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REPORT of the LANDS SERVICE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1969 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1970

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Hon. R. G. Williston, Minister D. Borthwick, Deputy Minister of Lands
REPORT
of the
LANDS SERVICE
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1969
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1970
  Victoria, British Columbia, February 16, 1970.
To the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C, LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor oj the Province oj British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the British Columbia Lands Service of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources for the
year ended December 31,1969.
R. G. WILLISTON,
Minister oj Lands, Forests, and Water Resources.
 Victoria, British Columbia, February 16, 1970.
The Honourable R. G. Williston,
Minister oj Lands, Forests, and Water Resources,
Victoria, British Columbia.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the British Columbia
Lands Service of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources for the
12 months ended December 31, 1969.
D. BORTHWICK,
Deputy Minister oj Lands.
 1
Roberts Bank Superport and Tsawwassen ferry terminal.   For construction detail
of superport see overleaf.
 Construction detail of Roberts Bank Superport.    Photo by Air Division, Surveys and
Mapping Branch, Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources, January, 1970.
 CONTENTS
Introduction by the Deputy Minister of Lands—
Accounting Division	
Lands Branch—
Director of Lands
Land Inspection Division
Surveys and Mapping Branch—
Surveyor-General	
Legal Surveys Division	
Topographic Division	
Geographic Division	
Air Division	
University Endowment Lands...
Personnel Office	
Page
9
. 13
Mail and File Room
21
30
43
46
52
62
68
81
87
91
COVER PHOTO
Bugaboo Glacier with Marmolata Mountain to
left, Bugaboo Alpine Recreation Area, 40 miles
south from Golden.
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Report of the British Columbia Lands Service
D. Borthwick, B.S.A., B.Ed., A.A.C.I., Deputy Minister of Lands
Title to lands not alienated to private control or administered by the Federal
or municipal governments lies in the Crown in the right of the Province of British
Columbia. British Columbia holds title to a major portion, over 90 per cent, of
its land area, and among the Provinces of Canada only Quebec has such a high
proportion of Crown land. This does not mean that Crown lands are vacant and
unused. Prospecting and mineral development take place largely on Provincial
land. Tens of thousands of head of cattle graze on it. Crown forests yield huge
volumes of wood for a billion-dollar forest industry. Extensive areas have been
set aside for parks and recreation, timber growing, municipal water supplies, and
other public purposes. Careful management of the land resources now and in the
future will assure a lasting foundation for the well-being of the people of this
Province.
During 1969, nearly two-thirds of the Lands Service revenue collections of
$4,000,000 were from Crown land leases and rentals, a reflection of the trend,
which has been evident for several years, toward lease hold alienation.
Although the number of new applications for land climbed nearly 10 per cent
in 1969, there was a slight decrease in land inspections, mainly as the result of
removing the inspection requirement for agricultural and home-site leases after
the initial three-year period of tenure. The number of inspections outstanding at
the end of the year also declined slightly.
Interest in northern lands remains strong. While less than 10 per cent of the
Provincial population lives north of the 53rd parallel, the number of land inspections processed in the Burns Lake, Fort St. John, Pouce Coupe, Prince George,
Prince Rupert, Smithers, and Vanderhoof districts accounted for 45 per cent of
the Provincial total in 1969. In view of the recent and projected extensions of
transmission-lines, pipe-lines, roads, and railways and large investments in resource-based industries in the north, the high level of interest in Crown land
should continue.
In order to pre-evaluate their potential for various uses, several large tracts
of Crown land in the vicinity of Fort Nelson, Fort St. James, Francois Lake, and
the Northern Trans-Provincial Highway east of Prince George were examined
during the year.
Under special circumstances and where conditions permit, the Crown may
assist municipalities to acquire private land for municipal purposes. The Lands
Service acts as an intermediary in a tripartite transaction where, after appraisal,
Crown lands may be exchanged for private lands, which in turn are conveyed to
the municipality. In 1969, land exchanges took place in Port McNeill, Cormorant Island (Alert Bay), and Vancouver.
The Legal Surveys, Topographic, Geographic, and Air Divisions of the
Surveys and Mapping Branch continued to extend cadastral and topographic
surveys, aerial photography, and mapping throughout the Province.
The Legal Surveys Division issued 1,137 sets of instructions for Crown land
surveys, and field-notes or survey plans were received for 918 lots surveyed under
the Land Act and 159 under the Mineral Act. Cadastral information is maintained on a day-to-day basis on 259 reference maps covering the Province.
 BB 10       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
The number of plans prepared for Land Inspectors was 2,997 in 1969, compared with an average of 2,810 annually for the previous five years.
With successful introduction of computer programme LSM 139, most Surveys and Mapping Branch programmes have been replaced by a single data-
processing system.
Field work recorded by the Legal Surveys Division included 93 waterfront
lease lots at Loon Lake in the Southern Rocky Mountain Trench, Lac la Hache
and Young Lake in the Cariboo, Powell Lake near Powell River, and on the
Similkameen River east of Princeton. Cadastral surveys covered a total of 235
rural roadside lots at Ta Ta Creek near Kimberley, three locations around Quesnel, Williams Lake, Quinsam River near Campbell River, Post Creek near Chilliwack Lake, and Ring Creek near Squamish.
A Topographic Division field crew laid out 5,500 square miles of horizontal
and vertical survey control for contour mapping east of Telegraph Creek, while
another project covering 1,200 square miles established control for a large-scale
geological mapping project in the Savona-Nicola Valley belt. At the request of
the Water Resources Service, survey control was obtained in the Taku River-Atlin
Lake region, around the junction of the Dease and Liard Rivers, and along the
Shuswap River below Sugar Lake.
On instructions from the British Columbia-Yukon-Northwest Territories
Boundary Commission, a staff surveyor completed maintenance surveys at several
locations along the 60th parallel.
For the fifth successive year, the Geographic Division set new records for
map distribution, the 1969 total being 149,421, an impressive increase of 16.5
per cent over 1968. Seven new maps were published, five reprinted with substantial revision, and five land status maps reprinted without revision to restock
supplies depleted by heavy demand.
Now that lithographed land-status mapping is virtually complete south of
55° N. latitude, work continues on expanding coverage north of the 55th
parallel.
Having arranged lease of a high-speed aircraft for two summer months, the
Air Division obtained a new record total of nearly 40,000 aerial photographs in
1969. Although poor weather severely curtailed operations in the northern
reaches of the Province, this plane demonstrated characteristics of speed, range,
altitude, and stability well beyond those of the existing operational aircraft.
Standard aerial photographic prints sold or loaned to the general public
numbered 104,362, the Federal Government used 70,426, and Provincial Government departments and agencies took 165,614. Gross distribution was 11-per-cent
higher than in 1968.
Detailed reports of the Lands Service infrastructure, including the University
Endowment Lands, Personnel Office, and Mail and File Room, may be found in
the following pages. An envelope inside the back cover contains indexes and key
maps to current air photos and maps.
 ACCOUNTING DIVISION
  ACCOUNTING DIVISION BB 13
ACCOUNTING DIVISION
M. B. MacLean, Departmental Comptroller
The Accounting Division performs the accounting function for both Lands
Service and Water Resources Service, which includes the preparation of payrolls,
vouchering of invoices and travel claims, billing of accounts receivable, expenditure
and revenue control, and compilation of statistical information.
Again our lease section showed a substantial increase in lease accounts with
13,050 as at December 31, 1969, compared to 11,826 at December 31, 1968.
Land sales on the other hand continued to decline, 844 at December, 1968, to 483
at December, 1969. This situation, i.e., increase in leases, decline in purchases,
is a result of the Department's policy of residential leases on waterfront and agricultural leasing in the Peace River with a conditional purchase option.
Three staff changes occurred during the year, two through transfers, Mr. D.
Woodward and Miss J. Graham, both to the Department of Finance, and the third
through the untimely death of Mrs. G. Gaunt after several months' illness.
Statistical Tables
Table 1.—Summary oj Lands Service Net Revenue Collections jor the
Year Ended December 31,1969
Land leases, rentals, fees, etc  $2,553,351.23
Land sales     1,251,111.88
Sale of maps and air photos        194,810.02
Net revenue collections  $3,999,273.13
Table 2.—Comparison oj Revenue Collections jor 10-year
Period 1960-69, Inclusive
1960 nwrnHM $1,714,220.41
1961 ^^h.hm 1,765,207.54
1962 wmmmmmmmmmmmm^ 1,847,457.83
1963 wmam^mm^—mmmmmmm 2,034,841.80
1964 amMmanMHi 2,587,110.34
1965 aiHaaaaiMHHHaBHaHaHHHaaBH! 2,594,341.32-
1966 wmmmmmmmBmmmammmmamm^Mmmm 3,343,672.46-
1967 MnMMHMHMi 2,985,996.61-
1968 wmmmmmmmmmmmmt^mmmmmmm^^ 3,367,912.14-
1969 m.^nnMHMHH 3,999,273.13-
i Net revenue.
 BB  14       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 3.—Classification oj Revenue Collections jor the Year Ended
December 31,1969
Land sales—
Country lands      $997,199.22
Town lots        265,577.96
Surface rights, mineral claims  12,957.15
  $1,275,734.33
Land leases, rentals, fees, etc.-—
Foreshore leases—
Booming and log storage	
  $318,566.13
Commercial (marina, etc.)  687,648.57
Oyster  14,834.22
Miscellaneous (foreshore protection, etc.)   222.00
Land leases—
Grazing and (or) agriculture  $449,141.19
Quarrying (limestone, sand and
gravel)   45,989.39
Camp-site (lodge, fishing)   11,573.09
Home-site   1,356.58
Residential  275,235.53
Miscellaneous   25,110.22
$1,021,270.92
Land-use permits	
Licences of occupation
Royalty collections
Bonus bids (lease tenders and auctions) 	
Easement collections—
Annual rentals       $1,434.88
Outright considerations     218,545.80
Fees-
Crown grant     $21,446.80
Assignment         4,875.00
Miscellaneous   (lease,   search,
etc.) 	
10,484.00
Sundry collections  (occupational rental, survey
charges, etc.) 	
Sale of maps and air photos—
Legal Division.
Geographic Division
Air Division	
Gross revenue for year	
Less refunds and taxes
Net revenue for year	
808,406.00
6,284.00
10,107.56
193,035.35
169,713.74
219,980.68
36,805.80
103,184.31
$29,549.90
66,853.72
111,421.97
2,568,788.36
207,825.59
$4,052,348.28
53,075.15
$3,999,273.13
 ACCOUNTING DIVISION
BB 15
Table 4.—Comparison of Land Leases, Rentals, Fees, Etc., Revenue for
10-year Period 1960-69, Inclusive
$842,413.17
MB 1,001,071.13
■ 933,607.66
■n 1,149,650.45
■mow 1,485,539.13
■mh 1,462,024.93-
mmmmb 1,514,749.69!
hmmmwhm 1,917,435.31-
a-M-MBMMMB-i 2,189,055.75-
■HMMMnHi 2,553.351.23!
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
i Net revenue.
Table 5.—Comparison of Land Sales Revenue for 10-year Period 1960-69,
Inclusive
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
$806,723.54
703,705.71
836,270.32
787,184.11
982,137.88
1,017,893,16-
1,692,861.14-
916,098.98!
1,024,410.931
1,251,111.88-
i Net revenue.
2 Includes sales to City of Prince George:   1966, $718,733;   1967, $107,200;   1968, $106,452;
s Includes sale to City of Vancouver, False Creek area:  $424,000.
1969, $156,240.
  LANDS BRANCH
 THE LANDS BRANCH
At the time of the Fraser River gold-rush in 1858 the demand for land in British
Columbia was greatly intensified and pre-emptions predated surveys. Within four years
254 pre-emptors had taken up more than 50,000 acres of land. To facilitate the transfer
of real estate and provide for the registration of titles, the Land Registry Act was passed
in 1860. The Government of the Province of British Columbia was now in the real-
estate business in a big way; the more than 366,000 square miles of land and water that
constitutes British Columbia was the real estate in question.
With the entrance of British Columbia into Confederation in 1871, the demand for
land quickened to a rush, and over the next thirty years the land-settler (and the promoter) succeeded the gold-miner in importance. Railroads were built and land grants
passed, cities came into being, and companies became established. Land was at the core
of all developments.
The task of land administration became very heavy and necessitated the formation
of a Department of Lands in 1908. In 1912 a Forest Branch was included in the Department of Lands. Today the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources exercises
control of more than 90 per cent of the surface of British Columbia.
How does the Lands Branch fit into the total organization of the British Columbia
Lands Service of today? The relation may be expressed briefly. The Lands Branch
has jurisdiction in matters pertaining to the disposition of Crown land, and is
charged with so administering and disposing of the land that the general welfare,
present and future, of the Province must be protected at all times.
When an individual, or group, desires to purchase or lease Crown land, the application is directed to the Director of Lands, head of the Lands Branch. His authority
governs the following matters:—
Sale, lease, and pre-emption of Crown lands for such purposes as agricultural,
industrial, commercial, and home-sites.
Preparation and issuance of Crown grants under the Land Act and the Mineral
Act.
Preparation and issuance of right-of-way easements for power, telephone, pipe
lines, etc.
Reservation of suitable Crown lands and foreshore for national defence, use
and enjoyment of the public, forestry experimentation, fisheries research
work, highways, etc.
Granting railway rights-of-way under various Statutes.
Protection of historic sites from alienation.
Reservation and conveying of Crown lands for such purposes as school-sites,
cemeteries, and fair grounds.
Leasing of land and foreshore for such varied purposes as wharf-sites, booming-
grounds, canneries, oyster and other mollusc fisheries, and for boat-houses,
quarry-sites, cattle-ranching, trappers' cabins, ship-building, and aircraft
bases.
To perform these and other functions efficiently, the Lands Branch works in close
co-operation with a great number of other agencies, such as municipal and city administrations, town-planning authorities, the British Columbia Forest Service, the Water Resources Service, the Surveys and Mapping Branch within the British Columbia Lands
Service, and all the departments in the Government of the Province, notably Highways,
Education, Attorney-General, and Agriculture.
Outside the Provincial departments there is much business transacted with Federal
departments, such as the Department of National Defence, the Veterans' Land Settlement
Act administration, the Public Works Department, and the Indian Affairs Branch of the
Department of Citizenship and Immigration.
Direct service to the people of British Columbia is the first duty of the Lands Branch
and this takes the bulk of the time of the Lands Branch personnel. Associated with this
prime duty is the important function of the maintenance of the records, which in many
cases are the only ones in British Columbia showing the correct legal status of the surface of the Province.
 —Photo by Max's Photo Studio Ltd., Kitimat.
A view of deep-sea wharf facilities being created in Kitimat Harbour by Eurocan
Pulp & Paper Co. Ltd. by dredging. Eurocan mill complex is shown in centre at top of
photograph.
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 LANDS BRANCH
BB 21
LANDS BRANCH
Walter R. Redel, B.A.Sc, P.Ag., A.A.C.I., Director of Lands
During 1969 there was a 9.7-per-cent increase in the total number of new
applications filed with the Department. Lands Branch revenue also increased
during the year to a new high record of $3,804,463. The Department's lease-
develop-purchase policy, implemented in 1965, is annually increasing the number
of leases being issued and correspondingly a larger percentage of revenue is attributable to lease rentals rather than to sale values.
Once again, most of the agricultural applications approved during the year
were in the Peace River District, the prime area of interest to new settlers. Elsewhere in the Province agricultural applications are generally confined to the needs
of established farmers and ranchers to round out holdings. It is anticipated that
the extension of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway from Fort St. John to Fort Nelson
will open up additional areas suitable for settlement in future years.
The large number of applications dealing with power transmission, oil and
gas pipe-lines, and the investigation of a proposed products pipe-line location,
indicates the manner in which resource-based industry is opening up the Province.
The Pacific Great Eastern Railway is pushing north from Fort St. John to Fort
Nelson and north from Fort St. James. In both cases extension of the rail-line is
expected to service resource-oriented industries. One extensive status dealt with
the proposed location of a transmission-line from Mica Dam to Meridian substation in the Fraser Valley. The Pacific Northern Gas Limited pipe-line between
Summit Lake, near Prince George, and Prince Rupert, was completed during the
year. This line has laterals to Fort St. James, Vanderhoof, Endako, Burns Lake,
Houston, Smithers, Terrace, and Kitimat.
The Canadian National Railways is constructing a microwave system between
Prince George and Kamloops and the Canadian Pacific Railway is expanding a
microwave network in the Okanagan Valley-Kootenay area.
Under special circumstances the Department endeavours to assist municipalities to acquire, by exchange, private lands required for municipal purposes. Both
the private and Crown lands involved in any such proposed exchange are appraised to determine market value. If the appraisal indicates the land values are
equivalent, the Crown will then accept a conveyance of the privately owned land
and subsequently issue a Crown grant under section 65 of the Land Act to the
private owner. The lands conveyed to the Crown will then be granted to the
municipality in order that such lands may be developed in the public interest.
Exchanges of this type enabled the Crown to acquire lands within the Village
of Port McNeill which will be retained for the purpose of a land assembly programme. Similarly, certain lands were acquired on Cormorant Island which will
be conveyed to the Village of Alert Bay for airport purposes. An exchange
involving Crown land on the south side of False Creek in Vancouver, for certain
city-owned lands on Burnaby Mountain, was completed and this exchange will
enable the city to replan  and develop land in the False Creek area.
In response to a continued demand for Crown lots by the general public, the
Department commenced work on 16 separate subdivisions throughout the Province
in 1969. Most of these subdivisions were to provide waterfront lots for summer
use, a number were for residential home-sites, and one subdivision was developed
for industrial purposes at Nakusp.
The Department is cognizant of the need to make available suitable Crown
land for recreational use, but it considers such developments must be laid out in
 BB 22       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
an orderly manner by survey and serviced by road wherever possible. Subdivisions for ski-cabin sites in the Garibaldi Mountain area and in the vicinity of
Purden Lake in the Prince George area are now being planned.
A number of ski-resort applications have been handled during the year; the
continuing interest of the public in ski-ing as a sport is such that ski facilities
are now available throughout all parts of the Province. Of particular interest is
the fact that the Crown, in co-operation with the Garibaldi Olympic Development
Association, has placed under reserve all Crown lands in the vicinity of Whistler
Mountain, which is the British Columbia site recommended for the 1976 Winter
Olympics.
Work was started on a subdivision of waterfront lots on Young Lake,
Summit Lake, Loon Lake, and North Barrier Lake during the year. A recreational subdivision was commenced at Post Creek near Chilliwack and home-site
subdivisions were started in areas near Williams Lake, Quesnel, and Cranbrook.
During the year, 418 reserves were established; of this number 79 were for
the use, recreation, and enjoyment of the public and the majority of the remainder
for departments of Government for various purposes. Of particular interest was
the establishment of 12 reserves for ecological sites and a number of map notations covering archaeological sites. The purpose of these reserves is to preserve
and permit study by university and Government personnel of distinctive untouched
ecological sites and to note the interest of the Provincial Museum staff in sites which
may prove to have archaeological value after study.
In 1967 the Government of the Yukon Territory requested the co-operation
of the Lands Branch in placing a reserve over the Canadian section of the Old
Chilkoot Trail, which was used by the gold-seekers of 1898. The purpose was to
perpetuate this historic route, which extends from Bennett, British Columbia, to
Skagway, Alaska. Using labour from a correctional institution, clearing was
started, shelters, cairns, and signs erected, and several bridges built during 1968.
The work was continued during the past year. The preservation of this historical
trail is a project which will be of great interest and value to hikers and recreation-
ists of British Columbia, the Yukon Territory, and Alaska when completed.
A brief summary of the activities of the various Sections of the Administration Division of the Lands Service is set out hereunder:—
Lease Section.—The number of new lease applications received increased to
5,155 from 4,453 received in 1968. This increase in application numbers,
which is continuing year by year, reflects the general demand throughout
the Province for Crown lands.
Purchase Section.—Purchase applications decreased once again over those of
the preceding year, from 484 in 1968 to 290 in 1969. The continuing
decrease in purchase applications was expected to result from the implementation of the lease-develop-purchase policy adopted in 1965. It is
expected that very shortly this downtrend will be reversed as lessees meet
the development requirements of the Department and apply for Crown
grant. This Section also processes all residential leases, of which 934
were issued in 1969.
Crown Grants.—A total of 931 Crown grants was issued in 1969 as compared
to 967 in 1968. As with the Purchase Section, there has been a decrease
in volume since the policy change in 1965, but as lessees complete development requirements and apply for Crown grant, the work of this Section
will increase. This Section also carries out clearances of reverted mineral
claims, of which there were 917, and statuses of coal licences, of which
there were 310 in 1969.
 LANDS BRANCH
BB 23
Pre-emption and Reserve Section.—A total of 32 pre-emption records was
