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Minister of Public Works REPORT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1970/71 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1972

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 r
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Minister of Public Works
REPORT
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
1970/71
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1972
  To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Public Works for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1971, in compliance with the
provisions of the Public Works Act.
W. N. CHANT
Minister of Public Works
Office of the Minister of Public Works,
Parliament Buildings, December 30, 1971.
 .
'We must lead, not follow."
—Department of Public Works.
 INDEX
PAGE
Report of the Deputy Minister.     7
Report of the Director of Design     8
Report of the Director of Construction and Maintenance  15
Report of the Co-ordinator of Maintenance  18
Report of the Co-ordinator of Construction  19
Construction Management  21
Report of the Mechanical Engineer.  22
Report of the Civil Engineer  23
Underground Disposal of Effluent  24
Report of the Electrical Engineer  26
Report of the Architect-Planner  27
Report of the Chief Engineer, Safety Engineering Services Division  30
Report of the Chief Boiler Inspector.  32
Report of the Inspector of Electrical Energy  35
Report of the Chief Gas Inspector  37
Report of the Comptroller of Expenditure  40
Tenders Received and Contracts Awarded for Buildings  45
  REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER
The Honourable W. _V. Chant,
Minister of Public Works,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, British Columbia.
Sir: I have the honour to submit for your consideration the Annual Report of
the Department for the fiscal year ended March 31,1971.
Elsewhere in this Report will be those from the heads of divisions. These set
out work accomplished and planned, tenders let and accepted, and Departmental
accounts.
Reference has been made in previous Annual Reports to the efforts and policies
of the Department aimed at developing buildings and surroundings which are pleasing to the public and invite their participation and involvement. It is most gratifying
to find strong evidence that this philosophy is attaining its objective.
During the year, five of our recently constructed buildings have been nominated
by Chambers of Commerce, and other bodies, for awards. These were the Law
Courts Buildings at Quesnel and Duncan; the residences, British Columbia Vocational School, Terrace; the Motor-vehicle Inspection Station and the Netherlands
Carillon Tower at Victoria. The Quesnel Government Building won an award for
having made the most significant contribution to beautification in its zone.
Support for the policy appears to be evidenced by the tremendous public response to Heritage Court. The Court and the Museum have drawn close to one
million visitors during 1971.
Initial use of the Construction Management principle in construction of Government buildings has proved encouraging, sufficiently so that we will be recommending its further use where appropriate.
The need for much greater involvement in programming was mentioned in
last year's Report. During the year under review this need was given greater attention, and much time has been spent in analysing programmes and requirements. It
has been possible, as a result, to offer alternative plans which enable maximum cost
savings to be effected.
The Department has been deeply involved in Centennial activities. We would
be remiss in failing to draw attention to the highly commendable work done in the
Capital and throughout the Province by our Superintendents and staff when looking
after the numerous special events during this very busy period. This special mention
must in no way be allowed to detract from the tribute which is due to Departmental
staff generally.  They have worked hard and cheerfully.
Yours respectfully,
A. E. WEBB
Deputy Minister
 G 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF  DESIGN
"Research is an organized method of rinding out what you are going to do when you can't
keep on doing what you are doing now"—Charles F. Kettering, Seed for Thought 1949.
The activities connotated by the word "design" extend not only to the provision of professional services in the design of new buildings but include architectural
design services associated with renovation of existing Government buildings; engineering design in the extension and initiation of primary services—sewer, water, gas,
heat, and electricity; landscape design in the development of sites; the testing, assessment, and improvement of possible environmental polluting sources such as sewage
plants, incinerators, and boiler plants; and the provision of professional advice to
other departments, to Government, and to the public.
With particular reference to our primary role of new building design and advice
relating to such service, we are very conscious that this present period of time is
one of changing social values, of rapidly changing construction methods and cost
relationships, of inflationary trends, and of greater sensitivity to the impact of construction programmes. This consciousness instils in all of us an even more dedicated awareness of the "trusteeship" nature of our function.
Thus, as all levels of Government endeavour to provide even more desired
services, cost-benefit studies and the application of strict cost control becomes of
vital importance.
There are many methods of achieving responsible cost control, but in this age
of "instant" solutions one must ever be alert to the pitfalls and disadvantages which
are possible between the enthusiastic claims of proponents of a particular method
on the one hand and the subjective, derogatory reports by opponents on the other.
The belief that a free-market economy will provide an answer has produced
the so-called "developer proposal" system. At first glance this appears to offer
many benefits. When applied to building design, however, faced with not only the
difficulty of specifying quality and deciding between short- and long-term cost-
benefit issues, but with the enormously more demanding problem of accurately
programming sociological, moral, and even spiritual issues, we believe that this
system can only be considered wasteful and inefficient. The method can, however,
be of value when first cost is the prime determinant, and can be so stated.
Others look to Construction Management as the answer to our construction-
cost ills, and there are indeed some areas where this can be of significant value. Yet
others, looking to technology to provide the solutions to our problems, hopefully
examine the "Systems" approach and other forms of prefabrication.
Our own conviction is that, while these various approaches may offer assistance,
there is no instant, magic formula which, if applied, will solve the problems inherent
in the construction industry, in the context of today's demands. Rather, we believe
that the best possibility lies in the rational application and refinement of the skills
which we now possess, aided by the processes previously mentioned where applicable.   The use of such skills, of course, involves a cost.
Consistent with these beliefs, the Design Division of this Department applies
the principles of cost control and cost budgeting to its every endeavour.
The essence of designing to a budget is to make meaningful decisions, related
to cost, at each stage of design from need to reality and only to add, subtract, or
change when the cost implication of such revision is clearly understood. In order
to implement cost control it is first necessary to isolate and tabulate, at the earliest
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1970/71 G 9
stage of development, the major cost determinants and then to critically examine
each to determine its acceptability.
To develop these principles more fully, several organizational changes have
been initiated—
(1) By the formation of a Programming Section to investigate need and define
requirements. This includes the formulation of the spacial, environmental, proximity, and circulatory requirements necessary to satisfy that need.
(2) By the establishment of multidisciplinary teams to produce design solutions to each problem. Each team includes a quantity surveyor to provide cost information, as well as any other specialists who can contribute
to the solution. The team is formed at the commencement of a project
and with the requisite authority to enable it to act in determining solutions.
(3) By the reorganization of the Division from a "process" system, i.e., a
rigid heirarchical, specialist-oriented system, to a much more flexible
"purpose" form, with the primary objective being the job at hand. The
multidisciplinary teams referred to are thus appointed on an ad hoc basis
for each special problem. This results in a more fluid interchange of
personnel.
(4) By the simplification of channels of communication, with teams being
authorized to deal directly with user departments and reporting directly
on their projects.
(5) By the development, in collaboration with other Governmental and private agencies, of an elemental costing system which enables much more
accurate cost information to be provided at an earlier stage in the design
process than has heretofore been possible.
(6) By extending the investigatory phases of design into intensive analyses of
alternative approaches to each problem as conceptual and feasibility
studies. Each such alternative is attended by a rational cost assessment
which enables management and the project team to appreciate the implications of each decision in choosing between desirable alternatives. Such
study extends to the cost analysis of programmatic statements to assist in
determining value.
(7) By the intensification of a training programme, both formal and informal,
to ensure that the skills being developed will be adequately backed by
knowledge and continually honed on the stones of discussion and constructive criticism.
This system has been in use now for approximately 12 months, and results have
been most encouraging in that a more precise determination has been shown to be
possible within the range of feasible alternatives. It is recognized that such a system
results in increased design costs. It is believed, however, that such increased cost
is one of the finest investments this Department can make.
Cost control does not mean an indiscriminate cutting of all costs. It means
making meaningful decisions related to cost. We believe that by spending more
time in the formative stage of a project we can more accurately forecast and select
these final answers which will have the most significant cost implications.
It is emphasized that the design approach being followed by this Division is
not a new one but is a refinement of methods which have been followed by all rational design agencies. When our present model is further extended into the private
designing sector, as has already been initiated with consultants employed by the
 G 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department, expanded by the freshness and originality of thought which is the life
blood of the private design sector, we are confident that the results will be of even
greater benefit.
CONTRACTS AWARDED DURING THE 1970/71 PERIOD
The construction year was distinguished by three conditions—
(1) many continuing projects from the proceding fiscal period;
(2) the tight monetary situation; and
(3) the extensive construction lockout.
