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ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1970

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 The Honourable Waldo M. Skillings,
Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce.
  r
To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C, LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg to submit the Report of the Department of Industrial Development, Trade,
and Commerce for the year ended December 31, 1969.
WALDO M. SKILLINGS,
Minister of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce.
 To the Honourable Waldo M. Skillings,
Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce,
Victoria, British Columbia.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce for the year ended December 31,
1969.
ROBERT F. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce.
 DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE,
AND COMMERCE
Douglas Building, 617 Government Street,
Victoria, British Columbia
Honourable Waldo M. Skillings, Minister.
Robert F. Renwick, Deputy Minister.
M. H. A. Glover, Exectuive Director, Eco- G. Geddes, Administrative Officer (Finance
nomic Research. and Personnel).
ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS BRANCH
J. R. Meredith, Director. G. R. Knight, Assistant Director.
J. L. P Anson, Research Supervisor.
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE OFFICE
R. W. Kersey, Industrial Commissioner. N. R. Blake, Trade and Industry Develop-
D. H. T. Mollison, Trade Development Of- ment Officer,
ficer.
DATA PROCESSING CENTRE
421 Menzies Street, Victoria
A. G. Lockyer, Manager, Systems and Pro- G. A. Spring, Manager, Operations,
gramming.
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE
1 - 3 Regent Street, London S.W. 1, England
Admiral M. G. Stirling, Agent-General. G. S. Gibson, Deputy Agent-General.
F. C. MacKay, Trade Commissioner.
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE
599 Market Street, San Francisco, Calif. 94105, U.S.A.
[Vacant] Commissioner for Trade and Tour- S. C. Turbis, Assistant Industry and Trade
ism. Commissioner.
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE
8833 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069, U.S.A.
L. Nevraumont, Industry and Trade Commissioner.
BRITISH COLUMBIA PAVILION, EXPO '70, OSAKA, JAPAN
J. J. Southworth, Commissioner.
FIFTH BRITISH COLUMBIA INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR
Suite 1100, 475 Howe Street, Vancouver 2, British Columbia
J. N. Hyland, President. D. K. Brown, Executive Director.
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 OBITUARY
The Department was saddened by the death of Newton Phillips Steacy, Commissioner of Trade and Tourism, British Columbia House, San Francisco, who died
suddenly on July 7, 1969. He was born in Vancouver on October 30, 1896, where
he received his education prior to spending three years with the Royal Flying Corps
in the First World War. After retiring from the Borden Co. Ltd., as Western Canada
Manager, Mr. Steacy was elected to the Provincial Legislature as M.L.A. for North
Vancouver in 1956. He subsequently served as Minister of Agriculture in the Provincial Cabinet from 1957 to 1960 and in 1961 was appointed Commissioner of
Trade and Tourism.
Mr. Steacy was a past president of the Association for Retarded Children in
British Columbia, former member of the Vancouver Board of Trade, and held official
positions in the Masonic Lodge and Independent Order of Oddfellows Lodge. He
is survived by three sons and a daughter.
  CONTENTS
Economy '69-
Outlook '70—
General Departmental Affairs.
Economics and Statistics	
Promotion—Trade and Industry.
Data Processing	
The Department Abroad	
The Department in California-
Expo '70, Osaka	
Fifth British Columbia International Trade Fair, 1971.
British Columbia Research Council	
Spotlight on External Trade	
Spotlight on Industrial Expansion	
Page
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.. 12
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_ 15
.. 16
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._ 18
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    ECONOMY '69
Economic conditions in British Columbia were generally favourable in 1969,
with most sectors of the economy recording steady advances. The Gross Provincial Product (value of goods and services produced) is estimated to have risen
by more than 11 per cent, although price increases continued to be of major
concern.
The Province's population growth rate of 3 per cent in 1969 was substantially above the national average of 1.5 per cent, largely due to a high level of
net immigration. Approximately 72 per cent of the 60,000 increase in population was accounted for by net immigration, while the remaining 28 per cent
resulted from natural increase (excess of births over deaths). At year's end
British Columbia's population was estimated at 2,108,000 persons.
A tightening of the labour market was experienced in 1969 as total employment rose 6 per cent to 795,000 and the unemployment rate decreased to a
three-year low of 4.9 per cent. Employment in the service industries continued
to increase more rapidly than in other sectors and was partially responsible for
the large influx of females into the labour force.
Personal income rose 10.5 per cent to $6.3 billion in 1969, reflecting increased employment and higher wage rates. Per capita personal income at $3,048
continued to be appreciably above the Canadian average. Retail trade, which
is closely linked to the level of personal income, also recorded an impressive gain,
up 10 per cent to $3.1 billion.
Inflationary pressures continued to pose a serious threat to the Provincial
economy, and there was little clear-cut evidence at year-end that this problem
was being brought under control. The Canadian Consumer Price Index rose by
4.6 per cent as all components shared in the increase; food prices were up 4.3
per cent and the cost of housing 5.1 per cent. Wholesale prices jumped 4.7 per
cent, compared to a 2.2-per-cent increase in 1968.
Capital and repair expenditures, boosted by substantial increases in manufacturing investment and housing construction, rose 10.8 per cent to a record
$2.9 billion. Approximately half of the 44-per-cent increase in capital investment
by manufacturing industries was accounted for by the wood products industries.
Housing starts were up 22 per cent to a record 32,000 units.
Manufacturing output, as measured by factory shipments, increased 9.9 per
cent to an estimated $3.9 billion. Pulp and paper production rose by 10 per cent
as both markets and prices generally firmed more quickly than had been anticipated a year earlier. Plywood production rose 3 per cent, while lumber output
decreased fractionally.
In the resource industries, the value of mineral production continued its steady
advance by increasing 13.5 per cent to a record $460 million. Agricultural production, as measured by farm cash receipts, rose slightly to $211 million, and the commercial fishing industry experienced its worst year since 1963. The Provincial
timber scale, which measures logging output, rose 7.5 per cent despite severe
weather conditions during the early months of 1969 which hampered coastal
operations.
The value of export shipments through British Columbia customs ports increased fractionally to an estimated $2.3 billion. Reduced shipments of wheat and
the longshoremen's strike combined to partially offset substantial gains in exports of
forest and mineral products. Imports were up 18 per cent to $1.1 billion, reflecting
the increased pace of economic activity in 1969.
Another prosperous year was enjoyed by the travel industry as travel receipts
jumped 8.7 per cent to a new high of $376 million. Nearly half of this revenue was
provided by American visitors.
11
 Y 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
A more detailed review of the Provincial economy is available in the Department's publication, "Summary of Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1969."
OUTLOOK '70
Continued advancement in all major sectors of the British Columbia economy
is forecast for 1970.
