Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

Department of Labour ANNUAL REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1971 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1972

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0373866.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0373866.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0373866-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0373866-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0373866-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0373866-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0373866-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0373866-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0373866-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0373866.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Labour
ANNUAL REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1971
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY
I
  The Honourable James R. Chabot, Minister
of Labour.
  To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C, O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province oj British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year
1971 is herewith respectfully submitted.
JAMES R. CHABOT
Minister of Labour
Office oj the Minister oj Labour,
February 1972.
J
 The Honourable James R. Chabot,
Minister oj Labour.
Sir: I have the honour to submit herewith the Fifty-fourth Annual Report on
the work of the Department of Labour up to December 31, 1971.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
WILLIAM SANDS
Deputy Minister oj Labour
Department oj Labour,
Victoria, British Columbia, February 1972.
 Department of Labour
OFFICIALS
James R. Chabot, Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Miss M. E. Higgs, Secretary to Minister, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
W. H. Sands, Deputy Minister of Labour; Chairman, Labour Relations Board; Chairman, Board
of Industrial Relations; and Chairman, Human Rights Commission,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Mrs. V. H. Gye, Secretary to Deputy Minister, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
C. R. Margison, Assistant Deputy Minister of Labour; Vice-Chairman, Labour Relations Board;
Vice-Chairman and Secretary, Board of Industrial Relations; and Vice-Chairman, Human Rights
Commission, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
J. Melville, Assistant Deputy Minister of Labour; Vice-Chairman, Labour Relations Board;
Vice-Chairman, Human Rights Commission; Administrative Officer, Trade-schools Regulation
Act; and Chairman, Provincial Apprenticeship Committee, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3:.
G. D. Bishop, Director, Research Branch, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
J. D. Forrest, Chief Inspector of Factories and Elevators, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
W. S. Haddow, Administrative Officer, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
R. J. Weir, Deputy Registrar, Labour Relations Board, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
F. B. Hilton, Secretary, Labour Relations Board; Secretary, Human Rights Commission,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
W. J. D. Hoskyn, Director, Labour Standards Branch, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
J. A. Laffling, Supervisor, Labour Standards Branch, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
G. S. Levey, Compensation Consultant, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
G. H. O'Neill, Chief Executive Officer, Labour Relations Branch; Registrar, Labour Relations
Board, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
J. C. Sherlock, Director, Human Rights Act, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
S. W. Simpson, Director of Apprenticeship and Industrial Training,
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
L. A. Stadnyk, Compensation Counsellor, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Mrs. C. K. Waddell, Director, Women's Bureau, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
BRANCH OFFICES
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Courthouse, 102 South 11th Avenue, Cranbrook.
British Columbia Vocational School, Box
899, Dawson Creek.
322 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Courthouse, Kelowna.
Courthouse, Box 996, Mission City.
Courthouse, Nanaimo.
Courthouse, Box 60, Nelson.
Provincial   Building,   1600   Third   Avenue,
Prince George.
Provincial Building, 4506 Lakelse Avenue,
Terrace.
Courthouse, Williams Lake.
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
(Headquarters: Parliament Buildings, Victoria)
William H. Sands, Chairman, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria.
C. R. Margison, Vice-Chairman and Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
C. Murdoch, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street,
Vancouver 3.
J. R. Edgett, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street,
Vancouver 3.
R. S. S. Wilson, Member, 411 Dunsmuir
Street, Vancouver 3.
D.  H.  Chapman, Member, 411 Dunsmuir
Street, Vancouver 3.
Mrs. Emily Ostapchuk, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
J
 U 8
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
LABOUR RELATIONS BOARD
(Headquarters: Parliament Buildings, Victoria)
William H. Sands, Chairman, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria.
C. R. Margison, Vice-Chairman, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria.
J. Melville, Vice-Chairman, 411 Dunsmuir
Street, Vancouver 3.
C. Murdoch, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street,
Vancouver 3.
J. R. Edgett, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street,
Vancouver 3.
R. S. S. Wilson, Member, 411 Dunsmuir
Street, Vancouver 3.
D. H. Chapman, Member, 411 Dunsmuir
Street, Vancouver 3.
Mrs. Emily Ostapchuk, Member, 411
Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
G. H. O'Neill, Registrar, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
F. B. Hilton, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION
(Headquarters: Parliament Buildings, Victoria)
William H. Sands, Chairman, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria.
C. R. Margison, Vice-Chairman, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria.
J. Melville, Vice-Chairman, 411 Dunsmuir
Street, Vancouver 3.
C. Murdoch, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street,
Vancouver 3.
F. B. Hilton, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
J. R. Edgett, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street,
Vancouver 3.
R. S.  S. Wilson, Member, 411 Dunsmuir
Street, Vancouver 3.
D. H. Chapman, Member, 411 Dunsmuir
Street, Vancouver 3.
Mrs.   Emily   Ostapchuk,   Member,   411
Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
PROVINCIAL APPRENTICESHIP COMMITTEE
(Headquarters: 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3)
John Melville, Chairman, 411 Dunsmuir
Street, Vancouver 3.
Thomas McGibbon, Member, 411 Dunsmuir
Street, Vancouver 3.
T. A. Turnbull, Member, 411 Dunsmuir
Street, Vancouver 3.
John S. White, Member, Department of
Education, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
S. W. Simpson, Member, 411 Dunsmuir
Street, Vancouver 3.
J. W. Thompson, Member, 411 Dunsmuir
Street, Vancouver 3.
Harold Taft, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION ACT ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
(Headquarters: 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3)
John Melville. Col. J. W. Inghs.
Mrs. C K. Waddell
 Contents
Page
Introduction  11
Apprenticeship and Industrial Training  13
Board of Industrial Relations  19
Factory and Elevator Inspection  21
Human Rights  26
Labour Relations—
Report of the Labour Relations Branch  29
Table I—Analysis of Certifications Issued in 1971  30
Table II—Comparison of Cases Dealt With by Labour Relations Board,
1970 and 1971  32
Labour Standards—
Report of Labour Standards Branch  35
Control of Employment of Children Act  37
Employment Agencies Act  3 8
Legislation—List of Acts Affecting Labour Inside front cover
Research  41
Trade-schools Regulation  42
Women's Bureau  50
Statistical Supplement  52
Review of Labour Statistics, 1971  53
Labour Disputes, 1971  72
Labour Organizations, 1971  81
Directory—
Part I—Officials of Congresses, Councils, Etc  91
Part II—International Officers, Western Representatives, and Senior
Trade-union Officials  93
Part III—Directory of Labour Organizations  103
Part IV—Director of Employers' Organizations  118
  Introduction
A return to more satisfactory levels of growth in the Provincial economy in
1971 reflected a significant improvement in the labour sector during the year. The
general expansion recorded in major Provincial industries in spite of international
currency and trading problems gave rise to a noticeably improved rate of labour
force and employment growth. Major contributions to this improved labour growth
were made in the realms of capital investment, consumer spending, and construction,
which all showed healthy gains during the year. It was also encouraging to note that
the resurgence in economic activity was accomplished without a significant increase
in price pressures. These developments suggest that 1972 will continue to support
these improved trends, and further gains in the labour sector are anticipated.
During 1971, British Columbia's population increased by 2.8 per cent. This
was the lowest growth rate since 1964 and was chiefly the result of a reduced net
inflow of migrants into the Province during the year. The growth rate was, however,
the highest of all provincial population growth rates and was twice the national
average.
The demand for labour in British Columbia in 1971 was up over the previous
year and, more importantly, was increasing at a faster rate than in 1970. The labour
force (labour supply) continued to grow at a slower pace than employment, with the
result that unemployment was at a lower level than it was during 1970.
Events that took place in the realm of foreign trade had a major impact on the
provincial and national economies in 1971. Part of the impact was experienced
in a less-than-potential employment growth in some British Columbia industries.
However, in 1972, British Columbia industries should enjoy a much improved
competitive position in both domestic and foreign markets as a result of the removal
of the American 10-per-cent surcharge and improved currency and trading arrangements. Such favourable developments should give rise to increased employment in
the Province.
Another improvement of some note during 1971 was in the field of labour
relations. While the number of labour disputes and workers involved was numerous,
the number of man-days lost was the lowest since 1966. In the past year, there
were 111 strikes or lockouts in which 52,333 workers were involved. The number
of 276,030 man-days idled due to work stoppages, however, was relatively low.
The ratio of 5.3 man-days idled per striker was the lowest since 1950. The reduced
time loss in 1971 was chiefly attributed to the absence of prolonged major disputes
involving over 1,000 employees. Out of nine such disputes, only one lasted over 20
working-days. The remainder were either settled or the workers returned to work
(pending further negotiation) within 10 days from the date on which the disputes
commenced. Both labour and management, therefore, were willing to iron out their
differences at the bargaining table rather than to prolong the strikes or lockouts
which could lead to economic dislocations, public inconveniences, and mutual
distrust.
The number of unions operating within the Province was 120 in 1971. These
unions had a total of 1,035 British Columbia locals, compared to 1,010 in 1970.
The total British Columbia union membership in 1971 reached 316,587, and over
two-thirds of this total were members of the 20 largest unions operating within the
Province.
11
 U 12 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
The Department offers a wide variety of services to employees in many circumstances. For instance, an opportunity to learn and become qualified in a skilled
trade is provided under a supervised system of apprenticeship and industrial training.
The Labour Standards Branch administers laws relating to unpaid wages,
holiday pay, hours of work, child employment, minimum wages, and employment
agencies.
The Women's Bureau assists women with complaints relating to their employment. It is concerned with the well-being of women in all types of work, provides
guidance and consultation, and makes studies and recommendations to improve their
efficiency and economic position in the labour force.
Under the provisions of the Labour Relations Act, employees are assured of
the right to be represented by a trade union. Once certified, trade unions are given
the exclusive right to bargain on behalf of employees. In addition, the Labour
Relations Board deals with unfair labour practices and grievances arising out of
collective agreements.
The Compensation Consultant, who is an employee of the Department of
Labour and is independent of the Workmen's Compensation Board, gives guidance
without charge to a workman with regard to the best method of proceeding with his
claim under the Workmen's Compensation Act.
The Human Rights Act prohibits discrimination between male and female
employees with respect to remuneration, and discrimination with respect to employment or membership in trade unions because of race, religion, sex, colour, nationality, ancestry, or place of origin. The Act also contains prohibitions with respect to
the publication of advertisements or the making of inquiries expressing limitations,
specifications, or preferences as to race, religion, colour, nationality, ancestry, or
place of origin, or expressing any intention to discriminate with respect to employment because of the age of employees. There are also contained in the Act provisions prohibiting discrimination with respect to the occupancy and purchase of
commercial premises and self-contained dwelling-units because of race, religion,
colour, nationality, ancestry, or place of origin.
Inspection is made of factories, shops, and office buildings with respect to
proper sanitation, ventilation, heating, lighting, and all working conditions for the
safety and comfort of employees. Passenger and freight elevators, escalators,
dumb-waiters, and man-lifts are inspected regularly to ensure that they are in safe
operating condition.
The work of the Research Branch is intended to assist the Department in its
programme of labour legislation and administration through the provision of a wide
range of research activities. The Branch studies problems relating to labour standards, industrial relations, technological change, and economic growth. These studies
are widely used by the public, labour, and industry.
The Department was pleased to host the 30th Annual Conference of the Canadian Association of Administrators of Labour Legislation and also Chairmen of
Labour Relations Boards from across Canada. A wide variety of subjects was
considered and the interchange of ideas and experiences proved to be beneficial to
all who took part.
 Report of the Apprenticeship and
Industrial Training Branch
Head office       - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Branch offices:
Department of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Department of Labour, Courthouse, Kelowna.
Department of Labour, 1600 Third Avenue, Prince George.
Department of Labour, Courthouse, Nelson.
Department of Labour, Box 899, Dawson Creek.
Department of Labour, Courthouse, Nanaimo.
Department of Labour, 4506 Lakelse Avenue, Terrace.
Department of Labour, 322 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Provincial Apprenticeship Committee
Chairman:
J.Melville    - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Members:
T. McGibbon - -      .      . 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
S.W.Simpson- - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
H. Taft   ----- 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
T. A. Turnbull -      -      - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
J.W.Thompson --- 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
J.S.White     - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Administrative Officials of the Branch
Samuel W. Simpson ... Director of Apprenticeship and Industrial Training.
Blair S. Anderson       - Assistant Director of Apprenticeship
and Industrial Training.
The Honourable the Minister oj Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, British Columbia.
Sir: I am pleased to submit this report of the Apprenticeship and Industrial
Training Branch for the year ending December 31, 1971.
Apprentices in Training
On December 31, 1971, there were 7,552 apprentices registered on the records
of the Apprenticeship and Industrial Training Branch. This is a small increase over
the 1970 total and indicates that the temporary hold-back in the hiring of apprentices is over.
Apprenticeship Technical Training
Technical training courses for apprentices are in a continual state of flux. Each
year there is a need to review and revise course outlines to bring them up to date with
13
 U 14 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
modern technology.   This year was one of increased activity, in that many of the
course outlines were completely revised.
There has been a gradual phasing-out of evening school classes for apprentices
in favour of day school classes; nevertheless, a total of 895 apprentices were enrolled
in evening classes.
When additional facilities are made available, many of the night school classes
in Vancouver will be phased out and day school classes substituted. Daytime
classes were conducted at the British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby; Mala-
spina Community College, Nanaimo; Okanagan Community College, Kelowna; and
the Vancouver Vocational Institute, Vancouver, and provided technical training for
5,120 apprentices.
Apprentices from all areas of the Province attended these classes, which lead to
a certificate of apprenticeship. It is interesting to note that, by arrangement with
the Apprenticeship and Industrial Training Branch, the Territories concerned, and
Canada Manpower, apprentices from the Yukon and Northwest Territories were
assigned to technical training in British Columbia.
Pre-apprenticeship Training
Pre-apprenticeship classes in various trades have been in operation, sponsored
by the British Columbia Government, since 1957. These classes were established
with a twofold purpose in mind:
(1) To provide young people who had left the secondary schools with an
opportunity to acquire basic trade knowledge so that they would be more
acceptable to employers:
(2) To overcome the reluctance of the employer about hiring young people
who did not have some previous trade experience.
The courses are from 20 to 24 weeks in duration and are offered to persons
who wish to prepare themselves for entry into apprenticeship training programmes.
There are no fees charged for the courses and a subsistence and travel allowance is
paid to the trainee to enable him to live while attending school.
The pre-apprentice programme has been an outstanding success and it is significant to note that, 10 years after the inception of the programme, the Federal
Department of Manpower and Immigration instituted a similar programme for persons who were unemployed or underemployed and who had a three-year attachment
to the labour force. Because Canada Manpower does not actually operate training
classes, the Apprenticeship and Industrial Training Branch makes available to
Canada a portion of each pre-apprentice class.
A carpentry pre-apprentice training class was arranged by the Apprenticeship
and Industrial Training Branch with Canada Manpower, the Department of Education, the Department of Indian Affairs, and the Cowichan Indian Band for young
Indian citizens of the Cowichan Reserve at Duncan. The classes were conducted at
the British Columbia Vocational School, Victoria. The graduates of the programme
will be employed by the Cowichan Band to work on their large housing programme
on the reserve.
Training was offered to 1,811 young men in 22 trades. Approximately 1,450
of the trainees graduated; many of them found employment as apprentices, others
found work in areas related to their training.
 1
INDUSTRIAL TRAINING BRANCH
Summary of Apprentices in Trades
U 15
Trade or Occupation
Term
in
Years
Year of Apprenticeship Being Served
First
Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth
Total
Number
of
Apprentices
in
Training
Completed
1971
Automotive—
Automatic-transmission repair-
Body repair	
Electrical-
Electrical and tune-up.-
Glass installation	
Machinist	
Mechanical repair	
Painting and reflnishing	
Radiator manufacture and repair
Trimming-
Diesel-engine repair	
Diesel-fuel injection	
Farm machinery mechanic	
Front-end alignment and frame
straightening
Front-end alignment and brake
service  	
Marine-engine mechanic..
Small-engine mechanic	
Tire repair-
Truck body building-
Truck mechanic	
Baking..
Barbering  „
Benchwork and joinery..
Boat-building-
Boilermaking (erection) .
Bricklaying	
Carman	
Carpentry-
Cook	
Dental technician	
Draughtsman   (hull,
or engineering)	
Drywall finisher	
Drywall installer	
Electrical—
Appliance repair  -
Cableman 	
mechanical,
Domestic radio and TV. servicing	
Industrial	
Lineman  	
Low-voltage systems-	
Operator	
Work-
Construction section	
Neon section 	
Shop section	
Winder	
Wireman 	
Electronics ..
Community antenna TV	
Instrument repair and calibration	
Marine electrical	
Panels and controls _
Radio communications-
Sound communications-
Telecommunications 	
Floorcovering installation -
Glazier  	
Grade and paving equipment operator.     	
Graphic arts   	
Hairdressing 	
41
4
2
2
1
2
39
191
192 |
7
8
3
1
6
4
~5
2
1
2
1
4
1
	
2
7
12
30
42
12
18
3
2
6
25
17
12
7
2
240
187
36
4
27
16
2
17
3
27
15
12
9
43
90
14
24
1
1
187
4
7
95
~io
	
1
8
6
1
	
2
	
1
8
1
38
3
16
7
12
1
15
18
157
304
2
59
3
1
2
5
202
3
1
2
2
1
10
~17
2
38
24
6
224
8
14
16
2
1
5
73
33
1
4
166
2
4
2
2
7
1
51
19
4
25
4
33
4
3
3
195
10
17
1
31
1
230
10
1
7
69
239
3
14
1
3
4
4
1
1
1
2
5
~40
52
172
11
7
5
17
780
15
3
2
21
2
10
3
11
5
3
1
29
72
64
8
69
84
16
881
48
67
3
36
42
2
1
33
275
71
1
6
687
9
39
3
3
16
25
2
3
2
1
11
6
105
43
5
150
461
2
30
5
152
9
1
7
1
3
7
55
13
4
15
10
3
191
3
11
1
5
11
5
64
14
1
6
137
1
8
2
7
4
2
20
10
50
236
 U 16
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Summary of Apprentices in Trades—Continued
Term
in
Years
Year of Apprenticeship Being Served
Total
Number
of
Apprentices
in
Training
Completed
in
1971
Trade or Occupation
First
Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth
Heavy-duty mechanic	
4
5
3
4
4
1
5
3
4
4
4
5
3
5
4
5
4
5
3
5
4
4
5
4
5
4
3
4
134
18
12
6
2
14
28
8
91
6
7
1
20
1
3
59
9
18
29
70
8
11
40
23
3
10
152
7
54
4
2
34
2
111
1
7
4
25
1
1
54
6
9
18
56
2
3
6
39
25
2
4
10
201
14
32
3
6
~64
4
93
2
9
24
7
85
6
7
2
83
4
8
20
1
113
33
3
9
8
175
15
3
14
44
121
4
8
3
2
4
71
10
13
86
1
5
1
42
32
5
9
17
53
4
1
89
17
85
3
40
5
662
71
98
16
24
14
223
14
416
13
31
12
69
5
15
358
31
64
49
380
7
24
41
1
274
113
5
21
42
142
12
55
Jewellery manufacture and repair-
1
8
Logging (basic)	
Machinist 	
5
60
3
Millwright	
Moulding                                      .
Office-machine mechanic  _
75
4
3
2
27
Patternmaking	
Plastering    	
4
2
64
4
11
Roofing, damp and waterproofing -
58
Shipwright	
7
2
58
29
Universal equipment operating
Welding  	
6
10
Totals	
—
1,825
1,841
1,895
1,609
382
7,552
1,772
Apprenticeship Advisory Committees
The Provincial Apprenticeship Committee met six times during the year to
consider and approve new contracts of apprenticeship, the cancellation of apprenticeship contracts, the transfer of apprentices between employers; the extension of
apprenticeship contracts, and the issuing of apprenticeship certificates to apprentices
who satisfactorily completed training. Approval was also granted to enrol selected
students in the pre-apprenticeship programme.
During 1971 the Provincial Apprenticeship Committee held two public hearings for the purpose of considering submissions made by interested parties regarding
the designation for apprenticeship and tradesmen's qualification of the trades of
industrial instrumentation and joinery (benchwork).
Meetings of the various Trade Advisory Committees were held for the purpose
of receiving recommendations for new courses, revision of existing courses, and
the examining of draft copies of trade analyses and examinations. The services
of these committees are beyond value and I would like to thank all those persons
who gladly gave of their time to attend and offer advice. Their help was greatly
appreciated.
Designation of Trades
Recommendations by the Provincial Apprenticeship Committee to the Honourable the Minister with respect to the designation of certain trades for apprenticeship
 1
INDUSTRIAL TRAINING BRANCH U 17
and the amendment of other trades for the purpose of voluntary or compulsory
tradesmen's qualification resulted in the following Orders in Council being passed:
The trade of industrial instrumentation was added to Schedule A of the
Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act by Order in Council
1615 on May 6, 1971.
The trade of joinery (benchwork) was amended for the purpose of voluntary
tradesmen's qualification by Order in Council 3749 on October 19, 1971.
The trades of lumber manufacturing industry—saw-fitter, lumber manufacturing industry—circular-saw filer, and lumber manufacturing industry—
benchman were added to Schedule A of the Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act for the purpose of apprenticeship and voluntary
tradesmen's qualification by Order in Council 749 on March 2, 1971.
Supervision and Promotion
Counselling visits to secondary schools to disseminate up-to-date information
and literature relative to the apprenticeship and pre-apprenticeship programmes to
students, school counsellors, teaching staff, and principals were carried out by the
counselling staff of the Apprenticeship and Industrial Training Branch.
The counselling staff made regular visits to employers' places of business to
interview and counsel employers and apprentices. The staff has also endeavoured
to devote as much time as possible to maintaining close contact with employer and
employee organizations for the purpose of promoting apprenticeship training.
Our staff has been extremely busy invigilating interprovincial examinations for
many of the over 6,000 apprentices who regularly attend day and evening technical
training classes. The role of our counselling staff has been in a gradual process of
change, 10 years ago the Branch's work was largely in the area of inspection and
promotion, today a larger portion of our time is devoted to the educational process.
Development of course outlines and examinations and the scheduling and assigning
of apprentices to school has meant the development of new ideas and practices.
The establishment of full-time Counsellors in district offices in the areas where
vocational schools are situated has done much to stimulate apprenticeship. Our
new office in Kamloops will be able to provide prompt, efficient service to apprentices, employers, unions, and persons applying to write a tradesmen's qualification
examination.
Federal-Provincial Co-operation
There has been good co-operation between the Government of Canada and the
Province of British Columbia in apprenticeship training; however, the Adult Occupational Training Act was not designed specifically as a vehicle for apprenticeship
training. In fact, there is some doubt that provision for apprenticeship training
was really considered when the Act was first prepared, but rather added as an afterthought. If this had not been so, the discrimination that presently exists relative
to who qualifies for training allowances would not apply to apprentices. It is
our firm contention that the Federal Government should pay allowances to all
apprentices.
The Department of Manpower and Immigration, which administers the Adult
Occupational Training Act, initiates several meetings each year with the Directors
of Apprenticeship and the Examination Co-ordinators from the various provinces
to discuss inter-provincial examinations, trade analyses, and other matters related
to apprenticeship training. These meetings provide a forum whereby the Directors
and Canada Manpower can discuss many items of mutual concern.
 U 18
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Tradesmen's Qualification
Since the inception of examinations of proficiency for tradesmen, a total of
13,783 tradesmen has been granted tradesmen's qualification certificates attesting to
their proficiency.
It is interesting to note that many employers will not consider employing a
tradesman unless he is the holder of a tradesmen's qualification certificate. It is
also significant that many of the persons who apply for examination are employed in
service trade areas, where the public is involved in purchasing a service, such as
automotive mechanical repair.
During 1971, examinations for the trades of painting and decorating and auto-
body repair were completed and placed in use.
Trade
Qualified in 1971 by-
Examination   Apprenticeship
Certificates
Issued In
1971
Exemptions
Issued in
1971
Automotive body repair-
Automotive mechanical repair-
Bricklaying	
Carpentry-
Heavy-duty mechanic-
Industrial electrical—
Machinist	
Millwright-
Oil-burner mechanic	
Painting and decorating-
Plumbing-
Radio and TV	
Refrigeration	
Sheet-metal work-
Sprinkler-fitting-
Steamfitting and pipefitting-
Totals	
22
157
6
226
172
127
37
364
38
43
118
8
28
56
2
57
1,461
19
134
9
191
131
64
53
64
1
65
5
12
60
2
61
871
41
291
15
417
303
191
90
428
39
43
183
13
40
116
4
118
2,332
35
4
11
21
71
Conclusion
I wish, at this time, to thank employers, trade unions, trade advisory committees, and educational authorities for their continued interest and co-operation, which
has been of great assistance in the expansion of the apprenticeship and industrial
training programme.
Respectfully submitted.
Samuel W. Simpson
Director oj Apprenticeship and Industrial Training
 BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS U 19
Report of the Board of Industrial Relations
Head office     ------      Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Members of the Board
Chairman:
W. H. Sands, Deputy Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings,
Victoria.
Vice-Chairman:
C. R. Margison, Assistant Deputy Minister of Labour, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria.
Members:
C.Murdoch   -      -      - - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
J. R. Edgett   -      -      - - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
R. S. S. Wilson     -     - - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
D. H. Chapman     - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Mrs. Emily Ostapchuk - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Secretary:
C R. Margison     - Parliament Buildings, Victoria
The Honourable the Minister oj Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, British Columbia.
Sir: We have the honour to present the thirty-eighth annual report of the
Board of Industrial Relations for the year ended December 31, 1971.
Meetings
The Board held 45 meetings in Vancouver during the year and six in Victoria.
Orders and Regulations Made During 1971
Order Made Pursuant to the Female Minimum Wage Act
An Order made by the Board of Industrial Relations during the year establishes
the same minimum wage and other working conditions for female employees where
an existing Order has application only to male employees.
Regulation Made Pursuant to the Hours of Work Act
The only regulation made was the annual regulation permitting persons in
retail establishments to work certain additional hours during the Christmas season.
Regulations Made Pursuant to the Male and Female Minimum Wage Acts
After due inquiry, the following regulations exempting certain employees from
the operation of the said Acts were made:
 U 20 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Regulation 22 (1971)—Exempts the child-care staff, counsellors, supervisors,
and teachers employed by The Pacific Centre for Human Development, Victoria,
British Columbia.
Regulation 31 (1971)—Exempts group-living parents, relief workers, resident
caretaker, cook, Programme Director, and Assistant Programme Director employed
by The Bishop Cridge Centre for the Family, Victoria, British Columbia, for the
period expiring June 30, 1972.
Regulation 24 (1971)—Exempts professional workers and residential therapists employed by Brown Camps Residential and Day Schools for the period expiring June 30, 1972.
Regulation 28 (1971)—Exempts employees of Outward Bound British Columbia for the period expiring June 30, 1972.
Regulation 18 (1971)—Exempts employees of the Victoria Hostel for Girls,
Victoria, British Columbia, for the period expiring July 31, 1972.
Conclusion
The Board at this time expresses its appreciation to all organizations, employers, employees, trade unions, and other persons for the co-operation it has
received during the year 1971.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
W. H. Sands, Chairman.
C. R. Margison, Vice-Chairman.
C. Murdoch.
J. R. Edgett.
R. S. S. Wilson.
D. H. Chapman.
Emily Ostapchuk.
 FACTORY AND ELEVATOR INSPECTION BRANCH U 21
Report of the Factory and Elevator
Inspection Branch
Head office ----- 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
James D. Forrest - Chief Inspector of Factories and Elevators.
Branch Office      -----     Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
The Honourable the Minister oj Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, British Columbia.
Sir: I have the honour to submit the annual report of the Factory and Elevator
Inspection Branch for the year ended December 31, 1971.
Elevator Division
The volume of elevator construction has considerably exceeded this year's
projection. As compared with 1970, when 260 units were installed, this year to
date we are in excess of 500 new units for the first time in our experience. Our
projection for 1972 shows a continued trend in the 500 construction bracket is
likely.
In last year's Annual Report we made reference to the inauguration of a protective-maintenance programme in 1971, throughout the pulp and paper industry,
to combat the effects of corrosion to the mechanical and electrical components of
elevators.
We are pleased to report that very effective results were achieved this year in
developing a system of protective maintenance that can be sustained. The co-operation of mill managers and their appropriate staffs was responsible, in large measure,
for substantial progress achieved in introducing to this industry a more effective
protective-maintenance programme.
During this year, as a result of the failure of a mechanical component which
caused a belt-type man-lift to free wheel, four workers were injured, of whom one
suffered very serious permanent disability.
Notwithstanding the fact it was the first accident ever reported to us from such
an occurrence, and since, in future, fatalities could result from such a source, the
following course of action was taken. On October 21, 1971, all owners of belt
man-lifts were notified that overspeed safety-gear would be required to be installed
on existing man-lifts on or before April 30, 1972. Further that, in future, new
installations would have to be initially equipped accordingly.
We have been informed by the Canadian Standards Association that a revised
1971 Elevator Code has now been completed for early distribution. Since our
Province has adopted and enforces this code as a regulation, it should be noted by
all concerned that there are many significant changes and additions that will apply
in 1972, and will be enforced by our Elevator Inspectors.
One of the most disconcerting problems facing the owners of highrise buildings,
particularly hotels and apartments, and office buildings to a lesser degree, is the
control of fires and the safe evacuation of the occupants, especially if the building
population is voluminous, and worse still when overnight sleeping is customary.
J
 U 22 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
In last year's Annual Report it was intimated that both the National Building
Code and the Canadian Standards Association B44 Elevator Code Committee were
going to modify their respective codes to cope with the problem. Since the former
code considerably increased the amount of hoistway ventilation required, and the
latter code has made the sole use of one or more elevators in such buildings available
for firemen, we are both involved and concerned.
Because the electrical and mechanical components of passenger elevators can
be adversely affected by heat, which can stall an elevator car in a hoistway, we
would rather see the amendments deferred until more comprehensive controls have
achieved engineering viability; especially with respect to air-conditioning systems,
pressurization, additional ventilation shafts, hoistway and entrance enclosures. If
total control can't be achieved, both firemen and occupants would be vulnerable
from the effects of smoke and heat. There is no intended or implied criticism of
elevators contained in the foregoing comments because we appreciate that it is most
unlikely that they could be designed to withstand the temperatures reached in some
fires reported.
Coincidental to the problems we have been involved with this year, relating to
the role of elevators as just described, we have had more than a passing interest
during this year in following the design and development work achieved by a local
engineering firm in actually bringing to the installation stage an entirely new concept
of vertical transportation known as a "Sky Van System."
Since this type of elevating device can operate on vertical rails on the outside
of existing or new buildings, although primarily designed for freight, it is safely
adaptable for the use of firemen to get access to all floors of a building from outside
access, for fire-fighting purposes, and the rescue of dwellers when required. We,
and others, intend to assess performance, and of course, if it fulfils its purpose
adequately, a new milestone may have been achieved, because its first use is on a
building occupied by nonperambular patients. All concerned will likely be pleased
to learn that this type of elevating device has merited inclusion in the C.S.A. B44
Elevator Code.
A fatal accident occurred to a worker in a Prince Rupert cold-storage plant
when he was pushed into a freight-elevator hoistway by a freight cart. The Elevator
Inspector concluded, from his on-site investigation, that the barrier chain guarding
the hoistway was inadequate to give sufficient protection to workers exposed to this
hazard.
Since conventional hoistway doors could not be used for this type of entrance,
because subzero temperatures would make them inoperative, the inspector designed
a manually operated, slatted steel door for future use, which the firm has since found
to be functional as well as providing adequate hoistway protection.
Authorization was granted this year to employ three additional Elevator Inspectors to permit the Branch to keep up with the accelerating pace of elevator
construction.
Factory Division
The primary purpose of the Factories Act, Part I, is to provide protection for
the health and safety of the people employed in factories, stores, and offices. It is
an extensive responsibility inasmuch as some 800,000 people are involved, who work
in over 35,000 such places of employment.
While more factory, store, and office workers are being protected under the
provisions of the Act in newly constructed buildings, we have also seen inspection
coverage increased for those working in older factories, stores, and offices.  This
 FACTORY AND ELEVATOR INSPECTION BRANCH U 23
year, substandard working conditions were rectified in many such places. The
satisfactory provision of heating and lighting alone, we feel, has provided safer and
more healthful conditions in hundreds of cases dealt with; and, more important,
employers and employees agree. Our inspectional work in this area is not only
time-consuming but complicated as well, because we are concerned with the technologically possible, the economically feasible, the environmentally necessary, and
the socially acceptable to satisfy employers and workers alike.
Notable progress has been observed where foundries have been relocated,
especially in providing ventilation, exhausting, lighting, washroom, heating, and
lunchrooms in accordance with the provisions of the Act. The adverse working conditions generally prevalent in the older type of foundries are being effectively overcome to the credit of the industry, and to the benefit of the employees.
In the course of the current year the inspectorate have accomplished very
effective results in progressively bringing older sawmills, and shingle-mills as well,
within conformity of the Act. Now that the wide variety of suitable lighting and
heating equipment is readily available, deficiencies can be reasonably overcome.
The lack of adequate washroom and lunchroom facilities has also been overcome
in a growing number of mills which have this year reached conformity with the
provisions of the Act. The workers, as a result, have had their working conditions
immeasurably improved.
Probably the most important volume increase, which occupied the time of the
Factory Inspectors during the year, was associated with the examination and
approval of over 800 new factory, office, and store plans for conformity with the
provisions of the Factories Act.
In the current year, as a result of store and hotel or office building combinations amounting to many hundreds of millions in dollar volume, and particularly
since rapid erection is becoming common, adjustments were made to cope with
such a high-volume situation by establishing and maintaining closer liaison with
major projects.
Typical of the results that were achieved was our experience with the Pacific
Centre, where diversification involves offices and stores, and standards vary, as well
as responsibilities of owner and lessee, the project officials have very effectively
assisted the Branch by designating a member of staff to collaborate in assuring that
design and applications are tied together in order to meet our requirements. We have
also been assured of similar co-operation for the Royal Centre and the Bentall
Centre's continuing construction programme.
This is to say, that, to protect the thousands of workers that will be employed
in such places, we and the developers have, during this year, streamlined our
respective systems to reach our mutual objectives.
In addition to our inspectional involvement with lighting, we, of course, are
also involved with electrical contractors on a Province-wide basis. Our past experience has indicated that closer understanding of our lighting standards could be
reached through closer co-operation with the Electrical Contractors' Association,
and to this end we have endeavoured, during the year, to keep their membership
informed of our inspectional functions.
To a similar degree, lighting-fixture manufacturers and distributors have also
worked more co-operatively in maintaining the standards of fixture design consistent
with our requirements. Time-consuming as such undertakings are, we feel confident
it will not take long for the benefits to be realized by both employers and employees
in better lighting.
 U 24 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Throughout the year, Inspectors have dealt with many phases of our work,
through speaking by invitation to employer and worker groups, as well as clubs and
technical societies, who welcome such participation, as we do ourselves. Inspectors
have also attended quite a number of seminars and staff meetings of our own, at
which various experts have attended, to discuss new techniques and equipment on
a continuing updating basis, so we can keep abreast of new technology pertinent to
our duties.
During the year there were 41 employers and 59 homeworkers authorized by
permit to conduct homework in accordance with the provisions contained in the Act.
For the first time in the history of this Branch an Inspector, on behalf of the
Canada Department of Labour, conducted occupational health inspections in the
Yukon Territory under the Canada Labour Code. Similar inspections were also
conducted for the first time in the East Kootenays and the Chilcotin areas.
The total inspections conducted on behalf of the Federal Government were
well over a thousand.
Technical Services Division
Technical consultations have continued very smoothly in this complex area,
where, during the year, we have been involved with the Department of Public Works,
British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service, British Columbia Hydro, International
Power Engineers and Consultants, Canadian Standards Association, and the Associate Committee of the National Building Code.
Consultative involvement has been associated with the W. A. C. Bennett and
Mica Dams on a continuing basis. As Government buildings and hospitals continue
to be constructed, our involvement will relate to the various elevating devices and
environmental engineering aspects emanating from the legislation.
During the year, by seminars or in the field, we have continued our programme
of assistance on protective maintenance for the operating staffs of hospitals and other
public buildings, which appears to be producing effective results, particularly in the
many cases of such buildings being in very isolated locations in the Province.
Summary of Inspections and Plan Approvals
The following itemization lists the number of inspections conducted during the
year 1971, relating to factories, stores, and offices, elevating devices, and the number
of directives issued to owners and employers pertinent to these inspections. The
number of engineering plans and specifications approved for construction are also
stipulated.
Inspections
Factories, offices, stores  5,838
Elevating devices  3,184
Total  9,022
Directives
Factories, offices, stores  2,318
Elevating devices  3,170
Total  5,488
 FACTORY AND ELEVATOR INSPECTION BRANCH U 25
Engineering Plan and Specification Approvals
Factories      827
Elevating devices      506
Total  1,333
Conclusion
As indicated in this report for the year 1971, there has been a very sharp
increase of construction which involves the inspectorate of this Branch, and it
appears very likely that it will continue next year. Consequently, I wish to express
our sincere appreciation for the assistance given to this Branch during the year by
other Departments of the Government, the Canada Department of Labour, municipalities, employers, employees, trade unions, architects, and engineers.
Respectfully submitted.
J. D. Forrest
Chiej Inspector
 U 26 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Report of Human Rights Branch
Personnel, Human Rights Commission
Headquarters ------      Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Chairman:
W. H. Sands -----      Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Vice-Chairmen:
C. R. Margison    - Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
John Melville   -      -      -      411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Members:
Charles Murdoch     - - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
J. R. Edgett       -      - - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
R. S. S. Wilson    -      - - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
David H. Chapman   - - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Mrs. Emily Ostapchuk - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Secretary:
Frank B. Hilton       - Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Director, Human Rights Act:
John C. Sherlock       ...      Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
The Honourable the Minister oj Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, British Columbia.
Sir: I have the honour to present the annual report of the Human Rights
Branch for the year ended December 31, 1971.
The Human Rights Branch of the Department of Labour processed a total of
680 complaints in the year ended December 31, 1971.
Complaints are categorized as either formal, informal, or miscellaneous.
Formal complaints are allegations of discrimination received by the Director
which, on their face, appear to violate the provisions of the Act. In the initial stage
such complaints may be made in the form of a letter from the complainant or in
face-to-face communication with the Director. These complaints are subsequently
reduced to writing on the form prescribed, in accordance with the provisions of
section 14 of the Act. There are also 12 Department of Labour offices situated
throughout the Province of British Columbia staffed by Industrial Relations Officers
charged with the responsibility of advising the public of their rights and responsibilities under the law. This is particularly important when assisting new Canadians
and members of minority groups who may have language difficulties.
E. Marshall Pollock, B.A., LL.B., Counsel to the Ontario Human Rights
Commission, in a paper presented at the Fourth Annual Workshop of the Canadian
Administrators of Human Rights Legislation in March 1971, observed "that the
human rights officer must be an educator, in the sense that even if no culpability
can be assigned in the particular case, as the field representative ... he must
ensure that in all possible situations the philosophy of human rights and the essential
dignity of man is publicized in the general community.    In this respect it is my
 HUMAN RIGHTS BRANCH U 27
firm conviction that a Human Rights Officer by direct and personal contact can
do far more to further these principles than can any number of inanimate press
releases, advertisements, or other publications, no matter how slick or well designed."   This Branch subscribes wholeheartedly to this observation.
Officers were appointed in 36 instances to investigate complaints during 1971.
Six of these complaints related to a difference in the rate of pay between male and
female employees. Four complaints were found to be without merit and two were
resolved with the assistance of the officer when the rate of pay was adjusted in
favour of the female complainants.
In 1970 the Human Rights Commission had ordered the Vancouver General
Hospital to pay to 10 female employees a sum totalling approximately $20,000 in
pay adjustments for contravening the provisions of section 4 of the Act, and also
ordered the hospital to cease the contravention. Pay adjustments were made and
the hospital proceeded to restructure the particular department to conform with
the Commission order. However, seven female employees again complained that
they were continuing to do the same or substantially the same work as their male
counterparts at a lower rate of pay. An investigation of the complaints was conducted and the matter was heard by the Commission in January of 1971. The Commission found that the hospital had complied with the order and dismissed the
charges as being without merit.
Officers were appointed to investigate allegations of discrimination in employment in 19 instances. Eight complaints were on the basis of sex, five on the basis
of age, four on the basis of race, and two on the basis of religion.
The officers were successful in settling eight of these complaints; eight complaints were found to be without merit and three are being investigated. In one
case a dental-mechanic trainee was dismissed by his employers because he declined
to change his religion to conform with their religion. As a result of the efforts of
the investigating officer, the complainant was offered re-employment or $500 in lieu
of wages lost by reason of the discriminatory act.   He chose the latter.
A complaint concerning discriminatory "application for employment forms"
lodged by the Vancouver Labour Committee for Human Rights under section 7
of the Act was settled when the employer made the required correction.
An officer was appointed to investigate a charge of discrimination under section
8 of the Act made by a Metis who had received an eviction notice from his landlord
allegedly for disobeying the parking rules. The particular parking rules concerned
the complainant's boat, which he insisted on parking in a restricted area in the
apartment's lot. The investigation revealed that the rules applied to all tenants of
the apartment block and that East Indian, Japanese, and Italian families were
tenants in the block.    The complaint was dismissed as being without merit.
Officers were appointed to investigate nine complaints of discrimination, pursuant to section 9 of the Act concerning accommodation. Eight of these complaints
alleged discrimination on the basis of colour and one on the basis of religion.
