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DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1969 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1970

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1969
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1970
  To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to transmit herewith the Annual Report of the Department
of Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31, 1969.
D. R. J. CAMPBELL,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Victoria, British Columbia.
 A
 Report of the Department of Municipal Affairs
Victoria, British Columbia, January 16, 1970.
The Honourable D. R. J. Campbell,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of this Department for
the year ended December 31, 1969.
The response to the topics discussed during the three seminars held in Burnaby,
Prince George, and Kamloops during the year respecting the operations of the
regional districts, together with the general reaction of which we have been made
aware in the day-to-day operations of the Department, clearly indicate that the
regional district concept has now been widely accepted as part of the local government institution. Senior members of the Department were present and participated
in the programme at these seminars. While from time to time there will be difficulties in regional operations, as there are in municipal operations, these will merely
confirm the viability of these units. Much of the suspicion among municipalities
and between municipalities and non-municipal areas has disappeared as a result of
three or four years of actual experience working together on the boards of the
respective regional districts.
The work of the Technical Branch of the Joint Study Committee on Provincial-
Municipal Finances has continued unabated throughout the year, and we are now in
the stage of rounding out the analytical part of the study and the presentation of
the analysis in a concise and readable form. It is hoped that the report will be
ready for presentation fairly early in the new year.
As this is the last Report that I shall have the privilege and honour to submit,
perhaps I may be permitted to refer to certain matters which I feel should receive
consideration in the years ahead.
At the U.B.C.M. convention in Kamloops I undertook to give a brief resume
of the changes that have taken place in local government in this Province since I
joined the Department in the spring of 1952. As this is already a matter of record
I do not feel it should be repeated here. However, I did mention one area where
I felt little progress had been made and I should like to elaborate upon that topic
in this Report.
The property tax has a long history and at one time was not only the mainstay
of local government but represented a major proportion of taxes levied by all levels
of government. During the decade of the thirties the property tax approached 40
per cent of the total taxes imposed by the Federal, Provincial, and municipal governments in this Province. Currently this is of the order of 10 per cent. Nevertheless,
the property tax remains an important part of local government finances and is
likely to so remain for the foreseeable future. While it may not be a perfect tax in
a theoretical sense, some of the theoretically better taxes have not been that much
better in practice. Moreover, to the surprise of many, the property tax has continued to be a very productive tax. It is surprising, therefore, considering the
importance of the property tax, that so little has been done to modernize its application.
 V 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA
In the days when the tax was first initiated in its present form we had a largely
rural and agrarian society whose annual cash crop provided the money to pay the
tax. It seems strange that in a highly urbanized and industrialized society geared to
monthly payment of accounts we should still be using the collection procedures
applicable to a largely rural and agrarian era. One of the prime requisites of any
tax is that it be as convenient as possible for the taxpayer to comply with the tax.
The present method of administering the property tax makes little or no effort to
do this.
Another important factor in respect to a tax is its equitable application, which
involves questions of exemption and the currency of the tax base. While property
values may not have changed too rapidly in earlier periods, they have been undergoing rapid changes in recent years with the rate of change varying substantially
from area to area. If equity is to be achieved it is just as important that property
assessment values be current as it is for incomes to be current. If assessors were
to use trend lines to keep their assessment values up-to-date it would do much to
remove the feeling that the tax is not being applied on an equitable basis as between
one taxpayer and another.
Lastly, with the bringing-together of municipal and non-municipal areas in
common ventures, there is much to be said for reducing the provisions of the
Municipal Act and the Provincial Taxation Act to a common set of rules which
would apply throughout.
The study to which I have already referred has brought to light another area
of municipal operations which, in my view, also requires some direct attention.
Municipalities in British Columbia have made substantial progress in the post-war
period in improving their administration and, generally speaking, their financial
records are second to none. However, to be effective, these must be supplemented
by sufficient data to make it possible to carry out some detailed cost analysis for the
various services which municipalities provide. We have been struck by the wide
variation in the per capita costs of providing a given service as between municipalities, and have been at a loss to account for these variations. While municipal
councils and their senior administrators have been conscious of the aggregate cost
of a particular service, they have not usually had the information necessary to uncover those elements or factors which have produced the total and have, therefore,
not been able to institute measures which would reduce the costs of providing the
same service. For example, any unnecessary use of time either of personnel or
equipment to pick up a certain amount of garbage increases the cost of providing
that service. Careful routing and timing can have a material effect on the cost,
both in labour and equipment.
Some fairly complex and expensive equipment is now coming on the market
to handle the growing volume of " paper " work. Councils will have to be alert to
see that they are not paying for much idle machine-time, which is a costly item, and
may find it necessary to share equipment-time with others in order to keep the costs
down. Just as industry has had to meet rising costs with increased efficiencies in its
operations, so all municipalities will be faced with the same problem and have to
employ the same techniques.
The problems of financing capital works at the local level have, if anything,
become more difficult as the year has progressed. The problem is compounded by
a number of factors, both national and international. Wars cause inflation and the
United States, which is fighting a fairly costly war, has been suffering from inflation
for some little period, and this has, because of the interrelations, tended to drift into
Canada. The attempt by the two Governments to dampen the inflationary effect by
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1969
V 7
fiscal and monetary policies has resulted in a substantial contraction in the supply
of money and, therefore, has reduced the amount of money available for investment,
with the resulting very high interest rate attached to whatever is available. A further
complication is the changing pattern of savings, with the decline in the importance
of the insurance companies and the rise in the importance of mutual funds, with the
resulting shift in the emphasis on equity investment as against fixed investment.
This change has also been accentuated by the development of the Canada pension
scheme. With the gradual disappearance of the traditional methods of financing,
local government will have to equip itself to face a substantially new situation and
adapt its methods accordingly.
In contrast to the extensive amendments made to the Municipal Act in 1968,
amendments introduced at the 1969 Session of the Legislature were kept to a minimum. Possibly the most significant change was the provision empowering council
to adopt by-laws, with the assent of the electors, to permit Sunday sports and
entertainment. To accommodate pollution-control measures, certain land and
improvements used for pollution control were exempted from taxation, while continued increase in the use of mobile homes led to the necessity of granting authority
to councils to impose mobile-home occupancy fees. Clarification and simplification
of the procedures affecting regional district financing on behalf of member municipalities completes the list of the more important amendments. In addition, legislation ratifying procedures and by-laws that were initiated to meet special situations of
various municipalities was enacted in the Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act.
The annual shield award open to all municipalities in three categories, presented by the Minister of Municipal Affairs as an incentive to increase the turn-out
at municipal elections, was received by the following municipalities:—
Cities and towns—Merritt	
District municipalities—Tadanac.
Village municipalities—100 Mile House
Per Cent
70.54
80.33
83.06
It is of interest to note that Tadanac won the award for the district section at
the municipality's final vote; it was amalgamated with the City of Trail, effective
January 1, 1969. Second-place municipalities were: Cities and towns—Fernie,
65.75 per cent; districts—Gold River, 70.55 per cent; villages—Port McNeill,
80.16 per cent.
The Annual Convention of the Union of British Columbia Municipalities,
which was held in Kamloops this year, was attended by senior members of the staff.
We again maintained an office at the Convention centre to accommodate delegates
from the various municipalities who wished to take the opportunity to discuss local
problems with the Departmental staff. The Annual Conference of the Municipal
Officers' Association of British Columbia was held in Penticton, which was a departure from a practice of long standing of holding such meetings in Victoria. As
in other meetings of this nature, the Departmental staff contributed actively in the
programme.
Boundaries of some of the municipalities in the Regional Districts of Greater
Vancouver, Dewdney-Alouette, Central Fraser Valley, and Fraser-Cheam have,
because of uncertainties in description, been the cause of several disputes. On
December 5, 1968, by Order in Council No. 3869, Mr. T. F. Moore was appointed
Commissioner, pursuant to special legislation in the Municipalities Enabling and
Validating (Amendment) Act, 1968, to determine and redefine the boundaries of
The Corporation of the District of Burnaby, The Corporation of the District of
Coquitlam, The Corporation of Delta, and the Corporation of the City of New
 V 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Westminster. On April 29, 1969, by Order in Council No. 1360, the terms of
reference of the Commissioner were extended to include the boundaries of the
District of Surrey. Six hearings were held in the offices of municipalities, and
supplementary Letters Patent instituting the Commissioner's recommendations were
issued on December 18, 1969.
We have continued with our programme, both by personal visit and by correspondence, of ensuring that investment houses and financial institutions in Eastern
Canada and the United States are kept informed of the development and the activities of the regional districts and municipalities in British Columbia. The reaction
to the introduction of the mandatory five-year capital expenditure programme has
received favourable recognition from financial institutions, who will now be able to
view the borrowing requirements of the municipalities and regional districts in a
more informed fashion than has been possible in the past.
At this time, may I record my very deep gratitude to you and your predecessor
for your confidence, support, and friendship; to my staff who have so cheerfully
and effectively carried out their respective duties and assignments and have been
ready on all occasions with their help and advice; to the municipal councils and
their staffs for their co-operation and unfaihng courtesy. To my associates in the
other Departments of Government who have worked with us for the betterment of
local government in this Province, I extend my thanks.
J. E. BROWN, F.C.I.S.,
Deputy Minister.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1969
V 9
REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND
DEPUTY INSPECTOR OF MUNICIPALITIES
Victoria, British Columbia, January 15,1970.
/. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—The past year reflected once again the axiom that increases in municipal
populations give rise to urgent demands for new or improved levels of local services,
particularly in such areas as sewers, water, and roads. These demands remain a
source of major concern, not only from the standpoint of their priority, but perhaps
more seriously in view of the scarcity of capital funds and the increased financing
costs which must be met if and when the desired funds are obtainable.
