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REPORT OF THE Department of Commercial Transport containing reports on COMMERCIAL VEHICLES, ENGINEERING,… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1972

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT
Hon. F. X. Richter, Minister F. A. MacLean, P.Eng., Deputy Minister
REPORT OF THE
Department of
Commercial Transport
containing reports on
COMMERCIAL VEHICLES, ENGINEERING, RAILWAYS,
AERIAL TRAMWAYS, PIPE-LINES, AND
INDUSTRIAL TRANSPORTATION
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1971
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1972
  Victoria, British Columbia, February 14, 1972.
To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C, O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Annual Report of the Department of
Commercial Transport for the year ended December 31, 1971.
F. X. RICHTER
Minister of Commercial Transport
 Victoria, British Columbia, February 11, 1972.
The Honourable F. X. Richter,
Minister of Commercial Transport.
Sir: I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Commercial Transport for the year ended December 31, 1971.
F. A. MacLean, P.Eng.
Deputy Minister of Commercial Transport
  F. A. MacLean, P.Eng., Deputy Minister of Commercial Transport.
 Report of the
Department of Commercial Transport
F. A. MacLean, P.Eng., Deputy Minister
I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of Commercial Transport for the year ended December 31, 1971.
Early in the year, both the Deputy Minister A. J. Bowering, P.Eng., and the
Chief Engineer R. E. Swanson, P.Eng., retired after a combined total of more than
66 years of service to the Province of British Columbia. During the subsequent
period of adjustments, a considerable load was placed on various members of the
staff and their efforts during this period are acknowledged.
The number of commercial motor-vehicle registrations continued to increase in
1971, with returns indicating a growth of approximately 10 per cent. In co-operation with the Department of Highways, new weight regulations were developed for
commercial vehicles and these came into effect on July 1, 1971. Operation under
the new regulations during the balance of the year did not reveal any anomalies or
omissions and showed the system to be simple and effective. Details of the new regulations are outlined in the report of the Weigh Scale Branch. As of November 24,
1971, a total of 1,583 commercial vehicles had licensed for gross loads in excess of
the previous limit of 76,000 pounds. Only 37 of these were licensed in excess of
86,000 pounds and 13 in excess of 90,000 pounds. This would indicate that the
higher weights will generally be carried by new equipment specificially designed for
a particular haul. With growing traffic volumes throughout the Province, the ever
increasing number of requests for the movement of oversize loads is causing much
concern with all requests being carefully examined and controlled or refused as
safety requirements indicate.
During the year, breaks in two small oil pipe-lines in the Peace River area indicated the potential hazards of such failures and the Department is working with the
Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources and the industry to formalize preventive and clean-up measures.
Other Departmental activities relative to industrial transportation, pipe-lines,
railways, and aerial tramways continued on a normal basis as outlined in the following reports.
 FF 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1971 FF 9
COMMERCIAL VEHICLE BRANCH
F. J. Regan, Director of Operations
The year under review was marked by a significant change in the weight
regulations as they apply to axle, axle group, and gross vehicle weights.
In the fall of 1970, the Honourable Minister of Commercial Transport and the
Honourable Minister of Highways authorized this Department, in conjunction with
the Department of Highways, to undertake a study of the existing weight regulations.
The purpose of this study was two-fold: To review the criteria on which the
regulations were based and to re-evaluate it in the light of the existing highways and
structures in the Province; and to ensure, as far as possible, that maximum use of
these facilities was being achieved not only from the point of view of the trucking
industry but of the general public. It was recognized that the overwhelming dependence of the general public on an efficient and economical road transport system depends on obtaining the maximum use of the facilities that are provided.
Accordingly, the general highway and structure inventory was evaluated against
the existing regulations and it was concluded that single axle weights could be increased to 20,000 pounds from 18,000 pounds; that the concept of wheelbase as a
limiting factor in gross vehicle weight could be abandoned; and that the control of
the spacing of two or more adjacent axles was of most importance.
A study of this latter factor revealed that it was desirable that all axles falling
within 28 feet should be limited by a schedule of allowable weight. An allowance
of 1,000 pounds per foot of axle spacing was found to meet the need.
Therefore, a schedule of allowable weights was developed on the basis of
20,000 pounds on a single axle and 35,000 pounds on two axles spaced 4 feet apart.
(All axles less than 42 inches are considered single axles.) This allowable weight
increases at 1,000 pounds per foot until a maximum of 59,000 pounds is reached
at 28 feet. All axles within the space of 4 feet to 28 feet are governed by the schedule and the 20,000 pounds limit on one axle.
The weight regulations do not limit wheelbase, which is controlled by the allowable length of the vehicle or combination of vehicles. These dimensions were
not changed, nor was the unit weight limit on tires.
A maximum gross weight of 110,000 pounds was set. This was done to afford
adequate protection to the bridges. There are many older structures in the Province that are rated below this standard and they are being individually "posted" to
show the maximum gross weight and maximum axle load allowed. The industry
as a whole is well aware of these limits and has taken care in the design of new
equipment to take these factors into account.
What the new regulations did was to provide an immediate increase to 82,000
pounds from 76,000 pounds for the conventional five-axle combination. This represents an approximate 15-per-cent increase in payload which is equivalent to a
substantial rate increase. The benefit is being passed on to the public by the industry, not through lower rates but by curtailment of rate increases.
Concurrent with the new weight regulations, provision was made for the operation of 45-foot semi-trailers on all highways, provided they meet the same tracking
characteristics that are found in 40-foot units.
All vehicles of 12,000 pounds or less were exempted from the requirements
to display their gross vehicle weight or to call at weigh-scale stations. These exemptions were made as it was found that this class of vehicle was seldom overloaded
and their presence at the scale-site constituted an additional traffic hazard at many
of the busier scales where traffic volumes are high. It was recognized that the
general public was being unduly inconvenienced by the existing regulations.
 FF 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
In view of the increased weight allowed by the new laws, it was thought desirable to include in the regulations provisions that would prohibit the proliferation
of vehicle combinations with inadequate horsepower and tractive effort and to reduce these problems on existing equipment over a period of time. Accordingly,
regulations were made to prohibit operators taking advantage of the new regulations
by increasing their gross weight unless their power units were equipped with engines
capable of producing one gross horsepower for every 300 pounds of gross weight
and by 1975 all vehicles with a gross vehicle weight in excess of 59,000 pounds will
be obliged to meet these requirements.
Also, any vehicle having one driving axle was prohibited from taking full advantage of the new allowable weights and by 1975 will be restricted to gross weights
of less than 60,000 pounds.
The last two regulations are the first to be applied in this manner by any jurisdiction in North America and they were promulgated with a view to discouraging
undesirable types of equipment and to provide performance standards and guidelines to industry, as well as to protect the interests of the general public.
