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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Ninety-ninth Annual Report 1969/70 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1971

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 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Ninety-ninth Annual Report
1969/70
By the Superintendent of Education
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1971
    G. Neil Perry, B.A., M.P.A., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D..
Deputy Minister of Education.
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.),
Superintendent of Education.
  To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Ninety-ninth Report of the Public Schools of
the Province.
DONALD LESLIE BROTHERS,
Minister of Education.
January, 1971.
  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION,  1970
Minister of Education:
The Honourable Donald Leslie Brothers, Q.C., LL.B.
Deputy Minister of Education:
G. Neil Perry, B.A., M.P.A., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D.
Superintendent of Education:
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.)
Assistant Superintendent (Administration):
J. Phillipson, B.A., B.Ed.
Assistant Superintendent
(Field Services):
C. I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed.
Assistant Superintendent (Instruction):
J. R. Meredith, B.A., M.Ed.
Assistant Superintendent
(University and College Affairs):
W. D. Reid, B.A., M.Ed.
Director of Special Education:
J. L. Canty, B.A., M.Ed.
District Superintendents, Superintendents, and Inspectors of Schools:
H. D. Abbott, B.A., M.A., Nanaimo.
K. F. Alexander, B.Sc, B.Ed., Mission City.
N. A. Allen, B.A.(Hons.), West Vancouver.
I. E. Beech, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent, Surrey.
G. C. Bissell, B.A., B.Ed., Castlegar.
R. S. Boyle, B.A., B.Ed., Dawson Creek.
C. A. Bruce, B.A., B.Ed., Kamloops.
A. C. Campbell, B.A., M.Ed., Courtenay.
A. D. Campbell, B.A., B.Ed., Fort St. lohn.
D. H. Campbell, B.A., B.Ed., Oliver.
N. Clark, M.A., B.Ed., Inspector, Vancouver.
R. B. Cox, B.A., Prince Rupert.
H. E. Cullis, B.Sc.(Hons.), M.A., Squamish.
C. Cuthbert, B.Acc, B.Ed., M.Ed., Murray-
ville.
D. E. A. Eldred, B.Ed.(Sec.) (U.B.C),
M.Ed.(Toronto), Grand Forks.
I. M. Evans, B.A., M.Ed., Alberni.
D. L. Feir, B.A., M.A., Quesnel.
H. C. Ferguson, B.A., Relieving Superintendent.
R. E. Flower, B.A., B.Ed., Williams Lake.
W. B. Fromson, B.A., B.Ed., North Vancouver.
G. W. Graham, B.A., Richmond.
S. J. Graham, B.A., New Westminster.
I. V. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
P. C. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Vernon.
R. R. Hanna, B.A., B.Ed., Sechelt.
W. L. B. Hawker, B.A., B.Ed., Haney.
C. Holob, B.S.A., M.Ed., Qualicum.
C. Hopper, B.Ed., M.Ed., Kamloops.
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.Psd., Sooke.
E. Irwin, B.A., B.Ed., Inspector, Vancouver.
E. E. Lewis, B.A., B.Paed., Duncan.
W. J. Logie, B.A., Campbell River.
A. J. Longmore, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Victoria.
R. F. Lucas, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Courtenay.
W. E. Lucas, B.A., B.Pasd., North Vancouver.
R. G. Lyon, B.Ed., M.Ed., Hope.
J. I. Macdougall, B.A., M.A., M.Ed.,
D.Paed., ChiUiwack.
D. E. McFee, B.A., M.A., Kitimat.
A. P. McKay, B.Com., M.Ed., Revelstoke.
C. S. McKenzie, B.A., Trail.
D. H. MacKirdy, D.F.C., B.A, B.Ed.,
M.Ed., Ladysmith.
W. A. Marchbank, A.B., B.Ed., Fort St.
John.
E. Marriott, B.A., Cloverdale.
F. T. Middleton, B.A., B.Ed., Creston.
W. J. Mouat, B.A., M.Ed., Abbotsford.
G. H. Nelson, B.A., B.Ed., Coquitlam.
F. J. Orme, B.A., B.Pasd., Kelowna.
G. M. Paton, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Penticton.
R. S. Price, B.A., B.Com., Sidney.
P. B. Pullinger, B.A., B.Ed., Cranbrook.
W. F. Ramsay, B.A., B.Ed., Merritt.
C. T. Rendle, B.A., Burnaby.
A. C. Rutledge, B.Ed., M.Ed., Kimberley.
R. F. Sharp, B.A., D.Paed., Superintendent,
Vancouver.
E. C. Stewart, B.A., B.Ed., Terrace.
M. V. Thorsell, B.A., M.Ed., Sidney.
R. F. Thorstenson, B.A., Ladner.
D. P. Todd, B.A., B.Ed., Prince George.
J. Walsh, B.Sc, M.Ed., Vanderhoof.
J.  H.  Wormsbecker,  B.A.,  M.A.,  Ed.D.,
Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
C. C. Wright, B.A., Salmon Arm.
W. J. Zoellner, B.A., B.Ed., Nelson.
 G 10 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SPECIAL OFFICIALS
Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment: P. J. Kttley, M.A.
Comptroller of Expenditures: S. E. Espley.
Supervisor of School Construction: H. Dickinson.
Director of Technical and Vocational Education: J. S. White.
Assistant Director of Technical and Vocational Education: V. E. Rickard, B.Ed.
Inspectors of Technical Classes: M. J. Tidmarsh and R. Smith.
Inspector of Technical and Vocational Education: P. C. MacGregor.
Registrar: E. A. Killough, B.Ed., M.A.
Director of Home Economics: Miss J. R. Irvine, B.Sc(H.Ec)
Inspectors of Home Economics:
Miss J. Campbell, B.Sc.(H.Ec), M.A., Dip.Ed., and Mrs. H. Krueger, B.Sc.(H.Ec)
Director of Community Programmes: J. H. Panton, B.A., M.Sc
Director of Curriculum: W. B. Naylor, B.A.
Director of Audio-Visual Services: B. A. Black.
Director of Research and Standards: C B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Pasd.
Director of Correspondence Education: J. R. Hind, B.A., B.Paed.
Director of Textbook Branch: D. W. C. Huggins, C.G.A.
Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (for the Deaf and the Blind):
P. Freemantle, N.C.T.D., Dip.(Eng.), B.Ed.
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Report by the Superintendent of Education  13
Reports:
Assistant Superintendent (Administration and School Board Relations)    40
Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment     45
Superintendent, Jericho Hill Schools (for the Deaf and the Blind)    47
Assistant Superintendent (Instruction)     49
Director of Curriculum     51
Co-ordinator of Adult Education     53
Director of Audio-Visual Services     57
Director of Research and Standards     61
Director of Correspondence Education     62
Director of Textbook Branch     65
Assistant Superintendent (Field Services)     68
Director of Home Economics     72
Assistant Superintendent (University and College Affairs)     77
Director of Technical and Vocational Education     84
Director of Community Programmes  108
Director of Special Education  119
Registrar and Division of Examinations  124
Commission on Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act  134
Strathcona Trust  135
STATISTICAL TABLES
Enrolment and Attendance by Type of School  13
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex  14
Distribution of Instructional Staff and Pupil/Teacher Ratios by Type of School- 15
Teachers' Certificates and Degrees  16
Province or Country of First Teaching Certificate  18
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for PubUc Education     19
11
J
 G 12 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
Page
Number of School Districts and Number of Schools in Operation  20
Number of Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District—
Elementary  21
Elementary-Junior Secondary  22
Elementary-Senior Secondary  23
Junior Secondary  24
Secondary  25
Senior Secondary  26
District-employed Instructional Staff  26
Summary of All Schools, Showing Number of Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils 27
Classification of Teachers' Salaries by Type of School  28
Expenditures for Education, Calendar Year 1969  33
Operating Costs per Pupil, Calendar Year 1969  33
Expenditure by School Districts for the Calendar Year 1969  34
Revenue by School Districts for the Calendar Year 1969  36
Capital Expenditures and Transportation  41
Enrolment in Adult Education Courses  55
Enrolment by Courses in Correspondence Schools  63
Enrolment in Courses in Home Economics  72
Enrolment in Universities and Colleges  78
Enrolment by Courses in Regional Vocational Schools  95
Enrolment by Courses in the British Columbia Institute of Technology  100
Teacher Certification and Supply  124
Examinations and Scholarships  130
Enrolment by Programme, Grades XI and XII  136
Summary of Enrolment by Schools in the Various School Districts  154
Recapitulation of Enrolment by Type of School, Sex, and Grade  210
 Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1969/70
Education Office,
Victoria, British Columbia, January, 1971.
To the Honourable Donald L. Brothers,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Ninety-ninth Annual Report of the Public
Schools of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30, 1970.
ENROLMENT AND AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE
Enrolment in the public schools of the Province rose from 489,596 in June,
1969, to 513,079 in June, 1970. The increases in secondary schools are largely
the result of the pre-1960 increases in British Columbia births, but recent increases
in elementary school enrolment have been caused by heavy immigration of school-
age and pre-school children. A 36 per cent drop in Grade XIII enrolment was
more than offset by an increase of 16 per cent in Kindergarten enrolment, and more
than 50 per cent of the available children are now enrolled in public kindergartens.
Attendance as a percentage of enrolment decreased in all types of schools, particularly those enrolling secondary grades. The latter is partly, but by no means entirely,
due to the introduction of the semester system in thirty-six secondary and senior
secondary schools.
Number
of Schools
Enrolment of Pupils
Attendance of Pupils
Type of School
Boys
Girls
Total
Per Cent
of Total
Mean Daily
Attendance
Per Cent
of Enrolment
Senior secondary	
Secondary	
19
110
96
9,209
45,939
31.833
8,324
43,094
29,925
5,609
7,233
154,218
17,533
89,033
61,758
11,702
14,950
318,103
3.4
17.4
12.0
2.3
2.9
62.0
13,956.3
77,077.2
55,533.5
10,257.3
13,560.8
295,878.3
79.6
86.6
89.9
Elementary-senior
18    1        6,093
60    1        7,717
1,179    |    163,885
87.7
Elementary-junior
secondary	
Elementary 	
90.7
93.0
Totals	
1,482
264,676
248,403
513,079
100.0
466,263.5
90.9
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled:-
In the Secondary School Correspondence classes, regular
students (exclusive of the 4,448 officially registered
in other schools)	
In the Elementary School Correspondence classes, regular
students 	
Under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, pupils receiving instruction	
2,226
626
73
2,925
Adult education—
Canadian Vocational Training Programme—
Day   23,326
Night  12,398
13
 G 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
Adult education—Continued
Public-school adult education.
Secondary School Correspondence (adults only)
Elementary School Correspondence (adults only)
British Columbia Institute of Technology—
Day
Night
Vocational teachers-in-training (summer session)
Selkirk College
University of Victoria non-credit courses	
University of British Columbia non-credit courses
162,1401
7,322
177
2,891
3,447
83
2592
7483
14,790*
230,506
i Includes 127,821 non-vocational.
2 This figure does not include the following enrolments:   300 extra-sessional (evening division).
3 This figure does not include the following enrolments:    1,386 summer session (credit and non-credit)-, 362
extra-sessional (evening division).
4This figure excludes single lectures and also does not include the following enrolments:   11,179 summer
session (credit and non-credit), 1,629 extra-sessional, 603 correspondence courses.
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
The following table provides a distribution of pupils by grade and sex for the
school year 1969/70 and a comparison of the totals with 1968/69. It will be
noticed that although Grades I to IV are now on a plateau the secondary grades will
continue rising rapidly for seven or eight years. In 1969/70 Grade XIII classes
were held in only 16 schools in 14 school districts.
Grade
Boys
Girls
Total,
1969/70
Total.
1968/69
Ratio.
1970:1969
Secondary
Grade XIII.
Grade XII—
Grade XI —
Totals, senior secondary gradesi..
GradeX    	
Grade IX-— 	
Grade VIII  	
Totals, Grades VIII to X.
Occupational 3  	
Occupational 2	
Occupational 1.  —
Totals, occupational classes	
Totals, junior secondary grades-
Totals, secondary grades _
Intermediate Special -
Grade VII	
Grade VL	
Grade V	
Grade IV	
Elementary
Totals, intermediate grades -
Primary Special-
Grade III	
Grade II	
Grade I	
Kindergarten-
Totals, primary grades	
Totals, elementary grades-
Grand totals -   	
569
14,914
16,675
328
13,614
15,736
897
28,528
32,411
1,410
25,519
30,076
2,602
20,511
21,262
22,218
22,507
1,631
20,114
20,597
20,989
21,378
4,233
40,625
41,859
43,207
43,885
4,400
38,879
39,675
40,691
42,134
89,100    I      84,709
173,809
165,779
2,018 1
1,037
3,055
3,193
.957
22,482
21,274
43,756
43,376
1.009
22,462
21,289
43,751
42,817
1.022
23,333 |
21,432
44,765
44,334
1.010
10,799 1
10,318
21,117
18,203
1,160
170,194    |    160,059    |    330,253    |    317,702
.636
1.118
1.078
32,158
29,678
61,836
57,005
1.085
18,489
20,006
20,716
17,624
19,459
19,905
36,113
39,465
40,621
33,786
36,947
39,265
1.069
1.068
1.035
59,211
56,988
116,199
109,998
1.056
795
1,017
1,301
413
584
681
1,208
1,601
1,982
1,304
1,715
1,872
.926
.934
1.059
3,113
1,678
4,791
4,891
.980
62,324
58,666
120,990
114,889
1.053
94,482
88,344
182,826
171,894
1.064
.962
1.045
1.055
1.062
1.042
1.048
81,094 |  75,350 | 156,444 | 151,923 | 1.030
1.040
264,676    |    248,403    |    513,0792 I    489,596    I    1.048
1 See pages 136 to 152 for enrolment by programme in Grades XI and XII.
2 Includes 622 January graduates.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
G 15
DISTRIBUTION OF INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF AND PUPIL/TEACHER
RATIOS BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
The number of teachers employed in the different types of schools and the
average number of pupils per teacher are shown in the following table. The average
number of pupils per staff member decreased in all except the elementary-junior
secondary type of school, where it increased from 21.81 to 21.86:—
Type of School
Number
of
Schools
Supervising
Principals
Instructional Staff
Total
School
Staff
Average Number of Pupils
per Staff Member
Enrolling
Divisions
Special
Staff
Total
Instructors
Enrolling a
Division
Instructing
On Total
Staff
Senior secondary
Secondary	
Junior secondary
Elemnetary-senior
secondary	
Elementary-junior
secondary—   	
Elementary	
District-employed
teachers	
19
110
96
18
60
1,179
18
107
95
16
30
417
596
2,965
2,112
414
537
10,300
242
1,276
822
138
117
1,076
203
838
4,241
2,934
552
654
11,376
203
856
4,348
3,029
568
684
11,793
203
29.42
30.02
29.24
28.27
27.84
30.88
20.92
20.99
21.05
21.20
22.86
27.96
20.48
20.48
20.39
20.60
21.86
26.97
Totals	
1,482    |      683      |    16,924
3,874    |    20,798    |    21,481
30.32
24.67
23.89
District supervisory and instructional staff members totalling 347 persons are not included.
 G
16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
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 report of superintendent g 17
Teachers and Principals with and without University Degrees
Highest Degree
No Degree
Total Teachers
Type of School
Bachelors
Masters or
Doctorates
Per Cent of
Teachers
in School
Type
Number
Per Cent of
Teachers
in School
Type
Number
Per Cent
of AU
Teachers
Senior secondary	
Secondary 	
Junior secondary 	
Elementary-senior secondary
Elementary-junior secondary
Elementary 	
District-employed instrue-
652
3,033
2,029
335
292
3,773
73
106
541
231
60
35
243
21
88.6
82.2
74.6
69.5
47.8
34.1
46.3
98
774
769
173
357
7,777
109
11.4
17.8
25.4
30.5
52.2
65.9
53.7
856
4,348
3,029
568
684
11,793
203
4.0
20.2
14.1
2.6
3.2
54.9
09
Total instructional staffi
District supervisory staff	
10,187
209
1,237              53.2
101      |        89.3
10,057              46.8      |    21,481             100.0
37      |        10.7      |         347      |    (100.0)
Total staff—	
11,734             j        53.8
10,094
46.2      |    21,828      |    (100.0)
1                     I
1 Part-time teachers and 18 exchange teachers without British Columbia certificates are included.
Highest Degree by Faculty and Level (Teachers, Principals,
Administrative and Supervisory Staff)
Faculty
Bachelors
Masters
Doctorates
Totals
P&Tl
A&S2
P&T
A&S
P&T
A&S
P&T
A&S
Combined
Education... 	
Arts            	
5,009
3,357
961
227
212
128
96
46
17
15
2
4
5
9
21
152
102
11
5
2
3
6
1
655
397
98
11
5
6
11
7
2
4
4
"  4
67
33
7
1
1
~2
3
2
7
3
5
5,666
3,754
1,059
238
212
133
102
57
24
17
9
8
9
9
25
222
135
18
6
3
3
8
1
5
3
5,888
3,889
1,077
Physical Education-	
Home Economics-	
Commerce and Business Ad-
244
212
136
Agriculture  	
105
65
25
17
Philosophy
14
11
9
Pharmacy- —
Other         	
9
25
Totals  	
10,109
282
1,204
114
9
8
11,322
404
11,7263
i P & T=PrincipaIs and teachers.
2 A & S=Administrators, supervisors, and district instructors.
3 Excludes 18 exchange teachers.
 G 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
Both the number and proportion of teachers with bachelors' or masters' degrees
increased during the year and 53.7 per cent of principals, teachers, and supervisory
staff were university graduates. Almost exactly half the degrees were degrees in
Education.
Numbers of certificates and degrees and per cent increases during the year were
as follows. The number certified by licence and letter of permission has decreased
10.7 per cent during the past two years, while the number with Professional or
Standard certificates has increased 23.1 per cent.
1969/70
1968/69
Increase,
1970/69
Certificates
(P, P-A, P-B)
(P-C, S, E-A)
(L, E-B, E-C)
(S-T, E-T)
9,612
7,442
4,425
303
24
(P, P-A, P-B)    8,523
(PC, S, E-A)    6,855
(L, E-B, E-C)    4,679
(S-T, E-T)       383
20
Per Cent
12.8
8.6
—5.4
—20.9
20 0
21,806
20,460
6.6
Degrees
17
1,321
10,396
10,094
28
1,148
9,299
10,006
—39.3
Masters 	
15.1
11.8
0.9
Total staffi	
21,828
20,481
6.6
i Includes four district-employed staff and 18 exchange teachers without British Columbia certificates in June,
1970, vs. two district-employed staff and 19 exchange teachers without British Columbia certificates in June, 1969.
Province or Country of First Teaching Certificate by Current Certificate Level, Number, and Per Cent, School Staff Reporting, September, 1969.
First Teaching
Current British Columbia Certificate
Total
Certificate from—
Professional
P-A, P-B
Standard
PC, S, E-A
Licence
L, E-B, E-C
Permission
L.P.,S-T,E-T
Vocational
1., C.
British Columbia  -
6,957
46.4
5,271
35.2
2,558
17.1
185
1.2
16
0.1
14,987
100.0
Alberta 	
409
6.7
434
7.1
222
3.6
163
2.7
69
1.1
99
1.6
511
8.4
29
0.5
68
1.1
183
3.0
254
4.2
220
3.6
439
7.2
107
1.7
86
1.4
27
0.4
50
0.8
640
10.5
20
0.3
56
0.9
126
2.1
160
215
3.5
421
6.9
190
3.1
128
2.1
31
0.5
70
1.1
192
3.1
22
0.4
30
0.5
357
5.8
11
4
0.1
2
0.0
3
0.0
10
0.2
6
0.1
7
0.1
15
0.2
4
0.1
2
0.0
9
0.1
14
0.2
	
848
13.9
Saskatchewan	
1,296
21.2
522
8.5
387
6.3
133
2.2
226
3.7
1,358
22.2
Other Europe 	
75
1.2
Africa and Asia  	
156
2.6
Australia, New Zealand	
675
11.0
U.S.A.                        	
439
Per cent	
2.6        |           0.2
7.2
Total,
non-British Columbia
Per cent - —
2,441
39.9
1,931
31.6
1,667
27.3
76
1.2
	
6,115
100.0
Grand total reporting	
Per cent   —      	
9,398
44.5
7,202
34.1
4,225
20.0
261
1.2
16
0.1
21,102
100.0
Source:  Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
G 19
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE
FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for the various years since
1877/78 and also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year
1877/78_
1882/83_
1887/88_
1892/93-.
1897/98-
1902/03-
1907/08-
1912/13-
1913/14-
1917/18-
1922/23-
1927/28-
1928/29-
1929/30-
1930/31_
1931/32-.
1932/33_
1933/34..
1934/35..
1935/36..
1936/37..
1937/38_
1938/39..
1939/40.
1940/41-
1941/42..
1942/43-
1943/44..
1944/45.
1945/46.
1946/47.
1947/48..
1948/49-.
1949/50..
1950/51-
1951/52.
1952/53..
1953/54-
1954/55-
1955/56.
1956/57-
1957/58-
1958/59-
1959/60-
1960/61-
1961/62-
1962/63-
1963/64-
1964/65-
1965/66..
1966/67.
1967/68-
1968/69-
1969/70-
Number
of
Teachers
Employed
Number
of
School
Districts
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
1,597
1,859
2,246
3,118
3,668
3,784
3,854
3,948
3,959
3,912
3,873
3,942
3,956
4,025
4,092
4,194
4,220
4,248
4,224
4,055
4,162
4,354
4,512
4,833
5,116
5,496
5,873
6,272
6,598
7,105
7,574
8,185
8,690
9,474
10,171
10,839
11,513
12,137
12,772
13,571
14,415
15,327
16,173
17,457
18,889
20,140
21,481
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741
721
720
730
696
661
654
650
86
89
93
97
97
98
101
100
104
104
102
103
102
101
98
97
99
100
100
93
93
87
85
85
85
Aggregate
Enrolment
Average
Daily
Attendance
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
164,212
173,354
183,112
195,290
210,174
223,840
240,674
260,069
277,070
291,223
305,837
321,760
340,290
358,905
378,641
400,064
420,790
445,228
467,486
489,596
513,079
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102,085
93,473
102,999
107,599
114,590
121,334
129,859
138,941
147,583
154,077
163,364
176,138
191,061
204,239
218,303
235,396
252,490
267,052
281,513
298,175
312,173
332,585
348,472
367,718
379,045
408,452
425,514
447,643
466,264
Percentage of
Attendance
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
85.99
87.74
88.03
88.51
89.34
89.87
88.88
89.21
90.19
90.91
91.24
90.70
90.51
91.13
91.70
92.05
92.67
91.74
92.67
92.03
91.91
90.98
91.74
91.02
91.43
90.88
Government
Expenditure
for
Education
Total
Public
Expenditure
on Education
$48,411,141
60,758.751
113,679.361
174,775.43
290,255.26
473,802.29
544,671.60
1,663,003.34
1,885,654.11
1,653,796.60
3,176,686.283
3,532,518.95
3,765,920.69
3,743,317.08
3,834,727.19
4,015,074.37
2,849,972.02
2,611,937.80
2,835,040.74
2,972,385.04
3,277,660.23
3,524,962.69
3,630,670.78
3,585,769.00
3,963,848.24
4,028,397.88
3,924,243.53
4,244,898.82
5,022,534.59
5,765,205.50
9,398,473.46
12,468,653.18
17,363,430.94
22,809,631.23
25,830,076.88
26,885,980.43
26,555,080.24
24,060,233.15
34,279,302.27
41,067,740.34
43,989,524.32
50,861,473.63
53,288,028.94
59,472,055.06
70,174,999.84
77,632,903.48
83,782,121.79
95,497,375.16
105,017,594.75
119,871,278.31
144,702,607.40
181,854,578.21
251,827,287.92
292,556,398.293
$215,056,222
425,555.10
604,357.86
1,220,509.85
4,658,894.97
4,634,877.56
3,519,014.61
7,630,009.543
9,261 .C94.98
11,149,996.27
10,008,255.66
10,061,387.99
9,719,333.81
8,941,497.34
8,213,369.04
8,458,156.00
8,775,353.78
9,593,562.64
10,193,367.08
10,640,740.47
10,521,684.92
10,982,364.49
11,120,801.94
11,502,291.35
12,231,029.35
13,683,538.18
14,818,625.81
20,176,930.53
25,768,392.09
35,538,079.88
47,726,750.37
54,195,133.95
57,881,559.48
58,401,121.15
70,791,844.25
80,823,263.713
69,314,181.24*
77,653,192.32
90,483,765.63
101,351,107.94
115,941,018.06
133,401,622.84
145,535,715.48
157,614,783.79
177,539,584.16
199,114,313.75
227,937,392.31
269,217,969.40
332,702,367.21
384,336,617.68
437,743,656.544
1 The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
2 Excluding unknown expenditure made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
3 Since 1922/23 this amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial universities
and since 1963/64 to school district and regional colleges.
* Since 1955/56 this amount is exclusive of capital expenditures from by-law funds.
 G 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS
The following table shows the number of classes of school districts in which
expenditure for school purposes was made during the school-year 1969/70:—
Municipal school districts  73
Rural school districts  12
Total.
85
NUMBER OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN OPERATION BY TYPE,
JUNE, 1965-70
Type of School
Type
No.
Numbers Open in June
Change
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1970-65
6
5
4
3
2
1,0
9
97
52
58
83
1,084
15
99
56
44
44
1,114
18
105
71
24
47
1,164
17
109
82
20
43
1,182
18
108
85
17
53
1,172
19
110
96
18
60
1,179
+ 10
+ 13
+44
—40
—23
+95
Elementary-senior secondary 	
Elementary-junior secondary —	
1,383
1,372
1,429
1,453
1,453
1,482
+99
Total net enrolment in thousands	
400
421
445
467
490
513
+ 113
On January 30, 1970, 26 schools with an enrolment of 1,294 enrolled only
children in special classes. Slightly more than half of the pupils were at the primary
level.
In 1969/70 the trend toward larger schools continued and the mean enrolment
per school has increased from 289 to 346 during the past five years. In September,
1969, exactly 50 per cent of the schools that were in use on their present sites had
originated during the previous 15 years. If those that had been destroyed and rebuilt, remodelled or enlarged had been included, the proportion would have been
much greater. During the eight years that the information has been tabulated, 214
other schools have gone out of existence. Most of them were of a temporary nature,
or were small rural schools that have been closed as the result of consolidation.
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
The number of schools enrolling grades between Kindergarten and Grade VII
increased from 1,172 to 1,179 during the year, but there has been no significant
increase since 1967. That is partly due to a decline in the growth rate in the primary grades, and partly to retention of Grade VIII classes which converts elementary schools into elementary-junior secondary schools. The principal reason, however, has been the great increase in the size of existing schools or the replacement
of one or more small schools by a larger one. In 1960 the average elementary school
enrolled 181 pupils; in 1965 the average enrolment was 224; and in June, 1970,
it had risen to 270.
Recent increases in total elementary-school enrolment have been inflated by
rapid increases in Kindergarten enrolments. The enrolment of Kindergarten children in public schools rose 2,914 or 16 per cent between June, 1969, and June,
1970. The increase in public kindergartens also has a carry-over effect on Grade I,
as pupils who might have attended the primary grades in a private school now rarely
do so if they have attended a public kindergarten.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
G 21
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1. Fernie -	
5
6
8
7
14
8
12
5
11
3
6
2
12
3
3
6
6
2
12
31
29
5
6
29
21
4
10
6
4
28
31
26
60
18
35
93
9
38
19
38
35
13
10
13
9
3
8
5
7
9
40
4
20
15
42
14
14
3
24
7
10
31
8
21
17
17
17
5
2
4
3
32
68
49
21
89
21
66
25
103
29
18
28
101
16
3
37
41
21
117
219
280
17
22
125
99
23
58
53
36
186
157
141
572
205
329
1,506
115
565
135
521
429
168
59
98
62
12
17
100
39
33
36
343
15
145
105
597
116
111
15
129
39
56
238
44
203
163
108
80
21
22
70
20
32.5
78.2
50.8
23.0
97.7
21.4
70.7
26.0
112.3
33.5
18.5
32.7
114.0
16.0
3.0
42.5
46.5
23.0
135.0
240.3
335.0
17.6
22.6
135.1
108.5
26.0
65.0
59.9
41.0
196.0
172.5
157.0
626.4
251.0
365.5
1,706.2
130.0
656.5
147.8
586.0
503.5
209.5
66.9
105.1
68.6
14.0
18.0
111.4
40.3
35.3
39.4
385.4
15.0
161.8
115.4
691.3
118.0
118.4
18.5
137.5
42.6
58.3
268.0
48.1
222.1
182.9
120.4
83.4
22.5
24.1
82.5
21.0
1,034
2,222
1,384
579
2,423
514
1,714
567
3. Kimberley- - 	
4. Windermere .  —
7. Nelson   	
8. Slocan 	
9. Castlegar  -	
11, Trail    	
2,777
937
12. Grand Forks.	
13. Kettle Valley 	
463
14. Southern Okanagan  	
15. Penticton -   	
878
2,980
464
17. Princeton -	
18. Golden                             	
41
1,085
19. Revelstoke	
1,263
680
22. Vernon —	
23. Kelowna —	
24. Kamloops 	
25. Barriere  -
26. Birch Island ... -	
3,586
7,041
8,529
473
604
3,648
3,015
693
1,666
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet   ..
31. Merritt -  	
32. Hope  	
1,646
1,124
5,954
4,766
4,470
17,607
6,912
10,307
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley  	
36. Surrey  	
37. Delta 	
38. Richmond  __  	
47,667
40. New Westminster 	
41. Burnaby     	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam 	
3,578
18,273
4,272
17,059
13,498
45. West Vancouver _ 	
46. Sechelt  	
5,466
1,642
2,962
1,755
221
448
52. Prince Rupert  	
54. Smithers 	
55. Burns Lake—  	
56. Vanderhoof .—   	
3,165
1,210
913
1,041
10,569
58. McBride  	
390
4,274
2,861
61. Greater Victoria— - ~	
62. Sooke- - 	
63. Saanich-  	
64. Gulf Islands - -	
19,854
3,784
3,200
423
3,836
1,111
1,619
6,822
69. Qualicum 	
70. Alberni   	
71. Courtenay  	
72. Campbell River	
1,215
6,164
4,888
2,949
75. Mission —     	
2,181
572
77. Summerland    —
80. Kitimat   	
81. Fort Nelson -	
729
2,340
618
 G 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
82. Chilcotin -  	
5
1
2
13
10
4
16
23
7
10
23
49
63
7
113
94
7.0
10.5
25.5
53.5
65.5
7.0
117.0
98.3
115
271
614
85. Vancouver Island North 	
86. Creston-Kaslo    _
87. Stikine - -
1,234
1,816
139
3,572
89. Shuswap	
2,727
1,179
10,308
11,556.7
318,103
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The number of elementary-junior secondary schools had decreased from 164
in 1963 to 43 in 1968 and was expected to continue downward, but it increased to
53 in 1969 and to 60 in 1970. In most cases, however, this merely represents the
retention of a Grade VIII class in an elementary school when accommodation is not
conveniently available in a junior secondary school, and total enrolment decreased
during the year from 15,460 to 14,950. There was a corresponding decrease in
teaching staff from 697.0 to 671.3.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
2
2
1
5
2
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
3
4
2
2
4
8
14
13
5
24
22
57
10
4
8
9
45
8
19
1
12
33
27
13
16
15
24
4
2
12
3
3
10
6
41
10
12
49
9.0
19.0
14.7
7.0
30.0
30.1
76.7
10.0
5.0
9.0
9.3
60.0
10.0
21.0
1.0
14.0
44.4
30.5
14.7
17.1
22.0
26.0
4.0
2.0
13.2
3.0
3.0
14.0
6.0
48.5
11.0
12.0
74.1
224
368
345
142
11. Trail                            	
730
730
22. Vernon    	
1,702
226
28. Quesnel     	
119
133
209
41. Burnaby	
1,438
226
50. Queen Charlotte   —  -	
466
11
314
1,011
518
58. McBride                                        	
379
415
468
62. Sooke       —
64. Gulf Islands    - —
809
73
70. Alberni	
34
263
45
82. Chilcotin 	
57
233
77
1,012
261
87. Stikine   	
286
89. Shuswap  —
1,626
Totals      — 	
60
539
671.3
14,950
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
G 23
One more school enrolled pupils in one or more elementary grades through to
the senior grades in June, 1970, than in June, 1969. The additional school was in
School District No. 50, Queen Charlotte, and it raised the total to 18 and the enrolment to 11,702. As the population increases, however, there is a tendency for this
type of school to disappear and the total number, which was 44 as recently as 1966,
is not expected to increase.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1. Fernie  - 	
7. Nelson  - 	
1
1
2
1
1
1
4
2
1
1
1
1
1
34
14
14
26
6
13
205
33
9
17
15
16
13
41.5
19.0
21.0
32.8
6.3
14.0
291.0
41.5
12.0
20.0
23.0
24.5
17.0
896
336
355
777
18. Golden -	
19. Revelstoke 	
39. Vancouver     -	
100
307
6,316
736
154
471
59. Peace River South	
437
470
347
Totals    	
18
415
563.6
11,702
 G 24
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
Eleven more schools enrolled pupils in Grades VIII to X, only, in June, 1970,
than in June, 1969. Enrolment increased 11.5 per cent and teaching staff 14.4 per
cent. Recent rapid rates of growth in the junior secondary grades reflect not only
the population growth of the 1950's, but an inflow from private and Indian elementary schools and very high net rates of immigration. In addition, enrolment in occupational classes has declined, thus tending to increase retention to at least Grade X.
Enrolment in the final junior-secondary year is now larger than in the final years in
elementary school from which the cohort stream was derived.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
4
1
1
3
2
2
9
2
5
6
7
4
1
1
1
5
2
1
8
2
3
3
4
1
2
4
1
1
1
1
17
19
24
11
22
31
10
102
23
22
50
67
26
218
37
131
181
153
90
33
28
11
104
41
32
214
35
43
57
89
10
49
57
41
4
23
10
23.0
28.0
34.5
16.0
31.0
44.0
14.0
152.5
32.0
30.4
69.0
82.0
39.0
312.1
49.0
180.0
263.0
225.0
131.0
42.0
42.1
17.0
150.7
61.0
51.0
308.0
50.0
59.0
74.7
129.0
15.0
70.0
79.5
60.0
6.0
32.5
14.0
477
3. Kimberley  _	
7. Nelson -_	
535
712
307
11. Trail -	
15. Penticton   -    -  -	
22. Vernon 	
669
921
257
24. Kamloops	
27. Williams Lake -	
28. Quesnel— _ —
33. ChiUiwack-   	
34. Abbotsford	
3,085
659
668
1,539
1,830
35. Langley  	
705
6,587
37. Delta 	
1,020
3,863
41. Burnaby    	
5,298
4,422
2,529
47. Powell River  	
887
889
54. Smithers _
383
3,298
59. Peace River South  -	
1,234
60. Peace River North -	
834
6,498
62. Sooke    	
1,048
1,225
1,521
2,493
296
70. Alberni- 	
1,369
71. Courtenay-	
1,561
1,097
99
703
89. Shuswap 	
240
Totals  - -	
96
2,115
3,017.0
61,758
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT                                        G 25
SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The number of schools enrolling Grades VIII to XII was 104 in June, 1970,
an increase of six from 1969.    Six other secondary schools enrolled Grade XIII,
a decrease of four from 1969.    Enrolment in occupational classes also decreased.
As a result, the net total secondary-school enrolment increase was only 4.4 per cent
during 1969/70, although grade enrolments increased 8.5 per cent in the senior
secondary grades and 5.6 per cent in Grades VIII to X.   The enrolment increase
in Grade XII was the largest on record and reflects increasing retention as well as
the great increase in births from 1951 to 1952.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1. Fernie  	
14
2
3
1
6
3
2
1
2
7
26
18
13
25
28
11
54
20
13
25
44
11
19
24
14
148
10
8
10
43
26
12
24
27
19
69
54
17
79
37
684
93
71
84
30
189
117
29
28
28
16
10
19
22
8
28
19
167
15
10
18
37
44
16
54
44
16
38
11.0
44.5
24.5
20.5
35.7
42.0
16.0
82.5
32.0
13.0
36.0
61.0
14.0
27.0
36.0
20.0
196.8
18.0
14.0
15.0
60.0
42.0
15.7
32.0
36.0
27.0
97.3
79.5
28.0
118.7
55.0
987.5
126.0
106.0
114.3
48.0
292.5
171.1
45.0
41.0
43.0
23.5
17.0
25.0
31.0
11.5
36.0
33.5
249.8
18.5
14.5
31.0
57.0
67.0
23.0
78.0
68.0
28.0
50.0
181
792
427
438
711
821
260
1,599
580
191
755
1,191
248
511
710
403
4,184
320
226
266
1,239
787
272
556
727
551
2,221
1,603
596
2,413
1,146
21,985
2,917
2,104
2,488
944
5,937
3,443
803
796
816
522
336
429
632
182
707
579
5,394
381
283
574
1,021
1,406
430
1,569
1,324
550
988
3. Kimberley   	
7. Nelson	
9. Castlegar     	
11. Trail 	
12. Grand Forks _
13. Kettle Valley   	
15. Penticton 	
16. Keremeos 	
23. Kelowna- 	
24. Kamloops  -     	
27. Williams Lake -
28. Quesnel   	
29. Lillooet..                           	
30. South Cariboo
31. Merritt  	
32   Hope                           	
33. ChiUiwack             	
37. Delta -	
39. Vancouver-    	
40. New Westminster  —
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam 	
58. McBride                            	
62. Sooke ..                                  _ 	
69. Qualicum 	
70. Alberni ,. -
 G 26
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
Rl,   Fnrf KpIsoti
1
2
1
2
2
7
11
12
36
30
10.0
16.2
17.0
53.0
41.0
162
84. Vancouver Island West 	
236
338
989
843
Totals _.   —
110        |        2,965        |     4,324.6
89,033
SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
Three senior secondary schools were added during the year and two became
" secondary " by the inclusion of Grades below XI, leaving a net gain of one senior
secondary school. Although Grade XIII was discontinued in all except eight senior
secondary schools, total enrolment increased 1,073 or 6.5 per cent and full-time
teaching staff increased 9 per cent.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1
2
1
4
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
27
49
33
101
24
93
77
59
16
29
25
28
15
20
42.9
74.5
44.7
149.5
38.0
137.0
102.0
59.0
19.0
35.0
41.0
42.8
32.0
35.0
857
24. Kamloops	
34. Abbotsford	
1,398
924
3,080
894
2,799
2,177
1,438
396
67   SnnVe
768
65. Cowichan	
71.  Courtenay
7?, Campbell River
692
920
609
89. Shuswap
581
Totals 	
19
596
852.4
17,533
DISTRICT-EMPLOYED INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF i
(Not Assigned to Specific Schools)
District Number
and Name
Number
of
Teachers
District Number
and Name
Number
of
Teachers
District Number
and Name
Number
of
Teachers
3. Kimherle.y
4
1
1
I
1
1
2
6
5
1
1
6
1
2
4
4
22
37.
38.
39.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
49.
52.
54.
55.
56.
57.
59.
60.
Delta   .
1
3
3
1
3
23
6
6
1
2
2
1
1
9
4
1
61.
62.
63.
65.
66.
68.
69.
70.
71.
75.
76.
80.
84.
86.
88.
89.
11
4
7, Nelson
Vancouver 	
2
13. Kettle Valley  	
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan	
3
15. Penticton	
Maple Ridge	
4
9
?,?„ Vernon
Qualicum  —	
2
73.  Ke.lnwna
West Vancouver	
16
Courtenay	
Mission	
Agassiz	
Kitimat- 	
Vancouver Island West
2
1
27. Williams Lake      _   _
Smithers—	
1
28. Quesnel	
1
32. Hope	
1
33. ChiUiwack
4
34. Abbotsford	
Peace River South	
Peace River North
Skeena-Cassiar	
Shuswap	
9
36. Snrrev
Full time, 167.   Part time, 36.   Total, 203.
Total full-time equivalents, 183.9.
i The district-employed instructional staff includes music, band, relief, remedial, visiting, and permanent
substitute teachers, as well as librarians and home instructors.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
G 27
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
The net number of public schools of all types open in June, 1970, was 29
greater than it was in June, 1969. The largest increases were at the junior secondary
level, reflecting recent increases in enrolment which have been very large in Grades
VIII to X and are now at the senior secondary level. Additional demand for classroom space is still very heavy but it is now largely the result of immigration and
internal migration of pupils. During the school year 1969/70 British Columbia had
a net gain of 11,260 children below the age of 16 from other provinces and approximately 5,500 from other countries. This one-year migration, after allowing for
graduation and foreign emigration, represents an eventual demand for about 510
additional classrooms. During the calendar year 1969, British Columbia with about
10 per cent of the Canadian population received 13.6 per cent of foreign immigrants
and 14.7 per cent of their children. Twenty-five per cent of all U.S. immigrants came
to British Columbia.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Fernie	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere-
Nelson	
Slocan	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes-
Trail	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan.-
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden  	
'. Revelstoke	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen.-
Vernon  	
. Kelowna - —
Kamloops	
Barriere- 	
Birch Island—
Williams Lake..
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo.
Merritt	
Hope	
ChiUiwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta 	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster-
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam	
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver—
Sechelt	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte-
Prince Rupert	
Smithers. 	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
9
10
10
17
11
14
6
15
4
7
4
15
4
4
3
16
36
36
6
7
35
24
6
13
7
6
33
34
30
74
22
42
111
10
49
22
47
45
16
12
16
11
6
7
11
8
10
12
Number of
Divisions
81
125
86
47
152
40
105
36
203
49
31
75
176
27
29
62
78
35
211
367
441
25
32
201
151
43
82
80
64
305
257
221
908
321
521
2,395
208
955
219
781
708
285
88
167
90
45
45
145
77
64
91
Number of
Teachers
94.0
164.7
103.3
58.2
186.9
49.4
128.7
42.0
255.8
65.5
31.5
98.8
219.0
30.0
35.8
75.8
96.5
43.0
268.6
437.1
580.0
31.6
37.6
237.1
185.9
50.7
97.0
95.9
77.3
362.3
299.2
275.5
1,116.0
418.7
638.5
2,984.7
256.0
1,222.5
262.1
961.0
927.0
380.6
111.9
198.1
111.6
55.5
51.0
178.0
94.3
74.3
114.8
Number of
Pupils
2,335
3,859
2,346
1,362
4,182
1,011
2,842
827
5,775
1,517
654
2,363
5,092
712
818
1,696
2,280
1,083
6,402
11,225
13,332
699
870
5,772
4,589
1,098
2,222
2,373
1,884
9,714
7,520
6,778
27,870
10,345
16,210
75,968
6,495
29,912
6,760
24,602
21,964
8,909
2,445
4,871
2,571
957
1,068
4,587
2,400
1,656
2,684
 G 28
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
57. Prince George  -  	
58. McBride	
59. Peace River South 	
48
6
24
22
58
19
18
6
28
8
12
36
10
26
22
21
18
6
3
5
6
6
2
7
19
13
6
21
29
533
36
229
172
993
206
183
29
211
57
93
371
70
308
248
176
124
37
38
108
30
10
20
40
106
112
17
178
173
625.6
41.2
281.8
217.0
1,271.1
231.5
212.4
37.0
253.2
73.6
115.3
464.0
86.1
372.1
305.2
225.6
151.4
47.0
52.1
132.5
34.0
10.0
24.5
47.7
125.0
135.5
18.0
202.5
221.4
15,823
951
6,652
4,689
32,214
62. Sooke 	
63. Saanich—     	
64. Gulf Islands	
6,418
5,193
779
65. Cowichan— .  — 	
6,049
1,685
2,640
10,721
67. Ladysmith  	
69. Qualicum    —
70. Alberni	
1,941
9,136
7,369
72. Campbell River	
4,918
3,505
1,042
77. Summerland   	
80. Kitimat  	
81. Fort Nelson 	
1,279
3,328
825
82. Chilcotin  	
172
504
84. Vancouver Island West	
927
2,683
3,152
400
5,404
87. Stikine- _	
88. Skeena-Cassiar -	
89. Shuswap	
5,174
Totals 	
1,482
16,938
20,985.6
513,079
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
The annual salaries classified in the following tables were obtained by multiplying the June, 1970, salary by 10. All class intervals in the salary distributions have
a range of $500, centring on round numbers.
Supervising Principals (Principals Not Enrolling a Division)
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Junior
Sec.
Elem.-
Senior
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
per Cent
$22,250-22,749	
21,750-22,249
21,250-21,749
20,750-21,249
20,250-20,749.
19,750-20,249
19,250-19,749.
18,750-19,249
18,250-18,749
17,750-18,249	
17,250-17,749
16,750-17,249
16,250-16,749
15,750-16,249
15,250-15,749	
14,750-15,249
14,250-14,749
13,750-14,249.
13,250-13,749.
12,750-13,249	
12,250-12,749
11,750-12,249—-
11,250-11,749
10,750-11,249	
10,250-10,749
9,750-40,249
9,250- 9,749	
1
24
26
57
30
36
45
34
34
34
23
24
9
7
9
7
11
3
1
2
1
1
1
4
4
1
6
3
1
1
3
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
4
7
14
11
11
10
14
8
6
5
1
1
1
3
4
7
4
9
14
12
5
8
10
4
6
6
5
2
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
6
3
3
3
7
10
6
16
21
29
48
49
83
54
55
59
52
40
40
24
29
12
8
12
9
11
3
1
2
100.0
99.6
98.5
97.1
96.2
93.9
90.8
86.5
79.5
72.3
60.2
52.3
44.2
35.6
28.0
22.1
16.3
12.7
8.5
6.7
5.6
3.8
2.5
0.9
0.4
0.3
Totals —
417              30      |        16      |           95
107
18
683
Total principals not enrolling a division, 683; median salary, $17,109;  mean salary, $16,926.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
Full-time Teachers and Teaching Principals
G 29
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Junior
Sec.
Elem.-
Senior
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
per Cent
$19,750-20,249
19,250-19,749
18,750-19,249	
18,250-18,749	
17,750-18,249
17,250-17,749
16,750-17,249
16,250-16,749	
15,750-16,249
15,250-15,749
14,750-15,249
14,250-14,749	
13,750-14,249	
13,250-13,749
12,750-13,249	
12,250-12,749	
11,750-12,249.
11,250-11,749.
10,750-11,249
10,250-10,749
9,750-10,249
9,250- 9,749
8,750- 9,249
8,250- 8,749
7,750- 8,249
7,250- 7,749
6,750- 7,249
6,250- 6,749	
5,750- 6,249.
5,250- 5,749.
4,750- 5,249	
4,250- 4,749	
3,750- 4,249	
2
2
8
21
32
37
47
46
59
101
94
122
329
110
173
509
299
342
943
1,218
1,592
1,331
997
1,270
834
347
40
16
1
2
4
3
3
5
2
21
15
10
37
8
27
23
40
32
45
58
85
64
60
43
31
11
1
2
2
2
1
1
2
1
18
10
53
14
21
62
18
23
37
31
22
43
37
49
43
17
22
6
3
2
1
—
1
8
6
7
10
10
9
35
32
78
92
94
267
79
107
223
198
207
239
281
311
378
122
83
17
7
3
1
1
9
9
10
10
21
8
15
10
106
85
363
221
196
588
141
171
299
226
235
253
292
303
402
111
74
19
7
1
2
1
1
.-„
3
2
4
4
4
4
15
16
89
37
49
111
42
28
59
45
53
51
56
47
91
8
11
1
1
1
16
14
20
30
56
59
71
70
225
204
705
473
492
1,394
398
529
1,150
839
891
1,574
1,942
2,387
2,309
1,315
1,503
908
375
46
21
2
100.0
100.0
100.0
99.9
99.8
99.7
99.6
99.3
99.0
98.7
98.3
97.2
96.2
92.6
90.3
87.8
80.9
78.9
76.2
70.5
66.3
61.8
54.0
44.3
32.4
20.8
14.3
6.8
2.2
0.3
0.1
0.0
Totals..	
10,922             630             543              2,905
4,189      |      831              20,020
Medians 	
$7,946      [$8,422      |$10,177     |    $9,275
|
$10,531
$10,694
$8,544
1
Total full-time teachers, 20,020, excluding district-employed and supervising principals;   mean salary, $9,159.
Part-time Teachers
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Junior
Sec.
Elem.-
Senior
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
per Cent
$9,250-9,749	
1
1
4
4
16
13
12
30
41
84
80
53
29
34
24
17
2
1
7
4
3
1
2
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
5
2
3
2
1
8
1
1
2
1
1
1
3
5
1
1
2
2
6
8
23
23
19
37
56
93
101
58
33
37
30
22
6
100.0
8,750-9,249	
8,250-8,749	
7,750-8,249...   	
7,250-7,749    „
99.6
99.3
6,750-7,249	
98.2
6,250-6,749.	
96.8
5,750-6,249	
4      1          1
4
92.6
5,250-5,749	
88.5
4,750-5,249—	
4,250^1,749   ..
2
6
3
6
2
2
1
2
2
1
3
85.1
78.4
3,750-4,249	
68.3
3,250-3,749   -
51.6
2,750-3,249	
33.5
2,250-2,749	
23.0
1,750-2,249	
1,250-1,749	
17.1
10.4
750-1,249	
5.0
250-  749	
2      I      	
1.1
Totals
445
24
8
26
46
7
556
—
Total part-time teachers, 556;  median salary, $3,705;  mean salary, $3,761.
 g 30 public schools report, 1969/70
Full-time Teachers and Principals Enrolling a Division
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Junior
Sec.
Elem.-
Senior
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
per Cent
$19,750-20,249	
1
1
100.0
19,250-19,749	
	
