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Civil Service Commission Fifty-Second Annual Report JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31 1970 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1971

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Civil Service Commission
Fifty-second Annual Report
JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31    .
1970
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1971
  To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Report of the Civil Service Commission, Province of British Columbia, from January 1 to December 31, 1970.
WESLEY D. BLACK
Provincial Secretary
Victoria, British Columbia, January 1971
 The Honourable Wesley D. Black,
Provincial Secretary,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir: In conformity with the provisions of section 8 of the Civil Service Act
(chapter 56, Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1960), I have the honour to
submit herewith the Report of the proceedings and work of the Civil Service Commission from January 1 to December 31,1970.
ARTHUR G. RICHARDSON
Acting Chairman, Civil Service Commission
Victoria, British Columbia, January 1971.
  Mr. Arthur G. Richardson, Acting Chairman.
 HIGHLIGHTS DURING 1970
• Pay increases averaging about IVz per cent of payroll were granted.
• 7,313 employees received merit increases within salary ranges.
• 3,892 appointments were made to permanent and temporary positions.
• 769 employees gained promotion through competitions.
• 10 per cent of promotions were made by transfer from one department to
another.
• 492 persons are employed who are handicapped.
• 27 student employees received diplomas in public administration.
• There was a 16.5-per-cent turnover of staff in permanent positions.
• There were 16 British Columbia Safety Council Awards presented to departments and major divisions, including three "million man-hour" awards to the
Department of Finance, Department of Public Works, and the local Health
Services Branch.
• Eight grievances entailing formal hearings were presented to the Civil Service
Commission.
• The Premier presented certificates to 134 employees who had completed 25
years of continuous service, and gold watches were presented to 11 employees
who had completed 40 years of continuous service at two luncheons, one in
Victoria and the other in Vancouver.
• Sick leave averaged 6.34 days per employee.
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 CONTENTS
Organization Chart	
Highlights During 1970.
Introductory	
Size and Composition of the Civil Service-
Separations	
Page
8
7
11
12
12
Recruiting and Selection Division  13
General Entrance and Promotional Examinations  15
Competitions for Promotion  15
Special Activities—Recruiting and Selection Division  17
Vancouver Office  19
Essondale Office (Valleyview)  19
Classification and Wage Division  20
Staff Training and Development  21
Sick Leave  24
Accident Prevention  25
Acknowledgments  26
Appendix  27
Statistics  29
  REPORT OF THE CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
Pursuant to Section 8 of the Civil Service Act, From
January 1 to December 31,1970
During the year, several changes in personnel of the Civil Service Commission
were made. Dr. H. M. Morrison retired as Chairman and A. G. Richardson was
appointed to replace him. R. D. Higgins, formerly Chief Classification Officer, was
appointed as Chief Personnel Officer to replace Mr. Richardson.
As indicated in the organization chart, changes in the organization of the
Commission's staff were made, whereby the Chief Personnel Officer became responsible for the Classification Division, Pay Research, and the Administrative Division.
The Co-ordinator of Accident Prevention, the Chief Selection Officer, and the Staff
Training Officer report directly to the Chairman. The Classification Division was
divided into Classification and Pay Research, both reporting to the Chief Personnel
Officer. W. M. Finlay was appointed as Officer-in-Charge of the Classification
Division, and R. W. Saunders was appointed to be in charge of Pay and other
research.
The Personnel Officer of the British Columbia Ferries Division was transferred
from the staff of the Civil Service Commission to the staff of that division. Two
Personnel Officers within the Classification Division, J. J. Maxwell and Miss J.
Gruen, resigned, and were replaced by A. M. Brand, promoted from the Department of Highways, and J. A. Mochrie, recruited from the Federal Post Office
Department. Mrs. R. Frankling, the Chairman's Secretary, retired, and was replaced
by Mrs. D. Sage, promoted from the staff of Government House. Mrs. D. Small
resigned from the staff of the Co-ordinator of Accident Prevention and has not yet
been replaced. Mrs. E. Goodwin, Miss E. E. Ferguson, and Miss S. Murphy resigned from the Recruiting Division staff and were replaced by Mrs. M. Douglas,
Miss S. Batten, and Miss D. Richards. Miss S. Hayward resigned from the Administrative Division and was replaced by Miss S. Brunning.
Due to the reduced activity in recruiting and in promotional competitions
during the year, the staff of the Recruiting and Selection Division were assigned to
other duties. C. R. Spence was assigned to the Classification Division, and M. B.
Horn, of that division, was assigned to duties in staff-training. A. D. Davies, of the
Valleyview Lodge staff, was assigned to assist the Personnel Officer of the Mental
Health Branch. Clerical staff in Victoria and Vancouver were assigned to temporary
duties with other departments where backlogs developed.
During the year the Commission met 35 times. In addition, special meetings
were convened to hear individual grievances and to receive representations from
groups of employees concerning wages and working conditions. There were eight
hearings on individual grievances, three of which were settled in favour of the
employee. One ruling of the Commission was appealed to the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council and, in this case, the Commission's ruling was upheld.
In addition to grievances heard by the Commission, the Chief Personnel
Officer mediated many grievances between employees and the departments.
The Screening Committee, which deals with problems of employees who are
unable to perform their duties due to ill health, dealt with 10 cases during the year.
Five of these were re-established in different types of employment, four retired, and
one case is pending.
A review of the Vacation Leave Regulation resulted in a recommendation that
the two-week vacation period during the first five years of service be changed to
three weeks in 1971. This recommendation was approved by the Executive Council.
11
 Y  12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
A review of the Overtime Regulations resulted in a recommendation that the
salary above which overtime does not apply be changed to a salary range number.
This recommendation was approved by the Executive Council.