Clauses were included in the regulations that would preclude the industry from
developing other equipment that is considered to be unsatisfactory either from a
highway-damage factor or from a safety factor. There is a specific provision in the
regulations that prohibits two axles being spaced more than 5 feet 5 inches apart
unless one is a steering axle or articulates in the manner of a steering axle to prevent any lateral movement between the road surface and the tires while the vehicle
is turning.   In a similar manner, three fixed axles on any one vehicle are prohibited.
These last provisions are also a first in North America and should prevent costly
experimentation with designs that have proved to be unsatisfactory in other jurisdictions.
During the year 1971, the Weigh Scale Branch expanded in relation to scale
sites, equipment, personnel, and portable patrols. Two new buildings were completed by the Department of Public Works, one at Golden which was a relocation of
site brought on by highway route changes and improvements. The new scale is
located approximately 1,000 feet west of the junction of Highway 95 and Highway
1. It is a completely modern building with adequate parking and servicing facilities
and is a vast improvement over the old site which was adequate while traffic volumes
were low but with increased volumes, particularly of mobile homes, the parking and
approach facilities became overcrowded and to a degree hazardous.
A new scale-site on Highway 1, west of Kamloops, was built to provide a
facility that would have a dual purpose, that is, the normal, weight, size, and licence
check would be made by our personnel. In addition, a truck inspection pit was
built on the site which will enable the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to carry out
normal mechanical inspection of trucks, i.e., steering, brakes, and exhaust systems.
Also, it will allow the individual truck driver to inspect his vehicle and make any
necessary brake adjustments.
Two new sets of portable scales have been purchased. One set will be located
in the Lower Mainland and the other at Terrace. Personnel have been appointed
and we are awaiting the delivery of transport. These additional patrols will serve a
growing need at both locations, and it is felt that by the random method of checking adequate controls can be maintained which will ensure the protection of the public investment in highways and bridges. The additional patrol will tend to stabilize
industry in their business practices with regard to contract bidding; in other words,
it will provide the legitimate operator with more protection from the unscrupulous
operator.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1971
FF 11
On luly 1, 1971, concurrent with the new weight regulations, an increased
scale of overload penalties was introduced. They vary from a minimum of $50 for
an overload of less than 2,000 pounds to a maximum of $50 plus an additional $6
per hundredweight for an overload of between 30,000 pounds and 40,000 pounds.
The purpose of setting these more severe penalties was to discourage the practice of
"taking a chance," relying on the fact that the previous small fine would from a
dollars and cents point of view justify the movement without permit. In a similar
manner it was meant to discourage the practice of obtaining a contract by bidding
on a project and calculating the costs and profits on the basis of carrying overloads.
If these objectives are carried out, the legitimate segment of the industry (which
is by far the larger) will be afforded more protection and encouraged to set their
costs on the basis of a legal load.
The upward trend in the number of permits issued, that has been apparent in
recent years, continued during 1971. The movement of loads in excess of 100,000
pounds continues to increase; this is a reflection of the state of industrial activity in
the Province. New technology has in fact produced the need for larger components
that in many cases must be manufactured under controlled conditions. There is
a serious concern within the Branch over this trend, and most manufacturing industries in the Province and as far east as Ontario have been, as far as possible, made
aware of the limits it has been necessary to impose on oversize and overweight loads
and of the fact that the industry must show justification for the move on public
highways. That is, they must show that no other means of transportation is available, that it is not possible to reduce the size or weight and that there is some public
interest involved. Even when these factors are met, it is sometimes necessary to
refuse applications due to the physical limits of the route or the danger to the
travelling public.
Mention should be made of the excellent co-operation the Branch has received
from other Government departments, particularly from the Departments of Highways, Public Works, and the Attorney-General, and from the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police. Their ready assistance and goodwill have assisted the Branch in
carrying out the duties and responsibilities imposed under the various Statutes.
PERMIT ISSUING OFFICES
Cache Creek
Chetwynd
Dawson Creek
Deas Island North
Deas Island South
Duncan
Fernie
Fort Nelson
Fort St. John
Golden
Hunter Creek
Kaleden
Kamloops North
Weigh-scales
Kamloops South
Kinnaird
Midway
Pacific
Parksville
Pattullo Bridge
Port Mann East
Port Mann West
Prince George North
Prince George South
Quesnel
Rossland
Ruskin
Rutland
Saanich
Sicamous
Terrace
Tete Jaune Cache
Tupper Creek
Vanderhoof
Vernon
Victoria (Term Permits)
Williams Lake
Yahk
 FF 12
Kamloops
Kootenay
Lower Mainland
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Portable Patrols
Nelson
Okanagan
Peace River
Prince George
Victoria
Department of Finance Government Agents
Alberni
Ashcroft
Atlin
Burns Lake
Clinton
Courtenay
Cranbrook
Creston
Duncan
Fernie
Fort Nelson
Fort St. John
Golden
Grand Forks
Ganges
Invermere
Kamloops
Kaslo
Kelowna
Kitimat
Lillooet
Merritt
Nanaimo
Nelson
New Westminster
Oliver
Penticton
Pouce Coupe
Powell River
Prince George
Prince Rupert
Princeton
Quesnel
Revelstoke
Rossland
Salmon Arm
Smithers
Terrace
Vancouver
Vanderhoof
Vernon
Williams Lake
MOTOR-VEHICLE BRANCH OFFICES
Abbotsford
Bella Coola
Campbell River
Casdegar
Chilliwack
Cloverdale
Dawson Creek
Gibsons
Kamloops
Masset
Mission
Nakusp
New Denver
New Westminster
North Vancouver
Pemberton
Port Hardy
Queen Charlotte City
Sechelt
Slocan
Squamish
Stewart
Trail
Valemount
Vancouver (Main)
Vancouver (East)
Vancouver (Point Grey)
Victoria
Miscellaneous
Director of Operations, Department of Commercial Transport, Victoria.
Engineering Branch, Department of Commercial Transport, Vancouver.
Comparison of Gross Revenue Collections From Commercial Licence and Permit
Fees for Five-year Period 1966/67 to 1970/71, Inclusive
Source
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
1969/70
1970/71
Commercial licences _ 	
Nonresident permits	
1                            1
$11,281,095    |    $11,732,631    [    $13,010,278
459,048    [           444,302    1           565,877
97,934    1           100,278    |           114,782
99,604    |           102,337    j           113,642
706,213    |           785,690               840,305
$14,639,288
715,407
122,556
134,918
889,623
$15,042,110
750,475
129,418
Temporary operation permits
Oversize and overweight permits
137,777
964,990
Totals	
$12,643,894    |    $13,165,238    1    $14,644,884    |    $16,501,792
1                            1                            1
$17,024,770
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1971
FF 13
Summary of Commercial-vehicle Licences and Permits Issued
for Five-year Period 1966/67 to 1970/71, Inclusive
Source
1966/67        1967/68 1968/69 1969/70        1970/71
Commercial motor-vehicle licences
Nonresident commercial permits....