Officers were successful in settling five of these complaints. Three complaints were
deemed to be without merit and one complaint is still under investigation.
One of these complaints concerned a white woman tenant who was given an
eviction notice allegedly because her visitors were black. The woman investigator
from our Vancouver office settled this matter and the eviction notice was withdrawn.
Formal and miscellaneous complaints are those in which the Branch's involvement was relatively brief. The examination of 28 application for employment forms
submitted by the field officers is included in this classification.
Also included in this classification are discriminatory advertisements appearing
in the classified sections of newspapers.   Three hundred and ninety-eight of these
 U 28 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
discriminatory advertisements were noted and the advertiser and the news media
were advised of their responsibilities under the Act. In every instance these advertisements contravened the provisions of the Act with respect to age by the use of the
adjective "young," or "girl," or "boy," or by the request for a person in an age
bracket under 45 years. The Director of Advertising of one of the large metropolitan newspapers is presently conducting a survey with a view to establishing
phraseology which would meet advertising requirements and yet not offend the Act.
The Branch received 218 miscellaneous complaints, and the subject-matter
ranged from tenant-landlord disputes, legal aid problems, difficulties in restaurants
or employment or schools encountered by bearded and (or) long-haired youths, and
cases involving welfare recipients. In each instance an effort was made to satisfy
the complainant by directing him to the appropriate agency or offering other assistance to satisfy his problem.
In the latter part of 1970 a Government department, the Reforestation Division of the British Columbia Forest Service, was accused of discrimination in the
hiring of female tree-planters. The female complainant had appealed to a human
rights association in Vancouver, which assisted her in making a formal complaint
to the Director of the Human Rights Act. The complaint was satisfied early in
1971 upon the issuance of a directive by the Forester-in-Charge to the District Reforestation Officers instructing them to apply the same standards and priorities to
applications from women tree-planters as from men.
Recognizing the importance of face-to-face communication, the Director met
with the Vernon Youth Council early in 1971 in Vernon, and was privileged to
address the Vernon High School students on human rights matters. Their interest
in human rights grew as a result of a local restaurant operator's posting of a notice
refusing service to persons affecting long hair. The operator eventually discontinued
this notice.
Early in the year a Human Rights Conference was held in Williams Lake,
sponsored by the Williams Lake Community Council. Participants in the programme were representatives from the British Columbia Human Rights Council,
the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association, the Victoria Labour Council, the
Legal Aid Society, the Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs, the Association of
Non-Status Indians, teachers, students, professional health and welfare people,
the clergy, and interested citizens, many of whom were representing specific service
organizations. As a result of this conference, a Human -Rights Committee has been
formed whose function it will be to act as a catalyst when problems of discrimination arise in order to prevent them from becoming major issues.
A similiar conference sponsored by the British Columbia Association of Non-
Status Indians in Quesnel in October 1971 produced a similar local Human Rights
Committee. Participants in this conference included the Union of British Columbia
Indian Chiefs, the British Columbia Human Rights Council, Quesnel and District
Resource and Service Council, and the Pacific Region, Canadian Council of
Christians and Jews.
The Branch is deeply grateful to these organizations for their co-operation in
promoting the principle that every person is free and equal in dignity and rights
without regard to race, religion, sex, colour, nationality, ancestry, or place of origin.
Respectfuly submitted.
John C. Sherlock
Director
 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
U 29
Report of the Labour Relations Branch
Personnel, Labour Relations Board
Chairman:
W. H. Sands -----      Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
V ice-Chairmen:
C. R. Margison   -
John Melville   -
Members:
Charles Murdoch
J. R. Edgett
R. S. S. Wilson   -     -
David H. Chapman    -
Mrs. Emily Ostapchuk
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Chief Executive Officer and Registrar:
Gerald H. O'Neill    -     -     -
Deputy Registrar:
R. J. Weir     -     -     -     -     -
Secretary:
Frank B. Hilton
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
The Honourable the Minister oj Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, British Columbia.
Sir: I have the honour to present the annual report of the Labour Relations
Branch for the year ended December 31, 1971.
Applications for Certification
In 1971 there were 1,004 applications for certification. This represents an
increase of 81 over the number which was received in 1970. There were 667 certifications ordered, compared with 691 in 1970, and 237 were rejected, while 121
were in this category in 1970.
There were 79 complaints filed with the Labour Relations Board under section
7 of the Act. This is an increase of 40 over the number which was filed in the
previous year. Twenty-six orders were issued by the Labour Relations Board pursuant to this section of the Act. In seven instances, settlements were effected by an
Officer of the Department.
The Labour Relations Board met on 113 occasions and held 34 hearings,
compared with 105 meetings and 20 hearings in 1970.
Settlement of Grievances
Provisions of section 22 (4) of the Labour Relations Act continued to be
widely used. The section provides that at any time prior to the appointment of a
Board of Arbitration or other body, either party to the collective agreement may
 U 30 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
request the Registrar in writing to appoint an Officer of the Department of Labour
to confer with the parties to assist them to settle the difference. The Officer, after
conferring with the parties, may make a report to the Registrar, and the report may
be referred to the Labour Relations Board. The Board may, if in its opinion the
difference is arbitrable, refer the matter back to the parties or inquire into it and,
following such inquiry, make an order for final and conclusive settlement of the
difference.
Under this section, out of 224 referrals, there were 133 settlements effected
by Officers of the Department, compared with 115. in 1970. Seventy orders were
issued by the Board; in 19 instances the differences were referred back to the
parties and in two cases it was found that the differences were not arbitrable.
Grievance Procedure Provided
No grievance procedures were provided by the Minister, pursuant to the
provisions of section 22 (2) of the Labour Relations Act.
Arbitration Boards
Where grievance procedures under collective agreements had been invoked
and the requisite applications made, chairmen were named to 11 Arbitration Boards
by the Minister of Labour and four appointments were made to one-man Boards.
The Labour Relations Board appointed chairmen to nine Arbitration Boards during
the year.
Accreditations of Employers' Organizations
During the year under review, accreditations of employers' organizations were
ordered in seven instances. One application for accreditation was rejected, one
application was withdrawn, and 21 others were varied by the Labour Relations
Board.
Table I—Analysis of Certifications Issued to December 31, T971
Total Number of
Employees Affected
Number of by Certification
Industry or Occupation Certifications Issued
Construction—
Boilermakers   6 46
Carpenters   84 566
Electrical   2 26
Ironworkers   23 78
Labourers   92 648
Miscellaneous   93 657
Painting   35 202
Pile-drivers   3 10
Plumbing   10 84
Sheet-metal workers   17 87
Totals, construction  365 2,404
Logging and lumbering and sawmill     42 1,425
 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
U 31
Table I—Analysis of Certifications Issued to December 31, 1971—Continued
Industry or Occupation
Manufacturing—
Automobile repairs and garage
Number of
Certifications
10
Bread and other bakery products     4
Distilled liquor 	
Furniture and fixtures	
Iron and steel products
Machinery 	
Miscellaneous 	
Printing and publishing
Pulp and paper	
Ship-building
Concrete products manufacturing
Totals, manufacturing	
2
4
16
7
17
5
1
2
4
Mining 	
Service—
Building maintenance
Education 	
Health 	
Hotels  	
Labour organizations
Laundries	
Other services 	
Restaurants, cafes, taverns, and catering ...
5
4
33
10
1
2
20
11
72
16
Totals, service      86
Public administration and defence       2
Trade-
Automobiles and accessories  2
Building material and supplies   6
Drugs  ... 1
Groceries and meats   14
Machinery and equipment   3
Retail trade   1
Wholesale trade  9
Total Number of
Employees Affected
by Certification
Issued
403
17
125
46
530
146
442
34
164
100
167
2,174
481
44
73
840
398
2
25
284
418
2,084
50
7
39
35
251
13
25
123
Totals, trade
Transportation, storage, and communications—
Storage and warehouse     1
Truck transportation  47
Totals, transportation, etc.
Grand totals 	
36
48
667
16
348
493
364
9,475
 U 32 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table II—Comparison of Cases Dealt With by Labour Relations Board,
1970 and 1971
Applications for certification—                                       Dml1' Di97i1'
Certifications ordered   691 667
Applications rejected  121 237
Applications withdrawn  111 100
Total applications   923 1,004
Votes ordered     22 21
Variance of certification—
Certifications varied  387 553
Applications rejected     38 75
Applications withdrawn     14 11
Totals   439 639
Declaration of successor status—
Declarations given  156 88
Declarations rejected       5 2
Withdrawn       6 	
Totals   167 90
Cancellation of certification—
Certifications cancelled  .     60 92
Applications rejected     32 44
Applications withdrawn      4 5
Totals     96 141
Votes ordered        5 4
Applications to alter rates of pay, etc.—
Applications granted  3
Applications rejected  .       1 2
Totals        1 5
Complaints under section 7—
Orders issued      10 26
Complaints rejected      13 30
Settlements effected by Officer of the Department      8 7
Complaints withdrawn       8 16
Totals -     39 79
 1
LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
U 33
Table II—Comparison of Cases Dealt With by Labour Relations Board,
1970 and 1971—Continued
Appeals from decisions—
Appeals granted 	
Appeals dismissed ...
Appeals withdrawn .
Dec. 31,
1970
15
65
5
Totals
Appointments, Arbitration Board chairman—appointments made	
Appointments, member to Arbitration Board—
Appointments made by Board	
Applications rejected
Applications withdrawn 	
Disputes resolved by Officer of Department
Totals
Requests for decisions under section 65-
Decisions made 	
Requests withdrawn
Requests rejected	
Totals
85
22
1
2
19
22
359
12
1
372
Dec. 31,
1971
19
64
1
84
5
2
5
12
374
12
386
Applications under section 66 (a)-
by Officer of Department 	
-settlement effected
1
Applications for an Officer under section 22 (4)—
Settlements effected by Officer of Department  115
Orders issued  70
Referred back to parties  20
Questions not arbitrable  38
Totals
243
133
70
19
2
224
Applications for accreditation—
Accreditations ordered 	
Applications rejected
Applications withdrawn
Accreditations varied ...
Totals
Hearings held 	
Number of times the Board met.
6
2
1
1
10
20
105
7
1
1
21
30
34
113
 U 34 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Other statistics outlining details of trade union membership and affiliations are
contained in the statistical supplement at the end of the Annual Report. A summary of labour disputes is also contained in that section.
Respectfully submitted.
Gerald H. O'Neill
Chief Executive Officer and Registrar,
Labour Relations Branch
 LABOUR STANDARDS BRANCH U 35
Report of Labour Standards Branch
Head office     ------     Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
W. J. D. Hoskyn ----------      Director.
J. A. Laffling     -      Supervisor, Labour Standards Branch, Vancouver.
W. D. Purdy    -    Assistant Supervisor, Labour Standards Branch,
Vancouver.
Branch Offices
Courthouse, Cranbrook. Courthouse, Nanaimo.
British Columbia Vocational School, Courthouse, Nelson.
Dawson Creek. Courthouse, Prince George.
322 Seymour Street, Kamloops. Courthouse, Terrace.
Courthouse, Kelowna. 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Courthouse, Mission. Courthouse, Williams Lake.
The Honourable the Minister oj Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, British Columbia.
Sir: I have the honour to present the annual report of the Labour Standards
Branch for the year ended December 31, 1971.
During the year 1971, Industrial Relations Officers made a total of 48,245
calls regarding the statutes administered by the Labour Standards Branch, including
those necessary with regard to the Labour Relations Act and Human Rights Act.
Industrial Relations Officers called on these employers during the year and
provided them with full particulars regarding the application of the legislation and
to ensure that the welfare and working conditions of the employees were being
looked after in accordance with the satutory requirements. The offices, which are
located throughout the Province, are available to give information to both the
employers and employees who seek particulars regarding the legislation applicable
to their establishments and places of their employment.
A number of calls made by the Officers resulted from complaints received
from employees that infractions were taking place, and it became necessary that
adjustments be made either to the conditions of work or to wages due to employees.
The largest number of complaints dealt with nonpayment of wages due to employees.
Investigations resulted in wage and annual and general holiday pay adjustments being made to 9,056 employees from 4,427 employers, and amounted to $788,099.83.
A large portion of this amount was obtained following the issuance of certificates by
the Board of Industrial Relations under the provisions of the Payment oj Wages
Act. During 1971, 393 certificates were issued on behalf of 2,255 employees.
Demand notices were issued to 386 persons who were or about to become indebted
to the employer named in the certificate that had been made. The effectiveness of
the certificates and the demands was considerably increased by the amendment
 U 36 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
passed in 1970 creating a priority for the certificates. Perhaps the most noticeable
single case was the securing of payment for 67 employees of $63,694.37, which
would not have been realized without this priority.
Department cars travelled 253,950 miles in connection with the administration of the legislation.
Seventy-five registrations were issued to employment agencies following inspection to ensure that the proprietors were aware of the provisions of the Act and
that they were being complied with, this encompassed instruction with regard to the
requirements of the Human Rights Act.
Permits under the Control oj Employment oj Children Act were issued to 252
employers, allowing them to employ a child under 15 years of age. In each case,
investigation was made to ensure that the work was not dangerous or that it would
not adversely affect the health of the child. School authorities were also questioned
to determine that the work would not interfere with the schooling of the child.
Legislation administered by the Labour Standards Branch was effective in
securing adjustments for employees which are recorded in the following table:
Comparison of Investigations and Wage Adjustments, 1970 and 1971
1970 1971
Inspections and investigations  53,229 48,245
Industrial Relations Officers  43 43
Annual and General Holidays Act—
Firms involved  1,534 1,371
Employees affected  3,318 2,551
Arrears paid  $138,315.26        $117,761.01
Female Minimum Wage Act—
Firms involved  231 156
Employees affected  711 400
Arrears paid     $18,916.88 $14,845.15
Male Minimum Wage Act—
Firms involved  312 210
Employees affected  884 556
Arrears paid     $66,929.62 $33,863.89
Payment oj Wages Act—
Firms involved  2,365 2,690
Employees affected  5,139 5,549
Arrears paid  $487,935.76       $621,729.78
Total adjustments  $712,097.52        $788,099.83
 LABOUR STANDARDS BRANCH
U 37
Payment of Wages Act
Certificates made1 under section 5 (1) (c)	
Certificates confirmed2 under section 5 (2) (a)	
Certificates cancelled3 under section 5 (2) (b) (ii)	
Certificates cancelled4 and remade under section 5 (2)
(b)   (i)	
Certificates paid before confirmation5	
Certificates paid before filed in Court6	
Certificates confirmed under section 5 (2) (a) and made
under section 5 (2) (b) (i) filed with Registrar of7—
County Court	
Supreme Court	
Appeals under section 5 (4)	
Demands made under section 6(1).
1 Forty-seven certificates made in 1971 pending at December 31, 1971.
2 Twenty certificates made in 1970 confirmed in 1971.
3 Two certificates made in 1970 cancelled in 1971.
4 One certificate made in 1970 cancelled and remade in 1971.
5 Four certificates made in 1970 paid before confirmation.
6 Four certificates paid before filing in Court.
t Seventeen certificates made in 1970 and filed in Court in 1971.
1970
1971
265
393
202
304
24
6
24
6
27
30
16
48
182
232
35
30
2
168
386
Court- Cases
When employers fail to co-operate with the Department in the matter of compliance with the provisions of the Orders and regulations administered by the
Labour Standards Branch, action is taken through the Courts in order to obtain
compliance with the legislation. A summary of Court cases during the year 1971
follows:
Court Cases for the Year 1971
Name of Act
-Payment oj Wages Act.	
Male Minimum. Wage Act...
Hours of Work Act	
Totals	
Number of
Employers
Charges
Convictions
Dismissals
1 Withdrawn.
Control of Employment of Children Act
Unless a permit has been granted to the employer by the Minister of Labour
or a person duly authorized by him to issue such permits, the employment of children under 15 years of age in certain designated occupations or industries is prohibited by the Control oj Employment oj Children Act.
In order that the health and scholastic standing of the children will not be
adversely affected by their work in industry or business, the Department works in
close co-operation with the school authorities and the parents or guardians of the
children.   Permits are issued only when it has been established that the child's health
4
J
 U 38
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
will not suffer, and that the work will not expose the boy or girl to unsafe conditions
or interfere with their standing in school.
The Schedule to the Act specifies and defines the occupations or industries
for which permits are required; these include
(1) manufacturing industry;
(2) ship-building industry;
(3) generation of electricity or motive power of any kind;
(4) logging industry;
(5) construction industry;
(6) catering industry;
(7) public places of amusement;
(8) mercantile industry;
(9 )  shoe-shine stands;
(10) automobile service-stations;
(11) transportation industry;
(12) laundry, cleaning, and dyeing industry.
Summary of Permits Issued for the Year 1971
District
Total
Boys-
Girls..
11       1
1
Totals..
12 |    1
41
Amusements-
Catering and hotel.
Construction	
Generation of electricity or motive power-
Laundry	
Logging-
Manufacturing-
Mercantile	
Service-station...
Ship-building	
Shoe-shine._
Transportation—
Totals-
12
22
41
31
52     13
29     11
? |    2
15
14
25
81 | 24 |    6
15
5
36
4
6
1
32
3
it.
1 1
1
—
81
24
158
94
252
10
105
6
i
7
3
95
04
252
Employment Agencies Act
This statute requires persons operating an employment agency to register with
the Department of Labour. The Act does not apply to a person operating an employment agency for the sole purpose of hiring employees exclusively for one
employer, or trade unions within the meaning of the Labour Relations Act. During
the year 1971 the following British Columbia employment agencies were registered
with the Department:
Able Personnel, 208, 1956 West Broadway, Vancouver.
Acme Personnel Service Ltd. (Vancouver District), Suite 402, 1111 West
Georgia Street, Vancouver.
Active Personnel & Business Services Ltd., Suite 4, 2571 Shaughnessy Street,
Port Coquitlam.
J
 LABOUR STANDARDS BRANCH U 39
Alouise Home Services, 3394 Wellington Avenue, Vancouver 16.
Anderson's Babysitting Agency, 412 East 16th Street, North Vancouver.
Babysitting Bureau, 3235 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver.
Beacon Apartment Services Ltd., 119 West Broadway, Vancouver 9.
Better Staff, 4a, 808 Anderson Road, Richmond.
B.C. Central Credit Union, 885 Dunsmuir Street, Box 2038, Vancouver.
B.C. Management Recruiters Ltd., 309, 1111 West Georgia Street, Vancouver.
B.C. Personnel (division of Pacific Personnel Ltd.), 581 Hornby Street, Vancouver.
Campbell River Woods Employment Agency, 150 St. Ann's Road, Campbell
River.
Canadian Retired Employment Centre, 2737 Woodland Drive, Vancouver 12.
Career Personnel, 117, 543 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
Century 21 Personnel Ltd., 401, 510 West Hastings Street, Vancouver.
H. V. Chapman & Associates Limited, Suite 1495, 2 Bentall Centre, Vancouver.
Chimo Placements Ltd., 71, 553 Granville Street, Vancouver 2.
Chinese Employment Bureau, 436 Main Street, Vancouver.
Chinese Employment Service, 434 Columbia Street, Vancouver 4.
Computech Consulting Corporation Ltd., 1404, 1177 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver 5.
Contact Personnel Ltd., 1013, 847 West Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Anthony Copeman Engineer (division of Copeman Employment Agencies),
3107, 1733 Comox Street, Vancouver.
Custom Credit Personnel, 11970—64th Avenue, Delta.
Demonstrators Bureau, 3122 Wellington Avenue, North Burnaby.
Dictaphone Corporation Limited (operating Dot Personnel Services), Suite
402, 602 West Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Dimension Personnel (a division of EDP Industries Ltd.), 1015, 789 West
Pender Street, Vancouver.
Dimension Personnel (a division of EDP Industries Ltd.), 2070, 777 Hornby
Street, Vancouver.
Drake International Limited (dba Drake Personnel), 595 Hornby Street, Vancouver.
Drake International Limited (dba Drake Personnel), 895 Fort Street, Victoria.
Drake International Limited (dba Business Girl Placement Service), Ninth
Floor, 777 Hornby Street, Vancouver.
Dumaresq Loggers Agency Ltd., 328 Carrall Street, Vancouver.
Dunhill Personnel of Vancouver Ltd., 220, 1155 West Georgia Street, Vancouver 5.
E. H. Edge & Associates, Second Floor, 1111 West Hastings Street, Vancouver
1.
The 500 Selection Services (Western) Limited, Suite 2500, 1177 West Hastings Street, Vancouver.
John W. A. Fleury & Associates Ltd., Suite 98, 845 Hornby Street, Vancouver.
Fortico Selective Placement Service, 1808 West Broadway, Vancouver 9.
Girl Friday Service Ltd., 806 Granville Street, Richmond.
Hannah, Turner & Associates Ltd., 612 East Broadway, Vancouver.
Helping Hands, 2206 Haversley Avenue, Coquitlam.
Helpful Aunts Bureau, 4049 West 31st Avenue, Vancouver.
Kates, Peat, Marwick & Co., 1101, 900 West Hastings Street, Vancouver.
 U 40 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Lamond, Dewhurst, Westcott & Fraser Ltd., Ninth Floor, 1112 West Pender
Street, Vancouver 1.
The Loggers' Agency Limited, 415 Carrall Street, Vancouver 4.
Martha's Home Aides, 2933 West 28th Avenue, Vancouver.
The Medical Office Assistants' Association of B.C.,  806 Granville Street,
Richmond.
Meldrum Employment Agency, 702, 543 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Mennonite Bethel Agency, 327 East 46th Avenue, Vancouver 15.
Mis-Jo Office Services Ltd., Penthouse 2, 845 Hornby Street, Vancouver 1.
Mosley and Associates (Pacific), 992 Brentwood Centre, Burnaby.
North Shore Business Services, 102, 140 West 15th Street, North Vancouver.
Office Assistance Vancouver Limited, 540 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1.
Personnel Service (operating as Percus Service Ltd.), 114 Sixth Street, New
Westminster.
Philcan Personnel Service, 5022 Victoria Drive, Vancouver 16.
Physicians Replacement Service, 870 Wildwood Lane, Vancouver.
Progress Personnel (B.C.) Ltd., 408, 470 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Reliable Baby Sitting Agency, 214 Harper Street, Prince George.
Richardson Personnel (1970), 404, 602 West Hastings Street, Vancouver.
P. S. Ross & Partners, 1500, 1177 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 110.
Ruby's Baby Sitting Bureau, 3038 East 59th Avenue, Vancouver.
Sales Consultants of Vancouver, 1102, 1177 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 1.
Samson Belair Riddell Stead Inc., 505 Burrard Street, Vancouver 111.
Selective Personnel Ltd., 504, 475 Howe Street, Vancouver.
Slate Personnel, 1177 West Hastings Street, Vancouver.
C. B. Shearing & Associates Ltd., 1640 Avord Towers, 777 Hornby Street,
Vancouver.
Snelling and Snelling Personnel, Suite 104, 2590 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Spectrum Babysitting Directory, 10346—124A Street, Surrey.
Stevenson & Kellogg Ltd., Ninth Floor, 1112 West Pender Street, Vancouver.
Technical Service Council, 1199 West Pender Street, Vancouver 1.
Thorne, Gunn, Helliwell & Christenson, 2400,  1177 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver.
Thorne, Gunn, Helliwell & Christenson, 305, 645 Fort Street, Victoria.
Toner's Hiring Service, Room 912, 207 West Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Tulk Personnel Ltd., Suite 424, 736 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Vancouver World of Personnel, 1665 West Broadway, Vancouver.
Victor Business Services (division of Victor Comptometer Ltd.) (personnel
consultants), 514, 718 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Woods, Gordon & Co., 409 Granville Street, Vancouver.
During the year the Director and certain members of the staff have spoken on
a number of occasions to groups of employers, trade unions, and students regarding
the application of labour standards legislation. We are pleased to offer this service
and wish to express sincere appreciation of the co-operation given by organizations,
trade unions, employers, and employees to the staff of the Labour Standards Branch
in the administration of its duties in the year 1971.
Respectfully submitted.
W. J. D. Hoskyn
Director, Labour Standards Branch
 RESEARCH BRANCH U 41
Report of the Research Branch
Head office     -      -      -      -      -      -      Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
G. D. Bishop      ___.---._-     Director.
The Honourable the Minister oj Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, British Columbia.
Sir: Since its formation in 1966, the Research Branch of the British Columbia
Department of Labour has continued to expand its staff and activities to complement the growing functions of the Department of Labour. At the present time, the
Research Branch has a staff of seven, of which five individuals are professionally
oriented in economics and with some specialization in labour economics. Within
the flow of organization of the Department, the Research Branch is a staff group
attached directly to the Deputy Minister's office, for reporting purposes.
The primary function of the Research Branch is to assist wherever possible
the operational and administrative activities of the Department of Labour. In this
regard, the Research Branch of 1971 has and continues to examine the changing
labour relations' climate in Canada and other countries in order to ensure that
the Department is constantly aware of change and merging trends in labour relations and in labour standards.
In addition to this primary function, the Research Branch also engages in research designed to assist, in addition to the Department of Labour, other departments of government, union and employers' organizations, and the general public.
In meeting previously outlined commitments the Research Branch has published a significant number of papers and studies for internal and general use. As
an example, a study by the Branch in 1971 delved into the topical and important
subject of severance-pay provisions in collective agreements.
In 1971 the Research Branch completed a major study of union contracts in
the Province. Entitled Analysis oj Collective Agreements in British Columbia, the
report analysed 200 major collective agreements in the Province covering an estimated 171,000 employees. The analysis covered 94 individual subject areas and
provided separate data for seven major industrial divisions. The study has proven
to be of significant value and interest to both employers and labour organizations
in the Province as it provides a comprehensive view of current conditions and trends
in the composition of collective agreements. Included in this analysis were statistical tables covering major working conditions, employee benefit programmes, and
miscellaneous provisions established by union contracts.
The Research Branch is continuing to examine these topical areas of interest
to labour and management and the general public, and anticipates continued publication of studies designed to assist in the solution of problems in the realm of labour
in the Province.
Respectfully submitted.
G. D. Bishop
Director, Research Branch
 U 42 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Report of the Trade-schools Regulation
Administrative Office
Head office     -----      411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Administrative Officers:
Mrs. C. K. Waddell.       Col. J. W. Inglis.       John Melville.
The Honourable the Minister oj Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, British Columbia.
Sir: It is my honour and privilege to present to you the annual report of the
administration of the Trade-schools Regulation Act for the year ended December
31, 1971.
The Administrative Officers of the Trade-schools Regulation Act met 12 times
during the year to consider all matters requiring their attention and made their recommendations to the Honourable the Minister in regard to registration, reregistra-
tion, requests for changes in tuition fees, approval of new courses, and the general
conduct of private trade-schools, together with other matters regarding the administration of the Act.
As of December 31, 1971, there were 113 schools registered in accordance
with the Trade-schools Regulation Act offering correspondence and practical courses
or combined correspondence and practical courses in the Province of British Columbia.
Ninety-two schools were reregistrations from the year 1970, and 21 new
schools were recommended to the Honourable the Minister and approved during
the year.   Nine schools discontinued operation in British Columbia during 1971.
I am pleased to report that Mrs. C. K. Waddell, Director, Women's Bureau,
was appointed as an Administrative Officer to replace Mrs. Rex Eaton, who retired
after having served as an Administrative Officer for 35 years.
Mrs. Waddell has brought to the ranks of the Administrative Officers many
years' experience dealing with opportunities, training practices, and working conditions affecting women.
Several matters of particular importance were considered during the year and
recommendations were made to the Honourable the Minister.
On April 29, 1971, an Order in Council was approved amending the Special
Regulations Governing Barber Schools in regard to maximum service charges to
the public for services in the barber schools.
On September 2, 1971, an Order in Council was approved amending the Special Regulations Governing Hairdressing Schools regarding the maximum service
charges to the public for services in hairdressing schools.
In both instances the allowable service charges were increased to help meet the
increased operating costs of the schools.
After considerable research and investigation, a recommendation was made to
the Honourable the Minister in regard to an upward revision of the registration fees
for trade-schools, and for the bonding requirements for trade-schools.
Subsequent to this on November 25, 1971, an Order in Council was approved
amending the General Regulations Governing Trade-schools and the Special Regulations Governing Correspondence and Home-study Schools.
 TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE U 43
The new regulation requires a registration fee of $25 for one course and $10
for each additional course, to a maximum of $125.
The surety bond for the protection of the students in the private trade-schools
has been increased in relationship to the tuition fees for courses offered.
Schools offering courses at a tuition fee of less than $250 and all tuition fees
are collected on a monthly instalment basis will continue to supply a $1,000 bond.
Schools offering courses with tuition fees less than $250 on a cash basis wiU require
a bond of $5,000. All schools offering courses with tuition fees between $250 and
less than $500 will require a bond of $7,500, and above $500 will require a bond
of $10,000.
All schools offering practical training in British Columbia were visited and
inspected at least twice during the year. Visits were also made to new schools
applying for permission to operate in British Columbia regarding the suitability of
premises and facilities for training.
Special visits were made to schools to attend to specific problems and complaints, and proper refunds were effected, in accordance with the regulations, in
instances where complaints were received from students wishing to discontinue
training, and who had moneys owing to them by way of prepaid fees.
The following is a list of schools reregistered for 1971, together with new
registrations for the year and discontinued schools for the year, together with subjects taught:
Schools Whose Registrations Were Renewed for 1971
Alexander Hamilton Institute Ltd., 57 Bloor Street West, Toronto 5, Ont.: Modern
business course.
American School of Correspondence, 850 East 58th Street, Chicago, 111. 60637,
U.S.A.: Architectural draughting (Part I—Basic and Part II—Advanced),
automotive maintenance and repair (including diesel), bookkeeping and accounting, executive secretarial, legal secretarial, air-conditioning and refrigeration, electronics communication technician, industrial draughting, electrical
draughting, electronic draughting, mechanical technology (II).
Apartment Training Institute, 7418 Sixth Street, Burnaby 3: Apartment-house
managers' training.
Art Instruction Schools, 500 South Fourth Street, Minneapolis, Minn. 55415,
U.S.A.: Advertising art, cartooning.
Atlantic School, Inc., Canada Building, 374 Ouellette Avenue, Windsor, Ont.:
Airline career training.
Canadian Institute of Science & Technology Limited, 263 Adelaide Street West,
Toronto, Ont.: Mechanical engineering; civil and municipal engineering; building, surveying, and architecture; electrical engineering; electronic and telecommunication engineering; chemistry and chemical engineering; forestry and wood
technology; industrial management and production; commerce, business management, and administration; computer programming; saleable writing; art and
drawing.
Canadian Property Managers Association, Suite 311, 85 Sparks Street, Ottawa,
Ont., KIP 5A7: Administration of property, property law, buildings.
Canadian School of Tax Accounting, Suite 805, 6 Adelaide Street East, Toronto,
Ont.: Personal income tax.
Career Training, 3, 113—16th Avenue, Calgary 41, Alta.: Medical receptionist,
hotel-motel management.
 U 44 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Columbia School of Broadcasting, 4444 Geary Boulevard, San Francisco, Calif.
94118, U.S.A.: Radio-television announcing, radio and television commercial
writing.
DeVry Institute of Technology of Canada, Limited, 970 Lawrence Avenue West,
Toronto 19, Ont.: Television, communications (practical); electronic instrumentation (practical and correspondence); electronic engineering technology
(practical and correspondence); television and radio servicing (correspondence); electronic operation technology (correspondence); electronic operation technology and computer controls (correspondence); home electronic
entertainment systems (correspondence); IBCE computer programming (correspondence).
Famous Artists Schools, Inc., Wilton Road, Westport, Conn. 06880, U.S.A.: Commercial art, illustration, and design; cartooning; fine arts painting.
Famous Photographers School, Inc., Wilton Road, Westport, Conn. 06880, U.S.A.:
Photography.
Famous Writers Schools, Inc., Wilton Road, Westport, Conn. 06880, U.S.A.: Fiction writing, nonfiction writing, advertising writing, business writing.
Institute of Home Study, 1076 Hyde Avenue, San Jose, Calif. 95129, U.S.A. (Canadian office: 503—17th Avenue South-west, Calgary 3, Alta.): Motel management.
International Accountants Society, Incorporated, 209 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, 111. 60606, U.S.A.: Accounting; Course 103, business data processing.
International Career Academy of Canada Limited, 8 King Street East, Toronto 1,
Ont.: Broadcasting, medical assisting, dental assisting.
International Correspondence Schools Canadian, Limited, 7475 Sherbrooke Street
West, Montreal, P.Q.: Architecture; art; business training, chemistry; civil
engineering; draughting; electrical engineering; general education; mechanical
engineering; plumbing, heating, and air-conditioning; railroading; textiles; traffic management; mining; domestic engineering; navigation; pulp and paper
making; other courses as listed in the Guidance Manual.
La Salle Extension University, 417 South Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. 60605,
U.S.A.: Accounting, interior decorating, secretarial, law, introduction to business management, sales training, modern bookkeeping, basic computer programming, traffic and transportation, stenotype, draughting, Washington School
of Art Course, dental assistant.
Lewis Hotel-Motel Training School (Division of International Career Academy of
Canada Ltd.), 8 King Street East, Toronto 1, Ont.: Hotel-motel management
(practical and correspondence).
McGraw-Hill Company of Canada Ltd. (Continuing Education Division), 330
Progress Avenue, Scarborough, Ont.: NRI—Television-radio servicing (without kits) (with black-white kits) (with colour television kits), complete communications, applied mathematics, electronics (basic, industrial, for automation), aircraft (marine and mobile communications). CREI — Electrical
Courses 204, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 239, and 243; Engineering Mathematics 270; Computer Programming 300, 300 plus 340.
Motel Managers Training School (Canada) (Division of Hospitality Training Ltd.),
Suite 200, 3107 Bloor Street West, Toronto, Ont.: Motel management, public
relations, PBX receptionist.
The National Institute of Broadcasting, 410 Hart Building, 261 Fort Street, Winnipeg 2, Man.: Radio and television announcing, radio and television writing,
radio and television advertising sales.
 TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE U 45
National Meat Packers Training, Inc., 3435 Broadway, Kansas City, Miss. 64111,
U.S.A.: Principles of American meat-packing.
Northern Institute of Technology (operating Radio College of Canada and Computer
Division), 461 King Street West, Toronto 2B, Ont.: Television and general
electronics, electronic engineering technology, automation electronics technology, aeronautical electronics, effective management.
Palmer Writers School, 500 South Fourth Street, Minneapolis, Minn. 55415, U.S.A.:
Fiction writing.
Technical Training International Canada Ltd., c/o Campney & Murphy, 1030 West
Georgia Street, Vancouver 5: Tractor and equipment training, J. I. Case programme, combination (tractor and equipment training plus Case specialized
programme), electronics programme (combination), electronics programme
(practical only).
Tech-Aids Company (Canada), Postal Station E, Box 5110, Vancouver 13: Building
construction estimating technology, blueprint reading.
Universal Heavy Construction Schools, Inc., 1901 Northeast Seventh Street, Miami,
Fla. 33125, U.S.A.: Road-building and heavy-equipment operators.
Vancouver Sales Training Ltd., 105A, 1675 West Eighth Avenue, Vancouver 9:
Sales training.
A.B.C. Dress Designing School, 4009 Cambie Street, Vancouver 9: Dressmaking
and designing, tailoring.
Advance Business College, 136 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3: General office
training (clerical), secretarial, junior management, powereading, executive secretarial, legal secretarial, medical secretarial, Gregg shorthand home-study
courses.
American Electronics Accounting Institute, Room 230, 175 East Broadway, Vancouver 10: Electronic accounting.
Armour-Hughes Secretarial School, 9569 Scott Road, Delta: Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
Autolec National Educational Programme, 1025 Howe Street, Vancouver 1: Automotive electrical and tune-up.
Blair's School of Hairdressing Ltd., 3203—31st Avenue, Vernon: Hairdressing.
H. & R. Block Basic Income Tax School, 3716 Oak Street, Vancouver 9: Basic
income tax.
H. & R. Block Basic Income Tax School, 2651 Douglas Street, Victoria: Basic
income tax.
Bonnevie Key Punch Training School Ltd., Room 3, 1402 Broad Street, Victoria:
Key-punch operator.
B.C. Academy of Fashion Design, 914 Rogers Building, 470 Granville Street, Vancouver 2: Fashion designing, clothing construction, patternmaking and draping,
suit and coat patternmaking, fashion sketching, pattern grading, specialized
brush-up course, refresher courses.
The Barbers' Association of British Columbia Advanced Barbering School, Room 6,
423 West Broadway, Vancouver 10: Advanced barbering.
Canadian Travel College, Suite 302, 100 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3: Travel
agent.
Capilano Business College, 132 West 15th Street, North Vancouver: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Delmar School of Beauty, 1134 Third Avenue, Prince George: Hairdressing.
Dorothy Dean School of Beauty, 11759 Fraser Street, Haney: Hairdressing.
 U 46 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Duffus School of Business Ltd., 522 West Pender Street, Vancouver 2: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
An Electric Typewriter Assistance Ltd., 423 West Broadway, Vancouver 10:
Electric typewriter instruction in conjunction with dictating equipment and
shorthand.
Elizabeth Leslie Ltd., 1102 Hornby Street, Vancouver 1: Personal development
and modelling, fashion merchandising.
Ernest Charles School of Hairdressing Limited, 198 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3: Hairdressing.
Glamour School of Advanced Hairstyling, 1106 Broad Street, Victoria: Advanced
hairstyling (limited to persons holding a B.C. Hairdressers' Association certificate).
Glamour School of Hairdressing, 1106 Broad Street, Victoria: Hairdressing.
IBM Education Centre—Vancouver, 1445 West Georgia Street, Vancouver 5: DOS
A/L LPI (learner pace instruction), OS PL/1 LPI, DOS PL/1 LPI, OS
COBOL LPI, DOS COBOL LPI.
Kinman Business University (owned by Lear Siegler, Inc.), Bon Marche Building,
North 214 Wall Street, Spokane, Wash. 99210, U.S.A.: Business education,
including accounting and business administration; secretarial science; stenographic; office machines training; IBM computer programming (360) (2 nights
per week); IBM computer programming (360) (4 nights per week); computer
programming (day school).
Kitanmax School of Northwest Coast Indian Art, Hazelton: West Coast Indian art
(engraving and jewellery-making), block printing and silk-screen techniques.
Lenkurt Electric Co. of Canada Ltd., 7018 Lougheed Highway, Burnaby 2: Electronic assembly.
Lithographing & Photoengraving Training Institute of British Columbia, 33 East
Eighth Avenue, Vancouver 10: Lithography (stripping), lithography (camera).
Local Joint Executive Board of the Hotel & Restaurant Employees and Bartenders'
Internation Union, Bar School, Room 409, 402 West Pender Street, Vancouver 9: Mixerologist.
The Lydia Lawrence Fashion Institute, 974 West Broadway, Vancouver 9: Professional dressmaking, design and patternmaking, fashion drawing, fashion embroidery.
Maison Raymond Beauty School Ltd., 4865 Kingsway, Burnaby 1: Hairdressing.
M.T.I. Business School, 630 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2: Grocery cashiering,
PBX receptionist and typing, sales clerk cashiers, IBM key-punch verifier.
Moler School of Barbering, 376 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3: Barbering.
Moler School of Hairdressing—
4242 East Hastings Street, Burnaby 2: Hairdressing.
710 Columbia Street, New Westminster: Hairdressing.
1754 Lonsdale Avenue, North Vancouver: Hairdressing.
14853—108th Avenue, Surrey: Hairdressing.
6407 Fraser Street, Vancouver 15: Hairdressing.
317 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3: Hairdressing.
1104 Douglas Street, Victoria: Hairdressing.
Montrose School of Hairdressing, 2485 Montrose Avenue, Abbotsford: Hairdressing.
Arthur Murray School of Dancing, 695 Smythe Street, Vancouver 2: Professional
dancing.
 TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE
U 47
Blanche MacDonald School of Finishing & Modelling, 966 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver 1: Demure deportment, teen finishing, summer-accelerated teen,
individual development, individual development (students), professional modelling (students), professional modelling (regular), advanced modelling, pre
and professional modelling, men's pre and professional modelling, adult drama
course, youth drama course.
McKay Technical Institute, 432 Richards Street, Vancouver 2: Electronic machine
accounting (practical), draughting (practical), data processing technology
(practical and correspondence), key-punch operating (practical and correspondence).
Nanaimo School of Hairdressing, 41 Commercial Street, Nanaimo: Hairdressing.
Nanaimo School of Advanced Hair Design, 41 Commercial Street, Nanaimo: Advanced hairdressing (limited to persons holding a B.C. Hairdressers' Association certificate).
National Charm & Modelling School, 3564 Redwood Avenue, Victoria: Personal
development and modelling.
New Westminster Commercial College, 622 Royal Avenue, New Westminster:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Northwestern School of Deep Sea Diving Ltd., 145 Riverside Drive, North Vancouver: Deep-sea diving.
Orchid School of Floristry, 1806 Lonsdale Avenue, North Vancouver: Flower
designing.
Pitman Business College Ltd., 1490 West Broadway, Vancouver 9: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
The Rayvan Legal Secretarial School Limited, 630 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2:
Legal secretarial (practical); legal secretarial (correspondence); medical secretarial; stenoscript Forkner shorthand; brush-up typing, shorthand, dictaphone.
Roggendorf School of Hairdressing (1969) Ltd.: 13625—105A Avenue, Surrey:
Hairdressing.
Louise Ruddell School of Floral Design, 14567—72nd Avenue, Surrey: Floral
design.
Sprott-Shaw School of Commerce Ltd., 1012 Douglas Street, Victoria: Office occupations (commercial and governmental), accounting, key-punch training.