allowed during 1969. This type of tenure has been diminishing in importance in recent years. Reserve applications totalled 562 in 1969, up from
489 in 1968; 418 reserves were established during the year. Accretion
applications, handled by this Section, totalled 25. General inquiries
regarding the availability of Crown land, also handled by this Section,
numbered 4,621 in 1969.
Clearance Section.—The number of clearances carried out by this Section decreased from 21,915 in 1968 to 18,133 in 1969. The number of acreage
and town-lot clearances decreased, while the number of time-consuming
special-status jobs increased.
Easement Section.—During 1969, 196 easements were granted, compared to
142 in 1968. The additional easements issued this year are mainly for oil
and gas pipe-lines and well-sites.
Hudson's Bay Company buildings, old Fort McLeod, north end of McLeod Lake, involved
in exchange of lands between the Crown and the Hudson's Bay Company.
 BB 24       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
GENERAL ACTIVITY
During 1969 a total of 41 parcels was tendered for lease; the acreage involved
was 6,766.4 acres and the bonus bid revenue realized was $19,038. In addition, 367
lots were offered for lease by public auction, with 292 lots being disposed of at the
time of auction, the bonus bid revenue realized therefrom being $164,701. Two
hundred and eighty-three of the lots offered were waterfront properties.
Five parcels were tendered for sale in 1969, two being disposed of for $6,510.
Of two lots offered for sale by public auction in 1969, one was sold for $18,000.
During the year, 175 town lots were sold, from which sales the Department
realized $86,294.
The following tables indicate in detail the work carried out by the various
sections of the Lands Branch in 1969.
Table 1.—Country Land Sales, 1969
Acres
Unsurveyed  71.23
Surveyed   27,893.94
Total  27,965.17
Table 2.—Certificates of Purchase Issued, 1969
Land Recording District Total
Alberni   17
Atlin   15
Burns Lake  6
Clinton  7
Cranbrook  17
Fernie  5
Fort Nelson  10
Fort St. John  66
Golden  2
Kamloops  18
Kaslo   2
Nanaimo  15
Nelson   34
New Westminster  5
Penticton  23
Pouce Coupe  23
Prince George  14
Prince Rupert  13
Quesnel  10
Revelstoke   9
Smithers  10
Vancouver  31
Vernon   3
Victoria 1  3
Williams Lake  25
Total  383
 LANDS BRANCH
BB 25
Table 3.—New Leases Issued, 1969
Land-
Agriculture 	
Hay and grazing (pasture and hay-cutting) _
Quarrying (sand, gravel, limestone, etc.)	
Home-site (section 78, Land Act)	
Residential	
Miscellaneous   (resorts,   service-stations,
camp-sites, mill-sites, etc.)	
Foreshore—
Number
594
159
19
11
934
118
Booming, log storage, log-dumping, etc.   92
Oyster and shellfish  4
Industrial (canneries, mill-sites, wharves, etc.) 8
Quarrying (sand, gravel from river beds)  2
Commercial (boat rentals, marinas, marine
service-stations, etc.) 	
Miscellaneous  (private wharves and boat-
houses, etc.) 	
Totals
60
28
Acreage
153,490.45
59,480.75
2,008.82
99.05
1,529.00
6,600.20
2,501.45
50.32
23.46
28.70
182.40
3,596.44
2,029        229,591.04
Table 4.—Temporary Tenure Leases Renewed, 1969
Number  962
Acreage  298,477.8
Number.
Acreage
Table 5.—Land-use Permits Issued, 1969
60
167.43
Number.
Acreage
Table 6.—Licences to Occupy Issued, 1969
27
496.26
Table 7.—Assignments Approved, 1969
Leases, land-use permits, licences of occupation	
974
 BB 26       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 8.—Easements Granted, 1969
Foreshore
Submarine power cable	
Submarine telephone cables-
Overhead power-lines-
Overhead telephone cables..
Pipe-lines-
Aerial tramway-
Totals...
Land
Oil and gas pipe-lines and well-sites..
Cathodic site	
Power-lines	
Telephone-pole lines	
Microwave and V.H.F. radio-sites-
Microwave-sites and power-lines-
Television satellite station	
Television transmitter-sites and power-lines..
Television antenna-site and power-line	
Television transmitter-site	
F.M. radio transmitter-site	
Radio-site and power-line	
T-bar and rope tow	
T-bar and chair-lifts	
Ski-lifts	
Ski-tow .	
Water pipe-line -
Sewer-line	
Access road	
Bridge 	
Totals-
Licence of Occupation
Radio-transmitter site_
Transmission-lines	
Totals	
Southern Okanagan Lands Project
Water-line..
Grand totals-
Number
196
Miles
0.083
4.791
0.945
0.192
0.494
0.560
784.871
Acres
0.504
32.617
8.338
1.270
3.260
0.135
25
7.065
46.124
86
610.365
4,489.704
1
0.268
0.650
46
134.440
1,294.462
5
2.982
6.004
4
9.156
7
6.142
48.071
1
0.918
2
1.561
2.636
1
1.481
4.230
1
0.920
1
0.520
1
15.894
1
0.398
4.570
2
1.690
9.063
3
3.971
34.126
1
0.424
2.600
1
0.961
2.739
1
0.240
0.440
1
0.341
2.880
-
0.034
0.300
167
765.298
5,929.883
1
0.780
2
12.405
44.840
3
12.405
45.620
1
0.103
0.747
6,022.374
In line with current Departmental policy, 98 letters of consent for the construction of access roads were
issued during the year.
Table 9.—Crown Grants Issued, 1969
Purchases (country lands)
Purchases (town lots) __
Pre-emptions
Surface rights {Mineral Act)
Public Schools Act	
Veterans' Land Settlement Act
Home-site leases	
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company
Miscellaneous 	
624
173
39
34
7
5
3
11
35
Total
Certified copies of Crown grants issued
931
6
 LANDS BRANCH
Table 10.—Crown Grants Issued for Past 10 Years
BB 27
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
Total
1,399
1,074
1,081
1,042
1,163
1,087
1,020
980
957
931
10,734
Ten-year Average, 1,073.
Table 11.—Total Area Deeded by Crown Grant, 1969
Purchases (country lands)
Pre-emptions
Surface rights (Mineral Act)
Public Schools Act	
Veterans' Land Settlement Act
Home-site leases	
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company.
Miscellaneous	
69,203.67
6,139.49
1,376.96
33.46
1,038.36
46.18
2,094.86
1,948.26
Total
81,881.24
 BB 28       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 12.—Pre-emption Records, 1969
Pre-emptions
Applications
Received
Applications
Allowed
Cancelled
Certificates
of Improvement Issued
Alberni.
Atlin	
Cranbrook
Fernie-
Fort Fraser (Burns Lake)	
Fort George (Prince George).
Fort Nelson	
Fort St. John	
Golden .—
Kamloops	
Kaslo	
Lillooet (Clinton)..
Nanaimo	
Nelson-
New Westminster—
Osoyoos (Vernon)-
Pouce Coupe	
Prince Rupert	
Quesnel	
Revelstoke	
Similkameen (Penticton)-
Smithers	
Telegraph Creek (Prince Rupert) _
Vancouver	
Vemon	
Victoria	
Williams Lake—
Totals-
3
15
1
6
13
1
47
13
32
29
14
14
1
37
Table 13.—Reserves, 1969
Applications Reserves
Received Completed
Use, recreation, and enjoyment of the public  135 79
British Columbia Department of Highways (rights-of-
way, gravel pits, bridge-sites, etc.)  122 125
Federal Government (defence purposes, wharf-sites,
etc.)        99 85
British Columbia Forest  Service   (Ranger  stations,
grazing, radio sites, reforestation, etc.)     40 19
Miscellaneous (Game Branch, water-power projects,
garbage dumps, school-sites, cemeteries, etc.)  166 110
Totals   562 418
 LANDS BRANCH
BB 29
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 BB 30       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
LAND INSPECTION DIVISION
L. D. Fraser, B.Sc.A., P.Ag., A.A.C.I., Chief
It will be noted by reference to the attached Table 3 that there was a slight
decrease from the 1968 level in the volume of new requests processed by the Division during 1969. While this decrease is only 6.4 per cent, it is nevertheless noteworthy since it is the first time in over 10 years that a decrease in the volume of
work has occurred. Although this figure remains above the 1967 level, it is only
9.3-per-cent greater than the average figure established in 1965.
Table 2 represents an analysis of inspections completed in each of the 17
Inspection Districts, as well as the yearly total outstanding at the end of each year
for the five-year period ending in 1969. Also shown is the work completed at
isolated coastal points by arrangement with the British Columbia Forest Service as
well as work done by headquarters staff. The total of 6,137 inspections completed
is down 4.5 per cent from 1968. This decline is due to delays experienced in
obtaining suitable replacements for the several vacancies which occurred during the
year in the field staff as well as a disruption in the work programme due to the
resulting transfer of certain staff members. It is significant to note that even with
these difficulties the outstanding backlog of work at year-end decreased from the
level of 1968 by 2.3 per cent to a total of 936 requests outstanding as of December
31,1969.
As had been anticipated, there was a further slight increase during the year in
the proportion of applications to lease relative to other types of inspections dealt
with. This is a continuation of the trend which began in 1965, following initiation
by the Department of the lease-develop-purchase policy. It will be noted by reference to Table 1, which shows the types of inspections completed during the year,
that of all the inspections completed, 4,603 or 75 per cent of the total fell into
these categories. This ratio stood at 73 per cent in 1968 and at only 53.4 per cent
in 1965. Applications to lease and renewal of leases other than foreshore totalled
4,209 or 68.4 per cent of all inspections completed. A policy change instituted by
the Department in 1969 makes it no longer necessary to undertake a field inspection
following the initial three-year leasehold tenure period. For this reason it is
expected that there will be a decline in 1970 in the number of examinations made
which fall in these lease categories.
As in past years, the Inspection Division examined properties and submitted
appraisal reports for many Government departments and agencies. Early in 1969
the Land Inspector located at Nelson was called on to assist the Department of
Highways to appraise land being acquired in connection with the Libby Dam
Project. Also, the Land Inspector at Quesnel was appointed as a member of the
Technical Study Team on the special sale area and served as chairman of that
group for a period of five weeks until the study was completed and the final report
submitted. In addition, properties were examined and reports submitted for the
Southern Okanagan Lands Project, Veterans' Land Act, Pacific Great Eastern
Railway, British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, British Columbia Forest
Service, Department of Social Welfare, Department of Highways, Public Utilities
Commission, and the Capital Improvement District Commission.
There was a significant decrease during the year from the 1968 level in the
number of new inspection requests received in the Peace River region. This decrease is mainly due to the previously mentioned policy change which has removed
the need to inspect areas held under lease for residential and agricultural purposes
 LANDS BRANCH BB 31
following the initial three-year term of the lease. The most pronounced decrease,
amounting to 33.9 per cent, occurred in the South Peace River area. Due to this
drop in new inspection requests received and also as a result of being able to maintain almost the same work output as in 1968, the outstanding backlog of work at
year-end in the Peace River area was at the lowest level since 1965.
Although there were slightly fewer inspections completed in 1969, there was
a very noticeable increase in the average size of the areas for which applications
were made. In the North Peace area a total of 650,000 acres of land was examined,
300,000 acres of which was involved in a land-use study made of a block of land
straddling the Alaska Highway and located approximately 10 miles south of Fort
Nelson. This study was undertaken in anticipation of a demand for land which is
expected to take place when work on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway from Fort
St. John to Fort Nelson is completed.
Due to the fact that 1969 was the third consecutive poor crop year experienced
in the Peace River region, coupled with the continued decrease in availability of
land suitable for agricultural development, it is anticipated that there will be a
slight decline in the demand for agricultural land in 1970. With improved road
conditions giving access to new recreational areas, there is an increased interest
shown in summer-home site applications, particularly in the area south of the Peace
River.
The Prince George Inspection District was increased in size slightly by the
addition early in March of a small portion of the Kamloops Inspection District
covering the McBride-Valemount area. The transfer later in the year of a small
portion of the Vanderhoof Inspection District to the Burns Lake District tended
somewhat to equalize the work load in the Prince George-Vanderhoof area and as
a result the number of new inspection requests processed during the year was
almost identical to the 1968 level. As in the previous year, the majority of land
applications were made by local residents.
A number of permanent forest reserves was established in the Prince George-
Vanderhoof area during 1969, and while the total acreage involved in these reserves
is substantial it is not felt that the effect on the inspection work load will be too
significant. In the Prince George District only 10 per cent of the inspections completed in 1969 covered areas which are now located within these permanent forest
reserves.
Three land-use surveys were undertaken in the Prince George Inspection District during the year. One area was located in the vicinity of Penny, while the other
two involved examinations of land located along Highway No. 16, from Prince
George to the Alberta border. Some work was done in the Vanderhoof District on
a land-use study to determine the agricultural potential of an area located between
Fort St. James, Grand Rapids, and Stuart and Pinchi Lakes. It is anticipated that
the study of this area will be completed early in 1970.
The extension of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway from Fort St. James to
Takla Lake will have a decided impact on the demand for land in this region. It is
expected that the demand for home-sites, as well as commercial and industrial use,
will be the most pronounced.
There has been a continued increase in interest shown in summer-home sites
in the Prince George-Vanderhoof area. Development of a 48-lot subdivision
fronting on Summit Lake was undertaken during the year and it is anticipated that
the lots which are to be provided will be available for disposition in 1970. As a
result of the establishment of the large permanent forest reserves which encompass
several major lakes within this area of the Province, it would appear that there will
 BB 32       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
be a reduction in planning and development of recreational subdivisions by the
Lands Branch.
The volume of new inspections requests processed in the Burns Lake, Smithers,
and Prince Rupert Districts during the year increased by 23.3 per cent over 1968.
The biggest change took place in the Burns Lake and Prince Rupert Inspection
Districts, while the work load in the Smithers District was almost identical to the
1968 level. A slight decline in the total work load toward the 1968 level is predicted
for this area of the Province in 1970.
A land-use study was made of a large area of approximately 19,500 acres of
land located within the Nadina Valley west of Francois Lake in the Burns Lake
District. This area is an important winter range for moose and the study was
undertaken to determine the highest and best use of the land following a request
from the Fish and Wildlife Branch for a multi-use reserve covering this key area.
A proposal made in 1968 to subdivide a parcel of Crown land situated in the
Hudson Bay Prairie area of Hudson Bay Mountain, located in the Smithers Inspection District, has been further delayed due to the existence of mineral claims. There
are now 27 ski cabins, a ski lodge, two television repeaters, and two ski tows located
in the area, but to date the ski club has not been able to obtain quitclaims from the
holders of the conflicting mineral claims. The territorial claims made by the Kitwan-
cool Indians have not as yet been resolved and continue to complicate the processing of applications located in Ranger District No. 5.
Highway No. 16 is rapidly approaching completion as a paved highway between
Prince George and Prince Rupert and, by 1971, Prince Rupert, Terrace, and Kitimat should be linked by pavement with the rest of the Interior. The construction
of a bridge over the Nass River in the vicinity of Meziadin Lake, as well as the
construction of the remaining few miles of road, will make Stewart and Cassiar
accessible from Highway No. 16. With these improvements in road access it is
anticipated that there will be a significant increase in the Prince Rupert Inspection
District during the next few years in applications for residential, commercial, and
industrial purposes.
A large dredging operation in Kitimat Harbour, undertaken mainly to provide
deep-sea wharf facilities for the new pulp-mill developed by Eurocan Pulp & Paper
Co. Ltd., has been completed. This is the first stage of a project designed to triple
the deep-sea berth capacity of Kitimat Harbour.   (See photo on page 19.)
Compared to the 1968 level, there was a marked decrease of 37.8 per cent in
the number of new land applications received in the Quesnel Inspection District.
This is largely due to the inhibiting influence of the special sale area requirements
as well as the establishment during the year of several large permanent forest reserves
which cover a major portion of the Inspection District. Due to these factors, there
will be much reduced activity in land applications in the Quesnel area during 1970,
but in view of the method of dealing with applications for agricultural land located
within the special sale area, it will be necessary to spend much more time completing
each inspection.
In the Central Southern Cariboo area, which takes in the Williams Lake and
Clinton Land Inspection Districts, the demand for lakefront lots is much in excess
of the supply. Applications for summer-home site use showed a marked increase
over the 1968 level, although the total of all new inspection requests covering all
types of applications decreased by 11.3 per cent. In the Clinton District, a total
of 125 lakefront residential sites was alienated by way of public auction. Competitive bidding for the right to acquire these summer-home sites on a leasehold
basis was strong and, in total, $119,475 in bonus bids were paid. It is interesting
to note that 83 per cent of the successful bidders were Lower Mainland residents,
 LANDS BRANCH BB 33
11 per cent were residents of the Cariboo area, and only 6 per cent gave addresses
indicating residence in the United States. There is a continued strong demand also
for permanent-home sites throughout this portion of the Cariboo. This demand is
expected to increase along with further growth in the population of the area.
Inspection requests received in the Kamloops Land Inspection District were
down substantially from the high record established in 1968 to a figure approximating the five-year average for the district. This reduction is chiefly due to the boundary change which involved a transfer of a portion of the district to the Prince George
Inspection District. The historical conflict which has existed between ranchers and
all outside interests continues to present the greatest problem in land alienation in
the Central Interior. This conflict has recently been vividly illustrated in the Highland Valley area of the Kamloops District, where applications covering large areas
of grazing land have been submitted by mining operations. Frequently the areas
most in demand for mining, home-site, and other industrial use cover valley bottoms and open slopes which are usually of the greatest value to the rancher for
grazing.
The work load in the Kelowna District remained static during the past year,
but at a level well above the five-year average. Applications to fill foreshore, as
well as applications made under section 102 (2) of the Land Registry Act to obtain
accreted lands, remained at a high level. In recent years, interest in these two
categories has been stimulated by new health regulations which have made certain
older lakefront lots unsuitable for residential development due to inadequate size
as well as by a desire to legalize areas previously filled and occupied in trespass.
A noticeable increase in land values, which became evident in 1968, continued
throughout the Kootenays. As a result of the rapid growth in population which is
taking place in this portion of the Province, particularly in the East Kootenays, it
can be expected that there will be a greatly increased demand for land in the residential and smallholding categories during 1970. Of the inspections completed
during the past year, 28 per cent were the result of applications made for permanent-
or summer-home site use.
In the two Lower Mainland Inspection Districts, the total work load decreased
by 9 per cent. The types of examinations completed do not indicate any particular
trend or development, but with the continued population growth in this region of
the Province the demand for permanent- and summer-home sites is expected to
remain at a high level. Of the total inspections completed during the year in the
Vancouver and New Westminster Land Inspection Districts, 34 per cent fell in
these two categories. The areas receiving the greatest attention for these home-site
uses are the Sechelt Peninsula, as well as the Nelson and Bowen Island areas of the
Vancouver District, and the Harrison Lake area of the New Westminster District.
A portion of the Vancouver District covering Cortes and Read Islands was
transferred to the Courtenay Land Inspection District early in the year. Even with
this addition, the number of new requests received in the Courtenay District decreased by 23.8 per cent from the 1968 level. As has been the pattern in previous
years, the large majority of inspections completed were inspections of foreshore
areas. Applications for permanent- and summer-home site use also remain at a
high level. Development on the north end of the Island is continuing, and further
expansion of the work load in this area is anticipated. Two of the main developments which took place during the year were commencement of construction of the
cedar mill at Tahsis and the announced plan for development of the copper mine
on Rupert Inlet near Port Hardy.
 BB 34       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Wharf approach and mooring-float on foreshore lease, Gowlland Harbour, Quadra Island.
A 90.6-per-cent increase in work load over 1968 was experienced in the
Victoria Land Inspection District. This increase in volume is chiefly due to an
unusually large number of requests received for review of a block of summer-home
site leases located on Valdes Island, and is not an indication of any significant trend
or development taking place within the district.
TRAINING
As a result of resignations and promotions, there are now only five Land
Inspectors, together with the Chief and Assistant Chief Land Inspectors, who are
accredited as appraisers with the Appraisal Institute of Canada.
Ten Land Inspectors and eight Deputy Land Inspectors have successfully
completed the required course material in the Appraisal Education programme and
most of these people are now actively engaged in finalizing the necessary demonstration appraisal reports required to meet accreditation standards. The three Land
Inspectors taken on staff in July are now enrolled in the new Appraisal I course
which began in 1969 and which became a two-part course consisting of the old
 LANDS BRANCH BB 35
Appraisal I material, plus an economics section designed to provide an introduction
to principles of economics. One Land Inspector, in addition to the Chief Land
Inspector, has responded to an appeal made by the Appraisal Institute to obtain
further professional advancement and has enrolled in the background course in
economics. Accredited members who successfully complete this course will be
issued with a certificate of completion. Two Land Inspectors and three Deputy
Land Inspectors are studying on their own with a view to rewriting final appraisal