For the ninth consecutive year, pay increases were granted to all Government
employees in 1970, amounting to an average of about ll/i per cent of the payroll.
The Commission's policy of employing handicapped persons wherever possible
has continued.   There are 492 handicapped persons employed within the Service.
SIZE AND COMPOSITION OF THE CIVIL SERVICE
On December 31, 1970 there were 26,790 Government employees (see Table
1 of the Appendix). On December 31, 1969 there were 27,081 employees. There
was, therefore, a reduction of 291 employees, the first reduction in staff in many
years.
Of the Government employees, 15,386 were classed as permanent employees
and 11,404 were classed as temporary employees. In 1970 there were 15,566
permanent employees and 11,515 temporary employees.
SEPARATIONS
During the year, 2,537 employees left permanent positions within the Civil
Service. This represents a turnover of 16.5 per cent. In 1969, 2,912 employees
left permanent positions, representing a turnover of 18.7 per cent.
The following graph shows the percentage of turnover for the past 10 years:
RATE OF TURNOVER
25%
20%
15%
10%
17
1.
64^^-—^
IS
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7
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32 16
17.
28^^^
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16.5'
1961
1962
1964
1965
YEAR
1966
1967
1968
1969
197Q
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1970 Y 13
During 1970, 26 employees were dismissed, the probationary periods of 99
employees were extended, eight employees were suspended for varying periods,
and merit increases were withheld in the case of 134 employees.
RECRUITING AND SELECTION DIVISION
General
The Civil Service Commission, with headquarters in Victoria, also operates
branch offices of the Recruiting and Selection Division in Vancouver and Essondale.
The branch offices reports follow this general recruiting summary.
Recruiting during the first five months of the year was slightly higher than
during the record year of 1969. From early June until the end of November, however, there was a very marked decrease, reflecting a combination of factors, including
anti-inflationary restraint by Government, demand for services due to general curtailment of economic activity in the Province, and labour-management strikes and
lockouts in the major industries. Recruiting activities, as shown in the table of
distribution of work load later in this Report, were down in various activities between 30 and 40 per cent from the previous year. The number of competitions
posted was the lowest since 1964.
A comparison of the 1970 activity with the previous five-year average also
shows a notable decrease. The number of competitions posted, for instance, was 72
per cent of the previous five-year average, and the total number of appointments
made was 76 per cent. The policy of restraint is illustrated by the fact that, at one
point in the autumn, some 957 positions under Civil Service Commission jurisdiction
were unfilled. Only 87 new positions were added to the departmental establishments,
compared with some 500 in the previous year. Fifty per cent of these new positions
resulted from the transfer of staff and facilities at the Vancouver Motor-vehicle Testing Station from the City of Vancouver to the Motor-vehicle Branch of the Department of the Attorney-General. Another 20 per cent of the new positions were due
to expansion in the establishment of the Pollution Control Branch of the Water Resources Service. There were additions to the Home Acquisition Branch of the Department of Finance and to the Division of Laboratories of the Health Services
Department, the latter in connection with the rubella vaccination programme.
With the reduction in activities, there was also a reduction in Recruiting Division staff, as well as loans of staff from this Division to other divisions and departments from all three recruiting offices. By year-end, however, recruiting had
returned to a brisk pace.
Salary adjustments which came into effect at the beginning of the fiscal year
in April, and the generally high rate of unemployment in the Province later in the
year, made recruiting at the beginning levels and in the trades and technical classifications relatively easy. There continued, however, a notable lack of well-qualified
applicants for vacancies at the intermediate and senior levels in almost all professional grades. Throughout the Province there was also difficulty in recruiting shorthand stenographers and male clerical staffs and trainees. In the professional grades,
there was short supply of experienced child-care group leaders; senior auditors;
hydraulic and pollution control engineers; mining engineers and geologists; foresters;
veterinarians; economists; nursing superintendents and instructors; teachers specializing in the deaf, blind, or mentally handicapped; public health nurses; speech therapists; probation officers; boiler, electrical, and gas inspectors with engineering
training; and data processing programmers with advanced theoretical knowledge of
 Y 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
their work.   Hospital orderlies continued in short supply, although vocational training programmes are beginning to fill this demand.
The following table illustrates the major breakdown of recruiting and selection
activities, as distributed between the Commission's three offices:
Distribution of Work Load
1969
1970
Per Cent
Change
from 1969
1970
Distribution
Requisitions and requests for staff—
Victoria.. —
Essondale _	
Vancouver..
Totals-
Competitions—•
Victoria	
Essondale...
Vancouver...
Totals-
Examinations    (persons   taking   written   examinations)—
Victoria  	
Essondale..
Vancouver..
Totals...
Appointments (initial hiring) —
Victoria 	
Essondale..
Vancouver..
Totals..
