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ANNUAL REPORT of the MOTOR-VEHICLE BRANCH FOR THE YEAR 1969 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1971

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL
ANNUAL REPORT
oj the
MOTOR-VEHICLE
BRANCH
FOR THE YEAR
1969
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1971
  To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor oj the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Annual Report of the Motor-
vehicle Branch for the year 1969.
LESLIE RAYMOND PETERSON,
A ttorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, British Columbia, December, 1969.
  REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT
OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1969
The Honourable L. R. Peterson, Q.C., LL.D., Ed.D., F.R.S.A.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, British Columbia.
Sir,—It is my privilege to submit the Annual Report of the Motor-vehicle
Branch for 1969. This Report deals with the activities of the Branch during 1969
and provides an accounting for the various aspects of licence issuance for the 1969
licence-year, which ended on February 28, 1970.
The rapid growth in the number of vehicle registrations, evidenced in previous
years, was continued in 1969. Motor-vehicle registrations in British Columbia
reached a total of 988,248, which is an increase of 7.6 per cent over the total registrations in the previous licence-year. The interesting point is to compare this rate-of-
growth figure with the 4 per cent rate of growth experienced throughout Canada.
The number of drivers licensed reached a total of 1,155,075.
Motor-licence issuing facilities are available to the public in 95 communities
throughout British Columbia, and drivers' examination services are available in
many additional communities, so that citizens have the opportunity to obtain original
drivers' licences without long delays or without the necessity of having to travel many
miles to get that public service.
Motor-vehicle accidents continue to increase in numbers and there are tables
of statistics contained in this Report which deal with that serious problem. The
number of traffic fatalities in 1969 reached a total of 542, which was a 5.6 per cent
decrease from the all-time high of 574 traffic deaths recorded in 1968.
The Motor-vehicle Branch continues to assign a great deal of effort to the
operation of the Driver Improvement Programme in its efforts to deal with the ever-
increasing number of drivers involved in accidents and traffic violations and convictions for the more serious traffic offences. This Report contains tables which
record the numbers of persons dealt with in the Driver Improvement Programme and
the actions taken. The number of drivers called in for personal interviews about
their driving records continues to increase and it is the feeling that this is a very
worth-while approach in attempts to have the driver fully recognize the implications
of his record. Across-the-table discussions with the driver of his driving habits are
valuable in obtaining the co-operation of the driver and obtaining his co-operation
in driving in a more responsible manner.
A programme was introduced in 1968 which resulted in dealing with persons
who violated traffic rules of the Motor-vehicle Act, and is known as the " no-fine "
method. The limited beginning of the programme in the County of Victoria on
October 1, 1968, was extended into the County of Nanaimo, which covers the remainder of Vancouver Island, on July 1, 1969. At the end of 1969, plans were
under way for expanding the programme on January 1, 1970, to the remainder of
the Province, with the exception of the Counties of Vancouver and Westminster.
The latter two counties were scheduled to be phased into the programme on April
1, 1970.
Experiences with the "no-fine" programme in 1969 have been encouraging.
It was hoped when the programme was developed that it would result in motorists
showing a great deal more concern about how they drive in order that they would
be able to retain their drivers' licences.   The fact that penalty points are assessed for
 L 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
certain traffic violations and offences has become a concern of drivers, and they are
coming to realize that the accumulation of a number of points inevitably is going to
lead them into problems. An interesting sideline is that a considerable number of
drivers have requested either the enforcement agency that apprehended them when
they committed the driving violation or the Motor-vehicle Branch to see if a fine
could not be paid rather than having penalty points assessed into their record.
The police forces throughout the Province continue to use the roadside
suspension law, which was first introduced into British Columbia in 1967. This is
the legislation which allows the enforcement officer, who suspects the driver has
been drinking and feels that the consumption of alcohol is in an amount that has
affected his ability to drive, to require the driver to surrender his driver's licence for
a period of 24 hours. The law provides that the driver may request the police
officer to provide him with a device so that he can prove to the policeman that he
was not impaired to the level set out in the law. Few drivers make this request,
presumably because they well know in their own minds that they are not very likely
to be able to prove the policeman incorrect. Drivers suspended under this law for
the 24-hour period during 1969 totalled 12,833. There is a strong feeling that the
action which removes this large number of drivers from the road for a critical period,
when their ability to drive was impaired by the use of alcohol, prevented at least
a fair number of those motorists from being involved in subsequent motor-vehicle
accidents.
A motor-vehicle inspection station was put into operation in Richmond in
December, 1969. This is the second station built by the Provincial Government
under the Government's programme of compulsory motor-vehicle inspection. In
1968 the first of the stations was placed into operation in the Greater Victoria area.
The two Provincial Government stations carry out the same sort of inspection programme provided by the Vancouver Motor-vehicle Inspection Station. These three
stations now service a large percentage of vehicles in British Columbia.
The various areas of activities of the Branch are dealt with under the following
headings:—
1. Licences.
2. Accidents and Convictions.
3. Driving Safety.
(a) Safety Responsibility.
(b) Examination of Drivers.
(c) Driver Improvement Programme.
(d) Motor-vehicle Inspection.
4. Central Registry.
5. School Buses.
6. Permits for Flashing Red and Amber Lights, Sirens, and Theft Alarms.
7. Staff.
1. LICENCES
Motor-vehicles licensed in British Columbia in 1969 reached the total of
988,248, as compared to 918,612 in 1968, an increase of 69,636, or 7.6 per cent.
Passenger-type motor-vehicles licensed in 1969 numbered 790,493, an increase
of 49,514 over the 1968 total of 740,979. Commercial-vehicle registrations increased by 20,122. For 1969 the total of commercial vehicles licensed was 197,755.
In comparison, the 1968 total for commercial vehicles was 177,633.
The increase in motor-cycle registrations of 2,441 from the 1968 total of
18,464 to the 1969 total of 20,905 (11.68 per cent) indicates the general motoring
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1969
L 7
public are still continuing to be interested in using the motor-cycle as a means of
transportation.
Trailer registrations are still continuing to increase. The 1969 total of 114,420
is an increase of 12,352 over the 102,068 total of 1968. The camping and boat-
type trailers account for the majority of this increase and would indicate that the
residents of British Columbia are still continuing to enjoy and spend more of their
leisure hours out-of-doors.
The comparative statement of licences, permits, etc., for motor-cycles, trailers,
and chauffeurs covers the volumes in these categories during the licence-years 1962
to 1969.
Comparative Statement of Licences, Permits, Etc., Issued during the
Licence-years 1962 to 1969, Inclusive
Licences Issued
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
Motor-vehicles—
56,822
438,486
67,659
463,457
76,388
495,419
94,190
529,552
89,427
575,364
89,817
612,186
94,333
646,646
107,504
682,989
Total passenger	
495,308|531,116
571,807
623,742
664,791
702,003
740,979
790,493
Commercial (new)	
11,886
108,843
13,830
112,228
16,604
116,969
20,367
123,560
20,009
133,311
20,329
142,885
25,171
152,462
30,564
167,191
Total commercial	
120,729
126,058
133,573
143,927
153,320
163,214
177,633
197,755
616,037
657,174
705,380
767,669
818,111
865,217
918,612
988,248
Non-resident   touring   motor-vehicle
1,551
157
12,069
1,772
1,613
110
12,478
2,241
1,446
111
13,221
2,746
1,212
86
14,250
2,228
1,222
45
15,260
1,968
1,067
34
13,209
1,912
929
32
15,690
2,408
590
Non-resident     special    motor-vehicle
permits    - -	
Non-resident   commercial   motor-vehicle permits—
19
20,696
Quarterly permits -	
3,029
Totals 	
13,841
14,719
15,967
16,478
17,228
15,121
18,098
23,725
Extra-Provincial prorated trucks _
Temporary operation permits—
Passenger   '
2,048
8,732
20,490
1,822
10,076
25,429
2,203
11,237
30,368
2,072
12,961
36,360
2,693
14,076
35,995
2,775
15,717
37,057
2,713
17,599
42,128
3,231
20,260
49,665
Totals	
29,222
35,505
41,605
49,321
50,071
52,774
59,727
69,925
Transporter—
5
63
1,342
3,937
9
67
4,209
4,803
17
82
5,630
8,016
20
88
4,263
11,124
26
81
4,063
13,166
27
68
3,780
14,684
30
87
Motor-cycles—■
706
3,683
5,181
15,724
4,389
5,279
9,012
13,376
15,387
17,229
18,464
20,905
Trailers 	
Extra-Provincial prorated trailers.
Motor-dealers—•
56,434
3,391
885
866
44
13
1,044
256,580
43,610
2,976
2,818
62,116
3,647
968
884
51
16
1,182
284,641
44,899
3,349
4,069
66,725
4,042
1,057
966
91
24
1,296
304,487
47,618
5,312
4,489
73,152
4,275
1,105
1,097
124
31
1,404
337,369
52,423
8,171
5,810
81,703
5,246
1,097
1,238
124
84
1,347
337,860
54,598
9,614
7,225
91,627
6,743
1,086
1,306
118
92
1,196
341,859
57,193
10,872
8,654
102,068
7,859
1,140
1,332
120
85
1,191
351,092
62,370
11,391
9,637
114,420
8,009
1,173
1,538
Original motor-cycle dealer licences ...
Additional   motor-cycle   dealer   licences       .   '    	
Salesmen's licences. ,.	
Transfers—
Passenger	
124
95
1,163
383,477
71,858
13,447
Trailers	
12,003
Total transfers.	
305,984|336,958
361,906
403,773
409,297
418,578
434,490
480,785
Chauffeurs—
5,672
5,010
63,677
796,687
13,741
5,891
5,320
67,781
641,992
14,281
5,910
5,432
72,484
1,619,395
15,563
6,310
5,785
80,977
1,145,251
17,707
7,059
6,435
83,853
1,659,586
13,080
7,065
6,876
83,091
1,692,128
13,459
7,972
7,078
83,323
1,701,655
15,884
8,324
7,768
90,476
Safety responsibility insurance certifi-
12,908
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Drivers' Licences
Original drivers' licences issued during the 1969 licence-year totalled 83,613,
an increase of 19.6 per cent from the 1968 total of 69,895. Original licences
issued to adult applicants amounted to 52,539, and those issued to applicants under
21 years of age amounted to 31,074.
