Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

REPORT of the LANDS SERVICE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1971 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1972

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0373854.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0373854.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0373854-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0373854-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0373854-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0373854-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0373854-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0373854-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0373854-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0373854.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Hon. R. G. Williston, Minister D. Borthwick, Deputy Minister of Lands
REPORT
of the
LANDS SERVICE
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1971
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1972
  Victoria, British Columbia, February 21, 1972.
To the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C, O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor oj the Province oj British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the British Columbia Lands Service of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources for the
year ended December 31, 1971.
R. G. WILLISTON
Minister oj Lands, Forests, and Water Resources
 Victoria, British Columbia, February 21, 1972.
The Honourable R. G. Williston,
Minister oj Lands, Forests, and Water Resources,
Victoria, British Columbia.
Sir: I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the British Columbia
Lands Service of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources for the
12 months ended December 31, 1971.
D. BORTHWICK
Deputy Minister oj Lands
 Vertical air photo of main Parliament Buildings and part of Inner Harbour, Victoria.
—photo No. B.C. 5449002
  CONTENTS
Introduction by the Deputy Minister of Lands	
Accounting Division	
Page
.    9
. 13
Lands Branch—
Director of Lands.
Land Inspection Division-
Surveys and Mapping Branch—
Surveyor-General	
1971 Report of the British Columbia Representative on the Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical Names	
Legal Surveys Division	
Field Operations Division.
Map Production Division..
University Endowment Lands.
Personnel Office	
21
30
47
50
52
57
65
75
81
Mail and File Room  85
COVER PHOTO
Valley west of Fort Nelson, near
Churchill Peak.
—British Columbia Government photograph
 CO
LU
o
ct.
3
o
co
OR.
> 1-
a. <
CO *
S»
6
H
m
_  UJ
<
CQ  Ct.
o
is o
~ u.
t-
o
D
>
"z
12
CO
ES
Q-
CQ  1-
Z
ce
<
0.
CO
UJ
o
CE
Z>
o
CO
UJ
0.
0-
UJ
i-
<
5
Q
Z
Z
o
r-
<
03
_1
_J
CO
1-
ii
CO
UJ
a
ce
cd
O
ii.
z
o
X
CO
Q
z
<
_l
LL.
o
ce
UJ
i-
co
z
I
UJ
o
>
ce
ir
UJ
i—
HI
CO
CO
ce     z
LU         —
CO
1-         2 0)
CO a.       z
UI
— a   > o
o
on
Z w   H s
2§ ct?
D
3   LU"
O
CO
3>  K-   .
UJ
0.      z 0
an
LU        <
o    >-
CO
on
CO
UI
1-
CO
<
<
CO
a
z
<
-i
o
r-
o
Z
■o
UJ
2
cr
HI
5
§
>
CL
O
D
a
O
cr
z
O
■LU
z
tr
>
<
■„
t
>
O
CO
tr
<
z
<
>
2
z
D
*
UJ
O
>
a:
LU
w
5
O
CO
o ;
O   c
°-   o
z  »
uj *;
< 1
-    (D
_1    _
- *
Q.
tr
Q     .
O o
Z   «
i-
<
< <
—l   Q
z
<
a
2
or
o
*
6
o
I
o
z
<
ce
at
LU
CQ
_J
z
o
O
<
ce
LU
CO
z
CO
Q.
ce
z
->
(0
0.
<
O
i-
o
UJ
2
O
<
s
LU
a:
O
o.
O
-
Q
Q
>
LU
CO
LU
<
z
>
E
<
ce
<
CO
CO
Z
>
D
UJ
o
>
ca
ce
D
CO
I
CO
Q
o
Z
z
<
<
_i
UJ
ce
u.
Q
CQ
o
*
CO
a
ce
O
I—
5
z
<
O
UJ
ce
_i
Q
o
o
o z
55
 Report of the British Columbia Lands Service
D. Borthwick, B.S.A., B.Ed., A.A.C.I., Deputy Minister of Lands
The Lands Service introduced new administrative procedures and did some
organizational restructuring during 1971.
On the procedural side, the system for disposing of Crown lakeshore lands was
further refined to equate the interests of the general public with those of the private
sector. Pending a balanced evaluation of potential land uses and subdivision layout, a 10-chain setback reserve is being established around lakeshore. Individuals
may submit Nominations of Interest for Crown lakeshore, but disposition by public
competition will be finalized only after a development plan is devised and there is
adequate provision for unencumbered public frontage.
The Surveys and Mapping Branch was completely restructured, the four previous divisions being reduced to three for greater administrative and technological
cohesion. The Lands Branch introduced an intermediate level of administration,
regional land inspector, to further co-ordinate the individual inspection districts
and to strengthen liaison with regional districts and other Government departments
and agencies. Also, a new land inspection district, Vancouver North, was established. There are now 18 such districts in the Province.
The Legislature repealed section 84 of the Land Act and its subject matter was
elaborated upon and substantially rewritten into the new Environment and Land Use
Act, chapter 17, Statutes of British Columbia, 1971.
Another important Statute, the Ecological Reserves Act, chapter 16, also was
passed during the 1971 Session of the Provincial Legislature. The Lands Service is
responsible for administering this Act, under which 100 natural areas will be set
aside by 1975. A brochure titled Ecological Reserves in British Columbia was
produced and distributed to familiarize interested individuals and organizations with
the locations and purposes of ecological reserves. By the end of the year, 29
reserves had been established by Order in Council and gazetted.
The moratorium on lease applications in the Bulkley Valley-Nechako-Prince
George-McBride belt remained in effect during 1971 pending completion of the
land-use capability study for that region of north central British Columbia. Similar
moratoriums were established in the East Kootenays from Golden to the International
Boundary and Yahk to the Alberta border and in the Quesnel-Prince George region.
Under direction of the Environment and Land Use Committee, the Lands
Branch participated in a multiresource-use study in the East Kootenay with a view
to evolving a system of Crown land management which will least disturb the balance
of the total environment.
The Lands Service continued to co-operate with regional districts and municipalities, so that policies established by the Lands Service will be compatible with
those aspects of land use and development administered by regional districts and
municipalities. A positional statement of Lands Service policies was presented to
participants at the Regional District Conference at Victoria in April. Surveying
and mapping systems also were altered to accommodate the interests of other levels
of government. For example, the Municipal Act was amended to permit establishment of basic integrated survey control at the earliest stage of municipal formation.
 Y 10        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Also, a standard system of scaling and indexing for large-scale maps has been devised
and is being recommended to regional districts, municipalities, and Provincial mapping agencies.
Net revenue collections showed a substantial increase of nearly 51 per cent
over the previous year. Revenues from all sources were in excess of $4,500,000,
a new record. The number of lease accounts rose by 923, to reach a total of close
to 15,000 at the end of 1971.
In recognition of the Centennial of British Columbia in Canadian Confederation, the Lands Service published A History oj the British Columbia Lands Service.
This booklet was distributed to appropriate Government departments and officials
and to major libraries throughout the Province.
The following pages of this Annual Report contain explicit details of the
accomplishments of the Lands Service during 1971. The reader may also refer to
the departmental and branch organization charts and the key maps inside the back
cover.
 ACCOUNTING DIVISION
  ACCOUNTING DIVISION Y 13
ACCOUNTING DIVISION
M. B. Maclean, Departmental Comptroller
The responsibilities of the Accounting Division include the accounting function
for Water Resources Service as well as Lands Service. The year 1971 has been very
active for this Division, as a result of a substantial increase in the work load of the
payroll and accounts payable section. Consistant with the growth of past years,
the number of leases has again increased—from 14,029, January 1, 1971, to 14,952,
December 31, 1971.
Statistical Tables
Table 1—Summary oj Lands Service Net Revenue Collections jor the
Year Ended December 31,1971
Land leases, rentals, fees, etc.  $3,093,281.59
Land sales      1,297,075.28
Sale of maps and air photos        189,955.32
Net revenue collections   $4,580,312.19
Table 2—Comparison oj Revenue Collections jor 10-year
Period 1962-71, Inclusive
1962 BHHMK $1,847,457.83
1963 HHHm 2,034,841.80
1964 MHHHW 2,587,110.34
1965 nBBBUmnMBBn 2,594,341.32
1966 nHunHMB 3,343,672.46
1967 wmitmmmmBBaHmammm 2,985,996.61
1968 HanHOHm 3,367,912.14
1969 HBHHHHHHB 3,999,273.13
1970 ■hmhmmbhmbhh 3,025,000.24
1971 iHHBNBHOBaMnnBB 4,580,312.19
Table 3—Classification oj Revenue Collections jor the Year Ended
December 31,1971
Land sales—
Country lands   $1,008,854.88
Town lots         304,673.33
Surface rights, mineral claims, miscellaneous  1,095.00
  $1,314,623.21
Land leases, rentals, fees, etc.—
Foreshore leases—
Booming and log storage  $503,893.53
Commercial (marina, etc.)      455,829.86
Oyster        15,480.95
Miscellaneous (foreshore protection, etc.)        12,810.35
      $988,014.69
 Y 14        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 3—Classification oj Revenue Collections for the Year Ended
December 31,1971—Continued
Land leases, rentals, fees, etc.—Continued
Land leases-
Grazing and (or) agriculture .... $494,375.94
Quarrying (limestone, sand and
gravel)        53,714.92
Camp-site (lodge, fishing)        10,942.00
Home-site         3,422.68
Residential       428,272.71
Miscellaneous        49,369.89
Land-use permits 	
Licences of occupation
Royalty collections
Bonus bids (lease tenders and auctions)
Easement collections—
$1,040,098.14
665.00
10,797.00
349,972.32
60,488.75
Annual rentals	
Outright considerations
Fees—
Crown grant
$2,432.20
448,080.42
$16,728.61
Assignment        12,825.00
Miscellaneous (lease, search, etc.)      31,636.00
Sundry collections  (occupational rental, survey
charges, etc.) 	
Sale of maps and air photos—
Legal Division 	
Map sales 	
Air Photo sales and rentals	
Gross revenue for year	
Less refunds and taxes
Net revenue for year	
450,512.62
61,189.61
160,914.57
$3,122,652.70
$24,434.55
96,776.01
90,751.62
211,962.18
$4,649,238.09
68,925.90
$4,580,312.19
Table 4—Comparison oj Land Leases, Rentals, Fees, Etc., Revenue jor
10-year Period 1962-71, Inclusive
$933,607.66
1,149,650.45
■ 1,485,539.13
I 1,462,024.93
■ 1,514,749.69
§mmum 1,917,435.31
mMMHai 2,189,055.75
KBGNHHrHHi                                 2,553,351.23
mmmmmm 2,283,719.11
wmmmmmmmmmmm 3,093,281.59
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
 ACCOUNTING DIVISION Y  15
Table 5—Comparison oj Land Sales Revenue jor 10-year Period 1962-71,
Inclusive
1962 ■aBBBHHHMHHM $836,270.32
1963 ■BHOawn 787,184.11
1964 mini i iiiiirmiwiiimmiM 982,137.88
1965 IlllllllMlMlll ■ —■■■■■Ill 1,017,893.16
1966 HnBBBHHHBMH 1,692,861.14
1967                 HaaaUBHafaa^HHaHB 916,098.98
1968 MBHCaHHHBnBH 1,024,410.93
1969 11 HUM IIMIMIIHI Hmilll I lilHIIIM I 1,251,111.88
1970 BnH.HM 518,015.63
1971 wmmmuMmmumtmammmmmm 1,297,075.28
  LANDS BRANCH
 THE LANDS BRANCH
At the time of the Fraser River gold-rush in 1858 the demand for land in British
Columbia was greatly intensified and pre-emptions predated surveys. Within four years
254 pre-emptors had taken up more than 50,000 acres of land. To facilitate the transfer
of real estate and provide for the registration of titles, the Land Registry Act was passed in
1860. The Government of the Province of British Columbia was now in the real estate
business in a big way; the more than 366,000 square miles of land and water that constitutes British Columbia was the real estate in question.
With the entrance of British Columbia into Confederation in 1871, the demand for
land quickened to a rush, and over the next 30 years the land-settler (and the promoter)
succeeded the gold-miner in importance. Railroads were built and land grants passed,
cities came into being, and companies became established. Land was at the core of all
developments.
The task of land administration became very heavy and necessitated the formation of
a Department of Lands in 1908. In 1912 a Forest Branch was included in the Department
of Lands. Today the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources exercises control of more than 90 per cent of the surface of British Columbia.
How does the Lands Branch fit into the total organization of the British Columbia
Lands Service of today? The relation may be expressed briefly. The Lands Branch
has jurisdiction in matters pertaining to the disposition of Crown land, and is
charged with administering and disposing of the land that the general welfare,
present and future, of the Province is protected at all times.
When an individual, or group, desires to purchase or lease Crown land, the application is directed to the Director of Lands, head of the Lands Branch. His authority
governs the following matters:
Lease and sale of Crown lands for such purposes as agricultural, industrial,
commercial, and home-sites.
Preparation and issuance of right-of-way easements for power, telephone, pipelines, etc.
Preparation and issuance of Crown grants under the Land Act and the Mineral
Act.
Reservation of suitable Crown lands and foreshore for national defence, use
and enjoyment of the public, forestry experimentation, fisheries research,
highways, and ecological research.
Granting railway rights-of-way under various Statutes.
Protection of historic sites from alienation.
Reservation and conveying of Crown lands for such purposes as school-sites,
cemeteries, and fair grounds.
Leasing of land and foreshore for such varied purposes as wharf-sites, booming-
grounds, canneries, oyster and other mollusc fisheries, and for boat-houses,
quarry-sites,  cattle-ranching,  trappers'  cabins,  ship-building,  and  aircraft
bases.
To perform these and other functions efficiently, the Lands Branch works in close
co-operation with a great number of other agencies,  such as municipal and regional
administrations, town-planning authorities, the British Columbia Forest Service, the Water
Resources Service, the Surveys and Mapping Branch within the British Columbia Lands
Service, and all the departments in the Government of the Province, notably Highways,
Education, Attorney-General, Agriculture, and Municipal Affairs.
Outside the Provincial departments there is much business transacted with Federal
departments, such as the Department of National Defence, the Public Works Department, and the Indian-Eskimo Branch of the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern
Development.
Direct service to the people of British Columbia is the first duty of the Lands Branch
and this takes the bulk of the time of the Lands Branch personnel. Associated with this
prime duty is the important function of the maintenance of the records, which in many
cases are the only ones in British Columbia showing the correct legal status of the surface
of the Province.
  X
o
z
<
a.
CQ
co
Q
Z
<
CO
Q
Z
<
QC
O
H
o
UJ
0C
Q
O
H
o
CO
CO
<
«t .
cc <
I- a
OT
Z
2
Q
<
(0
o
en
O
COURTENAY                 -H.K.Boas
NEW WESTMINSTER-D.E.Goodwin
PRINCE RUPERT          -J.P.Egan
VANCOUVER                 -R.F.Gilmo.ir
VANCOUVER  NORTH-Vacanl
VICTORIA                        -J A.Esler
an
O
Z  o.
O tn
uE
K   O
z
<
<
O       <D
o    «
>
o
O co
x < m m O J -
< O 5 z < g l
< < tz cc. tr ui t
co        z w g
Q * o" D°        o
m to uj w z w
a Q. D z lu - z
=> O O a. D ^ <
tfl u_ Q- Q. 0(/> >
to
CJ
n
D
CLINTON                     -K.M.Hall
KAMLOOPS                -T. J. Todd
KELOWNA                  -G.Huva
NELSON                      -H.L.Wenschlag
WILLIAMS   LAKE      -L.M.Warner
REGIONAL
LAND   INSPECTOR
KAMLOOPS
D.  1. Snider
o
LL -a
0 I
I— |
O cc
LU o;
O
a.
Zt
».?:
1-2
Q 2
<§
Q
Z
<
0>
<
o
5
°5
 LANDS BRANCH Y 21
LANDS BRANCH
Walter R. Redel, B.A.Sc, P.Eng., P.Ag., A.A.C.I., Director of Lands
Although the number of applications dealt with in 1971 was down 26 per cent
from the number handled in 1970, revenue increased to $4,437,275.91, an all-time
high for the Lands Branch. The increased revenue figure is in part attributable to the
continuing emphasis on a lease-develop-purchase policy which has resulted in more
and more land being held under leasehold tenure for longer periods of time. This
policy, which was inaugurated in late 1964, has resulted in a gradual decrease in
the number of Crown grants issued in each succeeding year. However, this year
there has been an increase in the number of Crown grants issued, which suggests
that development of the Crown lands included in some of the earlier leases has been
completed and the lessee has been able to exercise his option to purchase.
The above-mentioned decrease in the total number of applications filed is no
doubt to some extent a reflection of a policy change made early in the year. On
May 1, 1971, all Crown lands within 10 chains of any lake in the Province, and all
islands lying within any lake in the Province were placed under reserve in order
to give some direction as to how and where future developments along the lakeshore
would be encouraged. Although applications to acquire Crown land within the 10-
chain reserve are being refused, it is in order for the public to file with the Land
Commissioner or District Forester a nomination to acquire a lease or Special Use
Permit of Crown lands within the 10-chain reserve for a particular purpose. The
Land Commissioners and District Foresters are establishing elective lists for lakes
within their particular districts as inquiries are received at the counter. These nomination lists, together with the recommendations of the field staffs of the Lands Service
and the Forest Service, will be used in determining the priority of development of
future Crown subdivisions as well as all other dispositions contemplated within the
10-chain reserve area.
Subdivisions for summer residential use will be planned by the Lands Service
on those lakes in the Province where there is a strong demand after the recreational
potential of the lake has been fully assessed and adequate Crown lands have been
set aside for public use. Crown subdivisions will meet the standards imposed by
the Provincial subdivision regulations, and all lots created by Crown subdivisions
will be disposed of by public competition on a leasehold basis only, with no option to
purchase.
The interest in Crown land for agricultural purposes is still primarily in the
Peace River District. The moratorium which was placed on agricultural applications in north central British Columbia during 1970, except to established farmers
in the area, has curtailed agricultural applications in this region of the Province.
The moratorium was imposed to encourage those people already established and
engaged in agricultural pursuits to expand their holdings within the remaining arable
Crown lands in order to develop viable farm units. A similar moratorium has been
imposed on the East Kootenays and in the Quesnel-Prince George region of the
Province.
The Lands Branch is participating in a study of resource conflicts in the East
Kootenays with a view to recommending policy changes in wildlife, grazing, and
forestry practices in the area that would ensure a reasonable balance in the use
and development of the Crown lands for these purposes. This study was recommended by the Environment and Land Use Committee, and it is anticipated other
studies of a similar nature will be undertaken by similar technical committees composed of resource personnel from all the disciplines.
 Y 22        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
As in former years resource-based industries continued to apply for vacant and
unencumbered Crown land for industrial purposes. Dispositions were made for
plant- and pulp-mill site purposes to the pulp and paper industry; for plant, campsite, waste-rock and tailings-disposal areas for the mining industry, and gas and
oil pipe-lines and telephone-lines, power-lines, microwave-sites, and road purposes
to the oil industry and the utility companies. The Pacific Great Eastern Railway
Company completed its extension north to Fort Nelson, and construction is now
under way from Fort St. James to Dease Lake. Applications for the necessary
rights-of-way are being processed by the Lands Branch. During the year, Alberta
Natural Gas Limited started a 40-mile looping programme to increase capacity. Inland Natural Gas Limited began construction of a gas pipe-line from Princeton to
Oliver to open up a new customer-service area. Texaco Exploration Canada
Limited undertook a project to electrify its petroleum-producing operation in the
Boundary Lake field. This move will bring electric power to an agricultural area
that is without power at the present time.
As in previous years, Crown lands are sold to municipalities throughout the
Province for a nominal sum for municipal purposes. During 1971, a total of 48
free grants was issued by this means; 15 free grants were for park and six for
recreational purposes. Three Crown parcels were sold to municipalities for sewage-
disposal facilities and four for airport use. The Village of Chetwynd obtained land
to be developed with the assistance of the Federal Government and Central Mortgage
& Housing Corporation for low-income families. The City of Prince George
obtained land for a residential development. In a similar manner the District of
Stewart obtained land for a cemetery; the Regional District of East Kootenay, land
for a park; North Gabriola Fire Protection District, land for a firehall; and an additional 10 municipalities obtained land for a variety of municipal purposes.
Under certain circumstances the Department co-operates with municipalities
in the acquisition of private lands required for municipal purposes where Crown
lands of comparable value are available for exchange purposes. Both the private
and Crown lands involved in any such proposal are appraised to determine market
value. If the appraisal indicates the land values are equivalent, the Crown will
then accept a conveyance of the privately owned land and subsequently issue a
Crown grant under section 85 of the Land Act to the private owner. The lands
conveyed to the Crown will then be granted to the municipality in order that such
lands may be developed in the public interest.
Exchanges of this nature numbered 18 during the year and permitted the
acquisition of needed parkland for the Parks Branch of the Department of Recreation and Conservation. By exchange, parkland was also acquired for the Van-
couver-Fraser Park District, the Village of Port Alice, and the District of Powell
River. Recreational land was acquired for the Regional District of Sunshine Coast
and a parcel to complete an ecological reserve area at Ambrose Lake on Sechelt
peninsula. In order to consolidate ownership of lands fronting on False Creek,
certain Crown lands on the north side of the creek were conveyed to the CPR in
exchange for company-owned land on the south side of the creek. The Crown
land on the south side of the creek was then sold to the City of Vancouver. Ultimately this exchange will assist both the City of Vancouver and the CPR in their
long-range plans to phase out industry and redevelop these lands for park, marina,
and multiple-dwelling purposes.
The year 1971 was the Centenary of British Columbia joining Confederation.
To commemorate this historic milestone in our history, Provincial grants were made
available for the development of Centennial projects. Fifteen of these projects
involved developments on Crown land, and following processing of the applications
 LANDS BRANCH Y 23
by the British Columbia Centennial Committee, the Crown lands were reserved by
Order in Council for the particular committee receiving the Centennial grant.
During the past year, several resource industries acquired and developed Crown
land for townsite purposes to accommodate their employees. Westcoast Transmission Housing Limited acquired 6.72 acres at Fort Nelson for housing purposes.
Fording Coal Limited acquired 71.52 acres for townsite purposes at Elkford in
the East Kootenay Region. Crown land for expansion of the townsite at Granisle
on Babine Lake was acquired by Granisle Copper Limited, Noranda Mines Limited,
and Bulkley Valley Forest Industries Limited. In the last two cases a condition of
sale required the company to apply for a self-governing corporate status without
any undue delay, in accordance with the provisions of the Municipal Act, in other
words, sale of the land required that an "instant town" be created. In providing
housing for their own employees as in the first case, or in creating integrated or
instant municipalities, industry is bearing the total cost of initial development since
industry is the benefactor in cases such as these.
From time to time it is in the public interest to transfer the administration and
control of certain Crown Provincial lands to the Crown Dominion in order that
Federally sponsored projects can be carried through to completion. During 1971,
five such transfers took place. One parcel of land at Marpole was required to accommodate the approaches to the new bridge to serve Vancouver International
Airport. At Vedder Crossing, a land parcel was required by the Crown Dominion
to consolidate a Department of National Defence holding.
A lot was transferred to the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development at Bella Coola as a site for a monument to commemorate Sir Alexander
Mackenzie's transcontinental journey in 1783.
A parcel was transferred to the Crown Dominion at Nanaimo for use by the
Nanaimo Harbour Commission in connection with the expansion of the port facilities.   A similar transfer took place in the Esquimau: Harbour.