Commercial-trailer licences	
Temporary operation permits	
Oversize and overweight permits	
165,703
17,085
19,057
38,179
36,101
175,358
16,142
20,929
39,137
44,777
194,332
18,839
21,188
42,814
46,768
215,670
23,684
22,176
49,974
51,218
222,921
25,810
23,586
53,904
55,665
Comparison Between Oversize Permit Revenue and Overweight Permit Revenue
for the 10-year Period 1961/62 to 1970/71, Inclusive
Year
Oversize
Overweight
1961/62.   	
$131,902
151,544
161,760
184,359
215,028
245,077
272,350
273,549
305,525
321,658
$167,805
1962/63... -  	
178,510
1963/64	
202,629
1964/65
231,941
1965/66         	
256,813
1966/67..	
306,703
1967/68      	
325,330
1968/69    	
333,175
1969/70     	
319,996
1970/71
372,820
Revenue From Gasoline and Motive-fuel Use Taxes
for Passenger and Commercial Vehicles
Fiscal Year Amount
1957/58   $24,500,000
1958/59   26,100,000
1959/60   28,582,000
1960/61   30,093,000
1961/62   39,262,000
1962/63   43,129,000
1963/64   46,420,000
Fiscal Year Amount
1964/65   $50,865,000
1965/66   56,441,000
1966/67   61,388,000
1967/68   65,548,000
1968/69   69,414,000
1969/70   76,115,000
1970/71   80,779,000
Note—The above information on revenue from gasoline and motive-fuel taxes
has been combined, as separate returns for commercial vehicles are not available.
 FF 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ENGINEERING BRANCH
(Railways, Aerial Tramways, Pipe-lines, and Industrial
Transportation)
A. W. Turnbull, P.Eng., Chief Inspecting Engineer
Inspectors: J. F. Kirkland, J. Dyck, E. A. Smith, D. F. Burges, E. V. Crowder.
The many facets of the Engineering Branch as defined in the numerous Acts
and Regulations have throughout 1971 presented the usual variety and challenge
inherent in the rapid growth and advancement of all modern industries. The reports in the following pages covering individual sections of the above industries
serve only as brief outlines wherein the most outstanding features, however, continue to be those of rapid growth and modernization in all branches.
Provincial railway extensions amounting to more than 250 miles of mainline
track together with outstanding improvements in road bed, shop facilities, the
procurement of additional motive power and rolling stock, and the continuing increase in carloadings have made 1971 one of the most outstanding years in our
railway history.
The same trends are noted also in the sections covering pipe-lines, aerial tramways, and industrial transportation. In all cases, the increased engineering and
inspection demands have culminated in a most demanding work schedule. Excellent
co-operation from most industries has, however, as in past years, been very gratifying
and the prevailing high standards maintained by these industries have to a degree
alleviated the heavy work load borne by our inspectors.
A fair percentage of our inspection work has in the past dealt with maintenance
and replacement problems of railway and industrial road equipment, whereas pipelines and aerial tramways have until recently, due to their short history, required
minimum attention to such problems. The problems on pipe-lines and tramways
attributed to normal deterioration and, in rare cases, to inadequate maintenance are
increasing with much more attention required by the inspection staff. Procedures
have been readily established to cope with most of these problems but extensive
investigation must be considered in some areas. In all cases, such procedures must
be established at an early date and designed to provide for the full expectant life of
materials or components involved.
Early in 1971, the announcement of new drivers-licence classifications by the
Motor-vehicle Branch indicating a need for "certificates of competency" for operators of highway vehicles equipped with air brakes initiated a rush of applications
for industrial road "air tickets" from highway drivers. Our inspection staff worked
in close co-operation with the staff of the Motor-vehicle Branch to develop programmes and to train instructors to meet the new requirements.
RAILWAYS
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company
The year 1971 was a very good year for the Pacific Great Eastern Railway
with the completion of new trackage to Fort Nelson and work proceeding on the
new Deas Lake extension. Record traffic movement due to increases of copper
concentrates, lumber, wood chips, manufactured products, petroleum products, and
piggyback service has pushed their gross tonnage to a new record high. During the
year, industrial expansion has continued at a fast growing pace with the railway
giving service where needed.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1971
FF 15
In accordance with established procedures, inspections were carried out over
the entire year covering trackage, rolling stock, and motive power.
Yards
North Vancouver yard and facilities were inspected with main line, passing
tracks, spurs, and leads to shops found in good condition. Due to Squamish municipal weed control controversy, growth along right-of-way has to be slashed by section
crews. This is being done in such a manner that no hazard exists to train and engine
crews working in this locality.
Fort Nelson yard was inspected during the construction period and was found
to be well laid out with rail service planned for the various industrial-sites in this
area.
The new industrial park under construction at Fort St. James should be of
great benefit to rail shippers of this fast-growing area of Northern British Columbia.
Prince George yard was inspected and found in good condition. Several new
tracks have been added in the industrial park to service a continuous growth in this
area.
Williams Lake yard was inspected and found in good condition, and aside
from some cleaning up to be done around industrial-sites this yard has shown
improvements over the past years.
Quesnel yard was inspected and found in good condition. Several passing and
storage tracks are being built to accommodate the increase in traffic expected with
the opening of Cariboo Pulp & Paper.
Yard and facilities were inspected at Prince George Pulp, Intercontinental
Pulp, and Northwood Pulp. They were all in good condition and well maintained.
Main lines were protected by de-rail which were in closed position and locked
when not in use.
Work continues on the Fort St. James to Dease Lake extension, a distance of
420 miles. Track laying was completed for a distance of 70 miles. Clearing was
completed for an additional 109 miles and grading for 60 miles. General road
improvement continued through the year with the laying of 173 miles of heavier
rail and the replacement of approximately 200,000 ties.   This includes:
Rail renewal 70 pound and 85-100 pound. 23 miles Mackenzie Industrial Road
Rail renewal 85-100 pound.....
Rail renewal 100-115 pound...
Rail into extensions 85 pound.
 103 miles (Mile 504 to 607)
 26 miles (Mile 164 to 190)
 49 miles (Mile 8 to 57 Takla
Extension)
114 miles Fort Nelson Extension
Five new automatic crossing signals were installed at Mile 3.97, Mile 84.8,
Mile 92.1, Mile 94.7, and Mile 974.8.   Construction is nearly completed and all
should be activated in early 1972.
Ninety-five new crossings were installed of which 21 are public crossings,
55 are farm crossings and 19 are access crossings.
Nine crossings were removed of which one was a public crossing and the
remaining eight were temporary or access crossings.
The storage of inflammable liquids (oil-tanks, etc.) adjacent to the railways
was inspected and approved during the year. These installations are owned and
operated by the oil companies but are served by the railway.