	
	
	
18,750-19,249   —
	
	
	
	
	
	
18,250-18,749..
2
	
1
3
100.0
17,750-18,249.   -
2
2
100.0
17,250-17,749-    _
1
1
100.0
16,750-17,249—
8
	
1
9
100.0
16,250-16,749	
20
1
2
23
99.9
15,750-16,249	
26
1
1
28
99.8
15,250-15,749
30
	
	
	
1
31
99.6
14,750-15,249	
43
1
,	
2
	
46
99.4
14,250-14,749 	
42
2
12
13
55
8
132
99.1
13,750-14,249	
52
2
7
16
51
6
134
98.4
13,250-13,749
90
18
42
46
244
63
503
97.6
12,750-13,249	
86
10
5
64
155
27
347
94.6
12,250-12,749   ...
110
6
17
66
131
33
363
92.5
11,750-12,249
277
30
40
196
433
85
1,061
90.3
11,250-11,749	
98
7
11
53
105
30
304
84.0
10,750-11,249—
157
20
16
80
125
19
417
82.2
10,250-10,749.
422
17
31
164
206
43
883
79.7
9,750-10,249	
273
36
25
136
165
33
668
74.4
9,250- 9,749....
312
29
19
163
185
40
748
70.5
8,750- 9,249	
858
38
35
184
199
37
1,351
66.0
8,250- 8,749	
1,125
53
29
228
224
49
1,708
57.9
7,750- 8,249	
1,476
77
44
233
226
37
2,093
47.8
7,250- 7,749	
1,259
57
35
296
294
72
2,013
35.3
6,750- 7,249	
948
54
14
91
74
6
1,187
23.3
6,250- 6,749	
1,237
39
19
56
56
5
1,412
16.2
5,750- 6,249	
813
27
6
14
9
1
870
7.8
5,250- 5,749.
344
10
3
6
6
369
2.6
4,750- 5,249	
39
	
2
1
1
43
0.4
4,250- 4,749-
16
1
	
1
2
20
0.1
3,750- 4,249.
1
	
	
	
1
2
0.0
Totals	
10,166
535
413
2,108
2,954
596
16,772
	
Total enrolling divisions, 16,772; median salary, $8,360; mean salary, $8,905.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
G 31
Full-time Teachers not Enrolling a Division
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Junior
Sec.
Elem.-
Senior
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
per Cent
$18,750-19,249	
■
1
1
100.0
18,250-18,749 _ ..
1
9
3
13
100.0
17,750-18,249	
	
	
2
1
9
12
99.6
17,250-17,749.	
	
	
	
8
9
2
19
99.2
16,750-17,249...
	
	
2
6
10
3
21
98.6
16,250-16,749	
1
2
1
6
19
4
33
98.0
15,750-16,249—
6
3
1
10
7
4
31
97.0
15,250-15,749	
7
3
2
10
14
4
40
96.0
14,750-15,249	
4
2
1
9
8
24
94.8
14,250-14,749
4
3
6
22
51
7
93
94.0
13,750-14,249	
7
3
16
34
10
70
91.2
13,250-13,749	
11
3
11
32
119
26
202
89.0
12,750-13,249...
8
5
9
28
66
10
126
82.8
12,250-12,749-
12
4
4
28
65
16
129
78.9
11,750-12,249	
52
7
22
71
155
26
333
74.9
11,250-11,749	
12
1
7
26
36
12
94
64.7
10,750-11,249	
16
7
7
27
46
9
112
61.8
10,250-10,749
87
6
6
59
93
16
267
58.3
9,750-10,249	
26
4
6
62
61
12
171
50.1
9,250- 9,749—
30
3
3
44
50
13
143
44.9
8,750- 9,249	
85
7
8
55
54
14
223
40.5
8,250- 8,749
93
5
8
53
68
7
234
33.6
7,750- 8,249	
116
8
5
78
77
10
294
26.4
7,250- 7,749-
72
7
8
82
108
19
296
17.3
6,750- 7,249.	
49
6
3
31
37
2
128
8.2
6,250- 6,749—
33
4
3
27
18
6
91
4.3
5,750- 6,249	
21
4
	
3
10
38
1.5
5,250- 5,749   —
3
1
	
1
1
	
6
0.3
4,750- 5,249	
1
2
	
	
3
0.1
4,250- 4,749
1
	
	
	
1
0.0
Totals	
756
95
130
797
1,235
235
3,248
Total full-time teachers not enrolling a division, 3,248; median salary, $10,238;  mean salary, $10,471.
 G 32
public schools report, 1969/70
District-employed Instructional Staff
Salary
Mid-point
Number of Instructors
Cumula
Salary Range
Full Time
Part Time
tive
per Cent
F.T.E.
Persons
Full-time
Equivalents
Salaries
$15,250-15,749 	
$15,500
15,000
14,500
14,000
13,500
13,000
12,500
12,000
11,500
11,000
10,500
10,000
9,500
9,000
8,500
8,000
7,500
7,000
6,500
6,000
5,500
5,000
4,500
4,000
3,500
3,000
2,500
2,000
1,500
1,000
500
	
1
1
5
2
7
9
2
9
4
6
15
6
9
23
14
22
12
6
8
3
2
1
1
2
5
3
2
4
6
4
1
1
1
5
1
0.8
1.6
2.7
1.4
1.3
2.0
3.0
2.0
0.5
0.3
0.2
1.0
o~7
100.0
14,750-15,249	
14,250-14,749  	
13,750-14,249 	
99.5
99.0
96.6
13,250-13,749-	
95.6
12,750-13,249	
91.6
12,250-12,749 	
87.2
11,750-12,249	
11,250-11,749 	
86.2
80.3
10,750-11,249	
10,750-10,749
77.8
74.4
9,750-10,249	
66.0
9,250- 9,749-	
63.1
8,750- 9,249-	
58.1
8,250- 8,749	
46.3
7,750- 8,249     __	
35.0
7,250- 7,749     	
21.2
6,750- 7,249	
14.8
6,250- 6,749	
5,750- 6,249-	
9.4
3.4
5,250- 5,749  _..
4,750- 5,249	
2.0
4,250- 4,749	
3,750- 4,249	
0.5
3,250- 3,749	
2,750- 3,249-	
2,250- 2,749	
1,750- 2,249	
1,250- 1,749. -	
	