Total positions filled (including competitions)—
Victoria  -	
Essondale  	
Vancouver 	
Totals _	
4,454
2,040
586
7,080
1,004
268
152
1,424
2,546
277
564
3,387
2,397
1,594
395
4,386
3,487
1,857
596
5,940
3,193
1,381
349
4,923
655
121
94
870
2,308
155
360
2,823
1,477
1,113
220
2,810
2,289
1,240
363
3,892
—28.2
-32.3
—40.5
-30.4
—34.8
— 54.8
— 38.2
-38.9
-9.4
-55.9
-63.8
— 16.6
-38.4
—30.2
—44.3
—35.1
-34.4
-33.3
-39.1
-34.5
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1970 Y 15
GENERAL ENTRANCE AND PROMOTIONAL EXAMINATIONS
Examinations to establish qualified lists for such positions as stenographer,
typist, clerk, and draughtsman were held as follows:
Classification
Number of
Occasions
Number
Examined
Number
Qualified
Per Cent
Qualified
Victoria
321
73
63
81
16
2
9
4
5
875
919
143
144
101
50
10
10
9
25
12
6
2
2
505
645
81
97
74
26
8
10
9
6
7
4
1
2
58
Clerk	
70
57
67
73
52
80
100
100
Personnel Officer    	
24
58
67
50
100
Totals, 1970                                              	
579
2,308
1,475
64
Totals, 1969                                       —	
552
2,546
1,731
68
Essondale
Clerk-Typist	
20
19
3
25
2
2
1
1
2
3
3
1
1
29
26
3
32
7
15
5
4
8
20
3
2
1
22
22
3
27
4
7
4
3
8
19
2
2
1
76
Clerk 1 or 2                                           	
85
Clerk-Stenographer 1 	
100
84
Stationary Engineers' Helper	
57
47
Cook 2         ...                                                     	
80
Cook 3         .                           _	
75
100
95
67
100
100
Totals, 1970     	
83
155
124
80
Totals, 1969 .     ..	
123
277
232
84
Vancouver
51
71
76
6
1
1
2
1
1
5
2
4
72
133
99
15
2
4
2
10
1
10
8
4
57
100
88
15
2
4
2
7
0
10
1
4
79
Clerk
75
89
100
100
Estate Administrator, Clerk 5, Public Trustee —	
Switchboard Operator — _.„
Stationary Engineer 	
Administrative Officer —	
100
100
70
0
100
13
Stockman  	
100
Totals, 1970                         	
221
360
290
81
Totals, 1969 — 	
341
564
461
82
In total, 2,823 persons sat for the foregoing examinations in 1970. Sixty-seven
per cent of the applicants qualified. There were decreases at all three centres, with
Vancouver showing the largest drop. The examinations were held on 579 separate
occasions in Victoria, 221 occasions in Vancouver, and 83 occasions at Essondale.
Competitions for Promotion
Apart from appointments through entrance examinations, there were 870
competitions held in 1970. This was a decrease of 554, or 38.9 per cent from the
previous year, and is the first year since 1964 that the number has fallen below
 Y 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
1,000. Of these competitions, 222 were handled by the Personnel Officer attached
to the British Columbia Ferries Division. In addition, the chairmanship of 55
other competitions was delegated to Government Agents, departmental Personnel
Officers, and other agencies such as the Provincial Gaol Services. This assistance
was much appreciated.
Excluding two competitions in which there were no applicants and two with
over 100 applicants, the average number of applications received in the 651 competitions closing in Victoria was 14.5 candidates per competition. This was a
22-per-cent increase over the previous year, and no doubt reflects the increased
rate of unemployment in 1970. In total, 1,082 appointments were made from
among the 12,110 candidates who applied on posted competitions in the various
Government departments and agencies. Seventy-one per cent of these appointments were promotions within the Service, and the remainder were initial appointments. A high level of interdepartmental mobility was maintained, with 14.1 per
cent of the in-service promotions being made from one department to another.
There were, in total, 453 competitions of all kinds open to the general public, and
70 per cent of these were filled by candidates from outside the Service.
A graph on promotional policy follows:
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1970
Y 17
71%
71%
70%
65%
66
loyrr
60%
bVh^^^"^
55%
~                              58%    ^^~
PROMOTIONS FROM WITHIN THE
SERVICE
50%
45%
40%
4
2%
35%
^"^^!
8%
30%
APPOINTMENTS
FROM OUTSIDE T:
iE SERVICE
.%	
29%.
25%
20%
15%
10%
9.
12
5% ^^x***"""^
7%
10%
s%
^"^"""""•i^^         4
% ^y*^
^^"'N^S.
li
PROMOTIONS FROM ONE DEP
I
A.RTMENT TO ANO
THER
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
YEAR
Special Activities—Recruiting and Selection Division
The Victoria Recruiting Division convened 231 selection panels, which interviewed 1,039 candidates. They also held 1,071 individual recruiting or counselling
interviews with applicants. The general employment situation resulted in an increase in inquiries received by telephone and over the counter concerning employment. Letters of inquiry also demanded attention, and, during 1970, the Victoria
Recruiting Officers answered 1,190 such letters of inquiry, not counting form-letter
 Y 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
replies to students seeking summer employment. Selection Officers also took part
in Career Days at secondary schools, and administered employment examinations
for typists and stenographers at Vocational Schools and in Commercial Departments
of secondary schools in Victoria and Nanaimo. The interdepartmental committee
on draughtsman qualifications, under the chairmanship of a senior Recruiting
Officer, completed its report and recommendations to the Commission.
For the third consecutive year, the Provincial Government departments in
Victoria participated in a Secondary School Work Experience programme, organized
by the school counsellors and co-ordinated through the Recruiting office. This year,
58 students, primarily in Grade XII Commercial classes, were selected by the counsellors and teachers to be placed in 15 departments for one week at Easter as unpaid
trainee workers.
In the matter of staff development within the Recruiting Division, three Personnel Officers attended or participated in the Annual Conference of the local
Personnel Management Association, which was held in Victoria. One officer is
continuing in the three-year Personnel Management Course offered through university evening sessions. From May until November a Recruiting Officer was loaned
to the Classification Division to gain experience and assist in that work during the
light recruiting period. From January to September, prior to the appointment of a
Chief Personnel Officer, the Chief Selection Officer was privileged to assume a
portion of the duties of the senior position. This included the handling of four
grievances from individuals and 16 grievances from the Association, of which one
was still in progress at the end of the year. All requisitions for staff, and some 320
requests for extensions of limited staff, were screened by the Chief Selection Officer
on behalf of the Commission during this period.