The Department is in the process of setting aside certain lands at Bennett Lake
in order that the National and Historic Parks Branch may develop a small park on
a site that has historic significance in connection with the Klondike Gold Rush. This
site, comprising 11.2 acres, is situated on the White Pass and Yukon Railway route
and contains the old Presbyterian Church which was built in 1899. The church is
in fairly good condition and will be restored during development of the park.
In keeping with the policy of encouraging an orderly development of Crown
land for recreational pursuits and small home-sites the Lands Service continued to
develop small subdivisions throughout the Province.
The nomination system of indicating interest in various lakefront sites is proving
successful and reconnaissance parties from the various resource departments will be
adding their recommendations which will assist the Department to establish subdivision priority lists. It is hoped that this new procedure, after field work, will
provide home-site subdivisions as well as a land-bank of reserves for future public
use and enjoyment.
When constructing roads in Crown subdivisions the work is carried out to
the same standard required by the Highways Department of a private subdivider
working in the same area. The Department is of the opinion that many of the
Crown subdivisions undertaken are recreationally oriented and for seasonal use
only, therefore, a lower standard of road construction should be attainable.
One innovation, which was tried for the first time this year, was the development of a lower grade road by the Forest Service Engineering Division into a ski-
cabin subdivision. This road, which was surveyed under the Land Act, is proving
 Y 24        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
to be quite adequate for the purpose and the standard used may set a pattern for
similar subdivisions in the future.
During 1971, the Lands Branch undertook Crown subdivisions in the following
areas:
Fort Nelson Sulphurous Lake
Kispiox River Pouce Coupe
Mile 62, Alaska Highway South of Williams Lake
Texada Island Sechelt Peninsula
Hudson Hope Purden Lake
Vanderhoof Nanoose
Comox
A brief summary of the activities of the various sections of the Administration
Division of the Lands Service is set out hereunder:
Lease Section—The number of new lease applications decreased to 3,241 from
4,388 received in 1970. This decrease can be attributed in part to the
moratoriums established on agricultural lands in three areas of the Province and to the change in procedure for acquiring Crown lands within 10
chains of the lakeshore of all the lakes in the Province. In addition, the
establishment of several new Provincial forest reserves has withdrawn
large blocks of Crown land from administration under the Land Act.
Purchase Section—Purchase applications have declined from 150 in 1970 to
84 during the current year. The Department's lease-develop-purchase
policy will keep purchase applications at a relatively low figure, but there
will always be a few cases where, for a variety of reasons, a direct sale
will be entertained. In addition to the number of direct sales referred to
above, 246 lessees completed sufficient improvements to exercise the
purchase option contained in the lease indenture. This section is also
responsible for processing both waterfront and inland residential leases
which numbered 810 during the year.
Crown Grants Section—The number of Crown grants issued in 1971 totalled
735 compared to the figure of 708 the previous year. It is expected that
the "turn-around" point has been reached and the number of Crown grants
issued yearly will increase as more and more lessees complete development requirements and are able to apply for Crown grants. This section
is also responsible for clearing applications for reverted mineral claims,
of which there were 515 in 1971. The Crown grant section also prepared
and processed 48 free grants and 18 exchanges mentioned earlier in this
Report.
Pre-emption and Reserve Section—When the Proclamation bringing into force
the Land Act, 1970, was issued on May 1, 1970, the Department was no
longer able to issue pre-emption records, since the new Act contained no
provision to do so. However the Department still had a number of preemptions in good standing. During 1971, certificates of improvement
were issued over 22 pre-emptions and 28 Crown grants were issued,
leaving 170 pre-emptions outstanding at year-end. During 1971 there
were 459 reserves established. In addition, this section processed the 29
Ecological Reserves which were established by Order in Council under
the Ecological Reserves Act. Accretion applications totalled 25 in 1971.
Map notations made by this section on behalf of the Federal Department
of Transport, Marine Services, totalled 11 in 1971. General inquiries
regarding the availability of Crown land, also handled by this section,
numbered 11,217.
 LANDS BRANCH
Y 25
Clearance Section—The number of clearances carried out by this section
increased from 17,778 in 1970 to 20,737 in 1971.
Easement Section—In 1971, 186 easements were granted as compared to
142 granted in 1970. Easements for oil and gas pipe-lines and well-sites
totalled 66 in 1971 as compared to 31 the year before.
GENERAL ACTIVITY
During 1971 a total of 24 parcels was tendered for lease, the acreage involved
was 4,192.95 acres and the bonus-bid revenue realized was $16,352.50. In addition, 492 lots, most of which were within Crown subdivisions, were offered for
lease by auction. The bonus-bid revenue realized at the time of the auction amounted
to $47,118.15. Forty-two of the lots offered were waterfront properties. One lot
was tendered for sale but there were no bids for same. Similarly, two lots offered
for sale by auction did not bring forth any bids. The following tables indicate in
detail the work carried out by the various sections of the Lands Branch in 1971.
;      ■ -   .,,  .     .
V--VI
Portion of East Redonda Island ecological reserve.
Acres
Table 1—Country Land Sales, 1971
Unsurveyed   577 33
Surveyed   285.87
Total
863.70
 Y 26        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESC
Table 2—Certificates oj Purchase Issued, 1971
Number of
Agency                                                                                            Certificates Purch
Alberni                                                                    ~      13
URCES
ased     Acreage
101.51
Nil
960.01
964.97
261.836
93.48
146.57
22,481.40
195.05
254.913
10.67
143.48
84.31
114.796
255.97
2,382.22
2,418.34
46.54
443.30
208.96
390.14
304.84
17.07
9.23
252.99
Atlin     Nil
Burns Lake         _              -                                            17
Clinton                                                    14
Cranbrook              _____                     .                     10
Fernie                              _                                      .10
Fort Nelson            „.   ,                                                   13
Fort St. lohn     62
Golden             4
Kamloops             _   .                                                      18
Kaslo                                                                                 3
Nanaimo             _                                                           19
Nelson      10
New Westminster       _      11
Penticton               _ __                                          38
Pouce Coupe     16
Prince George _ __   ____     _     18
Prince Rupert           ,                                                       6
Quesnel        __                                                                 12
Revelstoke             __        7
Smithers      28
Vancouver                            22
Vernon       3
Victoria                       _        _.                   _                         6
Williams Lake             23
Total             383
32,542.595
Acreage
82,936.10
73,703.81
3,326.14
304.59
1,098.19
Table 3—New Leases Issued, 1971
Land                                                                                                         Number
Agriculture       295
Hay and grazing (pasture and hay-cutting) __     164
Quarrying (sand, gravel, limestone, etc.)         32
Residential (waterfront)         __ _         379
Residential (inland)       431
Miscellaneous   (resorts,  service-stations,
camp-sites, mill-sites, etc.)       157 5,121.73
Foreshore—
Booming, log storage, log dumping, etc      139 2,819.71
Oyster and other shellfish        16 200.87
Industrial (canneries, mill-sites, wharves,
etc.)   1 0.71
Quarrying (sand, gravel from sea or river
beds)          3 55.00
Commercial (boat rentals, marinas, marine
service-stations, etc.)         49 202.77
Miscellaneous (private wharves, boathouses,
etc.)         57 206.32
Totals   1,723        169,975.94
 LANDS BRANCH
Table 4—Licences to Occupy Issued, 1971
Y 27
Number
Acreage
Table 5—Assignments Approved, 1971
Leases, land-use permits, licences of occupation	
41
984.53
799
Table 6—Easements Granted, 1971
Number
Miles
Acres
Foreshore
5
4
9
2
1
1
1
1
7
1
6.860
1.979
1.354
4.517
0.112
0.093
0.167
0.019
2.673
0.510
395.392
15.640
16.621
239.500
2.680
0.570
0.400
0.020
9.817
1.240
TOtal                  .              a.                                                                a.                                                                             _                      -a	
32
18.284
681.880
Land
66
1
54
3
2
4
7
2
2
1
8
1
1
263.771
0.167
602.423
2.258
1,985.782
0.400
26,343.573
4.501
1.870
Television antenna sites and power-lines   	
4.239
6.085
17.732
28.224
1.840
0.337
0.391
9.716
9.673
0.250
0.553
Ski chair-lift and T-bar 	
3.120
63.033
Access tunnel __	
154.800
Road _____ __	
4.220
Total   __ ___	
152
899.310
28,609.648
Southern Okanagan Lands Project
Water pipe-line              	
1
1
0.050
0.138
0.515
Sewer pipe-line -    	
0.335
186
917.782
29,292.378
In line with current Departmental policy, 65 letters of consent for the construction of access roads were issued during the year.
Table 7—Crown Grants Issued, 1971
Purchases (country lands) 	
Purchases (town lots) 	
Pre-emptions 	
Public Schools Act	
Veterans' Land Settlement Act	
Home-site leases	
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company	
Miscellaneous 	
Total
Certified copies of Crown grants issued
505
123
28
9
4
5
3
58
735
1
 Y 28        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 8—Crown Grants Issued jor Past 10 Years
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
Total
Ten-year Average, 970.
Table 9—Total Area Deeded by Crown Grant, 1971
1,081
1,042
1,163
1,087
1,020
980
957
931
708
735
9,704
Purchases (country lands)
Pre-emptions 	
Public Schools Act	
Veterans' Land Settlement Act
Home-site leases	
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company
Miscellaneous 	
Total
63,341.79
4,224.31
50.37
131.00
54.55
25.78
6,665.67
74,493.47
Table 10—Reserves, 1971
Applications
Received
___    77
Use, recreation, and enjoyment of the public	
British Columbia Department of Highways (rights-of-
way, gravel pits, bridge-sites, etc.)   131
Federal Government (defence purposes, wharf-sites,
etc.)     71
British  Columbia  Forest  Service   (Ranger   stations,
grazing, radio-sites, reforestation, etc.)      31
Miscellaneous  (Game Branch, water-power projects,
garbage dumps, school-sites, cemeteries, etc.) ____ 173
Totals
483
Reserves
Completed
120
107
47
32
153
459
 LANDS BRANCH
Y 29
ITlOH
r- o c*. un
rN w o
00 i-i vo
cn vp r-
vo as
l>^0\n
vo cN tn
mt en so
mb*t^
un
Os
*      "!.
r—
t~~
O          ai
on"
fN
cs
o\
^
^5-
oo
tN
ri m un
nMOm
r- T? oo
inoor.
cS co co
On oO O fN
H0OO\
to f«
tcfl^h
b\     i-t
"^vi
OO 00 oo
es oo t> vo
r- io cs
cs ro vq
CS vo O
t-i vo t> g
CS i-i Tf
r- cs vo
cs ir
■* cs _: oo
00         i-l
*>*u-]
hPlH
1-H  CO  m-t  Ov
in t> vp
m tS Os
t> oo ©
co oO co
oo oo cs rN
r-1   rH   ©
ro Os
oo ro    • O
rs       *h
<*^co'
rs vo r-
Tt Os vp
ro os
" t> VO Q O
© OS © 00
co ro —: --1
cS un cs
2t ro tj>
a * s
CO oo o
<3 2? =5
mOM
CS   CO  O   rH
CS CS co
r- o o p
vo «.'i 0* t£
OS CS oo
in Os
CD         rH
1>        un CN
l>
oo Tt ©
' IS
0 oo in
^       OS VO ^ CS^        TT        tH
© Tf ©
Tf <p ©
oo ro __;
co Os r-
Tt  »H  CO
oo O
vo Ov O **
VC-tO^t
rt  CO      ■  -H
vo o <
un r- c
hih      m t
°^ £• fi
CN OS ©
Tt CO ^
CS Tf CS
CO CO Tf
Os O
Tt •-*  O mm!
un ro © m
co Oi ^ O
tStntv
r- r-> t>
00 00 o
i-h rs ©
Tt.n   •
Os vp vo tj-
oo O co Ov
°S_ *1 vp H
t- r-H #  rt
00 t— oo
m tt Os
Tt m ^
ft."
11 is
s^ »
"   B   u
_   (9 «i 11
« §_- 8
«S« a*, s ■"
ra >r_   C,
o o o
g afi
cj   o
III
Oh
0     B     O     a)
u O u
aO     QJ   aO
a « p o
Z>ZP
fe-d S
a c
aO     O
ra *j3
«.s - | a o
-  - - o ra ^
B SS |
1111
 Y 30        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
LAND INSPECTION DIVISION
G. H. Wilson, B.S.A., P.Ac, A.A.C.I., Chief
The Land Inspection Division attained a new dimension in 1971 with the
establishment of three Regional Land Inspection Districts. The Kamloops Region
embracing the Land Inspection Districts of Williams Lake, Clinton, Kamloops,
Kelowna, and Nelson in the southern sector of the Province and the Prince George
Region, made up of the Fort St. John, Pouce Coupe, Prince George, Vanderhoof,
Burns Lake, Smithers, and Quesnel Districts in the north were formed on July 15,
1971. Later, on August 1, 1971, the Coast Regional District comprising the Prince
Rupert, Courtenay, Victoria, Vancouver, Vancouver North, and New Westminster
Land Inspection Districts was formed.
In spite of the changes in personnel arising as a consequence of this regional
concept, the Inspection Division in 1971 continued to maintain much the same high
level of productivity as in the preceding four years. Reference to Table 2 shows
that in 1971 there were 6,104 examinations completed. Compared to the average
annual total of 6,023 for the preceding four years, the 1971 figure represents an
increase of 1 per cent.
Table 2 shows the volume of land examination output from each of the 18
land inspection districts in the Province. Notable features are the level of output
and the backlog of outstanding inspections in each district. The examination output
has increased significantly in the Clinton, Courtenay, Kamloops, and Williams Lake
Districts, and decreased significantly in the Fort St. John, Pouce Coupe, Vancouver,
and Vanderhoof Districts. On the other hand, there was a decline in the number
of inspections outstanding at year-end, as compared to 1970, in all districts with the
exception of the Courtenay District in which there was a substantial increase; an
outgrowth logically following a very heavy work load of new requests as shown in
Table 3. The total figure of 926 inspections outstanding as of December 31, 1971,
nevertheless, compares favourably with the average year-end figure of 997 for the
preceding four-year period.
Table 3 shows the volume of land examination requests recorded by each of
the respective 18 land inspection districts. The table also shows the percentage increase and decrease in the work load required of the Inspectors in each district for
the five-year period 1967 to 1971. Also noteworthy is that the Courtenay, Kamloops, and Nelson Districts have incurred significant increases in numbers of examination requests received. Fort St. John, New Westminster, Pouce Coupe, Prince
George, Smithers, Vancouver, Vanderhoof, and Williams Lake on the other hand
have decreased in this regard. The establishment of the new inspection district of
Vancouver North, which was carved out of the former New Westminster and Vancouver Districts, is the prime reason for the decline in the number of inspection
requests received in the two original districts. Despite these increases and decreases
within districts, the over-all change in the total number of new inspection requests
received during 1971 is insignificant when compared to the five-year average figure
for the period 1967 to 1971.
The types of inspections completed by the Land Inspection Division throughout
British Columbia in 1971 are shown in Table 1. Lease applications continue to
dominate the inspection output. Land-lease applications this year number 3,955,
64.7 per cent of the total, and foreshore-lease applications number 649, 10.6 per
cent of the total. Together they represent 4,604 applications or 75.4 per cent of
the total inspection output. A comparison of the current records as shown in Table
1 with the figures recorded in previous years for land-lease applications reveals little
 LANDS BRANCH Y 31
change between the 1971 figures of 3,955 (64.7 per cent of the total output) and the
1970 figure of 3,574 (63.7 per cent). The 1969 figure of 4,603 (75 per cent) is
however considerably higher. The decline in the number recorded during 1970 and
1971 from the 1969 figure is attributed to the Department's decision to drop the
need for a field inspection following the initial three-year leasehold tenure period in
agricultural leases. Note that land lease reviews in 1969 were 1,643, in 1970 were
880, and in 1971 were a little higher at 1,186.
The demand for summer-home and camp-site leases continued strong in 1971.
Th's year there were 890, as compared to 808 in 1970, and 644 in 1969. With the
current 10-chain reserve on Crown land surrounding all lakes and the new nomination procedure now in effect it is anticipated that summer-home site nonlakefront
applications will increase in number during 1972 and succeeding years thereby
bringing about a need for not only more subdivisions of lakefront land but also for
more subdivisions of the nonlakefront type.
The number of applications for permanent home-sites increased substantially
in 1971; 707 as compared to 495 in 1970, and 435 in 1969. Perhaps this strong
increase in demand for inland home-sites is an after effect of the Crown's current
restrictive waterfront policy.
Foreshore lease inspections in 1971 amounted to 649, a substantial increase
over 1970 at 469 and 1969 at 313. This is basically due to an increase in log-
storage applications arising out of the 110 foreshore trespasses recorded in 1970.
In this regard, it is noted that the occurrences of trespass in Crown Provincial waters
continued in 1971 at a fairly high level totalling 93 as compared to 56 recorded in
1969.
The other types of inspections noted in Table 1 do not show any significant
change from previous years. Licences of occupation were up to a total of 81,
possibly a direct result of the amendment to the Land Act in 1970 eliminating land
use permits. In 1970, licences of occupation and land use permits numbered 75.
In 1969 the figure was 104. Crown subdivisions proposed in 1971 numbered 32,
as compared to 35 in 1970 and 27 in 1969. It is likely that this number will increase
in the next five years in response to a growing public demand for recreational and
permanent home-sites.
Examinations of land made and reports completed for other departments and
agencies in 1971 were up only slightly from 1970. The British Columbia Hydro
and Power Authority and the Department of Recreation and Conservation were
the major recipients of this type of assistance.
This year the Land Inspection staff became more involved than ever in land-
use matters with the regional districts. Land application referrals, the deliberations
that arose out of these referrals and the participation on Technical Planning Committees have at times been beneficial but nevertheless costly in terms of the inspector's time. It is likely that this liaison with regional districts will increase and the
benefits will be reaped in terms of good planning and responsible administration.
The Fort St. John District continues to decline in terms of work load, most of
which is made up of applications for agricultural purposes. The reduction of oil
exploration, road building, and the current unfavourable agricultural economy are
notable factors. In spite of the somewhat gloomy agricultural picture the population
of this northern area continues to grow at a rapid rate with people crowding into the
towns and established communities. It is anticipated that more Crown subdivisons
to supply home-site needs will be required at Fort St. John, Fort Nelson, Dease Lake,
and Hudson Hope. Even the more remote community of Atlin has reached a point
where more home-site lots are needed.   With the extension of the Pacific Great East-
 Y 32        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
ern Railway northward from Fort St. James into the Dease Lake area, a population
influx and subsequent demand for land is predicted. Careful planning to accommodate this demand will be needed.
The Pouce Coupe District also remained at a much lower work-load level than
experienced in the sixties. This trend has been brought about mainly by the somewhat unstable state of the agricultural economy, but nevertheless there is still a great
deal of interest and confidence in the agricultural potential of the area.
Interest in land in the Prince George District continues to be fairly active. This
year the examination output reached 362, as compared to 318 in 1970 and 406 in
1969. The moratorium giving preferential treatment to "established farmers" has
had some effect in reducing applications to lease for agricultural purposes. Applications for summer home-sites and permanent home-sites on the other hand have increased. Lands within Community Planning Area 7 surrounding Prince George
received a great deal of attention from those interested in acquiring permanent home-
sites, and a number of applications were received.
Significant developments in the Prince George District during 1971 entailed the
auctioning of winter home-site lots at the Purden Ski Hill, an application by the City
of Prince George to develop a residential subdivision with underground power- and
telephone-lines and the acquisition and development by the District of Mackenzie
of 26 acres of Crown land for mobile homes and construction-camp purposes. Four
Crown subdivisions will be proposed in this district in 1972, the first at McLeod
Lake, the second along the Blackwater Road, the third north of Nukko Lake, and
the fourth a commercial subdivision at Tete Jaune Cache.
Work output in the Vanderhoof District declined from 306 examinations in
1970 to 155 in 1971. This is considered to be a direct result of the moratorium on
Crown land and the elimination of the requirement for the three-year inspection review of agricultural leases.    Three land-capability studies were conducted during
1971 by a joint Lands-Forest Service team involving lands located in the vicinity of
Whitefish and Stuart Lakes and in an area north of Tachie.
The 1971 examination requests received in the Burns Lake District declined
by 20.7 per cent from the figure for 1970. The work output, however, at 227 examinations completed is the highest for the past five years and left a residue of only
13 outstanding inspections. Most of the 1971 work load involved land rental reviews (35.2 per cent), summer home-site lease applications (19.8 per cent), and
permanent home-site lease applications (9.7 per cent). Agricultural lease applications have declined noticeably as a result of the moratorium. This policy is evidently
having an indirect affect on ranches in the Southbank area and much development of
existing ranch holdings has been observed there.
The incoming requests for the Smithers District declined even more than was
noted in the Burns Lake District, reaching a five-year low of 148; 30.9 per cent less
than 1970 and 49.3 per cent less than 1967. The principal types of inspections were
lease reviews (41.7 per cent), agricultural lease applications (11.5 per cent), and
grazing-lease applications (10.4 per cent). Although the latter two types of inspections amounted to over 20 per cent of the work load, the decline in numbers from
1970 is significant. With continuation of the moratorium these two categories are
likely to decline even further during 1972.
The Prince Rupert Inspection District recorded 200 examinations completed
in 1971, a slight increase over the 1970 output of 194 and the highest recorded in
the last five years. Completion of the Nass River bridge in 1971 coupled with a still
to be completed section of road will make the Stewart-Cassiar Highway a useful link
in the development of one of the last inaccessible frontiers of the Province.   A pre-
 LANDS BRANCH Y 33
liminary study of Crown land in this area is to be undertaken in 1972 with the objective of setting aside certain areas suitable for future recreational use by the public
as well as selecting areas for commercial and subdivision development.
The major projects undertaken in the Rupert District during 1971 entailed a
study of six potential subdivision-sites on the Queen Charlotte Islands, a detailed
study of all Crown land in Stewart, and a relocation proposal for the Crown subdivision at Meziadin Lake. A new fish cannery at Port Simpson and the creation
of a National Harbour in Prince Rupert are two developments expected to take place
in 1972.
During 1971, the Quesnel District incurred a slight increase in land-examination output over the level established in 1969 and 1970. The figure reached is, however, still 75 below the 1968 figure. Permanent home-site applications continued
to run at a low level, in sharp contrast to the more southerly reaches of the Cariboo
where this type of application makes up the bulk of inspections completed.
The dramatic changes in land use from ranching to recreation in the Cariboo,
as noted in the 1970 Annual Report, appears to be continuing but at a decreased
pace compared to past years. This is likely due to the Department's new lakefront
and site nomination policy which came into effect during 1971. In the Williams
Lake District, 163 inspections or 21.4 per cent of the total of 763 inspections completed were applications for summer home-site purposes, a decline of 20.9 per cent
from the 1970 figure of 206. It is anticipated that summer home-site applications
in 1972 will continue to decline.
A peak of 763 inspections completed was reached in the Williams Lake District,
the highest figure ever recorded for that district, and the highest number completed
by any district in the Province during 1971. Most of the examinations involved
lease rental reviews (26.8 per cent) and summer home-site applications (21.2 per
cent). With a predicted decline in the number of applications for summer home-site
purposes, it is likely that the Williams Lake District will have a lower total output in
1972.
The dramatic change from ranching to recreation was also evident in the southern Cariboo. In 1971 summer home-site applications represented 32.5 per cent of
all of the inspections completed in the Clinton District. The total of 134 summer
home-site inspections recorded was the highest figure reached in the past four years
but as a result of the new lakefront policy there will undoubtedly be a marked decrease in 1972.