Because of these factors, new major construction awards were limited to 11
principal contracts aggregating $836,000. These approximated 48 per cent for the
Department of Education, 43 per cent for the Department of Mental Health, while
the remaining 9 per cent included projects for the Departments of Rehabilitation
and Social Improvement and the Attorney-General.
Particulars of these contracts will be found at the end of the Report. Several
projects of particular interest are mentioned here:
(1) Nanaimo—British Columbia Vocational School Automotive Workshop:
A contract in the amount of $356,120 provided a workshop and classrooms for heavy-duty mechanics and carpentry.
(2) New Westminster—The Woodlands School, renovations to Wing No. 2,
Centre Building: A contract in the amount of $298,792 was the third
phase of the renovations to this building.
(3) New Denver—Sewage-treatment plant, Youth Development Centre: A
contract in the amount of $20,000 provided a package pumping and
sewage-treatment plant which will minimize the possibility of pollution
of Slocan Lake.
PROJECTS PLANNED DURING THE 1970/71 PERIOD
Approximately 55 projects were in various stages of planning during this fiscal
year under review.    The major portion of these are outlined below.
Department of Education
1. Nanaimo—British Columbia Vocational School: Planning continued on
the provision of a new welding shop.
2. Victoria—British Columbia Vocational School: Planning continued on a
Training and Feeding Cafeteria to seat approximately three hundred.
3. Burnaby—British Columbia Vocational School: Planning proceeded on
the completion of the heavy-duty diesel mechanics workshop.
4. Dawson Creek—British Columbia Vocational School: Planning commenced
on an addition to the Food Training Building.
Department of Mental Health
1. Tranquille—Tranquille School:
(a) A sewage aeration system was planned to reduce the possibility of pollution of Kamloops Lake.
(b) Planning commenced on the provision of fire escapes from the Greaves
Building.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1970/71 G 11
2. Essondale—Riverview Hospital:
(a) Planning commenced on Phase 2 of the renovations to West Lawn Building to improve the washroom facilities.
(b) Planning commenced on the conversion of the existing boiler plant from
coal to natural gas. This was part of the policy to minimize pollution
from stacks and to provide a more economical operation.
(c) Planning commenced on the revisions to Centre Lawn Building to provide
occupational therapy facilities in existing space.
(_.) Planning commenced for the provision of fire escapes to Crease Clinic and
East Lawn Building.
3. New Westminster—The Woodlands School: Planning commenced on a
complete ventilation system for the 100-bed units.
Department of the Attorney-General
1. Victoria-Colquitz—Vancouver Island Correctional Centre: Planning commenced on the upgrading of these facilities by the provision of a multi-use building,
by the replacement of the water service, by the conversion of the existing boiler
plant, and by the connection of the institution to sanitary sewer facilities. These
latter two projects were part of the Department's continuing efforts to minimize
pollution.
2. Haney—Alouette River Unit: Planning commenced on the provision of a
new Administration Building to replace the present inadequate structure.
Department of Highways
1. Victoria-Langford—Planning commenced on the provision of a welding and
fabricating shop at this establishment.
2. Highways maintenance establishments—Planning continued on the provision of maintenance establishments at the following locations: Vernon, New Denver,
Golden, Tete Jaune Cache. This accommodation is all being planned on a modular
basis, utilizing the scheme previously developed in this Department, modified as
required in the light of experience gained. Evaluation studies carried out by teams
after 13 months' occupancy have proved the value of this form of planning.
Other Departments
1. Nelson—Consultants were retained to study the situation with regard to the
retaining-wall adjoining the Courthouse and recommend corrective measures.
2. Department of Recreation and Conservation—Storage buildings: Planning
continued on the provision of bait and storage buildings at Penticton, Fort St. John,
and Smithers.
3. Department of Commercial Transport—Weigh-scale stations: Planning was
initiated for the provision of weigh-scale stations at Kamloops and Golden.
4. Essondale—Colony Farm: Planning commenced on the provision of prefabricated dormitories for agricultural workers to enable their relocation from the
existing condemned Riverside Cottage.
5. Charlie Lake—Mines establishment: Planning was initiated for the provision
of a new building to enlarge the core storage.
6. Provincial Government Buildings—Planning was commenced for new Provincial Government Buildings at Nelson and Smithers. In Nelson this building is
to supplement the existing Courthouse, and to centralize facilities for the public. In
Smithers the facilities are intended to replace the present inadequate and antiquated
 G 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Provincial Government structure, and to form the nucleus of a new Municipal
Governmental Centre in the downtown area.
7. Creston—Planning commenced on the provision of an Administration
Building for the Wildlife Management area at this location.
8. Prince George—Planning was initiated on a Library Development Commission Building to house Provincial Library facilities in this area.
9. British Columbia Building—Elements of the Design Division participated
in the Building Management Committee which was established for the management
of the design and construction of this building. Advertisements were placed, interviews were held, and selections were recommended to the Policy Committee, following which engagements were entered into with both the prime consulting architects and the consulting engineers. Concurrent with this process, programmers were
engaged and planning continued on the evaluation of requirements.
GENERAL
This fiscal period saw an increase in the demands by other departments for
professional consultation and advice on design and cost matters, including:
Provincial Secretary—Sixty-five submissions of plans for senior citizens' housing were made covering 33 projects, and constructive criticism was given, followed
be recommendations to the Provincial Secretary.
Municipal Affairs—
1. Assistance was given in evaluation and technical review of six Federal-
Provincial Housing Developments under design and construct contracts.
2. The Department carried out two concept studies on similar schemes which
did not come to fruition, and provided inspection services on another.
3. Full set of documents was prepared for the proposed Senior Citizens'
Development under the Strata Titles Act.
Engineering services—The Department continued to provide specialized engineering advice on a variety of matters apart from those previously mentioned:
1. Advice to the Purchasing Commission on fuel and specialty apparatus.
2. Advice to the Liquor Control Board with reference to their building and
operational proposals.
3. Advice to the Public Utilities Commission on the suitability of crematoria.
Checks were made on completion and certification carried out for three in this
period.
TREASURY BOARD
The work of the Cost Analysis Team on the construction and operating cost
problems for the University of British Columbia Health Sciences Centre continued
and provided much useful advice which resulted in considerable revision to the
schemes being considered.
In conclusion it is once again my pleasure to record the dedicated and creative
participation of all sections of the Design staff. Their continued cheerful and willing
acceptance of the heavy loads placed upon them is, as always, in accord with the
highest professional standards, and a measure of their pride in the service of the
people.
I would also record the constructive and harmonious relations which exist
with Construction and Maintenance Division and field personnel and the excellence
of co-operation received from the personnel of all Government departments and
agencies whom it is our privilege to serve.
G. L. Giles, M.R.A.I.C, Dip.Pub.Admin.
Director of Design
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1970/71
G 13
Brooder House, Abbotsford.
Highways maintenance establishment, Vanderhoof.
 G 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Cafeteria Building, Vocational School, Kelowna.
THERE S     NO    RUSH   ON    THIS,   WEMISH^
TAKE   ALL   NjqHT     IF     NECESSARY
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1970/71 G  15
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF CONSTRUCTION
AND MAINTENANCE
"When it shall be found that much is omitted, let it not be forgotten that
much is performed"—Samuel Johnson.
As a departure from the format of previous annual reports of this Division's
work, this year individual reports by both the Co-ordinator of Construction and
the Co-ordinator of Maintenance are included. This report, therefore, does not
attempt to recapitulate the numerous and varied interesting work performed by
each Branch, but does attempt to focus attention upon the actual composition of
our Maintenance Programme, and to review current trends in the management of
building contracts.
It is generally accepted that buildings start to deteriorate as soon as they are
constructed, but the rate of deterioration is radically affected by the materials used
and by design. The maintenance of buildings can, therefore, be broken down into
at least three categories—
(1) servicing;
(2) rectification;
(3) renewal.
The average citizen is probably most familiar with work required under category (1), which includes the cleaning of buildings and the replenishing of expendable
supplies.
Although the quantity of service required will vary according to the extent of
occupancy, seasonal changes, and other factors, the necessity to render this service
will continue as long as the building remains occupied.
Category (2) is work necessitated by incorrect installation, by design modifications, and by changes to meet actual operating requirements. Work arising
from this cause often occurs early in the life of a building, frequently from reallocation of accommodation, implementation of Government programmes, and normal
expansion. This activity consumes a large proportion of the total labour and
material resources available.
