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REPORT OF THE Department of Commercial Transport containing reports on COMMERCIAL VEHICLES, ENGINEERING,… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1973

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT
Hon. J. G. Lorimer, Minister F. A. MacLean, P.Eng., Deputy Minister
REPORT OF THE
Department of
Commercial Transport
containing reports on
COMMERCIAL VEHICLES, ENGINEERING, RAILWAYS,
AERIAL TRAMWAYS, PIPE-LINES, AND
INDUSTRIAL TRANSPORTATION
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1972
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1973
  Victoria, B.C., February 15, 1973.
To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Annual Report of the Department of
Commercial Transport for the year ended December 31, 1972.
J. G. LORIMER
Minister of Commercial Transport
  Victoria, B.C., February 14, 1973.
The Honourable J. G. Lorimer,
Minister of Commercial Transport.
Sir: I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Commercial Transport for the year ended December 31, 1972.
F. A. MacLean, P.Eng.
Deputy Minister of Commercial Transport
  Report of the
Department of Commercial Transport
F. A. MacLean, P.Eng., Deputy Minister
At the Spring Session of the Legislative Assembly, legislation was approved
changing the name of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway to the British Columbia
Railway. Also, the Pipe-lines Act was amended to include high-pressure water-
injection lines and to provide for oil-spill prevention and control measures. Most of
the oil pipe-lines operating under the Pipe-lines Act are in the Peace River area, with
one main line south to Kamloops. In the Peace River area, the industry has established a co-operative oil-spill contingency plan to handle spillage from any source.
Plans for lines in other areas are well advanced. Of course, preventive measures
are the most desirable and the Department continues to monitor pipe-line activities
with this in mind.
Under the Railway Act, several agreements were approved during the year.
Three separate agreements give the Burlington Northern Inc. Railway Company,
Canadian National Railways Company, and Canadian Pacific Railway Company
operating privileges on the British Columbia Harbours Board Railway serving Roberts Bank. An agreement between the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority
and the British Columbia Railway gives the British Columbia Railway management
responsibilities for the British Columbia Hydro Railway. Railway activities continued at a high level, as reported by the Engineering and Inspection Branch, and
the Department is devoting increasing attention to the evaluation of visibility and
other conditions at road crossings of railways and is arranging corrective measures
or increased protection as required.
There was considerable activity in the aerial-tramway field during the year,
with a number of new lifts constructed and placed in operation. The continuity of
the initial mechanical, structural, and operational safety of every aerial tramway is
a prime objective and the Department has increased its inspection activities in
keeping with the growth of the industry and increasing age of all facilities. A more
detailed appraisal of requested tariff increases is now being made before approval
is recommended.
Under the Industrial Transportation Act, approval is required to connect an
industrial road to a public highway. Such requests are being examined in more
detail for safety requirements and all approvals are now issued for a specific term,
after which they may be renewed for a further term if still required. Most of these
accesses are required for a short term only and, with an expiry date specified, the
access can be properly removed.
The addition of three inspectors to the staff during the year made it possible to
undertake the additional activities mentioned. Late in the year the Engineering and
Inspection Branch moved out of the downtown Vancouver area to new, more suitable quarters at 4299 Canada Way in Burnaby, near Willingdon Avenue, which will
contribute considerably to the over-all efficiency of the operation.
On public highways, the number of commercial motor-vehicles increased by
more than 10 per cent over 1971, and at year-end over 250,000 commercial vehicles
 AA 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA
were licensed to operate in British Columbia. With higher axle weights now possible
in British Columbia, Ontario, Quebec, and New Brunswick, there is a growing desire
in the industry to have a uniform standard established throughout the West. In this
regard, the Department is concerned that the wide-spacing of nonarticulating axles
on a vehicle will be permitted. The practice is prohibited in British Columbia as it
is not considered in the best interest of operational safety, and this position has been
supported by the industry. The Department will continue to work with the other
western provinces and the industry toward the development of a uniform size and
weight standard.
In the highway log-hauling industry, the impending loss of restricted route permits in 1976 has led to the development of six-axle combination units for the hauling
of short logs with legal weights up to 99,000 pounds. At year-end, a six-axle unit
for long legs was about to be tested. Some difficulties continue to surround the
highway log-hauling situation, with greater seasonal and over-all tolerances being
requested. The complexities of variable wood density, loading and area problems,
hauling rates, and other incentives tend to cloud the issue. There is no clear-cut
evidence that logs have to be hauled on the highway in loads heavier than loads of
other commodities. Any arguments made for special weight tolerances should be
related to legal loads.
Other Department activities relative to commercial vehicle operation, industrial
transportation, pipe-lines, railways, and aerial tramways continued on a normal
basis, as indicated in the following reports.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1972
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  DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1972
AA 11
COMMERCIAL VEHICLE BRANCH
F. J. Regan, Director of Operations
The new regulations introduced on My 1, 1971, and reported on in the 1971
Annual Report, have proved satisfactory to both the trucking industry and to the
Department. It was not necessary to recommend any changes during the year, nor
were any suggestions received from the industry advocating amendments. The year
1972 was the first year since the formation of the Department that regulations dealing with the operation of commercial vehicles were not amended.
The personnel of the Department, which numbers 108, consists of a Director
of Operations, one Weighmaster 4, and one stenographer located at Victoria headquarters. Six Weighmasters 4 are located at Surrey, Victoria, Kamloops, Fernie,
Prince George, and Dawson Creek. These weighmasters act as Regional Supervisors
for the six regions into which the Province is divided for administrative purposes.
There are 11 Weighmasters 3 who operate portable patrols throughout the Province.
These patrols are a valuable aid in the enforcement of the Department of Commercial Transport Act, Motor-vehicle Act, Motor Carrier Act, and Motive-fuel Use Tax
Act, and it is proposed to increase their number. The remaining staff consists of
13 Weighmasters 3, 20 Weighmasters 2 who are in charge of and supervise 36
permanent truck-weighing stations located on our main highway systems, and 55
Weighmasters 1 complete the operating staff of the permanent stations.
I believe it is fair to report that where the Department has sufficient enforcement capabilities, the laws relating to commercial vehicles are reasonably complied
with; however, there are still a few areas of the Province where enforcement is
somewhat haphazard due to the limited availability of personnel.
In line with Government policy, all employees are scheduled to take the
Defensive Driving Course being offered under the auspices of the Civil Service
Commission Accident Prevention Division. Provision has been made to have all
portable operators enrol in the Department of Highways Air Brake Training Programme. It is hoped that eventually all of our field personnel will take the course
in order that they may be in a position to detect faulty air-braking systems while
inspecting vehicles in the normal course of their duties.
A training conference was held at Kamloops in June. It was attended by all
Weighmasters 4 and Weighmasters 3, and legislation for which the Weigh Scale
Branch is responsible was discussed in detail.
The demand for both oversize and overweight permits continued to increase
notwithstanding strict adherence to the policy of the Department to refuse permits
in these categories if a load can be reduced. Vehicle combinations having a gross
weight in excess of 100,000 pounds and operating under an overload permit increased to 4,824 from last year's total of 3,525. A survey of overweight permits
issued between April 1, 1972, and December 31, 1972, indicates that approximately
77 per cent of the loads travelled less than 100 miles on a highway and approximately 6 per cent of the permits were for loads more than 30,000 pounds in excess
of the vehicle licensed weight.
