inquiries of all types. More than 200 other new names had been approved
for entry in the records by the end of the year.
On the 23rd of March the staff of the Branch held a retirement presentation
and dinner for W. R. (Ron) Young. Prior to earning his B.C.L.S. commission in
1939, Ron had worked as a draughtsman on phototopographic surveys throughout
the Province. After an absence of five and one-half years on war service, he returned
to the Topographic Division as a topographic surveyor. In 1952 he was officially
appointed Assistant Chief, Topographic Division, then in 1953 and 1955 became
Assistant Chief and Chief respectively of the Geographic Division. After reorganization of the Surveys and Mapping Branch in 1971 he served as Assistant to the
Director until his retirement. From 1955 until 1972 Mr. Young also acted as
British Columbia representative, Canadian Board on Geographical Names, and its
successor, the Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical Names.
 X 46        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
LEGAL SURVEYS DIVISION
W. A. Taylor, B.C.L.S., Chief
Being a part of the Surveys and Mapping organization, this Division plays a
support role to many other departments, similar to the role of the whole Branch.
About 40 per cent of the Division's time is spent servicing departments other than
the Lands Service. This is basically because the root of many activities in other
departments is some legal interest in or with land, water, and minerals. As this
Division supervises, checks, and records all original and all subsequent survey matters between Crown departments and the public, the input from and contact with a
cross-section of government is varied and stimulating.
This has been a matter of evolution over a number of years. Whereas status of
land and draughting maps at one time formed a large part of the work, the office
organization is now composed of survey technicians who prepare survey material
for land examination, carry out title and plan searches, examine newly completed
surveys under many Acts and regulations for surface and subsurface rights, easements, and rights-of-way. As well they adapt standard mapping to a graphic record
of current transactions in land matters by maintaining a series of up-to-the-minute
reference maps. The increase in transactions over the years, as well as the smaller
size of parcels being disposed of, has made it necessary to enlarge the scale of these
maps. Replacement of the 1 inch to 1 mile series is being accomplished as quickly
as possible to a scale of 1 inch to one-half mile as standard with some exceptions at
1 inch to one-quarter mile. The number of maps to maintain will quadruple at least.
In the past year, 110 new maps were taken into service and supplied to other departments as against 56 the previous year.
A concerted effort is under way to have the actual role of the Division recognized in a reclassification of many of the personnel from a draughtsman classification
to that of an office survey technician.
A field staff of land surveyors and technicians carry out a wide range of surveys
of all types for many departments besides the Lands Service, and this capability,
together with the office services available, provide a completely integrated legal-
survey service.
In the production of the increased number of maps to larger scales, a policy
was initiated in co-operation with the Forest Service to cancel the surveys of all
"dead" timber licences and to erase them from the maps. These surveys never were
anything more than compass surveys and hence not suitable for use to alienate the
surface of land. As dead licences are not renewable, it is desirable to clean up the
maps. There are thousands of old licences in this category. In the last few months
of 1972, 707 cancellations were made as against 45 in the whole of the previous year.
The clean-up will reduce the status complications, and rights-of-way plan draughting
will be simplified. The same approach to cancellations should be made with the old
mineral claim surveys, and only lack of staff to do the research prevents it.
The district lot system of Crown land surveys has always had the serious disadvantage of it being difficult to locate the lots on a map. This was referred to in
last year's report and since then the indexing of the location of the approximately
150,000 districts lots on the National Topographic System of numbering has progressed more quickly than expected. At the year's end all the major land districts
had been covered to the handwritten stage, with checking, typing, and printing only
to be completed.
Mathematical checking of Land Registry Office plans before deposit, increased
by about 20 per cent to 622, with no increase in staff. This is a service to the Depart-
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
X 47
ment of Attorney-General which should be expanded to provide a complete service
to all Registry Offices. This could be done with a small increase in staff and additional computing equipment.
Checking of Mineral Act survey plans and petroleum well-site plans was down
slightly in number, but the growing tendency to survey mineral claims by perimeter
survey of up to 40 claims on one plan does not mean a decrease in work nor in the
number of claims. Thus the reduction of the number of such plans is the result of
more claims being shown on each plan and streamlining of survey work in the field.
J. G. Callan was in charge of this work for many years in the Division and made an
outstanding contribution to the reputation in mineral matters which the Survey
Branch holds, for which we thank him. His transfer to an administrative position
in another department will be of great benefit to them.
Production Totals for the Years 1971 and 1972
Field books received __
Lots surveyed	
Survey plans examined
Lots confirmed	
Lots cancelled 	
Lots amended	
1971
  552
  742
  712
  769
  45
  513
  95
  56
  506
  6,403
  576
  515
  1,346
Crown grant applications cleared  869
Cancellations made  3,885
Inquiries   1,185
Letters received and dealt with  5,703
Mineral claim field books prepared	
Reference maps compiled or renewed
Applications for purchase cleared	
Applications for lease cleared	
Reserves cleared	
Mining leases cleared	
Timber sales cleared	
Examination sketches	
Crown grant and lease tracings made
Well-site plans recorded	
Survey instructions issued	
Mineral claims plotted 	
Mineral claims gazetted 	
Mineral claims cancelled 	
Placer leases plotted	
Placer leases cancelled	
Documents from vault examined	
  2,687
  9,036
  231
  996
  75
  95
  25
  1,124
  562
  61,555
Crown land subdivision and right-of-way plans  494
Plans checked for the Land Registry Office  1,750
Descriptions written   863
1972
475
633
598
573
707
58
36
110
446
5,660
518
622
1,369
723
3,033
891
4,622
2,472
11,845
208
839
36
24
96
340
530
55,277
584
2,240
782
A stock of official survey-posts is maintained in all offices of Government
Agents for use in Crown land surveys and replacement of original survey corners.
A resume of the activity in this service appears below.
 X 48        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Distribution of Survey-posts
B.C.L.S.
Bar
Standard
Pipe
Rod-
Post
Drive-
able Pin
Post Cap
Anchor
Plate
Drive-
able Pipe
2'/_" Bolt
Amount on hand, Jan. 1,
1972-	
3,845
Nil
2,067
Nil
1,348
2,085
4,309
3,000
3,985
4,311
572
1,678
2,256
Nil
2,250
Nil
Totals 	
3,845
2,067
3,433
7,309
8,296
2,250
2,256
2,250
1,545
Nil
Nil
35
30
128
25
995
260
860
3,415
293
395
4,580
605
25
250
Nil
84
196
197
20
62
Public surveyors    	
106
Total used in 1972
1,545
193
1,280
4,568
5,580
275
477
188
Balance   on   hand,   Dec.