Licensed drivers in British Columbia at the end of 1969 totalled 1,155,075,
an increase of 79,657 or 7.5 per cent over the 1968 total of 1,075,418. Male
drivers comprised 62.8 per cent of the total in the amount of 725,660, leaving the
remaining 429,415 to be the number of licensed female drivers.
The following table sets out statistical information on the number of drivers
in the various age-groups and provides for the number of male and female drivers
in each age-group.
Drivers' Licences—Statistical Information by Age-groups
Age
16-20 years	
21-24 years	
25-30 years	
31-35 years.	
36-40 years...	
41-45 years	
46-50 years	
51-55 years	
56-60 years	
61-65 years	
66-69 years	
70-75 years	
76-80 years	
81-85 years	
86-90 years _..
Over 90 years	
Totals-
Male	
Female	
Year of Birth
1950-1954
1946-1949
1940-1945
1935-1939
1930-1934
1925-1929
1920-1924
1915-1919
1910-1914
1905-1909
1901-1904
1895-1900
1890-1894
1885-1889
1880-1884
1879 and prior
Male
62,257
76,391
108,226
77,064
74,854
69,677
64,801
52,400
48,825
36,737
21,529
18,969
8,697
4,040
1,038
155
725,660
725,660
Female
37,293
50,393
72,443
50,055
45,481
43,244
42,026
32,493
25,610
15,222
7,038
5,773
1,756
497
76
15
Total
99,550
126,784
180,669
127,119
120,335
112,921
106,827
84,893
74,435
51,959
28,567
24,742
10,453
4,537
1,114
170
Per Cent
of Total
8.619
10.976
15.641
11.005
10.418
9.776
9.249
7.350
6.444
4.498
2.473
2.142
0.905
0.393
0.096
0.015
429,415    | 1,155,075 |  100.000
429,415
62.824
37.176
Chauffeurs' Licences
The comparative statement of licences and permits on the previous page shows
the number of licensed chauffeurs in 1969 to be 106,568, an increase of 8,195 over
the 1968 total of 98,373. The number of Class A category chauffeurs licensed to
drive buses increased to 8,324 from 7,972 in 1968. The Class B category chauffeurs licensed to drive taxis increased to 7,768 from 7,078 in 1968. The Class C
category chauffeurs licensed to drive trucks showed an increase in 1969 to 90,476
from the total of 83,323 in 1968.
Motor-dealers' Licences
Motor-dealers' licences issued by the Branch are required by individuals or
firms whose business involves the buying and selling of motor-vehicles, motor-cycles,
or trailers. During the 1969 licence-year, 1,165 motor-dealers' licences permitting
the sale of motor-vehicles and trailers and 124 motor-cycle dealers' licences permitting the sale of motor-cycles and trailers were issued.
A prerequisite for the issuance of a motor-dealer's licence or the retention of
such a licence is that an insurance bond be supplied to the Superintendent of Insurance in the amount of $5,000 or security be filed with the Minister of Finance in a
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1969
L 9
similar amount. The insurance bonds are filed with the Branch on behalf of the
Superintendent of Insurance and, in 1969, 339 dealers' bonds were filed, of which
205 were original bonds for new motor-dealers and 134 were replacement bonds.
There were 258 bonds cancelled during 1969. Security was filed with the Minister
of Finance by two motor-dealers.
A process of investigation is carried out for each new motor-dealer. Information in connection with the proposed operation, previous businesses, corporate
formation, business intentions, premises, and compliance with municipal zoning
regulations are considered before a licence is authorized.
Distribution of Motor-vehicles
The distribution of motor-vehicles in the various centres of the Province is
always of interest. The following table gives information concerning the numbers
of licences issued through the principal licence offices. Since vehicle-owners move
frequently from one area to another, and vehicles are often sold to new owners
residing in different locations from the previous owners, the table cannot be regarded
as an accurate population count of vehicles in the various parts of the Province.
However, the table does provide a guide as to the distribution of vehicles throughout
the Province, and it is of use to groups concerned with community planning projects
and development.
Summary of Passenger Motor-vehicle Licences Issued under Motor-vehicle Act and
Commercial Motor-vehicle Licences Issued under Department of Commercial
Transport Act, by Issuing Office, during 1969 Licence-year.
Passenger Motor-vehicles
Commercial Motor-vehicles
Grand
Total
Issuing Office
Used
Registrations
New
Registrations
Renewals
Total
Used
Registrations
New
Registrations
Renewals
Total
Abbotsford 	
353
203
80
11
54
595
11
1,080
623
682
181
378
238
416
146
406
37
312
62
230
147
1,157
31
1,261
224
13
87
84
502
364
2,307
1,228
800
6
10
138
1,371
20
2,164
1,134
751
294
652
868
225
56
530
2
200
164
1,170
81
1,682
1
1,368
339
23
117
211
1,640
765
7,159
9,948
8,815
1,268
40
1,176
13,447
403
29,073
13,287
6,821
2,471
4,771
10,063
1,815
706
4,308
1,045
1,713
2,213
9,155
1,120
14,597
357
14,697
3,178
677
1,926
3,714
17,092
9,902
63,501
11,529
9,818
1,354
61
1,368
15,413
434
32,317
15,044
8,254
2,946
5,801
11,169
2,456
908
5,244
1,084
2,225
2,439
10,555
1,348
17,436
389
17,326
3,741
713
2,130
4,009
19,234
11,031
72,967
74
37
29
14
41
93
7
224
73
201
82
215
48
211
102
231
4
109
22
38
58
322
19
292
31
3
18
17
116
90
322
415
328
14
13
104
490
11
762
513
395
124
461
335
257
43
517
5
119
64
338
71
907
5
458
124
13
106
86
534
311
1,609
3,023
2,192
638
no
874
4,019
322
7,436
3,922
2,779
1,441
3,038
3,043
1,028
624
3,369
369
892
1,176
2,127
750
5,786
223
4,471
656
412
973
1,231
4,290
3,761
9,569
3,512
2,557
681
137
1,019
4,602
340
8,422
4,508
3,375
1,647
3,714
3,426
1,496
769
4,117
378
1,120
1,262
2,503
879
7,015
247
5,221
811
428
1,097
1,334
4,940
4,162
11,500
15,041
12,375
2,035
198
Atlin	
Burns Lake	
2,387
20,015
774
40,739
19,552
11,629
4,593
9,515
14,595
3,952
1,677
9,361
1,462
3,345
3,701
13,058
2,227
24,451
636
22,547
4,552
1,141
3 227
Courtenay   _	
Fernie.— 	
Fort St. John	
Ganges.  	
Golden .   	
Haney. 	
Kaslo 	
Kelowna        	
Merritt
Mission. 	
5,343
24,174
15,193
84,467
Nelson  	
New Westminster1	
1 New Westminster (includes mail-order issuance to the New Westminster area from Victoria and issuance
of 8,806 passenger and 1,856 commercial plates at Port Coquitlam, who account through New Westminster, is
included; temporary office at Burnaby now accounts through Vancouver): Passenger, 74,121; commercial,
11,759.
 L 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Summary of Passenger Motor-vehicle Licences Issued under Motor-vehicle Act and
Commercial Motor-vehicle Licences Issued under Department of Commercial
Transport Act, by Issuing Office, during 1969 Licence-year—Continued.
Passenger Motor-vehicles
Commercial Motor-vehicles
Grand
Total
Issuing Office
Used
Registrations
New
Registrations
Renewals
Total
Used
Registrations
New
Registrations
Renewals
Total
North Vancouver	
1,270
98
633
52
104
1,065
211
23
141
177
213
20
423
115
173
243
4,561
2,519
1,595
136
597
2,757
209
5,243
106
1,224
9
305
2,119
476
26
353
216
291
32
366
367
462
915
14,683
11,986
5,095
118
1,131
6,543
659
31,887
2,884
10,489
350
5,584
15,785
4,813
927
3,759
2,322
5
1,086
4,063
2,637
3,612
6,826
128,072
56,952
41,423
1,909
10,446
89,080
4,779
38,400
3,088
12,346
411
5,993
18,969
5,500
976
4,253
2,715
509
1,138
4,852
3,119
4,247
7,984
147,316
71,457
48,113
2,163
12,174
98,380
5,647
92
25
148
250
18
279
51
9
80
41
13
8
172
45
55
24
260
363
88
63
180
364
95
782
54
391
21
108
1,187
167
27
261
84
62
9
173
263
421
216
2,545
4,062
652
39
645
2,454
543
3,356
1,213
3,051
301
1,334
6,841
1,471
494
2,265
1,012
4
303
1,896
1,684
1,907
1,504
21,640
9,428
3,012
1,452
4,608
20,302
3,569
4,230
1,292
3,590
572
1,460
8,307
1,689
530
2,606
1,137
79
320
2,241
1,992
2,383
1,744
24,445
13,853
3,752
1,554
5,433
23,120
4,207
42,630
4,380
15,936
983
7,453
27,276
7,189
1,506
Quesnel — .
Revelstoke	
6,859
3,852
588
Ro ssland 	
1,458
7,093
Smithers 	
5,111
6,630
Trail
9,728
Vancouver2  	
Vancouver East2_  	
Vancouver-Pt. Grey2„
Vanderhoof-—	
171,761
85,310
51,865
3,717
17,607
Victorias     _	
121,500
9,854
Totals	
29,610
77,894
682,989
790,493
5,866
24,698
167,191
197,755
988,248
2 Vancouver (includes issuance from Motor Licence offices at 1730 West Georgia Street, 2410 Nanaimo
Street, 6237 West Boulevard, mail-order issuance to the Vancouver area from Victoria, and includes temporary
offices at Burnaby and Richmond during the rush period; does not include issuance at North Vancouver and
does not include 666 commercial plates issued for National Defence vehicles that operate throughout British Columbia; issuance at Gibsons, Pemberton, Sechelt, and Squamish who account through Vancouver have been
deducted):   Passenger, 269,491;   commercial, 40,234.
3 Victoria (does not include mail-order issuance to other areas; does not include 1,667 passenger and 5,111
commercial plates for Provincial Government vehicles that operate throughout British Columbia and does not
include 561 commercial plates issued for National Defence vehicles that operate throughout British Columbia;
issuance of 287 commercial plates to prorated vehicles has been deducted; issuance of 1,810 passenger and 979
commercial plates at Alert Bay, Bella Coola, Port Alice, Port Hardy, and Port McNeill, who account through
Victoria, have been deducted; issuance at Sidney, who also account through the Victoria office, is included):
Passenger, 81,639;   commercial, 12,391.