examinations in the spring.
Two Land Inspectors have completed the three-year Public Administration
Course. One Land Inspector is enrolled in the first year of this course, while one
other Land Inspector and the Assistant Chief Land Inspector are now in the second
year of the course.
Annual zone meetings were again held in March at Kamloops, Prince George,
and Fort St. John.
STAFF CHANGES
The work programme during the year was complicated by several changes in
the location and employment of staff, and was climaxed in mid-December by the
tragic and untimely death of Mr. R. L. Cawston as a result of a hunting accident.
Mr. Cawston had served with the Forest Service for a number of years prior to
joining the Inspection Division on August 16, 1965. His death is not only a great
loss to the Department but to the Service in general.
Mr. G. A. Rhoades, former Land Inspector, Victoria, was promoted to the
position of Administrative Assistant, Land Administration, effective May 1, 1969.
The following resignations occurred for the reasons noted: Mr. J. R. Nijhoff,
April 1, 1969 (employed with Department of Highways, Victoria); Mr. D. M.
Thom, April 15, 1969 (employed with a private appraisal firm, Vancouver); Mr.
L. R. Paynton, May 23, 1969 (to manage his own business in Burns Lake).
These vacancies resulted in a number of transfers and promotions: Mr. J. A.
Esler from Williams Lake to Victoria, in charge, May 12, 1969; Mr. F. G. Edgell
from Smithers to Williams Lake to become Land Officer 3, in charge, August 1,
1969; Mr. L. M. Warner from Prince Rupert to Smithers, in charge, September 1,
1969; Mr. J. P. Egan from Fort St. John to Prince Rupert to become Acting Land
Officer 2, in charge, effective August 18, 1969; Mr. D. E. Jaffray from Kamloops
to Vanderhoof to become Acting Land Officer 2, in charge, effective June 1, 1969;
Mr. R. Gilmour from Kelowna to Vancouver to become Land Officer 4, in charge,
effective July 1, 1969; Mr. G. Huva from Quesnel to Kelowna, in charge, effective
August 1, 1969; Mr. R. A. Cullis from Williams Lake to Quesnel to become Acting
Land Officer 2, in charge, effective August 1, 1969; Mr. T. J. Todd from Prince
George to Burns Lake to become Acting Land Officer 2, in charge, effective August
1, 1969.
As a result of the aforementioned three resignations, the following personnel
were taken on staff on July 1, 1969: Mr. L. A. Gosselin, Land Officer 1, Kamloops;
Mr. D. M. Sayers, Land Officer 1, Williams Lake; Mr. D. B. Lymburner, Land
Officer 1, Prince George.
As of December 31, 1969, there were two vacancies on staff—one being a
Technical Land Officer position and the other a Land Officer position. A full staff
complement is 21 Land Officers and 12 Technical Land Officers, in addition to the
Chief and Assistant Chief Land Inspectors.
STATISTICS
Table 1 represents a summary of the number and type of inspections completed in the Province by this Division during 1969.   Table 2 represents a com-
 BB 36       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
parison on a year-to-year basis of the volume of field work completed and requests
outstanding at the end of each year for the period 1965 to 1969, inclusive.
Table 3 represents an analysis of requests for inspections processed by this
Division for the years 1965 to 1969, inclusive.
Table 1.—Types of Inspections, 1969
Purchases—
Agriculture (other than grazing)   80
Access (roads, etc.)   13
Commercial (resorts, service-stations, hotels, airfields, etc.)____ 26
Community (cemeteries, church sites, parking areas, etc.)  9
Grazing (pasture, range)   15
Home-sites (permanent)   96
Industrial (mill-sites, power-sites, manufacturing plants, etc.) 60
Summer home or camp-site  6
Woodlots or tree-farms  1
Others   3
Leases—
Land—
Agriculture (other than grazing)   1,000
Commercial (resorts, service-stations, hotels, airfields,
etc.)   123
Community (parks, cemeteries, dump-sites, etc.)  31
Fur-farming   2
Grazing (pasture, range, hay-cutting, etc.)   242
Home-sites (section 78 of the Land Act)   8
Home-sites (permanent, other than section 78 of the
Land Act)   435
Industrial (mill-sites, power-sites, manufacturing plants,
etc.)   31
Summer home or camp-site  644
Quarrying (sand, gravel, limestone)  45
Reviews (rental and (or) diligent use)  1,643
Others   5
Foreshore—
Booming and log storage or log-dumping  107
Commercial   (boat   rentals,   marine   service-stations,
wharves, etc.)   71
Industrial (mill-sites, canneries, factory-sites, wharves,
etc.)   15
Quarrying (sand and gravel from river beds)  3
Oyster and shellfish  13
Private (floats, boathouses)   6
Reviews (rentals and (or) diligent use)   175
Others   4
Land-use permits  75
Licence of occupation  29
Easements and (or) rights-of-way  11
Pre-emptions—
Applications   13
Annual inspections (including applications for Crown grant)__ 150
 LANDS BRANCH BB 37
Table 1.—Types of Inspections, 1969—Continued
Subdivisions—
Valuations   29
Survey inspection  3
Plans cancellation  2
Proposals (lakeshore, residential, etc.)   27
Others   2
Reserves—
Grazing   3
Gravel pits  2
Recreational   67
Others   8
Veterans' Land Act  2
Doukhobor lands  3
Southern Okanagan Lands Project  5
Pacific Great Eastern Railway  3
Department of Social Welfare  1
Other agencies—
British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority  8
British Columbia Forest Service  1
Public Utilities Commission  3
Department of Highways  1
Capital Improvement District Commission  1
Miscellaneous inspections—
Assignments   36
Delinquent accounts  18
Escheats Act  1
Lake reconnaissance  45
Land-use surveys  11
Land revaluations of special nature  73
Protests  40
Section 53 (2), Land Act (verifying improvements)  350
Section 65, Land Act (free grants)   1
Section 78, Land Act (re compliance with provisions of)  27
Section 131b, Land Act (cases of doubt regarding inclusion
of body of water in Crown grant)   9
Trespass (land)   28
Trespass (water)   56
Quieting Titles Act  5
Section 102 (2), Land Registry Act  17
Others   59
Total  6,137
 BB 38       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 2.—Analysis of Inspections Completed and Inspections Outstanding at
Year-end for the Years 1965 to 1969, Inclusive
Examinations Made during—
Outstanding at End of—
Land Inspection
District
1965
1966        1967
1968
1969
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
'111
136    1     318    1     173          171          190
1               1
151            27           32
8
56
Clinton -	
235          226
266
271
462
35
40
64
212
89
Courtenay	
293
303
274
353
325
32
15
36
61
24
Fort St. John 	
582
1,129
1,066
1,039
858
230
146
180
162
157
Kamloops	
482
515
423
530
428
50
72
52
60
58
Kelowna	
201
185
216
275
267
26
15
39
43
59
Nelson  .
278
307
250
324
369
63
37
45
16
9
New Westminster	
242
274
245
247
303
61
34
7
49
23
Pouce Coupe	
454
609
610
607
513
121
92
45
67
27
551
423
433
387
406
52
68
27
52
74
67    1     194
180
165
146
85
34
38
26
74
Quesnel	
173
191
241
266
185
51
38
33
32
14
Smithers	
317
351
212
272
244
178
14
23
25
57
Vancouver	
250
233
259
353
263
30
57
31
33
58
Vanderhoof	
236
330
327
401
341
35
49
40
35
61
Victoria 	
156
156
189
137
252
32
46
4
16
48
530
415
492
620
567
33
38
74
48
41
13
13
28
1
2
70
20
36
9
16
16
14
11
13
7
Totals	
5,266
6,192
5,920
6,428
6,137
1,281
836
781
958
936
Note.—These figures include pre-emptions.
Table 3.—Analysis of Requests for Inspection Processed by Land Inspection
Division for Years 1965 to 1969, Inclusive
New Requests Received during—
Per Cent
Per Cent
.
1969 over
1969 over
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1968
1965
287
194
180
147
238
+61.9
19.1
17.1
241
230
290
419
339
+40.7
1.4
292
286
295
378
288
23.8
Fort St. John   	
708
929
986
924
840
—9.1
+ 18.6
6.8
457
532
402
537
426
20 7
190
173
239
279
283
+1.4
+22.7
+4.1
—33.9
-1-4.5
+26.8
+48.9
+ 16.0
+3.7
— 16.4
9 4
312
281
258
295
362
267
450
457
246
506
426
241
508
375
266
569
396
277
376
414
108
143
184
153
194
+79.6
0.6
162
172
222
259
161
37.8
Smithers  	
366
187
221
274
276
+0.7
—24.6
Vancouver	
256
260
233
355
288
-18.9
+ 12.5
Vanderhoof ,   	
168
320
307
386
354
-8.3
+ 110.7
Victoria _    	
172
170
147
149
284
+90.6
+65.1
503
13
57
420
13
27
524
28
36
591
1
11
557
2
18
-5.8
+100.0
+63.6
+10.7
— 84.6
-68.4
Totals _   	
5,466
5,515
5.676
6.38Q
5,977
Average change for 1969 over 1968 for Province is —6.4 per cent.
Average change foi
1969 ov<
r 1965 fc
r Provina
: is -1-9.3
per cen
t.
 -
SURVEYS AND MAPPING
BRANCH
 THE   SURVEYS   AND   MAPPING   BRANCH
The framework of maps and surveys so necessary for the orderly development and
settlement of British Columbia is provided through the Surveys and Mapping Branch.
That such scientific foundations were necessary even in the earliest days is shown by the
fact that in 1851 the position of Colonial Surveyor for the young Crown Colony of
Vancouver Island was created. In more than 100 years which have passed since Joseph
Despard Pemberton was appointed first Surveyor-General, British Columbia has expanded
immensely in all spheres of human endeavour. Much of the foundation for the way of
life we have in British Columbia today rests on the reliability of our basic surveys. As
British Columbia has progressed through time, so the surveys and maps of the Province
have increased in magnitude and complexity.
It is the responsibility of the Surveys and Mapping Branch, through the Boundary
Commissioner, to establish and maintain co-operatively the boundaries between this
Province and the other adjacent Provinces and Territories of Canada. Within the Province, the Branch has established and is ever extending a basic network of triangulation
surveys which are fundamental to determining geographical locations and co-ordinating
property boundaries. The surveying procedures vary according to the intended purposes.
Topographic surveys are constantly improving the portrayal of various physical features.
Cadastral (legal) surveys, on the other hand, delineate the parcels of Crown lands subject
to alienation under the Land Act. Finally, it is necessary to show on published maps the
combined survey effort in order to give a visual account of the position of land alienation
and geographic features of British Columbia. Maps must satisfy a wide-range of uses,
whether it be by the sportsman searching for an untapped valley or virgin lake, the homesteader seeking unsettled lands, or the industrialist planning new ways and new places to
develop the resources of this Province.
So much for the uses of maps and surveys and their necessity. Also interesting is the
great variety of techniques and equipment which must support our complex surveying and
mapping organization. This includes photography from aircraft using precise cameras
calibrated to less than a thousandth of an inch, modern optical surveyors' theodolites
which read directly to seconds of arc, other instruments such as the tellurometer (a
distance-measuring device which operates on a principal similar to radar), and plotting
devices which are capable of precise mapping directly from aerial photographs. Helicopters and other aircraft speed surveyors to the remotest locations. Surveying is also
expanding into the realm of electronic computers which can process the contents of field-
notes in seconds compared with hours by manual methods. In all these ways, the science
of surveying and mapping continues to serve the people by keeping pace with their needs
and with the continual technological advances of our age.
The following is a brief summary of the functions of the various divisions of the
Surveys and Mapping Branch:—
/. Administration.—General co-ordination of the four divisions of the Branch, being
Legal Surveys, Geographic, Topographic, and Air; delineation and maintenance of
boundaries under the Provincial Boundary Commissioner—namely, (a) Alberta-British
Columbia Boundary and (b) British Columbia-Yukon-Northwest Territories Boundary;
interdepartmental and intergovernmental liaison.
//. Legal Surveys Division.—Regulations for surveys under the various Provincial
Acts, such as Land, Land Registry, Mineral, Petroleum and Natural Gas; instructions to
British Columbia land surveyors regarding surveys of Crown lands and subsequent check
of field-notes and plans of same; preparation and custody of official plans; preparation
and maintenance of Departmental reference maps, mineral reference maps, and composite
(cadastral) maps; processing for status of all applications concerning Crown lands; field
surveys of Crown lands, highway rights-of-way, etc.; preparation of legal descriptions;
operation of blue-print and photostat sections; computational scrutiny of certain land
registry subdivision plans; inspection surveys; restoration surveys.
///. Geographic Division.—Map compilation, drawing and negative engraving, editing, and reproduction; map checking, distribution, geographical naming—Gazetteer of
British Columbia; field and culture surveys for preparation of land bulletins and maps;
preparation of legal descriptions for and delineation of administrative boundaries; compilation and distribution of annual Lands Service Report; trigonometric computation and
recording of geographic co-ordinates; general liaison between this Department and Federal and other mapping agencies on exchange of survey and mapping data; checking well-
site survey plans under the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act.
IV. Topographic Division.—Propagation of field survey control—namely, triangulation, traverses, and photo-topographic control; operation of Otter float-plane; helicopters
on charter; compilation and fair drawing of manuscripts for standard topographic mapping; special field control for composite and photogrammetric mapping and other special
projects; precise mapping from aerial photographs through the use of the most modern
plotting-machines.
V. Air Division.—Aerial photographic operations involving maintenance and operation of two aircraft; photographic processing, air-photo distribution, and Provincial airphoto library; compilation of interim base maps, primarily for the forest inventory;
air-photo control propagation; instrument-shop for the repair, maintenance, and development of technical equipment.
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 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
BB 43
SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
A. H. Ralfs, B.C.L.S., D.L.S., Director, Surveyor-General,
and Boundaries Commissioner
Because portions of the northern boundary of the Province had not been
re-examined or maintained since their original demarcation in the middle and late
1940's and a short segment had not been retraced for more than 60 years, the British
Columbia-Yukon-Northwest Territories Boundary Commission decided to make a
maintenance survey of the boundary line in 1969. A. F. Swannell, B.C.L.S., was
loaned by the Topographic Division to carry out instructions issued by the Commission. In brief, these were to supervise defoliant spraying of approximately 160
miles of boundary line; clear the vista and restore monuments on either side of road
and railway crossings; retrace the boundary between Monuments 120 and 132
originally demarcated by J. N. Wallace in 1908; and finally to investigate an
apparent anomaly between Monument 600 and Monument 1, where the Liard
River flows across the 60th parallel into the Northwest Territories.
Although the field crew experienced considerable difficulty with poor visibility,
rain, and snow in August on the retracement survey, all aspects of the assignment
were concluded successfully. After checking several courses and angles and line
brushing at the Liard River crossing, the crew re-opened the boundary vista and
checked, restored, and in two cases, replaced monuments at boundary crossings on
the Alaska Highway, and the Cassiar, Atlin, and Haines Roads. The skyline at
Bennett Lake railway crossing was found to be adequately clear without reslashing.
While retracing Wallace's section in the rugged mountains between Mount Nevin
and the Blanshard River, Swannell recovered a well-preserved picket marker which
had been placed on the line more than six decades earlier.
A ground check confirmed that the spray defoliant, Tordan 101, dropped at
low level by helicopter on the relatively inaccessible sections of the line, had been
placed very accurately. This particular spray, while it will kill woody growth, is
non-toxic to birds, animals, fish, and grass.
During 1969 the general purpose computer programme LSM 139 was developed to the stage where it replaces all the previous Surveys and Mapping Branch
programmes, except for LTC116 (reduction of geodimeter measurements), and
aerotriangulation strip and block adjustments used by the Photogrammetric Section.
The LTC 116 programme probably will be integrated into the LSM 139 system
during 1970. Several improvements in data handling have been effected. For
example, under the former " Cosmos " and " Bride " programmes and level network
adjustment programme LTC 122, it had been necessary to manually pre-sort information on the punch-card data sheets. Data may now be presented in any order and
the sorting is done automatically by the LSM 139.
Besides being used by all Divisions of the Surveys and Mapping Branch the
LSM 139 programme has been adopted by the Water Resources Service, the Engineering Services Division of the Forest Service, and the Department of Highways.
The reproduction section of Legal Surveys Division continued to serve the needs
of the Surveys and Mapping Branch and several other departments for diazo prints,
Xerox copying, and photographic and multilith reproductions. In its first full year
of operation, the 105-mm. camera proved to be so versatile, and demands for its
services so great, that during November and December it was operated for 16 hours
a day. The camera has been invaluable for making miniaturized archival copies of
 BB 44       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
plans, diagrams, and maps.   It has also demonstrated an ability to make extremely
accurate reductions or enlargements for map-compilation purposes.
During the year, the Air and Topographic Divisions of the Branch experimented
with new methods of mapping in an attempt to discover an alternative to the slotted-
template laydown. A programmed analytical approach was tested, but so far has
not proved satisfactory.
The Branch also has been following progress in the development of the new
orthophoto method of mapping, which holds considerable promise of useful application in this Province. The end map-sheet product would be an air-photo mosaic
completely rectified to the required map scale, on which would be superimposed
contours, roads, lot structure, and any other desired element of culture. Orthophoto
maps obviously would be of tremendous value and offer a wealth of information to
all resource fields of interest such as forest inventory, highway location, traffic engineering, mining and geology, water investigation, land inspection, regional planning,
and many others. While sophisticated equipment to make such maps is on the
market, all involve a photographic scanning process which, in the rougher terrain of
British Columbia, would take much longer per photographic overlap than it would
in flatter areas. A new analytical procedure is currently being developed which is
expected to very much speed up the process so that it becomes economically acceptable.
A large-scale mapping project completed during the past year mapped an area
of 27,700 acres in the Kootenay River Valley. Sixty-three topographic map-sheets
compiled at a scale of 1 inch to 200 feet, with a 5-foot contour interval, covered the
area from the International Boundary north to the Bull River. The mapping, which
represents the area in British Columbia required for the Libby Reservoir, was
initiated by a request from the Water Resources Service to comply with the terms of
an agreement of the Columbia River Treaty. The addition of the cadastral surveys
plotted from field-notes and field-survey ties extended the use of the mapping from
engineering requirements to land statusing. The townsite of Wardner, at the northern end of the reservoir, was mapped at 1 inch to 100 feet, with a contour interval
of 2 feet to facilitate detailed study of the area. Copies of this mapping have been
supplied for use by all Government departments engaged in the preparation of the
Libby Reservoir.
Lithographed maps distributed to other departments and the public increased
for the fifth consecutive year to reach a total of slightly under 150,000 sheets. The
value of accurate, up-to-date maps may best be reflected through the importance
attached to them by those directly concerned with resources development and administration and by the public at large. Whether their purpose is to locate an industrial
plant or just to show a fishing lake in the mountains, maps must inspire confidence
and trust in the users. Approximately 80 per cent of all lithographed maps produced
by the Surveys and Mapping Branch are distributed to the general public, the other
20 per cent are taken by Government departments. External uses and benefits,
therefore, are substantial.
The 259 departmental reference maps provide a current visual record of applications, surveys, and alienation under the Land Act and Forest Act. On the Lower
Mainland and south-eastern Vancouver Island, where the population density is high
and cadastral and status details are complex, reference maps are printed at 4 inches
to 1 mile or 2 inches to 1 mile scale. Most other settled parts of the Province are
covered at 1 inch to 1 mile, except the lightly populated northern quarter, where
mapping at 1 inch to 2 miles scale is still usually adequate.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
BB 45
Besides the reference map series, which covers the whole Province, the Surveys
and Mapping Branch maintains more than 400 large-scale composite sheets for
selected areas, mainly around population centres. The composite map series shows
the cadastral system or lot structure and includes all subdivisions made under the
Land Registry Act. They are of tremendous importance to many Government departments and the public, but in the past year or two, with the advent of the regional
district concept, they constitute one of the first tools required by the aforesaid districts. At this time, Surveys and Mapping Branch is busy correlating all of the
activity in this special field of mapping to ensure that there is no duplication of effort
and expense by various Government departments, private mapping concerns, regional districts, and municipalities which are each involved in making or acquiring
these maps.
 BB 46       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
LEGAL SURVEYS DIVISION
D. Pearmain, Chief
The Legal Surveys Division, under the direction of the Surveyor-General, is
responsible for cadastral surveys of all Crown lands of the Province. This entails
the issuing of instructions to the land surveyors engaged to make each survey and
supplying them with copies of field-notes and plans of adjoining or adjacent surveys.
After the completion of the survey, the returns are forwarded to this office for
examination and acceptance. In these returns are all right-of-way surveys, including
those for highways, railways, and transmission-lines. This year, 1,137 sets of the
above instructions were issued, as against 1,195 during 1968.
During the year, 583 sets of field-notes or survey plans covering the survey
of 1,077 lots were received in this office and duly indexed and checked. Of these
surveys, 918 were made under the Land Act and 159 under the Mineral Act. At
the present time there are approximately 101,598 sets of field-notes on record in
our vaults.
There were 459 plans received from land surveyors covering subdivisions
and rights-of-way surveys which were made under the Land Registry Act. These
plans were duly indexed and checked, and certified copies deposited in the respective Land Registry Office.
In order that a graphic record may be kept of alienations of both surveyed
and unsurveyed Crown lands together with all reserves, a set of 259 reference maps
covering the whole of the Province must be maintained. These show all cadastral