31, 1972  .
Selling price of one post	
Selliing value of posts used
in 1972 	
2,300
$0.60
$927.00
1,874
$4.05
$781.65
2,153
$1.45
$1,856.00
2,741
$0.85
$3,882.80
2,716
$0.75
$4,185.00
1,975
$0.25
$68.75
1,779
$4.60
$2,194.20
2,062
$0.50
$94.00
Total selling value — __ _   _ _   $13,989.40
FIELD WORK
The field survey section undertook 56 assignments during the 1972 season,
comprising cadastral surveys of various types as requested by some eight departments, divisions, or agencies within the Service. In order to handle the work load
this year, it was necessary to reduce our commitment on highway right-of-way surveys to one full-time crew, leaving six surveyors for the more diversified type of
work.   Following is a descriptive breakdown of jobs completed, and for whom:
Lands Branch, Subdivision Surveys
Waterfront Lease Lots
Sulphurous Lake  108
Mahood Lake  62
Heffley Lake  22
Cordero Channel   10
Nicola Lake  15
Shuswap Lake  50
Total  267
Town Lots
Fort Nelson
Parksville .
Courtenay
Rural Roadside Lots
93
14
15
Royston   2
Comox   40
Port Hardy  32
Dawson Creek  17
Vanderhoof  25
Devine   3 4
West Quesnel  61
Chetwynd  5
Total  245
Each of the totals in the above three categories is considerably up from last
year (1971 totals were 21, 76, and 86 respectively).   Fort Nelson continues to be
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
X 49
a "demand" area—50 acres were contoured to facilitate additional subdivision design. On Hudson Bay Mountain near Smithers, over 90 lots were posted in a
scheme to accommodate many existing ski cabins. Three rights-of-way covering
ski-tows were also surveyed. It is unfortunate that improvements preceded any
planning and thus a proper subdivision design in this case. In the vicinity of Lillooet,
two 30-acre lots were created, and a foreshore lot was posted at Campbell River. A
survey for road gazetting purposes was required on Texada Island in connection
with a land exchange, and on Gabriola Island, the natural boundary was established
and marked on the ground in the area of a fill.
Reposting and Restoration
One survey crew spent seven weeks in the vicinity of Mud River rebuilding
the survey structure and remonumenting corner positions. This is one of many areas
in the Province where evidence of original surveys is notoriously lacking. Two
parcels were reposted near Revelstoke and a single lot defined at Ryder Lake. An
area of approximately 650 acres north of Kamloops was defined as a reserve for
ecological study, and at Swartz Bay a green belt reserve of 18.5 acres was surveyed
for the Environmental and Land Use Committee.
District lot corner renewals total 167, of which 44 corners were set in connection with highway right-of-way work.
Interdepartmental Surveys
Forest Service—Right-of-way surveys for portions of forest road included 0.7
mile at Wildhorse River, 1.1 miles at Adams Lake, 0.8 mile near Naramata, 1 mile
at Kleanza Creek, and 1 mile adjoining Kitsumkalum Lake, the latter two areas near
Terrace. Small alignment revisions to the Slok Creek Forest Road near Lillooet
were surveyed.
Department of Recreation and Conservation—At the request of the Parks
Branch, surveys were made at Okanagan Landing and near Miracle Beach to create
park areas donated by private citizens. An extensive posting survey was continued
for the Fish and Wildlife Branch, involving 4 miles of the west boundary of the
Creston Valley Wildlife Management Area.
Department of Public Works—Locally, surveys required to amend the Personal
Care Home and the Glendale Hospital site boundaries were made, and an area
posted to include the Forest Service laboratory. Four lots were posted in the Legislative Precinct, as was the warehouse property on Cloverdale Avenue and a single
lot in Penticton.
Department of Highways—The Libby Dam flooding necessitated the subdivision of three district lots to enable settlement with private owners.
Highway Surveys
Two sections of the Yellowhead Highway 16 near Terrace, totalling 11.5 miles,
were surveyed, following which the same crew completed 9.1 miles of the Blackwater
Road right-of-way at the Prince George end.
Miscellaneous Surveys
A special survey was carried out in Saanich at the request of the Department
of the Attorney-General. An inspection survey was made at Vernon for the Land
Registry Office, and examination surveys involving definition of water boundaries
were made at Mission, Thormanby Island, Alpha Lake, Victoria, and Cache Creek.
3
 X 50        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
FIELD OPERATIONS DIVISION
A. D. Wight, B.C.L.S., Chief
The severe winter of 1971/72 delayed the field programme of this Division
during the early spring. The late break-up deferred the field survey parties assigned
to primary mapping control and the above-average snow-pack, combined with a
cold spring, prevented air photography over the northern or mountainous regions
until the latter part of June. Normal weather patterns prevailed through the balance
of the field season and our accomplishment was maximized by the use of a turbo-
powered helicopter for transporting the ground control party. The lease of a Lear
jet for air photography and a compromise in the Forest Inventory photographic
programme, which changed photo requirements from 20 to 40-chain over a large
section of the poor weather area in northern British Columbia, were significant
factors affecting the field programme.
Field Survey Section
The Field Survey Section completed 27 projects this year and the personnel
were deployed basically into four parties—one airborne party which was responsible
for the basic mapping control in north central British Columbia, one assigned to
integrated survey control, and the remaining two worked on miscellaneous mapping,
levelling, and engineering surveys and site plans.
The airborne party completed horizontal and vertical control for 1/50,000
scale topographic mapping in Map-sheets 94C and F and portions of 93N and 94K.
The survey comprised 1,500 miles of tellurometer traverse to control approximately
12,000 square miles covering 39 National Topographic standard map-sheets. The
area is centrally located within the existing road structure of the Alaska Highway
on the east and north, the Stewart-Cassiar Road to the west, and the Northern Trans-
Provincial Highway to the south. Base camps established within the working area
ranged from 150 to 200 miles from the nearest supply points of Prince George for
the southern portion, and Fort Nelson for the camps at the northern end of the job.
In addition to the long supply lines, the area lacked suitable and strategically located
lakes necessary for the general use of a fixed-wing aircraft to assist in the day-to-day
movement of the survey crews. Because of the transport problem on this job, an
Alouette II turbine helicopter was contracted for the season and, after resolving a
few initial problems, the increased speed and range measured up to expectations.