Category (3) becomes a major concern much later than the previous phases
and consists of either part of total replacement of the building components which,
due to use in service, have deteriorated. Although the extent of this work can be
related to the use of the building and the durability of materials employed in construction, constant upgrading of safety and building codes make it mandatory to
consider replacement in some instances before final breakdown could result in
disruption.
In addition to work necessitated under the above classifications, the Branch
has been reviewing safety and security in both new and existing buildings to keep
abreast with prevailing advances in these fields. The participation of Public Works
tradesmen and their crews in setting up platforms, temporary lighting, and other
special items for all types of official ceremonies continued throughout the year and
will be a major item of work in the Centennial year.
A temporary slowdown in the award of new contracts was experienced during
the fiscal period under review, but construction work already in progress shows an
increase in volume over previous fiscal periods. As construction projects become
larger and more complex, construction management, which advocates the manage-
 G 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ment of the project on behalf of the client from the initial concept through to the
final completion, is of a special interest to this Branch if it is a means of ensuring
a better co-ordination in the construction stages. However, management of construction, despite its importance, is only one phase of total project management.
It is, however, interesting to note recent papers on the subject have suggested
Government agencies and commissions are well organized and set up to run projects
on this basis. Although a major advantage for adoption of project management
is on the score of comprehensive cost control on large complex buildings, there is
merit in some instances to the award of separate prime contracts on smaller projects
to expedite completion of the works.
In conclusion, I would like to acknowledge the co-operation we have received
from the Design Division and personnel in all Government departments to whom
we have provided service, and last, but not least, the staff of the Division who
responded so well to all demands.
Stanley Lloyd, M.R.A.I.C, A.R.I.B.A., Dip.Pub.Admin.
Director of Construction and Maintenance
Never mind which are stalactites or stalagmites—Fix the roof.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1970/71
G 17
Temple Building interior before renovations.
Temple Building interior after renovations.
 G 1-
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CO-ORDINATOR OF MAINTENANCE
The responsibility for maintenance of Provincial Government buildings is
taken by the Maintenance Branch of the Construction and Maintenance Division,
Mr. S. Lloyd, Director.
For administrative reasons, the Province is divided into six zones, numbered
1 to 6, and with headquarters at Victoria, Burnaby, Essondale, Kamloops, Nelson,
and Prince George respectively. Branch headquarters are in Victoria and constitute
the offices of the Co-ordinator of Maintenance, Maintenance Architect, Maintenance
Mechanical Engineer, and their staffs.
The distribution of Maintenance personnel by trades among the six zones was
as follows:
Trade
Zone 1,
Victoria
Zone 2,
Burnaby
Zone 3,
Essondale
Zone 4,
Kamloops
Zone 5,
Nelson
Zone 6,
Prince
George
Total
193
30
18
16
14
10
40
15
0
5
9
5
6
97
62
12
10
7
6
22
4
0
5
5
8
0
21
56
15
21
17
13
18
12
11
11
0
9
7
35
37
8
10
5
5
5
14
7
2
9
5
3
33
6
5
4
1
0
6
0
0
0
3
4
0
59
27
5
6
2
2
11
5
0
0
0
4
0
438
Stationary engineers	
Carpenters	
218
63
67
Electricians ,	
46
36
102
Gardeners	
50
18
23
26
Office staff-   -    _	
35
Plasterers 	
16
Total Maintenance personnel, 1,138.
Maintenance Expenditures by Zones, 1970/71
Zone 1,
Victoria
Zone 2,
Burnaby
Zone 3,
Essondale
Zone 4,
Kamloops
Zone 5,
Nelson
Zone 6,
Prince
George
Salaries and wages	
Heat, light, power, and
water _	
Maintenance of buildings..
Maintenance of mechanical equipment	
$
2,294,351.03
519,384.57
364,372.08
3,153.45
$           '            $
1,596,537.58 j 1,614,280.15
663,365.38 |     847,486.64
496,171.34 |     383,752.07
8,073.19 j         2,638.13
$
1.051,745.37
337,480.44
157,908.40
6,298.02
$
359,643.54
89,459.84
88,251.32
632.98
$
747,846.35
262,770.20
183,467.32
10,369.83
Totals	
3.181.261.1..   1  2764.14749  1  2.848.15699
1.553.372.23  \      537.98768  1   1.204.453.70
Branch Headquarters staff in Victoria were fully occupied in preparing drawings and specifications for renovation work to Provincial Government buildings,
landscape maintenance, and janitorial services. Tenders were invited for 107 jobs
during the year, varying cost from a few hundred dollars to $46,980 for renovations
to the Admitting Area, Oakalla Prison (Project 39-B-70).
During the fiscal period, new buildings costing approximately $4,500,000 were
accepted from contractors as substantially complete, and maintenance responsibility
assumed by the Branch. As the construction of Provincial Government buildings
continues at an accelerating rate, staff increases to operate and maintain them must
also continue. While some economies of scale are possible, in general it is apparent
that more buildings require more people to operate them and more money to maintain them. The Maintenance Branch is, therefore, preparing to assume a more important role financially in the Public Works Department.
Harry Greig, B.A.S.C.
P.Eng., Dip.Pub.Admin.
Co-ordinator of Maintenance
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1970/71
G 19
REPORT OF THE CO-ORDINATOR OF CONSTRUCTION
This Branch is responsible for the overseeing of construction of Government
buildings throughout the Province, and employs, in addition to the Headquarters
staff, 17 Project Inspectors. Four of these are specialists in the mechanical, electrical, and landscaping disciplines. Their task is to ensure that the specifications
and standards as laid down are adhered to.
In addition to the ever-increasing sophistication of materials and equipment,
with the consequent need for comprehensive inspection, it is found that the settling
of contract disputes and difficulties ensuing from firms going out of business during
contracts places a heavier burden upon the Branch.
A training course for Project Inspectors in surveying and some aspects of
mechanical engineering was organized. We must express our appreciation for an
excellent presentation by the Senior Mechanical Engineer and his staff. The course
was very successful and well received by all concerned.
During the year, progress payment and invoicing procedures were refined,
which now results in payments to contractors being made more expeditiously than
before.
The system of holding pre-job meetings with contractors prior to commencing
work was found to be successful. At this meeting, procedures are reviewed with
the contractor, covering such items as progress payments, communication, change
orders, shop and "as built" drawings, site instructions, and regular site meetings.
During the year the following samples of major projects were completed and
accepted, showing the scope and diversity of the projects which were supervised
by our staff:
Glendale Hospital, Victoria.
Provincial Building, Duncan.
Multipurpose Centre, BCIT, Burnaby.
Alterations to Centre Building, The Woodlands School, New Westminster.
Cafeteria and Dormitories, British Columbia Vocational School, Terrace.
Courthouse, Williams Lake.
Cafeteria, British Columbia Vocational School, Kelowna.
Highways establishments, Salmon Arm, Quesnel, Williams Lake.
Motor-vehicle Inspection Station, Burnaby.
Reroofing North Lawn Building, Riverview Hospital, Essondale.
Renovations to West Lawn Building, Riverview Hospital, Essondale.
A four-month construction lockout during the year created a difficult situation
with respect to security and completion of these projects and other work in progress.
A large number of minor projects were also supervised, including:
Renovations to the East Wing, Parliament Buildings.
Renovations, Vancouver Courthouse.
Renovations, Vernon Courthouse.
Underground services, Colquitz, Vancouver Island Unit.
Computer installation, Liquor Control Board, Vancouver.
Site works, British Columbia Vocational School, Prince George.
Revisions to Eric Martin Institute, Victoria.
In conclusion, the staff of the Construction Branch wish to express their
appreciation to the Design Division for their co-operation during the year.
D. Grey, Dip.Pub.Admin.
Co-ordinator of Construction
 G 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
________■
11 m wLii     m ■
■
1 f^EfHHi^^^H 1
Tri    n % *-^yjt
West Lawn interior, Essondale, before renovations.
West Lawn interior, Essondale, after renovations.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1970/71 G 21
CONSTRUCTION  MANAGEMENT
The "traditional method" has been used for many years by public and private
bodies in contracting for construction work to be done. By this is meant the system
whereby an owner selects and determines a requirement, arranges for a detailed
design to meet that requirement, and then by competitive tenders selects a contractor
and pays him a stipulated sum for the work done.