A review of revenues of municipalities for the five-year interval from 1964 to
1968 reflects the two-fold impact of increased demands for services and the increased costs of providing same. In 1964, municipal revenues, including those of
waterworks and other utilities, totalled approximately $252,000,000, while in
1968 this total had risen to $431,000,000, for an increase of $179,000,000.
Debenture debt of municipalities over the same interval has increased from
$323,000,000 to $384,000,000.
As was anticipated, the benefits accruing from the regional organization of
local government gained wider recognition, and numerous requests for services were
advanced by member areas to the various regional districts which are now well
established within the Province. Some indication of the expanding range of local
government activities which are being effectively co-ordinated and developed by
the regional type of institution is evident upon perusal of the 16 specified area bylaws and 59 supplementary Letters Patent approved and issued during the past year.
The revenues of regional districts in 1968 totalled approximately $1,700,000,
an increase of $500,000 over the previous year. Debenture debt of regional districts in 1968 totalled approximately $2,900,000, an increase of $800,000 over the
previous year.
The continued expansion and development in the various areas of local
government have added to the complexity of the problems to be solved and placed
additional demands upon all members of our staff. To keep abreast of the latest
developments in the field of local government, members of staff have, of their own
volition, undertaken special courses of study from time to time.
A record of major activities of the Department during 1969 would include
the following:—
(1) Four hundred and twenty-three visits were made to municipalities, improvement districts, and regional districts. The number of municipalities,
improvement districts, and regional districts actually visited was 164;
some received more than one visit.
(2) Four hundred and nine Minutes of Council were prepared and subsequently approved by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
(3) One hundred and fifty-five certificates of approval for municipal loan
by-laws were issued.
(4) Thirty-one debenture issues were examined and subsequently certified by
the Inspector of Municipalities, consisting of 4,146 debentures of a total
par value of $7,023,433.
 V 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(5) Eight hundred and forty-eight by-laws were examined and registered.
Of these, 78 were district by-laws, 215 were town by-laws, 510 were
village by-laws, 31 were regional district by-laws, and 14 were improvement district by-laws. Many of the by-laws required advice and correspondence, resulting in resubmission in revised form.
(6) Many draft by-laws and similar documents were submitted for review
and comment, involving a considerable amount of correspondence.
(7) Publication of the Annual Report of Municipal Statistics, which includes
some 35 different schedules.
(8) Editing the financial and statistical returns of the municipalities and
regional districts to ensure conformity with statutory and other requirements. This phase of administration involves considerable correspondence with officials and auditors.
(9) Administration of the Municipal Commercial Vehicle Licensing Programme.
(10) By correspondence and by visits to the various municipalities, encouraging the adoption of good financial, accounting, and administrative procedures.
(11) Members of staff devoted considerable time and attention to the furnishing
of advice to regional districts on appropriate activities which they could
undertake in fulfilment of their role as co-ordinator and developer.
The four-year programme to phase out the municipal administration course
sponsored by the Department continued during the 1969/70 academic year. This
programme, undertaken in co-operation with the Faculty of Commerce and Business
Administration of the University of British Columbia, commenced in the 1968/69
academic year with the phase-out of first-year registrations and the 1969/70 academic year saw the acceptance of second-year registrations for the last time. Third-
year applications will be accepted for the last time in 1970/71 and, to complete the
programme, the 1971/72 academic year will be the last in which fourth-year
applications are accepted.
To assure those persons who wished to participate in a course oriented to the
fields of local government administration and finance that such an opportunity would
be provided, arrangements were made with the Chartered Institute of Secretaries
and the Certified General Accountants' Association to accept applications for
courses offered under their sponsorship.
Persons enrolling in courses offered by the Chartered Institute of Secretaries
may, upon graduation, be granted senior certificates in municipal administration or
finance, depending on their practical experience and the appointment which they
hold. The additional attractiveness to graduates of this course is that they may be
granted the professional degree "A.C.I.S." (Associate of the Chartered Institute of
Secretaries). There were seven enrolments for this course from persons employed
in the municipal field for the 1969/70 academic year.
Persons enrolling as undergraduates in the special three-year diploma course
sponsored by the Certified General Accountants' Association, which contains selected subjects principally in the financial administration field, will, as they progress
through and complete the course, receive recognition as having sufficient academic
qualification for certificates of proficiency in municipal administration (junior) and
municipal finance (senior).   As some of the subjects in this special course are also
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1969 V 11
mandatory subjects in the certified general accountants' course of studies, the student
is afforded the opportunity of continuing his studies toward the certificate award of
certified general accountant and use of the professional designation " C.G.A."
There were six enrolments for this special course from persons employed in the
municipal field for the 1969/70 academic year.
Investigations are continuing into the possibility of offering a one- or two-year
course in selected subjects for those persons employed in smaller municipalities or
who, for some other reason, do not wish to seek senior certificates in the municipal
administration or municipal finance fields. It is anticipated that the successful
completion of this proposed course would be sufficient academic qualification for
a junior certificate in municipal administration.
Student enrolment in the present correspondence course which, as stated, has
seen first-year registrations eliminated, is as follows: Second year, 17; third year,
32; and fourth year, 22. In addition, the course in property appraisal open to
assessors has a current enrolment of eight students.
The Board of Examiners, on which the Department is represented, granted 28
certificates of proficiency during the year. The following table illustrates classifications of certificates issued during 1969, and the number by classification which have
been issued to date:—
Certificates 1969 To Date
Junior   12 71
Senior Administration   6 86
Senior Finance   2 87
Property Appraisal   8 51
Totals      28 295
In view of the importance of the annual edition of Municipal Statistics to investment houses, financial institutions, and others, every effort is made to ensure
that it is available for distribution as early in the year as possible, and that the
financial and other information contained in this publication is accurate and on a
comparable basis with prior years.
Interest in the Municipal Commercial Vehicle Licensing Programme, administered by the Department on behalf of the municipalities, has not diminished in that
118 municipalities participated in the programme during the 1968/69 licence-year,
an increase of three over the previous year. The revenue derived from licence sales
during the 1968/69 licence-year was $649,912, which, after payment of incidental
expenses, was distributed to the participating municipalities on a per capita basis.
In all, 57,651 municipal commercial-vehicle plates and 46,600 exempt plates were
issued.
I am pleased to report that it was possible during the past year to increase the
number of municipalities which received a visit from a senior staff member. If the
work load associated with the co-ordination and development of functions at the
regional level does not increase substantially during the coming year, it is anticipated
that further progress will be made toward fully resuming our policy of having all
municipalities within the Province visited at least once during the year by a senior
staff member.
 V 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
I would again express appreciation of the loyalty and devotion to duty which
all members of the staff have shown during the past year. For senior members,
this has meant many week-ends of work in the field, curtailed holidays, or taking
holidays in piecemeal fashion.   All in all, it has been a job well done.
J. D. BAIRD, F.C.I.S.,
Assistant Deputy Minister and Deputy Inspector
of Municipalities.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1969
V 13
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR, FINANCE AND
STATISTICS DIVISION
Victoria, British Columbia, January 15,1970.
/. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—The real-property tax continues to be the major source of revenue of
municipalities in British Columbia. The growth in assessed values of real property
and revenue from taxation of these properties over the past 10 years is portrayed in
the following table. It will be noted that revenue from this source of taxation in
1968 totalled $251,692,644. Of this amount, $130,248,086 represented taxation
for general municipal purposes and $121,444,558 represented taxation for school
purposes.
Growth in Combined Assessed Values and Taxes in Municipalities
of British Columbia
Year
Gross Assessed Values
(Millions of Dollars)
Assessed Values
Actually Taxed
(Millions of Dollars)
Tax
Revenue
(Thousands
of Dollars)
AU
Properties
Taxable
Properties
School
Municipal
1960	
1961	
3,569
3,717
4,032
4,062
4,188
4,460
4,808
5,292
5,7971
7,4772
6,3521
8,3292
3,016
3,143
3,408
3,434
3,534
3,771
4,071
4,507
4,885
4,958
5,4001
5,6182
2,417
2,508
2,770
2,795
2,878
3,770
3,315
3,653
3,950
4,402
1,844
1,920
2,182
2,225
2,295
2,366
2,549
2,780
4,372
5,404
116,857
122,272
1962
128,866
1963
141,021
1964 _. .
154,074
196S
172,164
1966	
1967
192,056
224,840
1968  _. 	
1969 	
251,693
285,0003
1 School values.
2 Municipal values.
3 Estimated.
The table below indicates the distribution of 1969 assessed values by class of
municipality, with the percentage increase over 1968 shown in parentheses.
General Municipal
Gross Assessed Values
(Millions of Dollars)
Assessed Values Actually Taxed
(Millions of Dollars)
All
Properties
Taxable
Properties
School
Municipal
Cities    	
%
1,437 (12.4)
3,114 ( 9.4)
163 (14.8)
135 ( 1.5)
%
940 (13.5)
2,063 (13.2)
102 (14.6)
83 ( 2.5)
%
1,050 (16.3)
1,906 ( 9.8)
118(13.5)
92 ( 1.1)
%
827 (15.5)
2,002 (14.2)
98 (13.9)
78 ( 1.3)
Villages	
4,849 (10.1)
3,480 (13.2)
3,188 (13.0)
2,430 (13.8)
3,166 (11.7)
1,236 (10.8)
3,005 (14.2)
2,399 (38.1)
Vancouver -   „	
Totals  	
8,329 (11.4)
5,618 (13.3)
4,402 (11.4)
5,404 (23.7)
 V 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
A major portion of the increase of 38.1 per cent indicated for the City of Vancouver
in "Assessed Values Actually Taxed " is represented by an increase of the percentage of improvements taxed. In 1968, improvements were taxed at 50 per cent of
actual value, while in 1969 this was increased to 75 per cent.