Revenue
Revenue collected by the Motor-vehicle Branch from licences, permits, motor-
vehicle inspection, and other services, and in the payment of social services tax,
increased by 10.02 per cent to $36,473,888.65 in the 1969 licence-year. The increase was $3,653,662.58 over the 1968 total of $32,820,206.73. Social services
tax collections amounted to $3,741,987.57, as compared to $3,066,096.00 in 1968.
These collections cover motor-vehicle and trailer taxes on transactions which do
not involve licensed motor-dealers. The motor-dealers make their payment of tax
collections directly to the Consumer Taxation Branch of the Department of Finance.
Offices of this Branch and Motor-vehicle Inspection (Richmond and Victoria)
collected 67.08 per cent of the total collections, in the amount of $24,468,196.60.
Offices of the Department of Finance, which carry out our licence-issuing service
in areas not served by the Motor-vehicle Branch, collected the balance of 32.92
per cent. These percentages show no appreciable change on the 1968 licence-year
figures.
The location of Motor-vehicle Branch offices are listed on the following page,
and the 1969 revenue collection at each office is shown:—
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1969       L 11
Motor Licence Offices with Corresponding Revenue
Vancouver  $6,372,021.38
Victoria   4,333,074.89
Vancouver East  3,128,611.08
New Westminster  2,713,010.56
Vancouver-Point Grey  1,430,351.84
Cloverdale  1,411,462.42
North Vancouver  1,136,264.49
Kamloops  1,043,285.66
ChiUiwack  792,745.77
Dawson Creek  656,334.32
Abbotsford  526,959.00
Haney   397,266.02
Trail  301,528.61
Mission   193,464.40
Richmond   31,816.16
Total  $24,468,196.60
Refunds
Legislation provides for refunding of licence fees in several instances where
licences are surrendered to this Branch.
Refunds are made where a vehicle is removed from the Province, and where
a vehicle has been burned, junked, or damaged beyond repair.
Refunds are obtainable by the seller on commercial-vehicle licences when vehicles are transferred. In these instances, the new owner is required to relicense
the vehicle, based on the gross vehicle weight at which he intends to operate the
vehicle.
Refunds may be obtained for vehicles located east of the Cascade Mountains
which are not operated in winter months (November, December, January). Due
to the ability to operate vehicles on an all-year basis in practically all areas of the
Province now, the applications for these seasonal refunds are declining each year.
The fee for the unexpired full years of the five-year drivers' licences is refundable under the following circumstances upon surrender of the licence to this
Branch:—
(a) The licence has been suspended due to the failure of the licensee to qualify
in a driver's examination.
(b) The licensee has taken up residence outside the Province.
(c) The licensee has died.
(d) The licensee has voluntarily surrendered his driver's licence.
The following table sets out the number of refunds and amount of money
refunded for the 1969 licence-year:—
Type of Refund Number Amount
Motor-vehicle licences, general refunds—
Motor-vehicle Act—passenger  1,009 $12,531.98
Dealers       39 341.09
Drivers'general      398 1,777.50
Chauffeurs        16 24.00
Department of Commercial Transport Act—commercial      427 25,940.59
     1,889           $40,615.16
 L 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Type of Refund Number
Relinquishment refunds—
Motor-vehicle Act—passenger   7,052
Drivers  1,793
Department of Commercial Transport Act—
Regular commercial  1,114
Farm commercial        78
10,037
Seasonal refunds—
Motor-vehicle Act—passenger      229
Department of Commercial Transport Act—
Regular commercial       262
Farm commercial         66
557
Refund on transfers—
Department of Commercial Transport Act—
Regular commercial       315
Farm commercial         20
335
Totals  12,818
Amount
$45,661.21
4,095.00
52,452.13
1,191.84
$103,400.18
$1,330.35
13,610.30
1,322.05
16,262.70
$63,781.22
974.50
64,755.72
$225,033.76
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1969       L 13
2. ACCIDENTS AND CONVICTIONS
Motor-vehicle Accidents
The following table gives a summary of the accident frequency during the
period 1960 to 1969:—
Year
Motor-
vehicles
Registered
Number
of Accidents
Accidents
per 1,000
Vehicles
Registered
Injuries
Deaths
Deaths
per
10,000
Vehicles
Registered
Average
Property
Damage
Deaths
per 100
Million
Miles
Fatal
Accidents
Fatal
Accidents
per 100
Million
Miles
1960	
1961	
1962
566,144
589,917
609,215
648,303
700,048
764,353
817,348
864,348
917,872
989,196
26,091
27,203'   '
29,077
30,924
38,368
40,262'
44,177
49,750
58,300
70,624
46.08
46.11
44.65
47.82
54.81
52.68   '
54.05
57.56
63.51
71.39
11,311
12,101
13,382
14,585
16,911
17,574
19,449
19,500
20,945
23,077
294
320
385
360
393
500
520
559
574
542
5.2
5.4
6.3
5.6
5.6
6.5
6.4
6.5
6.2
5.4
$474.78
475.08
489.05
503.69
523.39
561.96
592.91
565.58
570.87
586.29
6.73
7.07
7.96
7.00
6.90
8.00
7.60
7.67
7.36
6.39
253
272
322
309
345
421
445
461
460
467
5.79
6.01
6.66
1963	
1964	
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
6.01
6.06
6.73
6.51
6.33
5.90
5.50
The toll of motor-vehicle accidents continues to grow. However, during 1969,
the number of persons killed decreased from 574 in 1968 to 542, a decrease of 5.6
per cent.
During 1969, reportable accidents totalled 70,624, an increase of 12,324
or 20.9 per cent over the 1968 total of 58,300. The number of fatal accidents increased from 460 to 467. The number of persons injured during 1969 was 23,077,
an increase of 2,132 over the 1968 total of 20,945 or 10.1 per cent.
The property damage as a result of these accidents amounted to $41,406,-
403.89, an increase of $8,124,635.05 or 24.3 per cent over the 1968 total of $33,-
281,768.84.
The preceding table again shows an increase in the accidents per 1,000 vehicles
registered, but a substantial decrease is shown in the deaths per 10,000 vehicles
registered.   The average property damage increased slightly from last year.
 L 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in
Killed
Fatal Accidents
Injured
1968
1969
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1968
1969
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1968
1969
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1
8
2
2
Per Cent
100.0
—75.0
1
6
2
2
Per Cent
100.0
—66.0
59
67
52
73
Per Cent
— 11.0
Agassiz Det	
8.0
Alert Bay Det.
11
3
2
25
50
3
13
50
54
880
35
77
68
7
63
24
52
27
48
186
70
34
149
117
28
48
23
72
38
41
83
83
79
62
32
50
32
8
31
29
102
9
106
2
217
143
88
21
25
35
15
71
65
184
31
183
137
21
31
33
165
168
11
15
13
7
37
49
36.0
	
-50.0
	
333.0
250.0
2
3
2
3
7
8
2
3
1
1
3
2
2
1
3
—50.0
50.0
48.0
—2.0
Atlin Det.
— 100.0
— 100.0
—33.0
—42.0
50.0
50.0
—66.0
-100.0
2
2
5
6
2
3
1
2
3
12
2
1
— 100.0
— 100.0
2
4
12
3
1
70
57
1,083
66
58
66
7
77
28
52
37
59
172
78
25
151
181
33
57
15
96
3
56
91
105
129
68
16
63
19
13
40
13
92
15
130
3
231
191
129
32
18
44
23
75
51
230
32
235
118
65
8
18
167
227
16
40.0
—40.0
100.0
5.0
23.0
88.0
Campbell River Det 	
Campbell River Village —   -
-66.0
-100.0
100.0
-80.0
100.0
200.0
— 100.0
50.0
—57.0
75.0
100.0
200.0
100.0
100.0
— 100.0
— 100.0
300.0
100.0
—33.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
—33.0
-24.0
—2.0
1
1
5
1
2
6
5
1
1
4
1
2
6
5
22.0
100.0
— 87.0
100.0
200.0
16.0
8
1
2
5
1
2
12
4
5
1
2
5
1
2
7
4
37.0
22.0
ChiUiwack Tp	
—7.0
— 100.0
100.0
-75.0
75.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
300.0
— 100.0
— 100.0
300.0
100.0
—33.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
11.0
4
3
7
1
4
2
4
3
3
7
1
3
2
2
—26.0
1.0
54.0
17.0
2
1
18.0
—34.0
1
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
3
33.0
—92.0
4
1
2
1
1
1
3
36.0
4
1
2
1
1
1
2
9.0
26.0
3
63.0
9.0
—50.0
26.0
Falkland
3
3
—40.0
63.0
1
3
200.0
1
4
1
3
2
7
6
5
3
8
1
8
200.0
29.0
Field
—55.0
6
1
3
2
7
7
6
9
1
8
5
6
2
1
3
50.0
166.0
— 100.0
—28.0
— 14.0
—66.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
16<j\0
— 100.0
—28.0
— 16.0
—60.0
100.0
100.0
—9.0
Fort St   Tamee net
66.0
Fort St. John Town  	
22.0
50.0
Freeway Patrol A- -	
5
5
2
1
3
6.0
33.0
46.0
52.0
28 0
25 0
3
3
3
6
2
6
6
6
100.0
—40.0
—57.0
—53.0
-50.0
2
2
100.0
-60.0
100.0
53 0
5
7
13
4
6
14
5
5.0
Grand Forks Det	
1          2
—21.0
6
4
4
9
6
1
6
4
5
25.0
—75.0
50.0
-55.0
100.0
— 50.0
100.0
100.0
-100.0
3.0
28.0
100 Mite Hnusp.
-57.0
100.0
— 13.0
209 0
74 0
3
1
1
11
—66.0
100.0
57.0
— 100.0
2
1
1
10
—45.0
1.0
7
1
5
1
35.0
Kaslo Det.
45.0
Det.=Detachment.    Mun. ^Municipality.