Booming resource development is the major reason for an optimistic outlook,
despite the likely continuation of inflation and tight money.
A strong labour market will prevail, with shortages still persisting in many
skilled labour trades and for supervisory and accounting personnel.
Collective bargaining will play an important role in the over-all economic
situation in 1970 as contract negotiations are slated for a large cross-section of business and industry, including the mining, forestry, and construction industries.
It is expected that, in spite of the high cost of money, capital expenditures will
be maintained at last year's level and may reach a record $3 billion in 1970. Strength
in the forestry, utility, housing, trade, and commercial sectors will be noteworthy.
Exports and imports through British Columbia customs ports are expected to
exceed the record values attained in 1969. The value of exports should reach $2.5
billion in 1970 ($2.3 billion in 1969) and imports $1.2 billion ($1.1 billion in
1969).
The outlook in 1970 for the forestry industry is bright, based on the steady
increase in demand for pulp and paper and expectations for improvement in lumber
markets as the year progresses. The demand for plywood, mostly consumed in
Canada, is expected to firm and prices should improve over the currently low levels.
Capital spending by the forest industry will increase in 1970 as major projects
move into high gear. These include a large pulp-mill expansion at Kamloops and two
pulp-mills at Mackenzie. Construction of a new pulp-mill at Quesnel will commence
and another new pulp-mill at Kitimat is scheduled for completion in late 1970.
A sharp increase in mineral output will occur in 1970 as major new developments reach the production stage. These include the Brenda copper-molydenum
mine at Peachland, the Granduc copper property at Stewart, and Kaiser Resources
vastly expanded coal operation in the east Kootenay area. The Province's coal
industry will enter a new era with the first unit-train shipments to the Roberts Bank
superport expected to begin in April. Contracts calling for the shipment of approximately 100 million tons of coal to the Japanese over the next 15 years have been
negotiated and additional large contracts are in the offing.
Increased production and sales in 1970 are expected by the iron and steel
sector, which includes primary iron and steel producers, machinery manufacturers,
foundries, steel fabricators and erectors, and miscellaneous iron and steel manufacturers. In order to remain competitive and capitalize on opportunities for growth,
considerable plant expansion and modernization has been undertaken in recent years
by firms in this group. Capital spending intentions for 1970 reveal a sizeable increase over 1969 expenditures.
The shipbuilding industry is basing its future prospects on the continued construction of coastal vessels and barges, additional " stretching " of British Columbia
ferry vessels, and the maintenance and repair of the growing number of super cargo-
ships.
Transportation-equipment manufacturers, while primarily geared to the burgeoning British Columbia economy, are obtaining growing acceptance in external
markets.
 Pulp and paper operations at Crofton,
Vancouver Island.
  INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1969 Y 13
Food and beverage processors expect increased sales in 1970, particularly
wineries, which are experiencing rapidly growing consumer demand for their products. Manufacturers of building products likewise anticipate high levels of production and sales, based on the expectation that the volume of construction will be
well maintained during the coming year.
A large work volume is expected by the construction industry in 1970,
although the high cost of money will delay or cancel some projects. Favourable
factors are the high level of resource development, strong demand for housing, and
continuing work in the commercial sectors.
Reflecting population growth and rising personal income, retail trade is expected
to increase by approximately 10 per cent in 1970, about the same rate experienced
in 1969. A notable trend which is expected to continue is the shift to more " self-
service " in order to combat rising costs. The industry is also continuing to decentralize to suburban shopping centres. Wholesale trade is also expected to experience
steady growth in 1970.
Transportation development in 1970 will be highlighted by the start of coal
shipments to Japan from the Roberts Bank superport, the commencement of offshore containerized cargo shipments through the port of Vancouver, and continuing
work on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway extensions in Northern British Columbia.
New records continue to be set each year by the travel industry and the outlook
is for another record year in 1970.
A more detailed review of the outlook for 1970 is available in the Department's
publication, " British Columbia Business Outlook, 1970."
GENERAL DEPARTMENTAL AFFAIRS
During 1969 the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce, through its various divisions, actively promoted the development of new
industrial and commercial enterprises, provided assistance to established businesses,
and encouraged the development of domestic and export trade. Economic and statistical research was undertaken over a wide range of subjects relating to the above-
mentioned objectives and other matters of economic significance.
These activities were carried out in co-operation with other British Columbia
Government departments, the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, Federal
Government departments, boards of trade and chambers of commerce, manufacturing associations, industrial commissions, railway industrial agents, and foreign-trade
representatives in Canada and overseas.
The Department published various annual, quarterly, and monthly reports,
along with special regional and industrial surveys, which served to inform the public
and other government agencies of economic developments and opportunities in
British Columbia. These publications are recorded in other sections of this Report.
The Department provided financial support and statistical research services in
sponsoring three regional district economic surveys. The Regional Districts of
Fraser-Fort George, Comox-Strathcona, and Peace River were thus provided with
basic studies necessary for the promotion of their economic advancement. We also
participated in specific industry feasibility studies produced by various independent
firms of management consultants. These concerned convenience foodstuffs, softwood
plywood, and steel fabrication and foundry facilities. In addition, the Department
undertook a general advertising programme to encourage industrial investment from
other parts of Canada and abroad.
The Department answered numerous requests for information on location-sites,
including zoned industrial areas and availability of raw materials.   Information was
 Y 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
also provided on the services and facilities offered by the British Columbia Research
Council on matters relating to industrial and scientific research.
SEMINARS AND CONFERENCES
The Department participated in and co-operated in the sponsorship of a number
of seminars and conferences related to industrial development, trade, and general
economic matters.
A two-day Economic Outlook Conference, co-sponsored with the Department
of Agriculture, was held in Vancouver on January 8 and 9, 1969. The conference
involved discussion of the prospects and problems facing the various sectors of the
Provincial economy. The Department also co-sponsored another Economic Outlook
Conference at Terrace on December 10 and 11, 1969, which concentrated on the
future economic development of the surrounding area. An Industrial Development
Seminar, in co-operation with the Federal Department of Regional Economic Expansion, was held in Victoria.
Participants at Industrial Development Seminar, Victoria, November 3-5, 1969.
Department officials attended a wide variety of meetings, seminars, and general
business conferences throughout the year. At the national level these included
meetings with the Price and Incomes Commission (Ottawa and Vancouver), Provincial Mines Ministers' Conference (Toronto), and the Canadian Institute of
Forestry Annual Meeting (Prince George). Other seminars and conferences included the Pacific Northwest Trade Association Conference (Victoria), Annual
Meeting of the Council of Forest Industries (Vancouver), Automotive Transport
Association Conference (Vancouver), Export Development Corporation Seminar
(Vancouver), and Industrial Development Seminars at Prince George and Trail.