The helicopter flew 252 hours and the Department's Otter recorded 224 hours on
the survey. In addition, the Otter flew 50 hours to move and supply the Forest
Inventory field crews working in the same general area. The assistance to the Forest
Inventory crews was made possible by a co-operative agreement whereby the Forest
Service bulk-landed aviation fuel by barge at Ingenika Base at the north end of
Williston Lake, from where it was trans-shipped by air to the operating camps. The
reduced haul for the heavy fuel supply conserved flying-time, which was better used
where there was no alternative. The success of this operation, which proved to be
advantageous to both the Forest Inventory Division and the Surveys and Mapping
Branch, was attributed to the co-operative attitude of the field supervisors representing both departments.
Although the survey was hampered by a late start and lost 28 working-days
through poor weather, 155 stations were occupied, of which 129 were newly established horizontal control stations.   Terrestrial photographs were exposed to provide
 GEODETIC  TRIANGULATION ®
OLD PROVINCIAL STATION ±
TELLUROMETER STATION •
 X 52        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
vertical control, and all but 35 of the stations were covered by low-level vertical
photography from the Otter aircraft for control identification.
The Integrated Survey Programme was focused on areas of new and proposed
development. Four townsites incorporated under the Municipal Act as instant
townsites were declared as Integrated Survey Areas. The areas declared were Integrated Survey Area 5 (The Village of Elkford), Area 6 (The Village of Granisle),
Area 7 (The Village of Logan Lake), and Area 8, which covered a portion of the
District of Mackenzie.
Additional field work was undertaken in the Village of Granisle, the District of
Mackenzie, and the District of North Cowichan to upgrade a number of control
monuments and strengthen the survey ties to the primary survey network.
The City of Cranbrook was declared as Integrated Survey Area 9 and field
surveys were undertaken to co-ordinate 82 monuments in the southern portion of
the Municipality of Delta; 155 control monuments were surveyed in the City of
Penticton.
Tape-standardization bases were established in Penticton and Cranbrook, and
the existing bases in Victoria and Kelowna were remeasured to maintain the required
standards.
Reconnaissance surveys to design control networks for the Municipality of
Matsqui, District of North Vancouver, and the City of North Vancouver were completed on request in preparation for monumentation and final surveys for integration
of the areas.
Control for large-scale mapping was established on the Lower McGregor River
to cover a proposed dam-site, and the survey was extended into Arctic Lake to
relate the dam-site with the divide between the Pacific and Arctic watersheds. The
Okanagan Valley from Shuswap Lake to the border was targetted for horizontal
control and sufficient progress was made on the supplementary survey control to
map the priority areas this year.
Mapping control was completed for James Island, Sidney Island, Denman
Island, Hornby Island, Hedley Creek, and the Village of Fort Nelson for the Water
Investigations Branch. Vertical control in the form of spot elevations determined
by spirit levelling was marked on air photography to cover flood-prone areas for the
Fraser River Study in the Cities of Prince George and Quesnel. Four problem areas
were controlled for the Department of Highways at Mad River, De Sous Creek,
Ruby Creek, and Odium. Projects for the Department of Recreation and Conservation were completed for the mapping of Mount Assiniboine Park, an area on Forbidden Plateau, and a portion of the Fraser River estuary in the vicinity of Westham
and Woodward Islands. One party assisted the Forest Engineering Division by
establishing control for mapping to cover sections of the Owikeno Lake road location
where the topography made standard location survey procedures impractical.
A series of permanent bench-marks were established and levelled between Port
Alberni and Comox Lake to provide vertical control to extend the revision mapping
on Vancouver Island.
Engineering site plans were compiled by field survey methods to cover locations
for new courthouse buildings at Vernon and Revelstoke, the Government buildings
at Kamloops, the Victoria Public Works service centre, and the training academy at
Pierce Creek for the Civil Engineering Branch of the Department of Public Works.
One experienced instrument crew was assigned to the Okanagan shoreline
survey in July to assist in the joint Federal-Provincial study of the Okanagan Basin.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
X 53
Air Survey Section
The Air Survey Section produced 37,850 new photographs covering 105,000
square miles on block vertical photography and 7,183 lineal miles on special projects.
The 80-chain programme represented approximately half the area coverage, although
it required only 8 per cent of the photographs. A total of 194 photographic projects
was requested and 151 were completed during the season. Approximately 10 per
cent of the photographs were colour or false colour. The entire Creston PSYU was
photographed, both in standard 20-chain black and white and in colour to evaluate
the application of colour to forest inventory work. Colour photography for pollution control is listed as a single project; however, the project consisted of low-level
cover with Kodak Aerocolor negative film of 54 individual sites covering sewage
outfalls, industrial and mine sites scattered throughout the Province. The change
from colour-reversal film to colour-negative from which colour prints are produced
now makes reprints available to all departments on request.
The operation of a third photographic aircraft and the increased demand for
40-chain block cover required, a third air camera with a 6-inch focal length. The
shortage was overcome by leasing a Zeiss 6-inch camera and modifying one Beech-
craft to use that equipment.
Operationally, the 6-inch Zeiss has an advantage because the auxiliary components are interchangeable with the 12-inch Zeiss used for 20-chain cover. The
Air Survey detachment using the Zeiss equipment is equipped to undertake either
20 or 40-chain photography by carrying a second camera body. In the past, if the
flexibility of two scales was required from a single base, the second camera had to
be transported by truck. On the completion of the camera lease the Division successfully negotiated the purchase of this camera.
The two Departmental aircraft and the Lear jet leased for air photography during the past season flew a total of 681.5 hours. Although the Department had
operated a Lear jet for two preceding seasons, this was the first year funds have been
provided to cover the cost in the Surveys and Mapping Branch budget. The accumulation of requests for block vertical cover necessitated positive action to procure
sufficient photography to maintain the minimum requirement to accommodate the
accelerated resources inventories demanded of the Provincial resources departments.
The primary purpose of the jet was for photographic cover in northern British
Columbia for the Forest Inventory programme but, because of its high altitude
capabilities, our programme was expanded to include 80-chain coverage of Vancouver Island and the Lower Mainland for the Department of Agriculture. A general interest in small-scale photography supported the principle of completing the
80-chain cover of the Province as areas of opportunity to utilize the equipment and
all possible weather.
To facilitate the operation of the Lear jet, this Division undertook the formidable task of designing and constructing a camera port to replace the lower door
section of the aircraft. The camera installation necessitated a custom mount and
considerable modification to the camera. Time did not permit the construction of
the final mounting assembly, but a substitute unit was completed and proved serviceable within acceptable limits.
New radio equipment and radio navigation equipment were purchased for the
two photographic Beechcraft. The installation was completed on CF-BCD in time
for the field season, but the second installation was left until the end of the field
season.