The increase in assessed values actually taxed for general municipal purposes
from $2,780,000,000 in 1967 to $4,372,000,000 in 1968 and to $5,404,000,000 in
1969 was principally due to a change in policy by the Cities of Vancouver and
Penticton and the Districts of Burnaby, Peachland, Summerland, and West Vancouver. These municipalities have elected to utilize a separate assessment roll for
general municipal purposes in which land and improvements are assessed at their
actual value, as permitted by the provisions of the Municipal Act, rather than to
adopt the assessed values of land and improvements, as determined pursuant to the
Assessment Equalization Act. Under the Assessment Equalization Act, assessed
values for taxation purposes under the Public Schools Act are 50 per cent of actual
value.
On the basis of the present rate of growth it is anticipated that revenue from
real property and other sources of taxation for school and general municipal purposes in 1969 will reach $285,000,000. This would represent an increase of
approximately 144 per cent over the revenue of 10 years ago. The total assessed
values actually taxed for school purposes in the Province in 1969 amounted to
$5,786,349,575, which represents an increase of approximately $600,000,000 over
the values taxed in 1968. The assessment values in city, district, town, and village
municipalities amount to 76 per cent of this total, or $4,401,799,867.
During the year 1968, the last year for which audited financial statements of
municipalities are available, municipal revenues, including those of waterworks and
other utilities, were in excess of $430,000,000. This revenue can be identified as
accruing from the following major sources: General municipal taxation, $130,-
000,000; transfers from other governments, $93,000,000; revenue from own
sources, including sewer systems and utilities, $86,000,000; and school taxation,
$121,000,000. The school taxation levy was offset by the application of the homeowner grant payments of $40,000,000, leaving a net of approximately $81,000,000
in school taxes as having been paid by the property owner.
There was a marked decrease in the total value of capital projects undertaken
by municipalities and regional districts in 1968 over the previous year. This is
due in large measure to the difficulties municipalities are facing in the marketing of
municipal debentures, which in turn is due primarily to the lack of investor funds
available for this purpose. The value of works undertaken amounted to $101,-
000,000, of this total programme $87,000,000 was completed during the fiscal
year, leaving a balance of works in progress of $14,000,000 at the year-end. Of
the $101,000,000 expended during the year on works of a capital nature, municipalities were able to provide $34,000,000 out of current general revenue and utility
revenue funds, $5,000,000 from reserve funds, and approximately $3,000,000 was
obtained from grants-in-aid from the Provincial and Federal Governments. Municipal councils have continued in their efforts to finance larger portions of their capital
programmes out of current revenue funds, as is indicated in the increase of $5,000,-
000 in this category over 1967. When considered in the light of the $16,000,000
decrease in total projects, this increase in capital expenditures out of revenue funds
is more significant. There is also a sharp decrease in funds provided by grants due
to the elimination of the Federal Winter Works Incentive Programme.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1969
V 15
Figures in the following table indicate the activity in the capital works programmes over the past five years. The balance between the cost of the projects
undertaken and the amounts shown in the " Source of Funds " column was financed
through debenture loans, temporary bank loans, and other methods of financing.
Projects
Undertaken
Works
Completed
Works in
Progress
Source of Funds
Year
Revenue
Reserve
Funds
Grants
1964	
1965        	
1966.     ...	
1967	
1968        	
$80,000,000
103,000,000
118,000,000
117,000,000
101,000,000
$62,000,000
87,000,000
99,000,000
102,000,000
87,000,000
$18,000,000
16,000,000
19,000,000
15,000,000
14,000,000
$15,000,000
16,000,000
21,000,000
29,000,000
34,000,000
$5,000,000
5,000,000
5,000,000
6,000,000
5,000,000
$5,000,000
7,000,000
8,000,000
6,000,000
3,000,000
The trend in authorized term borrowing over the past seven years is indicated
below. The marked increase in borrowing between the years 1963 to 1964 has
been attributed to the municipal development and loan fund financing scheme.
However, since that date the level has been maintained due to the demand for
services, primarily sewerage and water, required by the continued accelerated
development of urban areas of the Province. The sharp increase in authorized
borrowings between 1967 and 1968 is due to increased borrowing for sewer programmes. The decline shown in 1969 is again a reflection of the difficulties currently being experienced by the municipalities in marketing municipal debentures.
Year
1963-
1964_
Amount
  $14,581,981
     25,231,663
1965     27,499,789
1966     24,663,3 8 8
Year Amount
1967  $30,756,706
1968  50,967,479
1969  23,343,554
Total debenture debt as at December 31, 1968, of all municipalities, including
the City of Vancouver, is shown by the following table. The debenture debt of the
Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District and the Greater Vancouver
Water District is not included.
Sold
Unissued
and Unsold
Total
Cities	
$64,858,326
80,399,792
9,058,974
6,047,896
248,177
$10,757,196
39,710,477
1,179,107
3,037,713
2,692,500
$75,615,522
120,110,269
Towns    	
Villages	
10,238,081
9,085,609
2,940,677
$160,613,165
168,894,368
$57,376,993
$217,990,158
168,894,368
$329,507,533
$57,376,993
$386,884,526
Debenture sales for all municipalities amounted to $15,042,375 for the year
1968. This resulted in a decrease of $12,377 to the total outstanding debenture
debt of all municipalities for 1968 after giving effect to the retirement of debentures
maturing during the year.
During the 1969 Session of the Legislature, the Municipal Act (section 199a)
was amended to require the preparation of a five-year capital expenditure programme by all municipalities.   Minor difficulties were experienced in presentation
 V 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
this initial year; however, these have been overcome and it is anticipated the programmes for subsequent years will provide meaningful information and guidance to
the municipalities, to this Department, and to financial institutions. A summary
of the capital expenditure programmes by year is listed below. Included in the
general heading under " Classification of Expenditure " are all capital expenditures on roads, sidewalks, building, land purchases, and other capital projects not
related to either water or sewerage systems. I pointed out previously in this report
the fact that municipal councils were making an effort to finance more of their
capital works out of current revenue; this is further emphasized from an analysis
of this summary, which indicates that over the five-year period total expenditures
from current revenue will represent approximately 30 per cent of the total programmes.
:     :
Five-year Capital Expenditure Programmes Summary by Year for
All Municipalities (Including Vancouver)
Classification of Expenditures
Year
Water
Sewer
General
Total
H-5<>
$11,823,623
8,176,880
10,173,150
8,390,615
6,956,804
$18,049,417
24,296,368
15,430,372
13,917,096
11,006,630
$78,188,328
72,982,537
68,118,023
61,936,455
60,432,982
$108,061,368
1970 -	
1971                         	
1972                            .          -                - ..
105,455,785
93,721,545
84,244,166
1073                      _ -	
78,396,416
$45,521,072
$82,699,883
$341,658,325
$469,879,280
Source of Funds
Year
General
Revenue
Grants
Reserve
Funds
Prior Years'
Surplus
Debenture
Sales
1969             -
$30,279,825
29,842,789
27,512,468
25,925,486
26,105,874
$6,694,334
4,390,121
3,339,258
3,839,390
3,175,525
$16,053,096
9,574,074
9,501,719
7,239,390
6,535,298
$1,577,234
169,057
246,365
21,000
19,327
$53,456,879
1970                            -  —
61,479,744
1971. —
1977
53,121,735
47,218,900
1973	
42,560,392
Totals .           ..   	
$139,666,442
$21,438,628
$48,903,577
$2,032,983
$257,837,650
The percentage of current revenue expended to service debenture debt, excluding utilities, in cities and districts declined in 1968 and increased slightly in the
towns and villages. Figures for 1968 are shown below, along with the 1967 figures
in parentheses:—
Per Cent
Cities   7.8   (8.4)
Vancouver   11.7(11.9)
Districts   6.7   (7.4)
Towns   7.6   (7.5)
Villages   5.3   (5.1)
Debenture debt of utilities is serviced almost entirely by revenues derived from
charges paid by the consumer and by frontage taxes.
British Columbia municipalities have continued to maintain a strong financial
position and in many cases have improved their position over previous years as
indicated from audited financial statements and other statistical information.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1969
V 17
Table 1 and Chart 1 indicate the trends in various financial aspects of municipal
government compared to population and income. The increase in total revenue as
indicated by the table and the chart resulted primarily from an increase of $16,000,-
000 in Provincial Government grants, raising the amount paid to municipalities to
approximately $76,000,000, excluding capital and special-purpose grants, an increase of $13,000,000 in general municipal taxation, and the increase in revenue
derived from school tax levies, which increased by $14,000,000 to approximately
$121,000,000. The increase in school taxes was offset to some extent, in so far as
resident home-owners were concerned, by an increase of $4,000,000 in the homeowner grants paid to municipalities on their behalf.
At the end of 1968, reserve funds of the various municipalities held for a variety
of purposes amounted to $36,000,000, an increase of $4,000,000 or 12.5 per cent
over the previous year, after giving effect to the fact that during the year 1968
approximately $5,000,000 from reserve funds was expended on capital works
during the year.
The total of reserves and surpluses held in all accounts of the municipalities
was $85,623,545. This represents 29 per cent of the total revenue, excluding school
taxes, of the municipalities. While the reserve funds are held in liquid form or in
investments authorized by Statute, a portion of the surplus is represented in arrears
of taxes and other receivables.