Extensive tours throughout the Province were undertaken by Department personnel during 1969 in conjunction with regional economic surveys being prepared
by the Department, and in the promoting of trade and industry affairs.
 Petroleum refinery at Kamloops.
  INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1969 Y 15
ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS
During 1969 the Economics and Statistics Branch continued its functions of
undertaking a broad range of economic research; informing the Government and
public of business and economic conditions, trends, and outlook; and collecting
varied statistical information on British Columbia in co-operation with other Federal
and Provincial Government departments. The Branch employs a staff of 11 professional economists and research officers and a support staff numbering 16.
A number of studies was undertaken in co-operation with other Provincial
Government departments or agencies. These included the Departments of Agriculture, Finance, Labour, Mines and Petroleum Resources, Municipal Affairs, and
the Provincial Secretary. In addition to preparing regular publications and special
reports, staff members answered numerous requests for economic and statistical
data concerning the Province.
The services provided by the Branch are based on the staff's expertise in such
areas as marketing, transportation, regional economic development, resource economics, domestic and international trade, forecasting, and statistical analysis. These
services are available to both the public and private sectors.
Following is a list of the publications issued by the Branch in 1969:
Bulletin of Business Activity (monthly).
Summary of Economic Activity (annual).
British Columbia Business Outlook (annual).
British Columbia Facts and Statistics (annual).
Preliminary Statement of External Trade through British Columbia Customs Ports (annual).
British Columbia Preliminary Salary and Wage Rate Survey (annual).
British Columbia Housing Statistics (annual).
Industrial Expansion in British Columbia (quarterly).
Establishing a Business in British Columbia (8th edition).
Import Items Meriting Further Investigation for Domestic Production or
Substitution.
Materials and Components Used by British Columbia Manufacturers in
1965.
The Pulp and Paper Industry of British Columbia.
The Asbestos-Cement Products Industry.
The Biscuit Industry.
The Vinyl-Asbestos Tile Industry.
The Market for Flat Band Steel Strapping.
The Cariboo-Chilcotin Region.
Publications in the course of preparation in 1969 included three regional
economic surveys and other reports.
The Branch library, which is one of the most comprehensive sources of economic and statistical data in the Province, continued to upgrade its services. The
many economic, statistical, government, and business publications received by the
library serve to keep staff members abreast of new developments and research
techniques.
Throughout the year, members of the staff attended and participated in a
number of conferences. Close liaison was maintained with other Government
departments and agencies with regard to the collection and dissemination of statistical and economic data.
 1
Y 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PROMOTION—TRADE AND INDUSTRY
During the year the Department maintained an active programme of contacting
firms considered to be suitable for branch plant establishment. A concerted effort
was also undertaken to encourage local firms to seek manufacturing under licence
opportunities. Several representatives of large manufacturing firms contacted the
Department for additional information on site locations, availability of raw materials,
and potential markets. Many of the inquiries originated through the Department's
selected mailing campaign and vigorous industrial development advertising programme.
During 1969 the Trade and Industry Bulletin completed 20 years of continuous
publication listing trade inquiries, export opportunities, manufacture under licence
agreements available to British Columbia firms, and news of general commercial
interest. The bulletin is used extensively by trade representatives of other nations
and by local businessmen. The circulation of the bulletin has now reached approximately 2,300.
A 1969 edition of " Regional Investment Opportunities " was compiled during
the year for the purpose of indicating potential commercial investment opportunities
in the fields of hotel and motel requirements, housing developments, retail and wholesale outlets, recreational facilities, and warehousing. The various listings were submitted by officials of chambers of commerce throughout British Columbia.
Due to the increased interest in the Roberts Bank superport, a revision of the
Lower Mainland Composite Industrial Map was being prepared. The superport
location and railway approaches will be illustrated on the revised map. A new
Composite Industrial Map of the West Kootenay Region (Castlegar, Creston, Nelson, Revelstoke, and Trail) was published in 1969.
DATA PROCESSING
The Data Processing Centre is the Government's central computer service
bureau. The Centre provides information-processing services, programming, computer systems, and general systems-analysis services to all Government departments
and agencies. To provide these services the Centre employs 142 persons, including
over 30 analysists and computer programmers. Two System 360 computers are
operated three shifts, five days a week, handling a wide variety of jobs and projects
for most Government agencies.
During 1969 the Centre introduced new computer-leasing agreements. These
agreements, which include computers in the Centre, Department of Finance, and
British Columbia Medical Plan, will produce substantial savings in equipment rentals
during the next three years. Studies are currently being carried out to establish
Government computer needs when these agreements expire.
One major change forecast for the coming year is the introduction of a terminal
attached to one of the computers. This will allow remote (off-site) use of the
computer, with the terminal being used to read punch-cards and print out reports.
SYSTEMS AND PROGRAMMING DIVISION
Work loads continued to grow very rapidly in this area. In March, 1969, four
supervising and senior analysts were hired. During the year, over 20 systems and
feasibility studies were carried out by supervising and senior analysts. Most of the
recommendations emanating from these studies were approved and have been or
are being implemented.
 Pacific Great Eastern Railway
freight train crossing the Fraser River
at Prince George.
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  INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1969 Y 17
Two major new jobs were implemented during the year. These were Examinations (Department of Education) and Civil Service Superannuation Records (Superannuation Branch). Several smaller projects were fully implemented and repro-
gramming of older jobs continued.
Senior staff in the Division attended five systems and computer conferences in
the United States during the year. The Centre was also represented at the 6th
Canadian Congress of Corrections Conference in Vancouver in June. Staff also
attended a number of informative seminars in Vancouver, Victoria, and Seattle.
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Computer section of the Data Processing Centre, Victoria.
OPERATIONS DIVISION
For the first time in over five years there was no major changes in staffing or
computer hardware in this Division. This stability, which is difficult to achieve in
the computer field at present, has allowed this Division to accept over a 15-per-cent
increase in work load and yet reduce computer times slightly. This reduction was
achieved by the following improvements in operating methods:—
(a) Replacing a slow-speed special-purpose printer with a high-speed general-
purpose printer, made possible by redesigning forms. This change also
reduced equipment rentals slightly.
(b) Introduction of multi-programming on the computer, i.e., running more
than one job at one time.
(c) Reprogramming jobs to run faster on the System 360 computers.
This increased work load, however, has been difficult to handle in the Data
Preparation Section of the Division. On occasion it was necessary to contract out
key-punching to meet deadlines. During the coming year a number of investigations will be carried out in regard to this problem.