The primary job of the Otter has been reported under the airborne operation
of the Field Survey Section, during which it flew 274 hours.   On completion of the
 X 54        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
assignment to the field survey party, the Otter and crew flew a further 73 hours between the Vancouver, Smithers, and Quesnel land inspection districts to transport
Land Inspectors and Tax Assessors to isolated areas of the Province.
Survey Control Section
The Survey Control Section co-ordinated and indexed 829 new cards to record
the new control established during the year. In addition to computing and adjusting
all field surveys undertaken by the Division, this Section is responsible for adjusting
all integrated survey monuments established by private surveyors under the Integrated Survey Regulations. The development in recently declared instant townsites
represents the major source of this work. In conjunction with the new surveys,
1,003 old cards were rewritten to add new information and revise the data based on
new survey information. A total of 46,361 control cards was on file at the end of
1972.
Two hundred and eleven well-site surveys submitted under the Petroleum and
Natural Gas Act, 1965 were checked. Route traverses were computed in the Halfway River and north of the Peace River Block to co-ordinate district lot corners and
extend their use to basic control for well-site surveys.
Instrument Shop
The Instrument Shop completed a number of design and manufacturing projects
during the year. The largest single job was the design of a camera-mounting system
and proto-type models of the camera pod as integrated units to mount a survey
camera in a Lear jet. The work on this project varied from precision machining
to modify a survey camera, to prefabricating a test chamber from quarter-inch
plate, to pressure test the completed unit to a pressure of 14 pounds per square inch.
A film carriage to position air film and a rewind device for the new Log Etron
printer were built for the air photo processing laboratory. The stage plates on the
Wild A40 plotting-machine were modified at the request of the Forest Engineering
Division.
The construction of draughting tables and office furniture continued as shop
space and personnel were available. This programme has been under way for two
years and an estimated three years' work remains.
The operation of a third photographic aircraft increased the work load of
camera maintenance and a collimator was set up to select quality glass for a camera
window installed in the photographic aircraft.
The Instrument Shop continues to provide a maintenance service for optical,
mechanical, and electronic equipment for the Surveys and Mapping Branch and other
departments requiring the servicing of sophisticated equipment. This service was
centralized by moving our electronics technician from the Forest Service Communications Section to the Kingston Street shop during July of last year.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH X 55
1972 Air Photography Summary of Accomplishments by Projects
Number of
Photos
Lineal
Miles
Square
Miles
A. 80-chain vertical cover (new cover)—
Agriculture Department—Vancouver Island and Lower Main-
1,780
26,000
Internal—
82E/E and F/W                                                               	
285
375
180
190
290
5,725
8?F 'E and <r                                                                           ...
8,100
ST.
3,500
Q.H'E
3,050
6,800
1,320
27,175
3,100
53,175
B. 40-chain vertical cover (new cover)—
Forest Surveys and Inventory Division—
B"I1 Irving-Rounitary PSYTT
595
3,734
525
220
2,775
20,000
Peace PSYU                                              	
	
2,530
TaVu-Foundnry PSYff
1,050
5,074
	
26,355
Finance Department—
Bulkley Valley   	
225
850
1,200
4,200
1,075
5,400
Lands Service—
60
50
385
275
265
1,900
495
2,440
Tn^ls
6,644
34,195
.
C. 20-chain vertical cover—
3,695
4,500
Forest Surveys—
500
3,160
1,270
3,615
850
160
1,300
125
140
1,235
675
3,150
rarest"" psyit
1,150
Fernie PSYU
3,150
Neh-Tljs.nn P^YTt
1,350
450
Williams Lake PSYU -   -      -                         .   ...
1,800
160
150
rrpstnn PSYTT1
1,150
Totals
16,050
17,685
D. Special projects—
Finance Department—
60
150
840
50
765
40
44
505
35
475
1,865
1,099
Forest Service—
Engineering Division—
45
17
185
12
165
84
160
9
63
31
5
67
10
235
40
132
6
37
Inventory Division—
Silver Star..          .       .        	
740
563
Highways Department—
3
3
2
2
1 Indicates colour photography.
 X 56        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
1972 Air Photography Summary of Accomplishments by Projects—Continued
Number of
Photos
Lineal
Miles
Square
Miles
D. Special projects—Continued
Highways Department—Continued
De Sous Creek Slide-
Horseshoe Bay Terminal-
Mad River Slide —
Parksville Bypass	
Qualicum Bypass..
Ruby Creek to Odium—
Spences Bridge to Hope.
Swartz Bay Terminal..
Terrace-Prince Rupert Road-
Tsawwassen. _	
Subtotals.
B.C. Hydro and Power Authority—Parsnip River-
Lands Service—
Arrow Lakes - —
Bear Creek _  	
Bonaparte Lake	
Boundary Bay	
Buccaneer Bay	
Chilliwack Lake.—
Coquitlam _	
Cowichan Bay	
Cranbrook—	
Discovery Passage..
Fernie 	
Fire Lake	
Gambier Island	
Harmac ._	
Head Bay ~.
Holberg .
Hope to Fort Langley...
Inspection sites	
Kamloops 	
Kitimat-Terrace Road..
Ladysmith	
Neroutsos Inlet ._	
Nita Lake— —
Pemberton to Powell River	
Pender Harbour to Secret Cove-
Pitt Lake 	
Powder Mountain	
Quatsino Sound.	
Queen Charlotte City..
Shuswap Lake _
Sooke 	
Stave Lake —
Vancouver Island areas..
Waddington Harbour	
Williston Lake	
Winter Harbour 	
Zeballos	
Subtotals..
Public Works Department-
Colquitz —	
Legislative Precinct1—
Subtotals	
Recreation and Conservation Department-
Cortes, marina, oyster beds*   	
Crooked River Park 	
Elk Valley-
Forbidden Plateau..
Fraser River delta _
Pitt River—	
Waldo!	
Subtotals..
