Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFIARS REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1971 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1972

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0375912.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0375912.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0375912-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0375912-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0375912-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0375912-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0375912-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0375912-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0375912-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0375912.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1971
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1972
  To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to transmit herewith the Annual Report of the Department
of Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31, 1971.
D. R. J. CAMPBELL
Minister of Municipal Affairs
Victoria, British Columbia, January 24, 1972.
 Victoria, British Columbia, January 21, 1972.
The Honourable D. R. J. Campbell,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir: I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31, 1971.
The format of the Annual Report of the Department remains the same as last
year at which time substantial changes were made following a reorganization of
the Departmental structure.
This Report contains the review of Departmental activities and observations
of the programmes and financial position of the municipalities and regional districts within the Province. Greater detail with respect to these areas is contained
in the publication Municipal Statistics which is published annually by the Department from information contained in audited financial and other statements of the
municipalities and regional districts.
J. D. BAIRD, F.C.I.S.
Deputy Minister
 CONTENTS
Page
Review of Departmental Activities     8
Legislation Changes  14
New Incorporations and Changes in Structure  15
Assessment and Tax Collection  17
Revenues and Expenditures  19
Reserves and Surpluses  19
Capital Programmes  20
Regional District Activities  24
Environmental Management  28
Housing, Land Assembly, and Urban Redevelopment  30
Tables and Charts  32
Departmental Publications  46
Acts Administered  46
 T 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
The Honourable D. R. J. Campbell,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
J. D. Baird, F.C.I.S., Deputy Minister and Inspector of Municipalities.
W. K. Smith, F.C.I.S., Assistant Deputy Minister and Deputy Inspector of
Municipalities.
C. H. L. Woodward, F.C.I.S., Programmes Co-ordinator.
G. E. Whelen, F.C.I.S., Research Officer.
Financial Management
J. H. Nuttall, Departmental Comptroller.
J. P. Taylor, Financial Analyst.
W. J. Larter, Administrative Officer.
Administrative Services
T. F. Moore, F.C.I.S., Administrative Officer.
A. R. Clarke, Administrative Officer.
Environmental Management
D. L. South, M.T.P.I.C., Chief Planning Officer.
W. J. Tassie, M.T.P.I.C, Senior Planning Officer.
B. S. Jawanda, M.T.P.I.C, Senior Planning Officer.
Housing and Urban Renewal
J. T. Williams, Administrative Officer.
 *a
(-i
o
St
5 8
C3
■P   ___
a
«•"'▼
K_)      C]
%    M
,*
*^j 5
O    cj
.**^
c ~
o a
«"**
3    C
U s
•5 *o
6 9
l*\
_9  ■**■
1*5
ci O
oo
CO
o
Ih
11 \
11    *
<*
CM
I*
'. \
>—1
<
ll   -
(I<
It  \
tu
1 I
<
II   \
c
<
1 1      N
1
1—1
taf Af art
ng Offio
inicians
U
r—1
p
»         1
—
tn
\
SI'S
5   SH
O r-
OS
<
[fa
(fa
<
.<°
a    8,
V\
ON
hJ
23
M        'o
\   i
H ~
3
3   -a
I      \
PARTMEN
ANUARY
Hi
y
Z
D
§
[fa
O
Deputy Minist
and
pector of Munici
iistant Deputy M
and
Inspector of Mu
1     '
.   . -
1    I
I   1
Q
w
H
8
<     5
o.
1 \
s:  ss      «■«
c     rs           U
*   2 *j o
o
z
2
a
anagem
Compti
Analys
:ive Offi
fc
\
■5  *« « 2
O
1
's  c a «
.5    u  fl_H
p—i
]
'
I
1
F inane
Departm
Fina
Admin
1
\
Sz.
\
<
\
t3
a
§     i_
\
Id
S5
3        c
C_            CD
\
\
9
o
s    s
£                 -1      C/l
e -8 > •§
E -3  o 3
\
■a
u
ralAd
Subsi
_calG
rSubs
irch
ation
\
\
■r*    o
.2?
n
1
1
1
\
*   rs
CJ
I
0 « ° o « «i
■a =3 i     ->
\
5»   £
*«
C
o
cutive an
Gra
ants in A
Horn
k       •-
S3    S3
H     S
n
w
u
u
>
C
ca
u
»   a
I
QJ            -.
•§    T3
■a
1       S
5    °
*           -_
X <
a
rt
«M         «*4
CJ
o    o
"C
U       O
u
c    a
G
3    3
 Report of the Department of Municipal Affairs, 1971
REVIEW OF DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES
The need to expand existing and to provide new services in municipalities and
regional districts has continued to be of major concern. Increases in population in
the municipalities and its relation to density have contributed substantially to the
demand for services such as sewer and water. The relative growth of population
within organized areas shown by the differences between the 1966 and 1971 census
would indicate that the trend will continue to make urgent the need for many local
services.
According to the preliminary figures available from the 1971 census, the population resident within municipalities was 1,761,818. This is an increase of 230,833
or 15.1 per cent in municipal population over the 1966 census. A part of the
increase may be attributed to new incorporations and extensions of area of existing
municipalities. The breakdown of population between the various classes of municipalities as compared with the 1966 figures is as follows:
Population Percentage Increase 196C
to 1971
1966
Census
Preliminary
1971
Census
Population
Increase
Percentage
Increase
Cities...	
771,729
646,541
56,561
56,154
850,758
793,000
58,647
59,413
79,029
146,459
2,086
3,259
10.2
22.6
3.7
Villages	
5.8
Totals.
1,530,985
1,761,818
230,833
15.1
Revenues available to municipal councils and regional boards for a variety of
purposes have increased dramatically over the past several years. For the period
under review, gross revenues of municipalities and regions were in excess of
$520,000,000, an increase of $60,000,000 over the previous year. There has
been a corresponding increase in the amounts held in reserve and surplus accounts
which at the end of 1970 amounted to approximately $150,000,000, an increase
of $10,000,000 over the previous year.
It will be noted in the other sections of this Report that borrowing by local
governments has shown a sharp increase in 1971. There are two primary causes
for this increase—first, municipalities and regions were discouraged from going to
the market for long-term financing because of high interest rates which prevailed
during 1970, but the rates eased somewhat toward the end of 1971, and temporary
bank loans were converted to long-term debenture issues. Second, there was the
impact of the two Federal-Provincial Loan Programmes introduced to alleviate
unemployment. One programme, the Federal-Provincial Special Development Loan
Programme, was introduced during late 1970 and provided low-interest loans to
municipalities. Under this programme 143 individual projects were undertaken
by 64 municipalities with a total expenditure of $39,613,762. The second programme, called the Federal-Provincial Employment Loans Programme, 1971, was
introduced in late 1971 and as well as providing low-interest rate loans to the
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1971 T 9
municipalities, also provides as an incentive, a forgiveness of 75 per cent of wages
paid for on-site labour incurred to May 31, 1972. Under this programme, 69
individual projects have been undertaken by 43 municipalities for a total expenditure of $20,962,575. Coupled with this is the Local Initiative Programme which
provides for a grant to local governments of $100 per man-week, up to May 31,
1972, on projects approved by the Provincial and Federal Governments. To date
132 project applications have been approved with a total expenditure of $6,789,546.
As conditions for term financing improved, the Municipal Finance Authority,
which was established under the Municipal Finance Authority of British Columbia
Act, enacted in 1970 to finance local sewer, water, and pollution-control projects,
entered the bond market and sold a debenture issue of $20,000,000 (Canadian
equivalent $20,204,664) in the United States and a debenture issue of $1,258,701
in Canada; the funds were distributed to the participating regional districts and
member municipalities. To complete documentation, 47 municipal and 26 regional
district by-laws were approved and adopted, and 94 municipal agreements and 52
regional district agreements were executed and certified. A further issue involving
$7,500,000 is now under consideration. To assist the Authority in the provision
of material to support the debenture issues on the market, financial and other
statistical information has been prepared by the Department. Assistance has also
been given in the preparation of draft by-laws.
On September 7, 1971, Premier W. A. C. Bennett announced the British
Columbia Job Opportunities Programme with the Honourable Dan Campbell as
Chairman of the responsible committee. Under this programme, the Government
of British Columbia pays 50 per cent of the gross wages or salary for each new job
created for a person who has been a resident of British Columbia for 12 months
and who has been on Provincial social assistance for the past three months or more.
Each social assistance recipient who registers for the programme is issued a Certificate of Opportunity which qualifies the holder for employment under the
programme. The period of employment must be for eight weeks. Claims for reimbursement of wages or salary and fringe benefits are paid by the Government
on a monthly basis. This programme will be in effect from November 1, 1971, to
April 30, 1972, and is administered by this Department.
Response to the announcement and the initial publicity through the news media
was immediate and encouraging. Approximately 2,205 applications were received
prior to the designated commencement date and the corresponding number of certificates were issued. By the end of the year, 7,215 applications had been received,
registered, and certificates were issued. District offices of the Department of
Rehabilitation and Social Improvement co-operated fully in the programme by
approving and forwarding applications, providing information to applicants, and
referring applicants to prospective employers. It is estimated that over 450 welfare
recipients were able to locate gainful employment during the period up to December 31, 1971, through this programme.
The Department conducts the administration of this programme under the
general supervision of the committee. Statistical and factual records are maintained
from information indicated on the application forms. A heavy flow of correspondence has developed with both applicants and interested employers. This
includes providing general information concerning the programme and providing
specific answers to personal inquiries. From the information available, certificate
holders are referred to possible employers with appropriate job opportunities.
Claim forms for reimbursement under the programme are distributed to participating employers. When completed and returned, these claims are audited, recorded, approved, and submitted for payment.
 T 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Following the proclamation of the Provincial Subdivision Regulations in 1970,
the Department has prepared, with the advice and assistance of the interdepartmental subdivision committee a brochure to explain subdivision processing and
the complications which may arise in subdividing. This brochure is intended for
the use of the general public in nonmunicipal territory. At the same time a check
list has been prepared to be sent to each subdivider seeking approval from Approving Officers of the Department of Highways. This check list explains what further
steps the subdivider will have to undertake or what conditions he will have to meet
before his proposal is considered for approval under the Land Registry Act.
Under the sponsorship of the Department, a working committee was formed
to examine the implications of an amendment to the Municipal Act to recommend
a building code suitable for use throughout the Province and to prepare appropriate
regulations. The committee is composed of representatives of organizations, associations, and departments of government directly concerned with the design,
approval, development, and inspection of buildings and services.