Under the traditional approach, the three most interested parties are the owner,
the architect (or engineer), and the contractor. Ideally, these should work together,
each contributing the maximum input, to bring the project to a sound conclusion.
Unfortunately, this does not always happen. The general contractor, for one, does
not become involved until the design and specifications are finished. He, therefore,
has no opportunity to offer his expertise. All he can do is to pare his price to the
limit in hopes of getting the job. Even the consultants are robbed, by their own
fee structure, of some incentive to save the owner cost. There is, whether overt
or otherwise, a conflict of interest involved.
However, whatever imperfections may be imputed to it, the method has
served a need very well. The competitive nature of bidding, for example, has been
tried by the hot fire of experience, has been proven of real value and needs to be retained. The method should not be, and indeed is not in this writing, sold short.
Rather, a method should be sought which will use the strengths, but also strengthen
the weaknesses, of what time has proved to be good. Construction Management
offers a solution.
It is necessary first to define what is Construction Management, and, perhaps,
what it is not. Construction Management is not Project Management. The two are
different. Project Management is the comprehensive management of all aspects of
a project from conception to completion. It is a service used by those "owners"
who do not normally have "in house" construction expertise and must, consequently, engage a professional service. Construction Management is the management of that part of the total project which is concerned with actual construction.
It is appropriate to the public sector, as the "in house" expertise is normally present.
Instead of a profit percentage, the general contractor (construction manager) is
engaged, as a professional, for a fee.
An integral part of Construction Management is that it is a team approach.
The basic premise is that the owner, the consultant, and the general contractor
(construction manager) for a team rather than acting independently or, as sometimes happens, at "arms length." It would seem almost unnecessary to remark
that the three pools of expertise pulling together should produce a better end result.
All the foregoing in no way diminishes the competitive factors inherent in the
tender system. On the contrary, all work is tendered with contractors submitting
bids to the project team, but having their work co-ordinated and managed by the
construction manager.
Other basic advantages are:
(1) Total project time can be saved. Design and construction may proceed
at the same time and in sequence.
(2) There is greater flexibility if requirements should change. There is also
a saving of cost in the pricing of extras.
(3) "Time is money." Among other savings brought about by the shortened
time factor are lessened interest charges for capital financing, earlier use
of the finished premises, and some lessening of inflationary trends—often
discounted ahead of time under conventional methods.
(4) A more precise definition and understanding of objectives is achieved,
there is a single office responsibility, and time and cost control systems
are more effectively used.
Probably no single method is the panacea for all ills. However, Construction
Management appears to offer considerable improvement. It should be given a
thorough trial.
 G 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE MECHANICAL ENGINEER
"According to the theory of aerodynamics, as may be readily demonstrated
through wind-tunnel experiments, the bumblebee is unable to fly. This is because the
size, weight, and shape of his body in relation to the total wingspread make flying
impossible.
"But the bumblebee, being ignorant of these scientific truths, goes ahead and flies
anyway—and makes a little honey every day"—sign in a General Motors Corporation
plant.
This year marks the end of an era. Use of coal for fuel in domestic and small
plants has become not only inconvenient when compared with other fuels available
but uneconomic as well. Over the last decade the Department has converted most
of the small heating plants to either natural gas, where it was available, or light
fuel-oil. The convenience, cleanliness, and the reduction of the attendant problems
have been excellent.
However, in the largest plant operated by the Department, at the Riverview
Hospital, Essondale, we have been well set up to handle coal as a fuel. Up to last
year it has been the most economic fuel to use. However, the use of coal is attended
by a reduceable level of pollution.
The declining domestic market for coal and the increased costs of producing
it have virtually closed most small coal mines in British Columbia. These two
factors have also combined to make the cost of heat in the form of coal more
expensive than either natural gas or fuel-oil.
Engineering studies, detailed plans, and specifications have been completed
this year for conversion of the Essondale plant, and money has been made available
to carry out the work.
It is the sad end of an era, but ironic, too, in that more coal is being mined in
British Columbia than ever before, but for overseas shipments, while the domestic
market has shrunk to its lowest point.
It is also an oddity, in that British Columbia is one of the very few places in
the world where an abundance of basic energy sources abound, where electric power,
natural gas, fuel-oil, and wood fuel have competed with each other in the available
market.
This Branch of the Design Division has participated in most of the capital
projects described elsewhere in this Report.
W. E. Mills, B.A.Sc, P.Eng., Dip.Pub.Admin.
Senior Mechanical Engineer
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1970/71 G 23
REPORT OF THE CIVIL ENGINEER
"Don't, like the cat, try to get more out of an experience than there is in it.
The cat, having sat upon a hot stove lid will not sit upon a hot stove lid again. Nor
upon a cold stove lid"—Mark Twain.
The Civil Engineering Division spent a busy year on many varied projects
listed elsewhere in the Annual Report. The Landscaping Section of our Division is
involved in producing plans for landscaping on most Government buildings. Probably one of the most rewarding projects was the design of playgrounds for children
with special problems, i.e., mental retardation, deaf and (or) blind, and problem
children. Due to the special problems involved, the standard parks or school
playgrounds are unsuitable. Consequently, much research and consultation with
supervisory staff was required in the design of these facilities.
It is essential that the interest of a problem child is stimulated to a far greater
extent than a normal child. This requirement has been met with the inclusion of
new and novel types of equipment and games.
A large contract was completed in 1969, at Jericho Hill School for the Deaf-
and the Blind, Vancouver, comprising playing-fields, tennis courts, running track
swings, and standard and specialized playground equipment. One of the unusual
pieces of playground equipment specially designed for this school was a large
wooden pyramid. The pyramid is designed with numerous holes—slides and
facilities for climbing and hiding. Due to the configuration, blind children are
able to find their way around easily and soon become very expert in its use.
Specially textured surfaces are located at strategic locations, such as stairs,
etc., to warn blind children of dangers ahead.
Another landscaping feature of the Blind School is a "fragrant" garden, composed of plants and herbs which blind children can smell and locate by themselves.
The forces associated with wind play a very important part in structural design,
especially in the case of larger buildings. Wind pressures are classified according
to probabilities of occurrence and height of structure, gust pressures, and the shape
of the structure. For example, the velocity pressure used in the design of cladding
for a building is usually based on the probability of being exceeded once in 10 years.
For all other structural members of a building the pressure used is that based
on the probability of being exceeded once in 30 years. The exception to the above
is a building essential to postdisaster services which is based on a probability of
'being exceeded once in 100 years. All the above values are multiplied by an
exposure and shape factor; for example, the wind pressure per square foot on a
building of 60 storys in height is approximately twice that of a building one story
in height.
The shape and location of the building plays an important part in determining
the wind pressures—positive and negative. Practically all tall buildings are now
analysed by wind-tunnel model test.
J. R. Simpson, P.Eng.
Senior Civil Engineer
 G 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
UNDERGROUND DISPOSAL OF  EFFLUENT
The Department has had initial success with the disposal of sewage effluent
underground. This new method is sufficiently promising to encourage the use of it
elsewhere, and a similar installation is being put down at the New Denver Youth
Centre.
In 1967, disused surplus equipment from the sewage-treatment plant at BCIT,
in Burnaby, was installed at the Alouette River Unit to replace over-used septic
tanks which were unsatisfactory. The installation, completed in 1968, provided
the Alouette Unit with an extended aeration disposal system, results of which can
now be assessed.
The unit is located on the bank of the South Alouette River, which connects
Alouette Lake with the Pitt River. The unit serves a population of about 150
people, and an estimated 15,000 gallons of sewage a day must be dealt with.
Some consideration was given to pumping the unit sewage into the Haney
Correctional Centre treatment plant, but this plan was abandoned and the existing
one implemented after ground percolation tests indicated the feasibility of underground effluent disposal. Although this method was not common practice, the
Pollution Control Board agreed with the study results and granted a permit in
1967.
The new installation consists of a comminutor, an extended-aeration treatment plant, a chlorine contact chamber, a dosing chamber, and a subsurface
disposal field.
The disposal field covers approximately one-quarter of an acre, and is divided
into four equal parts which can be alternately used in various combinations, present
practice being to use two sections at once, then to alternate daily. No problems
have been encountered so far, and there is no evidence of deterioration or seepage
along the riverbank, 400 feet away.