3
3
7
20
50
30
100
3
210
3
435
100
132
20
30
25
8
5
10
20
14
13
5
10
30
9
6
6
75
90
17
45
19
7
9
109
40
25
35
6
9
43
16
30
296
10
115
7
6
1,352
3
10
315
45
52
40
266
685
167
1,570
1
2
1
10
27
4
86
2
50
2
189
62
205
7
12
18
1
3
8
15
10
10
3
9
9
7
3
5
60
13
26
38
16
6
2
200
12
18
19
4
3
22
11
22
300
10
320
5
5
1,437
45
10
25
18
55
181
50
384
1 Indicates colour photography.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH X 57
1972 Air Photography Summary of Accomplishments by Projects—Continued
Number of
Photos
Lineal
Miles
Square
Miles
D. Special projects—Continued
Water Resources Service—■
Pollution Control Branch—industrial sites and sewage outfalls1            .          —             	
1,270
176
90
25
705
15
13
9
44
90
85
35
615
60
435
194
574
114
200
83
711
140
320
110
47
10
390
21
6
12
24
32
95
16
395
30
265
47
770
36
152
47
335
40
Water Investigations Branch—
Lillooet River     -	
Lower McGregor River 	
5,683
3,200
6
2
Attorney-General's Department—RCMP—Canada-United States
160
100
Totals	
11,924
7,038
Surveys  and  Mapping Branch—Field Operations Division—
140
145
Grand totals	
37,858
7,183
105,055
1 Indicates colour photography.
 X 58        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
MAP PRODUCTION DIVISION
E. R. McMinn, B.A., B.A.Sc, D.L.S., B.C.L.S., P.Eng., Chief
Public and Government demand for our products—maps and air photos—
increased slightly during the year and by virtue of some new equipment, a better
work flow, and modernizing some methods, production was likewise increased.
Lithographed map distribution was up 6 per cent to 158,000, white prints were up
8 per cent to 453,000, offset printing up 12 per cent to 2,469,000, and air photos up
5 per cent to 260,000. The money sales remained at $199,000, indicating the
increase was due to Government requirements.
In the compilation of new maps, the Photogrammetric section completed 57
projects of various sizes and scales and has seven projects in progress. Two Wild
B8S plotters were purchased and have proved to be the new work-horse instrument replacing the projection plotters such as the Kelsh and Multiplex, the latter
being of 1952 vintage.
The Planimetric Section has, in the calender year, processed 19,500 air photos
to complete 644 sheets of template laydowns; 475 of these were detail plotted. The
work is mainly for the Forest Inventory Division, but some 48 map-sheets were
compiled for the Timberland Appraisers and 39 for the Mineralogical Branch.
The Cadastral Section, working this year in a renovated and refurnished
draughting-room, produced, in the planimetric programme, 437 20-chain sheets, 45
40-chain sheets, and prepared 30 composite 40-chain sheets from 120 20-chain
manuscripts. A large number of base sheets was prepared and stockpiled for northern British Columbia, it being uncertain which area would get photographed.
The Reference Map Subsection delivered 107 sheets to Legal Surveys Division
as part of the continuing replacement programme for this graphical system of recording transactions in Crown land.
The Composite Mapping Section streamlined the methods of compilation and
so increased efficiency by about 30 per cent. A man is now sent to the Land Registry
Offices of the Province to search and copy the subdivision plans, which are brought
Turbo helicopter on Mapping Control, north central British Columbia.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
X 59
1
to scale on a reducing Xerox, shingled together with scissors and paste to the control
of the best map base available, then fair-drawn in ink. A Varityper will be acquired
to halve the time of lettering the sheets. These composite maps are in high demand
by administrative authorities in municipal, regional, and Provincial offices and the
Section has three years' work on hand. The maps are also made by many different
organizations, but some co-operation is beginning to be evident; no plans for continuous revision have yet evolved.
The Draughting Section completed 307 sheets of large-scale work, 4 integrated
survey plans, 37 of the 1:50000 manuscripts, and seven new B.C. litho series at the
2-mile or 4-mile scale. On hand are 110 of the 1:50000 manuscripts and 88 more
are in Ottawa awaiting lithography. Of the 2-mile and 4-mile series, seven new
sheets were published and five were reprinted. Of the Administrative Boundary
maps, 20 were prepared, and five of the General Series were revised. Miscellaneous
draughting was done on sketches, indexes, charts, maps, and mosaics.
Table A—Planimetric Compilation
Forest Inventory— Number of
...... r-r .   ...     . • Laydown
PSYU 40-chain mapping  Map-sheets
Bell-Irving   25
Finlay   18
Klappan   57
Liard   92
Totals   192
PSYU 20-chain mapping—
Cape Scott   21
Finlay   207
Morice   75
Spallumcheen    58
Silver Star Park  4
Totals    365
Number of
Map-sheets
Detail Plotted
6
18
20
18
62
21
207
75
58
4
365
Department of Finance (Timberland
Appraisers) —20-chain mapping—
west coast of Vancouver Island
(92F SW)      48
48
Department of Mines (Highland Valley
revision)—
20-chain map-sheets—
Transfer of landforms     11
Updating of roads, etc     28
39
Totals   644
475
 X 63        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Talbe A—Planimetric Compilation—Continued
Land reference maps — 109 sheets were produced largely in
82E, F, L; 92H, I, L, P.
Composite maps— sheets
Prince George revision   1"=500', 800'      8
Terrace revision  1"_=500' 3
Charlie Lake  1"=100' 19
Saanich Peninsula   1"=400' 18
Port Edward   1"=400/ 2
Table B—Topographic Mapping
M Number
Scale
Department
Complete
or in Hand
Project
Garibaldi	
M244B
M298A
M307
72-47P
72-52T
72 62T
M320
M195B
M319
72^t5T
72^16T
72-53C
72-68T
72-69T
72-70T
72-79T
72-1T
72 71T
72-72T
72-85T
72-89T
72-90T
72-16C
72-86T
72-97P
72-93T
72 101T
72-95T
72-109T
72-73T
72-74T
72-75T
72-76T
72-100T
72-99T
72 96T
72-59T
72-60T
72-11 IT
72-108T
72-105T
72-88T
72-87T
72-117P
72 64T
72-8T
72-110T
72-7T
72-23T
72-24T
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
6,000
12,000
12,000
240
2,400
2,400
6,000
4,800
2,400
6,000
1,200
600
600
4,800
6,000
2,400
1,200
4,800
1,200
1,200
1,200
1,200
9,600
6,000
4,800
1,200
2,400
3,600
4,800
600
1,200
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
1,200
1,200
600
2,400
• 2,400
2,400
2,400
2,400
2,400
2,400
1,200
4,800
4,800
■ 4,800
■12,000
:15,840
:  1,200
V.I.=20'
V.I.=20'
V.I. =25'
V.I.=2+5'
V.I. = 10'
V.I.=10'
V.I. = 10'
V.I._=10'
V.I.=2'
V.I.=2+4'
V.I.=2+4'
V.1^20"
V.I.=10'
V.I.=2'
V.I.=10'
Spot heights
V.I.=2+10'
V.I.=2+10'
V.I.=2'
V.I. = 15'
V.I.=5' +
Spot heights
V.I.=2'
V.I.-=5'
V.I.=:10'
V.I.=2'
V.I.=5'
V.I. = 10'
V.I. = 10'
V.I._=10'
V.I. = 10'
V.I.=2+5'
V.I.=2+10'
V.I.=5'
V.I. = 10+20'
V.I.=_0+20'
V.I.=20'
V.I. = 10'
V.I. = 10'
V.I. = 10'
V.I. = 10'
V.I.=20'
V.I.=5+10'
V.I.=25+100'
V.I. = 10'
V.I.=20'
V.I.=25'
V.I-1'
Spot heights
Parks
W.I.B.