The Kamloops Inspection District continued to show the greatest amount of
activity of any district in the Province. The total of 503 examinations completed in
1970 was eclipsed by the 1971 output of 702, representing an increase of 40 per
cent. Most of the increased work load can be attributed to rental reviews and to an
increase in permanent home-site lease applications. Although the number of summer home-site applications did not change much from last year, it is notable that this
segment of the work load continued to be the most significant. The figure for this
type of application stood at 69 in 1969, and rose to 152 in 1970, and in 1971
reached a high of 158.
The work output in the Kelowna District continued at much the same level as
in past years. Mining activity in the Princeton and Peachland areas has resulted
in a number of home-site applications. Land lease reviews increased from 26 in
1970 to 33 in 1971. Inspections resulting from applications for Crown grant under
section 53 (2) of the old Land Act, Revised Statutes, 1960, were also up. Lastly,
inspections resulting from the trespass use of Crown foreshore showed an increase in
number.
2
 Y 34        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Two residential subdivisions, one at Princeton with 22 lots intended for summer
home-site purposes and another at Westbank with 23 lots developed with permanent
residential use in mind were auctioned in 1971. A further large Crown subdivision
at Princeton is currently being processed. It is anticipated that future subdivisions
will be proposed near Princeton, along the Similkameen River, and in the Apex-Brent
Mountain Ski areas during 1972.
As in the preceding two years there was an active interest in land in the
Kootenays. In 1971, the work output in the Nelson Land Inspection District rose
to 385 inspections completed, a 13.6-per-cent increase over 1970 and the highest
level reached during the last five years. Lots in two Crown subdivisions were made
available to the public in 1971; an 18-lot lakefront recreational subdivision on Kootenay Lake and an 18-lot rural residential subdivision northwest of Cranbrook.
Floating community, Simoom Sound, Gilford Island.
Inspections of areas under application for permanent home-site purposes made
up 25.8 per cent of the work load and totalled 96 as compared to 58 in 1970. Of
the remaining types of inspections recorded, no significant variations from the level
reached in 1970 could be detected. In 1972 it is anticipated that the work load in
the Nelson District will not only increase but the types of inspections completed will
be more complicated. The establishment of a moratorium on agricultural lease applications in the Golden, Cranbrook, and Fernie Land Recording Districts; some
unresolved problems due to the Libby Reservoir; a number of proposed Crown subdivisions, and finally a land-use study of the Slocan-Summit Lake area will be
significant in this regard. Other developments that are expected to affect the 1972
work load involve the expansion of Cranbrook, the new highway from Galena Bay to
Nakusp, the Elkford townsite, as well as the Slocan Forest and the Kootenay Canal
Project near Nelson.
 LANDS BRANCH Y 35
The progressive increase in work load for the Lower Mainland districts, as noted
in the 1970 Annual Report, was largely responsible for the creation of the new
Vancouver North District early in 1971. Basically this new district was brought
about by removing the Alta Lake-Pemberton section from the New Westminster
District and the Powell River-Upper Coast section from the Vancouver District.
The work load in the Vancouver-New Westminster Districts in 1970 totalled
728 inspection requests, an increase of 28.8 per cent over 1969. In 1971 the total
number for the same area (Vancouver, Vancouver North, and New Westminster)
was 702, a figure that is still well above the yearly work load prior to 1970. Logically and as a consequence of the formation of the Vancouver North District the
other two districts have incurred relative cut-backs in numbers of requests from the
1970 output. The work load in the Vancouver District declined by 30.6 per cent
during 1971 while in the New Westminster District the decline amounted to 50.6
per cent. The total outstanding inspections at year-end for the three coastal Mainland districts stood at 183, up slightly from the 1970 figure of 166.
The records indicate that the Vancouver North District was primarily a recreation-oriented district during 1971 with 49.7 per cent of the examinations completed
involving applications for summer home-site purposes. On the other hand the work
output from the Vancouver District was made up of only 27.8 per cent summer
home-site applications with a still lower level of 15 per cent recorded in the New
Westminster District. In 1972 it is anticipated the work load will decline in the Vancouver North District as a consequence of the Departments new lakefront policy.
In the other two districts it is expected that the work load will remain at about the
same level as in 1971. In order to meet the demand by the Vancouver public for
residential and summer home-site use, further Crown subdivisions will be required.
Studies with subdivision in mind will be undertaken in 1972 of areas located near
Post Creek, at Jones Lake, near the Green River, and in the Powell River-Lund area.
As a result of arrangements made during the year, which brought about consolidation of the New Westminster, Vancouver, and Vancouver North District
offices at a central location in Burnaby, it will be possible in future years to achieve
a greater degree of flexibility in the utilization of staff and equipment and consequently it should be possible to deal with the many complex problems encountered
in these districts in a more efficient manner. These coastal districts are notable for
examinations involving high values and complex valuation problems. One example
of this type of work, which may be taken from the inspections completed in 1971,
involved the appraisal of a site to be used for a proposed highrise block located in
the University Endowment Lands. The appraised value of $5 per square foot is one
of the highest values placed on lands appraised by the Inspection Division during
the year.
There was a continued active interest in land in the Courtenay Inspection District during 1971. On a statistical basis, at 551 examinations completed, the district
rates third behind Williams Lake and Kamloops. New requests received during the
year totalled 581, a 43.9-per-cent increase over the 1970 level. In view of this
volume of work it is not surprising that the figure of 115 inspection requests outstanding as of year-end was higher than that recorded by any other inspection district in the Province. The principal types of inspections completed during 1971
were permanent home-site lease applications (132 or 23.9 per cent), land lease
rental reviews (67 or 12.1 per cent), commercial foreshore lease applications (50
or 9 per cent), foreshore trespasses (42 or 7.5 per cent), and log-storage lease applications (41 or 7.5 per cent). As a consequence of a strong public demand for
retreat-sites five Crown subdivisions were proposed.
L
 Y 36
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Future demand for Crown land in the Courtenay District will be influenced in
part by two noteworthy developments which took place in 1971. They are the coming into production of the Utah Construction and Mining Company copper mine on
Rupert Inlet and the completion of a vital logging-road by Tahsis Company from
Gold River to Tahsis, formerly an isolated west coast community.
The volume of new inspection requests recorded in the Victoria Land Inspection District during 1971 reversed the decline noted during 1970 and reached the
second highest figure established during the past five years. At 212 new inspection
requests received, the increase amounts to 10.9 per cent over 1970 and 44.2 per cent
greater than the figure for 1967. There was a parallel increase in the number of
examinations completed during 1971 and as a result there were only 32 inspection
requests outstanding as of year-end. On a percentage basis there are more examinations made in the Victoria District of those types of inspections dealing with Crown
foreshore than for any other inspection district in the Province. Of the total examinations made in 1971, 58 per cent were associated with foreshore lands.
This is the first year on record that no inspections were made by Headquarters
staff or by the British Columbia Forest Service. Needless to say, the Headquarters
staff experienced a very busy year resulting from vacancies created due to the serious
illness and subsequent retirement of L. D. Fraser, the former Chief Land Inspector,
and as a result of the tragic death of D. M. Thom shortly after his appointment as
Assistant Chief Land Inspector. Although the British Columbia Forest Service did
not complete any examinations during the year they collaborated with and helped
the Land Inspectors on many occasions. Their assistance is gratefully acknowledged.
The introduction of regional land inspection districts in 1971 has provided for
a more decentralized avenue of communication between the Director of Lands, the
Land Inspectors, and the regional districts. Closer liaison and a more uniform expression of Lands Branch policies are notable advantages. With a significant increase in new staff and the resulting problems of supervision and training, coupled
with the time required to study regional district planning and zoning proposals it has
been difficult for the Division to maintain the same quality of performance. Since
their introduction last summer Regional Land Inspectors have helped greatly in
clarifying the problems associated with administering Crown lands in the various
regional districts. Hopefully the Regional Land Inspectors will be the catalyst between the Lands Branch and the regional districts in solving problems and allowing
for a continuing responsible administration of Crown lands commensurate with the
planning objectives of the regional districts as well as the Provincial Government.
STAFF CHANGES
The 1971 period was punctuated by a number of significant personnel changes
in the Land Inspection Service. A tragic death, three resignations, eight hirings, 11
promotions, and four transfers occurred during this period.
D. M. Thom, the Assistant Chief Land Inspector was tragically killed in the
Fraser Canyon on November 4, 1971. Mr. Thom had served as a Land Inspector
in Kamloops, Prince George, and Vancouver. He resigned from the Service in 1969
to accept a position as a Fee Appraiser. Later in January of 1971 he returned to
the Service as the Land Inspector for the new district of Vancouver North. Subsequently in August of 1971 he became the Assistant Chief Land Inspector, a position
he maintained until his death. Mr. Thom had been with the Service approximately
11 years.   The staff and his associates will miss him greatly.
 LANDS BRANCH Y 37
Resignations during 1971 were tendered by D. E. Derkatz on February 28,
D. M. Sayers on September 10, and L. D. (Lee) Fraser in June. Mr. Fraser's early
retirement came as a consequence of ill health. During his 24 years in the Service,
Lee had spent five years in Kamloops as a Land Inspector and 19 in Victoria as the
Chief of the Inspection Division. During this time the Division through his guidance
developed into its present workable form.
Eleven promotions took place in the Inspection Division during 1971. G. H.
Wilson was promoted from Assistant Chief Land Inspector to Chief Land Inspector,
following Mr. Fraser's retirement in June. In addition, promotions involving the
following Land Officers occurred: D. M. Thom, from Land Officer 4 in Vancouver
North to Land Officer 5 (Assistant Chief Land Inspector) in Victoria on August 1;
D. I. Snider, from Land Officer 4 in Kamloops to Land Officer 5 (Kamloops Regional
Land Inspector) in Kamloops on July 15; F. G. Edgell, from Land Officer 4 in Williams Lake to Land Officer 5 (Prince George Regional Land Inspector) in Prince
George on July 15; A. Paulsen, from Land Officer 4 in New Westminster to Land
Officer 5 (Coast Regional Land Inspector) at Burnaby on August 1; L. M. Warner,
from Land Officer 3 at Smithers to Land Officer 4 at Williams Lake on September
7; T. J. Todd, from Land Officer 3 at Burns Lake to Land Officer 4 at Kamloops on
September 1; A. A. Hadland, from Land Officer 1 at Williams Lake to Acting Land
Officer 2 at Burns Lake on August 18; K. M. Hall, from Land Officer 1 at Williams
Lake to Land Officer 2 at Clinton on September 1; H. L. Wenschlag, from Land
Officer 3 at Clinton to Acting Land Officer 4 at Nelson on October 27; and E.
Warnock, from Land Officer 2 at Kamloops to Acting Land Officer 3 at Smithers on
September 1.
As a result of the foregoing events in 1971 two transfers have occurred as of
December 31, 1971. H. K. Boas, Land Officer 4, transferred from Nelson to
Courtenay on November 1 and W. O. Kalau, Technical Land Officer 2, transferred
from Vanderhoof to Williams Lake on September 7.
Appointments during 1971 that will result in transfers in 1972 involved A.
Paulsen from Coast Regional Land Inspector at Burnaby to Assistant Chief Land
Inspector in Victoria; A. Rhoades, from Administrative Assistant to Coast Regional
Land Inspector in Victoria; and D. Goodwin, Land Officer 4, from Courtenay to
New Westminster.
In addition to D. M. Thom (deceased), the following new employees were
hired in 1971 to compensate for personnel changes and losses incurred previously:
A. E. W. Dean to Prince George on May 1, K. M. Hall to Williams Lake on April
14, W. M. Letourneau to Fort St. John on May 17, and J. T. Hall to Williams Lake,
R. W. Avis to Vancouver, and L. E. H. Lacelle and J. D. Gerbrandt to Kamloops,
all on November 1.
With the introduction of Regional Land Inspectors, the total complement of
the field inspection staff reached 35 on December 31, 1971. This includes three
Regional Land Inspectors, 24 Land Inspectors, and eight Deputy Land Inspectors.
For the first time in the past three years the field staff has attained full strength.
TRAINING
Two Land Inspectors and one Deputy Land Inspector obtained their accreditation with the Appraisal Institute of Canada during 1971. The total number of
Accredited Real Estate Appraisers in the Inspection Division, including the Chief
and the Assistant Chief Land Inspectors, is now 13.
Eighteen Land Inspectors and five Deputy Land Inspectors are actively working
toward their accreditation.   Nine of these are Land Inspectors on the new study
 Y 38       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
programme, three of which have already passed the Appraisal I course. Of the
remaining 14 on the old study programme, seven Land Inspectors and five Deputy
Land Inspectors have completed the courses leading to accreditation and are currently working on their demonstration appraisals. Still remaining on the old study
programme are two Land Inspectors, each of whom have completed two of the
three basic appraisal courses.
One Land Inspector and the Chief Land Inspector completed the three-year
diploma course in Public Administration in 1971. This brings to four the total
number of staff members that have completed the course. One Land Inspector is
in the final year.
Unfortunately, due to administrative and personnel problems, it was not possible to hold any zone meetings in 1971.
STATISTICS
Table 1 represents a summary of the number and type of inspections completed
in the Province by this Division during 1971. Table 2 represents a comparison on
a year-to-year basis of the volume of field work completed and requests outstanding
at the end of each year from the period 1967 to 1971, inclusive.
Table 3 represents an analysis of requests for inspections processed by this
Division for the years 1967 to 1971, inclusive.
Table 1—Types oj Inspections, 1971
Purchases—
Agriculture (other than grazing)   121
Access (roads, etc.)   8
Commercial (resorts, service-stations, hotels, airfields, etc.) ___ 21
Community (cemeteries, church-sites, parking areas, etc.)  10
Grazing (pasture, range)   5
Home-sites (permanent)   176
Industrial (mill-sites, power-sites, manufacturing plants, etc.) 24
Summer home or camp-site  3
Woodlots or tree farms  1
Others  17
Leases—
Land—
Agriculture (other than grazing)   573
Commercial  (resorts, service-stations, hotels, airfields,
etc.)   137
Community (parks, cemeteries, dump-sites, etc.)   61
Fur-farming   4
Grazing (pasture, range, hay-cutting, etc.)   235
Cancellations (section 44, Land Act, 1970)   33
Home-sites (permanent)   707
Industrial (mill-sites, power-sites, manufacturing plants,
etc.)   64
Summer home or camp-site  890
Quarrying (sand, gravel, limestone)   59
Reviews (rental and (or) diligent use)   1,186
Others    6
 LANDS BRANCH
Y 39
Table 1—Types oj Inspections, 1971—Continued
Leases—Continued
Foreshore—
Booming and log storage or log-dumping	
Commercial  (boat rentals, marine service-stations,
wharves, etc.) 	
Industrial (mill-sites, canneries, factory-sites, wharves,
etc.) 	
Quarrying (sand and gravel from river beds) 	
Oyster and shellfish
Private (floats, boathouses) 	
Reviews (rentals and (or) diligent use)
Others	
Land exchanges (section 85, Land Act, 1970)
Licences of occupation
Easements and (or) rights-of-way 	
Pre-emptions (Land Act, R.S.B.C. I960)—
Applications
Annual inspections (including applications for Crown grant)
Subdivisions—
Valuations 	
Survey inspection _
Plans cancellation
Proposals (lakeshore, residential, etc.)
Others 	
Reserves—
Grazing	
Gravel pits __.
Recreational
Others	
Veterans' Land Act
Doukhobor lands	
Southern Okanagan Land Project	
Pacific Great Eastern Railway	
Other Agencies—
British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority
Department of Recreation and Conservation __.
British Columbia Forest Service	
Town of Kinnaird	
Miscellaneous Inspections—
Assignments  	
Delinquent accounts 	
Escheats Act 	
Lake reconnaissance
Land-use surveys
Land revaluations of special nature
Protests	
Section 53 (2), Land Act, R.S.B.C. 1960 (verifying improvements)
Section 65, Land Act, R.S.B.C. 1960, and section 48, Land
Act, 1970 (free grants)	
200
134
29
6
32
50
175
23
10
81
18
2
149
11
2
0
32
3
1
37
19
1
5
2
1
1
6
15
49
15
46
50
275
 Y 40        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 1—Types oj Inspections, 1971—Continued
Miscellaneous Inspections—Continued
Section 78, Land Act, R.S.B.C. 1960 (re compliance with
provisions of) 	
Section 130, Land Act, R.S.B.C. 1960, and section 97, Land
Act, 1970 (lands vested in Crown under Taxation Act)
Section 131b, Land Act, R.S.B.C. 1960, and section 53, Land
Act, 1970 (cases of doubt regarding inclusion of body of
water in Crown grant) 	
Trespass (land) 	
Trespass (water) 	
Quieting Titles Act 	
Section 102 (2) of Land Registry Act	
Others 	
20
11
40
93
2
30
67
Total
6,104
Table 2—Analysis of Inspections Completed and Inspections Outstanding at
Year-end jor the Years 1967 to 1971, Inclusive
Examinat
ons Made During-
Outstanding at End of—
District
1967
1   1968
1969
1970
1971
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
Burns Lake ___	
173
171
190
206
227
32
8
56
67
13
Clinton__-	
266
271
462
374
412
64
212
89
147
86
Courtenay	
274
353
325
377
551
36
61
24
85
115
Fort St. John	
1,066
1,039
858
620
439
180
162
157
86
72
Kamloops _____	
423
530
428
503
702
52
60
58
102
64
Kelowna . 	
216
275
267
236
249
39
43
59
62
37
Nelson __ 	
250
324
369
313
372
45
16
9
35
48
New Westminster	
245
247
303
301
240
7
49
23
91
33
610
607
513
273
282
45
67
27
19
7
433
387
406
318
362
27
52
74
111
64
180
165
146
194
200
38
26
74
49
34
Quesnel	
241
266
185
179
191
33
32
14
25
46
Smithers 	
212
272
244
183
182
23
25
57
88
54
Vancouver	
259
353
263
342
223
31
33
58
75
63
Vancouver North	
324
	
87
Vanderhoof	
327
401
341
305
155
40
35
61
20
12
Victoria	
189
137
252
189
230
4
16
48
50
32
492
28
620
1
567
2
687
2
763
74
48
41
200
59
Headquarters	
36
9
16
6
	
11
13
7
1
Totals	
5,920
6,428
6,137
5,608
6,104
781
958
936
1,313
926
Note—These figures include pre-emptions.
 LANDS BRANCH
Y 41
Table 3—Analysis of Requests jor Inspection Processed by Land Inspection
Division jor Years 1967 to 1971, Inclusive
District
New Requests Received During—
Per Cent Change
1
1967 ]   1968
1
1969
1970
1971
1971 Over
1970
1971 Over
1967
Mtn          147
238
339
288
840
426
283
362
277
376
414
194
161
276
288
354
284
557
2
18
217
432
438
494
547
239
339
369
207
337
169
185
214
359
252
191
843
2
172
351
581
397
664
224
385
182
188
299
185
205
148
249
271
135
212
619
20.7    i          1 1
290
295
QSfi
419
378
9.M.
— 18.7          +21.0
+43.9    '    +96.9
19 6    |        59 7
Fort St. John	
402        537
.  .Q          579
+21.4    ;    +65.2
6 3    j          6 3
Nelson  	
258
241
508
375
184
222
221
233
307
147
524
28
36
295
266
569
396
153
259
274 i
355
386
149
591
1
11
+ 13.6    ,'    +31.4
50 6    j        24 4
Pouce Coupe _ 	
—9.1    j    —63 0
Prince George.. _	
—11.2    '    —20.2
Prince Rupert _ 	
+9.5    1      +0.5
+ 10.8    j      -7.7
—30.9         —49.3
—30.6   i      4-6.8
Quesnel 	
Smithers	
Vancouver North	
—46.4
+11.0
-26.6
—56.0
+29.9
+ 18.1
Williams Lake 	
Headquarters _  	
Totals	
-. fi7fi   1   fi. .89 i
5,977
5,834
5,467
Average change for 1971 over 1970 for Province is —6.3 per cent.
Average change for 1971 over 1967 for Province is —2.8 per cent.
  SURVEYS AND MAPPING
BRANCH
 THE SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
It is the responsibility of the Surveys and Mapping Branch, through the Boundary
Commissioner, to establish and maintain co-operatively the boundaries between this
Province and the other adjacent Provinces and Territories of Canada. Within the Province, the Branch has established and is even extending a basic network of triangulation
surveys which are fundamental to determining geographical locations and co-ordinating
property boundaries. The surveying procedures vary according to the intended purposes.
Topographic surveys are constantly improving the portrayal of various physical features.
Cadastral (legal) surveys, on the other hand, delineate the parcels of Crown lands subject
to alienation under the Land Act. Finally, it is necessary to show on published maps the
combined survey effort in order to give a visual account of the position of land alienation
and geographic features of British Columbia. Maps must satisfy a wide range of uses,
whether it be by the sportsman searching for an untapped valley or virgin lake, the homesteader seeking unsettled lands, or the industrialist planning new ways and new places to
develop the resources of this Province.
So much for the uses of maps and surveys and their necessity. Also interesting is the
great variety of techniques and equipment which must support our comple.x surveying and
mapping organization. This includes photography from aircraft using precise cameras
calibrated to less than a thousandth of an inch, modern optical surveyors' theodolites
which read directly to seconds of arc, other instruments such as the tellurometer (a
distance-measuring device which operates on a principal similar to radar), and plotting
devices which are capable of precise mapping directly from aerial photographs. Helicopters and other aircraft speed surveyors to the remotest locations. Surveying is also
expanding into the realm of electronic computers which can process the contents of field-
notes in seconds compared with hours by manual methods. In all these ways, the science
of surveying and mapping continues to serve the people by keeping pace with their needs
and with the continual technological advances of our age.
The following is a brief summary of the functions of the various units of Surveys
and Mapping Branch:
/. Administration—General co-ordination of the three divisions of the Branch, these
being the Legal Surveys, Map Production, and Field Operations Divisions; delineation,
restoration, and maintenance of the Alberta-British Columbia Boundary and the British
Columbia-Yukon-Northwest Territories Boundary through the office of Boundary Commissioner; interdepartmental and intergovernmental liaison; geographical research and
data processing and research; editing of Lands Service Annual Report.
//. Legal Surveys Division—Survey regulations under various Provincial Statutes,
such as the Land Act, Land Registry Act, Mineral Act, and Petroleum and Natural Gas
Act; preparation of survey instructions to British Columbia land surveyors for surveys
of Crown lands and subsequent check of field-notes and plans; preparation and safekeeping of official field-notes and plans; maintenance of Departmental reference maps;
processing applications for disposition of Crown lands to determine the status of the
land; recording on maps, dispositions by other Departments such as timber sales, mineral
claims; and well-sites, reserves such as forests, roads, and parks, and all boundaries of
incorporated areas of other levels of Government; surveys of Crown lands and rights-of-
way at the request of other Government departments; computer checks of subdivision
plans for Land Registry offices; inspection surveys in areas of dispute; restoration of old
lot corners.
///. Map Production Division—Compilation and draughting of four main programmes of mapping—planimetric, for the Forest Inventory Series and for the Land
Reference Series; cadastral, for lot overlays at all scales as well as for the Composite
Series; topographic, for all large-scale engineering maps; and derived mapping, for the
Lithographic Series. Special mapping services including geographic information, editing,
descriptions, and delineation of administration boundaries. Operation of a large reproduction laboratory of three sections—printing, photo-mechanical, and air photo to supply
a map and air photo sales office.
IV. Field Operations Division—Propagation and maintenance of Provincial network
of survey control by triangulation, traverse spirit and barometric levelling, and photo-
topographic methods; operation of two or more aerial photographic survey aircraft, fixed-
wing aircraft, and helicopters on charter; surveys for establishment of integrated survey
areas under the Official Surveys Act; field control and mapping for site plans and other
special projects; data processing and plan checking of surveys made under the Petroleum
and Natural Gas Act; survey-control records; operation of radio and electronic maintenance section; aircraft maintenance, instrument and camera shop, and field equipment
warehouse.