Patricia Stevens Career College & Finishing School, 470 Granville Street, Vancouver 2: Professional modelling, secretarial, public relations, fashion merchandising, travel course.
Sunnyslope Dog Grooming School, 4696 Marine Drive, Burnaby 1: Dog grooming,
kennel attendants' course.
T. W. Thorfinnson & Associates (Dale Carnegie Courses), 204, 535 West Georgia
Street, Vancouver 2: Dale Carnegie sales courses.
Trail Business College, 625 Victoria Street, Trail: Office occupations (commercial
and governmental), practical accounting (correspondence).
United Electronics Institute, 3947 Park Drive, Louisville, Ky. 40216, U.S.A.: Electronics technology.
The Valle School of Beauty, 14 Princess Avenue East, Chilliwack: Hairdressing.
Vogue School of Floral Design, 2306 West Broadway, Vancouver 9: Floral designing.
 U 48
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Wesley's Academy of Hair Design, 3012 Granville Street, Vancouver 9: Advanced
hair design (limited to persons holding a B.C. Hairdressers' Association certificate).
Wesley's School of Hairdressing, 3012 Granville Street, Vancouver 9: Hairdressing.
New Registration of Schools for 1971
Beauty School of Northern Interior, 3671—15th Avenue, Prince George: Hairdressing.
B.C. Safety Council (diving safety group), 1477 West Pender Street, Vancouver 5:
Scuba-diving.
B.C. Telephone Plant Training Centre, 768 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2: Toll
and exchange plant courses, customer service courses, outside plant courses.
The Canadian Executive Counsel, Suite 311, 85 Sparks Street, Ottawa, Ont., KIP
5A7: Marketing management.
Computer Programming Center of Spokane, Sixth Floor, Bon Marche Building,
Spokane, Wash. 99201, U.S.A.: Computer programming (resident training),
computer programming (home study).
Construction and General Labourers Training Trust Fund, 515 East Broadway, Vancouver 10: Transit and level 1 and 2, foremen and prospective foremen, concrete placement, trenching and pipelaying, compaction and backfill, rakermen
(asphalt), mason's tender, construction materials identification and handling.
Fashion Design Methods, 630—12th Street, New Westminster: Dress designing,
ease and stretch sewing, millinery.
Finning Tractor & Equipment Co. Ltd., 555 Great Northern Way, Vancouver 10:
Basic mechanics, hydraulics (I), diesel engine service, salesmanship, hydraulic
transmission, off-highway trucks mechanical upgrading, driver training course
for 35-ton ore trucks.
Geor-La-Jane Poodle Grooming, 451 Seymour River Place, North Vancouver:
Poodle grooming.
Hope-Johnstone & Associates, 3905 Knight Road, Vancouver 15: Service-station
attendants.
Kandel Instructional Course by Contemporary Sewing Materials Ltd., 321 Water
Street, Vancouver 3: Sewing instruction course.
Metropolitan Ambulance Training School, 483 West 16th Avenue, Vancouver 10:
Ambulance driving and attending.
National College of Home Study, 3300 Cavendish Boulevard, Montreal 261, P.Q.:
Business management and accounting.
National Life Guard Service (division of Royal Life Saving Society of Canada), 2556
Highbury Street, Vancouver 8: Life-saving.
Office Assistance Rentals Ltd., Suite 201, 540 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1: Corporate legal stenography.
Operating Engineers Apprenticeship and Journeyman Upgrading Plan, 4333 Ledger
Avenue, Burnaby 2: Instructor training.
Professional Training Institute, Room 4, 1609a Centre Street North, Calgary 41,
Alta.: Medical receptionist course.
Sew Easy, 1445 West Broadway, Vancouver 9: Sew easy.
Spectrum Academy of the Arts Ltd., 308, 4695 Imperial Street, South Burnaby:
Fine and applied art.
Victor Business School, 514, 718 Granville Street, Vancouver 2: Comptometry.
Western Career Training Institute Ltd., Suite 100, 890 West Pender Street, Vancouver 1: IBM key-punch training, medical office assistant.
 TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE U 49
Registered Schools That Discontinued During 1971
Apartment Training Institute, 7418 Sixth Street, Burnaby 3.
Armour-Hughes Secretarial School, 9569 Scott Road, Delta.
Bonnevie Key Punch Training School Ltd., Room 3, 1402 Broad Street, Victoria.
Dominion Academy of Investigation and Security, 119 West Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Ernest Charles School of Advanced Hair Design, 198 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3.
Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics of B.C. Ltd., 1956 West Broadway, Vancouver 9.
Greer Technical Institute, Inc. (Pre-training Division), 2230 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 111. 60606, U.S.A.
M.T.I. Business School, 630 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2.
The Rayvan Legal Secretarial School Ltd., 630 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2.
Respectfully submitted.
John Melville
Administrative Officer
_
 U 50 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Report of the Women's Bureau
Head office   -----     411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Mrs. C. K. Waddell Director.
Mrs. Y. M. McCully Assistant Director.
The Honourable the Minister oj Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, British Columbia.
Sir: It is my honour to present to you the annual report of the Women's Bureau
for the year ended December 31, 1971.
During the year, 1,314 women came to the office for personal interviews.
"Women in Industry" forms, completed by branch officers of the Department
throughout the Province, recorded over 23,000 inquiries concerning women's employment.
Over the decade 1961 to 1971, British Columbia's labour force increased by
an estimated 58.4 per cent, or at an average annual rate of growth of 4.7 per cent.
Over this same period, the number of men in the labour force increased in total
by 44.6 per cent for an annual growth rate of 3.7 per cent. By comparison, however, the female segment of the Provincial labour force almost doubled over the
decade, expanding at an average annual rate of 7.1 per cent. *In 1971 the labour
force totalled 911,000—295,000 of these were women.
The function of the Bureau does not lessen the individual responsibilities of
the other branches of the Department, but rather augments their services by working in coalition with them by identifying any problems or trends relating specifically
to the working conditions, the employment, and the training of women. As well
as doing in-depth studies requested by the Department, the Bureau initiates its own
special studies.   It can and does make recommendations to the Department.
The Director travelled to many centres in the Province in response to requests
by organizations, and attended meetings and special hearings of the Board of Industrial Relations, the Labour Relations Board, the Human Rights Commission, the
Food Trades and Accommodation Industries Advisory Committee, and the Joint
Committee on Manpower Needs Assessment.
Major papers were given at the Canadian Association of Administrators of
Labour Legislation Conference, the Staff Representatives Conference of the Registered Nurses Association of British Columbia, and the annual conference of the
Business and Professional Women's Clubs of British Columbia. A lecture, "Working Conditions as They Relate to the Accommodation Industry," was delivered at
a seminar held in Kelowna for owners and managers of the hotel, motel, and restaurant industries. The Director attended the British Columbia Association of
Non-Status Indians as a resource person and panellist at their conference, "Human
Rights and Community Development," held at Quesnel, October 2 and 3, 1971.
1971 brought a militant upsurge of interest by women of the Province in the
status of women in the economy. Long-established women's organizations have
shown increased activity in their ongoing studies and analyses of legislation. New
groups have been formed to acquaint themselves with the progressive evolution of
* Estimated by Research Branch, Department of Labour for the Province of British Columbia.
 WOMEN'S BUREAU U 51
labour legislation for women, with special regard to its protective or restrictive
practices. Those wishing to be informed participants have enrolled in the increased
number of courses on social change and women's role today.
This burgeoning thirst for knowledge has doubled the number of requests to
the Women's Bureau for material from our library and newspaper files, for speakers
and resource personnel to attend conferences and workshops. Bureau staff members themselves realize the value of "voluntarism" and constantly remind women
not to minimize volunteer experience as preparation for full and satisfactory participation in the labour force, especially if supplemented by educational and other practical experience.
The number of calls and discussions on the Human Rights Act indicate that
women have become more aware of the legislation to protect them from discrimination and the process necessary to obtain redress. Parents of secondary-school
students also benefit from our lectures to students, and often inquire by telephone
or visit if they are being discriminated against.
Of special interest to the women of British Columbia was the announcement
that the Board of Industrial Relations had issued a minimum wage order which
provided that in all cases the same minimum wage rates which apply to men apply
to women. This year also marked the appointment of the Director of the Women's
Bureau as an Administrative Officer for the purpose of carrying out the provisions
of the Trade-schools Regulation Act. Under the legislation, private trade-schools,
both practical and correspondence, are approved and registered annually and their
operation is closely supervised for the protection of the public.
In concluding this report, the Bureau wishes to express its sincere appreciation
for the assistance provided by all the branches within the Department of Labour
and the co-operation of both Federal and Provincial Government departments and
women's organizations throughout the Province.
Respectfully submitted.
(Mrs.) C. K. Waddell
Director, Women's Bureau
 U 52 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Statistical Supplement
Containing:
REVIEW OF LABOUR STATISTICS, 1971
LABOUR DISPUTES, 1971
LABOUR ORGANIZATIONS, 1971
DIRECTORY OF LABOUR ORGANIZATIONS
DIRECTORY OF EMPLOYERS' ORGANIZATIONS
Prepared by Research Branch
 STATISTICAL SUPPLEMENT
U 53
Review of Labour Statistics, 1971
Population
The final census population counts were not available at the time this report
was written; however, the population of British Columbia was estimated to have
reached 2,196,000 as of June 1, 1971. An increase of 59,000 people over the 1970
figure, this indicates a growth rate of 2.8 per cent for the Centennial year. In comparison with growth rates during the past decade, the 2.8-per-cent rate can be
described as moderate in view of the decade's low rate of 1.9 per cent in 1962 and
the decade's high rate of 4.3 per cent which occurred in 1968.
Table 1—Population of British Columbia, 1961-71
Year
British
Columbia
Population
Yearly Population Growth
(Per Cent)
British
Columbia
Canada
19611
1,629,082
1,660,000
1,699,000
1,745,000
1,797,000
1,874,674
1,947,000
2,007,000
2,067,000
2,137,000
2,196,000
1
■I
1962	
1.9
2.3
2.7
3.0
4.3
3.9
3.1
3.0
3.4
2.8
1.9
1963                         ....                  ..                ....    .
1.9
1964
1.9
1965
1.9
19661
1.9
1967-.         .                                         .         ..     a.
1.9
196R
1.7
1969
1.5
1970
1.5
1971
1.4
i Census counts.
Source: Population Estimates, Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
FIGURE  IA—POPULATION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1961-71
(OOO's Persons)
1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971
Source: Population Estimates, Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
5
J
 U 54
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
The 1971 growth rate, significantly, was the lowest growth rate since 1964.
The primary factor involved in this occurrence was the reduced net inflow of
migrants into the Province during the year. Probably migration takes place according to the hypothesis that migrants move to British Columbia from their previous
location, and not to an alternative province, because they perceive conditions (unemployment, climatic, social, etc.) in British Columbia to be more favourable than those
in the other provinces. The implication of this hypothesis is that, as conditions in
our Province become better or worse relative to the other provinces, the net inflow
of migrants into the Province increases or decreases respectively. As conditions
were slightly poorer during the period of June 2, 1970, to June 1, 1971, than they
were during the comparable 1969/1970 period, the decreased net migration into
the Province seems to support this hypothesis as an explanation of migration and,
ultimately, population change.
FIGURE IB—POPULATION GROWTH  RATES, BRITISH COLUMBIA AND CANADA,
1961-71
4.5
Per Cent)
4.0
3 5
Bririsl
i Colum
3.0
2.5    _
2.0     -
1.5    -
^.^
a""
1.0
\
•s Canac
■          m           —a^
0.5
0
1961  1962  1963 1964 1965  1966 1967 1968  1969  1970 1971
Source: Population Estimates, Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
The net inflow of migrants into British Columbia was still of a magnitude large
enough for the Province to again record the highest population growth rate of all
the provinces. Our growth rate was also twice the national average. Even though
British Columbia experienced a decline in the net inflow of migrants, other provinces
with growing populations also experienced declines. It seems because of generally
unfavourable conditions throughout the nation, fewer Canadians felt there was an
advantage to changing provinces of residence during 1971.
 STATISTICAL SUPPLEMENT
U 55
Manpower Supply and Demand
The demand for labour in British Columbia in 1971 was up over the previous
year and, more importantly, was increasing at a faster rate than in 1970. The labour
force (labour supply) continued to grow at the rapid pace which has been experienced during the past few years, but, during the year, it grew at a slower pace than
employment, with the result that unemployment was at a lower level than it was
during 1970.
The average supply of available manpower was estimated to be 911,000. This
figure represented an increase of approximately 33,000 people, or 3.8 per cent over
the 1970 labour force of 878,000. Of this increase, 24,000 people, or 67.6 per cent,
were males. The male labour force in 1971 reached 616,000 and the female labour
force reached 295,000. The male-female ratio between the two labour forces was
approximately 2:1, which is the same as was the case in 1970. Ten years ago the
ratio was approximately 3:1. The growing supply of available manpower is clearly
depicted in Table 2 and Figure 2a.
Table 2A—Labour Force, by Sex, British Columbia, 1961, 1966-71
Year
Total
Labour
Force
Male
Labour
Force
Percentage
of Total
Female
Labour
Force
Percentage
of Total
1961_
1966_
1967_
1968..
1969_
1970-.
1971..
(OOO's)
575
710
762
797
836
878
91H
(OOO's)
426
498
525
544
566
592
6161
74.1
70.1
68.9
68.3
67.7
67.4
67.6
(OOO's)
149
212
237
253
270
286
2951
25.9
29.9
31.1
31.7
32.2
32.6
32.4
i Estimate.
Source: The Labour Force (monthly), Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
The rate of labour-force growth fluctuated throughout 1971. In the first
quarter the labour force was growing at a rate of approximately 3V£ per cent annually. In the second quarter the growth rate dropped but the labour force was in
the third quarter again growing at a rate of approximately 3V-J per cent. In the
last quarter the growth rate reached its highest level for the year as exemplified by
the October annual growth rate of 6.5 per cent. This pattern reflected the changes
in the unemployment rate with a time-lag of three months.
The 1971 labour-force growth rate of 3.8 per cent was not high in comparison
with the record levels of the '60's. It was the lowest rate since 1964 when the
growth rate was 3.4 per cent and was much lower than any of the rates reached
during the past five years. The reduction of the net inflow of migrants was probably a major factor in the occurrence of the low rate. Another factor probably was
that the entrance rate of the now mature members of the baby boom into the labour
force has peaked and is now declining. Participation rates during 1971 played a
very minor part in affecting the labour-force growth rate.
 U 56
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
FIGURE 2A—LABOUR FORCE, BY SEX, BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1961,  1966-71
(Thousands) .
1,200 J
1,000.
800
Labour Force
*V
600.
rm*
jA .
400.
Male Labour Force
	
 •
a^-
200 a
Female Labour Force
gvji
0.
	
	
1961
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
Source: The Labour Force (revised) (monthly), Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
For the labour sector of the British Columbia economy, 1971 was a year of
recovery, albeit slow recovery. In 1970 it was apparent that Federal measures
taken to combat the inflation of the '60's had seemingly succeeded but had also
stifled sectors of the economy, with the result that employment grew very slowly.
In 1971 the economy began to recover as various restraint policies designed to curb
inflation were lifted and governments, both Federal and provincial, instituted policies and programmes designed to get the economy moving. British Columbia's
economy in the latter part of the year was, as hoped, considerably more buoyant
than in the early months. Business expectations, however, were still not as good
as could have been hoped for, though, as the threat of inflation was still apparent
and many other factors, not the least of which were the sluggishness of the American economy and the measures the United States took to correct its balance of payments problems, were still in the minds of businessmen. Given this, the strong
increase in employment over the year is somewhat remarkable.
The 1971 average employment, an indicator of the demand for labour, was
estimated to be 846,000. This represented an approximate increase of 35,000
employed members of the labour force, or 4.3 per cent over the 1970 employment
figure of 811,000.   This growth rate was over twice the 1970 growth rate of 2 per
 STATISTICAL SUPPLEMENT
U 57
cent and, in view of other rates in the past 10 years, should be considered to be
moderately high.
The employment peak of 891,000 was reached in July, the month that the
employment peak has usually occurred historically. The employment peak was
48,000 people more than the 1970 high of 843,000, which also occurred in July.
FIGURE 2B—LABOUR FORCE, EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT,
BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1961,  1966-71
(000's Persons)
1,000     -.
900.
U = UNEMPLOYED
E= EMPLOYED
U &E= LABOUR FORCE
1961    1966    1967    1968    1969    1970    1971
Source: The Labour Force (revised series) (monthly), Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
There are several significant points regarding the 1971 employment growth
rate. As discussed in preceding paragraphs, a 4.3-per-cent growth rate is moderately high for British Columbia, but, in view of the economic uncertainty present
throughout the year, the rate was quite remarkable. The full implication of this
employment growth rate can be grasped when it is viewed in light of the 3.8-percent labour-force growth rate. Had the labour force continued to grow at the high
rate experienced during the past few years, the employment growth would have been
insufficient to account for the year's new entrants into the labour market and unemployment would have increased. This, of course, did not occur and labour-force
growth was moderate and, more importantly, lower than employment growth. The
result of the fairly high employment growth combined with the moderate labour-
force growth was a slight decrease in the unemployment level.
 U 58
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
3
o>
E
3
"o
u
c
a
E
a
E
cu
e
e
cu
E
>r
a.
E
U
O
Ik
o
n
CQ
6
psXoiduisun
poXojduia
so jo£ JtioqBT
paXojduiaufi
paXoidxu^
mjoj jnoqBi
psXoidiasnfx
p3iCojdui3
soio^j jnoqBi
paXoidmoaji
paXoiduig
aojo j JnoqBi
paXoiduraufl
paXoiduig;
sojOii JnoqBT
paKoiduwtifi
paXoidrag^
sojoj; JnoqBi
paXoiduisafi
poAojduiH
oojo j jnoqBq
00  T-4  W-l
OO O ©
r- oo oo
cn *H t-
TH    Tt   VO
'-i r- cn
Z*s OO VO
CO CO OO
i> v© un
00  OO  CO
i-h <n r- rt r-
jh r» © cn cs
Os OC Os Os Os
t- 1> t>
oo OO OO
worn
CO Os Qs
© oo cn
un m rH
Os Os OS
i-h l> VO cn VO
i-h oo w tn O
oo t— oo oo oo
otsw
oo as co
r- c- r*
,-H  Tj-TT
{S  1-H i-l
00 OO 00
WOif*
^t   CO  1-H
00 CO CO
S«n Os
o o
oo oo oo
00 CO 00
<3\ mun
mm,   O   t~-
0\ C\ oo
fO   1-H  C\
r- oo r-
oo oo oo
Un SO 00 r-t mf
OMtONO
(—   fm.   00   00   00
un rt oo
cn rt m
r^ fr* o
O O rt
co rn m
-> 00 00
cn cs o
oo oo oo
Os t— vo
O O ON
CO CO c-
VO VO VO *rt Oi
cn Os rj- in. rt
OO t~- OO 00 CO
00 I— tN
00 CJ. O
r- o oo
H/O.CA
vo m cn
oo oo oo
o\ in cs
rt in rt
CO 00 CO
o cn cs o cn
m th Tt oo vo
r- r- r- i- i>
(N rt Tt
O i-H CS
r- r- i>
cs m vo
r-1> i>
rt CO CO
t> oo >n
Ll- t>  t>
t> ri CS
«n vo t-
r- c- r-
r— os m © oo
Ov VO Os CS o
r- r-1> co oo
i-h cs m
vo r-» t-
i> r- o
t-- CO Tt
cn cn Ov
co co r-
Os co vo
O.OH
t- oo oo
cn m vo rt \o
(N oo i-h un m
r» vo r» O i>
co cn r-
Ov CS CS
vo iS r*
(S © ©
VO VO rt
O t- l>
ml  t- OS
rt cn CS
o t^ r-
CS © rt rt ©
\o tn m co oo
o r- r- r-1>
o oo cn
CS CS rt
t> t> l>
Os as cn
cn m vo
l> t> r-
«n © r-
ON O VO
c- t- t-
l-H   O  CO
CO CO o
1>    O   Cm
co vo cS un r—
t> cn r- i-h oo
\o vo vo r- vo
r- as ©
m t- oo
VO vo vo
»nrt r-.
cs cs o
r- r- vo
o\ vo r-
Os OO l>-
vo vO vo
© cn cn cn (S
l-H i> o rt cs
r- vo t- r-1>
vo cS oo
vo vo vo
cn r- i-h
Os © l-H
VOM--
cn i-h vo
un un ca
t- tr~ t~~
in oo m
Os CO OS
Tt rt -TI
CS rt Tt
i-h cn cn
m un un
»n un t
u-i m m
cs rt m
rt cn cs
un m m
in r^ in co cs
i> vo t> co r^
in in m m m
O VO rt
Vm   SO   SO
un un un
oo O \o
vo oo r-
in >n in
in rt rt
o\ Ov r-
in m in
rt rH O
tm.   fm   tm-
un un un
M (|
cm
w   > u
elve-month
st-quarter a
ond-quarte
>   -tH      1)
HUh
w
T3  S S
►las
1
5
■a
do
'-<   Ui
K&S    ^"S    2>S
5a §    -g = &   Sou
<S^    5<w    OZQ
Sh
Wc.
 STATISTICAL SUPPLEMENT
U 59
The average number of unemployed persons in British Columbia in 1971 was
estimated to be 65,000. This was a slight improvement over the 1970 figure of
67,000, but was still much higher than the 1969 figure of 42,000. The unemployment rate in 1971 averaged 7.1 per cent, compared to 7.6 in 1970 and 5.0 in 1969.
Monthly unemployment rates fluctuated from the January high of 9.4 per cent to the
August low of 5.4 per cent, which is in keeping with the historical seasonal pattern
for unemployment rates in British Columbia, but, of course, is not in keeping with
the historical magnitudes of these rates.
Table 2C—Monthly Labour Force and Employment Fluctuations,
British Columbia, 1971
Month
Labour Force
Monthly
Figure
Change in
Thousands
Percentage
Change
Employment
Monthly
Figure
Change in
Thousands
Percentage
Change
1970—December..
1971—
January-
February-
March
April	
May.	
June	
July	
August-
September-
October	
November _
December—
879
870
877
878
885
902
933
950
938
913
930
927
9251
-9
7
1
7
17
31
17
-12
-25
17
-3
—2
-1.0
0.8
0.1
0.8
1.9
3.4
1.8
-1.3
-2.7
1.9
-0.3
-0.2
809
788
801
805
813
841
867
891
887
863
877
861
8591
-21
13
4
8
28
26
24
—4
-24
+ 14
-16
-3
—2.7
1.6
0.5
1.0
3.4
2.1
2.8
-0.4
-2.7
1.6
—1.9
-0.2
i Estimates.
The 12 monthly unemployment rates are graphically presented in Figure 2C.
This figure illustrates the dynamic relationship of the labour force, employment,
and unemployment. Whenever the labour force is growing faster than employment
is growing or, alternatively, is decreasing slower than employment is decreasing,
the unemployment rate increases due to the fact that it is a residual statistic derived
from the other two. From this graph and Table 2C we can readily see what was
happening each month in the labour market. In the first five months of the year
employment was growing faster than the labour force and, hence, the unemployment
rate came down. In June, however, the labour force grew by more than employment, and unemployment rose, as evidently not all students that entered the labour
market readily found employment. In July, employment again grew by more than
the labour force and unemployment fell. Unemployment fell also in August due
to the fact that the labour force declined by more than employment declined. In
September, the rates of growth for employment and the labour force were equal
and the unemployment rate edged up slightly. (The case where the rates are equal
is also a case where unemployment goes up due to the fact that the employment
rate is calculated on a smaller base figure than is the labour force rate.) It continued to edge upward in the last three months, an occurrence which was consistent
with what usually happens in the British Columbia economy during the fall months.
Seasonal adjustment of the unemployment rates better reveals the monthly
performance of the labour sector of the economy by excluding seasonal fluctuations.
In March of 1971 the British Columbia economy was performing at its poorest;
however, the range of the seasonal rates from March's 7.7 per cent to October's 6.2
 U 60
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
per cent shows that the performance of labour sector of the economy was poor
throughout the year in comparison with its potential. Generally, the seasonal
unemployment rates improved slowly throughout 1971, further exemplifying the
slow but definite recovery of the labour sector of the economy.
FIGURE 2C—LABOUR MARKET IMBALANCE, BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1971
Per Cent
Source: The Labour Force (monthly), Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
 STATISTICAL SUPPLEMENT
U 61
Unemployment during 1971, as in 1970, was not restricted to those occupational groups of an unskilled or semiskilled nature. Indeed, some experienced
engineers, teachers, registered nurses, highly skilled craftsmen, and other educated
and (or) trained people, including a number of graduating university students, were
unable to find employment.
FIGURE 3—UNEMPLOYMENT RATES, BRITISH COLUMBIA AND CANADA,  1971
i?n
(Per
Cent)
11 n
inn
90
E
ritish C
(Act
olumbia
nal)
Briti
(Seaso
j
sh Colu
nally ad
nbia
usted)
r n
••..
r
**••,
...•••-'
•SS.
m
/
...
70
■■■■■■..>
/
•;^
,jS>>*:
''.a
^
v%
V
fiO
5 0
c
Season,:
anada
illv adiL
y
sted)
y
3
4n
Canad
(Actua
?n
)
?n
l n
n.
Jan.      Feb.     Mar.      Apr.      May     June      July      Aug.     Sept.      Oct.     Nov.     Dec.
Source: The Labour Force (monthly), Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
Unemployment in 1971 continued to be higher among males than among
females. The unemployment rate of the male labour force was estimated to be
7.5 per cent, which is certainly more favourable than the 8.6-per-cent rate of 1970.
Women in 1971 had an unemployment rate of 6.4 per cent, which compares with
the 1970 rate of 5.6 per cent and seems to be a continuation of the trend, occurring
during the past five years, toward higher female unemployment.
 U 62
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table 3A—Unemployment' Rates, British Columbia and Canada,
1961, 1966-71
Actual Rate
British
Columbia
Canada
Seasonally Adjusted
Rate
British
Columbia
Canada
1961-
1966-
1967-
1968-
1969-
1970-
1971.
January	
February-
March	
April-
May—
June_
Ju.y_
August-
September-
October	
November-
December—
Per Cent
8.3
4.5
5.1
5.9
5.0
7.6
7.11
9.4
8.7
8.3
8.1
6.8
7.1
6.2
5.4
5.5
5.7
7.1
7.11
PerCent
7.1
3.6
4.1
4.8
4.7
5.9
£o
8.1
7.8
7.8
6.3
6.2
5.7
5.1
5.0
5.1
5.8
Per Cent
7.3
7.0
7.7
7.6
6.8
7.3
7.3
6.8
7.1
6.2
6.9
Per Cent
6.2
6.2
6.0
6.7
6.3
6.4
6.3
6.5
7.1
6.7
6.6
l Estimate.
Source: The Labour Force (monthly), Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
Table 3A—Unemployment by Sex, British Columbia, 1961, 1966-71
Year
Male Unemployed
Female Unemployed
Unemployedi
Rate
Unemployed^
Rate
1961
(OOO's)
42
24
29
35
30
51
462
Per Cent
9.6
4.6
5.5
6.4
5.3
8.6
7.5
(OOO's)
8
8
11
12
12
16
192
Per Cent
5.4
lOfifi
3.8
10«7
4.7
10/.S
4.7
19fi9
4.4
1970
5.6
1971
6.4
i Source: The Labour Force (monthly), Stal
2 Estimate.
istics Canada, Ottawa.
 STATISTICAL SUPPLEMENT
U 63
FIGURE 3B—MALE AND FEMALE UNEMPLOYMENT RATES, BRITISH COLUMBIA,
1961, 1966-71
1?
Per Cent
11
in
0
\
8
*
*
•
4
/
*
7
♦.      V
/
♦
/ /
*      x
^^     ^
6
\\
Ma.P
..'■
^
/ /
/ /
>'
■S
-^
^"^             Total >—^»«^
/ /
* x
^
•
*??
i<
4
3
**i
y
?
1
n
1961
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
Source: The Labour Force (monthly), Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
Employment by Industry
The industrial composite employment index for 1971 was estimated to have
reached 145.0. This estimate, although it is based on eight months of preliminary
figures, reflects the moderately high employment growth rate of 1971, discussed at
length in the previous section. Each industry experienced a growth in employment
and many industries experienced considerable increases in employment, with the
result that the 1971 index was almost five points over the revised 1970 index of
140.6. Ten years ago the index was, of course, 100, as 1961 is the base year for
this index. Comparison of the 1961 index with the 1971 index easily reveals the
solid growth of employment in British Columbia industry over the past decade.
 U 64
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
FIGURE 4—EMPLOYMENT INDEXES OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1961,  1966-71
(1961=100)
260
H
Z
LU
s
>-
240
220
200
180
160
140
120
100
1 Service
2 Construction
3 Finance, Insurance
and Real Estate
4 Trade
5 Industrial
Composite
6 Mining  and  Milling
7 Transportation,
Communication,
and Other Utilities
8 Manufacturing
9 Forestry (Logging)
1961
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
Source: Employment, Earnings and Hours (monthly), Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
The primary industries showed solid employment growth in 1971. The forestry industry, which is primarily logging, registered a strong growth in employment
in the summer months, with the result that the forestry employment index was estimated to have reached 124.0 in 1971 compared to 115.5 in 1970. Mining and
milling registered a fairly consistent month-by-month employment growth, with the
result that the mining and milling index was estimated to have reached 156.0, up
6.0 points over the 1970 index of 150.0. The general upturn of economic activity
in North America was probably the main reason for the higher employment indexes
 STATISTICAL SUPPLEMENT U 65
of the primary industries, but the fact that many of the Province's large mineral and
metal ore deposits are now producing, and on increasingly larger scales, was also
a significant factor.
In manufacturing, an employment growth was experienced. The 1971 employment index for total manufacturing was estimated to have reached 127.0, up
from 122.8 in 1970. The wood-products industry, pulp and paper industry, metal-
fabricating industry, and the primary metal industry showed marked gains in employment of a magnitude large enough to easily offset the employment declines in
the food and beverage industry, the transportation-equipment industry, and the
chemical industry. In this industrial group, too, the increase in employment was
probably due to the increased buoyancy of the North American economy in 1971.
Construction employment in 1971 was much higher than in 1970. The 1971
construction employment index was estimated to be 165.0, which was much higher
than the 1970 index of 143.5. It was not, however, as high as the record 191.2
index of 1967. The increased employment in construction was probably due to
the increased new construction resulting from Government monetary and fiscal programmes designed to get the economy moving, and increased private investment in
fixed assets as business expectations improved.
Transportation, communication, and other utilities registered employment
growth during 1971, reaching an employment index of 135.0. Trade registered an
increase in employment during the year with the large increases experienced during
the latter half of the year, offsetting decreases in the first few months. The high-
growth industries of finance, insurance, and real estate and the service industry
reached record indexes of 171.0 and 205.0 respectively. The former industry continued to experience the high-growth rate that it has during the last several years.
The employment increase in service, however, was smaller than has usually been
the case historically.
As previously discussed, events that took place internationally in the realm of
foreign trade had a major impact on the provincial and national economies in 1971.
Part of the impact was experienced in a less-than-potential employment growth in
some British Columbia industries. As the year came to a close the outlook for most
industries in 1972 was much improved. The rather high level of the floating Canadian dollar in 1971 had increased foreign competitiveness in Canadian markets.
With the American 10-per-cent surcharge, those industries relying upon the United
States as a market for their goods (mostly primary and manufacturing industries)
in 1971 found the competition in this market very stiff. In 1972, British Columbia
industries should enjoy a much-improved competitive position in both domestic and
foreign markets as a result of the removal of the American 10-per-cent surcharge
and the revised exchange rates agreed upon late in 1971.
Labour Income
Total wages and salaries in 1971 were estimated to be $5,145 million, this
represents an increase of $434 million, or 9.2 per cent, over the 1970 wage and
salary total. Using the consumer price index (1961 = 100) as an approximation
of inflation, the yearly increase was estimated to be 228 million constant dollars, or
6.3 per cent, after the removal of the inflation factor. Both the 9.2-per-cent increase
and the 6.3-per-cent real increase are moderate in comparison with the historical
data outlined in Table 5.
 U 66
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
ooiAjag
•aoirejnsui 'aotreoij
»PBJX
•»urain»i.o
put 'uotiBOfunuiiuoo
'TOiiniodsneiT,
nojjsnjjsuo^
CA
3
TJ
C
>>
VO
t>
o
X
o
TJ
e
*S§
«  II
II
a
E
15
E
3
"3
u
LU
4
IB
H
ijonpoj<j reoruiaio
pan sfBoywaio
jxratudinbg
uonBjjodsxnJj'x
sauisnpui
sajjjsnpui iBjajAj
OTlJlsnpni psjnv
ptre 'guiqsfiqnj
•SuTJTJIJd
63U)snpax
spnpoij
Poom
saSej3A3g
pUBSpOOJ
8nunjoBjr»iB]Aj
Idox
ptre Snniij^
XJJS3J0;!
oixsoduioo
IBpjsnpai
^NONninnrtnHfoiOHi
ta>v-ia>ovTfo\ov©voTHO\.>tN:cn.*cN
IHHiiHrlntNtStN<SHrtr,HH»-<HtN(Sr.(N
.>ooOvooi>prtTtcnineNtNTteotNmovcNvqi>
« ooV h »j vd 00 W O OO i-I ol tji On 'H tN o * Q cj d H 6 H
c^cAcnunununununsounsounununsososoirtsososovmsoso
CN vq -> t- © \D l> l> 1> © vO 00 Os
■ — " cn vi l> Tt vi Tl*
o\ o. vo vc vo vo
\qo\TtTtooooo\ovovTtooopTtovvq.NcnTtvqr^po\M
vi o m" vd 1-! Tt od th ov* ©* © oo o* vd vd vi vi © ri un ^ tN* cn* in* cn Tt' tn* ov *h oi
MmwTfiriinin\o^^^^TrTrTr^^^>n>ntnin^^TtTtTtTfiri*t
00 VO Os  tN Ov « OO Tf © GO ri  Tf Tf N Tf VO Ov CO N O h O * h (*) VI (O O O »
rt o o vd vd cs" ©" od r* vd t> i> ©' r* Tt* vd vd Tf cn cn cn vi vd vd th* .-i vi ov Tf" m"
hMno\oooor,a-n^tNN^^^n^^vooqooi*-H^ovHioMn
th cn o tr; Ov Tt vo cn vq © t-; p oo oo vq vi o\ <n oci rH eo
Tt tr~ vd vi vi cn ri ri tn © cn vi vd vi vd vi vi ci fN ri mi
i-i^-HOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCiOOv
(fiiH«nv,r.«M*i
oo tN cn vq p th fm. vo ov Ov *-< <N ov cn cn Tt i> vq th cn Tt
vicnTtt^*r^ovi>TtTtvi^vdvdodor^odvdviiXi>
cncn'-tfncnmcncnrNTtmTtcncNcnT-      -  - -
isor-OTtTHt^Ovoo
v-»cnTti>t-~ovr-TtTr«ri'--'vovDoooi>oovo«ntrit-.    ir, HHin.
rtcn^fncnrncn<nrNTtv-.Tt<ncNcnTH^HC)Cioo   j i-i tN tN cn <
Ttvqvqv^cntnv^r^tnoocov^r^pcncNoop
adMaeortTrdONPriNOodooVQ^N^V
oooor-coo.o\ovo\ooo.ovo\Ovcoooooo».Ov0.oot-.
co vq co ov vq oo ov p
©tNvicdcnodocn
XC0 0(0\OOHH
rHrtiHiH(N(StNM
m i^ r-t t^ oo oq rt ^ h ,h ov .n oo Tt (N vo «n q tt
oovdr^o^^cn^^cnTHTHTtcnvivicdcnTHrtOTH
.HrtTHrtfNCNcNtN'-'CNtNCNtNritNOvOvOvi-'THTH
cn cn w cn in Tt vq ov
ooiTHcnvdvdvdvd
voTtcnoof^t^oooocncncNcot^oocninviTtTtvoo
Tt"vdr^c4o\o\*rtO\vd©vo"edoviododvdi>"vivi(S
THT-HirtrHCNCNcncNCNcnOvOvOcncnmcncncncncn
rl.f1:r:1.c;.^0.'^.xo.t":
TtooTtvdvivdi>fn
mmcnmenmcntn
I oo o; cs p cn ov ov w cn p in cn cn th Tt cN p p
Hrtl>.ncnm-nrt0.edinrnr^["--od
iinTtinininmrnTtcNcNininmm
l t— f- tr- cn n un co .
©oovovoootNcnOvt
lOvt^pr^TtcnpcNcnvqinov    j oo i> in Tf r^ *-< ov eo
i mi i-h* «h i-5 © th o m* cn Tt" Tt ©"    i th vi vi vd ov* cn" i-" vi
l,-l*-ITHT-(©'-.'-*,_.T-.l-.TH,_| H rt   H  H  <H  f)  N   N
csmTtmor-ooTtovTtrtcNmovOvcovocNcN'-'Tt    iv-.r-tnTHO\fNvoTH
Ortoq\einvoNoocoTtOsm«inHoqr^viNOAt^O-^t^
cnoooviodvdincNCNcncNcNcnL^vicNiriTt
CNr^THCNCNtNMCNCNCNC^r^cNTHcNCNC^r^CNeNi-Hr^TrtCN
r-THinTtppvortOOvc^ONWTHrNrNr^c^ot^cnOTtcot^oooovqTtcn
od O. vi © vi cn tj" cn" vi vd t^ o vd ©* »n od Tt" oo" Tt oi cn" Tt" .-" cn" vd cd ov" cn" vd ©*
THOTHCNcncncN^HirtrtrtCN'-HOvO»-<CNCNfNT-(OCNOT-ii-(THcNcncnTt
cNt-oomcncNTtvovoc
ooooovoovooor-r^ovovovoTt'-.Ttovovr-
4J   aj
111 §
vovovovotZlvJZPt-
Os Os Os Os
S—   — £> £1
tu   C   g
S"Sj2 a.3 §3 3 &u o .u« Bo£ &rt
OV
!     mi   <*1   »     «.
'Spa"
§33
h, h-i <
c
g
CO
IB
S
>,
H
0
Uj
*w
P.
§
■Stfl
w s
H 10
 STATISTICAL SUPPLEMENT U 67
Table 5—Total Wages and Salaries, British Columbia, T961-71
,
Total Labour Income
Consumer
Price
Indexi
Total Labour Income
Year
Current
Dollars
Yearly
Increase
Constant
Dollars
Yearly
Increase
10K1
Millions
1,914
2,043
2,193
2,422
2,773
3,158
3,487
3,738
4,288
4,711
5,145
PerCent
Tit
7.3
10.4
14.5
13.9
10.4
7.2
14.7
9.9
9.2
100.0
101.2
103.0
104.8
107.4
111.4
115.4
120.1
125.5
129.7
133.3
Millions
1,914
2,019
2,129
2,311
2,582
2,835
3,022
3,112
3,417
3,632
3,860
PerCent
1067
5.5
io/;-.
5.4
1%4
8.5
1965
11.7
1<>66
10.0
1967
6.6
1%8
3.0
1969                                .  	
1Q702
9.8
6.3
1071 s
6.3
i Canada (1961=100).
2 Revised.
s Estimate.
Source: Estimates of Labour Income, Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
FIGURE 5—TOTAL WAGES AND SALARIES, BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1961,  1966-71
(In Millions)
5,000
^r^T   Current $
Constant $ (1961)
1961
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
Source: Estimates of Labour Income, Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
 U 68
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
33IAJ0S
3;e,s3 iKaiij pire
'bouBmsoi 'aouBuiai
opEJX
saFliran »rpO
pas 'noBEorantn-uoQ
'uoijBJJOdsireJx
£
«B
di
>-
TJ
V
alW
O
o
<L)
1/1
IB
I/)
(B
■at.