surveys which are on file in the Department, and are kept up to date by new
information as it accrues from day to day. Prints are available to the public.
(See Indexes 1 to 7 in the envelope attached to the back cover of this Annual
Report.)
All applications to purchase or lease Crown lands on foreshore which are
received by the Lands Branch and all applications to purchase Crown timber received by the Forest Service are channelled through this Division for clearance.
The orderly processing of these applications requires that an exhaustive status be
made from the reference maps, official plans, and Land Registry Office plans.
From the reference maps, together with other information and facilities maintained
by this Division, it is possible to give an up-to-the-minute status of any parcel of
Crown land in the Province.
This Division co-operates with the other departments of Government by preparing and checking legal descriptions which they require. Those assisted in this
way were the Attorney-General's Department (descriptions of Small Debts Courts),
the Department of Agriculture (descriptions of disease-free areas and pound districts), the Forest Service (descriptions of tree-farm licences and working circles),
and the Lands Branch (descriptions for gazetted reserves, etc.). During the year
589 of the above descriptions were prepared and checked.
REPRODUCTION SECTION
The Legal Surveys Division, through this section, continues to supply a service
to all departments of Government and to the public, as well as supplying all prints
and photostats, etc., required by the Surveys and Mapping Branch. The total
number of diazo prints made during the year was 429,047, in the preparation of
which 306,532 yards or 174 miles of paper and linen were used, plus 75,000 mis-
 r
SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH BB 47
cellaneous sized, cut sheets.   The number of photographic reproductions made was
48,991. The number of Xerox copies made was 301,096.
Of the 429,047 diazo prints made, 53,889 were for the Surveys and Mapping
Branch, 79,415 for other branches of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water
Resources, 277,889 for other departments of Government, and 17,794 for the
public. Likewise, of the 48,991 photographic reproductions made, 9,634 were
for the Surveys and Mapping Branch, 10,101 for other branches of the Department,
29,248 for other departments of Government, and 8 for the public.
The multilith machine turned out 1,469,147 copies during the year.
The 105-mm. camera has turned out a tremendous amount of work during
the year. The miniaturization programmes of the Department of Highways and the
Department of Public Works are proceeding most satisfactorily. During the last
two months of the year, a night shift has been doing archival work for the Department of Highways.
COMPOSITE MAP SECTION
This Section is responsible for the compilation and fair drawing of composite
maps, mostly on a scale of 500 feet to 1 inch, of the more densely subdivided areas
of the Province, and especially where they occur in unorganized territory. (See
Index 3 inside back cover.)
During the year, 134 composite map-sheets were completed. These covered
areas requested by the Chief Land Inspector and the Surveyor of Taxes; also 22
reference maps were recompiled and redrawn during the year.
LAND EXAMINATION PLANS SECTION
This Section is responsible for the preparation of plans for the use of the Land
Inspectors in their examination of applications for Crown lands. These plans are a
consolidation of all the information available in this Department and pertinent to
the applications requiring inspection. A synopsis of the work accomplished by this
Section during the past six years is as follows:—
Plans Plans
Year Prepared Year Prepared
1964 2,827      1967   2,753
1965 2,212      1968 3,450
1966 2,808      1969 2,997
LAND REGISTRY OFFICE PLAN CHECKING SECTION
This Section supplies a service to the Land Registry Offices at Victoria, Vancouver, Kamloops, Nelson, Prince George, and Prince Rupert by giving a thorough
and complete mathematical check to plans tendered for deposit in the said offices.
This mathematical check is accomplished through the use of the electronic computer which is available to this Division.
During the year, 3,340 plans received this check as compared to 3,182 in
1968, 2,649 in 1967, 2,463 in 1966, and 2,436 in 1965.
GENERAL
The receiving and distribution of survey-posts, which are stored at 859 Devonshire Road, has operated smoothly and efficiently. The following synopsis shows
the quantities of posts shipped during the past year and to whom:—
 BB 48       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Standard
Pipe
Driveable
Pipe
Standard
Rock
B.C.L.S.
Bars
Driveable
Pin
Post
Caps
Anchor
Plates
2'/i-inch
Bar
Purchased by private
surveyors from headquarters  —
Supplied to Departmental surveyors	
Shipped to Government
35
70
35
18
213
57
392
1,250
100
289
890
4,254
1,065
288
7,554
6
230
147
33
300
Totals	
105
53
662
1,350
5,433
8,907
236
480
Summary of Office Work for the Years 1968 and 1969,
Legal Surveys Division
Number of field books received
„ lots surveyed	
„ surveys examined	
„        lots gazetted	
„ lots cancelled	
„ lots amended	
mineral-claim field books prepared
reference maps compiled or renewed
applications for purchase cleared	
applications for pre-emption cleared
applications for lease cleared	
timber sales cleared	
Crown-grant applications cleared	
cancellations made	
inquiries cleared	
letters received and dealt with	
land-examination plans	
Crown-grant and lease tracings made
photostats made	
diazo prints made	
offset prints made  1,
Xerox copies made	
1968
573
894
691
792
71
245
11
54
809
31
7,272
3,154
942
2,807
1,215
7,009
3,450
8,160
20,688
409,472
017,309
299,400
1969
583
1,077
541
724
20
308
136
22
576
13
7,301
3,047
934
600
1,152
6,378
2,997
6,466
48,991
429,047
1,469,147
301,096
Data Bank for Control Surveys
Control survey records are currently maintained by the Trigonometric Control
Section in a card index file. During 1969 a sub-programme was added to the
LSM 139 system which automatically prints the cards for the card index file after
the required data have been submitted in written form and key punched, or after
the data have been computed from preceding LSM 139 operations. At the present
time, when requests for control survey information are received from the public or
from other Government departments, a manual search of the card index is made and
Xerox copies of the required cards are made for distribution. The printed cards
make superior originals for copying compared with the manually written cards
of the past.
It was also intended that all this data should be stored on magnetic tape to
form a data bank for control surveys which could be searched for survey information in a specified area and with specified characteristics to meet the requirements
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH BB 49
of particular survey projects.   It was intended that any of the following steps could
follow as a result of a search:—
(1) A printout of the survey control stations meeting the specifications with
their co-ordinates, descriptive remarks, and rays to observed stations.
This would make Xerox copies of the card index cards unnecessary.
(2) Cards be punched with the station co-ordinates in a form suitable for
input to programme LSM 139.
(3) A plot be made of the stations to any specified scale.
Good progress has been made in the planning of this data bank and it has
aroused considerable interest in other Provinces and by the Federal Government,
which have similar developments in mind. However, to implement the scheme,
all existing written records have to be key punched as a preliminary to getting them
onto magnetic tape. Unfortunately the E.D.P. committee has had to refuse permission to proceed with this scheme at the present time due to a shortage of personnel in the key-punching section. It is hoped, however, that this is only a temporary setback and that the data bank will become a reality, perhaps in abbreviated
form, in the near future. Apart from the immediate benefits of having all survey
control data in the form of a data bank on magnetic tape, it is expected that useful
experience will be gained which will assist in the development of banks for other
types of environmental data.
FIELD WORK
Acreage Subdivision
Several blocks of town lots at Masset had to be consolidated into a 2 8-acre
parcel by survey prior to transfer to the municipal government. Over 400 acres at
Wilson Creek were surveyed to exchange for private land at Port Hardy and Port
McNeill, where surveys were also necessary. Land adjoining the Alaska Highway
was surveyed into district lots for eventual lease. Owing to a late start in the season,
poor side-road conditions, heavy cutting, and a small party, only 2,300 acres were
posted. A commercial subdivision at Nakusp of eight lots was provided at local
request. In the fall of the year, much posting was done on an old subdivision near
Westbank in order to locate road allowances for new construction and resubdivide
the larger lots into homesite-sized lots. The work was in an area of scant survey
evidence and apart from the benefit to the department will be of great assistance to
local owners. Goose Spit, in Comox Harbour, was surveyed for park purposes, to
be administered locally.
Waterfront Lease Lots
Loon Lake, near Grassmere  21
Lac la Hache   5
Young Lake, Cariboo  12
Powell Lake, Powell River  32
Similkameen River, near Bromley Park  23
Total     93
 BB 50       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Rural Roadside Lots
Dragon Lake (south-east of)  8
Ta Ta Creek, Kootenay  11
Barkerville Road   17
Quesnel  38
Williams Lake   25
Quinsam River, V.I.  4
Post Creek, near Chilliwack Lake  85
Ring Creek, ski cabins, near Garibaldi  47
Total  235
Interdepartmental Surveys
Wardner cemetery-site Public Utilities Commission.
Right-of-way at Chain Lakes   Fish and Game Branch.
Whiskey Creek Parksite Parks Branch.
Reserve east of Tete Jaune Parks Branch.
Barkerville Historic Park, boundary posting Parks Branch.
Long Beach on Vancouver Island, reserve Parks Branch.
Kennedy Lake Parksite, exchange Lands and Parks.
Alice Lake Parksite, exchange Lands and Parks.
Neroutsos Inlet, exchange Lands and Parks.
Airport in Cowichan Valley, exchange Lands and Regional District.
Right-of-way at Oliver- Water Resources.
Reservoir and right-of-way, near Oliver Water Resources.
Forest-development road at Bone Creek Forest Service Engineering.
Green Timbers (453.12 acres), exchange Lands and Forest Service.
Reposting and Restoration
An old settlement known as Gold Hill in the Lardeau area of the Kootenay
District was reposted to facilitate new settlement. As a number of people being
displaced by the Libby Reservoir are being relocated in the Baynes Lake area, near
Waldo, considerable reposting of roads and lots was done to locate previously surveyed parcels, and in the process 17 new lots were created by subdivision. In the
Government Precinct area in Victoria, five more parking-lots were posted for the
Department of Public Works in the spring of the year, prior to black-topping, and
late in the fall a hurry-up call to repost the Courthouse property in Nelson was
accommodated.
Miscellaneous Surveys
The following miscellaneous surveys were made:—
To except a road and public reserve from a sale area on the Horsefly Road,
118 acres.
A tie to complete a Hydro purchase survey on the Duncan River.
Survey to relocate an access road into Cluculz Lake, ZV2 miles.
Resurvey of the North-east Quarter of Lot 3775, Cariboo Land District, to
eliminate an error.
Resurvey of a road right-of-way at Lemon Creek, Kootenay Land District,
known to be in error.
Survey of the boundary between Lake and Esquimalt Land Districts.
Reserve for public on Kalamalka Lake, 1.6 acres.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
BB 51
Inspection Surveys
A complaint concerning a subdivision at Blue River, received through the Inspector of Legal Offices, was investigated by survey and found to be groundless. A
similar case at Burnaby was also investigated and no fault found. Three inspections
of water boundaries on new surveys were made and adjustment made in two of them.
A survey of a boundary in Cowichan Lake Land District, which was the subject of
disagreement between owners and had originally been established by survey confirmed by this department, was investigated and found to be in error and steps were
taken to correct the records. A meticulous survey of a water boundary and upland
parcels at Twin Bays on Kootenay Lake was required for a pending Court action,
and this entailed the preparation of numerous plans and annotated photographs.
Highway Surveys
Owing to lack of sufficient surveyors to handle the work, only two parties were
fielded on the survey of highways. Twenty miles was surveyed in the Blue River
area and 15.2 miles was finished in the area easterly of Tete Jaune. The surveyor
in charge of the Tete Jaune section suffered a heart attack at the height of the survey
work, which curtailed the eventual production of distance. However, the crew
carried on admirably and extra supervision was arranged.
Resignations
The Division regrets the loss of services of Mr. G. T. Mullin, B.C.L.S., and his
field assistant, Mr. T. Dignan, who both had been with the service for many years
and did yeoman work in all the difficult areas. They resigned to go into private
practice.
 BB 52       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
TOPOGRAPHIC DIVISION
A. G. Slocomb, B.C.L.S., Chief
The era of rapid transportation and electronic instrumentation has definitely
affected a surveyor's way of life. Where, in the past, he was usually assigned one
area per season, he now can be faced with many assignments that often are widely
scattered around the Province. This past season our integrated survey crew completed nine separate tasks. The control surveys completed eight and the mapping
party, assisted by a helicopter under contract, completed three, the one exception
being the Triangulation Section, which was assigned to a British Columbia-Yukon-
Northwest Territories Boundary Commission project for the season.
K. M. Bridge, B.C.L.S., was in charge of the National Topographic Series
mapping party which completed control for 16 map-sheets in 104 H area and obtained additional vertical control to revise the easterly four sheets of 104 G area.
(See Fig. 1.) This work is located to the east of the Stewart-Cassiar Highway,
and in the vicinity of Kinaskan and Cold Fish Lakes, which are south of the Stikine
River and south-east of Telegraph Creek. To assist them they had a Bell G3B1
helicopter chartered on a 4-month/400-hour basis from Tranwest Helicopters
(1965) Ltd. of Vancouver and the Department's De Havilland Otter aircraft. The
Otter also assisted the British Columbia-Yukon Boundary crew when it moved to
and from the Liard River crossing. This mountainous section of British Columbia
lies on the route usually taken by the weather systems generated in the Gulf of
Alaska. During the summer there were 32 days in which the work was rained out
and on many of the others it was marginal, necessitating an early return to camp.
SCALE
MAIN   CONTROL                     ▲
SECONDARY     CO NTROL    •
Fig. 1.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
BB 53
K. M. Bridge and his crew commenced their season's operation at Watson
Lake on an extension of the pondage study of the Liard and Dease Rivers which
was done in 1962. The extension was to the 2,200-foot contour, but horizontal
control for the river valleys could only be obtained on the adjacent open hills, so
that a perimeter traverse by tellurometer was run covering an area 120 miles by 80
miles. The actual length of the traverse was 280 miles and comprised 11 stations
from which photo-control points in the mapping area were fixed. One hundred and
twenty hours of flying time for the helicopter were used, 80 for horizontal control
and 40 for vertical. This and a second area at Atlin were requested by the Water
Resources Service for study purposes.
The Atlin assignment stretched from the mouth of the Taku River at the
Alaska-British Columbia border to the north end of Atlin Lake. Part of it had
been included in the mapping done in 1952 by D. J. Roy, B.C.L.S., and in 1953
by A. F. Swannell, B.C.L.S. Forty-two tellurometer traverse stations were occupied, while 18 of the old stations used had only to be targeted for control identification. Vertical control was derived from ground photos and vertical angles. While
at Atlin, the survey crew and helicopter were commandeered by the Forest Service
to fight a forest fire, which accounted for three working-days. A total of 29 days
was spent at Atlin, during which 80 hours of helicopter time was used.
The helicopter logged a combined total of 388 hours on its contract. The Otter
aircraft flew 271 hours for the mapping crews, consisting of moving and supplying
base camps, transportation of crews to and from pickup points for the helicopter,
and low-level photo and station identification flights. Following its return to Victoria, it was used by the Land Inspectors of the Lands Service and also by the
Highways Department.
Integrated Survey Area No. 3 was declared in June, situate in the Kootenay
Land District, comprising a portion of the City of Nelson.
A. M. Barber, B.C.L.S., and his integrated survey crew completed nine separate
assignments. The first, a co-ordinate control system for the City of Victoria was
used as a training scheme which commenced in April and was completed in May,
fixing 42 stations by interconnected traverses routed through the redevelopment
areas. They used a geodimeter and oriented the scheme by tellurometer ties to the
geodetic stations on Mount Tolmie, Gonzales Hill, and the Douglas Building.
The District of North Cowichan was the largest project and consisted of fixing
the location and elevation of 230 monuments set by the municipal crews of North
Cowichan and Duncan. While the ideal situation for interconnected urban control
traverses is a flat area of rectangular city blocks in the Cowichan area road access is
generally sparse, winding, and tree-lined. This difficult condition made necessary the
use of over one hundred additional temporary traverse hubs to interconnect the
monuments and forced the use of undesirably large traverse loops in some cases.
The following two precautions were introduced that are not normally used in this
type of work—bearing control was positioned throughout the work so that a bearing
check could be made at intervals of about 20 angles; and on the larger loops, levels
were double run as a precaution against compensatory errors. This project was
completed by the end of July and the crew moved to Kelowna, where, in 1966, we
had fixed 37 control monuments. This year the city increased the density of its
monumentation to meet the integrated survey specifications. This generally meant
the setting of a new monument between each pair of existing monuments, and with
other separate additions brought the new total of monuments set to 112. The new
spacing necessitated the occupation by the survey crews of both new and existing
monuments.   In effect it was necessary to resurvey the 1966 work (except for
 BB 54       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
trigonometric ties), despite the fact that the earlier work was of good quality. The
work was completed in one month and included a chainage base on the retaining
wall of the lake at the Yacht Club.
Filling in where convenient, there were two two-day measurings by geodimeter
commitments for the Department of Highways at Vancouver and Mission and two
building-site plans for the Public Works Department at Essondale.
The university students hired for this work returned to their studies at the end
of August, and the remainder of the crew completed two reconnaissance and layout
design plans for the Cities of Prince George and Penticton for integrated survey
programmes.
The control crew, with G. New, B.C.L.S., in charge, completed eight separate
projects, the first, in March in the Chilliwack River valley for the Forest Service,
was a topographic plan of their Chipmunk Run Nursery, drawn at the scale of 100
feet to the inch, with 2-foot contours. The last in December was for the Public Works
Department at Creston, for a topographic plan of parts of two lots to be used as a
building-site for administration buildings of the Parks Branch Bird Sanctuary.
Between the first and last projects, surveys were made on a second nursery-
site at Campbell River; a building-site for the Department of Public Works at
Poirer Lake; a large mapping project in the vicinity of Highland Valley for the
Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources that covered an area of 1,200 square
miles, lying between Mount Zakwaski and Nicola in the south and Cache Creek
and Savona to the north, mapped at 1,000 feet to 1 inch and to be used as a base
to plot geologic data; a control survey for mapping of the valley between Alta and
Green Lakes; a culture and map check of the Squamish District; and a request
from the Water Resources Service for elevations along the Shuswap River, between
Sugar and Mara Lakes, to record high and low water elevations, the survey crew
travelling to Enderby late in May to mark high water, and targets were set for
identification prior to photography. Upon completion of the Highland Valley project, they returned to Armstrong to establish elevations for the points established
earlier. To obtain these, 24 bench marks were set, and 90 miles of double-run levels
were required, as well as 30 miles of single run to tie in the high and low water
marks and picture points. While these levels were being carried out, Mr. New and
one man travelled to Williams Lake to meet a helicopter for use in the Nazko River
area. Several years ago, horizontal control for mapping had been obtained over
eight map-sheets in 93 B map area, but due to circumstances the vertical control
had to be postponed.   In a period of four days and 27 flying hours this was obtained.
The control crew completed 136 working-days in the field and logged over
10,000 miles on each vehicle.
Twenty-three half-sheets for the National Topographic Series, totalling approximately 2,733 square miles, were compiled in the Photogrammetric Section, in addition, eight more were prepared for early 1970. Bridging was completed in four
full map-sheets, 93 M/13, 14, 15, 16 in the Babine area.
There were 21 large scale projects ranging in scale from 40 to 1,320 feet to 1
inch, totalling approximately 666 square miles. The projects consist of ten for the
Water Resources Service, five for the Department of Highways, one for the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, two for the Forest Service, one for the
Department of Public Works, one for the Lands Service, and one for the Olympic
Development Association. In addition, three more were bridged and are presently
being compiled—Highland Valley for the Department of Mines, Hope to Merritt for
the Department of Highways, and the townsite of McBride for the Fort George
Regional Planning Board.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
BB 55
The Division is continuing the study of the use of ortho-photo mapping. Several of our senior officers attended a conference on the subject and discussed the
latest equipment and machines with representatives of various companies. We
were provided with prints for our appraisal and one company has offered use of its
equipment. At the present it appears that the prime use for such maps would be
for forest-inventory use.
The Draughting Section reports the compilation of 31 standard topographic
manuscripts at the scale of 2 inches to 1 mile.
One hundred and sixty-two large-scale mapping plans at various scales were
completed, as well as the plotting of the cadastral surveys on 47 Federal Government 1:50,000-scale manuscripts.
Worthy of mention are the Libby Pondage project that is made up of 63 sheets
at the scale of 200 feet to the inch, covering the Kootenay River from Bull River to