Knowledge of such an installation is not extensive, but it is felt there is less
deterioration than in traditional septic tank disposal, and that the more extensive
oxidization retards coating which tends to reduce percolation rate.
At the Alouette River Unit, aeration disposal area is equal to that of septic
tank method, although the Department of Health agrees that only 50 per cent of
this area is required.   This, it is felt, is a favourable factor for aeration disposal.
The Department is responsible for design and operation of a number of sewage
systems at various Government institutions, and current policy, after study of
individual facilities, favours discharge of effluent into, or onto, the ground, rather
than infiltrate any existing water system.
Several other plants are now being considered for similar treatment.
  G 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE  ELECTRICAL ENGINEER
"Sales resistance is the triumph of mind over patter"—Anon.
The work load carried by Branch personnel continued at a high level as a large
number of projects of various size and complexity was completed. The increased
emphasis on programming prior to the design stage results in an increase in work
requirement for more senior personnel, in spite of some reduction in numbers of
new projects undertaken. Also, a larger proportion of the work was undertaken by
the Branch personnel rather than by outside consultants. This is in keeping with
the policy that fluctuations in work load be counteracted by the employment of
consultants, permitting a stable staff to be developed to a highly skilled level.
In addition to the many other projects, this Branch has begun a project for
the improvement of fire-alarm systems in Government buildings. Designs have
been produced and work is under way for modernizing the fire-alarm systems in
Riverview Hospital, Tranquille School, The Woodlands School, Jericho Hill School,
Pearson Hospital, and BCIT. A project for power-factor correction in many
locations is under way, and this will improve the efficiency of energy utilization,
thus decreasing costs. Another cost-reducing project now being investigated is the
consolidation of many separate Hydro services in the Government Precinct, in
order to improve efficiency and take advantage of the new rate for large blocks of
power.
In the electrical industry the trend continues toward the development and
utilization of equipment which can be installed complete rather than piece by piece.
This matches the trend toward factory assembly which is apparent throughout the
construction industry. In lighting, a significant development has been the increased
availability of the very efficient high-pressure sodium lamp. In many applications
this golden light will be used instead of the greenish mercury vapour light.
During the year, personnel of this Branch have continually worked with the
electrical maintenance personnel throughout the Province. The interdependency
between design and maintenance is so close that this association has been beneficial
in every way.
Telephone systems and equipment throughout the Province continue to increase
in numbers with the increase in buildings, personnel, and services. Emphasis
remains on cost control, and this has permitted a large increase in telephone service
at relatively small additional cost. The Parliament Buildings' switchboard, which
in 1951 had two positions, and in 1961 had six, was this year increased from 11
to 12 positions. In its present form it has reached its maximum capacity, and
planning is now under way to replace it with radically new equipment. The "Tel-
pak" intercity network has been augmented, and now includes 35 lines to Vancouver, six each to Kamloops and Prince George, five to Nanaimo, four each to
Nelson and Kelowna, and two each to Abbotsford, Courtenay, Cranbrook, Dawson
Creek, Duncan, Port Alberni, and Terrace. At present all the Telpak switching
is handled by the Parliament Building's operators, but to improve efficiency and
economy, planning is under way to include switching in Vancouver and possibly
other major centres.
The Department is particularly fortunate in that the telephone supervisors and
operators, without exception, are thoroughly capable and responsible and are maintaining their image of cheerful courtesy and efficiency.
J. B. Hall, CD., B.A.Sc, P.Eng., M.E.I.C.
Senior Electrical Engineer
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1970/71
G 27
REPORT OF THE ARCHITECT-PLANNER
"Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must, like men, undergo
the fatigue of supporting it"—Thomas Paine.
In anticipation of the British Columbia Building programme getting under way
in the Centennial year, much preparatory work had to be carried out in connection
with agreements with the City of Vancouver, consolidation of the site, and investigation of underground services prior to rerouting and cost-sharing.
With an increase in requests for Courthouses throughout the Province, time
and effort have been expanded in the search for suitable sites. As has been so often
expressed in these Annual Reports, land is a precious resource, and sometimes
extremely difficult to purchase in urban areas.
In the large building programme now being undertaken, sites have also been
located for motor-vehicle inspection stations, Departmental laboratories, weigh-
scale stations, educational, health, and welfare buildings.
In many cases, only by having the support of the Administration have we
been able to supply Crown sites suitable for the intended development. We often
compete with a constant demand for land grants for other purposes.
Three important projects took place during the past year, certainly as far as
this Division is concerned. A new Curriculum Resources Branch, with trackage
and trucking facilities, has been built in Victoria designed to the client's projected
demand over the next two decades. Yard-sites and services building for the Department have been purchased in Nanaimo. In Victoria, the acquisition of the
former HBC warehouse property of AV2 acres of land, and 1V2 acres of building
was a highlight.
The demand for space comes from all sectors of Government activity. Mention
should be made of the need for the Legislative function. While some relief of inadequacy has been achieved, there is, nevertheless, a continuing need for planning
in order that this important role may be given its correct recognition.
No mention of space needs would be complete without drawing special attention to the Legislative Precinct. Under instruction from our superiors, we have
periodically reviewed the needs of the various departments. It is interesting to
examine the reports of 10 years ago wherein estimates were made of conditions
which might be expected today, 10 years later. Those estimates, considered a
little extravagant, have since proved to be conservative. The situation is now such
that only a major expansion will offer relief.
Other responsibilities carried out by this Division such as leasing, appraisals,
legal agreements, easements, rights-of-way, exchange of lands with Crown authorities, continue to demand much time and effort.
The steady increase in tempo of activity within British Columbia is too evident
to need emphasis. This acceleration is naturally felt in Government work and specifically in the work of this Division. It will, in fact has, become necessary to review
the organization of the Division and of its role in the total effort of the Department
of Public Works.   Fortunately, our superiors are alert to the situation.
An excellent rapport pertains with all departments of Government, and a constant communication is maintained with Municipal Councils, Regional Boards, and
Town Planning Commissions.
W. D. Lougher-Goodey, F.R.T.P., M.T.P.I.C, M.I.F.L.A.,
F.I.L.A., M.A.S.P.O., A.I. Struct.Eng.
 ■
FIVE PUBLIC WORKS PROJEC
NOMINATED FOR AWARDS
Law Courts and Tower, Duncan.
Dormitories, Vocational School, Terrace.
Motor-vehicle Inspection Station, Victoria.
llllltlllllBlllllllli II11111
•   =5i"-=I "mF'M   Ml    MUM
Carillon Tower, Vict
Provincial Government Building, Quesnel.
  G 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CHIEF  ENGINEER,
SAFETY ENGINEERING SERVICES DIVISION
On the 17th of July 1970 the "Safety Inspection Services Agreement" was
signed by the Honourable W. N. Chant, Minister of Public Works, and the Honourable B. Mackasy, Minister of Labour for the Government of Canada.
This agreement was executed pursuant to the Canada Labour (Safety) Code.
In effect this agreement has extended the jurisdiction of the Safety Engineering
Services Division into those areas which were previously solely under the jurisdiction
of the Federal Government. It has also ensured that in those areas where there
was some doubt as to whether the installations were under the Provincial or Federal
jurisdiction, that the installations will be inspected as the two authorities are now
combined into one enforcing agency.
All Inspectors of this Division have been designated as Safety Officers under
the Canada Labour (Safety) Act. Therefore, the installation of boilers, pressure
vessels, electrical equipment, and gas equipment in grain elevators, flour-mills,
radio and television stations, banks, aerodromes, harbour boards, lighthouses, and
Federal buildings are now to be inspected by Inspectors of this Division. This
extra work will require some increase in the number of Inspectors, but the cost
of these positions will be offset by fees paid by the Government of Canada for the
services of the Inspectors.
Much study and consideration has been given to the methods and reconstructing of each Branch in order that a better and more economical service can be
dispensed to industry and the public in this Province. Some initial changes have
been made, but the full effect will not be felt until next year.
Many Inspectors are now qualified in a second technology, and the use of
these dual technologists is saving time and money and giving the public a faster
service. Further studies will be done in the coming year in respect to the reorganization of the Division.
A. G. Kaneen, P.Eng.
Chief Engineer
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1970/71
G 31
Typical digester and steam plant of a pulp and paper mill, inspected by our
Safety Engineering Services Division.
Typical emergency drain valves in use in pulp-mills, inspected by our
Safety Engineering Services Division.