The tax-collection picture in municipalities has always been considered one of
the primary indications, not only of the efficiency of the administration, but also of
the ability of the taxpayer to meet the municipal tax levy promptly. Tax collections
have continued to improve to the point where the collection of current taxes in cities
now exceeds 96 per cent of the levy, districts collected 97 per cent, villages collected
in excess of 95 per cent, and towns were slightly lower with nearly 94 per cent. The
collection of current taxes in British Columbia municipalities continues to be the
highest among the Provinces in Canada publishing statistics of a comparable nature,
while the percentage of arrears of taxes is the lowest, as an examination of the 1967
published statistics indicates.
British Columbia—
Collection of current taxes
Per Cent
  96.4
Arrears on adjusted levy  4.7
Alberta—
Collection of current taxes  92.5
Arrears on adjusted levy  11.4
Saskatchewan—
Collection of current taxes  89.0
Arrears on adjusted levy  13.6
Ontario—
Collection of current taxes  93.3
Arrears on adjusted levy  8.8
Newfoundland—
Collection of current taxes  89.4
Arrears on adjusted levy  26.2
Nova Scotia—
Collection of current taxes  85.4
Arrears on adjusted levy  25.0
 V 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Chart 2 shows the percentage of tax collections for the period 1958 to 1968,
inclusive, and Table 2 reveals further information relative to tax collections in British Columbia municipalities for the years shown. Economic factors have contributed substantially to the establishment of this favourable position in the property-
tax field. However, municipal treasurers and collectors are to be congratulated for
their efforts in this high rate of tax collection.
Chart 3 indicates the per capita and percentage of revenues of municipalities
by major source for the 1968 fiscal year. The revenue shown for utilities represents
the amount appropriated from utility operations for general municipal purposes.
Chart 4 reflects the expenditures by major function on a per capita basis and as a
percentage of total expenditure.
The development of the regional district concept and the functions and activities in which they have become involved has caused a significant change in the financial content of the provisional and annual budgets adopted by the regional boards.
The Inspector of Municipalities has a responsibility to ensure that the amount to
be raised from non-municipal areas for regional district purposes is in accordance
with these annual budgets before a levy is made. The Division has, therefore, had
to devote considerable time, not only to the verification of the functional detail
within these complex budgets to ensure compliance with statutory requirements,
but also to the subsequent review of requisitions based thereon in satisfaction of the
fact that costs are properly apportioned to participating member areas. At the
present time these annual budgets require a two-fold review of the costs associated
with some 191 functions and 42 specified service areas.
While a few of the local areas established under the provisions of the Local
Services Act have had their agreements terminated and the jurisdiction for the provision of a specific service transferred to regional districts in the form of specified
service areas, the Division continues to review the agreements of the remaining 31
local areas to assure that the necessary funds for financing their particular service
requirements are advanced each year and then recovered by way of an appropriate
tax levy. It is expected that, as and when the opportunity arises, many of these
local areas will be converted to specified service areas within the regional district
structure.
Meetings were held at various times during the year in Winnipeg, Toronto,
and Halifax with the Departments of Municipal Affairs of the other provinces, and
the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, in connection with the revision of the Municipal
Finance Reporting Manual, mentioned in last year's Report. We had hoped that
the revised manual would be available for introduction in the 1970 fiscal year.
However, obtaining agreement or compromise on the many points in question on a
national basis has taken longer than anticipated and introduction of the manual will
therefore be delayed until the following year. The new manual will follow the
previous method of reporting revenues by source and expenditures by function.
The sources of revenue will, however, be divided into nine categories, the four
major being Taxes, Sales of Services, Revenue from Own Sources, and Transfers
from Other Governments. The expenditures will be segregated into nine functional
expenditure categories, the largest of which are General Government Services, Protective Services, Transportation Services, Environmental Health Services, Fiscal
Services, and Public Debt. While it is recognized that the manual will be used
primarily by the larger municipalities as a code of accounts, the smaller municipalities make use of the manual as a reference for fund accounting procedures, and
the revisions to the manual are being made with these factors in mind.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1969
V 19
The systems analysis and electronic data-processing feasibility-study programme which commenced in 1968 on a limited scale has expanded rapidly to now
include virtually all municipalities and regional districts throughout the Province,
with the exception of those in the Greater Vancouver area.
The study has been designed to serve a double purpose. The first phase includes a complete analysis of the existing systems and practices in the municipalities and regional districts and a projection of future work loads under these systems.
Appropriate recommendations will be made if it is determined that economies may
be effected by the adoption of practices in effect in other municipalities or regions.
The second phase of the programme deals with the movement from manual
systems to electronic data processing, assessing the needs of the community, the
probable cost of moving from manual systems to computer systems, and the operational effectiveness.
Municipal administrators are keenly aware of the necessity of receiving competent advice in this matter and also of the benefits which may be derived from
undertaking these studies on a joint basis rather than in isolation.
The Department has underwritten the development costs of the study, amounting to $10,000, which are common and of benefit to all areas of the Province. This
has permitted the smaller municipalities and regions to participate in the programme
at a very nominal cost.
It is anticipated that the results of the study, along with the appropriate recommendations, will be available to the municipalities and regional districts at the
same time as the revised Municipal Finance Reporting Manual, which is also oriented toward electronic data processing.
The functions of the Division include a continual review of the financial position and administrative practices of the municipalities and other areas of local government, and to encourage the adoption of good budgetary practices as well as the
maintenance of adequate accounting records. A close liaison is maintained with
financial institutions, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, and other departments of
Government in an effort to ensure that financial and other information required is
available on a uniform and comparable basis. In this regard we have continued
to receive the highest degree of co-operation from both elected and appointed municipal and local government officials.
W. K. Smith, F.C.I.S.,
Director, Finance and Statistics Division.
 V 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 1.—Trends in Financial Aspects of Municipal Government
Compared to Population and Income Expressed as Indexes
Year
Population
Total Revenue
(Excluding
Utilities)
Building
Permits
Debenture
Debt
Maximum
Values
Taxable
Total B.C.
Personal
Income
1956  	
1957  	
100.00
107.47
110.91
115.24
118.72
118.24
124.05
126.75
130.90
135.53
137.92
144.78
150.34
100.00
116.34
134.68
152.68
165.07
176.25
186.74
199.73
214.34
244.39
276.05
318.86
365.77
100.00
99.81
107.24
103.49
79.20
84.00
95.96
109.60
145.87
170.99
173.74
211.90
226.63
100.00
107.36
109.77
121.81
127.89
129.67
130.61
139.67
142.13
148.23
162.15
165.32
165.29
100.00
113.99
126.31
138.13
148.51
154.66
170.17
171.72
176.81
188.72
203.66
224.44
242.67
100.00
108.36
1958      	
112.04
1959   	
119.29
1960	
1961	
1962..    ..
124.39
126.37
134.86
1963 	
1964      	
1965	
1966	
142.23
154.97
174.95
194.63
1967      	
1968 	
215.35
232.84
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1969
V 21
Table 2.—Percentage Tax Collections
Percentage of
Current Levy
Collected
Total Collections
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
Outstanding Taxes
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
1939
Cities (Except Vancouver)
1946
1962	
1963         _  .   -        	
1964	
1965
1966
1967
1968  	
1939	
Vancouver
1946 	
1962          	
1963	
1964	
1965
1966	
1967  	
1968    	
1939
Districts
1946
1962           	
1963-	
1964   -
1965	
1966
1967
1968  -.	
1958
Towns
19.59
1962         	
1963 _
1964    	
1965 —
1966
1967
1968 	
1939	
Villages
1946
1962	
1963
1964     ..
1965 ..
1966	
1967
1968   _
81.10
94.13
95.12
95.42
95.82
95.92
96.28
96.61
96.65
91.00
95.74
94.65
94.95
95.11
95.66
96.03
96.36
95.67
77.60
92.32
95.12
95.27
95.52
96.05
96.51
96.69
97.00
89.55
88.69
91.36
90.80
91.88
92.87
92.81
93.21
93.98
76.50
92.45
94.73
95.21
95.09
96.04
95.21
95.64
95.45
99.10
100.46
100.17
100.32
100.45
100.01
100.40
100.30
100.20
103.10
100.57
99.56
99.92
99.78
100.39
100.20
100.15
98.87
95.80
99.28
99.94
100.16
100.10
100.31
100.67
100.17
100.29
97.06
98.00
101.00
97.87
100.25
99.93
98.90
99.75
100.20
98.30
99.90
101.53
100.53
99.99
100.31
99.08
100.07
99.97
40.16
7.85
6.75
6.30
5.70
5.49
5.12
4.57
4.44
30.06
5.90
7.83
7.50
7.34
6.45
5.80
5.04
5.75
34.81
9.45
6.47
6.28
6.03
5.33
4.64
4.22
3.90
13.62
15.18
11.58
12.71
11.47
9.94
10.16
9.84
9.06
38.71
11.90
7.32
6.66
6.28
5.52
6.48
6.16
6.15
 V 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TRENDS    IN     FINANCIAL   ASPECTS   OF   MUNICIPAL    GOVERNMENT
COMPARED     TO    POPULATION    AND      INCOME
Population   in   millions
— — — — Total   revenue   in   millions   of   dollars
Building   permits   in    millions  of  dollars
Debenture    debt     in     millions   of    dollars
Maximum  values  taxable in
hundreds of millions of dollars
Personal   income in hundreds
of millions of dollars
600
500
400
^
„,---
*-****
--**■
J.---
--"'
100
90
80
70
60
50
  "
40
30
20
10
9
8
	
■■■"""■*"
	
	
	
	
	
►♦♦♦♦*****
♦ ♦*>♦♦♦♦♦'
**********
♦♦.♦♦♦♦♦**
7
6
S
4
3
2
958       3
9           6
0           6
1           t
2          t
3          .