The principle of standardization of building codes has been accepted readily
by the majority of municipalities, which have been using the National Building
Code, in whole or in part.
The fundamental purpose of a building code is to protect persons and their
health and property by ensuring proper standards and specifications in building.
Uniformity in building codes could improve the productivity of the construction
industry by facilitating introduction of new materials and systems and by making
the erection of new buildings more efficient and less costly.
Attendance at Committee, Council, and Regional Board meetings and the
completion of inspections in 152 municipalities and improvement districts, and 28
regional districts required Departmental representatives to travel extensively
throughout the Province. Of the total of 411 visits, 197 were made for general
financial and administrative purposes and 214 were made by our planning staff
to attend Technical Planning Committee meetings and to carry out various planning duties such as contract-planning services to either municipalities or regional
districts. At the time of inspection, administrative and budgetary practices are
reviewed, and when necessary, specific recommendations are made. As a result,
the over-all administrative practices followed are more consistent when by-laws
and other data are submitted to the Department with requests for approval or
registration.
The publication A Financial Information System for Municipalities, which
provides a standard classification of accounts as well as a uniform system of
reporting local government financial activity on a national basis, has now been
distributed to all municipalities and regional districts; and the system was implemented effective January 1, 1971. This system has been well received by all
municipalities and regional districts, and a complete evaluation of the financial
data now submitted will be available when the financial returns based on the system are examined in the preparation of the 1971 edition of the publication
Municipal Statistics.
As a result of the systems analysis and electronic data-processing feasibility
study completed in 1970, several committees have been established by various
groups of municipalities to study and implement the recommendations of the
report. Department representatives have attended meetings of these committees
and have visited individual municipalities to assist and encourage participation
in this programme. These recommendations included the adoption of common
forms, the development of standard systems and procedures,  and joint use of
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1971
T 11
present local government data centres. Municipalities have shown interest in
these recommendations and progress has been made in developing an integrated
data-processing system. The continual growth of municipalities has caused smaller
local governments to consider use of computer facilities and many have now placed
one or more applications with other local government data centres which has
further emphasized the necessity of standard systems and procedures. This will
not only improve administrative operations and provide a number of economies,
but is also a necessary step in establishing regional data centres and facilitating
the conversion to EDP applications with the least cost and disruption of operations. In this regard, the Department has been involved in the development of
a standard-procedures manual in conjunction with the Municipal Officers' Association of British Columbia. An initial set of draft procedures for smaller communities has now been completed. Further studies are in progress concerning
the establishment of local government data centres on a regional or multiregional
basis. Proposals and recommendations have been made regarding the initial
stages of organization and development of such centres.
By-laws of village and town municipalities are submitted to the Department
for registration in the office of the Inspector of Municipalities; other by-laws such
as those that establish consumer or user charges for water and sewer for all
classes of municipalities are also forwarded for review by the Department and
are advanced to the approving authority. Such by-laws or other related documents may be received in draft form, after three readings or at adoption, and
all are reviewed before any suggestions or recommendations are made. While
many of the initial submissions are found to be satisfactory others require exchange
of considerable correspondence. A total of 907 by-laws were examined and
subsequently registered—37 were district by-laws, 292 town by-laws, 537 village
by-laws, 31 regional district by-laws, and 10 improvement district by-laws.
For a variety of purposes, 489 Minutes of Council were prepared and subsequently approved by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council—89 authorized the
abandonment and vesting of portions of highway; 63 approved municipal rates
by-laws for water, sewer, and electric power; 43 authorized appointment of members of municipal Boards of Variance and Boards of Commissioners of Police;
129 were for regional district purposes of which 64 approved subdivision and
zoning by-laws and 10 authorized appointments of members to Regional Boards
of Variance; and the balance of 165 met other legislative requirements.
Debenture issues of municipalities and regional districts may be certified
by the Inspector of Municipalities, and before such certification can be completed,
certificates of approval are issued to the by-law or resolution authorizing the
issuance of debentures. In 1971, a total of 310 certificates of approval were
issued compared to 120 in 1970. Excluding those debentures or agreements
that were issued by municipalities and regional districts to secure undertakings
of the Municipal Finance Authority, 18 debenture issues were examined and
certified, which consisted of 4,772 debentures with a total par value of $6,188,866.
As the annual edition of Municipal Statistics is an important source of
information to investment houses, financial institutions, and others, distribution
of the publication is made as early in the year as possible; Municipal Statistics
includes some 35 different schedules. Prior to publication the financial and
statistical returns of the municipalities and regions are closely edited to ensure
conformity and adherence to statutory and other requirements.
Redefinition of the boundaries of The Corporation of the Village of Abbots-
ford, The Corporation of the Township of Chilliwhack, The Corporation of the
 T 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
District of Kent, and The Corporation of the District of Sumas was completed
under the provisions of the Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act when
supplementary Letters Patent were issued after boundary redefinitions were recommended by Mr. T. F. Moore of this Department, who was appointed Commissioner by Order in Council 2001, on June 17, 1970, as amended by Order in
Council 3771, on October 19, 1971.
The convention of the Union of British Columbia Municipalities was held in
Victoria and senior members of the staff were available to those who wished to
discuss local problems. Departmental staff participated in the programme of the
annual conference of the Municipal Officers' Association of British Columbia,
held in Prince George. Senior members of staff also participated as resource
personnel in seminars sponsored by the University of British Columbia and the
Union of British Columbia Municipalities.
For the year 1970, the annual shield award presented by the Minister of
Municipal Affairs, which is open to all municipalities in three categories as an
incentive to increase voter turn-out at municipal elections was received by the
following:
Per Cent
Cities and towns—Williams Lake  67.18
District municipalities—Mackenzie  77.58
Village municipalities—Port McNeill  83.89
Second-place municipalities were Revelstoke (cities and towns) with 67.16 per
cent, Port Hardy (district municipalities) with 75.63 per cent, and 100 Mile
House (village municipalities) with 69.97 per cent.
The four-year Municipal Administration Course sponsored by the Department and provided by the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration of
the University of British Columbia has now been phased out from the standpoint
of student application. The 1971/72 academic year saw applications accepted for
the last time for the fourth and final year of the course.
Twenty-six students enrolled for fourth-year subjects in 1971/72 with 10 of
the students undertaking the Administration/Law option and 16 undertaking the
Finance/Accounting option. The special one-year course for Assessors, which is
also being phased out, has an enrolment of six.
During 1971 the Board of Examiners, on which the Department is represented, granted 31 certificates of proficiency, and the following table shows the
classifications of these certificates together with the total number which have been
issued:
Certificates 1971 To Date
Junior   6 81
Senior Administration   8 101
Senior Finance   9 102
Property Appraisal   8 61
Totals   31 345
In conjunction with the phasing-out of the Municipal Administration Course,
arrangements were made with the Chartered Institute of Secretaries and the Certified General Accountants' Association to offer courses under their sponsorship
oriented to the fields of administration and finance in local government.
Fifteen persons employed in the municipal field enrolled in courses offered
by the Chartered Institute of Secretaries for the 1971/72 academic year. In
addition to the professional degree "A.C.I.S." (Associate of the Chartered Institute
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1971 T 13
of Secretaries) which may be granted to a graduate of the course, application
may be made for a certificate of proficiency in municipal administration or finance,
depending upon experience and office held.
Applications for enrolment in the special undergraduate course offered by
the Certified General Accountants' Association were received in the 1971/72
academic year from 20 persons employed in the municipal field. As the student
completes various phases of this course he will receive recognition toward a certificate of proficiency in municipal finance while, at the same time, in completing
the mandatory subjects which form part of the course, he will have the opportunity of continuing his studies to meet the full qualification requirements leading
to the professional designation "C.G.A." (Certified General Accountant).
Investigations are continuing into the possibility of offering a one- or two-
year course in selected subjects for those persons employed in smaller municipalities or who, for some other reason, do not wish to seek senior certificates in the
municipal administration or municipal finance fields. It is anticipated that the
successful completion of this proposed course would be sufficient academic qualification for a junior certificate in municipal administration.
With the object of providing those presently certified and working in the
field of public administration with a means of upgrading their specific skills, the
Continuing Education Committee of the Municipal Officers' Association presented
a five-day course in management techniques entitled "The Effective Municipal
Executive" which immediately preceded the 1971 conference of the association.
It was found in extending the course from its initial two-day duration of 1970
to the five-day format used in 1971 that a much more meaningful presentation
could be made available to participants. The success of these ventures has
prompted the committee to propose that, over the next five years, they offer five-
day courses which, each year, will cover some special phase of the management
process.
Interest in the Municipal Commercial Vehicle Licensing Programme administered by the Department on behalf of the municipalities, has not diminished in
that 124 municipalities participated in the programme during the 1970/71 licence-
year, an increase of six over the previous year. The revenue derived from licence
sales during the 1970/71 licence-year was $748,397 which, after payment of
incidental expenses, was distributed to the participating municipalities on a per
capita basis. In all 64,873 municipal commercial vehicle plates and 62,620
exempt plates were issued.
 T 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
LEGISLATION CHANGES
At the 1971 session of the Legislature amendments to the Municipal Act were
passed to keep the Act in pace with the ever-changing requirements of local government. One of the more significant amendments was the introduction of the land-use
contract concept. The land-use contract is a technique whereby if a desirable
development cannot take place under the existing land-use by-laws the municipality
or regional district and the developer may enter into a contract setting out the
specific details of how the property is to be developed. It provides a method of
dealing with complicated urban schemes and more extensive types of development.
It is a precise tool for ensuring the development is compatible with the broader
public interest.
Provision was made in the Act for the application of the Municipal Building
Code on a uniform basis throughout the Province, and as indicated elsewhere in
this report a committee has been working throughout the year on this matter.
Other amendments designed to improve local government included the setting
out of criteria for the incorporation of a municipality; a provision for more publicity
to be given to municipal tax sales; a provision whereby if 60 per cent of the voters
vote on a question the majority required to approve a by-law or question is reduced
to 50 per cent, and a number of other amendments.
A number of amendments of a technical and procedural nature were made to
the provisions of the Municipal Act governing regional districts.
The Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act enabled particular municipalities to deal with problems peculiar to those municipalities.
The Mobile Home Park Fee Act exempted mobile homes in mobile home
parks from the real property tax and imposed a fee on the operator of mobile home
parks in relation to the number of spaces occupied in his park.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1971 T 15
NEW INCORPORATIONS AND CHANGES IN STRUCTURE
INCORPORATIONS AND CHANGES IN STATUS
Two new district municipalities were incorporated following successful votes—
the District of Dufferin on April 23, 1971, and the District of Brocklehurst on
June 22, 1971.