 FF 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Communications were inspected from time to time throughout the year.
During the year, the central traffic control system which previously controlled the
British Columbia Harbours Board Railway has been extended to include the section
of the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Railway over which the British
Columbia Harbours Board Railway train operates. This section of the British
Columbia Hydro and Power Authority railway is between Mile 21.83 and Mile
14.35 of the Company's Fraser Valley subdivision.
The British Columbia Harbours Board trains are now dispatched from the
central traffic control centre of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway in North Vancouver over the British Columbia Harbours Board Railway and the above section
of the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Railway.
Station facilities were inspected at different points. Housekeeping was in
order and washroom facilities are being properly maintained.
Shops
Shop facilities were inspected and it was found that all are being used to near
capacity. Through the year, 18 diesel-electric locomotives were on lease. All of
these units will be returned before the end of the year, when seven new 3,000-horse-
power engines are expected. Three remote-control cars housing locotrol equipment
are expected in service late this year or early in 1972. Two yard switchers (1,600
horsepower) obtained from another railway were added to the fleet bringing their
motive power to four (1,000 horsepower), 27 (1,600 horsepower), 29 (1,800
horsepower), 16 (3,000 horsepower) or a total of 76 diesel-electric locomotives.
Car-repair shops throughout the system were kept busy keeping the rolling-
stock in good repair. The main shop at Squamish built five new run-through
cabooses to add to their ever growing fleet. Also added were 700 boxcars, 300
bulk-head flatcars, 50 piggyback highway-trailer flatcars and 50 all-steel gondolas.
Accidents
During the year the Pacific Great Eastern Railway had three fatal accidents
which were investigated by this Department in co-operation with the Pacific Great
Eastern Railway's Department of Safety and Security. These investigations indicated that individual carelessness and disregard of good safety practices were
prime factors in these fatalities. The Pacific Great Eastern Railway's Department
of Safety and Security have safety training programmes for all employees and are
constantly finding ways and means to improve operational and employee safety.
Derailments are still a problem of railways but with the laying of heavier steel,
better crushed rock ballast and updated track maintenance, these derailments should
decrease in the years to come.
Conclusion
It can be reported that the Pacific Great Eastern Railway is being properly
maintained and operated, serving the public in a safe and proper manner.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1971
FF 17
New Pacific Great Eastern Railway 3,000-horsepower locomotive.
British Columbia Harbours Board Railway
All sections of this railway are being well maintained and periodic inspections
are being undertaken by our Inspecting Engineers.
Automatic crossing signals were installed, inspected, and placed in operation at
the following public road crossings:
Mile
Coast Meridian Road  1.58
Benson Road  14.23
Goudy Road  16.57
G. B. Main Road  19.46
The grade level detour crossing at Highway 17 at Mile 17.07 was eliminated
and replaced by a highway overpass.
On Highway 99, work continues on the approach fills for an overpass to replace
the temporary signal installation.
British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Railway
On November 1, 1971, an inspection was made of the rail facilities owned and
operated by the above authority in the Fraser Valley and New Westminster districts.
In company with Mr. Fred Friedel, Divisional Engineer, and Mr. W. Alcock,
General Roadmaster, a trip was made by rail car between New Westminster and
Chilliwack and buildings, bridges, yards, sidings, and main-line trackage were
inspected.
2
 FF        la
BRITISH COLUMBIA
«,
A
New British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority 2,000-horsepower locomotive.
Out of a total of 15 automatic signal crossings on the Fraser Valley line, six
were installed in the last year. All were tested and found to be in good working
order and roundels properly focused.
All bridges and trestles were inspected and found to be in good condition. The
track-maintenance programme continues to be held at a high standard. During the
past year, a total of 9,000 treated track ties were changed, 15,000 yards of ballast
placed and 2 miles of 85-pound rail relaid with 115-pound rail. In addition, two
new industrial leads and nine private sidings were constructed. Approximately 7.5
miles of track on the Fraser Valley line over which coal trains operate to the Roberts
Bank port are protected by centralized traffic control (C.T.C.) that was activated on
October 13, 1971.
Mileage posts, derail signs, whistle posts, and other markers with the exception
of most cross blocks are of metal construction. Wooden cross blocks are being
replaced with metal ones as required. The numerals and letters are coated with
reflectorized paint and provide excellent visibility.
An inspection was undertaken covering railway-highway crossings in the
Surrey-Langley area with respect to signs, visibility, and other safety factors at crossing approaches. The continuing number of automobile accidents at crossings in the
Lower Mainland indicates that further studies must be made to determine the cause
and the extent of possible improvements to be made.
The locomotive and car shops were inspected from time to time during the
year and found in good clean condition.   The motive power was also inspected and
 ^^^-
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1971 FF 19
found in good condition, and this reflects on the shop maintenance in effect. With
the purchase of a new 2,000-horsepower diesel locomotive, this brings the total of
motive-power up to 16.
In general, it can be stated that this railway is well maintained and operated
and with the expansion of industry in the Surrey-Langley area, the railway facilities
will continue to grow.
British Columbia Forest Products Limited Railway
Crofton Pulp Mill
On July 29, 1971, the annual inspection of railway trackage and equipment
was made.
The track was found to be in good condition with the track-repair crew installing more track gauge aligning bars on curves to compensate for heavier equipment.
This year, 200 treated ties were installed. Switches, derails, targets, and signals
were painted and in operating condition. The chemical unloading spur was well
protected with wheel-stop blocks and derails. Track-installed flange lubricator was
working.    Several barrels were noted too close to rail to meet railway standards.
The Diesel-electric Locomotive No. 9 was inspected, and it was noted that
all wheels had considerable tread wear. This condition was resulting in damage to
frogs and switches due to the outside lip of the wheel striking them. This would
also be the cause of poor adhesion and wheel slippage, which would result in damage
to the traction motors. There was sufficient material to machine the wheels and
retain rim thickness but the wheels would have to be changed if the machining
was delayed. It was intended to take the locomotive out of service for an overhaul
in September and to do the necessary work. When the current certificate expires
and the annual inspection made, if the wheels are condemned according to the
regulations, the locomotive would be removed from service by the Department.
During the overhaul, the electrical system should be cleaned up as it could cause
a costly breakdown. The doors on cab and engine compartment needed repair,
both compressors were throwing some oil and needed attention.
This locomotive was further inspected on December 22, 1971. Repairs had
been made to our satisfaction and a certificate was issued.
Canadian Forest Products Ltd. Railway
During the period September 27 to October 3, 1971, an inspection was made
of the railway motive power, rolling-stock, track, and bridges at the Englewood
Logging Division of the above company.
Inspections were also made of the log-hauling and crew-carrying equipment at
Woss, Croman, and Camp A siding reloads.