 G 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CHIEF BOILER INSPECTOR
GENERAL
Throughout the Province there has been continual growth of plant facilities
using boilers and pressure vessels. The northern districts in particular have been
hard pressed to maintain acceptable levels of service. Additional plants are being
built and many industries expanded their operations. District activities were
studied and changes were made to improve our services, with more changes in the
offing.
Totals of 3,150 new pressure vessels and 780 new boilers were put into use
during the year which, along with the increased examination of plant equipment
under the Federal Safety Code, resulted in 1,500 currently due boiler inspections
not being done.   It is noted that this backlog may be eliminated soon.
ACCIDENTS
There was one fatal accident at a gas-processing plant where two men were
killed doing maintenance work on a lethal gas column. The series of human errors
leading up to the accident could have been avoided if there had been proper training
and supervision of the personnel involved. The necessity of clear plant procedures
and in plant training programmes have been emphasized, and these are being
attended to more positively. The accident again points to the need for extended
vocational and apprenticeship programmes and closer scrutiny of plant facilities
on our part.
OPERATIONS
Along with the expansion of pressure-plant facilities, demand for our services
increased, and the whole of the staff are commended for the way in which each did
his part to cope with the important things in the added work load. Total boiler
examinations increased 18 per cent, engineers' certification increased 15 per cent,
welders' performance qualifications increased 55 per cent, pressure vessel inspection
increased over 100 per cent. Shop inspections were down by 39 per cent, and
refrigeration plant certification, which takes up a minor part of our time, 57 per cent.
SUMMARY OF WORK
1969/70
1970/71
Increase
Decrease
Total number of boilers inspected	
Total number ol engineers examined..
Total number of welders' performance tests..
Total number of pressure vessels inspected—.
Total number of shop inspections-
Total number of refrigeration plants inspected..
Total number of designs surveyed 	
5,729
700
1,901
474
1,340
140
800
6,770
805
2,956
1,051
817
60
824
1,041
105
1,055
577
24
523
80
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1970/71
G 33
Boilers
1969/70 1970/71
Boilers with defective safety valves  17 30
Boilers with overloaded safety valves  4 21
Boilers having severe corrosion or scale  46 98
Boilers having plate defects  30 40
Boilers having tube defects  61 93
Boilers having other serious defects  16 36
Boilers having low water condition  7 8
Chemical Recovery Boilers
Total emergency shutdowns	
Total number of additional unscheduled shutdowns of a normal kind	
1969/70
9
1970/71
28
10
Complete investigations were made of the accidents and incidents and full
reports are on file. Recommendations to prevent recurrence of accidents and the
elimination of potential hazards were made as deemed necessary.
S. Smith, P.Eng.
Chief Inspector
 G 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Liquor-firing floor in a typical pulp-mill, inspected by our
Safety Engineering Services Division.
Typical control panel for pulp-mill plants, commissioned during the year and
inspected by our Safety Engineering Services Division.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1970/71 G 35
REPORT OF THE  INSPECTOR OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY
Despite the economic problems that beset the country during the fiscal year
1970/71, the Electrical Energy Inspection Branch experienced a year of extraordinary growth in nearly all areas.
The number of certificates of competency issued during 1970 was 26.8 per
cent above that of the previous year. The number of examinations for such certificates was up 38 per cent over the previous year.
In the field of equipment approvals, applications increased 20 per cent and
the number of units approved was up 119 per cent.
As a result of the addition of a Technician 3 to the Vancouver office staff, the
Plans Inspection Service achieved a current position for the first time in four years.
Projects examined increased 21 per cent, involving 96 per cent more drawings than
for 1969/70.
Overhead-line permit applications increased 38 per cent and applications to
install television equipment on power-lines were up 150 per cent.
In two areas there were decreases; permits issued were down 14 per cent and
in consequence the number of projects finally approved without inspection decreased
26 per cent. The number of inspections carried out was up slightly by 1 Vz per cent.
In May 1970 the Branch assumed the task of inspecting premises under the
jurisdiction of the Government of Canada under the Canada Labour (Safety) Code.
In July we became the electrical inspecting body for the City of Fernie.
Despite authorization to recruit our staff to full strength and to add four field
inspectors, all indications point to an approaching year which will strain the resources of the Branch to their utmost.
During the fiscal year the Branch investigated 118 incidents involving 101
fires, and 16 injuries, of which six were fatal. There were also two incidents in
which seven cows were killed. Of the fires, 62 were caused by electrical faults in
or improper use of electrical equipment, 14 more were probably of electrical origin,
10 were very doubtful (undetermined), and 15 were not caused electrically. Ten
fires involved television sets; 14 occurred in trailers.
Of the six persons who died, three were children burned in a fire of undetermined origin, which may have been caused by a small boy neglecting to turn off the
power to an electric range after having used it. Two others died while carrying on
tree surgery close to energized high-voltage lines. The sixth died when the boom
of a machine he was operating touched an energized 7,200-volt primary line.
G. A. Harrower, P.Eng.
Chief Electrical Inspector
 G 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
■
1. The second of two kilns at Lafarge Canada Limited, in Richmond, completed.
2. Shows the operator's view through the
sight glass.
3. Control panel for kilns.
The total gas consumption for these kilns is
approximately 600,000,000 BTU/hr., or the
equivalent to supply gas to 6,000 average homes
during a winter season.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1970/71
G 37
REPORT OF THE CHIEF GAS INSPECTOR
THE ACT
There were no amendments to either the Gas Act or to the pursuant regulations.
THE BRANCH
Gas inspection services are extended into Highland Valley, Elk River Valley,
Cache Creek, Marguerite, and extensions to the Sparwood-Kaiser system.
The general work load of inspections remained fairly high in many areas,
particularly in the Surrey-Delta area, despite a recession in the economy.
There was a 30-per-cent increase in the number of new designs checked, but
the number of permits issued declined about 7 per cent.
This last year saw the completion and start-up of the British Columbia Hydro
Liquid Natural Gas Plant in Richmond and the large Eurocan Pulp and Paper
Plant at Kitimat.
Mr. J. F. Helme, P.Eng., joined the Gas Inspection Branch December 21,
1970, as Assistant Chief Gas Inspector.
ACCIDENTS
There were 20 incidents investigated by this Branch, of which one had resulted
in a fatality. This was investigated at the request of the Coroner, and was caused
by carbon monoxide poisoning in a propane-fired mobile trailer.
There were four explosions—one causing serious injury to the operator and
extensive damage to the equipment; the other three caused severe damage to units
involved. Poor start-up procedures and the shorting-out of safety controls were
the cause of two of the explosions.
Four gas-meter sets were severly damaged and resulted in fires to the premises.
The remaining incidents were of a minor nature.
SUMMARY OF WORK
1970/71
1969/70
1,609
1,732
1,642
1,240
820
782
1,994
2,000
661
700
557
650
379
316
94
70
232
226
5,774
6,383
15,230
17,257
1968/69
Appliance certification-
New designs checked	
Gas Codes distributed...
Gas-fitters' licences issued...	
Gas contractors' licences issued-
Provisional licences issued	
Gas-fitters' examinations  _
Gas-fitters' re-examinations 	
Number of gas-fitters passed examinations	
Number of gas permits issued, municipalities-
Number of gas permits issued by this Branch..
1,494
1,210
948
1,719
622
606
236
70
120
6,866
14,393
W. R. Montgomery, P.Eng.
Chief Inspector
   G 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF  EXPENDITURE
The following pages present in detail the expenditures relating to the construction, alterations, and repairs on the various Government buildings and institutions, etc., coming under the management, charge, and direction of the Minister
of Public Works.
A. E. Rhodes
Comptroller of Expenditure
STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES, FISCAL YEAR 1970/71
Administration and Maintenance Votes
(For details, see Public Accounts)
$
Vote 238—Minister's Office   32,070.68
Vote 239—General Administration   361,264.62
Vote 240—Government Buildings (maintenance)  (gross) 13,610,709.88
Vote 242—Rentals    (gross) 2,729,143.47
Vote 243—Safety Inspection Division   1,069,311.64
Less credits—
Items recovered from the Department of Education re Technical and
Vocational Schools (Government Building Vote)        2,179,089.41
Items recovered re Vocational Training, Energy Board, Curriculum
Resources Branch, Mediation Commission, etc. (Rental Vote)  407,696.90
15,215,713.98
CAPITAL
Vote 241—Construction of Provincial buildings (see expenditure by building)
 (gross)     13,348,314.72
Less credits—
Items recovered from the Department of Education re technical and
vocational  schools         6,649,802.11
6,698,512.61
SUMMARY
Gross expenditure, Department of Public Works—
Administration and maintenance      17,802,500.29
Capital     13,348,314.72
31,150,815.01
Less credits—
Maintenance        2,586,786.31
Capital          6,649,802.11
Net expenditure      21,914,226.59
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1970/71
G 41
Project No.