The movement of 12-foot-wide mobile homes remained steady throughout the
year. Numerous requests were received to expand the 12-foot limit, not only for
mobile homes but for a wide range of manufactured articles, and, in view of the
Department's policy in this regard, it is not possible to issue permits for any movement in excess of 12 feet in width if there is a probability that a precedent will be
set that would generate a high traffic volume of similar movements, or if there is
any other method of moving.
 AA 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The commercial trucking industry has, as previously mentioned, responded
well to the new regulations and this response has resulted in a marked increase in
the number of inquiries received relative to the design of vehicles and combinations
of vehicles. In all cases, advice is given both by checking plans and specifications
and by field visits to evaluate proposals. While the Weigh Scale Branch does not
undertake the design of vehicles, every assistance is given to the industry to ensure
that new vehicle designs and concepts comply with the Department of Commercial
Transport Act and regulations.
During the year, Highway 1 in the vicinity of our Hunter Creek weigh-scale
was relocated and expanded to four lanes. A scale-site to monitor the eastbound
traffic on the new highway is under construction near Laidlaw. Both the house and
the scale are of a new design. The building is eight-sided and gives excellent visibility and it should be adaptable to any location in the Province. The scale is an
electronic load-cell application with no moving parts and it incorporates the latest
technology in weighing. In this type of unit, the weight is obtained by the measurement of the electric resistance in strain gauges. As there is no lever system, the scale
deck may be placed in any location relative to the building. This feature has allowed
the use of a larger scale deck placed far enough away from the building to permit
the weighing of wide loads and large off-highway equipment. The scale is equipped
with a digital readout, both inside the building for the information of the weighmaster
and outside, so that the driver of the vehicle will also be aware of his actual weight
without leaving his truck. It is anticipated that the new installation will speed up
the weighing of vehicles, and the fact that the driver will be aware of his actual weight
should enable the industry to be more weight-conscious and capable of correcting
irregular loading practices.
As mentioned in previous reports, communication between the driver in a truck
and the weighmaster in a scale house can be difficult; however, the new signal-light
system is working well and it is anticipated that all of the installations will be completed in 1973.
Highway 7 has been extended from Agassiz to Haig and was open for traffic
on September 1. Two weigh-scale sites were incorporated in the highway construction and one building similar to the Laidlaw facility is planned for 1973.
Our records indicate that approximately 1,500,000 vehicle checks were carried
out during the year, resulting in approximately 5,000 prosecutions for offences under
the various Acts relating to commercial vehicles. In addition to the offences that
were serious enough to warrant Court action, a greater number of written and verbal
warnings were given in those cases where it appeared that the fault could and would
be corrected.
The Province of British Columbia is a member of the "Western Compact," an
association including 17 American states, all of which have entered into a common
agreement for the prorating of licence fees and (or) reciprocity. This agreement
provides a method to license and register only vehicles operating internationally.
Vehicles from other areas licensed under the terms of the compact are not permitted
to operate intraprovincially in the Province of British Columbia, nor are vehicles
based in this Province allowed to operate on a similar basis within any of the contracting states. Last year, the State of Minnesota joined the compact and, therefore,
this Province now has reciprocity and prorationing of commercial licence fees with
the State of Minnesota. There were no changes in the Canadian reciprocity agreement during the year.
In conclusion, it is gratifying to note that the Weigh Scale Branch has received
the wholehearted co-operation of the municipal police forces, the RCMP, and
other Government departments, particularly the Department of Highways and the
Attorney-General's Department.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1972
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BRITISH COLUMBIA
Three-axle trailer with centre-mounted fixed axle for long logs.
Three-axle trailer with centre-mounted articulating axle.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1972
AA 15
PERMIT-ISSUING OFFICES
Weigh-scales
Cache Creek
Kamloops South
Rutland
Chetwynd
Kinnaird
Saanich
Dawson Creek
Midway
Sicamous
Deas Island North
Pacific
Terrace
Deas Island South
Parksville
Tete Jaune Cache
Duncan
Pattullo Bridge
Tupper Creek
Fernie
Port Mann East
Vanderhoof
Fort Nelson
Port Mann West
Vernon
Fort St. John
Prince George North
Victoria (term permits)
Golden
Prince George South
Williams Lake
Hunter Creek
Quesnel
Yahk
Kaleden
Rossland
Kamloops North
Ruskin
Portable Patrols
Fraser Valley
Nelson
Terrace
Kamloops
Okanagan
Victoria
Kootenay
Peace River
Lower Mainland
Prince George
Department
of Finance Government Agents
Alberni
Ganges
Powell River
Ashcroft
Invermere
Prince George
Atlin
Kamloops
Prince Rupert
Burns Lake
Kaslo
Princeton
Clinton
Kelowna
Quesnel
Courtenay
Kitimat
Revelstoke
Cranbrook
Lillooet
Rossland
Creston
Merritt
Salmon Arm
Duncan
Nanaimo
Smithers
Fernie
Nelson
Terrace
Fort Nelson
New Westminster
Vancouver
Fort St. John
Oliver
Vanderhoof
Golden
Penticton
Vernon
Grand Forks
Pouce Coupe
Williams Lake
Motor-vehicle Branch Offices
Abbotsford
Mission
Squamish
Bella Coola
Nakusp
Stewart
Campbell River
New Denver
Trail
Castlegar
New Westminster
Valemount
Chilliwack
North Vancouver
Vancouver (Main)
Cloverdale
Pemberton
Vancouver (East)
Dawson Creek
Port Hardy
Vancouver (Point Grey)
Gibsons
Queen Charlotte City
Victoria
Kamloops
Sechelt
Masset
Slocan
Miscellaneous
Director of Operations, Department of Commercial Transport, Victoria.
Engineering Branch, Department of Commercial Transport, Burnaby.
 AA 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Comparison of Gross Revenue Collections From Commercial Licence and Permit
Fees for Five-year Period 1967/68 to 1971/72, Inclusive
Source
1967/68
1968/69
1969/70
1970/71
1971/72
$
11,732,631
444,302
100,278
102,337
785,690
$
13,010,278
565,877
114,782
113,642
840,305
$
14,639,288
715,407
122,556
134,918
889,623
$
15,042,110
750,475
129,418
137,777
964,990
$
17,458,520
1,021,408
155,615
177,545
1,044,583
Totals __..	
13,165,238
14,644,884
16,501,792
17,024,770
19,857,671
Summary of Commercial-vehicle Licences and Permits Issued for Five-year Period
1967/68 to 1971/72, Inclusive
Source
1967/68
1968/69
1969/70
1970/71
1971/72
175,358
16,142
20,929
39,137
44,777
194,332
18,839
21,188
42,814
46,768
215,670
23,684
22,176
49,974
51,218
222,921
25,810
23,586
53,904
55,665
254,090
38,903
27,172
71,598
Oversize and overweight permits	
66,867
Comparison Between Oversize Permit Revenue and Overweight Permit Revenue
for the 10-year Period 1962/63 to 1971/72, Inclusive
Year
Oversize
Overweight
1962/63 	
$
151,544
161,760
184,359
215,028
245,077
272,350
273,549
305,525
321,658
391,938
$
178,510
1963/64...._ 	
1964/65      	
-                                -       -
202,629
231,941
1965/66...   	