4         i
5          (.
6         6
7       196
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1969
V 23
PERCENTAGE      TAX       COLLECTIONS
CHART 2
LEGEND
Cities
Districts
•••••••••Towns
 Villages
 — Vancouver
PERCENTAGE    OF   CURRENT    LEVY  COLLECTED
rr-*^
OUTSTANDING   TAXES    AS   A    PERCENTAGE OF    CURRENT    LEVY
 V 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
MUNICIPAL  REVENUES
BY   MAJOR   SOURCE   1968
CITIES   (EXCLUDING  VANCOUVER)
CHART 3
UTILITIES11'
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER   PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE   GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION <"
PROVIDED   BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
X   OF    REVENUE
 100%	
$  PER   CAPITA
$253.40   (2-6.11)
3.26 ( 3.94)
13.37 (13.66)
1.10 (1.26)
9.49 ( 9.03)
9.87 (8.51)
33.39 (33.90)
-
15.52 (15.55)	
29.52 (29.70)
$ 8.28 ( 8.97)
33.82 (30.84)
2.80 ( 2.88)
24.06 (20.44)
25.00 (19.25)
84.62 (76.61)
94.82 (67.12)
1967   FIGURES    SHOWN    IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$95,463,825     TOTAL POPULATION-376,719
DISTRICTS
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER    PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE   GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION"'
PROVIDED   BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
7.   OF   REVENUE
100%
11111 111 * I*
$   PER   CAPITA
$226.09    (195.79)
10.51  ( 9.54)
.60 (    .73)
5.70 ( 6.45)
11.12 ( 9.13)
35.11  (36.26)
18.02 (18.00)
36.96 (37.89)  L_
ffSfMJS&lt:
$23.72 (18.77)
1.52 ( 1.49)
12.89 (12.54)
25.00 (17.87)
79.39 (70.97)
83.58 (74.15)
1967   FIGURES    SHOWN    IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$146,604,295   TOTAL POPULATION-648,411
NOTE1-   (1)   Utilities    represents    amount    appropriated   from   utility   operations    for    General    Municipal   Purposes,    is   not    Major
Source  of   Revenue   for   Districts, Towns, Villages   and   Vancouver,  included   in  'Licenses   and  Other'   for  1967   and   1968.
(2)  General   Municipal   Taxation   includes   Ad   Valorem Tax,    Business   Tax,   Sewer   and   Water   Frontage   Tax   and   Special
Assessments.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1969
V 25
MUNICIPAL   REVENUES
BY   MAJOR   SOURCE   1968
TOWNS
CHART 3
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER    PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE   GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION1
PROVIDED   BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
%   OF   REVENUE
 100%	
12.22  (11.58)
.97 ( 1.95)
8.44  ( 7.76)
12.44  (13.47)
31.59 (32.82)
18.29 (19.13)
34.34 (32.42)
4 11 III II
$ PER  CAPITA
$204.36   (172.75)
$24.94 (19.96)
2.41 ( 3.39)
17.26 (13.43)
25.00 (23.29)
64.57 (56.70)
70.18 (55.98)
1967   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$9,994,199       TOTAL POPULATION-48,903
VILLAGES
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER    PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL LOCAL  GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION'
PROVIDED   BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
7.   OF   REVENUE
 100%
12.32 (12.56)
1.29 (1.88)
17.33 (17.98)
30.69 (29.79)
21.35 (22.00)
38.37 (37.79)
$  PER  CAPITA
$153.88    (134.81)
$18.97 (16.93)
3.65 ( 2.53)
25.00 (24.24)
47.22 (40.16)
59.04 (50.95)
1967   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$7,919,966       TOTAL POPULATION-51,468
NOTE;-   (1)  General   Municipal   Taxation   includes   Ad  Valorem Tax,   Business   Tax,  Sewer  and  Water   Frontage  Tax   and   Special
Assessments.
 r
V 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MUNICIPAL  REVENUI
BY   MAJOR   SOURCE   1961
VANCOUVER
CHART 3
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER    PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE   GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION'1'
PROVIDED   BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
7.  OF   REVENUE
i«7.
12.80 (13.48)
.33 ( .43)     BjSjjtjpgijigiig
14.56 (14.10)     $:i:|:__ii:;:i^
8.81 (5.97)
35.49 (37.26)
12.78  (13.19)  —
28.01 (28.76)
$ PER  CAPITA
$283.51   (247.66)
$ 36.25 (33.34)
.93 ( 1.08)
41.28 (34.92)
25.00 (14.79)
100.63 (92.29)
79.42 (71.24)
1967   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$116,347,745     TOTAL POPULATION-410,375
NOTE:-  (1) General   Municipal   Taxation  includes   Ad Valorem Tax,   Business   Tax, Sewer  and  Water   Frontage Tax  and   Special
Assessments.
REVENUE   SHOWN   FOR  ALL CLASSES   OF   MUNICIPALITIES   INCLUDING   VANCOUVER   DOES   NOT    INCLUDE
APPROPRIATION   OF    PRIOR   YEARS    SURPLUS.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1969
V 27
REVENUE   EXPENDITURES
BY    MAJOR    FUIMCTIOIM    1968
CITIES   (EXCLUDING  VANCOUVER)
CHART 4
7.   OF    EXPENDITURE
100%
GENERAL   GOVERNMENT
FIRE
ADMINISTRATION   OF  JUSTICE
OTHER  PROTECTION
PUBLIC   WORKS
SANITATION   AND   WASTE  REMOVAL
SOCIAL WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT   CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL   EXPENDITURES  FROM   REVENUE
OTHER
6.06   ( 6.34)
4.41   (4.50)
6.36 (6.26)
1.87 (1.91)
( 7.35)
(4.10)
m&&.
XXX.Zst.Zst.
7.18
3.86
13.28   (11.22)
29.51   (29.34)
8.29   (8.99)
640 «w» EM^
12.78   (11.85)
ll111111111
$ PER  CAPITA
S 254.68   (227.19)
Z&ZZ&
$15.44 (14.42)
11.25 (10.22)
16.20 (14.23)
4.77 ( 4.35)
18.29 (16.69)
9.83   (9.32)
33.83   (25.48)
75.16   (66.66)
21.12   (20.43)
16.31    (18.49)
32.48   (26.90)
1967   FIGURES    SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$95,943,932     TOTAL   POPULATION - 376,719
DISTRICTS
%  OF   EXPENDITURE
100%    	
GENERAL   GOVERNMENT
FIRE
ADMINISTRATION  OF  JUSTICE
OTHER   PROTECTION
PUBLIC  WORKS
SANITATION  AND  WASTE  REMOVAL
SOCIAL   WELFARE
EDUCATION
-
DEBT   CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL  EXPENDITURES   FROM   REVENUE
OTHER
5.76 ( 5.97)
3.38 ( 3.40)
4.96 ( 4.89)
1.78 ( 1.65)
8.00 (8.18)
2.54 (2.68)
9.60  (8.57)
35.71  (36.73)
6.95  ( 7.74)
7.84  ( 6.63)
13/48  (13.56)
ymm
$  PER CAPITA
$234.55   (201.00)
$13.51
7.93
11.63
4.18
18.78
5.97
22.51
(11.99)
( 6.83)
( 9.84)
( 3.32)
(16.45)
( 5.38)
(17.24)
83.75    (73.84)
16.30    (15.56)
18.39    (13.33)
31.60    (27.22)
1967   FIGURES    SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$152,085,692    TOTAL   POPULATION - 648,411
NOTE:- Expenditures   for   Health   included   in 'Other'.
'
 V 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REVENUE    EXPENDITURES
BY    MAJOR   FUNCTION   1968
TOWNS
CHART 4
GENERAL   GOVERNMENT
FIRE
OTHER    PROTECTIONS
PUBLIC    WORKS
SANITATION   &   WASTE    REMOVAL
SOCIAL  WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT   CHARGES    (NET)
CAPITAL   EXPENDITURE   FROM   REVENUE
OTHER
7.  OF   EXPENDITURE
10°%	
8.15 (8.49)
1.55 (1.63)
2.36 (2.94)
8.79 (8.38)
4.51 (4.34)
11.67 (9.67)
34.43 (32.13)
8.59 (8.80)
9.52 (14.09)
10.43 (9.53)
r/.r/.y.Y.v-
$ PER  CAPITA
$206.30   (174.82)
$16.80  (14.84)
3.20    (2.85)
4.88    (5.15)
18 14   (14.64)
9.31   (7.58)
24.07 (16.90)
71.03 (56.17)
17.73 (15.39)
19.65 (24.64)
21.49 (16.66)
1967   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$10,088,636     TOTAL   POPULATION-48,903
VILLAGES
%   OF  EXPENDITURE
100%
$  PER CAPITA
$156.86    (130.46)
GENERAL    GOVERNMENT
FIRE
OT"""-
DTHER PROTECTIONS
PUBLIC  WORKS
SANITATION  &  WASTE   REMOVAL
EDUCATION
DEBT  CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL  EXPENDITURE   FROM   REVENUE
OTHER
1967   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN  PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-S 8,073,454     TOTAL   POPULATION - 51,468
NOTE:-  Expenditures   for    Health   included    in  'Other
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1969 V 29
REVENUE    EXPENDITURES
BY    MAJOR    FUNCTION    1968
VANCOUVER
CHART 4
GENERAL  GOVERNMENT
FIRE
ADMINISTRATION   OF JUSTICE
OTHER   PROTECTION
PUBLIC   WORKS
SANITATION   AND   WASTE  REMOVAL
SOCIAL WELFARE
%   OF   EXPENDITURE
100%
S PER  CAPITA
$309.30   (265.85)
EDUCATION
DEBT   CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL   EXPENDITURES   FROM   REVENUE
OTHER
3.14 ( 3.45)
5.63 ( 6.18)
8.83 (9.88)
2.64 (2.03)
2.26 (2.38)
2.78 (2.99)
16.88 (15.33)
25.67 (26.45)
10.85 (11.18)
7.72 (7.73)
13.60 (12.40)
WMMW
%£%££&.