Diesel-electric locomotives 301, 302, and 303; rail cars 121, 122, 123, 125,
129, and 130; diesel switchers 251 and 252; diesel crane 3; and track layer 7002
were all inspected, reservoirs hydrostatically tested and certificates issued, with
defects noted accordingly.
In general, the equipment, facilities, track, and bridges were found to be in
good condition.   The following conditions were noted:
Woss Yard: Some packing missing from frogs and guard-rails.
Gold Creek Bridge: Some ties and stringers renewed.   New queen-post brace
required downstream side.    Speed restriction of 15 m.p.h. in force on
this bridge.
 FF 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Twin Bridge 10: Good condition.
Twin Bridge 11: Some ties moving.
Steele Creek Bridge: Good condition.
Bridge Mile 21.5: Good condition.
Kinman Creek Bridge: Change tie and level up rail.
Storey Creek Bridge: Good condition. Check nut on queen-post span for
alignment.
Noomas Creek Bridge: Tighten loose angle-bar bolts.   Renew bad order tie.
Halfway Island Bridge: Good condition.
Tsultan River Bridge: Good condition.
East Fork Bridge: Clean out brush.
Elk River Bridge: Clean out brush.
Kokish River Bridge: Good condition.
Span Mile .04: Good condition.
Beaver Cove Yard: Keep junk clear of track.
Beaver Cove Dump: Generally in good condition, some damage to pile caps
and braces.
Kla-anch Bridge: Some stringers to renew.
Davie Creek Bridge "K" Line: Good condition.
Groves Creek Bridge: Install rail anchors.
Groves Creek Annex: Renew damaged ties.
Davie Creek Bridge Ho Line: Generally good.
Bugle Creek Bridge: Should be redriven and braced.
Maquilla and Fire Creek Bridges: Good condition.
Vernon Yard and Reload: Renew missing packing from guard-rails and frogs.
Deloader 1 at Beaver Cove was inspected, the air reservoir was hydrostatically
tested and certificate issued.
Steam locomotive 113 has been out of active service for a number of years.
However, it has been steamed up and run at the annual Woss Loggers Sports Day.
It is intended to return the locomotive to log-hauling service for a couple of trips
so that it may be recorded as being the last steam locomotive actively engaged in
log hauling in British Columbia. It was therefore necessary to apply a hydrostatic
test to the boiler, inspect the locomotive, and to certify the locomotive as being fit
for service.
Company reports were found to be in order with respect to repairs carried out
on the equipment.   The following statistics were available for 1971 to date:
Railway cars repaired  383
Wheels changed   322
Air brakes serviced  139
New cars built  4
Cars in service  454
Railway ties renewed  10,000
Railway ties yet to renew  3,000
Rail anchors installed  15,000
Miles of ballasting  6
Miles of resurfacing  2
Miles of 85-pound rail installed  2
Seventy-three railway logging-cars were inspected, air-brake cleaning dates
checked and found to be in order.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1971 FF 21
W. Weiszbeck was examined for certification as a conductor and passed a
satisfactory examination.
Richard M. Wallace, currently in possession of a temporary permit to operate
an air-equipped vehicle, was verbally examined and is now considered as being
fully certified.
Crown Zellerbach Canada Logging Railway
Ladysmith to Nanaimo Lakes
On July 28, 1971, in company with Mr. Bruce King, Superintendent, the
annual inspection was made of the railway from Ladysmith to Nanaimo Lakes, a
distance of 22 miles.
In general, the track was found to be in good condition and well maintained.
This year 3,000 new treated ties were installed with another 3,000 to be installed
before the end of the year. Reballasting is being done where required. Conditions
were as follows:
Haslam River Bridge: Centre span was renewed this year, a fill has replaced
the north-end span, the south end planned to be filled in 1972.
Nanaimo River Bridge: North-end approach raised with the use of shims.
Automatic sprinkler working.
Boulder Creek Bridge: This will be redecked in 1972.
Deadwood River Bridge: Checked and noted several angle-bar bolts missing
and tie plates needed.
Brush along right-of-way and under bridges has been slashed.
As a precaution against fires, all trains are preceded by a water car sprinkler
with other sprinkling being done between trains.
INDUSTRIAL TRANSPORTATION
With the upswing in activity experienced in the logging industry in 1971
involving many new drivers, one might expect a higher accident frequency rate
than in previous years. It is most gratifying therefore to report that the number of
accidents occurring on industrial roads during 1971 was greatly reduced.
Three reported accidents indicated that private vehicles were involved with
logging trucks on company roads and in each case the truck-driver was relieved of
all responsibility. It would appear from these reports that the drivers of automobiles allowed to run on industrial roads will have to be made to realize that
driving on this type of road requires sometimes a greater degree of alertness than
would normally be required when driving on public highways and that the types
of vehicles and loads encountered will be much larger than those to which they are
accustomed to meet on public highways.
In the matter of new equipment, the Department's records indicate that some
280 new logging trucks were put into service during the year and further that a
large number of these units were destined for the northern Interior.
The increase of logging activity in the area bounded on the east by Prince
George and on the west by Kitimat had been anticipated by the Department so
when the spring requests for air-brake training were received, inspectors were
dispatched in May and June, and lectures were conducted for hundreds of truck-
drivers. These sessions were repeated at Vanderhoof, Houston, Smithers, and
Terrace again during the month of November in answer to further requests for
instruction.
 FF 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 FF 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The change in licensing requirements introduced by the Motor-vehicle Branch
resulted in an added work load for members of the Department inasmuch as a great
number of drivers were processed through this office to obtain their "air tickets"
for highway operation. This was done as a stop-gap measure in order to give the
Motor-vehicle Branch a breathing space in which to set up their own training plan.
In addition, we were pleased to be able to assist the Motor-vehicle Branch with
the content of their new training manual together with air-brake instruction for
their examiners as well as proposed instructors from the trucking industry.
Before the vehicle-inspection station in Burnaby became operational, two weeks
were set aside for the training of new personnel to man this operation. The instruction provided includes testing and inspection routines as well as basic air-brake
design and operation. Inspectors from the Department extend further co-operation
by visiting at the various stations to assist with the employment of proper techniques
as well as providing any further instruction should it be required.
Lecture sessions were held in Victoria for the Department of Highways driver
trainers from all parts of the Province. The purpose of these air-brake lectures was
to enable these men to instruct Departmental truck-drivers throughout the Province
in order that they might be fully qualified to operate air-equipped vehicles under
the new licensing classification.
For some time now, the Department has insisted that certain types of vehicles
used in industry be equipped with backup braking and steering systems. It is
gratifying to note that during 1971, the Workmen's Compensation Board has
amended its new regulations to include these safety features on vehicles in industries
under its jurisdiction.
The usual training programme was conducted for the Royal Canadian Mounted
Police in Victoria in the late fall. This course consists of three days of concentrated
lecturing conducted in the classroom and on vehicles supplied by the Armed Forces
for the purpose of demonstrating inspection routines.