750- 1,249-  	
250-     749 	
Totals
167                36        |        16.9
203 persons
183.9 F.T.E.s
Medians:  Full time, $9,086;  part time, $4,166;  all F.T.E.s, $8,906.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
G 33
EXPENDITURES FOR EDUCATION, CALENDAR YEAR 1969
(Exclusive of Capital Expenditures from By-law Funds)
Total expenditures by school districts (including colleges)  $331,894,014.00
Add—-Department of Education expenditures
for administration, correspondence schools,
Teachers' Pension Fund, free textbooks
and maps, adult education, vocational and
technical schools, grants to colleges, universities, and school districts, etc $292,556,398.29
Less—Government grants to
school districts included in school district expenditure:
Direct grants $135,327,954.00
Grants  to  reduce  local
taxation      51,378,801.75
Total    Government   grants   to
school districts     186,706,755.75
Gross total, other Department of Education expenditures     105,849,642.54
Grand total, expenditures
$437,743,656.54
COST PER PUPIL--CALENDAR YEAR 1969
Grand total cost of education _
Deduct—School district expenditures not affecting pupil cost:
Colleges and other non-
operating expenditures 	
Debt charges
$437,743,656.54
Current  non-shareable
capital 	
$15,781,285.00
39,063,864.00
2,482,699.00
Total, school district deduction __ $57,327,848.00
Department of Education expenditures for
post-secondary and adult education,
correspondence schools, technical and
vocational schools, grants to colleges
not included in school district deduction, universities, etc.       95,461,828.85
Total operating costs
152,789,676.85
$284,953,979.69
Operating cost per pupil for year based on daily average attendance of 466,264	
$611.14
 G 34
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
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G 37
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 G 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
IN RETROSPECT
The Public Schools Act was amended in the Legislative Session of this year.
Most important was the bringing of all sections dealing with colleges under one Part
of the Act so that references could be consulted with convenience. In addition, the
old distinction between district and regional colleges was eliminated. Other
changes in the Act dealt largely with amendments of a housekeeping nature.
Changes in election procedures were introduced to bring closer conformity with
the provisions of the Municipal Act. A slight amendment to the sick-leave provisions for teachers removed an anomaly previously introduced. Another provision
made it possible to pay workmen's compensation to persons enrolled in courses of
technical and vocational training.
Of more immediate importance to the schools were two sets of amendments to
the Rules of the Council of Public Instruction. These amendments brought the
Rules up to date, deleting some sections which no longer apply and amending
others to conform to modern practice.
There were two important changes in the internal organization of the Department. One was the transfer of the Community Programmes Branch to the Department of Travel Industry. The second was the making of the Jericho Hill School
a district superintendency, thus enabling closer and more direct communication with
the central Department and giving some flexibility to the position of Superintendent.
The programme of amalgamation of school districts was continued in the
school-year 1969/70. University Hill School District was consolidated with School
District No. 39 (Vancouver). The school districts of Bamfield and of No. 79
(Ucluelet-Tofino) amalgamated with School District No. 70 (Alberni). Belmont
Park School District became part of School District No. 62 (Sooke). Before the
new school-year commenced in 1970, School District No. 58 (McBride) amalgamated with School District No. 57 (Prince George). These amalgamations should
improve educational opportunities in the smaller school districts and at the same
time increase the efficiency of school administration in the Province.
Although it is not the purpose of this introductory statement to repeat details
from the reports of the divisions of the Department, attention should be directed
to several other significant developments.
The suggestion made last year that there were indications that the teacher
shortage was disappearing has been borne out by the facts. This year, for the first
time in two decades, there were enough qualified professional teachers available to
fill the normal academic needs of both elementary and secondary schools. Those
areas in which shortages still exist are few and highly specialized. They include
commerce, home economics, music, and a few other fields. Even in these fields
there is an indication that needs will soon be met and that it will no longer be
necessary to issue letters of permission. The number of the latter necessary shows
a significant decrease at this time.
While on the question of certification, it is a pleasure to report that the
measures taken to modernize and simplify the certification process have been
effective and that, although the number of certificates being issued is greater than
ever before, it is now possible for the Registrar's Branch to keep up to date with its
processing of applications. It is probable that in the next few years some attention
should be paid to limiting the certification of non-citizens, at least at the permanent
certification level.
Two new colleges were opened during the 1969/70 year—Malaspina College
at Nanaimo and College of New Caledonia at Prince George.    The additional
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT G 39
facilities rapidly becoming available at the post-secondary level should ensure that
no student need be denied opportunity to continue his education.
A further addition to post-secondary facilities is the provision of the modern
quarters for the Vocational School at Victoria. The building there was opened
by the Honourable W. A. C. Bennett, Premier, in June, 1970.
SENIOR STAFF CHANGES
The number of changes at the senior level were very few during the 1969/70
school-year.
Mr. J. H. Panton first joined the Department of Education in 1948 as
Recreational Consultant at Kelowna. A former member of the Canadian Olympic
Track and Field Team, he was Acting Director of Physical Education at the University of Alberta before serving with the R.C.A.F. in World War II. He returned
to become Director of Physical Education at Regina College and a member of the
staff of the University of Saskatchewan. From 1958 on he was Director of
Community Programmes, a position he is maintaining upon the transfer of that
Branch to the Department of Travel Industry.
Mr. Peter Freemantle had been with the Department of Education from August,
1954, to June, 1961, as teacher and Vice-Principal of the Jericho Hill School.
From September, 1961, to June, 1965, he was Assistant Superintendent and Superintendent of the Interprovincial School for the Deaf in Nova Scotia and from
August, 1965, to June, 1966, Assistant Superintendent of the Ontario School for
the Deaf at Milton. He came back to the Department of Education in August,
1966, as Vice-Principal of the Jericho Hill School, became Superintendent and
Principal of the School in September, 1967, leaving to take a position with the Alberta Department of Education in 1970.
Mr. R. S. Price transferred from the field to take a position in the Administrative Branch of the Department of Education during the school-year.
Replacing Mr. Price on a temporary basis as District Superintendent of
Schools was Mr. G. M. V. Thorsell, who had been Supervisor of Special Services in
School District No. 47 (Powell River) for the last seven years.
Mr. A. C. Campbell resigned after one year's service as District Superintendent
of Schools to take a position with School District No. 61 (Greater Victoria).
Other replacements to the District Superintendents' staff were made at the
end of the school-year: Mr. W. B. Johnston, former Supervisor of Instruction for
the Campbell River School District; and Mr. J. Holden, former Supervising Principal of the Stanley Humphries Secondary School in Castlegar.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
As this will be the last annual report for which I shall be responsible, I would
like to place on record my gratitude to all my colleagues both within the Department and within the educational system of the Province whose understanding and
co-operation have made my 25 years' service such a pleasurable and valuable
experience.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
F. P. LEVIRS,
Superintendent of Education.
 G 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
REPORT OF J. PHILLIPSON, B.A., B.Ed., ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT
OF EDUCATION (ADMINISTRATION AND SCHOOL BOARD RELATIONS).
The activities of the Administration Branch have been, generally, of a routine
nature throughout the year. The tables which follow indicate developments in the
general areas of administration.
The school construction programme for the Province was necessarily curtailed
because of the difficulties experienced in selling school board debentures on the
open market. Funds which were made available were assigned to the construction
of essential classrooms which included regular and specialty instructional areas as
well as libraries. In the latter part of the year, funds were not authorized for the
construction of activity rooms and gymnasia.
Early in 1969 a survey was made and a programme presented to the Government. I am pleased to report that every single project recommended as being
essential was approved by the Treasury Board, in spite of the difficulties of
financing.
In the course of the year, a trend on the part of many school boards to investigate and experiment in the concept of modular construction, using pre-built components and simplified design became very evident. It was encouraging to find
that in a significant number of projects where these concepts were applied the cost
of school construction was actually reduced in spite of an escalating labour and
materials market. Significant dollar savings were noted in comparison with previous cost experience where the traditional custom approach was used.
The entire matter of the cost of school construction was studied by a Committee of the British Columbia School Trustees' Association. The report supported
the principles inherent in the modular and pre-built component approach. The
Department is favourably impressed with design and construction techniques which
point to controlling the cost escalation which was becoming apparent in recent
years. The writer is most appreciative of the opportunity to have served as a
consultant to the committee and is most hopeful that the cost-saving principles
which were enunciated will be seriously studied by all school boards in the
Province.
The Department finalized during the year a project which was an experiment in the same concept. The board that participated—School District No. 62
(Sooke)—was very pleased with the building that the Department designed, both
from a functional and cost point of view. The Department has since proceeded
with another project in the northern part of the Province and is preparing designs
for a variety of classroom sizes which will be made available to the trustees
throughout the Province. Through this it is hoped to provide a service which will
be practical and which will lead the way in providing the best possible dollar value
for school construction.
I wish to, as always, express my sincere appreciation to the many trustees and
school board officials with whom I have had the pleasure of working during the
year. It is most encouraging to enjoy the co-operation of so many people at a time
when construction problems have been so critical.
 ADMINISTRATION BRANCH G 41
Statistical Data
Certain statistical data concerning the affairs of the Administrative Branch for
1969/70 are shown below:—
School District Organization
Municipal school districts  72
Rural school districts     8
Total  80
School Board Organization
Three-member board  1
Five-member board  22
Seven-member board  38
Nine-member board  17
Official Trustees (number of districts)   2
Total  80
Capital Expenditures (Section 190 Approvals,
Calendar Year 1969)
Site purchases and improvement
Buildings—construction 	
Equipment	
Plans and supervision	
Total
$6,436,366
49,696,982
7,526,273
2,373,738
$66,033,359
Referenda, Calendar Year 1969
Referenda approved by Department  $88,607,554
Conveyance of School Children
The following statistics indicate details connected with the conveyance of
school-children during the school-year 1969/70:—
1. Number of large school districts providing transportation  73
2. Total number of vehicles        770
(a) District-owned   552
(_>) Contract  212
(c) Other (water taxis, etc.)        6
3. Total daily approved mileage	
(a) Average distance per vehicle (miles)
(_>) Average number of trips per vehicle .
Average distance per single trip	
Total number of daily trips by all vehicles
58,867
77.1
2.0
19.3
1,523
5. Total number of pupils carried daily 1  79,096
6. Average number of pupils carried per vehicle     102.7
 :    ;i^i«r
 administration branch
Transportation Assistance
g 43
Transportation assistance, to a maximum of 12 cents per vehicle-mile as of
October 2, 1969, is made available for the transportation of children who reside
where there are too few children to justify establishment of a bus route.
During the school-year 1969/70, the Province shared in transportation assistance of 2,352 pupils in 62 school districts at a cost of $404,559.60.
Table of Transportation Costs
The following table indicates the relationship between the total district expenditures and the total conveyance costs over the past 12 years:—
Calendar Year
Total District
Expenditures
Conveyance
Costs
Conveyance
Costs as a
Percentage
of District
Expenditures
1958                                                 	
$91,279,662
105,044,901
118,269,991
127,616,486
136,432,687
150,790,702
165,814,555
185,566,119
214,156,353
248,031,667
285,686,761
323,153,465
$2,236,918
2,340,813
2,477,202
2,611,370
2,721,510
2,886,696
3,125,447
3,475,895
4,009,393
4,610,089
5,355,378
5,891,894
2.4
1959        .   	
2.2
1960    -
1961                        	
2.1
2.0
1962.   	
1963   - 	
1964  -  	
1965         , „
1966            	
2.0
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.9
1967      	
1968        	
1.9
1.87
19691	
1.82
i Excluding college expenditures of $8,740,549.
Summary
of School Dormitory Data, 1969/70
School District No.
Capacity
Occupancy
Staff
Grade Limits
and Location of Dormitory
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Full
Time
Part
Time
From
To
15
12
40
30
34
16
43
16
14
12
40
30
20
28
47
12
15
9
26
22
26
15
43
9
31
12
20
9
10
22
21
17
25
47
7
49
8
20
1
2
4
2
4
3
5
2
6
2
3
Nil
Nil
1
3
1
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
1
1
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
13
12
12
27. 100 Mile House	
12
29. Lillooet    ■	
12
55. Burns Lake 	
12
12
58. McBride   	
12
68      !      58
15              14
20      |      20
12
64. Gulf Islands	
12
12
Totals 	
309      |    295
1
228
235
34
7
Boarding Allowances
For pupils who are unable to take advantage of transportation or dormitory
facilities, the school board is empowered to provide a boarding allowance. Under
this arrangement, a pupil can receive up to $40 a month on a basis shared by the
Department of Education.
During the past school-year, 1969/70, the Province shared in boarding allowances of 549 pupils in 41 school districts, who received a total of $217,700.
  ADMINISTRATION BRANCH G 45
TEACHER RECRUITMENT
(Report of Philip J. Kitley, M.A., Co-ordinator)
For the first time in more than a decade, positive signs this year pointed to a
relief from the chronic teacher shortage. However, there was no reason to think
that full supply could immediately be reached. Critical shortages still remained in
Commerce, Home Economics, Instrumental Music, Special Education, French, and
some other subjects. A number of districts still found it impossible to staff all their
schools with properly qualified teachers.
Solutions to the Commerce teacher shortage were investigated. Two days
were spent interviewing approximately 15 candidates for the special class of student
teachers in Commerce being conducted at the University of British Columbia. Talks
were given to Home Economics and French student groups at the university, stressing the need for teachers in those subjects. Some investigation was conducted
regarding Music teacher supply, revealing that the development of Fine Arts faculties at the universities should bring about some relief. During the summer, interviews were conducted at the University of British Columbia with those having
problems in teacher preparation, certification, or employment.
Promotion of Future Teachers Clubs was continued through the provision of
informational and programme material. One hundred clubs were in operation
during the year, with a total membership of 1,761, an 18 per cent drop in total
membership from the previous year. This Branch participated in the planning and
presentation of the annual conference for sponsors of Future Teachers Clubs at the
University of British Columbia. This is sponsored by the British Columbia School
Trustees Association. Visits were made to several clubs, including one at which
discussions were held regarding practical details of a teacher-aide project.
Other activities included participation in the Teacher Certification Committee;
conferring with the student committee concerned with planning the Future Teachers
Clubs conference at Simon Fraser University; directing the Advisory Committee on
Teacher Recruitment, which met twice during the year; and administering the
Minister of Education's Scholarships for Teachers programme. Scholarships are
awarded to outstanding classroom teachers to enable them to do further study.
Scholarships this year were awarded as follows: Mrs. L. E. Basso, Queen's Park
Elementary School, Penticton (the University of British Columbia—Preparation for
the New Science); Mr. R. L. McNabb, Trout Creek Elementary School, Summer-
land (the University of British Columbia—Elementary Counselling); Mr. J. Maher,
Lord Byng Secondary School, Vancouver (Simon Fraser University—History).
This Branch acts as a source of information for teachers and others regarding
certification and details of preparation programmes. The usual large number of
inquiries was dealt with during the year. A marked increase was noted in inquiries
from the United States.
Guidance Services
As a routine part of the services of this Division, 88,882 separate pieces of
occupational and other guidance information were distributed to the secondary
schools of the Province (and in some cases the elementary schools also), an increase
of 4,105 over last year. Three issues of the Guidance Bulletin were also prepared
and distributed. This is compiled in the office of the Director and aims at providing further reference material and drawing attention to current Guidance needs and
trends.
The Division continued to participate in the ongoing revision of the school
Guidance curriculum, and in practical discussion of ways and means of making it
more relevant to current school and student needs.    In addition, a revision of a
 G 46 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1969/70
guide for school counsellor qualification was completed. This outlines a suitable
programme of study, from basic requirements to the conclusion of a postgraduate
degree.
The policy of conducting business-education workshops was expanded this
year, with the enthusiastic participation of the British Columbia Chamber of Commerce. Regional workshops were held at Nanaimo, ChiUiwack, Castlegar, Kamloops, and Terrace, in the first three of which the Director was able to participate.
At such workshops, representative school counsellors and businessmen have opportunity to exchange information and discuss mutual problems relating to employment.
As an interesting innovation, a taped interview with an official who was unable to
attend in person was presented at Castlegar and used as a basis for comment and
discussion. In addition to these, the Vancouver Board of Trade continued its valuable programme of similar conferences. Students were involved, for the first time,
in a day's programme at the Vancouver Technical School, and made a useful contribution to the discussion.
A beginning was made on planning for a British Columbia Careers Directory,
which will fill a long-felt need among school counsellors. Research will likely be
taken care of largely by a team from the Canada Manpower office, and other co-operating bodies will include the University of British Columbia and the Vancouver
School Board.
Other activities during the year included discussions with Guidance groups at
the universities, discussions with university counsellors, participation in Guidance
workshops and in a regional careers exposition, continuing contacts with business
and industrial organizations regarding careers information and methods of bringing
it to the attention of school students.
Department of Education Display
The Director continued to assist in the development and modification of the
Department of Education display in the British Columbia Building, Vancouver.
Notable among the additions was a continuous 35-mm. slide presentation illustrative of various aspects of the Province's educational system, with voiced commentary
by the Director.    Eleven planning meetings were held during the year.
Federal-Provincial Young Voyageur Program
This programme continued to develop, the Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment acting as Co-ordinator for this Province. A new dimension of the project
was the inclusion, on a trial basis, of a student exchange with France. Four students
from this Province participated. Seventeen student " units," 24 students in each,
travelled by rail and bus to other parts of Canada, this Province receiving the same
number of visitors. Students remained a full week in the host community, enjoying
a programme which sampled its historical, cultural, industrial, and recreational
characteristics. As far as possible, students are selected from a geographical area,
using a larger centre of population as a rallying point and host centre. In most
instances at least five or six schools were represented in a single unit. British
Columbia centres participating, together with the destination of local student units,
as well as point of origin of visitors, are shown here:—
 ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
G 47
Travelling to—■
Nicolet, Que.
Hamilton, Ont.
Toronto, Ont.
Antigonish, N.S.
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.
Halifax, N.S.
Toronto, Ont.
Montreal, Que.
Montreal, Que.
Quebec, Que.
Ottawa, Ont.
Montreal, Que.
Shawinigan, Que.
Woodstock, N.B.
Humboldt, Sask.
Montreal, Que.
Winnipeg, Man.
British Columbia Centre
Burnaby
Duncan
Fort St. John
Kelowna
Ladner
Langley
Nanaimo
North Vancouver
Powell River
Prince George
Prince Rupert
Richmond
Trail
Vancouver
Vancouver
Victoria
West Vancouver
Hosting Visitors from—
Sarnia, Ont.
Montreal, Que.
Montreal, Que.
Chicoutimi-Jonquiere, Que.
Montreal, Que.
Toronto, Ont.
Regina, Sask.
Toronto, Ont.
Winnipeg, Man.
Halifax, N.S.
Rouyn, Que.
Ottawa, Ont.
St. John, N.B.
Windsor, Ont.
Quebec, Que.
Winnipeg, Man.
La Sarre, Que.
During the summer, contacts were made with students from France visiting
Canada, and with Dr. and Mme P. Marconnet, escorts of the French group. Later
in the year, the Co-ordinator was privileged to renew acquaintances with them, as
well as with M. Max Welzer and Mr. James Piatt, heads of co-ordinating and
informational travel and exchange organizations in France and Britain respectively,
through a brief study tour of Paris and London.
As a result of these exchanges, contacts were opened with such bodies as the
Youth Hostels Association, the Royal Commonwealth Society, and others.
JERICHO HILL SCHOOLS
Special Schools for Aurally or Visually Handicapped Children
(Report of J. Walsh, B.Sc, M.Ed., Superintendent)
The net enrolment for the 1969/70 school-year was divided as follows:—
Day
Resident
Total
122
27
103
50
225
77
Totals
149
153
302
Five classes were conducted off-campus, continuing the trend toward integrating handicapped children with the general school population.
With the completion of the grounds project, the school is in a setting both
beautiful and functional.
The integration of blind and partially sighted students into the public schools
continues. A vital factor making this possible is the sterling work carried out by
the Pioneer Group, a British Columbia Telephone voluntary group, which makes
brailled copies of prescribed texts transcribed by the C.N.I.B. It should be noted
that roughly one-third of our visually handicapped students are from Alberta.
One notable highlight of the year was a visit of His Royal Highness the Duke
of Edinburgh, who presented awards to members of the Duke of Edinburgh Club.
 G 48 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
The expectations of parents of the deaf have risen just as have the expectations
of the parents of hearing children, resulting in increased questioning of existing
methods of teaching. Significantly, eight of our students passed the entrance examination to Gallaudet College, the only institution of its kind in the world. Jericho Hill
Schools are proportionately the most successful schools in Canada in preparing
students for this college.
A greatly increased consultation with various external organizations connected
with the deaf has been instituted in order to gain their co-operation in improving
procedures within the schools. Their endorsement has been given to the plans which
had already been laid for extensions to programmes being conducted in the school.
It is obviously vital, if public confidence is to remain at the present level, to maintain a continuing dialogue with all friends of the deaf.
The administration of the schools wishes to acknowledge with thanks the cooperation and support of other branches of the Department of Education and of the
Department of PubUc Works.
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
G 49
INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
REPORT OF J. R. MEREDITH, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION (INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES)
Instructional services include those in the field of curriculum, textbooks, audiovisual aids, correspondence, research and standards, and adult education. Each of
these is the subject of a separate report by the Director of the division concerned.
Accreditation
An accredited school is a secondary school which is granted authority to recommend a proportion of Grade XII pupils for standing in certain courses leading to
graduation on the Academic-Technical Programme. All public secondary schools
offering this programme are eligible to apply for this authority and the Department
of Education Accreditation Committee may grant accreditation for periods of up to
four years. Factors considered include the school organization and programmes,
supervision and administration, qualifications of staff, and the standards being
achieved.
During the year 1969/70 the Committee assessed applications from 72 schools
and recommended that 56 be accredited. The following is a statistical summary
of the status of senior-secondary schools in respect of accreditation:—
Total offering Grade XII
Assessed, 1969/70	
Not accredited 	
Number of Schools
137
72
Accredited for one year	
Accredited for two years	
Accredited for three years
Accredited for four years
16
27
8
16
5
Total accredited, 1969/70	
Accredited in previous years and still retaining accreditation 	
Total accredited as of 1969/70	
56
65
121
In order that the process of accreditation may be updated, a special revision
committee was appointed in May of 1969 to look into present procedures and
modern concepts of accreditation and to recommend changes. It is expected that
this work will take some time to complete.
Teacher Certification
The certification of teachers is under the jurisdiction of the Department of
Education. The committee established in 1967 by the Superintendent of Education to advise on individual certification problems held four meetings during the
year. Ten special appeals were considered. The committee also considered other
matters relating to certification, including the following: The question of whether
or not citizenship should be a requirement for permanent certification, the need for
new procedures to determine whether or not applicants with special qualifications
should be certificated, and the question of whether or not there should be interim
and permanent types of certificates.    These studies are continuing.
 G 50 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
Pupil Report Cards
Changes were made in the Rules of the Council of Public Instruction which
enabled schools to develop their own forms for reporting to parents on the progress
of their children. The changes required that such forms be authorized by the Board
of School Trustees. Locally developed report cards for various grades and programmes have been authorized and are in use in 51 school districts.
Choice of Programmes, September, 1969
The reorganization of the secondary school curriculum enables pupils to elect
from a number of programmes, all of which require general education courses plus
particular courses related directly to the nature and purpose of the programme. The
following shows the choice of programmes made by 59,868 pupils in September,
1969, the fourth year the reorganized curriculum has been in effect. Comparison
with the 1966 figures in parentheses indicates little change in the proportions of
pupils electing the various programmes.
Programme Per Cent
Academic and Technical   64.8  (63.3)
Commercial   16.3  (18.7)
Industrial   11.5  (11.4)
Community Services        4.3     (3.9)
Visual and Performing Arts     1.7    (1.3)
Other programmes (Agriculture, Specific Vocational)       1.4    (1.4)
This organization is under continuing study, with particular reference to course
and subject requirements, in order to ensure that it meets the needs and interests of
pupils. Changes have been made in the requirements of certain programmes to
increase their flexibility. Discretionary authority is given to the school to change
these requirements in individual cases where it would be in the educational interests
of the pupil to do so.
Grade XIII Enrolment
There has been a continuing decline in the enrolment in Grade XIII, reflecting
the establishment of colleges.
Number of districts with Grade XIII _ _
1968/69
19
1969/70
14
Number of schools           __   _
24
16
Enrolment 	
  1,410
897
An evaluation study of the Grade XIII programme and a possible plan for
revision was undertaken. It was concluded that in view of the numbers and changing
nature of post-secondary institutions it was no longer feasible to maintain this programme as the equivalent of a first-year liberal Arts university programme. Announcement was made that Grade XIII classes will no longer be held under the
auspices of the Department of Education after the school year 1970/71. Correspondence courses will be carried on for one additional year in order to enable pupils
to complete deficiencies.
Kindergartens
The increase noted last year in kindergartens continued.
1968/69 1969/70
Number of districts with kindergartens  49 52
Number of schools        300 359
Enrolment   18,203        21,117
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
G 51
Local Supervisory Personnel
The following table shows the number of persons employed in school districts
in supervisory and special capacities as at September 30th:—
1968/69
Directors of instruction 	
Supervisors of instruction
Teacher consultants _
Special counsellors
District teachers other than relieving teachers
Totals 	
36
124
28
62
158
408
1969/70
38
136
21
73
234
502
Special Projects
A number of special projects and assignments were undertaken during the
year and are summarized as follows:—
1. Centennial Sub-committee on Educational Activities.—This committee,
representative of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, the British Columbia
School Trustees Association, the Parent-Teacher Federation, and the Department
of Education, held a number of meetings to plan special school activities to be
undertaken during the 1971 Centennial. Local school district Centennial committees have been organized in 56 school districts. An extensive programme of activities is being undertaken, including the preparation of a teaching-kit of documents
relating to British Columbia's entry into Confederation.
2. Soldiers' Dependent Children Act.—The chairmanship of the commission
appointed to administer the funds provided under this Act was assigned to this
office. The work undertaken by the commission is reported separately by the
Secretary.
3. Indian Education.—The First Citizens' Fund Committee appointed a special
consultant to work on curriculum and instructional problems related to the education of Indian children in public schools. Following visits and discussions with
teachers, principals, district superintendents, and representatives of Indian bands,
suggestions were prepared for improving curriculum and textbooks, for providing
in-service and pre-service education for teachers, and for preparing special teaching
material. These are now in the process of being implemented. Arrangements
were made to have selected teachers attend summer session courses at the University
of British Columbia and the University of Victoria. Work was commenced on a
revision of the booklets in the cultural Heritage Series, Our Native Peoples, published by the Department of Education. Provision was made for a special programme for adult Indian students to complete secondary school graduation. Publishers are being notified regarding specific changes to be made in prescribed textbooks.
4. Education Concerning Drugs.—Work undertaken last year was continued
and included the selection and distribution of materials for teachers and pupils
and the preparation of special programmes for educational television.
DIVISION OF CURRICULUM
(Report of W. B. Naylor, B.A., Director)
The development of new courses, the revision of prescribed courses in the
curriculum, the preparation of curriculum guides for authorization and publication,
and the evaluation and selection of textbooks for authorization are the main respon-
 G 52 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
sibilities of the Division of Curriculum. In addition, the Division advises on the
administration of the curriculum and provides advice and assistance to other divisions within the Department on matters related to curriculum. Advisory committees
of teachers and other experts assist in this work.
The extent of the assistance given by these advisory committees may be illustrated by the fact that during the year under review a total of 21 committees, comprising 164 members, held 165 meetings on curriculum matters. An estimated
5,170 hours of members' time was devoted to this work. It is significant to note that
the assistance given by members of these committees is voluntary. The policy of
providing for released time for teacher members was continued.
Course development and revision work were continued in the following curriculum areas: commerce, creative writing, French, guidance, health education,
home economics, junior science, kindergarten, mathematics, music, physical education, physics, and social studies. Seven new or revised courses were prepared for
use in September, 1970. New studies were undertaken in the fields of biology,
English, and electricity-electronics. In addition, a committee was formed to revise
the Elementary Administrative Bulletin. The regular procedure for reviewing books
for school libraries was continued. Two special summer workshops were held—
one to do course writing in the field of elementary health education and the other
to prepare the curriculum guide for the revised Grade X science course.
As noted in the foregoing, one of the main responsibilities of the Division of
Curriculum is the evaluation and selection of new textbooks. The following table
illustrates the significant increase in new titles provided to schools in the past few
years:—
Year Introduced Number of New Tit'.es
1965       52
1966      57
1967      71
1968   106
1969   104
1970   143
In addition to the regular evaluative procedures applied in the assessment of published books, committees have also become involved in supervising the development
of new books designed to meet particular needs. Such was the situation this past
year in the case of core books prescribed for Social Studies 7, Social Studies 10,
and Science 10.
Acknowledgment
Grateful acknowledgment is extended to the British Columbia Teachers' Federation and to the three public universities for their co-operation, specifically to those
teachers and members of university faculties who served on committees. Particular
acknowledgment is extended to the members of the two Professional Committees on
Curriculum Development. These met regularly throughout the year to advise on
matters affecting the curriculum for the elementary and secondary schools of this
Province.   Their help and advice has been most valuable.
Curriculum Consultants
The practice was continued whereby two outstanding teachers in the Province
are released on loan by Boards of School Trustees to work with the Division of
Curriculum. This year's appointees were Mrs. K. E. Maughan (Sooke) and Mr.
S. S.  Galbraith (Burnaby).    Their enthusiasm and knowledge, combined with
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
G 53
their practical experience and professional training, made an invaluable contribution
to the work of this Division.
Information and Related Services
Services related to the curriculum were also provided by the staff of the Division of Curriculum. The Director participated in meetings of the Directors of
Curriculum of the western Provinces and the Curriculum Committee of the Council
of Ministers. In addition, members of the Division represented the Department at
various teacher conferences and symposia convened by universities and other
organizations for the purposes of discussing educational developments and problems.
PUBLIC SCHOOL ADULT EDUCATION
(A. L. Carder, M.A., Co-ordinator of Adult Education)
During the past decade, phenomenal growth has occurred in Public School
Adult Education in British Columbia. Enrolment has increased fourfold from
40,000 to 160,000. The number of full-time administrators has increased from 6
to 54. At the beginning of the decade, 75 per cent of the enrolment was in the City
of Vancouver; but programmes have so developed in other centres that 75 per
cent of the enrolment is now in other centres.
The growth in enrolment has to a great extent been caused by the development of skill in the art of programming to meet the interests and needs of more
adults and by a growing awareness in adults of their needs for further education. The
demand for retraining and upgrading job skills has been met by the development
of highly specific vocational courses, particularly in the commercial and service-
trade fields.
In the non-vocational sector, the areas of greatest growth have been in new
courses and programmes designed to meet the needs of adults to upgrade their
academic qualifications, to gain more comprehension of community and public
affairs, to increase understanding of their role as parents, and to make more creative
use of their leisure time.
In the 1969/70 school-year, Public School Adult Education enrolment increased by 15 per cent over the previous year to reach a total of 162,140. A breakdown in the above total indicates that 34,319 were enrolled in vocational courses
while 127,821 were enrolled in non-vocational courses. The vocational enrolment
increased by 9 per cent, while the non-vocational enrolment increased by 16.4 per
cent. The most notable areas of growth were the following: Business management
courses up by 17.5 per cent, courses in electronics up by 37 per cent, service-trade
training up by 19 per cent, and vocational preparatory courses up by 75 per cent.
Services of the Adult Education Division
The major function of this Division is to provide a consulting service to local
directors of Adult Education and to other school district officials. During the past
year the Co-ordinator responded to requests for visits to 23 school districts. He also
assisted with regional conferences of directors of adult education as well as with
two Provincial meetings of directors.
This Division continues to act as a communications centre through which ideas
and methods developed in one district are made available to other districts. Pamphlets, films, books, and course outlines are also distributed from this office. Also
from time to time reprints of articles about adult education are made available to
directors and instructors.
 G 54 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
During the past year the Co-ordinator has assisted in the development of some
new methods or approaches to adult education with a view to encouraging the
use of similar methods elsewhere. During the past year he assisted in the development and utilization of television programmes in family budgeting and child-rearing.
He also worked with the Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement
on the development of adult education programmes for persons on welfare. New
approaches to consumer education were worked out in co-operation with the Consumers Association and the Victoria School District Adult Education Division.
Hopefully the lessons learned from these experiments will be usefully applied in
various parts of the Province.
Another function of this Division has been to maintain liaison with other
branches of government which have adult education functions and problems.
Through such liaison, co-operative programmes, workshops, and courses have been
developed in various areas of the Province.
Finally, this Division assists voluntary adult education organizations such as
church groups, senior citizen associations, the Canadian Association for Adult Education, the Canadian Consumers Association, the Inner City Project of Vancouver.
Co-operation with Other Government Agencies
Many Government departments, both Provincial and Federal, have adult
education roles concerned with preventive, correctional, rehabilitative, and upgrading functions. During the past few years this Division has tried to build a liaison
between many Government branches and local directors of adult education.
Through such liaison many co-operative arrangements have been made which are
of mutual benefit because they bring together the financial or technical resources of
the Government agency and the organization of the local directors of adult education.
The value of this type of co-operation is indicated by the following examples:—
1. Driver Education.—In addition to regular driver-training courses, a defensive-driving programme is operated throughout the Province in co-operation with
the British Columbia Safety Council and the Motor-vehicle Branch. In 1968/69
there were some 3,000 drivers referred to this programme by the Motor-vehicle
Branch. This year there were over 12,000 enrolled, most of whom had been referred by the Motor-vehicle Branch.
2. Corrections Branches.—Assistance was given in the implementation of the
Adult Secondary School Programme in both Federal and Provincial prisons. Assistance was also given in one of the Provincial gaols in the development of an
encounter-group programme.
3. Department of Health.—The nutrition and consumer-education programme
developed last year for Channel 8 continues to be used via video tape. A new
series on family life education was used in the Vancouver area and will be used
elsewhere next year.
4. Rehabilitation and Social Improvement.—This Department, in its concern
for prevention and rehabilitation, has been making a large number of referrals of
clients to adult education classes. In addition, members of the Department of
Rehabilitation and Social Improvement at both regional and central levels have
participated in the planning of special programmes for persons on assistance.
This Division has also collaborated with the Department of Rehabilitation
and Social Improvement in developing experimental programmes, in-service education programmes for social workers, a conference for senior citizen counsellors, and
conferences on parent education.
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
G 55
5. Department of Travel Industry.—This Division, through the local directors
of adult education, has assisted in organizing hospitality conferences and courses for
the upgrading of the skills of various categories of employees and supervisors
engaged in the hospitality industry.
6. Indian Affairs Branch.—At present, about 85 per cent of the Indian adult
education classes in British Columbia are now operated through local districts
on a purchased services basis. Last year there were 198 classes especially for status
Indians, with an enrolment of some 2,907. An additional 307 were enrolled in
integrated classes.   This programme has grown by about 52 per cent over last year.
The Victoria School District, through its Institute of Adult Studies, continues
to operate a very successful programme for young Indian adults. In addition to
the Art school and the two levels of upgrading, an Adult Secondary School Programme for Native Indians was introduced this year. The programme provides
opportunities to study native history and culture and law and legislation as these
apply to native Indians. In terms of student and teacher evaluation, the programme
has been successful. An evaluation of the whole Indian programme at the Institute
is being made by Dr. Sally Robertson, an anthropologist from the University of
Florida.
The New Adult Secondary School Programme
With the advice of a committee of directors of adult education from the Lower
Mainland area, a revision was made of the Adult Secondary School Programmes.
This revision reduced the minimum number of compulsory subjects to seven, provided an alternative to the study of a second language on the Academic and Technical Programme, and provided for greater flexibility in the choice of subjects.
Parent Education
Fifteen School District Adult Education Divisions organized courses, panels,
or workshops for parents on problems related to drug abuse. The total attendance
for these programmes was just over 2,500.
In addition, there were 75 special courses in parent education, enrolling 4,794
parents.
Summary Showing Trends in Enrolment, Number of Classes, Number
of Instructors, and Number of School Districts Participating
(These statistics are gathered from annual reports submitted by the directors of
adult education of the participating school districts.)
Year
1959/60   ...
1960/61	
1961/62	
1962/63 	
1963/64 —
1964/65	
1965/66 —
1966/67-	
1967/68 	
1968/69	
1969/70. —
Number
of School
Districts
58
64
65
68
70
70
71
69
671
631
69
Number of
Enrollees
40,867
40,917
46,548
70,405
78,461
91,579
100,292
112,105
127,659
141,217
162,140
Number of
Instructors
1,796
1,945
2,273
2,949
3,454
3,828
4,141
4,982
5,610
6,394
7,045
f
Number of
Courses
1,578
2,220
2,219
3,070
3,964
4,261
5,067
5,637
6,230
7,406
7,855
1 The number of districts is smaller because of amalgamation of school districts.
 G 56
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
Vocational Programme
Year
1959/60-
1960/61-
1961/62-
1962/63-
1963/64-
1964/65-
1965/66-
1966/67-
1967/68-
1968/69-
1969/70-
Number of
Enrollees
13,539
12,530
9,783
14,317
17,510
21,393
25,477
28,556
29,977
31,482
34,319
Number of
Instructors
540
552
518
685
880
1,029
1,194
1,432
1,479
1,554
1,649
Number of
Courses
322
552
512
681
910
1,116
1,384
1,511
1,566
1,767
1,785
Non-vocational Programme
1959/60-
1960/61-
1961/62-
1962/63-
1963/64-
1964/65-
1965/66-
1966/67_
1967/68-
1969/70-
1968/69-
27,328
28,387
36,765
56,008
60,951
70,186
74,815
83,549
97,682
109,735
127,821
1,256
1,393
1,755
2,264
2,574
2,799
2,947
3,550
4,131
4,840
5,396
1,256
1,648
1,707
2,389
3,054
3,145
3,683
4,126
4,664
5,639
6,070
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
Classification of Courses and Enrolment
Vocational Programme1
G 57
Course
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
6,153
7,984
1,161
1,533
2,409
1,909
1,412
2,633
2,279
434
1,477
4,935
285
402
75
103
130
89
55
48
118
39
81
224
313
439
Automotive 	
69
110
155
Electronics
Lumbering and Forestry	
Engineering-.  ..    „ _ 	
92
72
43
125
Agriculture -	
33
99
235
Totals
34,319
1,649
1,785
1 These are vocational courses sponsored by night schools operated by local
school districts only.
Non-vocational Programme
Academic (for credit) -  ...
21,417
5,059
9,785
11,357
15,374
10,973
4,794
17,673
12,057
19,332
971
269
412
587
800
612
109
688
323
625
1,030
291
421
701
Domestic Arts .
915
684
75
781
475
Miscellanpmis
697
Totals 	
127,821                5,396
6,070
Total enrolment  -	
162,140
7,045
7,855
The cost of instruction and administration of the above programmes for the
school year 1969/70 was $3,104,223.45. This figure does not include light, heat,
extra custodial services, or depreciation of plant. Provincial grants-in-aid amount
to just over 25 per cent of the above figure. In most school districts the balance
of the above costs is raised through the participants' fees. The average cost of
operating this programme is about $19 per enrollee.
Indications are that Public School Adult Education will continue to grow at
about the present rate. One of the main problems in its future will be the working-
out of methods of articulation with other adult education agencies. Although some
of the present programme may be assumed by the colleges, the presence of a college
or a regional vocational school tends to stimulate more interest in adult education
and promotes growth in the Public School Adult Education sector.
DIVISION OF AUDIO-VISUAL SERVICES
(Report of Barrie A. Black, Director)
In the first full year of operation since the reorganization of the Divisions of
Visual Education and School Broadcasts, the Division of Audio-Visual Services
has effected a number of significant changes to take advantage of the complementary
capabilities of the two former divisions. The photographic services, including both
still and film photography, have been used extensively to prepare materials for
educational television broadcasts. This technique has resulted in increased efficiencies of both time and money, while permitting an improved co-ordination and
  INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
G 59
presentation of television materials. Several successful television programmes have
been converted to the 16-mm. film format and have been added to the film Ubrary,
thus making them available to schools not equipped with television receivers.
The new organization has also facilitated closer liaison with other branches of
the Department, notably in procedures established to assist Curriculum Consultants
and Departmental revision committees in the previewing and selection of appropriate
audio-visual materials. The guidelines which have resulted from this co-operation
have been helpful in a large-scale review of the resources of the library undertaken
to determine the suitability of resources to the current needs and to replace older
materials with new ones. Coincident with this review, a new catalogue was compiled for distribution to schools in the new school year.
Photographic Services
The photographic section, under the guidance of Mr. Kerkham, carried out a
number of projects on behalf of various branches of the Department. Photographs
covering a variety of educational settings, including the regional colleges and vocational schools, were obtained for inclusion in Departmental publications. Technical
and photographic services were provided in the reorganization of the Department's
display at the Pacific National Exhibition.
Information and Related Services
Members of the Division served on a number of Departmental committees and
represented the Department at various Provincial and national conferences concerned with educational media. The director served as chairman of the Sub-
Committee on School Broadcasting, under the Council of Ministers of Education,
and represented the Department on the Joint Programming Committee and the
Western Regional Conference on School Broadcasts. Leadership and assistance
were provided in the planning and staging of media workshops and displays, including two Student Film Festivals. Assistance was also provided to a number of
school districts in the establishment of local audio-visual and media centres.
Distribution Services
Circulation Report
District Number and Name
Number Supplied—
Motion          Film-
Pictures         strips
1. Fernie	
366
368
2. Cranbrook .   	
234
220
3. Kimberley 	
4. Windermere 	
283
173
337
105
7. Nelson          . _ 	
355
55
336
23
82
293
25
399
474
707
8. Slocan 	
146
9. Castlegar 	
10. Arrow Lakes   -
726
50
11. Trail	
63
12. Grand Forks   	
435
13. Kettle Valley	
166
14. Southern Okanagan...
15. Penticton 	
8
352
16. Keremeos 	
30
1
17. Princeton	
160
203
18. Golden	
267
251
19. Revelstoke 	
532
541
Number Supplied—■
Motion Film-
District Number and Name Pictures strips
21. Armstrong-
Spallumcheen   126 290
22. Vernon  851 963
23. Kelowna  358 407
24. Kamloops   931 355
25. Barriere   168 183
26. Birch Island   16 28
27. Williams Lake  1,340 1,393
28. Quesnel   439 571
29. Lillooet   365 335
30. South Cariboo  225 237
31. Merritt   171 196
32. Fraser Canyon   79 23
33. ChiUiwack   2,262 1,956
34. Abbotsford   565 368
35. Langley   963 1,489
36. Surrey   3,820 5,310
 G 60
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
Number Supplied—
Motion Film-
District Number and Name Pictures strips
37. Delta  176 151
38. Richmond   15 276
39. Vancouver   996 661
40. New Westminster  1,135 17
41. Burnaby  13 259
42. Maple Ridge  969 1,596
43. Coquitlam  632 862
44. North Vancouver.  903 394
45. West Vancouver  393 93
46. Sechelt   498 720
47. Powell River  556 298
48. Howe Sound  576 157
49. Ocean Falls  376 248
50. Queen Charlotte  279 148
52. Prince Rupert   276 310
54. Smithers   262 388
55. Burns Lake   246 212
56. Vanderhoof   195 391
57. Prince George  92 41
58. McBride    344 86
59. Peace River South.... 546 412
60. Peace River North.... 376 369
61. Greater Victoria  645          	
62. Sooke   764 215
63. Saanich  852 1,153
64. Gulf Islands  530 720
65. Cowichan  303 270
Number
Motion
District Number and Name Pictures
66. Lake Cowichan  114
67. Ladysmith  239
68. Nanaimo  597
69. Qualicum   221
70. Alberni  828
71. Courtenay  359
72. Campbell River  361
75. Mission   471
76. Agassiz   34
77. Summerland   152
79. Ucluelet-Tofino   138
80. Kitimat   180
81. Fort Nelson  175
82. Chilcotin   40
83. Portage  Mountain  151
84. Vancouver Island
West   356
85. Vancouver Island
North   173
86. Creston-Kaslo   588
87. Stikine    125
88. Skeena-Cassiar     926
89. Shuswap   294
.__  Unattached    80
    Miscellaneous    774
Supplied—
Film-
strips
17
108
386
946
760
1,405
703
408
126
165
199
681
109
164
584
264
243
194
732
203
23
70
Totals
37,090      37,720
Broadcast Services
Television
Programmes prepared and presented 	
Schools using television broadcasts	
Divisions using television broadcasts	
Students using television broadcasts	
130
731
4,589
138,680
Radio
Programmes prepared and presented
Schools using radio broadcasts	
Divisions using radio broadcasts	
Students using radio broadcasts 	
206
795
3,805
117,666
Supplementary Materials (Prepared and Distributed)
Primary music booklets	
Intermediate music booklets
French language booklets 	
Teachers' Bulletins	
Radio Calendars 	
Television Calendars 	
65,000
75,000
18,000
15,000
15,000
15,000
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
G 61
RESEARCH AND STANDARDS BRANCH
(Report of C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Pad., Director)
During the year just ended, 84,650 tests and sub-tests were marked and statistical treatment of an even larger number of scores was carried forward. More
sophisticated methods of projecting enrolments and costs were developed for computer operation by Mr. Alex Tunner, of the British Columbia Research Council,
and the staff of the Branch was almost continuously involved in the project. The
coding systems and listing programmes previously developed in the Branch have
been of great value in this type of study as well as to universities and other institutions in the identification of students. Research Officer Robert May has been the
Department's liaison with the British Columbia School Trustees' Association Committee on Data Processing and is currently working with the Registrar on the
complicated student record and transcript systems. The Director attended five
meetings of the Universities' Academic Planning Committee during the year and
provided them with data to be used in academic forecasts.
Co-operation with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and collaboration with
members of its staff have reached a high level. Work is now under way in the
reduction of the duplication of data being collected by different government authorities, the simplification of forms, the use of geocoded census data, and the
establishment of a teacher-data system similar to the one programmed by the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics for New Brunswick. An example of the value of
such co-operation may be seen in the following: It was decided several years ago
to avoid duplication by discontinuing the Provincial age-grade-sex distributions
while retaining those collected by the Education Division of the Dominion Bureau
of Statistics. Since then the forms have been printed by the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics, distributed by the Textbook Branch, collected and coded by Research
and Standards, and processed statistically by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
When the data have been returned they have been used chiefly for studies of
retardation, turnover and migration, and retention, for example, of secondary
school boys. A surprising by-product this summer was the solution of an urgent
problem facing the Deputy Minister of Health. The Health Branch found it
necessary to establish priorities on short notice for the purchase and distribution of
rubella vaccine for each health unit. This required a knowledge of the number and
location of 11, 10, 9, etc., year-old girls, then boys, by health unit throughout the
Province. The census data were four years old and obviously had been made
inadequate by internal and external migration and were based on census subdivisions
that did not coincide geographically with the health units. Fortunately, the 1969
age-sex distributions were readily available for each school district and for the total
in private schools. Additional knowledge of internal migration and growth of school
districts made it possible for the Health Branch to obtain what should be reasonably
accurate age-sex forecasts for September, 1970, and the vaccine is presently being
distributed on that basis.
Quantitative statistics are essential in planning and interpretation, and one of the
responsibilities of this Branch for the past four years has been the collection, editing,
and preparation for data processing of the statistical returns and summaries given
in these annual reports. Nevertheless, the chief function of the Branch is qualitative. We must collect data to determine the effect of changes in curricula, in
regulations, in administrative procedures. In many cases they are long-term studies
which take several years to complete.
 G 62 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
The survey of ability in arithmetic conducted in Grade VII in May, 1970, for
example, was the second step in a six-year project. It involved testing " before and
after modern math." The test which was used, the Stanford Arithmetic, Advanced,
Form L, was identical to the test that had been administered to Grade VII in March,
1964. Because of this, objections were immediately raised by some teachers that the
test was not based on the British Columbia modern mathematics curriculum. But it
was not based on the British Columbia curriculum of 1964, either. It merely contained items which involved the fundamental processes applied to everyday life, in
British Columbia as in the United States, where the test was standardized. It contained, for example, problems involving interest rates and taxation, neither of which,
unfortunately, has been abolished. The results of the item-analyses indicate that the
pupils can accomplish much more in the " modern " items, for example, setting up
and solving equations, or reading graphs or gas and electric meters. They do much
more poorly, however, in problems involving interest rates or fractions, and zero
difficulties (e.g., 400 X 201) are even more prevalent than they were in 1964.
In fact, in emphasizing understanding in mathematics it seems that we have under-
emphasized application, and the results in computation indicate a need for a return
to that neglected and unpopular procedure called " repetition " or " drill." On the
other hand it should be mentioned that in 1964 the British Columbia students had
more than a one-year advantage over the United States Grade VII standardization
group. It is this advantage that has been lost, as the British Columbia students'
scores are now down around the United States 1964 averages.
In another skill subject, Grade XI Typewriting, distributions have been provided to the Curriculum Division for students on different programmes and in differing years of instruction. This has led to a decision to report results in actual words-
per-minute rather than to have, for example, an A grade for a beginner confused
with a C grade for a student who has been typing three years. Again, the results
generally indicated the need for additional drill, particularly in smaller centres where
the teacher himself might not be an expert typist.
Additional work that has been occupying the attention of the Branch includes
studies of trends in enrolments in science subjects and in Indian and private schools,
a complete re-dictation and re-standardization of the 1968 aural French tape, the
tracing of some of the students who were tested in Grade VII in 1964 and graduated
from XII in 1969, the updating of our previous retention and enrolment studies, and
the collection of information for the hundredth annual report to be produced for
the school-year 1970/71.
DIVISION OF CORRESPONDENCE EDUCATION
(Report of J. R. Hind, B.A., B.Pad., Director)
The regulations booklet which previously referred to secondary school education exclusively (Grade VIII to XIII and Special Vocational courses) was altered
to reflect the January, 1969, amalgamation of the old Elementary and Secondary
Correspondence Divisions. The booklet, renamed " Regulations and Detail of
Courses for Correspondence Education," was released in July, 1969, and contained
information pertinent to the elementary programme of studies (Grades I to VII).
This included reference to registration procedures, fee structure, and acquisition of
textbooks at this level.
Sections 17 and 159 of the Public Schools Act refer briefly to correspondence
education as authorized within the British Columbia school system. However, the
booklet is the only detailed summary of the instructional service provided.    The
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
G 63
booklet now includes all facets of instruction as they apply to students from age
5 years and up who wish to enrol for the service.
In addition to the instructional service to students, a reference service for
teachers has developed over the years. This service is not mentioned in the booklet
but is well known to the teaching profession. It has not been mentioned in previous
annual report nor has its extent been known. In 1969/70, 249 teachers requested
391 courses for reference purposes. The service is recognized as very useful to the
teacher who is new to the profession, is living in an area where library facilities are
limited, or has been assigned a course which is outside his special field of instruction.
Many teachers look upon the course material as a model of what should be
taught in the classroom. This, therefore, suggests a further reason for providing
the very best courses possible. Course writers are aware of this and make every
effort to meet the challenge. Because of the security aspect, the courses are released
to teachers on the understanding that no part of the courses may be reproduced or
placed in the hands of pupils.
To return to the instructional function of the Division, the following is a summary of the service provided during 1969/70:—
Enrolment
(a) By Age:
18 years and under
19 years and older
Unclassified 	
Grades I-XIII
1968/69 1969/70
7,024 6,798
7,948 6,799
31 1,202
Totals
15,003
14,799
Note.—The Grades I-VII total includes 99 students enrolled at the Pouce
Coupe office. Of the 12,794 classified students at the secondary level, 7,433 were
male and 5,361 female.
(£>) By Residence:
British Columbia
Elsewhere in Canada
Outside Canada	
Grades I-XIII
_ 13,806
743
250
Total    14,799
(c) In Schools.—Certain pupils were unable to obtain normal classroom instruction in particular Grades IX-XIII courses, as follows:—
1968/69
Small  secondary  schools   (fewer than  140
pupils in Grades IX-XII)       795
Larger secondary schools   (more than   140
pupils in Grades IX-XII)   3,477
Private schools       322
1969/70
750
3,452
246
Totals
4,594        4,448
 G 64 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
The reasons accepted as a basis for this service and the numbers involved
follow:—
Courses not offered in school	
Timetable difficulties	
Failure in a subject	
Acceleration 	
Extra course 	
1968/69
1969/70
2,212
1,951
802
762
444
424
4
6
1,305
Note.—Grades I-VIII pupils in attendance at schools are not permitted to
register for correspondence instruction.
(d) By Special Arangement.—The tabulation which follows represents persons who received instruction without payment of registration fees. (Note.—The
waiving of fees at the Grades IX-XII levels amounted to the sum of $45,349.)
1968/69    1969/70
Illness    534 472
Needed at home       3 12
Living too far from a school (Grades I-VII
included)   748
Correctional institutions   937 1,012
Social Assistance   194 218
Immigrants (Special English)   102 23
(e) Of Adults:
(i)   Adults continued to account for over half of the total enrolment.
(ii) Counselling and evaluation of documents continued to be provided
at all levels. Documents represented previous schooling in most
countries of the Western World and the Middle East, with a few
from Pakistan. In some instances new Canadians were provided
with translations of original documents by way of assistance to
them in finding employment.
Course Writing
The appointment of a course writer at the Grades I-VII level made it
possible to co-ordinate the efforts of instructors engaged in organizing new course
material at the elementary level.
During the year, new courses were prepared as follows: Electricity 11,
English Language 9, Foods and Nutrition 9, French 112, Beginners' Latin 11,
Library Work for Community Librarians, Social Studies 9, Stationary Engineering
Fourth Class, and six courses at the elementary level.
Over the years the Division has worked with other Departments of the
Provincial Government in providing instruction which assists Government services
generally. Reference is made to course material in Public Administration and
Stationary Engineering. In 1969 this assistance was extended to the Library
Development Commission through the release and administration of the course,
Library Work for Community Librarians. The 1969 Report of the Library
Development Commission states as follows: " The field consultant's job involves
considerable travel, stopping long enough in each place to talk business with the
library board and to give all possible help to the community librarians, most of
whom begin the job with little or no training. Sporadic brief visits in the past
have done little to improve their knowledge and ability;  now we are able to do
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES G 65
something about this, beginning with a correspondence course in library management. . . . The course will be listed in the Division's syllabus under ' Vocational
Training' and will carry the Department of Education's certificate on successful
completion."
TEXTBOOK BRANCH
(Report of D. W. C. Huggins, C.G.A., Director)
This past year has witnessed the continuation of curriculum changes and a
major change in the internal accounting procedures of the Branch. The new procedures permit simpler and more efficient reporting of purchasing costs and their
subsequent allocation to selected cost centres. Savings in record-keeping in this
area have resulted in more efficient administration of the order-filling process,
with the resultant improvement of service to the schools.
Prescription changes in Social Studies and languages are requiring inventory
to be held in many more titles than previously was experienced in these areas of
instruction. Problems of ordering, storing, and distributing are compounding with
this growth. The inability to issue firm orders to the suppliers until after the formal
appropriation of funds has been authorized by the Legislative Assembly seriously
impairs the scheduling of production and it becomes increasingly difficult to obtain
assurance of delivery of texts in time to meet the needs of instruction in the schools.
Last year a small number of Social Studies texts did not arrive in the Textbook
Branch until after the commencement of instruction in the schools. The science
reader for Grade IX arrived in the Textbook Branch on November 10th.
In an attempt to alleviate the pressure on suppliers, changes to the language
arts instruction at the intermediate levels were introduced to the schools following
the Christmas recess. Texts purchased to meet these prescription changes, comprising 16 titles, were not required for delivery to the Textbook Branch until
October, thus allowing later scheduling in production by the printers and relieving
the order-filling pressures of the textbook Branch staff during the major shipping
period, July/August. It is planned that future revisions at this level of instruction
will be introduced in a similar manner.
Once again the Textbook Branch has been involved in the production of magnetic tapes keyed to the alternate French programmes. With the gradual replacement, starting in 1970, of the 1963 edition by the 1968 edition of Ecouter et Parler,
a special edition of tapes has been produced and copies will be available for the
schools electing this programme in the 1970/71 school-year. The Director has
been involved in discussions relative to the acceptability and feasibility of the procurement and distribution of other non-print materials for the instructional needs of
the schools, and it appears that the Textbook Branch may become more involved
with non-print curricula resources as the curricula review continues.
Inventory turnover in the fiscal year 1969/70 resulted in total shipments of
2,288,742 pounds of books and supplies. This weight represents a 17 per cent
decline from the previous year's shipments. To effect these shipments, 84,348
cartons and parcels were handled for approximately a 7 per cent decline in numbers
from the previous year. This reduction in materials-handling by the Textbook
Branch is largely attributable to the inclusion of School Districts Nos. 39, 40, and
41 on the summer book-repair programme in 1969. Under this procedure, repairable books are collected, repaired, and returned to schools during the summer recess,
thus obviating the need for order replacements from the Textbook Branch. As
these three school districts have a student population equivalent to 22 per cent of the
total Provincial student population, the materials-handling savings can be readily
  INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES G 67
appreciated. The inclusion of these three school districts on the summer programme
increased the summer repair of books to 80 per cent of the total repair programme.
Approximately 200,000 books were repaired during the school-year.
Purchasing negotiations continued throughout the year and 2,525 purchase
orders were issued for a total expenditure of $3,764,307. These figures represent
an 8J/_ per cent decline in orders issued and 6 per cent decline in value of purchases.
At the same time, we experienced a 5V_ per cent increase in school requisitions
filled to 7,878 in number and a 10 per cent increase in sales invoices to 13,841. The
Director continued to act in his capacity as purchasing agent for the British Columbia
Institute of Technology and the vocational schools of the Province.
Communication with schools, school districts, and commercial enterprises
continues to be a major concern in the administration of the Branch. The Record
of Textbooks supplied to schools for inventory recording had become obsolete
with the dynamic curricula revision and its consequent changes in prescription
format, so redesigned loose-leaf inventory sheets were distributed as its replacement during the school-year. These sheets were designed to be compatible with
the inventory-reporting requirements of the annual requisition form submitted by
schools at the end of the school-year and to reduce the clerical task of inventory
checking and reporting necessary to reconcile stock levels and requisitions. Changes
in design were also effected in the School Opening Requisition (Form T.B. 1),
and it is hoped that benefits will be manifested in improved service to the schools.
 G 68 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES
REPORT OF C. I. TAYLOR, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent
(Field Services)
Staff
In the school-year there were on staff 55 District Superintendents and two
Assistant District Superintendents.
Special staff consisted of one Director of Home Economics and two Inspectors
of Home Economics.
The staff of School District No. 39 (Vancouver) consisted of one Superintendent of Schools, two Assistant Superintendents of Schools, and two Inspectors of
Schools.
There has been no change in total staff. One District Superintendent was on
leave of absence for the year. School District No. 61 (Victoria) was organized with
a District Superintendent but no Assistant District Superintendent. This made
possible a reduction of the size of the South Okanagan-Ketde Valley-Grand Forks
superintendency and the Hope-Princeton-Keremeos superintendency from three
districts to two. The three new superintendencies are Hope-Princeton (headquarters, Hope), Keremeos-South Okanagan (headquarters, Oliver), and Kettle
Valley-Grand Forks (headquarters, Grand Forks).
On January 26, 1970, Mr. J. Walsh, District Superintendent of Schools for
Vanderhoof-Burns Lake, was assigned to take charge of Jericho Hill School. This
Provincial school was declared a superintendency and will be served in the future
by a District Superintendent.
Staff Retirements
Mr. J. Chell, School District No. 61 (Victoria).
Mr. F. L. Irwin, School Districts Nos. 21 (Armstrong) and 22 (Vernon).
Mr. W. A. Marchbank, School Districts Nos. 7 (Nelson) and 8 (Slocan).
Mr. D. G. Chamberlain, School Districts Nos. 32 (Hope), 17 (Princeton),
and 16 (Keremeos).
Mr. H. D. Stafford, School District No. 35 (Langley).
Mr. G. E. Johnson, School District No. 47 (Powell River), died on July 24,
1969.
Staff Appointments
Mr. A. C. Campbell, Director of Instruction, Prince George.
Mr. H. E. Cullis, Principal, Sentinal Secondary School, West Vancouver.
Mr. D. E. A. Eldred, Director of Elementary Instruction, Prince George.
Mr. C. Hopper, Supervising Principal, Kelowna.
Mr. R. G. Lyon, Director of Instruction, Port Alberni.
Mr. M. V. Thorsell, Supervisor of Instruction, Powell River.
Staff Transfers
Mr. N. A. Allen, from School District No. 24 (Kamloops) to School District
No. 45 (West Vancouver).
Mr. C. A. Bruce, from School Districts Nos. 18 (Golden) and 19 (Revelstoke)
to School District No. 24 (Kamloops).
 INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES
G 69
Mr. A. C. Campbell, from appointment to School Districts Nos. 49 (Ocean
Falls) and 85 (Vancouver Island North).
Mr. D. H. Campbell, from School Districts Nos. 48 (Howe Sound) and 29
(Lillooet) to School Districts Nos. 14 (Southern Okanagan) and 16
(Keremeos).
Mr. H. E. Cullis, from appointment to School Districts Nos. 48 (Howe Sound)
and 29 (Lillooet).
Mr. C. Cuthbert, from School Districts Nos. 14 (Southern Okanagan), 13
(Kettle Valley), and 12 (Grand Forks) to School District No. 35 (Langley).
Mr. D. E. A. Eldred, from appointment to School Districts Nos. 12 (Grand
Forks) and 13 (Kettle Valley).
Mr. H. C. Ferguson, from School District No. 45 (West Vancouver) to School
District No. 47 (Powell River).
Mr. P. C. Grant, from School Districts Nos. 69 (Qualicum), 79 (Ucluelet-
Tofino), and 84 (Vancouver Island West) to School Districts Nos. 22
(Vernon) and 21 (Armstrong-Spallumcheen).
Mr. C. Holob, from Relieving District Superintendent to School Districts Nos.
69 (Qualicum), 79 (Ucluelet-Tofino), and 84 (Vancouver Island West).
Mr. C. Hopper, from appointment to School Districts Nos. 25 (Barriere), 26
(Birch Island), and 58 (McBride).
Mr. A. J. Longmore, from Assistant District Superintendent, School District
No. 61 (Victoria) to District Superintendent, School District No. 61
(Victoria).
Mr. R. G. Lyon, from appointment to School Districts Nos. 32 (Hope) and
17 (Princeton).
Mr. A. P. McKay, from School Districts Nos. 25 (Barriere), 26 (Birch Island),
and 58 (McBride) to School Districts Nos. 18 (Golden) and 19 (Revelstoke) .
Mr. W. J. Zoellner, from School Districts Nos. 49 (Ocean Falls) and 85 (Vancouver Island North) to School Districts Nos. 7 (Nelson) and 8 (Slocan).
Staff Recruitment
There was no shortage of applications this year. Two appointments were
made. One position was not filled, the field services being left without a Relieving
District Superintendent next year.
In-Service Activities of District Superintendents
Zone Conferences
These workshops are organized and chaired by the District Superintendents in
six zones of the Province. They are most valuable for the discussion of problems
and exchange of information among field staff.
The following were held:—
Zone Location Dates
Island Parksville November 6th
Duncan February 23rd
Fraser Valley Sechelt October 16th
Haney March 19th
Okanagan-Mainline-Cariboo -Kelowna October 30th
Vernon March 5th
 G 70 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
Northern .Smithers October 24th
Prince George February 20th
Kootenay Trail November 14th
Kimberley March 12th
Metro Sechelt May 7th
Seminar for District Superintendents
(Sponsored by the University of Victoria)
The third annual seminar for District Superintendents was held at Harrison
on January 15-17, 1970. Twenty-seven District Superintendents were present.
The over-all theme was " Evaluation," with papers on " Educational Measurement
and the Educationally Disadvantaged," " Testing for Mastery," " Assessment and
Evaluation in Programs for Individualized Instruction," and " Evaluation of New
Curricula." Mr. J. R. Meredith, Assistant Superintendent (Instruction), attended
from the Department. We are indebted to Dr. F. T. Tyler, Dean of Education,
University of Victoria, for the continued sponsorship of this type of seminar.
No Department of Education Conference was held this year.
Association Conference
The British Columbia Association of District Superintendents and Inspectors
held a two-day conference in Vancouver on April 2 and 3, 1970. The theme of
this conference was " The Teacher of the 70's," and dealt with such major topics as
" Staff Differentiation " and " Preparing Instructional Objectives." With one or
two exceptions, all District Superintendents attended.
The programme was very well organized. It was the second conference
arranged and conducted by the Association and proved a most worth-while venture.
Major credit for the success of this meeting goes to Mr. C. Cuthbert, president;
Dr. J. H. Wormsbecker, secretary; Mr. J. M. Evans and Mr. C. Holob, conference
chairmen.
Canadian International Development Agency
The Department of External Affairs in Ottawa again requested that the Field
Services Branch of the Department of Education conduct interviews for the selection
of British Columbia teachers for service overseas in the developing nations of the
West Indies, Africa, and southeast Asia.
A total of 48 interviews were conducted from January 12 to January 16, 1970,
in Victoria and Vancouver.
A final selection was made by Canadian International Development Agency
of 14 teachers from British Columbia for this service.
The interview teams were chaired by the Assistant Superintendent (Field
Services) and by Mr. W. D. Reid, Assistant Superintendent (University and College Affairs). Members of the teams were Mr. J. E. Beech, District Superintendent,
Surrey; Mr. W. E. Lucas, District Superintendent, North Vancouver; Mr. T.
Home and Mr. David Janzen, teachers nominated by the British Columbia Teachers'
Federation.
 inspection of schools and school services g 71
Investigation Committee
The following appeals by teachers from the action of Boards of School Trustees
under section 134 of the Public Schools Act were held:—
AprU 29, 1970—Merritt.
June 15, 1970—Terrace.
June 18, 1970—Squamish.
Appointed by the Superintendent of Education to act as chairman of these
Investigation Committees were Mr. S. J. Graham, District Superintendent of
Schools (New Westminster); Mr. J. L. Canty, Director of Special Education; and
the Assistant Superintendent (Field Services).
Annual and Monthly Reports of the District Superintendents
of Schools
The Field Services of the Department of Education has had another very
busy year. The District Superintendents are very much involved in the administrative work of the Boards of School Trustees to which they are attached.
In addition to this they are responsible for the supervision of all educational
staff and for the efficiency and effectiveness of the schools in their districts.
It is reported that the average number of meetings attended by District Superintendents is 10 per month during the school-year. These are board, committee,
and district staff meetings and take much of the District Superintendents' time.
Written reports on teachers, totalling 3,271 in number, were submitted by the
District Superintendents to the Department in 1969/70.
Some trends, as reported by the District Superintendents of the Province,
are:—
1. A decline in the growth rate at the elementary school level, coupled with an
increase in the rate at the secondary level. Some districts such as Kelowna, Fernie,
Vancouver Island North and West, Fort Nelson, Delta, Terrace, Sooke, and Coquitlam, to mention a few, have shown considerable growth, others are either
declining in the rate of growth or remaining fairly static. Adult Education programmes continue to grow in most districts.
2. In the area of increased teacher supply, most District Superintendents
report a considerable increase in the number of applications for positions, with shortages only in specialist areas. Most districts were staffed much earlier this year.
Staff turnover has decreased.
3. There was continued integration of Indian children in the public schools.
For example, Mission reports the attendance of 230 Indian children, including 100
secondary pupils from the Indian Residential School and School District No. 85
(Vancouver Island North) took over the Alert Bay Indian Day School. A number
of discussions have been held between school boards and Indian band councils.
Indians are serving as teachers and members of school boards.
4. There has been an increase in the use of teacher-aides, particularly volunteer aides, in the schools of the Province.
5. Several reports mention " Outdoor Schools." This is a form of extended
field trips where a class of children spend some time in the outdoors where regular
school subjects are treated as at school but special emphasis is placed on Science
and subjects related to the outdoors.
 G 72 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1969/70
6. There was a continued trend toward remedial instruction for those with
learning disabilities. The separate special class, per se, is giving way in favour of
integration of children with learning problems in regular classes with assistance
from teachers specially trained and able to help the regular teacher and the pupils.
This is coupled with a better diagnosis of the problems of pupils with learning disabilities.
7. The changes in the Rules of the Council of Public Instruction have led to
the use of locally developed report cards and a much greater awareness of ways and
means of reporting to parents.
8. The use of the semester system in secondary schools is definitely on the
increase. Many senior-secondary schools in the Province are operating on a two-
term basis, September to the end of January and February to June.
9. Other trends as reported last year continue. These include establishment
of libraries in elementary schools, the development of resource centres, the use of
science kits, the individualization of instruction, and the development of resource
courses. A great range of in-service activities is reported. These are board and
teacher sponsored and cover a great number of problem areas.
Mr. Gordon Edward Johnson died on July 24, 1969. In this report we
would like to pay tribute to his service as a teacher, principal, and District Superintendent in this Province. He was well known and highly respected in all parts
of British Columbia, from Bella Coola where he started his career as a teacher to
Powell River, Dawson Creek as a principal, and as District Superintendent in the
Peace River, Prince George, Kelowna, and Powell River Districts.
HOME ECONOMICS
(Report of Miss Jean R. Irvine, B.Sc(H.Ec), Director)
The total enrolment in Home Economics and Community Services Programme
courses in the public schools of British Columbia during the 1969/70 session was
74,506.   The enrolment by courses was as follows:—
Home Economics 8  19,410
Foods, Nutrition 9      9,338
Clothing, Textiles 9   10,287
Foods, Nutrition 9A/Clothing, Textiles 9a     1,967
Foods, Nutrition 9B/Clothing, Textiles 9b     1,290
Child Care 9     2,261
Cooking, Foods Service 9     4,616
Occupational 1, 2, 3     1,631
Jericho HiU         33
Community Recreation 12     4,743
Foods 11      6,076
Foods 12a     1,263
Foods 12b         591
Textiles 11      4,728
TextUes 1 2a     1,405
Textiles 12b        505
Management 11     1,931
Home and Industrial Services 12        300
ChUd Care 12     2,131
  G 74
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
Notes regarding enrolment figures:—
(1) In many cases the Foods, Nutrition 9 and the Clothing, TextUes 9 courses
are combined and taken over a two-year period.
(2) The total enrolment increased by 5,518.
(3) Enrolment in Home Economics 8 increased by 513.
(4) Enrolments in Foods, Nutrition 9; Clothing, TextUes 9; Child Care 9;
and Cooking, Foods Service 9 increased by 1,480. The greatest numerical increase was in Cooking, Foods Service 9, which is a foods course
for boys in Grades IX and (or) X.
(5) Enrolments in Foods 11, Foods 12a, Foods 12b, Textiles 11, Textiles
12a, TextUes 12b, Management 11, Home and Industrial Services 12,
and ChUd Care 12 increased by 2,534. The greatest numerical increase
was in Foods 11. The enrolment figures for Foods 11, Foods 12a, and
Foods 12b include both boys and girls.
Growth Chart of Enrolments in Community Services Specialties
Year
1965/66.
1966/67..
1967/68-
1968/69.
1969/70-
Foods
358
631
687
897
1,185
Textiles
338
683
742
849
842
Home and
Industrial Services
177
504
481
496
591
Totals
873
1,818
1,910
2,242
2,618
The number of public schools having Home Economics departments was 258,
which is an increase of 11 over the total number for the previous year. Home
Economics was offered for the first time at School District No. 50 (Masset), School
District No. 68 (Cedar), and School District No. 85 (Port Hardy).
A teaching-cafeteria kitchen was opened at Alberni District Secondary School.
The total number of teaching-cafeteria kitchens in the Province is 12.
There were 623 Home Economics and Community Services positions in the
public schools of British Columbia, which is an increase of 33 over the preceding
year. A degree in Home Economics was held by 54 per cent of the teachers of
Home Economics and Community Services.
During the school-year, members of the Division of Home Economics had
consultative visits with 140 Home Economics and Community Services teachers
in 44 school districts. In addition, district conferences were held at Cowichan,
Maple Ridge, and Powell River.
Frequent consultative contacts were made with the Supervisor of Home
Economics in Victoria schools and with the Co-ordinator of Home Economics in
Vancouver schools.
A one-day workshop was held at Abbotsford Senior Secondary School for
teaching chefs and Home Economics teachers of senior foods courses who were
teaching in schools with teaching-cafeteria facilities. This workshop was made
possible through the co-operation of the Board of School Trustees, School District
No. 34 (Abbotsford) and the Technical and Vocational Branch, Department of
Education.
A 10-day workshop, which provided an orientation to teaching Home Economics, was held at Victoria, in July, for teachers with valid Standard or Professional Certificates who were interested in gaining an understanding of Home Economics at the junior-secondary level. The co-operation of the Board of School
Trustees, School District No. 61 (Greater Victoria), was appreciated.
 INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES
G 75
At the invitation of the School of Home Economics, University of British
Columbia, one or more members of the Division of Home Economics attended
the following: Two workshops regarding the teaching of family living, a workshop
regarding career opportunities in home economics, a meeting to assist in planning
a university summer workshop regarding the consumer, a meeting of the Council
of the School of Home Economics, and a meeting with fourth- and fifth-year Home
Economics students regarding certification and teacher education. For three days
of summer session, members of the Division of Home Economics were on campus
to interview prospective teachers.
The Director accepted the invitation of the North Central Island Chapter of
Teachers of Home Economics Specialist Association to attend their workshop on
child care at Nanaimo.
As a consultative member, the Director attended meetings of the Home Economics and Community Services Textbook Selection Committee.
  DIVISION OF UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE AFFAIRS G 77
DIVISION OF UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE AFFAIRS
REPORT OF WILLIAM D. REID, B.A., M.Ed., ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION (UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE AFFAIRS)
General
The Division has been concerned for the year 1969/70 with the establishment
of two further colleges in the Province of British Columbia. These are Douglas
College, in the Lower Mainland area, which involves seven participating school
districts, namely, School Districts Nos. 35 (Langley), 36 (Surrey), 37 (Delta), 38
(Richmond), 40 (New Westminster), 41 (Burnaby), and 43 (Coquitlam); and
Cariboo College, centred primarily in Kamloops, which involves six participating
districts, namely, School Districts Nos. 24 (Kamloops), 25 (Barriere), 26 (Birch
Island), 27 (WiUiams Lake), 29 (Lillooet), and 30 (South Cariboo). From
previous experience it is believed that, despite difficulties which these colleges and
others may experience in opening in temporary quarters or in the use of shared
after-hours secondary school facUities, services superior to those previously offered
through Grade XIII to students in the areas served will be provided by the new
colleges, because they wUl offer a more comprehensive and complete programme
than was previously the case.
The eight public colleges in the Province, which are shown below in Table I,
will all be offering programmes in the coming year. The two-year public coUeges
in this Province offer programmes which might be classified into three general areas
—academic, technical, and college preparatory or other adult programmes.
It is believed that, in line with the Minister's announcement made in the
Legislature in 1969, as and when colleges and vocational schools are melded, a
fourth area of training, specifically called " vocational," will also be offered in
most of our colleges. Close co-operation has existed between the colleges, and
those colleges which have had longer experience have been more than willing to
assist the newly opened colleges in the development of effective programmes.
Table I below shows the state of development of the colleges as at June 30,
1970.
Table I
College Present Status
Vancouver City College In operation five years.
Selkirk College (Castlegar) In operation four years.
Okanagan College (Kelowna) In operation two years.
Capilano College (North Shore) In operation two years.
Malaspina CoUege (Nanaimo) In operation one year.
College of New Caledonia (Prince George)..In operation one year.
Douglas College (West Fraser Valley) To open in September, 1970.
Cariboo College (Kamloops) To open in September, 1970.
The coUege councils, and those committees which preceded them in helping
to establish coUeges, must be given much credit for long hours of difficult, gratuitous work.   The ladies and gentlemen who have served, and continue to serve the
 G 78
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
Province on these councils, must be complimented on the vigour and upon the
resourcefulness and imagination they have shown in the development of the colleges.
Enrolments.—Tables II and III below show the enrolment figures for universities and for colleges as well as for the British Columbia Institute of Technology for
the year 1969/70.
Table II.—British Columbia Universities
University
of British
Columbia
University
of
Victoria
Notre Dame
University
Simon Fraser
University,
Fall Semester
Full-time degree enrolment—
17,339
2,687
5,070
246
562
4,427
674
Totals
20,026
5,316
562
5,101
Part-time degree enrolment—
Correspondence -
On campus    _	
738
1,615
5,627
537
127
1,296
3
42
145
393
Totals                                                     	
7,980
1,960
190
393
28,006
7,276
752
5,494
Table III.—British Columbia Colleges and British Columbia
Institute of Technology
British
Columbia
Institute of
Technology
Selkirk
College
Okanagan
Regional
College
Capilano
College
Vancouver
City College
Fall
Semester
Malaspina
College
College
of New
Caledonia
Full-time enrolment—
Transfer programme _
Technical programme
Totals .__	
Part-time enrolment—
Transfer programme
Technical programme
Totals - 	
Grand totals	
2,407
5,083
346
116
338
40
364
98
1,581
545
270
526
979
3,747
573
131
34
2,407
462
378
462
2,126
358
165
2,676
1      232
271
49
99
481
36
1,621
111
104
69
47
2,676
503
148
517
1,621
215
116
281
  G 80 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
Table IV shows the chairman of each regional or district coUege councU and
the principal of each college which was in operation or under fuU preparation for
opening in 1970.
Table IV.—Regional and District Colleges
College Chairman of Council Principal
Vancouver City. Dr. H. P. Oberlander1... Mr. J. D. Newberry.
Selkirk Mr. F. E. Beinder Mr. A. E. Soles.
Okanagan Regional. Mr. C. L. Finch Dr. R. F. Grant.
CapUano Mr. C. P. Jones Mr. A. H. Glenesk.
Malaspina Dr. W. R. MacMUlan____ Dr. Carleton M. Opgaard.
New Caledonia Mr. S. C. Evans Dr. F. J. Speckeen.
Cariboo Mr. D. O. Summers Mr. N. Harrison.
Douglas Mr. J. V. Smedley. JDr. George C. Wootton.
i Board Chairman, School District No. 39.
Canada Student Loans
During the loan-year 1969/70, which began July 1, 1969, the Division issued
9,066 loans in the total amount of $6,677,558. The average amount of a loan was
$736.55.
During the year the British Columbia Student Aid Committee met with the
Financial Aid Officers of the post-secondary institutions in the Province and discussion of changes and procedures for the loan-year 1970/71 took place. The
Financial Aid Officers continued to participate in the redesign of application forms
and worksheets for use in the coming loan-year. Co-operation and assistance, which
these important officers of post-secondary institutions provide to this office, is
appreciated and recognized.
The chairman of the British Columbia Student Aid Committee, who is head of
this Division, attended three meetings of the Plenary Committee for Canada Student Loans in Ottawa at the invitation of the Plenary Committee, of which he is
a member. Much discussion took place at these meetings with respect to changes
in procedure, and possible changes in policy, which the Canadian Government
might approve. The participating provinces of Canada are still making every
attempt to establish uniform criteria applicable to all provinces in order that all
students in Canada may have similar opportunities to utilize Canada Student Loan
funds for post-secondary education. As a result of discussion on changes in procedures and policy, it is anticipated that every British Columbia student who meets
the needs criteria will be able to obtain a Canada Student Loan in the loan-year
1970/71.
British Columbia Scholarships
The Government of the Province of British Columbia continued its programme
of awarding scholarships to able students proceeding with appropriate post-
secondary undergraduate education to the universities, colleges, British Columbia
Institute of Technology, and Grade XIII, with awards also being made to those
competing in Grade XII scholarship examinations. In the early spring of 1970,
the Honourable the Minister of Education announced a change in the method of
awarding scholarships to students at the Grade XII level and those competing in
designated post-secondary institutions. In essence, the change provides that a
number of students, equal to 17 per cent of the full-time undergraduate enrolment
in the designated post-secondary institution concerned, or a number equal to 17
per cent of the students in British Columbia at the Grade XII level undertaking the
 DIVISION of university and college affairs
G 81
academic and technical programme, may be awarded scholarships. The ranking
of these students in the case of post-secondary institutions is the prerogative of the
post-secondary institution concerned and the ranking of the Grade XII and Grade
XIII level is as a result of the Provincial scholarship examinations offered at those
levels. The number of scholarships offered, representing 17 per cent of the enrolment, is further subdivided into the following classes:—
Three-quarters of basic tuition fee The upper 5 per cent of fuU-time
undergraduate students.
One-half of basic tuition fee The next 6 per cent of fuU-time
undergraduate students.
One-third of basic tuition fee .The next 6 per cent of fuU-time
undergraduate students.
This action was taken by the Honourable the Minister of Education in order
to ensure that there may be equality of opportunity for students at any eligible post-
secondary institution in the Province of British Columbia.
Table V below shows the number and value of scholarships awarded by the
Province of British Columbia for the year 1969/70.
Table V.—Scholarships
Award Year
Awards Authorized
First Class
Second Class
Total
Amount
April 1, 1968, to March 31, 1969.
April 1, 1969, to March 31, 1970-
2,583
3,242
5,713
6,564
8,296
9,806
$1,624,080
$1,966,730
British Columbia Government Bursaries
The Government of the Province of British Columbia has annually provided
Government bursaries to assist students to undertake further training. An average
of 65 per cent is required, together with evidence of financial need. The value of
bursary awards made this year varied from $120 to $400. These awards are made
available to those undertaking undergraduate university and college studies within
the Province (Universities of British Columbia, Victoria, Simon Fraser, and Notre
Dame, public coUeges, as well as the British Columbia Institute of Technology),
recognized nurses' training in the Province, and for recognized university study
outside of British Columbia in undergraduate courses of training not available in
this Province (for example, veterinary science). The responsibility for final decision
on awards and general bursary policy rests with the British Columbia Student Aid
Committee, chaired by the Assistant Superintendent of Education (University and
CoUege Affairs). Notification to all candidates is made by the Registrar's office
with cheques being issued through the Departmental Comptroller's office.
Government bursaries authorized are shown in Table VI below:—
Table VI.—Bursaries
Award Year
Awards Authorized
Number      Amount     Average Award
September 1, 1968, to August 31, 1969.
September 1, 1969, to August 31, 1970.
4,060
5,5381
$732,545
$1,151,090
$180.43
$207.85
l Exclusive of 32 awards in veterinary science totalling $80,000.
 G 82 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
It is of interest to note that the Government of the Province of British Columbia has made avaUable $3.3 mUlion for Provincial scholarships and bursaries for
the year 1970/71, which represents an increase of $399,000 over the allotment of
$2,901 mUlion for the year 1969/70. The change in the amounts represented
slightly more than a 13 per cent increase.
The Academic Board for Higher Education in British Columbia
The Academic Board's membership this year has included:—
Name Appointed by
Dean I. McTaggart-Cowan, Chairman University of British Columbia
Dean S. N. F. Chant, Vice-Chairman Lieutenant-Governor in Council
Dean D. SuUivan Simon Fraser University
Dr. J. F. Hutchinson Simon Fraser University
Professor C. B. Bourne. .University of British Columbia
Dean F. Tyler. University of Victoria
Dr. R. E. L. Watson University of Victoria
W. D. Reid Lieutenant-Governor in Council
E. C. Roper Lieutenant-Governor in Council
Mr. D. W. Franklin serves as Executive Secretary to the Board.
During the year 1969/70, the Academic Board's activities increased. This
has been caused partly by the increase in the number of public colleges in the Province of British Columbia and partly by the assumption of other duties by the
Board in its role as an adviser to the Honourable the Minister of Education. The
Board has continued to make periodic visits to coUeges in the Province and has
reported to the Minister of Education subsequent to such visits.
The Academic Board has continued to hold its regular meetings, approximately on a monthly basis, throughout the year, with special meetings being held
at the call of the chairman. It has been the custom of the Academic Board to make
an annual report to the Honourable the Minister of Education. This report, which
details the activities of the Board, is normally filed with the Minister in March of
each year and covers the immediately preceding calendar year.
It is of interest to note that the Board has given modest financial support to
studies which have been pursued at the University of British Columbia with respect
to the achievement of students continuing in higher education who have had their
earliest post-secondary education in the public coUeges of this Province. Although
these studies are as yet in an early stage, there is some evidence to indicate that the
preparation of students for further post-secondary education is being conducted very
effectively by the public colleges of the Province.
Meetings with College Principals
The principals of the public colleges of British Columbia have continued in
the past school-year to meet regularly on three or four occasions to discuss problems and to find solutions and compare projected programmes, and generally to
co-ordinate their plans to some degree. With the emergence of eight colleges, the
value of this group wUl become more evident. In the past, the Honourable the
Minister of Education has avaUed himself of an opportunity to meet with the
group and it is anticipated that he wUl from time to time continue this practice.
The very great wUlingness of experienced and senior principals to offer help and
information to their more junior colleagues has been much appreciated.   The older
 DIVISION OF UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE AFFAIRS
G 83
colleges in the Province have been very willing to go to great lengths to assist the
newer colleges in their development.
The head of this Division has, on invitation, attended aU the meetings which
the principals have held. This courtesy is appreciated and does serve the purpose
of keeping the Department of Education aware of developments in the colleges and
permits the Department of Education to bring information to the assembled principals. The courteous co-operation of the principals of the colleges of this Province
is much appreciated.
Educational Research Institute of British Columbia
The Educational Research Institute of British Columbia meets frequently
throughout the year to act as a funding and co-ordinating body in educational research. The body is autonomous and has representation from the British Columbia
School Trustees Association, the universities, the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, the Parent-Teacher Federation, the Vancouver School Board, and the Department of Education. The Institute reports its activities annually at a general meeting in April of each year. Copies of its reports may be obtained from the Executive
Director, Dr. Selwyn A. Miller, British Columbia Research Building, 3650 Wes-
brook Crescent, Vancouver 8, British Columbia.
The writer has had the privUege of representing the Minister and the Department of Education as a member of the Board of Directors of the Educational Research Institute since its inception.
It has also been a privUege to represent the Honourable the Minister of Education as a member of the Post-Secondary Sub-Committee of the Council of Ministers
of Education for Canada.
It is with respect and appreciation that one offers thanks to the Deputy Minister
of Education, his senior colleagues in the Department of Education, officials of
universities and colleges, as well as to members of college councils, for the many
courtesies and the sincere co-operation he has received during the past year.
 G 84 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. S. WHITE, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND REGIONAL DIRECTOR FOR CANADIAN
VOCATIONAL TRAINING.
In spite of, or because of, the slow-down in the general economic situation,
our vocational and technical training programmes continued to expand in almost
all fields with the addition of new courses and increases in existing classes.
Construction projects progressed but were naturaUy affected adversely by
strikes and lock-outs. Nevertheless, we have been able to meet all training demands made by the many agencies interested and concerned with this kind of
training.
In Victoria, the new trades building was completed as described separately in
this report. The additional classroom at Nanaimo went into fuU operation and a
start was made on a new automotive workshop. Terrace was the scene of three
major projects now nearing completion, namely, dormitories, cafeteria, and a goods
receiving and first-aid centre, whilst a much needed store and first-aid room was
under way at Nelson. The greenhouse and animal-holding buildings at the British
Columbia Institute of Technology came into use and, on the same campus, students
of the Nanaimo Heavy Equipment Operators class built an internal road to relieve
traffic congestion. Work on the first phase of the new Kamloops school continued,
as did the cafeteria at Kelowna. Two new workshops at Dawson Creek were finished,
namely, a farrier-shop and a welding-shop. In addition to these projects, numerous
smaUer modifications to various physical plants were carried out in order to improve
general efficiency.
In foreign fields, the Malaysian Teacher Training project continued with
good progress reports being received. Mr. N. Mair, Assistant Director of the
Curriculum Division, left for Zambia on a Federal government-sponsored scheme
of assistance, whUst in the opposite direction, Mr. T. Held, of the Burnaby school,
returned from Jamaica, having completed an assignment in the welding field in that
country.
Canada Manpower increased its participation in the training scheme, both
within our schools and in projects outside the regional centres, but administered by
and contracted with this Branch.
Finally, a number of staff changes took place by the introduction of new
members or the transfers of old. Mr. J. Drysdale, formerly the principal at Dawson
Creek, assumed the principalship of the Victoria school on the resignation of Mr. F.
Dunford, who moved to Fort ChurchiU as principal of the Churchill Vocational
Centre. Mr. D. MacRae, formerly instructor at the Dawson Creek school, became
principal, whUst Messrs. D. S. Goard, D. V. Kyle, R. P. Mylrea, and J. M. Brodie
were appointed as vice-principals to Nelson, Terrace, Victoria, and Nanaimo respectively, with Mr. F. L. Savage joining Nanaimo as assistant to the principal.
British Columbia Vocational School—Burnaby
The growth and development of the activities of this institution continued
during the past year. The day-school enrolment has increased to 5,715, or up
25.3 per cent from last year, whilst night-school enrolment increased to 3,718, or
up 18.4 per cent from 1968/69. In all, 9,433 people had access to these facUities
during the year.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION G 85
Day School Division
Administration.—The temporary shift of responsibilities to other administrators, due to the absence of the principal in Malaysia, is now well established and
settled.
Overseas Projects.—Two more apprentice instructors from this school will be
recruited this year to join the Malaysian project established in 1969.
Training.—The following new courses were added during the year: Dry wall
InstaUers and Finishers, to meet requirements of the construction industry; Fishermen Upgrading, for seine and gillnet crews in the off-season; and Nurserymen
Upgrading, for experienced nurserymen and landscapers.
Increases in existing Commercial courses took place better to serve the older
student, entry to these classes being on a bi-monthly basis so as to accommodate
new entries. An experimental Pitman Shorthand method called " Take Thirty "
has shown encouraging results, some students achieving employable shorthand
speeds in up to one-third less time than the conventional method.
The addition to the Food Training Centre was opened in September, 1969,
making possible a 25 per cent increase in both the Commercial Baking and Retail
Meat Processing courses. The demand for the Retail Meat Processing course continues to be very strong, with more than twice as many acceptable applicants left
over after selection each year.
Seven short classes in Heavy Duty Mechanics were conducted during the
winter. These classes, designed to offer refresher and upgrade training to meet
requirements under the Tradesmen's Qualification Act, were given on the afternoon
shift and met with an excellent response.
Both the Plumbing and Sheet Metal courses were expanded for the benefit of
apprentices, whilst a fifth general welding class was added to meet a continued
heavy demand in this field. The demand is so great for upgrade welding training
that during the off-season in the Construction Industry applicants often had a two
months' wait for admittance. Special training in the latest semi-automatic field
welding techniques was offered to workmen on the new Block 52 project.
Due to reduced interest by the public, or few demands by employers, the
Stenotype and Court Reporter courses were terminated, whilst the number of
Ironworker classes was reduced.
Building Programme.—After many delays, most Basic Training for Skill
Development classes were relocated in the former Curriculum Building last January.
The design has proven very functional and wUl give this growing department a
central core for operations.
Plans and specifications have been submitted for the construction of a greenhouse and workshed for the Pre-apprentice Practical Horticulture course. This
course was conducted on site at Murray & Wood Growers in South Vancouver
during the winter, and classroom work held in a large, leased, construction trailer.
The Heavy Duty Mechanics workshop is still being used as a temporary gymnasium until the Multi-purpose BuUding is ready. Completion of the latter has
been delayed by the present lockout and strike situation.
Completion of the Industrial Instrumentation laboratory was also delayed for
the same reason, but, in spite of this, the facilities have been used in their
unfinished condition to improve the training situation.
In preparation for anticipated enrolments in 1975, a building brief and sketch
plans were submitted for a large classroom and laboratory block to accommodate
classes at the Burnaby Lake Division (Pitpar) and others on that site.
 G 86 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
Once again a vigorous Community Relations Programme was undertaken.
All administrators and many of the teaching staff conducted tours through school
facUities or represented the school at Careers Days group talks, etc. A total of
55 group tours (approximately 1,350 people) visited the school to learn of the
opportunities for vocational training. This approach has proven the most successful
method of making known to prospective students the facilities available.
The conference rooms and other school facilities were used by many groups
and organizations such as the Joint Training Committees of the Carpenters, Electricians, and Plumbers. The latter conducted their own training programmes for 155
tradesmen from the three trades, all costs other than the provision of space being
borne by these organizations. Other groups using the conference rooms included
the Institute of Power Engineers, the Canadian Welding Society, the Refrigeration
Service Engineers, the Lower Mainland Public School Administrators, and the
Burnaby Power Boat Squadron, in addition to a number of other organizations.
Night School Division
Although more apprentice classes are being transferred to day school each
year, the night-school apprentice population still continues an upward trend at an
average of 7.08 per cent per year. Of the 138 apprentices who wrote interprovincial
examinations in their graduating years, there were only 18 failures.
Enrolment in Trade Extension courses increased by 33.56 per cent to a new
high of 2,177, and, in the peak periods of October to March, the school handled
over 2,000 students.   Space became a critical factor.
The following new courses were offered: Acrylic and Corrugated Preparation
(for the sign trade in the preparation and use of plastics), Bricklaying Upgrading
(for bricklayers preparing to write trade-qualification examinations, Evaluation and
Upgrading of B.C. Ferry cooks, Millwork Layout (an upgrading course for millwork
personnel in advanced layout), and Steel Fabrication Layout (to upgrade the skills
of the steel fabricators and broaden their employment possibilities).
General
During the last year, 13 instructors completed certification requirements. This
has considerably reduced the disruption and expense of Summer School training.
The training schedule for most pre-employment and apprentice classes permits some
time for curriculum work and industrial liaison.
The activities both in day and night school throughout the past year have been
vigorous. The challenge to accommodate all requests for training has generally
been met. 1 am grateful to the instructional staff for their efforts to meet the challenges for additional training in overcrowded conditions.
The co-operation of all members of this administration is to be commended.
British Columbia Vocational School—Dawson Creek
The day enrolment reflected a modest increase, while the night-school programmes were reduced due to a lack of demand.
With the present economic problems in the construction and agricultural industries of the Peace River area, a number of residents have entered courses for retraining and further upgrading. Many of the students have realized this training
through the support of Canada Manpower.
The enrolment in the Agriculture programme continues to expand, with a
wide representation of students from throughout British Columbia.    Live-stock
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION G 87
numbers on the school farm are increasing, with surplus breeding-stock being sold
to live-stock producers in the area.
The demand for graduates in the Welding courses appears strong, as the oil
and mining industries of the North continue to develop.
The facilities of the school are being utilized by a number of agricultural and
industrial organizations. The Department of Agriculture conducts extension workshops and conferences in the school on a regular basis.
During the past year, plans were developed for the establishment of a Farrier
Training programme at the school. With an increasing demand for trained farriers
in the light-horse industry of western Canada, it is expected that this programme
will serve an important function in the coming years.
British Columbia Vocational School—Kelowna
A cafeteria with 240 seating-capacity is nearing completion. A 10-month
Cook Training course will commence as soon as possible. The Okanagan Motel-
Hotel Association strongly supports the move toward training new cooks and
upgrading their present staff.
Day-school enrolment increased 11 per cent over 1968/69 and the night
school increased 68 per cent. Participation by Canada Manpower has influenced
the night-school attendance. Graduates in most courses are continuing to obtain
employment in spite of the depressed labour situation.
There is continued demand for courses such as Agriculture, Dental Assistant,
Beauty Culture, Barbering, Surveying, and Draughting. Construction of a new
classroom wing for the Administrative Building is urgently needed if Interior
industrial and business requirements are to be met.
British Columbia Vocational School—Nanaimo
Day-school enrolment increased by 51 students to 1,638. Excluding the
Logging Division, the rate of drop-out before completion was 6.4 per cent, a considerable improvement over the previous years. Night-school enrolment remained
steady.
A small but significant step was taken toward amalgamation with Malaspina
College by accepting their secretarial students for " skills " training.
Placement continues to maintain itself at a very high level, with weU over
90 per cent of the graduates that we know of being employed.
British Columbia VqcATioNAL School—Nelson and Kootenay
School of Art
With the announcement of legislation to amalgamate the regional coUeges and
regional vocational schools, a continuing dialogue has been in effect with Selkirk
Regional College. These talks have been necessarily general as specific guidelines
have not yet been promulgated and, in an attempt to introduce the faculty of the
college to the training opportunities offered at this school, some 30 local educators attended an Open House on May 21, 1970, meeting with the staff of the
school.
Administration staff members made several trips to local high schools to keep
up the contact with our potential students, while several hundred high-school
students toured the school in turn.
The school was made available to other agencies for special short courses,
tests, and meetings, including a British Columbia Forest Service upgrading course
for Fire-fighters and a Department of Highways Defensive Driving course.    The
 A Millwright student carries out maintenance work on heavy industrial machinery in
the Millwright shop, at the British Columbia Vocational School in Nelson.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION G 89
Department of Labour continued its use of the school as a testing centre for the
Tradesman Qualification Examinations, and the Department of Highways Regional
Office managers held a two-day meeting in June, whilst Canada Manpower conducted a regional manager's meeting in May.
The physical plant received some changes, as well as many of the gravelled
areas of the grounds being paved.
Automotive and Heavy Duty Mechanics.—Increases both in the class sizes and
numbers of classes were recorded in this Division with a special class of Heavy Duty
apprentices from Cominco embarking on a 12-month pilot programme, with the
company assisting the school in providing teaching-aids.
Basic Training for Skill Development.—There were two new Basic Training
SkiU Development courses started in the school this past year, one at Level II and
one Level IV. There has been a good acceptance of graduates from this Division,
with two being employed as instructors in the Technical and Vocational Branch
and two students topping pre-apprenticeship classes.
Beauty Culture.—Due to poor bus service to the school, the Beauty Culture
Division has, in the past, had difficulty getting sufficient " customers." During the
past year, several service clubs have been driving old-age pensioners to the school
for appointments. This practice has been very successful and resulted in an increase
in the number of clients urgently needed for the second-year apprentice hairdressers.
Kootenay School of Art Division.—Forty-six students from Notre Dame University were enrolled in courses during the day programme and 70 in the three
evening classes.   Most of the students were on a B.F.A. or a B.Ed, programme.
The students' annual Tea and Sale raised $945 for scholarships, and one of
the most interesting and well-received items was a booklet produced by three
commercial art students entitled "A Humorous History of Nelson."
The Display Gallery was well used for graduating student and staff exhibitions,
and two private exhibitions.
Millwright and Welding.—Three demonstrations were held by industry on
safety, maintenance welding, and hardfacing, and there was a series of programmes
explaining and applying the new semi-automatic welding processes.
Practical Nursing.—A change, resulting from an Advisory Committee recommendation, consolidated the training into the Trail and Cranbrook Regional Hospital and, to date, seems to be working well.
A research study into the characteristics of successful and unsuccessful
Practical Nursing students was initiated and the first section completed in June.
Night School.—There was an increase in the number of courses and total
enrolment. The staff members at the school enrolled in a very successful Vocational Education credit course on Reading and Library Skills, and the school was
also represented on a Continuing Education Co-ordinating Committee for the
Nelson area.
Student Council.—The student councU was quite active this year. They are
building a baseball diamond on the school property and have organized several
teams. The students also adopted an orphan from Eastern Nigeria and are the
" foster parents."
British Columbia Vocational School—Prince George
The year 1969/70 has been a generaUy successful one for this school. A total
of 306 people completed full-time day classes, with 371 people completing short
day courses of less than two months' duration.
The principal and vice-principal attended numerous advisory committee meetings for many of the pre-employment courses, consultative committee meetings
 ^U_____U9_______I
 ..   ,   .    :     -■ .   ..-..».  :..,.. •.,--
TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION G 91
with agencies such as Canada Manpower, and meetings of organizations such as
the Community Resources Planning Board.
The established pre-employment courses operated at capacity or over-capacity
during the year. More applicants for training were available than could be
accommodated.
The Heavy Equipment Operator's classes have again been able to complete
several projects for the Department of Highways, School District No. 57 (Prince
George), the Nechako Improvement District, and a number of private, non-profit
agencies.
The Dental Assistants class graduated 15 students in June and, although all
of these young ladies were placed in employment, the demand for trained personnel
stUl continues. There are many more applicants for training than can be accommodated and it would be entirely feasible to establish an afternoon class in this course.
The Dental Assistant students again participated in the British Columbia Dental
Association convention and received first prize for their display in the clinical
demonstrations. This class also helped in several projects undertaken by the local
Director of Dental Health, Department of Health (Northern Interior Health Unit),
which were weU received.
The Draughting class operated at capacity, with both full-term and upgrading
students enrolled. In April of this year all the students were placed for two weeks'
employment experience in local draughting offices.
The three commercial courses, Secretarial, Bookkeeping, and Clerical also
operated at capacity throughout the year, with most students finding suitable jobs.
The Practical Nursing course remains one of the most popular courses in
terms of number of applications. Jobs are not as easily obtained now as they were
a year or two ago and married graduates, wishing to remain in their home areas,
often find they have to wait several months for an opening.
The General Welding class attracted considerable local attention with its construction of playground equipment for one of the local elementary schools.
A Small Engine Repair course, opened in September, 1969, proved to be very
successful, both in the training offered and the placement of the graduates.
Although the Heavy Duty Mechanics course remains in reasonable demand,
it is probable that a revision of the course would lead to heavier enrolments.
Enrolment of suitable students and placement in apprenticeships continue to
be a major problem with the Automotive Mechanics course at this school. It is
therefore recommended that the Automotive Mechanics course be reorganized so
that additional training in mechanical systems may be given. The course should
be of at least 10 months' duration.
The demand for welding upgrading remains continuous and heavy. The
majority of these upgraders are referrals from Canada Manpower, but significant
numbers of fee-payers are always in attendance.
The Basic Training for Skills Development classes continue to attract large
numbers of adults, not all of whom prove suitable candidates. Classification of
students into training levels will start this fall. It is thought that the planned
one-month assessment, followed by assignment to a particular training level, will
significantly improve our training programme.
The instructors in the Basic Training for Skill Development programme have
made real progress in the development of programmed instructional materials and
are now able to devote much more time to individual tutoring.
Short Courses.—Two six-week classes were held for Guide-Outfitters and
received enthusiastic support from the students concerned and the Western Guides'
Association.
 G 92 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
Short courses were also offered in Carpentry, Millwrighting, Automotive
Mechanics, and other trade specialties.
Night School.—This, again, proved to be highly successful. Twenty-six different classes were offered and 534 people were enrolled.
Mobilearn classes operated in the following centres: Prince George, Bear Lake,
Chetwynd, Quesnel, WUliams Lake, 100 Mile House, McBride, Valemount, Vanderhoof, Burns Lake, Houston, Smithers, and Kitimat. The instructors offered courses
in hydraulics, pneumatics, and bearings.
During the year, the school provided accommodation for several organizations
offering short courses, training sessions, and seminars. Two three-week courses in
supervisory training were given under Canada Manpower sponsorship.
Several hundred interviews were given by the administration to prospective
students. The very large number of inquiries handled during the year emphasizes
the need for a full-time counsellor on the school staff.
An active students' council operated a canteen, sponsored several dances,
picnics, and other social activities. The council also made two $100 bursaries
avaUable for students entering the school in September. No significant problems in
student-staff relationships were encountered during the year.
The 1969/70 year has been generally active and successful. Not all the problems and difficulties faced by the staff and students have been solved successfully,
but most have been satisfactorily concluded. The coming year promises to be
difficult, but its chaUenges wUl be met as they arise. It is our hope that we will
continue to be able to present technical and vocational training courses relevant to
the economy of the area and that we wUl be able to improve these courses as
demands and needs change.
British Columbia Vocational School—Terrace
During this past year this school has witnessed a substantial gain both in the
number of students enrolled, from 295 in 1968/69 to 691, and the variety of courses
offered.
The new $1.8 million cafeteria/dormitory complex now nearing completion
will no doubt result in a simUar increase during the coming year.
One of the key words in the school's training programme is " avaUabUity," and
the staff of this school has made great strides in designing programmes so as to make
them avaUable as often as possible to the greatest number of students.   To accomplish this, most courses are set up on multiple intakes.   We offer,
(i) on a monthly intake,
Commercial Advanced options.
Navigation.
Basic Training for Skill Development.
Marine and Stationary Engineering.
Welding Upgrading,
(ii) on a three-month basis,
General Commercial.
Secretarial.
Carpentry Pre-apprentice.
(iii) on a six-month basis,
Marine Engine Repair.
General Welding.
Electronics.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION G 93
There are no changes to the other pre-apprentice courses.
Some of the above programmes are being further divided into self-contained
blocks of subject-matter which can be taken separately or in groups, as time permits,
during the year. This is the concept of " banking learning," and when the full course
has been covered a certificate will be issued. This arrangement was designed to
take into account the seasonal unemployment which is prevalent in the area.
In the Basic Training for SkiU Development programme, training has been
based on " directed learning " rather than formal teaching, by encouraging students
to accept their responsibilities on how far and how fast they progress through the
training programme. The minimum standard is based on the maximum time the
student has at his/her disposal after we have made an assessment during the one-
month orientation period.
The staff has endeavoured to work very closely with outside agencies, such as
the Departments of Indian Affairs, Rehabilitation and Social Improvement, Workmen's Compensation Board, Canada Manpower Commission, and the Probation
Branch, and have been able to utiUze their resources for the betterment of the
students. The contribution of these agencies has been a real help, particularly in
the area involving personal problems.
A recent approach has been made by mining interests to assist them in the
setting-up of new courses. The school has also been involved with Eurocan in
establishing a course in " Vibration Analysis," as well as an Electronics course for
the United Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, and a gas-fitting course for Alcan.
The night-school programme was integrated with that of the local Adult Education Extension programme with moderate results generally, but with particular
success in First Aid for Fishermen Upgrading, General Welding No. 1, General
Welding No. 2, Electronics for Electricians, Business Management, Navigation,
Vibration Analysis, Electricity Upgrading, Medical Terminology, Gas-fitters, Welding Upgrading.
The same approach is planned again this year and hopefully will attract additional students into other programmes.
Visits by the principal and vice-principal were made during the year to all
secondary schools in the Prince Rupert, Kitimat, Smithers, Hazelton, and Terrace
areas.
British Columbia Vocational School—Victoria
A significant increase in student enrolment occurred in 1969/70 and is
expected to continue. It is anticipated that the increase will be as high as 30 per
cent, or approximately 300 pupils, in 1970/71.
Highlight of the 1969/70 school-year was the opening of the new trades-
training complex located at 4461 Interurban Road. This modern complex, comprising 10 workshops and 13 classrooms, was officially opened on June 23, 1970,
by the Honourable W. A. C. Bennett, with the Honourable D. L. Brothers, Minister
of Education, in the chair, and a number of Federal, Provincial, and civic government officials in attendance. An indication of the public interest in Technical and
Vocational Education was shown by an audience of approximately 900 people who
toured the complex following the official opening.
These new shops will permit the school to offer training in Automotive
Mechanics, Auto Body Repair, Carpentry, Electrical, General Welding, Welding
Upgrading, SmaU Engine Repair, Diesel Mechanics, and Navigation. In addition
to the foregoing, studies are under way to determine other local training needs.
 G 94 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
These new facilities will enable us to develop various night-school programmes
for those persons who are presently employed as journeymen and may wish to
upgrade their present skills.
Special Projects Division
This Division was created within the Technical and Vocational Branch for the
purpose of developing and conducting training programmes to meet specific requirements of Canada Manpower for courses outside the regular regional vocational
schools. In effect, it is a separate vocational school with its own register and
administration. In most cases, the Division makes contracts with local School
Boards or private agencies to carry out the actual training. There are, however, some
instances when Special Projects employs staff and rents facilities directly.
The programmes offered vary in length from short one-week upgrading courses
to continuous ongoing programmes, and in complexity from Basic Training for
Skill Development to Personnel Supervision training for management.
Inspection Report—Regional Vocational Schools
During the past year all regional vocational schools were visited for varying
periods of time and discussions were held with the administrative and instructional
staff, and it is pleasing to be able to record that the over-all situation was found to
be quite satisfactory.
At the request of the Warden, visits were made during the months of September
and March to the Haney Correctional Institute, and all instructors were inspected
and reports were issued.
As per agreement between our Department and the Yukon Territorial Government, the Director visited the Yukon Vocational and Technical Centre during the
month of November to advise and assist the administration and instructors.
During the year, 36 days were used to conduct interviews for the selection of
new staff. This does not include the time required for organizational purposes and
travel.
Interviews were held in Burnaby, Victoria, Nanaimo, Nelson, Kelowna, Prince
George, and Terrace.
Investigations as a result of complaints were conducted in Burnaby and Nelson
and were satisfactorily resolved.
Special Assignments.—A three-man committee formed jointly by the Technical
Branch, Department of Education, of this Province, and the Department of Manpower and Immigration, Government of Canada, to investigate Basic English Language Training programmes in British Columbia, was chaired by the writer. Numerous meetings and visits to institutions conducting these programmes, were carried out
during the months of February and March. A detaUed report was submitted to both
departments in April.
A one-session seminar was conducted for the Industrial Education Teacher
Training Summer School class, the University of Victoria.
The Director was guest speaker at the Workmen's Compensation Board RehabUitation Officers' Workshop and at the Apprenticeship Branch Annual Conference.
Conclusion.—Supervision of instruction is still a problem with most principals.
It is hoped that this situation will improve during the coming year.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
G 95
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 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
G 97
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 G 98 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1969/70
Vocational Night-school Enrolment in Regional Schools
School
1967/68
1968/69
1969/70
3,186
159
287
583
121
877
25
34
4,676
401
3,138
201
574
651
154
690
176
32
59
4,445
258
3,718
Dawson Creek  	
Kelowna  -	
Nanaimo   —
92
702
634
231
534
231
Victoria -	
356
129
5,152
6191
Totals                       	
10,349
10,378
12,398
i Includes some non-vocational classes.
Night-school Enrolment in School Districts
1967/68
1968/69
1969/70
Commercial - 	
11,096
9,033
659
2,687
7,449
12,216
338
6,277
11,695
9,334
Agricultural  -	
529
4,986
Totals 	
23,475
26,280
26,544
British Columbia Institute of Technology
Construction Programme
The most important feature of the construction programme last year was the
start made on the Multi-purpose Building. Substantial progress has been made on
this building, but completion has been delayed because of strikes. However, completion at the end of 1969 of the temporary Gymnasium Building was secured. This
proved to be a tremendous boon to the students of British Columbia Institute of
Technology (B.C.I.T.) and British Columbia Vocational School. It was widely patronized in the spring term and its success augurs well for the future use of the Multipurpose Building.
The banking complex built under the north colonnade was completed by the
Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce in May, 1970, is now in full operation and is
proving to be a convenience to staff and students on the whole Burnaby campus.
Last summer, students of the Heavy Equipment Operators course from the
Nanaimo Vocational School cleared two sites for additional playing-fields and this
summer started the grading and levelling of these areas. They are also building a
perimeter road around the campus.
We are continuing to plan for the building of student residences on the campus.
In this connection we are investigating the use of low-cost modular buildings and
we hope to present a plan for construction of residences at an early date.
Last year we were able to borrow from the Industrial Teacher Training College
sufficient accommodation for laboratories and classrooms to expand the Nurses
Training programme. We also built some office accommodation for staff in the
Industrial Teacher Training College and in the Library Building.
In order to reduce book losses, turnstiles designed for student traffic control
were installed in the Library Building. These have been effective.
  G 100 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
The limit of accommodation for students in existing classrooms and lecture
theatres has been reached. Studies have been made during the year for increased
accommodation either in a new building on campus or borrowed or leased facilities.
Although additional enrolments can to some extent be undertaken by increasing the
hours of daily use in existing facilities, new accommodation is needed for the expanding student body. Early consideration of a new building project on the B.C.I.T.
campus should be given.
New Training Programmes
The first year of transfer programmes from regional colleges to B.C.I.T. in
second-year developed smoothly during the year. Thirty-two students transferred
into B.C.I.T. from regional colleges. This Uow will be increased this year and with
the addition of new regional colleges wiU become an increasing factor in the Institute's second-year enrolment. In the past year the decision to grant a second diploma
became effective, and several students enrolled for a third year in B.C.I.T. in order
to secure a second diploma. This plan wUl grow in the future.
In B.C.I.T. the following new training technologies and options were established
last year:—
Health Data Technology in Health Division (this programme has been postponed for one year).
Economics Statisticians Option in Business Management Division.
Traffic and Transportation Management Option in Marketing Management
Technology.
Nursery and Landscape Option in Biological Sciences Technology.
Pollution Control Option in Chemical and Metallurgical Technology.
The number of students applying for admission to B.C.I.T. is increasing, and
this year is the greatest ever experienced by the Institute.
Extension Division
During the past year the Extension Division made steady progress, with 3,447
students enrolled in Extension Division classes. One new and very popular combined day and evening extension class was added, namely, Applied Real Estate
Salesmanship course.
The foUowing daytime extension courses were provided: British Columbia
Hydro and Power Authority, British Columbia Road Builders Association, Chartered
Accountants Society (Computer Science Course); Fire Simulator Course for Forest
Industries; and Course for Real Estate Salesmen.
Day Enrolment
Course Year
Broadcast Communications \ 1st
12nd
Building fist
)2nd
Business (1 st
|2nd
Chemical and MetaUurgical [1st
)2nd
CivU and Structural (1st
12nd
Male
Female
30
6
25
7
72
3
45
298
51
209
42
69
1
41
4
62
1
53
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION G 101
Course                                                                                 Year Male          Female
Electrical and Electronics (1st 191
)2nd 136
Biological Science (1st 42            23
|2nd 18            12
Forest Products j 1st 33
|2nd 25
Forestry fist 136
}2nd 83              1
Health (1st 67          292
{2nd 24          227
Hotel, Motel, and Food
Service Management (1st 68              7
)2nd 36               6
Instrumentation fist 41
)2nd 30
Mechanical [1st 72
}2nd 48
Mining [1st 34
|2nd 21
Natural Gas and Petroleum [1st 23
)2nd 13
Surveying [1st 65
|2nd 45
Medical Radiography  1            52
Totals  2,156 735
Total day enrolment  2,891
Total extension (night) enrolment  3,447
CO-ORDINATION WITH INDUSTRY AND OTHER AGENCIES
The Uow of requests for new adult vocational training programmes throughout
the Province has continued to increase significantly over previous years and, although Canada Manpower makes the most demands, additional requests are received from agencies such as the Department of Indian Affairs, the Department
of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement, Penitentiary officials, the Rehabilitation
Division of the Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance, and both
management and labour in private industry.
The emphasis on the upgrading of the existing labour force has resulted in the
need for many short, intensive, training programmes.
In addition to new courses offered under the auspices of the Special Projects
Division (see separate report), a total of 78 new programmes or courses were
commenced in the regional vocational schools and the Vancouver Vocational Institute during the past year.
In addition to the organizational work required to develop these many programmes, no less than 30 continuing advisory committee meetings were attended
to discuss existing and proposed new courses.
Special meetings were held concerning the Provincial Alliance of Businessmen,
Indian Affairs training programmes in connection with the Chilcotin Indian Forest
 G 102 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1969/70
Training Camp, Mobile training programmes for the forest industries on Vancouver
Island and the northern part of the Province, school district Adult Education
Directors, and the training of stationary engineers.
A total of 83 applications for Canada Student loans, amounting to $62,000,
were approved for qualtfying students in the regional vocational schools.
This past year has seen the discontinuation of two programmes at our vocational schools, namely, Court Reporting at Burnaby and Data Processing at Victoria.
Division of Technical and Vocational Curriculum
During the year 1969/70, the Division's responsibilities centred around the
development and publication of course outlines, instructional materials, manuals,
examinations, and publicity materials.
Course Outlines
Course outlines were developed in the following fields:—
(a) Apprenticeship and Pre-apprenticeship Courses.—Resilient Floorlaying,
Carpet Laying, Heavy Duty Mechanics, Piledriver and Bridgeman, Foundry, Electricity Apprentice, Hairdressing, Lineman, Painting and Decorating—Pre-apprentice, Floor Covering Installation, Backhoe Operation, Industrial Instrumentation,
Carpentry, Electrical Pre-apprentice, Steel Fabrication, Dental Technician, Foundry,
Electronics, Painting and Decorating—Apprentice, Sprinkler Fitting, Drywall Installer, Drywall Finisher, Heavy Duty Mechanics, MiUwright, Benchwork and
Joinery, Lathing.
(t>) Pre-employment Courses.—Basic Training for Skill Development, Levels
II, III, and IV; Dental Assistant; General Welding; Electronics—Night School;
Mechanical Draughting; Service-station Salesman; Commercial—Advanced Options and Upgrading, Commercial—Secretarial, Commercial—Bookkeeping and
Accounting; Fisherman Upgrading; Commercial Art; Fine Arts; Business Law;
Electronics; Legal Aspects of the Hospitality Industry; Commercial—General;
Nursing Orderly; Audio-Visual Methods;   Truck-driver; Court Reporter.
Instructional Materials
(a) Printed instructional materials were developed for almost all the pre-
employment and pre-apprenticeship courses offered in the British Columbia Vocational schools. In addition, the Division developed instructional materials for
almost all the technologies offered at the British Columbia Institute of Technology.
Printed materials were also developed for use at Summer School (Vocational
Instructor Certificates), and for numerous apprenticeship and night-school courses
offered at both the British Columbia vocational schools and the British Columbia
Institute of Technology.
(b) Manuals were developed for 46 different subjects, whilst 14 other various
types of publications were also produced.
Photography
A considerable amount of photographic work was undertaken during the year,
and several 35-mm. colour slide sequences were developed for use by instructors
as instructional material.
The Division was also called upon to assist in the development, and in the
production, of 8-mm. film loops for use by instructors at both the British Columbia
vocational schools and the British Columbia Institute of Technology.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION G 103
Many large photographs were prepared for the Department of Education
Display, the Logging Show at the P.N.E., and for use as publicity material by various
vocational schools at Open Days and Career presentations. Along with these,
several thousand black and white photographs and colour slides were taken in various areas of the British Columbia vocational schools, the British Columbia Institute of Technology, the Industrial Education Teacher Training Centre, the Jericho
Hill School for the Blind, and many other locations in the community. These photographs are all filed and are used for record, instructional, or publicity purposes.
Examinations
Tradesmen's Qualification examinations were developed for Sheet Metal,
Carpentry, and Industrial Mechanics (MiUwright). Series 1 and 2 of the Practical