$ 9.72 ( 9.17)
17.42 (16.43)
27.31  (26.27)
8.18 ( 5.41)
6.99 ( 6.34)
8.61   ( 7.97)
52.23   (40.78)
79.42 (70.30)
33.58 (29.73)
23.90 (20.56)
41.94 (32.89)
1967   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$126,929,317     TOTAL   POPULATION-410,375
NOTE^- Expenditures   for   Health   included   in  'Other'.
 V 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR, ADMINISTRATION DIVISION
Victoria, British Columbia, January 15, 1970.
/. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—Previous Annual Reports have made mention of the growing range of
activities of the regional districts and the services being provided by them. This
year a series of tables has been introduced at the end of this report to illustrate the
growth that has taken place. Table 1 shows the new functions of the various
regional districts undertaken during the past 12 months on behalf of two or more
member areas. The growing trend toward the development of community services
on a multi-municipal approach is indicated by these new functions. Co-operation
between municipal and non-municipal areas is rapidly expanding under the regional
district concept as illustrated by the number and variety of new functions that have
been assumed. In addition to new functions, several regional districts expanded
their activities by adding to the number of participating members for already existing
functions. Many of the functions and other services provided by regional districts
represent an entirely new approach in local government. Because the ground is
largely unfamiliar, we have found it necessary in most cases to spend a good deal
of our time in developing new methods and procedures and in guiding proposals
through to a successful conclusion. Table 2 summarizes the functions that have
been undertaken by the regional districts to date.
Apart from authorizing new or expanded functions a large number of supplementary Letters Patent were issued for such things as extension or revision of
regional district boundaries, alteration of internal electoral area boundaries, administrative amendments to functions, and other procedural revisions. To facilitate a
regional approach in situations where financial assistance was requested, a number
of regional districts were empowered by supplementary Letters Patent to make
grants-in-aid.
Prior to the introduction of regional local government, nearly all community
services in the non-municipal areas of the Province were provided by improvement
districts. Most communities in need of services are now turning to the regional
district. Twenty-eight specified service areas were established in 1969. Many of
these would have been established as separate improvement districts with the resulting duplication of administrative organization had the regional district not been
available as the means of centrally providing the needed services.
Table 3 fists the specified service areas established during the year. All of
these areas were established following a favourable vote of the benefiting property
owners. Specified service areas within regional districts are gradually replacing
existing improvement districts (created under either the Water Act or the Municipal
Act) as the means of providing elementary local services for small unincorporated
communities. Of the specified service areas formed during the year, two were
former improvement districts that were dissolved and their assets and liabilities transferred to a regional district, two were former local areas incorporated under the
Local Services Act, and one was established for the purpose of preserving services
in a non-municipal area adjacent to a municipality where the greater part of a former
improvement district had been absorbed within the municipal jurisdiction.
Turning to the municipal borrowing picture, the prevailing difficult monetary
situation with accompanying high interest rates is clearly reflected in the activities
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1969
V 31
of the past 12 months. There were a few more borrowing by-laws adopted compared to the previous year, but in total they were for considerably less money.
Altogether 100 term borrowing by-laws of both regional districts and municipalities
were recommended for the approval of the Inspector of Municipalities during 1969.
All but five of these by-laws were subsequently adopted either upon the initiative of
council following statutory advertising procedures, or where necessary, the assent
of the owner-electors; this reflects the very high acceptance record enjoyed by
British Columbia local governments in obtaining sanction from the taxpayers for
capital borrowing proposals.
The total new borrowing authority authorized during the year amounted to
$23,343,554 for the various categories of projects summarized below. The table
shows term borrowing by issuing authorities. The amount authorized is nearly
$30,000,000 less than that authorized in 1968. Part of the decrease was a result of
the lack of available financing and part due to there being fewer major capital programmes for extended sewer and water development schemes than the previous year.
Included in the total authorized borrowing is some $1,000,000 in short-term
loans authorized under the per capita borrowing provisions of the Municipal Act.
Borrowing Authorization,
1969
Purpose
Regional
Districts
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Total
$1,600,000
91,500
755,000
1,506,000
$4,282,500
505,000
140,000
530,000
35,670
658,800
45,000
92,000
$4,931,000
1,006,000
896,317
1,653,000
2,839,240
192,551
34,000
$926,616
$11,740,116
1,602,500
356,000
60,000
1,791,317
Waterworks     	
Consolidated local improvements
Paving, roads, and sidewalks	
Equipment (including fire protec-
$34,860
4,079,860
2,874,910
911,351
235,500
116,000
16,000
40,500
108,000
Totals   .          	
$4,084,500
$6,288,970
$11,552,108
$75,360
$1,342,616
$23,343,554
Borrowing by the City of Vancouver and by the metropolitan water and sewer
boards is not subject to the approval of the Inspector of Municipalities and therefore has not been included in the above table. The borrowing authorized for regional districts does not include some $22,000,000 borrowed by the Greater Vancouver Regional District on behalf of a number of its member municipalities and
the Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District.
For comparison purposes, trends in borrowing authorization during the past
five years, including 1969, are indicated by the following table.
Trends in Borrowing Authorization, 1965-69
Year
Regional
Districts
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages               Total
1965
$10,122,759
12,601,600
4,440,914
5,754,270
6,288,970
$13,532,776
10,206,513
21,315,016
41,051,821
11,552,108
$2,010,500
771,500
1,136,381
1,200,693
75,360
1
$1,833,754    |    $27,499,789
1966    ....
1967      -	
1968
1969	
$2,345,500
567,750
4,084,500
1,083,775    |      24,663,388
1,518,895    |      30,756,706
2,392,945           50,967,479
1,342,616    |      23,343,554
1
It will be noted that the total amount of borrowing authorized in the year under
review is considerably less than the average of the previous four years, reflecting the
difficult borrowing situation and, as mentioned previously, the reduction in major
programmes extending over lengthy construction periods.
 V 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Despite an over-all decrease in the amount of borrowing authorization there
was a marked increase in the amount of anticipated borrowing for local improvement works. Projects estimated to cost in excess of $8,000,000 were given preliminary borrowing approval. A considerable part of this will be financed internally through special local improvement funds rather than by the issue of debentures. Projects in the amount of nearly $3,000,000 that were financed during the
year are included by issuing authority in the previous table.
In addition to new loan authorization by-laws, 46 security issuing by-laws were
approved; these by-laws specify the details of debenture issues and other security
which previously had been approved in principle only. It was necessary to amend
a number of these by-laws to meet the rapidly changing demands of the market
where sales were made, and to bring earlier by-laws in line with procedural requirements where the issue of debentures was being undertaken by a regional district.
A number of amendments were made to the borrowing procedures of the Municipal
Act during the 1969 Session of the Legislature to further expedite the issue and
sale of debentures by regional districts on behalf of municipalities. The Division
assisted in this by preparing several sample by-laws for the information of the
municipalities and regional districts; these samples were distributed, together with
a procedural outline prepared for the purpose of helping municipal officials complete the documentation of their borrowing by-laws, and in particular to assist
smaller municipalities in meeting procedural requirements.
Recent increases in the costs of operation and maintenance and the development of new projects resulted in a large number of municipalities undertaking the
revision of utility and sewer rates by-laws. Over 50 such by-laws were reviewed
and commented on by the Division prior to being recommended for the approval
of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
The Division reviews all by-laws of towns, villages, and improvement districts before acceptance for registration in the office of the Inspector of Municipalities, as required by the Municipal Act. A total of 891 by-laws were registered,
many of which were the subject of correspondence and discussion. This is an
increase of nearly 150, compared with the previous year.
Three municipal debenture issues were guaranteed under the provisions of
the Municipalities Assistance Act in 1969. The total amount of debentures guaranteed by the Province under the Municipalities Assistance Act and the Village
Municipalities Assistance Act outstanding as at December 31, 1969, was $67,351,-
288; details are shown in the following table. In addition, debenture debt guaranteed by the Province under the Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District Act outstanding as at the end of the year amounted to $23,986,000.
Outstanding Debentures Guaranteed
Village
Municipalities
Assistance Act
Municipalities
Assistance
Act
Total
$643,600
433,000
1,348,500
522,450
$13,130,000
12,610,738
2,175,500
3,386,500
$13,773,600
Districts  	
Towns    	
Villages  	
13,043,738
3,524,000
3,908,950
Totals	
Vancouver   -	
$2,947,550
$31,302,738
11,820,000
668,000
1,701,000
81,000
18,831,000
$34,250,288
11,820,000
668,000
1,701,000
81,000
18,831,000
	
Grand totals  - _	
$2,947,550
$64,403,738
$67,351,288
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1969 V 33
As an element of borrowing power and to improve borrowing capability, nearly
all municipal waterworks and sewerage systems are operated on a self-liquidating
basis. During the past year the Inspector of Municipalities certified as self-liquidating a further four sewerage systems and one waterworks system; all of the certificates issued were provisional and will be replaced by subsisting certificates following a number of years of actual operation and continued proof of self-liquidation.