  I
o
on
z
UJ
<
z
on
a.
_l
o
CD
"-
<
CO
a
«'
cc
uj
CO
z
a
a.
<
m
_>
o
Q.
o
1-
o
LU
z
UJ
0
1
Q.
5M
5 __;
O <
5
D
o
ce
O
>
UJ
x
CO
Z
z
Q
UJ   <
<
z
>
OL
5
<
CO
CC
■D
Q
>
UJ
>
<
>
CO
Z
3
cc
o
ID
CO
to
< «■
0 aj
1 ■
Q_ Q
<
tr
a
o
o|
z __
<
5f
to oi
co ui
to
<
o w £
-.o i
__>■»
< £6
5Sj
>
CC
D .
OT o
O t_i
Zs
SURVEY
CONTROL
SECTION
G. W. Barnes
O
IsS
z    »
<
(_
>. z
LU n
2            0 •*
*■
> -
co M
DETAC
CH
R. H.
V. C.
D. V.
D _,
OT f
of
_?=.
OT oi
>
_C
UJ
__-
D
OT
co
Z    Sa
<ll
is*
< >|-
--    1    »
a O J
OO -
iris
«(fl
B. C.  LAND
SURVEYORS
D. G.Alexander
A. C. Bridge
H. V.Buckley
M. R. Millard
D. L. Morton
G. T.Mullin
P. D. Noonan
o
to
<
z
£
£
tr
5
(/)
1
DC
s
C
o
a
z
i
D
3
(0
z
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH Y 47
SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
A. H. Ralfs, B.C.L.S., D.L.S., Director, Surveyor-General,
and Boundaries Commissioner
A comprehensive administrative restructuring of the Surveys and Mapping
Branch resulted in three of the former Divisions, Geographic, Topographic, and
Air being regrouped into the Field Operations Division and the Map Production
Division. The Legal Surveys Division retained its former title and most of its
functions.
The data processing and geographical research sections, previously in Legal
Surveys and Geographic Divisions, were brought under the administration sector of
the Branch as was the assistant to the Director who is also British Columbia representative, Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical Names.
The Map Production Division combines all of the map-making activities of the
four former Divisions from multiplex mapping through to the preparation of base
maps and lithographed sheets. This Division also has the reproduction laboratories
for air photos, offset prints, white prints, 105-mm. photos and xeroxes as well as
the map and air photo storage and distribution offices.
The Field Operations Division is responsible for operating and servicing the
aerial photographic aircraft and the Otter float plane. The field survey section of
the Topographic Division was transferred to this Division, along with the survey
control section of the former Geographic Division. Maintenance and stores (aircraft maintenance, instrument shop, warehouse, field vehicles, and radio) are also
in the Field Operations Division.
The structure of the Legal Surveys Division remained generally unchanged
except for transfer of the reproduction laboratory and composite mapping sections
to the Map Production Division.
Additional descriptions of the new structure of the Branch may be found in
the organization chart and the epigraph preceding this Surveys and Mapping Branch
Report, and in the more detailed Divisional reports.
The Air Space Titles Act (chapter 2, S.B.C. 1971), designed to legalize aspects
of title registry not covered by the Land Registry Act, was passed during the 1971
Session of the Provincial Legislature. The Surveys and Mapping Branch assisted
with technical aspects of the Act and with preparation of a specimen plan to illustrate how it may be applied. The purpose of this Statute is to provide for divided
title of volumes of air or air and land between specified planes of elevation. Firm
title must, of course, be predicated on suitable cadastral control. The Air Space
Titles Act will have particular merit where the development of air space is necessary
and desirable above surface in either private or public title.
Steadily increasing needs and uses for large-scale base maps, cadastral sheets,
and reference maps have been emanating from all levels of local, regional, and
Provincial administration. A committee was established to solicit the opinions of
large-scale map users and to design a system for standardizing sheet size, scale, and
indexing. The results of this work were circulated by letter from this office and by
direct presentation to participants at the Regional District Conference held at Victoria in mid-April. The gist of the system is derived from the National Topographic
System of sheet indexing. It is designed for scales of 1:2,400, 1:4,800, 1:6,000,
or 1:12,000 and these may be readily converted to proximate metric equivalents
with only a small reduction of photoprinting image size.
 Y 48        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
The Municipal Act was amended in 1971 to allow integrated survey areas to
be established within municipalities when they are in the earliest stage of incorporation. An obvious benefit of this change will be to allow the Branch to establish
a skeletal network of co-ordinate control monuments for the immediate use and
benefit of municipal engineering and subdivision surveys. In 1971, work was done
at the developing centres of Logan Lake, Elkford, Granisle, and Mackenzie as well
as at the older municipalities of Delta and Cranbrook. Responsibility for protection and maintenance of the control monuments is delegated to the municipal
authority.
The geographic co-ordinate system for identifying district lots within land
districts was extended to the Kootenay, Lillooet, and New Westminster Land Districts during 1971. Eventually, the entire Province will be covered by the system,
which will introduce enormous time savings in locating district lots on reference
sheets.
Most of the field projects completed by the Legal Surveys Division were in the
central and southern interior or southern coast. There were, however, several subdivisions for small-holdings and residential lots in the Peace River country, all of
which were done at the request of the Lands Branch.
At the beginning of the aerial photographic season, 185 requests for photography had been submitted and with the good fortune of a favourable turn of
weather in July, the flying operation units successfully completed a record 143
assignments. The trend of requests for aerial photography has taken a sharp upward turn over the last decade and this has been reflected through a rise in the
number of completed projects from 51 in 1962 to 72 in 1966, 108 in 1969, and 143
in 1971.
Unfortunately, it continues to prove difficult to complete large areas of block
photography in the north. In spite of a creditable 21,200 square miles of forest
inventory photography north of the 55th parallel, there was a large carry-over of
incomplete photography at the end of the operational season. Together with additional coverage being requested for 1972 by the Forest Service in the Kechika,
Dease, and Liard Public Sustained-yield units, and the Taku, Alsek, and the (Panhandle) Boundary inventory units, the work backlog is expected to rise still more.
Various lines of relief are being looked at, including the potentialities of replacement aircraft for the Beechcraft D18S Expeditors which have been in service since
1962. Several former military aircraft which have been modified for civilian use
are now on the market and their capabilities were studied during the year.
The Map Production Division reallocated mapping priorities and introduced
new procedures for map production, storage, and distribution. Instrumentation
was also improved with the addition of a new Zeiss-Jena Topocart photogrammetric
plotter and modification of two of the existing Kelsh plotters.
Production of togographic manuscripts at 2-inches to 1-mile scale for use as
bases for lithographed National Topographic Series maps at 1:50,000 scale is
nearing completion for British Columbia. A backlog of 145 sheets currently await
delivery to Ottawa for reproduction but with publication of these sheets and clean
up of previously missed fractional areas, initial coverage of published 1:50,000 maps
will be virtually complete.
Programme LSM139 continues to be the work-horse for most procedures in
the Branch which are amenable to data processing and it continues to be used extensively by all three Divisions. A considerable number of revisions and additions
have been made to the programme during the year to keep pace with changing
requirements.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH Y 49
Last year it was reported that the capabilities of programme GALS obtained
from the Geodetic Survey of Canada, would be built into programme LSM139.
This proved to be impracticable and authority has been obtained from the Director
of Data Processing for the use of GALS as supplied from Ottawa and modified
to suit the particular requirements of this Branch. A special addition to LSM139
will also generate the input data to GALS. Data prepared for LSM139 may thus
be used as input to either programme which saves a considerable amount of keypunching. The feature of GALS of principle use to the Branch is its ability to
predict the relative accuracy between surveyed points that will result from an actual
survey or from a simulation of a proposed survey. This feature was first used
successfully for the evaluation of the Highland Valley survey network which required
strengthening prior to the establishment of an Integrated Survey Area at Logan Lake.
The Control Survey Data Bank has continued to grow and at the year's end
contained the records of in excess of 21,000 control points. The data bank has
been for archival purposes only but in November the Director of Data Processing
gave authority for the use of a programme to search and selectively extract information from it. The use of the programme is restricted to Government departments
and Crown agencies. While this is a good step forward and has already proved of
great assistance to the Map Production Division it will not be of full value until the
data bank contains all control-survey information—and this is dependent upon
funds becoming available for the large amount of key-punching required.
The Branch lost the services, through retirement, of one of its long-term members, A. G. (Alf) Slocomb, B.C.L.S., Chief of the Topographic Division, and, after
the reorganization in April, Chief of the Field Operations Division. Mr. Slocomb
was first employed by the Provincial Government in 1927, though his term of continuous service dated from 1936. After overseas service in World War II, he
returned to Government employment, succeeding A. J. Campbell as Chief of the
Topographic Division in 1948. He was instrumental in maintaining the high caliber
of technical competence for which the Topographic Division was well-known. To
mark his retirement, Alf's colleagues honoured him with a presentation and a buffet
dinner on July 20.
Another long-service member of the Surveys and Mapping Branch, A. M.
(Art) Barber, B.C.L.S., also retired later in the year. Mr. Barber was one of the
original members of the Air Division which he joined after returning from World
War II duty overseas in the air force. He earned his commission as a British Columbia Land Surveyor in 1956 and was party chief in Field Operations Division at the
time of his retirement.
 Y 50        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
1971 REPORT OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA REPRESENTATIVE
ON THE CANADIAN PERMANENT COMMITTEE ON
GEOGRAPHICAL NAMES
W. R. Young, B.C.L.S.
The first organization established to control geographic names in Canada was
created by Order in Council in 1897; it was called the Geographic Board of Canada.
In 1948, the name was changed to the Canadian Board on Geographical Names,
and in 1961 to its present title as above. The membership and responsibilities of the
Committee have been revised by Order in Council dated July 22, 1969.
The Committee is composed of representatives from Federal Government departments concerned with mapping, archives, translation, defence, and territorial
administration, together with an appointed representative from each province of
Canada.
The Committee is responsible for dealing with all questions of geographical
nomenclature affecting Canada, undertaking research and investigation into the
origin and usage of geographical names.
Records of all Committee decisions (and name origins where known relating
to British Columbia) are maintained here as well as in Ottawa.
As a result of extensive large-scale mapping presently being carried out in British Columbia, there is a growing need for more names, especially for creek tributaries
and lakes which were unnamed on smaller scale maps. Again, because it is a policy
of the Committee to maintain the names of streams throughout their length even
when they flow through one or more lakes before joining a larger stream, considerable work is entailed in determining the main fork of various stream watersheds.
The accurate positioning and spelling of names is extremely important, particularly, for example, in cases of search and rescue operations, issuance of water
licences, trappers licences, mineral claim leases, delivery of goods or the preparation
of legal descriptions.
Requests for information concerning geographical names originate from most
Government departments and Crown agencies as well as mountaineering groups,
within and outside of Canada, newspapers, clubs, and similar organizations as well as
private citizens. Many questions are more or less routine and can be answered in a
few words; for example, how high is Mount "X", or how long is "Y" River, or how
many lakes, etc., while others can be quite involved and may take hours of research.
Inquiries reach the Gazetteer office by letter, telephone, and personal visits, and
over the years, requests for information have come from as far away as Sweden by
letter, and from Toronto and Washington D.C. by long-distance telephone.
Records at Ottawa indicate that new names accumulate at an average of 500
per year, and during the past year there have been 223 new names added to the
British Columbia records, and these will appear on future maps.
Among the more or less routine requests for information inevitably a number
of quite unusual ones crop up.
Heart cases have asked for "the lowest road route from Victoria to Summer-
land, and from Victoria to Fort St. James." An elderly lady was interested in moving to a small island near Campbell River. She had evidently been told by a real
estate agent of various facilities and requested from this office confirmation of such
amenities as ferries, post office, hospital, supermarkets, electricity, and telephone.
Another inquiry by phone was received from someone wanting the name of a mountain seen from a certain street in Victoria looking northeast; after considerable
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH Y 51
research it was determined that the mountain in question was Mount Dallas on San
Juan Island, Washington, U.S.A.
Another inquirer requested the place-name with the greatest number of o's in it.
It would seem to be Woolloomooloo Lake. Possibly that request came from a
homesick Aussie. And finally was can always count on a number of inquirers who
say "Our family name is . . . and I have seen that name on maps. Is it named
after my uncle   .   .   .   , grandfather, etc.?"
The research required to adequately prepare the geographical names for a new
map-sheet about to be published is such that present staff cannot keep up with the
work. Ideally every name not already on record as approved should be checked
for origin, correct spelling, possible duplication, position, etc., but when this is not
possible, it is equally important to see that only approved names are used, and that
no submitted but unchecked names are published.
It is far better to publish a map with a few correct names than to risk using
additional names that may later be proved wrong. Once a wrong name appears on
a map that map may not be republished and the error corrected for five to ten years
and during that time it becomes established with resulting confusion and annoyance
when corrected.
It is not a function of the British Columbia Gazetteer staff to initiate new names,
merely to record accepted names, carrying out research as to the acceptability of new
names submitted and check spelling, position, etc., as mentioned above. However,
in order to avoid delay in processing maps for publication it has become apparent
that some device is necessary to speed this process; consequently a start has been
made on a "Name Bank" consisting of the names of people prominent in the development of the Province and communities within the Province, pioneers not previously
so honoured and so on. In this way there would be a pool to draw from, particularly
when preparing maps of sparsely settled areas.
Another device suggested but not yet implemented is the use of numbers for
unnamed mountains particularly in areas where adequate fairly large-scale maps are
not yet available. Mountaineers and Alpine groups understandably wish to name the
peaks they have climbed but seldom submit them for approval before publication in
their journals. This is partly due to the lack of suitable contour maps on which to
locate the peaks accurately; consequently if such groups could be persuaded to use
numbers initially—for example, Peaks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, etc., in "X" Range it would be
a great help. The numerous ranges and mountain groups are adequately defined
on current maps even though the individual peaks are not as yet in some areas.
This device, if adopted would permit discussion and comment prior to acceptance
or rejection and more important, prior to publication. It should perhaps be noted
that such discussion frequently results in lengthy and prolonged correspondence including the choosing of alternatives, adding to the already large burden of a very
small staff.
It should also be pointed out that under the terms of the current Order in Council, the provinces have complete autonomy with respect to the acceptance or rejection
of geographical names. It is seldom that a provincial representative has felt it necessary to exercise this power in the face of real opposition, and naturally it is hoped
that such instances would be rare indeed.
The Department of National Defence has the responsibility of naming features
within DND military areas, camps, etc., and at the last plenary meeting of the Committee in Regina it was announced that the representative for the Northwest Territories would be responsible for the naming of features within National Parks;
however such names must be acceptable to the provincial representative concerned.
 Y 52        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
LEGAL SURVEYS DIVISION
W. A. Taylor, B.C.L.S., Chief
The barometer of activity is not always represented by the number of applications that are received concerning land, timber, and mining. The process that these
applications must follow and the increasing number of reserves and regulations that
are put in the way of final allowances, determine the activity. Every alienation
makes the bank of data a little fuller and slows down the operation of the next application by a small amount of time as there is one more document to compare and
refer to.
The status or ownership of land must be determined before an application can
proceed through all the subsequent operations of application sketch; amendment of
original survey to delete new roads built subsequent to the survey, and to delete
large water areas because of change in policy; amendment to parcel size because of
reduction in the maximums and minimums allowed by policy and regulation changes;
arrangements for survey of a parcel if required; processing the survey when received,
through a mathematical check; indexing and plotting it on maps; confirmation of new
original surveys of unsurveyed Crown land and registering of subdivision and right-
of-way plans in the various Land Registry offices; production of plans for grant and
lease in an increasing number because of the increase in number of agencies required
to be informed; and finally the writing of descriptions for deeds.
LIAISON SECTION WITH LANDS SERVICE
Clearances of applications were slightly down, by 500, at 11,415 or 95.66 per
cent of the previous yearly total. Land examination plans were down 600, at 2,687,
which would indicate a slightly smaller percentage of the applications received had
a chance of ending up as a disposition. An examination plan is made up for every
application which passes the first hurdles of ownership and reserve, however, as there
are so many reserves for one purpose or another, less than a quarter of the applications received have a chance of running the whole route. As plan amendments
totalled 513, down 364, and survey instructions issued were also down by 78, these
route figures all bear the same trend.
However, there was an upward trend in correspondence received, and in documents removed from the vaults for examination and comparison. In descriptions of
land written, three weeks more time was required than previously. Nine thousand
and thirty-six lease and Crown grant plans were prepared against 7,381 the previous
year, but for a lesser number of dispositions. These upward trends indicate the increase in complexity of administration despite the small drop in initial applications.
A start has been made on the indexing of district lots within the 58 land districts of the Province on a National Topographic Map Numbering System. The
present district lot registers give a very vague location to each lot and the index is
not available to outside users. Pressure is coming from many agencies for this Division to produce a location reference for each surveyed lot so that they can be easily
found on the maps. Work is now being carried out on three of the larger districts
when staff can be spared to do the work. About 10 years are likely to pass before
the task can be completed, unless more help is available.
All incorporated areas and regional districts were canvassed for their latest
composite type maps and the response was very gratifying. Many cadastral maps
were thus obtained which will be useful for administration.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Y 53
A stock of official survey-posts is maintained in all offices of Government
Agents, for use in Crown land surveys and replacement of original survey corners.
A resume of the activity in this service appears below.
Distribution oj Survey-posts
B.C.L.S.
Bars
Standard
Pipe
Rock
Post
Driveable
Pin
Post
Caps
Anchor
Plates
Driveable
Pipe
Amount on hand, January 1,
1971...   	
New stock ___  	
1,595
3,000
1,124
1,000
111
500
5,035
3,000
Totals _
Legal surveys -  	
Government Agents 	
Public surveyors- 	
Total used in 1971	
Balance  on  hand,  December
31, 1971  _ _______ __
Selling price of one post-	
Selling value of posts used in
1971 _ -	
4,595
2,124
611
750
Nil
Nil
57
Nil
Nil
73
45
145
750
57
263
3,845
2,067
1,348
$0.60
$4.05
$1.45
8,035
6,728
2,100
~8,828~
702
Nil
702
802
2,700
224
321
3,300
1,222
40
90
Nil
3,726
4,843
130
4,309
3,985
572
1,251
1,504
2,755
—234~
196
69
~~ 499"
2,256
$0.85  |
$0.25
$4.60
$450.00        $230.85        $381.35     $3,167.10     $3,632.25
$32.50     $2,295.40
Total selling value       _   $10,189.45
Production Totals jor the Years 1970 and 1971
1970 1971
Field books received  583 552
Lots surveyed  872 742
Surveys examined -  1,070 712
Lots gazetted or confirmed  743 769
Lots cancelled   24 45
Lots amended  875 513
Mineral-claim field books prepared  146 95
Reference maps compiled or renewed  36 56
Applications for purchase cleared  589 506
Applications for pre-emption cleared  7             	
Applications for lease cleared  7,625 6,403
Timber sales cleared   2,253 1,346
Crown-grant applications cleared  823 869
Cancellations made  2,293 3,885
Inquiries   1,347 1,185
Letters received and dealt with  4,697 5,703
Examination sketches   3,287 2,687
Crown-grant and lease tracings made  7,381 9,036
Well-site plans recorded  184 231
Survey instructions issued  1,074 996
Mineral claims plotted  84 75
Mineral claims gazetted  11 95
Mineral claims cancelled          25
Placer leases plotted          1,124
Placer leases cancelled          562
Documents from vault examined  58,038 61,555
Crown land subdivision and right-of-way plans  437 494
Plans checked for the Land Registry Office  1,719 1,750
Descriptions written   735 863
 Y 54        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
SURVEY SERVICES TO OTHER DEPARTMENTS
Mineral Act plan checking of surveys of mineral claims, gazetting of surveys
where application is made to apply for lease, and handling of correspondence from
surveyors in private practice concerning points of law on the Mineral Act remained
about the same. Placer leaseholds, which are not surveyed but must be entered on
the reference maps from descriptions, were very numerous.
Well-site plans under the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act increased about 25
per cent, the checking and plotting of which is purely a service to another department. New survey methods and plan preparation to simplify the recording of petroleum development roads were negotiated with the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources and introduced by Order in Council.
The drop in timber sale clearances and notations for the Forest Service is the
result of an agreement of the previous year with the Forest Service, that only timber
sales outside of Provincial forests would be done. The drop does not indicate fewer
timber sales.
Land Registry plan checking for the Department of the Attorney-General was
virtually at the same level, with 1,750 plans checked. The tendency for the Registry offices, with their increase in volume (and the limited ability of this Division,
because of staff shortages, to increase output without increasing the time lag), is to
submit the larger, more complicated plans. In effect the number of computer input
lines written increases enormously without the number of plans increasing to any
extent.
FIELD WORK
The permanent field staff of the Legal Surveys Division consists of seven land
surveyors and eight field assistants with headquarters in Victoria. Thirteen summer
employees were hired to augment the field crews.
Three of the surveyors were engaged on road right-of-way surveys, one full
time and the other two for the greater part of the season, leaving four crews to handle
the remaining survey requests from the Lands Branch and various other Government
departments.
Acreage and Subdivision Surveys, Lands Branch
Early in the year, 48 town lots were created in Fort Nelson additional to a
previous Crown subdivision, and a small subdivision near Fort St. John was required
to define a cemetery. Four surveys were carried out to facilitate exchanges of Crown
for private lands. These included a two-lot subdivision at Bella Coola, one lot in
the Sooke area, a two-lot subdivision on Texada Island, and a survey near Sechelt.
Right-of-way surveys to provide extra road width through subdivisions at Salmo and
Hudson's Hope were made, as well as a survey for road gazetting purposes as access
to a subdivision near Fort St. John. Proposed waterfront subdivisions at Sulphurous
Lake and Heffley Lake could not be undertaken, as necessary road construction was
not completed in time and an extensive subdivision on Mahood Lake covering existing special-use permits had to be postponed until next season due to lack of time.
Locations and totals of waterfront, roadside, and town lots surveyed are as follows:
Waterfront Lease Lots
Sechelt Inlet   21
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH Y  55
Rural Roadside Lots
Mile 22 Alaska Highway  26
Mile 62 Alaska Highway  23
Hudson's Hope   23
Fort St. John     3
Texada Island      6
Little Fort     2
Mile 141 Cariboo Highway     3
Total    8 6
Town Lots
Fort Nelson   48
Elko  28
Total   76
Reposting and Restoration
A posting survey of Crown lands in the vicinity of Tranquille was carried out
to define an area for ecological studies, and several district lot corners were remonu-
mented westerly of Quesnel and in the Willow River area. In the Victoria Government Buildings precinct, five parking-lot areas were posted for the Department of
Public Works and for the same department, postings were required for the Victoria
Vocational School and for an extensive area of former DND property at Kamloops.
A total of 242 lot or section corners was renewed with permanent type monuments, including corners tied to roads and highway right-of-way surveys.
Interdepartmental Surveys
Surveys performed for the following departments are as follows:
Parks Branch—Two areas, totalling 910 acres, were surveyed as part of the
Barkerville Historic Park, and on the Barkerville road a grave-site was posted. An
addition to Goldstream Park was surveyed on a land-exchange agreement, and additions to Downing Park were posted out. West of Williams Lake a reposting of two
district lots was required, and a small right-of-way survey was made at Sun-Oka
Beach Park, Summerland. A partial monumentation of the south boundary of
Strathcona Park was completed, aided by the loan of a Tellurometer and crew from
the Field Operations Division. An extensive posting of the westerly boundary of
the Creston Valley Wildlife Management Area was requested. Approximately 4
miles have been done, with completion planned next season.