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1969        L 15
the Province for the Calendar Years 1968 and 1969
Injury Accidents
Vehicles Involved
Accidents Reported
Property Damage
Increase
Increase
Increase
Increase
1968
1969
or(-)
Decrease
1968
1969
or(-)
Decrease
1968
1969
or(-)
Decrease
1968
1969
or(-)
Decrease
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
$
$
Per Cent
41
30
—26.0
265
286
7.0
159
176
10.0
86,736.53
133,600.21
54.0
33
39
18.0
158
182
15.0
112
120
7.0
90,765.72
76,861.64
— 15.0
2
7
250.0
1
4
300.0
125.00
2,486.00
1,888.0
8
10
25.0
38
54
42.0
25
35
40.0
10,238.41
22,933.24
123.0
3
7
133.0
31
49
58.0
22
35
59.0
9,308.76
30,575.00
229.0
2
7
250.0
17
47
176.0
10
28
180.0
3,928.81
12,258.73
212.0
16
18
12.0
51
80
56.0
36
57
58.0
39,385.00
53,803.62
37.0
25
28
12.0
149
213
42.0
107
152
42.0
85,620.70
154,070.48
79.0
2
—100.0
8
8
6
7
16.0
4,300.00
1,595.38
—62.0
9
—100.0
39
28
—28.0
29
20
—31.0
24,448.46
11,660.00
— 52.0
25
40
60.0
122
194
59.0
95
143
50.0
66,151.03
142,294.41
115.0
22
28
27.0
117
169
44.0
78
108
38.0
101,185.55
104,957.68
3.0
629
737
17.0
5,253
6,860
30.0
2,770
3,610
30.0
1,447,589.18
1,955,707.41
35.0
18
37
105.0
132
181
37.0
89
123
38.0
67,677.22
91,784.40
35.0
51
37
—27.0
242
246
1.0
175
169
—3.0
118,414.37
116,504.83
— 1.0
48
41
— 14.0
331
371
12.0
193
212
9.0
105,757.56
109,747.46
3.0
4
6
50.0
21
30
42.0
14
19
35.0
38,763.00
19,630.00
—49.0
46
49
6.0
265
330
24.0
168
207
23.0
103,786.35
136,184.75
31.0
16
14
— 12.0
88
90
2.0
56
59
5.0
33,710.92
53,019.99
57.0
26
32
23.0
134
160
19.0
98
114
16.0
145,820.98
86,452.99
—40.0
20
25
25.0
138
150
8.0
88
96
9.0
45,347.74
64,562.01
42.0
26
30
15.0
119
118
-0.8
89
91
2.0
117,291.95
84,664.42
—27.0
103
114
10.0
635
673
5.0
381
384
0.7
204,633.75
209,893.93
2.0
35
50
42.0
224
331
47.0
135
199
47.0
95,371.70
103,035.88
8.0
18
13
—27.0
111
99
— 10.0
82
71
-13.0
75,413.85
57,460.04
—23.0
98
109
11.0
570
665
16.0
346
400
15.0
224,120.74
278,135.80
22.0
81
115
41.0
475
786
65.0
292
490
67.0
177,953.87
307,831.95
72.0
20
20
168
285
69.0
92
154
67.0
40,344.80
76,456.25
89.0
34
35
2.0
151
210
39.0
116
149
28.0
72,965.47
120,393.82
65.0
13
12
-7.0
76
86
13.0
58
53
-8.0
32,612.44
45,453.29
39.0
45
56
24.0
248
260
4.0
175
178
1.0
118,113.87
112,580.38
-4.0
24
3
—87.0
114
17
-85.0
84
10
-88.0
59,929.57
4,380.75
-92.0
31
39
25.0
327
415
26.0
175
226
29.0
77,495.76
130,729.15
68.0
37
46
24.0
173
224
29.0
121
150
23.0
138,419.41
157,322.85
13.0
62
75
20.0
402
601
49.0
240
353
47.0
118,078.45
203,146.04
72.0
49
77
57.0
357
449
25.0
226
272
20.0
103,539.43
157,586.54
52.0
33
42
27.0
149
200
34.0
96
123
28.0
71,559.42
97,582.58
36.0
21
13
-38.0
101
108
6.0
70
72
2.0
57,979.78
40,410.62
—30.0
37
46
24.0
309
385
24.0
170
201
18.0
82,185.74
106,496.18
29.0
16
10
—60.0
59
63
6.0
46
51
10.0
37,218.72
64,240.48
72.0
4
7
75.0
42
91
116.0
25
52
108.0
13,812.69
25,792.94
86.0
17
29
70.0
78
159
103.0
59
118
100.0
43,786.00
130,881.17
198.0
15
6
—60.0
53
54
1.0
41
39
-4.0
49,690.00
36,470.00
-26.0
64
53
— 17.0
275
363
32.0
202
253
25.0
443,001.06
419,193.35
—5.0
6
12
100.0
52
61
17.0
32
41
28.0
30,815.72
31,079.48
0.8
75
80
6.0
529
609
15.0
326
381
16.0
230,182.37
383,644.08
66.0
2
2
13
11
— 15.0
8
6
—25.0
5,172.00
3,365.00
320,757.27
—34.0
106
126
18.0
521
692
32.0
278
364
30.0
234,274.83
36.0
74
no
48.0
359
545
51.0
248
360
45.0
220,926.04
337,708.44
52.0
54
62
14.0
211
234
10.0
141
162
14.0
124,306.50
165,575.94
33.0
12
22
83.0
48
112
133.0
34
74
117.0
19,981.65
44,454.58
122.0
13
10
—23.0
66
66
48
49
2.0
32,529.59
26,332.95
— 19.0
22
29
31.0
112
137
22.0
73
90
23.0
39,581.64
56,209.24
42.0
10
19
90.0
60
92
53.0
46
68
47.0
41,566.54
42,551.00
2.0
42
39
-7.0
262
298
13.0
186
184
— 1.0
185,153.51
156,405.37
— 15.0
34
30
— 13.0
162
175
8.0
116
122
5.0
84,534.87
75,577.14
— 10.0
124
143
15.0
640
827
29.0
387
469
21.0
230,306.49
316,327.10
37.0
19
20
5.0
103
93
-9.0
72
73
1.0
55,736.47
83,411.66
49.0
93
104
11.0
515
573
11.0
335
348
3.0
271,803.65
365,354.32
34.0
54
67
24.0
242
290
19.0
178
209
17.0
197,448.80
172,424.66
— 12.0
17
33
94.0
96
142
47.0
72
105
45.0
57,752.83
112,150.00
94.0
20
3
— 85.0
73
15
-79.0
50
12
-76.0
45,263.72
4,654.23
-89.0
18
14
-22.0
102
125
22.0
72
82
13.0
52,330.70
61,782.52
18.0
112
108
-3.0
957
1,146
19.0
519
605
16.0
259,495.27
374,717.92
44.0
108
125
15.0
503
647
28.0
347
420
21.0
302,995.56
343,426.32
13.0
8
11
37.0
34
63
85.0
25
43
72.0
14,613.00
27,072.57
85.0
 L 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the
Killed
Fatal Accidents
Injured
1968
1969
Increase
or (-)
Decrease
1968
1969
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1968
1969
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
5
9
4
7
2
Per Cent
—20.0
—22.0
100.0
— 100.0
100.0
5
8
4
4
2
Per Cent
—20.0
—50.0
100.0
— 100.0
100.0
123
124
33
9
52
14
64
8
39
31
74
101
38
29
21
26
13
40
203
7
63
55
9
25
50
39
42
72
139
16
51
10
316
217
167
42
6
42
54
42
41
26
107
52
103
63
9
112
18
41
36
22
54
224
222
54
5
108
44
7
150
18
13
112
366
6
133
127
38
26
27
36
61
7
44
23
107
67
35
45
29
52
42
36
270
17
85
56
7
34
39
38
19
122
175
29
66
11
414
224
205
53
7
36
23
79
17
26
124
33
95
90
8
127
49
34
54
41
40
204
253
63
5
158
55
5
150
31
17
64
366
13
Per Cent
8.0
2.0
15.0
1
1
188.0
1
1
48.0
Kitimat Det      '
157.0
1
-100.0
1
— 100.0
—33.0
—4.0
12.0
4
2
-50.0
100.0
—57.0
—50.0
3
2
12.0
25.0
1
7
6
2
3
3
1
6
5
2
3
3
100.0
-50.0
—40.0
44.0
43.0
Lillooet Det.         -     	
7.0
55.0
1
5
1
1
2
1
1
7
1
6
2
2
4
3
40.0
500.0
— 100.0
100.0
300.0
100.0
— 100.0
— 100.0
—85.0
1
4
1
1
2
1
1
1
4
1
5
2
38.0
T.ytton Det.
100.0
Mr.Rrirte. Del
223.0
400.0
10.0
Maillardville-  	
33.0
-100.0
100.0
300.0
100.0
-100.0
-100.0
-80.0
142.0
2
4
3
34.0
Merritt DM
1
1.0
—22.0
4
4
7
2
3
5
36.0
—22.0
1
1
2.0
Nakusp Opt
—54.0
1
7
4
— 100.0
—42.0
200.0
100.0
200.0
25.0
— 100.0
25.0
100.0
200.0
100.0
100.0
50.0
—66.0
200.0
1
7
-100.0
—57.0
69.0
3
25.0
Nelson City	
81.0
1
3
1
3
5
1
3
1
3
5
200.0
100.0
200.0
66.0
— 100.0
29 0
New Denver Det.
10.0
1
4
2
1
3
2
31 0
3 0
22 0
Oak BavMun.
26.0
Ocean Falls Det.
16.0
4
5
3
9
1
1
3
4
2
5
1
1
33.0
100.0
150.0
100.0
100.0
14 0
Osnvoos
— 57.0
3
2
88 0
Pattullo Bridge Patrol         •      ....     _.
—58.0
Pemberton net
	
Penticton City
15.0
2
3
3
3
1
9
2
3
2
2
1
5
36 0
Port Alberni City            	
—66.0
150.0
70
Port Alherni net,
42 0
Port Alice Det	
— 11.0
4
5
3
2
1
— 50.0
-80.0
-100.0
2
1
3
1
1
—50.0
-100.6
13.0
Port Edward Det	
172.0
Port Hardy Det	
— 17.0
Port Moody City  .
50.0
2
1
2
14
1
7
1
9
1
7
3
100.0
-33.0
16.0
— 100.0
75.0
-66.0
—30.0
—50.0
— 100.0
1
3
9
1
1
4
1
2
1
2
9
1
100.0
-33.6
86.0
1
3
12
1
1
4
3
—25.0
—8.0
13.0
Prince Rupert City— 	
-100.0
25.0
16.0
5
1
46.0
25.0
—28.0
9
1
10
6
1
5
1
5
6
1
7
1
6
3
40.0
72.0
Revelstoke City
30.0
Revelstoke Det	
20.0
— 50.0
-100.0
—42.0
116.0
Det.=Detachment.    Mun.=Municipality.