Three new villages were incorporated as instant municipalities in conjunction
with the development of a natural resource—the Village of Fort Nelson on April 8,
1971 (petroleum resources), the Village of Granisle on June 29, 1971 (mineral
and other resources), and the Village of Elkford on June 16, 1971 (mineral and
other resources).
A representative of the Department attended all the inaugural meetings of
Council and participated in the proceedings while the aldermen were sworn into
office and the mayor was elected.
Under the direction of the Minister a plebiscite was held on the question of
incorporation of the Westsyde area as a town municipality. Another plebiscite
was held on incorporation of the Village of Invermere and the improvement districts
of Athalmer and Westsyde together with a nonmunicipal area as a district municipality to be known as Kootenae House. Both proposals failed to receive the
assent of the owner-electors.
Enabling legislation was passed during the 1971 Session of the Legislature to
provide for the surrender of the Letters Patent of the Corporation of the District of
Coquitlam and the Corporation of the District of Fraser Mills and reincorporation
of the area comprising the municipalities as the District of Coquitlam. Letters
Patent providing for the amalgamation of these two municipalities were prepared
and issued effective November 1, 1971.
Letters Patent were issued changing the status of the District of Port Alice
to a village municipality, effective January 1, 1971, and the District of Gold River
to a village municipality, effective January 1, 1972.
MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY EXTENSIONS
Twenty municipal boundary extensions were authorized by the issue of supplementary Letters Patent; Table 1 shows the municipalities affected together with
the resulting adjustment in areas and changes in population. Population is determined by local census in the extension areas and the original population is established by using the 1966 census figure as a base.
All of these extensions were completed without the necessity of a vote, with
the exception of the Village of Alert Bay where certain owner-electors of the
village objected to the proposed extension. At the direction of Council a vote
was held in the village on July 31, 1971, and the proposal received the required
majority.
Following the incorporation of the Villages of Lions Bay and Fort Nelson,
the Lions Bay and Fort Nelson Improvement Districts were dissolved and the
assets and liabilities and services supplied were assumed by the new villages.
The Cumberland Street Lighting Improvement District was dissolved, as the
boundaries of the Village of Cumberland were extended to include the area, and
the Council of the Village of Cumberland agreed to accept the assets and liabilities
of the improvement district and supply the service.
 T 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
At the request of the trustees of the Langdale Water District the improvement district was dissolved and the assets and liabilities transferred to the Sunshine
Coast Regional District and the service supplied on a specified area basis.
The Cranbrook Local Service Area was dissolved when a greater part of the
area was taken into the City of Cranbrook by an extension in boundaries. The
Red Bluff Local Area adjacent to the Town of Quesnel was also dissolved as the
area is now part of a specified area of the Cariboo Regional District.
Under enabling legislation supplementary Letters Patent were issued to the
Town of Quesnel to implement the petition of Council to increase Council membership from four to six, exclusive of the Mayor. The Council of the District
of Surrey requested a decrease in Council membership from 10 to eight, exclusive
of the Mayor, and Letters Patent were issued effective January 1, 1972. An
amendment to the Letters Patent of the District of Houston was made so that
the interim Council is replaced by a fully elected Council at the first meeting in
January 1972 rather than 1974.
In co-operation with the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service, 33 of
the 35 hospital improvement districts, transferred from the Water Rights Branch
of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources to the Department,
have been dissolved under the provisions of the Regional Hospital Districts Act,
and their assets and liabilities transferred to the regional districts. One of these
dissolutions was completed this year.
An agreement was reached between the Province and the Cape Mudge
Indian Band with the approval of the Federal Government for the incorporation of
Cape Mudge as a municipality under the Municipal Act. The agreement incorporates special provisions to recognize the particular trust status of the Indian
reserve lands while at the same time offering to the Indian community the benefits
of municipal incorporation. Under it the Indian community will be entitled to
take advantage of the per capita grants and home-acquisition grants on the same
basis as all other citizens in ordinary municipalities. These benefits will be in
addition to all Federal programmes available to Indian communities.
Under the Municipal Act agreement is subject to a vote of the members of
the Indian band and incorporation can only proceed if 75 per cent of the band
members, who exercise their franchise, vote in favour. The vote in Cape Mudge
was held on January 17, 1972 with 71.4 per cent of the band members voting in
favour, just 3.6 per cent below the required 75-per-cent majority and therefore
incorporation cannot proceed at present.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1971
T 17
ASSESSMENT AND TAX COLLECTION
As in the past years, the major single source of revenue of municipalities in
British Columbia continues to be the real property tax. The growth in assessed
values of real property and revenue from taxation of these properties over the past
10 years is illustrated in the following table. It will be noted that revenue from this
source of taxation in 1970 totalled $323,924,895. Of this total, $172,161,067
represented taxation for general municipal purposes and $151,763,828 represented
taxation for school purposes.
Growth in Combined Assessed Values and Taxes in Municipalities
of British Columbia
Year
Gross Assessed Values
Assessed Values Actually
Taxed
Tax
All
Properties
Taxable
Properties
School
Municipal
Revenue
1967.
(Millions)
$
4,032
5,292
5,7971
7,4772
6,3521
8,3292
6,9721
9,1922   ,
7,6201
10,0762
(Millions)
$
3,408
4,507
4,8851
4,9582
5,4001
5,6182
5,9051
6,2262
6,4561
6,8172
(Millions)
$
2,770
3,653
3,950
4,402
4,835
5,279
(Millions)
$
2,182
2,780
4,372
5,404
6,072
6,632
(Thousands)
$
128,866
1967	
1968
224,840
251,693
1969                                              	
1970
286,239
323,925
1971
360,0003
i School values.
2 Municipal values.
3 Estimated.
The following table provides a further analysis of the assessed value of real
property and indicates the distribution of 1971 assessed values by class of municipality, with the percentage increase over 1970 shown in parentheses.
General Municipal Gross
Assessed Values
Assessed Values Actually
Taxed
All
Properties
Taxable
Properties
School
Municipal
Pities
(Millions)   (%)
$
1,826    (16.0)
3,819    ( 8.8)
197    (20.1)
168    ( 4.3)
(Millions)   (%)
$
1,179    (15.0)
2,552    ( 8.6)
124    (21.6)
105    ( 2.9)
(Millions)   (%)
$
1,243    ( 9.9)
2,355    ( 9.9)
146    (23.7)
124    (11.7)
(Millions)   (%)
$
1,072    (14.8)
2,516    ( 8.4)
119    (21.4)
99    ( 3.1)
Subtotals  .    	
6,010    (11.1)
4,066    ( 7.4)
3,960    (10.6)
2,857    ( 7.8)
3,868    (10.4)
1,411    ( 5.8)
3,806    (10.4)
2,826    ( 7.5)
Totals       	
10,076    ( 9.6)
6,817    ( 9.4)
5,279    ( 9.4)
6,632    ( 9.2)
The increase in assessed values actually taxed for general municipal purposes
from $2,780,000,000 in 1967 to $6,072,000,000 in 1970, and to $6,632,000,000
in 1971, was primarily due to a change in policy by the Cities of Vancouver, Penticton, and Kamloops and the Districts of Burnaby, Peachland, Summerland, West
Vancouver, and Port Hardy. These municipalities have elected to utilize a separate
assessment roll for general municipal purposes, in which land and improvements
2
 T 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
are assesed at their actual value as permitted by the provisions of the Municipal
Act, rather than to adopt the assessed values of land and improvements, as determined pursuant to the Assessment Equalization Act. Under the Assessment Equalization Act, assessed values for taxation purposes under the Public Schools Act are
50 per cent of actual value.
As a result of the continuing rapid growth in the urban communities, it is
anticipated that proceeds from real property taxation for school and general municipal purposes in 1971 will reach $360,000,000, which would represent an increase
of approximately 60 per cent over the revenue of five years ago. The total assessed
values actually taxed for school purposes in the Province in 1971 amounted to
$6,860,075,092, an increase of approximately $500,000,000 over 1970. Of this
amount, $5,279,434,485, or approximately 77 per cent, represented assessed values
in the city, district, town, and village municipalities.
The tax collection picture in municipalities is considered to be the primary
indicator, not only of the efficiency of the administration, but also of the ability of
the taxpayer to meet the municipal tax levy promptly. In the year under review,
tax collections have shown a fractional decline over the collections of 1969, but
continue to maintain a very high level. During this period collections in cities and
districts exceeded 96 per cent of the levy, villages collected nearly 95 per cent, and
towns in excess of 93.5 per cent. We have established a practice of communicating
with any municipality where the arrears of taxes are in excess of 10 per cent of
the current levy, in an effort to determine the cause and what steps may be taken to
improve the position. The collection of current taxes in British Columbia continues to be the highest among the provinces in Canada publishing statistics of a
comparable nature, while the percentage of arrears is the lowest. Economic factors
may have contributed substantially to the favourable position indicated in the
property-taxation field, however, municipal treasurers and collectors are to be congratulated for their continued efforts in maintaining this high rate of tax collection.
Chart 1 shows the percentage of tax collection for the period 1960 to 1970, inclusive, and Table 2 reveals further information relative to tax collection by class
of municipality for the years shown.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1971
T 19
REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES
Table 3 and Chart 2 indicate the trends in various financial aspects of
municipal government as compared to population and income. It is apparent
from a review of the audited financial statements and other statistical information
that British Columbia municipalities, generally, continue to enjoy a favourable
financial position.
During the year 1970, the last year for which audited statements are available, revenues, including those of all utilities, were in excess of $520,000,000,
an increase of $60,000,000 over the previous year. The major revenue sources
were general municipal taxation of $172,000,000 and school taxation of $152,-
000,000. These have increased $23,000,000 and $15,000,000 respectively over
the amounts received in 1969. Transfers from other governments accounted for
$110,000,000 of which $91,000,000 was from Provincial Government grants,
excluding capital and special purpose grants, an increase of $5,000,000 over the
amount received in the previous year. Revenue from own sources amounted to
$86,000,000. The school taxation levy was offset by the application of homeowner grant payments of $52,000,000, an increase of $4,000,000 over 1969,
leaving a net of approximately $100,000,000 in school taxes payable by the
property owner.
Chart 3 indicates per capita and percentage of revenues of the various
classes of municipalities by major source for the 1970 fiscal year. Chart 4
reflects the expenditure by major function of these funds on a per capita basis,
and as a percentage of total expenditure.