Forest Service—Approximately 13 miles of the Willow River Forest Access
Road right-of-way was surveyed, and at Kitsumkalum Lake 1 mile of access-road
and a necessary subdivision was completed. A one-lot subdivision was made at
Prince George and at Lund. Late in the season a posting of certain lot corners
south of Trail was carried out.
Water Rights Branch—In connection with the Fort Nelson subdivision, elevations were obtained for use in designing an extension to the water system.
Department oj Public Works—Various repostings as covered under that heading.
 Y 56        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Department of Highways—A total of 12 privately owned properties affected
by the Libby Dam flooding of the Kootenay River was subdivided. This project
will necessarily be completed next season when a final six parcels near Wardner will
be surveyed.   A two-lot subdivision in Kelowna was completed.
Highway Surveys
In the vicinity of Crescent Spur to Dome Creek, 19.6 miles of the Yellowhead
Highway were completed by one crew, and approximately 10 miles of the southerly
section of this highway near Valemount occupied a second crew for a partial season.
Miscellaneous Surveys
Inspection surveys were carried out at Clearwater, Vernon, Cobble Hill, Smithers, Prince George, and in Victoria. Also, a subdivision under the Strata Titles Act
was undertaken for the British Columbia Housing Commission.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH Y 57
FIELD OPERATIONS DIVISION
A. D. Wight, B.C.L.S., Chief
The Field Operations Division was created in April of this year through a reorientation by function of the services provided by the Surveys and Mapping Branch.
Under the new organization, this Division is responsible for expansion and maintenance of the survey-control network, computations, distribution, and recording of
survey data; field control for topographic, planimetric, and engineering mapping;
control surveys for the Integrated Survey System; map and cultural checks, and air
photography of the Province. The four sections which comprise the Division are:
Field Survey Section, Air Survey Section, Survey Control Section, and Maintenance
and Stores.
The Field Survey Section consists of the field survey staff responsible for triangulation, traversing, spirit and barometric levelling for mapping control and large
scale engineering plans compiled by standard ground-survey techniques.
The Air Survey Section covers the operation of two Beechcraft and one Otter
aircraft. The Beechcraft are maintained and operated as photographic aircraft to
provide air photography of the Province as required by all Government departments.
The Otter aircraft is operated primarily as a transport and support machine for the
airborne survey party of the Field Survey Section. During the off season it serves
as a transport and reconnaissance aircraft on a limited scale for other branches and
departments.
The Survey Control Section is responsible for final computations and adjustments of all control surveys undertaken by the Field Survey Section and revising by
readjusting the existing control as it is strengthened by higher order or additional
field information. Well-site surveys under the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act are
checked, adjusted, and recorded, as are all integrated survey monuments set under
the revised Integrated Survey Regulations.
Maintenance and Stores, while under the Field Operations Division, do not limit
services to this Division. The productive capability of this section is used by all divisions of the Surveys and Mapping Branch, and many other branches of the Government service. The demands for services and maintenance of precision instruments
and sophisticated electronic equipment have grown with technological advances. As
a result, maintenance is the primary function of this section, and development and
construction of specialized equipment has suffered. Staff limitation prevents full
use of the facilities, and restricts the projects undertaken by this section. The instrument and electronics technicians are highly specialized, and a loss of present staff in
this field would leave a serious gap. An increase in personnel would improve the
productivity and provide the opportunity of training to prevent the loss of valuable
knowledge and experience gained over past years.
The first season of the Field Operations Division was very productive. Surveying is associated with the early stages of all development and is therefore sensitive to the state of the economy. Although many indications pointed to a slowing
of the economy, this was not reflected in demands for the services of this Division.
All sections worked to capacity, and there is a backlog of work to carry forward into
the 1972 season.
The Field Survey Section completed 26 projects during the year, ranging from
large scale site plans covering a few acres to a single mapping control job covering
10,000 square miles.   One airborne field party operated in north-central British Co-
 Y 58        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
lumbia and completed basic control for forest inventory planimetric and 1:50,000
scale topographic mapping of 34 map sheets. Horizontal control was established by
tellurometer traverses and vertical control by terrestrial photography supplemented
by barometric levelling where necessary. One hundred and sixty-one locations were
marked, photo-identified, and co-ordinated in the unmapped sections of map sheets
104P, 94M, 94L, and the southeast quadrant of 94K. Transportation of the survey
crew was provided by a Bell G-3-B1 helicopter, on charter, and the Departmental
Otter. Each aircraft flew in excess of 350 hours on this phase of the season's programme.
The mapping of northern British Columbia was initiated in 1970 as a five-year
programme. The raw materials of the map-maker are suitable field control and air
photography. Because of uncertain weather patterns, pre-planning will not insure
control and photo cover of the same areas during a single season. The air photography suffers most by weather restriction and therefore confines flexibility to the
field control. This year's photographic weather is the northern regions occurred in
July, which left time to divert the field-control party into the area covered by photography. Although time was short and finances low, sufficient stations were fixed in
map sheet 94C to control planimetric mapping of the area.
Field control for large-scale mapping at 1 inch to 1,000 feet of the Smith and
Coal Rivers was completed as an extension to the mapping of the Liard River system.
Similar mapping was requested for the Peace River and its main tributaries between
Hudson's Hope and the Alberta boundary. Field work for this job consisted of 375
miles of tellurometer traversing, 340 miles of spirit levelling, and 18 barometric elevations to control 232 air photos. One hundred and eight traverse stations were
occupied, five of which were geodetic positions to which the traverse was adjusted.
Transportation was primarily by four-wheel-drive vehicles, but a helicopter was used
when road access failed.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Y 59
A spirit-levelling project was undertaken to provide elevation control for a detailed gravity survey of the Guichon Batholith. This area is bounded by the Thompson River on the north and west, the Nicola River on the south, and Guichon Creek
on the east. The survey comprised three main lines—two running roughly east and
west and one north and south.   Precise levels and Invar rods were employed with
TELLUROMETER  STATION     •
second order procedures to complete the 160 miles of levelling. Each of the three
lines started from geodetic points in the valley bottoms and climbed 5,000 feet over
the batholith. Fifty-eight permanent bench-marks were set, spaced at 2-mile intervals throughout the length of the survey.
Control for large-scale mapping with a vertical interval of 2 feet was completed
for flood-prone areas at Courtenay and Grand Forks. A request for similar mapping
at Kamloops, Quesnel, and Prince George was changed to spot elevations marked on
an air photograph on the advice of this Division. Because this request was received
in late November, the priority area of Kamloops is all that has been completed. This
project consisted of 65 miles of levels from which 280 spot heights were established.
Mapping control was established in the Skagit Valley and the western section
of Manning Park. A helicopter on casual charter provided transportation for a tellurometer traverse to produce horizontal and vertical control in the mountainous sections. Vertical control was supplemented by levels along the Skagit Valley and the
Hope-Princeton Highway.
Site plans compiled by field-survey methods for the Civil Engineering Division
of the Department of Public Works were completed for the Creston Wildlife Administration Building, Chilliwack Vocational School, Summerland Fish Hatchery, Ab-
 Y 60        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
50°00
I2I"30'
I20°30'
botsford Agricultural Complex, Colquitz Care Centre (Victoria), Mount Thurston
Gaol site, Langley Borstal Home, and a building-site at Williams Lake. Three proposed debris collecting sites on the Fraser River were surveyed for the Forest Engineering Services by spot heights and cross sections. The required data was plotted
on air photo enlargements positioned by photo interpretation of ground detail. Precise distances at three bridge-sites were measured for the Department of Highways.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH Y 61
There were two crossings on the new highway at Terrace and Kitwanga, and a series
of lines on the Knight Street crossing in Vancouver. A Tellurometer MA 100
recently acquired was used with a 50-centimeter bar to ensure the required accuracy
on the relatively short lines. At the request of the Water Investigations Branch,
geodetic elevations were established on 18 water guages in the vicinity of Port Coquitlam. The survey included cross-sections on eight drainage ditches in the low
areas at Coquitlam.
One experienced instrument man was assigned to the Okanagan Shoreline Survey as part of the Provincial Government's contribution to the joint Federal-Provincial study of the Okanagan basin.
The Integrated Survey Regulations were replaced by new regulations written
to incorporate improvements evident after four years of use. In addition to the new
regulations, an amendment to the Municipal Act permitted the declaring of instant
townsites as integrated survey areas after completion of a skeleton control network.
To fulfil the control requirements and permit declaring current instant townsites
early in their development, concentrated efforts were placed on this programme.
Control surveys were completed in the townsites of Elkford, Logan Lake, Granisle,
and Mackenzie. The Townsite of Elkford was declared Integrated Survey Area 5
in November, and the remaining three are being finalized.
Additional control was established in the City of Cranbrook and the major portion of the town may now be declared.
A reconnaissance of the Municipality of Delta to design a suitable control system to densify the existing control was completed prior to the field season. Although
about 65 monuments were installed, time did not permit further field work this year.
The control survey within the Townsite of Logan Lake was tied to second order
mapping control. An analysis of this second order control by the GALS programme
indicated the necessity to strengthen the primary control. Field observations were
made to improve the network by providing a more direct tie between the first order
positions. On the basis of this survey, revised co-ordinates were computed for two
secondary geodetic points which had presented problems in the past.
The Survey Control Section readjusted 1,246 old stations and co-ordinated
1,229 new points. Control cards recording survey data for 45,532 stations within
the Province are on file. Two hundred and twenty-four well-site surveys submitted
under the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act were checked during 1971.
The Air Survey Section made full use of the unusually fine weather in the northern latitudes during July. Both Beechcraft exposed a substantial number of photographs in the Finlay, Klappan, and Morice Public Sustained-yield Units. A realistic
assessment of the accomplishment would not be possible without the knowledge that
photo opportunities between the north and south regions are in the ratio of 1 to 10,
and that the performance of the Beechcraft limits the effective time on photo to approximately four hours per day in northern British Columbia. A total of 23,295
photographs of 20 and 40-chain block vertical cover were exposed, of which 78 per
cent were north of 54 degrees latitude.
One hundred and ninety-six requisitions for air photography were received, of
which 134 were completed, and five of the larger blocks were partly done. The
special projects added 11,584 photographs, to make the season's total 34,879, of
which 2,500 were colour or false colour. The photographic aircraft flew a total of
607 hours during the season with relatively few maintenance troubles.
A. G. Slocomb, B.C.L.S., Division Chief, and A. M. Barber, B.C.L.S., Party
Chief, retired after 35 years of service.
 Y 62        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
1971 Air Photography Summary oj Accomplishment by Projects
Number of
Photos
Lineal Miles
Square MUes
40-chain vertical cover—
Finance Department—•
Bulkley Valley	
Peace River Block-
Subtotals..
Forest Service—
Klappan PSYU	
Sikanni PSYU	
Stikine PSYU	
Subtotals..
Lands Service—
Land Inspectors—
Ootsa-Francois Lake..
Vanderhoof 	
Subtotals-
Totals	
Average cost._
B. 20-chain vertical cover—
Forest Service—
Finlay PSYU-
Lac la Hache PSYU-
MoricePSYU _
Spallumcheen PSYU..
Totals	
Average cost	
Special projects—
Agriculture Department—
Cox and Lane Islands   	
British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority-
Fraser River-Hope 	
Finance Department—
Cameron River..
Fernie-Morrisey-
Ladysmith	
Subtotals-
Forest Service-
District Forester, Kamloops—
Burn areas-
District Forester, Nelson—
Burn areas— 	
Engineering—
Adams F.D.R	
Badger Lake	
Binta Lake ~	
Doris Lake 	
Libby Pondage-
Mica Pondage....
Stave Lake __.
Willow-Cale	
Subtotals	
Reforestation—
Red Rock Nursery-
Inventory—
West Fire	
Highways Department—
Fort Nelson-Fort Simpson.
Hells Gate 	
Port Hardy-Holberg _
Subtotals	
Lands Service—
Lands Branch-
Alert Bay__
CowichanlR-
Esquimalt-
Fort Nelson Airport	
Fort Nelson-PGE terminus-
Hudson Bay Mountain	
475
1,240
10,515
3,410
2,630
2,360
18,915
$3.13
23
250
66
500
816
89
492
47
8
30
53
72
410
12
23
655
38
45
425
30
30
485
6
3
13
32
3
20
16
165
44
210
419
100
120
36
4
19
38
50
310
7
18
482
40
80
3
38
121
2,500
8,064
1,715                               |        10,564
1,475
680
65
6,532
3,128
324
2,220                    __                     9,984
335
110
1
1
1,508
                        532
445                              ,|          2,040
4,380
22,588
$4.97                    	
$0.96
11,212
3,448
2,876
2,225
19,716
$3.01
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH Y 63
1971 Air Photography Summary oj Accomplishment by Projects—Continued
Number of
Photos
Lineal Miles
Square Miles
C. Special Projects—Continued
Lands Service—Continued
Lands Branch—Continued
Kettle-Granby            _	
289
4
7
6
279
77
28
3
300
7
8
114
3
3
3
236
96
10
2
315
5
6
POF. riEIit-i.f-way
1,073
815
Land Inspectors—■
15
23
26
205
30
40
27
39
34
291
3
4
20
160
25
20
18
30
4
466
Port McNeill 	
730
750
Surveys and Mapping Branch—
189
35
Film-filter test _  	
370
409
Herring spawn areas— —	
— -                      __
Subtotals..       _	
779
224
Mines and Petroleum Resources Department—
104 A and B _	
1
1
1
2
1
2
Public Works Department—
1
3
3
1
1
3
Kamloops D.N.D _	
Tranquille _ -   	
	
12
8
Recreation and Conservation Department—
151
4
429
21
56
132
2
130
8
31
'
-
 	
661
303
Water Resources Service—
Pollution Control Branch—
Industrial-sites and sewage outfalls   	
Water Investigations Branch—
2,154
41
31
8
26
80
345
15
9
10
195
280
764
20
20
4
8
120
564
9
64
3
320
166
	
Hedley      	
	
 Y 64        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
1971 Air Photography Summary oj Accomplishment by Projects—Continued
Number of
Photos
Lineal Miles
Square Miles
C. Special Projects—Continued
Water Resources Service—Continued
Water Investigations Branch—Continued
148
90
700
1,035
9
70
35
34
7
57
100
130
68
200
47
420
215
5
30
27
12
2
12
18
70
25
3,523
2,381
Totals                                      ...
11,584
6,567
Average cost	
$3.82
$6.74
34,879
6,567
42,304
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH Y 65
MAP PRODUCTION DIVISION
E. R. McMinn, D.L.S., B.C.L.S., P.Eng., Chief
The formation of this Division was effected during the year by consolidating
the varied functions of map-making into six sections, as shown in the organizational
chart. Duties were defined for each section in such a way as to make the staff and
supervisory responsibilities similar; space was reallocated and telephone service
redesigned to improve the effectiveness of the organization. One conclusion consequent upon the reorganization is that the space allotted to the production and
distribution of maps and air photos, namely, the film vault, the air photo library,
the map storage, the two laboratories, and the sales office is so inadequate as to
cause some inefficiency. The modern concept of large open draughting offices,
which permit the most effective supervision, will be effected when several partitions
are removed.
A new second-order plotter, a Zeiss-Jena Topocart, was installed in the Photo-
grammetric Section after two months of testing. The instrument will accommodate
a wide range of focal lengths of air cameras, has brilliant viewing, good horizontal
and vertical accuracy, and has the capability of accepting digital read-out, and ortho-
photo equipment. The two Kelsh plotters were fitted with new correction cams
which will not only correct for the residual distortion of the RC8 camera and so
improve heighting accuracy but also enable the use of film rather than glass dia-
positives with subsequent savings in cost and storage.
As part of our investigation into mapping methods as an alternative to template
laydowns, the Section advised on and prepared the base material for two orthophoto
maps made by Hobrough Ltd. of Vancouver for the Forest Service. A difficult area
was chosen and considerable experience was gained from the problems encountered;
a joint report with the Forest Inventory Division will be made.
Another alternative to template laydowns, which is a graphical method of
making maps from air photos requiring considerable hand labour, is analytical
bridging, which is also being examined. In this system, co-ordinates of points of
detail on an air photo are measured by a recording monocomparator, then adjusted
by a computer programme, and finally plotted as output on a map sheet base.
Similarly two alternatives to hand plotting of composite maps are being investigated. One system digitizes, records, adjusts, and plots the plans as units; the
other recomputes the surveys from plan data and replots the plans as now adjusted
to fit control points. Promising results have been obtained even though tests have
been done at irregular times and on borrowed equipment. The need for automatic
digitizing recording and plotting equipment is becoming apparent.
Twenty-nine large-scale topographic mapping projects were produced by the
Photogrammetric Section and are indexed at the end of this report.
The Planimetric Compilation Section completed work on the 1970 air photos in
June 1971, and started the mapping of the 1971 harvest of 17,000 air photos to
produce 537 map-sheets at 20-chain or 40-chain scale in four public sustained-yield
units namely, the Finlay, Morice, Spallumcheen, and Klappan. The base sheets for
this programme which show the grids, the lot compilations, and the control were
prepared by the Cadastral Compilation Section. The mapping of these four large
areas will be completed by September 1972.
The planimetric work of this Division is largely in two programmes, the Forest
Inventory Mapping and the Land Reference Series. Priority is given to the Forestry
mapping but this in turn is dependent on the summer production of air photos; a
 Y 66        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
yearly average would be 15,000 air photos and 70 land reference maps. A third
priority is the making of mosaics, minor planimetric tasks, and large-scale composite
mapping. It is apparent to us that there is an enormous demand in this Province
for composite mapping, mostly by planners and assessors.
The Mapping Services Section has undertaken a programme of preparing a set
of name record maps which will be the authoritative reference for all names on all
maps produced; some 30 map-sheets, 2-mile and 4-mile, remain to be done. At
present there is also a backlog of Federal 1:50,000 map-sheets awaiting a name
check. This Section produces and updates the official maps and legal descriptions
of the 24 kinds of administrative boundaries in the Province.
The compilation programme for lithographic mapping, the popular 2-mile and
6-mile series, is being examined both in method and in information shown so as to
produce modern high-quality sheets in shorter time.
The Draughting Section produced 236 sheets of large-scale mapping as listed.
A new standardized system of map-sheet sizes and numbering has been adopted.
The standard scales are 200, 400, 500 and 1,000 feet to 1 inch and only in
exceptional circumstances will other scales be used. Sheet lines are geographical and
are designed so that all standard map-sheets will fit onto the standard size "D"
paper which is 22 by 34 inches. The numbering system is based on a further breakdown of the N.T.S. system which is familiar to most map users.
The 1:50,000 programme, once a major undertaking of this Branch, has
arrived at a final stage where the remaining large block of map-sheets can be done
most efficiently by the Federal Department of Energy, Mines and Resources. Our
small plotting capability in that series will be used to complete various map-sheets
which have been by-passed. At present the draughting office has 145 sheets of
1:50,000 mapping on hand ready to be sent to Ottawa for publication.
Lithographed map production is listed in Table D-1 to D-3; one new 2-mile
sheet (Mount Assiniboine) was produced, and six maps were revised and reprinted.
The air facilities chart and a route map of Northern Vancouver Island were also
revised and reprinted.
With the combining of the Air Photo Processing and the Reproduction Sections, all personnel are being trained in both specialties in order to improve the
combined operation by movement of personnel to the heavy work load areas.
The "Barco" gallery camera was rebuilt by Field Operations instrument shop
giving a much more accurate piece of equipment with vacuum easel and back. Also,
new double-deck xenon arc lamps have been installed giving excellent illumination
and even coverage and permitting copying of line, half-tone and continuous-tone
originals to a negative size of 30 by 40 inches and an easel size of 42 by 60 inches.
Direct positive work is now being done only in reproductions with continuous-
tone contact work being handled by the Air Photo Section. A new 30 by 40-inch
Berkey-Ascor printer was installed giving high-intensity light source with much less
exposure of such materials as direct positive, diazo, and offset plates; for example,
an exposure on a medium-speed diazo paper which was 40 minutes under the old
system is now only 40 to 60 seconds.
With the increasing demand for multiple copies of small originals a table-top
325A A. B. Dick offset duplicator and an electrostatic master-maker were installed,
which will eliminate the abuse of multiple copy work on the two xerox machines.
By restricting the use of xerox to only 10 copies of any one original and going to
the offset process for more than 10, the saving in xerox costs will equate the cost
of the offset equipment within two years.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Y 67
In the Air Photo Section work hours have been staggered so as to get more
hours work per day from the equipment. Continuing maintenance problems with
one of the electronic printers will necessitate purchase of a Log-E Printer next year.
The maps and air photo sales office was set up in new quarters with receiving
and shipping facilities adjacent to the map-storage room. A recording cash register
has simplified accounting procedures. Additional space was gained by discarding
all but the latest air-photo cover, thus making imperative the speedy reprint from
the film of priority orders for air photos.
Total cash receipts are down 16 per cent from 1970, although noncash distributions such as offset or white prints have increased 25 per cent. The year ended
fortunately with a small carry over of uncompleted requisitions.
Planimetric Mapping—Table A
Forest Inventory Programme
Note—This work commences in the summer as new photography is received
and the maps are completed in time for field work the following summer. The stages
of compilation are: Photo baselines and control, template cutting, preparation of
base sheets (grids, control, and lot compilations), template lay down, detail plotting
and fairdrawing.
1970—14,100 Photos, 443 Map Sheets    1971—21,135 Photos, 644 Map Sheets
Number of
PSYU                      Scale           Sheets
Longworth   20          69
Eagle  20          24
Quesnel  20          91
Babine   20          18
Dawson Creek         20        141
Liard  40          37
Sikanni  40          31
W. Coast V.I  20          32
Land Rejerence Mapping
98-40 chain bases were prepared fron
Reference Maps:
20 chain  14
40 chain  43
Cadastral Plots—1:50,000 Series
Completed  9 sheets
Large Scale Cadastral Plotting
Quesnel        _ .
Number of
PSYU                        Scale           Sheets
Lac la Hache           20          87
Finlay  20 Chain 335
Morice   20          83
SpaUumcheen          20          60
Klappan  40          55
Peace  40          24
l 392-20 chain sheets.
80 chain       6
160 chain .
  4
Revised
  1"=500'
     63 sheets
3 revised.
Mackenzie      	
  1"=400'
1 completed.
11 completed.
17 in hand.
16 in hand.
Summerland        _
  1"=500'
Squamish 	
Charlie Lake 	
1"=200'
Bamfield 	
Spences Bridge	
Summerland	
1"=500'
l"=400r
  1"=500'
1 completed.
1 completed.
6 revised.
McBride 	
  1"=200'
24 in hand.
 Y 68        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Topographic Mapping—Table B
Project Name
M Number
Scale
Department
Complete
in Hand
Large Scale
Liard River (addition) ___	
McGregor pondage 	
M177B
M130A
M211A
M244B
M282
M287
M288
M290
M291
M292
M293
M297
M298A
M300
M301
M303
M304
M305
M306
M307
M308
M309
M310
M311
M312
M313
M314
M315
M316
M242A
M275
M276
M298
1"=1000'
1"=1000'
1"= 200'
1"= 500'
1"= 200'
1"= 500'
1"= 200'
1"= 100'
1"=    50'
1"= 500'
1"=1000'
1"=1000'
1"=1000'
1"= 200'
1"= 200'
1"= 200'
1"= 400'
1"= 400'
1"=1000'
1"=1000'
1"=1000'
1"= 100'
1"= 200'
1"=1000'
1"= 400'
1"=    20'
1"= 200'
1"=    40'
1"=    40'
1"=1320'
1"=2640'
1"=2640'
1"=2640'
V.I.=20'
V.I.=20'
V.I.=2'
V.I.=20'
Spot Heights
V.I.=5'
Spot Heights
V.I.=2'
V.I.=5'
V.I.=10'
V.I. =20'
V.I. =20'
V.I.=20'
V.I.=5+10'
V.I..-.10'
V.I.=2'
V.I.=10'
V.I.=25'
V.I.=20'
V.I.=25'
V.I.=20'
V.I.=2'
V.I.=2'
V.I.=20'
V.I.=10'
V.I.=
V.I-2+5'
V.I.=5'
V.I.—5'
V.I. = 100'
V.I.=100'
V.I.=100'
V.I. = 100'
Water Resources
Water Resources
Water Resources
Parks
Water Resources
Water Resources
Water Resources
Public Works
Fish and Wildlife
Water Resources
Water Resources
Water Resources
Water Resources
Water Resources
I.P.E.C.