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1969        L 17
Province for the Calendar Years 1968 and 1969—Continued
Injury Accidents
Vehicles Involved
Accidents Reported
Property Damage
Increase
Increase
Increase
Increase
1968
1969
or (-)
Decrease
1968
1969
or(-)
Decrease
1968
1969
or(-)
Decrease
1968
1969
or (-)
Decrease
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
$
$
Per Cent
83
83
643
766
19.0
347
410
18.0
190,500.20
166,020.36
257,800.39
241,614.48
35.0
69
79
14.0
418
535
27.0
261
332
27.0
45.0
18
21
16.0
107
113
5.0
81
81
	
52,587.61
69,875.94
32.0
8
20
150.0
82
178
117.0
47
103
119.0
19,853.34
49,410.29
148.0
30
18
—40.0
150
95
—36.0
115
70
—39.0
77,855.83
71,924.10
-7.0
11
26
136.0
66
81
22.0
48
58
20.0
31,801.63
50,149.26
57.0
37
48
29.0
276
353
27.0
155
196
26.0
112,977.49
117,126.59
3.0
8
6
—25.0
36
61
69.0
26
39
50.0
10,951.91
15,672.25
43.0
25
24
-4.0
153
216
41.0
98
127
29.0
59,683.38
78,196.71
31.0
20
18
— 10.0
97
139
43.0
71
92
29.0
58,173.18
70,858.59
21.0
42
68
61.0
281
446
58.0
160
266
66.0
92,938.02
173,547.88
86.0
58
32
—44.0
344
225
—34.0
218
137
—37.0
148,637.55
107,129.46
—27.0
18
16
— 11.0
89
90
1.0
67
63
—5.0
40,501.00
40,649.00
0.3
22
30
36.0
153
187
22.0
70
82
17.0
47,953.58
58,478.31
21.0
9
16
77.0
63
96
52.0
46
72
56.0
32,833.00
46,575.88
41.0
17
18
5.0
80
119
48.0
64
83
29.0
100,735.00
121,758.00
20.0
7
26
271.0
39
85
117.0
33
60
81.0
18,496.92
54,105.68
192.0
18
23
27.0
101
122
20.0
78
84
7.0
77,999.67
123,495.30
58.0
142
189
33.0
930
1,619
74.0
526
875
66.0
249,811.72
430,828.05
72.0
5
10
100.0
19
50
163.0
15
36
140.0
8,352.00
19,992.50
139.0
46
54
17.0
309
427
38.0
190
244
28.0
91,314.46
176,049.72
92.0
34
30
— 11.0
166
220
32.0
120
150
25.0
90,427.91
121,211.49
34.0
7
5
—28.0
30
64
113.0
25
46
84.0
16,961.76
56,340.00
232.0
19
23
21.0
97
93
—4.0
76
71
—6.0
88,078.77
48,385.00
—45.0
28
28
154
174
12.0
98
108
10.0
53,117.90
59,502.51
12.0
19
25
31.0
102
185
81.0
66
116
75.0
38,465.68
76,111.07
97.0
21
13
—38.0
111
93
— 16.0
79
63
—20.0
48,633.95
36,132.39
—25.0
57
76
33.0
581
787
35.0
312
425
36.0
136,597.94
214,796.65
57.0
81
105
29.0
506
600
18.0
305
361
18.0
201,973.16
249,736.95
23.0
11
16
45.0
145
182
25.0
77
103
33.0
39,275.94
57,362.59
46.0
29
38
31.0
137
174
27.0
97
120
23.0
76,029.95
88,872.31
16.0
6
6
33
37
12.0
26
30
15.0
17,483.51
28,880.73
65.0
226
294
30.0
2,476
3,055
23.0
1,287
1,578
22.0
594,849.06
797,195.37
34.0
164
158
-3.0
1,413
1,711
21.0
746
886
18.0
376,128.68
453,754.26
20.0
120
153
27.0
1,147
1,609
40.0
625
880
40.0
315,664.82
454,464.81
43.0
33
40
21.0
245
355
44.0
138
207
50.0
60,663.56
93,822.27
54.0
7
4
—42.0
12
18
50.0
9
12
33.0
4,435.00
8,790.00
98.0
22
19
— 13.0
129
126
—2.0
84
81
—3.0
55,888.20
53,587.99
-4.0
27
17
—37.0
129
132
2.0
91
95
4.0
59,030.18
63,183.09
7.0
20
35
75.0
120
193
60.0
76
119
56.0
54,921.51
84,966.98
54.0
24
13
—45.0
207
93
—55.0
94
47
—50.0
58,920.41
40,132.39
—31.0
15
12
-20.0
50
61
22.0
41
46
12.0
24,149.00
24,762.84
2.0
77
84
9.0
503
652
29.0
270
346
28.0
161,090.59
198,238.31
23.0
25
16
—36.0
109
127
16.0
72
85
18.0
55,733.29
63,933.03
14.0
62
81
30.0
602
866
43.0
331
459
38.0
201,068.42
218,547.82
8.0
40
54
35.0
229
316
37.0
160
207
29.0
114,059.37
137,654.39
20.0
5
4
—20.0
32
32
22
21
—4.0
11,088.46
20,710.89
86.0
75
89
18.0
474
587
23.0
265
325
22.0
123,491.01
160,884.32
30.0
7
28
300.0
92
120
30.0
70
77
10.0
54,393.00
76,649.00
40.0
20
16
—20.0
124
107
— 13.0
91
74
— 18.0
76,149.04
63,193.44
— 17.0
25
36
44.0
229
352
53.0
128
185
44.0
59,757.17
92,353.36
54.0
16
22
37.0
102
128
25.0
78
91
16.0
40,316.62
61,631.62
52.0
44
33
-25.0
298
276
-7.0
173
160
—7.0
83,164.76
77,616.00
—6.0
141
132
—6.0
1,304
1,538
17.0
687
790
14.0
471,331.50
533,363.57
13.0
131
153
16.0
675
759
12.0
456
503
10.0
355,719.06
480,116.11
34.0
41
52
26.0
492
648
31.0
266
346
30.0
159,414.29
189,593.31
18.0
4
100.0
13
12
—7.0
7
10
42.0
4,168.00
11,317.00
171.0
67
84
25.0
315
333
5.0
229
234
2.0
170,650.06
231,215.83
35.0
27
36
33.0
142
186
30.0
93
122
31.0
88,671.89
100,528.06
13.0
6
5
— 16.0
32
29
-9.0
24
19
—20.0
16,295.00
13,080.00
— 19.0
84
82
-2.0
494
507
2.0
314
319
1.0
259,343.53
287,450.91
10.0
13
13
86
91
5.0
63
68
7.0
39,091.00
49,610.43
26.0
8
13
62.0
122
178
45.0
70
94
34.0
36,092.62
53,727.16
48.0
34
39
14.0
205
200
-2.0
144
143
-0.6
197,386.20
283,780.97
43.0
247
262
6.0
1,645
2,118
28.0
897
1,165
29.0
441,867.14
570,701.51
29.0
2
9
350.0
51
103
101.0
33
57
72.0
16,415.00
26,773.12
63.0
 L 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the
Killed
Fatal Accidents
Injured
1968
1969
Increase
or (-)
Decrease
1968
1969
Increase
or (-)
Decrease
1968
1969
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
Saanich Mun.-    . 	
2
1
7
4
2
1
1
1
3
Per Cent
100.0
100.0
—85.0
100.0
— 50.0
200.0
— 100.0
-25.0
— 100.0
— 100.0
50.0
— 100.0
—60.0
22.0
— 100.0
2
1
3
2
1
1
4
2
1
1
1
3
Per Cent
100.0
100.0
—66.0
100.0
—50.0
200.0
— 100.0
350
17
29
29
27
46
48
30
65
51
16
45
87
6
79
813
6
370
11
51
31
30
58
32
54
61
32
16
35
143
7
65
996
1
2
Per Cent
5.0
-35.0
75.0
6.0
Sechelt Det	
2
1
1
11.0
26.0
Sicamous Det  	
—33.0
80.0
4
3
1
2
8
1
5
18
2
3
4
1
1
1
6
1
3
17
1
3
—25.0
— 100.0
— 100.0
100.0
33.0
— 100.0
—33.0
17.0
— 100.0
—6.0
-37.0
2
12
2
22
2
8
—22.0
64.0
Stewart net.
16.0
2
20
— 17.0
22.0
— 83.0
Tahsis 	
100.0
2
58
29
10
27
8
14
38
16
3,770
55
73
85
555
1
238
29
86
—100.0
7
2
10
1
1
1
2
2
23
1
1
3
7
42.0
— 100.0
100.0
— 50.0
100.0
100.0
-100.0
100.0
—39.0
— 85.0
—57.0
250.0
—42.0
—42J)
5
2
3
1
1
1
2
2
23
1
1
3
6
—40.0
— 100.0
100.0
— 50.0
100.0
100.0
— 100.0
100.0
—34.0
—75.0
77
32
12
27
26
21
76
16
3,779
58
52
85
651
4
241
53
122
32.0
10.0
Toflno Det.	
20.0
Trail City   .
2
2
1
1
35
4
1
5
2
Trail Det   _	
225.0
1
1
50.0
100.0
38
7
1
7
2
0.2
5.0
—28.0
—40.0
200.0
17.0
Wells Det 	
300.0
7
1
7
4
1
4
7
1
7
3
1
4
-57.0
1.0
82.0
-42.0
41.0
Totals  	
480
574
438
542
— 8.0
—5.0
379
460
375
467
— 1.0
1.0
16,133
20,371
17,873
22,535
10.0
Totals, January to December,
1968-69 	
10.0
Det.=Detachment.    Mun,---Municipality.