 Y 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE DEPARTMENT ABROAD-
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, LONDON, ENGLAND
British Columbia House was associated once again with the visit of the
Premier, Hon. W. A. C. Bennett, P.C., LL.D., D.Pol.Sc, K.St.J. The Premier
visited Austria, West Germany, and France, as well as the United Kingdom.
The Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce visited Europe
during the year and spent some time in London meeting with businessmen and
bankers as well as Ministers of the British Government.
Since assuming office in October, 1968, the Agent-General has continued to
meet leaders of Government and industry in various parts of Great Britain. He has
filled speaking engagements in Liverpool, Glasgow, and London, and visited other
centres. A visit to Germany was made for the purpose of discussing with bankers
and industrialists the desirability of investing in British Columbia. Considerable
interest was expressed and with the German elections over, some progress is hoped
for.
On the 31st of January, 1969, Mr. H. F. E. Smith, who had served in British
Columbia House for 21 years as Industrial and Trade Counsellor, retired, and was
replaced by Mr. F. C. MacKay as Trade Commissioner. Mr. MacKay was transferred from British Columbia House, San Francisco, where he had been stationed for
seven years.
VISITORS, FILMS AND PUBLICITY
During the year, 5,300 visitors to Britain registered at British Columbia House,
and in addition some 25,600 letters and parcels were handled on their behalf. This
is a substantial increase over previous years, which is no doubt occasioned by use
of cheaper-fare charter flights.
Films, both Government and commercial, were distributed throughout the year
to schools, social clubs, business gatherings, etc. Film audiences numbered approximately 10,000.
The News Letter, published in the name of the Agent-General, continues to
attract good readership. The copy depicts British Columbia's economic and social
development. A number of complimentary letters and cards continues to be received, indicating interest in the information contained in the News Letter.
SPECIAL PROJECTS
Again in 1969 this office was instrumental in assisting the Department of Education in the recruitment of school teachers. Mr. R. Boyle and Mr. E. Miller visited
Great Britain, interviewing 279 teachers. Forty teachers were hired as a result of
this recruitment programme.
IMMIGRATION AND TOURISM
Immigration and tourist desk inquiries were received from approximately 1,800
persons in 1969.
The arrival of Mr. Harry Harrod and his attachment to the Agent-General's
staff has resulted in inquiries from travel agents, among others interested in promoting travel to the Province. Fortunately, on January 1, 1970, the British
Government increased the £50-per-year limit on foreign exchange for travel purposes
to £300 per journey.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1969 Y 19
REPORT OF THE TRADE COMMISSIONER
The Trade Commissioner assumed his London post early in the year and in
the spring undertook a series of visits to familiarize himself with the general economic
conditions in the industrial regions of the United Kingdom and Europe. During the
year he travelled to Glasgow, Liverpool, Manchester, Birmingham, Derby, Wolverhampton, and Leicester in the United Kingdom and to the Netherlands, West Germany three times, and to Italy on the continent. In all regions he found a considerable degree of interest in the economic growth and industrial development taking
place in British Columbia.
The number of industrial and trade inquiries dealt with in 1969 remained at
approximately the same level as that of the previous year. The subject matter of
the inquiries included:—
Establishment of import/export enterprises.
Investment and land development in British Columbia.
Manufacturing and licence manufacture opportunities.
Resource development and raw materials supply.
Small business and professional opportunities.
TRADE PROMOTION
British Columbia's traditional trade in lumber and plywood, pulp and paper,
metals, fish and food products, etc., continued at a satisfactory level. Due to
exceptionally high prices for lumber in the domestic and United States market,
there was a decline in shipments of these products to the United Kingdom and
Europe in the second quarter of the year. However, normal shipments were resumed midway through the third quarter, only to be disrupted again by the longshoremen's strike.
A number of new consumer products from British Columbia were introduced
in 1969, including toys, toilet articles, builder's hardware, and marine towing-
equipment.
The Trade Commissioner's office also provided information and assistance to
the British Board of Trade and to individual manufacturers on market opportunities
in British Columbia.
INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PROMOTION
Representatives of the Okanagan Regional Industrial Council and the Vancouver and Lower Mainland Industrial Development Commission visited West
Germany and the United Kingdom in 1969. The Trade Commissioner made appointments for them to meet prospective investors, manufacturers, government
officers, and trade association representatives in both countries, and to call on Canadian financial institutions, transportation companies, and Government officials.
The industry studies prepared by the Economics and Statistics Branch of the
Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce were circulated to
major manufacturers in the United Kingdom and Europe and received very favourable comment on their excellent content. Two of the industries reviewed are
currently under study by British firms.
TRADE MISSIONS
The Vancouver Board of Trade Mission in 1969 visited the Netherlands, West
Germany, and the United Kingdom.    They were met by the Agent-General and
 1
Y 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Trade Commissioner at the Hanover Trade Fair in Germany, and were assisted by
this office during their brief stay in London.
The Agent-General addressed the outbound mission of the Glasgow Chamber
of Commerce prior to their departure for British Columbia. The office also assisted
representatives of the British Farm Machinery Association, British Hospitals Export
Council, and the French Coal Board who were travelling to British Columbia to
investigate markets and sources of supply.
PUBLICITY AND INFORMATION SERVICE
An information service directed specifically to selected business and industrial
contacts was inaugurated in 1969. This is in addition to the News Letter distributed
monthly from British Columbia House. Initially, 175 firms received the " Monthly
Bulletin of Business Activity " on a regular basis. The mailing-list is being increased
and the bulletin is being supplemented by feature reports on British Columbia as
they become available.
Articles on British Columbia's growth and development are being submitted
to important chambers of commerce throughout Britain for inclusion in their
monthly bulletins.
The Trade Commissioner attended a number of trade fairs, exhibitions, and
conferences throughout the year.
GENERAL
During 1969 there was no noticeable relaxation of restrictions on British overseas investment. This factor, coupled with Britain's interest in obtaining membership in the European Economic Community, undoubtedly deterred some movement
of capital from the United Kingdom to Canada. The devaluation of the French
franc, the late date of the election in the Federal Republic of Germany, and the
eventual revaluation of the Deutsche mark also had an effect on foreign investment
from Western Europe.
These matters were being resolved toward the end of the year and it appears
that there will be increased prospects for overseas investment in the 1970's.
THE DEPARTMENT IN CALIFORNIA-
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS ANGELES
The year was marked with the passing away of the Commissioner, Mr. Newton
P. Steacy, on July 7, 1969. Mr. Steacy played an important role in the establishment of British Columbia House in San Francisco and he will be sadly missed by all
his associates.
On May 1, 1969, the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce appointed two representatives to the offices in San Francisco and Los Angeles.
Their principal functions are to promote investment in British Columbia by California industrialists and to determine market opportunities in California for British
Columbia manufacturers.