0)
V
ot
(B
aa,
CU
>•
<
E
o
U
ca
vo
IB
H
uoTpnJisncQ
SpnpOJJ IB0TIU31O
ptre s[Borai3io
uoijBuodsireJx
sapjsnpui
Svvye oxxqej-re jaj^
XJBOIUd
saiJjsnpui psniV
ptre 'Surqsytqn j
'Surjuuj
saiflsnpui
poyiXV PnB JQdBd
sjonpoia
pooAV
S33l3J3A3a
ptre spoOii
SininpEjmrej^
ptre Stnuij^;
Kxjsajog
sjisoduroo
l*eij(snpui
©ini-HcNOvO\->CNTfr^V^CNvoincNVOO\rrtvovocNcn©TtVi(^fNI>^
coi^vqpo^vqcortprrtv^ooovvqoor^qcorHi^
^rtvdodcnt^cdodo^Tt'cNtNrttNcNTfTtrnvivivi
VOI>l>OOCOCOOOOvO\OvOvO\Ov Os Os OvO\OvO\OvOvOv©O.OvOOVOO©0
Trtr^ovrtHOvo\invoTHcN<nTfi>Tt«-i©ovco'-tTf©ov©Tt©oov'-iinintn
Tfa>rtrtOOVOOO^V^rtVOa\CO.ni-HTfrtrn©CNCT\rtpcNlnCOVOV^C»OOrt
^cNo'i^vifn'rt^TtincxJvdfnTtvdodcdoiovOvOv^
r^OvOv©rtrtrtrtrtrtrtrtrtrtrtrtrtrtrtrtTrtcNfNCNtNtNcNCNtNcNcN
vOrt^M-nnvoTtOlnN^g^n^N^^^ooNOoor^o\^oMfNoo(»)
ppvivqi-jTtppp^virtpTtcnininpnivqOvcNpcNc^
**©Tr'i»vo'vdaicdcdg"cn©o.cNtNc^TtTtinT^
r-COWO>OOOOOrtrtOrHrtrtHrtrtHHrtrtr.HH(NHr.(SMr.
cninv^TfTtcoovTfvointnO\v^vot^OvcNoor^©ooTrt©fnovvov^TfM'^i>
vDnvD^rtin^rtvqt^ootsr^wo^oooNqoirnM
^^incn"rt©fScdvdts"<n"odo'o.cncn"cn«n"cn".>
Ovi^r^rnTrTtTtTfTtv^TfTtTtv^-nv^v^-nv^v^v^v^vovovov^vovovOl>c--
i^OrnrtV^rnor^^i^wOvO\o\cnvoor^i^^TrtootNr^fNcn(Ncooorn
o\©Tr^vqcNfNoot^cnr^cotNTtovi^ooTfcoc^
"" m" od vd cs od rt" r-* Tt t-" vd cd ri r-" vo" Ov* Tt cn" Tf r-" oi ov* -N ai rrt i>* © ts" vd i-h vi vd
Oinvovot^©OvOvvoO\ooO\COC>OvOOv©0©c>t^rrtO\OvrrtcN*HiriTtTt
rtrtrtrtrtcNrHrtrtrtrtrtrtTrtrtcN^CSCSCNi-irttSi-iTrtCNtNCNcSfNtN
:cot^inmo\cni-"r-
icnmcorrtrtiocnTt
f-nMVr^6w^d^'co^d^'Hifiodo6o\rti<t^rt    iodoTtTtcsododcs"
0\i^rJfnv^TfTtinTfiinv-i'ninvointnininvo«nin->    jvDt-vovoL>vcvoi>
voi^©vor-v-)Ttr--'--ii>Tf©or--coort©Tto\cNi>
voTf©c^v^oorrtc»c»cNrttscsv^r>ovtNi-;fnvo©p
"TtinTtr*r-*0\Tt
i in m in «. v. in vi
cocNvomTfovOvoo
p fN p tm- CN Ov _r^ i-i
rt rt ts' cn vi cs" ov" cn
vovovovovor-vor-
Ovinvpoovi>fnor^Ovt--cnvoov©cscNvoinoor--tN
0\©0\rtCOfn©o\oocsoortc~-<nr--0\i--'cnooi--iOvO
;voTfOvincnr-o>o
IC^TrtCTlTfOO©ini-rt
i-(^cnTtcNincoo\Tti-iOv^t--vooovor~tsoor-.Tfoo
OtNrnTt-nininin'nvoinv-iinv-.inv-.v-.vovovovovo
!oovoocSt--vOTtvO
ivovor-c-vor-r-r-
oooor^ovTfvDfSr-ovcnoovoo\covoi>voo\vooortTt
t-cocscnTfcnvomvDTtcomtNvor^'nvortcnoovor-
ovr-Ttr-Ti-ovfSOv
ooovinvocnooTtvo
^cNvo^v^coOvcNTtTt-voovcnTtr^vDinoortoocNr--
o^rtrtfNcncncnTtcnTtt^rqcncnTtTtTtTtinTtinin
0\mr--vom>ni—irn
Tfv.mmvcvOvovo
oocNTtovo\»nr^rJO\r-r~-voooTti--i(r.oooTtovinr^
Tfm(Nm*ocnrtrnq»o\\q^t^TtmrtO\Ov(NO\-n
*Ttr^r^vivdi-HtNtNcninTtTtvivi©r>"vdvdr^rrtocn*
o^^-iovor-t^r-r--r--p--^r~t--h-vot^r"t^Mioocc
-rrtr-Ttvocncs©
iovooTti-rtr-(v.co
ovTfvoTtvoov<nwcnts©cni>vovocnfSTtr--ofsin
cS vq vq in tr~m >n ts cs vq in co r-t cs ov oo cn cn mi © co © in
cn cm o od vd co r- t- cn vi -j ■* . > - < -; ■-.. ni
cncncncncntncncncncncncncnTtTtTt
T-iovOvcncocscn'-i
cn00rt©00tSt-;O\
O.Ttrt©*rtO0dSp
Ttcninminvoinm
cNcSTti-irtcn»n©voincncsoocoTtr-©'-'oovoTtTf
vovovqrnO\i>Tt;cscni^pcSinTtvqr»vqTtOvTtf^
^^cdcn^odvdvdcdTt'cs'odi^r^oiTtodvdcdvdin'cdcnod
r-Ov©©rtrti-rtCStStSCStNcSCSCSCSfScStSCSCncn
Ttr-OiTtoovoi-rtc—op~i—cr-(v^ir—rfcn'—'Ovcsi—< i-i r- © co i—< cn © 0\ © vo >—<
c©Q0vqTtr^cnTt-^ONO\r>jO>av©in©!-HcN
^odooiodt^r-iocdo.vdinTti^vdTtTtTt"Ttvdrtcdcn
00rtrtc^cnTtTtTrcnTtTtTt^TtTtTtTtTtTti^i^^voin>nin>n*nvovDV0
in^HOcncncsv^©int^voi-rtcScnr^cnO\v^cn^H-ni-H©i-(cninincSvoinTt
cnrNOTtcSpTto\vqcncNcn©TtTtTtvqoo\MTtvqo
^t^i-"cncs"©*cnr^vo"rtt^ocSTtvicsi^in"ovov"cn
ovcnTtinvovovovovor^i>t^r~t^i>r^t^t^i>coooc»ovcocoO\cooooococo
ovtScnin»nr^i^vOTtvoini>vor^inTtTtvovoc»i^Tti>^^voi^ooONco
0\cS©vo©vot^cntNcocSoOTtTfOvl^ONcnrNvovo©©TtooTtO\OvcSOcn
ovTtint^tN^rHcNTtcocoini-jcnt^incnrto^ovTrp©
>Tfi^Tt©0\cncnTto'r^Ttinvo'i^invdvdcd©cs"'-ioi©c^
co©i-"CStscncncntN(ncncncncncncncncnTtTtTtcninTtTt^Ttininvi
o  a
as
i-ivor-coov "X^
vpvovovovotwvj/;
OMJ\ 0\0i Ov
1-8,2 a*§
b J3rt
I*
3 "8
I**
« s
■ -. o
> a
»a aUiS **J3 la af»5r? ss S'S.s ft.2 if g
 STATISTICAL SUPPLEMENT
U 69
Average weekly wages and salaries continued to increase during 1971. The
average weekly income for the industrial composite was estimated to be $150, up
$12.12 over 1970. All industries registered higher weekly income figures in 1971
than 1970. The largest yearly increase was the $22.63 increase in construction,
followed by mining and milling; manufacturing; transportation, communication, and
other utilities; forestry; trade; service and finance, insurance, and real estate with
the lowest increase of $5.88. This pattern reflects the pattern established during
the past few years.
FIGURE 6—AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGES AND SALARIES,  BRITISH COLUMBIA,
1961,  1966-71
(Dollars)
300
280
260
240
220
1 Construction
2 Mining and Milling
3 Forestry (Logging)
4 Transportation, Communication,
and Other Utilities
5 Manufacturing
6 Industrial Composite
(6) Industrial Composite (Constant $)
7 Finance, Insurance, and Real
Estate
8 Trade
9 Service
1961
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
Source: Employment, Earnings and Hours (monthly), Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
 U 70
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Adjustment of the industrial composite data in terms of 1961 dollars gives one
an approximation of the "real" income increases of the worker. From Table 6A
we can see British Columbia achieved a significant increase in real average weekly
wages and salaries.
Table 6A—Average Weekly Wages and Salaries, 1961 Dollars,
British Columbia, 1961, 1966-71
Year
Industrial
Composite
(Unadjusted)
Consumer
Price
Indexi
Industrial
Composite
(Adjusted)
1961
Current
Dollars
84.99
107.42
114.50
120.76
129.20
137.88
150.00
100.0
111.4
115.4
120.1
125.5
129.7
133.3
Constant
Dollars
84.99
lOfifi
96.43
1967  	
99.22
]Ofi8
100.56
1969                                          	
102.95
]O702
106.31
19713                   ...        .             	
112.53
i Canada (1961=100).       2Revised figures.       3Estimates.
Source: Prices and Price Index, Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
Hours of Work
Very little change occurs in the average weekly hours of hourly rated wage-
earners from year to year, and this is clearly depicted in Table 7 and the accompanying graph. The average working-time of the manufacturing industry was estimated
to be 36.9 hours per week, up 0.1 per week from 1970. Mining employees worked
an estimated 39.7 hours per week in 1971, down 0.6 hour from 1970, but precisely
the same as the 1961 figure for average weekly hours. Construction employees
averaged 35.8 hours per week in 1971, down 0.2 hour from 1970. This statistic
seems, at first glance, to be rather uninformative and uninteresting because of its
lack of fluctuation from year to year; however, it does help to explain the movements of average weekly wages and salaries data. Manufacturing, construction, and
mining all registered average weekly labour income increases, but in mining and
construction we can conclude that these increases were due to actual wage and salaries increases as the average weekly hours of work declined. In manufacturing,
the average weekly hours of work increased only fractionally so the average weekly
labour income increase was due mainly to wage and salary increases.
Table 7—Average Weekly Hours of Hourly Rated Wage-earners,
British Columbia, Selected Industries, 1961, 1966-71
1961
1966
1967
1968
1969
19701
19712
37.7
39.7
36.5
37.7
40.5
40.1
37.7
40.6
39.1
37.7
40.7
37.2
37.4
39.9
36.3
36.8
40.3
36.0
36.9
39.7
35.8
1 Revised.        2 Estimate.
Source: Employment, Earnings and Hours, Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
 STATISTICAL SUPPLEMENT
U 71
FIGURE 7—AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS OF HOURLY RATED WAGE-EARNERS,
BRITISH COLUMBIA, SELECTED INDUSTRIES,  1961,  1966-71
(Hours of Work)
45
Mining^
V
Mai
.ufacturing
■ \
1
k
1961
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
Note—1971 figures are estimated.
Source: Employment, Earnings and Hours, Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
Comparative Summary Statistics, British Columbia, 1970 and 1971
Statistic
1970
1971
Percentage
Change
Population (June).— 	
Population over 14 years of age (June) —
Men over 14 years of age (June)	
Women over 14 years of age (June).
Labour force  	
Men	
Women	
Paid workers	
Employed  	
Men 	
Women  	
Employment Index (1961 = 100)-
Industrial composite	
Manufacturing  	
Construction	
Unemployed	
Men 	
Women-
Unemployment rate-
Total labour income-
Average weekly wages and salaries—
Industrial composite	
Manufacturing	
Construction	
Average hours per week worked-
Manufacturing— 	
Construction	
Consumer Price Index (Canada, 1961=100)-
2,137,0001
1,530,000
760,000
770,000
878,000
592,000
286,000
722,000
811,000
541,000
270,000
140.6
122.8
143.5
67,000
51,000
16,000
7.7%
$4,711,000,000
$137.88
$146.97
$196.37
36.8
36.0
129.7
2,196,0001
1,591,000
792,000
799,000
911,0001
616,0001
295,0001
751,0001
846,0001
570,0001
276,0001
145.01
127.01
165.01
65,0001
46,0001
19,0001
7.1 %l
$5,145,000,0001
$150,001
$161,001
$219,001
36.91
35.81
133.3
2.8
4.0
4.2
3.8
3.8
4.1
3.5
4.0
4.3
5.4
2.2
3.1
3.4
15.0
—3.1
-10.9
18.8
9.2
8.8
9.5
11.5
0.3
-0.6
2.8
i Estimate.
 U 72 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Labour Disputes in British Columbia, 1971
Technical Notes
The British Columbia Department of Labour has been collecting and reporting
labour-dispute statistics since 1918. The functions prior to 1970 were carried out
by the Chief Executive Officer, Labour Relations Branch. Presently, the duties are
the responsibility of the Research Branch.
Since 1970, new techniques with respect to collecting and reporting labour-
dispute statistics have been introduced. Classifications of disputes by industry in
1970 were made in accordance with Statistics Canada's Standard Industrial Classification System. The principal effect of this change is that disputes in the sawmilling
or pulp and paper sectors are now recorded under "Manufacturing" rather than
under "Forest Industries". The major groups under the SIC Code are as follows:
1. Agriculture.
2. Forestry (Primarily Logging).
3. Fishing and Trapping.
4. Mines, Quarries, and Oil Wells.
5. Manufacturing.
6. Construction.
7. Transportation, Communication, and Other Utilities.
8. Trade.
9. Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate.
10. Community, Business, and Personal Service.
11. Public Administration and Dejence.
In reporting labour-dispute information, it has always been the policy of this
Department to include only those data which can be accurately estimated. As in
past years, the same techniques and policy were used in calculating man-days lost
and workers involved in 1971. Theoretically, when reporting and recording disputes and time-loss information, it would be desirable to classify workers unable to
work because of strikes into three main categories. These would be—
(a) Workers who are the primary antagonists, i.e., those initially involved in
the strike or lockout.
(b) Workers who are not on strike, but are unable to work for reasons of
respecting the picket lines at the firm or firms involved in a dispute.
(c) Workers who are employees of other plants, but are unable to work for
lack of materials or other reasons directly attributable to the strike.
From an economic point of view all three categories of workers are significant.
The economy as a whole suffers a loss of production and workers suffer a loss of
wages. However, insurmountable difficulties in obtaining an accurate measurement
of (b) and (c) categories of workers prevent their inclusion in the figures given
in this report. In utilizing these statistics it should be kept in mind that they deal
only with the (a) category of worker, that is, the primary antagonists in the dispute.
Definitions
Dispute—For the purposes of definition, strikes and lockouts are recorded
under the single heading of "labour dispute." Individual disputes are not classified
as being either strikes or lockouts and no indication is given of their legality. Labour
disputes under Federal jurisdiction and those that are contrary to the Mediation
Commission Act are also included.
 STATISTICAL SUPPLEMENT U 73
Workers involved—Only those workers whose unions are directly involved
in the strike or lockout are reported. Where the number of workers involved varied
in the course of the stoppage, the maximum number is shown.
Employer—Firm(s) employing the workers reporting on strike or locked out.
Duration—The duration of each stoppage is calculated in terms of working-
days, counting the starting date and all subsequent normal working-days, up to the
termination date.
Man-days—Duration in man-days is calculated by multiplying duration in
working-days by the number of workers involved. For disputes commencing before
1971, only time loss during 1971 is considered. Variations in the number of workers
involved in the course of a stoppage also are taken into account in the calculation,
as far as this is practicable. The man-days' loss figure shows the total number of
man-days lost without regard to whether or not the workers made idle were employed elsewhere during the strike.
Highlights
While the numbers of labour disputes and workers involved were relatively high
in the labour history of British Columbia, the number of man-days idled was the
lowest since 1966. In 1971, there were 111 strikes and lockouts in which 52,333
unionized workers were involved. The estimated figure of man-days lost, however,
was relatively low at 276,030. It is also noted that the ratio 5.3 man-days idled
per striker was the lowest since 1950.
The relatively low time loss was chiefly attributed to the absence of prolonged
major disputes involving over 1,000 workers. In the past year, there were nine
such disputes and only one lasted over 20 working-days. The remainder were
terminated within 10 days or less from the date on which the disputes commenced.
Of the 111 labour disputes recorded, it is noted, 61 involved 75 employees or less.
The greatest loss in terms of man-days idled occurred in the transportation, communication, and utilities industries. The figure of 104,474 man-days lost due to
work stoppages accounted for 37.85 per cent of total time loss. The largest number
of workers involved, however, did not take place in these industries.
Due to the 22,000 striking members of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, the business, community and personal service sectors of the economy reported
the largest number of workers affected by labour disputes. The estimated number
of 22,109 accounted for 42.25 per cent of total number of employees involved in
strikes and lockouts.
Time loss was particularly low in the construction industry this past year. The
industry reported 9,554 man-days lost, or 3.46 per cent of total time loss.
 U 74
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
o.
et
UI
Z
et
<
-i
a
z
<
UI
I
u-
O
UI
H
O
z
tie;
o
_J
o
I-
u.
o
ui
o
t.
z
ui
O
ui
a.
<
(A
l/t
O
5
P
o
co
rv
O
LO
■t
ro
CN
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
 STATISTICAL SUPPLEMENT
U 75
TOTAL TIME LOSS DUE TO WORK STOPPAGES,  1965-71
Man-days Idled
(Thousands)
1,600.
■v
500
400.
300.
200
100
1965    1966   1967    1968   1969   1970    1971
 U 76
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
ON
a
3
O
10
o
'>
Ot!
ti _S ^-t
«T3 vJ
en •-.                         cn          i-h               Os                n as cn          tn      Hc,«r.Hc>      hhhnp.(N
lis
Tf                                                                                                                                                                             fN
wS
H
n «"d
t. ti«
M   U   a_
aO   fc   O
f. H                                      tn                                             _                        inn                       CN                              r-<                i-H                                      (SH
Si5 E
z
•a
u §
^Sis"^M^^ncn^MOTTOMcncM.NcS^TOTO
fl
CD
J S i aS.B.B.&&| | § 1 | § 8 § St l&S'&SS.tJ 6 6 S § -5 S S § S S « § g
H
•a
u
CJ
JS cu
i    Q!
i            o
g;§;S<;<aa,<:2S     =     =     =     =     333PP    =    3    =    «(g^:>
OZZZZZZZZZZgzz
U
coenco                                          enen                                     cn                                     cn tn cn <*>      cn
"rt   •
unsoinunsosom-iir^ounununv^unsOinmisocoununununsZ^asoununununm^
!       3 o
^cnooc»cnrni>c<)coc»cx)oooooocnoor-^cnoo
c»c»c»coc«c«cnMc»c»oor--r^i>rncncncnoorn
5*
§
j
j
i
i
i
i
1
j
.a-2
■
i
■
i
ii
j
!
i
ii
;
i
i
OS
!
;
i
C4
i
i
i
I-I
<
i
i
i
g   =   =   =   8   =   8   8   =   =   5   S   B   8   8   8   S   8   S   8   8   8   8   B   S   K   8   ^   88   =   8^88   8   8   8   8
0
O
^
rt'{j
§1
bo
C
6o
O
'is<
mi
*!■
,>.
5
tS    a>
1 j
ft  O
.1 3
U*a?
a.      a-l
w a
faa         U
gi
vl  13
'CW
b 1
3 O
§ «
"2 ->
£  S
fli
rt
o  5
z
o
rt
s
j
i   1
tfl
TJ       ;
|
T3
:
i
a   :
a
|
i
rt    ■
j
rt
:
a
j
i
HH
i
HH
o
;
U      !
a
1)
j fe fe.j£
"• rt rt TJ
vi
di  ai <-■
mi    P
>.
* <u
i-
OJ
11
Sm\
ji
lH
rt
o
5
0
rt
i;
-. rt k
cu               a j^ cu
>       cu 4) '3  rt  >
CD   O
2 * fe
" .c  rt
rt
CQ  4>
^  rt
CD  H
CU
>
2 a
c
>
Ca
ca
a«
Ca
rt
>
rt
fe
CQ   N
>
rt
CU
ml    £ J    >>«CQ    S3
c a^ .-.>>§,£ £ c tj m g hJ a .fee c
lia8Salol8jfsiSli
.a> 9 sa&mi
o a .a
PP  tfl  £ffl
H     OJ
.5 >
t; i ti u >. :>.ffi
L   O   b   Hl4i4   L
aSESeSsSa
<u  n P5  cd "3 Ph
tfl   C   —   tfl   c   ,.
Pi.
co C
J CO&
u   tu  CD  o
aa,a,aa
hh cow
CI
CO
cu
u
HH
>
£
3
a
z
CO
fi
a.
U
aC
aO
2
u
Va
Ph
a
CO
a
o
PL|
cr
CO
s
>
•4
b2
£
p3
 STATISTICAL SUPPLEMENT
U 77
© O 00
un © i-h
cs cn
un o oo
©0©©©©©©moo©o©\D,*>^'^.o,*<n©»
©^o*n©o^r\0(S^o^rr--r^©i-'\Dcnoo©©(S©1
©u^vocn©OO^^r-Tt-a\'ii-i-H(N'^-ooc>.i-HCS ^^O un •
tn •<* t> oo cn oo      r-Tcs i-h .-Ten i-hi-i ri
o^moomoo-HNomt
(Si-Hi-Hinuncst— Nmr-HHH
r-« i-h      cn cn i-h "tf
©\fioo©ir.©^J-»n©ir.
©CN'-Hr^'tOfNVOOcS
cn m cs ts «o cs
Z0Q
toO oD tj
°° R £ n £ 2 *■£;-, f-£ «   t~ °$ 5 8 "> ~ 2 8 "> £
o ©
j fe >*£)
C rt « 3 *
zoo
M t-0 tj
>
;oort>nrHc,mc«.222ST,"*0,f32««"'*«
-Hr.a.*-6ob!ai!3*--'^-.*^ndCa-^w>wiMat6
^OaJhH,a,a,a.ZSa,<<S«>.>.5».<J<ajZfl
>-> o
'     S?   2?   S?   a.
S.2,25 3
in SS cs
i-« o rs
jcs'-Hi.o r;oo - >-h *o © oo
XJW->ooo©m©cScno
£ .-. >o © oo © oo © o oo m
OOCOIC.O   t^Tlfjl
^^ocsoocn.OcscsTj-i
ir> i-1 t— r- ^t
l-H ©   ©   1-H
i-h CS CS ©
a
a .-
2 =
I
O   i_
•9
o>
2
•K8
, C r. °
J Aft
*ft..
a5    a.   .2    2    S    I
a-!
TTJ    CO
>1 ~
|s|l
o.S t. S
& g^
—i rrl  rt mi
-■ -is III
& K "<   £ '
Si|    Saaa.
ta      a)     a>   >
Oa3    C^rSiS    «aror_7>W     «£     O-C    li3aG!£
A<-oOC.om>OmO-omwOc-i5.C.
;*'=S^ESo8sSS5
>ftg
«>BhSih
ft*
^    -fl   cfl
S     H     H I
, -M    U    11    ,,
1 I-jLR
j    S HH  HH    O
—  CQ    CD    CD    S
j-   cfl "O "O   O
'|^ s i |
w s s £3
I*ftfti
-a.     a> a        a    C
rt  G T3 *a  n
&«a?    °    rt
oSsSjsz
B-u
s
Ot
1     S3   » S c
I s§fJ
,« 4-.    O    «
1 .giJ
i *>  rt c
' 5 TJ rt
"*  rt U
i5 P co «♦_, ^
■-H TJ _
a o s
jo
rt  D
II'-
rt   K  -M
r o o)
cp< &
'£   c/>   Si.
0 iS*
hJ tj -
ai   3  £
►J   ft".
cn   pa, 3 '
u<oft<:S «>
S| 8
4*- l
*<   l4 TJ TJ
i~)   tU   C  -hj
o .5 rt c
« m CU o
Z      M      Ht     CU
^ m o z
TJ        tU ^
o .5 £. y
.g-S eg
Qo5Ea$
a2     0
(OS
S«
rt =«
11
Sal
a-   T3
•n t-S em <fl ™
^•rt     S     2   Ta
U    O^ia    ^
&0 ._"      a.   a-.     U
ci   rt ^   >.J3
C Tl OJ    hi
S 3 =a "3 s>
55u.
, co:
0
TJ   CD
I-I TJ
°S
Sa!
c     .
o -a
'S3
UU
cr)5
a> -    w
>-J CQ  co
s 0,5
«.■<"'o
—   i o
Sp!  C
muO
s
PS
£
1
a.
d
3
33
d
c
q
rt
Ph  Ph ft
t3 rt -a m
K§S
CD   CD   CU
M O O O -3
c o o o rt
C c c c c
3  rt  rt rt rt
m>>>Z
 U 78
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
TJ V>
ii l>.
wS
Sa9   >
VO © © o
Os O l> \D
cn «n i-h cs
IT)
Os
CS o © o
©
r-
m
m © o o un o
cS © oo cn cs ©
© © o\ cs cs cs
oi miso
cs oo © (S Tt © ©
C- Os © o © o ©
Ti- t- un as mm\      so Tt
ri     o © tn un ©
©        O Os Os cS o
oo      m t>     cs cs
© o
o o
i* cs
cmosTtass\o<z~oscx)c~)
csomcs^cSi-Hvocs cn
cn cs      ri
HHHHC30W r-t
l-H  1-H  CS
in      -.n^co^      o      ^^
-a     !« fe h, rt fe    S    ^J>?^n
£      rC «
O   °o
-a"  V.   CO   a^   aa.   OO O
^o5^h r. r* •*■ CN     «
« N jj tJ S o 8 w u
§m<^i-.a5   o
a-,   OS   __,   O.
co -i   . N
a5>   M   0,"S
3 3r!i   &
i\ S <*. r- "3
H CS tN ^CS
-1     Sm v.t~'*     ttfj
o\ ^r m
HCNtN'        .a,
> a si &- &
*   a?   O   a?
^^^^-a-OTfaJaa
>> >; 2? d 3 3 9" o
■3Jj2s^-30z
p-,«J<Q
TJ
CD
_C
*+-
c
o
U
O
IA
CU
(A
3
O
a)   O
.sz
S§s£
^-aS
s   >
>>
>>
oo©oo©©©i-Hcn
OO 00 CO th co co n m h
•'iwiv.ini/ii/.wc.rl
P-2
■8 Sag
a!
W-2
•Ph
a*W
H     HJUHH     W
co CL co
a.  —< a.
CO     H      &0 *>
K.     3    M     a. tfl
ft -2 s i 1
W 3 rt .g S
-Q     CCJ    0    Va U
aa.     CO
* a
pj a
ro   cu
Sh
tu cu tu
CD   CD   CD
OOO
d  & D.
s s a
wtaw
CU   tU   CD
CU   CD   cu
o ^O o
Oi Ot Oi
£ a a
www
U   cu   U
O O O m* o o o
ftft*J^ll
rtrtrtrtrtrtccj*2*H
O ca
rt >s
as
•cpq
SB
z
i -"loll §?
T |6?-"
.2 § g § a
I o|l|
r§ J: I § 8
§1
S3
a   a>
•2 5
aSg
i«!
6
U
8 5
Ah
=8
O „
aa.3H
SSI
Oh   «j
o«
Q    13    aa
•rt      rt      a)
3 ajS
'3 2 S
OZ
TH      9     ■     O
•2-3 S
S  rt  3
3Z-3
,9 a<->
u a
■8 t3 -a
.9.2
~3   aO
o a
.U
i cd .
a a
>? o
•= aa -a 9
0,2 o jj
fl-S-S H
tj" 55
o W
to    l-i    —
325
i    ©    CD
vu   CU 2
oaucq    cq     uuphQ
i
<fl
CD
is
o
Oh
T3
rt
O
t-H
<
>*
tn
^
O
a
CQ
mO
'•—'
B
H>
£
U >
V
tfl  c
.s
CQ
hJ
13 13 M-j
o=3
",. a"L S SO
g j< aw ■" •§
a3    CO    Q,   a.    ^   a^.
Z  O  3 -2 <M   rt
aa'ilil
3   -2oS«
ZOuuuS
Q3"2
5-)-"
1 a 8
«"   O   "3
o-Scn
ftp
cj -J  rt
«° s
ftftl
w u
3ia
O  rt
Sfta>
I S S I o
i to 8"
u
^^ *s a ,K
B w
m    cm >a.c-tcq    >
O     CD    a-    tj   '5
a 3 ra .a -a
aao>«
►j^j   -• --"   rj   o   -j   -•   -;
OOOjartrtOOO
aacjHticgrta
rtrtrtOB-Hrtrtrt
>>>Zmm>>>
 —I
STATISTICAL SUPPLEMENT
U 79
© vo un
so un cc
3
co © un cs
cs © 00
|
e*s     ©
Un Os    Tl           cr
>o © csm i-h l> © 00
VC
•*■      no      Q
i> t>" rn" i-T i-h rf
c
V)
cs
Tf
o oo inn so o m ^
cn CS *-• rH r-t ©
s
cot-  in       cn
ri ■*   r-       cn
©
cn
«s
cs
S
rf
un
SS^2        m
3-N
/—\-^s!*j"vo    • "■■■»    •
oi ©I »i cn      h,n +*
fe> si
r«|H
as
O   P   O   a3   5
?? s p: ■* ■* **.N .
VH ©
M cn
-a,   a*.   fO   C-t   IH     _.     J   *.
Sz
Jan.
Sept.
Oct.
Dec.
Dec.
Ma
Ap
Oc
cohocNN
© VI
Tf
t---.C\»^
00 l-H
cn CO OT CN cs
o
c
O    tfl
.3   CU
-Ht    CU
rt >.
SS
TJ   Oi
a
4.
>
CU   c
rr. a to
.  W S3
CA   1-H   l-U
tn rt h
CO
s.
>
(D
o <-> o
O
"a
S
•Safe
1
H
w
S3
<u
i>.
o
fl)   cc
•a t
S3*
CL
c^-
1-
Ca      CCj     JH
3 3*
ESS!
CO
CJ
a
V
m-i
*o,
a
cdP-
o p.
2fe^2an
fi ,-,*UU a
9 a aSI 8
^
■2 ft
OL
■h. B 3 3 3 id
u a « h hJ
^ J k) C3 cq C
ZS
JS
*d
i
"2
U
i
Is
to
u
oa
,2        j
c
<3
*-    '•
9* rt
£
c
hi .2     !  c
ii5   IB
5
"3
3 S     E
--<      '   tU
00  O      j   hi
i
e
o.
Jo   «
O T
CD
W js   i *"o
5
TJ*
a"
C       a.
'K           CC
Kg
cd   rt
SU
•a =
c
cu
L
tu
.5
c
rt
6135
J-      t_,   M     Cfl
wCQ « fe
.2"S.S§
fi   ,* TJ Tn
|
I
■3
d
.2
V? t-i
9 to
? >
h 3
& 5
i *
S  £
£ 5
o r
I^Oa2 saw
•a o >, o o_, w>
•a H S -a s § a
■§ B o 3 2 C S
§        .     O   'a.   •§     rt    D.
s
3
aS
5|
to i*
3  O
^
H~|    >>
<o .ti
.C3
rt
a/
2   o io
c
« "^ *C
m-        Cfl    S
a
O
O   T3 tfl
5   rt 3
t
a
t-
X
1
HI
I
3
CO
»H
CD
5.2..,
o hi o £
5
« Ph  >.
S »*3 rt
S 3
•a o
o  o o c.
C
p s §
rt u
i ti c "
rt .H  «  a
1
aa
>
>
>
2
2
p-
P.
ca
2
H>
a
.2 rn"
CU   cU
3 S
*^   CD
13 cS
a a
ra .-.
ca iri
2 ra   .
rt a na
a -a a)
BIS
SSSi
& o ■
DC"
a      o
•a id a
|3v
^ q, ra
||1
PhQh,
 U 80 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Analysis of Labour Disputes in British Columbia, 1951—71
Year
Total
Paid
Workers*
Number of Disputes2
Approximate
Number of
Workers
Affected
Estimated
Man-days
Lost
Total
Time Loss
as Percentage
of Working-
time of
Wage and
Salary
Earners
Workers
Affected as
Percentage of
Total Union
Membership
Starting in
Year
During
Year
1951     	
342,000
362,000
368,000
370,000
390,000
421,000
439,000
434,000
452,000
448,000
455,000
477,000
501,000
529,000
561,000
597,000
636,000
663,000
714,000
722,000
748,000
26
31
32
21
24
34
35
27
32
12
17
29
18
27
39
30
51
60
81
72
100
26
32
34
24
25
35
35
29
34
14
17
33
23
29
40
39
54
66
85
82
111
3,326
37,206
6,432
12,622
3,367
3,197
8,914
11,709
33,443
999
1,638
1,982
824
9,503
6,755
24,748
11,371
12,179
17,916
46,642
52,333
74,722
1,132,120
234,485
140,958
27,588
39,211
225,869
325,211
1,423,268
35,848
34,659
32,987
24,056
181,784
104,430
272,922
327,272
406,729
406,645
1,683,261
276,030
0.094
1.326
0.273
0.163
0.030
0.040
0.222
0.325
1.338
0.035
0.033
0.030
0.021
0.147
0.080
0.198
0.222
0.265
0.246
0.942
0.146
2.11
1952	
1953 	
1954	
1955 	
1956	
21.88
3.67
7.07
1.80
1.67
1957               	
4.13
1958
5.00
1959      	
15.25
1960 - -
1961     _	
0.46
0.74
1962               a
0.91
1963	
1964..   . -.	
0.37
4.19
1965
2.84
1966 	
9.66
1967	
1968 	
1969	
4.15
4.25
6.12
1970S	
1971*...        	
15.04
16.53
i Does not include persons who operated their own business, farms, or professions; or persons who worked
without pay on a farm or in a business owned or operated by a member of the household to whom they were
related.
2 Statistics for years prior to 1970 exclude disputes not within the scope of the Mediation Commission Act.
3 Revised.        * Preliminary.
Analysis of Time Loss by Industry, 1971
Industrial Classification
Number
of
Disputes
Workers Involved2
Number
Percentage
of Total
Estimated Number of
Man-days Lost
Number
Percentage
of Total
Agriculture	
Forestry (logging)	
Fishing and trapping-
Mines, quarries, and oil wells-
Manufacturing	
Construction	
Transportation and communication-
Trade	
Finance, insurance, etc	
Business and personal service-
Public administration	
Totals-
42
1
3
23
9
14
9
3,649
4,500
443
5,799
1,370
13,878
510
22,109
75
6.97
8.60
0.85
11.08
2.62
26.52
0.97
42.25
0.14
111
52,333
100.00
14,488
40,500
568
53,461
9,554
104,474
8,781
43,660
544
276,030
5,25
14.67
0.21
19.37
3.46
37.85
3.18
15.81
0.20
100.00
1 Preliminary statistics only, subject to revision.
2 Only the primary strikers involved in the disputes are recorded.
 STATISTICAL SUPPLEMENT U 81
Labour Organizations, 1971
Interanion rivalry became one of the focal points of the industrial relations
field in 1971. Certifications were challenged as various labour unions sought to
increase their total membership, enter new industries, command new certifications,
and (or) tried to fulfil some other union objective. After the year had passed, however, it was observable that there were few changes in the labour movement in British Columbia during the year.
Information regarding labour organizations in British Columbia is the result
of data analysis conducted by the Research Branch. The data are collected through
the annual Survey of Labour Organizations, a joint project conducted in co-operation with the Economics and Statistics Branch of the Canada Department of Labour
and Statistics Canada.
Structural Developments
There has been, in recent years, a great deal of structural change within the
labour movement in British Columbia as it adapted to the new demands being put
upon it. Union formation, reorganization, and amalgamation continued to occur
in 1971, but few major changes occurred.
New unions certified for the Province in 1971 were the Pacific Marine and
Maintenance Employees' Association, the Cariboo Woodworkers Association, the
North Central Plywood Employees' Association, and the Pederson and MacTaggart
Plant Employees' Association; all are independent local organizations. Also
formed and certified during the year was the independent regional Social Services
Employees' Union of the Province of British Columbia. Newly included, Federally
certified unions are the Canadian Postmasters' Association and the Professional
Institute of the Public Service of Canada. These organizations contributed to the
increase in the number of union locals operating within the Province.
Other developments took place in 1971. During the year the Transportation-
Communication Employees' Union (AFL-CIO/CLC) merged with the Brotherhood of Railway, Airline, and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express and
Station Employees under the latter's name. The Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International Union (CLC) merged with the American Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International Union (AFL-CIO/CLC) under the former's name
and gained duel congress affiliation. Also during 1971, the United Mine Workers
of America affiliated themselves with the Canadian Labour Congress. The International Brotherhood of Operative Potters changed its name to the International
Brotherhood of Potters and Allied Workers. The Monsanto Employees' Association of Monsanto Canada Ltd. changed its name to the Wesport Employees' Association of Wesport Chemicals Ltd.
The number of unions operating within the Province was 120. These unions
had a total of 1,035 British Columbia locals in 1971, compared to 1,010 in 1970.
The 20 largest unions accounted for over two-thirds of the total 1971 British Columbia union membership. The largest labour organization in the Province was
again the International Woodworkers of America. The second largest was again
the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, but the third largest union is now the
British Columbia Government Employees' Union. Other changes in the relative
positions of these unions having a British Columbia membership of over 5,000 are
readily discernible from Table 1.
 U 82 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Union Membership
In 1971 the total British Columbia membership of the labour unions operating
within the Province reached the record level of 316,587 workers. This was a 2.1-
per-cent increase over the 1970 membership total of 310,222, and represents an
increase of 5,278 workers.
Table 1—Unions With a British Columbia Membership Greater
Than 5,000, 1971
Relative Relative
Position, Position,
197U Union 1970
1 International Woodworkers of America (AFL-CIO/CLC)  (1)
2 British Columbia Teachers' Federation (Independent)  (2)
3 British Columbia Government Employees' Union (CLC)  (5)
4 Registered Nurses' Association of British Columbia   (Inde
pendent )        (6)
5 Canadian Union of Public Employees (CLC)     (4)
6 International Brotherhood of Teamsters,  Chauffeurs,  Ware
housemen, and Helpers of America (Independent)     (3)
7 United Steelworkers of America (AFL-CIO/CLC)     (8)
8 United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners  (AFL-CIO/
CLC)       (7)
9 Public Service Alliance of Canada (CLC)      (9)
10 Hospital Employees'Union (CLC)  (11)
11 International Union of Operating Engineers (AFL-CIO/CLC)  (10)
12 International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers
(AFL-CIO/CLC)     (12)
13 Laborers' International Union of North America (AFL-CIO/
CLC)    (13)
14 Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International
Union (AFL-CIO/CLC)   (17)
15 International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (AFL-CIO/
CLC)    (14)
16 Federation of Telephone Workers of British Columbia (CLC)  (15)
17 International Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill
Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC)   (19)
18 Retail Clerks' International Association (AFL-CIO/CLC)  (18)
19 United Fishermen and Allied Workers'Union (independent)  (16)
20 Pulp and Paper Workers of Canada (independent)     (2)
1 Note—As of January 1971.
2 Newly included union.
The total membership figure represents 42.3 per cent of the total number of
paid workers in British Columbia. The number of paid workers gives an indication
of the number of British Columbians who are potential union members. This percentage, 42.3, was lower than the 1970 figure of 43.0 and indicates a "real" decline
in union membership—a drop in the number of potential members of unions who
actually were members. Factors responsible for this occurrence were the low 2.1-
per-cent growth rate of the total union membership and the large increase in the
number of total paid workers. This real decline in a union membership was a continuation of a trend prevalent in the '60's but interrupted in 1970.
 STATISTICAL SUPPLEMENT U 83
Table 2—Union Membership in British Columbia, 1940—71
Year
Number
of Locals
Total
Membership
Change
From
Previous
Year
Total
Paid
Workers^
Organized
Labour
as a Percentage of
Total Paid
Workers
1940-
1941-
1942-
1943-
1944-
1945-
1946-
1947-
1948-
1949-
1950-
1951_
1952-
1953-
1954-
1955-
1956-
1957-
1958-
1959-
I960-
1961-
1962-
1963-
1964-
1965_
1966-
1967-
1968-
1969-
1970-
1971-
380
404
402
415
473
617
636
642
715
745
761
770
772
766
795
865
869
907
952
948
923
1,048
1,043
1,041
1,057
1,061
1,064
1,054
1,092
1,085
1,010
1,035
44,867
50,360
61,292
91,618
107,402
110,045
108,125
119,258
135,326
142,989
146,259
157,287
170,036
174,894
178,533
186,951
191,952
216,070
233,972
219,279
215,437
221,946
216,685
222,138
226,690
237,864
256,241
273,946
287,502
292,842
310,222
316,587
Per Cent
12.24
21.71
49.47
17.22
2.46
—1.75
10.30
13.47
5.66
2.29
7.54
8.10
2.86
2.08
4.72
2.68
12.56
8.28
—6.30
—1.75
3.02
—2.37
2.52
2.05
4.93
7.73
6.91
4.95
1.86
5.93
2.05
213,000
231,000
266,000
283,000
322,000
334,000
338,000
340,000
335,000
342,000
362,000
368,000
370,000
390,000
421,000
439,000
434,000
452,000
448,000
455,000
477,000
501,000
529,000
561,000
597,000
636,000
663,000
714,000
722,0002
748,0003
28.8
39.7
40.4
38.9
33.6
35.7
40.0
42.0
43.6
46.0
47.0
47.5
48.2
47.9
45.6
49.2
53.9
48.5
48.1
48.8
45.4
44.3
42.9
42.4
42.9
43.1
43.4
41.0
43.0
43.3
i The Labour Force, Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
2 Revised.
3 Estimated by the Research Branch.
 U 84
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
FIGURE
1—GROWTH OF PAID WORKERS AND UNION MEMBERSHIP
ann
700
600
Paid workers
b   500
o
o
&   400
a,
CL
aa-
o
S   300
ad
E
Z   200 _
Union membership
100
n«t
1
1940
1945                 1950                 1955                  I960                1965                1970
1971
■ ■
FIGURE 2—REAL GROWTH OF UNION MEMBERSHIP
55  _
50  _
45
aa.
c
."i   40
\
\   Union members
cu
Q.
as a per cent of
35
paid workers
30
25
Oa^
L
1940
1945                 1950                  1955                  1960                   1965                 1970
19
71
 STATISTICAL SUPPLEMENT
U 85
The breakdown of the total British Columbia union membership by sex reveals
that there was an increase in the number of female members relative to the number
of male members from 1970 to 1971. Of the 316,587 union members in the Province, 71,916 members, or approximately 22.7 per cent, were women. These figures,
when compared with 65,599 (21.15 per cent) women members in 1970, show an
increase in the fraction of female members to male members. Approximately 77.3
per cent of the union members, or 244,671, were men.