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1969       L 19
Province for the Calendar Years 1968 and 1969—Continued
Injury Accidents
Vehicles Involved
Accidents Reported
Property Damage
Increase
Increase
Increase
Increase
1968
1969
or (-)
Decrease
1968
1969
or(-)
Decrease
1968
1969
or(-)
Decrease
1968
1969
or (-)
Decrease
Per Cent
Per Cent
1
Per Cent
$
$
Per Cent
234
258
10.0
1,440
1,957
35.0
818
1,090
33.0
441,555.06
541,392.42
22.0
13
7
—46.0
60
105
75.0
48
76
58.0
129,554.90
52,969.01
-59.0
14
30
114.0
121
190
57.0
71
115
61.0
78,301.19
81,664.61
4.0
16
24
50.0
136
221
62.0
86
133
54.0
70,307.00
78,296.84
11.0
18
19
5.0
114
124
8.0
85
89
4.0
39,448.56
53,662.88
36.0
29
27
—6.0
129
148
14.0
91
99
8.0
64,020.00
99,633.52
55.0
22
18
— 18.0
86
90
4.0
57
66
15.0
69,399.18
69,074.26
—0.4
21
30
42.0
160
201
25.0
104
124
19.0
48,176.95
83,467.78
73.0
38
39
2.0
240
234
—2.0
160
156
—2.0
146,014.96
97,677.51
—33.0
29
20
-31.0
107
140
30.0
83
91
9.0
63,264.15
58,159.20
—7.0
12
11
— 8.0
47
96
104.0
35
62
77.0
17,967.75
42,505.34
136.0
19
18
—5.0
61
64
4.0
44
46
4.0
43,245.83
49,022.87
13.0
47
82
74.0
318
476
49.0
214
315
47.0
145,860.30
239,715.00
64.0
2
3
50.0
13
21
61.0
11
14
27.0
9,263.35
11,160.00
20.0
47
31
—34.0
194
202
4.0
126
135
7.0
90,839.64
96,807.97
6.0
511
611
19.0
2,784
4,026
44.0
1,585
2,214
39.0
895,242.26
1,252,563.95
39.0
5
1
—80.0
24
1
-95.0
16
1
-93.0
8,810.15
50.00
—99.0
 	
1
100.0
7
3
—57.0
4
2
—50.0
2,875.00
5,000.00
73.0
2
— 100.0
9
2
—77.0
7
2
—71.0
6,350.00
145,630.14
1,500.00
—76.0
39
43
10.0
239
248
3.0
155
164
5.0
175,810.23
20.0
20
21
5.0
274
332
21.0
154
179
16.0
71,760.08
150,262.41
109.0
3
7
133.0
22
25
13.0
15
20
33.0
11,019.00
14,751.21
33.0
21
19
—9.0
236
286
21.0
123
160
30.0
60,960.52
61,099.53
0.2
7
17
142.0
66
102
54.0
44
62
40.0
26,427.46
39,205.66
48.0
6
11
83.0
42
86
104.0
28
60
114.0
32,275.20
36,390.25
12.0
27
57
111.0
303
467
54.0
175
261
49.0
75,604.24
114,141.16
50.0
12
6
—50.0
47
54
14.0
38
41
7.0
26,436.00
55,866.90
111.0
2,699
2,783
3.0
23,222
27,366
17.0
12,680
14,910
17.0
5,576,194.85
6,739,979.78
20.0
28
35
25.0
205
201
— 1.0
142
140
— 1.0
120,313.78
133,504.83
10.0
49
38
—22.0
423
475
12.0
231
246
6.0
108,434.27
110,370.89
1.0
45
52
15.0
272
299
9.0
185
196
5.0
141,524.34
126,779.58
— 10.0
418
456
9.0
3,175
3,649
14.0
1,656
1,947
17.0
735,027.06
943,115.96
28.0
1
4
300.0
27
17
-37.0
16
14
— 12.0
9,555.00
15,576.73
63.0
161
169
4.0
1,521
1,846
21.0
805
988
22.0
408,014.01
511,257.75
25.0
17
32
88.0
211
301
42.0
119
166
39.0
49,340.94
86,032.22
74.0
50
73
46.0
379
434
14.0
250
276
10.0
216,303.50
229,876.38
6.0
10,492
11,689
11.0
75,987
94,049
23.0
43,837]53,464
21.0
25,345,099.89
31,804,055.29]
1
25.0
13,299
14,866
11.0
100,159
122,652
22.0
58,300]70,624
21.0
33,281,768.84
41,406,403.89)
24.0
 L 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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U
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1969
L 21
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1969—Continued
2.       HOUR OF OCCURRENCE
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
2,765
1,876
1,365
821
529
424
701
2,593
3,025
2,284
2,564
3,166
3,394
3,639
36
24
20
14
9
5
2
12
15
10
11
14
16
15
30
27
27
33
32
36
25
15
19
20
654
448
312
213
139
100
164
490
583
396
425
556
658
662
854
1,137
1,470
1,168
808
895
780
666
629
656
3
2,075
1,404
1,033
594
381
319
6 to   7 a.m. 	
7 to   8 a.m.          .    _                 	
535
2,091
8 to   9 a.m                         _   	
2,427
9 tn 10 a.m
1,878
10 to 11 a.m  	
2,128
11 to 12   m.   .                               .... _  -
2,596
12 to   1 p.m _ —
2,720
2,962
2 to   3 p.m.-                               	
4,388
5,394
6,842
5,345
3,417
3,789
3,371
3,357
2,824
2,733
18
3,504
4,230
5,345
4,144
6 to   7 p.m                   	
7 to   8p.m -
8 to   9 p.m.                                      	
2,577
2,858
2,566
9 to 10 p.m	
10 to 11 p.m             .                 	
11 to 12 p.m.
2,676
2,176
2,057
15
Totals -	
70,624
467
14,866
55,291
DAY OF OCCURRENCE
Number of Accidents
Total
Personal
Property
Injury
Damage Only
71
2,005
6,208
49
1,858
6,933
44
1,870
7,436
64
1,976
7,825
50
1,792
7,499
74
2,508
9,699
115
2,851
9,686
6
5
1. Sunday	
2. Monday.	
3. Tuesday	
4. Wednesday...
5. Thursday	
6. Friday..
7. Saturday	
8. Not stated-
8,284
8,840
9,350
9,865
9,341
12,281
12,652
11
Totals-
70,624
467
14,866 55,291
4.            TYPE OF VEHICLES
Number of Vehicles Involved
INVOLVED
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Private passenger -. -—
107,885
12,534
611
477
29
1,002
44
11
59
486
143
7
1
26
21,703
2,596
146
101
5
739
85,696
9,795
458
3,  Rus
4. Taxi       .   	
376
23
6. Motor-cycle	
237
1
9
2
14
9
9. Not stated                              	
44
Totals
122,652
665         1       25.315
96,672
RAILROAD CROSSINGS
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Unguarded crossing-
2. Automatic signal	
3. Guarded crossing—man on duty_
5. Driver disregarded signal	
6. Signal not given	
7. Not stated  	
Totals-
50
8
2
5
41
114
2
1
10
40
4
2
4
4
30
84
 L 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1969—Continued
6.       MANNER OF COLLISION
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
25,788
10,207
17,920
5,188
5,446
6,075
150
174
19
4
7
113
5,358
2,767
4,100
133
421
2,087
20,280
7,266
13,801
2. Head-on   colUsion   or   head-on   sideswipe.-    	
5,051
5,018
5. Side-swiped other vehicle going same
3,875
Totals -  	
70,624
467
14,866
55,291
7.           DRIVERS INVOLVED,
Number of Drivers
DESCRIPTION OF
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1    -M(,1p
88,952
20,178
13.522
574
73
18
19,926
4,689
700
68,452
15,416
12,804
Totals	
122,652
665
25,315
96,672
Age of Driver
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. 16 to 20 years	
2. 21 to 24 years	
3. 25 to 30 years	
4. 31 to 40 years	
5. 41 to 50 years	
6. 51 to 60 years	
7. 61 to 64 years	
8. 65 to 69 years	
9. 70 years and over_
19,619
16,323
16,575
20,506
17,287
11,723
3,512
1,656
1,966
112
117
101
110
98
66
18
16
11
4,779
3,764
3,711
4,527
3,786
2,524
744
354
429
14,728
12,442
12,763
15,869
13,403
9,133
2,750
1,286
1,526
Driving Experience
Total
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Less than 3 months..
2. 3 to 6 months	
3. 6 to 12 months	
4. 1 to 4 years	
5. 5 years and over	
6. Not stated	
2,639
1,331
2,605
22,263
80,286
13,528
22
8
5
125
487
18
638
349
629
5,287
17,708
704
1,979
974
1,971
16,851
62,091
12,806
Condition of Driver
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. NormaL
2. Extreme fatigue	
3. Physical defect	
4. Confused by traffic-
5. Ability impaired	
6. Not known	
7. Not stated  	
106,673
452
98
198
1,671
2,575
10,985
586
3
2
59
3
12
23,809
161
35
50
523
62
675
82,278
288
63
146
1,089
2,510
10,298
Licence of Driver
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
101,406
1,450
5,412
14,384
566
33
49
17
22,601
435
1,348
931
78,239
982
4,015
13,436
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1969
L 23
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1969—Continued
8.            ACTION OF DRIVER
CONTRIBUTING TO ACCIDENT
Number of Drivers
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
46,667
5,851
13,792
8,574
8,796
4,980
252
1,647
200
2,381
13,880
1,347
938
60
76
2,928
60
208
9,921
21
4
271
94
24
15
1
68
17
~34
113
3
___
3
1
9
10,361
1,421
2,658
2,231
2,130
859
35
479
46
678
3,459
108
39
16
14
119
18
24
598
7
2
36,035
4,336
3. Did not have right of way. 	
4. Car standing in roadway (not parked)
11,110
6,328
6,665
4,053
217
1,151
154
1,669
10,308
12. Cutting in              	
1,239
896
44
62
2,798
39
183
19. Parked legally. _
9,314
20. Driving through school-zone 	
21. Driving through safety-zone	
14
2
Totals	
122,583
664
25,302
96,617
9.           TRAFFIC CONTROL
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
51,375
141
9,044
7,440
2,624
367
2
22
31
45
10,409
34
2,149
1,575
699
40,599
105
6,873
5,834
1,880
Totals	
70,624
467
14,866
55,291
10.
PEDESTRIANS INVOLVED,
ACTIONS OF
Number of Pedestrians
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
Crossing at intersection—no signal-
In street, not at intersection	
Coming from behind parked or moving vehicle-
Crossing at intersection with signal-
Crossing street diagonally, not at intersection-
Walking on or along highway  	
Playing in street-
Crossing at intersection against signal-
Not on roadway-
Getting on or off another vehicle-
Riding or hitching on vehicle	
Working on car or roadway	
Crossing intersection diagonally...