The logging industry has generally remained static in the matter of new types
of log-hauling equipment, however, larger log-skidder units have been introduced
and the steering and braking systems may have to be redesigned for British Columbia
operation.
The advent of dry-land sorting of log species and subsequent use of large
fork-lift type machines has posed some safety problems. However, in conjunction
with the Workmen's Compensation Board, these have largely been overcome to
provide greater safety for the operators of this equipment.
Although there were many near misses with vehicles on industrial roads
throughout the year, only one fatality was reported to the Department. While
other vehicle accidents did occur, resulting injuries were not serious and it is hoped
that with continued training of personnel and inspection of equipment that accident
frequency rates will become even lower in the future.
Air-brake Lectures and Examinations Conducted During 1971
Lectures held  27
Lecture attendance  1,254
Truck operators certified  1,496
Vocational school (air-brake examinations)   161
RCMP (air-brake examinations)   62
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1971 FF 25
Additional Lectures and Examinations Held for
Other Agencies
Number Attendance
Motor-vehicle Branch  15 204
Workmen's Compensation Board  2 12
Department of Highways  3 42
Lake Cowichan School District  2 52
Fleet Supervisors' Association  2 28
Haney Correctional Institution  2 33
AERIAL TRAMWAYS
We now have over 100 ski-lift areas listed in British Columbia, with a total of
230 lifts of all kinds. New lifts constructed and approved during the present year
include: Big White Mountain double chair-lift, the first Dopplemayr chair-lift in
British Columbia; Red Mountain Ski Club's T-bar at Rossland; Pinegrove Ski Development's T-bar at Quesnel; Snowpatch Developments Ltd.'s T-bar at Princeton;
Winter Sports Club of Stewart's T-bar at Stewart; Canyon Aerial Tramways
Limited's Hell's Gate reversible tramway; and Cana Construction Co. Ltd.'s aerial
cableway were completed this year; All Star Holdings Ltd.'s T-bar at Brent Mountain; and several rope-tows.
In addition to the above, a new chair-lift, the first one in British Columbia designed by Hall Ski Lift Co., Inc., is nearing completion. An application has been
confirmed from Whistler Mountain for the construction of two new chair-lifts in
1972. A new ski-ing area has been established at Brent Mountain, where rope-tows
were being installed to be followed by a new T-bar in 1972.
Most ski resorts have attained significant increases in skiers per hour accommodated, either by the addition of new high-capacity lifts or by the upgrading of
existing equipment and facilities.
In the following areas, existing lifts have been extended, relocated, or have had
their capacity increased in various ways: Tabor Mountain, Azu Lift Co. Ltd. at
Pine Pass, Kimberley Ski Club on North Star Mountain, Fairmont Hot Springs Resort, and Red Mountain. The rope-tows on Mount Seymour have been upgraded
and some have been relocated.
Independent of capacity, the ski-ing conditions in most areas are improved annually by clearing and grooming new and existing ski runs, installing and updating
safety circuits, improving night-lighting systems and in general making the sport of
ski-ing more attractive to both the novice and the expert. It is common knowledge
that a well groomed and well managed ski area with suitable amenities such as
warming huts, well maintained roads, adequate parking and high safety standards
does more to promote ski-ing in that area than a programme wherein additional
high-capacity lifts have been added without sufficient attention to amenities as mentioned above.
The maintenance of high safety standards both for the public and for the operating staff has always been our prime concern and the well established procedures
as outlined below have very effectively provided the necessary high standards in
equipment, training of personnel, and general maintenance.
The usual procedures followed to cover a new lift from its inception to its completion are as follows:
1. Regardless of the applicant's acquaintance with our regulations and Canadian Standards Association Code Z98, it has been found expedient immediately an
application is made to provide him with a detailed list spelling out in chronological
 FF 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
order many points requiring attention that are frequently overlooked. This procedure saves a great deal of unnecessary communication and numerous delays, particularly when dealing with smaller companies.
2. Immediately following the applicant's submission of a map and other registration data, a file is set up in the Chief Inspecting Engineer's office with a separate sheet on which record is kept of compliance with each requirement, such as reg-
-,.■■   ■■ ::    ■■■ ■■■■■:■   ■.■   ..     ■
Chair-lift return station, Big White Mountain.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1971 FF 27
istration data, plan and profile, land-use permit, detailed construction drawings, etc.
Referring to these lists at regular intervals is most essential to avoid subsequent delays due to oversight by the applicant.
3. Progress inspections are arranged as required, such as examinations of excavations for towers, setting of rock anchors, reinforcements, etc. Normally, for a
T-bar, this would require a minimum of three trips prior to final inspection and testing. We have become very firm in insisting that a detailed test procedure agreed to
by the manufacturer and this Department be submitted well in advance of final inspection.
4. Follow-up inspections are frequently advisable, particularly in newly established areas.
On new and existing lifts, we are very emphatic in requiring that, prior to
commencement of each season's operation, a certain number of operators or attendants must have completed a written examination proving them to be qualified for
each particular type of lift and a copy of this exam forwarded to this Department
for review.
Practically all the construction and operating details that are checked in detail
on the new lifts are rechecked each year during the annual inspection. Space does
not allow a detailed description of such inspections. Also, it has been found that,
following several years of operation, repair and maintenance problems require an
increasing amount of attention. Fortunately, the economics of operation in the
older areas has assisted us in that the older lifts are now being replaced or brought
up to date.
Most successful ski resorts now maintain key personnel on a year-round basis
and have established a work programme during the off season, including a very
thorough summer overhaul procedure. In all such areas maintenance standards
show a marked improvement.
Due to the pressure of work in other areas, it has been difficult to conduct the
desired number of inspections during the summer months and it is hoped that in
future this practice may be more thoroughly pursued. However, we have required
all owners and operating companies to submit prior to the commencement of the
season a complete report of all maintenance and repair work with particular attention to any points shown as outstanding on the last annual report. Also included at
that time are examination papers which have been completed by the hill managers
and proposed ski-lift operators for the coming season.
Canadian Standards Association Code Z98 has now been well established as
a common book of reference for proposed and existing ski areas and it is proving
invaluable in attaining the essential understanding and full co-operation in such
matters as proper registration procedures, responsibilities of operating companies,
and other matters which were previously not well handled by many companies. A
supplement, No. 1—1971, has recently been issued but no major changes have been
made.
Particularly where rope-tows and small T-bars are proposed, we have found
that standard forms defining in detail the proper procedure for registration and compliance with code requirements have greatly reduced the time delays and numerous
communications which were previously encountered.
A firm stand was required on a few occasions to obtain full compliance by
European manufacturers with British Columbia requirements, however, in all cases
the questions were resolved to our full satisfaction. Proposed major and minor
revisions and additions to existing equipment have increased during the past year
and in all such cases the same compliance with regulations is being rigidly enforced.