RESERVES AND SURPLUSES
Statutory reserve funds of various municipalities have again shown an increase
over the previous year. At the end of 1970 these funds, held for a variety of
purposes, amounted to $42,000,000, an increase of $3,000,000 over the previous
year, after giving effect to the fact that approximately $8,000,000 was expended
on capital works from reserve funds during the year 1970. The amount held in
these reserve funds has shown an increase of 40 per cent, from $30,000,000 in
1966 to the current figure of $42,000,000.
The total of statutory reserves and operating reserves and surpluses held in
all accounts of the municipalities was $104,954,301. This represents an increase
of $10,148,592 over the previous year. These reserves and surpluses amount to
27 per cent of the total revenue, excluding school taxes, of the municipalities and
in the case of districts and villages they are in excess of 30 per cent of the total
revenue. It is significant that of this total, $75,393,327 is held in liquid form or
in investments authorized by Statute, while the remainder of the surplus is represented in arrears of taxes and other receivables.
The following table provides an analysis of these reserves and surpluses by
class of local government:
Reserves
Surpluses
Total
Total
Revenuei
$
18,198,293
27,224,344
731,818
443,030
266,327
$
9,873,974
17,823,609
952,127
2,153,668
651,866
$
28,072,267
45,047,953
1,683,945
2,596,698
918,193
(Per Cent)
25.85
30.95
17.22
31.57
Regional districts	
11.27
Subtotals 	
46,863,812
23,771,320
31,455,244
2,863,925
78,319,056
26,635,245
27.94
23.23
Totals	
70,635,132
34,319,169
104,954,301
26.58
l Excluding school taxation.
 T 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CAPITAL PROGRAMMES
The value of capital projects undertaken during 1970 by municipalities was
the same as 1969, with projects initiated to the value of $118,000,000. Of this
total programme, $96,000,000 was completed during the fiscal year, leaving a
balance of works in progress of $22,000,000 at year-end. In the total capital
programme, municipalities were able to provide $33,000,000 out of current general revenue and utility revenue funds, $8,000,000 from reserve funds, and approximately $3,000,000 was obtained from grants-in-aid from the Provincial and
Federal Governments. The balance of the amount expended was financed by
debenture loans, temporary bank loans, and other methods of financing. Figures
reflecting the activity in this area over the past five years are as follows:
Projects
Undertaken
Works
Completed
Works in
Progress
Source of Funds
Year
Revenue
Reserve
Funds
Grants
1966                -
(Thousands)
$
118,000
117,000
101,000
118,000
118,000
(Thousands)
$
99,000
102,000
87,000
102,000
96,000
(Thousands)
$
19,000
15,000
14,000
16,000
22,000
(Thousands)
$
21,000
29,000
34,000
36,000
33,000
(Thousands)
$
5,000
6,000
5,000
7,000
8,000
(Thousands)
$
8,000
1°67
6,000
1968
3,000
1969
5,000
1970
3,000
The trend in authorized term borrowing over the past five years is indicated
below.
Year
Regional
Districts
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Total
1967
1068
$
$2,345,500
567,750
4,084,500
13,531,000
3,950,200
$
4,440,914
5,754,270
6,288,970
15,909,500
20,104,529
$
21,315,016
41,051,821
11,552,108
13,903,894
47,581,626
$
1,136,381
1,200,000
75,360
3,545,751
5,120,820
$
1,518,895
2,392,945
1,342,616
558,050
4,039,630
$
30,756,706
50,967,479
1060
23,343,554
1970     	
1971 _	
47,448,195
80,796,805
The substantial increase in authorized borrowing between 1967 and 1968
is attributable to the increased borrowing for sewer programmes. The decline
shown in 1969 is a reflection of the restraint practised by municipalities in avoiding long-term debt during the period when exceptionally high interest rates for
this type of borrowing were in effect. As in 1968, the increase in authorized
borrowing during 1970 is attributed to a substantial increase in borrowing for
sewer programmes due, no doubt, to the rapid development in urban communities.
The very sharp increase in debenture borrowings in 1971 is partly a reflection of
the impact of the Federal-Provincial Special Development Loans Programmes,
which made available low-interest Federal funds for municipal projects and the
Federal-Provincial Employment Loans Programmes, 1971, which also provides
low-interest Federal funds as well as providing a forgiveness feature of 75 per cent
of direct on-site labour incurred to May 31, 1972. It is also partly attributable to
the favourable rate the Municipal Finance Authority was able to obtain in marketing
a back-log of municipal debentures which had been held from the market due to the
high interest rates which had previously prevailed.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1971
T 21
FIVE-YEAR CAPITAL EXPENDITURE PROGRAMMES SUMMARY
The difficulties experienced in the presentation of the five-year Capital Expenditure Programme have, in most part, been overcome and the presentations for
1971 continue to provide meaningful information and guidance to municipalities, to
the Department, and to financial institutions. In order to achieve maximum consistency in programme format and content the Department reviews each submission
and offers constructive criticism where necessary. This action has been well received
and works to the mutual advantage of all concerned.
A summary of the Capital Expenditure Programmes by year is listed below.
Included in the "General" heading under "Classification of Expenditures" are all
capital expenditures on roads, sidewalks, public buildings, recreation facilities, land
purchases, and other capital projects not related to either water or sewage systems.
Municipal Councils are continuing in their efforts to finance a large portion of
their capital works out of current revenue and reserves. An analysis of this summary indicates that expenditures from current revenue and reserves represents
approximately 39 per cent of the total programmes.
Five-year Capital Expenditure Programmes Summary by Year for All
Municipalities (Including Vancouver)
Classification of Expenditures
Year
Water
Sewer
General
Total
1971...             	
1972..	
$
14,352,272
10,237,473
8,816,100
8,218,690
6,904,810
$
40,929,227
34,769,100
16,248,450
15,228,300
13,701,750
$
125,229,188
92,781,578
72,967,607
63,948,167
72,987,571
$
180,510,687
137,788,151
1973       -	
1974
1975    . •■
98,032,157
87,395,157
93,594,131
Totals
48,529,345
120,876,827
427,914,111
597,320,283
Proposed Source of Funds
Year
General
Revenue
Grants
Reserve
Funds
Prior Years'
Surplus
Debenture
Sales
Total
1971	
$
34,394,324
33,507,812
32,814,592
31,772,516
32,767,031
$
9,268,397
6,234,534
1,689,137
1,702,750
1,037,650
$
21,885,339
15,391,255
12,416,530
9,542,140
10,231,950
$
8,831,483
413,400
215,600
304,090
110,000
$
106,131,144
82,241,150
50,896,298
44,073,661
49,447,500
$
180,510,687
137,788,151
98,032,157
87,395,157
93,594,131
1972 	
1973 	
1974	
1975...	
Totals
165,256,320
19,932,468
69,467,214
9,874,573
332,789,753
597,320,283
Financing of sewer projects continued to take the major share of municipal
borrowing, although funds were borrowed for the construction of many other functions and activities. Altogether, 294 term borrowing by-laws of both municipalities
and regional districts were approved by the Inspector of Municipalities and subsequently adopted by Councils and Regional Boards. Special legislation passed in
1971 provided for the adoption of those by-laws that authorized the borrowing of
funds through the Federal-Provincial Programmes without the assent of the owner-
electors and much of the borrowing was authorized in this manner; other by-laws
were advertised pursuant to statutory provisions or, where necessary, were submitted to the owner-electors for assent.
 T 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Borrowing in the total amount of $80,796,805 was authorized to finance the
various projects summarized in the table following, which is $33,348,610 more
than that authorized in 1970. Distribution of the funds received from actual debt
commitment for many of these schemes will be spread over a number of years under
progressive construction programmes. Included in the total authorized borrowing
is $985,624 for short-term loans which under the provisions of the Municipal Act
has a per capita limitation.
Borrowing Authorization, 1971
Purpose
Regional
Districts
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Total
Waterworks  	
$
1,670,000
1,428,200
787,000
$
778,400
7,117,000
1,929,000
5,380,583
742,000
4,013,300
144,246
$
4,070,306
16,965,335
9,434,300
8,320,000
2,942,585
5,610,100
239,000
$
311,100
2,147,000
970,000
428,000
$
459,000
1,983,250
600,000
189,000
773,000
35,380
$
5,618,806
29,882,585
Parks and recreation. —
14,361,500
15,104,583
3,684,585
1,119,500
145,220
11,515,900
Equipment (including fire protection)...  	
65,000
628,846
Totals  - 	
3,950,200
20,104,529
47,581,626
5,120,820
4,039,630
80,796,805
Borrowing by the City of Vancouver and by the Metropolitan Water and
Sewer Boards is not subject to the approval of the Inspector of Municipalities and
is not included in the above table.
Local improvement works at an estimated cost of $7,983,700 were given
preliminary borrowing approval—an increase in excess of $4.3 million over that
authorized in 1970. Through special improvement funds many local improvements are financed internally and in addition over $3.5 million were financed by
the issue of debentures and are included by issuing authority in the previous table.
Security-issuing by-laws specify the details of debenture issues or other securities that have been approved in principle at the time of the adoption of loan-
authorization by-laws, and approval was given to 118 of these by-laws which
authorize the issue of debentures or other forms of indebtedness in a total amount
of $39,824,369. Of this total, $18,361,004 was financed directly by the municipalities and regional districts on the open market or through bank facilities.
No municipal debenture issues were guaranteed by the Province under the
Municipalities Assistance Act. As at December 31, 1971, the total amount of
debentures outstanding guaranteed by the Province under the Municipalities Assistance Act was $60,796,787; details are shown in the following schedule:
Outstanding Debentures Guaranteed, 1971
Village
Municipalities
Assistance Act
Municipalities
Assistance Act
Total
$
440,000
478,000
784,500
369,550
$
11,488,266
11,348,800
1,941,000
3,186,671
$
11,928,266
11,826,800
2,725,500
Districts 	
Villages _ _ _ 	
3,556,221
Totals    _	
2.072.050       1       77.964.717      i        30 Ittfi 7R7
10,811.000
595,000
1,546,000
65,000
17,743,000
10,811,000
595,000
1,546,000
65,000
17,743,000
2.072.050       1        5R.77_l.717        i        60 706 7R7
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1971
T 23
In addition, debenture debt guaranteed by the Province under the Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage Act at the end of the year amounted to $22,755,000.
Total debenture debt as at December 31, 1970, of all municipalities, including City of Vancouver, is shown below. The debenture debt of the Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District and the Greater Vancouver Water District
is not included.