In pedestrian crosswalk	
Standing on safety-isle  _	
Totals- 	
157
202
224
287
98
131
151
56
49
48
13
10
14
11
145
1
9
13
23
7
5
10
29
2
1
1
1
1
148
189
201
280
93
121
122
54
49
47
12
9
13
11
141
1
1,597
106
1,491
Condition of Pedestrian
Number of Pedestrians
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
1. Apparently normal—.
3. Had physical defect..
4. Confused by traffic—
5. Ability impaired	
6. Not known—	
7. Not stated 	
Totals ..
1,372
9
23
71
1
121
1,597
2
1
11
106
1,284
7
22
60
1
117
T491~
 L 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1969—Continued
CLASSIFICATION OF VICTIMS
Number of Victims
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
1. Passengers...
2. Drivers 	
3. Pedestrians-
4. Bicyclists  	
5. Motor-cycle drivers  	
6. Others (persons in horse-drawn vehicles, etc.)..
7. Motor-cycle passengers	
8. Not stated	
Totals..
10,326
9,869
1,597
420
691
27
143
4
23,077
180
219
106
10
20
4
3
10,146
9,650
1,491
410
671
23
140
4
542
22,535
12.
NATURE OF INJURIES
Number of Victims
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
1. Slight shock and shake-up„
2. Fractured skull	
3. Fractured spine	
4. Other fractures —	
5. Other injuries (sprains, dislocations, etc.)..
6. Internal injuries	
7. Concussion of brain .	
8. Severe general shock with bruises and cuts-
9. Cuts by glass (only)	
10. Drowned	
11. Burned  	
12. Asphyxiated	
13. Not stated. 	
Totals..
9,475
275
154
1,984
6,871
452
203
3,574
38
27
12
159
50
47
56
188
1
1
27
5
9,475
116
104
1,937
6,815
264
202
3,573
38
23,077
542     22,535
13.
LIGHT CONDITIONS
Number of Accidents
Total
Personal
Property
aa
Injury
Damage Only
216
8,695
33,825
212
3,988
13,965
11
1,002
3,524
23
858
2,950
5
301
974
22
53
1. Daylights
2. Darkness-
3.
4.
5.
6.
Artificial light—good-
Dusk or semi-darkness-
Artificial light—poor—
Not stated 	
42,736
18,165
4,537
3,831
1,280
75
Totals-
70,624
467
14,866 55,291
14. PROPERTY DAMAGE.—Amount of property damage for period covered by this report,
$41,406,403.89;   amount for same period last year, $33,281,768.84.
15.   CONDITION OF VEHICLES
Number of Vehicles
INVOLVED
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
116,534
2,720
1,145
335
258
594
no
100
14
78
711
53
636
6
2
1
3
1
1
2
13
24,026
376
293
108
71
184
24
21
6
16
174
16
91,872
2,344
3. Brakes defective _     	
846
225
186
407
7. Head-lights out (both)	
85
78
8
10. Head-light out (one light)... 	
11. Other defects   	
60
524
12. Not stated —
37
Totals  	
122,652
665
25,315
96,672
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1969       L 25
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1969—Continued
16.      DIRECTION OF TRAVEL
Number of Vehicles
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
59,143
12,902
6,447
9,324
4,474
6,967
1,401
197
673
7,099
342
1,311
2,276
10,096
488
37
27
12
4
46
1
10
5
	
9
17
9
14,109
2,646
1,036
2,338
141
1,350
78
28
166
1,941
46
283
542
611
44,546
10,219
5,384
4. Slowing down or stopping	
6,974
4,329
5,571
7. Leaving curb (including backing)
1,323
168
497
10. Stopping (not at curb or off paved
5,153
296
1,019
1,717
14. Not stated                  	
9,476
Totals  -	
122,652
665
25,315
96,672
17.              ROAD SURFACE
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
37,796
20,198
7,321
1,604
3,464
231
10
316
111
22
5
10
3
8,581
4,448
1,014
385
405
29
4
28,899
15,639
6,285
4. Loose sand or gravel -	
1,214
3,049
199
7. Not stated	
6
70,624
467
14,866
55,291
18.           ROAD CONDITION
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
68,760
421
392
491
146
403
11
452
3
2
8
2
14,500
111
53
98
33
66
5
53,808
2. Defect in roadway 	
307
337
4. Road under repair.  	
385
5. Obstruction not marked or lighted	
6. Other	
7. Not stated	
111
337
6
Totals 	
70,624
467                14.866
55,291
19.              TYPE OF ROAD
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Asphalt           . -
65,266
4,053
556
513
36
192
8
422
40
4
1
13,935
725
102
53
6
41
4
50,909
2. Gravel	
3,288
3. Concrete	
4. Earth	
450
459
5. Brick or cobble  	
6. Other    .   	
7. Not stated	
30
151
4
Totals      	
70,624
467
14,866
55,291
L
 L 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1969—Continued
Number of Accidents
20.       WEATHER CONDITIONS
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Clear                                               	
41,151
14,272
9,308
1,778
3,916
186
13
281
72
82
16
14
2
8,805
3,038
2,051
424
490
54
4
32,065
7    Rain
11,162
3   Cloudy
7,175
1,338
5. Snow - —
3,412
130
7. Not stated  —
9
Totals   	
70,624
467
14,866
55,291
During the year, 16 persons other than bicyclists were injured in bicycle accidents; 25 persons other than pedestrians were injured in pedestrian accidents; 175
motor-cyclists were injured and three motor-cyclists were killed in other than motorcycle accidents.
Motor-vehicle and motor-cycle licences issued for the year 1968—917,872
Motor-vehicle and motor-cycle licences issued for the year 1969 ,989,196
Convictions
The driving records of the Motor-vehicle Branch include an individual record
on computer tape of every driver licensed to operate a motor-vehicle in the Province.
Access to these records is available by means of the driver's licence number or by
means of the name of the driver. The record on computer tape includes all pertinent information regarding the issuance of a driver's licence and any further action
which is relevant to a driving history. Forming an important part of this driving
record is the record of convictions for driving infractions under the Criminal Code
of Canada, the Motor-vehicle Act, and the Mo tor-vehicle Act Regulations. In our
efforts to reduce the accident picture on the highways of this Province, we operate a
Driver Improvement Programme based on the information in these driving records.
I would like to take this opportunity to express my appreciation for the high
degree of co-operation by the Courts in the providing of conviction report and related
information necesasry to deal with the driving records of persons subsequent to Court
action.
The following table summarizes the conviction reports under various Statutes
dealing with highway traffic from 1966 to 1969, inclusive. The convictions for the
offence of speeding continue to increase, indicating thorough and complete traffic
surveillance by the enforcement agencies throughout the Province.
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1969
Convictions under Motor-vehicle Act and Criminal Code of Canada, 1966
L 27
-69
Offences
1966
[    1967
1968
1969
Under Criminal Code of Canada—
3
27
1,011
479
178
5,119
999
2
6
50
1,009
543
161
5,230
1,193
3
12
49
1,038
599
156
5,919
1,570
6
29
1,142
661
153
329
6,840
42
324
1,688
Driving motor-vehicle while ability impaired by alcohol or drugs, sec. 223-
Breath sample not provided (as amended, 1969), sec. 223 (2)	
Driving with more than 80 mgs. of alcohol in blood   (as  amended,
1969), sec. 224 '  	
Driving motor-vehicle while driver's licence under suspension, sec. 225 (3)..
Unlawfully taking a motor-vehicle without consent of owner, sec. 281
Under Motor-vehicle Act—
Failing to obtain or display motor-vehicle licence or permits as required,
sees. 3-10, 57	
7,818
8,195
9,343
11,214
2,805
101
2
165
34
4,666
6,688
1,033
244
361
31
34
300
551
79
252
68
18
338
9
21
16,705
9
96
6,344
53,568
3,043
111
408
4,447
7
3,188
3,934
3,952
887
289
6,605
2,016
1,422
3
935
316
69
50
2,485
134
1
143
31
4,526
5,654
1,061
256
334
32
24
552
79
341
65
17
5
322
10
6
28
16,625
12
119
6,293
70,450
4,542
183
458
5,327
3
2,929
3,168
4,103
1,787
215
6,979
2,411
1,128
1
1,016
78
54
37
2,120
240
1
171
55
3,791
3,876
1,095
208
364
35
29
6
426
90
266
54
24
14
278
5
4
20
19,288
12
102
5,353
81,150
3,772
170
535
4,359
3
3,328
3,736
3,733
1,670
233
7,643
2,944
1,178
13
1,047
28
53
29
2,920
326
1
217
48
4,183
4,330
1,787
176
421
32
27
8
505
85
340
77
321
1
24
26,388
7
349
4,218
100,288
3,124
123
673
4,573
5
3,256
4,102
3,308
2,395
258
6,109
3,137
1,131
2
1,265
28
62
42
Faffing to notify re change of address, sees. 11, 18 (11)	
Failing to report change in motor-vehicle, sec. 12	
Failing to transfer motor-vehicle, etc., sec. 14
Failing to register as a tourist, sec. 17	
Driving without obtaining driver's licence, sec. 18 (1), (2)
Driving motor-vehicle otherwise than as restricted on driver's licence,
sec. 18 (6), (7), (8)	
Driving as a chauffeur without chauffeur's licence or permit, sees. 21-
23, 25, 27, 28	
Operating as dealer without licence, misuse of dealer's plates, etc., sees.
29, 33, 34 _ 	
Operating with " D " plates without salesman's licence or permit, sees.
36-39  	
Operating vehicle not properly equipped, sec. 40 (refer sec. 205)	
Improper disposition of licence-plate, dismantled vehicle, sec. 45	
Failing to report accident, etc., sec. 54	
Making false statement, permitting another to use licence, etc., sec. 55
Using licence belonging to another, refusing to show licence, etc., sec. 56
Failing to stop on request of police or state proper name, sec. 58	
Altering number-plates and using fictitious plates, sec. 59. 	
Responsibility of owner when not driver, sec. 67	
Permitting person not properly licensed to drive motor-vehicle, etc.,
sec. 69	
Failing to surrender licence on suspension, sec 99	
Producing invalid financial liability card, etc., sec. 102	
Improper operation of emergency vehicle, sec. 123	
Failing to obey emergency instructions of a peace officer, sec. 124	
Failing to obey traffic-control signal legend, sees. 127, 128, 152	
Defacing traffic-control devices by advertising or removal, etc.,  sees.