During the year, numerous requests were received from United States companies interested in establishing in, or selling to, British Columbia. Information was
provided on mobile-home construction, high-quality nickel and chromium plating
services, construction of containers for the shipping industry, petro-chemicals,
pollution-control equipment, steel fabricating, cattle raising, and minerals such as
oil, coal, mercury, iron, and zinc.
 British Columbia House,
San Francisco, California.
^
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-in nil 0
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If J $5*     i
    INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1969 Y 21
Development of the Roberts Bank superport has created considerable interest
in California, and many export-orientated industries are keenly interested in its
potential.
Several large companies used the California offices to obtain general economic information, including data on British Columbia's labour force, wage rates
and standards, construction codes, population concentration, and general market
conditions.
Considerable interest by Californians in immigration to British Columbia was
witnessed during the year. Information pertaining to employment opportunities
was requested in such areas as electronics, teaching, mineral exploration, and the
tourist industry. Many others were interested in recreational land development and
land purchases (Crown and private).
An active interest in entering the California market was exhibited by many
British Columbia firms in 1969. Information was provided on a wide range of
products, including pre-fabricated recreation homes, home accessories such as metal
and wood wall decorations, non-flammable paint, upholstered furniture, wood components for the furniture and mobile-home industry, toys such as kites, candles,
restaurant franchising, industrial machinery, minerals, and lumber.
Close communication was maintained with all British Columbia Industrial
Development Commissioners. The California offices were visited by several Commissioners during the year.
An up-to-date supply of industrial films and slide presentations was maintained
and distributed to interested business groups. Several film presentations were made
by the Industrial and Trade Development Officer and received enthusiastic response.
The British Columbia Houses in both San Francisco and Los Angeles took an
active role in attempting to acquaint the California market with the business conditions in British Columbia. This was accomplished through repetitive selective
mailings of Departmental publications to interested companies and organizations.
BRITISH COLUMBIA PAVILION, EXPO '70, OSAKA
During the year, the Honourable Waldo M. Skillings, Chairman of the British
Columbia Osaka Seventy Cabinet Committee, actively co-ordinated the organization
of this Province's forthcoming participation in the 1970 World Exposition to be held
at Osaka, Japan, from March 15 to September 13, 1970. Mr. J. Southworth,
appointed as Commissioner of the British Columbia Pavilion on December 1, 1968,
is responsible for all phases of administration from his office in Japan.
The pavilion was completed in 1969 and is a sculptured wood structure formed
from whole British Columbia Douglas fir trees, trimmed of branches, standing vertically and curving gracefully upward to a maximum height of over 160 feet. This
structure, symbolic of the richly timbered mountain slopes of British Columbia, is
believed to be the tallest wood structure in the world.
The Douglas fir trees were cut in the Chemainus-Nanaimo area of British
Columbia and transported to Kobe by a selected log-carrier ship.
The distinctive log structure houses a theatre, where revolutionary film techniques will portray British Columbia in colour and sound. Beneath the structure
and extending the full dimension of the remainder of the site is a lake and waterfall
area, a simulated mine, and areas depicting the variety of industrial, agricultural,
and recreational activities in British Columbia.
 Y 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Visitors will be exposed to outstanding audio-visual techniques. A vertical
screen 42 feet high and 14 feet wide will combine full-screen and split-screen
sequences. A third dimension will be added by the use of suspended objects in the
foreground and the sectional opening of parts of the screen to reveal objects placed
behind. The 10-minute presentation, titled " The Theatre of the Antipodes," links
Japan with British Columbia and dramatically portrays the physical characteristics
of our Province.
Emphasis on the younger generation will be portrayed by a spherorama show
called " The Symphony of Youth." Ten thousand colour slides taken in British
Columbia and Japan will be projected from behind on to 48 screens in a 16-foot
diameter dome, under which visitors will stand.
In late 1968 the responsibility for design and construction of the British Columbia Pavilion was awarded to Dominion Construction Company Ltd., associated
with Cunningham Design Consultants Ltd. and architect Barclay McLeod, all of
Vancouver. The consortium, working with a well-experienced Japanese firm of
builders, have maintained erection of the impressive project according to plan. Pace
Industries Limited of Vancouver will be food and souvenir concessionaires.
Negotiations and various administrative matters required attention throughout
the year, many of these duties being assumed by Mr. L. J. Wallace, Deputy Provincial Secretary, as Chairman, the Osaka '70 Technical Committee. Six hostesses
and a special guide were selected from a very large number of applicants, drawn
from all sections of our Province. These young ladies, chosen for their qualities of
charm and ability to represent the Province, are due to proceed to Osaka '70 in
mid-February, 1970. Arrangements were concluded to have a detachment of six
members of " E " Division (British Columbia) Royal Canadian Mounted Police
on duty at the pavilion. This will not only ensure highly efficient security, but will
lend a welcome and traditional colourful presence.
FIFTH BRITISH COLUMBIA INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR,
IMPOEXPO 71
The Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce will sponsor the Fifth British Columbia International Trade Fair at the Pacific National
Exhibition grounds in Vancouver from June 2 to 12, 1971. It is confidently anticipated this will be one of the feature events of British Columbia's Centennial
celebration.
A Board of Directors composed of British Columbia businessmen and senior
Government officials has been selected and Mr. J. N. Hyland has been appointed
to serve as President of the Fair organization. Mr. D. Kenneth Brown, who served
as General Manager for the Fourth International Trade Fair in 1967, will again
head up the staff group, with administrative offices at 475 Howe Street, Vancouver.
Almost 250,000 square feet of floor space in five international pavilions,
including the new Pacific Coliseum, will be available for exhibitors. These pavilions
will feature all the various elements of international trade—consumer products, raw
materials, industrial products, construction materials and equipment, governments
and their agencies, tourism and transportation. An outside exhibit area will feature
large-size displays, including construction, logging, and mining equipment.
A new symbol and short title, ImpoExpo 71, has been designed for the fair.
The official symbol represents the flow of trade to and from British Columbia—
imports from its overseas and continental suppliers and exports to its world-wide
customers.    In keeping with the progressive look at present-day trade shows and
 n
IMPOEXPCr^
Scene of Fourth British Columbia International Trade Fair, Vancouver, 1967
  r
New offices and laboratories
of British Columbia Research.
  INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1969 Y 23
fairs, the simple, but easily remembered short title is not only descriptive of the
fair but also designed to attract participation.
The Honourable Waldo M. Skillings has undertaken effective liaison with representatives of foreign governments and Canadian Trade Commissioners throughout
the world. Many nations which participated in the previous fairs will again be
represented at the upcoming fair, as well as several nations which have not previously
participated.