256,813
1966/67 	
306,703
1967/68                _            	
325,330
1968/69           	
333,175
1969/70	
319,996
1970/71                                  	
372,820
1971/72     	
371,836
Revenue From Gasoline and Motive-fuel Use Taxes for
Passenger and Commercial Vehicles
Fiscal Year
Amount
$
1958/59   26,100,000
1959/60   28,582,000
1960/61   30,093,000
1961/62   39,262,000
1962/63   43,129,000
1963/64   46,420,000
1964/65   50,865,000
Fiscal Year
Amount
$
1965/66   56,441,000
1966/67   61,388,000
1967/68   65,548,000
1968/69   69,414,000
1969/70   76,115,000
1970/71   80,779,000
1971/72   108,830,000
Note—The above information on revenue from gasoline and motive-fuel use
taxes has been combined, as separate returns for commercial vehicles are not
available.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1972 A A 17
ENGINEERING AND INSPECTION BRANCH
(Railways, Aerial Tramways, Pipe-lines, and Industrial
Transportation)
A. W. Turnbull, P.Eng., Chief Inspecting Engineer
R. Mester, P.Eng., Inspecting Engineer
Inspectors: J. W. Kirkland, J. Dyck, E. A. Smith, D. F. Burges, E. V. Crowder,
M. Howbold, K. O'Neill, W. Hendren
Inspection and investigation programmes established for 1972 were generally
completed as scheduled, despite the usual problems resulting from forest closures,
weather conditions, and other work stoppages. The late arrival of snow in the many
ski areas presented a particular problem to accomplish aerial-tramway inspections
prior to the year-end holiday season.
The ever-changing conditions inherent in expanding industries generate a need
for a degree of flexibility in the basic approach of the Department toward the many
and varied industries within its jurisdiction. Excellent co-operation is received
from most industries; however, resistance to change in procedures is sometimes encountered and this involves considerable extra man-hours by Department inspectors.
Recognizing the need to meet the demands of industries deeply involved in
accelerated programmes of development, staff changes were implemented in which
a vacancy at the engineering level was filled, and three new inspector positions were
created. We were fortunate to obtain personnel to fill the vacancies who were well
qualified in each of the basic engineering fields within Department jurisdiction, and
who are proving capable of expanding their personal experience and abilities into
the remaining engineering aspects of the work involved.
Province-wide application of regulation requirements in several major industrial
fields demands that the widest possible experience and ability be developed among
the engineering and inspection staff if adequate service to industry is to be maintained
with the present staff.
In order to provide a more adequate coverage of the oil and gas fields in the
northeastern section of the Province, it was necessary to station an experienced inspector in the Fort St. John area during the year. The foremost responsibility of
this particular inspector is related to the field of pipe-line inspection and testing;
however, he is utilized to some extent, in the company of other qualified inspectors,
on projects related to railways, aerial tramways, and industrial transportation in the
northern area of the Province.
RAILWAYS
British Columbia Railway
In the year 1972 the British Columbia Railway again established new records.
For the first time on record, tonnage hauled topped the 6,000,000 level. Carloadings
for the year were approximately 130,000—brought about by an increase of ore concentrates, lumber products, pulp and paper, and manufactured products. In accordance with established procedures, inspections were carried out over the entire year
covering trackage, rolling-stock, and motive power.
British Columbia Railway yards at Fort Nelson, Dawson Creek, Chetwynd,
Prince George, and Quesnel were inspected and resulted in several recommendations.
Among these were the following:
(1) Improve weed control around grain elevators in the Peace River
area:
2
 AA 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
(2) Upgrade certain spur and yard trackage:
(3) Clean up around new warehouses:
(4) Install permanent bonding between railway and bulk-fuel storage
plants:
(5) Pipe in water to the mechanical shops for fire protection at Fort St.
John:
(6) Consider means of removing wood chips and sawdust from the yards
and from along the main line; in the former areas, this debris can
constitute a fire hazard.
The shops for repairing diesel locomotives and rolling-stock were in good order.
These were working to capacity due to the added purchase of diesel units and freight
cars. The car-repair shop in Squamish is in the process of building 10 all-metal
cabooses. These will be completed early in 1973 and will add to the comfort and
safety of employees. All locomotives leased from other railway companies have
been returned. The addition of new diesel units, including several 3,000-h.p. units,
will substantially reduce the need to lease power. Diesel locomotives and car equipment were inspected throughout the year and generally found to comply with our
Department standards.
Two fatalities occurred during the year to railway employees. Both of these
were investigated by this Department and the cause in each case was found to be
accidental, with no blame attached to the railway. The railway company Department of Safety and Security has conscientiously checked into ways and means of
making employees safety conscious.
Derailment of rolling-stock and diesel locomotives is a factual part of railroading. The British Columbia Railway had its share of these derailments, with one
major one at Mile 10 just above Marine Drive near Horseshoe Bay. Several rail
cars went over the bank and damaged homes in this area, but fortunately no one
was seriously injured. This piece of track will be bypassed when the tunnel now
under construction between Horseshoe Bay and Nelson Creek is completed.
Construction of the new rail-line between Fort St. James and Dease Lake continues at a steady pace. This extension covers a distance of 413 miles and, of this
distance, 79 miles of steel to Leo Creek have been laid. The construction of railway
grade in preparation for track-laying has nearly been completed from Leo Creek to
Bear Lake, which lies 178 miles north of Fort St. James. Contracts have now been
let for construction between Bear Lake and the Stikine River, a distance of 186
miles, and from the Stikine River to Dease Lake, a distance of 49 miles. Bridge
construction in this area continues to keep pace with the track-laying gangs.
During 1972, track maintenance and upgrading has continued, involving
(1) replacement of eight wooden-trestle bridges by permanent concrete
structures;
(2) re-laying of 17 miles of 80-pound rail;
(3) replacement of 130 miles of light rail with heavier rail (Table I);
(4) removal of 200,000 ties and their replacement by new ties (Table II);
(5) reballasting of 76 miles of track during upgrading.
The railroad now operates in excess of 1,390 miles of track, of which 1,112
miles is currently designated as main line. The balance is comprised of industrial,
yard track, and sidings.
Independent of established detail inspections, several cursory inspection trips
were made during the spring and fall seasons to appraise over-all conditions and to
cover progress being made concerning road-bed maintenance, general improvements,
and works under construction.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1972
AA 19
During the first two weeks in May, track inspections were made covering the
main line from North Vancouver to Prince George, Odell to Fort St. James, and on
through to Mile 98 on the Dease Lake extension, and also from Summit Lake to
Kennedy and through to Mackenzie. Visibility was good at all times and conditions
of the road-bed, ties, and tracks were carefully observed and noted. Stops were
made periodically to cover details as required. During the inspection, road-bed
work programmes and allied questions were discussed with key railway personnel.
Maintenance techniques show marked improvement and the summer works programme was progressing smoothly and effectively. As we proceeded, planned maintenance programmes were outlined for areas in need of attention. Except for minor
interruptions, all such work was proceeding on schedule.
Track and road-bed conditions in the Fort St. John area were covered in
October. Inspections included the south end of the Fort Nelson line up to Mile
816. Abnormally heavy rainfall caused severe problems on several sections of the
road-bed in the northern section; therefore, these inspections were completed at a
later date. In spite of unusual weather conditions which would pose major problems on any new road-bed in such terrain, safe operating conditions were maintained.