The following is a brief resume of municipal incorporations, extensions of
boundaries, and other changes in municipal structure:—
Plebiscites held under the supervision of the Division at the direction of the
Trustees of the Chase Waterworks District and the Valleyview Irrigation District
on the question of a change in status to a village resulted in affirmative votes; the
Village of Chase was incorporated on April 22, 1969, and the Village of Valleyview
was incorporated on October 23, 1969.
As and from January 1, 1969, the Village of Golden, because of growth in
population, was elevated by a change in status to a town. Effective February 1,
1969, the Village of Houston, together with additional lands, changed in status to
a district municipality. This was to accommodate the anticipated growth of the
community as a result of the development of a major forest products utilization
complex.
A vote on the question of incorporation as a district municipality held in the
communities of Colwood, Langford, and Metchosin, which together have one of
the largest populations for a non-municipal area in the Province, failed conclusively.
Effective November 1, 1969, the Town of Mission City and the District of
Mission were amalgamated as the new District of Mission. Several other municipalities have shown interest in studying amalgamation as it applies to their communities.
Changes to local areas established under the provisions of the Local Services
Act include the following: Supplementary Letters Patent were issued to the Regional District of Central Okanagan governing the transfer of the administration
of Community Planning Areas 1 and 2. The Regional District of Fraser-Fort
George in like manner assumed the administration of Community Planning Areas 7
and 20 for the general Prince George area. Vanderhoof Local Area (fire protection) was dissolved and the Regional District of Bulkley-Nechako undertook to
provide the service on a specified-area basis.
Mission Dyking District and Silverdale Dyking District were dissolved and
designated specified areas of the District of Mission. Arnold Waterworks District
was transferred to the District of Sumas; Port Hardy Improvement District was
dissolved and its assets and liabilities were transferred to the District of Port Hardy.
The 100 Mile House Fire Protection District was similarly dissolved and its assets
and liabilities transferred to the Village of 100 Mile House; Gibsons Fire Protection District and Selma Park Improvement District have been dissolved and their
assets and liabilities transferred to Sunshine Coast Regional District.
Of the 35 hospital improvement districts transferred from the jurisdiction of
the Water Rights Branch of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources
to this Department, only nine remain operative; the balance, in co-operation with
the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service, have been dissolved under the
provisions of the Regional Hospital Districts Act and their assets and liabilities
transferred to the appropriate regional hospital district.
 V 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Boundary extensions were authorized by the issue of supplementary Letters
Patent for the following municipalities:—
Municipal Boundary Extensions, 1969
Municipality
Area (Acres)
Population
Before
Added
After
Before
Added
After
Cities
Cranbrook   -..
1,181.0
1,424.0
1,206.5
8,005.2
8,549.7
32,970.0
407.4
955.9
3,104.1
2,719.0
1,349.0
607.4
178.2
565.1
502.0
905.8
240.0
229.6
944.2
243.0
1,089.5
19.7
18.0
9.0
79.3
17,064.6
4.0
37.4
63.6
620.8
14.8
4.8
22.9
612.1
46.1
114.0
32.2
110.6
1,424.0
2,513.5
1,226.2
8,023.2
8,558.7
33,049.3
17,472.0
959.9
3,141.5
2,782.6
1,969.8
622.2
183.0
588.0
1,114.1
951.9
354.0
261.8
1,054.8
7,849
7,849
2,781
7,731
15,330
7,809
699
2,961
7,738
5,725
3,592
1,290
1,530
1,254
1,450
879
652
895
1,558
Nil
(1)
Nil
Nil
5
452
1,101
Nil
98
Nil
Nil
18
4
64
244
Nil
C1)
62
Nil
7,849
(1)
2,781
7,731
15,335
8,261
1,800
2,961
7,836
5,725
3,592
1,308
1,534
1,318
1,694
879
Districts
Towns
Creston 	
Quesnel 	
Villages
Cumberland    . - ;	
Fruitvale  	
C1)
957
1,558
100 Mile House   	
Vanderhoof 	
1 Figures not available at time of printing.
Adjustments in area as well as the alternations in population are shown in
the table. Local count determines the additional population of the extension areas
and the primary populations are those established by the 1966 census.
At the direction of the Minister, a boundary extension of Cranbrook was submitted to the owners of land. The proposal failed to receive the required three-
fifths majority in the affirmative. Submission of two further boundary extension
petitions resulted in the inclusion of most of the originally proposed extension area.
In addition, a plebiscite held on an extension to the boundaries of the Town of
Quesnel failed to receive the requisite number of votes in the affirmative.
The introduction of legislation providing for the incorporation of Indian lands
as village municipalities has raised interest in municipal status in several Indian
bands.   The first Indian municipality may be incorporated next year.
Amongst other activities of the Division, 72 Minutes of Council authorizing
the abandonment of highways in municipalities were prepared and recommended
for approval, together with 32 Minutes of Council appointing members of the Board
of Variance and Boards of Commissioners of Police. Many other Minutes of Council were prepared for a variety of approvals as indicated in the report of the Assistant Deputy Minister.
While the efforts of the Division, as a matter of necessity, have been directed
primarily in assisting regional districts in their formative period, we have attempted
to continue to assist the municipalities to meet their ever-increasing local government responsibilities.
C. H. L. Woodward, F.C.I.S.,
Director, Administration Division.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1969
V 35
Table 1.—Functions Assigned to Regional Districts during 1969
Alberni-Clayoquot—
Control of fireworks.
Control of soil removal.
Cariboo—
Regional planning.
Community planning.
Building regulation.
Control of unsightly premises.
Central Fraser Valley—
Community arena and recreation complex
(Matsqui, Sumas, Abbotsford).
Establishment of a community civic properties and recreation commission (Matsqui,
Sumas, Abbotsford).
Central Kootenay—Control of noxious insects
(Creston and district).
Central Okanagan—
Regional planning.
Community planning.
Building regulation.
Control of noxious insects.
Establishment of the Okanagan Basin Water
Board   (jointly  with   Okanagan-Similka-
meen).
Comox-Strathcona—
Parks acquisition and development.
Control of firearms.
Cowichan Valley—-
Ambulance facilities (Duncan, North Cowichan, and district).
Airport land acquisition and development.
Regional planning.
Community planning.
Building regulation.
Sanitation regulation.
Fraser-Fort   George.—Parks   acquisition   and
development (Regional Parks Act).
Greater Vancouver—Contract works and services for member municipalities.
Kootenay Boundary—
Housing for elderly citizens (Grand Forks,
Midway, and district).
Refuse disposal facilities (Grand Forks and
district).
Control of insects (Grand Forks and district).
Sewage disposal facilities (Trail, Rossland,
and Warfield).
Nanaimo—Public transit (Nanaimo and district).
North Okanagan—
Community  arena improvements   (Lumby
and district).
Building regulation.
Okanagan-Similkameen—
Refuse disposal (Osoyoos and district).
Establishment of the Okanagan Basin Water
Board (jointly with Central Okanagan).
Peace River—
Contract works and services for member
municipalities.
Local works and services for non-municipal
communities.
Regional planning.
Community planning.
Building regulation.
Library services.
Powell River—
Contract works and services for member
municipalities.
Local works and services for non-municipal
communities.
Control of fireworks.
Skeena A—
Regional planning.
Community planning.
Building regulation.
Skeena B—
Regional planning.
Community planning.
Building regulation.
Sunshine   Coast — Water   supply    (Gibsons,
Sechelt, and district).
Thompson-Nicola—Control of fireworks.
 V 36                                                    BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 2.—Regional District Functions as at December 31,
1969
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XI   1   1   1   1   1
Airport facilities	
1  1 1  1  1
1    IX
1  1 1
1  1
1 1 1 1 1 1
Sanitary regulation	
1 1 1  1  1
1     IX
1  1  1
1 1
1 1 1 1 1 1
Soil-removal regulation.	
X
1
1  1
1 1 1
1 1
1 1 1 1 1 1
Transit    	
1 1 1 1
1
1  1
1  1  1
1  1  1—1
II  1  1  1  1
" X " indicates function.           " — " indicates application of function in part of regional district only.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1969
V 37
Table 3.—Regional District Specified Service Areas Established
during 1969
Bulkley-Nechako—
Fire-protection services (Vanderhoof district).
Fire-protection services (Burns Lake district).
Cariboo—
Street-lighting services (Horsefly).
Fire-protection services (100 Mile House).
Central   Okanagan—Refuse   disposal   (West-
bank) .
Comox-Strathcona—
Water works (Courtenay district).
Fire-protection services (Black Creek).
Emergency answering service  (Courtenay,
Comox district).
Cowichan Valley—
Recreation facilities (Mesachie Lake).
Street-lighting services (Mesachie Lake).
Water works (Mesachie Lake).
Sewer services (Mesachie Lake).
Fire-protection services (Mesachie Lake).
Fire-protection   services   (Cowichan   Lake
district).
East Kootenay—
Street-lighting services (Moyie).
Street-lighting services (Elko).
Street-lighting services (Wardner).
Fraser-Fort George — Street-lighting services
(Prince George district).
Mount Waddington •
(Sointula).
■ Fire-protection services
North Okanagan—Park acquisition  (Cherry-
ville).
Okanagan-Similkameen—
Refuse disposal (Okanagan Falls).
Fire-protection services  (Okanagan Falls).
Squamish-Lillooet—
Fire-protection services (Lillooet district).