Table 3—Union Membership by Sex, 1971
Union
Membership
Percentage
Distribution
Paid
Workers!
Membership
as a Percentage of Paid
Workers
Total-       . .             	
316,587
244,671
71,916
100.0
77.3
22.7
748,0002
499,0002
249,0002
42.3
49.0
Women
28.9
i Source: The Labour Force (monthly), Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
2 Estimates.
Of the number of men or women paid workers who could potentially be organized, 49.0 per cent and 28.9 per cent respectively were actually organized in 1971.
Comparison of the 1971 male and female membership figures with the respective
1970 figures of 244,623 and 65,599, however, reveals that, although unions have
managed to organize a smaller percentage of the potential female membership than
the potential male membership, female workers in 1971 were being organized at a
faster rate than male workers. This was due chiefly to the fact that most of the
organizing of the labour movement was, and is currently, centred in the service
industries which are the traditional industries of employment for women.
Industrial Distribution
The service industrial group was the largest employer of British Columbia's
labour-union members in 1971. This industrial group had 107,432 union members,
or 33.9 per cent of the total union membership. The industrial group of manufacturing was the next largest employer of union members with 89,972 members, or
28.4 per cent of the total union membership. Transportation, communication, and
other utilities; construction; trade; and the primary industries were the industrial
groups with the next largest percentages of the total union membership. Specific
membership figures are presented in Table 4.
 U 86 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table 4—Industrial Distribution of Union Membership by Sex, 1971
Industry
Total
Membership
Percentage
Distribution
Male
Membership
Female
Membership
Service—
Community, business, and personal services	
67,083
40,349
21.2
12.7
25,861
31,937
41,222
8,412
Tntfllo
107,432
33.9
57,798
49,634
Transportation, communication, and other utilities-
Trail?-
48,721
13,673
12,871
43,918
12,375
34,608
12,909
3,881
11,653
9,028
5,518
15.4
4.3
4.1
13.9
3.9
10.9
4.1
1.2
3.7
2.9
1.7
41,161
8,196
12,374
43,786
8,481
33,798
12,454
3,112
11,371
8,716
3,424
7,560
5,477
497
132
Primary industries—Logging, mining, fishing	
Manufacturing—
3,894
Wood products
810
455
769
282
Machinery, transportation equipment, and elec-
312
2,094
Tntals
89,972
28.4
81,356
8,616
316,587
100.0
244,671
71,916
Note—Industries are defined by example in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual, Statistics Canada,
Information Canada, revised 1970.
Due to a change in the methodology of the assignment of an industry to the
various labour organizations, specific comparisons between the membership of an
industry in 1971 and in past years should not be made.
FIGURE 3—INDUSTRIAL DISTRIBUTION OF TRADE-UNION
MEMBERSHIP,  1971
PRIMARY
INDUSTRIES
TRADE
TRANS.,
'COMM., AND
OTHER UTILITIES
 STATISTICAL SUPPLEMENT
U 87
Women union members were prevalent mostly in the service industry. Indeed,
49,634, or roughly 70 per cent of the total 71,916 women union members, were
employed in this industry. The majority of the women were, in fact, employed in the
community, business, and personal-service sector of the service industry—the traditional area of employment for women. The men's membership was more evenly
spread among the industries, with the manufacturing and service industrial groups
being the major areas of employment. The other industrial groups also employed a
considerable portion of the total male union membership.
Males clearly predominated the union membership of every industrial group,
with the exceptions of the service and trade industrial groups. Over 80 per cent of
the union membership of transportation, communication, and other utilities and over
90 per cent of the union membership of the primary industries, construction, and
manufacturing were males. In the service industries, males comprised only 54 per
cent of union members working in that industrial group. In the trade industry, 60
per cent of the union members working in that industrial group were males.
Union Affiliation
The tabulation of the data received through the 1971 Survey of Labour Organizations showed there to be no significant changes in the congress affiliation of
the British Columbia unions. The distribution of the Province's union membership
by congress affiliation is shown in Table 6.
Table 6—Union Membership by Congress Affiliation
Congress
Locals
Membership
Percentage
Distribution
AFT -<~TO
2
404
429
72
169,904
75,962
(l)
CLC	
AFL-CIO/CLC  ...	
53.7
24.0
833
245,866
77.7
Unaffiliated—
19
99
63
19
3,994
38,463
14,160
14,032
1.3
Regional	
12.1
4.5
4.4
200
70,649
22.3
1,035       i
316,587
100.0
i Less than one-tenth per cent.
Apparent from 1970 to 1971 is a small membership shift from the international
unions to the solely Canadian unions. The membership of the international unions
dropped both in terms of numbers and in terms of the percentage of the total Provincial union membership. This occurrence may not be at all meaningful, as such
a shift in membership must be of a very large magnitude or occur for a number of
years before it should be deemed significant. It was interesting that the shift
occurred, especially in the light of the supposed increase in Canadian nationalism.
 U 88 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
FIGURE 4—UNION MEMBERSHIP  BY CONGRESS AFFILIATION,  1971
AFL-CIO ONLY _
CLC
 STATISTICAL SUPPLEMENT
FIGURE 5—UNION MEMBERSHIP BY TYPE OF UNION,  1971
LOCAL,
U 89
'NTERNATIOVA^'
 U 90
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
The union membership of the local unions fell from 5.64 per cent of the total
in 1970 to 1.9 per cent in 1971. This was mainly due to the reclassification of
many of the local unions as regional or Provincial unions, which correspondingly
rose to 22.9 per cent of the total membership. The union membership by the type
of union and by affiliation in 1971 is outlined in Table 7.
Table 7—Union Membership by Type of Union and Affiliation, 197T
Type of Affiliation
Number
of Locals
Membership
Number
Per Cent
International unions—
AFI^CTO/CLC	
CLC only-
AFL-CIO only-
Unaffiliated	
Totals.
National unions—
CLC	
Unaffiliated-
Totals-
Regional unions—
CLC	
Unaffiliated	
Totals-
Local unions—
CLC (directly chartered)-.
Unaffiliated	
Totals-
Grand totals-
404
15
2
19
1,035
169,904
4,927
72
14,032
316,587
53.7
1.6
C1)
4.4
440
188,935
59.7
315
63
35,036
14,160
11.1
4.5
378
49,196
15.5
94
99
34,082
38.463
10.8
12.1
193
72,545
22.9
5   I
19
1,917
3,994
0.6
1.3
24
5,911
1.9
100.0
Note—Figures may not add up to a total of 100 per cent due to rounding,
i Less than one-tenth per cent.
 DIRECTORY U 91
Directory
PART I—OFFICIALS OF CONGRESSES, COUNCILS, ETC.
CANADIAN LABOUR CONGRESS
Regional Vice-Presidents, Pacific Region
E. T. Staley (United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America), 4706 West
Saanich Road, Victoria.
R. Smeal (Canadian Air Line Flight Attendants' Association), 280, 1885 West Broadway,
Vancouver 9.
G. Johnston (Canadian Food and Allied Workers), 4530 Victoria Drive, Vancouver 16.
Staff Officers
Regional Directors, Pacific Region
Thomas C. Gooderham, Regional Director of Organization, 112 East Sixth Avenue, Vancouver 10.
Ron Tweedie, Regional Director of Education, 112 East Sixth Avenue, Vancouver 10.
Representatives
Wm. Gauld, 212 Main Street, Penticton; J. Radford, 112 East Sixth Avenue, Vancouver 10;
and R. Langford, 112 East Sixth Avenue, Vancouver 10.
PROVINCIAL FEDERATION
British Columbia Federation of Labour
President: G. Johnston, 4530 Victoria Drive, Vancouver 16.
Secretary-Treasurer: R. C. Haynes, 210, 517 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
LOCAL LABOUR COUNCILS
Campbell River, Courtenay, and District Labour Council
President: Larry Widen.   Secretary-Treasurer: Nick Chernoff, 910 Island Highway, Campbell River.
East Kootenay and District Labour Council
President: Wayne Stone.   Secretary: James Patterson, 140 Howard Street, Kimberley.
Kamloops and District Labour Council
President: R. Morgan.   Secretary: H. Home, 937 Sherbrooke Avenue, Kamloops.
Kitimat-Terrace and District Labour Council
First Vice-President: Pat Henderson.   Secretary: Glen S. Yearley, Box 173, Kitimat.
Nanaimo-Duncan and District Labour Council
President: Howard Carruthers.   Secretary: Nick Mieras, 534 Chestnut Street, Nanaimo.
Nelson-Trail and District Labour Council
President: R. L. Keiver.   Secretary: R. A. "Duke" Hysseys, Burns Buildings, Suite 1, 560
Baker Street, Nelson.
New Westminster and District Labour Council
President: Gerry Stoney.   Secretary-Treasurer: Wayne Brazeau, 709—12th Street, New
Westminster.
Okanagan Labour Council
President: S. A. Muir.   Secretary: M. Schur, c/o IBEW Local 213, 1564 Pandosy Street,
Kelowna.
 U 92 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Port Alberni and District Labour Council
President: Dan Connell.   Secretary: S. J. Squire, 310 Montrose Street, Port Alberni.
Prince George and District Labour Council
President: Fred Scholz.   Secretary: C. H. Webb, 909 Fifth Avenue, Prince George.
Prince Rupert Labour Council
President: Graham Lea.   Secretary: Harbhajan S. Sangha, Box 465, Prince Rupert.
Vancouver and District Labour Council
President: S. Thompson.    Secretary: C. P. Neale, 206, 33 East Eighth Avenue, Vancouver 10.
Victoria Labour Council
President: J. W. Groves.   Secretary: L. Ryan, 2750 Quadra Street, Victoria.
Williams Lake and District Labour Council
President: Fred R. Chambers.   Secretary: Robert E. Browning, Box 1947, Williams Lake.
BUILDING TRADES COUNCILS
(Chartered by the Building and Construction Trades Departments, AFL-CIO)
British Columbia and Yukon Territory Building and Construction Trades Council
President: Jim Kinnaird.   Secretary: Edward Fay, 207, 33 East Eighth Avenue, Vancouver 10.
Kamloops-Revelstoke-Okanagan District of British Columbia Building and Construction Trades
Council
President: A. J. Barnes.   Secretary: Mike Scheer, 1615 Ellis Street, Kelowna.
Prince George and District Building Trades Council
Vice-President: Gordon Downs.   Secretary: Ken Thom, Box 1749, Prince George.
Vancouver Island Building and Construction Trades Council
President: Wm. Wocknitz.   Secretary: John Schibli, 9, 2750 Quadra Street, Victoria.
Vancouver-New Westminster and District Building and Construction Trades Council
President: W. Evers.   Secretary: D. C. Fraser, 207, 33 East Eighth Avenue, Vancouver 10.
METAL TRADES COUNCILS
(Chartered by the Metal Trades Department, AFL-CIO)
Vancouver and District Metal Trades Council
President: Joseph Bayer.   Secretary: James E. Mead, 202, 33 East Eighth Avenue, Vancouver 10.
Victoria District and Vancouver Island Metal Trades Council
President: W. W. Isbister.   Secretary: Larry Tickner, 589 Nora Place, Victoria.
PRINTING TRADES COUNCILS
(The International Allied Printing Trades Association, formed by the International Brotherhood
of Bookbinders, the International Photo-engravers' Union, the International Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, the International Stereotypers' and Electrotypers' Union, and
the International Typographical Union, exercises jurisdiction throughout the United States
and Canada in regard to the Allied Printing Trades label. Adopted and owned by the
Association, the label designates the product of the labour of its members. Use of the
label is granted to qualified shops by local Allied Printing Trades Councils.)
Victoria Allied Printing Trades Council
President: R. West.  Secretary: O. LeBus, 11, 2750 Quadra Street, Victoria.
 DIRECTORY U 93
MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEES CO-ORDINATING CONFERENCE
Municipal Employees Co-ordinating Conference
President: D. Mulroney.   Secretary: Wm. Marshall, Box 52, West Vancouver.
CANADIAN RAILWAY ASSOCIATION
Canadian Railway Labour Association
Chairman: W. C. Y. McGregor.   Executive Secretary: , 305a 77 Metcalfe
Street, Ottawa, Ont.
PART II—INTERNATIONAL OFFICERS, WESTERN  REPRESENTATIVES,
AND SENIOR TRADE-UNION OFFICIALS
AIR-LINE DISPATCHERS
Canadian Air-Line Dispatchers' Association
President: D. J. Kennedy, 71 Swanhurst Drive, Streetsville, Ont.
AIR-LINE EMPLOYEES—
Canadian Air-Line Employees' Association
National President: Keith Kerr, 3575 West 20th Avenue, Vancouver 8.
District Chairmen in British Columbia: Edward Sadler, 3379 Kingsley Place, Victoria;
Norman Holt, Apt. 604, 4676 Yew Street, Vancouver 8; Cord Fehsenfeld, 4887 Fifth
Avenue, Delta.
AIR-LINE FLIGHT ATTENDANTS
Canadian Air-Line Flight Attendants' Association
Business Manager: R. R. Smeal, 280, 1885 West Broadway, Vancouver.
AIR-LINE PILOTS
Canadian Air-Line Pilots' Association
President: Capt. C. H. Simpson, 9675 Cote de Liesse Road, Dorval, Que.
Western Representative: Norman Hove.
AIR-TRAFFIC EMPLOYEES
Canadian Air Traffic Control Association, Inc.
President: J. D. Lyon, 47 Woodcrest Drive, Winnipeg 17, Man.
AUTO WORKERS
International Union, United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of
America
International Representative, Western Canada: Alfred A. Johnston, Room 4, Lakehead
Labour Centre, Thunder Bay P, Ont.
BAKERY WORKERS
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International Union of America
International Vice-President: John H. Reid, Labour Centre, 15 Gervais Drive, Don Mills,
Ont.
International Representative: Thomas H. Rose, 228 Huntford Way Northeast, Calgary 51,
Alta.
President, Western Canada Council: Harold A. Gellner, 5512 Fourth Avenue, Regina,
Sask.   Secretary: E. Staudt.
BARBERS AND HAIRDRESSERS
The Journeymen Barbers', Hairdressers', Cosmetologists', and Proprietors' International Union
of America
International Sixth Vice-President and Western Representative: Allan M. Coleman, 2847
Windsor Street, Vancouver 10.
 U 94 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
BOILERMAKERS
International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers, and
Helpers
International Vice-President, Western Canada Section: Donald G. Whan, Suite 202, 11209
Jasper Avenue, Edmonton, Alta.
International Representatives: Robert M. Macintosh, 113, 119 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3.
BOOKBINDERS
International Brotherhood of Bookbinders
Canadian Vice-President: Bert Groves, 446 Farewell Street, Oshawa, Ont.
International Fifth Vice-President: Mrs. Betty Whittaker, 604 Lumsden Building, 6 Adelaide Street East, Toronto, Ont.
International Representative: V. Mailloux, 2493 St. Charles Street, Montreal 104, Que.
BOOT AND SHOE WORKERS
Boot and Shoe Workers' Union
Representative: Roy E. Cook, Ian E. Reilly, 411 Dundas Street, Belleville, Ont.
BREWERY AND GRAIN WORKERS
International Union of United Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink, and Distillery Workers of
America
Regional Director (Region 6, Canada, except Quebec): Norman Wilson, Suite 400, 15
Gervais Drive, Don Mills, Ont.
International Representative for Provinces of British Columbia and Alberta: James Leiper,
2725 Dean Avenue, Victoria.
BRICKLAYERS
Bricklayers', Masons', and Plasterers' International Union of America
Business Agents, Locals 1 and 3: T. B. Fleming and John Geddes, 401, 4333 Ledger Avenue, Burnaby 1.
BROADCAST EMPLOYEES
National Association of Broadcast Employees and Technicians
Regional Director: Kenneth A. Steel, Suite 31, 105 Carlton Street, Toronto 1, Ont.
Regional Vice-President: Lars Eastholm, 528 Lancing Road, Richmond.
International Representative: Bryon J. Lowe, Suite 31, 105 Carlton Street, Toronto, Ont.
BUILDING SERVICE EMPLOYEES (see SERVICE EMPLOYEES)
BUTCHER WORKMEN
Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America
Special International Representative: George Johnston, 4510 Victoria Drive, Vancouver.
CARPENTERS
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America
General Executive Board Member, Tenth District: E. T. Staley, 4706 West Saanich Road,
Victoria.
International Representative: C. B. Comerford, 946 Sherbrooke Street, North Kamloops.
British Columbia Provincial Council President: Arnold J. Smith.
Secretary-Treasurer: Lome Robson, 2, 2415 Columbia Street, Vancouver 10.
CEMENT WORKERS
United Cement, Lime, and Gypsum Workers' International Union
District Representative: Charles Morton, 527 Murray Place Northeast, Calgary, 62, Alta.
CHRISTIAN LABOUR
Christian Labour Association of Canada
British Columbia Representative: Neil J. Roos, 778 Miller Avenue, Coquitlam.
 DIRECTORY U 95
CLOTHING WORKERS
Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America
Vice-President: Harry Lautman, 20 Demontigny Street West, Montreal 129, Que.
International Representative: Edward P. Taychuk, 501, 198 West Hasting Street, Vancouver 3.
DISTILLERY WORKERS
Distillery, Rectifying, Wine, and Allied Workers' International Union of America
International Vice-President: Roy Cairns, 734 Tenth Street, New Westminster.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, INTERNATIONAL
International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers
International Vice-President: Wm. Ladyman, Suite 601, 88 University Avenue, Toronto 1,
Ont.
International Representative: Jim Wolfgang, 12222—100 Avenue, Surrey.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, UNITED
United Electrical, Radio, and Machine Workers of America (U.E.)
National Representative, Local 552: George Gee, 5, 199 East Eighth Avenue, Vancouver
10.
ELEVATOR CONSTRUCTORS
International Union of Elevator Constructors
Western Representative: John E. Neil, 505, 119 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3.
FIRE-FIGHTERS
International Association of Firefighters
Vice-President, Sixth District: Gordon R. Anderson, 1386 East 61st Avenue, Vancouver 15.
FISHERMEN, BRITISH COLUMBIA
British Columbia Deep Sea Fishermen's Union
Secretary-Treasurer: Joseph V. Dixon, Box 249, Prince Rupert.
FISHERMEN, UNITED
United Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union
President: Homer Stevens, 138 East Cordova Street, Vancouver 4.
Secretary-Treasurer: J. H. Nichol, 138 East Cordova Street, Vancouver 4.
Business Agent: Glenn McEachern, 138 East Cordova Street, Vancouver 4.
Northern Representative: Ray Gardiner, 869 Fraser Street, Prince Rupert.
FOOD WORKERS
Canadian Food and Allied Workers Joint Administrative Board
International Representatives: Wm. Symington and Jim Smith, 4530 Victoria Drive, Vancouver 16.
Secretary, Vancouver Joint Council: Miss E. Quinell, 4530 Victoria Drive, Vancouver 16.
GARMENT WORKERS, LADIES'
International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union
Western Canada Director: Frank Bagolie, 109,   119 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3.
Business Agent: Ernie Mickoski.
GARMENT WORKERS, UNITED
United Garment Workers of America
International Representative, Member of General Executive Board: Mrs. Emily Ross, 370
West 44th Avenue, Vancouver 15.
GLASS AND CERAMIC WORKERS
United Glass and Ceramic Workers of North America
International Representative: Lewis E. Toole, Room 56, Arcade Building, 419 Third Street
Southeast, Medicine Hat, Alta.
 U 96 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES (PROVINCIAL)
British Columbia Government Employees' Union
General Secretary: John L. Fryer, 2090 West Fourth Avenue, Vancouver 9.
GRAIN WORKERS (see BREWERY WORKERS)
HEAT AND FROST WORKERS
International Association of Heat, Frost Insulators', and Asbestos Workers
International Vice-President: Alfred Kirton, 13 Waltonice Road, Scarborough, Ont.
International Organizer: Norman Pon, 13220—79 Street, Edmonton 31, Alta.
HOSPITAL EMPLOYEES
Hospital Employees' Union
Secretary-Business Manager, Local 180: R. S. McCready, 538 West Broadway, Vancouver 9.
HOTEL EMPLOYEES
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International Union
International Representative: O. Zambri, 301, 103 Church Street, Toronto 1, Ont.
Secretary, Local Joint Executive Board: H. D. Courson, Room 409, 402 West Pender
Street, Vancouver 3.
INDUSTRIAL MECHANICAL WORKERS
Canadian Association of Industrial, Mechanical, and Allied Workers
Regional Vice-President: George Brown, 4826 Imperial Street, Burnaby 1.
Regional Secretary: F. H. "Jess" Succamore, 4826 Imperial Street, Burnaby 1.
IRONWORKERS
International Association of Bridge, Structural, and Ornamental Iron Workers
General Organizer: Donald W. O'Reilly, 2415 Columbia Street, Vancouver 10.
JEWELLERY WORKERS
International Jewelry Workers' Union
International Representative: Reginald A. Loader, RR 3, Belleville, Ont.
LABOURERS
Laborers' International Union of North America
International Representatives: S. J. Warner, W. Slewidge, W. E. Hart, A. D. Cameron,
208, 535 West Georgia Street, Vancouver 2.
Vice-President and Regional Manager: H. W. Flesher.
LATHERS
Wood, Wire, and Metal Lathers' International Union
International Representative (Canada) and Fifth Vice-President: A. H. Burton, 9908—
132nd Street, Surrey.
LETTER CARRIERS
Letter Carriers' Union of Canada
General Vice-President: J. C. Mayes, 2197 Riverside Drive, Ottawa, Ont.
Field Representative, British Columbia District 9:  Ray Andrus, 517, 402 West Pender
Street, Vancouver 3.
LITHOGRAPHERS AND PHOTO-ENGRAVERS
Lithographers' and Photo-engravers' International Union
International Vice-President: Richard J. Clarke, Suite 525, Place Cremazie, 110 Cremazie
Boulevard West, Montreal 11, Que.
Special Representative: Earl Kinney, 102, 33 East Eighth Avenue, Vancouver 10.
 r
DIRECTORY U 97
LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEERS
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers
Canadian Pacific Railway (Western) Lines General Chairman: M. H. Tetlock, 803, 356
Main Street, Winnipeg, Man.
Canadian National Railways  (Western Region)  General Chairman:  G. A. Murray, 2e,
1383 Pembina Highway, Winnipeg 19.
Pacific Great Eastern Railway General Chairman: K. G. Mason, Box 2525, Williams Lake.
Assistant Grand Chief Engineer and National Legislative Representative: J. F. Walter, 88
Metcalfe Street, Room 604, Ottawa 4, Ont.
Secretary-Treasurer, British Columbia Legislative Board (represents all engineers on all
railways in British Columbia on legislative matters): C. W. Sims, 212—13th Avenue
South, Cranbrook.
LONGSHOREMEN AND WAREHOUSEMEN
International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union
Regional Director: C. H. Pritchett, 2681 East Hastings Street, Vancouver 132.
MACHINISTS
International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers
International Representative: David H. Chapman, 17, 2414 Main Street, Vaucouver 10.
MAINTENANCE OF WAY
Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees
Vice-President, Canada: A. M. Hopper, 115 Donald Street, Winnipeg, Man.
Canadian National System Federation (Western Lines), System Federation General Chairman: T. V. Greig, 115 Donald Street, Winnipeg, Man.
Canadian National System Federation (Eastern Lines), System Federation General Chairman: P. A. Legros, 306, 45 Rideau Street, Ottawa 2, Ont.
Canadian Pacific System Federation, System Federation General Chairman: G. D. Robertson, 1706 Bank Street, Ottawa 8, Ont.
Vice-Chairman, British Columbia Legislative Committee, IRB: J. C. Kesler, 13469—98th
Avenue, North Surrey.
MARBLE, SLATE, AND STONE POLISHERS
International Association of Marble, Slate, and Stone Polishers, Rubbers and Sawyers, Tile
and Marble Setters' Helpers, Marble Mosaic and Terrazzo Workers' Helpers
General President: Wylie Lawhead, Room 628, 821—15th Street Northwest, Washington,
D.C., U.S.A.
MERCHANT SERVICE
Canadian Merchant Service Guild, Inc.
President: Capt. Roy Barry (Jr.), 230 West Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Vice-President: Capt. Griff S. Morris, 230 West Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Secretary-Treasurer: A. W. Davis, 230 West Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Mainland Representatives: H. C. Chapman and K. H. Lysell, 230 West Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Vancouver Island Representative: G. W. Mercer, 4308 Savoy Place, Victoria.
MINE WORKERS
United Mine Workers of America (District 18)
President: John H. Delaney, 911 Webster Building, 237 Seventh Avenue Southwest, Calgary 2, Alta.
Secretary-Treasurer: Stanley Grocutt, 911 Webster Building, 237 Seventh Avenue Southwest, Calgary, Alta.
District Representatives: Donald A. McDonald, 911 Webster Building, 237 Seventh Avenue
Southwest, Calgary 2, Alta., and Ezna De Anna, Natal.
 U 98
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
MOULDERS
International Molders and Allied Workers' Union
International Vice-President: Ernest Fish, 32 Heagerty Street, Brantford, Ont.
MOVING-PICTURE MACHINE OPERATORS
International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Picture Machine Operators
of the United States and Canada
International Vice-President: A. L. "Pat" Travers, Labour Temple, 167 Church Street,
Toronto, Ont.
District Secretary-Treasurer, District 12 (includes British Columbia), Local 295: Roy
Thom, 2178 McTavish Street, Regina, Sask.
MUSICIANS
American Federation of Musicians of the United States and Canada
Vice-President (Canada): J. Alan Wood, 101 Thomcliffe Park Drive, Toronto 354, Ont.
NEWSPAPER GUILD
The Newspaper Guild
Executive Secretary: William H. McLeman, 4, 1557 West Broadway, Vancouver 9.
Vice-President at Large: Eleanor Dunn, 2458 Howland Avenue, Ottawa 8, Ont.
Canadian Vice-President: Glen Ogilvie, 399 Spruce Street, Oakville, Ont.
OFFICE EMPLOYEES
International Union of Office and Professional Employees
International Vice-President and Regional Director: William A. Lowe, 16936—143rd Avenue Southeast, Renton, Wash. 98055, U.S.A.
International Vice-President: Ronald F. Bone, 878 Mowbray Road, Richmond.
International Representative: Brian James, 206 West 27th Street, North Vancouver.
OIL WORKERS
Oil, Chemical, and Atomic Workers' International Union
International Representative: R. T. Philp, 5550 East Hastings Street, North Burnaby.
British Columbia Council: President, S. Dorozowski, 830a Dogwood Street, Coquitlam;
Vice-President: D. McDonald, 4332 Karindale Road, Westsyde, Kamloops; Secretary-
Treasurer: N. McArthur, Box 126, Taylor.
OPERATING ENGINEERS
International Union of Operating Engineers
Canadian Regional Director: Rowland G. Hill, 304, 160 Eglinton Avenue, Toronto 12, Ont.
International Representatives: Edward Callan, 2771 Burdick Avenue, Victoria, and Clifton
H. Parker, 2444 Sinclair Road, Victoria.
British Columbia Council: President, George Anderson, 1412 Madore Avenue, Coquitlam.
Secretary-Treasurer: Ovila Lalonde, 14, 2750 Quadra Street, Victoria.
PAINTERS
International Brotherhood of Painters and Allied Trades
General Representatives: David Cairns, 9 Aspen Avenue, Toronto, Ont., and Herbert Ma-
caulay, 175 East 41st Avenue, Vancouver 15.
Secretary-Treasurer, British Columbia Conference of Painters, Glaziers, Signwriters, and
Paintmakers: Don Mcintosh, 211 Seventh Avenue North, Port Alberni.
PAPERMAKERS
United Papermakers and Paperworkers
Vice-President and Region XI Director: Oscar Robertson, 10324 Northeast Halsey Street,
Portland, Ore. 97220, U.S.A.
International Representatives: Arthur C. Gruntman, 4416 Ranger Avenue, North Vancouver.
 DIRECTORY U 99
PATTERN-MAKERS
Pattern Makers' League of North America
District Council 9 Financial Secretary: I. Jamieson, 875 William Road, Richmond.
President, District 9: W. A. Brown, 122, 2800 First Avenue, Seattle, Wash., U.S.A.
District Secretary: Charles Romelfanger, 204 Warren Avenue, San Francisco, Calif., U.S.A.
PEACE OFFICERS
British Columbia Federation of Peace Officers
Provincial President: Ernest P. Doyle, 11317—92A Avenue, Surrey.
Secretary-Treasurer: Robert Stewart, 4690 Boundary Road, Vancouver 16.
PLASTERERS AND CEMENT MASONS
Operative Plasterers' and Cement Masons' International Association of the United States and
Canada
Canadian Vice-President: Charles W. Irvine, 521 Sutherland Drive, Toronto 17, Ont.
International Representative: W. E. McMynn, 649 West 52nd Avenue, Vancouver 14.
PLUMBERS
United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry
of the United States and Canada
Senior General Officer in Canada for Western District: J. Russ St. Eloi, 1146 East 16th
Avenue, Vancouver 10.
President: British Columbia Provincial Pipe Trades Association:  Thomas Wheatley, 7,
2750 Quadra Street, Victoria.
POSTAL WORKERS
Canadian Union of Postal Workers
National Director and Western Representative: R. H. Capstick, Suite 2, 4857 Kingsway,
Burnaby 1.
POTTERS
International Brotherhood of Potters and Allied Workers
International Second Vice-President and Director of West Coast Office: Bernard Rowbot-
tom, 2131 Gage Avenue, Huntingdon Park, Calif. 90255, U.S.A.
Canadian Representative: Eugene Dulue, 1638 Duchesnay, Chambley, Que.
PRINTING PRESSMEN
International Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union of North America
International Representative: K. A. Glintz, 11128—48th Avenue, Edmonton, Alta.
Secretary, British Columbia District Joint Council: D. A. Maclntyre, 207, 517 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
PUBLIC EMPLOYEES
Canadian Union of Public Employees
Representatives: A. Burton, Suite 3, 860 Eldorado Street, Trail; George Cole, M. L.
Kramer, J. Philips, Len Stair, all of 103, 1965 West Fourth Avenue, Vancouver 9;
H. Home, 380 Seymour Street, Kamloops; A. G. Markides and T. H. Smith, 280, 777
Broughton Street, Victoria; R. G. Magill, J. E. McAllister, 103, 1965 West Fourth
Avenue, Vancouver 9.
Assistant Director: A. R. Mercer, 103, 1965 West Fourth Avenue, Vancouver 9.
PUBLIC EMPLOYEES, BRITISH COLUMBIA DIVISION EXECUTIVE
Canadian Union of Public Employees
President: Harry Greene, 204, 140 East 14th Street, North Vancouver.
First Vice-President: M. J. Loyer, 531 Kennedy Street, Nanaimo.
Second Vice-President: Mrs. Vema King, 204, 1267 Foster Street, White Rock.
Third Vice-President: A. G. Carmichael, 1805—32nd Street, Vernon.
Secretary: Gordon Adamson, 309, 5095 Newton Street, Bumaby 1.
Treasurer: L. P. (Phil) Anderson, 1510 Derby Road, Victoria.
 U 100 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
PUBLIC SERVICE EMPLOYEES
Public Service Alliance of Canada
British Columbia Headquarters: 205, 2001 East 36th Avenue, Vancouver 16.
PULP AND PAPER WORKERS
Pulp and Paper Workers of Canada
President: Fred Mullin.
First Vice-President: lames Sloan, 28, 448 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2.
Second Vice-President: Angus Macphee.
Secretary-Treasurer: Sharon Lambert, Box 329, South Burnaby.
PULP, SULPHITE, AND PAPER MILL WORKERS
International Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers
Ninth Vice-President: E. P. O'Neal, 504, 1075 Melville Street, Vancouver 5.
International Representatives: R. Biasutti and A. K. Stelp, 504, 1075 Melville Street, Vancouver 5.
RAILWAY EMPLOYEES, CARMEN
Brotherhood of Railway Carmen of the United States and Canada
General Vice-Presidents: P. Raymond, 544—43rd Avenue, Ville Salle, Que., and F. West-
well, 2035 Seventh Avenue Northwest, Calgary 42, Alta.
Systems General Chairman (Canadian National Railways): R. E. Peer, 8875 Centrale
Street, Ville La Salle, Que.
Systems General Chairman (Canadian Pacific Railway): G. Sartorio, Rooms 202-203,
8875 Centrale Street, LaSalle City 680, Que.
General Executive Board: P. Zablonski, 941 Munroe Avenue, East Kildonan, Man.
Mountain Region Chairman: D. McGregor, Box 383, Jasper, Alta.
Prairie Region Chairman: A. Irwin, 811 Avenue H South, Saskatoon, Sask.
Western General Chairman: D. Mandrick, 380 Robertson Avenue, Winnipeg 14, Man.
RAILWAY EMPLOYEES, CLERKS
Brotherhood of Railway, Airline, Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express, and Station
Employees
International Vice-President: W. C. Y. McGregor, Suite 690, 550 Sherbrooke Street West,
Montreal 3, Que.
District Representative: W. A. MacKay, 2416 West 13th Avenue, Vancouver 9.
General Chairman:  R. Welch, 401 Dominion Bank Building, 207 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver 3.
Assistant General Chairmen: G. R. Beattie and R. Spooner, 401 Dominion Bank Building,
207 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3.
RAILWAY EMPLOYEES, SIGNALMEN
Brotherhood of Railroad Signalmen
General Chairmen and Grand Lodge Representatives: H. A. Stockdale, 508, 1411 Crescent
Street, Montreal 107, Que., and A. N. Cotton, Suite 204, 2515 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg 12, Man.
General Chairman and Secretary-Treasurer: C. R. Scott, 508, 1411 Crescent Street, Montreal 107, Que.
Assistant General Chairman, Canadian Pacific Railway Western Lines: J. M. Boisjoli,
825—19th Avenue Northwest, Calgary 43, Alta.
Local Chairman, Canadian National Railways: Gordon Lintott, Box 206, Ashcroft.
Local Chairman, Canadian Pacific Railway: R. E. York, Box 1377, Revelstoke.
RAILWAY EMPLOYEES, TRANSPORT AND GENERAL
Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, Transport, and General Workers
Regional Vice-President: R. Henham, 101, 529 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Representatives: W. Apps and J. Simpson, 101, 529 East Broadway, Vancouver 10; H. L.
Critchley, 11128—37th Avenue, Edmonton 73, Alta.
 DIRECTORY U 101
RETAIL CLERKS
Retail Clerks' International Association
Vice-President in Canada: Clifford Evans, 864 Lady Ellen Place, Ottawa, KIZ 5M2.
Organizing Director, Northwestern Division: Earl D. McDavid, 320 Vanderveer Building,
2819 First Avenue, Seattle, Wash. 98121, U.S.A.
RETAIL WHOLESALE EMPLOYEES
Retail, Wholesale, and Department Store Union
International Representative: John A. Squire, 212, 517 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Representatives: C. Visser and A. Peterson, 212, 517 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
SEAFARERS
Seafarers' International Union of Canada
Vice-President, Pacific Area: Alfred Poole, 837 Homer Street, Vancouver 3.
SERVICE EMPLOYEES
Service Employees' International Union
Special Representative: Thomas B. Hyde, 359 Homer Street, Vancouver 3.
SHEET-METAL WORKERS
Sheet Metal Workers' International Association
International Representatives, Canada:  James B. Mathias, RR 2, Ennismore, Ont., and
Raymond A. Gall, 11311—36th Avenue 73, Alta.
International Organizer: Donald W. Scott, 7923—85th Avenue, Edmonton, Alta.
SHIPYARD WORKERS
Shipyard  General  Workers'  Federation  of  British   Columbia   (Association   of  Structural
Draughtsmen; Machinists, Fitters, and Helpers' Industrial Union; Marine Workers' and
Boilermakers' Industrial Union; Shipwrights', Joiners', and Wood Caulkers' Industrial
Union)
President: William A. Stewart, 1219 Nanaimo Street, Vancouver 6.
SLEEPING-CAR PORTERS
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters
International Field Representatives: A. R. Blanchette, 517 Castle Building, 1410 Stanley
Street, Montreal 110, Que.
STEELWORKERS
United Steelworkers of America
Representative and Area Supervisor for British Columbia: F. S. Dunphy, 33 East Broadway,
Vancouver 10.
Representatives, Vancouver: M. J. Alton, Ron Douglas, A. Macdonald, A. King, N. Mc-
Leod, and V. Ready, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Representative, Fraser Lake and Kitimat: J. Don Smith, Box 215, Kitimat.
Representative, Prince George: W. Rudychuck, Box 2178, Prince George.
STEREOTYPERS
Stereotypers and Electrotypers of North America
Canadian Vice-President: George P. Fry, 59 Cliveden Avenue, Toronto 18, Ont.
TEAMSTERS
International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen, and Helpers of America
(Teamsters Joint Council 36: General Truck Drivers' and Helpers' Union, Local 31;
General Teamsters Union, Local 181 (Kelowna); Bakery Salesmen's Union, Local 189;
Building Material Construction and Fuel Truck Drivers' Union, Local 213; Miscellaneous
Workers' Wholesale and Retail Delivery Drivers' and Helpers' Union, Local 351; Milk
Sales Drivers' and Dairy Employees' Union)
Canadian Representatives of the Western Conference of Teamsters: E. J. Lawson, President, Teamsters; Joint Council 36, 490 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
 U 102 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
TELEPHONE EMPLOYEES
Federation of Telephone Workers of British Columbia
Secretary-Treasurer: Mrs. O. M. Nunn, 1237 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1.
General Secretary, Plant Division: W. G. Clark, 1237 Burrard Street, Vancouver.
General Secretary, Clerical Division: J. D. Booth, 201, 1237 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1.
General Secretary, Traffic Division: Mrs. Hazel J. Magee, 201, 1237 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1.
TEXTILE WORKERS
Textile Workers' Union of America
Canadian Director: George C. Watson, Suite 304, Gervais Drive, Don Mills, Ont.
TILELAYERS (see BRICKLAYERS)
TRANSIT WORKERS
Amalgamated Transit Union
Member, General Executive Board: Stuart R. Snowdon, 46 Thornlee Crescent Northwest,
Calgary 47, Alta.
TRANSPORTATION
United Transportation Union
Vice-Presidents in Canada: G. C. Gale, 610 Broadway Avenue, Winnipeg 1, Man., and
G. W. McDevitt, 108, 1729 Bank Street, Ottawa 8, Ont.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen (Canadian National Railways) General Chairman:
G. H. Warren, 610 Broadway Avenue, Winnipeg 1, Man.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen (Canadian Pacific Railway) General Chairman: C. J.
Allen, Room 611, 1117 St. Catharines Street, Montreal 110, Que.
Railroad Trainmen General Chairman (Lines West): H. R. Burnett, 610 Broadway Avenue, Winnipeg 1, Man.
Railway Conductors and Brakemen General Chairman: G. W. Adams, 6002 Grant Street,
North Burnaby.
Switchmen General Chairman (Great Northern System): George J. Kelley, 410 American
National Bank Building, St. Paul, Minn. 55101, U.S.A.
TYPOGRAPHICAL
International Typographical Union
International Representative: H. G. Buchanan, RR 4, Uplands Drive, Kelowna.
UPHOLSTERERS
Upholsterers' International Union of North America
Vice-President, International Union Executive Board: Jess Gonzales, 2411 West Eighth
Avenue, Los Angeles, Calif., U.S.A.
Treasurer, International Union Executive Board:  Leon Forman,  8928 South Figueroa
Street, Los Angeles, Calif. 90003, U.S.A.
WOODWORKERS
International Woodworkers of America
Director, Regional Council 1: J. A. Moore, 2859 Commercial Drive, Vancouver 12.
Assistant Director of Organization: Robert Schlosser, 104, 1416 Commercial Drive, Vancouver 12.
 DIRECTORY
U 103
PART III—DIRECTORY OF LABOUR ORGANIZATIONS
The Directory of Labour Organizations is compiled by the Research Branch
from information gathered from the 1971 Survey of Labour Organizations. The
survey is a joint project conducted by the Research Branch in co-operation with the
Canada Department of Labour and Statistics Canada.
Entries in this directory are arranged in alphabetical order according to the
short titles of the various labour organizations Usted. Short titles are composed of
the key words of the organization's full title. No official recognition is implied by
the listing of any organization in the directory. The standards for inclusion have
been established solely in the interests of consistency.
Addresses are in British Columbia, unless otherwise shown.
A Local 355: Secretary, G. Jennens, 1354 South High
land Drive, Kelowna.
Local  468:   Secretary,  Melvin Kemmis,  327 West
Broadway, Vancouver.
Local 475: Secretary, Mrs. Muriel Field, 3367 East
27th Avenue, Vancouver 12.
BAKERY WORKERS (United) (see Christian Labour
Association)
BARBERS AND HAIRDRESSERS (The Journeymen
Barbers', Hairdressers', Cosmetologists', and Proprietors' International Union of America) —
Local  120:  Secretary, Wm. H. Masson, 421  West
Broadway, Vancouver.
Local 372: Secretary, L. J. Stephenson, 654 Fisgard
Street, Victoria.
Local  1054:   Secretary,  Mrs.  Eileen Metcalf,   3861
Blenheim, Vancouver.
BEVERAGE   DISPENSERS   (see Hotel Employees,
Local 676)
BEVERAGE     DISPENSERS     AND     CULINARY
WORKERS (see Hotel Employees, Local 835)
BIRKS BUILDING EMPLOYEES' ASSOCIATION.