the International Boundary, as well as the Squamish Valley project of 17 sheets at
the same scale. The Gulf Islands were drawn at the scale of 1,320 feet to 1 inch,
containing 12 sheets, which can be combined and reduced to produce single prints
of a very popular boating area.
One integrated survey plan was completed covering the City of Nelson, Integrated Survey Area No. 3, as well as a revision of the Integrated Survey Area No. 1
in the Municipality of Surrey.
The Federal Government now has 142 of our 1:50,000-scale manuscripts on
hand for printing, which are in various stages of reproduction.
Copies of the photogrammetric large-scale mapping listed following this report
are available on request. The reader is also referred to the indexes contained in
the envelope attached to the back cover of this Annual Report.
Large-scale Mapping
No.
Name
Scale
Contour
Interval
No. of
Sheets
Date
S.P. 1
S P 2
Goldfields	
l"-=200', 600'
1"=1,000'
1"=1,000'
1"=10 ch.
1"=13 ch.
1"=   100'
1"=1,000'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=   200'
1"=   200'
1"=   400'
1"=   400'
1"=   400'
1"=   400'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=1,000'
1"-=1,320'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=1,320'
1"-=1,000'
1"=   500'
1"=1,000'
1"=   500'
Mosaic
5' to 50', then 50'
5' to 50', then 50'
50'
500'
5'
50'
20'-40'
10'-20'
20'^t0'
5'
Spot heights
5'-10'-25'
5'-10'-25'
Planimetric
20'-100'
20'-40'
20'-40'
50'
50'
20'-40'
20'-40'
2C-40'
50'
20'
20'
50'
20'^10'
18
20
13
1
1
38
•A
6
13
28
73
2
7
1
C1)
11
12
8
6
6
1
1
26
3
48
8
23
1957
S P 3
1958
E.P. 5
1951
EP. 7
1951
E.P. 8
EP 9
Moran Dam-site	
1951-52
1952
EP  10
1952
E P. 14
1951
EP  15
1953
E.P. 17
EP 18
Agassiz 	
1953
1953 54
E.P. 19
Doukhobor lands—
1953 54
Krestova-Raspberry, etc. ...
1953-54
1963
E.P. 21
1954
E.P. 24
E.P. 28
M2
Clearwater	
1954-55
M3
1955
M4
1955
M5
1955
M6
1955
M7
1955-56
M8
1956
M9
1956-62
Mil
1955
M12
1955
i See Map E.P. 17.
 BB 56       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Large-scale Mapping—Continued
No.
Name
Scale
Contour
Interval
No. of
Sheets
Date
M13
M14
M15
M16
M17
M21
M24
M27
M29
M30
M34
M36
M37
M38
M39
(1957)
M39
(1958)
M40
M41
M42
M44
M45
M52
M54
M56
M59
M62
M63
M63A
M66
M67
M68
M70
M73
M73
M74
M75
M76
M77
M88
M88
M89
M89
M90
M90a
M90b
M92
M98
M105
M107
M108
M109
Mill
M113
M117
Ml 17
M118
M121
M122
M125
M126
M127
M129
M130
M131
Penticton-Osoyoos.-
Kelowna— 	
Westbank 	
Lower McGregor River-.
Creston-—	
Clearwater	
San Jose  	
Peace River Pondage..
Naramata —	
Goat River 	
Fruitvale 	
Moose River—	
Mount Robson 	
McLennan River	
Dease River Dam-sites _
Dease-Stikine Dam-sites -
Chilliwack River..
Summit Lake Diversion -
Peace River Dam-site—
Prince George East	
Prince George 'Vest	
Kaslo	
Big Bar -
Lac la Hache __
Eaglet Lake	
Alberni -
Parsnip River Pondage	
Parsnip River Pondage Addition  	
Glen Lake 	
Chemainus River 	
Hansard Lake  	
Courtenay-Comox 	
North Okanagan —	
North Okanagan - —	
GlinzLake 	
Duncan  	
Nanaimo 	
Prince George	
South Okanagan _	
South Okanagan -	
North Thompson	
North Thompson	
Similkameen 	
Similkameen  	
Similkameen _	
Skeena River 	
Aberdeen-Haddo Lake	
Clearwater Lake-Azure Lake
Campbell River	
Kootenay River	
London Mountain (Whistler
Mountain) _ 	
Clearwater River Dam-site ..._
Nanaimo 	
Liard River   	
Liard River Dam-site... _.
Nitinat    -	
Winfield	
Stuart Lake Pondage	
Port Hardy  	
Thompson River 	
Parksville—	
AlezaLake  	
McGregor River Pondage	
Long Lake 	
V— 500'
V— 500'
1"= 500'
1"=1,000'
1"= 500'
1"= 500'
1"= 500'
1"=1,000'
1"= 400'
1"= 200'
1"= 500'
1"=-1,000'
1"=1,000'
1"= 1,000'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"= 600'
V-1,000'
1"= 600'
1"= 200'
V— 200'
1"= 500'
1"=2,640'
1"= 500'
1"=-1,320'
1"= 500'
1"=1,320'
1"=1,000'
1"= 400'
V— 400'
1"-= 1,320'
1"=1,320'
1"= 1,000'
1"= 500'
1"= 200'
1"= 500'
\"= 500'
1"=1,000'
1"= 500'
1"=1,000'
300'
500'
1"= 200'
1"= 200'
1"= 200'
1"= 500'
■'= 500'
1"= 1,000'
1"= 1,000'
1"=   500'
1"= 200'
1"= 250'
1"= 500'
1"=1,000'
1"= 500'
1"= 500'
1"-= 500'
1"= 1,320'
1"= 100'
1"= 200'
1"= 200'
1"= 40'
1"=1,000'
1"—1,320'
10'
10'
10'
20'
5'-10'-15'
20'^10'
10'
20'
10'
Planimetric
10'-20'
20'^t0'
20'^10'
20'^t0'
20'
10'
20'
20'
20'
5'
5'
50'
100'
20'
20'
10'
20'-2,600', then 50'
20'
10'
10'
20'
25'-600',
then 500'-2,000',
then 100'
20'
10'
10'
10' and 20'
10' and 20'
20'
10' and 20'
20'
5'
20'
5'
5'
5'
20'
10'
50'
20'
Planimetric
20'
5'
5'-10'
20'
10'
10' and 20'
10' and 20'
20'
2' and 4'
10'-20'
10'
2'
20'
50'-100'
11
5
2
7
6
20
8
11
2
4
2
4
5
3
9
7
3
10
2
8
17
1
10
2
2
98
5
10
4
3
10
48
5
1
25
20
17
11
5
5
15
9
19
24
il
4
6
5
12
3
4
8
68
7
7
4
9
4
3
4
1
6
4
1954
1954
1954
1956
1954
1955
1956
1958
1956
1956
1957
1957
1956-57
1956-57
1956-57
1959
1956
1959
1957
1958
1958
1959-60
1957
1958
1958
1958
1958-59
1961-63
1962
1958
1958
1958
1958
1959
1959
1959
1959
1960
1960-61
1963
1964-65
1960
1960
1961
1965
1966-67
1962
1960
1962
1961
1961
1961
1961
1963
1962
1962
1962
1961
1962
1962
1962
1965
1962
1962
1962
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Large-scale Mapping—Continued
BB 57
No.
Name
Scale
Contour
Interval
No. of
Sheets
Date
M134
1"=1,000'
1"=:   500'
1"=   500'
1"=1,000'
1"=   400'
1"=   500'
1"= 1,000'
1"=   200'
1"=   200'
1"=   500'
1"=   600'
1"=   600'
1"=1,000'
1"=   100'
1"=   300'
1"=   200'
1"= 1,320'
1"= 1,000'
1"=   200'
1"=   500'
1"=   100'
1"=   200'
1"=1,000'
1"=   200'
1"=1,320'
1"=   200'
1"=   400'
1"=-:   200'
1"=   200'
1"= 1,000'
1"=   200'
1"=1,000'
1"=   100'
1"=   200'
1"=   200'
1"=   200'
1"=   400'
1"=   500'
1"=   200'
1"=   100'
1"=   100'
1"=   200'
1"=1,000'
1"= 1,000'
1"= 1,320'
1"=   500'
1"=   100'
1"=     50'
1"==   200'
1"=   100'
1"=   400'
1"=   500'
1"=      16'
1"=   200'
1"-=   200'
1"=:   600'
1"=   100'
1"—1,320'
1"= 1,320'
1"=   200'
1"=   500'
1"=   200'
1"-=1,320'
1"=   400'
1"=:   400'
1"=   200'
20'
10'
25'
50'
10'
10'
25' and 50'
2'
5'
2C-50'
20'
20'
50'
2' and 5'
5' and 20'
5'
25'-2,500', then 50'
25'-50'
5'
10'
5'
10'
50'
5'
100'
5' and spot heights
50'
5'
5'
20'
10'
20'-100'
2'
5'
5' and spot heights
5'
25'
10'
2'
5'
2'
10'
20'
20'
25'
20'
20-100 cm.
5'
50'
5'
20'
10'
2'
5'
5'
20'
5'
25'
50'
2'
20'
10'
100'
10'
10'
5'
4
7
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
23
1
1
8
24
1
1
31
3
2
1
9
4
4
10
2
3
1
27
1
21
6
53
4
4
3
2
5
3
6
1
5
9
31
28
7
1
11
1
1
9
24
9
2
16
17
3
3
12
2
1
1
1
2
63
1962
M135
M136
M138
M139
Quesnel 	
Haney —  	
Hobson Lake Extension	
1963-65
1962
1962
1962
M142
M144
Kaleden  	
1963
1963
M151
1963
M152
1963
M155
M158
Sechelt 	
1964
1964
M160
M161
Ladysmith 	
1964
1964
M162
M163
Haney By-pass ( 2)	
1964
1964
M164
M168
Saanich garbage disposal
Peace River Pondage (Find-
1964
1965
M170
1965-66
M171
1965
M171
1965
M172
1965
M172
1965-66
M173
1965
M175
M176
M178
M179
Shuswap Canal Diversion
Stewart 	
Sparwood   -
1965-66
1965
1965
1965
M180
M181
M182
Colwood-Langford	
Nemotode -	
1967
1965
1968
(1968)
M182
1965
M182
1965-66
Ml 86
M188
Revelstoke   	
1966
1966
M189
1966
M196
1966
M197
M198
M200
Hurley Pass(2)	
Peachland	
1966-67
1966
1967
M201
M202
Archaeology	
1966
1966-67
M204
1967
M205
1968
M210
M215
Kechika 	
1967
1967-68
M216
M217
Black   Mountain   Irrigation
District    -
1967
1967
M218
1967
M218
1967
M220
M222
M226
Floods-Hope (2 )	
Sayward-Beaver Cove(2)_—
1968
1968
1968
M228
1967
M230
Peace   River   Dam-sites,   C.
and E	
1968
M232
M233
Squamish —  .
1969
1968
M233
M234
Jordan River	
1968
1969
M236
M237
Copper Mountain	
1968
1968
M238
1968
M238
1968
M242
M243
1968
M245
M249
Saanich Peninsula*	
1969
* Compilation in process.
2 Restricted.
J
 BB 58       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Large-scale Mapping—Continued
No.
Name
Scale
Contour
Interval
No. of
Sheets
Date
M250
1"=     40'
1"=   100'
1"=   100'
1"=   100'
1"=   100'
1"=1,320'
1"=   200'
1"=   200'
1"=   500'
1"=1,000'
1"= 1,000'
1"=1,000'
2'
2'
5'
5'
5'
50'
10'
10'
20' and 100'
20'
20'
4
2
2
3
1
1
1
1969
M249A
M256
M256A
M259
Wardner „.
Flood Hope Addition(2)	
Flood Hope Addition^)
Cowichan VJley Forest Mu-
1969
1969
1969
1969
M260
M261
M262
M263
M266
Highland Valley*	
Windermere Lake*	
McBride*  	
Alta Lake*	
1969
M269
1969
M270
Dease River*	
* Compilation in process.
2 Restricted.
British Columbia Topographic Map Sheets Showing Dates
of Field Surveys
Sheet
82 F/3 	
82 F/4 _	
82 K/ll W.
82 K/12 	
82 L/7 	
82 L/10 	
82 M/13   	
83 D/4 	
83 D/5 	
83 D/12   	
83 D/13 W.
92 B/5 	
92 B/5 W.*
92 B/6 W	
92 B/ll W. .
92 B/12* 	
92 B/13* --.
92 B/14* 	
92 C/8*   ,	
92 C/9*   .	
92 C/10*   .-
92 C/11E.*
92 C/13 E.  .
92 C/14	
Date
.1951, 1960
..1944, 1947
 1952
 1952
 1958
 1958
 1959
 1959
 1959
92 C/14 E., part*
92 C/15* 	
92 C/16*   	
92 E/l E	
92 E/7E -.-
92 E/8 	
92 E/9   	
92 E/10  --
92 E/14 	
92 E/16 	
92 F/l* 	
92 F/2*   	
92 F/2, part* .	
92 F/3  -
92 F/4 	
92 F/5	
92 F/6	
92 F/7* - -
92 F/7, part* 	
92 F/8 	
92 F/8 part*   	
92 F9 	
92 F/10 	
92 F/l 1	
92 F/12	
92 F/13 	
 1959, 1960
  1960
_1937, 1938, 1955
 1963
  1955
  1955
  _ 1963
 1963
 1951
-1937, 1938, 1963
..1937, 1938, 1963
..1937, 1938, 1965
 1938, 1965
.  1938
 1938
 1965
 1965
..1963, 1965
 1942
 1946
,1946
..1943,
..1938, 1940, 1947
 1947
 1948
 1947
_ 1965
..1938, 1940, 1942
  1965
.1938,1940, 1941
 1942
..1937,1938, 1943
 1938, 1940^13
 1940-43
  1965
..1942, 1943, 1950
 1965
  1950
 1950,1953
 1934, 1935
  1936-38
 1935, 1936
part
part
Sheet
92 F/14 ....
92 F/15 E.,
92 F/16E..
92 G/4*   _
92 G/5   	
92 G/7, part ..
92 G/10, part
92 G/ll 	
92 G/12   	
92 G/13   	
92 G/14   	
92 H/l   	
92 H/2	
92 H/3   	
92 H/4   	
92 1/12   	
92 1/13   	
92 J/15   	
92 J/16
Date
 1935
 1950
 1950
1963, 1965
..1950, 1952
 1940
 1940
 1952
.1950, 1952
.1950, 1952
 1952
.1920, 1923, 1950
-1923, 1949
.1924, 1931, 1948, 1949
 1948,1956
   1958
  1958
92 K/l E., part .
92 K/2W.*   	
92 K/3 	
92 K/4 	
92 K/5  	
92 K/6 	
92 K7*   	
92 L/l 	
92 L/2   	
92 L/3 	
92 L/4 	
92 L/6   	
92 L/7 	
92 L/8 	
92 L/10   	
92 L/l1 	
92 L/12	
92 L/13	
92 M/3   	
92 M/4   	
92 M/5   	
92 N/1   	
92 N/7   	
92 N/8 	
92 N/9   _..	
92 N/10   	
92 N/15   	
92 O/l 	
92 0/2 	
92 0/3 	
..1948, 1949
.1948, 1949
 1950
 1961
 1949
 1949
 1949
 1949
 1961
 1932
..1931, 1932
 1948
.  1948
..1931, 1934, 1940
 1931
 1931,1932
..1931,1940, 1956
 1940
..1935, 1936
 1936
 1959
 1959
 1959
 1958
 1958
 1958
 1958
 1958
 1958
 1950
 1947
 1958
* Compilation in process.
t Field survey completed.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
BB 59
British Columbia Topographic Map Sheets Showing Dates
of Field Surveys—Continued
Sheet
92 0/4 	
92 0/5 	
92 0/6 .....
92 0/7 ...
92 0/8 	
92 0/9 --
92 O/10 ...
92 O/ll ...
92 0/12 ...
92 0/16 ...
92 P/2 	
92 P/3 	
92 P/4 	
92 P/5 	
92 P/6 	
92 P/7 	
92 P/10 -
92 P/ll .
92 P/12 ...
92 P/13 -
92 P/14 .
92 P/15 ...
92 P/16 ...
93 A/1* ._
93 A/2* ..
93 A/3	
93 A/4 __.
93 A/5 __.
93 A/6 .....
93 A/7* .
93 A/8* .
93 A/9* .
93 A/10*
93 A/11 ...
93 A/12 .
93 A/13 ...
93 A/14 .
93 A/15*
93 A/16*
93 B/l .....
93 B/6* ...
93 B/7* _.
93 B/8 .....
93 B/9
93 B/9W.* .
93 B/10* 	
93 B/ll* 	
93 B/12* 	
93 B/13*	
93 B/14* _	
93 B/15*	
93 B/16 	
93 B/16W.*
93 C/5  	
93 D/7 E	
93 D/8 	
93 G/2 	
93 G/3 	
93 G/4	
93 G/5  	
93 G/6	
93 G/7 	
93 G/10	
93 G/ll 	
93 G/12	
93 G/14 	
93 1/8 	
93 1/9 	
93 1/10 	
93 1/11 	
93 1/12 	
93 1/13 	
93 1/14 	
Date
...1958
...1958
..1958
.1950, 1958
 1950
 1951
 1958
 1958
 ..1958
 1951
 1959
 1959
 1958
 1958
 1959
 1959
 1959
 1959
 .1958
 1958
 1959
 1959
 ....1959
 1959
.1936, 1959, 1960
 1959, 1960
  1959
 1935
 1935
..1936, 1959, 1960
 1959
 1959, 1960
 1934, 1960
 1933, 1934
-1931, 1933, 1934
 1934
1933, 1934
.1934, 1960
 1960
 1951
 1963
 1963
 1952
 1950
 1965
  1963
 1963
 1963
 1963
 1963
 1963
... 1950
 1965
 1959
 1958
.1958, 1959
1933,1960
 1960
  1960
 1960
 1960
.1933, 1960
 1960
 1960
 1960
 1948
 1956
 1956
 1956
 1957
 1957
 1957
 1957
Sheet
93 1/15
Date
 1956
93 1/16
  1956
93 J/2
 1949
93 J/3
 1949
93 J/5 	
 1961
93 J/6 	
 1961
93 J/11
 1961
93 J/12 	
 1961
93 J/13 	
 1961
93 K/l	
...1946
93 K/2 	
     1946
93 K/7 	
...I960
93 K/8 	
 1960
93 K/9 	
 1960
93 K/10	
 1960
93 K/ll 	
      1961
93 K/12 	
 1961
93 K/13	
 1961
93 K/14 	
1961
93 K/l5 	
      1961
93 K/16 . 	
      1961
93 L/2 	
 1951
93 L/7	
 1951
93 L/8 	
         1951
93 L/9    . „
   1951
93 L/10  .
 1950, 1951
93 L/l1 	
     1950
93 L/14 	
          1950
93 L/l5 	
        1962
93 L/16	
        ..1962
93 M/l 	
      1962
93 M/2	
1QS-,
93 M/5 	
  1949
93 M/7 	
  1963
93 M/8	
_     1963
93 M/9 	
 1963
93 M/10	
 1963
93 M/ll  ...
         1963
93 M/l2 	
_ 1949
93 M/13* 	
1963
93 M/14*	
 1963
93 M/15* 	
  1963
93 M/16* 	
  1963
93 N/1* 	
 1962
93 N/2* 	
 1962
93 N/3*  	
.1962
93 N/4* 	
     1962
93 N/5*	
         1962
93 N/6* 	
 1962
93 N/7* 	
  1962
93 N/8*  . --
 _ 1962
93 N/9*   	
     1962
93 N/10*   	
196?
93 N/11*	
  1962
93 N/12*	
 1962
93 O/l 	
          1957
93 0/4*	
1961
93 0/5* 	
 1961
93 0/6   -
 1957
93 0/8 	
 1957
93 O/ll
 1957
93 0/12
         1957
93 0/13  —
   1957
93 0/14 	
   1957
93 P/l
 1956
93 P/2 	
 1956
93 P/3 	
 1957
93 P/4	
.1957
93 P/5	
1957
93 P/6
 1957
93 P/7 .        	
... .       .1956
93 P/8 	
.... .. .     1956
94 B/4 	
 1939, 1957
* Compilation In Process.
t Field survey completed.
 BB 60       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
British Columbia Topographic Map Sheets Showing Dates
of Field Surveys—Continued
Date
...1939
.1963
...1963
...1963
...1963
...1963
 1963
 1963
 1963
 1939
 1939
.1940, 1941
 1941
-1935,1937
. 1935-37
  1937
Sheet
94 C, part .
94 D/l*   -
94 D/2*   ....
94 D/3*   _
94 D/4*   ...
94 D/5*   —
94 D/6*   ...
94 D/7*   ....
94 D/8*   ...
94 E, part .
94 F, part .
94 L, part ..
94 M, part .
102 1/8 E	
102 1/9   	
102 1/15   	
102 1/16    1936, 1937
102 P/8 E  1961
102 P/9 E   1961
102 P/16   1961
103 A/1    _  1961
103 A/2 E.   1961
103 A/8     1961
103 A/9     1961
103 A/13 E  1961
103 G/l E   1961
103 G/7 E.  1961
103 G/8    1961
103 G/9    —.1961
103 G/10 E.   1961
103 G/15 E   1961
103 G/16     1961
103 H/3     1961
103 H/4      1961
103 H/5     1961
103 H/6       1961
103 1/2       1949
103 1/7    1948
103 1/10     _ 1947
103 P/9   1949
103 P/10 E 1950
103 P/14 E  1950
103 P/15   _ 1950
103 P/16*   1967
104 A/1 *     1967
104 A/2 E.*   _ —.1967
104 A/2 W  1950
104 A/3  1950
104 A/4*   	
104 A/5 E	
104 A/5 W.*
104 A/6 	
104 A/7*   	
104 A/8»   	
104 A/10* 	
104 A/11 E.*
104 A/11 W.
104 A/12	
104 A/13 E.*
104 A/13 W.
104 A/14*   ....
104 A/15*	
104 B/l* 	
104 B/6* 	
104 B/7*	
104 B/8* 	
...1967
—1950
—1967
...1950
—1967
—1967
—1967
—1967
...1951
....1951
—1967
...1951
—1967
—1967
—1967
—1967
....1967
...1967
Sheet Date
104 B/9*   1967
104 B/10 *   1967
104 B/ll*   _ 1967
104 B/12 E.*    1967
104 B/12 W.*   1966
104 B/13 E.*       ...1965
104 B/13 W.*     1966
104 B/14*    1965
104 B/15 *   _ 1965
104 B/16  1951
104 G/l    —1951
104 G/2*    1965
104 G/3 *     1965
104 G/4 E.*   1965
104 G/4 W.*      1966
104 G/5 E.*      ...1965
104 G/5W. * 1966
104 G/6 *    1965
104 G/7*  1965
104 G/8  _  1951
104 G/9 1951
104 G/10*   1966
104 G/ll*  1966
104 G/12*     1966
104 G/13    _ 1966
104 G/14   1951
104 G/15  1951
104 G/16  —  1951
104 H/lf    1969
104 H/2t  _ 1969
104 H/3t   _ 1969
104 H/4t   1969
104 H/5t    1969
104 H/6t   1969
104 H/7f    1969
104 H/8t    1969
104 H/9t   1969
104 H/lOt   1969
104 H/llf 1969
104 H/12 E.t  1969
104 H/12 W.t    '- 1951, 1969
104 H/13 E.t  1969
104 H/13 W.t   1951,1969
104 H/14t      1969
104 H/15t    1969
104 H/16t  — 1969
104 J/2 W  1952
104 J/3     1952
104 J/4   1952
104 J/5 _   1952
104 J/12 1952
104 J/13 ._     1952
104 K/16 E  1952, 1953
104 N/1    1952, 1953
104 N/2 1953
104 N/3 E  1953
104 N/5  1952
104 N/6  1952, 1953
104 N/7 W   1953
104 N/7 E., part    1953
104 N/11 W.      1952
104 N/12  1952
104 N/13   1952
104 P, part     1941
104 P/15    1941
* Compilation In Process.
t Field Survey Completed.
 „
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'^:-w
 BB 62       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION
W. R. Young, Chief, B.C.L.S.
The Geographic Division distributed a record number of maps during 1969,
the cumulative 12-month total of 149,421 being an increase of 16.5. per cent over
1968. Although the number of maps edited and reproduced was slightly lower
than the previous year, seven were completely new compilations, compared with
only two in 1968. Except for a very small part of National Topographic Block 82
in South-eastern British Columbia, which will be covered on a forthcoming map, full
land status coverage is now available south of 55° N. latitude. Including the Man-
son River sheet (93 N) which was added in 1969, three maps are also available for
the belt between the 55th and 56th parallels and work is under way on two other
status sheets north of 55° N. latitude in North-eastern British Columbia. In the
decade since 1960, 30 new sheets at 1:250,000 or 1 inch to 2 miles scale have been
added to the inventory of Provincial land status maps and another 32 sheets revised
or recompiled.
The rate of staff turn-over was comparable to that of most recent years. Two
appointments were made to fill vacancies arising out of the retirement of one clerk
and resignation of a draughtsman.
As listed in Table H, four of the new or completely revised status maps, namely
Fort Fraser (93 K) and Smithers (93 L) at 1:250,000 scale and Tulameen (92
H/NE) and Princeton (92 H/SE) at 1 inch to 2 miles were third status editions of
these areas, which is a good indication of the popularity of Provincial status maps
for use by the general public and Government departments. The continuing strong
interest in this series is reflected by the reprinting of another four sheets, Upper
Kettle River (82E/NE), Kelowna (82E/NW), Cranbrook (82 G/NW-NE), and
Merritt (92I/SE), without revision to replace stocks depleted by demand.
At the end of the year, 17 maps were in various stages of preparation (see
Table J). Of this total, ten will be printed at 1 inch to 2 miles scale and three at
1:250,000 scale, all with status information. Other forthcoming maps include a
reprinting of sheet 1 J (British Columbia) and 1 D (North-eastern British Columbia) and new maps 3 R (Fort Nelson, land status) and P.S.G.-3 (Western Garibaldi
Park). Completion of Mount Assiniboine (82 J/NW) will completely fill in the 1
inch to 2 miles series south of the 51st parallel and east of the 122nd meridian. The
Pitt River, Squamish, Bridge River, and Pemberton maps will replace current
coverage at 1:250,000 scale for areas where land development is increasing in
intensity and status is becoming more difficult to show at the smaller scale.
Late in 1968, Federal mapping agencies instituted a new policy of producing
1:50,000 National Topographic maps as single sheets rather than east halves and
west halves. Table I of this Division's report and Index 14 in the Index to Published
Maps in the envelope attached to the back cover of this Lands Service Annual Report show all new 1:50,000 map-sheets in the joined format. Stocks of 16 full
sheets and 42 half sheets, published by the Department of Energy, Mines, and Resources, Ottawa, were received, including two Provincial sheets, Canim Lake (92
P/15) and Mahood Lake (92 P/16) and another eight were awaited at the end of
the year. By the end of 1969, lithographed maps at 1:50,000 scale covered about
one-half of the Province compared with only one-third 10 years earlier.
Table K shows that another 59 Provincial topographic manuscripts were
awaiting publication in Ottawa at the end of the year. These will fill in several gaps
on Index 14.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
BB 63
A total of 66 map-sheets was checked for place names and 233 new gazetteer
cards were filed.
An average of nearly 39 letters was received and acted upon each working-day
of the year. Besides the rising inflow of correspondence, direct sales of maps
through the map distribution office also continued to grow steadily.
Two field parties completed culture checks for sheets 92 G/NW, 92 G/NE,
and 92 I/SW on the Lower Mainland and 82 F/SW, 82 E/NE, and 82 E/NW in
the Southern Interior. All of these map-sheets were in various stages of production
by the end of 1969.
Among the special jobs carried out for other Departments and the public (see
Table F) were a revised edition of the British Columbia Air Facilities Chart for the
British Columbia Aviation Council; a special map of Northern Vancouver Island
showing transportation routes, for the Minister of Municipal Affairs; preparation
of maps for the " Survey '69 " air tour through British Columbia, for the Minister
of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources; checking, rewriting, and preparing maps
of polling divisions for the 1969 Provincial Election for the Chief Electoral Officer;
complete revision of Industrial Map of Metropolitan Area and Lower Mainland of
British Columbia for Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce;
preparing legal descriptions by metes and bounds of four changes to eight school
districts for the Department of Education, and the Land Recording Districts of
Fort Nelson and Fort St. John for the Lands Branch; inscribing 85 certificates for
presentation to civil servants of 25 years' service and preparing place cards for two
luncheons.
The Trigonometric Control Section made least-square adjustments for seven
localities, using the " Cosmos " computer programme and three localities under the
" Bride " programme. The number of triangles or traverse stations involved in all
10 projects totalled 1,240. A tabular summary of this work is given in Tables A,
B,and C.
For the first time, all 11 land series bulletins were reprinted during a single
year. Minor revisions were done on Bulletins 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 1.0, and 11, while
Bulletin No. 4 (Vancouver Island) was reprinted without revision. A completely
revised text of Bulletin Area No. 6 (Kamloops) was sent to the Queen's Printer.
At the end of 1969, the text of a revised second edition of Bulletin Area No. 1
(Kootenay) was also in hand. The research officer made a field trip to the Prince
Rupert-Smithers Bulletin Area to gather information for a revised second edition of
Bulletin No. 8. New sub-area maps and fold-out maps were completed for all
bulletins and these will appear in future reprintings.
Other research work included preparation of a text and maps for the " Survey
'69 " aerial tour from Castlegar to Whitehorse, and lectures at the Department of
Travel Industry Tourist Counsellors' course in Vancouver.
Complete Indexes to Published Maps, Indexes 8 to 14, may be found in the
manila envelope attached to the back cover of this Annual Report.
 BB 64       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
STATISTICAL COMPUTATIONS
Table A.—Least-square Adjustments by " Cosmos " Completed
Net
Locality
Type of
Bearings
Number of
Triangles or
Traverse Stations Involved
True
True
True
True
True
True
True
40
Tweedsmuir Park area _   	
150
103
35
Atlin and Watson Lakes areas	
40
86
Canadian Hydrographic Service-
107
Table B.—Least-square Adjustments by " Bride " Completed
Net
Locality
Type of
Bearings
Number of
Triangles or
Traverse Stations Involved
Grid
Grid
Grid
248
132
299
Table C.—Records
1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969
Index cards—
New	
Old (rewritten)-
Total on file..
Requests for control attended to..
1,475
293
35,547
389
1,693
1,453
37,240
334
673
2,482
37,913
368
1,184
912
39,097
361
883
2,102
39,980
412
3,088
1,375
43,068
495
Well-site surveys checked during 1969, 166.
Table D.—Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical Names
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
22
6,090
277
93
5,584
402
85
11,428
440
48
13,018
314
49
4,754
260
66
Number of names checked - —
6,835
233
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Table E.—Map Stock and Distribution
BB 65
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
10,395
88,322
71,178
$58,469
9,429
86,755
107,741
$56,152
9,550
95,540
155,133
$62,977
11,639
114,723
261,314
$73,550.82
12,174
128,303
221,187
$77,086.36
12,311
149,421
178,386
$91,633.29
Table F.—Geographic Work for Other Departments and Public
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
19
$5,213
20
$4,460
23
$4,307
22
$2,927.13