Sold
Unissued
and
Unsold
Total
Cities ' _    	
Districts   ....	
$
62,647,052
94,517,947
7,712,222
6,401,393
2,159,084
S
25,209,030
47,106,853
3,674,081
3,413,617
14,719,438
$
87,856,082
141,624,800
11,386,303
Villages _ „   ,                    	
9,815,010
16,878,522
Subtotals _ _    	
173,437,698
169,958,768
94,123,019
	
267,560,717
169,958,768
Totals  . .
343,396,466
94,123,019
437,519,485
Debenture sales for all municipalities amount to $27,261,669 for the year
1970. This resulted in an increase of $4,888,364 to the total outstanding debenture debt of all municipalities for 1970, after giving effect to the retirement of
debentures maturing during the year.
The percentage of current revenue expended to service debenture debt,
excluding utilities, in cities and villages declined in 1970, and increased slightly
in districts and the City of Vancouver. Figures for 1970 are shown below,
along with the 1969 figures in parantheses:
Cities 	
Vancouver
Districts 	
Towns	
Villages 	
Per Cent
6.4 (7.0)
9.1 (8.9)
6.4 (6.3)
7.4 (7.4)
5.6 (6.0)
Debenture debt of utilities is serviced almost entirely by revenues derived
by charges paid by consumer and by frontage taxes.
 T 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REGIONAL DISTRICT ACTIVITIES
In past years the Annual Report has dealt in some detail with the introduction
and establishment of regional government and a review of the legislation under
which regional districts have been developed. To avoid repetition it is sufficient
to say that regional local government was introduced as a first in Canada by British
Columbia in 1965 and now is gaining impetus in other provinces although none
have attempted the Province-wide approach adopted in British Columbia.
In the early formative years of the regional districts in British Columbia little
attention was paid in some quarters to their rapidly expanding powers and broadening areas of activity. The role of the regional district may not have been fully
appreciated nor always given proper recognition by some Provincial agencies or for
that matter by many Municipal Councils.   This has now been largely overcome.
In an effort to clearly define the role of regional districts much of the Department's time and effort this past year has been devoted toward improving co-operation
and liaison between the departments of government and the regional districts on
the one hand and the regions and their member municipalities on the other. This
is considered essential to the continuing success of a regional approach to local
government.
Regional districts now are recognized as a viable force in the local government
structure. Each fulfils a vital role as the local presence in matters of liaison and
co-operation between regional needs and aspirations and the responsibilities of the
various departments of the Provincial Government and in turn the municipalities.
In keeping with this expanding role the governing legislation has been constantly
reinforced and broadened, but always with care to ensure that there has been no
loss of flexibility nor lessening of the ability of each Regional Board to develop
its own priorities and service responsibilities within broad statutory guidelines.
The past year marked a further expansion of local government services undertaken by regional districts. It marked a coming to grips with the issues and problems of land use and environmental management as related to the responsibility of
regional districts in the field of regional and community planning and the statutory
responsibilities in this field of various Provincial agencies. Close scrutiny and
examination of the role to be played in the future by regional districts in land-use
and environmental management was a key issue in 1971, and will be under further
review in 1972.
A large number of new functions were assumed by the 28 regional districts
in 1971. Table 4 summarizes the 30 new functions assigned and Table 5 summarizes all functions undertaken to date. A number of regional districts assumed
the function of refuse disposal which in most communities ideally lends itself to
regional control. Twelve regions now provide this service and it is anticipated that
other regional districts will be undertaking refuse-disposal programmes within the
near future. Of special significance is the assumption of the powers and functions
of the Boards of the Greater Vancouver Water District and the Greater Vancouver
Sewerage and Drainage District by an administration board consisting in large
part of the Greater Vancouver Regional Board. In addition to progress on the
proposed transportation function the Greater Vancouver Regional Board has
received supplementary Letters Patent to assume the responsibilities and assets of
the Fraser-Burrard Regional Parks District. The regional parks function is now
exercised by nine regions.
A number of regional districts have undertaken to provide recreational facilities for greater community areas comprising one or more municipalities and neigh-
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1971 T 25
bouring nonmunicipal areas. A regional approach to recreation services ensures
that the total benefiting area shares equitably in the cost.
The summary of functions of regional districts serves to illustrate the expanding
range of services being undertaken and the variety of the types of services requested.
Following some six years of operation, regional districts now provide in excess of
30 different services as functions on behalf of member areas. The trend toward
the development of services through the medium of the regional district continues
to grow. Many municipalities are now considering a regional approach in providing services and facilities for the greater community areas of which each is a part.
In addition to the development of multimunicipal services many local community
services in the nonmunicipal areas of the Province are being provided by regional
districts either as a direct service or by contract with a neighbouring municipality
under the administrative control and direction of the Regional Board.
In addition to the assumption of new functions or the broadening of the scope
of existing functions to include additional participating member areas, many regional
districts were granted supplementary Letters Patent for such purposes as the extension or revision of external or internal boundaries; amendments to alter the basis
of cost sharing; and in a number of instances to accommodate the recovery of
the cost of a function by requisition and levy on the taxable value of land only or
improvements only. Other specific amendments by supplementary Letters Patent
provided for the revision of board membership and structure and other similar
procedural and corporate changes.
Several important legislative provisions directly affecting regional districts
were passed at the 1971 Session of the Legislature. Included in these amendments
is a provision whereby the area comprising an improvement district or a local area
may be declared a specified service area and be thereafter under the administrative
jurisdiction of the regional district. Another important amendment withdrew the
application of regional district zoning and subdivision by-laws to land designated
in a tree-farm licence or to land constituting a forest reserve. Important legislation
was introduced governing land-use contracts; further discussion of this amendment
is given in the environmental management section of this Report.
A number of specified service areas were established during 1971. Of the
16 areas created, four were established by the petition method and the remainder
were created following a favourable vote of the property-owners concerned. Table
6 lists the specified areas established during the year and gives an indication of
the scope of services now being extended by regional districts to nonmunicipal
communities in this fashion. Prior to the introduction of regional government,
nearly all community services in the nonmunicipal areas of the Province were
provided by improvement districts administered by the Water Rights Branch of
the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources, or improvement districts
incorporated under the Municipal Act, or in a few instances by local areas established under the Local Services Act; the latter two agencies being administered by
the Department of Municipal Affairs. Apart from the need of water, irrigation,
and dyking works, all nonmunicipal communities are now turning to the regional
district for the provision and financing of new projects.
Of the specified areas established during 1971, many would in the past have
been formed as improvement districts or as local areas with the resulting duplication of administrative organization had the regional district not been available
as the means of providing the service. A number of communities thus served
are urban in character and in time will be either absorbed within the boundaries
of adjacent municipalities or be separately incorporated as municipalities in their
 T 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
own right. Others, more rural in character, or isolated, likely will retain their
present nonmunicipal status. Two specified areas established early in the year
were included within the newly incorporated District of Dufferin and subsequently
dissolved; the services provided being assumed by the municipality.
A fundamental responsibility of regional districts is the planning function.
This divides into two inter-related parts—on the one hand regional planning and
the development of the regional plan and on the other, the undertaking of community planning services and the enactment of land-use control and other regulatory by-laws.
Each regional district has the statutory responsibility of preparing a regional
plan. Much of our time during the past year, and likely to an even greater
extent in the forthcoming year, will be directed to the encouragement of Regional
Boards to prepare regional plans. It is felt that the community planning aspect
of the planning function, which extends to the development of zoning and other
land-use by-laws, cannot be initiated in an orderly fashion unless there is first
an over-all regional plan. While a few regional districts have prepared regional
plans and others are working toward this goal, the record has not been impressive
considering the fact that this is a statutory responsibility of each Regional Board.
We will continue in our efforts to encourage the early commencement on regional
planning where it is lacking and to press for completion of the regional plan
where preliminary work has started. To this end, we have and will in the future
be making our planning staff available on a contract basis to the Regional Boards
to assist them in undertaking regional planning work. A number of contracts
have been entered into and it is anticipated that there will be a marked increase
in 1972.
A series of one-day seminars sponsored by the Department were held during
the year. While environmental management and related land use and planning
matters were the main topics, many other facets of regional government received
attention. Seven seminars in all were conducted in various regional centres, following a Province-wide keynote conference held in the spring in Victoria, involving all
regional districts and the resource departments of Government. It is felt that the
seminars were a success and served a very useful purpose in familiarizing those
concerned with other points of view. A number of issues concerning relationships
between Regional Boards and departments of Government were fully discussed. It
is proposed to continue a similar seminar programme in 1972, with emphasis on
municipal-regional relationships.
It is anticipated that the growth of regional services will accelerate in the
future. It is expected that many municipal services over time will pass to the
regional district to take advantage of the economies of scale, or where such a move
is the logical answer to service problems that extend beyond municipal boundaries.
For many services, the Regional Board merely consolidates and co-ordinates services previously provided independently by one or more municipalities. In all
instances a request for a service at the regional level must be initiated by the member
area or areas of the regional district that is or are to benefit.
The over-all growth of regional districts is reflected in the fact that there has
been an increase of approximately 50 per cent in the level of expenditure over 1970.
This increase is largely attributable to new function, which in many instances represent merely a transfer of municipal services to regional jurisdiction, and to the
provision of new services in nonmunicipal areas. To assist in meeting administration
expenses, an annual grant of $6,000 is made to each regional district by the Province.
In addition, each is provided with an annual grant calculated at 15 cents per capita
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1971
T 27
with a minimum of $5,000 and a maximum of $25,000, to assist in developing an
environmental management programme.
To meet increasing demand the Department produced a new booklet outlining
the regional district concept. This was prepared in time for the fall Union of British
Columbia Municipalities convention, and has enjoyed wide acceptance in both the
local government and in the private field. A second and third printing were found
to be necessary. The contents will be reviewed in 1972, and a new edition published
if the demand warrants.
 T 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
The emphasis last year in environmental management was directed to the
encouragement of the development of regional plans by regional district Boards.
While it is gratifying to note that seven Regional Boards have now adopted regional
plans and seven others are nearing this stage, there are still a few Boards who have
not significantly moved toward the development of a regional plan. The Department
currently is reviewing the state of development of regional plans with the aim of
formulating a programme of encouragement and assistance. We are endeavouring
to direct Regional Boards toward a programme of phased development of the regional plan and are suggesting that in its first phase the plan formulate simply a
statement of principles directing where settlement should go or expand; where low
density areas should be maintained; where a conflict in uses may be minimized;
where there is anticipation of land recreation needs; and in the public interest where
land should be left in its present state. The aim of a phased regional plan programme
is to enable the Regional Board to evolve a flexible on-going development framework
for the future. Toward this end we are concentrating on the retrieval of information
that is an essential input to the plan. One of the problems that is being met by the
regional districts and which may not readily be evident, is in many instances the lack
of suitable mapping. We are endeavouring to cope with this problem and are encouraging the development of various map bases.