Agriculture
Water Resources
Parks
I.P.E.C.
Parks
Water Resources
Water Resources
Water Resources
Lands
Highways
Highways
Water Resources
Highways
Highways
C
C
c
c
c
C
C
Wardner _____ 	
Summerland 	
Watson Lake -.__ 	
Atlin   	
C
C
c
c
c
c
Cowichan Indian Reserve
Spences Bridge 	
c
c
c
c
Manning Park-Skagit River...
In hand.
c
Courtenay 	
c
c
c
Skeena River Bridge	
Clarke Road-Port Moody.	
c
In hand.
Odium Slide	
1:50,000 Series
c
104H 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
10, 11, 12E, 13E, 14, 15, 16
c
93B 6, 7, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15
c
104K 11, 12, 13, 14. 104N 3, 4
Mosaics—Table C
Name
For
Scale
Number
of Sheets
British Columbia Hydro
Water Resources
British Columbia Hydro
40 chains
80 chains/inch
40 chains/inch
750 feet/inch
1,000 feet/inch
80 chains
1,000 feet/inch
80 chains
8
82E, 82L (portions) Okanagan Lake watershed	
Hope to Kamloops _	
Greater Victoria (1928)       -	
3
4
2
West Coast Trail                                            	
4
94A, 94B, 94G (portions of the above areas were compiled)  	
Department of Mines
Water Resources
16
2
1
6
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Map and Air-photo Sales, 1971—Table E
Total maps issued
149,490
Y 69
Requisitions
Maps Issued
Cash
Provincial
Federal
Litho Map Distribution
	
87,003
34,457
$96,776.00
14,032
13,998
Totals.. _	
13,594
101,035              48,455
$96,776.00
Requisitions
White
Prints
Cash
Prints Maps
_ —
12,593
$11,305.44
407,126
Totals _ 	
419.719               $11,305.44
Offset
Xerox -
2,210,805
355,667
Requisitions
Prints
Cash
Photo Reproduction
58
$142.33
166,420
Totals _ 	
166.478      1            $142.33
Requisitions
Air Photos
Cash
9X9
Enlargements
Air-photo Distribution
93,082
164.343
$85,237.35
Totals  	
3,896
257,425
3,187
$85,237.35
Requisitions
Public
Department
Cash
Air Photo Rentals
2,657
39,704
48,247
$5,514.27
Totals     	
2,657
87,951
$5,514.27
20,147
1
$198,975.39
Letters Inward._
14,234
 Y 70        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Lithograph Maps—Table D-1
Map No.
Name
Scale
Remarks
ID
1DL
SGS1
82F/SW
82J/NW
93H-83E
103B-C
1BL
82E/NE
82E/NW
82E/SW
82F/SE
S2G/SE
82G/SW
82J/SW-SE
82K/SE
92I/SE
92P
93B
93C
103F-G
103P
93K/9
93K/14
93L/15
British Columbia Government Publications
New Editions—
North Eastern British Columbia (Planimetric)-.
North Eastern British Columbia (Landforms)-.
Vancouver Island (second edition)	
Trail (second status edition) ~
Mount Assiniboine (first status edition) _
McBride (second status edition) ~
Moresby Island (second status edition)	
Reprints—
North Western British Columbia (Landforms) _
Upper Kettle (first status edition)	
Kelowna (second status edition)- 	
Penticton (second status edition)	
Creston (first status edition) 	
Flathead (first status edition)	
Elko (first status edition) _.
Canal Flats (first status edition) _
Lardeau (first status edition)	
Merritt (second status edition)-.
Bonaparte Lake (third status edition) _
Quesnel (first status edition)..
Anahim Lake (second status edition) _
Graham Island (first status edition)	
Nass River (second status edition)	
Federal Government Publications
Pinchi Lake   	
Trembleur Lake	
Driftwood Creek-
1 in. to 10 mi.
1 in. to 10 mi.
1 in. to   6 mi.
1 in. to  2 mi.
1 in. to   2 mi.
1:250,000
1:250,000
1 in. to 10 mi.
1 in. to   2 mi.
1 in. to   2 mi.
1 in. to   2 mi.
1 in. to   2 mi.
1 in. to   2 mi.
1 in. to   2 mi.
1 in. to   2 mi.
1 in. to   2 mi.
1 in. to 2 mi.
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:50,000
1:50,000
1:50,000
Complete revisions.
Complete revision.
Complete revision.
Complete revision.
Seven colours, contoured.
Complete revision.
Complete revision.
No revision.
No revision.
No revision.
No revision.
No revision.
No revision.
No revision.
No revision.
No revision.
No revision.
No revision.
No revision.
No revision.
No revision.
No revision.
First edition.
First edition.
First edition.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Y 71
Maps oj British Columbia Published by Department oj Energy,
Mines and Resources, Ottawa—Table D-2
Provincial, Compilations 1:50,000
Name
Map No.
Name
Map No.
92 0/5
93K/13
93K/9
93K/14
Federal, Compilations 1:50,000
Glacier Lake	
Charlotte Lake	
Clusko River 	
Christensen Creek
Ulkatcho 	
Kushya River	
Tahyesco River	
Kimsquit	
Nadina River —
Qualcho Lake	
Natalkuz Lake	
Cheslatta Lake	
Dunedin River	
Ashington Range..
Tseax River	
Observatory Inlet-
Homan Lake	
92G/16
93C/3
93C/9
93C/11
93C/13
93C/15
93D/9
93D/15
93E/15
93F/4
93F/6
93F/11
94N/1
103 0/1E
103P/3
103P/5
104M/14W
Alta Lake  	
Anahim Lake _	
Townton Creek _	
Tusulko River	
Carnlick Creek 	
Toil Mountain __	
Swallop Creek _	
Whitesail Reach —
Wistaria — 	
Tetachuck Lake 	
Tatuk Creek	
Knapp Lake 	
Trout River (second edition)
Lava Lake  	
Greenville   _
Aiyansh- _	
Porter Landing	
92J/2
93C/6
93C/10
93C/12
93C/14
93C/16
93D/10
93E/10
93E/16
93F/5
93F/9
93F/14
94N/4
103P/2
103P/4
103P/6
104J/16W
Federal, Miscellaneous 1:25,000
92G/1C
92G/2f
92G/2h
92G/7a
92G/2d
92G/2g
92G/6c
Pitt River
92G/7b
Federal, 1:250,000
Federal, 1:1,000,000
Dease Lake.
 Y 72        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Department oj Regional Economic Expansion—ARDA—Table D-3
Area Name Map No.
Prince George Land Capability Analysis _LA1
East Kootenay Land Capability Analysis LA2
Bulkley Land Capability Analysis LA.4
Tulameen Porestry 92H/NE
Princeton Forestry 92H/SE
Fort Nelson Agriculture 94J/NE
Fernie Waterfowl 82G
Lardeau Waterfowl 82K
Bute Inlet .Ungulates _92K
Mount Waddington Waterfowl 92N
Quesnel Waterfowl 93B
AnahimLake Ungulates 93C
Nechako Recreation 93F
Nechako Ungulates 93F
Nechako Waterfowl _93F
Whitesail Lake -Recreation 93E
Whitesail Lake .Ungulates _93E
Whitesail Lake Waterfowl 93E
McBride -Waterfowl _93H
McLeodLake Ungulates .93J
Fort Fraser Recreation 93K
Fort Fraser Ungulates 93K
Smithers Recreation 93L
Smithers Waterfowl 93L
Hazelton Waterfowl 93M
Pine Pass Waterfowl 930
Dawson Creek Waterfowl 93P
Charlie Lake .WaterfowL 94A
Nass River WaterfowL 103P, O
 UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT
LANDS
 (b) U.E.L. Fire Department
attack pumper truck.
(a) U.E.L. garbage packer with
new Cushman vehicle.
(rf) Storm sewer installation
on U.E.L. golf course.
(c) U.E.L. Emergency Control
Centre.
Illlllii*!!
 UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS Y 75
UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
R. P. Murdoch, Project Manager
The operations for the year 1971 were related mainly to normal municipal
administration and maintenance. However, there were a number of highlights
which I feel will be of interest, and, therefore, are included in this Annual Report.
The design for 16th Avenue west of Blanca Street through to Marine Drive
calls for a paved four-lane divided roadway. This will accommodate the majority
of what is a substantial daily flow of traffic. During the year, work was completed
to the halfway point in this project. The paved two-lane roadway has resulted in a
substantial decrease in the flow of traffic on both University Boulevard and Chancellor Boulevard.
The design work for the extending of Fourth Avenue into Chancellor Boulevard was also completed, with the actual construction work to be done by the
Department of Highways.
The long driveways in the University Endowment Lands have prompted our
truck driver to back his garbage vehicle into these driveways. Because of the
weight of the vehicle we have had complaints of driveways being broken up. This
problem was solved during the year by purchasing a three-wheeled Cushman unit,
which is extremely mobile and, as can be seen from the photo on page 74, is self
dumping and works in co-operation with our garbage packer without any modification necessary.
In my 1970 report I stated that steps have been taken to implement the
recommendations of the Canadian Underwriters' report on fire protection for this
area. During 1971, nine additional fire-fighters were employed which enabled us
to bring our shift-crew strength up to six men. A picture of the new attack pumper
truck is included in this report. Extensive alterations were also carried out in the
fire hall to accommodate our new truck and additional staff. Included in the
alterations were modifications to the emergency control centre and a picture of the
centre is also included in this report.
On July 1, 1971, we took over the operation of the University Endowment
Lands Golf Course. Prior to that date and for a period of some 40 years it had
been operated as a public course by the Westward Ho Golf Course Limited. Three
of the course's staff retired at the end of 1971. They were Harry Winder with over
40 years' of service, John C. Ritchie with 35 years of service, and Mrs. Emma
Thomsett with 14 years' of service. The condition of the course had been allowed
to deteriorate to a point where it will require major expenditures to bring it back
to an acceptable level. Steps have been taken to implement a programme of equipment replacement. The course also requires a new underground irrigation system
and preliminary design work has commenced. There is also some major drainage
problems, and steps to correct the most pressing of these were undertaken during
the year. A picture of this particular project is included in this report. The present
clubhouse has reached a state where steps must be taken to replace it. The amount
of dry-rot in the existing structure makes it impractical to consider any possible
remodelling. We, therefore, are working along with an architect from the Department of Public Works on the design of a new clubhouse.
An experimental project was undertaken in an effort to arrest the long outstanding problem of Spanish Banks erosion. This involved the sowing of the banks
with a special mixture of grass seed.   Stanley Weston, Agricultural Consultant, was
 Y 76        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
retained on this project. We are looking forward with interest to the spring of 1972
to assess the results of this programme.
I would also take this opportunity to acknowledge the splendid co-operation we
have received during this past year from the various Provincial departments with
which we have had to deal.
It is with regret that I mention the sudden passing of one of my staff, Arnold
Vogt, who commenced work with the University Endowment Lands on December
3, 1951, and passed away very suddenly on August 28, 1971.
There remains a broad interest in the possibility of future development of the
University Endowment Lands for single family, multiple dwelling, and commercial
development.
The following tabulation shows comparative revenue figures for the past 10
years, together with a summary of building permits.
 UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
Y 77
>
GO
0
.J
U
Z
t-~
Os
o
H
<N
VO
ON
W
5
z
>
all
s
CO
Q
Z
<
mi
H
Z
w
2
I
D
Z
W
H
-»5
>
z
D
* aS
.«   a.
H 2
«o
c c
a)    «1
o
SS
3 3
18
i-i >
St.0'
SOU)
_fe
z >
Caps
u
- E _»
« 5 <u
558
-1 B.H
«*. tt m m tJ->n W « (
vjOif-r-oo-ctn-Ooon
C\ ^r g. t~^ rt 00 m t~-' -n \d
HrH^MVOhTf   Op(NCJ\
W*OtN <n»(Nr-iO»N
»" o tn *o vo h ^ h " irt
0\HltO'H(nhH»OQ
mientnenmrnrn-rtsoun
mrnoscnso-mim-irnsorA
j Os so O O O t";
o\ 10 i-5 cs Tt e*i
I m 00 un mi cn \o
■ rn c> mi rt t> ot
*i ^ 1 "i ^ ^ ^ "^ t. °i
w rt n n n Tt m <t n m
OTt>Ot>OOOOOOi-i.
«■ tt o\ o\ r~ c
OvotvotnTtov-iO-n
t> tn in rt <-; o^ os n n n
O Tt Os" «N »r. rn i-h Tt so Os
W-(M » Tt « (S vC lOO-ONtH
tncntnt^ooosOsOvootn
d d 00 co 00" ^ » Tt in d
(Stn^nnvOhooOso^
sOsososososOsOSO^mtm.
Os Os Os Os Os Os Os Os Os Os
 Y 78        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Number and Value of Building Permits Issued for the
Calendar Years 1969, 1970, and 1971
1969
1970
1971
Number
Value
Number
Value
Number
Value
1
1
1
14
2
3
4
$
75,000
125,000
30,000
75,771
87,000
~3,700
58,000
22
3
12
3
$
1
27
1
1
4
2
$
25,000
	
143,700
10,000
89,050
3,000
182,000
Alterations to commercial buildings	
18,150
16,500
2,800
14,000
Total.!
26
454,471
40
188,350
36
315,850
   PERSONNEL OFFICE
Y 81
PERSONNEL OFFICE
R. C. Webber, Personnel Officer
The establishment of the Lands Service was increased by 23 employees during
1971, 10 new employees as a result of the Lands Service take-over of the Westward
Ho Golf Course on the University Endowment Lands. In addition, nine firefighters
were added to the University Endowment Lands, two clerical positions to the Land
Administration Division, and two Regional Land Inspectors to the Land Inspection
Division. These changes brought the year-end total of permanent and continuous
employees in the Lands Service to 374, plus 5 temporary employees.
As the following table indicates, personnel activity in 1971 was considerably
above the previous year, with an 8 2-per-cent increase in recruitment of continuous
staff and an 18-per-cent increase in recruitment of temporary staff, bringing it up
to the level previously handled in the 1967/68 period of high employment. Reclassifications reached an all-time high in 1971, with a 59-per-cent increase over
1970, the previous record year. On the other hand, turnover of continuous employees was down 19 per cent over 1970, to a level that has not been enjoyed since
1965. The high increase in promotions appears to be only a reflection of the general
increase in recruitment activity.
1968
1969
1970
1971
52
25
24
2
13
8
40
3
59
45
22
16
6
8
5
42
1
52
34
41
7
6
4
5
36
2
38
62
Reclassifications _    	
65
28
8
12
Transfers and promotions from other departments	
6
29
Retirements  ~ - _ _ _	
4
45
Despite the relatively high level of unemployment, difficulty was still encountered in recruiting licensed Land Surveyors as well as experienced map Draughtsmen
and Land Officers.
The Personnel Office played an active part in the reorganization of the Surveys
and Mapping Branch, which was concluded in 1971. The previous four divisions,
Legal Surveys, Topographic, Geographic, and Air Surveys, were reduced to three
functionally integrated divisions, namely, Legal Surveys, Field Operations, and Map
Production. Under the new organization, the Field Operations Division, and, to
a certain extent, the Legal Surveys Division, supply the basic survey and air-photo
input data to the Map Production Division, which has the responsibility for compiling all basic and much final mapping for the Government. In addition, the Legal
Surveys Division continues to act as a central registry for the disposition of all
Crown lands.
There were many significant promotions made in 1971. The following occurred
in the Land Inspection Division: G. H. Wilson to Chief, Land Inspection Division;
D. M. Thom to Assistant Chief, and successively, A. Paulsen after Mr. Thorn's
untimely death; Messrs. Paulsen, Edgell, and Snider to Regional Land Inspectors
in Vancouver, Prince George, and Kamloops respectively. A. D. Wight was promoted to Chief and K. M. Bridge to Supervising Surveyor of the Field Operations
Division; while D. B. Young was promoted to Supervisor of the Reproduction Sec-
 Y 82        DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
tion and G. S. Smith to Supervisor of the Map Compilation Section, of the Map
Production Division.
Four retirements occurred within the Service during the year. They were A.
G. Slocomb, Chief of the Field Operations Division, after 35 years of service; L. D.
Fraser, Chief of the Land Inspection Division, after 24 years of service; A. M.
Barber, Surveyor 2, Field Operations Division, and E. B. Hackett, Supervisor of
the Air Photo Laboratory, retiring after 35 years and 24 years of service respectively.
During the year, three Lands Service employees died while in service. They
were D. M. Thom (12 years' service), Assistant Chief, Land Inspection Division;
Mrs. J. M. Dawes (2 years' service), Clerk Typist of the Land Inspection Division,
Prince Rupert; and A. Vogt (20 years' service), Labourer, University Endowment
Lands.
In 1971, three employees of the Lands Service graduated from the Government's three-year Executive Development Training Plan. They were G. H. Wilson
and A. G. Anderson of the Land Inspection Division and A. C. Bridge of the
Legal Surveys Division. In addition, the following employees are currently enrolled
in the course: W. C. Fry, Land Administration Division, and T. J. Todd, Land
Inspection Division, in their third year; D. Conway, Land Administration Division,
and D. V. Smith, Field Operations Division, in their second year; and L. G. Smith,
Map Production Division, in his first year.
For the past several years, the sick leave record of the Lands Service has been
equal to, or better than, the average within the Government; however, in 1971, the
Service's record slipped to an average of 7.3 days' sick leave per employee, which
is approximately one day per year more than the average civil servant.
   MAIL AND FILE ROOM Y 85
MAIL AND FILE ROOM
David S. Preston
Letters received in the Department during 1971 amounted to 247,532, compared to 260,420 in 1970. The decrease in the number of letters received may not
factually reflect the work load because many reports, etc., are no longer recorded
by the mail room. Each division, therefore, is receiving their correspondence sooner
than they would have and they will only record the pertinent data required for their
use. One record deleted from our records: (Stumpage adjustment notices) would
in all probability raise the letters recorded to more than the previous year.
The Department's main files ("O" Series) were located in two vaults, one in
the precinct area, the other several miles distant. This split up of the filing area
caused an unnecessary delay in securing information. An all-out effort was made
to relocate the distant vault within the main buildings. Space was located finally
and the move was made. All our files are now easily accessible to the staff once
again.
While it appears that our filing system has accessibility, it also has increased
in size, leaving the Department with only six to eights months of filing space. In
spite of the microfilming programme and the shelf space gained, Departmental files
are overtaking the gain, therefore, it will be necessary to locate additional filing
space in 1972 to maintain an efficient and functional filing system.
New lighting has been installed in the mail room giving better placement of
light on the work areas and greatly reducing the glare problem experienced from
the older type fixtures.
Letters Inward
Branch
1971
1970
10-year Average,
1962-71
74,190
112.338
69,819
130.614
58,369
137,024
37,516                    35,532
23,488                    24,455
31,738
23,086
247.532           1         260.420           !         25(1.717
'
Letters Outward (Recorded)
1
12,300
1,752
17,340
2,300
Forests     _ 	
1,878
Totals                       - 	
14,052
19,640
16 006
Miscellaneous Reports
Designation
1971
1970
1962-71
2,898
7,968
Nil*
6,104
4,003
8,540
12,035
5,608
2,775
10,628
Logging-inspection reports	
5 520
Totals   	
16,970
30,186
18,923
New Files Created
"O" files        _	
1
9,348                      8,369
1,096                      1,510
668                         865
7,216
1,529
1,566
Totals   .                                    	
11,112          |          10,744
10,311
* To speed up mail flow, some types of reports are no longer recorded in this division.   They are now
recorded by the Department receiving them.
Micro-film Reference, 1083.
 Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1972
1,030-272-1354
 1972
KEYS 1 TO 7
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS,  FORESTS, AND  WATER  RESOURCES
LANDS SERVICE
HON. R. G. WILLISTON -    -    MINISTER
D. BORTHWICK -   DEPUTY MINISTER  OF LANDS
DEPARTMENTAL MAPPING
DECEMBER 31, 1971
KEY 1
EXPLANATION
Key 1 „  Information
Key 2 ..  Air Photo Mosaics
Key 3  Composite Maps
Key 4  Topographic Mapping (scale \"-=.Vi mile)
Key 5 \   Planimetric mapping (scale, \"z=.Vi mile+1 mile)
Key 6  Large-scale topographic mapping
Key 7  Planimetric mapping (scale 4-"=l mile)
Most of the maps shown on these Keys were prepared originally for Departmental
use and, having proved of value to the public, copies are available for sale in white print
form, which shows the map detail with dark-blue or black lines on white paper.
Maps and mosaics supplied from these Keys are not kept in stock, but are printed to
fulfil each individual request and have no returnable value.
The topographic mapping shown on Key 4 is also being published at a scale of
1:50,000.   Key 14 shows the progress of this programme.
Government Agents DO NOT stock maps from these Keys.
HOW TO ORDER A MAP
1.
Choose the type and scale of map best suited for your particular need.
2.
State KEY NUMBER  and MAP NUMBER, scale, and number of copies
required of each.
*3.
Enclose price of maps with order, adding 5 per cent S.S. & M.A. tax for orders
to be delivered in British Columbia.
4.
Address orders from these Keys to:
Director, Surveys and Mapping Branch,
Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources,
Victoria, British Columbia.
5.
Small orders will be sent folded; if wanted rolled, add 25 cents per order.
* Prices are noted on each Key and the correct amount should be submitted with the
order. Cheques or money orders should be made payable to the Minister of Finajice^for
the Province of British Columbia. Orders to points within Canada only may be sent
C.O.D. upon request.   Unless otherwise requested, all orders are sent third-class jnail.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND SERVICES AVAILABLE
PUBLISHED MAPS—Separate Keys will be supplied upon request, showing the various
types of maps covering the Province, as follows:
General Maps   __._     Key 8
Regional Maps L —-     Key 9
National Topographic Maps at the scale of—
1 inch to 2 miles   _   Key 10
1:250,000 (approximately 1 inch to 4 miles)   Key 11
1:500,000 (approximately 1 inch to 8 miles) _.__  Key 12
1:1,000,000    _  Key 13
1:50,000 (approximately 1 inch to 1 mile)  Key 14
AIR PHOTO COVER—Separate Keys will be supplied upon request, showing the air
photography taken at various altitudes, as follows:
Vertical photography—
1 inch to 1 mile :    .—I1  Key 15
1 inch to Vi mile   t  Key 16
1 inch to V4 mile __ I _.__  Key 17
Special projects    Key 18
LAND ACQUISITION MAPS—Separate Keys will be supplied upon request, showing
the various types of maps helpful in the acquisition of Crown lands, as follows:
Land Status Maps and Land Bulletin Areas ..___  Key 19
Departmental Mineral Reference Maps _   Key 20
Land Recording Districts and Provincial Forests ,._  Key 21
Departmental Reference Maps _._ _  Key 22
For detailed topographic maps of the British Columbia-Alberta Boundary, British
Columbia-U.S.A. Boundaries, and the valleys of the Columbia River basin, write to
the Director, Surveys and Mapping Branch, Department of Lands, Forests, and Water
Resources, Victoria, British Columbia.