AIR-LINE DISPATCHERS (Canadian Air Line Dispatchers' Association)—
Local 1:  Secretary, L. D. Brendon,  14154 Marine
Drive, White Rock.
Local 9: Secretary, Art Pearce, 954 Bayview, Delta.
AIR-LINE  EMPLOYEES  (Canadian Air Line Employees' Association)—
Local 19: (address not known).
Local 20: Chairman, N. Holt, 604, 4676 Yew Street,
Vancouver 8.
Local 21: (address not known).
Local 26: Chairman, D. K. Seely, 206, 140 East 17th
Street, North Vancouver.
Local 27: Chairman, L. G. MacKenzie, 5566 Gallagher Place, West Vancouver.
Local 28:  Chairman, R. Hannan, 10323 Resthaven
Drive, Sidney.
AIR-LINES EMPLOYEES  (Pacific Western Airlines
Employees' Association)—Secretary, R. T. Standell,
c/o Pacific Western Air Lines, Vancouver Airport,
Vancouver.
AIR-LINE FLIGHT ATTENDANTS  (Canadian Air
Line Flight Attendants Association)—
Local  7:   President,  Jim Cowan,  280,  1885  West
Broadway, Vancouver 9.
Local 8: President, Mrs. I. Schonberger, 4012 West
39th Avenue, Vancouver 13.
Local 11: Chairman, Mrs. J. James, 280, 1885 West
Broadway, Vancouver 9.
AIR-LINE NAVIGATORS (Canadian Air Line Navigators'  Association)—Local 2:   Secretary,  W.  G.
Haynes, 612 Azure Road South, Richmond.
AIR-LINE PILOTS (Canadian Air Line Pilots* Association)—
Local 1: Secretary, M. F. Mathews, 17, 1090 No. 3
Road, Richmond.
Local 2:  Secretary, R. D. Nassey, 6657 Kampson
Crescent, Delta 726.
Local 4:   Secretary,   M.   G.   McAskill,  980  Pacific
Drive, Tsawwassen, Ladner.
Local 6: Secretary, R. E. Moul, 5121 Wilson Drive,
Ladner.
AIR TRAFFIC EMPLOYEES (Canadian Air Traffic
Control    Association    Incorporated)  — Vancouver
Branch: Secretary, Miss J. D. Schmidt, Box 1692,
Langley.
AMBULANCE EMPLOYEES' UNION (see CUPE,
Local 873)
AUTO WORKERS (International Union, United
Automobile, Aerospace, and Agricultural Implement
Workers of America)—Local 432: Secretary, Arthur
Gaudry, 949 Piermont Road, Richmond.
B
BAKERY   SALESMEN'S   UNION   (see  Teamsters,
Local 189)
BAKERY   WORKERS   (Bakery   and   Confectionery
Workers' International Union of America)—
BOILERMAKERS (International Brotherhood of
Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths,
Forgers, and Helpers)—
Local 191: Manager, Neil Hindle, 1442 Elford
Street, Victoria.
Local 194: Secretary, James W. Cameron, Apt.
1301, 621 Eighth Street, New Westminster.
Local 359: Secretary, Clare Rowa, Suite 5, 2360 Ontario Street, Vancouver 10.
BOOKBINDERS (International Brotherhood of Bookbinders)—
Local 105: Secretary, Wm. Dunsmuir, 104, 33 East
Eighth Avenue, Vancouver 10.
Local 147:  Secretary, M. H. Davison, 4335 Savoy
Place, Victoria.
BOOT   AND   SHOE   WORKERS   (Boot   and   Shoe
Workers' Union)—Local 505:  Secretary, Frank D.
Ferrier, 3071 Graveley Street, Vancouver 6.
BREWERY AND GRAIN WORKERS (International
Union  of  United  Brewery,  Flour,  Cereal,  Soft
Drink and Distillery Workers of America)—
Local 280: Secretary, H. W. Johnston, 1269 Montrose Avenue, Victoria.
Local 300: Secretary, Alex Lipp, 1, 4857 Kingsway,
Burnaby 1.
Local 308: Secretary, E. DeMartini, Box 157, Creston.
Local 333: Secretary, D. E. Fraser, 994 Foster Avenue, Coquitlam.
Local 359: Secretary, Bruce Murray, 46, 2000 Central Avenue, Prince George.
BRICKLAYERS (Bricklayers', Masons', and Plasterers' International Union of America)—
Local 1: Secretary, J. Geddes, 401, 4333 Ledger
Avenue, Burnaby.
Local 3 (Tile Setters' International Association):
Secretary, S. J. Cooke, 7735 Ontario Street, Vancouver 15.
 U 104
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
BROADCAST   EMPLOYEES   (National  Association
of Broadcast Employees and Technicians) —
Local  83:   Secretary,  Jay Moore,   164 West Keith
Road, North Vancouver.
Local 84:   Secretary, Lawrence Mills,   1125  Eighth
Avenue East, Prince Rupert.
BUILDING  MATERIAL,   CONSTRUCTION,  AND
FUEL-TRUCK   DRIVERS   (see Teamsters,  Local
213)
CBC   PRODUCTION    EMPLOYEES    (see   CUPE,
Local 664)
CAFETERIA (Cafeteria and Coffee Shop Employees'
Association)—Secretary,   Mrs.   Doris   Lucas,    124
West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3.
CARPENTERS   (United   Brotherhood  of  Carpenters
and Joiners of America) —
Local 452: Secretary, Nick Podovinnikoff, Room 5,
96 East Broadway, Vancouver.
Local 506: Secretary, Joe J. Bayer, 119 West Pender
Street, Vancouver.
Local 513: Secretary, P. Podovenikoff, Box 38, Port
Alberni.
Local 527: Secretary, J. Clark, Box 84, Nanaimo.
Local 872: Secretary, J. E. Nault, Box 329, Burns
Lake.
Local 1081:   Secretary, Noe Mastroianni, Box 161,
Kitimat.
Local  1237:   Secretary,  Fred Kwasny,   10104—14th
Street, Dawson Creek.
Local 1251: Secretary, J. Ireland, 732 Royal Avenue,
New Westminster.
Local 1346: Secretary, Carl Beaulieu, RR 2, Vernon.
Local 1370: Secretary, Malcolm Broxham, Box 388,
Kelowna.
Local  1540:   Secretary,  J. F. Mobley,  717 Nicola
Street, Kamloops.
Local 1541: Secretary, C. N. Bressler, Room 2, 96
East Broadway, Vancouver.
Local 1549 (Pile Drivers, Bridge, Dock, and Wharf
Builders):  Secretary, B. Wilson, Box 94, Prince
Rupert.
Local 1598: Secretary, B. Lidstone, 9, 2750 Quadra
Street, Victoria.
Local 1638: Secretary, Lome Paisley, RR 4, Courtenay.
Local 1670:  (School Board Employees): Secretary,
Peter Paul Gaard, RR 1, Matsqui.
Local  1696:   Secretary,  R.  Gooch,  Lot   160a,  Mcintosh Drive, RR 1, Penticton.
Local  1719:   Secretary, W.  Stone,  Box  147,  Cranbrook.
Local 1735: Secretary, Bruce Wilson, Box 94, Prince
Rupert.
Local 1812: Secretary, Fred Bright, 3015 Westview
Road, Duncan.
Local 1843: Secretary, Ian Cameron, Box 89, Chilliwack.
Local 1882: Secretary, J. Kasper, Box 296, Campbell
River.
Local   1928   (Millworkers):   Secretary,   C.   Peace,
Room 2, 96 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local   1998:   Secretary,   Fred   Scholz,   1610   Gorse
Street, Prince George.
Local 2068:  Secretary, Sid Arkell, RR 1, Zillinski
Road, Powell River.
Local 2076:  Secretary, Mrs. Billie Stone, Box 696,
Kelowna.
Local 2213: Secretary, Conrad L. Siverson, Box 425,
Mission City.
Local 2300:   Secretary,  Lucien  Schwab, 410 Third
Avenue, Trail.
Local 2404 (Pile Drivers, Bridge, Dock, and Wharf
Builders):   Secretary,  S.  C.  Allen,   2,  96  East
Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local 2415 (Pile Drivers, Bridge, Dock, and Wharf
Builders): Secretary, F. Almond, 9, 2750 Quadra
Street, Victoria.
CARPENTERS   (United  Brotherhood  of  Carpenters
and Joiners of America)—Continued
Local 2458: Secretary, George Fofonow, Box 206,
Nelson.
Local 2493: Secretary, Michael Gauthier, Box 1838,
Quesnel.
Local 2511: Secretary, Betty Miller, Box 311, Penticton.
Local 2518 (Shingle Weavers): Secretary, William J.
Kieler, Box 1446, Mission City.
Local 2527 (Floorlayers and Millworkers): Secretary, C. Fenwick, 9, 2750 Quadra Street, Victoria.
Local 2545 (Quesnel School Board Employees): Secretary, Mrs. D. M. Cheavins, Box 2379, Quesnel.
Local 2578 (Shingle Weavers): Secretary, J. J.
Vanyo, 4014 Quadra Street, Victoria.
Local 2736 (Millwrights): Secretary, Frank Bush,
Room 2, 96 East Broadway, Vancouver.
Local 2802 (Shingle Weavers): Secretary, J. Vanos,
2, 96 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local 2833 (Lumber and Sawmill Workers): Secretary, A. Harrison, Box 237, Cranbrook.
Local 2861 (Millworkers): Secretary, David Gaines,
2402—45th Avenue, Vernon.
Local 3014 (Lumber and Sawmill Workers): Secretary, JefTery Dashwood, Box 1194, Creston.
Local 3214: Secretary, Frank Konken, Box 257,
Grand Forks.
Local 3275: Secretary, Stan Paholka, Box 1498, Wil-
li3ms "Lnlcc
CARTER EMPLOYEES' ASSOCIATION—Secretary,
Tony Dueck, 33246 Alta Avenue, Abbotsford.
CEMENT MASONS (see PLASTERERS)
CEMENT   WORKERS   (United  Cement, Lime,  and
Gypsum Workers' International Union)—
Local 277: Secretary: P. A.Warner, RR 1, Mill Bay.
Local 385: Secretary: C. Haupt, 320, 815 Fifth Avenue, New Westminster.
Local 400: Secretary, Walter G. Arnason, 5796—
16A Avenue, Delta.
Local 479: Secretary, R. Nixon, Box 105, Invermere.
Local 486: Secretary, G. Moskaluk, 13091—106A
Avenue, Surrey.
Local 503: Secretary, G. Haskins, RR 2, Old Vernon
Road, Barnhartvale, Kamloops.
CHRISTIAN LABOUR (Christian Labour Association
of Canada) —
Local 44: Secretary, R. Turner, 778 Miller Avenue,
Coquitlam.
Local 57: Secretary, Mr. DeVries, 778 Miller Avenue, Coquitlam.
Local 59: (temporarily defunct).
Local 62: Secretary, Herb Rose, 778 Miller Avenue,
CoquiUam.
Local 64 (Victoria Construction Workers' Association): Secretary, A. Vanderwekken, 778 Miller
Avenue, CoquiUam.
Local 66:   Secretary,  H. Vanderschaaf, 778 Miller
Avenue, Coquitlam.
CLOTHING   WORKERS,   AMALGAMATED
CLOTHING  WORKMEN (Amalgamated Clothing
Workers of America)—Local 178: Secretary, Lillian
Hale, Room 501, 198 West Hastings Street, Vancouver.
CONSTRUCTION  AND   GENERAL  LABOURERS
(see Laborers, Locals 602, 1070, 1093)
CONSTRUCTION    WORKERS,    VICTORIA     (see
Christian Labour Association)
CORDAGE, ROPE, AND TWINE WORKERS (New
Westminster  Cordage,  Industrial Rope  and Twine
Workers' Union)—Secretary, W. Eakin, 2090 Crane
Avenue, Coquitlam.
CPR  MAINTENANCE WORKERS  (Victoria Maintenance   Workers'   Federal   Union)—Secretary,   H.
Hatcher, 2607 Scott Street, Victoria.
CPR SHIPYARD WORKERS (address not known)
CRANBROOK BUILDING CO-OPERATIVE (Cranbrook   Building   Co-operative   Union)—105   South
Ninth Avenue, Cranbrook.
 DIRECTORY
U 105
DISTILLERY WORKERS (Distillery, Rectifying,
Wine, and Allied Workers' International Union of
America)—
Local 69: Secretary-Treasurer, Russel A. Cyr, 7315
Second Street, Burnaby.
Local  153:   Treasurer,  A.  R.  Murdoch,  636—59th
Avenue, Vancouver 15.
Local 154: Secretary, K. Matheson, 329 Blair Avenue, New Westminster.
DOCK AND SHIPYARD WORKERS (see Laborers,
Local 1204)
EATON'S EMPLOYEES' ASSOCIATION—Secretary,
Mrs. Edith Beadle, c/o T. Eaton Co., Canada, Ltd.,
1150 Douglas Street, Victoria.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, CANADIAN (see Industrial Mechanical Workers, Local 1)
ELECTRICAL    WORKERS,    IBEW    (International
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers)—
Local 213:   Secretary,  C.  Dorflinger,  201,  33 East
Eighth Avenue, Vancouver 10.
Local 230: Secretary, W. Nygarrd, 12, 2750 Quadra
Street, Victoria.
Local 258: Business Agent, D. L. Cronk, 202, 2001
East 36th Avenue, Vancouver.
Local 264: Business Agent, Wayne N. Brazeau, 404,
7155 Kingsway, Burnaby 1.
Local 344: Secretary, L. G. Crampton, Suite 8, 2475
Manitoba Street, Vancouver 10.
Local 993:   Secretary, Rich. Hove, Box 306, Kamloops.
Local  1003:   Secretary,  R.  McKnight,  422 Vernon
Street, Nelson.
Local 1900: Representative, H. O. Barons, 615 Silica
Street, Nelson.
Local 2027: Recording Secretary, G. R. Barker, Box
1130, Squamish.
Local   2203:   Secretary,   M.   Mincay,   Professional
Building, 1705 Third Avenue, Prince George.
Local 2231:  Secretary, E. R. Myers, 1689 Sheridan
Avenue, Coquitlam.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, UE (United Electrical,
Radio, and Machine Workers of America)'—Locai
552: Business Agent, George Gee, 3, 199 East Eighth
Avenue, Vancouver.
ELEVATOR CONSTRUCTORS (International Union
of Elevator Constructors)—Local 82: Western Representative, John E. Neil, 505, 119 West Pender
Street, Vancouver.
FIRE BOSSES, EAST KOOTENAY (East Kootenay
Fire Bosses' Union)—Local 1585: Recording Secretary, Robert Doratty, General Delivery, Natal.
FIRE-FIGHTERS   (International Association of Fire
Fighters)—■
Local 18 (Vancouver Fire Fighters' Union): Secretary, L. E. Kraft, 1349 Vivian Way, Port Coquitlam.
Local 256 (New Westminster Fire Fighters' Union):
Recording    Secretary,    Barry    Eriendson,     1521
Mayses Street, New Westminster.
Local 323  (Burnaby Fire Fighters' Union): Secretary, W. Copland, 2011 Cliff Avenue, Burnaby 2.
Local 559: Secretary, J. C. Franks, 135 East Eighth
Avenue, Prince Rupert.
Local 730  (Victoria Fire Fighters):  Secretary, R.
Campbell, 1234 Yates Street, Victoria.
Local  871   (Tadanac  Fire  Fighters'  Association):
Secretary, G. B. Cady, 380 Laurier Drive, Trail.
Local   901   (University   of   British   Columbia  Fire
Fighters): Secretary-Treasurer, Larry Pierce, Apt.
208, 25 East 13th Avenue, Vancouver.
Local 905  (Nanaimo Fire Fighters' Association):
Secretary, T. MacDonald, Fire Hall 1, Nanaimo.
FIRE-FIGHTERS (International Association of Fire
Fighters)—Continued
Local 913: Secretary, W. F. Wilson, c/o 120 Vernon
Avenue, Kamloops.
Local 914 (West Vancouver Fire Fighters' Union):
Secretary, D. R. McCairns, 757 Browning Place,
North Vancouver.
Local 941 (Trail-Rossland Firefighters' Association):
Secretary, George Lawrie, 1390 Pine Avenue, Trail.
Local 953 (Kelowna Fire Fighters' Union): Secretary, Dick Auty, 1616 Water Street, Kelowna.
Local 967 (Saanich Fire Fighters' Union): Secretary,
R. P. Sproule, 3130 Frechette Street, Victoria.
Local 1183 (District of North Vancouver Fire Fighters' Union): Secretary, G. T. Ramsay, 101, 362
East Tenth Street, North Vancouver.
Local 1253 (East Kootenay Fire Fighters' Union):
Secretary, Walter Tymchyna, 707 South Tenth
Street, Cranbrook.
Local 1271 (Surrey Fire Fighters' Association): Secretary, J. D. Brucker, Box 165, Surrey.
Local 1286 (Richmond Fire Fighters' Association):
Secretary, Ted Lorenz, Box 6, Richmond.
Local 1298 (Powell River Fire Fighters): Secretary,
D. A. Davidson, 6965 Courteney Street, Powell
River.
Local 1304 (Kitimat Fire Fighters): Secretary, A. K.
Isley, 27 Osprey Street, Kitimat.
Local 1343 (Nelson Fire Fighters' Association): Secretary, H. Sommerville, 919 Ward Street, Nelson.
Local 1372 (Prince George Fire Fighters' Association) : Secretary, Fred Eagle, c/o Prince George
Fire Department, 1111 Seventh Avenue, Prince
George.
Local 1399 (Penticton Fire Fighters' Association):
Secretary, B. Hodgins, 1724 Ridgedale Avenue,
Penticton.
Local 1517 (Vernon Fire Fighters' Association):
Secretary, R. F. Sauer, 3401—30th Street, Vernon.
Local 1525 (West Vancouver City Fire Fighters'
Union): Secretary, W. A. Weeks, 2110 Jefferson
Avenue, West Vancouver.
Local 1667 (Port Alberni Fire Fighters): Secretary,
L. R. Liesch, 519 Neill Street, Port Alberni.
Local 1668 (Campbell River Fire Fighters' Association): Secretary, R. L. Nuttall (Jr.), 560 Charles
Place, Campbell River.
Local 1746 (Revelstoke Fire Fighters' Association):
Secretary, Robert Wilton, Box 768, Revelstoke.
Local 1754 (Rossland Fire Fighters' Association):
Secretary, Arthur Martin, Box 952, Rossland.
Local 1763 (Delta Fire Fighters' Association) : Dennis G. Monk, 4846 Elliott Street, Delta.
Local 1782 (Coquitlam Fire Fighters): Secretary,
Doug Johnson, Box 1036, Port Coquitlam.
Local 1856 (Oak Bay Fire Fighters): Secretary, K.
E. Gunter, 2568 Estevan Avenue, Victoria.
Local 1941 (Coquitlam Fire Fighters' Association):
Secretary, W. J. Thomas, 2291 Kelly Avenue, Port
Coquitlam.
FIREMEN AND OILERS (International Brotherhood
of Firemen and Oilers)—
Local 134: Secretary, Victor P. Ruecker, 204, 7916
Knight Road, Vancouver.
Local 289: Secretary, H. K. Past, 303, 1355 West
14th Avenue, Vancouver 9.
Local 381: Secretary. P. Mayert. General Delivery,
Revelstoke.
Local 1140: Secretary, Ken Past, 303, 1355 West
14th Avenue, Vancouver.
Local  1141:  Secretary-Treasurer, A.  C. Robertson,
RR 1, Nelson.
FISHERMEN,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA   (British Columbia Deep Sea Fishermen's Union)—
Amalgamted Shoreworkers' and Clerks' Union, Division of B.C. Deep Sea Fishermen's Union: Secretary, J. V. Dixon, Box 249, Prince Rupert.
Local 80: Secretary, J. V. Dixon, Box 249, Prince
Rupert.
 U 106
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
FISHERMEN, UNITED (British Columbia Provincial
Council, United Fishermen and Allied Workers'
Union)—
Local   1:   Secretary,   Don   Taylor,   3844   Imperial
Street, Burnaby.
Local 2: Secretary, L. Robson, 3875 Inverness Street,
Vancouver 10.
Local  3:   Secretary, T. Puska,  256  Street, Maple
Ridge.
Local 4: Secretary, Nicholas A. Spilchen, 4504 Savoy
Street, Delta.
Local 5: Secretary, J. Person, 599 Chapman Road,
New Westminster.
Local 6: Secretary, Percy Starr, Klemtu.
Local 7: Secretary: Ed. Simmonds, 510—55th Street,
Delta.
Local 8: Secretary-Treasurer, E. Olson, 367 I.amond
Road, Richmond.
Local 9:  Secretary, H. Onitera, 8655 River Road,
Delta 715.
Local   11:   Secretary,  Jack Hill,   947  Finn  Road,
Richmond 344.
Local  15:  Secretary, W. A. Coates,  1399 Stewart
Avenue, Nanaimo.
Local 16: Secretary, Robert H. Lee, Irvings Landing.
Local 17: Secretary, Norman Lysne, 1930 Treelane
Road, Campbell River.
Local  19:  Secretary, A. Strom, 2731 Scott Street,
Victoria.
Local 20: Secretary, Donald H. Starr, Box 34, Bella
Bella.
Local 21: Secretary, Ray Keelan, Box 587, Sechelt.
Local 23:  Secretary, M. Campbell, 8611 Dencross
Terrace, RR 1, Saanichton.
Local 24: Secretary, Rodney Ogden, Box 104, Sooke.
Local 26: Secretary, Lennie Pohto, Box 204, Sointula.
Local 27: Secretary, Donald Egan, Bella Coola.
Local 28: Secretary, E. Regnery, Queen Charlotte.
Local 30: Secretary, Norman A. Sumner, Box 193,
Alert Bay.
Local   31:   Secretary,   F.   Greenwood,   869   Fraser
Street, Prince Rupert.
Local 32: Secretary, Eric Burnell, RR 5, Langley.
Local 33: Secretary, George Nelson, Kincolith.
Local 37: Secretary, K. Harris, 1655 Herman Place,
Prince Rupert.
Local 42:  Secretary, J. F. Chambers, 7510 Nootka
Street (Box 1), Powell River.
Local 43: Secretary, Bruce Hageman, Masset.
Local   44:   Secretary,   George   H.   Musgrave,   Port
Simpson.
Local 45: (address not known).
Local 46:  Secretary, Terry Stewart, c/o UFAWU
Office, Prince Rupert.
Local 47: Secretary, Victor Cavenaile, Masset.
Local 48: Secretary, Robert G. Chisholm, Box 327,
Port Hardy.
FLOORLAYERS (see Carpenters, Local 1541)
FOOD WORKERS*—
Local   P162:   Secretary,   J.   Waters,   7161   Gibson
Street, Burnaby 2.
Local P180: Secretary, J. D. Owens, 933 Baverview
Drive, Richmond.
Local 212 (Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher
Workmen): Manager, George Johnston, 4510 Victoria Drive, Vancouver 16.
Local P249: Secretary, K. Lowdermilk, 2633 Mount-
view Place, Burnaby 3.
Local P283: Secretary, Mrs. G. Pollock, Box 4480,
Station O, Vancouver.
Local   P333:   Secretary,   Mrs.  Marg  Meister,   129
Grandview Street, Penticton.
Local P341: Secretary, Mrs. N. Beckwith, 4530 Victoria Drive, Vancouver 16.
Local 412 (Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher
Workmen): Secretary-Treasurer, George Johnston,
4510 Victoria Drive, Vancouver.
FOOD WORKERS—Continued
Local P430:  Secretary, Mrs. A. Willard, Box 70,
Sardis.
Local P432:  Secretary, Terry Inglis, 31046  Ollund
Road, RR 1, Mount Lehman.
Local 445:  Secretary, Paul J. Ross, 478 East 54th
Avenue, Vancouver 15.
Local P472: Secretary, Mrs. Rita Toker, 4202 Cas-
tlewood Crescent, South Burnaby.
Local P501: Secretary, Mrs. M. Nohr, RR 1, Stave
Lake Road, Mission.
Local P517: Secretary, Donald Anderson, 22337 St.
Anne Street, Maple Ridge.
Local P541: Secretary-Treasurer, D. Burritt, 17705—
97th Avenue, Surrey.
Local P1148: Secretary, E. Copeland, 4530 Victoria
Drive, Vancouver 16.
FOREMEN (Vancouver Foremen's Association)—Secretary, F. R. Causton, 4781 Bruce Street, Vancouver 16.
FRUIT   AND   VEGETABLE   WORKERS    (British
Columbia  Interior  Fruit  and  Vegetable  Workers'
Union)—Local   1572:   Secretary,   Jim  Currie,   212
Main Street, Penticton.
FUEL DISTRIBUTORS (Victoria Fuel Distributors)
—Local 150: Secretary, B. E. Alexander, 1324 Balmoral Road, Victoria.
GARMENT   WORKERS,    LADIES'    (International
Ladies' Garment Workers' Union)—
Local 276:  Business Agent, E. Mickoski, 109,  119
West Pender Street, Vancouver 3.
Local 287:  Business Manager, Frank Bagulie, 109,
119 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3.
Local 325:  Business Manager, Frank Bagulie,  109,
119 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3.
GARMENT WORKERS, UNITED (United Garment
Workers of America)—
Local 190: Secretary, Mrs. Stella Farmer, Suite 101,
2625 Alberta Street, Vancouver 10.
Local 232:   Secretary, E.  Hawrylechko,  Suite 206,
1877 Haro Street, Vancouver 5.
GLASS AND CERAMIC WORKERS  (United Glass
and Ceramic Workers of North America)—
Local   238:   Secretary,   D.   Langton,   10122—128th
Street, Surrey.
Local 257:  Secretary, Frank G. Darbon, Box 325,
Vernon.
GLAZIERS (see Painters, Local 1527)
GOVERNMENT    EMPLOYEES    (British   Columbia
Government Employees' Union)—
ABBOTSFORD-MISSION:   Secretary,   C.   Wilford
Friesen, Box 196, Mission City.
ALBERNI: Secretary, Mrs. Karlo Beres, 507 Montrose Street, Port Alberni.
ALLISON PASS: Secretary, H. C. Hurst, Manning
Park.
BLUE RIVER: Secretary, Fred L. Turner, Box 48,
Blue River.
BURNS  LAKE:  Secretary, C. H. Dodge, Box 46,
Burns Lake.
CHILLIWACK: Secretary, A. E. Schaap, 408 North
Corbould Street, Chilliwack.
COMOX  DISTRICT:  Secretary, George H. King,
Croteau Beach, RR 1, Comox.
CORRECTIONS BRANCH, OAKALLA: Secretary,
J. N. McLaren, c/o 101, 6508 Telford Street, Burnaby 1.
CORRECTIONS BRANCH, MAPLE RIDGE: Secretary, S. G. A. Ray, 12311—216 Street, Maple
Ridge.
CORRECTIONS   BRANCH,   KAMLOOPS:   Secretary, P. W. Howard, 811 Crestline Street, Brockle-
hurst, Kamloops.
CRANBROOK:   Secretary,   R.   Reeve,   c/o   British
Columbia Forest Service, Box 760, Cranbrook.
• Canadian Food and Allied Workers are chartered by the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen
of North America.
 DIRECTORY
U 107
GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES (British Columbia
Government Employees' Union)—Continued
CRESTON VALLEY: Secretary, W. Davidson,
Box 340, Creston.
DUNCAN: Secretary, E. Pakulak, RR 4, Somenos
Road, Duncan.
FERNIE: Secretary, E. V. Marcer, Box 697, Fernie.
FORT ST. JOHN: Secretary, C. Nickel, Box 2582,
Fort St. John.
FRASER CANYON: Secretary, D. E. Warlow,
North Bend.
FRASER VALLEY: Secretary, G. W. Penner, 8860
—118A Street, North Delta.
GOLDEN: Secretary, John Hickmott, Box 195,
Golden.
GRAND FORKS-GREENWOOD: Secretary, Wm.
Watson, Box 171, Grand Forks.
KAMLOOPS: Secretary, Miss C. Cusworth, Box
172, Kamloops.
KELOWNA: Secretary, Mrs. S. Roux, RR 1, Carrall Road, Westbank.
LAKE WINDERMERE: Secretary, R. C. Clement,
Box 631, Invermere.
LANGFORD: Secretary, R. Smith, 3528 Calumet
Avenue, Victoria.
LIQUOR CONTROL BOARD: Secretary, O. Peder-
son, 1071 Cecile Drive, Port Moody.
LILLOOET: Secretary, R. Jones, Box 352, Clinton.
McBRIDE: Secretary, R. V. Brown, Box 328, McBride.
MARINE BRANCH (unlicensed): Secretary, A.
Nieman, 22, 2750 Quadra Street, Victoria.
MARINE BRANCHH (licensed): Secretary, Robert Doull, c/o 230 West Broadway, Vancouver 10.
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH: Secretary, R. Williamson, 21003 Dewdney Trunk Road, Haney.
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH, TRANQUILLE:
Secretary, Angela Lake, 606A Pine Street, Kamloops.
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH, DELLVIEW: Secretary, Mrs. M. Forslund, Box 785, Vernon.
MERRITT: Secretary, A. C. Taylor, Box 2007,
Merritt.
NANAIMO: Secretary, Mrs. M. Broadhurst, 403B
Nicol Street, Nanaimo.
NELSON: Secretary, P. J. Lindsay, 720 Josephine
Street, Nelson.
NEW DENVER: Secretary, Mrs. L. McBurney, Box
161, New Denver.
100 MILE HOUSE: Secretary, D. Kurylowich, RR
1, 100 Mile House.
PEACE RIVER: Secretary, R. G. Cuthbert, 924—
94th Avenue, Dawson Creek.
PENTICTON: Secretary, Mrs. F. Worthing, 1214
Killarney Street, Penticton.
POWELL RIVER: Secretary, G. Wheeler, 6315
Cedar Avenue, Powell River.
PRINCE GEORGE: Secretary, T. J. Burgess, Box
944, Prince George.
PRINCE RUPERT: Secretary, Mrs. I. Husoy, 1629
Graham Avenue, Prince Rupert.
PRINCETON: Secretary, E. Howe, Box 413, Princeton.
PROBATION OFFICERS' BRANCH: Secretary,
Miss M. Arthur, 204, 2072 West Third Avenue,
Vancouver 8.
QUESNEL: Secretary, Mrs. M. Stohl, Box 1501,
Quesnel.
REVELSTOKE: Secretary, Mrs. A. F. Lines, Box
179, Revelstoke.
ROSSLAND-TRAIL: Secretary, Mrs. J. A. D'An-
drea, 1409 Fourth Avenue, Trail.
SALMON ARM: Secretary, J. R. Willis, RR 1,
Salmon Arm.
SKEENA-OMINECA: Secretary, Mrs. Dorothy
Bruce, Box 903, Smithers.
TERRACE: Secretary, D. Griffiths, 2912 Brauns
Island Road, Terrace.
SOCIAL WORKERS (professional): Secretary, B.
Corrin, 6880 Balmoral Street, Burnaby 1.
GOVERNMENT   EMPLOYEES   (British   Columbia
Government Employees' Union)—Continued
SOUTHBANK: Secretary, H. Funk, RR 2, Burns
Lake.
VANDERHOOF: Secretary, O. N. Pederson, Box
616, Vanderhoof.
VANCOUVER-NEW WESTMINSTER: Secretary,
Mrs. J. Ruddell, 1155 West 64th Avenue, Vancouver 14.
VERNON: Secretary, J. Alveberg, Box 353, Vernon.
VICTORIA: Secretary, Mrs. Joan Krause, c/o Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
VOCATIONAL INSTRUCTORS: Secretary, Mrs.
K. Brodie, 3075 Allan-a-Dale Place, Nanaimo.
WOODLANDS SCHOOL, THE: Secretary, Mrs. M.
Canessa, 5131 Carson Street, Burnaby 1.
WILLIAMS LAKE: Secretary, Ike Nelson, Box 447,
Williams Lake.
MEMBERS-AT-LARGE:   Headquarters,  2090 West
Fourth Avenue, Vancouver 9.
GRAIN WORKERS (see Brewery and Grain Workers,
Local 333)
H
HEAT AND FROST WORKERS (International Association of Heat and Frost and Asbestos Workers)—
Local 118: Secretary, A. Ceraldi, 1 West Seventh
Avenue, Vancouver 10.
HOSPITAL EMPLOYEES, HEU (Hospital Employees' Union) —
Local 180:  Secretary-Business Manager, R. S. Mc-
Cready, 538 West Broadway, Vancouver 9.
Local   181:   Secretary,   E.   J.   Ashmore,   538   West
Broadway, Vancouver 9.
HOSPITAL EMPLOYEES, PRIVATE  (Private Hospital and General Service Employees* Union)   (see
Canadian Union of Public Employees, Local 1311).
HOSPITAL EMPLOYEES, ROYAL JUBILEE (Royal
Jubilee   Hospital   Employees'   Association)—Secretary,  Mrs.  M.  Rimmer,   1983  Newton Street,  Victoria.
HOSPITAL EMPLOYEES,  ST.  JOSEPH'S   (St.  Joseph's General Hospital Employees' Association)—
Secretary,   Mrs.   Roxie  Ellis,   St.   Joseph's   General
Hospital, Box 487, Comox.
HOTEL  EMPLOYEES   (Hotel   and  Restaurant  Employees'  and Bartenders'  International Union)—
Local 28: Secretary, A. E. Morgan, 409, 402 West
Pender Street, Vancouver 3.
Local   619:   Secretary,   George   Bryce,   60   Rainer
Street, Nanaimo.
Local 636:   Secretary, Nick A. Pavlikis, Box  144,
Prince Rupert.
Local 676 (Beverage Dispensers' Union): Secretary,
Harold D. Courson, 509 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local 835 (Beverage Dispensers' Union): Secretary,
Ed. O. Carlson, 7726 Edmonds Street, New Westminster.
I
INDUSTRIAL   MECHANICAL  WORKERS   (Canadian   Association   of   Industrial,   Mechanical,   and
Allied   Workers)—Local   1    (Canadian   Electrical
Workers): Secretary, John R. Jacobs, 3826 Imperial
Street, Burnaby.
INTERIOR    CONTRACTING    CO.    EMPLOYEES'
SOCIETY—Secretary, Mrs. J. Williams, 294 Edna
Avenue, Penticton.
IRON    WORKERS    (International    Association    of
Bridge,   Structural  and  Ornamental  Iron  Workers)—
Local 97: Secretary, D. W. O'Reilly, 2415 Columbia
Street, Vancouver 10.
Local 643: Secretary, Andrew Manson, 3981 Douglas Street, Victoria.
Local 712:  Secretary, Ben D. Parry, 2, 5550 East
Hastings Street, Burnaby 2.
 U 108
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
JEWELLERY WORKERS (International Jewelry
Workers' Union)—Local 42: Secretary, W. L. Rout-
ley, 410, 509 Richards Street, Vancouver 3.
KELLY DOUGLAS (Kelly Douglas and Subsidiary
Employees' Association)—Secretary-Treasurer, R. D.
Brown, Box 299, Burnaby 1.
LABOURERS    (Laborers'    International   Union   of
North America) —
Local 105 (Security Officers and Associated Personnel) : Business Agent, H. Ainsworth, 210, 105
West Georgia Street, Vancouver.
Local 168 (Tunnel and Rock Workers Union): Secretary, H. Croft, 1 West Seventh Avenue, Vancouver.
Local 602 (Construction and General Labourers'
Union): Secretary, D. W. Porter, 2, 536 Tranquille Street, Kamloops.
Local 1070 (Construction and General Labourers'
Union): Secretary, C. Larry Pleasant, 33 Eighth
Avenue, New Westminster.
Local 1093 (Construction and General Labourers'
Union): Secretary, John Gallow, 2750 Quadra
Street, Victoria.
Local 1204 (Dock and Shipyard Workers):  Secretary, N. P. Spech,  6765 Veyaness Road,  RR 1,
Saanichton.
LATHERS (Wood, Wire, and Metal Lathers' International Union)—
Local 207: Secretary, C. A. Burton, 7675 Edmonds
Street, Burnaby 3.
Local 332: Secretary, John Lang, 522 Davida Avenue, Victoria.
Local 566: Secretary, Charles Amos, 7675 Edmonds.
Street, Burnaby 3.
LAUNDRY WORKERS (Laundry, Dry Cleaning, and
Dye House Workers' International Union) —
Local 292: Secretary, Patricia Pyper, Room 400, 146
East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local  336:   Secretary-Treasurer,  E.  A.  Black,  Box
435, Prince Rupert.
LETTER   CARRIERS   (Letter   Carriers'   Union   of
Canada)—
Local 11: Secretary, C. A. Spencer, 4117 Carey
Road, Victoria.
Local 12: Secretary, R. C. Hamilton, 440 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3.
Local 32: Secretary, Leo Lambert, 235 Howe Street,
New Westminster.
Local 54: Secretary, L. Kristiansen, 110 Ashlar
Street, Nanaimo.
Local 75: Secretary, G. Kennedy, 515 Sixth Street,
Nelson.
Local 76: Secretary, H. E. Nesmith, 708 Eliot Street,
Trail.
Local 80: Secretary, W. Kipp, 196 West St. Paul
Street, Kamloops.
Local 95: Secretary, D. Freeman, 732 Government
Street, Penticton.
Local 100: Secretary, C. M. Dick, RR 1, Beaver
Creek Road, Port Alberni.
Local 102: Secretary, R. Turner, Box 982, Vernon.
Local 110: Secretary, F. Chapman, Box 261, Chilliwack.
Local 127: Secretary, Wm. Greenly, Box 190, Prince
George.
Local 133: Secretary, E. R. Johnson, 3341—140th
Street, White Rock.
Local 148: Secretary, Bruce Ludvigsen, 1821—108th
Avenue, Dawson Creek.
LETTER   CARRIERS    (Letter   Carriers'   Union   of
Canada)—Continued
Local  149:   Secretary,  Don  Cameron,   1561—11th
Avenue East, Prince Rupert.
Local 170:  Secretary, A. E. Layton, 7176 Warner
Street, Powell River.
Local 172: Secretary, P. O'Rabko, 12347 Davidson
Street, Maple Ridge.
Local 172: Secretary, D. Swinton, 1580 Grant Street,
Port Coquitlam.
Local 199: Secretary, Henry Curscience, 2375 Ethel
Street, Kelowna.
Local 201: (defunct).
Local 202: Secretary, O. Philips, 185 Crear Street,
Kimberley.
Local 208: Secretary, A. Freeman, Box 164, Duncan.
Local  209:   Secretary,   G.  D.   Mansbridge,   33504
Hawthorne Avenue, Abbotsford.
Local 218:  Secretary, Al. Billingseley, c/o 5712—
148th Street, Surrey.
Local 220: Secretary, Rita Thompson, 16 Wienggon
Street, Kitimat.
Local 234:  Secretary, Rolande S. Klause, 304, 283
First Avenue, Campbell River.
Local 235: Secretary, B. Cromarty, Box 96, Terrace.
LITHOGRAPHERS    AND    PHOTO-ENGRAVERS
(Lithographers'  and  Photo-engravers'  International
Union)—Local  210:   Secretary,  Paul  Leo,   Room
102, 33 East Eighth Avenue, Vancouver 10.
LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEERS (Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers)—
Division 105: Secretary, D. D. Morrison, Box 366,
Williams Lake.
Division 111: Secretary, L. A. Thistle, Box 601, 18
South 13th Avenue, Smithers.
Division   151:   Secretary,   A.  Merserau,   242   Sixth
Avenue West, Prince Rupert.
Division 320: Secretary-Treasurer, P. R.Williamson,
1792 Jensen Avenue, Port Coquitlam.
Division 563: Secretary, O. Sherratt, 212 Ninth Avenue South, Cranbrook.
Division 579: Secretary, F. L. Zak, 922 Fifth Street,
Nelson.
Division 657:   Secretary,  F.  Delacherois, Box  60,
Revelstoke.
Division 821: Secretary, J. J. Waugh, 705 Columbia
Street, Kamloops.
Division 843: Secretary, George W. Reid, 1142 Central Street, Prince George.
Division 855:  Secretary, J. Hill, 74 St. Paul Street
West, Kamloops.
Division 866: Secretary, V. Kavolinas, RR 1, West
Bench Drive, Penticton.
Division   907:   Secretary-Treasurer,   Albert   Prins,
11770—82A Avenue, Delta 716.
LONGSHOREMEN  AND  WAREHOUSEMEN   (International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's
Union)—
Local  500:   Secretary,  P. Lanoville,   1685  Franklin
Street, Vancouver 6.
Local  502:   Secretary,  R.  B. Ferguson,  71 Tenth
Street, New Westminster.
Local  503:   Secretary,   D.   Beaumont,   117  Second
Avenue South, Port Alberni.
Local 504: Secretary, G. F. Snelling, 6, 476 Cecelia
Street, Victoria.
Local  505:   Secretary-Treasurer,   M.   A.   Campbell,
Box 531, Prince Rupert.
Local 506; Secretary-Treasurer, C. H. Ickingill, 1685
Franklin Street, Vancouver.
Local 508:  Secretary-Treasurer, H. E. Irving, Box
179, Chemainus.
Local 514 (Foremen's Union of British Columbia):
Secretary,   Basil   Oliver,   1605   Crestlawn  Drive,
North Burnaby.
Local 515: Secretary, D. Sankey, Port Simpson.
Local 517:   Secretary, Jim Jackson,   1685 Franklin
Street, Vancouver 6.
LUMBER AND SAWMILL WORKERS (see Carpenters' locals)
 DIRECTORY
U 109
LUMBER AND TIMBER WORKERS (Boston Bar
Lumber and Timber Workers)—Secretary, Kevin
Duddy, Box 77, Boston Bar.