Main-line track from Fort St. John to Chetwynd and also on the Dawson Creek
line were inspected in the usual manner and work completed to date was noted.
Again proposed work schedules were discussed with railway personnel at numerous
points along these lines. Adequate control was being maintained where local problems existed.
The problem of soil instability along the banks of the Peace River near Taylor
has not as yet been permanently resolved and research is in progress on this area.
A general upgrading programme is scheduled in the near future covering the
Dawson Creek subdivision. In the meantime, minor repairs and maintenance work
had been done to maintain safe operating conditions. A continuing detailed inspection on this line will be essential until the proposed major work programme has been
completed.
On November 7 the Blueberry River bridge on the Fort Nelson extension was
taken out of service when a portion of the south approach fill slipped, causing the
abutment and two tower pedestals to move. The south three spans had to be rebuilt,
with the over-all structure being extended to the south with 135 feet of trestle approach. Adverse weather hampered reconstruction activities; however, it is proposed to be open for service before the end of January 1973. Fills at other major
structures along the route have been carefully checked in the interim to try to detect
any potentially similar circumstances.
Minor track revisions, including the installation of spur trackage and some
industrial road crossings, were undertaken during the year to accommodate the
demand for service from industrial customers along the railway.
In the public interest, and for the better enjoyment of properties adjacent to the
railway, 10 grade-level public crossings and 10 grade-level private access crossings
were installed on the railway.
Due to the increased volume of heavy industrial and commercial traffic, automatic signal protection was ordered to be installed at the intersection of the railway
and the public highway at Fort St. James and also at the crossing of the Willow-Cale
forest road near Prince George. Previously approved installations of automatic
signals were completed and placde in operation at seven other locations on the railway during the year.
 AA 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table I—Maintenance of Way, 1972
NEW RAIL PROGRAMME
Subdivision
Weight
(Lb.)
Mile to Mile
Total
(Track-miles)
115
100
115
115
100
99.3-106.1
123.3-155.6
159.3-164.0
190.3-194.8
607.5-675.7
704.4-719.0
6.8
32.3
4.7
Lillooet 	
Chetwynd	
4.5
68.2
Fort St. John      	
14.6
Total	
  131.1
RELAY RAIL PROGRAMME
Dawson Creek	
85
1.6- 10.5
16.9- 22.6
56.8- 59.8
8.9
5.7
3.0
Total   	
._     17.6
Total track-miles
148.7
Table II—Cross-tie Renewals
(Production Gangs 302, 303, 304)
Subdivision
Out of Face,
Mile to Mile
Total
(Miles)
Number of
Ties Installed
11.0- 18.9
19.0- 20.6
23.5- 29.5
51.0- 52.8
164.0-193.9
260.7-373.2
487.0-523.6
535.9-553.6
557.5-639.0
660.7-683.1
7.9
1.6
6.0
1.8
29.9
112.5
36.6
17.7
81.5
22.4
2,119
Squamish  	
287
933
1,951
8,362
68,5211
28,299
11,283
66,988
Fort St. John _	
10,602
317.9
199,345
System tie renewals, maintenance gangs, and section forces	
	
83,500
Total  	
282,845
	
i Includes additional ties account respacing.
Table III—Ballast Programme
Subdivision
Out of Face,
Mile to Mile
Total
(Miles)
Ballast
(Cu. Yds.)
299.0-373.2
51.0- 52.8
74.2
1.8
177,000
5,200
76.0
182,200
 department of commercial transport, 1972 aa 21
British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Railway
In October an inspection was made by rail car of the rail facilities in the New
Westminster and Fraser Valley districts.
Several of the automatic crossing signals were tested and these were found to
be in good condition, giving sufficient protection to road traffic at railway crossings.
During the year, 2 miles of rail were replaced by heavier steel (85-pound to 115-
pound), 15,000 yards of new track ballast were placed, and 11,000 ties were replaced with treated ties. Weed and brush growth is kept well under control, giving
the railway a neat and tidy appearance over its entire length.
The locomotive and car shops were inspected and found in good order. This
reflects on the condition of the locomotives, all of which were inspected and found
in good condition. Two new 2,000-horsepower diesel units arrived late in the year,
bringing the number of motive power units to 18.
Further inspections were made of the road and railway crossings in the District
of Surrey. Of these 27 crossings, eight are protected by automatic signals, the remainder have the standard advance-warning signs and railway-crossing signs, and
two of the latter also have stop signs for road traffic. With ever-increasing road
traffic and industrial growth in this area, repeated inspections must be made to
ensure that the motoring public is adequately protected at all railway-highway crossings.
Due to the increased industrial growth adjacent to its right-of-way, the British
Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Railway is now moving more traffic than
ever. With the sound-preventive maintenance programme employed by this railway, it should continue to serve competently the ever-growing needs of people and
industry in the Fraser Valley.
British Columbia Harbours Board Railway
As in past years, an inspection was made of the railway to Roberts Bank. The
inspection this year covered the railway in general, as well as all road and railway
crossings. All automatic signals were tested and found in good working-order,
giving adequate warning to road traffic crossing the railway. Several unsignalized
crossings were given particular attention, with reference to visibility and safety for
road traffic. The railway is well maintained and gives Roberts Bank Superport the
rail connection required for its type of operation.
Canadian Forest Products Railway
In March an inspection was made of this railway's facilities and equipment by
rail speeder between Woss Camp and Beaver Cove and between Woss Camp and the
Sutton railhead. The inspection covered the main line, siding, shop tracks, yards,
and railhead sidings for a total of approximately 112 miles of rail, and all rail
cars and locomotives. As noted in past inspections, track and bridge maintenance
continues at a high standard.
In conjunction with proposed highway construction in the Nimpkish Lake
region, plans are presently being drawn up for the relocation of short sections of
this railway. There are also plans for the construction of railway overpasses of
the proposed highway.
Crown Zellerbach Logging Railway
In September an annual inspection was made of the Crown Zellerbach railway from Ladysmith to Nanaimo Lake.    Twenty-two miles of main-line track
 AA 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
were inspected by rail car. Generally, the track was found to be in good condition
and well maintained. Worn-out lighter steel rails are being replaced by 85-pound
rails. In a few years, upgrading of the whole line to heavier steel will be completed.
The track-maintenance programme includes the installation of 1,200 new ties, 75
per cent of which will be yellow cedar.
Plant Trackages
Locomotives and plant trackages were inspected on the MacMillan Bloedel
complex at Harmac in Nanaimo, at Port Alberni, and also at their Powell River
location.
On the Crown Zellerbach, Elk Falls Company railway, an inspection was
made of the Shay Locomotive No. 1, a unit of historical significance, which is one
of the few remaining operational steam locomotives in British Columbia. The
inspection at Elk Falls also included the one diesel locomotive and the trackage.
Recommendations were made with reference to the above railways, though
generally maintenance in all instances was found to be satisfactory.
Waterfront Switching
During 1972, inspections were made of railway trackage pertaining to Vancouver Wharves, Neptune Terminals, Hooker Chemicals, and Surrey Fraser Docks
(all in the Lower Mainland), and at the F.M.C. Plant in Squamish. During the
inspections, diesel locomotives and trackmobiles were inspected and air reservoir
hydrostatic tests were witnessed. Also many company trainees were examined as
to their ability to handle railroad equipment.
Examinations
During the year 1972, railway-operating examinations were held at various
centres.    Those passing the examinations were issued certificates for the appropriate category.