For Canada Land Inventory published maps, write to Director, Surveys and Mapping
Branch, Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources, Victoria, British
Columbia.
For Canada Land Inventory information not contained on the published maps, write to
the Co-ordinating Chairman, Canada Land Inventory, Department of Agriculture,
Victoria, British Columbia.
For vacation and tourist information, write to British Columbia Travel Bureau, Victoria,
British Columbia.
For forest-cover maps, write to Forest Inventory Division, British Columbia Forest Service, Victoria, British Columbia.
For information concerning forestry matters (i.e., obtaining a timber sale, grazing regulations, etc.), write to Chief Forester, British Columbia Forest Service, Victoria, British
Columbia.
For published soil maps, write to Department of Agriculture, Victoria, British Columbia.
For staked mineral claim maps, placer lease maps, mineral inventory maps (showing
locations of mineral deposits), natural gas location maps, and geological bulletins,
write to Department of Mines sind Petroleum Resources, Victoria, British Columbia.
For Geological Maps, write to Geological Survey of Canada, Department of Energy,
Mines and Resources, Ottawa, Ont.
For marine charts, write to the Canadian Hydrographic Service, Department of Environment, Victoria, British Columbia, or Ottawa, Ont.
For aeronautical charts, write to Canada Map Office, 615 Booth Street, Ottawa, Ont.
For Geographical Gazetteer of British Columbia 1966, write to Information Canada,
Ottawa, Ont.   $7.50 per copy.
KEY 2
LIST OF AIR PHOTO MOSAICS
Date of
Photography
Photo- White
graphic Print
Price Price
(Each) (Each)
KEY 3
LIST OF COMPOSITE MAPS
Revision No. of
Date     Sheets
KEY 3
BRITISH     COLUMBIA
COMPOSITE   MAPS
Scale
A composite map is compiled from all available
data and is the best lit assembly of Land Registry
Office plans within district lots and sections. Prints-
of the various sheets in each area listed above may
be obtained for 75 cents per sheet. Orders or
inquiries should specify the district lot or section
number required in addition to the map name.
Map Name                   n»te     Sheets
to 500 Feet
Nelson ...a	
1967           8
North Bend ... . aijiijK.2?
1967 .         !
Oliver uni] District -   -	
1967         18
Osoyoos ;ind District	
1967          9
Penticton and District ...
1967   .     12
Powell River and District..
1967  ...    18
Prince George and District
1967 _. 10
Quesnel   ..              .	
.1971         .4
Sechelt and District   	
1967   .     16
Sechelt Peninsula	
.1967-70 28
Shuswap Lake and District
1967          24
Summerland   . 	
1971   ..     6
Squamish ',£_£^ai
.1967   .   . 4
. 1967
1967
1967
.1967
1970
1969
1969
. 1969
1969
..I970-.
1971..
_I970_
. 1969
 I3ff 135"
133*
5?
5?
130"
1201
Si
13r I3"tr I3g I341 I33T \3Z
KEY 5
BRITISH     COLUMBIA
PLANIMETRIC MAPPING
Scale
1 Inch to V2 Mae (1:31,680)
Completed maps:
Scale: 1 inch to Vi mile (1:31,680)    I
(completed to December 31, 1970) ^^
Scale: 1 inch to Vi mile (1:31,680)    jffjfffj
(completed 1971)
Scale 1 inch to 1 mile     _N^
Maps in course of compilation    Y////
KEY 5
PLANIMETRIC  MAPPING
1 Inch to V2 Mile (1:31,680)
These maps are prepared from vertical air photographs tied to existing
ground control such as triangulation stations, highway and railway surveys,
cut base lines and other ground surveys.
No effort has been made to establish ground control other than that
already available and hence geographic positioning of detail in remote areas
may be unreliable.
However, relative positions have been maintained as accurately as
possible and these maps will   be found to be most useful for all general
purposes.
They show all planimetric detail such as roads, water features and lot
boundaries. No contours are shown.
The positions of the centres of air photos used in the compilation are
also marked, together with the flight and photo numbers.
Prints, at the scales shown in the legend, may be obtained for 75^ per
half-sheet.
•See Key 4  for  1" to  Vi mile Topographic Manuscripts available.
When ordering prints, show:—
Index No  _^v„ 92
Alphabet letter E    P
Sheet No   14
State if only East or West half is required,
 e.g., Lac la Hache, 92 P/14 W W.	
fl_U
~T3i?
i2&
Hot
5cr
139° 138* 137° 136° 135° 134° 133° 132° 131'
126° 127° 126° 125° 124° 123°
121° 120° 119° It
ids
Jgfi
DIXON £ ITRANCE
PRINCE RUPERT!
k_PBEI___)
MR
lie*
120"
119"
ts
i$3ai
IQ(££
56"
53f
5?
I
ill
11 o\f-\p
EN TRJA, N C £ 21'
f»
-©.-
KEY 7
PLANIMETRIC MAPPING
1 inch to Va mile (1:15,840)
These maps are prepared from vertical air photographs tied to existing
ground control such as triangulation stations, highway and railway surveys,
cut base lines and other ground surveys.
No effort has been made to establish ground control other than that
already available and hence geographic positioning of detail in remote areas
may be unreliable.        However, relative positions have been maintained as
accurately as possible and these maps will be found to be most useful for
all general purposes.
They show all planimetric detail such as roads, water features, lot
boundaries. No contours are shown.
The positions of the centres of air photos used in the compilation are
also marked, together with the flight and photo numbers.
1 inch to V-i mile sheets are divided as follows:
92 G-
When ordering prints, show:—
Index No  92
Alphabet letter    G
Sheet No   7c
KEY 7
BRITISH     COLUMBIA
PLANIMETRIC MAPPING
1 inch to V4 mile (1:15,840)
Completed map sheet...  .	
Completed map sheet available from Forest
Inventory Division, British Columbia Forest Service, Victoria, British Columbia—	
CHARLOTTE
aa
I26T
12ff
OSS
.1107
<^z?
\50
'OWELL
UVER
.,72-61T
RTENAY
aW -^^
Great   CmSSm.
M62    %,
KEY 6
LARGE SCALE MAPPING
BRITISH     COLUMBIA
10   0 25        50
SCALE
100
Large Scale Mapping is compiled from air photographs by use of stereo plotting instruments. They are
based on ground control supplied by various agencies
and are generally topographic maps plotted at scales of
100 to 1,320 feet to 1 inch with a 5 to 50 foot contour
interval and intended primarily for engineering purposes.
Each project is numbered and consists of several
map-sheets.
A key map is available for each project and should
be obtained first in order to establish the number and
cost of sheets required.
Area of Large Scale Mapping is shown thus ^^B
Maps in the course of compilation are shown thus J
m
Berkley /
Souix.      <& .
14
J(/   Ml
?4__
AU
N^D^IS
ictoio!
180     6    jfP
LIST OF  LARGE SCALE  MAPPING
Ndi-
Name
Lower Fraser Valley_.
Lower Fraser Valley-
Lawless Creek .
Moran Damsite.-
Scale
per
Inch
1,000'
1,000'
10 ch.
100'
E.P. 21
Salmo  1,000'
Moran Pondage  500'
Fraser Pondage -  500'
Fraser Pondage ...-_ _  500'
AgassirUee E.P. 24)  200'
Delta Municipality ...„ 200'
Doukhobor Lands—
Grand Forks    400'
Krestova-Raspberry, etc  400'
Krestova Revision  400'
Agassiz Extension (see E.P.
17 _  400'
Moran Pondage  500'
Clearwater _<....>_.  500'
Morice Lake  1,000'
Naver Creek  1.320'
Chilcotin River _ 500'
Gaspard Creek  500'
Churn Creek...  500'
Willow River   1,320'
Upper McGregor River !  1,000'
Sinclair Mills  500'
Hobson Lake_  1,000'
Moran-Lytton    500'
PentictonaOsoyoos._    500'
Kelowna  500'
Westbank :.. 500'
Lower McGregor River  1,000'
Creston  500'
Clearwater _..._..  500'
San Jose  500'
Peace River Pondage  1,000'
Naramata  400'
Goat River  200'
Fruitvale  500'
Moose River  1,000'
Mount Robson  1,000',
McLennan River..-.  1,000'
M 39(57) Dease River Damsites  500'
M 39(58) Dease-Stikine Damsites  500'
M 39(60) Dease-Stikine Damsites  500'
M 40     Chilliwack River.....'.  600'
M41     Summit Lake Diversidn..  1,000'
M 42     Peace River Damsite  600'
IM 44     Prince George East  200'
tM45     Prince George West  200'
M 52     Kaslo  500'
M 54     Big Bar    2,640'
M56     Lac la Hache  500'
M 59     Eaglet Lake  1,320'
»M 62     Alberni-  >  500'
M 63    Parsnip River Pondage  1,320'
M 63a   Parsnip River Pondage Addition  1,000'
M 66    Glen Lake _  400'
M 67    Chemainus River  400'
M 68     Hansard Lake  1.320'
M 70     Courtenav-Comox  1.320'
F..P
24
F..P
28
M
2
M
3
M
4
M
5
M
6
M
7
M
8
M
9
M 11
M
12
M
13
M 14
M
15
M
16
M
17
M21
M24
M27
M29
M30
M34
M36
M 37
M 38
Contour
Interval
5', 50'
5', 50'
50'
5'
50'
20', 40'
10', 20'
20', 40'
5'
S.H.
5', 10', 25'
5', 10', 25'
P
20', 100'
20', 40'
20', 40'
50'
50'
20', 40'
20', 40'
20', 40'
50'
20'
20'
50'
20', 40'
10'
10'
10'
20'
5', 10', 15'
20', 40'
10'
20'
10'
P
10', 20'
20', 40'
20', 40'
20', 40'
20'
10'
10', 20'
20'
20'
20'
5'
5'
50'
100'
20'
20'
10'
20', 50'.
25'.
No. of
Sheets
Date
1957
1958
1951
1951-52
1952
1952
1951
1953
1953
1953-54
1953-54
1953-54
1963
1954
1954-55
1955
1955
1955
1955
1955-56
1956
1956-62
1955
1955
1954
1954
1954
1956
1954
1955
1956
1958
1956
1956
1957
1957
1956-57
1956-57
1956-57
1959
1960
1956
1959
1957
1958
1958
1959-60
1957
1958
1958
1958
1958-59-
61-62-63
1962
1958
1958
1958
1958
No.
M73
M73
M74
M75
M76
: M'77"
M88
M88
M89
M89
M90
M90a
M 90b
M 92
M 98
M 105
M 107
M 108
M 109
M 111
M 113
M 117
M 117
M 117a
M 118
M 121
M 122
tM 125
M 126
M 127
M 129
M 130
M 131
M 134
M 135
M 136
M 138
M 139
M 142
M 144
M 151
M 152
M 155
M 158
M 160
M 161
§M 162
M 163
M 164
M 168
M170
M 171
M 171
M 172
M 172
M 173
M 175
M 176
M 178
M 179
M 180
M 181
Scale
Name per
Inch
North Okanagan _ 1,000'
North Okanagan _     500'
Glinz Lake      200'
Duncan ..._»:-.      500'
Nanaimo      500'
Prince George   1,000'
South Okanagan      500'
South Okanagan  1,000'
North Thompson      300'
North Thompson      500'
Similkameen     200'
Similkameen      200'
Similkameen     200'
Skeena River     500'
Aberdeen-Haddo Lake     500'
Clearwater Lake-Azure Lake..  1,000'
Campbell River  1,000'
Kootenay River      500'
London  Mountain   (Whistler
Mountain)._       200'
Clearwater River Damsite _     250'
Nanaimo        500'
Liard River .   1,000'
Liard River Damsite     500'
Liard River      500'
Nitinat'-E- _.1      500'
Winfield      500'
Stuart Lake Pondage  1,320'
Port Hardy—- _..     100'
Thompson River     200'
Parksville—     200'
Aleza Lake       40' -
McGregor River Pondage  1,000''
Long Lake   1,320'
Kamloops Lake    1,000'
Quesnel.     500'
Haney     500'
Hobson Lake Extension  1,000'
Norbury Creek     400'
Kaleden      500'
Marysville   1,000'
Prospect Lake       200'
Ruby Burn 1      200'
Sechelt      500'
Parksville Building Site     600'
Ladysmith.      600'
Hudson Bay Mountain...  1,000'
Haney By-pass.-     100'
Slesse Creek Bridge     300'
Saanich Garbage Disposal     200'
Peace River Pondage (Find-
lay River)  _ _  1,320'
Gibson Pass   1,000'
Black Tusk Meadows     200'
Black Tusk Meadows     500'
Chilcotin Road      100'
Chilcotin Road     200'
Copeland Mountain  1,000'
Shuswap Canal Diversion „    200'
Stewart -.  1,320'
Sparwood       200'
Niskonlith _      400'
Colwood-Langford          200'
Nemotode s£     200'
Contour
Interval
No. of
Sheets
* Available only showing District Lots and Sections.
t Available only showing Land Registry Office Subdivisions within District Lots and Sections.
j Available with or without Land Registry Office Subdivisions within District Lots and Sections.
§ Restricted distribution.
|| Available with or without District Lots and Sections.
II In course of compilation.
S.H.—Spot heights.
P—Planimetric.
Scale
Date                    No. Name per
Inch
1959                  M182 (1968) Stikine-lskut Pondage. 1,000'
1959                  Ml82   Stikine-lskut Damsites  200'
1959                  M 182   Stikine-lskut Pondage _ 1,000'
1959 M 186    Revelstoke  100'
1960 M 188    Otter Lake..__Jaii.^.L^_^.  200'
1960-61             M 189    Shuswap-Okanagan   200'
1963                   M 196    Keremeos   200'
1964-65           §M 197    Hurley Pass i  400'
1960                 XM 198    Peachland-  500'
1960 M 200    Merritt : .  200'
1961 M 201    Archeology  100'
1965 M 202    South Revelstoke ... 100'
1966-67             M 204    Prince George West...': .:__. 200'
1962 M205   Nelson-Liard Pondage  1,000'
1960 M210    Kechika !  1,000'
1962 M215    Anyox-Portland Canal *p 1,320'
1961 M 216 Black    Mountain    Irrigation
1961                                      District  500'
M 217    False Narrows-..-^.  _ 100'
1961
1961 M2I8    Hells Gate  50'
1963 M 218    Hells Gate  200'
1962 §M220   Floods-Hope £  100'
1962                §M 222    Sayward-Beaver Cove  400'
1966 M226    Salmon River _.„ 500'
1962                   M 228    Portage Inlef-__i  16'
1961 M 228   Portage Inlet..__.i :  50'
1962 M229    Rossland   ...  1,000'
1962                  M230 Peave River Damsites C & E... 200'
1962                   M232    Squamish   200'
1965                  M233    Jordan River  600'
1962                    M233    Jordan River ._ .  100'
1962                «M234   Gulf Islands ._._i  1,320'
1962                  M236    Copper Mountain  1,320'
1962                  M237    Mission Creek  100'
1963-65              M 238    Mission Creek  500'
1962                  M 238    Mission Creek  200'
1962                  M 242a   Unuk River 3*  1,320'
1962 M 243    Sugar Lake Outlet  400'
1963 M 244b Garibaldi _  500'
1963                  M 245    Saanich Peninsula - 400'
1963                 §M 246    Chilanko Forks_'._   400'
1963 JM249    Libby Pondage ■.  200'
1964 tM 249A Wardner           100'
1964                  M 250   The Woodlands School  40'
1964                  §M251    Hope Merritt   .      400'
1964                  SM256    Fiood-Hope Addition  100'
1964                §M 256a Flood-Hope Addition :  100'
1964                  M 259 Cowichan Valley Forest Mu-
1964 seum      100'
IIM 260   Highland Valley—..--  1,320'
1965 JM262    McBride  200'
1965,66            JM263    Alta Lake   500'
1965                  M266    Mara Lake...__*  1,000'
1965                  M 269    Liard River  1,000'
1965                   M 270    Dease River    1,000'
1965-66             M 273    Forbidden Plateau  1,320'
1965                 §M 283    Vancouver-Whistler Mtn  400'
1965-66            M287     Slocan Valley  _  500'
1965                   M290    Charlie Lake  100'
,1965                  M291    Wardner .  50'
1965                XM 292    Summerland   500'
1967 M293    Watson Lake.-.__„-.u.  1,000'
1965                 1IM 297    Atlin , 1,000'
1IM298A Taku ;._ __._._  1,000'
IM 307   Manning Park-Skagit  : -1,000'
1IM308    Smith River , ,—_.  1,000'
§ 72-47 P Clark Road-Port Moody ;... 20'
1172-51 T Courtenay  - ."._.»_ 100'
172-52 T Grand Forks..._i__  _. 200'
♦72-57 T Peace River Pondage.  ._£ 1,000'
172-64 T Pemberton—  400'
Contour No. of
Interval Sheets
Date
1968
1965
1965-66
1966
1966
1966
1966
1966-67
1966
1967
1966
1966-67
1967
1968
1967
1967-68
1967
1967
1967
1967
1968
1968
1968
1967
1967
1970
1968
1969
1968
1968
1969
1968
1968
1968
1968
1970
1968
1972
1971
1970-71
1969
1969
1969
1970
1969
1969
1969
1970
1970
1970
1969
1969
1971
1970
1970
1971
1971
1971
1971
1971
 1972
KEYS 8 TO 14
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT  OF  LANDS,   FORESTS,  AND   WATER   RESOURCES
LANDS SERVICE
HON.   R. G. WILLISTON -   t'j MINISTER
'?£>% D. BORTHWICK   DEPUTY MINISTER OF LANDS
KEY 8
PUBLISHED MAPS
EXPLANATION
Key 8 General Maps
Key 9.  Regional Maps
Key 10 National Topographic Series at the scale of 1
inch to 2 miles
Key 11  1:250,000 (approximately 1 inch to 4 miles)
Key 12   1:500,000 (approximately 1 inch to 8 miles)
Key 13 —.. 1:1,000,000
Key 14  1:50,000 (approximately 1 inch to 1 mile)
Request Separate Index.. 1:25,000 (approximately 2Vi inches to 1 mile)
The National Topographic Series are map sheets at various scales designed
to cover Canada in a regular manner using lines of latitude and longitude for the
borders.
The Land Status Series of Regional Maps (Key 9) are being replaced
by the National Topographic Series at the scales of 1 inch to 2 miles and
1:250,000 (Keys 10 and 11).
Government Agents throughout the Province stock copies of the above
maps within their districts for over-the-counter sale.
HOW TO ORDER A MAP
1. Choose the scale of map required: NOTE PUBLICATION DATE.
2. State KEY NUMBER and MAP NUMBER and number of copies
required of each.
*3. Enclose price of maps with order, adding 5 per cent S.S. & M.A. tax
for orders to be delivered in British Columbia.
4. Address orders from these Keys to:
Director, Surveys and Mapping Branch,
Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources,
Victoria, British Columbia.
5. Small orders will be sent folded; if wanted rolled, add 25 cents per
order.
AIR PHOTO COVER—Separate KEYS will be supplied upon request, showing the air photography taken at various
altitudes as follows:
Vertical Photography
1 inch to 1 mile   KEY 15
1 inch to Vi mile  -. KEY 16
1 inch to Va, mile  .  KEY 17
Special Projects     KEY 18
LAND ACQUISITION MAPS—Separate KEYS will be supplied upon request, showing the various types of maps
helpful in the acquisition of Crown land as follows:
Land Status Maps and Land Bulletin Areas   KEY 19
Departmental Mineral Reference Maps  .   KEY 20
Land Recording Districts and Provincial Forests   KEY 21
Departmental Reference Maps .    KEY 22
For detailed topographic maps of the British Columbia-Alberta Boundary, British Columbia-U.S.A. Boundaries, and the
. valleys of the Columbia River Basin write to Director, Surveys and Mapping Branch, Department of Lands, Forests,
and Water Resources, Victoria, British Columbia.
For Canada Land Inventory Published maps write to Director, Surveys and Mapping Branch Department of Lands,
Forests, and Wafer Resources, Victoria, British Columbia.
For Canada Land Inventory information not contained on the published maps write to the Co-ordinating Chairman,
Canada Land Inventory, Department of Agriculture, Victoria, British Columbia.
For vacation and tourist information write to British Columbia Travel Bureau, Victoria, British Columbia.
For forest-cover maps, write to Forest Inventory Division, British Columbia Forest Service, Victoria, British Columbia.
For information concerning forestry matters (i.e., obtaining a timber sale, grazing regulations, etc.)  write to Chief
Forester, British Columbia Forest Service, Victoria, British Columbia.
For published soil maps, write to Department of Agriculture, Victoria, British Columbia.
For staked mineral claim maps, placer lease maps, mineral inventory maps (showing locations of mineral deposits),
natural gas location maps,  and geological bulletins,  write to Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources,
Victoria, British Columbia.
For Geological Maps write to Geological Survey of Canada, Department of Energy, Mines and Resources, Ottawa,
Ontario.
For marine charts, write to the Canadian Hydrographic Service, Department of Environment, Victoria, British Columbia, or Ottawa, Ontario.
For aeronautical charts, write to Canada Map Office, 615 Booth Street, Ottawa, Ontario.
For Geographical Gazetteer of British Columbia 1966, write to Information Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.   $7.50 per copy.
GENERAL MAPS
Map
No.
Year
of
Issue
Title of Map
Size of
Sheet
Per
Copy
lA
1958
1970
* Prices are noted on each Key and the correct amount should be submitted
with the order. Cheques or money orderSaShould be made payable to the Minister of Finance for the Province of British Columbia. Orders to points within
Canada only may be sent C.O.D. upon request. Unless otherwise requested, all
orders are sent by third-class mail.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND SERVICES AVAILABLE
DEPARTMENTAL MAPPING—Separate KEYS will be supplied upon request, showing the
various types of maps and air photo mosaics as follows:
Air Photo Mosaics      KEY
Composite Maps .   KEY
Topographic Mapping—Scale 1 inch to '/_. mile   KEY
Planimetric Mapping—Scale 1 inch to Vi mile + 1 mile   KEY
Large Scale Topographic Mapping     KEY
Planimetric Mapping—Scale 4 inches to 1 mile  KEY
lJF
1964
►lJH
1957
1JNT
1970
1JP
1964
lJR
1968
1 set
1968
1SB
lsc
1SD
lSE
lSF
1SQ
1SJ
lSK
lSIa
lSR
lss
lsw
Wall Map of British Columbia.    In two sheets.    Roads, trails,     Inches
railways, etc... ..   When joined—     57x71
British Columbia.   In one sheet.   Showing post offices, railways,
main roads, trails, parks, distance charts, etc     30X38
B.C. Electoral Districts (redistribution, 1966)_      30x38
B.C. School Districts (revised, 1971)     30x38
B.C. Showing N.T. System _.       30x38
B.C. Physical—Landforms and roads (Geology inset).     30X38
B.C. Relief Map--—Layer colours, roads (precipitation inset)     30X38
B.C. Administrative Boundary Maps      11X15
Includes:
Land Districts
Land Recording Districts (amended 1972)
Mining Divisions (amended 1958)
Assessment and Collection Districts (amended 1960)
Provincial Electoral Districts (redistribution, 1966)
Counties and Sheriffs Districts (amended 1965)
Forest and Grazing Districts (gazetted 1972)
Bills of Sale Registration Districts (revised 1960)
Land Registration Districts
Regional Districts (1971)
Census Divisions (revised 1957)
Water Districts
1:1,000,000 or
1 in. to 15.78 m.
1 in. to 30 m.