Fire-protection services (Pemberton district).
Sunshine Coast—
Fire-protection services  (Gibsons district).
Street-lighting services (Selma Park).
Fire-protection services (Roberts Creek).
Street-lighting  services   (Granthams  Landing).
*
 V 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR, REGIONAL
PLANNING DIVISION
Victoria, British Columbia, January 15, 1970.
/. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—Of the 28 regional districts incorporated in the Province, all but four now
have the planning function, 13 have operating planning offices, and two more
are in the process of hiring planners and technical staff. The remainder are using
the services of consultants or the Division whenever staff is available.
The Lower Mainland Regional Planning Area was reconstituted into the
Regional Districts of Greater Vancouver, Central Fraser Valley, Dewdney-Alouette,
and Fraser-Cheam on March 31st, and since that time the Regional Plan has been
administered by these regional districts and has had very few amendments affecting
land, and one major administrative procedure amendment. In all, the intent of the
Plan has remained intact.
Both the Capital Region Planning Area and the Central Okanagan Regional
Planning Area were absorbed into their respective regional districts, so that now
there are no regional planning areas. Legislation creating planning areas was first
passed by the Legislature in 1948 on the American model, where planning was
expected to be conducted in a vacuum without any direct contact with other government agencies. Now planning becomes the staff function in a regional district and
is a proper tool for co-ordination in a management function.
The planning staff are designated in groups of regional districts, and besides
being statutory members on Technical Planning Committees and giving planning
advice and guidance along with other public servants in group form, we have been
involved directly on request in a number of areas throughout the Province in the
preparation of plans and by-laws. Besides specific projects, there has been a great
deal of day-to-day advice given in the environmental management process.
It has been the practice of the Division for a quarter of a century now to give
direct advice where asked in small communities and in particular to villages which
have just been incorporated. To this end, we prepared a planning report for the
Village of Midway. We also finished the Village of Lillooet Planning Report and
the Village of Cumberland had a report prepared which has now been implemented
by the council. As soon as the regional districts have operating staffs well established and there are regional plans for the regional districts, they will be able to do
this work themselves on a contract basis, but until that time we will be available to
help out wherever possible. The Village of Houston was reconstituted into the
District of Houston with the development of the forest resource in that area, and to
this end we have been intensely involved in an advisory capacity, in the future
development of the community.
Last summer the Minister's Land Use Committee was formed, consisting of
the departments most intensely involved with multiple land use problems. Technical
assistance is being supplied to this committee through the respective Deputy Ministers and professional staff. The Department is represented on the committee
advising on settlement land-use policy and one of our planners acts as secretary to
the Technical Sub-committee.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1969
V 39
The Division has been active wherever possible in giving talks, participating in
seminars, and taking the initiative in holding group workshops ourselves with
affected officials, to improve communication and exchange of ideas. We are now
also assisting wherever we can in forming ideas through operational research to help
more efficient, effective, and better decision-making processes in environmental
management.
COMMUNITY PLANNING AREAS
Community Planning Area Number 1 (Kelowna) was absorbed into the
administration of the Regional District of Central Okanagan. The changeover
warrants special mention because this was the first area of this kind in the Province.
In the mid 'forties there was a great deal of concern about development outside the
City of Kelowna. A committee of the Government at that time made recommendations which would give the Minister of Municipal Affairs the authority to act as a
municipal council in unorganized territory where problems of land use were concerned, and the Town Planning Act was amended in 1946 to allow this action. A
building inspector was hired, and building, subdivision, and zoning regulations were
passed in the form of Minister's regulations, and the area was called Kelowna Regulated Area. When the Town Planning Act was repealed in 1957 and the Local
Services Act was passed, the name was changed to Community Planning Area
Number 1, and regulations in effect were revised with the benefit of experience of
the administration in the area for 10 years. In the time that we have administered
the area, over 4,000 dwelling units have been built and the subdivision and zoning
regulations have helped shape the outside community into some semblance of order,
which otherwise would have resulted in a chaotic jumble of land uses. The community planning area has always been looked upon as a holding device rather than
a permanent institution and now, with the administration going to the Regional
District, the people living in the area have an elected voice through the Directors of
the electoral areas around the City.
Similarly, another community planning area of long standing, Community
Planning Area Number 7, around Prince George, has been taken over by the Regional District of Fraser-Fort George. In both these cases the building inspection
staff have been retained by the regional districts, ensuring that there is a good continuity of experience by qualified staff.
Community Planning Area Number 22 became incorporated into the Village
of Chase. In co-operation with the Department of Lands, subdivision proposals
were prepared for Community Planning Area Number 17 at Fort Nelson.
A new community planning area was formed last year to meet a special purpose.
There had been some concern about the rapid development of the Gulf Islands, and
the subdivision regulation was passed as a holding device which would restrict subdivisions to parcels of 10 acres or more. This will give breathing-time to the various
regional districts bordering around the islands in the Gulf of Georgia to prepare
plans and help mould orderly development.
In all the community planning areas there were 162 applications for a change in
zoning, about the same amount of activity as least year, but there was a record in
building, with $12 million more in construction than last year and 300 more dwelling
units being constructed. In Community Planning Area Number 1 (Kelowna), 100
more houses were built than last year;  in Community Planning Area Number 4
 V 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
(outside Victoria), almost 150 more houses than last year and equalling in activity
the largest municipality in the region. The community planning area around Kamloops had a similar increase.
Community Planning Areas
Dwelling
Units
Built,
1969
Dwelling
Units Built
since Areas
Established
Total Value
of All
Construction,
1969
Community Planning Area Number 1 (around Kelowna)!	
Community Planning Area Number 2 (around Vernon) 	
Community Planning Area Number 3 (View Royal) 	
Community Planning Area Number 4 (Langford-Metcbosin) _
Community Planning Area Number 6 (Nanaimo)	
Community Planning Area Number 7 (Prince George) 2	
Community Planning Area Number 8 (around Kamloops) ._
Community Planning Area Number 9 (around Quesnel)  	
Community Planning Area Number 12 (around Dawson Creek)	
Community Planning Area Number 13 (Woodhaven, near loco).	
Community Planning Area Number 14 (north of Campbell River
to south of Courtenay) 	
Community Planning Area Number 15 (around Fort St. John)	
Community Planning Area Number 16 (Sicamous)  	
Community Planning Area Number 17 (Fort Nelson)	
Community Planning Area Number 20 (Crooked River, 60 miles
north of Prince George) 2	
Community Planning Area Number 22 (Chase) 3	
Community Planning Area Number 23 (Shawnigan)  	
Community planning  areas now  part  of   a  municipality   or   a
regional district	
Totals  	
753
191
11
397
275
55
397
10
5
22
130
36
13
55
10
14
4,082
1,076
603
1,439
4,060
2,068
2,702
306
277
108
1,223
378
81
177
15
60
47
960
19,662
$15,800,730
2,344,101
237,050
5,448,055
4,720,703
1,080,152
7,431,119
1,000,387
252,860
313,762
2,389,499
1,066,118
153,285
831,400
2,000
160,339
1,590,470
178,592
$45,000,622
1 Absorbed by Central Okanagan Regional District, December 1, 1969.
2 Absorbed by Fraser-Fort George Regional District, June 1, 1969.
3 Incorporated into a village, April 22, 1969.
Don South, M.T.P.I.C,
Director, Regional Planning Division.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1969
V 41
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR, HOUSING AND
URBAN RENEWAL DIVISION
Victoria, British Columbia, January 15,1970.
/. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—During 1969, the Division, with the co-operation of municipalities,
has promoted actively the provision of public-housing for rental, the development
of land for residential purposes, and urban modernization and redevelopment.
In the field of public housing, additions of projects in Burnaby, Prince Rupert,
Vancouver, and Victoria have raised the inventory to 2,750 units completed or
under contract. Projects awaiting contract or final agreement will provide 655 more
dwellings. New proposals are being strongly supported which are anticipated to
provide 771 new units. Although the majority of the dwelling units are intended
for family occupancy, nearly 40 per cent will be available for those senior citizens
who have difficulty in finding economical accommodation.
Public Housing Projects
Municipality
Units of Accommodation
Completed     Contract      Approved     Proposed
Total
Burnaby	
Dawson Creek-
New Westminster-
Prince Rupert	
Saanich  	
Vancouver	
Victoria	
Totals-
90
50
13
1,858
84
37
434
184
341
50
60
90
114
2,011
739
655
771
771
431
50
60
134
140
3,177
184
4,176
In the year preceding, several municipalities had wished to study their physical
urban problems or had proposed works of rejuvenation and redevelopment. Changes
in Federal policy with regard to urban renewal caused suspension of outstanding
proposals. However, approval has been achieved for the renewal of areas of Delta,
Port Coquitlam, and Surrey and the special problems are being studied for a drastically revised rehabilitation programme in the Strathcona area of Vancouver.
The development of serviced residential lots through land-assembly projects is
of continued interest in some municipalities. Work in progress at Sparwood and
Ladysmith is providing 309 building lots, and preparatory work at Masset and
North Cowichan will develop a further 127 lots. As presently seen, the programme
may reach 3,722 lots, including the potential of the land-bank in the District of
North Vancouver.
Explanation of the various programmes to municipal officials, and discussions
of the ramifications of their introduction, involves considerable time and travel, but
the results of the knowledge are apparent in the broader approach being taken by
 V 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
municipalities. Regional district Boards are looking to the available aid in resolving
the problems of complex or metropolitan areas, and this co-operative attitude is
encouraging.
J. T. Williams,
Director, Housing and Urban Renewal.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1970
1,530-170-1145

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