Parks
Highways
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
Highways
Highways
Lands
Lands
Rec. & Con.
W.I.B.
Highways
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
Forest Eng.
W.I.B.
Map Production
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
Municipal Affairs
Highways
Highways
Highways
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
Highways
Lands
Lands
Lands
Lands
Lands
Lands
Lands
Legal
W.I.B.
Mines
Highways
W.I.B.
Parks
Rec. & Con.
C
C
Manning-Park-Skagit River-
Clarke Road-Port Moody	
C
C
C
Crescent Lake	
Summerland Reservoir	
C
C
c
C
Ruby Creek Bluffs	
Odium Bluffs     	
C
C
C
c
Coronation Mountain-	
Headwater Lakes	
C
C
C
c
c
Eneas and Tsuh Lakes	
C
c
c
c
c
c
c
c
c
De Sous Creek Slide  _.
Floods—Hope	
c
c
c
c
James Island  	
c
c
c
c
c
c
c
c
Courtenay Sub 	
Meziadin Lake-	
c
c
c
c
c
Pemberton 	
Lorraine porphyry  —
Petitot River crossing	
Lower McGregor-Arctic D.
Mount Assiniboine	
c
c
c
c
c
In hand.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Table B—Topographic Mapping—Continued
X 61
M Number
Scale
Department
Complete
or in Hand
Project—Continued
72-114T
72-65T
72-124T
72-131T
72-130T
72-129T
72-39T
72-135T
72-136T
72-127T
M298
72-94T
72-123T
1: 2,400
1: 2,400
1:15,840
1:15,840
1: 2,400
1: 6,000
1: 2,400
1: 2,400
1: 2,400
1: 4,800
1:31,680
1:25,000
1:31,680
V.I.=2+10'
V.I.=5'
V.I. = 10'
V.I.=100'
V.I-5'
V.I.=5'
V.I. = 10'
V.I.=5'
Spot heights
V.I. = 5'
Spot heights
V.I.=10'
V.I. = 100'
V.I.=25+100'
V.I.=100'
W.I.B.
Forest Eng.
Forest Eng.
Mines
Fish and Wildlife
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
W.I.B.
C
Owikeno Lake  	
C
C
Kwanika Creek	
C
In hand.
Woods-Kalamalka Lakes	
Hedley Townsite	
C
In hand.
In hand.
Keremeos	
Dease Lake Townsite	
Map-sheet
Taku
In hand.
C
C
92F (part)	
-
In hand.
Table C—Mosaics
Number
Name                                                        Scale of Sheets
PM   1    Greater Victoria, circa 1928  1"=1,000' 1
PM37    Vernon-Armstrong   1"= 1,000' 3
PM 44    Crooked River Park  1"=   800' 1
PM 42    Kispiox Valley   1 "=3,100' 2
PM 43    Westham Island   1"=   400' 6
PM50    Pitt Meadows   1"=   500' 11
PM51    Osoyoos    1"=1,000' 5
PM46    Fort Nelson  1"= 1,000' 3
PM61    Prince George  1"= 1,320' 1
PM62    Quesnel   1"= 1,000' 3
PM 63    Nelson    1"=   500' 1
Table Dl—Lithograph Maps, British Columbia Government Publications
Map No.
Name
Scale
Remarks
82E/SE  -
New editions—
1 in. to 2 mi.
1 in. to 2 mi.
1 in. to 2 mi.
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1 in. to 2 mi.
1 in. to 2 mi.
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
92G/NW	
92J/SE    	
920 	
93D	
930	
103P	
92B/NW-SW-
92H/SW
Reprints—
Victoria- - — ,   	
No revision.
92F    	
93A
93L
 X 62        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table D2—Maps Published, 1972
(Surveys and Mapping Branch, B.C. Lands Service)
Map No.
Name
Edition
Scale
Contour
Interval
(Feet)
82E/SE
Second status
First status
First status
Third status
Second status
First status
Third status
1 in.=2 mi.
1 in.=2 mi.
1 in.=-2 mi.
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
100
92G/NW
100
92J/SE
93D/103A
Pemberton   	
Hells! rnnla
100
500
920
500
930
103P
500
Table D3—Maps Received Into Stock, 1972
(Surveys and Mapping Branch, Department of Energy, Mines and Resources, Ottawa)
Map No.
Name
Edition
Map No.
Name
Edition
92G/2b
92G/2e
Scale, 1:25,000
Langley 	
White Rock
2
3
2
82N/2E
82N/3W
82N/4E
82N/5E
82N/6W
82N/8W
82N/10E
94N
940
94SE
94NW
104SE/SW
Inte
N.M. 9/10
N.M. 11
N.N. 8/9
N.N. 10
N.N. 11
Scale, 1:50,000
Overprint Revisions
McMurdo  ~
Mount Wheeler 	
IUecillew aet	
2
92G/7c
2
Scale, 1:50,000
2
2
83C/4
2
93E/13
93E/14
5
2
93F/2
Scale, 1:250,000
93F/15
Hallett Lake
193M/1
3
193M/2
3
193M/7
Scale, 1:500,000
Hudson Hope	
193M/8
93N/2
S<-afr-_d r.»ot
93N/3
Eight Mile Creek	
93N/6
93N/10
104J/7W
Stikine River  	
Scale, 1:1,000,000
rnational Map of the World
Vancouver	
6
Prince George	
Lesser Slave Lake —	
r Provincial compilations.
(Canada Land Inventory, Department of the Environment, Ottawa)
Map No.