The Fifth British Columbia International Trade Fair is recognized internationally as one of the major trading events in North America. It will attract professional buyers from North America's largest corporations. At the 1967 trade fair,
more than 10,000 buyers viewed thousands of products from many nations and
public attendance exceeded 130,000. Substantially higher numbers are anticipated
for ImpoExpo 71.
BRITISH COLUMBIA RESEARCH COUNCIL
The British Columbia Research Council is an independent, non-profit industrial
research society, registered under the Societies Act of British Columbia and initially
financed by the Department. For the past 25 years it has received an annual grant
from the Department to enable it to carry out in-house research projects to the
stage that they become of interest to and supported by industrial sponsors. In early
1969, a new office and laboratory building housing the complete operations of the
research arm of the society, B.C. Research, was completed and officially opened
on May 14th. The Department underwrote 80 per cent of the $3.34 million
cost of this new building, which is located on land leased from the University of
British Columbia. The building, which has many new laboratory design concepts,
has a total area of 147,000 square feet.
B.C. Research undertakes research and development in applied biology,
applied chemistry, applied physics, and engineering, and makes available to industry
and Government Departments business services in the areas of operations research,
economic and feasibility studies, technical information, management, and productivity.
In addition to a grant of $320,000 received from the Department, B.C.
Research had, during 1969, an earned income of $1,100,000, made up mainly
from industrial and Government contracts. Net royalties for the year from patents
held by B.C. Research amounted to $90,000.
Substantial progress was made on the development of a highly specific attrac-
tant for wasps, which was a product of the section devoted to non-poisonous insect
control. Encouraging advances were also made on the production of microbiological protein from natural gas and on the development of underwater and fire-
retardant coatings. Industrial applications were also made during 1969 in the use
of automatic colour sorting for salmon and in equipment for the colour standardization of apples.
SPOTLIGHT ON EXTERNAL TRADE
Economic growth in British Columbia is highly dependent on the development
of export markets. The Province, as a large-scale and rapidly expanding producer
of an increasingly diversified range of resource-based goods, sells over 40 per cent
of its commodity production to other countries.
Major markets for British Columbia products are the United States, Japan,
the European Common Market, and United Kingdom. Most of the Province's
exports are produced by the forestry and mineral industries.   In 1968, forest prod-
 Y 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ucts accounted for 61.5 per cent of the value of Provincial exports and mineral
products, 24.3 per cent. Fish products, chemicals, fertilizers, and apples are also
important export items.
The value of all exports through British Columbia customs ports reached an
estimated $2.3 billion in 1969, with commodities originating in the Province
accounting for 62 per cent of the total. Exports to the United States increased 16
per cent, largely in response to a strong demand for lumber, pulp, crude petroleum,
and natural gas. A 7-per-cent increase in exports to Japan was realized, despite
monetary restraints imposed on the Japanese economy. For the first time, the
value of exports to the European Common Market (up 20 per cent) exceeded
exports to the United Kingdom (up 1 per cent).
Section of the " Time Belt," located in the entrance foyer of the British Columbia
Pavilion, Osaka, lapan.
The outlook for the export of Provincial products in the 1970's is very encouraging. Exports to Japan are expected to grow substantially, particularly for mineral products, including copper and coal. In addition, establishment of a special
Drawing Account by the International Monetary Fund should help foster continued
expansion in world trade.
A number of important trade missions was undertaken to and from British
Columbia during 1969, including a 30-man mission of the Vancouver Board of
Trade to Europe, a visit to British Columbia by an eight-man Australian mission,
and a mission to Japan by a technical group representing the British Columbia
plywood industry.
In order to foster further trade and investment in British Columbia, the
Premier and other members of the Provincial Government visited European and
Pacific Rim countries during the year.
 1200
1100
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1944 49 54 59 64 69
 r Earned income.               >    British Columbia Government Grant.
Source of Income, British Columbia Research Council.
  a
    INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1969 Y 25
SPOTLIGHT ON INDUSTRIAL EXPANSION
British Columbia's industrial base continued to expand in 1969 as private and
public investment totalled $2.9 billion, an 11-per-cent increase over the 1968 level
of $2.6 billion. On a per capita basis, capital investment averaged $1,360, 28 per
cent above the Canadian average of $1,060.
Among manufacturing industries, wood industries showed the largest relative
gain with new capital expenditures reaching $75 million, compared with $28 million
in 1968. New sawmills equipped for close utilization of timber were completed at
several locations in the Province. The pulp and paper industries continued as the
largest component of manufacturing investment with new capital expenditures estimated at just over $95 million, approximately the same level as in 1968. In other
manufacturing industries, relatively large increases in new capital investment occurred in chemical and chemical products, petroleum and coal products, and in
food and beverage industries.
Highlighting new capital investment by commercial firms during 1969 were
various major redevelopment and hotel expansion projects currently under way in
the Metropolitan Vancouver area. These included the $95-million project of Pacific
Centre Ltd., and the multi-million dollar expansion of the Bayshore Inn by Marwest
Hotel Co. Ltd. A development permit was granted for the $20-million Canada
Square portion of the $300-million complex of Project 200 Properties Ltd.; final
planning is underway for this first phase.
Investment in new mining operations continued to account for the largest share
of expenditures by primary and construction industries in 1969. Two major mines
are expected to begin early in 1970—the $60-million Brenda Mines Ltd. operation
in the Central Interior area and the $85-million Kaiser Resources Ltd. operation in
the Kootenay area. Expenditures in new logging operations also reached a high
level with the construction of various new forest products complexes in the
Province.
Among the major utility projects completed in 1969 were the causeway and
50-acre terminal area of the Roberts Bank deep-sea terminal, the $32-million
Greater Vancouver Terminal Project of the Canadian National Railways Co., and
the $24-million air maintenance base of Canadian Pacific Airlines at Vancouver
International Airport. The Roberts Bank terminal could ultimately represent a
total investment of $100 million. All contracts have now been awarded for construction of the 250-mile Fort St. John—Fort Nelson extension of the Pacific Great
Eastern Railway and construction is proceeding on the Fort St. James-Takla Lake
extension. The British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority completed the installation of two 227-megawatt generators at the W. A. C. Bennett Dam, raising to
five the total number of installed units. Contracts were awarded in 1969 for the
installation of three additional generators at this project.
The following tables list new manufacturing plants and plant expansions either
completed or under construction in British Columbia during 1969. In most cases,
only firms with a minimum capital investment of approximately $100,000 were
included.