The following number of certificates were issued:
Trackmobile operators 41 Steam engineer     1
Switchmen  18 Power-car operators _    7
Diesel-electric engine- Motormen     6
men     5 Dispatchers      2
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1972
AA 23
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 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1972
AA 25
AERIAL TRAMWAYS
The total number of ski-ing facilities in the Province of British Columbia
still continues to increase, as is evidenced by the additions of all types of lifts, both
in established areas and in new areas. In the space of roughly 15 years, the industry has expanded to a point where there are now over 100 areas providing every
type of aerial rope transportation, from a simple rope-tow installation to reversible
aerial tramways with cars capable of transporting 50 or more skiers and their
equipment up to a mountain top in a matter of minutes. In all, there are ski-lifts
serving the public from Fort St. John in the north to Fernie in the south and from
within the Rocky Mountains next to the British Columbia-Alberta boundary to
the mountain ranges of Vancouver Island.
Five new chair-lifts have been constructed and tested for the 1972/73 ski
season. Of these, two were installed at Whistler Mountain for Garibaldi Lifts
Ltd. These are of local manufacture and design and will greatly increase the
capacity to transport skiers to the slopes. Heretofore, the only means of access was
by way of the gondola lift to the mid-station and then via the chair-lift to the top
of the mountain. This system was working to capacity at times, with line-ups
formed at the top and bottom of the mountain. The two additional chair-lifts
will help to alleviate this problem and at the same time open up more area for
ski-ing.
The old Cut Chairlift on Grouse Mountain was dismantled in 1972 and subsequently purchased for location at Mount Mackenzie near Revelstoke. Although
it was too late to complete the transfer and erection of this lift for the coming winter,
it is being reworked to comply with the Canadian Standards Association Code Z98
for design and operational safety. It is fully expected that construction and testing will be finished well ahead of next winter, making this chair-lift a first for the
Revelstoke area.
Grouse Mountain Resorts Ltd. replaced the former chair-lift with another
of European design, which was tested and approved shortly before Christmas
1972. In 1970 a double T-bar was constructed parallel to and in the immediate
area of this chair-lift. This surface lift was designed with towers capable of handling two complete T-bar arrangements; however, only one T-bar was installed at
that time. During 1972 the second T-bar was added. Since this was of a different
manufacture from the first, engineering assurance was required from both manufacturers that the two lifts would be compatible, running as they were side by side.
Again this combination of lifts was successfully tested and approved during the
latter part of December.
Grandview Ski Acres in the Kamloops district, located approximately 7 miles
to the south of the city, as an added inducement to skiers, added a double chair-
lift to complement the existing T-bar and rope-tows at this site.
At Mount Becher near Courtenay on Vancouver Island, previously serviced
only by rope-tows and T-bars, a new chair-lift has been added. Due to an extremely
wet spring, construction was considerably behind schedule; however, it again was
successfully tested in time for the holiday season.
Cranbrook Ski Developments Ltd. ordered a T-bar, which was delayed during construction due to the late delivery of some critical components. However,
an inspector was flown to Cranbrook immediately prior to Christmas to complete
the inspection and testing and it was put intd service for the New Year week-end.
As was the case at other operations, a few minor items required attention on the
final inspection and, therefore, a follow-up inspection will be conducted once the
ski-lift has been in operation for a short time.
 AA 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The inspection capability of the Department has been greatly enhanced by
the addition of a full-time aerial-tramway inspector. For the first time, a great
number of chair-lifts and T-bars were subjected to a summer inspection, with interesting results. One of the main items checked was the condition of tower footings. In many cases, footings had been scoured by spring run-off and the operators were directed to have this condition corrected. Other conditions noted were
lack of wire-rope lubrication and loading on tower sheaves not relieved during the
off season. These extra inspections were very well received by the industry, with
most operators expressing their appreciation of the efforts of our inspectors.
On new lift construction, more time was spent ensuring that the requirements
of the aerial-tramway code were being adhered to, particularly where the safety
of any ski-lift could be endangered. Final approval of new lifts is now only granted
after the submission of design summaries, wire-rope test certificates, concrete test
certificates, etc., is complete.
Increased emphasis was placed on the importance of proper concrete control
during the pouring of station footings. In this regard the Department has required
that a field-cured concrete cylinder be obtained and tested for each foundation
poured. This will help to assure that the foundations are structurally sound and
durable.
Test certificates for all new wire-rope installations have been more closely
examined and some reports have been rejected for simply supplying general information rather than actual test data. Increased use of equipment for detecting
defects in wire ropes by the use of magnetic induction nondestructive testing techniques has been employed by quite a number of area operators. The regular use
of this equipment on an annual basis will be of great assistance in determining the
lift of a wire rope when the results are analysed in conjunction with tension test
results (destructive testing). The latter tests are carried out on a section of the
original cable when it is foreshortened. This latter process is necessary from time
to time, as the cable stretches during use.
The submission of design summaries, together with detailed drawings of all
lift components, is required before the advent of construction. The requirement
has not been met in some cases and has proven to be a disadvantage to the Department in performing its inspection duties. It is important that the Department
monitor new installations during the construction period, particularly with reference
to such items as the foundations. For this reason the Department will require
more advance notice of future installations in order that the design summaries and
drawings may be reviewed prior to the actual start of construction.
The provision by the equipment supplier of an operating and maintenance
manual, sufficiently prior to the performance tests to facilitate its review by our
staff, is a necessary prerequisite to actual system operation. This manual has to
be complete in all aspects of system maintenance and must include information
pertinent to the life expectancy of items such as cable clamps, ropes, bearings,
brake bands, etc. The manual should also recommend nondestructive or destructive testing techniques, pertinent to those items having a limited life expectancy.
As well as including a complete explanation of the operation and maintenance of
all mechanical mechanisms of the systems, complete explanatory details and
sketches of electrical and hydraulic circuits must be included.
With reference to the first full inspection and testing of an aerial tramway,
be it a small T-bar or large reversible-type unit, a complete test procedure must
be submitted by the manufacturer well in advance of completion of construction
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1972 AA 27
in order that it may be fully evaluated. Before any actual running tests are witnessed by Department inspectors, the area operator must indicate that the lift has
been test-run for a full day under simulated full-load and no-load conditions and
that all brakes, electrical circuits, communication systems, etc., are in working-
order before our inspectors are dispatched to the area.
Taking a new chair-lift installation as an example, the following inspection
procedure has been adopted and has proven satisfactory:
1. A minimum of two inspectors is scheduled to witness a test, and these
inspectors will familiarize themselves with system details and any unusual features of
that particular chair-lift (as may be outlined in the maintenance and operating
manual) before proceeding to the area. When they are fully conversant with the
operation as well as with the testing programme, they will perform a full day's preliminary inspection of the lift before any operational checks are performed. This
would include inspection of the structural and mechanical components, including
towers, balancers, derailment switches, drive and return stations, counterweights,
winches, controls, etc.
2. On the day of the performance tests, the inspection group includes a manufacturer's representative, the area operator or his representative, a certified lift
operator, and the Department inspectors.
3. After receiving advice from the senior inspector on the site that all tests have
been successsfully completed, the Chief Inspecting Engineer may grant interim permission to operate the tested system. On the following day the inspectors carry out
a running recheck of all aspects of the lift operation. The senior inspector then
compiles a written report on the inspection, noting any aspects that are to be given
attention pending final certification. When all requirements have been met, an operating certificate may be granted for a period of one year. A certificate for a lesser
period could be issued should unusual operating conditions exist.