The Commission adopted recommendations on a number of policy or procedural matters. These included a change in allowances for removal expenses in areas
of difficult recruiting; a formal delegation of chairmanship of Selection Panels, with
the chairman's report to be vetted by a Selection Officer; a statement of responsibilities and rights of employees hired on limited appointments with respect to transferring to continuous or permanent employment; a change in promotional policy
affecting the Qualified Lists of Assistant Charge Nurses in the Mental Health Services to keep these lists more current; an acceptance in principle that under the
Civil Service Act the commission has authority to make appointments involving
promotion from one department to another after one month's notice; and a definition
of the degree of recruiting authority to be delegated to the Personnel Officer of the
Ferries Division from the beginning of the 1970/71 fiscal year.
Early in the year, the Systems Analyst from the staff of the Director of Data
Processing and Research completed his review of Recruiting Office and Implementation Section procedures, with a view to reducing paper work and streamlining the
operation. Major portions of his report were adopted, and the net benefit will be
noticeable during the next heavy recruiting period.
Vancouver Office
As in previous years, the work of this office during 1970 was mainly concerned
with the recruitment and placement of personnel and advising officials on matters
relating to personnel practices as concerns Government offices and institutions on
the Lower Mainland. Despite the opening of a Motor-vehicle Inspection Station
in Burnaby and the transfer of the Vancouver Inspection Station from the City to
the Provincial Motor-vehicle Branch, the recruiting activity in the Vancouver area
reflected the general decrease throughout the Service and was, in fact, the most
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT, 1970
Y 19
affected, with a 39-per-cent drop in total appointments. One Clerk was loaned from
the office for approximately three months to other departments.
The unsettled labour conditions which prevailed during the summer, and the
influx of transient young Canadians who converged on Vancouver, resulted in a
much greater use of this office by persons seeking employment. Daily telephone
and counter inquiries were high. Written inquiries seeking information concerning
employment included many from out of Canada. The 94 posted competitions drew
1,617 applications.
The following table shows the number of competitions and appointments
handled by the Vancouver office during the last five years. There was a 38-per-cent
decrease from 1969 in promotional competitions, a 44-per-cent decrease in initial
hirings, and a 64-per-cent decrease in candidates taking written examinations.
These examinations were administered on 221 occasions to 360 candidates.
Summary of Competitions and Appointments for the Past Five Years
1966
1967
1968
1969
1    1970
1
Competitions — —	
Total appointments —	
180
755
189
548
125
524
152
596
94
363
1
Essondale Office (Valleyview)
The Essondale office is located at Valleyview Lodge and is primarily engaged
in recruiting and selection for the various Mental Health Services institutions
throughout the Province. An important secondary activity is the recruiting of
related professional and technical staff for Vancouver area institutions or other
departments.
As the Essondale office deals mainly with recruiting of essential institutional
staff, the reduction in activity was less than in the other Recruiting offices. There
was, nevertheless, a 30-per-cent reduction in initial hiring, and a 55-per-cent reduction in promotional competitions. The total number of positions filled was 1,240,
of which 1,113 were new appointees. One hundred and twenty-one competitions
were held, and written examinations were taken by 155 candidates.
Total Appointments
Percentage of Total
Appointments
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
272
46
33
22
188
394
643
42
42
18
229
46
43
25
186
293
663
33
35
37
165
27
52
28
156
277
597
53
31
34
16
199
42
53
47
200
405
715
111
30
29
26
120
31
48
30
123
324
460
53
16
22
13
16.0
2.7
2.0
1.3
11.0
23.2
37.8
2.5
2.5
1.0
14.4
2.8
2.8
1.6
11.7
18.4
41.7
2.1
2.2
2.3
11.5
1.9
3.6
2.0
10.9
19.3
41.5
3.7
2.2
2.4
1.0
10.7
2.3
2.9
2.5
10.7
21.8
38.6
6.0
1.5
1.5
1.5
9.6
2.5
3.8
Vista, Venture, and mental health centres,
except Burnaby	
2.5
9.6
Woodlands  	
Riverview  	
Burnaby Mental Health Centre and Youth
26.1
37.1
4.7
Headquarters and Education Centre	
1.3
1.7
1.1
Totals            _.              	
1,700
1,590
1,436
1,857
1,240
100.0
100.0
inoo nooo
100.0
 Y 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
There was a reduction in clerical staff during part of the year, and a Personnel
Officer was loaned on a part-time basis to the Mental Health Services Personnel
Branch. Apart from regular recruiting activities, the staff gave in-service talks on
interviewing principles and methods, and on gaining co-operation in supervision to
members of the Mental Health staff. They also participated in Career Day programmes at local secondary schools.
The following table shows the total number of appointments made, by institution. Two new mental health centres were staffed and opened at Terrace and
Nelson.
CLASSIFICATION AND WAGE DIVISION
The Classification and Wage Division is responsible for evaluating and classifying positions and for defining, revising, and maintaining position specifications.
Directly related to classification is the matter of wages and salaries, although there
are many things about a classification plan that are completely extraneous to a
salary plan. The information used by the Civil Service Commission in forming its
recommendations on salaries and wages is gathered, analysed, and interpreted by
the Classification and Wage Division. The Division assists departments in matters
involving organization and staff utilization, and carries out the Commission's control
of departmental establishments.
During 1970, the Division reviewed 713 individual positions. Table 2 indicates
the number of reviews by department. Upward revisions totalled 574, downward
revisions were 5, and a total of 134 remained unchanged. This reflects a slight reduction from 1969, and is partly attributable to the fact that the two staff vacancies
brought about by resignations during the latter part of 1969 were not filled until
March when, under open competition, A. M. Brand and J. A. Mochrie were appointed. Many studies involving complete series and (or) classes were also carried
out, and 130 new or revised position specifications were written. The Division continued to conduct "on-the-job" reviews whenever possible, and several field trips to
the Interior of the Province were made by staff members, as well as many trips to
the Greater Vancouver area.