 Y 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
NEW MANUFACTURING PLANTS BUILT OR UNDER
CONSTRUCTION IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1969
Food and Beverages
Canada   Kelp  Co.   Ltd.,
dried kelp
Estimated
New
Employment
Masset —
     15
35
Foremost Foods Ltd., Burnaby—milk,
cottage cheese, ice-cream	
Golden Grove Foods Ltd., Vancouver
—macaroni, spaghetti      5
Hiram Walker & Sons Ltd., Winfield
(near Kelowna) — distilled beverages   200
Clothing
West Coast Garments Ltd., Victoria—■
uniforms, work clothes, linen, and
hospital supplies       6
Wood Products
Balco Forest Products Ltd., Heffley
Creek (near Kamloops)—veneer
and plywood  150
Bulkley Valley Forest Industries Ltd.,
Houston—lumber  425
C.I.P.A. Lumber Co. Ltd., Nanaimo
—lumber    70
Eurocan Pulp Paper Co. Ltd., Kitimat—lumber   220
MacGillis & Gibbs Co. (B.C.) Ltd.,
Terrace — cedar poles, ties, and
bridge timbers .
15
Moller Construction Co. Ltd., Fort
Nelson.—fabricated wood products    10
Nootka Cedar Products Ltd., Tahsis—
lumber  104
North Central Plywoods Ltd., Prince
George—veneer     65
Parta Industries Ltd., Grand Forks—
particle board    60
Seeley Sawmills Ltd., New Hazelton
—lumber    42
Takla Development Ltd., Fort St.
James—lumber, veneer  200
Trilam Wood Products Ltd., Salmon
Arm—particle board 45-55
Paper and Allied
Crestbrook Pulp and Paper Ltd.,
Skookumchuck — bleached kraft
pulp  225
Crown Zellerbach Canada Ltd., Kelowna—corrugated boxes     40
Eurocan Pulp & Paper Co. Ltd., Kitimat—pulp, paper, linerboard  150
Finlay Forest Industries Ltd., Mackenzie—groundwood pulp  100
Printing and Publishing
Caledonia Courier, Fort St. James—■
newspaper publishing  (1)
Metal Fabricating
American Can Co. of Canada Ltd.,
Kelowna—metal cans      9
Canwest Metal Sections Ltd., Vancouver—steel studs and metal products for the building trades      9
Estimated
New
Employment
Metal Fabricating—Continued
Cone Muffler Co. Ltd., Port Moody—
stainless-steel pipe, mufflers      7
Hialco Reliance Manufacturing Ltd.,
Coquitlam — aluminum  windows
and doors     60
Met-Tec Installations Ltd., Burnaby—
custom stainless-steel fixtures
Mid-Way Wrought Iron Works,
Prince George—railings, wrought-
iron products	
Machinery
Horn Elevator Ltd., Burnaby—passenger and freight elevators	
Lockheed Offshore Petroleum Services Ltd., Delta—offshore petroleum drilling systems	
Transportation Equipment
Canadian Fiberform Ltd., Westbank
—fibreglass boats	
Caveman Industries Ltd., Saanich—
campers	
Mariner Trailers Ltd., Penticton—
mobile homes	
Marlin Plastics, North Surrey—fibre-
glass boats
Neil Industries Ltd.,
ers	
Penticton—trail-
14
(!)
12
40
25
16
48
(*)
8
Electrical Products
Canadian Safety Fuse Co. Ltd.,
Salmon Arm—" Primacord " safety
fuses  15-20
Viscount Video Systems Ltd., Vancouver—video production switching equipment  15-24
Non-metallic Mineral Products
Consumers Glass Co. Ltd., Lavington
(near Vernon)—glass containers_._. 300
Lafarge Canada Ltd., Kamloops—
cement      60
Salmon Arm Ready Mix Ltd., Salmon
Arm—ready-mix concrete  (!)
Petroleum and Coal Products
Union Oil Co. of Canada Ltd., Prince
George — penetration-grade   and
cutback asphalts   (!)
Chemical and Chemical Products
Fiberplast Products Ltd., Kelowna—
polyester resins 10-14
Inland Chemicals Canada Ltd., Prince
George—aluminum sulphate (alum) (*)
Reliance Universal (B.C.) Ltd., Langley—coatings and catalytic finishes    12
Miscellaneous Manufacturing
DeMarcon Plastics Ltd., North Vancouver—toys     14
Pacific Containers Ltd., Langley—
rigid containers     12
i Under five employees.
   INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1969
Y 27
MANUFACTURING PLANT EXPANSIONS BUILT OR UNDER
CONSTRUCTION IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1969
Estimated
New
Employment
Food and Beverages
Andres Wines Ltd..
wine	
Port Moody-
B.C. Sugar Refining Co. Ltd., Vancouver—sugar 	
C1)
Nil
C1)
Nil
Calona Wines Ltd., Kelowna—wine...
Canada Safeway Ltd., Burnaby—milk
and dairy products	
Canadian Park and Tilford Distilleries Ltd., North Vancouver — distilled beverages   Nil
Empress Manufacturing Co., Burnaby—jams, jellies, marmalades.... JV;7
Fletchers Ltd., Vancouver — meat
processing  (!)
Langis Foods Ltd., Burnaby—institutional food products, soup and hot-
drink mixes    Nil
Meteor Meat Co. Ltd., North Vancouver—meat processing 15-20
Molson's Capilano Brewery Ltd., Vancouver—malt beverages   Nil
Potter Distilleries Ltd., Langley—distilled beverages    Nil
The Quaker Oats Co. of Canada Ltd.,
Burnaby—pet foods 10-15
Snowcrest Packers Ltd., Abbotsford—
frozen foods  Nil
Star   Meat   Co.   Ltd.,   Sumas—meat
processing   Nil
J. D. Sweid & Co. Ltd., Vancouver—
meat processing  Nil
Venice Bakery Ltd., North Vancouver
—bread, rolls  Nil
Villa Wines Ltd., New Westminster—
wines _
Wometco
drinks .