242-B-4
631-B
461-B-l
517-B-l
599-B-l
30-B-4
30-B-5
539-B
636-B
645-B
656-B
548-B
661-B
705-B
684-B
707-B
468-B-l
121-B-5
619-B
482-B
708-B
289-B
289-B-l
123-B-19
654-B
499-B
79-B-10
79-B-13
79-B-15
10-B-56
685-B
651-B
640-B
706-B
648-B
97-B-4
625-B
641-B
519-B
39-B-62
39-B-70
39-B-73
39-B-75
39-B-76
647-B
31-B-9
479-B
658-B
VOTE 241—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS
Description
Abbotsford—■
Brooder House Random Sample Poultry Testing Station	
Fraser Valley Trout Hatchery 	
Alberni—Government buildings (renovations)  	
Allison   Pass—Living   accommodation   (Department   of   Highways
personnel)  	
Alouette River Unit, Haney-
Brannan Lake School—
Special unit
-Kitchen Stores building
Maintenance building 	
Burnaby—
British Columbia Youth Development Centre
Dairy  Laboratory  	
Willingdon Avenue Telephone Exchange 	
Motor-vehicle Inspection Station
Charlie Lake—Alterations to Department of Mines establishment __.
Coquitlam—Remand Centre	
Creston—Wildlife Management area, Administration Centre	
Dawson Creek—
Weigh-scale station
Provincial Government building (consultant's fee and site investigation)  	
Duncan—Provincial buildings 	
Essondale—Structural alterations 	
Fernie—Government Agent's residence 	
Fort Nelson—Government Agent's residence	
Fort St. John—Provincial Government building (consultant's fee and
site investigation) 	
General—
General expenses 	
Wages and expenses, Casual Design staff
Haney Correctional Institution garage and maintenance shop (credit)
Hazelton—Ksan project  (credit)
Hutda Lake—Men's Camp	
Jericho Hill School-
Dormitory unit and development	
Playing-fields and ancillary work	
Principal's residence	
Kamloops—Structural alterations	
Kimberley Airport—Purchase of buildings	
Lillooet—Purchase of property and renovations	
Maillardville—Purchase of property and renovations	
McBride—Purchase of property
Mica  Creek—Highway  crew  accommodations,  Shelter  Bay,  Trout
Lake, and Mile 54	
Nelson—■
Courthouse retaining-wall	
Employee housing 	
Structural alterations in Zone 5	
New Denver—Dormitory alterations 	
Oakalla—
Roads 	
Central Classification Section alterations and improvements	
Security 	
Licence Shop revisions	
East Wing Unit plumbing	
100 Mile House—Department of Highways maintenance establishment
Pearson TB. Hospital—Modifications	
Prince George—Structural alterations in Zone 6	
Quesnel—Department of Highways maintenance establishment	
Expenditure
$
7,166.89
54,223.03
36,050.58
2,954.87
19,305.66
5,844.71
16,039.09
85,184.57
35,239.03
1,244.92
506,791.38
13,402.03
345,047.73
14,203.53
30,009.43
90.21
203,965.16
76,325.50
3,795.81
8,514.54
96.65
84,089.34
805,216.31
932.58
40,824.54
2,432.00
8,987.52
827.05
82.95
38,494.37
31,500.00
30,397.00
6,838.86
16,590.75
1,436.23
194.74
221.12
37,421.89
39,329.72
8,428.98
59,968.14
36,407.14
21,399.28
13,687.25
6,612.10
13,149.89
54,450.91
208,513.54
 G 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOTE 241—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project No. Description Expenditure
611-B
5-B-102
5-B-116
5-B-134
5-B-138
5-B-139
5-B-140
5-B-142
5-B-145
5-B-146
5-B-147
659-B
24-B-10
655-B
660-B
10-B-12
10-B-57
8-B-8
682-B
89-B-3
408-B
546-B-l
608-B-l
610-B
634-B
649-B
502-B
Richmond Municipality—Motor-vehicle Inspection Station	
Riverview—
Alterations and renovations to kitchen and staff rooms, dining-
room areas 	
Landscaping, roads, parking, etc.	
Fire-alarm systems	
West Lawn Building, alterations	
Fire escapes at Valleyview Hospital and The Woodlands School-
Fire equipment.
Industrial therapy storage building
North Lawn Building	
Conversion of boiler plant	
Cable television connections	
604-B
617-B
617-B-l
211-B-l
292-B
385-B
536-B
639-B
690-B
464-B
486-B
487-B
492-B
518-B
550-B
552-B
554-B
601-B-2
629-B
630-B
643-B
683-B
Salmon Arm—Department of Highways maintenance establishment..
Skeenaview Hospital alterations and renovations	
Tete Jaune Cache—
Weigh scale	
Living accommodation	
Tranquille—
Water supply and sewage disposal	
Renovations to fire-alarm system	
Tranquille Farm—Dairy barn	
Ucluelet—Foreman's residence 	
Vancouver-
Provincial Health Building renovations	
Structural alterations in Zone 2	
Willow Chest Centre—West elevator replacement 	
Laurel House, renovations (home for retarded children)
Courthouse, Courtroom facilities	
British Columbia Building .
Roads, paths, and parking areas	
Vanderhoof—Department of Highways establishment
Vernon—
Courthouse—
Purchase and demolition of property	
Elevator and alterations	
Provincial buildings (landscaping) _	
Victoria—
Materials Testing Laboratory (extension)
Structural alterations in Zone 1	
Parliament Buildings—
Parking facilities
New electrical distribution system
Legislative Chamber sound-amplifying equipment
Renovations to East Wing	
Eric Martin Institute	
British Columbia Museum and Archives Building	
Parliament Buildings Precinct—Acquisition of property
Motor-vehicle Building, Data Processing Centre	
Dogwood Building, 1019 Wharf Street	
Motor-vehicle Inspection Station	
Windermere Building purchase	
Glendale Hospital
International Airport—Roof repairs to hangars	
Windermere Building—Roofing and parapets	
British Columbia Medical Plan Building—New ventilation systems
Renovations of Temple Building on Fort Street.
Douglas Building—Renovations to Ministers' offices
14,471.11
1,792.14
18,023.16
176.22
62,295.02
7,759.61
6,054.89
14,491.81
45,015.42
10,116.00
10,881.27
171,909.66
34,876.13
2,115.40
18.92
12,514.96
5,271.91
4,230.50
5,500.00
6,666.02
59,755.51
18.21
24,483.40
35,156.59
528,351.44
19,233.61
4,526.85
102.78
19,685.69
21,991.19
5,391.67
97,572.52
48,355.73
128,547.51
2,217.25
36,457.88
201,267.77
164,545.63
63,690.71
478.32
2,660.37
1,344.28
20,000.00
1,640,975.18
28,414.27
17,182.12
2,043.60
3,154.04
16,630.15
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1970/71
G 43
VOTE 241—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project No.
607-B-l
657-B
7-B-40
7-B-48
7-B-50
7-B-51
7-B-56
614-B
Description
Williams Lake—
Courthouse	
Department of Highways maintenance establishment
The Woodlands School—
Landscaping, fencing, and paving, etc 	
Renovations to Centre Building	
Renovations to boiler plant 	
Fire-alarm system
Renovations to Wing No. 2, Centre Building	
Various districts—Fencing, Department of Highways yards
Expenditure
$
668,139.34
402,489.83
2,030.17
9,883.17
10,335.29
524.96
303,287.84
17,000.00
401-B-2
401-B-4
401-B-5
401-B-7
401-B-8
401-B-9
401-B-10
401-B-12
401-B-13
299-B-4
299-B-5
299-B-6
507-B
481-B-2
620-B-l
412-B-2
231-B-7
231-B-8
429-B-l
429-B-2
312-B-l
407-B
407-B-l
407-B-3
633-B
Vocational Schools*
British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby-
Library
Alterations to  (1962)  building, including instrumentation and
power laboratory	
Underground power-distribution system	
Roads and ancillary site work	
Multipurpose Student Centre	
Addition to Food Training Centre	
Greenhouse and Animal Holding Building .