28
$1,612.36
23
$5,113.65
Table G.—Letters
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
Letters received and attended to	
8,469
7,297
8,007
9,481
9,044
9,729
Table H.—Maps Prepared and Reproduced by the Geographic Division,
Victoria, during 1969
Map No.
Name
Scale
Remarks
If
Ifl
3e
92L/102I
92 N
93 F
93 K
93 L
93 N
103 H
92 H/NE
92 H/SE
lFLS
82 E/NE
82 E/NW
82 G/NW-NE
92I/SE
New Editions
West Central British Columbia (planimetric).
West Central British Columbia (iandforms)	
Peace River	
Alert Bay (first status edition)  _	
Mount Waddington (first status edition)..
Nechako River (second status edition)	
Fort Fraser (third status edition)	
Smithers (third status edition) _
Manson River (first status edition)	
Douglas Channel (second status edition)..
Tulameen (third status edition) 	
Princeton (third status edition) 	
Reprints
West Central British Columbia (special).
Upper Kettle River (first status edition) —
Kelowna (second status edition)	
Cranbrook (first status edition) 	
Merritt (second status edition)	
1 in. to 10 mi.
1 in. to 10 mi.
1 in. to 4 mi.
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1 in. to 2 mi.
1 in. to 2 mi.
1 in. to 10 mi.
1 in. to 2 mi.
1 in. to 2 mi.
1 in. to 2 mi.
1 in. to 2 mi.
Reprint, complete revision.
Reprint, complete revision.
Land status revision only.
New, seven colours, contoured.
New, seven colours, contoured.
Reprint, complete revision.
New, seven colours, contoured.
Reprint, complete revision.
New, seven colours, contoured.
New, seven colours, contoured.
New, seven colours, contoured.
New, seven colours, contoured.
Reprint, no revision.
Reprint, no revision.
Reprint, no revision.
Reprint, no revision.
Reprint, no revision.
 BB 66       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table I.—Provincial Government Topographic Manuscripts Prepared and Reproduced at 1:50,000 Scale by the Canadian Government, Ottawa, during 1969
Map No.
Name
Map No.
Name
92 P/15
Canim Lake (first edition).
92 P/16
Mahood Lake (first edition).
Table J.—Maps Being Prepared by the Geographic Division, Victoria, during 1969
Map No.
Name
Scale
Remarks
U
In
92 K/92 J (W)
93 D/103A
93 P
82 E/N.E.
82 E/NW
82 E/SE
82 F/SW
82 J/NW
92 G/NE
92 G/NW
921/SE
92 J/NE
92 J/SE
3R
P.S.G. 3
British Columbia, post offices, roads, etc	
North Eastern British Columbia _
Bute Inlet (third status edition) 	
Bella Coola (third status edition)— _	
Dawson Creek (first status edition)	
Upper Kettle River (second status edition)
Kelowna (third status edition) 	
Grand Forks (second status edition)	
Trail (second status edition)   	
Mount Assiniboine (first status edition)	
Pitt River (first status edition)	
Squamish (first status edition)  _
Merritt (third status edition) 	
Bridge River (first status edition)	
Pemberton (first status edition)  	
Fort Nelson (land status edition)	
Western Garibaldi Park -  	
in. to 30 mi
in. to 10 mi
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
in. to 2 mi.
in. to 2 mi.
in. to 2 mi.
in. to 2 mi.
in. to 2 mi.
in. to 2 mi.
in. to 2 mi.
in. to 2 mi.
in. to 2 mi.
in. to 2 mi.
in. to 1 mi.
in. to 1 mi.
In lithography.
In compilation.
In compilation.
In compilation.
In draughting.
In compilation.
In compilation.
In draughting.
In draughting.
In draughting.
In draughting.
In draughting.
In compilation.
In draughting.
In compilation.
In draughting.
In draughting.
Table K.—Provincial Government Topographic Manuscripts Being Prepared at
1:50,000 Scale by the Canadian Government, Ottawa, during 1969
Map No.
Name
Map No.
Name
83D/4
Murtle Lake (first edition).
93 K/ll
Cunningham Lake (first edition) .
83D/5
Angus Home Lake (first edition).
93 K/12
Pendleton Bay (first edition).
83 D/12
Azure River (first edition).
93 K/13
Tochcha Lake (first edition).
83 D/13W
Kiwa Creek (first edition).
93 K/14
Trembleur Lake (first edition).
92 0/3
Warner Pass (first edition).
93 K/15
Inzana Lake (first edition).
92 0/4
Tchaikazan River (first edition).
93 K/16
Tezzeron Creek (first edition).
92 0/5
Mount Tatlow (first edition).
• 93 L/15
Driftwood Creek (first edition).
92 0/6
Nadila Creek (first edition).
93 L/16
Fulton Lake (first edition).
92 0/7
Churn Creek (first edition).
93 M/l
Old Fort Mountain (first edition).
92 O/10
Gaspard Creek (first edition).
93M/2
Harold Price Creek (first edition).
92 O/ll
Big Creek (first edition).
93M/7
Netalzul Mountain (first edition).
92 0/12
Elkin Creek (first edition).
93M/8
Nakinilerak Lake (first edition).
92 P/2
Criss Creek (first edition).
93M/9
Bulkley House (first edition).
92 P/3
Loon Lake (first edition).
93 M/10
Nilkitkwa River (first edition).
92 P/6
Green Lake (first edition).
93 M/ll
Gunanoot Lake (first edition).
92 P/7
Bridge Lake (first edition).
102 P/9E-8E
Calvert Island (first edition).
92 P/10
Deka Lake (first edition).
102 P/16
Hunter Island (first edition).
92 P/ll
100 Mile House (first edition).
103 A/1-2E
Bella Bella (first edition).
92 P/14
Lac la Hache (first edition).
103 A/8
Spiller Channel (first edition).
93 A/3
Murphy Lake (first edition).
103 A/9
Roderick Island (first edition).
93 A/4
150 Mile House (first edition).
103 G/8-1E
Banks Island (first edition).
93 J/5
Great Beaver Lake (first edition).
103 G/9
McCauley Island (first edition).
93 J/6
Youngs Creek (first edition).
103 G/10E-7E
Griffith Harbour (first edition).
93 J/11
Weedon Lake (first edition).
103 G/15E
Kitkatla Inlet (first edition).
93 J/12
Carrier Lake (first edition).
103 G/16
Oona River (first edition).
93 J/13
Salmon Lake (first edition).
103 H/3
Gil Island (first edition).
93K/7
Shass Mountain (first edition).
103H/4-A/13E
Trutch Island (first edition).
93K/8
Fort St. James (first edition).
103 H/5
Port Stephens (first edition).
93K/9
Pinchi Lake (first edition).
103 H/6
Hartley Bay (first edition).
93 K/10
Stuart Lake (first edition).
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Village of Fort St. James, May, 1969.   Pacific Great Eastern Railway right-of-way
at top of photo.
 BB 68       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
AIR DIVISION
E. R. McMinn, B.A., B.A.Sc, D.L.S., B.C.L.S., P.Eng.
The acquisition of air photographs reached a new high of 40,000 prints despite
a season of unusual weather; a highlight of air operations this year was the lease
for two months of a Lear Jet for air photography.
During the year a 40-per-cent increased demand for air photos developed, and
over one-quarter million prints were produced. In map compilation, our arrangements with the Forest Inventory Division were redefined so that we will now produce
finished planimetric sheets giving the original to them and retaining a 20-chain master
and a 40-chain reduction from which we can quickly produce the very useful 40-
chain series. Our output with present staff for lay downs and for compilation and
draughting will be four hundred 20-chain sheets per year. Several changes were
made in equipment, and especially in methods, to increase production in the airphoto unit, the laydown section, and the compilation and draughting sections.
At the start of a new decade, the Division is in good condition to take part in
the work of the 70's, which will be the air photography, survey control, and mapping of the northern half of the Province where the mining and forestry industries
are already pressing into the wilderness.
FLYING OPERATIONS
Some camera unserviceability was experienced with the Zeiss camera during
a period of heavy flying in June. The problem was a breakdown in a main-drive
motor and in a blower motor; however, replacements were obtained with no loss
of photography, and spare motors of each type are now stocked in our Instrument
Shop.
Again this year Highways Department provided one pilot and the Division
hired one for the six-month season. For the leased aircraft a pilot, co-pilot, and
engineer were hired and the navigator and photographer were provided from our
staff. This Lear Jet aircraft has a top speed of 600 m.p.h., a range of 1,200 miles,
and will climb at 5,000 feet per minute with a ceiling of 48,000 feet. Operationally,
in 100 hours' flying-time there was no unserviceability and, apart from a new battery, no field maintenance was required. A feature of the aircraft was its high speed
and all-weather IFR capability; the crew could be on photography at the limits of
the Province within one hour and 40 minutes out of Victoria. The jet was vibration
free and the camera leveling mount was bolted to the air frame; there were no
stability problems; course corrections were almost instantaneous. Ferry trips were
made at the optimum ceiling 35,000 feet and the aircraft descended to 20,000 feet,
where photography was carried out at 400 m.p.h. The Zeiss navigation sight, after
modification, was perfectly matched to this unexcelled photographic airplane.
Both Beechcraft continued to function well. CF-BCE had an engine change
at the end of August and also developed a leaking gas tank late in the season,
which will be repaired during the annual winter maintenance period.
With the exception of a bright clear 10-day period in early June, photographic
weather was not favourable, and in the northern latitudes almost non-existent in the
mid-summer months. As a consequence, the utilization in July and August of the
Lear aircraft in the northern area was limited; it did, however, accomplish large
blocks of revision photography in the south.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH BB 69
A record accomplishment was achieved during the 10-day period already mentioned during which the two Beechcraft flew a total of 140 hours and took some
15,500 photographs.
Total hours flown  677:40
Total square miles photographed    67,080
Total number of photographs    39,558
Photography was completed all or in part for 106 out of a total of 120 projects.
With the greatly increased service ceiling of the jet, some 1 mile to 1 inch
photography was done in the Peace River area and 1 mile and one-half to 1 inch
photography was done on the Lower Mainland and southern Vancouver Island with
success.
In last year's report it was stated that the northern part of the Province has
the least amount of photographic weather. This fact was vividly portrayed this
year when in the Dease Lake-Stikine area, between the middle of June and the
beginning of September, there were only two part-days when it was clear enough
to undertake photography. It is evident that if this part of the Province is to be
covered with new photography within the time period originally outlined, it can
only be done with high-speed aircraft in order to get into the area quickly and to
achieve the maximum production possible during the limited duration of clear
weather. For complete air-photo coverage of the Province, the reader is referred
to Key Maps 15 to 18 contained in envelope attached to back cover of this Annual
Report.
PROCESSING
The 1969 season began in March when 12 rolls of film were exposed. April
was a month of poor weather and no further photography was taken until early
May. A total of 173 air films, including 10 colour films, was exposed during the
season.
Early May saw the installation of the Kodak Versamat film processor. This
processor handles film of all sizes from 16 mm. up to 9Vi inches in rolls and sheet
film from 4 by 5 to 11 by 14 inches. After a two-week working-in period, good
results were obtained on all our air film.
Prints on a waterproof-base paper are also very quickly and efficiently handled
in this processor, one feature being that prints end up in the basket in order, doing
away with the necessity of hand sorting afterwards. This feature applies only to
orders for complete rolls, small one or two-print orders having to be separated by
hand, although they are in sequence. The flight information is shown automatically
on all prints, including the date of exposure which has eliminated the manual chore
of date-stamping on the back of each print.
The month of April showed a drop in production. This was due to the need
for a complete rewiring of the Process Laboratory to accommodate the installation
of the Versamat automatic processor. After a three-day period endeavouring to
keep production going while allowing the electricians to do their work, it was
decided to shut down completely for four days. As a result, a new power supply
was also installed, controlled from a central panel, a great improvement.
Also in the month of May a night shift was instituted for a period of three
weeks. A three-man crew began work at 4.30 p.m. and continued until 12 p.m.
to cut down some of the tremendous backlog of small print orders for public use.
The month ended with a total of over 27,600 prints. The use of the Versamat
processor and waterproof prints had a great deal to do with this record output.
An overtime shift for two weeks during the month of July and the use of the
Versamat for print processing again showed a substantial increase in production.
The total for the month of July was 28,995.
 BB 70       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Two of the junior personnel left at the end of July and two more, one a female
assistant, were taken on. A second female employee started in September, but left
in November. November 12th saw the unexpected loss of a long-time member of
the Process Laboratory staff. CD. Hobson died suddenly, having been one of
the staff for 20 years.
One of the electronic printers was practically out of operation for 10 days during November. The loss of one of these printers for only a few days as well as the
loss of a skilled man has quite an effect on the month's production figures, which
dropped to a low of 14,000 prints.
The year ended with a total of 253,027 prints.
COMPILATION
The 1969 harvest of air photography for Forest Inventory mapping was 20,000
first-priority prints and 5,000 second-priority prints.
The photography from the Fontas area of North-eastern British Columbia came
in early May, giving the compilation section a running start in its attempt to produce
600 compiled map-sheets for the Forestry Inventory Division. Photography from
the other areas came in at a steady rate through the season and although the Botanie
area was not included in the programme until September, it was completed by
October.
In an effort to produce 600 map-sheets in the 1969/70 season, the Compilation
Section has streamlined its procedure; the raying-in process has been eliminated and,
in place of duplicate photos, the originals will be given to the Forestry crews for all
areas that can be mapped by April of each year. Full use is being made of all
existing mapping and by December 31st all 19,500 first-priority photos were
through the template laydown stage and approximately 325 maps were detail-
plotted. At the present time, mapping personnel are being diverted from laydown
to detail plotting. Considering all aspects of 1969, it has been a most successful
and productive year.
1969 ends with 5,000 second-priority photos on hand; therefore, the Compilation Section has a good start. Two problems must be faced in 1970—first, the vast
areas to be mapped have virtually no control, a major problem for this section, and
second, the Division continues to lose senior mapping personnel. These people
cannot be replaced from the outside and the past turnover of junior personnel increases the problem of in-service training.
DRAUGHTING
The Draughting Office has completed another productive year; the regular
duties pertaining to the mapping of some 15,000 square miles for the Forest Inventory Division were interspersed with many special and interesting assignments.
For the Timberland Appraisers of the Taxation Branch, the redrawing of the
Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway Land Grant was undertaken at a scale of 20
chains to 1 inch, with its complicated process of fitting and adjusting the existing
cadastral surveys to the newly surveyed and alienated blocks.
To facilitate this request, four university students were recruited for the summer months to allow experienced personnel to proceed with this exacting work. A
separate drawing office was borrowed to accommodate the students; trained under
a capable supervisor, their contribution was notable.
By using the skills of photogrammetry and mapping, the Draughting Office was
able to provide answers to several problems presented by the Lands Branch in
matters of land accretion, the proposed subdivision of Crown lands, pinpointing the
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
BB 71
position of lots on aerial photographs, and the computing of areas with irregular
boundaries.
Because the requirements for lot compilation are decreasing as the Forest
Inventory Division moves into Northern British Columbia, and because changes in
the mapping procedure have been effective, there has been an increase of 65 per
cent in the number of control sheets handled by the Draughting Office.
Another 37 map-sheets were produced at 40 chains to 1 inch by means of
reducing the newer 20-chain sheets as a quick means of revising the original 40-chain
sheets.
Several mosaics were prepared; there is an increasing demand for this method
of presenting air-photo information.
New employees and students continue to visit the Air Division for purposes of
orientation and education; although this is a time-consuming process, it appears to
be extremely worth while. This year the visitors included the engineering students
of the Royal Roads Cadets, a fourth-year class of engineering students of the
Faculty of Foresty at the University of British Columbia, a class of senior-secondary
students from a Duncan high school, the map-draughting students from the Vocational School in Victoria, and the recent employees of the Forest Service, together
with employees of the Forest Engineering Section. In the same theme, members of
this office contributed to an informative lecture on the use of aerial photographs at
various city schools.
20-chain Control and Compilation by Map-sheets, 1969
Botanie -            .    	
Compilation
Control
9
Kingcome	
85
Nicola - -    -    - _ _ -     -   -
34
Stuart Lake     	
  51
181
E. & N.                 ...    	
87
Lakelse                     -              	
11
Moberly ,       ___           _ -
17
21
Kotcho      ___
166
Fontas      _        __ 	
____     23
149
Vancouver      	
     4
5
Totals 	
  95
748
INSTRUMENT-SHOP
The Instrument-shop completed 107 projects during the year. These projects
include design, construction, and maintenance of equipment used for field work,
photographic processing, and mapping. Successful completion of such a wide variety of tasks speaks well for the versatility, ingenuity, and technical competence of
the shop staff.
Field Equipment
A navigation sight, identical to the one designed and built in this shop a few
years ago for survey aircraft CF-BCD, was constructed for CF-BCE. While on the
subject of navigation sights it is interesting to note that the new Zeiss NT-1 navigation sight was modified for use in a pressurized aircraft. In order to do this it was
necessary to find a method which would provide the required pressure-seal, and
then carry out this work as well as designing a vacuum tank so the pressure-seal could
 BB 72       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
be tested. The operational problems were condensation, icing (at 50,000 feet the
outside air temperature was in the order of —64° F.), and the 7 p.s.i. pressure
differential. The sight was shortened, sealed at both ends, and filled with dry nitrogen.   Both sights performed well during the field season this year.
The camera mount which was leased with the Lear Jet broke very early in the
field season, so this shop was called upon to make emergency repairs to the mount.
Annual preventive maintenance was carried out on the Division's four aerial
cameras.
Out of 18 pairs of binoculars evaluated or repaired for the Forest Service, 12
pairs were found to be uneconomical to repair and six pairs were adjusted or
repaired.
Also for the Forest Service, new mounts for the 70-mm. Linhof cameras were
fabricated on the helicopter boom. The new mounts were required so that the
Linhof cameras could be removed from the boom and replaced without loss of
relative orientation.
Photographic Processing Equipment
The main feature was the purchase by the Air Division of a Kodak Versamat
continuous processor. This shop was responsible for the planning and modification
of the Process Laboratory in preparation for the installation of this processor. It
also worked closely with the Photographic staff for the initial sensitometry and operation of the machine.
In addition to the just-mentioned modifications, the shop participated in the
upgrading of the facilities in the enlarging room by designing new stainless-steel
processing and washing sinks and by building a carriage-type support for the
new vacuum easel.
Stainless-steel racks for processing Va -inch-thick glass plates were built for use
in the Process Laboratory.
As noted in last year's Annual Report, the production of 35-mm. diapositives
from aerial negatives was temporarily discontinued because of a lack of suitable
equipment. A recommendation, outlining a method and the equipment required
to do this job, was submitted by the shop; subsequently, the equipment was purchased, assembled into a working unit, and delivered to the Process Laboratory.
Maintenance of the two electronic photographic printers proved to be rather
time-consuming this year. Five hundred and eighty-three man-hours were devoted
to this task during the year; however, one or the other of the printers were actually
out of service for approximately one-quarter of this time. A spare amplifier was
assembled to facilitate isolation of electrical faults and thus reduce lost printing time.
The electrical problem with the pressure-plate lifting system in the F.F.3
Projection Printer, which was indicated in last year's Annual Report, was rectified
in March of this year and no further trouble has been reported. This enlarger was
fitted with an Aristo cold-light source in July of this year.
Modification of aerial camera instrument boxes, design of a series of electronic
printer masks, and design and construction of special annotation equipment were
the Instrument-shop's part in implementing a decision to remove the necessity for
stamping the date of photography and "All rights reserved " on the reverse side
of each print.
Because of a reallocation of space in the basement next to the Process Laboratory, a large amount of new storage space was required for paper and chemicals
within the Process Laboratory itself. The planning of this work was done cooperatively by the laboratory and shop personnel. The resulting construction of
shelves, storage racks, and working-tables was undertaken by the shop.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
BB 73
Mapping Equipment
One older-type Episcope which will handle large originals was refurbished and
fitted with circular fluorescent lights for use in the Draughting Office.
Seven tables were built for the Mapping Office and the Topographic Division
used the shop facilities to construct three L-shaped draughting tables for its own use.
REPORTS
The following reports were prepared during the year:—
Process Laboratory Tempered Water Supply and Requirements.
Saltzman Projection Printer Scale Enlargements.
Versamat Processor Discussion.
Further Notes on Versamat Processor.
Low Contrast Diapositive Batch Developing.
Cold-light Source for F.F.3, Projection Printer.
35-mm. Diapositive Production.
Multiple Printing and Processing of 9-by-9-inch Glass Diapositives.
Report on Tri-X Film.
Process Laboratory Hot Water Requirements.
Preliminary Ilford Film Test.
Report on the Condition of F. 24 Camera Equipment.
STATISTICS
1969 Air Operations Cost Summary by Projects
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80-chain vertical cover—
1. New cover—
Agriculture Department—Peace River
1:15
2:00
65
90
1,405
2,045
$218.87
350.18
$153.82
212.96
$372.69
563.14
Finance Department—Halfway River
Totals	
3:15
155
$6.04
3,450
$0.27
$569.05
$366.78
$935.83
Average cost	
40-chain vertical cover—
1. New cover—Forest Surveys and Inven
tory Division—Stikine P.S.Y.U	
2. Revision—
Agriculture   Department—-ARDA
Blocks 82 F and K   -	
	