With experience having shown that there should be greater emphasis placed on
the "audit" approach to classification reviews as opposed to the "on request" approach, two major studies of the former type were initiated by the Division during
the latter part of the year, and presently are nearing the stage of completion. One
study covers all positions classified at the Clerk 7, Administrative Officer 1, and
Administrative Officer 2 levels; the other study covers all laboratory positions, both
technical and professional.
Pay and fringe-benefit research continued to occupy an increasing amount of
the Division's time. Salary and wage surveys were conducted on "benchmark"
positions in all classes, and numerous outside concerns were visited for the purpose
of ensuring proper matching of positions. Considerable contact was maintained
with counterpart organizations in other provinces and with the Pay Research Bureau
of the Federal Government to update pay and classification data, and salary surveys
conducted by larger employers in the Province were contributed to on a reciprocal
basis.
The Division investigated 155 requistions for appointment, 85 requests for
extensions to casual appointments, and carried out the following miscellaneous
studies:
Organization and Classification Studies:
Registrar's Office, Department of Education.
Central Microfilm Bureau, Department of Provincial Secretary.
Electrical Energy Division, Department of Public Works.
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1970
Y 21
Classification and Salary Studies:
Fish and game biologists.
Inspectors—gas, electrical, and boiler.
Recreational instructors.
Resident instructors—Jericho Hill School.
Professional staff—British Columbia Research Council.
Instructors, food service officers, and shop foreman—Corrections
Branch.
Hospital housekeepers.
Community mental health nurses.
Console operators.
Investigators—Securities Commission.
Classification Studies:
Operators, switchboard.
Staff—Provincial Alliance of Businessmen.
Clerical staff—Mediation Commission.
Audit accountants—Consumer Sales Tax Branch.
Centreline foremen and tire repairmen—Department of Highways.
Labourers—Mental  Health   Services   and   Department   of  Public
Works.
Warehouse staff—Liquor Control Board.
Staff-requirement Study:
Pearson Hospital.
From January to September, prior to his appointment as Acting Chief Personnel Officer, the Chief Classification Officer was required to assume certain of
the duties and responsibilities of the senior position. This involved mainly the
handling of a number of grievances from individual employees or the British Columbia Government Employees' Association. During a lull in recruiting activities
from May to November, a member of the recruiting staff was loaned to the Division,
through the co-operation of the Chief Selection Officer; this enabled the Division to
lend a staff member to the Staff Training Officer to assist with the conducting of
training seminars on supervision.
For some time, the matter of a change in the organization of the Division had
been considered. With the promotion of the Chief Classification Officer to Acting
Chief Personnel Officer, effective September 1, 1970, it was thought opportune to
split the Division, separating the functions of Classification and Pay and Fringe-
benefit Research. Under open competition, W. M. Finlay was promoted to Senior
Classification Officer, effective December 1, and R. W. Saunders was appointed to
head the Pay and Fringe-benefit Research section. Both officers report independently to the Chief Personnel Officer. The resultant vacancy in the Classification
Division was filled by the transfer of C. R. Spence from the Recruiting and Selection
Division.
STAFF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT
Executive Development Training Plan
Twenty-seven employees, enrolled in Class XII of the Executive Development
Training Plan, received their diplomas in public administration at a special academic
assembly at the University of Victoria on Wednesday, October 28, 1970.
Twenty-seven employees are enrolled in Class XIII, the third and final year
of the programme, and 26 employees are enrolled in the second year of the pro-
 Y 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
gramme.  Thirty employees who were selected for Class XV commenced their first
year of studies in September 1970.
Back row: J. Cox, L. Sands, W. Weston, E. W. Holborn, V. G. Knapik, R. Oberg,
J. L. Thornton, R. Paine, R. C. Jones, F. Simpson, A. Brand, D. Bennett, L. Stellingwerff,
A. Paul, B. Anderson, G. Armitage. Front row: N. Dixon, R. Stromberg, C. E. Stenton,
J. J. Juhasz, Mrs. G. Brown, J. Holmes, J. Walkinshaw, F. J. Wallace, H. Holmes, D.
Grey.   H. E. Tucker was absent when the picture was taken.
Correspondence Course in Public Administration
Thirty-six employees, enrolled in the eight-month Correspondence Course in
Public Administration, received their certificates on March 26, 1970 at a luncheon
held on the final day of a four-day workshop. A. G. Richardson, Acting Chairman
of the Civil Service Commission, presented the certificates to the employees who had
successfully completed 24 weekly assignments, and had attended the workship held
at Parksville. Mr. Richardson conveyed to the class the best wishes of the Hon.
W. D. Black, Provincial Secretary, who was unable to attend the ceremony because
of his Legislative duties.
Lecturers at the workshop were K. Lightbody, Co-ordinator of Central Accounting, Control and Audit Branch; J. Baird, Director of Data Processing and
Research, Premier's Office; H. Turner, Administrative Officer, Superannuation
Branch; and A. G. Richardson and Miss Meryl Campbell, Staff Training Officer, of
the Civil Service Commission.
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1970
Y 23
Graduates^ this training programme are as follows: J. G. Alveberg, Highways,
Vernon; J. Bartell, Attorney-General, Vancouver; Mrs. E. M. Bateman, Mental
Health Branch, Victoria; H. B. Bennett, Provincial Secretary, Victoria; J. H. Carra-
dice, Forest Service, Prince George; W. H. M. Collison, Finance, Burns Lake; A. R.