Extension to culvert	
Emergency power system
British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby—
Industrial Laboratory
Heavy-duty diesel mechanics workshop	
Alterations to existing building for installation of Curriculum
Development Programme  (credit)
Burnaby Vocational—Teacher College	
British Columbia Vocational School, Dawson Creek—Auto-body shop,
welding-shop, and teaching farm	
British Columbia Vocational School, Kamloops—Vocational school	
British Columbia Vocational School, Kelowna—Cafeteria and training kitchen	
British Columbia Vocational School, Nanaimo—
Additional floor to existing classroom building	
New workshop building .
British Columbia Vocational School, Nelson-
Central receiving and stores depot.
Completion and extension of parking areas	
British Columbia Vocational School, Prince George—Sawmill building and conversion of existing classrooms	
British Columbia Vocational School, Terrace—
Dynamometer shop in Workshop Building	
Dormitory and cafeteria	
Central receiving and stores depot	
British Columbia Vocational School, Victoria-
-Workshop complex..
47,888.27
1,644.18
58,940.28
36,872.82
786,453.01
3,207.53
1,914.84
103,107.48
20,040.82
163,550.22
14,679.81
861.19
27,920.67
11,417.05
2,900,633.05
113,203.84
11,935.20
372,036.92
41,647.66
58,407.27
9,158.51
10,072.01
401,166.81
64,015.85
96,741.51
13,348,314.72
* Credits were received from the Department of Education to offset part of these expenditures.
 G 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
If it won't roll—make it into a symbol.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1970/71
G 45
TENDERS  RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED
FOR BUILDINGS
"By necessity, by proclivity, and by delight, we all quote"—Ralph W. Emerson.
Project
No.
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
5-B-116
Alterations to Motor Transport Garages, Riverview Hospital, Essondale:
$
30,733.00
36,090.00
37,000.00
31,453.00
29,743.00
37,412.00
37,137.00
31,722.00
30,410.00
28,400.00
47,793.00
54,333.00
38,772.00
37,470.00
33,185.00
36,101.00
61,659.00
59,686.00
56,510.00
63,690.00
59,500,00
22,354.00
22,860.00
24,573.00
419,800.00
470,000.00
515,148.29
15,480.00
13,446.00
17,221.00
14,672.00
13,955.00
15,777.00
15,985.00
15,522.00
13,367.00
255,795.00
215,868.00
143,600.00
259,980.00
187,527.00
11,700.00
26,510.00
15,000.00
10,665.00
11,661.00
16,711.00
14,650.00
K_F Construction Ltd	
A. W. Gillis Ltd	
464-B
Minor Revisions, Eric Martin Institute, Victoria:
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd	
539-B
Basement Renovations, Youth Development Centre, Burnaby:
A. W. Gillis Ltd _	
Commonwealth Construction Co. Ltd	
K & F Construction Ltd.            	
5-B-148
Alterations to Centre Lawn Building, Riverview Hospital, Essondale:
K & F Construction Ltd _	
Lickley, Johnson, Palmer Construction Ltd	
Commonwealth Construction Co. Ltd	
507-B
Additions to  Ventilation System,   Vocational Teachers Training College, Burnaby:
M & M Sheet Metal Works...... _,_
Fred Welsh Ltd.                — ....: 	
5-B-138
Renovations, Phase 2, West Lawn Building, Riverview Hospital, Essondale:
Seaward Construction Co. Ltd —-	
536-B
Alteration to Electrical Services, Queen's Printer Building, Victoria:
Camosun Electric Co. Ltd   ~ 	
Ricketts-Sewell Electric Ltd :  	
Mott Electric Ltd.            ■	
Knight & Waring Co. Ltd - '	
401-B-7
Landscaping and  Site   Works   (1970),  British- Columbia Institute  of
Technology, Burnaby:
A. W. Gillis Ltd.	
10-B-56
Steel Stack, Tranquille School, Tranquille:
Tryco Steel Co. Ltd. ...	
Alpine Steel Ltd .._ •	
 G 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED-COT«'«i.e<_
Project
No.
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
554-B-l
Sewer Connection. Vancouver Island Unit, Wilkinson Road, Saanich:
$
25,950.00
15,961.00
18,974.00
41,583.00
15,284.00
9,895.00
9,150.00
11,665.00
11,114.00
17,511.00
21,647.00
19,332.00
17,812.00
18,992.00   i
16,160.00
18,890.00
16,389.00
22,600.00
21,000.00
25,721.00
29,935.00
27,016.00
25,525.00
21,875.00
20,010.00
12,500.00
7,491.00
7,816.00
8,389.61    ,
8,110.00
8,933.00
29,770.00
33,400.00
33,337.00
25,680.00
20,800.00
20,845.00
24,352.00
22,700.00
24,900.00
20,740.00
28,788.00
18,434.00
18,490.00
161,786.00
180,500.00
139,400.00
173,700.00
235,404.00
A. J. Barr Ltd	
W. Campbell Ltd	
519-B
Extension to Central Heating System, Japanese Pavilion,  Youth Centre, New Denver:
385-B
Paving Provincial Government Parking-lots, Victoria:
OK Trucking Co. Ltd.                 	
407-B-l
Covered Way, British Columbia Vocational School, Terrace:
	
Alterations to 231 Menzies Street, Victoria:
(X)
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd                            	
407-B
Dynamometer Shop, British Columbia Vocational School, Terrace:
Pine Tree Construction Co. Ltd  	
Awarded.
519-B
Package  Pumping  and  Sewage-treatment  Plant,   Youth  Development
Centre, New Denver:
West-Pac Utilities Ltd             	
10-B-12
Sewage Aeration System, Tranquille School, Tranquille:
Electrical Alterations, British Columbia Medical Plan Building, Victoria:
Hume & Rumble Ltd            	
Wyder Electric Co. Ltd	
601-B-2
Reroofing Hanger 2,  Department of Highways,  Victoria International
Airport, Victoria:
Playsted Sheet Metal Ltd  	
695-B
Universal Sheet Metal Ltd.... _
Storage Building, Fish and Wildlife Branch, Penticton:
97-B-4
Retaining-wall, Courthouse, Nelson:
554-B
Landscaping, Glendale Hospital, Victoria:
G. H. Wheaton Ltd                              	
Capital City Construction Co. Ltd	
Awarded.
i Withdrew bankrupt.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1970/71 G 47
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Project
No.
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
231-B-10
Electrical  Distribution  System,  British   Columbia   Vocational School,
Nanaimo:
Ricketts-Sewell Electric Ltd..	
$
152,444.00
154,369.00
158,000.00
163,621.00
177,800.00
180,906.00
445,000.00
486,586.00
465,933.00
462,672.00
469,000.00
104,695.00
115,960.00
94,964.00
88,025.00
81,151.00
581,742.00
582,000.00
564,275.00
571,880.00
570,000.00
39,854.00
39,576,00
41,926.00
41,500.00
84,554.00
65,937.00
13,300.00
12,115.00
17,932.88
15,277.00
■
Hume & Rumble Ltd _	
Camosun Electric Co. Ltd	
Mott Electric Co. Ltd	
5-B-138
Renovations, Phase 2, West Lawn Building, Riverview Hospital, Essondale:
RatclifTe & Sons Construction Co. Ltd	
Burdett Construction Co. Ltd	
Seaward Construction Co. Ltd	
Awarded.
6-B-38
Dormitories, Colony Farm, Essondale:
Atco (Western) Ltd.	
Condor Construction Co. Ltd	
633-B-l
Cafeteria Building, British Columbia Vocational School, Victoria:
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd	
Cana Construction Co. Ltd 	
Bird Construction Co. Ltd _	
G. H. Wheaton Ltd.	
211-B-l
Addition to Materials Testing Laboratory, Kingston Street, Victoria:
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd	
G. H. Wheaton Ltd.                           	
E. J. Hunter & Sons Ltd	
617-B
Renovations, Phase 3, Basement Office, Courthouse, Vernon:
539-B
Hot-water Tanks, Youth Development Centre, Burnaby:
S. M. Fraser Ltd  _ _   	
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1972
530-1171-8824

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