Name
Edition
Map No.                         Name
Edition
82G/SE
82J/SW-SE
82J/SW-SE
Scale, 1 in.=2 miles
A
A
F
R
U
W
R
W
W
Scale, 1:250,000—Continued
R
Canal Flats
92H             Hope   	
92J              Pemberton 	
R
R
Scale, 1:250,000
920             Taseko Lakes	
W
82G
93C             Anahim Lake 	
93E             Whitesail Lake	
w
R
82K
93K             Fort Fraser..-   ._	
w
82M
930             Pine Pass     - ..
TJ
82N
93P              Dawson Creek 	
94A             Charlie Lake	
94H             Beatton River	
u
82N
TJ
83D
W
A—Agriculture, F—Forestry, R—Recreation, TJ—Ungulates, W—Waterfowl.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Table E—Map and Air-photo Sales
X 63
Litho Map Distribution
Requisitions
Maps Issued
Cash
Provincial
Federal
8,447
1,163
262
4,266
17,689
18,793
52,313
15,489
16,186
8,226
9,357
19,677
$24,912.40
14,187.92
46,853.31
Totals
14,138
104,284      |       53,446
85,953.63
157.730
White-print Maps
Requisitions
Prints
Cash
1,575
18,323
13,017
440,004
$11,464.05
Totals   	
19.898       1       453.021
$11,464.05
Requisitions
Offset   .._	
Xerox 	
735
2,468,701
332,613
Photo Reproduction
Requisitions
Prints
Cash
16
5,483
525
98,131
$1,070.58
Totals    -   	
5,499
98,656
$1,070.58
Requisitions
Air Photos
9X9
Enlargements
2,332
684
1,393
62,741
46,697
150,656
602
769
3,023
$69,053.82
Mail and counter discount sales — 	
25,252.33
Totals  	
4,409
260,094
4,394
$94,306.15
Diapositives
Requisitions
Number
Cash
Department and public.— _. ——    __. —	
i
157      |          1,595
1
$2,585.50
Air-photo Rentals
Requisitions
Public
Department
Cash
Number-
Total .
2,593
26,218
48,667
74,885
$3,903.03
Total requisitions
Total cash  	
Letters inward	
47,429
$199,282.94
12,786
 X 64        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table F—Copy Other Than Air Photo by Departments
Department
White Print
Photographic
Reproduction
Offset
Total
Agriculture..
ARDA	
Attorney-General 	
Commercial Transport-
Education.—  	
Finance.  _ 	
Health and Hospital Insurance.
Highways-
Industrial Development-
Lands (General) ..
Lands (Surveys andMapping)..
Forestry 	
Water Resources 	
Mines —	
Municipal Affairs..	
Provincial Secretary-
Public Works	
Recreation and Conservation-
Miscellaneous .. 	
Public	
2,124
2,694
48
594
1,600
262
109,875
6
10,949
45,676
32,233
26,593
23,336
4,582
2,473
160,555
17,165
172
12,743
127
5,872
2
432
9
35
693
16,343
2
331
5,606
9,778
6,634
2,571
604
1,394
35,483
2,077
582
769
68,443
4,300
3,050
3,636
558,256
849,990
446,208
496,583
500
720
3,000
28,015
2,251
77,009
50
432
4,903
4,685
955
129,854
8
569,536
904,700
488,219
529,810
26,407
5,906
6,867
224,053
21,319
754
13,512
 UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT
LANDS
  UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
X 67
UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
R. P. Murdoch, Project Manager
The year covered by this annual report was one in which the operations were
related to normal municipal administration and maintenance. There were a number
of highlights, however, which I would like to mention specifically.
The construction of Chancellor Court on Block 96 was started during the year
and is now progressing at a favourable pace. The development is tentatively scheduled for completion by August 1973.
The diversion of Chancellor Boulevard into Fourth Avenue was completed
during the year. This change necessitated that alterations be made to the bicycle
path on Chancellor Boulevard. A new bicycle path has been built on the south side
of Chancellor Boulevard, enabling cyclists to commute from the Little Australia
area to the elementary school without having to cross either lane of Chancellor
Boulevard unprotected by a traffic-control device.
Work has been completed in the installation of the 30-inch water main on
Cleveland Way between 16th Avenue and University Boulevard. The work has
also been completed in the installation of the 12-inch water main on Chancellor
Boulevard between Western Parkway and School Road.
The excessive rainfall during the middle part of December taxed our sewer
systems to a point where surcharging occurred. Remedial action has been taken
to correct a flaw in the design of the sanitary sewer, and we are looking at ways and
means of correcting the storm sewer in adequacy to handle the flow of water.
During this year a record of $295,000 for a sale of a private dwelling was registered. While this was an exceptional sale price, it does intimate that the market
continues to reflect a keen interest in the area.
The remodelling of the golf course is under way. The installation of the
underground irrigation system has been completed for the first nine holes. Because
of certain delays encountered, we were unable to seed the nine holes being remodelled
in phase 1. The seed has been purchased and seeding will take place as soon as
possible in 1973.
Mrs. Jean Sutherland, who has been associated with the golf course since
February 1957, retired in December.
I would again take this opportunity to acknowledge the splendid co-operation
received during this past year from the various Provincial departments with which
we have had to deal.
The following tabulation shows comparative revenue figures for the past 10
years, together with a summary of building permits:
 X 68        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
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T—                                      T—                                      T-H
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 UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
X 69
Number and Value of Building Permits Issued for the
Calendar Years 1970, 1971, and 1972
1970
1971
1972
Number
Value
Number
Value
Number
Value
22
3
12
3
$
1
27
1
1
4
2
$
2
26
1
2
2
8
$
3,627,000
25,000
89,050
3,000
182,000
2,800
14,000
Alterations to dwellings 	
Alterations to commercial buildings 	
143,700
10,000
18,150
16,500
139,875
6,150
105,000
14,000
Swimming-pools-      	
39,700
Totals	
40
188,350
36
315,850
41
3,931,725
  PERSONNEL OFFICE
  PERSONNEL OFFICE
X 73
PERSONNEL OFFICE
R. C. Webber, Personnel Officer
The establishment of the Lands Service was increased by five employees during 1972—two in the Accounting Division and three in the Environment and Land
Use Committee. This increase raised the total of permanent and continuous positions in the Lands Service to 386, six of which were temporarily vacant at the year-
end.   Seven temporary employees were also on staff at the end of the year.
As the following table indicates, personnel activity in 1972 was down somewhat from the record attained in 1971; however, activity is still generally above
previous years. Recruiting of continuous staff declined 29 per cent, while recruitment of temporary staff increased 51 per cent, for a combined increased of 5
per cent over 1971. During the year we continued to experience difficulty in recruiting experienced land surveyors, map draughtsmen, and land officers. Reclassifications dropped by 17 per cent in 1972, but still maintained a level well
above previous years, as is indicated by the 32-per-cent increase over the 1970
activity. Turnover in the Lands Service increased by 7 per cent in 1972, but is
still somewhat lower than the level during the 1968/69 period. The over-all turnover in the Lands Service for 1972 was 12.2 per cent; professional staff turnover
was 8.5 per cent; technical staff 1.5 per cent; clerical staff 29.4 per cent; and operational services 6.3 per cent. The Government-wide turnover rate in 1971 averaged
14.3 per cent, significantly worse than the Lands Service.