Nursing examinations were revised and reprinted and are now used in conjunction
with the new series 4.
A Provincial examination for the Waiter/Waitress Training Programme was
developed and printed for use by the Co-ordinator, Food and Accommodation
Industry. British Columbia Institute of Technology term examinations were printed
for 39 programmes.
Publicity Materials
Publicity materials produced by this Division were distributed to District
Superintendents, principals, counsellors, teachers, apprenticeship and manpower
counsellors, etc., throughout the Province, and also to educators in other parts of
Canada, the United States, and in numerous foreign countries.
Major publicity projects were developed and produced by this Division for
the British Columbia Institute of Technology, British Columbia vocational schools,
and Apprenticeship Branch.
Finally, the Division trained one deaf youth as a Multilith Operator in a six
months' training programme which appeared to be successful, as the student
obtained immediate employment on completion.
Industrial Education and Vocational Programmes
Secondary Schools
The Technical Branch provides assistance for approved programmes in technical, industrial, commercial, agricultural, community services, visual and performing
arts, occupational, and other programmes for particular occupations.
Construction and Equipment
Capital projects under the Federal-Provincial A.O.T.A. Capital Agreement
progressed according to schedule. Six projects were approved by Ottawa to a
gross total of $2,635,000, and contracts have been let for $900,000 to cover buildings and equipment. Four projects totalling $32,000 are still in the planning stages.
Technical books for 70 schools to a value of $300,000 will be presented for approval
during the coming fall.
The Vocational Schools Assistance Act Amendment Act, 1965, requires that
where the Federal-Provincial sharing is 50:50 the School Board provides 20 per
cent, the Province 40 per cent, and the Federal Government 40 per cent of the
capital costs.
 G 104 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
Staffing
The graduating class from the Industrial Education Accelerated Programme
at the University of British Columbia numbered 66, 53 of whom were sponsored by
Canada Manpower and 13 by the Province of British Columbia. The majority of
the graduates found suitable employment in the Province and brought the total
number of Industrial Education teachers employed to 923. Fifteen teachers were
engaged on letters of permission, and five of these have registered for training in
the 1970/71 year. Four of the fifteen are partially trained and completing full
certification by Summer School.
Recruitment
Seventy-nine persons have been recruited for training during the 1970/71
year, 50 to be sponsored by Canada Manpower and 29 by the Province. This number would appear to be adequate to provide additional staffing in September, 1971.
The student growth rate in Industrial Education courses is approximately 5 per cent,
and the general attrition rate of the teachers is approximately 2 per cent.
In-service Training
Considerable study has been undertaken in the field of Industrial Science with
a view to holding zone workshops. These workshops will culminate in a large
Easter workshop in 1971.
Following the Electricity-Electronics workshop of Easter, 1969, the Curriculum
Revision Committee for Electricity-Electronics has held regular meetings under the
direction of the Director of Curriculum.
The follow-up of the Construction workshops of 1969 showed many new
housing starts in the secondary-school Construction programme. It is estimated
that 50 per cent of all secondary schools offering the Construction programme are
using the full-size project as a vehicle of instruction.
Inventory of Equipment
Considerable expansion of Industrial Education facilities has taken place over
the last five years and the inventory of new equipment runs into millions of doUars.
In order to assist school districts to maintain and account for their inventories, the
Technical Branch has developed prepared inventories for Construction 11 and 12,
Mechanics 11 and 12, Woodwork 9, Metalwork 9, and Woodwork and Metalwork
8 and 9. Copies are available to aU school districts upon request. Inventories for
Power Mechanics 9; Electricity 8, 9, 11, and 12; Industrial Power 11; and
Draughting 11 will be prepared and printed during the 1970/71 school-year.
Provincial Technical Advisers in Industrial Education
(Formerly Inspectors of Technical Classes)
The change in the role of the Technical Inspector to Technical Adviser became
effective in September of 1969. The policy and terms of reference for the Advisers
were outlined at all of the District Superintendents' Zone Conferences held in the
fall of 1969.
The practice in the past had been to inspect teachers in Industrial Education
rather than evaluate the programmes in those areas. With the expansion of specialized programmes and the number of teachers in Industrial Education, it was felt
that the role of the Provincial Inspectors would be better changed to that of Adviser.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION G 105
New Policy and Terms of Reference
1. The District Superintendent is responsible for the supervision, inspection,
and reporting on aU Industrial Education teachers in a school district.
2. The school district is responsible for the implementation of programmes
and courses, and for the obtaining of equipment for these Industrial Education
programmes.
3. Specialist assistance is available to all school districts by request to the
Technical Branch for the following areas:—
(o) To offer technical advice to the District Superintendent of Schools.
(b) To establish the technical competence of an Industrial Education teacher.
(c) To assess the technical value of a particular course.
(d) To establish the effectiveness and safety of the learning situation.
(e) To assess the expansion or modification of shops and equipment.
(/) To be concerned with all matters relating to the accomplishing of objectives of Industrial Education.
4. Programmes for Particular Occupations (Vocational Specifics) may be
offered only after approval has been granted by the Department of Education.
5. The Technical Branch officials of the Department of Education will conduct visits to secondary schools to maintain constant liaison with District Superintendents, principals, and Industrial Education staff. Such visits wiU be made by
arrangement with the District Superintendent of Schools.
Student Enrolment
Industrial Education pupils in Grades VIII, IX, and X normally enrol in the
equivalent of one course or block of time, although it is permissible to enrol for
additional study. Grades XI and XII pupils selecting Industrial Education normally
take from one to three courses. The following figures are the number of Industrial
Education courses being taken by students:—
I.E. 8  21,307 Programmes for Particu-
I.E. 9  37,180 lar Occupations (Vo-
I.E. 11   23,078 cational Specifics)._____ 1,011
I.E. 12  12,257
Course total  93,822
Approximately 2,250 Occupational students receive instruction in the Industrial Education Division of the schools.
Grand course total  97,083
Teachers instructing in Industrial Education        923
The number of student courses in Industrial Education increased by approximately 4.5 per cent and the number of instructors by 6.4 per cent. The increase was
slight in Grade IX but much greater at the senior level. It is apparent that the
Programmes for Particular Occupations requirements are decreasing since the enrolment total dropped by 2 per cent. The general course enrolments in Grades XI
and XII increased by 10.9 per cent.
Tourist Services
The organizing of some 19 courses in Waiter/Waitress and Room Maid training, including supervising, supplying of course material, and instructors, marking
of examination papers, and issuing of certificates in addition to some instructing was
carried out by this Division.
 G 106 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
Two Travel Counsellors' courses were conducted in conjunction with the
Department of Travel Industry on campus in Burnaby, in addition to three more at
Kamloops, Salmon Arm, and Revelstoke.
Orientation trips are mostly of a fact-finding nature to obtain first-hand
information regarding requests for training courses, workshops, etc., and to assist
in the organization of programmes. Meetings are generally held with representatives
from industry, Directors of Adult Education, and Canada Manpower centres, and
this year some 16 such meetings were held throughout the Province covering the
training for waiters, waitresses, and short-order cooks.
The Waiter and Waitress Training Manual was updated, whilst the booklet,
" Careers in the Hospitality Industry," was completely rewritten and a new edition
published. In addition, a new RetaU Sales Training Manual was developed and is
now ready for printing.
Assistance was given throughout the year to the Catering Department of the
British Columbia Ferries regarding evaluating and training of their staff, whilst a
number of advisory committee meetings were held covering such topics as Retail
Sales Training; Hunting and Fishing Guides; Law for the Hospitality Industry;
Waiter/Waitress course; Travel Counsellors' course; Retail Meat Cutting; Hotel,
Motel, Restaurant Management; Food Trades and Accommodation; Industries
Training;  and British Columbia Tourist Advisory Council.
Finally a Career Counselling session was held for the students at the Belmont
School, Victoria, and a second one for counsellors and home economics teachers of
the Victoria School District.
Enrolment
Waiters/Waitresses   114
Waiters/Waitresses Upgrading  373
Room Maid  12
Travel Counsellors  65
Total  564
Supervisory and Management Training
A broad variety of companies in British Columbia continues using the training
facilities made available to them in two major management courses—Communications and Human Relations and Techniques of Work Study—which they find invaluable as upgrading courses for their middle management group. The range is
from foreman to plant manager. One popular comment from executive industry
is " we just don't have any grievances now."
On the other side of the coin, production is being increased, quality improved,
and costs cut to new levels which were considered unattainable 18 months ago.
One general manager of a large plywood firm who had taken the Work Study course
himseh several years ago, finally enrolled all of his management staff with very
beneficial results.
The Workmen's Compensation Board of British Columbia has a continuing
programme operating, using our course facilities, and reports satisfying results
in training and rehabilitating injured supervisors and others to higher levels of
supervision. A few large companies trained conference chairmen through our programme and are now operating in-plant programmes for supervisors.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
G 107
Sundry
There was little change in the two Federal programmes for the Armed Services
at ChiUiwack and Naden until June 30, 1970, when the Naden operation was
terminated.
The Department continues to provide some assistance by way of capital grants
to the Forestry Training School (Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources). During the year, 48 students took the Basic course and an additional 80
enrolled in a variety of short courses.
The Division also participated in the continuation of the Air Brakes course
conducted by the Department of Commercial Transport, and in which 15 students
were enrolled.
 G 108 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
REPORT OF J. H. PANTON, M.Sc, DIRECTOR
1969/70 was the final year for the Community Programmes Branch to be a
branch of the Department of Education. Effective April 1, 1970, the Branch was
transferred to the Department of Travel Industry.
The final year in the Department of Education saw some significant changes
which indicated a new trend and ultimately an entirely new procedure for grants to
communities. Grants were determined at the beginning of the year and were not
subject to increase or further approval during the year. This was the first step
toward a complete change in grant procedure.
The establishment of the Physical Fitness and Amateur Sport Fund created a
new system of grants to sports bodies and agencies. During the year the Vancouver
office became no longer involved in Federal-Provincial grant allocations; this was
a phasing-out of the office as it had been since 1962.
Regional projects again received more emphasis, and no Provincial school or
seminar was organized. The educational seminar conducted by the British Columbia Professional Society in May, with the aid of the Community Programmes
Branch, was a successful start in the establishment of educational opportunity for
recreation personnel.
Field services remained very much the same as the previous year.
Recreation commission growth was slight due to the large number of communities which have formed commissions in the past. The active number is also
becoming less due to inclusion of many communities into city or district boundaries.
During the 17 years that the Community Programmes Branch has been in the
Department of Education it has contributed significantly to the growth of public
recreational services in the Province. The increased interest in municipal recreation
over the past two decades can in fact be attributed to the many services provided by
the Branch, which has encouraged and enabled communities to contribute to the
recreation needs of aU citizens.
Growth chart for recreation commissions in British Columbia to March 31,
1970, is shown below:—
1959  266 1965  375
1960  281 1966  390
1961  307 1967  396
1962  332 1968  408
1963  351 1969  417
1964  359 1970  425
This does not indicate growth of recreation in the Province. There are few
communities not reached by the Community Programmes Branch and there are not
many new commissions established during a year. The Community Programmes
Branch is now endeavouring to strengthen existing commissions rather than organize
new ones.
Services extended by the Community Programmes Branch to British Columbia
communities are as follows:—
(1) Advice to public agencies and individuals on recreational matters by a
staff of regional recreation consultants.
(2) The Fitness and Amateur Sport Division, which provides special service
to sports organizations, communities, and schools.
  G 110
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
(3) The Adult Education  Division,  which  provides  grants,  consultation,
clinics, and conferences to School Board Adult Education Divisions.
(4) Aid to recreation for the blind through White Cane Clubs organized by
staff member Mr. Joseph Lewis.
(5) A large and comprehensive library of books, booklets, films, and film-
strips on innumerable recreation topics.
(6) A drama library, drama materials, and advisory services.
(7) Leadership training through regional workshops,  conferences,  clinics,
seminars, and a Provincial Study Seminar.
(8) Grants-in-aid to recreation commissions on behalf of full-time recreation
directors and to aid with the expenses of public recreation programmes.
(9) The provision of resource personnel and advice for Provincial Conferences.
(10) Special grants to those recreation commissions who conduct summer
swimming and playground programmes.
Recreation Commissions
The following is a list of recreation commissions in British Columbia and the
annual Provincial Government grant allocated for the year:—
* Commissions receiving grants for directors' salaries.
t Inactive commissions.
Annual
Recreation Commission Grant
Abbotsford  $480
Adams Lake   360
tAinsworth        	
Alert Bay  1,110
tAlexandria   —_
Alexis Creek
Appledale
Argenta-Iohnsons Landing
Armstrong 	
tArrowhead-Sidmouth  	
tArrow Park West	
Ashcroft 	
Atlin	
Avola 	
240
180
300
600
Baker Creek	
Baldy Hughes „.
Balfour 	
Bamfield	
Barnhart Vale ...
tBarnstone Island
Barriere  	
tBear Creek 	
Beaver Creek ....
tBeaverdell 	
Bella Coola 	
Belmont Park 	
Bessborough 	
Birch Island 	
Blackburn Road _
Black Creek 	
tBlue River 	
Blueberry Creek	
Bonnington-Corra Linn
Boston Bar	
Boswell	
Bouchie Lake
300
180
240
240
240
540
480
240
360
480
300
540
240
240
240
480
240
240
420
420
360
Recreation Commission
tBowen Island	
Bralorne-Pioneer	
Bridesville 	
Brisco 	
Annual
Grant
Britannia Beach
tBrocklehurst 	
tBrookmere 	
*Burnaby 	
Burns Lake	
Burton 	
$600
240
240
480
  3,600
  480
  420
Cache Creek   240
*Campbell River  1,800
Canal Flats   300
Canyon   300
Carrier   300
Cape Mudge   420
tCawston       	
Cecil Lake   240
Cedar   420
*Central Kootenay   1,500
Central Saanich
Chase 	
Chase River.
Chehalis Crossing
tChehalis Reserve _.
Cherry Creek	
Cherryville
Cheslatta District
Chetwynd	
*Chilliwack 	
t Christian Valley _.
Christina Lake 	
Clayhurst   	
Clearwater 	
Clinton 	
480
300
360
420
600
480
480
300
1,200
Columbia Valley
300
240
300
300
240
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
G  111
Recreation Commission
Colwood 	
Annual
Grant
  $210
*Comox Village   1,500
Coombs     240
*Coquitlam   3,300
Cottonwood Island   300
*Courtenay    2,400
Cowichan Indian Band  540
*Cranbrook   2,100
Crawford Bay  300
Crescent Valley   360
Creston    600
Cultus Lake  480
*Cumberland   1,500
Cutbank   240
tDawson Creek	
Decker Lake 	
Deep Creek	
*Delta 	
Denman Island
Departure Bay .
Deroche .....
Dewdney
District of Matsqui
District of Mission .
  420
  300
  2,700
  420
  540
  360
  420
  600
  2,100
District of Salmon Arm   600
*District of Surrey   4,500
Doe River   240
Donald   240
tDragon Lake 	
Duhammel 	
Duncan 	
Eagle Valley 	
East Kelowna 	
East Wellington
Edgewater  	
Elko 	
Emerald Mines
tEnderby 	
Erickson 	
Errington 	
*Esquimalt 	
Falkland 	
Fanny Bay 	
Farmington 	
Ferndale 	
tFernie 	
Field 	
Forest Grove ...
Fort Fraser	
tFort Nelson  ...
tFort St. John ...
Francois Lake _
Franklin River .
Fraser Lake —
Fruitvale 	
600
600
240
600
420
420
240
600
420
300
1,500
300
480
360
300
Fulton River 	
Gabriola Island
Galiano 	
Galloway 	
Genelle  	
600
300
420
420
300
300
480
240
360
420
600
540
Recreation Commission
tGiscome 	
tGlenmore  	
Glenora	
tGolata Creek	
Golden  .	
Annual
Grant
Gold River __..
*Grand Forks .
tGreat Central
Greenwood 	
Gray Creek __.
Grindrod   	
Groundbirch _
$420
900
900
600
420
240
300
420
tHaida Masset	
Half moon Bay	
Happy Valley-Glen Lake
Harewood 	
Harrison Hot Springs 	
tHarrop 	
Hatzic Prairie	
t Hazelton	
Hedley	
Hixon 	
No grant
420
540
600
Holberg (R.C.A.F.)
Holberg 	
Hope 	
Hornby Island 	
Horsefly 	
Houston 	
Inonoaklin 	
Invermere  	
loco 	
Jordan River 	
Justportel   	
Kaleden 	
*Kamloops  	
Kaslo   	
tKelly Lake 	
*Kelowna 	
Kent 	
tKeremeos 	
Kersley 	
240
240
600
300
240
600
300
300
600
600
600
480
480
360
420
1,275
600
2,250
480
Kettle Valley ._..
Kilkerran 	
*Kimberley   	
Kingfisher 	
Kispiox Valley ...
Kitwanga Valley
tKootenay Bay __
tKyuquot 	
Lac la Hache	
Ladysmith   	
tLa France	
Laidlaw 	
300
240
240
2,400
300
240
360
Lakeview Heights
Langford
Gibsons  No grant
Gillies Bay        420
  300
  540
  240
  300
  480
*Langley   .            1,500
Lantzville     600
Lardeau    240
Lavington Coldstream  600
Lillooet  240
Lister   480
Little Fort  300
 G 112
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
Annual
Grant
Recreation Commission
tLone Butte     	
Lower Nicola  $240
Lower Similkameen No grant
Lumby    300
Lund  420
Lytton   420
Mahatta River  300
Mahood Falls  180
Malaspina   300
Maple Ridge   600
Mara   240
Mayne Island  360
*Merritt  1,800
Merville    420
Metchosin   480
Mica Creek  300
Midway    300
tMinstrel Island       	
Minto 	
*Mission City 	
Montney 	
Montrose  	
Moose Heights	
Moricetown 	
Mount Currie	
Moyie 	
tMud River	
McConnell Creek
tMcBride 	
Mackenzie	
tMcLeese Lake _.
Nakusp
420
1,200
300
600
180
300
360
240
*Nanaimo   	
Nanaimo Indian Band..
Nanoose 	
Naramata 	
tNarcosli Creek	
Nazko	
240
600
600
3,300
420
420
300
240
Nelson  No grant
New Denver   240
New Hazelton   360
tNew Masset  	
New Westminster No grant
Nicomen Island  360
Noralee Clemretta Colleymount  360
North Bend  480
*North Cowichan   1,500
Northfield   420
North Saanich  420
North Shore (Nelson)   600
North Shuswap   360
tNorth Vancouver       	
*Oak Bay	
tOkanagan Centre
Okanagan Falls
1,400
240
tOkanagan Indian Band
tOkanagan Mission	
tOliver 	
100 Mile House	
tl50 Mile House 	
Ootischenia 	
tOsoyoos   	
360
240
Recreation Commission
Oyama 	
Palling  	
Parksville 	
Pass Creek	
tPaul Creek	
tPeace Canyon	
Peachland 	
Annual
Grant
$300
420
600
240
600
540
Pemberton Valley	
Pender Harbour No grant
tPendleton Bay     	
Penticton   600
tPitt Meadows     	
Pleasant Valley  420
Popkum  480
*Port Alberni  3,000
Port Alice   420
*Port Coquitlam
tPort Hardy 	
Port Mellon 	
-No grant
300
*Port Moody     1,200
Port McNeill         540
Port Renfrew        420
*Port Simpson        900
Pouce Coupe         300
*PoweIl River      3,300
*Prince George      1,500
*Prince Rupert      2,700
Princeton        600
Procter         480
Progress         300
tQuadra Island 	
Qualicum Beach 	
Queen Charlotte 	
tQuesnel   	
Radium Junction 	
Red Bluff 	
tRedwell  	
tReid Lake 	
Revelstoke  	
*Richmond 	
Riondel 	
Riske Creek 	
Riverside 	
Rivervale 	
300
360
360
300
  480
  4,000
  300
  300
  300
  240
Roberts Creek  No grant
Robson   600
Rock Creek   240
Roe Lake   360
Rose Lake   300
Round Lake  240
Royston   360
Rutland     300
tSaanich Indian Band     	
Salmo 	
*Salmon Arm 	
  420
  600
  600
  420
  240
  300
Sayward ..      480
Seabird Island   240
Saltspring Island
Saltair  	
tSandspit 	
Saturna 	
Savona   	
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
G 113
Recreation Commission
Sechelt  	
70 Mile House and Watch Lake
tShalalth  	
Annual
Grant
..No grant
—     $180
Shawnigan Lake
Shirley  ..
Sidney
Silver Creek (1)
Silver Creek (2)
Silverton 	
480
240
540
300
300
Skidegate Mission
tSlocan 	
tSmithers 	
t Soda Creek	
..No grant
600
Songhees Indian Band .
Sooke 	
tSorrento 	
Southern Cortez 	
South Cowichan 	
South Fort George
South Hazelton 	
South   Kelowna 	
Southside 	
South Slocan 	
tSouth Taylor 	
South Wellington ...
Sparwood 	
Spence's Bridge 	
Sproat Lake
480
540
420
540
420
360
300
360
420
360
600
180
420
*Squamish      3,500
tSquamish Indian Band 	
Stewart 	
420
tSticking (Telegraph Creek)
Straiton 	
Stuart Island 	
Sumas	
Summerland 	
Sunnybrae 	
Sunrise Two Rivers 	
Sunrise Valley 	
Sunset Prairie 	
tTappen
Tarrys and district
*Tasu 	
Tatla	
tTatlayoko Lake .	
Taylor
360
240
600
480
180
300
240
240
300
1,200
420
Tchesinkut Lake
420
300
Recreation Commission
Telkwa	
Texada 	
*Terrace  	
Thornhill
Tofino 	
Topley
Annual
Grant
$300
300
2,400
600
540
480
tTower Lake ...
*Trail-Tadanac
Trout Lake —
Tulameen  	
Ucluelet 	
Union Bay
  3,000
  240
  300
  600
  480
  420
  360
  360
* Vancouver Parks Board  31,200
Vanderhoof   600
Vavenby    240
*Vernon   1,200
  540
  804
  300
  600
University Hill
Valemount 	
Valleyview
View Royal 	
*Wallace Gardens
Wardner 	
Warfield 	
tWasa Lake 	
Welcome Beach
Wellington 	
tWells 	
240
420
Westbank 	
West Bench 	
Westbridge 	
West Creston —
Westsyde 	
*West Vancouver
Whaletown 	
White Lake 	
Williams Lake ._
Willow 	
Wilson Creek ....
Windermere   	
Winfield 	
Winlaw  	
Wistaria (Ootsa)
tWoodfibre 	
Wynndel 	
Yahk 	
Yale 	
Ymir 	
Zeballos  	
420
300
300
180
240
... 3,300
... 360
420
600
360
..No grant
420
300
360
240
600
240
360
360
420
During the year 81 recreation commissions were inactive or not receiving
a grant. Inactive recreation commissions are of serious concern as indicative of
ineffective leadership and community disinterest. In the case of an incorporated
community, lack of interest shown by the local government may be the principal
reason.   Two commissions have been amalgamated into regional districts.
Quarterly Reports
The quarterly reports of recreation commissions indicate that almost every type
of recreational activity has participant interest in British Columbia. Although there
are many approaches to community recreation organization and promotion, all com-
 G 114 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
munities seem to be very concerned with leisure-time services, especially to young
people. There is also much interest in elderly citizens' programmes. The middle-
age group is not very often emphasized by community recreation groups.
The quarterly reports do indicate that many thousands of British Columbians
engage in a wide variety of public recreation programmes. This does not include
the thousands who have recreation pursuits of their own which are not part of a
public recreation programme.
Quarterly reports also indicate the need for planning, programming, and
leadership in public recreation.
Staff
Mr. R. C. Davis resigned, effective August 31, 1969. Mr. G. Ferguson was
appointed in November of 1969 to replace Mr. Davis.
The consultant staff travelled 50,508 miles and made 908 visitations during
the year.
Community Programmes Branch staff and locations are as follows:—
A. L. Cartier, Victoria—Adult Education.
K. K. Maltman, Vancouver—Sports and Fitness.
D. M. McCooey, Abbotsford—Fraser-Sechelt.
E. W. Mayers, Kamloops—central British Columbia.
G. J. Pynn, Victoria—Vancouver Island.
D. E. Brown, Burns Lake—northwest British Columbia.
J. M. MacKinnon, Kelowna—Okanagan-Similkameen.
G. Ferguson, Quesnel—northeast British Columbia.
A. D. Collier, Nelson—Kootenays.
Miss A. Adamson, Victoria—Drama.
Leadership
The provision of recreation education opportunity and the development of
leadership services form the major role of the Branch. The field staff is continually
evaluating field services to determine the most effective and acceptable way of
involving communities so that each community will be given the opportunity to
understand recreation and to take advantage of all services supplied by Government
and many other agencies.
Local clinics, regional conferences, and workshops, zone meetings, and Provincial seminars, workshops, and conferences come within the scope of Community
Programmes Branch aid. The Province is almost a network of these activities, as
indicated by the statistics listed in this section.
The Provincial Conference at Trail was well attended by 180 delegates from
aU over the Province. The Conference keynote speaker was the Honourable
Premier W. A. C. Bennett. Excellent sessions on community planning and recreation for youth, along with film displays by the National Film Board, were conference
features.
Several excellent seminars for recreation commission personnel, municipal personnel, school boards, and recreation professionals were conducted in the Community Programmes Branch regions.   These served as excellent education media.
 community programmes branch
Leadership Statistics
Regional
G 115
Number
Participants
Number of
Commissions
Cost
Clinics _	
Conferences 	
Seminars.    :  _
Workshops- _	
72
8
3
1
3,125
594
86
250
262
95
16
4
$6,775.25
3,656.25
972.40
300.00
Miscellaneous Activities
British Columbia Schools Athletic Association  $109.10
British Columbia Recreation Conference  1,373.64
British Columbia Professional Society  434.00
Student Conference—Alma Mater  200.00
Recreation Administration Study—Vancouver  400.00
Special grants to communities conducting playground programmes and swimming instruction and water safety totalled $11,824. One hundred and fifty-six
communities received this aid. These grants are provided to encourage community
activity in these extremely important aspects of recreation.
Library Services
The Branch library continued with a revision programme which was due for
completion in August of 1970. The film section will be reorganized and a new
catalogue printed.
Books are not used as extensively as they should be due to the lack of an
adequate information programme.
Publications
Community Recreation is forwarded to all recreation commissions and many
other agencies on a quarterly basis.
Drama
Continued interest in the theatre is obvious. Newspaper headlines make much
of the avant-garde type of production. Improvisation is a much used word in school
and adult drama. The value of the Arts Councils and their interest and help in
developing small groups are important to the cultural life of British Columbia.
The festival scene continues to dominate the spring picture. Special interest
in speech choirs is noticeable in festivals which include the speech arts. Both high
schools and adult groups show a desire to try the modern play. Budding playwrights also lean toward the conditions of our time for their material; violence,
nudity, and mass protests form the basis of their work.
Noticeable also is the increase in attendance at the theatre; a new type of
critical audience is emerging, perhaps due to the content and audience-participation
type of play. Scholarships and cash awards are emerging as the popular type of
prize rather than challenge cups or trophies. Adjudicators are quick to praise this
type of presentation, as are actors, directors, and teachers.
A higher level of professional production is apparent in both small and large
centres. This is caused in part by workshops and further training at university and
other colleges; also by the availability of better-trained teachers.
 G 116 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
Workshops and clinics are now an accepted part of the drama club's season.
More attention is being paid to costume, lighting, sets, speech, manners, and properties. More speech training is required, especiaUy in the early school years, a fact
stressed by adjudicators at the annual festivals.
The third annual Secondary School Festival was held in May at the University
of British Columbia, and was most successful. Students attended for four full
school-days. Sessions on speech, acting, directing, playwrighting, and general production were held. Specialists in each field were brought in for this purpose. Plays
from various parts of the Province were performed both afternoons and evenings
and discussed fully the next morning with the adjudicator on hand to answer questions.   Both students and teachers feel this method worth while and interesting.
Vernon was the host city for the one-act finals. More emphasis was placed on
the learning aspect rather than the presentation type of festival. Workshops and open
forums followed each evening performance Standard of production was noticeably
better than in past years, partly because of the workshops held and conducted under
the auspices of the Community Programmes Branch of the Department.
Mr. T. Gil Bunch, of Brentwood College, adjudicated both the secondary and
adult final festivals. Thirty-five festivals were held during the spring season, with the
adjudicators being sent from the Community Programmes Branch.
The British Columbia Regional Festival, held in North Vancouver, brought
three full-length plays from Cranbrook, Prince Rupert, and Vancouver to present
their work before Miss Dalby, Adjudicator from Montreal, and a good-size audience.
At present the Dominion Drama Festival is taking a new look at its structure, and
wUl be known in future as " Theatre Canada."
The British Columbia Drama Association continues its active life, with much
help from this Branch. The library is a much-used resource centre and this is apparent from the more than 8,000 plays, pamphlets, technical books, magazines, etc.,
sent out each year.
The help given through the Cultural Fund to the many small drama clubs is used
to good advantage. Scholarships to worthy individuals have helped raise the standard
of production, or brought specialists into the community. With the grants given by
the Community Programmes Branch, each group is able to plan for a more active
part in the community and to expect greater support from the local populace.
The drama clubs in the Province are contributing much to the artistic life of
British Columbia.
Sports and Fitness Division
The estabUshment of the new Physical Fitness and Amateur Sport Fund and the
announced withdrawal from Federal-Provincial agreements as in the past by the
Federal Government, changed the whole procedure for special service to sports and
fitness by the Community Programmes Branch. The new Fund was administered
from Victoria and the Vancouver office was no longer involved with grant allocations.
The growth of the Sports Federation-Recreation office in Vancouver provided
many former services of the Community Programmes Branch Sports and Fitness
office to sport-governing bodies and agencies, and as a result, the Vancouver office
became redundant and it was decided to close it at the end of the fiscal year.
The Director of the Community Programmes Branch was appointed Secretary
of the Physical Fitness and Amateur Sport Fund and acted in this capacity throughout the year. All grant allocations, both Federal-Provincial and Provincial, were
administered in Victoria.
The Community Programmes Branch, through the Vancouver office, provided
a very significant service to sports bodies and agencies from 1962 to the present.
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH G  117
This service has laid the foundation for future procedure and, as a result, has enabled
the new Physical Fitness and Amateur Sport Fund to estabUsh itself on a good
foundation.
Federal-Provincial Projects, 1969/70
Sports and Fitness office, Vancouver   $22,250
Student Aid  6,000
British Columbia Sports Federation-Recreation Association office  19,500
C.A.H.P.E.R., Victoria Branch  700
Stop-watches, British Columbia Sports Federation  2,500
Scholarships and bursaries  15,000
British Columbia Sports Federation Seminars  700
Recreation Seminar for Professional People  500
Archery   1,800
Badminton  1,200
Baseball, minor   2,500
BasketbaU, amateur  3,000
Black belt, Judo  800
Bowling   500
Boys Clubs of Vancouver  500
Boy Scouts of Canada  800
Cricket  700
Cycling  800
Federation of School Athletic Associations  2,500
Fencing  300
Football, amateur  1,500
Girl Guides of Canada  500
Golf   500
Gymnastics   4,000
Hockey, amateur  3,800
Hockey, field (men's)   1,000
Hockey, field (women's)  2,000
Horse-owners  1,500
Kayaking and canoeing  1,800
Lacrosse  3,000
Mountain access  1,000
Rugby  1,500
Skating, figure  _.  3,000
Ski-ing, amateur  2,000
Ski-ing, water  1,000
Soccer  2,500
SoftbaU, amateur  700
Swimming, amateur  3,000
Swimming, Royal Life Saving Society  500
Swimming, synchronized  2,000
Swimming, water safety, Red Cross  500
Tennis, lawn  2,500
Tennis, table  500
Track and field  5,000
Volleyball   3,700
Weightlifting  1,000
Wheelchair sports  600
 G 118 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
Federal-Provincial Projects, 1969/70—Continued
  $3,000
  1,500
  1,000
  900
Wrestling, amateur
Yachting	
Youth Hostels 	
Y.W.C.A., Vancouver
Total	
.$139,550
 SPECIAL EDUCATION
G  119
SPECIAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. L. CANTY, B.A., M.Ed., DIRECTOR
As mentioned in the 1968/69 Annual Report, this Division was created during
that year to provide Provincial supervision of this very important part of the school
system. This is, therefore, the first time that an annual report of the activities of this
Division has been included as a separate section of the Annual Report of the Public
Schools.'
The Division has the following major areas of concern:—
1. Approval for grant purposes of special education programmes operated by
Boards of School Trustees.
2. Approval of tutorial assistance classes established in isolated areas under
section 20 of the Public Schools Act.
3. Responsibility at the Departmental level for the functioning of the Jericho
Hill Schools in Vancouver. The report of the Superintendent of these schools is
included as part of the report of this Division.
4. Liaison with other Government departments in matters concerning education of the handicapped, including representing the Department of Education on the
Provincial Youth Resources Panel and the Community Care Facilities Licensing
Board.
5. Liaison with private organizations operating special education programmes
and approval of any grants made to support such programmes.
In this first report, an attempt is made not only to indicate some details of the
work of the Division but also to give a background of the development of special
education in British Columbia.
Development of Special Education
The first official financial recognition of special classes in British Columbia was
made in amendments to the Public Schools Act in 1956. Nevertheless, special education had its beginnings over half a century ago. As early as 1901 an item appears
in the Public Schools Report indicating that the cost of " education of deaf and
dumb " in the Province was $3,208.50, believed to be the cost of sending children
to a school at Winnipeg. During the decade 1910-20, various classes were established in the Vancouver and Victoria areas to provide special education programmes
for deaf, blind, and mentally retarded pupils as well as for boys confined in the
detention home in Vancouver. From these beginnings, special classes continued to
increase in number, mainly in the two major population centres. There was, however, only token recognition of these efforts by the central Department of Education
until the school-year 1955/56. The growth of programmes and classes, approved
for grant purposes since that date, is indicated in the following table:—
Special Education Approvals, 1955-70
School-year Number of Approvals
1963/64  348
1964/65  409
1965/66  506
1966/67  597
1967/68  709
1968/69  744
1969/70  834
School-year Number of Approvals
1955/56  103
1956/57  126
1957/58  172
1958/59  172
1959/60  207
1960/61  249
1961/62  308
1962/63  322
 G 120
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
Enrolments in special classes and programmes, as reported by the School
Districts on September 30th, are shown in the following table:—
Special Education Programmes
Type
Number
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Function
Educable mentally retarded...
Trainable mentally retarded..
Remedial  	
Hospital and rehabilitation centrei-
Home instruction	
New Canadians	
Visual impairment	
Hearing impairment-
Detention home	
Speech .
Indian orientation —	
Educationally handicappedi-
Totals	
Number of
Approvals
1968
318
83
196
31
14
48
1
10
2
2
1
36
742
1969
304
90
295
33
14
46
1
15
2
5
2
42
8493
Number of
Pupils
1968
4,029
867
1,983
484
(2)
748
11
76
51
(2)
16
284
8,549
1969
3,908
916
3,665
522
(2)
687
5
134
66
(2)
23
321
10,247
i Combines two or more programmes previously shown separately.
2 Enrolment varies greatly.
s Total differs from that in previous table, since this figure includes all classes reported.
Occupational Classes
The Occupational programme was established in recognition of the futUity of
expecting all pupils of secondary school age to master a common curriculum. The
programme is oriented positively toward school leaving and entry into employment
at the end of two or three years, makes provision for work experience, and should
be based on the needs and conditions in the community concerned. It is designed
for pupUs of secondary age who are retarded in terms of school progress and show
indication of low scholastic-aptitude ratings.
Enrolments in classes in the Occupational programme in secondary schools,
as reported on September 30th, are shown in the following table:—
Occupational Programmes
Number of teachers 	
Number of pupUs	
1968
1969
290
324
5,068
5,167
Certificates are issued to pupUs who have successfully completed the Occupational programme. The number of certificates issued for the past five years is as
follows:—
Occupational Certificates
Year
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
Nnmher of r«rtifiratps issiwrl
1
704
696
677
792
644
 special education
Trainable Mentally Retarded Children
G  121
The training of trainable mentally retarded chUdren is conducted both in schools
operated by local chapters of the Association for Retarded Children of British Columbia, supported by grants made through Boards of School Trustees, and in classes
operated as part of the regular public schools of the Province. Details of schools,
classes, and enrolments are indicated in the following tables:—
Schools Operated by Chapters of the Association for Retarded Children
of British Columbia
Year
Districts
Schools
Enrolment of Pupils in Relation to Grants
Fully
Eligible
Kindergarten
Ineligible
Total
1968	
1969	
34
35
35
35
441
417
28
29
29
29
498
475
Classes Operated by School Districts
Year
Districts
Schools
Enrolments
1968...              	
1969              	
20
22
20
24
867      ,
916
Tutorial Assistance for Pupils in Isolated Areas
The establishment of classes for pupils living in isolated areas is authorized
where neither school accommodation nor transportation is avaUable. AU pupUs in
such classes must be assembled in suitable quarters during regular school hours, be
tutored by an instructor sanctioned by the Superintendent of Education, and be
enrolled in courses provided by the Division of Correspondence Education.
During the past school-year there were 16 classes of this nature in operation,
enrolling a total of 73 pupUs, of whom 63 were elementary pupUs and 10 were
secondary pupUs. These classes were operated in conjunction with the Division of
Correspondence Education and were authorized under the provisions of section 20
of the Public Schools Act. Under this section, salary aid in the form of a grant to
the teacher is paid directly by the Province. As of September, 1969, the grant
normally payable was increased to $20 per pupil per month of instruction.
Liaison Activities
Much of the work of this Division is concerned with mamtaining and developing effective liaison with a number of other Government departments and with various
private organizations. Liaison becomes desirable when the general welfare of a
handicapped child would be furthered by the provision of an educational programme.
There are many situations in which it is impossible for the chUd to attend a regular
public school situation. Attempts to provide educational opportunities while the
child remains at home or is confined to a treatment institution must then be explored.
In all cases the local school district is considered to be the primary source of the
educational programme.
While discussions were held with, and talks given to, many organizations, a few
of these deserve special mention.   At the beginning of the school-year, as a result of
 G 122 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
discussions among trustees and officials of School District No. 68 (Nanaimo), the
Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement, and this Department, arrangements were completed by which the Board of School Trustees of School District
No. 68 assumed responsibility for the operation of classrooms within the Brannan
Lake School for Boys. Reports received from the school district and the Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement indicate that this experiment is off
to a good start.
The Director was also a member of the Advisory Committee on Indian Education established by the Board of School Trustees of School District No. 46 (Sechelt)
in co-operation with the local association of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation in that district. The purpose of this committee was to assist the Board in making
the best possible provisions for the relatively large percentage of Indian students
within the schools of that district.
The Director of Special Education is also a member of the Board of Directors
of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind and of the Professional Advisory
Committee of the Association for Retarded Children of British Columbia, since both
these organizations are directly involved in educational activities relating to handicapped children.
Other Activities
During the year the Director was privileged to attend the Annual Conference
of the Council for Exceptional Children in Chicago, the Regional Conference of that
organization in Vancouver, and the First Annual Conference of the Canadian Association for the Deaf in Toronto. From all of these and other conferences and meetings attended he gained further insight into the educational needs of handicapped
children in British Columbia.
School Utilization Committee Report
Although the School Utilization Committee is not directly connected with the
work of this Division, the Director had been asked in 1968 to assume the chairmanship of the committee. In October, 1969, the committee submitted to the Honourable D. L. Brothers a report containing its observations concerning the utilization of
school buildings in this Province, together with a number of recommendations which
in the Committee's opinion would result in improvements in the extent of utilization.
These recommendations were concerned with the utilization of school buildings for
both the instruction of school-age children and with their use by the community at
large.
Trends
Although the 18 months of this Division's existence provide a rather limited
base for predictions, it is apparent that there are certain trends in existence in the
Province which must be recognized. There appears to be a definite move away from
almost exclusive reliance on special classes and curricula for the child with learning
problems. Through the utilization of special counsellors and remedial and other
supporting teachers, efforts are being made to provide assistance to the chUd whUe
he remains part of a regular instructional group. This trend is particularly noticeable
in provisions for the child with a mild degree of retardation or of emotional disturbance. Undoubtedly related to it is the growing number of requests that school
districts operate educational programmes within specialized institutions such as
therapeutic centres. Also noticeable are two distinct trends with respect to the
education of the deaf and hard of hearing. These take the form of increased insistence upon the provision of educational opportunities within the public schools, and
for the provision of pre-school educational programmes.
 SPECIAL EDUCATION
G 123
Finally, it must be noted that there appears to be a growing co-operation among
the various disciplines concerned with the welfare of handicapped chUdren. As a
result, the tendency by adherents of any one discipline to fit children into a predetermined category and then insist that a facility be created for that category of child
is being replaced by a tendency to study the needs of the particular child and then
determine how the resources of the community can best be mustered to provide the
needed assistance.
My thanks and appreciation must be extended at this time to the Deputy Minister
of Education, the Superintendent of Education, to other members of headquarters'
staff, and to the District Superintendents of Schools, particularly those in the 31
districts which were visited during the year. Without their assistance and co-operation, the work of establishing this Division would have been a much more difficult
task than it was. In addition, my appreciation is expressed to the various members
of the many organizations in this Province dedicated to improving the welfare of
handicapped children. In tackling the many problems of Special Education, I have
frequently drawn on their continued zeal and detailed knowledge.
 G 124
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF
EXAMINATIONS
REPORT OF EDWARD A. KILLOUGH, B.Ed., M.A., REGISTRAR
For reference convenience, this report includes data covering a number of years.
Teacher Registration and Certification
I. Each teacher employed in the public schools must hold a valid teaching
credential. Eligibility for a teaching credential is determined by this office, which
maintains an individual record for every teacher.
A highlight of 1968/69 was the full implementation of new regulations and
procedures whereunder the number of types of regular teaching credentials avaUable
for issue was reduced from six (Professional Advanced, Professional Basic, Professional C, Elementary A, Elementary B, and Elementary C) to three (Professional,
Standard, and Teaching Licence). The Professional and Standard are both certificates, and therefore may be made permanent following at least two years of satisfactory teaching service in British Columbia schools. The Professional certificate
requires completion of a minimum four-year programme, and the Standard certificate, of a minimum three-year programme, of post-secondary professional and academic or specialist studies, including appropriate basic teacher education. The
Teaching Licence, a credential which cannot be made permanent, requires completion of a similarly acceptable two-year post-secondary programme of studies,
including basic teacher education.
The new regulations, together with commensurate modifications of office procedures, made possible significant improvements in the service rendered by this
office to those applying for teaching credentials.
The following chart provides data concerning the number of records maintained for employed teachers:—
1
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
1969/70
2a 	
16,281
377
1,018
6.7
2,061
13.4
481
3,079
20.2
17,575
450
1,294
7.9
2,146
13.2
442
3,440
21.1
19,075
434
1,500
8.5
2,571
14.6
556
4,071
23.2
20,330
406
1,255
6.6
2,891
15.2
517
4,146
21.7
21,350
7b
399
Ir
1,020
5 0
?<1
^a
2,707
13 3
3b
4    .
5a
505
3,727
18 3
5b
1.   School-year.
2a. Teachers employed, as at October, from district nominal rolls. Figures include supervisors, consultants, relieving teachers, etc.
2b. Numbers teaching with temporary credentials (qualified, but over age) or letters of
permission (incomplete teacher training), included in 2a. A change in age regulations occurred
for 1966/67 and continued thereafter.   See Section II for details.
2c. Increase in teachers employed.
2d. Percentage increase in teachers employed.
3a. Numbers who were teaching as at June 30th in previous school-year but not teaching in
November of year shown;  that is, drop-outs.
3b. Drop-outs as a percentage of numbers employed in previous year.
4.   Numbers who left positions during school-year shown.
5a. Numbers of teachers needed in September of year shown to staff new postions and replace drop-outs from June previous; that is, teacher demand. This does not include replacements
for staff changes during the school-year.
5b. Teacher demand for September as a percentage of numbers employed in previous year.
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
G 125
II. The following table indicates the types and numbers of temporary teaching
credentials (qualified, but over age and Vocational C) and letters of permission
(incomplete teacher training) issued to teachers in the pubUc schools for the
applicable school-year:—
Year
Temporary
Elementary
(E-C)
Temporary
Secondary
(P-C)
Letters of
Permission
Vocational
C
Total Temp.
Cred. and
L. of P.
1965/66	
1966/67
1967/68
15 (1E-B)
6 (1 E-B)
2
2 (1 E-B)
5 (1 P-B)
3 (1 P-B)
2
355
427
420
389
356
2
14
10
15
43
377
450
434
1968/69    	
1969/70	
406
399
III. During the period up to the end of 1955/56, teacher-training was carried
out in normal schools or in the one-year courses for graduates at the university.
Enrolments, therefore, in such one-year courses were easy to determine. Commencing in 1956/57, all training has been in the Faculties of Education of the universities.
Enrolment figures, therefore, are more difficult to relate to completion of a basic
teacher-training programme, since enrolments cover all years of training.
(Note.—Data in sections III, IV, V, and VI are for the University of British
Columbia and the University of Victoria only.)
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
1969/70
la	
lb	
2,382
1,318
3,700
1,846
377
2,223
1,729
453
2,182
1,210
33
1,243
228
719
947
2,426
1,321
3,747
1,859
426
2,285
1,691
388
2,079
1,163
27
1,190
283
626
909
2,543
1,480
4,023
1,890
488
2,378
1,624
441
2,065
1,238
41
1,279
325
586
911
3,077
1,846
4,923
2,330
629
2,959
1,677
598
2,275
1,240
26
1,266
565
444
1,009
3,274
1,846
lc   -  	
5,120
2a
2b      	
2c 	
3a   	
3b 	
3c 	
4a   	
2,022
654
2,676
4b	
4c	
5a
5b                   	
5c        	
1. Teacher-training enrolments in all years—(a) elementary training, (A) secondary training,
(c) total. Additional persons from Simon Fraser University and Notre Dame were trained and
entered teaching.   Sections VII, VIII, IX.
2. Enrolled in training programmes likely leading to a teaching credential at end of academic
year—(a) elementary, (_) secondary, (c) total. The reduced enrolment reported in 2a and 2c for
1969/70 reflects .a change in regulations whereby the minimum tr_ining programme available to
most elementary trainees was of three rather than two years' duration. Some 563 persons registered in second year of the elementary programme are excluded from 2a and 2c data for 1969/70;
in previous years these trainees would have been reported as enrolled in programmes likely leading
to a teaching credential at the end of the academic year.
3. Listed by training college at end of academic year (prior to Summer Session or supplemental), and teaching considered likely (includes those who could be considered for letters of permission but not those who failed the year, failed practice teaching, or otherwise could not qualify).
For years prior to 1968/69, the discrepancy between the total of 3c and the total of 4c plus 5c
arises because the Industrial Education, Commerce, and Internship programmes were not completed until after the university term ended, and thus individuals on these programmes were not
included in 3c. Further, some not included in 3c later passed additional work to be included in
4c or 5c.
4. Number of those listed in 3 who were teaching as at November (after summer session and
supplemental) in school-year following training—(a) numbers with regular teaching credentials;
(b) numbers with temporary credentials, including letters of permission;   (c) total.
5. Numbers of those listed in 3—(a) not teaching as at November but teaching credentials
issued, (.) not teaching and no credentials issued or requested, (c) total not teaching.
 G 126
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
IV. The following table shows numbers of each type of teaching credential
awarded those in the training college in the year shown who were teaching in November of the year following; i.e., actual supply from the training college. For years
prior to 1968/69, those teaching on a letter of permission are identified as holding
either E-T or S-T qualifications. Note that while the demand for teachers has continued to rise, the supply from these two teacher-education institutions has remained
relatively constant in recent years.
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
Type
1968/69
Type
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
E-C      	
10
78
73
67
223
4
28
227
243
143
106
1
38
305
316
210
329
5
3
33
41
49
238
3
23
232
260
151
128
2
26
265
301
200
366
5
14
83
53
51
255
6
18
192
237
166
163
32
275
290
217
418
6
Teaching
licence 	
Standard	
Professional
Total
eligible
credentials _
Letter of
permission
Grand total—
79
62
374
130
214
381
E-B	
E-A   	
209
276
PC   	
P-B   	
P-A     	
755
Total
eligible
credentials—
E-T	
455
9
7
748
24
1,203
33
7
367
5
8
796
9
5
1,163
14
13
462
11
10
776
9
11
1,238
20
21
515
11
725
15
1,240
S-T
26
Grand total
471
772
1,243
380
810
1,190
483
796
1,279
526
740
1,266
V. Table V identifies the numbers of each type of teaching credential, either
issued or available, for those in these training institutions in the year shown who were
not teaching in November following. For years prior to 1968/69, E-T and S-T
indicate that had the individual taught, a letter of permission would have been required. The figures do not include those who would not have received a certificate,
those who would not have been considered for a letter of permission, nor those in
programmes not normally leading to certification; e.g., first-year elementary, various
years secondary. It is worth noting the number of trainees qualifying for higher-level
certificates who were not teaching in November following. In 1968/69, of 1,086
persons qualifying for Professional certificates, 331 (30.5%), were not teaching as
of November, 1969.
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
Type
1968/69
Type
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
E-C 	
32
61
47
15
35
1
110
313
129
28
28
142
374
176
43
63
1
13
41
39
24
46
2
89
296
145
43
38
3
102
337
184
67
84
5
13
43
26
15
63
84
295
159
41
47
97
338
185
56
100
Teaching
licence	
Standard 	
Professional
Total
eligible
credentials
Letter of
permission __
Grand total _
36
41
124
260
244
207
E-B     	
296
E-A
285
PC 	
331
P B
P-A     	
Total
eligible
credentials _
E-T
191
26
8
608
107
7
799
133
15
165
24
14
614
88
4
779
112
18
160
24
8
626
80
13
786
104
21
201
30
711
67
912
S-T	
97
Grand total
225
722
947
203
706
909
192
719
911
231
778
1,009
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
G  127
VI. From the preceding tables can be calculated supply from these training
institutions as a percentage of demand:—
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
1969/70
1 a    	
2,103
1,230
3,079
68.3
39.9
2,182
1,243
3,440
63.4
36.1
2,079
1,190
4,071
51.1
29.2
2,065
1,279
4,146
49.8
30.8
2,275
lb     	
2   . .   _ _    	
1,266
3,727
3a	
3b  -
61.0
34.0
la. Numbers in training college listed in June previous as likely available to teach in September of school-
year shown.
lb. Numbers in training college in June previous actually teaching in October of school-year shown.
2. Numbers needed in September to staff new positions and replace drop-outs from June previous; that is,
teacher demand.   This does not include further replacements required during the school-year.
3a. Numbers listed in training college in June as a percentage of demand;   that is, la as a percentage of 2.
3b. Numbers from training college who taught, as a percentage of demand; that is, lb as a percentage of 2,
actual training-college supply as a percentage of demand.
 G 128
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
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w
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
G 129
VIII. The following tables show the numbers of those listed by Notre Dame
University who undertook teacher-education leading to each type of teaching
credential.
(a) Numbers teaching in public schools, as at November following:—
Type
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
Type
1968/69
M. I F.    T.
1       1
M. I F.
1
T.
1
M. j F.
T.
1
M. 1 F.
1
T.
E-C        	
4
2
8
12
2
2
1
3
5
7
1
3
3
3
2
1
4
9
1
1
1
7
12
3
1
4
9
14
9
6
7
13
E-B 	
E-A
15
P-C    _
Professional	
Total eligible
credentials —	
Letter of permission
P-B-    .	
71
P-A -    	
Total eligible
credentials	
E-T  	
6
1
8
2
14
3
6
5
11
8
T
1
16     24
::: |i
27
1
22
49
S-T 	
1
7
10
17
6
5
11
9
16  I  25
28
22
50
(b) Numbers not teaching in public schools, as at November following:-
E-C
i
l
l
i
1
2
1
2
1
8
2
1
1
10
2
1
2
1
2
1
6
16
11
1
8
17
13
1
1
4
3
5
16
17
6
?n
E-B	
E-A 	
P-C 	
Standard 	
Professional 	
Total eligible
20
P-B	
11
P-A.  	
Total eligible
l
3
3
4
3
2
12
1
14
1
6
1
34
2
40
3
12
2
39
2
51
E-T	
Letter of permission
S-T  .  .     ..	
4
i
6
7
2
13
15
7
36
43
14
41
51
IX. The supply of teachers from the training institutions of the Universities
of British Columbia, Victoria, Simon Fraser, and Notre Dame, as calculated from
the lists provided by these institutions, is shown below. Data for Notre Dame are
not included in figures prior to 1968/69, but represented less than 1 per cent of
the demand. Figures prior to 1966/67 include only the Universities of British
Columbia and Victoria.
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
1969/70
1 	
2	
3	
1,230
3,079
39.9
1,257
3,440
36.5
1,321
4,071
32.4
1,558
4,146
37.6
1,604
3.727
43.0
1. Numbers in training institutions listed for previous training-year, actually teaching in
October of school-year shown.
2. Numbers needed in September to staff new positions and replace dTop-outs from June
previous; that is, teacher-demand. This does not include further replacements during the school-
year.
3. Numbers from training institutions who taught, as a percentage of demand; that is, actual
training-institution supply as a percentage of demand.
X. Teacher Exchange.—Teacher-exchange applications proceed through the
Registrar's office. Although the number of applications from British Columbia
teachers annually exceeds that of exchange positions available, the reduced number
of exchanges completed for 1969/70, particularly with other provinces, was disappointing.
5
 G 130
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
1969/70
20
2
24
2
25
10
1
16
11
13
4
2
Totals 	
22
26
36
27
19
Division of Examinations
I. Examination Preparation and Marking.—Again this year, school students
required to write Grade XII Departmental examinations received final standing
based on the average of a mark assigned by the school plus the mark earned on the
regular Departmental examination, each of equal weighting. In order to provide
additional opportunity for students to complete Academic-Technical Programme
graduation requirements, a second annual regular Departmental examination session
was introduced, effective January, 1970.
The school-years 1965/66 and 1966/67 saw the phasing-out of former University Programme Departmental examinations at the Grades XI-XII level and the
introduction of new Academic-Technical Programme requirements characterized by
fewer examinations. This change is reflected in Tables A and C below, indicating
relatively large numbers of candidates registered, and of papers marked for those two
years. The reduced number of regular Grade XII Departmental examinations
marked in the past two years (Table C) resulted from a change in regulations where-
under recommended scholarship candidates are no longer required to write the regular examination in addition to the special scholarship examination. Since June,
1969, all regular Departmental examinations have been entirely objective in format.
These papers are computer-scored, therefore accounting for the decrease in the
number of Assistant Examiners appointed as markers in 1968/69 and 1969/70
(Table D).
Grade XII scholarship examinations and Grade XIII examinations remain
predominantly subjective in format, and, consequently, Assistant Examiners were
appointed to mark these papers. Grade XII students competing for a Provincial
Government scholarship are required to write special scholarship Departmental
examinations in two courses. As indicated in Table C, the number of scholarship
papers marked in 1969/70 increased some 28 per cent over that of the previous
school-year. However, opening of additional regional and district colleges in recent
years has resulted in a continuing decrease both in the number of Grade XIII candidates registered (Table A) and of Grade XIII examinations marked (Table C).
A. Number of Candidates
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
1969/70
Grade XII—
January	
17,470
18,910
3,962
17,769
18,586
21,952
18,586
21,952
17,470
18,910
21,731
Grade XIII—
June  	
August -
3,068
909
2,784
658
2,016
528
1,224
326
801
82
Totals 	
3,977
3,442
2,544
1,550
883
22,563
25,394
20.014
20,460
22,614
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS G 131
B. Candidates Completing
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
1969/70
Grade XII—
I
!
!
938
June  	
9,870
10,722
11,448
12,253
12,979
Totals 	
9,870
10,722
11,448
12.253
13,917
Grade XIII—
June  	
August	
733
202
602
87
470
67
268
41
131
38
Totals	
935
689
537
309
169
10,805
11,411
1
11,985
12,562
14,086
C. Papers Mark
ed
Grade XII—
January (regular)   	
1
1
38,919
       |
24,676
4,927
21,955
5,466
19,242
5,345
4,003
17,046
June (scholarship) 	
6,824
Totals 	
38,919      |
29,603
27,421
24,587
27,873
Grade XIII—
12,278      1
2,181      1
10,534
1,226
8,813
961
4,978
447
3,121
373
Totals	
14,459      |
11,760
9,774
5,425
3,494
Grand totals	
53,378      I
1
41,363
37,195
30,012
31,367
D. Number of Assistant Examiners (Markers)
June	
August    	
1
519      [
15      |
344
11
3fl0
16
151
14
163
15
Totals	
534      |
I
355
316
165
178
For 1969/70, regular Departmental examinations covering 11 courses were
prepared for each of January and June, and a further 11 special scholarship examinations were provided for June only. Twenty Grade XIII courses were examined in
both June and August. In June, 1970, 173 regular and special examination centres
were established in the Province and 24 outside British Columbia, with the farthest-
removed centres being in Switzerland and Germany.
II. Scholarship Examination Results.—Under new regulations in effect this
school-year, scholarships were awarded on a rank basis to all qualifying students
who wrote for scholarships and achieved averages of 70 per cent or higher, providing
the number of awards made did not exceed 17 per cent of the total Grade XII Academic-Technical Programme and Grade XIII enrolment. In June, 1970, of the
3,087 Grade XII and Grade XIII students who wrote for scholarships, 1,080 qualified for three-quarters, 1,140 for one-half, and 150 for one-third of their next year's
post-secondary tuition fees.
The tabulation below indicates the top-ranking Grade XII and Grade XIII
scholarship candidates for the school-year 1969/70, and the schools attended by
these students. Grade XII scholarship averages are based on the candidate's best
two scholarship examinations. For Grade XIII, averages comprise marks on
English and four other Departmental examinations based on Grade XIII courses.
Chris Patrick Archibald, of J. Lloyd Crowe Secondary School in Trail, ranked first
on the Grade XII scholarship examinations, and won the Governor-General's silver
medal. The Governor- General's bronze medal was awarded to Daniel Wing Wong,
a Grade XII student at Cowichan Senior-secondary School, Duncan.   Four candi-
 G 132
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1969/70
dates obtained averages of 98.5 per cent, but, as only one bronze medal was to be
awarded, the Provincial Board of Examiners chose Mr. Wong as the most eligible on
the bases of the best average rank in the examinations written. The other three
candidates were Paul Hamilton Durham, of Mount Baker Secondary School, Cranbrook; Roberta Christine Melton, of Point Grey Secondary School, Vancouver; and
William Allan Squires, of Oak Bay Senior-secondary School, Victoria.
Name
School
Average
Grade XII Candidates
Chris Patrick Archibald _ _	
Daniel Wing Wong 	
Paul Hamilton Durham	
Roberta Christine Melton	
William Allan Squires -	
Frances Rachel Frankcnburg	
William David Mark Latham 	
David Joseph Newberry _	
Bruce Edward Turkington_ _	
James Edward Davidson	
Leo Grinblats  _
Kevin Thomas Ruddell 	
Philip Desmond Bennett—	
David Blair McDonald 	
Garry Robert Mitchel _	
Douglas Stephen Reid 	
Cyril Yip Chow Chan  	
David Jeffrey Chercover __	
Shelly Joyce Lundberg	
Richard John Bacchus 	
Michael Karl Epstein 	
Charles Augustin Lin —
Peter Gerald Ludemann	
Andrew Penn  	
David Anthony Todd 	
Joanne Beetstra  	
Patrick Michael Campbell	
Dennis Richard Crabtree   	
Godtfred Holmvang  	
Teresa Marie Kope	
Douglas Kenton LaRoy 	
Manfred John Maier  	
Robert Duncan Klett 	
Valerie Jean Lindsay 	
John Henry McConville 	
Teresa Plowright 	
Margaret Karen Roe	
Teresa Adelina Tenisci 	
Annette Mary Walker.. 	
Leslie Watanabe    	
Charles Frank Willms  	
Top-ranking Grade XIII Candidates
Wendy Joy Sperling  	
Janice Marilynn Rode -  	
Muriel Dorothy Arnason 	
Joan Elaine Toews 	
Martin Beerens  	
Ernie Walter Quiring 	
J. Lloyd Crowe Senior Secondary-
Cowichan Senior Secondary	
Mount Baker Secondary	
Point Grey Secondary 	
Oak Bay Senior Secondary	
Eric Hamber Secondary 	
St. George's Private.
Oak Bay Senior Secondary	
Oak Bay Senior Secondary	
Sir Winston Churchill Secondary ...
J. Lloyd Crowe Senior Secondary-
Sir Winston Churchill Secondary -
Centennial Secondary	
St. George's Private  	
Vancouver College Private	
Golden Secondary 	
University Hill Secondary 	
Eric Hamber Secondary.
Princess Margaret Secondary...
Vancouver College Private....
Lord Byng Secondary.
Sir Winston Churchill Secondary-
Lake Cowichan Secondary- —
Shawnigan Lake Private.
Oak Bay Senior Secondary 	
J. Lloyd Crowe Senior Secondary..
Oak Bay Senior Secondary 	
Dr. Knox Secondary  	
Delbrook Senior Secondary	
ChiUiwack Senior Secondary-
New Westminster Senior Secondary-
Mount Douglas Senior Secondary	
Sir Winston Churchill Secondary	
Sir Winston Churchill Secondary	
St. George's Private .
Burnaby South Senior Secondary-
Oak Bay Senior Secondary 	
J. Lloyd Crowe Senior Secondary....
Oak Bay Senior Secondary..
Mount Elizabeth Senior Secondary..
Centennial Secondary	
Abbotsford Senior Secondary	
Abbotsford Senior Secondary	
Queen Elizabeth Senior Secondary „
Abbotsford Senior Secondary..	
Alberni District Secondary 	
Abbotsford Senior Secondary	
00
50
50
.50
50
00
00
00
00
50
50
,50
.00
.00
.00
00
50
50
50
00
.00
.00
00
00
.00
50
50
.50
.50
.50
50
.50
.00
00
00
00
00
.00
.00
.00
.00
87.60
85.40
83.60
83.40
82.60
80.00
Additional information on Provincial Government scholarship awards, as well
as Provincial Government bursaries and Canada student loans, appears in the Report
of the Assistant Superintendent of Education (University and College Affairs).
 EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT
G  133
EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT
REPORT OF MRS. VERNA KINGSLEY, SECRETARY TO
THE COMMISSION
During the school-year 1969/70, a total of 376 applications was considered
by the Commission. Of these, 113 were ineligible, the main reason being that
family income was higher than the ceiling set by the Commission for grant purposes.
For the first payment of the grant, 263 students were approved; for the second
payment of the grant, 241 applications were approved. Of the 22 students who
became ineligible for the second payment, 11 had withdrawn from school, 10 had
poor reports, and 1 was eliminated because of an increase in the total family income.
The students who were eligible for the second payment of the grant were distributed by grades, as follows: Grade IX, 57; Grade X, 56; Grade XI, 71; Grade
XII, 57.
The students in the greatest financial need received $139.14 for the year, and
the balance received $119.14.
 G 134
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
STRATHCONA TRUST
REPORT OF THOMAS H. BUCKHAM, B.Com., SECRETARY, LOCAL
COMMITTEE, STRATHCONA TRUST FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA
For many years the Province has participated in the Strathcona Trust. An
annual grant of approximately $1,700 has been received in recent years. The money
has been utilized to encourage physical fitness in the schools, as well as cadet training.
The Local Committee, Strathcona Trust for British Columbia, administers the
money received and consists of military representatives and representatives of the
Department of Education. The annual meeting was held on November 5, 1969, at
Headquarters, Pacific Region, Department of National Defence, in Vancouver.
Cadet awards have been made to the National Cadet Camp, to the Annual
Cadet Trades Training Camp at Vernon, and the Annual Strathcona Trust Rifle
Competition. The Local Committee has enthusiastically received the formation of
the Tri-Service Cadet Tattoo by providing a substantial grant to them.
 STATISTICAL TABLES
 G 136
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
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  G 154
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys      Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
II
III
16
20
15
119
114
132
12
8
5
9
8
10
58
48
72
1
1
Primary
Special
District No. 1 (Fernie)
Secondary—Sparwood..
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Fernie -
Elementary-Junior Secondary—J affray-
Elementary—
Isabella Dicken	
Elko  -	
Grasmere	
Michel-Natal.
Waldo	
Totals, District No. 1	
District No. 2 (Cranbrook)
Secondary—Mount Baker	
J unior Secondary.—Laurie— —
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Parkland.
Elementary—■
Muriel Baxter  _	
Cranbrook CentraL.
Moyie    	
T. M. Roberts	
Tenth Avenue	
Amy Woodland	
Totals, District No. 2. _
District No. 3 (Kimberley)
Secondary—Selkirk  	
Junior Secondary—McKim  __
Elementary—■
Blarchmont— - —
Chapman Camp..
Lindsay Park	
Marysville	
Meadowbrook	
Ta Ta	
Wasa _ _ _
A. A. Watkins __
Totals, District No. 3	
District No. 4 (Windermere)
Secondary—David Thompson 	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Canal Flats 	
Edgewater 	
Elementary—
Brisco	
Galena	
Invermere	
J. Alfred Laird-
Radium	
Wilmer	
Windermere...
Totals, District No. 4__
District No. 7 (Nelson)
Secondary—L. V. Rogers 	
Junior Secondary—Trafalgar-
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Salmo .
Elementary—
Balfour   	
Blewett	
A. I. Collinson 	
Harold Lakes..
Hume	
Nelson Central-
North Shore	
Procter	
Rosemont	
Salmo	
181
896
224
522
56
47
395
14
95
455
107
291
33
26
206
7
86
441
117
231
23
21
189
7
2,335 I    1,220 I    1,115
792
477
368
253
609
12
497
354
497
424
247
206
130
312
6
261
198
251
368
230
162
123
297
6
236
156
246
3,859 j 2,035 | 1,824
427
535
223
HI
133
225
84
30
47
531
221
260
112
54
60
117
50
15
22
279
206
275
111
57
73
108
34
15
25
252
346
1,190
438
222
204
107
141
73
17
10
15
9
209
115
162
75
45
27
48
22
83
49
1,156
216
97
68
7
6
94
87
18
26
34
362
709
711
384
712
352
336
169
28
12
152
78
136
74
29
16
449
225
453
224
96
47
82
37
218
110
322
167
1
653
327
360
167
16
74
62
13
224
229
49
45
108
155
105
33
68
57
133
24
50
38
87
61
73
5
2
3
85
75
58
56
63
55
65
69
63
33
35
43
18
16
16
48
24
61
32
36
29
15
8
16
17
14
16
38
37
29
201
170 I
13
39
34
37
13
15
14
6
1
5
3
4
3
31
15
22
27
29
32
6
10
7
13
9
6
18
23
9
156
140
135
5
5
4
29
18
11
20
16
5
5
5
67
41
48
62
64
42
12
12
14
10
14
13
29
28
34
53
48
50
17
138 I  214 I  199 I  235 |
17
258 I  322 I  320 |  290 |
13
13
13
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G  155
ENROLMENT
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
12           3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
43
53
28
34
23
78
133
107
105
14
17
16
77
99
81
105
64
19
14
24
31
35
23
27
	