The Municipal Act has been amended to allow for a new approach in land-use
regulation by contract rather than by permit. The land-use contract allows a municipality, or a regional district in the electoral areas, to waive the usual process of
zoning and land-use controls where they are not sufficiently flexible in a particular
situation. Generally speaking, it would apply in cases where there is a complex
change of urban land use such as in the commercial area of a city or large development or subdivision of land on the outskirts of a community or where there
are particular problems where the hard and fast rules of zoning are inadequate.
Essentially it allows for flexibility in approach to land use and development. The
legislation gives authority to consider greater efficiency and quality, the impact of a
development on future or present public costs, the betterment of the environment,
fulfilment of community goals and the provision of necessary public space.
Participation on the Technical Planning Committees of the regional districts
has continued to be an important staff responsibility. The Technical Planning Committees are continuing to prove to be a very satisfactory means of communication
between the regional districts, the various departments of Government, and the
municipalities. The availability of expertise assembled in the Technical Planning
Committees is proving of invaluable assistance to both the Provincial and local governments. We have continued our participation in the technical subcommittee of the
Environment and Land Use Committee.
During the year a community planning area was established under the Local
Services Act and regulations passed for the area around Chetwynd in anticipation of
a large coal-mining operation south of the community. Another community planning area was established in the Okanagan where development was imminent. The
Local Services Act still proves to be essential as a means of establishing interim land-
use controls until such time as the Regional Board having jurisdiction is able to
develop and administer its own land-use by-laws.
Several community planning areas were transferred to regional districts during
the year.   The community planning area at Fort Nelson has been transferred to
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1971 T 29
the jurisdiction of the new Village of Fort Nelson. Three community planning
areas continue to be administered directly by the Department; these are Community
Planning Area 23 at Shawnigan Lake in the Cowichan Valley Regional District,
Community Planning Area 26 at Chetwynd, and Community Planning Area 27 in
the Okanagan-Similkameen Regional District (Rattlesnake). It is anticipated that
Community Planning Area 26 will be transferred shortly to the jurisdiction of the
Peace River-Liard Regional District.
Upon request, last year we undertook planning projects under contract for a
number of Regional Boards. Seven contracts were entered into—for the most part
centring on the development of regional plans. A number of similar contracts are in
the process of negotiation. Paralleling the guidelines for subdivision approval, a
base zoning by-law has been prepared for the use of smaller municipalities and Regional Boards in electoral areas. This model by-law includes all essential regulations
and may be easily adapted for the particular needs of a community.
An important amendment last year to the Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act gave the Department the ministerial responsibility for the approval of land-
use amendments to the official regional plan in the flood plain of the Fraser Valley.
This was a development of the agreement between the Government of Canada and
the Government of British Columbia, which was entered into in 1968 for a plan of
flood-control in the Fraser Valley.
The Highways (Scenic Improvement) Act, 1968 is continuing to be an effective
device in improving the scenic attractiveness and appearance of highways. Table
7 illustrates the highways designated under the Act, listed by regional districts.
 T 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
HOUSING, LAND ASSEMBLY, AND URBAN REDEVELOPMENT
PUBLIC HOUSING
The activity in this period has followed requests from municipalities for aid in
the provision of public housing, gaining strength and impetus as the year progressed.
There has been a greater demand for information from this Department, particularly
related to proposals which do not follow the historical pattern of development; there
is greater interest in providing public housing in smaller groups of buildings more
widely distributed throughout communities. The results of this approach would
satisfy sociological and psychological attitudes, but require great care to avoid larger
costs in construction of buildings and acquisition of land. The Department has
striven to maintain a practical and economical balance in discussing such proposals.
Brief information papers have been made available upon request, and a booklet
prepared which outlines the several methods of housing development, both by private
and public enterprise.
The style of request for information reflects the interest and concern of private
citizens as well as public officials in adequate accommodation in a controlled and
sensibly planned environment, with concepts of development related to people. This
is exemplified in a programme in Saanich, where accommodation designed to fit the
needs of physically handicapped persons will be provided, and again in Penticton
where it is planned that several forms of aid may be co-ordinated to provide a variety
of housing and services for senior citizens.
The Greater Vancouver Regional District has been empowered to undertake
the function of public housing, as if it were a municipality, and to assist in its provision on a regional basis. Careful selection of building-sites and housing groupings
in co-operation with the member municipalities and co-ordination with the construction industry will result in a significant increase in the inventory of homes for families
of low income.
Municipality
Units of Housing
Completed
or Under
Contract
Approved
Project
Planned
Project
Total
Alert Bay-
Burnaby—
Chetwynd..
Dawson Creek-
Langley..
New Westminster.,
Penticton	
Port Alberni	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Saanich	
Surrey	
Vancouver-
Victoria	
Totals..
431
~50
ibi
50
134
116
248
2,382
184
3,696
16
"53"
23
139
625
856
16
150
140
70
100
144
620
16
581
16
50
53
101
140
23
120
134
255
348
3,151
184
5,172
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1971
T 31
LAND ASSEMBLY
The only new project in the residential land development programme is at the
District of Mackenzie, where approximately 125 acres of municipal land will be
developed in two phases. Very few municipalities have attempted to implement
the benefits of aid in land development to provide residential lots at advantageous
prices.
Through the establishment of development areas, utilization of the land-use
contract technique, and the judicious employment of aid in developing lots on
municipal land, municipalities may achieve greater satisfaction of community aims.
The use of this programme is related, of course, to the demand and supply of
such property, and in many municipalities there is a shortage of land in municipal
control. The land development programme is intended to be self-liquidating as
costs are recovered through the sale of individual lots. As a municipality may
contract with the Provincial and Federal partnership to do the work associated with
the installation of services, there is an opportunity for local employment which may
be of benefit to the community.
A summary in this field follows:
Municipality
Residential Lots
Provided
Approved
Planned
Total
135
157
50
93
103
177
185
132
216
480
219
135
Duncan ,	
	
157
50
93
103
Mackenzie	
*48 acres
219
177
185
Saanich     ,	
132
216
Trail                                .. ,
480
Totals                    ,	
1,728
219
1,947
District of North Vancouver, 740-acre land bank.
City of Prince George, 227-acre land bank.
* District of Mackenzie, 48 acres to be developed as Phase II.
URBAN REDEVELOPMENT
Basically, projects of urban redevelopment are difficult to promote, as the Federal restriction of funding of this work is still effective. However, three programmes
have received approval, two in Vancouver and one in Victoria. In particular, an
extended programme of assistance in rehabilitation of properties in the Strathcona
area of Vancouver will move forward with funds provided by the Provincial and
Federal Governments and the City of Vancouver. In Victoria, the specific purpose
of assistance is to acquire a property on the shores of the Inner Harbour and remove
an activity which is deleterious to the beauty and public use of the core of the
Capital.
 T 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TABLES AND CHARTS
Table 1—Municipal Boundary Revisions, 1971
Municipality
Area (Acres)
Before
Added
After
Population
Before
Added
After
Cities
Courtenay_
Cranbrook-
Fernie	
Fernie (second)..
Grand Forks	
Prince George	
Vernon	
Districts
Oak Bay.	
Port Hardy	
Terrace (reduction) —
Towns
Ladysmith..
Quesnel	
Alert Bay_
Chetwynd-
Villages
Fort Nelson-
Oliver	
Pouce Coupe-
Princeton	
Princeton (second)-
Tofino	
1,919.10
2,513.50
1,228.52
1,772.05
2,439.23
11,668.37
3,376.98
2,883.83
9,051.00
5,302.00
2,204.00
3,457.90
563.23
972.59
2,000.00
540.00
143.61
592.89
1,232.98
852.50
2.94
568.02
543.53
205.51
92.39
459.82
16.30
718.40
245.60
—4.50
73.14
10.79
96.71
64.90
12.34
13.54
23.06
640.09
23.93
106.03
1,922.04
3,081.52
1,772.05
1,977.56
2,531.62
12,128.19
3,393.28
3,602.23
9,296.60
5,297.50
2,277.14
3,468.69
659.94
1,037.49
2,012.34
553.54
166.67
1,232.98
1,256.91
958.53
5,861
8,249
2,786
3,089
2,769
25,696
11,569
18,123
1,262
8,637
3,410
6,077
795
1,368
2,413
1,563
602
2,151
2,159
477
3
1,188
303
248
185
9
2
Nil
(!)
Nil
10
Nil
Nil
16
Nil
(!)
39
8
Nil
14
5,864
9,437
3,089
3,337
2,954
25,705
11,571
18,123
l.il7
3,420
6,077
795
1,384
2,413
"~ 641
2,159
2,159
491
i Figures not available at time of printing.
Source of base population figures is the 1966 Census.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1971
T 33
Table 2—Percentage Tax Collections
Percentage of
Total Collections
Outstanding Taxes
Current Levy
as a Percentage
as a Percentage
Collected
of Current Levy
of Current Levy
81.10
99.10
40.16
94.13
100.46
7.85
96.28
100.40
5.12
96.61
100.30
4.57
96.65
100.20
4.44
96.82
100.32
4.15
99.46
99.69
4.64
91.00
103.10
30.06
95.74
100.57
5.90
96.03
100.20
5.80
96.36
100.15
5.04
95.67
98.87
5.75
96.11
99.96
5.22
95.80
99.12
5.87
77.60
95.80
34.81
92.32
99.28
9.45
96.51
100.67
4.64
96.69
100.17
4.22
97.00
100.29
3.90
96.85
100.08
3.95
96.37
99.48
4.54
89.55
97.06
13.62
88.69
98.00
15.18
92.81
98.90
10.16
93.21
99.75
9.84
93.98
100.20
9.06
93.45
99.46
9.08
93.56
99.36
9.35
76.50
98.30
38.71
92.45
99.90
11.90
95.21
99.08
6.48
95.64
100.07
6.16
95.45
99.97
6.15
95.70
100.27
6.39
94.85
100.72
7.00
1939-
Cities (Except Vancouver)
1946
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970-             -              	
1939 -     -
Vancouver
1946
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970-                                               	
1939       ..
Districts
1946
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970-
1958.,
Towns
■1959
1966       ...