It is required by our regulations that lift attendants be properly trained and
pass a written examination on their knowledge of the system operating rules and the
proper guidance of the public. When the foregoing has been complied with, the
Department registers the attendants and issues them with an identification card. It
is felt that this procedure is desirable as the operator is made more aware of his
responsibility and of the fact that his job includes the operation of a sometimes quite
sophisticated piece of equipment.
We consider that the safety record of the industry over the past several years
has been an enviable one, which is largely due to the fact that the areas are managed
by first-class operators, but which is also due in no small measure to the effectiveness
of our inspection staff.
There was no increase in the number of industrial aerial tramways during the
year, but those on the current list were subjected to inspections which resulted in the
discovery of several faults overlooked on the company monthly inspection reports.
On one industrial tramway, an accident resulted in the injury of two construction
personnel.
Monthly inspection forms are submitted to the Department for all lifts by the
operating companies. These are analysed each month and kept on file so that an
inspector can update himself on the condition of any lift on record. The receipt of
these forms on a regular basis can sometimes indicate a trend to a faulty condition
on a particular lift which, if noted, can then be alleviated before it turns into a dangerous condition.
 AA 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
It is expected that several chair-lifts in the Province will have to be retested
early in 1973 because of extensive modifications or increases in their capacity.
The following is a list of the aerial tramways currently in operation in the
Province of British Columbia for the year 1972:
Aerial Tramways
No.                        Name of Company
Location
as
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1. Grouse Mountain Resorts Ltd	
North Vancouver
i
i
i
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1
1
11
4
2
5
1
2
n
2
i
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
3
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
3
1
2
11
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
3
1
3. Mount Seymour Caterers Ltd 	
4. Garibaldi Lifts Ltd 	
Mount Seymour Park..
Garibaldi	
6
1
1
6. Mount Becher Ski Development Society	
Courtenay.	
3
3
Dawson Creek	
1
11. Wells Ski Club   	
Wells	
1
12. British Columbia Telephone Co	
13. Canadian National Telecommunications
Hope	
Hope	
Kamloops	
1
2
18. Silver Star Sports Ltd _	
19. Big White Ski Development Ltd	
Vernon	
1
20. Panorama Ski-Hill Co. Ltd.	
Invermere	
1
2
22. Amber Ski Club   	
2
23. Apex Alpine	
Penticton	
1
1
26. Kimberley Ski Club	
Kimberley	
Fernie—	
2
27. Fernie Snow Valley Ski Ltd...	
28. Silver King Ski Club  	
1
1
29. Salmo Ski Club	
30. Red Mountain Ski Club Society	
Rossland	
2
32. Shuswap Ski Club   	
2
33. Kamloops Ski Club	
Kamloops	
Nakusp 	
Smithers	
Prince Rupert 	
2
34. Nakusp Ski Club	
1
35. Smithers Ski Club 	
2
3
37. Bornite Ski Club    	
2
38. Corporation of the District of Kitimat	
Kitimat 	
1
3
40. Blue River Ski Club	
1
3
42. Little Squaw Valley Resorts Ltd.
2
2
2
45. Nicola Valley Ski Club     	
1
46. Century Estate Ltd    .
47. Fort St. John Ski Club	
Fort St. John  	
48. 100 Mile House Ski Club	
100 Mile House.	
1
51. Chetwynd Ski Tow	
Chetwynd	
Sicamous	
Fruitvale	
1
2
53. Beaver Valley Ski Club	
1
1
3
56. McBride Bell Ski Resort	
57. Clearwater Ski Club	
McBride -
Clearwater .,
Golden	
Port Coquitlam	
1
1
58. Golden Skiers	
1
3
60. Mount Diadem Ski Club	
2
61. British Columbia Telephone Co.	
Zymoetz River	
1
64. Mount Garibaldi Glacier Resorts Ltd	
65. Fort Fraser Ski Club 	
Squamish	
Endako —	
1
Salmo 	
Squamish	
68. Squamish Stawamus River Intake	
....
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1972
AA 29
Aerial Tramways—Continued
No.                        Name of Company
Location
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69. Azu Lift Co. Ltd	
-
1
1
12
-
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
—
1
70. Winter Sports Club of Stewart...	
Fairmont Hot Springs
1
76. McDame Mountain Ski Club	
77. Municipality of Mackenize 	
Cassiar	
Mackenzie 	
1
2
2
Boston Bar, Fraser
2
Vernon	
Princeton 	
1
82. Snowpatch Developments Ltd	
83. Granduc Ski Club	
2
1
84. Blewett Ski Club  	
1
Shalalth    	
1
3
87. Pemberton Lions Club Ski-tow	
88. Sky-Glider Recreations Ltd	
Pemberton	
Vancouver	
Kemano	
1
89. Kemano Ski Club	
90  Troll Resort
2
91. Skyline Resort Ltd.	
92. Overlander Recreations Ltd.	
93. Northern Heights Ski Hill...	
94   Hart Highlands Winter Club	
Courtenay	
Armstrong _.	
Terrace..	
1
1
2
1
Barriere  -	
North Vancouver	
1
1
99. Britannia Ski Club	
1
100. Department of Recreation and Conservation .
101. Canadian Ski Assn. (Summer Ski School)  ...
102. Jos. Konst   -	
103. Mount Ida Ski Resort	
Cheakamus River.	
Whistler Mountain
Smithers	
4
1
2
Cranbrook	
Elkford 	
105. Elkford Ski Club..	
106. Department of Recreation and Conservation..
2
Totals.—	
6
5
2
29
51
5
121
i Under construction.
2 Manually operated.
Note—Missing area numbers on left-hand side of page indicate that these areas have been abandoned.
 AA 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
"Blue Chair" Lift, Whistler Mountain.
PIPE-LINES
Our Department's coverage of pipe-lines includes both new and old installations
involving oil, gas, liquefied petroleum, and high-pressure water-injection lines.
Extensive interconnected systems of such pipe-lines are located in the producing
areas of northeastern British Columbia, while others are rapidly expanding distribution systems centred in the principal market region of southwestern British Columbia.
Unfortunately, in the early stages of market development, some consumers
require the transmission of fuel over great distances to serve markets that are relatively small. Such is the case for the Pacific Northern Gas Limited's transmission
system serving Prince Rupert. However, the future economic prospects of such
areas are obviously sufficient to justify the installation risk involved.
Many new pipe-line installations were inspected this year during the construction phase. These inspections were later followed by Department personnel witnessing the endurance and leak tests at the completion of pipe-line construction. Most
of these lines were extensions of existing systems and were short in length, as
depicted in Tables I and II. As a result of a 1972 amendment to the Pipe-lines Act,
water-injection pipe-lines are also now subjected to inspection where operating pressures in excess of 500 p.s.i. are prescribed.
Much of the work referred to involved pipe-lines in the Peace River region of
the Province. However, the extension of transmission pipe-lines in the Lower
Mainland, primarily by British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority natural gas
transmission systems, received particular attention because these installations pass
through areas of relatively dense population (including Class 3 and Class 4 locations).