Corner, Mines and Petroleum Resources, Victoria; J. F. Currie, Finance, Victoria;
J. H. Dabell, Liquor Control Board, Kamloops; F. E. Fagan, Labour, Terrace; J. D.
Faris, Attorney-General, Smithers; Mrs. J. Goodrow, Provincial Secretary, Victoria;
M. Harnadek, Health Branch, Kinnaird; R. G. Harrison, British Columbia Ferries
Division, Vancouver; G. M. Hayes, Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce,
Victoria; F. M. Heidt, Recreation and Conservation, Fruitvale; F. H. Hindle, Public
Works, Victoria; S. J. Hives, Water Resources Service, Victoria; H. V. Hopkins,
Forest Service, Vernon; A. W. Horsnell, H'ghways, Prince Rupert; P. K. Jackman,
Attorney-General, Abbotsford; J. W. Mcintosh, Milk Board, Agriculture, Kelowna;
L. E. McManus, Mental Health Services, Essondale; S. Matsuo, Finance, Smithers;
F. R. Morris, Lands Service, Victoria; C. J. Newman, Forest Service, Victoria; A. P.
Petty, Forest Service, Clinton; D. A. Phillips, Rehabilitation and Social Improvement, Victoria; W. G. Radigan, Liquor Control Board, Clinton; B. F. Rafuse,
Attorney-General, Prince George; Mrs. M. J. Reid, Provincial Secretary, Victoria;
J. F. Taylor, Public Works, Essondale; C. H. Ulch, Attorney-General, New Westminster; D. N. Vickers, Highways, Victoria; J. D. Williams, Recreation and Conservation, Fernie; Mrs. D. E. York, Education, Prince George.
Appraisal Courses
No courses in the appraisal of real property were given during 1970. However, four employees completed their full accreditation as A.A.C.I. (Accredited
Appraiser Canadian Institute) during the year. These employees were D. M.
Ferrier, G. Huva, J. A. Braniff, and J. H. Taylor.
Sixty-five employees of the British Columbia Civil Service and municipalities
now have received their accreditation after attending the appraisal courses sponsored by the Civil Service Commission Training Division.
 Y 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Supervisor's Guide to Appraising Employee Performance
During 1970, the Staff Training Officer prepared the Supervisor's Guide to
Appraising Employee Performance to assist supervisors in completing the employee
appraisal form.
The Training Officer also acted as a liaison between the Director of Curriculum, Vocational and Technical Education, and the Committee on Draughting
Training in the preparation of a Manual of Mapping and Draughting Techniques,
which was written by E. P. Creech, former Chief Draughtsman, Air Surveys Division.
Short Staff-management Courses
During 1970 a short course in Staff Management, composed of five correspondence lessons and a two-day seminar, was given to 11 social workers of the
Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement. A similar programme is
being offered to group leaders in this department.
During the latter part of the year, Martin Horn, Personnel Officer in the
Classification Division of the Civil Service Commission, was on loan to the Training
Division. Mr. Horn and Miss Campbell conducted short courses of five IVi-hour
lecture-discussion sessions on Supervision-staff Management. Supervisory personnel from the following departments attended these sessions:
Department of Recreation and Conservation—
Provincial Museum  12
Fish and Wildlife Branch  15
Parks Branch  15
Administration  10
Hospital Insurance Service     8
It is planned to continue these sessions during 1971.
Fellowship Students
At the request of the Canadian International Development Agency, the Staff
Training Officer arranged a special training programme for two senior Civil Servants
from Nigeria, Messrs. Ogundipe and Tokunboh.
Leave for Educational Purposes
During the year, 96 persons in various departments were granted leave for
educational purposes. Eleven employees were granted leave to train with Her
Majesty's Reserve Forces.
Sick Leave
Sick leave granted during the period October 1, 1969 to September 30, 1970
averaged 6.34 days, 5.72 of which were with pay and 0.62 without pay. (See Table
3, Appendix.) In the period October 1, 1968 to September 30, 1969, the average
per employee was 5.50 days. These figures are exclusive of sick leave granted under
the Workmen's Compensation Board and the Department of Veterans Affairs.
The average number of days' sick leave per employee (exclusive of the above
groups) for the past 10 years was as follows:
Year Ended
Sept. 30
Average per
Employee
Year Ended
Sept. 30
Average per
Employee
1961	
  5.37
1966	
  6.10
1962	
  5.53
1967	
  5.91
1963	
  5.59
1968	
  6.20
1964	
  5.91
1969	
  5.50
1965	
  5.62
1970	
  6.34
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT, 1970
Y 25
-ACCIDENT PREVENTION
During 1970, staff and programme budget of the Division remained at the
levels set in 1965. As the number of employees covered by the programme has increased 32 per cent since 1965, it was not possible to initiate or develop new projects
to any great extent, emphasis being on maintenance of existing services to the extent
possible in the face of rising costs.
Of the 24 departments embraced by the programme, 17 had the same or lower
accident frequences than in 1969, while seven had higher rates than the previous
year. Over-all accident frequency rose by 1 per cent, compared with 1969, and
cost rate was down 0.5 per cent.
Major projects undertaken in 1970 included continued participation in safety
rallies in the Department of Highways, Ferries Division, and Public Works; a series
of tests of carbon monoxide levels on major ferries; a study of safety factors in the
operation and maintenance of microwave cookers; and a special survey of occupational hazards in the Pollution Control Branch of the Water Resources Service.
The Co-ordinator attended 38 Headquarters Safety Committee meetings, 32
other meetings, and made 43 visits to departmental locations. He addressed Public
Works safety rallies throughout the Province, attended by 702 employees. Twenty-
three per cent of his time was spent away from Victoria.