1967
1968
1969
1970
1939	
Villages
1946
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970	
Table 3—Trends in Financial Aspects of Municipal Government
Compared to Population and Income Expressed as Indexes
Year
Population
Total Revenue
(Excluding
Utilities)
Building
Permits
Debenture
Debt
Maximum
Values
Taxable
Total B.C.
Personal
Income
1960                               I
100.00
99.60
104.49
106.77
110.26
114.16
116.18
121.95
126.63
132.48
137.79
100.00
106.77
113.12
120.99
129.84
148.05
167.23
193.15
221.57
250.25
285.03
100.00
106.05
121.16
138.37
184.18
215.89
220.38
267.54
286.06
335.88
291.24
100.00
101.40
102.13
109.21
111.14
115.90
126.79
129.27
129.24
132.45
133.95
100.00
104.14
114.59
115.63
119.06
127.08
137.14
151.11
163.39
182.08
200.02
100.00
1961
101.01
1962
107.43
1963
1964
115.57
125.90
1965
141.10
1966.                     .    .
1967
1968
1969
1970  .              	
160.21
176.39
191.25
216.99
234.61
 T 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 4—Functions Assigned to Regional Districts During 1971
(Unless otherwise indicated, all member areas of the regional district participate in the function.)
Alberni-Clayoquot — Senior citizens' housing
(Port Alberni, Tofino, Cherry Creek, and
Electoral Area D).
Capital — Ice arena and recreation complex
(Colwood and Langford Electoral Areas).
Cariboo—Refuse disposal (all electoral areas).
Central Fraser Valley—Swimming-pool (Mats-
qui, Sumas, and Abbotsford).
Central Okanagan—
Electoral Area A added as participant in
refuse-disposal function.
Control of nuisances and unsightly premises
(all electoral areas).
Rutland swimming-pool (Electoral Area C
and defined part of I).
Columbia Shuswap—Ambulance service (Golden and Electoral Area A).
Comox-Strathcona—
Recreation complex  (Campbell River and
Electoral Areas D, E, and F).
Exhibition   park   and   recreation   complex
(Courtenay,   Comox,   Cumberland,   and
Electoral Areas B and C).
Regional parks   (all member areas except
Cumberland).
Fireworks regulation.
Cowichan Valley—Ambulance service  (Duncan, North Cowichan, and Electoral Areas
A, B, C, D, and E).
Fraser-Fort George—Community services
(Electoral Areas A, C, D, and F).
Greater Vancouver—Public housing.
Kootenay Boundary—
Community and recreation services (Fruit-
vale, Montrose, and Electoral Area A).
Recreation programmes.
Nanaimo—
Refuse disposal (Nanaimo Electoral Areas
A, B, C, D, E, F, andG).
Control of nuisances and unsightly premises
(all electoral areas).
Ambulance service (Nanaimo, Electoral
Areas B, C, D, E, F, and G, and defined
part of A).
North Okanagan—
Refuse disposal (Lumby and Electoral Area
D).
Senior citizens' housing (Enderby and Electoral Area F).
Noxious insect control (all electoral areas).
Okanagan-Similkameen—Community centre
(Osoyoos and Electoral Area A).
Peace River-Liard—
Recreation and community centre (Fort Nelson and defined part of Electoral Area A).
Ice arena (Chetwynd and defined part of
Electoral Area E).
Sunshine   Coast — Public  lighting   (Electoral
Areas A, B, C, D, E, and F).
Thompson Nicola—
Mosquito control (Kamloops, Chase, Logan
Lake, Valleyview, and Electoral Areas F,
G, J, and L).
Refuse disposal (all electoral areas).
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1971 T 35
Table 5—Regional District Functions as at December 31,1971
o
3
a-
o
cd
O
■a
>
C-
0
o
5
c
o
u
-c
ecj
|
>
B
O
<!
g
3)
o
bU
ih
Q
a
1-1
>
3
s
5
tf
CD
1
•a
i
0
n
o
c
a
c
1
■a
i
if,
a.
o
o
3
CO       CJ
0
i
_-
'4.
>,
a)
3
73
'S
o
o
£
3
III
v.
e
1
O
ci>
c.
E
J3
o
°?
X
o
E
o
ca
o
q
&
3
•3
*
O
o
at
u
u
tf
o
at
_p
1
d
o
0
O
6
a
a
O
o
cq
a
U
-Jl
B
«
2
0
Q
5
s
<
a
P
CD
1
3
a> o
.s a
1   §
<
03
u
U
0
U
U
U
U
u
u
W
H<
Uh
0
!*,
'A
£
£
0
0
Oh
ft.
u.
03
w H
Regional planning1
Community planning1
Building inspection i
Contract services1
Local works and services!
1
1
1
1
Grants-in-aid1
Ambulance 	
P
PIP
P
X
p
P
P
X
p
Y
X
Bus transit and transportations-
P
Civil Defence  ,    •
Y
Control of gatherings	
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X X
P
Y
X
P
Firearms control
p
Y
P
P
P
Y
P
X
Y
p
Y
Y
p
p
Y
p
x
p
V
p
Y
P
IP
p
P
p
P
Okanagan Basin Water Board-
X
X
X
P
Y
P
P
Y
p
P
p
P
P
PIP
P
p
P
p
P
Recreation programme	
p
X
P
P
X
X
P
p
P
p
p
P
P
p
p
X P
p
Y
p
P
V
Y
v
Y
p
P
Y
P
P
p
p
Urban renewal	
p
Water                         	
P
p
p
i Assigned by statute to all Regional Districts.
X=indicates function. P=indicates application of function in part of regional district only.
Note—Functions are described in detail in the publication Statistics Relating to Regional and Municipal
Governments in British Columbia.
 T 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 6—Regional District Specified Service Areas
Established During 1971
Capital—
Fire protection (North Pender Island).
Community park (View Royal).
Fraser Cheam—■
Fire protection (Yale).
Street lighting (Yale).
Cariboo —Fire protection  (100 Mile House     Mount Waddington—Street lighting (Sointula).
area).
Central Okanagan—Street lighting (Casa
Loma).
Comox-Strathcona—
Street lighting (Quathiaski Cove).
Refuse disposal (Cortes Island).
Cowichan Valley—Sewers (Cowichan Bay).
East Kootenay—Street lighting (West Fernie).
North  Okanagan — Refuse  disposal   (Mabel
Lake).
Okanagan-Similkameen—
Fire protection (Penticton area).
Refuse disposal (Osoyoos area).
Thompson-Nicola—
Street lighting (Powers addition).*
Fire protection (Powers addition).*
* Since included within the District of DufEerin, incorporated April 23, 1971.
Table 7—Highways (Scenic Improvement) Act, 1968
(Highways designated under above Act.)
Regional District
All
Highways in
Municipality
Certain
Highways in
Municipality
All Highways
in Regional
District
Outside of
Municipalities
Certain
Highways in
Regional
District
Outside of
Municipalities
Alberni-Clayoquot	
City—Port Alberni..
Bulkley-Nechako..
Village—Vanderhoof-
Capital..
Districts-
Esquimalt..
North Saanich..
Saanich	
Cariboo	
Town—Quesnel..
Village—100 Mile House-
Central Fraser Valley	
City—Langley	
Districts—
Langley..
Matsqui.
Central Kootenay..
City—Nelson—
Towns—
Creston.-	
Kinnaird-
Columbia-Shuswap—
District—Salmon Arm.-
Comox-Strathcona	
City—Courtenay_.
District—Campbell River-
Town—Comox	
Village—Cumberland-
Cowichan Valley-
District—North Cowichan..
East Kootenay..
City—Kimberley..
District—Sparwood..
Fraser-Fort George	
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1971
T 37
Regional District
All
Highways in
Municipality
Certain
Highways in
Municipality
All Highways
in Regional
District
Outside of
Municipalities
Certain
Highways in
Regional
District
Outside of
Municipalities
Greater Vancouver—
Cities—
Port Coquitlam	
Whiterock	
Districts—
Coquitlam-
North Vancouver-
Richmond	
Surrey-
Kitimat-Stikine-
Districts—
Kitimat	
Terrace..
Kootenay Boundary	
Village—Montrose-
Mount Waddington	
Villages—
Port Alice	
Port McNeill	
Nanaimo	
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
City—Nanaimo_.
North Okanagan	
Districts—
Coldstream	
Spallumcheen.-
Village—Lumby_
Okanagan-Similkameen	
District—Summerland-
Villages—
Keremeos	
Oliver  	
X
X
Osoyoos..
Peace River-Liard-
City—Dawson Creek-
District—Hudson's Hope-
Town—Fort St. John	
Villages—
Chetwynd	
Taylor	
Skeena A	
Sunshine Coast 	
X
X
X
X
X
Village—Gibsons-
S quamish-Lillooet	
X
X
 T 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
PERCENTAGE TAX   COLLECTIONS
CHART 1
LEGEND
 Cities ■- Villages
Districts  Vancouver
•••••••••Towns
PERCENTAGE    OF    CURRENT    LEVY   COLLECTED
TT*^
-•^S^s.*^^*^.
OUTSTANDING    TAXES    AS   A    PERCENTAGE OF    CURRENT    LEVY
.*-X
I960 61
69 1970
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1971
T 39
TRENDS    IN     FINANCIAL   ASPECTS   OF   MUNICIPAL    GOVERNMENT
COMPARED     TO    POPULATION    AND      INCOME
CHART  2
LEGEND
-~^^^~-Population  in   millions ......
— — — — -Total   revenue   in   millions   of  dollars
-.Building   permits   in    millions  of  dollars       	
Debenture    debt     in     millions   of    dollars
Maximum values taxable in
hundreds of millions  of dollars
Personal   income in hundreds
of millions of dollars
600
500
^±1
 T 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
MUNICIPAL   REVENUES
BY   MAJOR   SOURCE   197Q
CITIES   (EXCLUDING  VANCOUVER)
CHART 3
UTILITIES*1'
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER   PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE   GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION'2'
PROVIDED   BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
%   OF   REVENUE
 1002	
2.66 ( 2.72)
12.19 (12.72)
.94 ( 1.12)
11.81 (10.09)
9.10  (9.58)
34.07 (33.32)
15.11 (15.61)	
29.23 (30.45)
$  PER  CAPITA
S328.24   (291.75)
$ 8.73 ( 7.95)
40.05 (37.00)
3.07 ( 3.27)
38.77 (29.44)
30.00 (28.00)
111.69 (97.23)
95.93 (88.86)
1969   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$124,661,317   TOTAL POPULATION-379,781
DISTRICTS
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER    PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE   GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION12'
PROVIDED   BY  PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
% OF   REVENUE
 100°/-.