35
12
11
8
11
4
5
_
51
43
39
51
—
	
	
4
8
	
	
	
	
	
	
210
213
183
187
14
17 |       16 |   	
155
175
136
139
87
	
7
4
2
41
236
268
234
167
310
28
29
129
26
156
	
	
35
37
35
34
65
2
73
75
66
101
13
	
	
82
67
34
102
89
109
	
	
311
311 |     306
264
39
7 |         4 |         2
323
351
236
268
234
	
95
204
128
12
14
176
210
123
	
	
33
45
34
18
14
29
-       	
	
36
24
25
30
8
15
22
11
19
	
	
69
94
92
149
23
	
	
175
211 |     202
179
23
12 |       14
176
210
218
204
128
11
4
3
62
155
72
82
49
23
21
19
17
14
16
5
5
19
17
16
28
22
	
	
—jjjj
40
54
5
	
	
	
	
22
20
32
	
7
8
7
	
	
13
7
20
13
	
	
130
106 |      114
99
5
11 |         4 |         3
98
155
72
82
49
224
240
247
13
10
10
306
307
66
	
81
5
3
1
80
53
46
40
27
	
5
4
5
19
18
21
23
17
24
20
39
5
4
5
	
49
66
66
61
55
49
70
67
15
15
15
13
14
14
17
26
22
32
19
36
53
38
	
6
	
	
 G 156
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 7 (Nelson)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
South Nelson	
W. E. Wasson .
Willow Point...
Ymir _	
Totals, District No. 7_
District No. 8 (Slocan)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—
Lucerne   	
Mount Sentinel —
Elementary-Junior Secondary—W. E. Graham
Elementary—
Crescent Valley 	
New Denver 	
Perry's.
Silverton	
Slocan 	
Slocan Park-
South Slocan..
Winlaw	
Totals, District No. 8-
District No. 9 (Castlegar)
Secondary—Stanley Humphries	
Junior Secondary—Kinnaird	
Elementary—
Blueberry Creek.	
Brilliant	
Castlegar	
Kinnaird	
Ootischenia-
Pass Creek—
Robson	
Shoreacres...
Tarrys -
Twin Rivers-
Valley Vista..
Woodland Park-
Totals, District No. 9 _
District No. 10 (Arrow Lakes)
Secondary—Nakusp	
Elementary-
Burton 	
Edgewood-
Fauquier	
Glenbank—
Nakusp	
Totals, District No. 10_
District No. 11 (Trail)
Secondary—
J. Lloyd Crowe .
Rossland	
Junior Secondary—Trail .
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Fruitvale..
Elementary—
Beaver Falls 	
Cook Avenue...
Genelle	
Glenmerry	
Maclean	
Montrose	
Laura J. Morrish-
Sunningdale	
Tadanac	
Trail Central	
James L. Webster-
335
15
61
47
189
7
27
26
146
8
34
21
44
4
29
10
40
5
30
6
182
2,144
132
74
223
121
142
80
113
61
85
45
18
9
56
29
87
50
53
29
54
27
48
26
2,038
226
821
307
104
40
149
395
38
38
185
37
139
377
71
141
2,842
260
56
44
37
141
289
~S2T
1,155
444
669
730
15
283
45
313
360
239
477
170
73
494
308
Totals, District No. 11..
5,775
58
102
62
52
40
9
27
37
24
27
22
359
306
281
19
27
32
15
10
8
31
25
14
13
15
14
13
14
1
7
1,011 I  551 |  460
76
95
87
402
160
57
21
82
209
15
17
95
17
61
194
34
83
419
147
47
19
67
186
23
21
90
20
78
183
37
58
	
23
17
11
31
68
81
29
30
60
8
5
8
14
6
8
32
35
9
11
21
15
31
70
31
40
22
14
19
1,447 | 1,395
|  248 |  252 |  249
142
29
26
22
71
130
420
643
226
347
388
4
152
26
158
193
126
255
92
37
253
157
3,057
118
27
18
15
70
159
44
407
44 |
I   9
9
1   6
7
5
6
19
24
1  31
31
|  70
77
10
9
5
26
34
84
512
218
322
342
11
131
19
155
167
113
222
78
36
241
151
71
3
39
17
45
49
40
53
27
15
60
36
63
5
47
6
42
38
38
61
15
22
60
35
2,718
|  455
432
72
7
45
11
40
52
29
58
22
8
59
32
435
14
22
10
10
11
9
~_iT
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G 157
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
vn
1
2     [      3
1
vra
DC
X
XI
XII
XIII
45
6
45
11
37
6
38
14
	
	
292
325 |     332
341
20
18 |       13 |       11
386
360
336
280
274
28
20
26
29
9
11
26
16
24
24
52
33
10
	
	
	
25
34
29
29
33
25
20
34
29
18
32
16
38
	
16
17
30
15
106
95 |       66
109
io I   1  1 --
88
87
83
50
54
17
74
5
4
38
11
18
60
30
16
37
8
~25
~32
64
~32
~92
.._ __
109
9
7
7
248
167
59
245
194
192
20
9
61
4
12
6
31
6
22
74
14
247
257 |     214
225
12
9 |         7 |         7
248
226
245
194
192
	
8
2
4
28
33
4
7
5
22
31
6
5
3
54
	
	
	
55
79
68
23
35
10
8
9
22
31
80
75 |       69
68
-  1   --- 1
55
79
68
23
35
	
85
28
44
52
35
77
29
10
67
48
82
43
35
54
33
83
22
83
45
75
42
~S6
57
36
67
28
70
56
2
16
7
15
5
5
95
321
107
81
312
103
441
102
365
95
349
57
64
39
11
51
58
28
67
27
	
	
18
59
56
27
	
478
475 |     480
487
27
18 |       22 |       10
523
496
543
460
406
 G 158
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total   I   Boys
District No. 12 (Grand Forks)
Secondary—Grand Forks 	
Elementary—
Christina Lake	
Grand Forks ..
John A. Hutton .
Totals, District No. 12..
District No. 13 (Kettle Valley)
Secondary—Boundary Central	
Elementary—
Beaverdell  —
Bridesville  	
Greenwood  	
Kettle Valley  	
Midway..   	
Westbridge.
Totals, District No. 13
District No. 14 (Southern Okanagan)
Secondary—Southern Okanagan	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Osoyoos _
Elementary—
Okanagan Falls  -	
Oliver    	
Totals, District No. 14_
District No. 15 (Penticton)
Secondary—Penticton..
Junior Secondary—■
McNicoll Park	
Princess Margaret.—
Elementary—•
Carmi Avenue	
Columbia	
Kaleden.
Learning Centre 	
Learning Centre Annex..
Naramata	
Nkwala	
O'Connell	
Queens Park-
Snowdon	
Uplands	
West Bench...
Totals, District No. 15	
District No. 16 (Keremeos)
Secondary—Similkameen- 	
Elementary—
Cawston  	
Hedley.
Keremeos ..
Totals, District No. 16..
District No. 17 (Princeton)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Princeton-
Elementary—■
Allison Pass	
Coalmont	
Tulameen	
Totals, District No. 17_
District No. 18 (Golden)
Secondary—Golden...
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Field-
Elementary—
Alexander Park	
Columbia Valley..
580
52
619
266
299
24
328
143
Girls
517
794
191
99
53
28
40
22
263
136
39
16
35
22
33
17
281
28
291
123
"723"
92
25
18
127
23
13
16
654 |       340 |
755
730
101
777
386
380
48
419
1,191
643
482
247
439
212
534
261
53
32
125
58
57
36
17
9
136
76
336
164
475
242
487
246
400
210
229
122
131
70
248
140
72
252
128
72
33
133
712 |
366
777
10
17
14
423
818 |       445 |
511
100
267
111
246
45
142
64
314
369
350
53
358
2,363  |    1,233  |    1,130
548
235
227
273
21
67
21
8
60
172
233
241
190
107
61
5,092 |    2,628 |    2,464
120
39
119
346
354
5
8
6
373
265
55
125
47
Kindergarten
55
37
Grade
92
39
39
12
71
27
III
9
91
37
Primary
Special
105  |     110 |     137
12
11
22
12
5
9
12
11
18
22
21
7
13
3
3
45
62
62
62 |
52
62
13
120
75
24
113
195
212
46
22
20
18
44
44
60
59
29
12
56
31
16
22
49
57
75
66
33
9
74
13
100
187
75
22
47
50
73
51
37
16
20
21
7
20
27
27
23
7
29
54 |
68
59
67
1
2
3
73
17
52
19
61
1
7
4
73
34
21
66
69
37
19
17
67 |       17
14
"14"
23
354 |     414 |     384 |       23
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G  159
ENROLMENT-
-Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1             1
112     13
1            1
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
10
10
6
127
82
133
117
95
10
6
7
72
35
81
29
82
30
97
36
	
  .
117 |     116 |     119
133
10 |       10 |        6
127
82
133
117
95
-  1   -	
50
46
55
40
6 1         5
3
6
	
	
	
	
36 1       38
37
31
8            8
10
13
3 |   ........
4 |         6
5
7
57 |       57 |       55
57
	
-  1   	
50
46
55
40
-   -- 1   -	
9
6
126
143
127
151
193
48
95
67
77
18
74
70
70
11
100
13
99
14
118
13
96
	
17
159 |     207 |     199
186
35
- 1        9 |         6
200
213
197
151
193
 1  1 _	
	
8
4
10
123
179
163
142
157
144
126
146
132
407
337
34
 .
90
92
76
99
.
	
	
19
20
24
13
	
	
	
	
	
34
17
	
	
	
	
22
52
82
73
57
39
11
19
46
87
74
51
34
21
17
50
91
67
58
35
25
16
48
64
65
58
22
37
	
445  |     444 |     443
422
51
8 |         4 |       10
465
443
404
407
337  |       34
1
8
1
67
62
47
34
28
19
17
21
19
6
21
10
30
10
28
12
31
	
  |
10
46 |       57 |       59
62
10
1  |         8  |          1
67
62
47
34
28 |   	
65
3
60
1
62
2
69
2
6
2
2
57
54
63
32
49
	
2
3
2
4
1
	
.	
	
	
	
74 |       65 |       66
71
6
2
2
57
54
63
32
49 |   	
6
4
6
118
137
118
66
56
8
13
10
10
8
8
4
6
36
34
38
36
20
18
14
	
	
 G 160
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys      Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
II
III
Primary
Special
District No. 18 (Golden)-
Elementary—Continued
Donald  	
-Continued
Golden	
Nicholson	
Rogers Pass.
Totals, District No. 18-
District No. 19 (Revelstoke)
Secondary—Revelstoke	
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Mica..
Elementary—
Big Eddy	
Farwell 	
Mount Begbie	
Mountain View-
Selkirk 	
Trout Lake	
Totals, District No. 19_
District No. 21 (Armstrong)
Secondary—Armstrong	
Elementary—
Armstrong.
Len W. Wood-
Totals, District No. 21..
District No. 22 (Vernon)
Senior Secondary—Vernon	
Junior Secondary—Charles Bloom	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Clarence Fulton	
W. L. Seaton	
Elementary—
B.X 	
Beairsto _	
Cherryville ~
Coldstream _
Harwood __
Lavington 	
J. W. Inglis _ 	
Lumby Primary	
Okanagan Landing.
Silver Star...	
South B.X.    	
West Vernon	
Totals, District No. 22..
District No. 23 (Kelowna)
Secondary—
George Elliot _ _	
Ke'.owna 	
Dr. Knox _	
George Pringle .
Rutland	
Elementary—
Bankhesd _
Benvoulin....
Black Mountain.
Central   	
DeHart Avenue	
East Kelowna	
Ellison — _
Glenmore _.	
Glenn Avenue	
Gordon 	
Graham	
Lakeview Heights...
Martin 	
45
466
187
9
27
243
91
4
18
223
96
5
1,696
862
834
710
307
93
268
229
425
239
9
2,280
403
457
223
357
160
45
143
132
220
123
4
353
147
48
125
97
205
116
5
15
61
39
2
6
64
27
1
61
33
1
205
161
1,184
1,096
223
241
106
47
19
70
30
87
1
43
24
54
29
72
2
41
16
55
36
69
2
254 |     224 |     219 |
180
216
117
80
102
1,083 |       570 |       513
|       80 |     102
857
449
257
127
790
384
912
464
190
106
596
299
74
29
408
198
467
240
140
54
407
205
97
45
240
129
445
231
37
16
485
245
408
130
406
448
84
297
45
210
227
86
202
52
111
214
21
240
6,402 |    3,221 |    3,181
255
1,907
1,010
377
635
475
38
18
406
117
96
59
381
123
119
56
245
373
133
980
505  |
185
299
221
22
13
188
67
42
31
179
74
65
27
127
198
122
927
505
192
336
254
16
5
218
50
54
28
202
49
54
29
118
175
100
100 i
25
87
9
59
78
12
~56
33
62
6
84
—
21
27
88
108
9
15
56
52
65
82
28
15
43
68
41
29
36
71
65
10
7
81
79
62
12
10
68
13
9
35
29
39
18
34
14
13
42
32
27
42
36
60
9
47
33
39
44
12
167 |       12
11
11
31
12
511  |     542 |     554 |       43
15
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G 161
ENR(
3LMENT-
-Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
vn
Special
1
2
3
vra
DC
X
XI
XII
XIII
7
4
41
30
1
5
56
26
2
89
2
	
	
—
66
32
16
169
141
151
137
16
6 |        4 |         6
126
145
122
72
56 |   	
32
26
22
9
8
5
164
17
164
16
131
17
118
10
111
36
24
10
39
39
76
38
129
169
	
	
	
	
	
50
57
38
13
1
2
1
—
	
206
198 |     193
192
13
9
8 |         5
181
180
148
128
"1 1   - -
14
15
110
76
72
57
59
108
67
28
97
~ 98
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
108
95
97
98
	
14
15
	
110
76
72
57
59
	
	
	
	
	
8
5
6
88
~76
~~74
447
410
	
177
143
18
10
12
219
236
197
266
197
227
25
35
99
7
73
74
22
65
37
70
74
33
80
8
54
76
26
82
37
98
91
24
15
64
16
60
31
E
93
11
10
50
77
21
3
89
	
37
79
14
76
	
572
556 |     585
530
13
26 |       15
18
543
539
498
447
410 |   ,	
	
	
	
57
38
35
79
351
260
106
197
68
323
264
95
179
52
318
234
91
137
30
410
143
51
67
26
375
109
34
55
	
	
67
5
77
66
89
-_
72
83
23
76
~~82
31
105
47
72
1-6
100
32
63
49
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
29
25
93
11
19
18
23
64
	
6
 G 162
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 23 (Kelowna)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
369
118
119
130
127
12
125
84
208
508
475
147
768
309
235
364
176
261
194
63
65
62
68
8
66
46
111
263
255
89
405
138
119
191
88
149
175
55
54
68
59
4
59
38
97
245
220
58
363
171
116
173
88
112
	
34
21
88
20
7
53
21
31
80
82
26
11
31
41
33
5
61
20
27
71
64
22
134
45
50
42
56
29
89
25
11
11
31
75
71
26
111
52
44
50
63
14
|       20
|     126
  1   	
      |       40
-  1       55
  |       59
  1   -	
16
9
Winfield                              	
12
Totals, District No. 23 -
11,225
5,736
5,489
   |  1,032
997
997
71
District No. 24 (Kamloops)
Senior Secondary—
Kamloops    	
806
592
320
620
1,046
866
553
12
16
486
321
665
241
274
22
315
518
58
200
458
45
552
492
256
499
211
466
192
139
226
318
521
405
284
115
222
462
307
172
331
539
470
297
7
9
257
163
354
126
152
13
154
278
36
99
213
22
289
266
135
274
114
229
97
66
115
164
279
213
146
58
105
344
285
148
289
507
396
256
5
7
229
158
311
115
122
9
161
240
22
101
245
23
263
226
121
225
97
237
95
73
111
154
242
192
138
57
117
1
1
—.  |   —
   1   	
3
4
86
50
77
64
52
44
73
72
10
91
59
39
88
28
72
20
22
32
52
71
60
54
18
25
4
5
63
45
86
58
41
52
79
80
16
85
65
44
61
28
69
13
17
33
43
75
44
47
16
28
Secondary—Chase   	
Junior Secondary—
Brocklehurst ~  	
	
51
5
7
60
46
66
59
68
22
36
84
59
19
81
59
40
61
30
63
20
35
24
46
82
52
44
13
41
Elementary—•
Blocklehurst — - -
Dallas	
Fitzwater   -
12
Heffley Creek	
7
Overlander     	
A. E. Perry	
6
Savnna
Valleyview -  _	
Westsyde _	
	
Stuart Wood 	
Totals, District No. 24	
13,332
7,011
6,321
51
1,222
1,266
1,197
25
District No. 25 (Barriere)
Secondary—Barriere.  	
Elementary—
226
350
14
16
117
185
3
10
109
165
11
6
48
3
5
48
2
3
58
3
3
Chu Chua  	
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G  163
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
47
60
30
22
18
34
77
61
20
115
63
40
44
57
57
24
61
62
16
92
57
36
58
71
46
27
32
72
72
22
96
83
42
61
29
-----
	
	
27
14
29
72
63
21
78
54
30
56
72
971
977 |     937
963
96
57 |       38 |       35
993
929
832
701
599
  1   	
	
65
40
114
38
51
72
61
70
90
31
78
31
63
24
8
37
34
73
59
32
16
28
19
10
17
44
10
	
	
19
18
14
20
53
237
358
253
207
	
75
220
313
263
182
--
70
153
325
268
154
407
338
70
313
254
33
86
84
44
144
45
64
66
66
72
72
33
71
37
64
39
28
29
40
69
62
41
22
33
72
41
107
55
71
62
60
82
77
26
73
28
55
40
19
34
53
69
61
37
11
34
56
55
71
60
62
45
96
46
60
	
71
70
30
67
6
29
74
36
	
10
37
50
 — |
82
  |
  1   	
67
.
29
19
33
1,209
1,225 | 1,167
1,115
52
100
37
34
1,108
1,053
970
815
600
86
39
3
3
51
62
	
65
„—
47
33
47
34
44
3
2
 G 164
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 25 (Barriere)-
Elementary—Continued
Little Fort	
Louis Creek 	
•Continued
Totals, District No. 25..
District No. 26 (Birch Island)
Secondary—Clearwater	
Elementary—
Avola
Birch Island..
Blue River.—
Dutch Lake _
Star Lake.—
Vavenby	
Totals, District No. 26	
District No. 27 (Williams Lake)
Secondary—■
Columneetza..
100 Mile House-
Junior Secondary—Williams Lake-
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Boss Mountain	
Bridge Lake	
Horsefly 	
Elementary-
Alexis Creek	
Big Creek 	
Big Lake.
Buffalo Creek	
Canim Lake East.
Chilcotin Road	
Crescent Heights.-
Deka Lake	
Dog Creek	
Eagle Creek	
Empire Valley	
Forest Grove	
Gang Ranch	
Glendale	
Kwaleen	
Lac la Hache	
Lakehill 	
Likely
Lone Butte —
McLeese Lake —
Mountview	
Poplar Glade -
Riske Creek	
Wildwood	
Williams Lake.—
Wright Station _
93 Mile	
100 Mile House.
150 Mile House.
Totals, District No. 27_
District No. 28 (Quesnel)
Secondary—Quesnel.
Junior-Secondary—Cariboo  —
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Wells-Barker-
ville  	
Elementary—
Alexandria	
Australian 	
Baker  _
Barlow Creek.
Bouchie Lake..
43
50
266
18
24
699 |  357
139
38
21
47
19
76
44
300
155
98
54
45
16
870
448 |
663
336
576
306
659
365
58
23
63
33
105
55
52
30
14
6
11
7
65
30
12
5
129
73
258
144
15
11
21
12
42
24
11
8
183
100
22
7
273
164
124
60
145
75
50
22
20
11
54
21
33
18
269
119
352
161
34
21
127
70
547
281
19
14
46
25
482
270
238
114
772
3,021
787
385
668
329
119
59
48
34
11
3
418
199
122
74
238
134
25
26
342
127
17
28
32
145
44
29
422
327
270
294
35
30
50
22
8
4
35
7
56
114
4
9
18
3
83
15
109
64
70
28
9
33
15
150
191
13
57
266
5
21
212
124
2,751
402
339
60
14
8
219
48
104
27
79
52
9
91
61
32
11
78
5
10
8
56
17
64
96
5
11
12
6
12
15
12
6
3
3
4
1
16
5
3
2
21
19
48
39
3
2
4
5
8
5
3
1
22
24
6
6
68
30
17
19
27
14
4
7
3
3
13
12
5
6
48
40
51
43
5
11
18
14
76
64
5
2
4
4
61
78
63
18
20
11
20
9
8
6
2
4
1
76
79
54
25
20
17
47
41
22
14
14
12
27 |  650 |  515 |  527 |
12
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G  165
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
vn
1
2
3
vm
DC
X
XI
XII
XIII
4
10
9
1
1
18
7
.... |   ....
	
	
—
—
71
62 |       60
62
 |	
  |   	
65
47
33
47
34
	
75
71
56
33
31
7
7
8
9
5
.	
	
	
	
17
14
10
10
	
	
	
65
53
68
58
	
	
	
3
5
	
	
100
88 |       83
68
	
  |     |   .  ._.
75
71
56
33
31
254
209
200
_
156
137
124
84
75
...
	
16
8
9
347
279
	
	
	
	
5
7
10
7
5
11
6
10
5
_
6
	
	
11
16
9
19
	
10
	
	
	
12
8 |         8
1
2
4
9
2 1         1
1
9
1
16
	
	
	
	
8
3
20
4
3
17
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
17
32
40
26
38
_
	
	
	
	
4
3
2
	
1
6
2
	
	
	
	
	
6
5
3
25
9
1
26
5
1
20
	
■	
	
	
"   19
3
2
2
1
	
	
	
	
42
38
37
19
_
	
	
	
	
20
12
17
18
	
	
	
_
	
	
19
7
3
4
6
20
9
6
9
7
20
13
3
8
6
28
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
■	
	
	
	
	
	
37
42
26
40
_
	
	
48
54
59
46
_
	
1
3
5
1
	
	
21
14
20
19
_
	
..
85
84
103
75
13
_
_
	
3
6
3
	
6
6
2
18
_
	
	
76
60
57
75
_
..
25
32
25
17
	
539
556 |     534
480
13 1       16 |         8
9
524
416
378
293
275
	
181
201
242
163
	
	
	
	
	
411
180
77
	
	
8
10
10
11
	
13
10
6
	
7
9 |         9
4
49
36
66
58
_
17
16
11
16
32
34
35
27
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
 G 166
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 28 (Quesnel)—Continued
Elementary Continued
229
324
108
123
194
55
13
48
58
132
30
278
107
258
100
121
111
163
60
56
103
24
8
29
35
67
14
149
54
132
68
60
118
161
48
67
91
31
5
19
23
65
16
129
53
126
32
61
	
27
63
17
18
29
7
4
11
14
32
13
33
23
44
17
14
32
26
13
18
22
12
4
6
8
11
7
36
13
40
14
18
26
38
16
14
36
7
5
10
9
22
10
38
25
36
15
19
7
13
Pinecrest -  	
Red Bluff	
Rich Bar                   	
West Fraser „.„   -	
Totals, District No. 28 _	
4,589
2,350
2,239
545
443
446
20
District No. 29 (Lillooet)
272
133
126
443
27
97
136
66
69
226
14
48
136
67
57
217
13
49
64
19
24
36
5
28
14
23
54
6
29
10
17
34
1
29
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Bralorne   _	
Elementary—
11
Totals, District No. 29
1,098
559
539
64
112
126
91
11
District No. 30 (South Cariboo)
Secondary—
Ashcroft 	
229
165
162
434
23
317
33
333
26
373
37
42
48
110
90
78
222
10
148
19
187
13
201
26
20
22
119
75
84
212
13
169
14
146
13
172
11
22
26
54
47
35
36
60
7
68
51
5
63
6
6
11
74
4
38
10
30
6
36
9
9
6
46
40
4
45
1
35
3
7
12
David Stoddart	
	
Elementary—
13
Clinton—    -	
	
15
70 Mile House 	
Totals, District No. 30	
2,222
1,146
1,076
172
277
222
193
28
District No. 31 (Merritt)
Secondary—Merritt  	
Elementary—■
Collettville  	
727
189
376
157
596
47
281
388
91
204
81
299
23
136
339
98
172
76
297
24
145
	
52
66
33
60
25
40
31
52
24
70
13
66
31
62
24
74
9
43
15
15
Totals, District No. 31	
2,373
1,222
1,151
	
276
256
243
30
District No. 32 (Hope)
551
209
635
86
302
101
283
109
349
42
150
54
268
100
286
44
152
47
16
53
11
43
10
29
73
8
41
20
18
96
20
26
20
12
104
11
35
12
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Boston Bar
Elementary-
	
North Bend	
Yale	
Totals, District No. 32 -	
1,884
987
897
133
171
180
174
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G 167
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1    2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
40
31
32
41
53
44
38
47
15
13
16
14
12
12
21
21
19
35
26
17
16
13
9
7
	
8
6
7
4
12
2
9
16
16
17
18
	
33
41
45
36
16
10
14
12
10
38
34
37
29
18
13
10
13
18
15
14
23
428
403 |  404
385
31 1   1 ----- 1 	
424
371
284
242
163 1 	
1
12
74
67
44
44
24
16
8 1  15
13
14
13
11
11
20 |   14
16
1
62
81    59
53
4
4 |   5
  1	
2
93
113 |  93
84
1
  1   7 I   12
88
80
55
44
24 | 	
78
70
43
38
8    5
4
40
45
20
26
17
56
36
40
30
51
45
51
40
5
4
2
1
27
38
27
32
9
6
4
50
36
44
42
4
5
2
3
45
38
34
57
14
5
5
9
7
6
7
7
9
3
210
192 j  183
175
14
8
5
4
174
151
103
94
17 | ...--
	
18
48
42
71
	
43
36
46
109
20
49
138
22
20
16
23
166
153
130
98
121
21
53
34
41
	
18
-----
32
 - 1 	
181
222
211
209
18
20
16
23
166
153
130
98
121
13
12
4
126
102
109
92
93
19
21
20
24
26
18
6
70
83
9
37
13
65
12
42
14
91
35
15
43
12
1
159
163
153
150
13 1   12 I    A
152
120
115
92
93
 G 168
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I      I     II
III
Primary
Special
District No. 33 (ChiUiwack)
Secondary—
ChiUiwack ..
Sardis	
Junior Secondary—
ChiUiwack	
Rosedale	
A. D. Rundle	
Elementary—
Atchelitz-	
Bernard-	
Camp River..
Chadsey—	
Cheam	
ChiUiwack Central-
Cultus Lake	
East ChiUiwack	
Evans	
Fairfield Island...
Greendale	
Kipp	
F. G. Leary	
Little Mountain.
Lotbiniere	
McCammon	
Miller	
Robertson	
Rosedale	
Ryder Lake	
Sardis 	
Southlands -
Strathcona-
Sunshine Drive..
Unsworth	
Vedder	
Watson	
Yarrow	
Totals, District No. 33-
District. No. 34 (Abbotsford)
Senior Secondary—Abbotsford 	
Junior Secondary—
Abbotsford _ 	
Clearbrook 	
Elementary—
Abbotsford 	
Aberdeen.   	
Alexander..
Barrowtown.
Bradner..
Centennial Park..
Clayburn 	
Clearbrook	
Dunach 	
Glenmore	
Godson..
Good Shepherd..
Huntingdon	
Jackson	
Jubilee	
King	
McMillan	
MatsquL
Mount Lehman North.
North Poplar	
Peardonville 	
Ridgedale	
Ross
Philip Sheffield
Simpson 	
1,105
1,116
737
368
434
107
389
55
82
110
592
132
119
87
113
213
188
216
517
54
263
75
241
253
60
404
96
160
42
105
280
616
385
571
572
368
172
213
62
191
35
48
68
288
68
67
48
50
109
91
104
251
27
132
37
114
127
27
204
51
75
30
49
150
317
201
924 |
I
1,123 I
707 I
I
176
211
344
112
189
194
48
154
132
56
491
27
80
137
26
96
92
231
103
455
109
49
31
243
206
493
570
364
82
106
189
60
104
109
27
85
55
35
267
18
48
76
18
43
49
125
54
227
57
27
17
122
105
534
544
369
196
221
45
198
20
34
42
304
64
52
39
63
104
97
112
266
27
131
38
127
126
33
200
45
85
12
56
130
299
184
9,714 | 4,917 [ 4,797
431
553
343
94
105
155
52
85
85
21
69
77
21
224
9
32
61
8
53
43
106
49
228
52
22
14
121
101
113 |
62
30
57
58
29
29
54
15
42
6
12
20
38
16
12
13
11
27
48
29
67
13
32
14
29
28
5
43
28
20
21
30
80
50
14
31
6
12
19
49
29
15
19
15
27
39
23
65
11
35
8
19
38
9
45
34
25
14
35
71
47
16
54
10
6
17
46
13
18
13
18
17
44
21
52
11
37
9
20
29
9
42
34
35
18
34
81
46
749 1  754 |  750
48
19
48
16
21
35
19
11
49
10
14
10
15
12
21
10
44 |
14
8
19
21
58
20
37
12
21
32
13
12
7
59
12
19
7
7
14
23
11
65
12
6
12
32
41
34
32
14
21
45
7
28
17
8
55
14
16
9
19
11
43
11
62
10
10
36
31
20
12
63
29
30
13
14
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G  169
ENROLMENT-
-Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
DC
X
XI
XII
XIII
14
42
6
11
19
77
20
16
15
13
24
21
64
7
45
8
41
40
14
53
27
15
27
65
17
40
15
13
13
91
17
23
12
13
23
._.._
22
55
29
13
36
30
12
61
25
	