M
MACHINISTS (International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers)—
Lodge 151: Secretary, E. White, 9544—125th Street,
Surrey.
Lodge  182:   Secretary,  G.  W.  Ingram, 2967  Glen
Drive, Port Coquitlam.
Lodge 219:   Secretary,  Lome D. Jones, Box 635,
Victoria.
Lodge   281:   Representative,   A.   White,   3406   East
Third Avenue, Vancouver 12.
Lodge 456:  Recording Secretary, R. L. Salter, 670
Fernhill Road, Victoria.
Lodge  663:   Secretary,  G. F.  L.  Marsden,  RR   1,
Nelson.
Lodge 692:  Secretary, J. A. S. Hawkes, 17a, 2414
Main Street, Vancouver 10.
Lodge 764: Secretary, A. C. Steele, 1371 Southwest
Marine Drive, Vancouver 14.
Lodge 861: Secretary, Robert C. Gibson, Box 477,
Squamish.
Lodge 1500: Secretary, Paul Jankowski, 1924 Whyte
Avenue, Vancouver 9.
Lodge 1857 (Automotive): Secretary, John E. Hewlett, 6947 Victoria Drive, Vancouver 16.
Lodge 2324: Secretary, H. Noble, 608 Adams Place,
Richmond.
MACHINISTS' FITTERS', AND HELPERS' INDEPENDENT UNION— (see Shipyard Workers, Local
3)
MAILERS (see Typographical Union, Locals 70 and
121)
MAINTENANCE OF WAY (Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees)—
Lodge 15: Secretary, M. Kurylowich, Box 162,
Barriere.
Lodge 30: Secretary, J. C. Kesler, 13469—98th Avenue, Surrey.
Lodge 31: Secretary: W. B. Lamsay, 115, 1336 Columbia Street, Kamloops.
Lodge 165: Secretary, Otto Buser, Box 352, Golden.
Lodge 167: Secretary, W. C. Alderman, 7769 Patterson Avenue, Burnaby 1.
Lodge 181: Secretary, P. Munch, Box 27, Proctor.
Lodge 202: Secretary, S. Fedoruk, 964 Fourth Avenue, Prince George.
Lodge 208: Secretary, T. E. McMahon, Box 433,
Revelstoke.
Lodge 210: Secretary, W. Tofin, 33078 Mill Lake
Road, Abbotsford.
Lodge 215: Secretary, R. J. Lafreniere, Box 1797,
Williams Lake.
Lodge 221: Secretary, V. J. Cardin, RR 1, Lac la
Hache.
Lodge 229: Secretary, Fred Kalt, 533 Hurry Avenue
West, Cranbrook.
Lodge 252: Secretary, R. R. Edmunds, RR e, Box
33, Randell Road, Prince George.
Lodge 335: Secretary, A. F. Skattebol, 1425 Graham Avenue, Prince Rupert.
Lodge 340: Secretary, A. J. Harrison, Box 517,
Smithers.
Lodge 533: Secretary, A. E. Costin, RR 1, Chemainus.
Lodge 1023: Secretary, C. A. Tarr, 1427 Balfour
Street, Penticton.
Lodge 1332: Secretary, L. S. Beckett, RR 2, Kamloops.
Lodge 1734:  (address not known).
Lodge 2824: Secretary, F. S. Poulin, Metchosin Post
Office, Metchosin.
MARBLE, SLATE, AND STONE POLISHERS (International Association of Marble, Slate, and
Stone Polishers, Rubbers and Sawyers, Tile and
Marble Setters' Helpers, Marble Mosaic and Ter-
razzo Workers' Helpers)—
Local 78:   Secretary, Arnold Pattison, 549 Arcadia
Road, Richmond.
Local  179:   Secretary-Treasurer, W.  A. McDonald,
3022 East First Avenue, Vancouver 12.
MARINE    AND    MAINTENANCE    EMPLOYEES
(Pacific Marine and Maintenance Employees' Association)—President, D. H.  Dakin, Box 1556, Victoria.
MARINE WORKERS  (see Shipyard Workers, Local
1)
MEAT  CUTTERS   (see  Food  Workers,   Locals  212
and 412)
MERCHANT SERVICE (Canadian Merchant Service
Guild)—Western Branch:   Secretary, A. W. Davis,
230 West Broadway, Vancouver 10.
MID-VALLEY  (Mid-Valley Construction Employees'
Association) (see Operating Engineers, Local 115)
MILK SALES, DRIVERS', AND DAIRY EMPLOYEES' UNION (see Teamsters)
MINE WORKERS  (United Mine Workers of America)—
Local   7292:    Secretary-Treasurer,   James   Calwell,
Drawer 6, Sparwood.
Local   7335:   Secretary,   George   Bryce,   60   Rainer
Street, Nanaimo.
MISCELLANEOUS WORKERS, WHOLESALE AND
RETAIL DELIVERY DRIVERS AND HELPERS
(see Teamsters)
MOULDERS    (International   Molders'    and   Allied
Workers' Union)—
Local 144:  Secretary, Sam Emery, 864 Old Esquimau Road, Victoria.
Local 281: Secretary, A. White, Room 9, 1654 Renfrew Street, Vancouver 6.
MOVING-PICTURE MACHINE  OPERATORS   (International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees
and   Moving  Picture  Machine   Operators  of  the
United States and Canada)—
Local   B-70:   Secretary,   Mrs.   Marjorie   E.   Doney,
1888 Allenby Street, Victoria.
Local  CE-71   (Vancouver Film Exchange Employees) : Secretary, Miss Diane Overbo, 6130 Patterson Avenue, South Burnaby.
Local B-72   (Theatre  Employees):   Secretary,  Mrs.
Florence Foster, 1, 4508 Main Street, Vancouver
10.
Local 118 (Stagehands):  Secretary, G. T. New, 111
Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Local 348 (British Columbia Projectionists):  Secretary, H. K. Gilbert, 1356 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2.
Local 891  (Studio Technicians' Union):  Secretary,
C. N. Gowen, 1356 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2.
MUNICIPAL AND REGIONAL EMPLOYEES (Municipal and Regional Employees' Union)—Local 15:
Secretary Agent,  R.  C. Ross,  300,  545 West 10th
Avenue, Vancouver 9.
MUNICIPAL  EMPLOYEES,  WEST VANCOUVER
(West   Vancouver   Municipal   Employees'   Association)—Secretary, H. Jonvik, Box 52, West Vancouver.
MUSICIANS   (American Federation of Musicians of
the United States and Canada)—
Local 145: Secretary Agent, John D. Townsend, 510,
207 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3.
Local 247: Secretary, R. E. Groves, 838 Gorge Road
West, Victoria.
N
NATIVE BROTHERHOOD (Native Brotherhood of
British Columbia)—Secretary, Ed. Nahanee, 517,
193 East Hastings Street, Vancouver.
 U 110
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
NEWSPAPER GUILD (American Newspaper Guild)
—Local 115: Executive Secretary, William H. McLennan, Room 4, 1557 West Broadway, Vancouver 9.
Local 223:  Secretary, Peter McNeill, 2631 Douglas
Street, Victoria.
NURSES (Registered Nurses of British Columbia)
OFFICE EMPLOYEES, BURRARD  (Burrard Office
Employees' Association)-—Secretary, R. F. Wiltshire,
Box 99, North Vancouver (c/o Burrard Dry Dock).
OFFICE EMPLOYEES, OFFICE AND TECHNICAL
(Office and Technical Employees' Union) —
Local 15: Secretary, Mrs. Opal Skilling, Room 100,
146 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local 378:   Secretary, Miss Eva Lopuszensik,  1110
Hornby Street, Vancouver 1.
OIL WORKERS (Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers'
International Union)—
Local 9-601:  Secretary, W. Wenschlag,  5550 East
Hastings Street, Burnaby 2.
Local  9-675:   Secretary,  W.  Adams,  602  Windsor
Street, Kamloops.
Local 9-686: Secretary, J. Olafson, Box 3935, Fort
St. John.
Local 9-696:  Secretary, W. A. Hein, 339 Ker Avenue, Victoria.
Local 9-697: Secretary, B. A. Deasey, 2484 Haywood
Avenue, West Vancouver.
Local 9-817: Secretary, R. McKenzie, 199 McKinley
Crescent (Box 1274), Prince George.
OPERATING ENGINEERS, INTERNATIONAL (International Union of Operating Engineers)—
Local  115:   Recording Secretary,  F.  Randall, 4333
Ledger Avenue, Burnaby.
Local   510:   Secretary,   M.   B.   O'Toole,   Box   653,
Prince Rupert.
Local 858: Secretary, B. Mashden, 963 Carney Street,
Prince George.
Local  882:   Secretary,  Donald E.  Ankersen,  2414
Main Street, Vancouver.
Local 918: Secretary, O. Lalonde, 14, 2750 Quadra
Street, Victoria.
Local 959:  Secretary, Brian Forbes, Box 221, 100
Mile House.
Local 963: Secretary, G. J. Schultz, 2825 West 13th
Avenue, Vancouver 8.
PAINTERS   (International   Brotherhood   of   Painters
and Allied Trades)—
Local 138:  Recording Secretary, C. W. Carson, 3,
2475 Manitoba Street, Vancouver 10.
Local   1163:    Secretary,   J.    Frocklage,   21,   2750
Quadra Street, Victoria.
Local   1527:   Secretary,   A.   Allen,   Room  4,   2475
Manitoba Street, Vancouver 10.
Local 1642: Secretary, Don Mcintosh, 211, Seventh
Avenue North, Port Alberni.
Local  1820:   Secretary,  J.   Crane,   1312—96th Avenue, Dawson Creek.
Local 1857: Secretary, Jean Seidel, Box 873, Prince
George.
Local 1896: Business Agent, Art Greco, Box 309,
Penticton.
Local 1947: Secretary, A. S. Pengelly, 2966 Orillia
Street, Victoria.
PAPERMAKERS   (United  Papermakers  and Paper-
workers)—
Local 142: Secretary, E. K. Stride, 6162 Columbia
Street, Powell River.
Local 180: Secretary, Larry Beitz, Box 260, Kitimat.
Local 360: Secretary, Gordon Rose, Box 250, Ocean
Falls.
Local   367:   Secretary,   Henry   B.   Goertzen,   5164
Elsom Avenue, Burnaby 1.
Local 456:  Secretary, Sophie Combe,  1327A Kamloops Street, New Westminster.
PAPERMAKERS   (United   Papermakers   and  Paper-
workers ) —Continued
Local 630:   Secretary,  P.  J.  Blaseckie,   1996—19th
Avenue, Campbell River.
Local 789: Secretary, S. Southam, 14732—37A Avenue (RR 2), Langley.
Local  686:   Secretary,  A.   E.  Nash,  906  Glenside
Road, Port Alberni.
Local 886:  Secretary, W. M. Annala, 2849 Phillip
Street, Duncan.
Local   950:    Secretary,   Harvey   Clark,   2306   Oak
Street, Prince George.
PATTERNMAKERS   (Pattern   Makers'   League   of
North America)—Local 1260: Business Agent, W.
Hilton, 875 Williams Road, Richmond.
PEACE OFFICERS (British Columbia Federation of
Peace Officers)—
Local  1:   Secretary,  Robert J.  Stewart,  333   Main
Street, Vancouver 4.
Local   2:   Secretary,   Gloria   J.   Heinekey,   7   Pine
Block, 2891 Craigowan Road, Victoria.
Local  3:   Secretary,   Wykes  E.  Huggan,  Box 368,
New Westminster.
Local 4:  Secretary, H. B. Bryan, Box 4023, Postal
Station A, Victoria.
Local 5: Secretary, R. Archie McKay, 748 Chester-
lea Road, Victoria.
Local 6:  Secretary, W. Wyatt, 548 Snelling Street,
Victoria.
Local 7: Secretary, T. Liverside, 32353 South Fraser
Way, Abbotsford.
Local   8:   Secretary,   E.   T.   Pruner,   1300   Marine
Drive, West Vancouver.
Local 9: Secretary, R. G. Parker, 4681—64th Street,
Delta.
Local 10:   Secretary,  Quinton E. Zwicky,  Box  72,
Port Moody.
Local 11: Secretary, Derek William G. Price, Box
459, Nelson.
PILE  DRIVERS',   BRIDGE,  DOCK,   and WHARF
BUILDERS' UNION  (see Carpenters and Joiners,
Locals 1549, 2404, 2415)
PLASTERERS    (Operative   Plasterers'   and   Cement
Masons' International Association of the U.S. and
Canada)'—■
Local 450:   Secretary,  Anton Friedrich,  Room 22,
2750 Quadra Street, Victoria.
Local 779: Secretary-Treasurer, John S. Bawn, 2360
Ontario Street, Vancouver 10.
Local 919: Secretary, Frank Stevens, 201, 517 East
Broadway, Vancouver 10.
PLUMBERS (United Association of Journeymen and
Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of the U.S. and Canada) —
Local 170: Business Manger, Leslie C. Andrew, 115,
307 West Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local  180:   Secretary, C.  G.  Silversides, Box  146,
Prince Rupert.
Local 324: Secretary, L. P. Church, 7, 2750 Quadra
Street, Victoria.
Local  516:   Secretary,  R.  Wintle,   137 West 40th
Avenue, Vancouver.
Local 571: Secretary, J. Reid, 906 Fifth Street, New
Westminster.
PLYWOOD EMPLOYEES   (North Central Plywood
Employees' Association)—President: Andrew Doer-
ing, 63 Sherwood Court, 2243 Upland Street, Prince
George.
POSTAL  WORKERS   (Canadian   Union   of   Postal
Workers)—
Local   57:   Secretary,   Joyce   Bradford,   Box   995,
Castlegar.
Local 170: Secretary, Mrs. M. Redfern, Box 1594,
Merritt.
Local 218: Secretary, M. E. Mitchell, 2302 Hillside
Drive, Abbotsford.
Local   219:    Secretary,   Irene   Madseth,   c/o   754
Seventh Avenue, Campbell River.
Local  222:   Secretary,   George  Harrison,   Box   72,
Courtenay.
 DIRECTORY
U 111
POSTAL   WORKERS   (Canadian   Union   of   Postal
Workers) —Continued
Local 223: Secretary, Irene S. Laine, Box 141, Cranbrook.
Local  224:   Secretary,   Miss  J.  Dresser,  Box   32,
Dawson Creek.
Local 225: Secretary, D. G. Icerr, c/o 770 Coronation Avenue, Duncan.
Local 228: Secretary, M. Lyne, Box 99, Kamloops.
Local 229:  Secretary, Jack Bechel, Box 515, Kelowna.
Local 230:  Secretary,  A.  C. Bennet,  SS  1, Kimberley.
Local   231:    Secretary,   Mrs.   M.   McKercher,   10
Skeena, Kitimat.
Local 232: Secretary, Box Wiseman, Suite 304, 4586
Evergreen Lane, Delta.
Local 233:  Secretary,  Mrs. A. Willans, Box 1533,
Langley.
Local    234:    Secretary,    Derek    Garside,    RR    1,
Nanaimo.
Local 235: Secretary, G. Kennedy, 515 Sixth Street,
Nelson.
Local 236:  Secretary, L. R. Honeyboume,  11, 552
Columbia Street, New Westminster.
Local 237: Secretary, Mrs. R. Lundquist, Box 2001,
Smithers.
Local 238: Secretary, Vernie Olenyk, Box 45, Penticton.
Local 239:   Secretary, Mrs.  Lois L.  Tassie, 917—
11th Avenue, Port Alberni.
Local 240: Secretary, Elsie Levers, Box 1312, Prince
George.
Local   241:    Secretary,   Evelyn   Muller,   Box   205,
Prince Rupert.
Local 242: Secretary, J. Kawa, Box 73, Quesnel.
Local 243: Secretary, Mrs. C. Berry, Box 518, Revelstoke.
Local 244:   Secretary,  W.  R.  Campbell,  Box  321,
Salmon Arm.
Local 246:  Secretary, F. C. Vance, Box 246, Trail.
Local 247: Secretary, R. Capstick, 440 West Pender
Street, Vancouver 3.
Local 248: Secretary, S. Holmes, Box 188, Vernon.
Local 249: Secretary, W. A. Fry, Box 604, Victoria.
Local 250: Secretary, E. Alderson, c/o White Rock
Post Office, White Rock.
Local 273:  Secretary, Mrs. Kaye Irving, Box 505,
Creston.
Local 275: Secretary, Jim Fletcher, Box 193, Vedder
Crossing, Chilliwack.
Local 276:  Secretary, M. E. Samuelson, Box 1052,
Rossland.
Local 344: Secretary, Mrs. Pearl Cassidy, c/o RR 2,
Ladysmith.
Local 345: Secretary, H. Middletin, c/o Post Office,
5424 Ash Street, Powell River.
Local 346: Secretary, Mrs. J. A. Sawyer, Box 781,
Williams Lake.
Local 352:  Secretary, Miss J. Chobotar, Box 555,
Terrace.
Local 454: Secretary, K. Hemus, Box 423, Fort St.
John.
Local 455:   Secretary,   O.  A.  Matthews,   Box 975,
Mission City.
Local 523: Secretary, Mrs. Louise Woods, Box 1102,
Golden.
POSTMASTERS (Canadian Postmasters' Association)
—Western Local: Frank Hilkey, Gabriola.
POTTERS (International Brotherhood of Potters and
Allied Workers)—Local 303: Secretary, William E.
Kells, 9646—153A Street, Surrey.
PRINTING    PRESSMEN.    (International    Printing
Pressmen    and    Assistants'    Union    of    North
America)—
Local  25:  Secretary,  David A.  Maclntyre,  Room
207, 517 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local 79:  Secretary, G. W. Langley, 1576 Rowan
Street, Victoria.
Local  598:   Secretary,  R.   C.   Banninger,   207,   517
East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTE (The Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada)—
Agassiz Branch: Secretary, Dr. Roger B. Buckland,
Box 226, Agassiz.
DREP Branch: Secretary, Dr. B. F. Peters, 1185
Highrock Place, Victoria.
Nanaimo Branch: Secretary, Miss E. A. Young,
28 Pine Street, Nanaimo.
Prince Rupert Branch: Secretary, Miss P. Critcher,
Box 488, Prince Rupert.
Summerland Branch: Secretary, R. M. Rosher, Box
228, Summerland.
Vancouver Branch: Secretary, Miss D. Callfas, 1585
West 14th Street, Vancouver 9.
Victoria   Branch:   Secretary,   G.   S.   Poritch,   7031
Brentwood Drive, Brentwood Bay.
PUBLIC EMPLOYEES  (Canadian Union of Public
Employees).—
Local 23 (Burnaby Civic Employees' Union): Secretary, John Knight, 1473 East 20th Street, North
Vancouver.
Local 50 (Victoria Civic): Secretary, L. P. Anderson,  1510 Derby Road, Victoria.
Local 105 (Prince Rupert Civic): Secretary, Vernon Movold, Box 83, Prince Rupert.
Local 116 (University of British Columbia): Secretary, Wm. W. Walker, Hut 08, UBC Campus,
Vancouver 8.
Local 237 (Ladysmith and District Public Employees' Union): Secretary, Bev. M. Welch,
RR 2, Ladysmith.
Local 333 (Esquimalt Municipal): Secretary, W. J.
Hawker, 482 Nelson Street, Victoria.
Local 338 (Kelowna Civic): Recording Secretary,
Mrs. Thelma Young, Room 3, 375 Bernard
Avenue,   Kelowna.
Local 339 (Nelson Civic): Secretary-Treasurer,
R. A. Grodzki, 1411 Crease Street, Nelson.
Local 343 (Kootenay Civic): W. H. Holmes, Room
5, 910 Portland Street,  Trail.
Local 358 (Duncan Municipal): Secretary, R. W.
Smith, RR 2, Duncan.
Local 363 (Revelstoke Civic Employees' Union):
Treasurer, Neil Pickering, Box 1544, Revelstoke.
Local 374 (Saanich Municipal): Secretary, Mrs. W.
H. Francis, Box 4160, Station A, Victoria.
Local 379 (Burnaby School Board Employers'
Union): Secretary, E. Apps, 4865 Triumph Street,
Burnaby 2.
Local 382 (Greater Victoria School Board): Secretary, J. Foxgord, Box 295, Victoria.
Local 386 (Coquitlam District Civic): Secretary, H.
Shuster, 608 Dansy Avenue, Coquitlam.
Local 387 (New Westminster Civic): Secretary,
John W. Nottall, 4887—200th Street, Langley.
Local 388 (Victoria City Hall): Secretary, Mrs. J.
Proctor, 1 Centennial Square, City Hall, Victoria.
Local 389 (North Vancouver): Secretary-Treasurer,
T. P. Kelly, 814 West 15th Street, North Vancouver.
Local 391 (Vancouver Public Library): Secretary,
Miss B. Bell, c/o Vancouver Public Library, 750
Burrard Street, Vancouver 111.
Local 392 (Vancouver School Board): Secretary,
Jack Curtis, 1767 East 62nd Avenue, Vancouver 15.
Local 394 (Richmond Municipal): Recording Secretary, Russell Mack, 546 Blundell Road, Richmond.
Local 399 (Prince George Civic): Secretary, John
McFadden, Box 936, Prince George.
Local 401 (Nanaimo Civic): Secretary, David T.
Jaques, 1521 Bush Street, Nanaimo.
Local 402 (Surrey Municipal): Recording Secretary,
M. Dench, 5738—172nd Street, Surrey.
Local 403 (Langley): Secretary-Treasurer, I. M.
Faulkner, 25162—40th Avenue, RR 3, Aldergrove.
Local 407 (Vancouver): Secretary-Treasurer, A.
Hutchinson, 3046 Charles Street, Vancouver 6.
Local 409 (New Westminster School Maintenance):
Secretary, Mrs. P. Linton, 4514 Watling Street,
Burnaby 1.
 U 112
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
PUBLIC EMPLOYEES   (Canadian Union of Public
Employees)—Continued
Local 410 (Victoria Public Library): Secretary,
Miss Gillian Pearson, c/o 1312 Blanshard Street,
Victoria.
Local 411 (Chilliwack School District): Secretary-
Treasurer, Ezra Neetz, 8857 Prest Road, RR 1,
Chilliwack.
Local 439 (Courtenay School Board): Secretary, G.
F. Calvert, RR 2, (Box 1167), Courtenay.
Local 441 (Saanich School Board): Secretary, T. W.
Healey, 5904 West Saanich Road, R.R. 7, Victoria.
Local 454 (Delta Civic): Secretary, Mary Esposito,
Box 83, Delta.
Local 458 (Chilliwack Municipal): Financial Secretary, J. J. Dyck, 239 Riverside Drive, Chilliwack.
Local 459 (Sooke School Board): Secretary, S.
Armstrong, 2784 Shoreline Drive, Victoria.
Local 476 (Powell River School Board): Secretary,
Mrs. M. M. Ford, Box 246, Powell River.
Local 479 (Royal Oak Burial Park, Victoria): Secretary, Philip Austin, 206, 3820 Shelbourne Street,
Victoria.
Local 498 (Port Coquitlam Civic): Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. Lucia Holmgren, Box 143, Port Coquitlam.
Local 511 (Oak Bay Municipal): Secretary, A. C.
Haas, 1785 Emerson Street, Victoria.
Local 523 (Okanagan Valley School Board): Secretary, A. G. Carmichael, 1805—32nd Street, Vernon.
Local 556 (Courtenay Civic): Recording Secretary,
George E. Anderson, Box 1851, Courtenay.
Local 561 (Coquitlam School District): Secretary,
F. Hurst, Box 374, Mission City.
Local 598 (Greater Victoria Water): Secretary,
Dave Jackson, 3917 Braefoot Place, Victoria.
Local 608 (Penticton Civic Employees' Union):
Secretary, Miss Helen J. Fox, Box 338, Penticton.
Local 622 (Maple Ridge Municipal): Secretary, Lisa
Flatta, Box 301, Maple Ridge.
Local 623 (Campbell River Municipal): Secretary,
Mrs. R. Tucker, Box 113, Campbell River.
Local 626 (Vernon Civic Employees' Union): Secretary, Miss R. Okazaki, Box 862, Vernon.
Local 664 (CBC Production Employees): Secretary,
.Archie Kelly, 870 Milner Road, Richmond.
Local 682 (Association of Radio and Television Employees of Canada): Secretary, Shirley Stocker,
Box 35251, Station E, Vancouver.
Local 703 (Maple Ridge School Board): Secretary,
Mrs. G. Robinson, 11606—248th Street, Haney.
Local 707 (Kitimat Civic): Secretary, Victor F.
Peppar, Box 174, Kitimat.
Local 712 (Chilliwack Civic): Secretary, Alfred E.
Beer, 160 Mellard Avenue, Chilliwack.
Local 716 (Richmond School Board Employees'
Union): Secretary, C. H. Delves, 393 Lockhart
Road, Richmond.
Local 718 (Richmond Civic): Secretary, Betty Elliott, Box 134, Richmond.
Local 723 (Campbell River School Board): Secretary, D. C. Loucks, Box 341, Campbell River.
Local 727 (Alberni and District): Secretary, J. J.
Deboer, Box 1250, Port Alberni.
Local 728 (Surrey School Board): Secretary, Mrs.
P. Chubb, 3, 7169 King George VI Highway, Surrey.
Local 729 (Cranbrook School Board): Secretary,
Ehlert Huebener, 722 Tenth Street South, Cranbrook.
Local 733 (Ashcroft School Board): Secretary, E.
R. Evans, Box 482, Ashcroft.
Local 748 (Nelson School Board): Secretary, L.
Batley, 508 Fifth Street, Nelson.
Local 751 (White Rock Civic): Secretary, L. Straite,
2847 Gordon Street, Crescent Beach.
Local 774 (Matsqui Municipal): Secretary, H.
Heppner, 3139 Casrel Court, Clearbrook.
PUBLIC EMPLOYEES  (Canadian Union of Public
Employees) —Continued
Local 779 (Howe Sound School Board): Secretary-
Treasurer,  Mrs.  E.  D.  McCawley,  Judd  Road,
Brackendale.
Local  788   (Saltspring  School  Board):   Secretary,
Mrs. D. Elliott, Box 7, Ganges.
Local 798 (Powell River Outside Workers): Secretary, Dianne McMillan, 5562 Maple Street, Powell River.
Local 801 (Sechelt School Board): Secretary-Treasurer, Ed A. Field, Box 677, Gibsons.
Local 825 (Port Moody Civic): Secretary, P. Boude-
wyn, 1969 East Eighth Avenue, Vancouver 12.
Local 847 (Merritt School Board): Secretary-Treasurer, T. Law, Box 21, Merritt.
Local 848 (Oliver Public Employees' Union): Secretary, Melvin Miller, Osoyoos.
Local 873  (Ambulance Employees' Union):  Secretary, Terry Garrow, c/o 814 London Street, New
Westminster.
Local   881    (Chest   Employees):    Secretary,   Peter
Fleming, 3136 West Broadway, Vancouver.
Local  900   (Kamloops  School  Board):   Secretary,
W. N. Ferguson, 204, 380 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
Local 917 (University of Victoria Employees' Association) : Recording Secretary, D. Thorndick, 2941
Donald Street, Victoria.
Local 947  (Greater Victoria School District):  Recording Secretary, Mrs. R. Taylor, 4120 Cedar Hill
Road, Victoria.
Local 951 (University of Victoria): Secretary, A. H.
Sinclair, 105, 1720 Richmond Road, Victoria.
Local 979 (Golden School District): Recording Secretary, Mrs. Elaine Orcutt, Box 944, Golden.
Local 1004  (Vancouver Civic Employees' Union):
Secretary, D. L. Werlin, Suite 400, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local 1040 (Lillooet Civic Employees' Union): Secretary, B. Hillocks, Lillooet.
Local 1048 (Prince George Civic):  Secretary, Mel
Springal, Box 1364, Prince George.
Local 1050 (Quesnel Civic): Secretary, F. B. Moxley,
Box 1885, Quesnel.
Local 1091  (Delta School Board): Secretary, Miss
M. Peltola, 111, 11864—88th Avenue, Delta.
Local 1123 (Okanagan Regional Library): Secretary,
Miss Gaye Hayes,  1781 Highland Drive North,
Kelowna.
Local   1136   (Summerland   Municipal):   Secretary,
Evelyn A. Ask, Box 489, Summerland.
Local   1260   (Langley   School   Board):   Secretary,
Lawrence A. Davis, Box 104, Fort Langley.
Local   1267   (Mission Civic):   Secretary,  Lola Mc-
Breen, Box 151, Mission.
Local 1276 (Rossland Civic): Secretary, Jack Smith,
Box 642, Rossland.
Local 1285  (Trail Civic): President, A. E. Underwood, Box 344, Rossland.
Local 1298 (Castlegar School District No. 3): Secretary, D. E. Hughes, Box 432, Castlegar.
Local  1311  (Victoria, Nursing Home):  Recording
Secretary,   Mrs.   Pat   Rowland,   1535   Edgeware
Road, Victoria.
Local  1333   (Creston-Kaslo School Board):   Secretary, J. A. Samuelson, Box 1201, Creston.
Local 1341 (Selkirk College Unit): Secretary, Miss
Elaine Soukoroff, Box 432, Castlegar.
PUBLIC EMPLOYEES (PSAC) Public Service Alliance of Canada)—
Agriculture Union—
Local 29: Secretary, Leo Caillier, c/o 395 Johnson
Street, Prince George.
Local 38: Secretary, W. F. De Zwaan, Box 265,
Agassiz.
Local 39:  President, J. Proctor, Box 340, Kamloops.
Local 40: Secretary, L. C. A. Collett, 434 Bernard
Avenue, Kelowna.
 DIRECTORY
U 113
PUBLIC EMPLOYEES (PSAC)— Continued
Agriculture Union—Continued
Local 41: Secretary, W. R. Evans, 347 Green
Avenue, Penticton.
Local 42: Secretary, James Lenuik, 345—5th Avenue East, Prince Rupert.
Local 43, Secretary, George Wardle, RR 1, Summerland.
Local 44: Secretary, N. Gregg, 395 South Delta,
Burnaby 2.
Local 60: Secretary, F. K. Mcintosh, 1356 West
49th Avenue, Vancouver 14.
Local 64: Secretary, Dave Winter, Box 44, Saan-
ichton.
Local 69: Secretary, D. Eyles, 3101—32nd Avenue, Vernon.
Custom Excise Union—
Local 20040: Secretary, J. B. Connell, 790 Belair
Drive, Richmond.
Local 20042: Secretary, Mrs. C. M. Davis, 525
Rupert Street, Victoria.
Local 20045: Secretary, M. J. Hadden, 15290 Pacific Avenue, White Rock.
Department of Public Works—
Local 20043: Secretary, Frank Rutter, Box 732,
New Westminster.
Local 20045: Secretary, J. R. Cameron, 301 Mil-
burn Drive, Victoria.
Local 2O0O7: Secretary, Box 330, Fort Nelson.
Local 20420: Secretary, c/o John Crowdis, 5031
Ann Street, Vancouver.
Local 20421: Secretary, Mrs. Margaret Honsinger,
1110 West Georgia Street, Vancouver 5.
Local 10441: Secretary, L. C. Kidd, 810 Lawndale
Avenue, Victoria.
Department of Veterans' Affairs:
Local 28: Secretary, Mrs. Wava Davis, 1231 Haro
Street, Vancouver 5.
Local 29: Secretary, Mrs. D. Bleackley, Room
101, Shaughnessy Hospital, Vancouver 9.
Local 30: Secretary, Mrs. B. Welsh, Veterans' Hospital, 2355 Richmond Avenue, Victoria.
Local 31: Secretary, Mrs. E. Hakkinen, c/o George
Derby Health and Occupational Centre, 7502
Cumberland, Burnaby 3.
Economic  Security  Employees'  National Association—
Local 005: Secretary, Mrs. J. S. Plane, 201, 2772
Spruce Street, Vancouver.
Local 900:   Secretary, Mrs. E. E. Yakubic, Box
435, Station A, Vancouver.
Local 901: Secretary, Mrs. Pritam Ark, 1849 East
64th Avenue, Vancouver.
Local  904:   Secretary,  Mrs.  G.   Mann,   308,   825
Cook Street, Victoria.
Local 905: Secretary, R. J. Bowman, 659 Fairview
Street, Coquitlam.
Local 906:  Secretary, Mrs. P. Stewart, Box 1605,
Castlegar.
Local 907: Secretary, V. A. Davidson, Box 2000,
Terrace.
Local 909:   Secretary, Mrs.  Dorothy Oram, 313
Baker Street, Kamloops.
Local   910:   Mrs.   N.   Bucynski,   1424   Bankhead
Crescent,  Kelowna.
Local 911:  Secretary, Pat Thornton, RR 1, Nanaimo.
Local 912:   Secretary,  Mrs.  R.  E.  Person,  2819
Spruce Street, Prince George.
Local 920:  Secretary, Mrs. V. Walters, Apt. 302,
130 West 17th Street, North Vancouver.
Local 921:   Secretary,  Mrs. E. Hutchinson,  Box
909, Postal Station A, Vancouver.
Local 922: Secretary, R. Wood, 551 Young Street,
Chilliwack.
Local   923:   Secretary,   Mrs.   D.   M.   Williams,
Suite 201, 33505 South Fraser Way, Abbotsford.
Local   924:   Secretary,   M.   Sharpe,   6349   Burns
Street, Burnaby.
PUBLIC EMPLOYEES (PSAC)— Continued
Economic  Security  Employees'  National  Association—Continued
Local 925:   Secretary,  R.  J.  Watts,  6271—133rd
Street, Surrey.
Local 926; Secretary, F. F. Foster, c/o 120 Lonsdale Avenue, North Vancouver.
Local 927:  Secretary, Mrs. T. N. Gourlay, Box
1505,  Victoria.
Local 928: Secretary, Mrs. M. A. Plecas, 308 B.
Bayview Road, General Delivery, Ladysmith.
Local  930:   Secretary,  B.  P.  Bens,  600  Redford
Street,   Port  Albemi.
Local 931:  Secretary, Mrs. J. D. Rowe, Box 644,
Courtenay.
Local 932: Secretary, Mrs. J. T. Bewza, 1430 Elm
Street,  Campbell River.
Local 933: Secretary, Mrs. M. Gillespie, Box 103,
Kamloops.
Local   934:   Secretary,   George   Douglas,   2106—
32nd Street, Vernon.
Local 935:   Secretary, R. R.  Cameron, Corywell
Road, RR 4, Kelowna.
Local 936:   Secretary, H. Irvine Moss, 269 Scott
Avenue, Penticton.
Local 937:   Secretary, J.  M. Drewry, 905 Edge-
wood Avenue, Nelson.
Local  938:   Secretary,  R.  W.  Necker,  25,  3518
Highway   Drive,   Trail.
Local  939:   Secretary,   Mrs.   I.   Gandolpho,   520
Fifth  Street South,  Cranbrook.
Local 940:  President:   A. B. Shortt, 430 Alward
Street,  Prince George.
Local   941:    Secretary:    M.   Fortune,   Box   672,
Prince Rupert.
Local 942:  Acting Secretary, Mrs. Irene Ainley,
7316—94th Avenue, Dawson Creek.
Local 943: Secretary, G. Van Elslade, Box 1955,
Quesnel.
Local  944:   Secretary,   D.   H.   Castling,   General
Delivery, Williams Lake.
Local 946:  Secretary, Mrs. A. Newell, 4017 Yeo
Street, Terrace.
Local 947:  Acting Secretary, E. E. Buckingham,
5312 Laurel Street, Burnaby 2.
Local 948:  Secretary, Mrs. Darlene P. Ursulak,
Box 3593,  Fort St. John.
Local  949:   Secretary,   L.   G.   Carter,   6142  Lois
Street,  Powell River.
Manpower and Immigration Union—
Pacific  Branch:   Secretary,   Mrs.   Doris   Wright,
306, 6508 Silver Avenue, Burnaby 1.
National Component—
Local 20073: Secretary, R. A. Slater, c/o Federal
Building,    Department    of    Fisheries,    Argyle
Street,  Port Alberni.
Local 20075:   Secretary, J. McQuillan,  c/o CGS
Wm. J. Stewart, Victoria.
Local 20076:   Secretary, W.  Rapatz, 4212 Cedar
Glen, Victoria.
Local 20088:  Secretary, Miss Jean Coventry, 644
East Eighth Avenue,  Vancouver   10.
Local 20090:  Secretary, B. M. Humphreys, 3560
Departure Bay Road, Nanaimo.
Local 20103:   Secretary,  Miss   S.   Hathway,  Kis-
piox, RR 1, Hazelton.
Local 20104:   Secretary,  Miss  M.  Durfeld,  Box
730, Williams Lake.
Local 20105: Secretary, P. J. Brackett, Box 135,
Field.
Local 20106: Secretary, T. Gibbons, Rogers Pass.
Local 20113: Secretary, M. Nuttgens, Box 3, Edge-
water.
Local 20147: Secretary, W. C. Tierney, 7256 Inlet
Drive, Burnaby 2.
Local 20149:  Secretary, W. J. Kangas, 1709 Jamaica Avenue, Prince Rupert.
Local 20169:  Secretary, Miss P. MacLean, 3260
Admirals Road, Victoria.
 U 114
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
PUBLIC EMPLOYEES (PSAC)—Continued
National Component—Continued
Local 20199: Secretary, Mrs. O. E. Ferguson, 4730
Willow Creek Road, West Vancouver.
Local 20214: Secretary, Miss V. E. Andrew, 1617
West 14th Avenue, Vancouver 9.
Local  29184:   Secretary,  Mrs.  P.  Aspinall, Box
1100, Port Alberni.
Local 29185: Secretary, Miss L. Cunnington, Alert
Bay.
Local 29189: Secretary, Miss L. Sellars, Box 730,
Williams Lake.
Local   29192:   Secretary,  Mrs.  N.  Hughes,   652
Victoria Street, West Kamloops.
Local  29193:   Sheila  Daly,  Lejac  Student Residence, Fraser Lake.
Local 29197:   Secretary, Mrs. I. McAdams, Box
510, Chemainus.
Local 29212:  Secretary, A. J. Shaw, Lower Post
I.R.S., Lower Post.
Local 29233: Secretary, St. George's Student Residence, Lytter.
National Health and Welfare Union—
Local  20017:   Secretary,  Mrs.  Perrie  Ashdown,
3976 Happy Valley Road, RR 1, Victoria.
Local 20024: (address not known).
Local 20025: Secretary, Mrs. M. Mutch, Box 488,
Prince Rupert.
Local 20031: Secretary, Mrs. Olaf Steeves, Room
7017, 1001 West Pender Street, Vancouver 1.
Post Office Component—Local 15: Secretary, P.
G. Roy, 705, 1445 West 13th Avenue, Vancouver
9.
Solicitor General Component—
Local 20011: Secretary, Miss A. I. K. Goldsmith,
3530 Cambie Street, Vancouver 9.
Local 20012:  Secretary, Miss S. J. Hodding, 531
Dumeresq Street, Victoria.
Local 20016: Secretary J. G. Vegt, 202, 544 Austin
Avenue, Coquitlam.
Local 20017:   Secretary, R. R. McPherson, 2588
Park Drive, Abbotsford.
Local 20018: Secretary, S. Gaines, 4116 Cedar Hill
Road, Victoria.
Local  20019:   Secretary,  L.  J.  F.  Whyte,  46194
McCaffery Boulevard, Chilliwack.
Local   20069;   President,  Mrs.  Elinor  M.  White,
1252 Pine Street, Kamloops.
Local 20085:  President, Alan Hale, 33827 South
Fraser Way, Abotsford.
Local 20086: Secretary, Roert T. Lusk, Room 357,
1231 Haro Street, Vancouver.
Supply and Services Union—
Local   20001:   Secretary,   Mrs.   L.   Brooke,   2660
Killarney Road, Victoria.
Local 20002: Secretary, Miss L. Cook, 211 Battle-
ford Street, Victoria.
Local 20003:   Secretary, Mrs. M. Taverner, 3044
Paisley Road, North Vancouver.
Local 20062:   Secretary, Miss V. Hanley,  Room
318, 816 Government Street, Victoria.
Taxation Component—
Local 27: Secretary: T. W. Plewis, Federal Building, 251 Nanaimo Avenue West, Penticton.
Local 28: Secretary, N. Janssen, 1110 West Georgia Street, Vancouver 5.
Local 29: Secretary, Mrs. L. Vincent, 1005 Pandora Avenue, Victoria.
Union of Canadian Transport Employees—
Local 20202:   Secretary, T. F.  Parkin, Box 338,
Airport,  Quesnel.
Local 20204:  Secretary, T. L. Bennett, Box 330,
Fort Nelson.
Local 20209:  Secretary, M. A. Dolan, Box 398,
Sidney.
Local 20210: Secretary, J. T. Macintosh, 7, 1491
Government Street, Penticton.
Local 20211: Secretary, P. B. Robertson, Box 262,
Port Hardy.
PUBLIC EMPLOYEES (PSAC)—Continued
Union of Canadian Transport Employees—Continued
Local  20212:   Secretary,   F.   N.   Foster,   RR   1,
Airport, Prince George.
Local 20213:   Secretary, B. J. Goudy, Box 367,
Prince  Rupert.
Local 20217:   Secretary,  D.  Eastham,  Box  724,
Terrace.
Local  20218:   Secretary,   P.   Tupper,   Box   105,
Ucluelet.
Local 20219:  Secretary, J. E. Clymo,  1063 Bird
Avenue,  Richmond.
Local 20220:  Secretary, B. Green, Box 684, Victoria.