$  PER  CAPITA
S297.31    (256.03)
9.45 ( 9.64)
.58 (    .60)
7.59 ( 5.97)
10.18 (11.00)
36.76 (36.76)
18.16 (18.83) 	
35.44 (36.03)
tr&f&yfyt?*
$28.08 (24.82)
1.72 ( 1.55)
22.59 (15.29)
30.00 (28.00)
109.56 (94.11)
105.36 (92.26)
196»   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$194,389 513   TOTAL POPULATION-653,820
NOTE:-  (1) Utilities   represents   amount   appropriated   from   utility   operations   for   General   Municipal   Purposes,   is   not   Major
Source of   Revenue   for   Districts, Towns, Villages  and   Vancouver,  included   in 'Licenses  and  Other'   for  1968   and   1969.
(2) General   Municipal   Taxation  includes  Ad Valorem Tax,   Business  Tax,-Sewer  and  Water   Frontage  Tax  and   Special
Assessments.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1971
T 41
MUNICIPAL  REVENUES
BY   MAJOR   SOURCE   1970
TOWNS
CHART 3
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER    PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE   GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION*"
PROVIDED   BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
%  OF   REVENUE
 100%
11.69 (10.71)
1.08 (   .79)
9.38  ( 8.54)
11.93  (12.56)
33.64 (33.80)
19.49 (18.73) —
32.28 (33.60)
rrrrrri .41
r/ejSEm
S PER CAPITA
S 235.45   (222.30)
$27.53 (23.65)
2.55 ( 1.76)
22.09 (19.00)
30.00 (28.00)
77.28 (75.17)
76.00 (74.72)
1969   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$12,409,225     TOTAL POPULATION-52,704
VILLAGES
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER   PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION*1'
PROVIDED   BY  PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
%  OF   REVENUE
100%
11.85 (12.28)
.77  (   .77)
17.64 (17.63)
33.13 (33.52)
23.07 (22.26) —
36.64 (35.80)
$ PER  CAPITA
$173.11    (151.30)
$20.51 (17.26)
1.33 ( 1.17)
30.00 (28.00)
57187 (50.71)
63.40 (54.16)
1969   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$9,572,767       TOTAL POPULATION-55,297
NOTE;-  (1) General  Municipal   Taxation includes  Ad Valorem Tax,   Business  Tax, Sewer and Water   Frontage Tax   and  Special
Assessments.
 T 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
MUNICIPAL   REVENUE!
BY   MAJOR   SOURCE   1S70
VANCOUVER
CHART 3
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER   PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE   GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION'
PROVIDED   BY  PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
7,  OF   REVENUE
$ PER CAPITA
$348.65   (312.39)
10.80 (13.65)
.47 (   .47)
17.33 (13.77)
8.60 (8.96)
35.58 (34.43)
12.98 (13.55)  —
27.22  (28.72)
ttXtttf&ti*
$ 37.65 (42.63)
1.67 ( 1.46)
60.43 (43.01)
30.00 (28.00)
124.03 (107.57)
94.87 (89.72)
1969   FIGURES    SHOWN    IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$143,080,391     TOTAL POPULATION-410,375
NOTEc-  (1) General   Municipal   Taxation  includes  Ad Valorem Tax,   Business   Tax,  Sewer and  Water   Frontage Tax   and   Special
Assessments.
REVENUE   SHOWN   FOR  ALL CLASSES   OF   MUNICIPALITIES   INCLUDING    VANCOUVER   DOES   NOT    INCLUDE
APPROPRIATION    OF    PRIOR   YEARS     SURPLUS.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1971
T 43
VENUE    EXPENDITUR
BY    MAJOR   FUNCTION    197D
CITIES  (EXCLUDING  VANCOUVER)
ES
CHART 4
%  OF   EXPENDITURE
100%
$ PER
$332.07
CAPITA
(294.73)
GENERAL  GOVERNMENT
5.81
4.27
6.06
1.79
6.29
3.89
16.77
29.03
6.82
5.50
13.77
( 6.05)
( 4.32)
( 6.05)
( 2.06)
( 7.05)
( 3.82)
(14.06)
(30.28)
( 7.37)
( 5.94)
(13.00)
•■ : :":•. - :"■': .- .
$19.30 (17.82)
14.16  (12.73)
20.12  (17.82)
5.95  ( 6.07)
20.90   (20.77)
12.94   (11.25)
55.67   (41.42)
96.38   (89.19)
22.64   (21.69)
18.27   (17.50)
45.74    (38.47)
FIRE
p/Wft
ADMINISTRATION   OF JUSTICE
OTHER  PROTECTION
PUBLIC   WORKS
SANITATION   AND   WASTE REMOVAL
V////A
SOCIAL WELFARE
EDUCATION
m
DEBT  CHARGES  (NET)
CAPITAL  EXPENDITURES  FROM  REVENUE
W///,
OTHER
1969   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$126,114,745     TOTAL   POPULATION-379,781
DISTRICTS
% OF   EXPENDITURE
100%	
GENERAL   GOVERNMENT
FIRE
ADMINISTRATION  OF JUSTICE
OTHER   PROTECTION
PUBLIC WORKS
SANITATION  AND WASTE REMOVAL
SOCIAL WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT   CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL  EXPENDITURES   FROM   REVENUE
OTHER
5.64 ( 5.84)
3.32 ( 3.33)
4.89 (4.91)
1.64 ( 1.67)
6.56 ( 7.37)
2.70 (2.71)
12.96 (10.39)
34.80 (35.4$
6.75 ( 6.91)
7.40 ( 8.68)
13.34 (12.70)
sssssss
asa&ss
* * *
$  PER CAPITA
$303.44   (260.43)
$17.10
10.08
14.85
4.98
19.91
8.19
39.33
(15.22)
( 8.69)
(12.78)
( 4.35)
(19.19)
( 7.07)
(27.07)
105.58    (92.42)
20.47    (18.01)
22.46    (22.62)
40.49    (33.01)
1969   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$198,398,368    TOTAL   POPULATION - 653,820
NOTE:- Expenditures  for   Health   included  in 'Other'.
j
 T 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REVENUE    EXPENDITURES
BY    MAJOR    FUNCTION    1S70
TOWNS
CHART 4
GENERAL   GOVERNMENT
FIRE
OTHER    PROTECTIONS
PUBLIC   WORKS
SANITATION   &  WASTE   REMOVAL
SOCIAL WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT   CHARGES    (NET)
CAPITAL   EXPENDITURE  FROM  REVENUE
OTHER
Z OF  EXPENDITURE
 _____	
7.57   (7.84)
1.52 (1.56)
2.26 (2.36)
6.88   (8.00)
4.45 (4.69)
14.88 (12.32)
32.68 (33.93)
8.99 (9.63)
8.03 ( 7.88)
12.74 (11.79)
$ PER CAPITA
$234.09   (221.50)
$17.71   (17.56)
3.57    (3.47)
5.30    (5.23)
16.12   (17.73)
10.42  (10.38)
34.82 (27.29)
76.50 (75.16)
//. 21.04 (21.32)
18.80 (17.47)
29.81 (25.89)
1969   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$12,337,857     TOTAL   POPULATION-52,704
VILLAGES
%    OF  EXPENDITURE
100%      	
GENERAL    GOVERNMENT
OTHER PROTECTIONS
PUBLIC  WORKS
SANITATION & WASTE   REMOVAL
EDUCATION
DEBT CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL  EXPENDITURE   FROM   REVENUE
OTHER
11.63 (12.05)
2.31    (2.50)
2,94   (2-79)
9.18   (10.02)
4.74   (5.09)
37.42 (37.16)
6.97   (7.13)
11.91 (10.50)
12.92 (12.76)
$   PER   CAPITA
$170.39   (146.56)
$19.82 (17.65)
3.94   (3.67)
5.00   (4.09)
15.63 (14.68)
8.09    (7.46)
63.73 (54.46)
11.88 (10.45)
20.30 (15.39)
22.00 (18.71)
1969   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES"$ 9,422,533     TOTAL   POPULATION-55,297
NOTE:-  Expenditures   for    Health   included    in  'Other'
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1971
T 45
REVENUE    EXPENDITURES
BY    MAJOR    FUNCTION    1370
VANCOUVER
CHART 4
GENERAL  GOVERNMENT
FIRE
ADMINISTRATION   OF  JUSTICE
OTHER  PROTECTION
PUBLIC   WORKS
SANITATION   AND   WASTE  REMOVAL
SOCIAL WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT   CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL  EXPENDITURES  FROM  REVENUE
OTHER
%  OF   EXPENDITURE
100%
S PER   CAPITA
$360.38   (330.76)
3.21 ( 3.23)
5.70 ( 5.70)
8.91 ( 9.40)
2.60 ( 1.97)
2.30 (2.65)
3.09 ( 3.12)
21.98 (17.08)
26.23 (26.97)
9.07 ( 8.55)
3.03 ( 6.27)
13.88 (15.06)
777777?,
:/././//:/.
$11.57 (10.69)
20.54 (18.85)
32.12 (31.11)
9.36 ( 6.53)
8.30 ( 8.77)
11.14 (10.33)
79.19 (56.52)
94.51 (89.22)
32.69 (28.29)
10.93 (20.75)
50.03 (49.70)
1969   FIGURES    SHOWN    IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$147,891,070    TOTAL   POPULATION-410,375
NOTE:- Expenditures   for   Health   included   in 'Other',
 T 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENTAL PUBLICATIONS
Annual Report, year ended December 31, 1970.
Municipal Statistics, year ended December 31, 1970.
Statistics Relating to Regional and Municipal Governments, May 1971.
Regional Districts in British Columbia, September 1971.
Subdivision Approval Procedures 1971—A Guide for Use—Areas Outside Municipalities.
A Guide to Municipal and Regional District Administrative Procedures, May 1970.
A Guide to Municipal and Regional District Financial Management, May 1970.
Provincial Subdivision Regulations, November 1970.
Land Use Colour and Coding Guide, December 1970.
Zoning Colour and Coding Guide, December 1970.
ACTS ADMINISTERED BY DEPARTMENT OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
Municipal Act.
Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act.
Local Services Act.
Highways (Scenic Improvement) Act, 1968.
Municipal Finance Authority of British Columbia Act.
Housing Act.
Mobile Home Park Fee Act.
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1972
1,530-172-464

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0375912/manifest

Comment

Related Items