In 1972 the incidence of sick leave in the Lands Service dropped to an average of 5.3 days per employee, compared to the previous year's average of 5.9
days per employee. This is a significant improvement as well as being well below
the Government-wide average of 6.2 days per employee per year.
1969
1970
1971
1972
45
22
16
6
8
5
42
1
52
34
41
7
6
4
5
36
4
38
62
65
28
8
12
6
29
4
45
44
54
16
10
13
4
31
3
68
During the year, major classification reviews commenced for draughtsmen,
mapping assistants, and Air Survey personnel. It is hoped that these reviews will
be concluded early in the new year. A new classification, Technical Land Officer
4, was created in the Land Inspection Division in 1972, thereby opening more opportunities to technical employees who may now be placed in charge of less-complex district offices.
In October the Departmental Personnel Officer visited the Land Inspection
Division offices in Nelson, Kelowna, and Kamloops, where he discussed personnel
problems and procedures and met the employees, many of them for the first time.
The Accident Prevention Division of the Civil Service Commission has made
a defensive driving course available to all Government employees who drive a
car during a significant part of their work. To date, 13 Lands employees have
taken the course and it is presently being conducted at Interior locations so that
our field staff may have the advantage of this worth-while training.
 X 74       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
In 1972, two Lands Service employees graduated from the Correspondence
Course in Public Administration. They are R. G. Pilling, Draughtsman, and W.
W. Taylor, Mapping Assistant, both of the Map Production Division. N. D.
Smith, Clerk, Environment and Land Use Committee, is presently taking the course.
Graduates of the Executive Development Training Plan in 1972 were T. J. Todd,
Land Officer, Land Inspection Division, Kamloops, and W. C. Fry, Administrative
Officer, Land Administration Division. Presently enrolled in the course are D.
V. Smith, Detachment Chief, Field Operations Division (third year); D. Conway,
Clerk, Land Administration Division (third year); L. G. Smith, Technician, Map
Production Division (second year); and L. M. Warner, Land Officer, Land Inspection Division, Williams Lake (first year).
Lands Service employees who received 25-year continuous service certificates
in 1972 were D. Borthwick, Deputy Minister of Lands; Miss R. I. Davies, Clerk-
Stenographer, Lands General Administration; H. G. Galvin, Draughtsman, Map
Production Division; D. E. Goodwin, Land Officer, Land Administration Division;
L. G. McBratney, Draughtsman, Legal Surveys Division; C. T. V. Morley, Technician, Legal Surveys Division; F. R. Morris, Technician, Map Production Division;
R. A. Paine, Draughtsman, Map Production Division; A. Paulsen, Assistant Chief,
Land Inspection Division; A. F. Smith, Assistant Director of Lands; J. D. Southern,
Clerk, Accounting Division; C. R. Vater, Photo Printer Technician, Map Production Division; A. F. G. Gosse, Draughtsman, Map Production Division; and W.
R. Darlington, Fire Captain, University Endowment Lands.
Two retirements were recorded in the Lands Service in 1972. They were W.
Ron Young, Division Chief, Surveys and Mapping Branch, after 33 years of service, and Russell Brown, Land Officer in charge of the Pouce Coupe office of the
Land Inspection Division, after 24 years of service.
During the year, two Lands Service employees died while in service. They
were George Ewan, Mapping Assistant, Map Production Division, after 19 years of
service, and A. C. Watson, Mapping Assistant, Map Production Division, after
14V_s years of service.
Principal promotions, appointments, and transfers in 1972 were A. C. Kinnear,
appointed Secretary, Environment and Land Use Committee; N. D. Smith, promoted to Clerk 6, Environment and Land Use Committee; W. C. Fry, promoted
to Projects Officer, Land Administration Division; H. K. Kidd, promoted to Head,
Leases Section, Land Administration Division, R. H. Goodchild, promoted to Head,
Purchases Section, Land Administration Division; W. R. Benwell, promoted to
Clerk 5, Leases Section, Land Administration Division; D. Conway, transferred
to Head, Easement Section, Land Administration Division; L. C. Sorken, promoted to Land Officer i/c, Fort St. John; R. W. Avis, promoted to Land Officer
i/c, Prince Rupert; A. A. Hadland, transferred to Land Officer i/c, Pouce Coupe;
A. E. W. Dean, promoted to Land Officer i/c, Quesnel; J. W. Hazelwood, appointed
as Land Officer i/c, Burns Lake; H. K. Boas, transferred to Land Officer i/c, New
Westminster; J. P. Egan, transferred to Land Officer i/c, Courtenay; A. G. Anderson, transferred to Land Officer i/c, Vancouver North; and D. E. Goodwin, promoted to Land Officer, Land Administration Division.
 MAIL AND FILE ROOM
  MAIL AND FILE ROOM
X 77
MAIL AND FILE ROOM
David S. Preston
Letters received in the Department during 1972 amounted to 224,440, compared to 247,532 in 1971, a decrease of 23,092. The decrease was probably due
in part to a light fire season and fewer general inquiries.
The microfilming of old obsolete files has proceeded well and at the present
time has almost reached the point where the previous filming concluded. Microfilming is expected to continue throughout 1973.
A new multipart file control form was introduced on a trial basis throughout
the Department in an effort to provide more up-to-date file-location data. The files
are assigned to the recipient with this advice forwarded to our file vault, thereby
making it possible to get the file or find out readily who in the Department has it.
Letters Inward
Branch
1972
1971
10-year Average,
1963-72
66,926
97,880
38,095
21.539
74,190
112,338
37,516
23.488
60,510
133,014
33,133
23,203
Totals  	
224,440          j        247,532
249,860
Letters Outward (Recorded)
1
15,000                      12,300
1,400                        1,752
13,891
1,813
16,400                      14,052
15,704
Miscellaneous Reports
Designation
1972
1971
10-year Average,
1963-72
1,903
7,052
5.547
9 S9S
2 411
7,968                      9,961
6 1 fU                            5 fi61
Totals   	
14 502           1            16.97fl           I           isn.i
New Files Created
"O" files         	
6,636
1,246
732
9,348
1,096
668
7,139
1,509
1,388
Totals            	
8.614           t           11.112
10,036
Micro-film Reference, 1,362.
 Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1973
1,030-273-1902

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