 FF 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
9am
Chair-lift, Big White Mountain.
Local lift manufacturers and any shops manufacturing components for use
on existing equipment are required to have their welders comply fully with code
and all components are inspected in detail during fabrication and again during
approval tests.
As in past years, adequate coverage of the aerial passenger tramway industry
has required careful work scheduling and constitutes a large part of our work,
particularly during the early winter months.
Following is an up-to-date list of ski facilities in the Province.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1971                  FF 29
Aerial Tramways
Name of Company
Location
Reversible
Gondola
Or>ir-
lift
T-bar
J-bar
Rope-
tow
Industrial
Freight
1. Grouse Mountain Resorts Ltd. ...
2. Hollyburn Ski Lodge	
3. Mount Sevmour Caterers Ltd.
4. Garibaldi Lifts Ltd	
North Vancouver   .
West Vancouver
Mount Seymour Park.__
1
1
4
2
5
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
6
3
1
3
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
2
1
3
1
3
2
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
3
2
1
3
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
i
6. Mount Becher Ski Development
8. Aluminum Company of Canada
Ltd	
9. Dawson Creek Ski Club	
1
10. Tabor Mountain Ski Area De
Prince George 	
Wells	
2
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
3
3
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
1
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
ll. Wells Ski Club 	
12. British Columbia Telephone Co.
13. Canadian    National    Telecom-
Hope	
14. Tod Mountain Ski Resort Ltd	
Kamloops _	
16. Revelstoke Winter Sports Ltd.—
Mount Revelstoke
17. Mount MacKenzie Ski Develop
ment Ltd   —
18. Silver Star Sports Ltd	
19. Big White Ski Development Co.
Revelstoke , ,, ____
Vernon  __ _
Kelowna _	
21. Department of Recreation and
Manning Park	
22. Amber Ski Club  	
23. Apex Alpine Recreations Ltd	
25. Phoenix   Alpine  Ski  Club   Society	
PTinceton 	
Penticton 	
Kimberley—	
27. Fernie Snow Valley Ski Ltd.
28. Silver King Ski Club -	
29. Salmo Ski Club    __
30. Red Mountain Ski Club Society
31. Sturzenegger's Hill Rope TOW—
Fernie  ,__
Nelson ____.	
Rossland 	
Smithers	
Salmon Arm	
Kamloops	
Nakusp ___	
Smithers	
Prince Rupert	
34. Nakusp Ski Club 	
35. Smithers Ski Club	
37. Bornite Ski Club  	
38. Corporation of the District of
Terrace  _ _.
39. Northlander Motor Lodges Ltd..
40. Blue River Ski Club	
Blue River 	
42. Little Squaw Valley Resorts Ltd.
43. Dragon Mountain Development
Ltd 	
44. Silver Tip Development Ltd.
45. Nicola Valley Ski Club    	
46. Century Estate Ltd	
47. Fort St. John Ski Club	
Quesnel -  	
Hope 	
Merritt __ _	
Fort St. John	
100 Mile House	
48. 100 Mile House Ski Club
49. Lac la Hache Ski Tow	
Lac la Hache  _
Mount Arrowsmith	
Chetwynd	
Sicamous  _
Fruitvale	
50.          -
51. Chetwynd Ski Tow 	
53. Beaver Valley Ski Club _	
55. Grandview Ski Acres Ltd	
56. McBride Bell Ski Resort	
57. Clearwater Ski Club   ...	
58. Society of Golden Skiers 	
59. Burke Mountain Ski Resort
Kamloops	
McBride	
Clearwater 	
Port Coquitlam	
Powell River	
61. British Columbia Telephone Co.
Terrace.—	
 FF 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Aerial Tramways—Continued
Name of Company
Location
Reversible
Gondola
Chair-
lift
T-bar
J-bar
Rope-
tow
Industrial
freight
62. The Nesters Ski Ranch 	
....
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
-
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
63. Portage Mountain Ski Club-	
64. Mount   Garibaldi   Glacier   Re
sorts Ltd. _	
65. Fort Fraser Ski Club —	
Squamish 	
66. Purden Lake Ski Development
Ltd 	
67. British Columbia Telephone Co.
68. Squamish  Stawamus River  In-
Salmo	
Squamish	
1
1
69. Azu Lift Co. Ltd _ __	
70. Corporation of the District of
Stewart __   	
Fairmont Hot Springs ___
Kamloops __	
Rock Creek	
72. Fairmont   Hot   Springs   Resort
Ltd    -	
73. Sleigh-Tow-Time Recreations
76. McDame Mountain Ski Club	
77. Municipality of Mackenzie
Cassiar	
Mackenzie _
79. Department of Highways Aerial
80. Hemlock    Valley    Recreations
Ltd
81. Winterside Recreations Ltd.   .....
82. Snowpatch Developments Ltd..—
83. Granduc Ski Club     -
Vernon	
Tide Lake _	
85. Mission       Mountain      Winter
Shalalth	
86. Rainbow    Mountain    Develop-
88. Sky-Glider Recreations Ltd...
89. Kemano Ski Club   	
Vancouver 	
Kemano  	
Quesnel 	
-
90. Pine Grove Ski Development —
91. Skyline Resort Ltd -
93. Northern Heights Ski Hill	
94. Hart Highlands Winter Club.
Terrace	
96. Barriere    Centennial   Ski    and
97   All Star Holdings Ltd.
100. Department of Recreation and
102. Jos. Konst 	
Totals 	
5
2
27
51
5
130
6
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1971
FF 31
 FF 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1971
FF 33
PIPE-LINES
New construction occupied the inspectors from Crowsnest to the Yukon border
with 234 miles of pipe-line completed and 241 miles still under construction. The
majority of the latter lines are physically completed and operating but the necessary
final "as built" plans and forms, etc., are still outstanding.
The Department is presently updating its maps of all Provincial pipe-lines and
it is interesting to note that eight companies operate over 4,500 miles of lines between them, with the mileage of numerous smaller companies adding considerably
to the total.
Problems concerning the deterioration of operating pipe-lines continue to warrant careful attention.
In April 1970, a leak occurred in a 3-inch oil-transmission line at the West
Stoddart Field in the Charlie Lake area north of Fort St. John. In intermittent use,
the line developed a pinhole which enlarged to %6-inch diameter before it was discovered. The pipe somehow had become contaminated by sulphate reducing bacteria (Desulfovibro) which propagated in colonies. Destruction of the iron was
caused by the action of hydrogen sulphide gas produced in their digestive cycle.
The introduction of a suitable inhibitor appears to have overcome this problem
as evidenced by the inspection of a section since removed from a low portion of
the line. Inhibitors also are being used to control the adverse effects of carbon
dioxide in some contaminated gas transmission-lines.