Nil
(B.C.) Ltd., Vernon—soft
Leather Products
John Watson Ltd., Vancouver—work
gloves and leather products   Nil
Textile Products
Canada    Ropes    Ltd.,    Richmond—
braided synthetic ropes and twine..    10
Westmill   Carpets   Ltd.,   Kelowna—
tufted carpets and rugs     20
Wood Products
Aspen Planers Ltd., Merritt—lumber (x)
Balco Forest Products Ltd., Heffley
Creek (near Kamloops)—lumber.. Nil
British   Columbia   Forest   Products
Ltd., Mackenzie—lumber      25
British   Columbia   Forest   Products
Ltd., Victoria—lumber, plywood  Nil
Carrier  Lumber  Ltd.,   Mackenzie—
lumber  Nil
Estimated
New
Employment
Wood Products—Continued
Crestbrook Forest Industries Ltd.,
Canal Flats and Cranbrook—lumber   232
Crestwood Kitchens Ltd.,
—kitchen cabinets	
Crows Nest Industries Ltd.,
lumber	
Richmond
     20
Elko—
 10-15
John Ernst Lumber Co. Ltd., Quesnel
—lumber	
Field Sawmills Ltd., Courtenay—lumber 	
Finlay Forest Industries Ltd.,
kenzie—lumber 	
Mac-
Kootenay Forest Products, Nelson—■
plywood 	
Lavington Planer Mill Ltd., Vernon—
lumber	
24
25
50
Nil
16
McDonald Cedar Products Ltd.,
Langley—lumber
Fort
  Nil
Merrill & Wagner Ltd., Williams Lake
—lumber  Nil
Montalco Kitchen Cabinets Ltd.,
Richmond—kitchen cabinets 20-25
Nanoose Forest Products Ltd., Chemainus—lumber      10
Nicholson & Cates (Western) Ltd.,
Haney—remanufactured lumber..-    14
Northwest Wood Preservers Ltd.,
Dawson Creek—lumber     50
Pacific Pallett Ltd., Aldergrove—pallets        5
Pinette & Therrien Planer Mills Ltd.,
Williams Lake—lumber  Nil
Pioneer Industries Ltd., Richmond—
studs, building material       8
Rayonier Canada (B.C.) Ltd., Marpole, New Westminster, and Woodfibre—lumber, chips     46
Revelstoke Sawmill Ltd., Radium—
lumber    Nil
Tahsis Co. Ltd., Gold River and
Tahsis—lumber, chips  34-38
Tappen Valley Timber Ltd., Tappen
Valley (near Salmon Arm)—cedar
specialty products   Nil
Tubafour Stud Mills Ltd., Quesnel-
lumber	
West Fraser
lumber	
N/7
Mills  Ltd.,  Quesnel—
64
Furniture and Fixtures
Scali and Durante Furniture Manufacturers Ltd., Burnaby — upholstered and case goods, custom furniture   Nil
1 Under five employees
 Y 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Estimated
New
Employment
Paper and Allied
B.C. Shipper Supplies Ltd., Vancouver — corrugated boxes, shipping-
room supplies    (1)
Canadian Forest Products Ltd., Port
Mellon—sulphate pulp  Nil
Columbia Cellulose Co. Ltd., Castlegar and Prince Rupert—sulphate
and dissolving-grade sulphite pulp..  Nil
Crown Zellerbach Canada Ltd., Duncan Bay and Ocean Falls—sulphate
and groundwood pulp, newsprint,
paper   Nil
Intercontinental Pulp Co. Ltd., Prince
George—sulphate pulp   7V;7
Kamloops Pulp & Paper Co. Ltd.,
Mission Flats (near Kamloops)—
sulphate pulp    Nil
MacMillan Bloedel Ltd., Harmac,
Port Alberni, and Powell River—
sulphate, sulphite and groundwood
pulp, newsprint, paper    Nil
Prince George Pulp & Paper Ltd.,
Prince George — sulphate pulp,
kraft paper   Nil
Printing, Publishing and Allied
Bank Cheque Supply Co.  (Canada)
Ltd., Vancouver—printed and personalized cheques    (!)
Evergreen Press Ltd., Vancouver—
magazines
Mills Printing & Stationery Co. Ltd.,
Vancouver—printed material   (!)
Royal Printers & Stationers Ltd., New
Westminster—printed  forms     (!)
Primary Metal
Aluminum Co. of Canada Ltd., Kitimat—aluminum  JVi7
Western Canada Steel Ltd., Vancouver
—metal fastening devices, rolled-
steel products, ingots   Nil
Metal Fabricating
Ebco Industries Ltd., Richmond —
steel-fabricated products, tools and
dies        75
Kay-son Steel Fabricators & Erectors
Ltd., Coquitlam—structural steel  Nil
Quest Metal Works Ltd., Vancouver
—Stainless-steel products   Nil
Titan Steel & Wire Co. Ltd., North
Surrey—wire     50
Westeel-Rosco Ltd., Vancouver—custom fabricated products   Nil
Westland Metals Ltd., Vancouver—
metal    roofing,    siding,    decking,
eavestroughs   (!)
Machinery
Aquacare International Ltd., Vancouver—water-sterilization and purification equipment  10-12
Estimated
New
Employment
Machinery—Continued
Durand Machine Co. Ltd., New Westminster—automated forestry equipment   Nil
Transportation Equipment
Bel-Aire Shipyard Ltd., North Vancouver—shipbuilding   Nil
B.C. Fiberglass Co. Ltd., Richmond
—fibreglas boats   (!)
Columbia Trailer Co. Ltd., Burnaby
—trailers      10
Freightliner of Canada Ltd., Burnaby
—trucks    Nil
Hayes Manufacturing Co. Ltd., Vancouver—heavy-duty trucks     71
Electrical Products
British Columbia Transformer Co.
Ltd., North Burnaby—distribution,
small power, and specialty transformers   Nil
Sinclair Radio Laboratories Ltd.,
Burnaby — industrial-communications antennae   Nil
Non-metallic Mineral Products
Columbia Concrete Products Ltd.,
Surrey—concrete blocks       5
Dominion Glass Co. Ltd., Vancouver
—glass products     85
Lafarge Canada Ltd., Richmond —
clinker   (!)
Ocean Cement & Supplies Ltd., Bam-
berton, Coquitlam, North Vancouver,  and  Victoria—cement,   clear
crushed-aggregates    (!)
Petroleum and Coal Products
Gulf Oil Canada Ltd., Port Moody—
sulphur,  petroleum     (1)
Imperial Oil Ltd., loco — liquefied
petroleum gas      (1)
Standard Oil Co. of B.C. Ltd., North
Burnaby — petroleum   Nil
Chemical and Chemical Products
Cloverdale Paint & Chemicals Ltd.,
Surrey — paint     10
General Dye & Chemical Co. Ltd.,
Burnaby—chemical specialties   (*)
Reichhold Chemicals (Canada) Ltd.,
Port Moody—plywood resins, slimi-
cides, wood preservatives, alkyds,
polyesters   (J)
Tonecraft Paints (B.C.) Ltd., Vancouver —• paint      16
Miscellaneous Manufacturing
Caldwell Industries Co. Ltd., North
Vancouver—clay-pigeon targets — Nil
Canplas Industries Ltd., Delta—plastic pipe-fittings, valves      19
J & C Manufacturing Co. Ltd., Vancouver—plastic containers      50
Seaforth Plastics Ltd., Burnaby —
printed plastic bags   (1)
i Under five employees.
 Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1970
1500-170-910
 

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