The Safety Officer took part in 86 rallies, 64 of which were in the Ferries Division, attended by 2,045 employees, and 22 in Regions 3 and 4 of the Department
of Highways, attended by 1,524 employees. In addition, he attended two workshops
and 93 other meetings. Seventy-two per cent of his time was spent away from
Victoria.
The highlight of the year's activities was the Annual Safety Presentation ceremony held at the Parliament Buildings on December 15. Sixteen British Columbia
safety awards were presented to departments and major divisions. The ceremony
was attended by members of the Cabinet, 22 Deputy Ministers and senior departmental officials, a Commissioner of the Workmen's Compensation Board, and the
Vice-President and the General Manager of the British Columbia Safety Council.
The Provincial Secretary, the Hon. W. D. Black, gave the main address, and the
awards were presented by the Hon. W. A. C. Bennett, P.C., LL.D., D.Pol.Sc, K.St.J.
The main results were summarized as follows:
(1) There were three fatal accidents, compared with twelve, eight, five, two,
three, nil, one, and seven in previous years.
(2) Awards of honour were presented to the Hospital Insurance Service and
the Department of Municipal Affairs. "Million man-hour" awards were
won by the Department of Finance, Department of Public Works, and the
local Health Services Branch of the Department of Health Services and
Hospital Insurance.
(3) The awards represented 8,358,158 man-hours free of compensable injury,
worked by 4,602 employees.
(4) During the year, a total of 105 British Columbia Safety Council awards
were won by units of various departments, compared with 141 in 1969.
These included three "million man-hour" awards, four awards of honour,
five silver-on-gold and nine bronze-on-gold awards—all major awards for
outstanding performance.
(5) A new safety trophy, the "Prime Minister's Award for Safety Achievement," was presented for the first time. This competition is confined to
the seven major-hazard departments, and is based on the best percentage
reduction in departmental accident frequency.   The first winner was the
 Y 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
%^»s_____.
■3-   '    "***__
. i.—._.,..   ________
g^^4^
There are many types of jobs in the Service.
Know your job thoroughly and prevent accidents.
Department of Public Works, with a reduction in the accident-frequency
rate from 11.3 in 1969 to 3.2 in 1970, or 72 per cent, a very creditable
record.
The Division is indebted to the Workmen's Compensation Board and the
British Columbia Safety Council for co-operation and support in the safety effort,
to the editor of the British Columbian for Service-wide publicity, and to Deputy
Ministers, Headquarters, and local Safety Committees, and all levels in the Service
for their participation in the Safety Programme.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The Chairman wishes to record his sincere appreciation to his two colleagues,
on the Commission, to each member of the Commission's staff, the Government
Agents, the Departmental Personnel Officers, the solicitors of the Attorney-General's
Department, to the Civil Service Commissioners of other provinces, and the
Federal Government for their able assistance, and to you, Mr. Minister, for your
sympathetic appreciation of the Commission's problems.
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
A. G. Richardson, Acting Chairman.
J. E. Brown, Member.
E. R. Rickinson, Member.
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1970
Y 27
APPENDIX
Twenty-five-year continuous-service certificates were awarded to the following
Government employees in December 1970:
Department of Agriculture
Benjamin K. Oxendale
William H. Pope
Gordon R. Thorpe
Department of the Attorney-General
Ernest L. Anderson
Sidney A. P. Birchfield
Maurice J. Crawford
Mrs. Marjorie A. Dennett
Eugene N. Dunlap
James P. Erickson
Douglas C. Ferguson
Henry K. Jenns
Ellis L. MacKinnon
William D. Sutherland
Tobias H. Tobiasson
John R. Waugh
Department of Education
Charles L. Dakin
Miss Maureen M. Donald
Stewart J. Graham
Ernest E. Hyndman
Franklin P. Levirs
Department of Finance
Miss E. Mary Helmcken
Miss Phyllis H. Jenner
Miss Doris G. F. Veale
Mrs. Grace Williamson
Raymond C. Winterburn
Health Services
Miss J. Alice M. Beattie
Mrs. Irene A. Brown
Mrs. Catherine G. LaRiviere
Miss E. Mary Millard
James McM. Phillips
Department of Highways
Edgar D. Allen
Philip E. Bishop
Miss Joyce N. Calhoun
Lew B. Donovan
George E. Douglas
Thomas H. Fennell
Michael A. J. Ferro
William D. S. Hoggan
Thomas A. Jacklin (Jr.)