Some existing pipe-lines were investigated for corrosion status, and leakage and
upgrading work was performed on others. Where leaks were involved, the offending
systems were repaired and retested in full compliance with code requirements.   An
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1972
AA 31
8-mile section of the Boundary Lake-Taylor liquefied petroleum pipe-line was leak-
tested by the bar-hole method. The Shawest Petroleums Ltd. Sunrise Field surface
line of 3,7000 feet, originally installed as a temporary line for the purpose of test-
flow purposes, was upgraded, buried, and pressure-tested.
Several pipe-line projects under construction were monitored by our inspector
located in the Peace River area. These include installations by Pacific Petroleums
Ltd., BP Oil and Gas Operations Ltd., and Anadarko Production Company. The
latter company is installing a line in the East Buick Creek area involving the laying
of 3,000 feet of 3V2-inch-diameter X-42 pipe to transmit natural gas at a pressure
of 1,000 p.s.i.
Many compressor and pumping stations, again primarily in the Peace River
area, were inspected. This involved a total of 64 inspections, which covered installations owned by Amoco Canada Petroleum Company Limited, Trans-Prairie
Pipelines Ltd., Shawest Petroleums Ltd., Pacific Petroleums Ltd., BP Oil and Gas
Operations Ltd., Anadarko Production Company, Blueberry-Taylor Pipeline, Canadian Superior Oil Ltd., Creole Compression Corporation, Imperial Oil Limited,
Monsanto Oils Ltd., Skelly Oil of Canada Ltd., Sun Oil Company, Tenneco Oil &
Minerals Ltd., Texaco Exploration Canada Ltd., Union Oil Company of Canada
Limited, Westcoast Transmission Company Limited, and Westcoast Petroleum Ltd.
Some battery pump installations were also inspected.
As a result of 1972 amendments to the Pipe-lines Act, programmes have been
established on a co-operative basis to control oil spills as effectively as present techniques allow. In the Peace River region, the Northeast British Columbia Petroleum
Industry Environmental Control Co-operative was organized early in the year and
equipment purchased for immediate dispatch to any area within the boundaries of
the co-operative. The oil-producing fields were mapped into three areas, each containing control points strategically located to contain and salvage any oil leak. Oil
companies may call upon the co-operative at any time for help in the event of a
major oil spill. Other companies are presently involved in establishing programmes
for the early determination of the occurrence of spills and for effectively confining
such spills. During the year, special attention was given to the instrumentation
systems and procedures for detecting pipe-line oil leaks in gathering lines with a
view to obtaining improvements wherever possible.
During the year, there were three pipe-line breaks which allowed oil to escape.
Two were in gathering systems in the Peejay and Milligan Creek areas and the third
was in the main 12-inch line carrying crude oil from Taylor to Kamloops. In all
cases, the areas were cleaned up promptly and effectively. In the case of the 12-inch
main line, the break occurred at a point about 34 miles north of Prince George and
was detected immediately by the pressure-monitoring equipment at the control
centre in Prince George. The operator at the control centre has full control of the
complete system so was able to shut down the line within 15 minutes. The leak was
located and isolated within two hours and other personnel arrived soon after for
repair and clean-up activities.
One hundred and ten pressure vessels operating in the Fort St. John area have
been checked and registered. A few pressure vessels found to be unused and unprotected against corrosion have been placed under investigation. Several pressure
vessels that have undergone modifications or repairs under the auspices of the Boiler
and Pressure Vessel Branch of the Department of Public Works were inspected
during repair and testing. This included the modification of separators by Arkon
Wireline Ltd. and Pacific Petroleums Ltd. and the repair of a dehydrator and two
desiccators by Texaco Exploration Canada Ltd. and Westcoast Transmission Com-
 AA 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
pany Limited respectively.   A system to record the ultrasonic survey results of
pressure vessels was initiated.
As is obvious from the above, a significant portion of the Department's work
involving pipe-lines was concentrated in the Peace River region. The prime coverage
of this area has been undertaken by a recent addition to our staff now located at
Fort St. John.
During the year a programme of recording the actual location of oil and gas
pipe-lines within designated field areas throughout the Peace River area of the
Province of Brisiht Columbia has been instituted in the headquarters office of the
Department at Victoria. Other special plans are under way which are devised to
monitor existing installations, some of which are remote from the Vancouver office.
One such programme was undertaken this last year when a Department of Commercial Transport inspector accompanied Pacific Northern Gas Ltd. personnel during
the aerial survey of the Terrace to Prince Rupert section of their gas pipe-line system.
This programme also included the inspection of some regulating stations and standby
installations, such as the air-propane mix plant at Prince Rupert, all pertinent to the
Pacific Northern Gas Ltd. service area.
Table I—Miles of Pipe-line Completed in 1972
Company
Size of Pipe in Inches
Under
2
2
3
4
6
8
12
0.600
0.001
0.77
0.01
0.83
1.46
0.40
0.05
0.88
1.80
2.71
0.85
1.58
2.00
2.37
4.90
5.60
4.01
0.50
1.48
0.95
1.69
2.80
2.67
0.05
Totals	
0.601
3.07
3.13
7.14
18.86
5.44
2.72
Total, 50.961 miles.
Table II—Miles of Pipe-line Uncompleted at End of 1972
„
Company
Size of Pipe in Inches
Under
2
2
3
4
6
8
0.06
0.09
2.10
1.30
3.60
0.70
6.70
0.15
0.70
1.50
3.60
2.20
2.80
0.60
0.60
2.50
2.10
2.60
7.90
5.90
Inland Natural Gas Co. Ltd	
3.40
Tenneco Oil & Minerals Ltd	
Trans-Prairie Pipelines Ltd ~	
Woods Petroleum of Canada Ltd           	
Totals
0.06
7.79
14.85
11.20
13.80
Total, 51.10 miles.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1972
AA 33
 AA 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
INDUSTRIAL TRANSPORTATION
In the administration of the Industrial Transportation Act, 431 vehicles were
inspected relative to the condition of the air-brake systems and all other items affecting safe operation. The vehicles inspected were mostly logging-trucks, but included
crew buses and gravel-trucks. Results of these inspections showed that in general
the vehicles operating on industrial roads were in good condition and most of them
were quite new. Information received from contract log-haulers and the companies
involved indicates that, due to the highly competitive nature of these operations,
vehicles and equipment must be in good condition in order for all concerned to
remain competitive.
In 1972 the northern half of Vancouver Island was the focal point of the truck-
inspection programme. Because of limited staff, this area had been passed over for
several years and it was felt likely that conditions had deteriorated over this period.
The supposition was not supported as our inspectors found only a few vehicles defective. The logging companies had obviously kept up their preventive-maintenance
programme which they had instigated with the assistance of the Department in early
1960. Along with many other inspections, this programme involves a complete
inspection of the braking systems by checking and recording a specified section of
the braking system at each servicing of a vehicle so that, after a certain number of
operating hours, the whole braking set-up has been tested. This systematic checking
has proved to be a factor in lowering maintenance costs as well as maintaining the
safety of the vehicle.
In the matter of meeting the requirements of the Industrial Transportation Act,
most vehicles are now properly equipped at the factory level, whereas in the past it
had been found that some dealers, mostly in outlying smaller centres, were selling
vehicles not equipped to comply with the regulations. These problems have largely
been resolved by inspectors of the Department contacting the dealers when in the
area and explaining the requirements and instructing them on the proper installation
of air-brake systems. Further, operators of vehicles on industrial roads are now
more familiar with the air-brake systems required and will, therefore, not purchase
vehicles unless properly equipped. The continuing programme of air-brake lectures
and instructions by the Department has played an important part in upgrading the
operator's knowledge of braking systems and functions.