1 in. to 30 m.
1 in to 30 m.
1 in. to 30 m.
1 in. to 30 m.
1 in. to 30 m.
1 in. to 84 m.
2.00
1.50
.90
.90
1.50
1.50
2.00
1.00
* Prints only available.
REGIONAL   MAPS
KEY 9
Map
No.
S.G.S. 1
*3c
*3b
5B s
5Bn
5e
Year of
Issue
1971
1963
1965
1929
1929
1952
Title of Map
SPECIAL GEOGRAPHIC SERIES
Vancouver Island—Relief and roads.
LAND STATUS SERIES
Stuart Lake	
Peace River (revised status, 1969)	
TOPOGRAPHICAL SERIES
Howe Sound-Burrard Inlet (contoured), South
„                     „                   „             North
Lower Squamish Valley (contoured)	
Size of
Sheet (in
Inches)
30X42
28X42
29X40
28X42
28X42
25X40
Scale,
Miles, etc.
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
2 in. to
2 in. to
4 in. to
6 m.
3 m.
4 m.
Im.
lrri.
Im.
Per
Copy
Map
No.
Year of
Issue
Title of Map
Size of
Sheet (in
Inches)
Scale,
Miles, etc.
Per
Copy
$2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
mrm2
mrm3
mrm4
mrm5
mkm6
mrm7
mrm8
1928
1928
1929
1929
1932
1934
1935
MINERAL REFERENCE MAPS printed
Trout Lake, Lardeau, and Ainsworth ^_
Ainsworth, Trout Lake, and Slocan	
Nelson and Trail Creek (Ymir)	
Trail Creek and Nelson (Rossland)	
Grand Forks, Greenwood, and Trail Creekl
Greenwood and Osoyoos |	
Barkerville and Lightning Creek	
28X43
22X32
24X42
22X42
22X43
22X42
32X44
1 in. to
1 in.to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in.to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 m.
Im.
Im.
Im.
Im.
Im.
Im.
$1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
The Land Status Series show lot surveys and vacant Crown land to the date of issue
See Keys 10 and 11 for additional maps showing land status.
13B*       138"       137*       136*       135*       134*       133T      __3__"       131*       13CT       lgflf       lgcf       127*       126"       125*       Igtf
Year of
Issue
Title of Map
North Western British Columbia—Planimetric..
North Western British Columbia—Landforms _.
North Western British Columbia—Special	
North Eastern British Columbia—Planimetric—
North Eastern British Columbia—Landforms	
North Eastern British Columbia—Special	
South Eastern British Columbia—Planimetric...
South Eastern British Columbia—Landforms	
South Eastern British Columbia—Special	
West Central British Columbia—Planimetric.	
West Central British Columbia—Landforms	
West Central British Columbia—Special	
East Central British Columbia—Planimetric.	
East Central British Columbia—Landforms	
East Central British Columbia—Special	
South Western British Columbia—Planimetric..
South Western British Columbia—Landforms....
South Western British Columbia—Special -
Size of
Sheet (in
Inches)
30x38
30X38
30X38
30x38
30X38
30x38
28X3&-
28X38
28x38
30x38
30X38
30x38
30X38
30X38
30X38
30X38
30X38
30x38
Scale,
Miles, etc.
1 in. to
\ in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in.to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in.to
10 m.
10 m.
10 m.
10 m.
10 m.
10 m.
10 m.
10 m.
10 m.
10 m.
10 m.
10 m.
10 m.
10 m.
10 m.
10 m.
10 m.
10 m.
Per
Copy
139*       138T
135*       134*
129*       128*
KEY 10
Map No.
Date
82 E/SW
SL 1960
82 E/NW
SL1960
82 E/SE
SL 1971
82 E/NE
SL1957
82 F/SW
SL 1971
82 F/NE
SL 1961
82 F/NW
SL 1962
82 F/SE
SL1962
82 G/SW
SL 1962
82G/SE
SL 1963
82G/NW, NE
SL 1964
82 J/NW
SL 197r
82J/SW, SE
SL1965
82 K/SE
SL 1963
82 K/NW
SL 1966
82 K/SW
SL 1961
82 K/NE
SL1965
82 L/SE
SL 1967
82L/NE
SL 1965
82 L/NW
SL 1968
82 L/SW
SL 1967
82N/NE
1950
82 N/SE
L 1952
82 N/SW
L 1955
92 B/NW, SW,
parts
_>f SL 1958
92G/SE
SL 1967
92 G/SW
SL1959
92 H/NE
SL1969
92H/NW
SL 1966
92 H/SE
SL 1969
92 H/SW
SL1960
92 l/SW
SL1968
92 l/NW
SL 1966
92 l/NE
SL 1968
92 l/SE
SL 1961
92J/NE
SL 1970
93 P/NE
PL 1951
93 P/NW
PL 1951
94 A/NW
PL 1951
94 A/SE
PL 1953
94 A/SW
PL 1953
94 A/NE
PL 1951
L denotes sheets on which lot surveys are shown.
P denotes preliminary maps without contours.
S denotes maps showing land
status.	
KEY 10
NATIONAL TOPOGRAPHIC SERIES
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Showing Maps Published on Scale
1    INCH   TO   2   MILES
SCALE
100
LEGEND
Sheets published shown thus:-
Provincial Government
Price $1.00 per copy
Canadian Government
Price $ .50 per copy
KEY 13
NATIONAL
TOPOGRAPHIC  SERIES -
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Showing Maps Published   sWi
SCALE   1:   1,000,000 235^
LEGEND
Canadian Government Sheets
. published shown thus.
Price $.50 per copy
Layer Colour Contours
Size of sheets: 24 in.x30 in,
120°
128* 127* 126* 125" 124' 123* 122
Explanation: The maps published on this scale, will show: water features in blue; relief features (if available
with brown contour lines and cultural features, such as place names, roads, railways, and boundaries, in black.
Road classification is shown in red.   Provincial maps show lot surveys and land status to the date of issue.
Contour Interval: 100 and 200 feet.
Size of standard sheets: 24 in. X 30 in. 	
$1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
KEY 11
ONLY   SHEETS   SHOWN   IN   RED   ARE   PUBLISHED
138*
t Maps IB, ID, IE, IF, 1G, IK show water "features, place-names, railways, roads, airports, parks, etc.
Maps 1BL, 1DL, 1EL, IFL, 1GL, 1KL show, in addition, relief in grey.       (1BL, 1EL, 1KL also available in sand.)
Maps 1BLS, 1DLS, 1ELS, 1FLS, 1GLS, 1KLS show only water features and relief in brown.
The above sheets were compiled from air photographs.
PROVINCIAL PARK MAPS
Map
No.
X
P.S.A.2
P.S.B.2
t
P.S.G.2
P.S.G.3
w*
P.S.K.2
t
P.S.R.2
t
P.S.T.l
t
P.S.T.2
t
P.S.W.l
at P.S.W.2
Title of Map
Scale
Per
Copy I
Mt. Assiniboine—Contoured	
Bowron Lake—Contoured	
Garibaldi—Contoured _	
Garibaldi (Western)—Contoured.
Kokanee Glacier—Contoured	
Mt. Robson—Contourpd	
Tweedsmuir—Planimetric	
Tweedsmuir—Planimetric..	
Wells Gray—Planimetric	
Wells Gray—Contoured	
2 in.
1 in.
1 in.
1 in.
2 in.
lin.
lin.
1 in.
lin.
1 in.
to 1 mi.
to 1 mi.
to 2 mi.
to 1 mi.
to 1 mi.
to 2 mi.
to 8 mi.
to 4 mi.
to 4 mi.
to 2 mi.
$0.40
.75
.75
.75
.75
.751
.401
.751
.401
.751
X   Prints only available.
NATIONAL PARK MAPS
Map No.
M.C.R. 200
»' M.C.R. 204
M.C.R. 205
M.C.R. 206
M.C.R. 208
M.C.R. 211
"<- M.C.R. 213
Title of Map
Scale
B anff—Contoured	
Jasper (North)—Contoured.
Jasper (South)—Contoured.
Kootenay—Contoured	
Mt. Revelstoke—Contoured .
Waterton Lake—Contoured.
YohO:—Contoured	
1 in. to 3 mi.
1 in. to 3 mi.
1 in. to 3 mi.
1 in. to 2 mi.
1 in. to 1.25 mi.
1 in. to 1 mi.
1 in. to 2 mi.
Per
Copy
$ .50
.50
.50
.50
.50
.50
.50
130* 129" 128' 127' 126*
125* 124'
KEY 11
NATIONAL TOPOGRAPHIC SERIES
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Showing Maps Published
SCALE   1:   250,000 (Approx. 1 in. to 4 mi.)
SCALE
10   0        25       SO 100     150 200
LEGEND
Sheets published shown thus:—
Provincial Government
Price $1.00 per copy
Canadian Government
Price $ .50 per copy
Order by Map No., e.g.—92 G
92 H
KEY 12
120      a,
--■=S"i60°  NATIONAL TOPOGRAPHIC  SERIES
BRITISH  COLUMBIA
SCALE   1:   500,000
(Approx. 1 in. tor 8 mi.)
LEGEND
92SW
Canadian  Government
Sheets published
shown thus
Price $.50 per copy
Layer Colour Contours
i\6°.      Size of sheets:
25 in.X30 in.
EXPLANATION:
The maps published at the 1/250,000 scale will show:  water features in
blue; relief features with brown contour lines and cultural features, such as
place names, roads, railways and boundaries in black.   Road classification is
55   shown in red.
The Provincial Series show lot numbers, land status and culture to the
date of issue, whereas the Canadian Government series
U8. _. show the wooded areas in green but no lot surveys.
The Canadian Government series will be supplied in
place, of the Provincial Series if specifically requested.
Contour Interval:  500 feet.
Size of standard sheets:  24 in. x 30 in.
1965—denotes date of publication.
C—denotes  sheets showing
5f contours.
L—denotes sheets on which
lot surveys are shown.
All  published  Provincial
maps show land status.
5-.*
 ONLY SHEETS SHOWN IN RED ARE PUBLISHED
132° 131° 130° 129° 128° 127° 126° 125° 124'
LIST   OF   PUBLISHED   MAPS
SCALE:    1:50,000   (TWO SHEETS  EACH   UNLESS  NOTED)
KEY 14
ADVANCE
OZALID
PRINTS
Scale:
Scale:   1:50,000
Price-
When ordering Maps, show: ,
Index No .'_ 92
Alphabet letter _  G
Sheet No.     4
State if only East or West half is
required, unless a full sheet is shown,
e.g., Nanaimo,—92 G/4 W Vfc
Advance Print Price-
Prints of manuscripts of this series not yet published are shown on Key 4,
which is available on request.
128° 127° 126° 125° 124° 123°
ONLY   SHEETS   SHOWN   IN   RED   ARE   PUBLISHED
 ntnuW'0% PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DECEMBER 31, 1971
J " g   j£a DEPARTMENT OF LANDS,  FORESTS, AND  WATER  RESOURCES
LANDS SERVICE
KEYS  15  TO  18
'   p   ,w   '° HON. R. G. WILLISTON -    -    MINISTER
D. BORTHWICK DEPUTY MINISTER OF LANDS
.M AIR PHOTO  COVER
EXPLANATION MAP AND AIR PHOTO SALES
The Federal Government and the Provincial Government are the main sources of air The Surveys and Mapping Branch maintains a library of air photographs taken by
photographs covering the Province.   Negatives of the photography taken by the Federal the Provincial Government. These library prints are available for reference and may be
Government are held in Ottawa; those taken by the Provincial Government are held in rented at the following rate: $1.00 for five prints (or less) and 15 cents for each additional
Victoria. print.   Rentals must be prepaid.
Photographs are exposed from various altitudes with various cameras, and provide The time-limit for rentals in the Victoria-Vancouver area is two weeks; elsewhere,
overlapping or " stereo " cover of the ground.  The scale of photography varies, depending three weeks.   Photographs are available for rental in Canada only,
upon the height of the aircraft above ground, the focal length of the camera used, and the
size of the photographic print.
For ease of reference, photographs are spotted as accurately as possible on appropriate PURCHASING   INSTRUCTIONS
index maps, copies of which are available at nominal cost. These index maps are numbered c c    c u«.       _u _..,~.#_,,i „_. „.„,_*__,!_, «_. ..,™_._i,i_, «_, ._„....,-.
according to the keys illustrated on this sheet. . ,For„ease of refere.nce- Photographs are spotted as accurately as possible on appro-
_,,.... .     , .,       .«■._-      _,,-,        • .    c r        ii i pnate index maps, copies of which are available at the price noted below.
The vertical photography shown on Keys 15, 16, and 17 consists of a series of parallel, r     _,       ,-... £.■*..* j u      ..._, a- _,♦     ♦_,„_,,_ ■,~a-..,-.a..^ „i ♦„ ...,.-_,.,_,.■_.
,      . •      , _■• ,        .;,_.._.• __ _. __     i. These Flight Line index maps show the flight path and individual photo numbers,
overlapping strips that extend over large block areas; the tn-camera photography shown „ ■        , %-.. .. T .     .   .     „ __,   f„u„,„„.
.,     ,, .        ,   •    ,     _ • ,,   a , •      _. ?.•   , *   _. Prices of Flight Line index maps are as follows:
on Key 15 consists of single strips, usually flown along prominent geographical features Kevs 15 and 16 $0 40 each
such as valleys, coastlines, and highways. Kev 17        $0 75 each
Key 18   $0.25 for each project.
KEY  15:  VERTICAL PHOTOGRAPHY—Scale 1  inch to 1 mile
Reprints or enlargements of air photographs taken by the Provincial Government may
The photographs were taken from an altitude of 35,000 feet above sea-level with a be orf!?red at the Prices noted below. L .    ^ t
6-inch focal length camera and are at a scale of approximately 1 inch to 1 mile for a \    The exact photo number(s) required for a particular area may be ascertained from
standard 9 x 9-inch print.   Each photograph covers approximately 80 square miles. thue coverl"S index maP*   Otherwise, it is necessary to specify precisely the area for which
r photographs are required, the purpose for which the photographs are to be used, and
whether the prints are to be viewed under a" stereoscope.
 _____   , „..______... ._..„    „        , ,, The prices of reprints and enlargements are as follows:—
KEY  16:  VERTICAL PHOTOGRAPHY—Scale 1  inch to Vi mile
Size Price per Print
These photographs were taken from 18,000 to 21,000 feet above sea-level (roughly 9"x  9" !   $1.00
15,500 feet above average ground elevation) with a 6-inch focal-length camera.    Over 18" x 18" .: .     6.50
mountainous terrain the scale varies considerably within each photograph but averages 27" x 27"  12.00
about 1 indh to Vi. mile for a standard 9" x 9" print.   Each photograph covers approximately 20 square miles.
Address all orders and inquiries to
Director, Surveys and Mapping Branch,
KEY  17:  VERTICAL PHOTOGRAPHY—Scale 1 inch to Va mile Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources
These photographs were taken from 18,000 to 21,000 feet above sea-level (roughly Victoria, British Columbia.
15,500 feet above average ground elevation) with a 12-inch focal-length camera.   Over Prices are noted aboye    The fli ht M index should fee obtalned and        correct
mountainous terrain the scale varies considerably within each photograph but averages amount shou,d be submitted with the order    Ch          or m         orders should be made
about 1 inch to V4 mile for a standard 9" x 9" print.   Each photograph covers approxi- payable to the Minister of Finance for British Columbiai    F(/r orders to be delivered
mately 4 square miles. within the Province add 5 per cent social services tax.
KEY  18: SPECIAL PROJECTS Allow 10 to 20 days for delivery.      i^ '       .,
Special, mostly large-scale, photography is taken to supplement standard air-photo Further information regarding Federal Government photographs and prices may be
cover as required.   These projects may consist of an entire block of several hundred obtained by writing direct to:—
photographs or as few as a single overlapping pair. National Air Photo Library,
*   , - .       . .     ... . .   ,   . , _,.•,_,.,     %.m    . Department of Energy, Mines and Resources
Key 18 is only a general guide to special photography; more detailed information of Ottawa Ont
special projects or large-scale photo cover in a particular area is available upon request.
139*       138*       137*        136*       13S'       134*        133*       132*       131*        13<r       129*       128*       127*       126*       125*       134*      123*       122*
121 120 119
KEY 15
l-INCH-TO-l-MILE
VERTICAL PHOTOGRAPHY
Federal Government photos are indexed on
1-inch to 16-mile maps. Provincial Government
photos are indexed on 1-inch to 8-mile maps.
Each index map is shown on this key by a number, e.g., 94 1 inch to 16 miles
94 NE 1 inch to 8 miles
LEGEND
Provincial Government  .1969/70 I
■(■Federal Government... 1951-71
* Federal Government photography is shown for
general information only; prints are available from
Ottawa.
118"
130° 129* 128' 127' 126* 125° 124" 123"
121' 12Q' 119" IMP 117" 116" US*
139*       13S*        137*        136*       135*       134*        133*       132*       MT        130*       129*       128*       127*       126*       125*       124*       123*       122*       121*        12Q*        119
KEY 16
1 -INCH-TO -Vi -MILE
VERTICAL PHOTOGRAPHY
These photographs are indexed on 1-inch-
to-4-miles maps. Each index sheet is shown
on this key by a number and a letter; e.g.,
Sheet 92g (for the Vancouver area).
139*       13flT       137*        136"       135*       134*       133*       132"       131*        13C       129"       128"       127*       126*       125*       124*       123*       122*       121*        120*        119'
KEY 17
1 -INCH-TO-14 -MILE
VERTICAL PHOTOGRAPHY
These photographs are indexed on 1-inch-
to-2-miles maps. Each index sheet is shown
on this key by a number and a letter, and, in
addition, is divided into east and west halves;
e.g., Sheet 82e West (for the Penticton area).
LEGEND
Provincial Government 1956-70
Provincial Government 1971    *///.
130* 129
126* 12S" 124 123*
116* US*
  1972
KEYS 19 TO 22
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND  WATER  RESOURCES
LANDS SERVICE
v HON. R. G. WILLISTON -    -    MINISTER
D. BORTHWICK -   DEPUTY MINISTER OF LANDS
LAND ACQUISITION MAPS
DECEMBER 31, 1971
EXPLANATION   ,
Key 19  Land Status Maps and Land Bulletin Areas
Key 20...   Departmental Mineral Reference Maps
Key 21___   Land Recording Districts and Provincial Forests
Key 22   Departmental Reference Maps
The maps shown on Keys 20 and 22 were prepared originally for Departmental use
and, having proved of value to the public, copies of same are for sale in white print form,
which shows the map detail with dark-blue or black lines on white paper.
The maps shown on Key 19 are also shown on the Keys to Published Maps, Keys 9,
10, and 11.
HOW TO ORDER A MAP
1. Choose the map best suited for your particular need.
2. State KEY NUMBER and MAP NUMBER, scale, and number of copies
required of each.
"3. Enclose price of maps with order, adding 5 per cent S.S. & M.A. tax for orders
to be delivered in British Columbia.
4. Address orders from these Keys to:
Director, Surveys and Mapping Branch,
Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources,
Victoria, British Columbia.
5. Small orders will be sent folded; if wanted rolled, add 25 cents per order.
N.B.—Maps supplied from Keys 20 and 22 have NO RETURNABLE VALUE.
* Prices are noted on each Key and the correct amount should be submitted with the
order. Cheques or money orders should be made payable to the Minister of Finance for
the Province of British Columbia. Orders to points within Canada only may be sent
COD. upon request.   Unless otherwise requested, all orders are sent third-class [mail.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND SERVICES AVAILABLE
For published soil maps, write to Department of Agriculture, Victoria, British Columbia.
For staked mineral claim maps, placer lease maps, mineral inventory maps (showing
locations of mineral deposits), natural gas location maps, and geological bulletins,
write to Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Victoria, British Columbia.
For Geological Maps, write to Geological Survey of Canada, Department of Energy,
Mines and Resources, Ottawa, Ont.
For marine charts, write to the Canadian Hydrographic Service, Department of Environment, Victoria, British Columbia, or Ottawa, Ont.
For aeronautical charts, write to Canada Map Office, 615 Booth Street, Ottawa, Ont.
For Geographical Gazetteer of British Columbia 1966, write to Information Canada,
Ottawa, Ont.  $7.50 per copy.
For detailed topographic maps of the British Columbia-Alberta Boundary, British
Columbia-U.S.A. Boundaries, and the valleys of the Columbia River basin, write to
the Director, Surveys and Mapping Branch, Department of Lands, Forests, and Water
Resources, Victoria, British Columbia.
For Canada Land Inventory published maps, write to Director, Surveys and Mapping
Branch, Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources, Victoria, British
Columbia.
For Canada Land Inventory information not contained on the published maps, write to
the Co-ordinating Chairman, Canada Land Inventory, Department of Agriculture,
Victoria, British Columbia.
For vacation and tourist information, write to British Columbia Travel Bureau, Victoria,
British Columbia.
For forest-cover maps, write to Forest Inventory Division, British Columbia Forest Service, Victoria, British Columbia.
For information concerning forestry matters (i.e., obtaining a timber sale, grazing regulations, etc.), write to Chief Forester, British Columbia Forest Service, Victoria, British
Columbia.
DEPARTMENTAL MAPPING—Separate Keys will be supplied upon request, showing
the various types of maps and air photo mosaics as follows:
Air Photo Mosaics _.__  Key 2
Composite Maps ._ _ { Key 3
Topographic Mapping (scale 1 inch to >/__ mile)  ____. Key 4
Planimetric Mapping (scale 1 inch to Vi mile+1 mile)  Key 5
Large Scale Topographic Mapping     Key 6
Planimetric Mapping (scale 4 inches to 1 mile).  _.  Key 7
PUBLISHED MAPS—Separate Keys will be supplied upon request, showing the various
types of maps covering the Province, as follows:
General Maps _ _     Key 8
Regional Maps      Key 9
National Topographic Maps at the scale of—
1 inch to 2 miles _  Key 10
1:250,000 (approximately 1 inch to 4 miles) _. Key 11
1:500,000 (approximately 1 inch to 8 miles) Key 12
1:1,000,000  . :  Key 13
1:50,000 (approximately 1 inch to 1 mile) a  Key 14
AIR PHOTO  COVER—Separate Keys will be supplied upon request, showing the air
photography taken at various altitudes, as follows:
Vertical photography—
1 inch to 1 mile .  Key 15
1 inch to Vi mile   Key 16
1 inch to Va mile |  _!  Key 17
Special projects   Key 18
Titles and numbers of the various Bulletin Areas as shown on
the map:
LAND BULLETINS
No.   1 Kootenay Bulletin Area.
No.  2 Okanagan Bulletin Area.
No.  3 Lower Coast Bulletin Area.
No.  4 Vancouver Island Bulletin Area
No.  5 Quesnel-Lillooet Bulletin Area.
No.  6 Kamloops Bulletin Area.
No.  7 Fort Fraser-Fort George Bulletin Area.
No.   8 Prince Rupert-Smithers Bulletin Area.
No.  9 Atlin Bulletin Area.
No. 10 Peace River District.
No. 11 Disposition of Crown Lands in British Columbia.
I
 KEY 22
DEPARTMENTAL REFERENCE MAPS
PThese maps ate produced at scales indicated below, the scale being determined by the density of irtfamation to be shown.
No area is covered by  more than one scale.
The smallest area enclosed by solid lines, or solid lines and the Provincial boundary, constitutes one reference map, in most
cases the last letter Cs) or number of the full map number appears within the area outlined.
Extent of coverage of B.C. by size
p5?352335535?55555?3?55S33S?5?S^
approximate
size of Map
$1.50
42"X50"
1 inch - 2 miles

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0373854/manifest

Comment

Related Items