B.
6:50
14:45
5:10
18:25
9:10
8:30
7:30
6:40
6:10
10:00
2:30
10:30
2:00
350
535
315
725
290
900
460
630
475
460
235
305
140
1,730
2,970
1,595
3,340
1,650
4,615
2,340
3,450
2,205
2,515
1,250
1,050
700
—
$1,196.48
2,582.64
904.65
3,224.64
1,605.02
1,488.30
1,313.20
1,167.29
1,079.74
1,750.95
437.73
1,838.49
350.18
$828.20
1,265.96
745.38
1,715.55
686.22
2,129.66
1,088.49
1,490.76
1,123.98
1,088.49
556.08
721.71
331.28
$2,024.68
3,848.60
1,650.03
4,940.19
2,291.24
3,617.96
2,401.69
2,658.05
Forest  Surveys and Inventory Division—Stikine P.S.Y.U..;	
	
Geographic Division—■
Block 82 E.._   -
Block 82 F --
Blocks 92 G and J	
Lands Department—
Block 82 E	
	
Block 82 F	
Block 82 G	
Block 82 J 	
2,203.72
2,839.44
Block 82 K              	
	
993 81
Block 82 L	
2,560.20
681.46
Block 82 N	
	
 BB 74       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
1969 Air Opeations Cost Summary by Projects—Continued
rt
3 °
•. a
Is
Zcl,
Accomplishment
00 .
OS
•r ai
PL.O
o
a
e<l
u
So
2 s
as
0.O
13 ai
»2
SJ <D
as.
31
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B. 40-chain verticle cover—Continued
2. Revision—Continued
Land Inspection Division—
Peace River Region   	
Prince George-Quesnel	
2:30
13:40
75
690
430
3,445
437.73
2,392.95
177.47
1,632.73
615.20
4,025.68
,S"h-tnti-0"
117:30
6,235
33,285
$20,573.511$14,753.76
$35,327.27
3. Improvement flying—Block 82 G..._ -
2:45
80
340
	