Considering terrain and size of loads being hauled, it is almost inevitable that
accidents will occur, and in 1972 a total of 11 accidents was reported to the Department; however, no fatal truck accidents were reported this year.
In the past year the Department has spent considerable time in the development
of two new air schedules known as Schedule L and Schedule T. Schedule L is an
alternative to the existing Schedule B, and Schedule T an alternative to Schedule D.
The purpose of the new schedules is to simplify the air-brake systems without sacrificing safety.
Mention must be made at this point in regard to the assistance and co-operation
rendered by Hayes Manufacturing Co. Ltd. and MacMillan Bloedel Ltd. in developing these two new schedules. Hayes Manufacturing volunteered to install the new
braking arrangement on one of the Model HDX log trucks and MacMillan Bloedel,
Sproat Lake Division, agreed to have it installed on a truck which was to have been
equipped to the old schedule.
As anticipated, the new Schedule L in practice performed extremely well and
driver reaction was very favourable. The brake response proved as fast or faster
than any other system currently employed by vehicles operating on highways or
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1972
AA 35
 AA 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
::© ni^Qi
'
,:;
!,S >•   -o    3 " s Sg
11'5 S lis III * IS^
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1972
AA 37
logging-roads. The local truck manufacturers have indicated that the new schedules
are preferable because of simplicity and also because the one air-brake system can
be installed for both industrial roads and highway use.
In 1971 the Department spent a considerable amount of time giving air-brake
lectures to a great number of highway drivers who required air endorsements because
of a change in the driver-licence requirements under the Motor-vehicle Act. In
1972 the assistance given by this Department has largely helped to increase the
number of instructors available to teach air brakes and also to standardize the
teaching methods and subject-matter. The foregoing contribution is based on the
Department's experience and successful approach to the subject over the years. The
Department also had several sessions with the Department of Highways, who have
started their own driver-training programme. This programme, wherever possible,
will allow people outside the Highways Department to attend courses, particularly in
isolated areas.
As well as the above training activities, air-brake lectures were also held for
several groups of men from the Workmen's Compensation Board, as the information
would be of considerable value in making their own inspections.
At the request of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, a three-day course of
lectures was held in Victoria in April. These courses are intended for officers who
have been assigned to traffic details and who have had no previous experience with
trucks or air brakes. As a result, a greater number of truck inspections is carried
out throughout the Province, likely resulting in fewer unsafe trucks on the highway.
Also at the request of the RCMP, seven highway trucks involved in accidents (some
fatal) were inspected by the Department using the mobile testing equipment with
which two of the Department vehicles are equipped.
Although most of the inspections are carried out in the field, many vehicles are
inspected at the manufacturer and dealer level. This also involves going over many
air-brake drawings submitted for approval. Frequent meetings were held with
manufacturer engineers from all over North America to discuss the acceptance of
various vehicles and components for use on industrial roads in British Columbia.
The construction of industrial roads by logging companies throughout the
Province has benefited the general public by making available to hikers, fishermen,
and hunters the use of these roads during week-ends and nonworking hours. In
some cases, industrial roads have provided an integral link between isolated towns
or villages and public highways. Such a situation exists in the northwest section of
British Columbia where access is provided to the town of Stewart from either Terrace or Hazelton through a combined private and public road system. With the
completion of the Forest Service bridge over the Nass River last summer, the final
gap between these communities was closed and road traffic to and from Stewart
commenced.
During 1972 a total of 1,438 new logging-trucks was recorded as being manufactured for service on industrial roads. Not included in this total are units classed
as mobile equipment, such as portable spars, loaders, etc. These are appearing on
the logging scene in ever-increasing numbers and are inspected along with other
vehicles when an inspector is in the area.
The accident rate appears somewhat higher for 1972 and, from reports received, some logging-truck drivers may have received too little initial training. A
programme of investigation is being instituted with the object of reducing the accident frequency in 1973. If the growth trend continues, as indicated by the new
trucks supplied in 1972, then 1973 will be another busy year for the Department in
this field of inspection.
 AA 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Air-brake Lectures and Examinations Conducted During 1972
Lectures held	
Lecture attendance	
Truck operators certified	
Vocational School (air-brake examinations)
RCMP (air-brake examinations)	
15
478
1,294
456
66
Additional Lectures and Examinations Held for Other Agencies
Workmen's Compensation Board
Haney Correctional Institute	
Lake Cowichan School District	
No.
Attendance
6
78
2
50
1
57
Industrial Road Accidents Reported During 1972
Logging-truck
Crew cars	
Loaders 	
Gravel trucks
6
1
3
1
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1972 AA 39
PERSONNEL
A. Shaw, C.A.M., Administrative Officer
During the year, staff changes were recorded in all branches of the Department.
In the Weigh Scale Branch, Frank Huber elected to take an early retirement
due to ill health. Mr. Huber was with the Branch for approximately 10 years. He
was the supervising weighmaster of the Port Mann (East) weigh-scale.
Two weighmasters reached the compulsory retirement age during the year.
Eric R. McNabb was employed at the weigh-scale at Tupper Creek for a period of
13 years. William Archibald transferred to the Weigh Scale Branch in June 1959
after serving approximately 20 years in the Motor-vehicle Branch in Vancouver. He
was the supervising weighmaster at the Port Mann (West) weigh-scale.
Vacancies which occurred at various weigh-scales throughout the Province
were filled through an open competition system. In this regard, interviews were
held in Prince George, Golden, Tete Jaune Cache, Dawson Creek, Chilliwack, Pat-
tullo Bridge, and Kamloops. A total of 183 applications was received, and from
this number 58 were called for personal interviews.
Due to the promotion of A. W. Turnbull, P.Eng., to the position of Chief Inspecting Engineer, a vacancy occurred at the Engineer 4 level in the Engineering
Branch. During the year, from a group of eight applicants with a wide range of
experience, a suitable candidate was selected.
In order to improve the availability and extent of the inspection services, three
new positions at the initial inspector level were added to the staff of the Engineering
Branch. One inspector is now located in the Fort St. John district to provide a more
direct liaison within the main oil and natural gas development area in northeastern
British Columbia. The other two inspectors are located in the head office of the
Engineering Branch in Burnaby. They are principally used in the aerial tramway
and industrial transportation fields. Although the new inspectors are initially concentrating their services in the field of engineering related to their personal background knowledge and experience, they will be fully trained in the other aspects of
work within the jurisdiction of the Branch.
The reclassification study of the weighmaster group initiated in 1971 and reported in last year's annual report was brought to a satisfactory conclusion and resulted in the upgrading of all Weigh Scale Branch positions.
One employee of the Weigh Scale Branch, K. J. Good, Weighmaster 3 (Portable) for the southern Interior region, is currently enrolled in the Correspondence
Course in Public Administration conducted by the Training Division of the Civil
Service Commission.
The following statistics outline the activities in the area of staff changes during
1972:
Competitions held  20
Applications received  240
Interview panels   17
Personal interviews  83
Resignations   5
Retirements   3
New appointments  16
Promotions   5
Transfers within the Department  2
Voluntary demotions  2
 AA 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1973
480-373-2647

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