9
32
75
44
19
32
14
121
19
12
30
40
23
80
	
46
15
43
30
~~64
10
31
66
48
17
17
34
17
241
261
134
120
269
276
125
168
53
249
183
109
146
432
191
500
149
69
1
  1   	
12
35
12
14
22
94
18
14
23
15
13
25
19
70
12
4
39
8
53
....
29
11
42
	
28
	
18
22
34
77
44
24
767 |     742
720
743
64 |       34 |       34 |       17
756
838
740
623  |     649 |       69
1
1
_   1
441
400
83
38
21
11
293
314
394
201
366
192
29
28
30
16
22
37
8
33
22
9
60
43
53
15
35
1
7
32
14
12
79
37
43
20
32
31
20
~~ii
	
	
	
	
30
55
19
17
37
44
5
30
28
9
44
32
8
4
25
15
12
26
16
54
16
7
58
32
19
20
16
12
42
11
66
17
10
94
31
13
19
14
18
47
22
74
23
69
22
14
	
	
 ■
	
	
	
	
	
24
10
13
29
22
62
17
14
8
22
32
 G 170
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 34 (Abbotsford)—Continued
Elementary Continued
203
162
11
26
65
307
103
80
3
13
31
161
100
82
8
13
34
146
33
33
2
5
31
36
21
33
5
13
34
41
24
36
2
8
32
7,520
3,923
3,597
612
638
645 1       86
District No. 35 (Langley)
Secondary—
697
906
340
365
322
90
385
142
150
318
273
275
185
122
55
118
220
173
258
59
140
273
81
54
100
32
119
237
164
125
389
443
184
199
166
40
217
71
74
153
158
144
100
59
29
61
124
96
146
28
89
140
42
28
52
15
68
115
91
65
308
463
156
166
156
50
168
71
76
165
115
131
85
63
26
57
96
77
112
31
51
133
39
26
48
17
51
122
73
60
57
54
40
52
55
47
50
54
15
50
16
21
49
19
13
46
24
23
18
32
22
31
13
17
26
16
15
18
20
29
23
45
13
42
15
22
40
16
15
44
18
18
16
38
21
30
10
20
36
13
11
21
12
17
30
28
50
11
41
19
23
44
20
17
43
21
14
18
22
23
25
9
19
34
14
11
13
16
27
21
21
Junior Secondary—•
H. D. Stafford .	
Elementary—
Aldergrove -  	
Belmont   -
16
North Otter	
Otter	
South Carvolth	
SperUng	
Tillicum 	
23
_ |       26
Totals, District No. 35 	
6,778
3,586
3,192
355  |     636
591
576 |       39
District No. 36 (Surrey)
Senior Secondary—
772
1,262
558
488
596
687
934
780
422
849
868
404
765
878
198
544
158
203
482
328
416
650
299
255
359
348
483
442
236
469
465
208
391
481
106
279
82
115
228
177
356
612
259
233
237
339
451
338
186
380
403
196
374
397
92
265
76
88
254
151
27
77
27
29
65
46
32
90
35
20
77
68
33
85
23
26
76
28
Secondary—Princess Margaret .	
Junior Secondary—
Cloverdale 	
West Whalley     - 	
White Rock          _	
Elementary—•
12
16
 ENROLMENT—
-Continued
STATISTICAL TABLES
G  171
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
37
35
2
54
31
25
46
30
47
27
51
705  |     632  |     706 |     665
77 |       38 |       21 |       11
607 |     595
558
441  |     400 |       83
38
15
48
14
13
42
42
47
21
19
40
21
22
10
29
38
15
10
15
14
29
22
18
38
19
47
13
15
41
36
49
10
12
28
20
22
9
13
31
9
7
16
23
26
21
15
44
17
46
11
20
48
43
56
14
19
29
41
29
8
22
31
14
17
19
22
26
17
53
54
36
54
41
67
14
16
31
25
32
20
30
37
21
10
28
11
19
7
15
158
87
142
134
165
107
99
129
130
140
99
102
118
281
98
229
11
12
9
15
582 |     520 |     593  |     531
47 |       38 |       30 |       22
521  |     500 [     471
399 |     327 |   	
27
79
21
35
55
51
34
73
13
|       26
66
42
21
77
21
24
59
34
24
63
18
31
68
43
18
17
16
18
9
14
13
19
16
17
12
14
22
9
4
14
15
11
5
7
9
223
298
239
232
287
269
201
219
307
172
301
243
190
305
226
203
209
291
82
251
288
250
216
345
294
249
381
674
311
258
277
357
507
202
230
237
34
81
45
16
1   	
-      1   	
 G 172
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 36 (Surrey)—Continued
Elementary Continued
Bridgeview     -	
J. T. Brown  	
Csdar Hi'ls
387
408
503
260
458
65
469
201
9
118
24
442
139
387
441
124
323
147
153
263
177
157
244
203
577
200
190
46
174
638
391
210
182
723
328
759
223
262
612
306
341
562
51
124
51
371
227
319
188
205
184
292
707
149
203
219
261
140
258
38
250
112
8
57
12
236
65
226
262
64
171
66
68
135
112
73
116
105
287
100
110
24
99
327
205
99
88
351
172
402
122
139
304
161
179
289
25
63
27
190
111
161
89
106
99
162
348
85
184
189
242
120
200
27
219
89
1
61
12
206
74
161
179
60
152
81
85
128
65
84
128
98
290
100
80
22
75
311
186
111
94
372
156
357
101
123
308
145
162
273
26
61
24
181
116
158
99
99
85
130
359
64
	
81
43
76
43
55
25
68
23
15
10
60
11
73
75
14
25
34
121
31
24
26
40
35
82
44
28
	
55
49
57
36
58
22
57
10
15
8
61
17
48
76
18
46
41
32
36
18
19
34
17
85
20
27
54
71
53
31
25
111
58
101
39
96
57
61
70
15
17
16
56
25
50
29
13
26
38
61
37
52
55
64
43
71
18
71
23
17
6
76
25
70
48
11
42
40
30
33
32
31
33
93
15
39
56
93
65
29
24
97
48
122
42
57
37
58
89
22
13
10
47
40
36
32
17
37
49
68
48
	
22
Colebrook	
	
61
9
Elgin 	
Fleetwood.
11
28
Hjorth Road 	
Holly	
Invergarry. 	
	
A. H. P. Matthew 	
10
25
_—  1       64
OM Yalp Rnart
80
68
30
33
94
40
27
97
42
■ 40
70
14
16
25
40
31
39
30
37
18
38
73
55
16
Port Kfills
Riverdale
	
T. E. Scott	
12
13
Dr. F. D. Sinclair
14
Sunnyside	
H.T. Thrift              .     .
18
Tvnehead
Georges Vanier
WiUiam Watson  	
White Rock 	
K.B.Woodward	
13
9
Totals, District No. 36	
27,870
14,670
13,200
  | 2,534
2,494
2,545
289
District No. 37 (Delta)
Secondary-
Delta  .              	
North Delta
1,260
1,153
349
671
689
128
311
49
101
648
603
161
348
361
63
174
25
58
612
550
188
323
328
65
137
24
43
	
81
41
18
18
19
97
52
14
9
20
100
35
21
12
21
Junior Secondary—
Delview 	
Tsawwassen                    	
Elementary—
Annieville —	
Reach Ornvp
6
Boundary Bay  	
Boundary Beach	
 ENROLMENT-
-Continued
STATISTICAL TABLES
G 173
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
51
48
68
75
36
49
~67
9
17
55
19
56
59
17
68
37
30
27
34
45
82
30
24
101
58
27
25
95
30
136
78
44
88
48
38
84
22
""52
27
41
25
45
20
39
128
50
67
74
32
65
64
11
18
68
15
41
50
20
43
40
24
18
32
31
68
14
22
72
43
33
25
92
48
126
44
32
79
36
39
84
19
~~59
36
43
24
30
32
30
109
50
71
84
30
54
71
14
21
~57
23
55
47
21
52
36
21
21
27
33
74
27
23
89
56
29
24
121
51
123
38
46
87
33
53
70
~ 21
	
50
29
42
27
28
23
54
125
	
	
	
	
1
—
=
55
73
40
56
28
71
18
_..-_
32
51
29
44
58
23
3
32
32
15
39
27
14
14
46
9
83
35
27
15
84
48
21
32
31
26
113
53
151
63
21
96
40
52
81
11
	
54
39
50
21
35
13
	
28
44
130
2,472 | 2,457
2,238
2,378
200
105 |     109
65
2,275
2,140
1,975
1,901 | 1,533  |     160
114
73
9
89
60
15
97
" 64
I        4
8
5
6
7
4
3
226
174
159
264
211
176
178
183
204
286
209
323
260
280
239
	
1       10
6
	
8
	
99
6
61
10
17
 G 174
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
II
III
Primary
Special
District No. 37 (Delta)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Chalmers  _	
Cliff Drive	
Delta Manor	
Devon Gardens..
East Delta	
English Bluff.	
Heath _ __ _
Kennedy _. __
Ladner	
Richardson	
South Park	
Sunbury	
Sunshine Hills .
Totals, District No. 37-
District No. 38 (Richmond)
Senior-Secondary—Steveston	
Secondary—Richmond	
Junior Secondary—
Hugh Boyd	
J. N. Burnett	
Cambie 	
Hugh McRoberts   	
Robert C. Palmer	
Elementary—
Blundell— _	
William Bridge	
Bridgeport _
Samuel BrighouEe .
LordByng—	
William Cook	
Crestwood 	
General Currie	
Howard De Beck....
Alfred B. Dixon	
Harry Eburne	
John T. Errington.
W. D. Ferris	
Garden City-	
B. W. Garratt	
James Gilmore	
R. M. Grauer-	
Hamilton 	
Austin Harris	
Thomas Kidd	
Alexander Kilgour..
Walter Lee	
Charles E. London-
Duncan McDonald-
Donald E. McKay-
James McKinney	
Mitchell __	
Sea Island 	
Sidaway..
Manoah Steves.
Tait 	
Thompson.
F. A. Tomsett	
James Whiteside	
Daniel Woodward-
Totals, District No. 38-
District No. 39 (Vancouver)
Secondary—
Britannia __ 	
Lord Byng _	
Sir Winston Churchill-
Gladstone	
263
689
750
669
43
186
545
198
620
784 ]
544 j
79 |
264 |
124
355
378
361
19
96
276
103
330 |
412 I
253 |
43 |
146 |
10,345 | 5,337
894
1,146 |
904
624
685
877
773
480
293
396
701
547
477
35
80
55
552
120
479
159
447
115
802
466
106
52
369
220
364
100
86
201
91
533
276
180
197
120
356
68
338
446
447
604 j
449
298
312
459
415
253
147
217
364
285
235
19
33
29
275
66 |
260
83
252
62
399
227
47
28
184
88
207
42
45
119
56
280
156
97
103
67
192
32
172
260
1,367 I
1,746 |
1,746 |
1,818
708
890
870
936
139
334
372
308
24
90
269
95
290
372
291
36
118
5,008
447
542
455
326
373
418
358
227
146
179
337
262
242
16
47
26
277
54
219
76
195
53
403
239
59
24
185
132
157
58
41
82
35
253
120
83
94
53
164
36
166
186
16,210 | 8,365 | 7,845
659
856
876
882
26
33
102
104
140
138
96
122
10
11
29
27
94
92
33
33
88
77
145
125
93
75
12
15
35
35
22
103
137
91
12
24
84
25
70
118
56
11
36
I
9
50
28
94
71
56
27
30
72
20
42
40
30
33
122
46
16
11
65
54
58
33
18
29
21
91
45
26
36
42
43
11
47
76
13
61
32
113
66
66
24
25
66
19
37
43
32
44
120
48
15
14
49
53
50
31
17
32
25
79
40
28
46
23
55
16
56
66
41
30
102
69
60 |
29
61
17
46
61
62
38
117
39
11
13
44
52
48
36
12
31
20
75
37
24
48
29
39
12
51
65
I
I
5
19
1,080 | 1,079 |  978 |  42
13
14
15
15
| 1,492 | 1,504 | 1,419 |  57
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G  175
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Inter-
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
Special
1    2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
36
109
43
76
62
78
38
58
31
103
87
75
7
48
52
89
62
95
29
73
29
104
99
72
39
39
87
135
74
57
66
94
89
38
7
	
	
	
	
■ ■ -
76
113
10
39
87
37
101
116
7
11
	
69
11
33
15
14
1,024
902 |  907
840
60
28 |  26 |   7
823
748
699
583
519
1
1
[
118
27
87
90
83
70
89
102
100
100
125
15
49
48
62
42
25
64
39
62
9
8
10
10
9
4
15
14
54
—
333
217
217
304
252
284
215
236
310
263
	
269
180
207
239
227
451
589
443
449
_._..
--
	
	
54
19
12
100
115
38
76
84
97
77
78
24
77
125
34
88
111
83
72
113
80
1
!
42
—
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
	
42
107
67
76
13
11
22
73
26
95
74
75 |  74
127 |  110
92 |   78
21 |   15
47 j   62
52 |  48
14 |   13
39 |  34
83 |  76
38 |   23
27 J  24
31 |
53 |  55
39 1  53
59    52
....
106
38
13
14
53
61
60
12
36
25
67
35
26
16
36
26
47
14
53
66
1,490
1,463 | 1,423
1,397
62
56 |  54 |  54
1,323
1,308
1,122
1,040
892
54
23
50
3
7
11
269
355
300
338
243
337
361
424
282
353
356
358
297
351
398
336
243
350
293
301
38
 G 176
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 39 (Vancouver)—Continued
Secondary—Continued
1,772
1,940
500
905
2,283
1,328
1,072
1,907
1,875
1,726
1,736
2,142
244
2,194
540
598
829
331
592
256
462
813
592
416
427
92
477
219
573
360
860
739
208
858
413
519
77
571
613
288
543
727
324
584
208
450
557
869
182
648
836
510
172
625
512
103
566
687
254
434
481
355
842
195
921
458
214
799
912
969
256
467
1,187
678
524
992
938
864
908
1,045
137
1,206
269
317
427
177
295
129
235
398
298
203
228
51
231
85
305
191
427
389
103
434
206
268
42
282
301
151
281
369
154
308
114
240
270
403
104
336
414
257
97
336
252
51
297
343
133
234
261
189
425
104
468
242
117
400
860
971
244
438
1,096
650
548
915
937
862
828
1,097
107
988
271
281
402
154
297
127
227
415
294
213
199
41
246
134
268
169
433
350
105
424
207
251
35
289
312
137
262
358
170
276
94
210
287
466
78
312
422
253
75
289
260
52
269
344
121
200
220
166
417
91
453
216
97
399
66
89
62
59
48
50
54
96
60
55
58
18
28
52
75
52
111
57
41
91
39
73
23
92
76
55
59
58
70
59
45
62
49
84
51
55
91
40
42
61
41
28
59
54
61
47
60
27
92
33
94
47
49
88
81
71
69
65
65
59
53
104
73
52
46
26
42
60
64
23
124
62
39
98
64
63
22
89
85
68
79
61
110
69
40
64
53
90
42
76
113
38
39
71
66
30
61
46
75
50
74
32
72
48
111
46
53
85
70
77
84
78
52
76
55
97
71
32
39
12
28
55
73
21
104
66
46
112
52
61
23
82
64
62
69
42
72
63
52
56
58
85
39
75
82
44
44
68
51
25
69
54
60
53
69
25
70
33
111
46
57
77
76
63
85
73
61
71
63
97
77
58
49
12
61
52
84
35
106
57
41
103
44
71
9
80
72
68
73
63
72
51
42
53
66
72
50
67
105
48
47
86
57
20
56
56
58
57
61
42
73
49
93
47
55
75
Elementary-Senior Secondary—
Elementary—
29
10
15
20
Edith Cavell                            	
19
24
George T. Cunningham	
104
15
Douglas Annex
1
Sir Wilfrpcl fire.nf«ll
Hastings          	
12
16
11
Annie B. Jamieson	
Kerrisdale	
Dr. A. R. Lord
13
15
Dr. H. N. MacCorkindale.   ..	
14
Dr. R. E. McKechnie	
Chief Maquinna   	
Maquinna Annex 	
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G   177
ENROLMENT-
-Continued
Grade
Inter-
Occupational
Grade
I             [
IV
V
VI
VII
Special
1           2     ]     3
1             1
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
58
13
10
7
304
365
347
323
345
39
396
333
408
416
348
	
95
202
104
192
108
166
100
177
93
168
98
14
10
432
474
458
404
393
26
274
235
226
268
299
"43
28
20
232
388
211
389
219
293
206
401
204
324
21
30
24
16
22
407
403
345
320
308
	
	
—
22
378
360
377
305
284
	
80
42
51
8
304
311
344
318
278
64
44
58
31
18
434
369
387
352
385
	
37
38
38
37
46
48
	
170
114
18
18
11
445
427
375
330
286
	
69
57
56
65
64
65
54
64
22
	
	
107
162
158
102
56
86
83
62
82
"~68
89
51
16
	
	
	
	
_=
56
98
85
95
96
30
	
	
82
76
80
73
52
47
44
42
14
	
	
65
57
81
81
44
89
69
50
73
61
	
	
	
	
	
__
75
66
29
25
20
34
17
104
102
112
82
15
70
112
106
115
79
41
114
121
110
109
58
49
45
50
12
78
61
73
60
73
51
	
	
-----
82
74
88
80
74
35
77
52
68
66
117
126
80
116
96
118
80
14
	
.....
70
29
51
46
"""42
34
31
	
	
	
	
75
73
94
80
9
.
150
137
100
126
96
125
96
	
	
83
118
105
95
127
71
103
106
71
80
95
73
	
80
75
81
83
69
76
72
78
	
71
99
139
52
113
55
111
53
	
	
67
64
60
66
13
64
52
52
61
113
139
142
141
32
157
121
132
102
79
77
142
61
125
55
118
	
89
7
 G 178
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 39 (Vancouver)—Continued
Elementary Continued
256
445
989
275
578
557
845
203
407
455
649
821
216
770
459
654
156
493
567
681
872
254
230
739
827
623
435
212
1,049
738
235
524
587
116
389
765
631
539
647
133
247
509
156
297
281
450
118
205
239
343
414
108
392
232
341
84
272
290
351
440
126
114
375
429
333
233
95
547
395
115
285
283
66
185
386
298
266
356
123
198
480
119
281
276
395
85
202
216
306
407
108
378
227
313
72
221
277
330
432
128
116
364
398
290
202
117
502
343
120
239
304
50
204
379
333
273
291
50
46
122
63
70
61
110
45
53
73
92
52
77
60
53
24
29
61
69
91
62
55
82
101
53
81
121
56
61
74
41
29
60
73
79
52
81
66
59
118
65
63
69
99
35
48
84
96
50
98
48
53
45
41 .
87
85
84
48
64
61
100
79
69
140
66
52
94
50
29
62
86
80
58
77
70
44
96
55
68
76 -
117
50
53
74
82
55
84
53 i
52
41
32
58
87
69
47
51
77
97
86
62
127
62
55
68
41
28
59
90
79
60
69
48
58
107
50
71
57
105
51
67
79
96
59
101
47
61
33
30
74
92
77
52
60
62
112
73
69
125
65
53
68
44
30
60
88
82
63
64
21
11
11
15
7
Sir William Osier.	
14
Queen Mary  	
15
13
Lord Roberts  	
10
Selkirk Annex A	
J. W. Sexsmith.._ _	
37
Seymour 	
11
Shaughnessy 	
Southlands.. ,   	
Southlands Annex 	
Lord Strathcona	
12
Tecumseh- 	
Tecumseh Annex	
14
6
Trafalgar 	
University Hill  -	
10
Totals, District No. 39	
75,968
38,917
37,051
5,648
6,069
5,715
5,895
525
District No. 40 (New Westminster)
Secondary—New Westminster	
2,917
181
263
80
455
609
364
443
627
556
1,501
101
124
47
223
299
190
231
316
263
1,416
80
139
33
232
310
174
212
311
293
	
22
22
28
55
63
52
61
83
90
24
23
23
69
58
49
66
84
69
23
36
29
72
64
61
48
82
60
Elementary—
13
F. W. Howay 	
T.nrd Kp.lvin
Sir Richard McBride	
14
9
John Robson.-   .
15
Herbert Spencer 	
Totals, District No. 40 -	
6,495
3,295
3,200
476
465
475
51
District No. 41 (Burnaby)
Senior Secondary—
Burnaby Central 	
1,415
1,384
799
1,305
640
727
1,160
1,139
1,004
628
763
687
386
688
316
360
568
570
490
348
652
697
413
617
324
367
592
569
514
280
Burnaby South. _	
Secondary—
Alpha  	
Burnaby North.     	
Junior Secondary—
Burnaby Heights. 	
Cariboo Hill 	
Kensington     	
Moscrop -  .
Royal Oak 	
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G  179
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
1"
X
XI
XII
XIII
22
44
140
65
76
95
45
72
91
109
103
58
102
~~ii
71
133
159
104
94
80
84
111
114
47
122
56
91
82
83
80
52
135
57
72
91
50
46
69
103
101
66
104
42
61
100
129
84
83
85
103
95
110
47
89
44
94
73
68
83
30
138
49
68
77
55
67
55
130
108
57
106
~40
58
138
100
80
82
85
70
120
44
89
115
68
87
73
	
	
	
	
42
133
49
31
73
78
51
	
121
44
49
15
203
25
zz
82
113
28
98
55
86
37
35
59
115
212
38
	
103
45
12
104
121
85
28
28
94
116
121
132
24
63
97
13
14
—
48
108
88
20
—
68
87
23
5,976
5,904
5,556
5,506
1,594 |  403 |  120 |  153
5,591
5,576
5,439
5,348
4,950
22
37
70
90
52
59
106
65
27
54
63
104
54
59
106
103
26
45
~66
110
46
64
81
73
56
32
24
569
563
561
526
586
24
32
14
60
106
41
59
85
12
81
15
488
501
570
511
41 |  56 |  32
24
569
563
561
526
586
	
40
46
51
24
206
192
261
365
379
345
150
209
218
235
413
383
352
190
198
230
231
382
377
307
197
612
716
186
598
714
668
637
89
	
	
	
	
 G 180
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kinder
Grade
garten
I
II
III
52
36
42
58
82
86
79
58
54
74
93
23
30
21
59
55
70
70
29
25
41
33
45
27
25
21
124
105
100
102
62
60
72
66
56
68
75
86
62
93
66
73
59
39
44
42
67
61
61
60
89
90
112
58
42
31
50
54
29
25
27
66
82
61
86
108
98
86
105
57
56
37
48
61
59
57
65
28
32
34
64
65
85
80
99
75
54
61
57
52
53
66
58
82
76
60
41
65
55
29
14
16
31
21
37
59
49
42
39
25
30
27
46
60
50
55
60
74
66
86
63
79
76
74
66
66
72
66
51
40
30
49
63
23
48
27
112
63
56
53
62
90
77
80
66
77
60
Primary
Special
District No. 41 (Burnaby)—Continued
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Edmonds—
Elementary.—
Armstrong	
Aubrey-
Brantford-
Brentwood Park-
Buckingham 	
Cameron Road—
Capitol Hill-
Cascade Heights.
Chaffey-Burke	
Clinton .	
Confederation Park-
Douglas Road	
Gilmore Avenue	
Gilpin	
Glenwood 	
Inman  	
Kitchener	
Lakeview	
Lochdale	
Lyndhurst	
Marlborough—
May wood	
Morley Street-
Nelson	
Parkcrest— _
Riverside	
Riverway West-
Rosser	
Schou	
Seaforth	
Second Street.
Sperling	
Stride 	
Suncrest	
Sussex	
Twelfth Avenue-
Westridge	
Windsor	
Totals, District No. 41.
District No. 42 (Garibaldi)
Secondary—
Garibaldi	
Maple Ridge—
Pitt Meadows-
Elementary—
Albion	
Alouette	
Blue Mountain _
Fairview—	
Glenwood	
Golden Ears—
Hammond	
Haney Central	
Eric Langton	
Maple Ridge	
Meadowland	
Mount Crescent-
Pitt Meadows	
Alexander Robinson.
Ruskin _	
Thorn Hill	
Websters Corner.
Whonnock	
Yennadon	
1,438
713
479
250
623
276
195
889
559
603
673
322
437
797
317
275
615
779
404
513
216
635
526
583
554
480
148
252
392
195
462
546
611
470
387
339
521
685
552
741
357
236
109
302
141
97
493
282
303
334
160
248
406
161
142
334
372
208
274
106
318
273
291
290
250
73
133
205
95
253
288
319
245
213
155
261
340
283
697
356
243
141
321
135
98
396
277
300
339
162
189
391
156
133
281
407
196
239
110
317
253
292
264
230
75
119
187
100
209
258
292
225
174
184
260
345
269
29,912 | 15,267 | 14,645
609
318
1,507
758
372
188
109
52
58
34
172
96
254
130
277
162
267
132
260
135
274
133
223
102
307
162
158
75
498
246
327
152
155
80
109
55
79
40
237
133
237
120
271
143
291
749
184
57
24
76
124
115
135
125
141
121
145
83
252
175
75
54
39
104
117
128
68
57
IS
24
32
44
33
39
34
33
34
36
19
40
36
30
16
20
30
22
28
19
14
18
29
37
37
38
34
20
46
29
74
34
17
19
19
28
27
35
11
20
28
33
37
39
44
35
24
42
18
61
39
18
11
13
33
31
34
11
18
14
12
7
12
1,973 [ 2,223 | 2,177 | 2,304 |  94
40
15
Totals, District No. 42.
6,760 | 3,446 [ 3,314
125 |  568 |  574 |  571 |
55
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G 181
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
rv
V
40
34
83
77
67
84
34
12
101
92
41
35
22
16
98
105
63
78
75
77
99
86
39
28
61
68
115
119
30
46
33
35
87
84
94
97
56
36
73
73
29
27
85
97
65
55
76
79
84
85
62
64
22
20
33
45
50
59
27
26
72
60
86
88
75
82
42
67
54
43
34
49
64
54
101
89
78
84
VI
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
VIII       IX
XI        XII      XIII
40
87
72
37
87
39
20
100
72
94
89
34
60
98
29
32
80
89
44
54
35
72
52
83
94
62
18
46
42
29
56
86
86
44
54
41
61
88
86
2,450 | 2,455 | 2,392
—
	
17
13
~31
19
32
44
30
52
43
40
37
38
26
32
41
32
49
46
24
22
70
76
32
37
26
20
16
15
5
10
36
33
27
36
46
49
11
24
40
33
47
37
37
28
40
22
67
35
23
20
12
44
18
40
588
614 [  578
66
161
70
89
33
19
116
68
72
91
37
59
102
31
40
69
102
45
71
31
74
56
117
75
71
21
39
52
31
63
~76
47
66
47
58
98
65
2,428
20
~20
32
41
22
32
37
31
48
24
82
46
21
12
~33
19
39
559
28
24
87
40
53
14
13
40 I  53    33
373
393
362
97 |  24
2,271 | 2,393 | 2,284
2,112 | 2,019 |  89
22
206
241
112
22
559
166
341
103
610
133
297
79
62
310
49
509
421
42
210
29
281
 G 182
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys      Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
II
III
Primary
Special
District No. 43 (Coquitlam)
Senior Secondary—Centennial	
Secondary—Port Coquitlam 	
Junior Secondary—
Sir Frederick Banting  	
Como Lake  	
Mary Hill-
Montgomery-
Moody.
George PearkeS-
Winslow	
Elementary-
Alderson..
Viscount Alexander..
Anmore  	
Austin Heights	
Lord Baden-PoweU-
Baker Drive	
Sir Frederick Banting_
Brookmere 	
Burquitlam	
Cape Horn .
Cedar Drive.
Central	
Coronation Park-
Glen  	
Glenayre..
Harbour View..
Hillcrest	
loco	
Irvine 	
James Park...
Kilmer	
Leigh  _.
Mary HiU—
Millside.
Montgomery..
Moody.
Mountain View..
Mundy Road	
Parkland	
Pleasantside	
Porter Street	
Ranch Park	
Rochester.	
Seaview	
Roy Stibbs	
Sunny Cedars.	
Sunny Park	
Vanier	
Totals, District No. 43-
District No. 44 (North Vancouver)
Secondary—
Argyle.
Delbrook	
Carson Graham.
Handsworth	
North Vancouver-
Windsor 	
Junior Secondary—
B almoral	
Hamilton	
Sutherland.
Youth Resources Centre-
Elementary—
Blueridge  	
Boundary  	
Braemar  	
2,177
944
879
627
449
803
489
319
856
472
700
79
486
535
195
646
458
328
352
466
418
331
492
607
545
684
83
478
530
504
247
553
344
598
504
478
608
638
155
720
556
410
638
451
86
30
654
Brooksbank	
Burrard View..
1,140
799
1,158
1,196
873
771
986
905
625
13
253
142
497
584
301
1,220
479
443
340
221
398
238
167
419
253
358
41
276
268
106
344
241
178
174
245
219
171
259
294
279
356
44
215
273
254
124
282
171
291
263
248
322
325
87
375
292
220
313
222
44
17
329
957
465
436
287
228
405
251
152
437
219
342
38
210
267
89
302
217
150
178
221
199
160
233
313
266
328
39
263
257
250
123
271
173
307
241
230
286
313
68
345
264
190
325
229
42
13
325
24,602 | 12,698 | 11,904
583
399
669
609
468
384
508
507
330
13
142
76
262
295
156
557
400
489
587
405
387
478
398
295
111
66
235
289
145
85
97
59
50
96
67
48
4S
59
29
41
60
75
52
90
48
76
81
28
62
57
80
60
50
55
78
27
77
75
48
91
66
87
68
105
14
71
54
26
93
46
48
40
70
51
28
89
79
78
89
12
73
80
84
24
85
47
83
68
64
83
89
10
94
67
58
80
68
69
66
74
12
47
63
37
98
56
34
51
63
57
22
79
82
70
75
9
75
68
68
39
67
62
81
74
55
91
88
23
101
66
52
104
70
90
56
89
13
62
61
22
77
60
47
48
77
60
40
69
90
70
97
9
66
53
75
31
94
30
88
74
67
84
86
17
83
57
55
98
60
73
66
48
40
62
35
—
	
62
57 !
37
57
55
50
68
72
58
49
11
15
12
14
14
9
14
14
15
63
13
2,102 | 2,287 | 2,269 | 2,238 |  205
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G  183
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
48
88
11
61
64
32
82
54
35
38
51
55
80
25
69
67
72
9
52
59
49
30
69
29
69
73
64
63
73
28
89
60
46
71
51
78
47
73
17
40
104
22
62
55
30
43
40
55
28
72
66
67
92
9
49
62
45
34
57
32
54
62
53
73
72
13
84
54
44
65
44
88
29
66
52
62
25
62
50
37
39
36
42
32
64
70
70
75
25
45
44
53
29
50
34
63
9
64
61
74
21
94
88
53
45
41
~~74
13
18
6
8
13
14
18
11
21
13
12
zz
	
—
17
2
13
1
16
"no
349
185
145
284
163
161
306
~149
287
204
153
254
173
136
251
225
216
185
132
231
153
258
988
261
1,106
199
83
	
	
59
80
12
14
17
	
65
63
31
14
14
60
58
16
35
33
70
12
55
60
34
76
62
80
10
70
57
49
17
32
57
38
12
	
80
72
61
12 i
	
83
78
15
16
83
80
43
15
9
84
51
95
23
17
	
2,072
1,994
1,907
1,778
207
58
89 |       49
1,703
1,607
1,400
1,249
1,305
83
82
89
52
~94
99
37
83
86
30
78
90
77
166
262
182
205
417
227
261
179
~265
207
176
435
237
252
253
231
121
234
174
164
134
196
112
322
296
462
230
159
112
220
272
575
205
151
114
,
i
i
68
13
	
93
	
	
108
40
 G 184
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
II
III
Primary
Special
District No. 44 (North Vancouver)—Continued
Elementary—Con tinued
Canyon Heights	
Capilano.
Carisbrooke..
Cleveland	
Cloverley	
Eastview	
Fromme	
Highlands	
Keith Lynn —
Larson	
Lonsdale	
Lonsdale Annex..
Lynn Valley	
Maplewood	
Monteray	
Montroyal	
Norgate.
North Star	
Plymouth	
Prince Charles..
Queen Mary	
Queensbury	
Ridgeway_
Ridgeway Annex-
Ross Road 	
Seymour HeightS-
Sherwood Park—
Upper Lynn	
Westover	
Westview	
Totals, District No. 44_
District No. 45 (West Vancouver)
Secondary—
Hillside.	
Sentinel	
West Vancouver-
Elementary—
Caulfeild	
Cedardale	
Chartwell	
Cypress Park	
Eagle Harbour-
Gleneagles	
Glenmore	
Hollyburn...
Irwin Park	
Pauline Johnson..
Ridgeview	
West Bay	
Westcot	
Totals, District No. 45_
District No. 46 (Sechelt)
Secondary—■
Elphinstone 	
Pender Harbour	
Elementary—
Bowen Island	
Davis Bay... 	
Egmont	
Gibsons  	
Halfmoon Bay~
Langdale	
Madeira Park-
Roberts Creek-
Sechelt 	
West Sechelt	
633
463
558
704
335
601
408
537
248
477
351
55
268
236
131
375
306
582
96
76
630
434
617
115
496
517
424
524
179
345
305
232
275
344
178
311
215
286
131
261
174
29
137
118
72
211
147
301
51
41
313
243
318
61
264
249
220
271
96
193
328
231
283
360
157
290
193
251
117
216
177
26
131
118
59
164
159
281
45
35
317
191
299
54
232
268
204
253
83
152
1,964
11,448
1,055
533
842
420
1,546
804
601
280
316
169
348
182
166
87
137
63
460
236
487
256
493
255
517
274
466
237
468
231
499
249
508
264
10,516
522
422
742
321
147
166
79
74
224
231
238
243
229
237
250
244
909
4,540 |
676
361
127
67
9
9
49
26
12
5
578
294
16
7
153
98
181
83
142
73
448
249
54
27
4,369
315
60
23
7
284
9
55
98
69
199
27
Totals, District No. 46-
2,445 [    1,299 |    1,146
89
70
59
62
82
62
90
43
62
35
39
55
43
42
45
47
51
73
35
".9
53
53
61
70
39
56
79
19
40
72
67
67
95
39
101
53
71
41
72
66
~ii
34
38
63
60
66
43
71
59
47
54
71
53
59
55
22
29 |
88
67
76
98
45
70
45
76
31
56
63
Z?5
35
48
60
45
82
18
_70
52
118
80
38
62
65
27
57
89 I 1,755 I 1,876 | 1,892
49
24
26
25
55
45
51
52
33
45
40
51
—
1
57
54
34
29
40
42
34
42
44
34
67
55
61
55
65
64
59
62
60
30
47
52
48
61
46
59
46
32
45
31
34
57
54
55
75
60
56
56
61
496
662 I  639 I  662
100
16
42
3
1
8
16
2
3
64
59
5
4
29
30
19
19
23
25
57
38
12
17
39
11
~iT
8
I.
28
158
222 I  212 I  180 I
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G 185
ENROLMENT-
-Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
rv
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
DC
X
XI
XII
XIII
94
93
104
103
9
61
74
68
67
 1
	
.	
88
79
92
94
_ ;
 1
	
	
 ,
88
130
109
102
 1
	
	
	
	
	
	
51
54
38
41
  ■
	
	
	
	
_
92
90
70
66
13
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
64
80
65 '
58
 1
	
,	
	
	
	
82
64
95
79
8
.	
	
	
	
_
40
34
39
28
82
69
78
81
58
52
50
50
6 '
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
•—
	
""""44"
41
~¥9
"ii
29
29
33
34
	
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
—
	
~44
49
~~ 60
~*52
36
43
41
30
	
	
	
	
 .
	
79
82
84
99
17
	
■—
	
—
	
	
	
—
	
84
86
84
~~94
37
13
	
—
	
—
	
	
	
—
	
76
74
62
58
	
.  '
	
	
	
107
98
95
99
	
	
—
	
■—
	
	
	
—
	
71
68
"~79
57
87 '
102
111
87
	
	
	
	
 . .
	
	
73
60 1
70
44
	
	
	
	
	
80
64
79
61
39
	
.	
 '
. ,
,	
26
27
27
31
	
.	
	
	
	
	
50
45
34 '
53
26 ■
	
	
	
	
	
1,995 | 1,910 | 1,936
1,805
181 |       78 |       90 |       77
1,720
1,751
1,619
1,581
1,537 |   	
236
228
204
197
190
	
	
.	
	
	
	
178
180
152
179
153
	
	
	
	
14
	
16
11
316
305
292
292
300
	
103
115
88
89
49
43
46
47
12
	
49
33
50
67
55
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
~69
""""55"
62
40
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
74
60
64
74
66
55
62
61
14
62
62
54
65
67
67
64
70
59
70
84
68
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
71
89
64
70
_
..
	
	
	
	
_
61
68
80
82
	
	
	
	
753 |     734 |     726
740
40 |   	
16 |       11
730
713
648
668
643 |   	
164
175
145
112
80
2
3
—
	
	
	
	
	
32
30
35
16
14
17
2
74
2
4
70
60
~~ 86
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
21
27
27
34
18
22
28
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
19
18
20
14
_
_
	
	
	
_
_
48
81
76
69
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
20
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
232 |     237 |     196
197
......    |      	
196
205
180
128
94 |   	
 G 186
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total       Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
II
37
39
53
60
29
33
1
2
27
39
46
53
39
31
29
40
43
33
36
28
6
5
48
~~36
III
Primary
Special
District No. 47 (Powell River)
Secondary—Max Cameron-
Junior Secondary—Brooks..
I
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Texada
Elementary—
Cranberry Lake      —-
J. P. Dallos	
Edgehill.
False Bay	
Gillies Bay—
Gordon Park-
Grief Point	
Henderson	
J. C. Hill	
Kelly Creek-
Lund 	
Stillwater	
James Thomson-
Totals, District No. 47-
District No. 48 (Howe Sound)
Secondary—
Howe Sound _ —
Pemberton  	
Elementary—
Alta Lake  	
Blackwater Creek  	
Brackendale       	
Britannia Beach  	
Mamquam  — -	
Signal HiU 	
Squamish 	
Stawamus  	
Woodfibre  	
Totals, District No. 48 _	
District No. 49 (Ocean Falls)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—
Charleson 	
Sir Alexander Mackenzie _	
Elementary—•
Bella Coola  	
Owikeno  — ._
Shearwater  _
South Bentinck   	
Totals, District No. 49 .
District No. 50 (Queen Charlotte)
Elementary-Senior Secondary — George M.
Dawson       	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Queen Charlotte  	
Sandspit  _	
Tasu     	
Elementary-
Moresby .
Port Clements..
Tahayghen	
Totals, District No. 50.
District No. 52 (Prince Rupert)
Secondary—Prince Rupert 	
Junior Secondary—Booth Memorial	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Oona River
Elementary—
Conrad Street  __ 	
Digby Island	
Kanata  	
King Edward _ 	
796
887
226
292
480
273
20
100
353
307
257
285
155
33
79
328
395
474
117
159
232
136
15
54
162
158
120
142
76
21
42
180
,571
1,325
482
252
254
130
175
83
21
10
18
9
7
2
957
486
154
75
312
171
102
56
52
30
17
11
108
55
323
190
068
588 |
522
286
889
481
11
8
468
241
11
6
356
193
502
246
401
413
109
133
248
137
5
46
191
149
137
143
79
12
37
148
4,871
2,483
2,388
641
317
324
175
98
77
11
3
8
16
10
6
235
109
126
174
87
87
440
250
190
250
116
134
335
175
160
217
119
98
77
41
36
1,246
230
124
92
11
9
 5_
471
79
141
46
22
6
53
133
~480~
236
408
3
227
5
163
256
28
24
51
33
46
36
27
35
30
33
39
57
35
4
34
62
32
33
35
36
2
39
343 |     394 |     399 |     408
	
2
8
24
31
26
27
61
51
26
33
41
25
28
13
3
3
37
27
54
27
49
33
14
169 |     227 |     247
36
45
14
30
5
6
1
45
25
25
2
1
1
215
44
21
22
1
1
3
38 |     101 |      99 |
92
33
24
11
9
3
17
55
33
119
43
55
66
4
59
86
25
16
2
16
58
25
146 |
1
2
69
74
3
1
66
33
60
75
12
12
3
10
13
20
20
14
 STATISTICAL TABLES
ENROLMENT—Continued
(
3 187
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
112     13
1            1
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
31
30
37
73
38
1
58
35
30
46
5
26
46
30
30
42
35
4
36
33
33
27
6
24
33
~"_4
39
81
37
5
71
33
31
29
38
	
6
7
9
358
31
371
19
220
136
23
302
274
47
63
33
2
52
  1   .
30
	
32
35
25
	
9
55
	
414 |     425 |     333 |     398
  |         6 |         7 |         9
389
390 |     379
302 |     274 |   	
34
20
58
35
34
19
10
25
14
50
47
34
35
10
24
18
44
43
40
20
13
21
	
22
11
149
37
132
43
120
36
110
32
76
27
3
34
14
64
	
32
42
24
9
13
23
222 |     210 |     215 |     202
36 |       21 |       22 |       11
186 |     175 |     156
142 |     103 |   	
33
18
34
19
26
3
1
31
21
18
3
3
35
15
27
1
4
1
5
	
	
	
43
40
40
29
35
21
27
22
26
9
17
4
2
1
75 |       83 |       76 |       83
5
  |   	
83 [       69 1       56
49 |       35 |   	
29
9
6
4
11
40
30
12
5
2
15
45
33
29
10
4
~ii
	
	
	
38
28
10
2
31
18
8
4
29
19
5
3
19
4
29
4
3
16
58
	
   |   	
110 |       99 |     109
89
 | |    |	
78 |       61  |       56
19 |         4
	
3
72
44
61
34
37
54
55
31
56
87
	
	
299
1
333
2
92
170
237
174
19
=
  I   	
70
3
43
14
55
	
  |
 G 188
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
II
III
Primary
Special
District No. 52 (Prince Rupert)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Port Edward . 	
Roosevelt Park-
Seal Cove	
Westview	
Totals, District No. 52	
District No. 54 (Smithers)
Secondary—Smithers	
Junior Secondary—Chandler Park-
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Silverthorne-
Elementary—
Lake Kathlyn..
Muheim Memorial _
Quick	
Telkwa 	
Walnut Park .
Totals, District No. 54..
District No. 55 (Burns Lake)
Secondary—Lakes District 	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Babine 	
Grassy Plains..
Elementary—
Burns Lake	
Francois Lake .
McKenna-Decker Lake _
Ootsa Lake	
Pendleton Bay	
Southbank	
Topley  	
Totals, District No. 55	
District No. 56 (Vanderhoof)
Secondary—Nechako Valley	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Fort St. James	
Fraser Lake	
Elementary—
Braeside 	
Carman Hill	
Evelyn Dickson..
Endako	
Fort Fraser	
Mapes	
Prairiedale	
Sinkut View	
Vanderhoof _
Totals, District No. 56 .
District No. 57 (Prince George)
Senior Secondary—Prince George	
Junior Secondary—
Blackburn Road	
Connaught
Duchess Park-
Kelly Road	
Lakewood	
Elementary-Junior Secondary-
Mackenzie— 	
Winton	
Elementary—■
Aurora  	
Austin Road-
Bear Lake	
Beaverley..
426
598
398
406
4,5877
229
279
198
199
197
319
200
207
2,366
2,221
336
383
471
133
655
44
181
197
180
182
250
71
333
15
89
113
2,400 | 1,233
429
97
217
504
44
138
47
44
12
124
219
54
113
270
25
62
26
20
6
73
632
504
507
12
65
97
35
125
33
103
90
481
2,684
Blackburn Road-
1,438
376
513
1,081
533
795
305
213
24
579
115
297
514
322
251
268
5
29
54
16
71
22
56
50
261
1,405
749
203
241
566
294
391
150
136
10
311
55
144
269
156
201
221
62
322
29
92
84
1,167
210
43
104
234
19
76
21
24
6
51
1,656 |  868 |
788
310
253
239
7
36
43
19
54
11
47
40
220
1,279
689
173
272
515
239
404
155
77
14
268
60
153
245
97
71
82
53
47
74
23
56
75
69
41
61
369 |  520 |  399 |  431
36
44
38
25
20
143
	
	
	
13
1
	
30
31
	
96
85
34
30
86
11
30
16
179 |  208 |  175
207
18
12
12
12
74
87
7
10
18
26
11
7
11
8
8
3
26
17
12
12
57
7
18
7
6
1
19
61
51
5
11
6
26
5
16
14
83
60
48
3
18
36
9
13
5
15
15
41
|  278 |  263
49
86
24
55
97
38
99
15
51
84
64
54
4
9
35
6
23
5
10
18
37
265
41
83
22
40
64
14
12
12
  |  185 |  182 |  139 |
32
11
13
15
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G 189
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
DC
X
XI
XII
XIII
56
40
38
40
94
72
60
68
	
	
	
	
	
42
46
31
35
	
	
	
	
60
39
43
44
	
	
	
	
.	
	