Arthur W. Jarvis
Robert Langley
C. J. Donald McCormick
Frederick F. Neale
Donald Piggot
Judson H. Schamerhorn
Mrs. Lesley K. Veitch
Lands Service
James W. Bathhurst
Albert G. Grant
H. Kenneth Kidd
John MacKay
Forest Service
Jack P. Agnew
Richard J. P. Barriscale
Herbert L. Coles
Geoffrey D. Harris
Joseph F. Killough
Miss Isobel L. Long
John O. Noble
Miss Evelyn Rivett
Alister I. Ross
Water Resources Service
Ronald F. Mousley
Department of Mines and Petroleum
Resources
Edward J. Bowles
Department of Municipal Affairs
J. Howard Nuttall
Mental Health Branch
Arthur B. Finnie
Richard T. Franklin
Hollis A. Henson
William J. Kucey
William R. Livesey
Miss O. Marta Piper
Maxwell A. Renton
Leonard C. Wilson
Department of Provincial Secretary
Kenneth L. Morton
Department of Public Works
William E. Austin
James T. Christie
Randolph Fraser
William R. Jones
John H. Peterson
J. Raymond Simpson
Department of Recreation and
Conservation
Ole N. Johansen
John D. Williams
Department of Rehabilitation and
Social Improvement
Frank J. Chapman
Miss Sarah Evelyn Kidd
Mrs. Jean P. Scott
Queen's Printers
Cyril P. Connorton
George B. Olson
Workmen's Compensation Board
Glen E. M. Dagg
James C. Polley
Henry S. Robertson
Liquor Control Board
Edward J. Bedford
Albert V. Bowerman
Philip E. Campbell
George Daws
 Y 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Liquor Control Board—Continued
Robert J. P. Donohue
Walter T. Fea
Norman C. Forsbeck
Leslie J. Granger
Harold Hamon
Harry J. Holden
Leslie G. Hunter
Alfred E. S. Jones
Francis M. Kyle
Kenneth G. Langrish
Norman J. Lloyd
John R. McCorkindale
Frederick J. Mallett
Reginald A. Marcer
Liquor Control Board—Continued
Tom Marsland
George W. Miller
Pearl C. Robinson
T. William Robinson
John C. Ross
J. Nat Rosso
Robert Scott
Jack Siddall
William Smith
Douglas E. Terry
Gerald L. Venables
Jerry E. Warren
Richard N. Webster
Ronald G. Whiffin
Gold watches were awarded to the following Government employees, with 40
years' service, in December 1970:
Department of Education
Mrs. Freda M. Kinsman
Miss N. Winifred Snape
Department of Finance
Thomas S. Dalby
Newton E. Impett
Thomas J. Marrion
Department of Highways
Reginald C. S. Cooper
Thomas Tams
Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce
Raymond W. Kersey
Lands Service
A. Herbert Ralfs
Department of Provincial Secretary
Miss H. Inez Mitchell
Department of Public Works
William R. Barlow
 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT,  1970
Y 29
J
STATISTICS
Table 1—Number of Full-time Permanent and Temporary Employees in
Each Department and Agency as at December 31, 1970
Department
Permanent
Temporary
Combined
1
7
329
2,362
112
305
683
1,143
3,771
134
475
132
161
314
822
167
124
34
386
35
50
56
621
258
50
669
3
122
190
928
16
460
301
2
4,453
34
29
36
1,542
100
26
3
213
3
4
762
117
35
183
4
7
451
2,552
Commercial Transport.   	
112
1,233
699
1,603
4,072
136
4,928
166
190
350
2,364
267
150
37
Provincial Secretary  	
599
38
54
56
1,383
375
85
852
Totals	
13,201
1,065
1,120
9,562
868
974
22,763
1,933
2,094
15,386
11,404
26,790
Table 2—Classification Reviews by Departments in 1970,
With Comparative Figures for Previous Years
Department
Upward
Revisions
Downward
Revisions
Reviews
Resulting
in
No Change
Total
37
96
1
18
59
6
34
16
3
15
34
14
6
3
45
1
35
19
12
54
17
39
3
7
1
1
1
1
1
5
16
15
5
11
8
3
4
2
13
1
2
1
7
1
10
13
4
3
1
7
2
42
113
1
Education.— 	
33
64
18
Highways      	
43
19
7
17
47
15
8
4
Provincial Secretary —	
Public Utilities Commission. 	
53
2
46
32
16
57
Public Health..
18
Mental Health     	
46
5
7
Totals, 1970            	
574
5
134
713
Totals, 1969  	
789
Totals, 1968    	
765
Totals, 1967	
727
Totals, 1966	
711
Totals, 1965 -	
682
 Y 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 3—Annual Sick Leave Report, October 1, 1969 to
SEPTEMBER 30, 1970
Department
Number of
Employees
Days With
Pay
Average
per
Employee
Days Without Pay
Average
per
Employee
Total
Average
Days per
Employee
4
296
997
1,202
646
1,452
980
4,216
171
327
146
37
275
52
1,470
535
868
1,181
112
181
97
207
18.5
1,008.0
6,080.0
3,725.0
3,686.0
10,258.0
5,333.0
31,757.0
1,067.0
1,061.5
691.0
110.5
1,860.0
386.0
7,730.0
859.0
5,306.0
5,939.0
580.0
1,015.0
510.0
560.0
4.63
3.41
6.10
3.10
5.71
7.07
5.44
7.53
6.24
3.25
4.07
2.99
6.76
11.97
5.26
1.61
6.10
5.02
5.18
5.61
5.26
2.70
1S.0     '
890.0
187.0
139.0
1,535.0
223.0
4,331.0
75.0
127.5
39.0
465.0
18.0      i
590.0
45.0
466.0
308.0
4.0
60.0
40.0
23.5
0.05
0.89
0.16
0.22
1.06
0.23
1.03
0.43
0.39
0.27
1.69
1.29
0.46
0.08
0.54
0.26
0.04
0.33
0.41
0.11
4.63
3.46
6.99
3.26
Finance .,..  	
Health Services and Hospital Insurance... 	
5.93
8.13
5.67
Mental Health	
8.56
6.67
3.64
Mines and Petroleum Resources-
4.34
2.99
8.45
13.29
Public Works 	
Recreation and Conservation	
Rehabilitation   and   Social   Im-
5.72
1.69
6.64
5.28
Commercial Transport	
Industrial  Development,   Trade,
5.22
5.94
5.67
2.81
Totals	
15,452
89,540.5
9,584.0
Over-all sick leave averages: With pay, 5.72; without pay, 0.62; total, 6.34 days.
Does not include gaol service which average was 7.5 days per employee; nor Liquor Control Board, which
average was 7.2 days per employee; British Columbia Ferries, which average was 8.5 days per employee; daily
rate staff not available; Health Services and Hospital Insurance totals are combined.
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1971
330-1270-9406

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