On November 7, a seam in the 8-inch pipe-line serving the Boundary Lake
area split allowing crude oil to flow into Alces Creek. Immediate action was taken
to stop the flow and dam the creek to contain the oil. Some oil was salvaged until
these efforts were hampered by snow so the balance was burned off while it was
still possible to do so.   Final cleanup will be carried out during the winter and early
Inland Natural Gas pipe-line, Kingsvale to Oliver section.
 FF 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
SfS i6. of*e break, a rate-check system with alarms was in the pro-
cess of installation on this line and has subsequently been completed.   The fated
section of pipe is being analysed for determination of the possible cause of failure
More sophisticated methods of detecting hydrocarbons in the environment are
coming into use and these show promise in the locating of very small leaks that are
^thelrf11"11? ^ ^ ? Pipe"lineS- ThC t£Stin* ?r0cess it-lfTs beSng faste
for the inspectors as the oil company personnel become familiar with the requirements of the Department.   Ways and means are being explored to better reach the
out-of-province contractors to relieve some of the pressure from the inspection staff
In the interests of better recovery from the fields, substantial water- and gas-
lnjection plants are being built with discharge pressures up to 5,000 p.s.i.
The continuing good liaison between the Department and industry often enables the inspectors to combine other duties along with their pipe-line work.
Inland Natural Gas pipe-line, Kingsvale to Oliver section.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1971
Miles of Pipe-line Uncompleted at End of 1971
FF 35
Company
Under
2
3
4
5
6
8
10
12
Over
1. Pacific Northern Gas Ltd	
2. Canadian Superior Oil Ltd	
3. Great Basin Petroleum Ltd.
4. Texaco Exploration of Canada
Ltd                 _
3.19
0.28
0.07
1.33
16.10
1.02
0.38 i
6.65
1
2.40
65.00
0.52
2.94
2.65
0.04
1.88
0.83
2.39
	
0.02
1.14
28.00
0.23
	
	
-   - -
3.22
.....
  1
0.84
0.80
11.00
0.05 '
	
1.72
55.01
	
5. British Columbia Hydro  and
0.52
0.57
0.02
6. Inland Natural Gas Co. Ltd
8. Amoco Canada Petroleum Ltd.
2.22
3.98
24.35
	
11. Union Oil Co. of Canada Ltd.
12. Tenneco Oil & Minerals Ltd	
13. Trans Prairie Pipelines Ltd	
	
Totals    _	
4.87
26.55 1
100.10
7.79
32.61
12.69
	
56.73
0.02
!
Grand total, 241.36 miles.
Miles of Pipi-line Completed in 1971
Company
Size of Pipe in Inches
Under
2
3
4
5
6
8
10
12
Over
0.01
1.45
1.88
0.26
6.98
0.45
9.76
9.10
13.39
2.40
2.18
0.02
11.64
7.67
4.40
1.38
0.15
4.10
4.55
8.60
5.00
1.48
6.64
5.31
18.28
5.80
6.00
4.63
0.40
1.20
1.12
42.52
1.17
3. Texaco  Exploration  of  Can-
0.12
17.61
18.20
4.40
4.90
4. British Columbia Hydro and
5. Inland Natural Gas Co. Ltd.
6. Columbia Natural Gas Ltd
7. Amoco     Canada     Petroleum
Ltd	
4.23
9. Tenneco Oil & Minerals Ltd—
10. Trans Prairie Pipelines Ltd	
	
12. Wainoco    Oil    &    Chemicals
Ltd	
0.03
0.99
14. Shawest Petroleums Ltd	
Totals	
3.60
36.08
46.25
31.54
13.15
36.71   I   16.83
1.20
44.81
4.23
Grand total, 234.40 miles.
PERSONNEL
A. Shaw, C.A.M., Administrative Officer
The year 1971 was particularly active in the area of personnel administration.
The staffing of two new weigh scales opened during the year, together with a number
of retirements, resignations, and promotions within the Department, in general,
paved the way for a more than usual number of recruitment competitions.
In the Weigh Scale Branch a total of 26 competitions was held, 10 of which
were at the Weighmaster II and III level and provided promotional opportunities
within the Weigh Scale Branch. The remaining 16 competitions were for the initial
level of Weighmaster I, all of which were filled by outside applicants. In this regard, competitions were held at Chilliwack, Fernie, Golden, Kamloops, New Westminster, Prince George, Quesnel, Tete Jaune Cache, and Yahk.
 FF 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA
In conjunction with the Civil Service Commission, a study was undertaken
during the year into the day-to-day function and responsibilities of the weighmaster
group from the initial grade of Weighmaster I, through the intermediate supervisory grades of Weighmaster II and III, to the Weighmaster IV or Regional Supervisor level. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the additional duties and
responsibilities assumed by the weighmaster group since a previous reclassification
completed in 1968.
The time and cost factor entailed in stopping a commercial vehicle en route
places additional emphasis upon the need for speed and accuracy in the checking
undertaken by the weighmasters, and also justifies the current practice of concentrating many of the related aspects of commercial-vehicle control at one common
point of inspection. In keeping with this practice, further responsibilities were added
to the weighmaster function relative to duties performed pursuant to the Motor
Carrier Act involving a more detailed checking procedure with respect to licences,
permits, and ownership of goods transported. Responsibilities were also increased
as a result of a general change in the Department of Commercial Transport regulations which allows increased carrying capacity on commercial vehicles. This increased weight allowance together with much higher penalties for overloading made
prosecution a far more serious and vital consideration.
It is hoped that this reclassification study will be brought to a satisfactory
conclusion early in 1972.
The Department was saddened by the passing of Weighmaster Tom Arbuckle
during the year. Mr. Arbuckle was employed at the Fernie Weigh Scale for approximately four years.
The many improvements to date at weigh-scale facilities throughout the Province enhance the working conditions of the field staff, and these considerations are
appreciated by the staff involved. An improvement in the general calibre of the
weighmaster applicant evident during the year was very encouraging in view of the
increased technical and financial responsibilities now being placed upon the weighmasters.
Staff changes in the Engineering Branch were minimal and resulted from
normal retirements and resignations. A generally accelerated industrial expansion
programme in the Province provided a heavy work load for the remaining engineering and inspection staff during the year. I am happy to report, however, that Mr.
A. W. Turnbull was promoted to the position of Chief Inspecting Engineer and that
the concerted efforts of the Branch as a whole appear to be keeping pace with the
demands of service from the industries within its jurisdiction.
The year 1971 has been one of growth and development in all areas of endeavour, a year in which staff changes and reorganization have played a predominant role.
The following table lists the staff changes throughout 1971.
Retirements 	
Resignations 	
New appointments
Transfers 	
Promotions 	
Competitions held
Field
6
Headquarters
1
3
1
20
2
2
	
11
	
31
1
480-772-5576

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