Union of National Defence Employees—
Local 1001:  Secretary, Ken Henderson, 227 Wellington  Avenue,   Chilliwack.
Local 1002:   President, R. Bradshaw, 840 Ruskin
Road,   Richmond.
Local   1003:   Secretary,   T.   Smith,   266  Chestnut
Avenue,  Kamloops.
Local 1004: Secretary, J. E. Wilson, 20189—53A
Avenue, Box 443, Langley.
Local  1005:   Secretary,  C.  M. Rose,  1906—32nd
Avenue, Vernon.
Local 1006:  Secretary, J. R. Morland, 2445 First
Avenue, Prince George.
Local   1007:   Secretary,  Garry  Marriott,   RR   1,
Courtenay.
Local 1008:  Secretary, K. Fraser, 802 Esquimau
Road,  Victoria.
Local 1009:   Secretary, H. Minchin, 462 Sturdee
Street, Victoria.
Local  1010:  Secretary, Dave Tidbury, Box  128,
San Joseph.
Local 1011:  R. F. B. Currie, 2834 Colquitz Avenue, Victoria.
Local   1012:   Secretary,   Murdoch   Schmitz,   219,
1575 Begbie Street, Victoria.
Local  1013:   Secretary, A.  Ruff,  1505  Monterey
Avenue, Victoria.
Local 1014:   Secretary, A. B. Stevens, Box 346,
Nanaimo.
PULP AND PAPER WORKERS   (Pulp  and  Paper
Workers of Canada)—
Local 1: Secretary, J. Vigue, Box 1028, Castlegar.
Local   2:    Secretary,   Mel   Schmidt,    192   Kenneth
Street, Duncan.
Local 3: Secretary, Peter Evans, General Delivery,
Box 109, Woodfire.
Local 4: Secretary, D. Miller, Box 296, Prince Rupert.
Local 5: Secretary, Sharon Lambert, 8, 4829 Kings-
way, Burnaby 1.
Local 8: Secretary, Bill Bayliss, Box 161, Nanaimo.
Local 9: Secretary, J. R. Finnigan, Box 370, Prince
George.
Local   11:   Secretary,  R.  Hammell,  Box   11,   Gold
River.
Local 15: Secretary, M. G. Murphy, 35 Tenth Avenue South, Cranrook.
Local 18: Secretary, G. Hipkiss, Box 398, MacKen-
zie.
PULP AND PAPER MILL WORKERS (International
Brotherhood of Pulp,  Sulphite, and Paper Mill
Workers)—
Local 76: Secretary, W. F. Mattick, 5814 Ash Avenue, Powell River.
Local 297: Secretary, F. A. Allnutt, Box 188, Gibsons.
Local 298: Secretary, Ed Allen, 623 Enterprise Avenue, Kitimat.
Local 312: Secretary, L. C. Kent, Box 190, Ocean
Falls.
Local 433: Secretary, M. W. Charlebois, 5608 Victoria Drive, Vancouver 16.
Local 514:  Secretary, H. Anderson, Box 144, Port
Alice.
 DIRECTORY
U 115
PULP AND PAPER MILL WORKERS (International
Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill
Workers)—Continued
Local 572: Secretary, G. W. Penny, Box 602, Kamloops.
Local 592: Secretary, Robert Hoadley, 1150 Johnston
Road, Alberni.
Local 603: Secretary, R. I. Fujikawa, Suite 5, 245
Quebec Street, Prince George.
Local 742: Secretary, S. D. McEachren, Box 107,
Campbell River.
Local 860: Secretary, Tom Brooks, 2229 Belmont
Avenue, Victoria.
Local 951: Secretary, L. M. Olynick, 52 Okanagan
Boulevard, Kelowna.
RADIO   AND   TELEVISION   EMPLOYEES    (see
CURE, Local 682)
RAILWAY   EMPLOYEES,   RAILWAY   CARMEN
(Brotherhood of Railway Carmen of the United
States and Canada)—
Local 58:   Secretary,  H. Holmes, 2510 West 21st
Avenue, Vancouver 8.
Local 98: Secretary, E. C. Cook, RR 2, Nelson.
Local 148: Secretary, A. C. Quirie, 2160 Ponderosa
Avenue, Kamloops.
Local 173:  Secretary, G. S. Mason,  15 Little Van
Home Street, Cranbrook.
Local 280: Secretary, A. R. Porterfield, 15630—80th
Avenue (RR 14), North Surrey.
Local 426:  Secretary, A. S. McFadden, 932 Tenth
Avenue East, Prince Rupert.
Local 481: Secretary, W. F. Maki, Box 391, Revelstoke.
Local 773: Secretary, D. E. Foum, 1895 East 34th
Avenue, Vancouver 15.
Local 1415:  Secretary, Frank J. Westle, 927 Irwin
Street, Prince George.
Local   1419:   Secretary,  M.  G.  Hurren,  Box  111,
Squamish.
RAILWAY CLERKS  (Brotherhood of Railway, Airline, and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express and Station Employees)—
Local 42:  Secretary, G. M. Frketich, 2864 Walton
Avenue, Port CoquiUam.
Local 62: Secretary, G. Hackman, RR 2, McCurdy
Road, Kelowna.
Local 123:  Secretary, Miss E. Anderson, 631 Fitz-
william Street, Nanaimo.
Local 125: Secretary, R. E. Wells, 547 Foster Avenue, Coquitlam.
Local 135: Secretary, Al A. Horkoff, 712 East Sixth
Street, North Vancouver.
Local 404:   Secretary,  G.  H. Burchill,   135 Atkins
Avenue, Victoria.
Local 525:  Secretary, R. Wilson, Box 983, Revelstoke.
Local 526:  Secretary, J. H. Vallance, 4497 Quebec
Street, Vancouver io.
Local 630:   Secretary, M. Hill, Suite 15, 3040 Nanaimo Street, Vancouver.
Local 247: Secretary, Len Alyward, Box 247, Wellington.
Local 1241: Secretary, M. C. Moody, 1280 Dogwood
Crescent, North Vancouver.
Local  1291:  Secretary, W. H. Phillifent,  18 View
Street, Nelson.
Local 1292: Secretary, G. F. Engelen, 901 Seventh
Street South, Cranbrook.
Local 1321: Secretary, W. D. Sharp, 921 Delta Avenue, Burnaby.
Local 1322:  Secretary, Mrs. Pat Janes, 4370 Mos-
crop Street, Burnaby 1.
Local 1386: Secretary, I. Wilson, 701, 999 Gilford
Street, Vancouver.
Local 2315: Secretary, G. E. Tweed, 2914 West 30th
Avenue, Vancouver 8.
RAILWAY CLERKS (Brotherhood of Railway, Airline, and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express and Station Employees)—Continued
Local 2320: Secretary, R. Head, Suite 85, 1710 Newton Street, Victoria.
Local 3016:   Secretary,  J.  A.  Dodd,  209,  910  St.
Andrews Street, New Westminster.
RAILWAY  POLICE   (Canadian  National  Railways
Police   Association)—Local   1:   Secretary,   K.   W.
Roach, 304, 1015 Third Avenue, New Westminster.
RAILWAY   EMPLOYEES,   RAILROAD   SIGNAL-
MEN (Brotherhood of Railroad Signalmen)—Local
192: Secretary, Edward J. Smith, 1256—12th Street,
Kamloops.
RAILWAY, TRANSPORT, AND GENERAL WORKERS  (Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, Transport, and General Workers)—
Local 28: Secretary, G. Yeomans, 45, 2000 Central
Street, Prince George.
Local 82: Secretary, F. A. Trybuch, 2555 Charles
Street, Vancouver 6.
Local 93: Secretary, R. P. Ellison, Box 2754,
Smithers.
Local 100: Secretary, J. Simpson, Suite 101, 529
East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local 143: Secretary, A. N. Fen, Box 5, Blue River.
Local 150: Secretary, A. N. Brown, 742 Ivy Street,
Kamloops.
Local 154: Secretary, K. B. Adams, 1430 Eighth
Avenue, Prince Rupert.
Local 221: Secretary, H. K. King, SS Prince George,
c/o CNR Marine Terminal, foot of Main Street,
Vancouver.
Local 222: Secretary, R. E. Greig, 1521 Bay Street,
Victoria.
Local 226: Secretary, Miss Shirley J. Chartrand,
9580—129th Street, Surrey.
Local 234: Secretary, Ralph Davis, 3656 Raymond
Street South, Victoria.
Local 247: Secretary, E. Ferreira, Box 166, McBride.
Local 275: Secretary, Miss K. LeBlanc, 462 East
16th Street, Vancouver.
Local 276: Secretary, J. Hardy, 467 Foster Street,
Victoria.
Local 293: Secretary, R. B. Graham, 940—112th
Avenue, Dawson Creek.
Local 326: Secretary, F. Leclair, 8630—111th Street,
North Delta.
Local 332: Secretary, Miss J. Aitken, 6766 Fleming
Street, Vancouver 15.
Local 400:   Secretary, J. M.  Collins,  1, 2276 West
Fourth Avenue, Vancouver 9.
REFRIGERATION    SERVICE    AND    INSTALLATION WORKERS'  UNION   (see Plumbers, Local
516)
REFRIGERATIVE  SUPPLY  EMPLOYEES'   ASSOCIATION—Secretary, W. Distan, 3088 Flint Road,
Port Coquitlam.
RETAIL   CLERKS   (Retail   Clerks'   Union)—Local
1518:   Chief   Executive   Officer,   Rudolph   Krickan,
4021 Kingsway, Burnaby 1.
RETAIL/WHOLESALE     EMPLOYEES     (Retail,
Wholesale, and Department Store Union)—
Local 470: Secretary, Mrs. V. Hansen, 212, 517
East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local 517: Secretary, W. Friesen, 212, 517 East
Broadway, Vancouver  10.
Local 580: Secretary, N. Kinar, 2116 Grand Boulevard, North Vancouver.
SEAFARERS (Seafarers' International Union of
Canada)—Vice President, A. Poole, 837 Homer
Street, Vancouver.
SECURITY OFFICERS AND ASSOCIATED PERSONNEL (see Laborers, Local 105)
 U 116
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
SERVICE  EMPLOYEES   (Service  Employees'  International Union)—
Local   244:   Secretary,   T.   B.   Hyde,   359   Homer
Street, Vancouver 3.
Local  379:   Secretary,  Hugh  Peebles,   129 Medina
Street, Victoria.
SHEET-METAL WORKERS  (Sheet Metal Workers'
International  Association)—
Local  276:   Secretary,  John  Walker,   472   Cecelia
Street, Victoria.
Local 280: Secretary, James E. Mead, 202, 33 East
Eighth Avenue, Vancouver 10.
Local 314: Secretary, L. W. Phillips, 2261 Waterloo
Street, Vancouver.
SHINGLE WEAVERS   (see Carpenters)
SHIPWRIGHTS, JOINERS, AND BOATBUILDERS'
UNION (see Laborers, Local 506)
SHIPWRIGHTS, JOINERS, AND CAULKERS  (see
Shipyard Workers, Local 9)   (now known as Carpenters,  Local   1598)
SHIPYARD WORKERS (Shipyard General Workers'
Federation  of British  Columbia) —
Local 1 (Marine Workers' and Boilermakers' Industrial  Union):   Secretary,   W.   Stewart,   1219  Nanaimo  Street,  Vancouver 6.
Local 3 (Machinists', Fitters', and Helpers' Union):
Business   Agent,   R.   B.   Loudon,   715   Johnson
Street,  Victoria.
Local 9   (Shipwrights', Joiners',  and Caulkers'  Industrial Union):   Secretary, Don Douglas, Room
5, 715 Johnson Street, Victoria.
SHOREWORKERS   AND   CLERKS   (see   FISHERMEN, BRITISH COLUMBIA)
SLEEPING-CAR PORTERS  (Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters)—Local 8:  Secretary, Ernest Lawrence, 3696 East Georgia Street, Vancouver.
SMITHERS GARAGE  (see Christian Labour Association)
SOCIAL SERVICES WORKERS (Social Service Employees' Union of the Province of British Columbia)—Recording  Secretary,  Miss M. Wheeldon,   1,
436 Niagara Street, Victoria.
STAGEHANDS (see Moving Picture Operators, Local
118)
STEELWORKERS (United Steelworkers of America)—
Local 289: (defunct).
Local  480:   Secretary,   S.   Krewski,   910   Portland
Street, Trail.
Local   649:   Secretary,   Bruce   Lambert,   Box   667,
Princeton.
Local 651:   Secretary, H. Honeyman,  140 Howard
Street, Kimberley.
Local   663:   Secretary,   Gilles  Trembley,   Box   22,
Britannia Beach.
Local   816:   Secretary,   D.   McCormack,   Box   22,
Vananda.
Local 882: Secretary, John Buholzer, Box 177, Blubber Bay.
Local 898: Secretary, Mervin DeHaan, c/o Granisle
Copper Co., Box 40, Granisle.
Local 900: Secretary, Don Gardner, Box 7, Beaverdell.
Local 901:   Secretary, J. J.  Chernenkoff,  Box 39,
Salmo.
Local 931: (defunct).
Local  935:   Secretary,  R.  Lindstrom,  425  Ritchie
Street, Kimberley.
Local 946: President, C. Lok, Box 1001, Hope.
Local 949: Secretary, Roger D. Lee, c/o Cominco
Ltd., Port McNeill.
Local  954:   Secretary,   Bernie   Brisch,   Box   8000,
Campbell River.
Local 959: Secretary, F. J. Schulte, Box 9, Fraser
Lake.
Local  1105:  Administrator, Vincent L.  Ready,  33
East Broadway, Vancouver.
Local   2655:   Secretary,   Peter   McLean,   33   East
Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local 2821:  Secretary, John Lukas  (Jr.), 33 East
Broadway, Vancouver 10.
STEELWORKERS (United Steelworkers of America)
—Continued
Local  2952:   Secretary,   E.  Meglaughlin,   33   East
Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local 2119:  Secretary, A. Wheat, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local 3253: Secretary, Allan Fitterer, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local 3302: Secretary, John Nixon, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local 3376: Secretary, Douglas Reid, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local   3546:   Secretary,   David   McCrea,   33   East
Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local 3910:  Secretary, R. Pulling, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local 5115: Secretary, K. Herre, Box 196, Kitimat.
Local 5404: Secretary, K. Bums, 33 East Broadway,
Vancouver 10.
Local 5432: Secretary, Fred Girling, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local 5770: Secretary, Noreen Cahill, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local 6470:  Administrator, V. L. Ready, 33 East
Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local  6523:   Secretary,   Lome   Qually,   Box   2269,
Merritt.
Local 6613:   Secretary, Art Hilderbrandt, 33  East
Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local   6623:   Secretary,   C.  Hammerstein,   33   East
Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local 6721: Secretary, Al Rawlings, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local 7293: Secretary, J. Starklauf, Riondel.
Local 7517:  Secretary, J. G. P. Barfoot, Box 727,
Fort St. James.
Local   7618:   President,   Tony   Belcher,   Box   300,
Peachland.
Local 7619:  Secretary, G. Edwards, Box 532, Ashcroft.
Local  7623:   Secretary,   Virginia  Reimer,   33   East
Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local  7692:   Secretary, Herbert Walker,  c/o  Box
1700, Revelstoke.
Local 7816:  Secretary, Verna Mcllwaine, 1234 Esquimau Road, Victoria.
STEREOTYPERS    (International   Stereotypers'   and
Electrotypers' Union)—Local 88:  Secretary, Don
J. Bennett, 6575 Curtis Street, Burnaby 2.
STRUCTURAL    IRON     WORKERS     (see    IRON
WORKERS).
STUDIO TECHNICIANS (see Moving Picture Operators, Local 891).
TAILORS  (see Clothing Workers, Local 178)
TEACHERS (British Columbia Teachers' Federation)
—General Secretary,  C.  D. Ovans,  105, 2235 Burrard Street, Vancouver 180.
TEAMSTERS   (International   Brotherhood   of  Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen, and Helpers of
America) —
Local 31 (General Teamsters' Union): Secretary,
Frank Bachmier, 106 Strickland Street, White-
horse, Y.T.
Local 181 (General Teamsters' Union): Secretary,
Allen J.  Barnes, 441  Francis Avenue, Kelowna.
Local 189 (Bakery Salesmen's Union): Secretary,
G. Thomson, 2520 Ontario Street, Vancouver 10.
Local 213 (Building Materials, Construction, and
Fuel Truck Drivers' Union): Secretary, Joseph
W. Whiteford, 490 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local 351 (Miscellaneous Workers', Wholesale and
Retail Delivery Drivers' and Helpers' Union):
Secretary, John Brown, 202, 2520 Ontario Street,
Vancouver.
Local 464 (Milk Sales Drivers' and Dairy Employees' Union): Secretary, Ben McCrone, 6516
Butler Street,  Vancouver  16.
 DIRECTORY
U  117
TELEGRAPH WORKERS (United Telegraph Workers)
Division 43  (Canadian Telecommunications Union,
British  Columbia District):   Secretary,  W.  Lindsay, 1013—92nd Avenue, Dawson Creek.
Division   1   (Canadian  Telecommunications  Union,
Pacific  Region):   Secretary,  W.  M.   Meyer,   Box
432, Station A, Vancouver 1.
Division 43  (Canadian Telecommunications Union,
Pacific   District):    Secretary,   B.   Nenson,   2658
Bobolink   Street,   Vancouver.
TELEPHONE   EMPLOYEES   (Federation   of   Telephone Workers of British Columbia)—
Local  1:  Secretary, R. Montgomery, 6959 Beatrice
Street, Vancouver 15.
Local  2:   Secretary-Treasurer,  D.  W.   Smith,   1533
Gladstone Avenue, Victoria.
Local 3: Secretary, D. Munro, 5965 Dauchers Drive,
Duncan.
Local 4:  Secretary, G. Ottewell, RR 1, Nelson.
Local 5:  Secretary, J. T. Grindley, 102, 2225 West
Seventh Avenue,  Vancouver  9.
Local 6:  Secretary, R. K. Bebault, 88 Secrest Avenue,  Penticton.
Local   7:    Secretary,   J.   D.   Johnston,    11446—96
Avenue, Delta.
Local 8:   Secretary, D. Pallot,  1877 Russet Wynd,
Kamloops.
Local   9:   Secretary,   K.   McCormack,   124   Aitken
Crescent,   Prince  George.
Local   10:    Secretary,   Mrs.   Dollina   Storey,   3391
Dundas Street, Vancouver 6.
Local   11:   Secretary,   Miss   Julie   Hall,   402,   845
Burdett Avenue,  Victoria.
Local 12: Secretary, Mrs. F. Fox, 67 Robart Street,
Nanaimo.
Local   13:    Secretary,   Miss   A.   McDonald,   1017
Hoover Street, Nelson.
Local   15:    Secretary,   Miss   Lorna   Dan,   15,   280
Third Avenue, Kamloops.
Local  16:   Secretary, Mrs.  C.  Dobie,  RR 4,  Bella
Vista Road, Vernon.
Local 17: Secretary, Miss Heather Hendricks, 4334
Second Street, Yarrow.
Local 18: Secretary, Mrs. F. Dawson, Austin Road,
RR 2, Prince George.
Local 20:  Secretary, Miss F. Allen,  116 East 57th
Avenue, Vancouver 15.
Local 21:  Secretary, F. G. Peech, 4588 Balmacarra
Road, Victoria.
Local  22:   Secretary,  Mrs.  E.  Douglas,  Box  653,
Vernon.
Local 23:  Secretary, Mrs. Cami Fincham,  10838—
144 Street, Surrey.
Local 24: Secretary, Mr. J. Sadorsky, RR 1, Kamloops.
Local   25:   Secretary,   Mrs.   K.   Cappelletto,   1264
Green Avenue, Trail.
Local 26: Secretary, Miss S. Manzer, 252 Mclntyre
Crescent, Prince George.
Local 27:   Secretary, Miss Mary Fourmeaux,  Box
1007, Ladysmith.
Local   30:   Secretary,   Don  Didier,   352   East   25th
Street,  North  Vancouver.
Local 31:   Secretary,  G. Corney,  3808  St. Thomas
Street, Coquitlam.
Local 32:   Secretary, M. J. Hansen, 2178 Wilerose
Street, Abbotsford.
Local 33:  Secretary, R. Watson, 30 Plover Street,
Kitimat.
TELEVISION AND RADIO ARTISTS (Association
of Canadian Television and Radio Artists)—Local
1: Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. Cathy Johnston, 106,
525 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2.
TERRACE AND DISTRICT FORESTRY EMPLOYEES' UNION—Secretary, Paul Nichol, Box 178,
Terrace.
TERRACE TRADES ASSOCIATION (see Christian
Labour Association)
TERRAZZO WORKERS' HELPERS (see MARBLE,
SLATE, AND  STONE POLISHERS)
TEXTILE   WORKERS   (Textile   Workers   of   North
America)—Local   1484:   Secretary,   Penny   Severs,
Box 5538, Vancouver.
THEATRE EMPLOYEES (see Moving Picture Operators, Locals B72, B70)
TILELAYERS   (see Bricklayers,  Local  3)
TILESETTERS   (see  Bricklayers,   Masons,   Local  3)
TRANSIT UNION  (Amalgamated Transit Union)—
Divisions 101-134: Secretary, Frank C. Collins, 125
East Eighth Avenue, Vancouver 10.
Division 109:  Secretary, J. T. Hassell, 1727 Town-
ley Street, Victoria.
TRANSPORTATION (United Transportation Union)—
Local 361: Secretary, S. F. Fuoco, Box 1090, Revelstoke.
Local 442: Secretary, W. A. Alliott, 483 East 30th
Avenue, Vancouver.
Local 501: Secretary, S. J. Parker, Box 1244, Revelstoke.
Local 534: Secretary, W. J. Boston, 1841 Whyte
Avenue, Vancouver 9.
Local 691: Secretary, K. E. Bumside, 229 Nicola
Street, Kamloops.
Local 799: Secretary, Fred H. Lowe, RR 1, Nelson.
Local 833: Secretary, J. A. Huxtable, 414—11th Avenue South, Cranbrook.
Local 839: Secretary, J. L. Brown, 820 Fir Crescent,
Cranbrook.
Local 968: (address not known).
Local 1010: Secretary, A. Floren, 1735 Lincoln
Avenue, Port Coquitlam.
Local 1051: Secretary, D. W. Haughan, 95 Mach-
leary Street, Nanaimo.
Local 1143: Secretary, G. A. Page, 662 Brandon
Avenue, Kamloops.
Local 1249: Secretary, J. J. Williams, Carpenters
Hall, Fifth and Alward Street, Prince George.
Local 1271: Secretary, Mike Keryluik, RR 4, Prince
George.
Local 1335: Secretary, W. E. Thompson, 7315 Stride
Avenue, Burnaby.
Local 1341: Secretary, J. J. Stuart, 1412 Balfour
Street, Penticton.
Local 1514: Secretary, G. A. Trojan, Apt. 3, 430
Fourth Avenue, Kamloops.
Local 1644: Secretary, J. Penner, 14771—106th Avenue, Surrey.
Local 1660: Secretary, W. Basil, Suite 2, 1168 Pen-
drell Street, Vancouver 5.
Local 1747: Secretary, John D. Kitt, 1248 Premier
Street, North Vancouver.
Local 1868: Secretary, D. A. Lambie, Apt. 1, 1028
Third Avenue, Prince Rupert.
Local 1923: Secretary, John G. Cokran, 1140 Douglas Street, Prince George.
Local 1778: Secretary, H. M. Crowston, Box 1074,
Squamish.
TRUCK DRIVERS AND HELPERS (General Truck
Drivers'    and   Helpers'    Union)     (see   Teamsters,
Local 31).
TUNNEL  AND   ROCK WORKERS   (see  Laborers,
Local 168).
TYPOGRAPHICAL (International Typographical Union)—
Local 70: Secretary, Ray Gordon, 1830 Como Lake,
Coquitlam.
Local 121: (Victoria Mailers' Union): Secretary, C.
H. Steele, 1946 St. Anne Street, Victoria.
Local 201: Secretary-Treasurer, William Richardson,
11, 2750 Quadra Street, Victoria.
Local 226 (Vancouver Typographical Union): Secretary, N. D. Pearsall, Room 102, 517 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local 340: Secretary, R. L. Redman, 1683 Bailey
Street, Trail.
 U 118
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
TYPOGRAPHICAL (International Typographical Union)—Continued
Local 413: Secretary, J. D. Standring, Box 53,
Prince Rupert.
Local 868: Secretary, J. Delaurier, 136 Aitken Crescent, Prince George.
u
UPHOLSTERERS (Upholsterers' International Union
of North America) —
Local   1:   Secretary,   Mrs.   Isabel   Opp,   666   East
Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Local  34:   Secretary,  Robert  Budzeszyn,   666  East
Broadway, Vancouver 10.
VANCOUVER BRICKLAYERS (Vancouver Bricklayers', Masons', Marble Masons', and Terrazzo
Workers' Union)   (see Bricklayers, Local 1)
VANCOUVER CITY HALL EMPLOYEES (see
MUNICIPAL   AND   REGIONAL   EMPLOYEES)
VANCOUVER FILM EXCHANGE EMPLOYEES
(see Moving Picture Operators, Local CE71)
VOCATIONAL INSTRUCTORS (British Columbia
Vocational Instructor Society)—Secretary, Mrs. B.
Collins, 5450 Chestnut Crescent, Delta.
w
WAREHOUSEMEN AND MANUFACTURING EMPLOYEES (see Teamsters, Local 842)
WATER, SEWERAGE, AND DRAINAGE EMPLOYEES (Greater Vancouver Water District
Sewerage and Drainage District Employees' Union)
—Secretary, Mark Brennan, 2467 Tolmie Avenue,
Coquitlam.
WESPORT EMPLOYEES' COMMITTEE OF WESPORT    CHEMICALS    LIMITED—Secretary,    G.
Vervoort, 955 Bakerview Drive, Richmond.
WHITE SPOT EMPLOYEES' UNION—Secretary, D.
McLeod, 5, 4424 Main Street, Vancouver.
WOODWORKERS,  CARIBOO   (Cariboo  Woodworkers'  Association)—President,  Larry Duncan,  Box
775, 100 Mile House).
WOODWORKERS    (International   Woodworkers   of
America)—■
Local   1-71:   Secretary-Treasurer,   W.   H.   Wilson,
405, 207 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3.
Local 1-80: Secretary, Edwin Linder, c/o 351 Brae
Road, Duncan.
Local 1-85: Secretary, H. Irg, 310 Montrose Street,
Port Alberni.
Local 1-118: Secretary, A. E. Carle, 3656 Raymond
Street South, Victoria.
Local  1-217:  Recording Secretary, Douglas Evans,
2859 Commercial Drive, Vancouver 12.
Local  1-288:   Secretary, E. E.  Smith,  305,  545 St.
Georges' Avenue, North Vancouver.
Local  1-357:   Secretary,  Patricia  Ewles,  731—12th
Street, New Westminster.
Local 1-363:  Secretary, Karl E. Lidberg, Box 405,
Courtenay.
Local 1-367: Secretary, Erik Wood, 22554 Lougheed
Highway, Haney.
Local  1-405:   Secretary,  Elmer Atwood,   15  South
Ninth Avenue, Cranbrook.
Local 1-417: Secretary, D. K. Kelly, Suite 102, 1050
West Columbia, Kamloops.
Local 1-423: Secretary, Samuel A. Muir, 1139 Ellis
Street, Kelowna.
Local 1^124: Secretary, T. Mogensen, 909 Fifth Avenue, Prince George.
WOODWORKERS, NORTHERN (Northern Interior
Woodworkers' Association)—Secretary, B. W. Kruis-
selbrink, Box 773, Smithers.
PART IV—DIRECTORY OF EMPLOYERS' ORGANIZATIONS
The following organizations are organizations of employers that are involved
in collective bargaining in British Columbia or make representations to the Department of Labour from time to time regarding matters under the jurisdiction of the
Department. No official recognition is implied by the listing of any organization
in the directory. The standards for inclusion have been established largely in the
interests of consistency.
Addresses are in British Columbia, unless otherwise shown.
APARTMENT OWNERS' ASSOCIATION,
GREATER VANCOUVER—President, Keith Hill-
man; Secretary, Bruce Forrest, 2068 West Fourth
Avenue,  Vancouver  9.
AUTOMOBILE DEALERS' ASSOCIATION OF
GREATER VANCOUVER—President, H. S. Mus-
grove; Secretary, K. G. Dale, 305, 1037 West Broadway, Vancouver 9.
AUTOMOBILE DEALERS' ASSOCIATION, VICTORIA—President, Lou Waibel; Secretary, L. F.
Maggs, 3928 Cedar Hill Cross Road, Victoria.
AUTOMOTIVE RETAILERS' ASSOCIATION —
President, H. N. Curtis; Secretary, J. Lloyd Kin-
neard, 302,  1687 West Broadway, Vancouver 9.
AUTOMOTIVE TRANSPORT ASSOCIATION OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA — President, James F.
Charles; Secretary, R. E. Hunt, 4090 Graveley
Street, Burnaby 2.
BAKERY INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS ASSOCIATION, WESTERN—President, T. E. Moir; Secretary, D. M. Ritchie, 3, 8431 Granville Street,
Vancouver 14.
BARBERS' ASSOCIATION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA—President, John E. Richardson; Secretary,
R. R. Foxcroft, Room 6, 423 West Broadway,
Vancouver.
BUILDING OWNERS' AND MANAGERS' ASSOCIATION OF VANCOUVER—President, A. H.
Ens; Secretary, Donald T. Bain, 809, 409 Granville
Street, Vancouver.
BUILDING OWNERS AND MANAGERS ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA—Secretary, P. E. Wain-
wright,   1205 Government Street, Victoria.
COAL ASSOCIATION OF CANADA—President, J.
F. Diskin; Managing Director, G. W. Barnes,
202a, 627 Sixth Avenue Southwest, Calgary 1, Alta.
CONSTRUCTION ASSOCIATION OF BRITISH
COLUMBIA AMALGAMATED—President, B. L.
Blain; Secretary, L. Procter, 2675 Oak Street, Vancouver 9.
CONSTRUCTION ASSOCIATION, DAWSON
CREEK—President, Dave Connolly; Secretary Manager, R. D. Benoiton, 204 Professional Building,
Dawson Creek.
 DIRECTORY
U  119
CONSTRUCTION ASSOCIATION, PRINCE
GEORGE—President, Lome Jackson; Secretary,
Peter Sorensen, 3851—18th Avenue, Prince George.
CONSTRUCTION ASSOCIATION, VICTORIA —
President, G. Fanner, 2925 Douglas Street, Victoria; Secretary, E. J. Phillips, 69 Bastion Square,
Victoria.
CONSTRUCTION CENTRE LTD., INDUSTRIAL—
President, Wm. G. McKinnon; Secretary, Evelyn L.
McKinnon, 2430 Willingdon Avenue, Burnaby 2.
CONSTRUCTION LABOUR RELATIONS ASSOCIATION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA—President,
C. J. Connaghan; Executive Vice-President, R. K.
Gervin, 4787 Kingsway, Burnaby 1.
CONTRACTORS ASSOCIATION, ALBERNI VALLEY—President, John G. Reeves; Secretary, Pete
Carsholt, Box 81, Port Alberni.
CONTRACTORS' ASSOCIATION, REVELSTOKE
AND DISTRICT—President, W. J. Coles; Secretary,
C. Rutherford, Box 410, Revelstoke.
DRUG ASSOCIATION, BRITISH COLUMBIA
WHOLESALE—Secretary, Bruce McColl, 1508, 510
West Hastings Street, Vancouver.
DRY CLEANERS' AND LAUNDERERS' ASSOCIATION, BRITISH COLUMBIA—President Lyle Pul-
lam; Secretary, Murray Grainger, 13521 King
George VI Highway, Surrey.
DRYWALL CONTRACTORS' ASSOCIATION,
BRITISH COLUMBIA—President, T. Burns; Secretary, B. Vanderveen, 1696 Booth Avenue, Coquitlam.
ELECTRICAL ASSOCIATION, VANCOUVER—
President, Harold E. Johnson; Secretary, Norman
Beech, 310, 509 Richards Street, Vancouver 2.
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS ASSOCIATION OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA—President, D. H. Topp;
Secretary, P. Wise, Box 338, Kelowna.
EMPLOYERS' COUNCIL OF BRITISH COLUMBIA—President, F. G. Peskett; Secretary, A. J. Keylock, 20th Floor, 1177 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 1.
FISHERIES ASSOCIATION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA—President, E. L. Harrison; Secretary-Manager,
K. M. Campbell, 400, 100 West Pender Street, Vancouver.
FISHING VESSEL OWNERS' ASSOCIATION OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA—President, Capt. Richard
Martinolich; Secretary, Frank Buble, 1619 Fell Avenue, Burnaby 2.
FLOOR COVERING ASSOCIATION, BRITISH COLUMBIA—President, D. Patrick; Secretary, Ed
Russell, 2675 Oak Street, Vancouver 9.
FOOD PROCESSORS' ASSOCIATION, WESTERN
—President, D. H. Kitson; Manager, James A. Rankin, 608 Marine Building, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1.
FOOD SERVICE EXECUTIVES' ASSOCIATION—
President, J. G. Anderson; Secretary, Anne J.
Harrison, 4424 Main Street, Vancouver.
FOREST INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS LIMITED—
President, John M. Billings; Manager, V. G. Jamieson, 880, One Bentall Centre, 505 Burrard Street,
Vancouver.
FOREST INDUSTRIES OF BRITISH COLUMBIA,
COUNCIL OF THE—President, G. L. Draeseke;
Secretary, H. E. Bufton, 1550, 1055 West Hastings
Street, Vancouver 1.
FOREST LABOUR RELATIONS ASSOCIATION,
INTERIOR—President, M. H. Davison; Secretary,
M. H. Davison, 203 Capri Office Tower, Kelowna.
FRUIT GROWERS' ASSOCIATION, BRITISH COLUMBIA—President, Allan Claridge; Secretary,
Mrs. Barbara Snowsell, 1473 Water Street, Kelowna.
FRUIT GROWERS' ASSOCIATION, CRESTON
VALLEY—President, E. Gatzke; Secretary, E.
Masuch, Creston.
HAIRDRESSERS' ASSOCIATION OF BRITISH
COLUMBIA—President, K. Campbell; Manager,
G. Driediger, 1777 West Third Avenue, Vancouver
9.
HOSPITALS' ASSOCIATION, BRITISH COLUMBIA—President, T. C. Marshall; Secretary, J. D.
Bradford, 440 Cambie Street, Vancouver 3.
HOTELS' ASSOCIATION, BRITISH COLUMBIA—
President, T. Tidball; Secretary, L. W. Manuel, 948
Howe Street, Vancouver.
HOTELS' ASSOCIATION, VICTORIA DIVISION—
President, J. Mawer; Secretary, J. Riddoch, 1140
Government Street, Victoria.
LITHOGRAPHERS' ASSOCIATION, BRITISH COLUMBIA—President, D. Clippingdale; Secretary, R.
A. Mahoney, Suite 103, 1090 West Seventh Avenue,
Vancouver 9.
LOG HAULERS' ASSOCIATION, WESTERN INDEPENDENT—President, Tom Hawthornthwaite;
Secretary, John T. Fisher, RR 2, Russell Road,
Ladysmith.
LOGGING ASSOCIATION, CENTRAL INTERIOR
—President, Howard Lloyd; Secretary, W. E. Bell-
mond, 3851—18th Avenue, Prince George.
LOGGING ASSOCIATION, INTERIOR—President,
A. Baird; Secretary, Harold Hildred, RR 2, Hart-
man Road, Box 593, Kelowna.
LUMBER MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION,
CARIBOO—President, R. L. Smith; Secretary, J.
Mlyazawa, Box 2830, Williams Lake.
LUMBERMEN'S ASSOCIATION, NORTHERN INTERIOR—President, W. J. Hutton; General Manager, R. J. Gallagher, 514, 550 Victoria Street,
Prince George.
MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION, THE CANADIAN—Chairman, Wm. C. Wright; Manager,
James A. Rankin, 608 Marine Building, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1.
MARITIME EMPLOYERS' ASSOCIATION, BRITISH COLUMBIA—President, E. M. Strang; Secretary, J. M. Devine, 45 Dunlevy Avenue, Vancouver 4.
MASONRY CONTRACTORS' ASSOCIATION, VANCOUVER ISLAND—President, Kroppman; Secretary, D. Cunningham, 989 Londonderry Road, Victoria.
MASONRY CONTRACTORS' ASSOCIATION, VANCOUVER—President, R. Hillis; Secretary, H. Orm-
iston, 2727 Boundary Road, Vancouver 12.
MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS' ASSOCIATION
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA—President, N. Proch-
nicki; Secretary, G. H. Anderson, 1128 West Georgia Street, Vancouver 5.
MECHANICAL INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS' ASSOCIATION—President, N. Pringle; Secretary, V.
J. Traynor, 1128 West Georgia Street, Vancouver 5.
MECHANICAL INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS' ASSOCIATION, VICTORIA—President, B. H. Johnson; Secretary, V. J. Traynor, 1128 West Georgia
Street,   Vancouver  5.
MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE LTD., VANCOUVER
■—President, D. Mackay; Secretary, W. A. Sankey,
355 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1.
METAL INDUSTRIES' ASSOCIATION—President,
Stan Mason; Secretary, Jack Muirhead, 4012a East
Hastings Street, Burnaby 2.
MINING ASSOCIATION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA—President, T. H. McClelland; Managing Director, C. H. Mitchell, 305, 1200 West Pender Street,
Vancouver 1.
MUNICIPAL LABOUR RELATIONS ASSOCIATION, OKANAGAN MAINLINE—Secretary, c/o
Kelowna City Hall,   1435  Water  Street,  Kelowna.
OIL HEATING ASSOCIATION, BRITISH COLUMBIA—President, R. C. Neil; Executive Director, D.
J. Hamilton, 500, 1177 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 1.
OILWELL DRILLING CONTRACTORS, CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF—President, J. H. Storey,
211, 1147—17th Avenue Southwest, Calgary 3, Alta.;
Secretary, J. D. Porter, 500, 816 Seventh Avenue
Southwest, Calgary 2, Alta.
 U  120
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
PAINTERS' AND DECORATORS' ASSOCIATION
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA, THE MASTER—
President, George Minskip; Secretary, Karl Simon,
210 East Fifth Avenue, Vancouver 10.
PETROLEUM ASSOCIATION, CANADIAN —
Chairman, M. C. McKinnon; Manager, G. B. Mc-
Gillivray, 602, 880 Douglas Street, Victoria.
PIPE LINE CONTRACTORS' ASSOCIATION OF
CANADA—President, O. J. Johanson; Secretary,
Gordon R. Hodson, 130, 815 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver.
PLUMBING AND MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS' ASSOCIATION, CANADIAN—President,
G. H. Anderson; Secretary, H. L. Fritz, 1128 West
Georgia Street, Vancouver 5.
PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
BUREAU—President, D. A. S. Lanskail, 503, 1030
West Georgia Street, Vancouver 5.
CANADIAN RESTAURANT ASSOCIATION (BRITISH COLUMBIA REGION)—President, R. J.
Stout; Managing Director, Don Bellamy, 4424 Main
Street, Vancouver 10.
RESTAURANT ASSOCIATION, CANADIAN —
President, Primo Villaneuva; Secretary, Dave Scott,
6 and 7, 4424 Main Street, Vancouver.
RESTAURANT ASSOCIATION, CANADIAN (VICTORIA AND ISLAND BRANCH)—President,
John Davies; Secretary, Ross Douglas, 1975 Maple
Street, Vancouver 9.
ROAD BUILDERS' ASSOCIATION, BRITISH COLUMBIA—President, G. J. Zacharias; Secretary,
D. W. Spooner, 130, 815 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver  1.
SCHOOL TRUSTEES' ASSOCIATION, BRITISH
COLUMBIA—Secretary, F. M. Reder, 1095 Howe
Street, Vancouver  1.
SHEET METAL AND AIR CONDITIONING NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, BRITISH COLUMBIA
—President, G. Thackery; Secretary, L. Bolton,
Room 230, 3316 Kingsway, Vancouver 16.
SHEET METAL AND ROOFING CONTRACTORS'
ASSOCIATION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA, MASTER—President, R. G. Morison; Secretary, C.
Bollman, 2727 Boundary Road, Vancouver 12.
SHIPPERS' ASSOCIATION, OKANAGAN FEDERATED—President, J. W. Williamson; Secretary, H.
A. Pettman,  1476 Water Street, Kelowna.
STEEL ERECTORS' ASSOCIATION—President, L.
McWaters; Secretary, N. W. MacPherson, Box
2954, Vancouver.
TOWBOAT OWNERS' ASSOCIATION, BRITISH
COLUMBIA—President, J. H. Gardiner; Secretary, W. A. Sankey, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver.
TRANSPORT LABOUR RELATIONS ASSOCIATION—President, E. A. Tilton; Director, Carl E.
Anshelm, 4090 Graveley Street, Burnaby 2.
TRUCK LOGGERS' ASSOCIATION, THE—President, Jack D. Sexton; General Manager, Don Mackenzie, 216, 837 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 1.
VANCOUVER REGIONAL DISTRICT BOARD,
GREATER—Director, Graham D. M. Leslie, Room
10, 4829 Kingsway, Burnaby  1.
VENTILATING CONTRACTORS' ASSOCIATION
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA—1698 West Third Avenue, Vancouver 9.
WALL AND CEILING CONTRACTORS' ASSOCIATION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA—President,
Clifford Dann; Secretary, Ken Brown, 2315 Main
Street,  Vancouver  10.
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1972
6,030-1171-8697

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0373866/manifest

Comment

Related Items