	
	
423
377 |  297
329
14
87 | .	
300
335
262
237
174
19
109
107
120
23
17
11
164
139
29
56
43
42
28
	
	
	
	
37
38
33
27
15
	
23
17
18
111
7
20
90
6
18
95
6
21
102
16
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
31
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
...
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
217
174
182
161
16
23 |  17 |  11
201
177
171
134
135
6
17
7
101
87
87
66
58
15
14
10
7
9
18
23
29
28
	
	
	
	
36
25
22
	
	
	
90
8
25
7
5
71
8
21
9
2
54
4
17
6
5
71
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
13
7
	
	
	
__
	
	
	
	
	
	
23
17
12
10
	
	
	
	
—
	
191
165 |  137
136
6 |  17 |   7
146
112
109
66
58
145
123
102
139
123
41
65
47
42
56
47
21
40
11
26
4
12
38
9
7
15
35
7
3
21
47
24
	
■	
	
60
59
51
	
	
	
15
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
4
18
10
24
4
20
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
	
	
12
17
14
45
82
75
106
12
	
	
——
	
	
	
	
	
	
213
267 |  226
210
36 | 	
	
	
261
229
174
139
123
—..
___
742
696
155
106
115
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
176
187
150
	
_
	
	
	
	
	
414
377
290
	
	
	
	
	
208
164
161
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
283
283
229
	
	
	
36
36
31
22
20
28
4
	
	
	
63
22
44
52
	
	
	
64
59
56
104
13
15
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
18
7
18
11
_
44
29
42
36
_
_
_
_
51
68
61
61
13
	
	
	
	
	
 G 190
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
m
Special
District No. 57 (Prince George)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
184
408
532
25
532
186
48
218
346
637
702
162
60
511
44
108
169
117
466
5
226
580
35
27
49
493
77
21
834
49
89
323
357
205
215
103
185
259
15
261
89
24
101
178
341
371
74
30
286
26
62
78
63
247
1
135
304
21
15
24
240
36
13
422
25
44
159
183
106
111
81
223
273
10
271
97
24
117
168
296
331
88
30
225
18
46
91
54
219
4
91
276
14
12
25
253
41
8
412
24
45
164
174
99
104
16
30
81
52
5
61
29
17
39
61
92
137
20
33
66
7
38
30
18
70
1
33
74
6
6
10
60
9
3
122
11
13
71
66
35
50
33
67
56
12
68
32
7
35
41
97
116
19
14
75
7
37
40
18
71
53
100
5
2
10
75
18
4
123
8
19
46
66
30
34
28
60
63
3
69
26
6
34
63
91
111
25
13
59
5
33
38
32
71
1
29
99
4
8
13
72
21
4
148
4
12
64
77
31
39
Fraserview
Giscome   .      .      	
	
Harwin	
PedenHill                	
11
Penny   	
Quinson   	
Red Rock.. _ .._.. ■	
Shady Valley           	
Upper Fraser  —	
	
Wildwood _
	
Totals, District No. 57            	
15,823
8,151
7,672
16 | 1,767
1,725
1,706
82
District No. 58 (McBride)
182
379
12
20
49
309
101
204
8
11
30
160
81
175
4
9
19
149
31
34
42
6
1
6
49
45
2
6
5
54
38
4
1
7
35
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Valemount	
Elementary—
Dunster..
McBride Centennial- 	
	
Totals, District No. 58                . 	
951
514
437
65
104
112
85
District No. 59 (Peace River South)
707
744
490
437
336
282
489
39
125
85
599
85
130
58
358
46
270
142
119
395
387
239
220
171
143
261
20
64
37
312
43
50
28
181
23
142
82
63
312
357
251
217
165
139
228
19
61
48
287
42
80
30
177
23
128
60
56
	
53
45
56
7
21
14
99
9
22
20
44
16
30
34
23
47
45
58
7
22
18
84
17
15
13
69
9
53
14
16
43
35
60
9
16
15
101
9
16
11
46
12
31
23
13
Junior Secondary-
Central    	
	
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Chetwynd	
Elementary—■
	
21
Devereaux     	
	
Grandview- 	
	
Moberly Lake
Parkhill     	
6
Rnlla
South Taylor ..    .                               	
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G 191
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
vra
DC
X
XI
XII
XIII
21
31
44
104
1
92
20
5
30
35
87
89
24
76
9
18
18
60
1
31
80
8
3
4
58
10
3
108
5
14
38
33
28
29
23
47
87
81
18
6
21
51
100
84
12
71
4
24
16
57
2
29
75
9
4
5
78
7
3
99
13
10
36
38
27
36
18
39
82
~72
27
_23
59
82
69
31
~83
5
50
""22
74
1
104
I
30
34
30
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
70
88
4
89
34
7
36
	
	
36
88
96
31
65
	
7
19
15
76
29
78
	
3
4
7
71
12
3
130
8
13
	
	
38
43
24
27
	
	
1,485
1,395
1,381
1,256
104 |       22 |      44 | .    52
1,256
1,145
949
742
696
 .
32
1
6
45
27
4
10
38
41
4
8
27
	
	
42
32
37
30
40
26
34
29
35
3
7
27
72
84
79
80
—.... |   	
 .
	
74
67
66
34
29
49
49
49
7
21
10
85
14
18
59
40
19
15
68
55
36
57
6
27
10
83
12
19
25
44
15
18
~80
45
28
95
8
82
9
22
"Ii
32
9
15
11
10
	
21
8
9
3
286
178
79
220
195
62
66
197
117
56
331
37
283
34
27
—
44
44
64
3
29
	
18
10
65
15
18
14
42
9
24
	
40
28
	
	
19
	
	
 G 192
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys      Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
II HI
Primary
Special
District No. 59 (Peace River South)-
Elementary—Continued
Tate Creek	
•Cont'd
Don Titus	
Tremblay	
Willowbrook-
Windrem	
Totals, District No. 59	
District No. 60 (Peace River North)
Secondary—North Peace ...
Junior Secondary—Bert Bowes..
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Altona	
Clearview..
Mile 18 Beatton River Road_
Prespatou VaUey	
Rosefleld	
Elementary—
Airport-
Ambrose 	
Attachie	
Charlie Lake	
Fort St. John Central-
Grandhaven	
Alwin Holland	
Montney 	
North Pine	
Robert Ogilvie  	
Osborn	
Peejay Camp	
Taylor	
Upper Pine	
Wonowon	
Totals, District No. 60-
District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)
Secondary—
Esquimalt-
Mount Douglas..
Mount View	
Oak Bay	
Reynolds	
Victoria —
Junior Secondary
Central 	
Colquitz	
Dean HeightS-
Esquimalt	
Gordon Head-
Lansdowne	
Oak Bay	
S. J. WilUs	
Elementary-Junior Secondary-
Shoreline 	
Solarium	
Elementary—
Bank Street	
Beacon HU1	
Blanshard	
Braefoot	
Burnside —
Cedar HiU—
Cloverdale—
Craigflower-
Doncaster.	
Sir James Douglas..
Fairburn	
Glanford	
Gordon Head	
Hampton	
92
252
518
43
206
41
127
246
21
111
51
125
272
22
95
6,652 |    3,407 |    3,245
579
297
834
446
17
6
234
113
51
26
83
45
30
12
84
45
235
126
9
4
211
100
826
437
215
112
501
256
67
34
26
9
279
150
36
22
19
10
175
83
120
58
58
32
720
362
687
318
649
319
1,223
640
729
385
1,386
787
900
469
935
517
64
43
786
419
934
478
986
504
999
533
894
442
443
216
25
11
305
142
115
61
550
257
222
114
334
174
279
140
656
336
458
238
864
421
758
415
453
220
434
205
603
314
418
216
282
388
11
121
25
38
18
39
109
5
111
389
103
245
33
17
129
14
9
92
62
26
4,689 |    2,423 |    2,266
358
369
330
583
344
599
431
418
21
367
456
482
466
452
227
14
163
54
293
108
160
139
320
220
443
343
233
229
289
202
15
16
51
34
81
66
10
10
53
35
13
50
92
6
25
|  703 |  648 |  626 |  29
68
93
102
101
52
64
48
2
31
10
11
5
21
34
3
44
107
41
86
12
4
52
3
3
31
23
12
535
42
22
73
26
44
27
82
60
89
71
71
52
75
64
—
	
4
32
39
9
8
16
12
4
5
17
14
31
40
2
30
32
118
120
33
31
79
77
11
9
2
4
44
53
5
7
1
5
24
28
23
12
8
9
	
	
46
42
24
23
77
69
30
34
54
56
37
29
79
76
66
46
123
104
90
92
80
59
47
45
76
61
57
37
31
491 |  507 |  31
17
17
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G 193
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
DC
X
XI
XII
XHI
10
11
14
13
40
66
11
	
_
	
83
64
63
69
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
10
5
2
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
44
35
	
12
	
	
.	
. .
——
	
	
 .
	
620
616
565
550
65
21 |  29 |  12
543
477
436
368
317
27
	
	
	
	
	
11
17
7
320
333
120
181
218
206
	
3
31
4
15
6
32
8
10
1
25
2
9
22
6
5
	
	
	
	
1
22
4
4
	
	
	
	
1
3
6
2
2
	
	
	
3
	
	
	
	
	
18
14
35
1
38
27
2
36
36
1
31
32
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
107
87
92
135
29
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
35
35
22
18
	
	
	
	
	
	
_
60
69
61
69
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
6
4
34
7
3
31
12
5
31
10
4
34
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
8
3
29
10
3
30
1
2
16
2
2
17
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
24
18
9
11
	
	
	
	
	
	
9
7
8
5
	
	
467
441
366
374
29
11 |  17 |   7
354
334
301
218
206
	
97
342
281
.	
. .
.	
,	
	
	
	
	
	
22
312
353
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
24
346
279
_
146
548
529
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
219
200
165
145
	
	
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
	
209
680
497
	
21
18
20
322
340
179
_
_
20
21
24
315
296
259
	
	
	
28
25
11
	
	
	
8
21
23
300
253
181
_
	
	
356
307
271
	
	
	
18
18
5
331
355
259
	
	
	
_
	
	
347
401
251
_
	
	
	
	
	
16
12
12
300
285
269
	
	
	
	
64
8
	
	
	
139
136
104
	
	
	
41
16
67
41
54
39
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
61
62
58
44
42
46
47
49
42
42
31
33
41
81
	
..
_
94
97
86
74
61
67
65
_
109
115
96
112
14
94
93
104
113
65
71
52
55
56
43
70
69
_
	
_
81
78
84
84
48
60
58
46
	
	
	
	
	
—
 G 194
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys      Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
II
III
Primary
Special
District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Hillcrest  	
Frank Hobbs	
James Bay 	
George Jay	
George Jay Annex
Margaret Jenkins	
Lake HiU 	
Lampson Street..
Macaulay..
McKenzie Avenue..
Marigold	
Monterey..
Northridge	
Oaklands 	
G. R. Pearkes Clinic.
Quadra 	
Richmond 	
Rockheights 	
Shelbourne 	
South Park 	
Strawberry Vale	
Tillicum	
Tolmie 	
Uplands 	
Victor _  	
Victoria West-
View Royal—
WiUows	
Totals, District No. 61-
District No. 62 (Sooke)
Senior Secondary—Belmont	
Secondary—Edward Milne	
Junior Secondary—
Dunsmuir	
Elizabeth Fisher-
Elementary-Junior  Secondary — John  Stubbs
Memorial  	
Elementary—
Colwood  _   	
Dogwood	
Glenlake —
Happy Valley—
Hans Helgesen..
Jordan River—
Langford	
Metchosin	
Millstream —
Port Renfrew-
Sangster	
Saseenos. _
Savory	
Sooke	
Totals, District No. 62-
District No. 63 (Saanich)
Senior Secondary—Claremont 	
Junior Secondary-
Mount Newton   —
North Saanich 	
Royal Oak-
Elementary—
Beaver Lake-
Brentwood 	
Cordova Bay-
Deep Cove
Durrance Road.
Elk Lake	
Keating 	
399
604
184
958
81
617
596
549
634
510
342
656
201
936
45
703
587
545
565
242
243
548
473
340
69
594
420
764
206
312
95
503
47
310
300
267
325
270
189
316
101
487
22
365
306
291
277
128
124
289
252
154
38
327
233
394
193
292
89
455
34
307
296
282
309
240
153
340
100
449
23
338
281
254
288
114
119
259
221
186
31
267
187
370
,214
16,624
396
203
381
197
327
172
721
380
809
415
535
263
14
10
340
199
207
114
52
27
31
19
598
292
214
111
216
110
75
45
428
232
203
114
408
211
463
218
15,590
193
184
155
341
394
272
4
141
93
25
12
306
103
106
30
196
89
197
245
6,418 ,| 3,332 | 3,086
768
■1
\
385
411
229 '
378
193
436
221
125
54
322
168
457
247
163
75
100
57
90
45
349
187
383
182
185
215
71
154
210
88
43
45
162
44
45
78
57
53
""68
64
57
45
109
66
51
103
87
90
43
55
61
39
73
44
146
68
76
66
75
67
36
57
24
105
78
83
69
71 I
30
65
58
30
86
70
64
1,800 i 2,378
93
106
157
61
93
62
~ii
31
11
6
86
24
34 |
13
59
33
42
55
67
61
50
132
64
69
92
90
64
46
91
33
108
101
72
64
71
33
57
75
37
~84
41
77
51
82
48
119
~79
76
46
72
69
33
79
34
109
99
82
56
57
31
61
59
45
~79
65
106
95
81
33
30
11
4
80
31
33
11
77
31
30
56
123
57
~41
27
14
6
84
21
33
13
53
16
28
49
417 |  580
603
565
42
43
45
	
19
9
44
32 .
30
37
22
22
11
12
28 i
32
44
36
21
27
40
29
17
30
50
12
23
23
21
16
41
2,565 | 2,410 |  182
14
31
52
13
5
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G 195
ENROLMENT—-Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1  1  2
1
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
50
49
49
50
77
42
90
86
90
	
	
	
	
------
	
	
	
	
121
111
130
98
15
81
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
85
79
107
78
"
83
90
88
79
80
81
73
69
90
73
—
z
	
	
	
	
86
89
15
77
83
77
73
35
36
41
31
16
_
79
110
82
101
29
36
123
136
114
112
8
	
_
22
	
83
73
88
92
	
59
85
51
86
69
69
56
	
	
	
	
77
66
75
71
68
60
70
51
	
	
	
	
39
33
37
62
44
68
35
63
	
	
68
14
68
75
57
65
45
57
41
	
.
	
42
28
76
76
78
60
49
74
55
66
101
123
109
123
	
	
	
	
	
2,552
2,696 | 2,615
2,485
260
Ill |  115 |  95
2,629
2,573
2,436
2,373
1,939 | 	
239
157
	
	
	
11
3
4
85
90
89
57
42
	
81
87
67
17
15
16
103
216
52
114
215
29
110
242
	
89
64
48
59
58
45
~51
47
36
25
	
	
 ■
36
27
32
24
16
2
6
3
4
_
	
	
	
	
105
84
81
78
	
	
22
31
48
37
	
35
24
27
30
	
	
	
	
	
12
9
13
4
	
	
74
57
63
45
40
26
29
28
	
	
	
	
	
_
36
44
38
33
64
54
60
53
4
	
	
	
	
640
542 |  587
497
29
28 |   18 |  20
456
448
441
296
199 | 	
1
1
  1	
	
1
  1  	
405
326
37
1
25
13
12
1
7 1   11
135
122
159
143
123
139
102
121
138
18
15
18
40
34
45
33
12
67
73
67
87
8
	
26
21
24
19
12
11
21
16
	
	
	
	
	
	
44
41
42
33
8
	
 .
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
 G 196
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys      Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
II
III
Primary
Special
District No. 63 (Saanich)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Lochside -
McTavish	
Prospect Lake-
Royal Oak	
Saanichton	
Sansbury	
Sidney-
Totals, District No. 63-
District No. 64 (Gulf Islands)
Secondary—Gulf Islands.
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Galiano Island 	
Pender Island	
Elementary—
Mayne Island	
Saltspring .
Saturna Island-
Totals, District No. 64-
District No. 65 (Cowichan)
Senior Secondary—Cowichan	
Junior Secondary—
George Bonner	
Mount Prevost	
Quamichan	
Elementary—
Alex Aitken	
Alexander	
Arcadian	
Bayview	
Bench 	
Cobble Hill Annex..
Cowichan Station	
Crofton	
Drinkwater _
Duncan 	
Gibbins Road	
Glenora	
Charles Hoey, V.C..
Khowhemun—	
Koksilah  	
Maple Bay	
MiU Bay-
Old Koksilah Annex.
Sahtlam Annex	
Shawnigan Lake	
Somenos	
Tansor	
Westholme Annex..
York Road Annex.
Totals, District No. 65	
District No. 66 (Lake Cowichan)
Secondary—Lake Cowichan	
Elementary—
J. H. Boyd ....
Caycuse..
Stanley Gordon.—
A. B. GreenweU...
Honeymoon Bay..
Nitinat	
Yount	
Totals, District No. 66_
164
113
87
301
125
191
613
78
52
50
163
67
106
306
5,193 I 2,683
283
41
32
18
394
11
143
186
5
779
373
692
346
330
168
590
317
601
316
168
80
435
235
17
8
48
25
269
143
122
68
122
56
228
111
196
101
500
264
93
47
45
25
123
69
218
118
225
122
197
103
191
89
16
11
46
18
86
48
222
118
216
104
23
11
30
12
574
1,685
307
151
87
47
16
389
178
207
118
80
45
15
8
222
100
859
61
37
138
58
85
307
2,510
140
23
19
10
208
6
406
346
162
273
285
200
9
23
126
54
66
117
95
236
46
20
54
100
103
94
102
5
28
38
104
112
12
18
6,049 | 3,133 | 2,916
267
64
31
211
89
35
7
122
50
51
60
19
22
13
31
17
IS
87
33
12
12
43
21
17
56
22
9
12
34
14
18
108
405
374
431
29
49
7
4
5
4
4
3
48
46
2
2
4
6
3
47
3
49 |
66
59 |  63
32
42
89
46
27
55
—
	
30
26
61
58
48
29
31
41
21
15
31
30
26
37
26
25
11
8
59
58
35
31
20
23
17
8
20
16
25
34
21
12
9
5
	
	
25
56
30
38
18
27
27
29
55
31
23
6|
10
20
27
16
9
23
17
35
16
409
489 |  458 |  455
91
39
55
31 |
28
49
11
5
18
826
125
119
32
11
54
13
3
30
143
43
6
"49
7
2
32
139
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G 197
ENROLMENT-
-Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
I
IV
V
VI
vn
Special
1
2
3
vni
DC
X
XI
XII
XIII
18
28
19
25
26
10
13
16
8
16
9
17
	
	
33
41
35
34
	
15
11
24
23
	
	
	
	
24
19
27
17
	
63
90
93
56
	
	
	
	
—
	
—
~--
394
413 |     434
401
28
25 |         7 |       11
416
405
361
405
326
37
56
53
58
57
59
5
5 :
7
8
1
4
8
ZZ
zz
ZZ
2
3
	
	
	
	
1
49
4
46
2
52
1
57
—
	
— .
—
	
	
	
	
	
1
3
	
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
	
	
.	
61
60 |       63
70
 1    —
—
	
61
53
58
57
59 |   	
"
	
	
—
	
113
118
99
404
288
23
30
36
180
180
141
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
206
211
184
	
	
	
25
65
27
38 ;
35
34
~~72
28
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
~26
1
18
25
_41
_55
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
~ 22
~~ 28
19
36
20
28
	
	
	
30
24
30
22
	
	
	
	
	
 .
~93
9
109
9
93
75
27
	
—.—
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
30
25
24
9
36
38
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
27
25
27
25
	
	
 .	
45
11
16
33
36
46
58
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
~~_4
29
35
~39
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
15
32
35
30
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
19
11
	
	
	
	
	
.	
	
	
	
	
463 |     475 |     488
453
55
23
30
36
499
509
424
404
288 |   	
1
1
16
4
119
134
114
105
82
9
109
~19
5
29
" 7
86
~~15
~~29
6
92
_15
"~27
Z5i
	
	
	
~26
	
	
	
171
137
140
128
	
16
	
4
119
134
114
105
82
	
 G 198
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 67 (Ladysmith)
Secondary—
493
528
317
39
67
57
324
227
282
114
177 i
15
257
272
159
24
36
39
146
106
151
60
90
10
236
256
158
15
31
18
178
121
131
54
87
5
32
55
49
58
11
27
15
52 i
25
49
20 '
2
31
8
25
2
67
25
7
24
3
54
13
15
8
53
29
31
4
Elementary—
15
Thetis Island	
	
Totals, District No. 67	
2,640
1,350
1,290
194
201
192
207
15
District No. 68 (Nanaimo)
1,406
854
298
481
860
219
392
232
39
321
344
471
25
615
373
41
126
179
75
293
248
112
187
50
283
106
254
176
220
357
437
97
192
130
38
190
755
458
146
231
425
110
204
111
17
167
169
259
12
328
178
18
72
88
36
148
125
62
102
35
141
56
128
90
122
191
229
46
96
76
14
94
651
396
152
250
435
109
188
121
22
154
175
212
13
287
195
23
54
91
39
145
123
50
85
15
142
50
126
86
98
166
208
51
96
54
24
96
34
46
38
32
38
33
71
49
35
44
40
42
31
41
35
34
48
28
36
51
24
44
34
35
5
79
64
5
52
33
12
30
14
24
40
19
37
43
30
59
17
21
20
8
25
40
57
29
47
27
34
4
102
66
3
25
33
11
29
27
12
20
31
18
40
38
33
64
18
21
10
6
25
27
54
23
42
36
41
4
62
58
9
52
11
43
24
19
24
40
23
46
27
23
58
13
26
16
6
31
Junior Secondary-
Elementary—
BayvieW-   „	
	
12
19
Cilaire   	
	
13
Forest Park-	
	
Georgia Avenue..  	
Hammond Bay 	
6
North Cedar.	
Northfield .____ _	
8
9
16
Rock City..	
Rutherford _ 	
Waterloo ... _   _	
	
Totals, District No. 68 	
10,721
5,539
5,182
719
861
870
838
83
District No. 69 (Qualicum)
Secondary—Qualicum Beach 	
430
296
56
75
144
32
35
107
516
250
218
151
32
39
86
18
17
58
271
114
212
145
24
36
58
14
18
49
245
136
15
51
40
14
15
19
9
56
26
11
11
13
....—
56
34
11
15
31
16
57
40
	
Elementary—
Bowser         	
	
Nanoose —  	
Parksville _.	
12
Totals, District No. 69  	
1,941
1,004
937
106
139
137
170
12
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G 199
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2  1  3
VIII
1-
X
XI
XII
XIII
51
"si
~~ 20
~~ 26
3
65
""69
~~33
21
1
72
~~93
_ 37
~24
12
10
12
113
127
101
112
104
126
81
104
60
59
44
7
	
	
79
	
	
28
~~ii
2
21
	
191
183
189
226
21
12 |   10
12
240
213
230
185
119
	
39
37
22
52
44
68
3
80
32
7
" 14
56
26
13
24
38
17
54
26
82
57
17
19
19
5
31
34
32
54
53
81
5
62
43
7
13
51
30
19
19
34
14
28
109
46
18
25
15
5
27
64
27
75
133
71
52
48
30
21
14
39
19
114
59
29
23
32
3
8
15
11
19
304
117
189
279
298
86
187
303
100
234
95
105
259
689
598
43
49
25
50
20
	
37
33
4
88
58
	
	
10
26
14
	
	
60
37
14
22
	
	
30
15
36
24
27
20
46
16
	
14
23
17
8
10
19
	
	
849
882
824
850
46
11 |  26
19
889
874
793
689
598
	
25
10
21
13
18
59
39
13
21
22
11
64
23
33
15
81
20
13
8
6
66
101
77
95
77
73
131
79
20
12
12
11
66
28
14
	
149
172 |
145
171
14
13
8 |   6
167
172
150
131
79
	
 G 200
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Prl-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 70 (Alberni)
Secondary—
1,400
169
504
865
34
637
274
665
258
671
68
28
540
158
234
285
356
39
110
516
287
92
216
123
284
323
724
83
273
426
15
333
134
341
139
343
28
8
286
83
122
151
192
24
55
260
143
40
116
58
155
167
676
86
231
439
19
304
140
324
119
328
40
20
254
75
112
134
164
15
55
256
144
52
100
65
129
156
107
27
159
~I6i
145
62
30
16
32
9
75
58
57
30
107
13
2
54
23
45
53
43
7
21
27
39
23
22
29
46
52
4
69
25
66
51
98
12
7
56
15
35
30
57
9
16
60
43
23
27
17
36
50
2
70
34
70
25
99
9
2
54
27
30
57
37
5
22
38
42
22
22
16
36
49
Junior Secondary—
A. W Neill
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Eric Godson
Elementary—
35
Faber                .	
Gill                 	
6
n, W GrRy
C.T.Hilton	
	
23
Redford               -	
12
Tofino    .    	
10
Wood
Totals, District No. 70
9,136
4,699
4,437
681
835
806
768
86
District No. 71 (Courtenay)
920
464
472
208
417
284
33
180
220
623
525
640
374
11
149
15
602
344
17
376
145
350
493
216
247
100
224
144
17
91
122
334
249
336
184
7
78
7
302
167
10
197
80
186
427
248
225
108
193
140
16
89
98
289
276
304
190
4
71
8
300
177
7
179
65
164
74
66
94
46
91
39
43
59
31
29
31
85
60
83
52
21
3
66
51
11
27
6
34
36
~~ 26
28
82
59
68
37
3
25
4
73
47
6
41
21
47
43
_io
30
78
66
85
45
2
25
1
75
49
~47
16
38
Junior Secondary-
Elementary—
33
Black Crp.ek
10
16
14
Tsolum  	
10
Totals, District No. 71	
7,369
3,791
3,578
512
590
603
630
83
District No. 72 (Campbell River)
609
1,097
57
206
16
451
332
154
313
537
30
96
11
236
162
70
296
560
27
110
5
215
170
84
	
3
23
~45
~75
7
27
77
79
6
26
71
48
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Sayward.
Elementary—
Arbutus	
16
15
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G 201
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
vn
Special
1
2
3
vra
DC
X
XI
XII
XIII
8
43
17
144
157
179
426
336
90
	
	
	
—
3
3
5
44
31
35
23
25
	
190
167
147
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
	
354
301
210
	
	
	
5
4
4
2
4
60
65
87
69
47
29
33
21
__
	
.	
78
79
62
94
_
	
	
42
37
24
49
	
	
	
102
12
87
13
82
9
96
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
6
65
4
64
2
78
5
66
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
16
19
16
17
19
	
	
	
	
	
	
33
30
30
31
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
54
33
36
34
	
"'
	
	
*
5
15
13
18
18
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
81
90
80
105
12
27
19
35
5
51
17
21
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
26
24
27
38
...
_
	
7
14
13
11
—
33
28
30
24
9
	
	
	
	
	
48
40
51
33
	
	
	
	
781
731 |     733
712
69
3
46
22
736
656
571
449
361
90
434
437
49
167
149
148
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
171
79
119
165
73
128
136
56
116
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
20
17
17
	
	
	
48
34
42
49
1
	
	
	
	
	
	
 .
	
30
31
~34
37
36
29
29
	
	
	
.	
.  ,.
	
	
83
66
72
72
11
	
	
	
_
	
	
69
60
64
67
4
	
74
85
57
78
56
6
26
1
79
32
~20
4
76
44
~ii
2
70
48
	
	
	
	
zz
	
	
	
	
	
61
11
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
	
	
28
38
51
41
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
~"io
~~ii
59
~ 82
15
17
20
23
42
	
	
	
	
45
40
30
47
-	
	
	
—
	
629
574 |     609
616
42
20 |       17 |       17
536
515
456
434
437
49
295
297
17
25
40
49
372
319
292
7
2
6
5
9
8
4
25
23
23
26
	
	
	
	
18
8
7
	
	
	
70
55
~63
~~70
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
73
64
65
67
	
	
	
	
	
.	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
 G 202
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 72 (Campbell River)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
209
200
249
127
205
51
224
185
244
9
12
7
274
107
109
122
68
99
22
123
94
134
7
6
5
142
102
91
127
59
106
29
101
91
110
2
6
2
132
33
17
1
24
34
25
20
28
33
22
35
1
1
44
23
30
20
17
40
33
21
28
2
4
1
40
31
24
46
23
39
31
20
35
2
2
2
48
8
Flm
Quadra   	
Rockland.  	
	
Totals, District No. 72 	
4,918
2,493
2,425
51
413
449
454
39
District No. 75 (Mission)
1,324
62
144
55
163
82
161
64
21
36
61
486
32
180
78
46
283
227
688
31
75
21
80
37
73
35
9
17
36
258
21
91
38
25
145
119
636
31
69
34
83
45
88
29
12
19
25
228
11
89
40
21
138
108
	
11
20
11
13
15
24
8
6
6
13
59
5
26
11
13
40
27
6
16
12
15
12
27
4
8
5
10
66
9
19
12
5
41
40
5
15
10
20
16
13
6
7
7
8
55
9
31
8
6
46
31
Elementary—
Deroche                                     	
Dewdney                                           	
Femdale...
17
Silverhill
1
West Heights
Windebank
7
Totals, District No. 75   	
3,505
1,799
1,706
	
308
307
293
25
District No. 76 (Agassiz)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Agassiz	
Elementary—
470
7
91
25
383
66
234
3
49
13
206
36
236
4
42
12
177
30
2
26
44
2
8
4
48
22
1
18
6
66
	
2
14
4
80
	
Kent	
McCaffrey _       	
Totals, District No. 76 -	
1,042
541
501
72
84
91
100
	
District No. 77 (Summerland)
550
597
132
274
307
70
276
290
62
80
17
67
21
92
18
Elementary—■
Trout Creek
	
Totals, District No. 77	
1,279
651
628
—
97
88
110
	
District No. 80 (Kitimat)
988
313
879
607
541
517
171
453
309
279
471
142
426
298
262
46
136
88
60
30
111
72
76
45
95
75
65
42
116
89
73
Elementary—
KUdala  	
	
5
Totals, District No. 80   . .
3,328
1,729
1,599
330
289
1
280
320
5
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G 203
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
29
36
32
34
35
23
22
24
29
30
33
33
15
11
24
17
26
27
19
26
21
16
14
	
31
36
30
30
	
	
	
	
23
26
26
30
	
. - .
29
35
43
39
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
51
34
29
28
	
. i —
	
	
444
428 |  435
445
—
25 |  40 |  49
399
335
303
295
297
17
16
21
10
325
309
252
199
192
10
9
8
13
20
25
20
28
9
13
	
	
	
7
30
45
33
	
	
	
10
13
16
34
20
27
16
9
11
12
14
	
	
	
6
2
10
12
12
6
	
62
9
57
71
68
31
	
	
	
	
	
23
27
25
29
12
7
13
15
5
10
6
	
37
41
43
35
	
	
25
32
28
34
3
	
	
	
	
290
309 |  330
285
34
16 |  21
10
325
309
252
199
192
	
18
79
15
11
1
69
102
75
61
39
21
12
18
	
2
9
55
63
45
	
	
	
	
	
	
.	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
78
84 |   81
79
	
15 |  11 |   1
69
102
75
61
39
4
7
4
100
107
112
108
87
81
84
106
18
17
23
18
	
	
	
	
,
105
98
107
124
	
4
7|   4
100
107
112
108
108
16
9
9
230
241
192
190
101
42
35
37
36
118
121
97
85
69
83
69
62
70
63
69
55
5
	
	
	
	
299
302
272
238
5
16
9
9
230
241
192
190
101
 G 204
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 81 (Fort Nelson)
Secondary—Fort Nelson	
Elementary Secondary—
Camp Mile 456  —	
Fireside  — 	
Elementary—
Camp Mile 392-
G. W. Carlson—
Streeper Annex .
Totals, District No. 81-
District No. 82 (Chilcotin)
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Puntzi  Moun.
tain-
Elementary—
Anahim Lake.	
Chezacut 	
Kleena Kleene .—
Poplar Grove	
Tatlayoko Lake.
Totals, District No. 82	
District No. 83 (Portage Mountain)
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Hudson Hope
Elementary—General George R. Pearkes	
Totals, District No. 83  	
District No. 84 (Vancouver Island West)
Secondary—>
Gold River-
Captain John Meares..
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Fair Harbour	
Kyuquot	
Zeballos- 	
Elementary-
Gold River	
Tahsis River-
Totals, District No. 84..
District No. 85 (Vancouver Island North)
Secondary—North Island -
Junior Secondary—Port Hardy-
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Alert Bay 	
San Josef 	
Sea View Annex.
Woss Lake	
Elementary—
Coal Harbour-
Echo Bay _
A. J. ElUott	
Fort Rupert	
Kokish	
Mahatta River	
Minstrel Island	
Open Area Annex.
Port McNeill	
Quatsino.
Robert Scott	
Sea View	
Winter Harbour-
Totals, District No. 85..
District No. 86 (Creston-Kaslo)
Secondary—
Crawford Bay-
Prince Charles .
162
34
11
7
457
154
233
271
151
85
27
18
32
424
190
338
99
382
259
192
179
14
11
110
70
55
15
8
144
189
12
445
149
12
84
18
6
3
244
77
78
213
77
67
1
90
2
93
92
825 |  432 |
393
69 |
57
33
44
23
16
4
8
3
14
9
33
17
24
21
12
5
5
16
172 |   89 |
83
132
125
101
146
50
97 |  103 |
12
8
9
8
3
2
3
2
2
3
6
8
99
35
31
25
66
58
51
257 |  247
68
39
9
10
16
208
101
927 |  451
158
42
214
103
102
94
9
4
46
30
34
5
4
63
101
5
237
95
4
2,683 | 1,350
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Kaslo.
131
858
347
76
432
189
83
46
18
8
16
216
89
59
27
	
4
5
5
5
5
3
7
3
5
69
50
60
24
27
27
476
180
57
168
156
90
85
5
7
64
40
21
10
4
81
88
7
208
54
8
34
38
31
65
33
11
25
13
2
1
49
24
2
69
46
1
1,333
201
314
55
426
158
31
29
33
21
6
1
14
18
10
4
1
51
21
54
34
2
67
31
27
1
3
20
10
9
2
3
44
22
4
42
36
2
270 |  323
31
35
50 |  66 |  58 |  51 | 	
86 |  109 |  90 |  100 | —
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G 205
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
■ I-
3
vm
DC
X
XI
XII
XIII
53
49
34
17
9
5
3
3
4
3
1
2
1
2
1
	
	
	
	
1
	
	
	
	
	
"~87
57
68
57
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
	
93
62
74
62
 |   	
  |	
57
49
34
17
9
—
11
8
1
1
1
4
5
6
2
3
8
8
4
I
6
1
2
3
1
	
	
	
	
3
	
1
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
•	
	
	
	
26
16
27
8
_  |     |   -   -
	
3
— „
1
	
	
	
40
44
29
	
42
36
42
	
	
46
	
46
40
44
29
—      |   ..— |   ._   ..
	
42
36
42
... |
	
43
33
27
27
21
4
1
4
53
2
3
1
2
47
1
2
37
::
25
3
1
4
25
19
12
4
7
49
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
25
20
21
19
—
	
——
	
	
	
	
	
	
87
78
74
59
—
	
	
	
76
58
46
39
25
	
	
	
	
	
—
.	
3
52
55
45
44
85
95
58
	
46
47
86
36
28
22
16
28
29
26
28
32
16
28
	
	
■	
15
32
16
13
	
	
45
20
21
11
17
—
	
_—
	
15
11
13
	
	
	
_..._.
21
18
2
14
12
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
17
8
5
1
18
9
1
2
23
6
24
1
26
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
2
50
63
1
59
3
21
~22
	
	
	
■	
	
	
	
	
	
2
3
2
	
	
;	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
267
242
265
161
22 |   	
3
197
138
127
95
58
	
10
26
32
27
23
13
	
	
	
	
16
15
11
181
183
174
179
99
	
26
18
29
23
	
	
	
	
33
35
19
23
15
	
 G 206
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
1
I
II
III
Special
District No. 86 (Creston-Kaslo)—Continued
Elementary—
102
178
831
200
35
61
77
132
143
57
60
96
415
96
17
27
52
67
76
28
42
82
416
104
18
34
25
65
67
29
128
18
18
83
33
8
10
9
38
18
12
19
24
80
19
10
9
12
34
19
9
11
22
58
23
8
8
12
35
21
11
8
Yahk	
Totals, District No. 86.   	
3,152
1,631
1,521
159
276
266
244
8
District No. 87 (Stikine)
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
AtUn	
36
225
14
38
25
62
22
108
9
18
12
37
14
117
5
20
13
25
28
6
28
2
4
6
16
7
25
3
6
3
6
7
29
2
9
3
9
Elementary—
Dease Lake 	
Good Hope Lake  	
	
Totals, District No. 87 	
400
206
194
28
62
50
59
—..
District No. 88 (Skeena-Cassiar)
Secondary—
548
295
703
41
245
9
281
451
120
398
189
50
61
463
72
133
101
552
317
39
336
291
158
372
20
129
6
153
215
62
204
110
30
23
232
36
67
52
285
158
22
183
257
137
331
21
116
3
128
236
58
194
79
20
38
231
36
66
49
267
159
17
153
20
44
108
66
25
119
47
4
29
2
42
31
87
75
8
8
19
34
13
18
124
6
59
7
35
1
16
32
31
93
48
13
7
10
40
18
49
74
7
30
9
29
1
30
98
27
98
5
11
14
34
8
126
5
35
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Stewart 	
Elementary—
	
10
Cassie Hall —  	
Kalum     	
E. T. Kenney... 	
Kiti-K'Shan                  	
12
Kitsault                	
Kitwanga     . 	
Parkside     	
	
Ttinrnhill
Two Mile  .
Totals, District No. 88	
5,404
2,808
2,596
429
559
511
530
22
District No. 89 (Shuswap)
581
240
513
590
173
350
51
134
379
195
17
22
184
57
272
126
256
324
90
182
20
61
198
108
10
17
103
25
309
114
257
266
83
168
31
73
181
87
7
5
81
32
33
43
12
21
38
21
7
19
52
26
7
21
1       11
50
15
8
19
49
31
s
28
5
55
21
9
21
35
23
6
19
11
Junior Secondary—Enderby	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
	
Elementary—
M. V. Beattie	
1
17
Falkland  	
	
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G 207
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Inter-
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
DC
X
XI
XII
XIII
21
13
31
20
26
24
_
	
20
13
_
64
134
122
145
9
	
	
38
32
25
30
	
	
	
	
9
14
7
8
5
_
._
	
	
_ .
16
25
13
15
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
16
27
22
20
8
4
13
. —
	
	
	
	
257
279 | 280
247
22
26 |  15 |  11
240
250
220
225
127 | 	
7
4
3
2
17
29
6
19
3
1
16
2
5
	
	
	
15
10
9
Z
	
2
7
3
2
5
3
3
11
8
9
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
39
52 |  39
35
  |
	
	
17
10
9
	
	
197
190
161
4
25
6
19
1
15
20
16
15
3
9
4
70
334
1
21
73
279
1
14
58
67
14
30
20
8
24
3
1
1
28
26
31
54
78
31
81
66
82
14
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
6
7
8
3
	
	
9
9
7
10
117
119
121
89
17
	
	
8
14
7
11
12
14
~14
ii
	
	
	
	
104
104
89
62
	
	
	
	
	
6
53
8
43
7
35
34
	
	
	
	
	
	
486
453 |  411
364
42
36 |  18 |  13
426
367
336
220
181
	
320
261
	
	
	
	
	
	
90
87
63
	
	
	
50
51
31
40
61
49
55
~~22
28
68
17
12
18
16
162
14
155
20
159
	
	
15
	
34
	
	
	
103
112
101
	
	
9
10
8
27
26
22
_
	
	
	
	
37
50
38
62
12
_
	
	
	
26
28
25
24
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
4
31
27
19
18
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
8
14
8
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
 G 208
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1969/70
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 89 (Shuswap)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
17
103
22
82
38
44
52
171
19
557
108
52
100
194
129
9
52
12
36
21
26
28
91
7
291
53
26
39
90
69
8
51
10
46
17
18
24
80
12
266
55
26
61
104
60
119
4
12
4
7
8
2
3
21
7
79
15
11
12
27
24
4
16
5
15
4
7
10
16
3
72
8
9
9
19
9
4
13
1
14
2
6
9
26
4
56
19
10
11
20
29
Kingfisher     _.   _
 ■
lNIntc-h Hill
14
TotRlcs, District No. 89
5,174
2,642
2,532
228
438
416
424
32
RECAPITULATION OF ENROLMENT, 1969/70, BY
Grade
Elementary
Elementary-
Junior Secondary
Elementary-
Senior Secondary
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
XITT
	
	
""""842
983
1,240
53
40
38
805
1,003
1,171
27
32
14
1,647
1,986
2,411
80
72
52
588
778
862
910
943
27
59
113
645
727
814
864
915
17
30
67
XII
1,333
XI
1,505
X
1,676
IX
1,774
1,858
Occupational 3
Occupational 2
Occupational 1.    	
44
89
180
Sub-totals
	
	
3,196
3,052
6,248
4,380
4,079
8,459
Intermediate Special.
VII	
VI
2,314
19,115
20,457
21,447
21,852
1,964
21,752
21,795
22,644
10,545
1,356
18,847
19,862
20,267
20,703
1,011
20,621
20,694
20,806
10,051
3,670
37,962
40,319
41,714
42,555
2,975
42,373
42,489
43,450
20,596
82
851
606
599
488
51
598
518
557
171
57
805
520
542
522
26
536
493
495
185
139
1,656
1,126
1,141
1,010
77
1,134
1,011
1,052
356
131
545
199
172
167
3
132
149
132
83
88
462
215
180
153
117
102
131
82
219
1,007
414
V
IV    -
352
320
3
TIT
249
II	
251
I
263
Kindergarten	
165
Sub-totals	
163,885
154,218
318,103
4,521
4,181
8,702
1,713
1,530
3,243
Totals..  	
163,885
154,218
318,103
7,717
7,233
14,950
6,093
5,609
11,702
l Vocational school, district and regional coUege, correspondence, adult, and night-school enrolments are
 STATISTICAL TABLES
G 209
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
vn
1
2
3
VIII
DC
X
XI
XII
XIII
2
18
3
23
10
n
	
	
	
	
——
	
	
	
	
	
3
8
9
12
9
5
12
6
14
10
4
14
4
3
11
12
5
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
31
5
63
11
30
69
12
24
71
15
23
28
14
	
	
	
	
z
	
	
	
	
5
15
31
8
16
30
9
14
36
23
31
	
	
	
	
	
—
	
	
13
27
27
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
442
493
421
396
26
12
18
16
430
423
378
320
261
	
TYPE OF SCHOOL, GRADE,
AND
SEX OF PUPILS
Junior Secondary
Secondary
Senior Secondary
Totals
,1 Public Schools
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
172
121
293
397
207
604
569
328
897
9,942
9,187
19,129
4,284
3,782
8,066
14,914
13,614
28,528
	
11,369
10,674
22,043
4,528
4,335
8,863
16,675
15,736
32,411
8,129
7,733
15,862
8,656
8,272
16,928
	
18,489
17,264
36,113
10,769
10,486
21,255
7,344
7,106
14,450
	
	
	
20,006
19,459
39,465
11,400
10,937
22,337
7,133
6,882
14,015
	
	
	
20,716
19,905
40,621
353
176
529
362
193
555
	
	
	
795
413
1,208
539
283
822
379
239
618
	
	
	
1,017
584
1,601
630
310
940
520
290
810
	
	
	
1,301
681
1,982
31,820
29,925
61,745
45,877
42,964
88,841
9,209
8,324
17,533
94,482
88,344
182,826
13
13
62
130
192
	
	
	
2,602
1,631
4,233
	
	
	
	
	
20,511
20,114
40,625
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
21,262
20,597
41,859
	
	
	
-
	
	
	
	
22,218
20,989
43,207
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
22,507
21,378
43,885
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
2,018
1,037
3,055
	
	
	
	
	
22,482
21,274
43,756
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
22,462
21,289
43,751
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
23,333
21,432
44,765
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
10,799
10,318
21,117
13
—
13
62 |       130
192
..  |         __ |   ..	
170,194
160,059
330,253
31,833
29,925
61,758
45,939
43,094
89,033
9,209
8,324
17,533
264,676
248,403
513,079
not included.
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1971
6030-1170-8400
 

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