$481.51
$189.30
$670.81
Totals       	
127:05
6,665
$5.70
35,355
$1.08
—
$22,251.50 |S15,771.26
 |	
$38,022.76
C. 20-chain vertical cover—
1. New cover—Forest Surveys and Inventory Division—
Fontas P.S.Y.U _ -	
Kingcome P.S.Y.U  	
Moberly, P.S.Y.U   _
Takla P.S.Y.U	
73:55
11:00
24:35
46:30
14:50
6,910
840
2,500
4,835
605
8,875
835
2,450
5,330
675
-—-
$12,942.34
1,926.04
4,304.39
8,141.86
2,597.22
$16,351.00
1,987.68
5,915.70
11,440.98
1,431.60
$29,293.34
3,913.72
10,220.09
—
19,582.84
Wapiti P S.Y.U.
4,028.82
170:50
15,690
18,165
$29,911.85
$37,126.96
$67,038.81
2. Revision—■
Forest Surveys and Inventory Division—
Botanie P.S.Y.U.          	
24:25
13:00
22:25
9:40
2:50
30:20
9:35
9:05
2,015
1,185
1,350
565
160
2,145
485
380
2,225
1,500
1,430
565
180
2,200
470
425
$4,275.21
2,276.23
3,925.01
1,692.57
496.10
5,311.18
1,677.97
1,590.44
$4,768.06
2,804.04
3,194.48
1,336.95
378.60
5,075.67
1,147.65
899.19
$9,043.27
Kingcome P.S.Y.U.. 	
Nicola Barton P.S.Y.U	
5,080.27
—
7,119.49
Quesnel Lakes P.S.Y.U	
3,029.52
Skeena P.S.Y.U	
874.70
Stuart P.S.Y.U -	
10,386.85
Vancouver P.S.Y.U 	
2,825.62
Willow Naver P.S.Y.U	
2,489.63
121:20
8,285| 8,995
—
$21,244.711$19,604.64
$40,849.35
Finance Department-
3:25
7:00
3:15
190
500
270
195
600
320
—
$598.23
1,225.66
569.05
$449.59
1,183.14
638.90
$1,047.82
2,408.80
Mines Department—Highland Valley..
1,207.95
Sub-totals —	
13:40
960
1,115
 .
$2,392.94
$2,271.63
$4,664.57
305:50
24,935
$4.51
28,275
$3.98
$53,549.50
$59,003.23
$112,552.73
Average cost	
D. Special projects—
Agriculture Department—
Fraser Valley Soils Study  	
3:25
6:35
1:15
4:40
4:25
1:30
1:00
1:00
:15
2:20
1:00
1:00
:30
1:00
1:00
2:40
:45
:50
3:00
2:00
2:00
2:15
168
300
20
170
185
80
87
66
7
152
24
210
7
58
24
80
32
10
86
92
6
100
260
72
5
130
130
52
44
44
5
80
16
128
4
22
19
48
26
8
61
60
2
27
$598.24
1,152.71
218.87
817.11
773.34
262.64
175.09
175.09
43.77
408.56
175.09
175.09
87.55
175.09
175.09
466.92
131.32
145.91
525.28
350.18
350.18
393.96
$397.54
709.89
47.32
402.25
437.77
189.30
205.87
156.17
16.56
359.68
56.79
496.93
16.56
137.24
56.79
189.30
75.72
23.66
203.50
217.70
14.20
236.63
$995.78
Port Renfrew Soils Study  	
1,862.60
University of British Columbia Soils
Study   	
266.19
British Columbia Hydro—Arrow Lakes ....
1,219.36
Finance Department—
1,211.11
451.94
Garibaldi-Green Lake	
	
380.96
331.26
60.33
Salmon Arm	
768.24
231.88
672.02
Thormanby Island	
Geographic   Division — Vanderhoof-Fort
	
104.11
312.33
Forest Engineering—
231.88
656.22
	
207.04
169.57
	
728.78
567.88
364.38
Forest Research—Blaeberry River
630.59
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH BB 75
1969 Air Operations Cost Summary by Projects—Continued
Vi
° <«
5 °
5-3
Accomplishment
00
'£ "ri
o
IS
a
rt
GO
2 ■»
o t«
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as
-2a
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1>  CJ
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HO
D. Special projects—Continued
Highways Department—
4:40
6:45
2:40
:30
1:30
2:30
4:30
1:55
:45
4:20
:30
1:35
3:10
2:15
1:15
:45
1:00
:45
:30
:45
1:00
:50
1:00
1:30
1:30
1:45
•4";
90
20
175
7
18
42
417
5
9
181
7
18
296
65
130
45
38
26
15
19
108
7
53
9
50
9
17
10
8
75
7
6
28
285
12
77
21
118
36
198
74
52
2,294
20
402
66
1
6
13
2
64
3
8
77
	
20
3
73
4
12
33
49
3
5
146
4
18
168
185
109
20
15
18
12
6
79
4
40
2
24
1
22
7
6
56
5
2
21
69
4
85
19
14
18
45
95
34
1,225
12
102
18
2
2
4
1
240
2
30
12
$817.11
1,181.88
466.92
87.55
262.64
437.73
787.93
335.59
131.32
758.75
87.55
277.23
554.47
393.96
218.87
131.32
175.09
131.32
87.55
131.32
175.09
145.91
175.09
262.64
262.64
306.41
131.32
87.55
43.77
175.09
87.55
87.55
87.55
700.37
700.37
1,050.56
262.64
612.83
131.32
1,327.79
350.19
875.47
2,042.75
1,721.75
1,196.47
423.14
14.59
29.18
218.87
29.18
787.93
29.18
218.87
350.19
$212.96
47.32
414.11
16.56
42.59
99.38
986.75
11.83
21.30
428.30
16.56
42.59
700.43
153.81
307.62
106.48
89.92
61.52
35.49
44.96
255.56
16.56
125.41
21.30
118.31
21.30
40.23
23.66
18.93
177.47
16.56
14.20
66.25
674.39
28.39
182.20
49.69
279.22
85.19
468.52
175.10
123.05
5,428.26
47.32
951.25
156.17
2.37
14.20
30.76
4.73
151.45
7.10
18.93
182.21
$1,030.07
1,229.20
Natal Slide	
Lands Department—
	
104.11
305.23
537.11
1,774.68
347.42
152.62
1,187.05
104.11
319.82
1,254.90
547.77
526 49
Manning Park    	
Land Inspection Division—
BabineLake    	
237.80
265.01
Booming-grounds.-..    _	
192.84
123.04
176.28
430.65
162.47
300.50
283 94
	
Northern Trans-Provincial Highway
Redonda Island	
Tatlapan Lake  	
Legal Surveys Division—Kootenay Lake-
Municipal Affairs Department—Kimberley
Public   Works   Department — Provincial
	
380.95
327.71
171.55
111.21
62.70
352.56
Recreation   and   Conservation   Department—
Champion Lakes Park	
1
4
30
15
00
30
30
30
no
	
Garibaldi Park 	
—
104.11
101.75
Rathtrevor Beach Park _	
Wells Gray Park 	
1,374.76
728.76
1,232.76
312.33
892 05
Topographic Division—-
4:00
6:00
1:30
3:30
:45
7:35
2:00
5:00
11:40
9:50
6:50
2:25
:05
:10
1:15
:10
4:30
:10
1:15
2:00
Ortho-photo test	
	
Transport   Department—Campbell   River
Water Resources—■
216.51
	
1,796.31
525.29
Liard River  „
998.52
Lower Fraser Valley	
Nakina-Taku Rivers	
	
7,471.01
1,769.07
-
2,147.72
579.31
16 96
Western Canadian Universities—Barclay
Sound _	
Internal—
43.38
249.63
Vancouver	
Vancouver high altitude	
	
33.91
939.38
36.28
237.80
Whistler Mountain	
532.40
Totals	
173:15
7,803
$6.25
:::::.
4,448
$10.97
$30,334.98'$18,464.09| $48,799.07
 1           1
 BB 76       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
1969 Air Operations Cost Summary by Projects—Continued
So,
as
3 o
Vi
0 a
U M
5 °
5-5
Accomplishment
c;2
■r c«
■so
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E. Miscellaneous flying—
Internal—
11:15
2:05
31:25
23:30
$1,969.80
364.78
$1,969.80
364.78
Aircraft, maintenance.!
Totals	
68:15
$2,334.58
$2,334.58
677:40
39,558
67,080
4,448
$109,039.61
$93,605.36
$202,644,972
1 Cost of maintenance and training charged to all projects.
2 Includes $75,927.91 for two-month lease and operation of a Lear jet.
Orders for Standard Prints (9 by 9 Inches) from
British Columbia Negatives, 1969
Public—
Individuals
Companies
Mining
Universities and schools	
Towns and cities	
Commercial air surveys        5,769
Real estate	
Forest industries     16,987
Reprints
Loans
5,087
3,039
2,324
752
32,421
13,924
12,805
864
4,108
109
5,769
1,725
419
162
16,987
3,867
Totals
79,920
Federal Government—
Mines and technical surveys  39,513
Fisheries   5,505
ARDA  7,005
Miscellaneous   1,099
Totals
Provincial Government-
Lands Service	
Surveys and Mapping Branch
Water Resources Service	
Forest Service	
Department of Highways __
Department of Finance	
Department of Agriculture
Department of Mines
British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority
Regional Planning Board	
Department of Recreation and Conservation
Miscellaneous 	
Totals  1	
Grand totals	
53,122
9,548
23,605
4,067
69,609
3,320
3,674
2,508
2,186
623
4
690
151
119,985
253,027
24,442
100
182
16,562
460
17,304
346
26,973
1,806
10,915
3,161
377
63
270
67
488
987
176
45,629
87,375
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Public Loans and Reprints
BB 77
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
13,033
53,141
15,680
61,276
13,123
50,918
13,127
60,794
24,442
79,920
Totals	
66,174
76,956
64,041
73,921
104,362
Letters Inward and Loans
Letters inward	
Loan service requisitions	
Loan fees	
3,621
554
$5,859
Revenue
Cash sales	
Land accounts .
Total
$7,935.36
109,892.73
$117,828.09
Production Record to 1969, Process Laboratory
1946-1966 1967
1968
1969
Grand
Total
Processing completed—■
Air films—
R.C 8, O.S.C., Zeiss 	
F24 and Eagle  	
F24, F8, K20 obliques	
Test rolls  _
Colour—R.C. 8 and Zeiss 	
70 mm.—black and white  ft.
70 mm.—colour  ft.
Topographic (116)	
Dominion Hydrographic K20	
Printing completed—
Standard prints (5" x 5" enlarged to 10" x 10")
Contact prints (5" x 5") 	
Kendra prints (9" x 9" reduced to 5" x 5")	
Contact prints, Cintel and Milligan (10" x 10")
Contact prints, colour (10"x 10")	
Contact prints (20" x 24" and larger)	
Enlargements (up to 40" x 96")	
Topographic (11" x 14")	
Lantern slides (2" x 2" (stereo and 35 mm.) )~.
Autopositive films (up to 40" x 42")	
Film transparencies (up to 40" x 46")	
Film transparencies (photo drawings) _
Kelsh,   A7,   A8,   plates,   films,   and   miscellaneous ground negatives	
Requisitions completed 	
639.5
2,829
75.5
28
8.5
3,535
750
4,039
9
1,963,516
46,087
4,132
617,148
3,781
29,333
23,688
384
8,284
1,438
5,248
40,282
140.5
3
1.5
5
1,200
3.5
39,810
144,717
2
1,301
66
228
182
19
980
3,976
105.5
5
10
.5
8
600
27,236
184
177,651
56
1,363
17
172
297
875
4,085
163
4
8
10
1,100
700
67
2
56,121
196,906
64
51
1,534
237
218
324
1,072
3,907
1,048.5
2,841
93.5
30
27
6,435
1,450
4,106
15.5
2,086,683
46,271
4,132
1,136,422
64
3,890
33,531
23,754
638
8,902
2,241
19
8,175
52,250
  UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT
LANDS
  UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
BB 81
UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
R. P. Murdoch, Project Manager
Mr. M. E. Ferguson, who has served as Project Manager for the University
Endowment Lands for the past 26 years, retired on August 15, 1969. Mr. Ferguson's intimate knowledge of the area and his long association with the local
residents will be missed by all concerned.
No decision has as yet been made with respect to development of the considerable acreage of raw land in the Endowment area. However, one parcel of
privately owned land is now being developed for residential purposes. A proposal
from the owners of Block 96 to erect a high-rise apartment building was submitted
to the Manager for consideration, but never finalized. Preliminary discussions
have also taken place with respect to developing cliff-side apartments along the
sloughing cliffs facing Spanish Banks. If this proposal proves to be feasible, the
continuing erosion problem along these banks could be arrested while at the same
time providing apartment housing which is still in great demand in this area. The
availability and cost of capital will no doubt be a major factor if either of the above-
mentioned proposals proceed.
The concentrated flow of traffic onto the University of British Columbia
campus continues to be a problem. The Department of Highways has installed an
additional lane, extending the two lanes on South-west Marine Drive in a northwesterly direction an additional 400 feet. However, until both South-west Marine
Drive and 16th Avenue west of Blanca Street are opened up as four-lane divided
highways, the major problem of moving 8,000 cars in one direction over a period
of approximately one hour each day the university is in session will not be solved.
The fill in No. 1 Ravine has proceeded satisfactorily during this past year
and at the present rate the fill should be completed in approximately four months'
time.
During this past year a change was made in our scavenging operations. Since
April 1, 1969, the garbage has been picked up by a private contractor. The inability
of the contractor to operate within his contract price has made it necessary to terminate the contract on March 31, 1970. Arrangements have been made to acquire
a garbage-packer unit and operate same by the Endowment Lands staff.
There is a continuing interest by private corporations and entrepreneurs to
develop all or part of the University Endowment Lands for various purposes. All
proposals have been rejected by Government pending proclamation of the Universities Real Estate Development Corporation Act.
The tables hereunder outline the revenues received over the past 10 years
and the building activity over the past three years.
 BB 82       DEPARTMENT OF LANDS,
FORESTS,
AND WATER RESOURCES
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1       0\0\aNO"\0-.0-.0\C-OSO\
 UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
BB 83
Number and Value of Building Permits Issued for the
Calendar Years 1967, 1968, and 1969
1967
1968
1969
Number
Value
Number
Value
Number
Value
1
2
10
1
1
5
13
3
1
3
2
1
1
1
14
~2
~3
4
$75,000.00
$150,000.00
235,000.00
71,800.00
150.00
16,377.00
	
125,000.00
New students'centre                         	
30,000.00
$51,900.00
75,771.00
Alterations to schools	
Alterations to commercial buildings	
66,500.00
19,000.00
1,200.00
8,400.00
87,000.00
6,648.00
3,700.00
58,000.00
Totals	
20
$479,975.00
22
$147,000.00
26
$454,471.00
  PERSONNEL OFFICE
  PERSONNEL OFFICE
BB 87
PERSONNEL OFFICE
K. M. Hanson, Personnel Officer
The year 1969 was a busy one, even though the table below indicates fewer
recruitments, reclassifications, and promotions than in the last two years.
1966
1967
1968
1969
55
42
22
7
12
44
5
58
55
39
19
11
17
43
3
77
12
52
25
24
2
13
40
3
59
8
45
22
Promotions... „ _ 	
16
6
8
42
1
52
5
The establishment of the Department was increased during the year by two
Clerks 4. These positions have been added to the Land Administration Division
(Vault).
In November, 1969, Mr. A. F. Smith was awarded a diploma in public administration, having completed the three-year training plan. Other employees of
this Department taking this course include V. G. Knapik, R. F. Oberg, R. A. Paine
(third year); G. H. Wilson, A. C. Bridge, A. G. Anderson, Fort St. John (second
year); W. C. Fry, T. J. Todd, Burns Lake (first year).
Promotions during the year included that of Mr. R. P. Murdoch to the position
of Manager, University Endowment Lands, replacing Mr. M. E. Ferguson, who
retired effective August 31, 1969, after 33 years of service. As a result of promotions made in the latter part of 1968 at headquarters in Victoria, a number of Land
Officers in the District Offices were either promoted or transferred.
In October of this year, Mrs. G. Gaunt, Clerk 4 in the Accounting Division,
passed away after a lengthy illness. In November, Mr. C. D. Hobson, Photographic
Technician, Air Surveys Division, died while in service. In December, Mr. R. L.
Cawston, Technical Land Officer 2, Land Inspection Division, Smithers, died as a
result of a hunting accident.
The year as a whole was successful, though it is hoped that a better system
with regard to reclassifications can be devised in the future.
  MAIL AND FILE ROOM
  MAIL AND FILE ROOM
BB 91
MAIL AND FILE ROOM
David S. Preston
Letters received in the Department during 1969 amounted to 272,431, compared to 259,246 in 1968. There has been approximately the same percentage
increase in letters received for the past three years.
The renovations to the file vault progressed quite favourably and should be
completed early in the new year. The new colour-code filing system will then be
installed and should serve the Department more efficiently than the previous system.
In our old system of filing it was necessary for the staff to visit three separate
offices to collect file or data, whereas, in the new system, a visit to one central location will give the clerks the material or file they require. One of the major advantages of the new system will be a complete record of all files that have been drawn
from the vault, whereas in the old system anyone had access, thereby leaving the
control of the files without an accurate record.
The colour coding of the files will undoubtedly assist the staff in quick recognition of the particular one they are searching for. Numbers 0 to 9 are each given
a colour and wherever a number appears it will be on its own colour bar, and it is
anticipated during drawing and searching of files a misplaced colour bar will be
easily spotted, thereby eliminating some of the common filing errors.
Letters Inward
Branch
1968
1969
10-year Average,
1960-69
Lands   	
Forests -      - ~
58,368
141,250
34,197
25,431
64,298
145,536
36,706
25,891
52,658
142,965
29,288
22,182
Totals                                 	
259,246
272,431
247,093
Letters Outward (Recorded)
Lands  	
Forests — — 	
14,933                        15,417                       14,419
1,811                          1,900                          1,964
2,566         |             Nil                        Nil
Totals      	
19,310          |          17,317          |          16,383
Miscellaneous Reports
Designation
1968
1969
10-year Average,
1960-69
Forest-fire reports 	
Logging-inspection reports	
Land-classification reports	
Stumpage-adjustment notices..
Totals	
1,647
8,418
6,428
11,664
28,157
2,318
8,360
6,137
21,636
38,451
Micro-film Reference, 3,082.
3,832
12,090
5,115
6,064
27,101
New Files Created
" O" files	
Timber-mark files -	
7,051
1,685
1,128
7,727
1,753
1,574
6,562
1,522
1,964
Totals	
9,864
11,054
10,048
 Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1970
1030-270-1811

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