129, 131, 136—
Failing to obey special signal signs re highway construction, sees. 134,
135, 137	
Careless driving, sees. 138, 139
Exceeding maximum speed limit, sec. 140 	
Exceeding speed limit overtaking stopped school bus, sec. 142	
Failure to drive on the right, sec. 143	
Infractions of " lane " driving, sees. 144-146	
Leaving highway other than at intersections, sec. 147	
Infractions of " passing," sees. 148-151, 153, 154	
Infractions of turning, starting, and directional signals, sees.  155-159,
160-162	
Failure to yield right-of-way, sees. 163-167 	
Not exercising due care re pedestrians, sees. 168-172 	
Failure to stop at railroad crossing, sees. 174-176	
Failure to stop at intersections, sec. 177	
Illegal stopping or parking, sees. 178-181	
Leaving vehicle improperly parked, sec. 182	
Illegal parking on private property, sec. 183	
Backing vehicle illegally, sec. 184 	
Operating motor-cycle with more than one person, sec. 185- - 	
Requirements of safe driving on highway, sees. 186, 187
Fire-vehicle safety, sees. 189, 190
 L 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Convictions under Motor-vehicle Act and Criminal Code of Canada, 1966-69—
Continued
Offences
1966
1967
1968
1969
Under Motor-vehicle Act—Continued
87
52
262
2
241
5
211
7
251
65
225
7
248
6
901
6
417
83
33
251
10
246
1,071
2
537
13
119
46
278
Failing to carry adequate safety equipment, sees. 197, 198	
228
1,576
2
440
Miscellaneous       _ _  	
27
127,322
145,899
155,797
183,388
Under Motor-vehicle Act Regulations-
367
1,345
1,069
145
42
1,358
187
3,379
275
484
119
308
13
3
97
577
371
413
78
291
13
25
383
1,214
1,189
142
35
1,098
192
3,485
198
347
85
211
7
9
36
315
513
127
43
96
48
498
1,227
983
141
38
1,116
291
1,374
2,531
348
368
129
240
3
5
143
297
781
109
70
73
106
40
497
1,445
Driving without tail-lamps, reflectors, other required lamps, sees. 4.07-4.10
Driving without clearance-lamps, lamps on projections, etc., sees. 4.11-4.13.
Driving without proper parking-lamps, spot-lamps, turn-signal devices,
1,114
129
46
1,084
Driving vehicle with defective horn or miscellaneous equipment, sees.
7 01, 7 02
225
2,541
2,128
Driving vehicle without rear-view mirror or unobstructed rear view,
sec. 7.04	
402
Inadequate windshield-wiper, etc., sec. 7.05   	
759
225
Failing to have proper connection between motor-vehicle and trailer,
sec. 7.07    	
269
Operating motor-cycle against regulations as to handlebars, sec. 7.14	
Operating slow-moving vehicle without slow-moving warning device, sec.
7B.02       	
98
23
Failing to obtain temporary permit for moving motor-vehicle or trailer
from place to place, sec. 14 -	
10
Failing to sign driver's licence, sec. 15.01	
11
Parking prohibited at yellow curb, sec. 18.01	
121
Oversize loads, sees. 19.01, 19.02 (19.03 repealed)	
346
Inadequate tires, insecure loads, excessive speed with unloaded trailer,
sec. 19.04 „ 	
1,077
Excessive weight, sec. 19.05             	
78
Failure to report for weight inspection, sec. 19.06 -	
Failure to obtain overweight or oversize permits, sec. 19.07 	
Operating a snow vehicle on highway without a permit, sec. 24.01	
29
77
69
Operating a motor-vehicle without a current inspection certificate, sec.
25.02	
983
Miscellaneous infractions -.             	
2
10,934
9,750
10,919
13,828
Summary—
7,818
127,322
10,934
1,709
3,812
8,195
145,899
9,750
2,469
3,831
9,343
155,797
10,919
806
2,420
10,123
11,214
183,388
13,828
147
21,455
14,958
151,595
3,454
170,144
4,672
189,408
6,495
244,990
5,123
155,049
174,816
195,903
250,113
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1969
L 29
Traffic Violation Reports, 1968-69
Under Motor-vehicle Act—
Driving motor-vehicle otherwise than as restricted on driver's
licence, sec. 18 (6), (7), (8)	
Failing to obey emergency instructions of a peace officer, sec.
124	
Failing to obey traffic-control signal legend, sees. 127, 128,
152	
Failing to obey special signal signs re highway construction,
sees. 134, 135, 137	
Careless driving, sees. 138, 139	
Exceeding maximum speed limit, sec. 140	
Exceeding speed limit passing schools and playgrounds, sec.
141	
Exceeding speed limit overtaking stopped school bus, sec. 142
Failure to drive on the right, sec. 143	
Infractions of " lane " driving, sees. 144-146	
Leaving highway other than at intersections, sec. 147	
Infractions of " passing," sees. 148-151, 153, 154	
Infractions of turning, starting, and directional signals, sees.
155-162	
Failure to yield right-of-way, sees. 163-167	
Not exercising due care re pedestrians, sees. 168-172	
Failure to stop at railroad crossing, sees. 174-176	
Failure to stop at intersections, sec. 177	
Leaving vehicle improperly parked, sec. 182	
Backing vehicle illegally, sec. 184	
Operating motor-cycle with more than one person, sec. 185 __
Requirements of safe driving on highway, sees. 186, 187	
Fire-vehicle safety, sees. 189, 190	
Driving on sidewalk, sec. 191 	
Opening door requirements, sec. 194
Illegal depositing of articles on highway, sec. 195 _
Riding motor-cycle without safety helmet, sec. 207
Miscellaneous infractions	
Under Motor-vehicle Act Regulations—
Number plates, sees. 3.01-3.03 ___..
Driving without proper head-lamps, sees. 4.01-4.06	
Driving without tail-lamps, reflectors, other required lamps,
sees. 4.07-4.10	
Driving without clearance lamps, lamps on projections, etc.,
sees. 4.11-4.13	
Driving without proper parking-lamps, spot-lamps, turn-signal devices, etc., sees. 4.14-4.22	
Driving vehicle with defective horn or miscellaneous equipment, sees. 7.01, 7.02	
Driving vehicle without muffler, sec. 7.03	
1968
1969
44
568      2,765
35
295
1,921
864
10,566
15
429
3
40
6
112
101
828
1
13
83
775
90
463
128
762
19
122
7
111
1,143
7
57
37
235
6
2
5
1
11
4
3
5
19
9
23
2,341    20,402
9
88
12
55
—
18
—
3
9
23
16
182
 L 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Traffic Violation Reports, 1968-69—Continued
Under Motor-vehicle Act Regulations—Continued
Driving vehicle without rear-view mirror or unobstructed rear
view, sec. 7.04	
Inadequate windshield-wiper, etc., sec. 7.05	
Driving without mudguards, etc., sec. 7.06	
Failing to have proper connections between motor-vehicle and
trailer, sec. 7.07	
Operating defective vehicle after ordered off road, sec. 7.09
Operating motor-cycle against regulations as to handlebars,
sec. 7.14	
Causing loud or unnecessary noise, sec. 7A.01	
Operating slow-moving vehicle without slow-moving warning
device, sec. 7b.02	
Miscellaneous infractions	
1968
4
4
23
Notice of Juvenile Offence, 1968—69
Under Motor-vehicle Act—
Driving without obtaining driver's licence, sec. 18 (1), (2)
Driving motor-vehicle otherwise than as restricted on driver's
licence, sec. 18 (6), (7), (8) 	
Failing to obey traffic-control signal legend, sees. 127, 128,
152	
Failing to obey special signal signs re highway construction,
sees. 134, 135, 137	
Careless driving, sees. 138, 139	
Exceeding maximum speed limit, sec. 140	
Exceeding speed limit passing schools and playgrounds, sec.
141   	
Exceeding speed limit overtaking stopped school bus, sec. 142
Failure to drive on the right, sec. 143	
Infractions of " lane " driving, sees. 144-146	
Infractions of "passing," sees. 148-151, 153, 154	
Infractions of turning, starting, and directional signals, sees.
15 5-162 	
Failure to yield right-of-way, sees. 163-167	
Not exercising due care re pedestrians, sees. 168-172	
Failure to stop at railroad crossing, sees. 174-176	
Failure to stop at intersections, sec. 177	
Backing vehicle illegally, sec. 184	
Miscellaneous 	
1969
32
16
12
6
2
598
1
79  1,053
933
1,612
1,373
2,106
307
518
9
5
812
1,115
3,002
4,165
166
159
6
8
46
59
153
266
220
335
97
187
246
290
51
63
10
8
403
522
53
83
2,236
3,457
10,123 14,958
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1969        L 31
Driver Licence Suspension under Roadside Suspension Law
(Driving After Consuming Alcohol), 1969
Suspensions,
Section 203
Requested
Mobat
Test
Positive
Reading
Charged
Driving
under
Suspension
Delta—    	
232
66
84
342
48
57
7,741
3,762
394
107
4
2
3
269
32
4
3
4
2
261
30
4
3
22
3
Oak Bay  	
1
R.C.M.P. detachments 	
172
75
2
1
Totals	
12,833
317
304
276
3. DRIVING SAFETY
(a) Safety Responsibility
Past legislation required proof of financial responsibility to be submitted by
owners and drivers of motor-vehicles if, as a result of the operation of a motor-
vehicle, a judgment was rendered and remained unsatisfied, upon conviction for an
infraction of the Criminal Code of Canada, or because of an unsatisfactory driving
record.
In all cases, where proof of financial responsibility was required to be submitted by private individuals, a certificate of a duly authorized automobile insurance
company was obtained. As a result, the Safety Responsibility Division received
15,835 certificates from the insurance companies. Of this total, 14,113 certificates
were accepted as proof of the policyholder's financial responsibility. A table with
full information concerning the filing and cancellation of certificates is shown hereunder:—■
Comparisons of Financial Responsibility Certificates Received,
Filed, and Cancelled in 1968 and 1969
1968
1969
Increase
Decrease
Per Cent
16,770
16,135
635
13,684
1,273
1,178
15,357
$32,270
15,835
15,114
721
12,632
1,393
1,089
14,113
$30,228
86
120
935
1,021
5.5
6.3
13.5
Owners* policy certificates and sales agency certificates filed
1,052
89
1,244
$2,042
7.6
8.6
7.5
8.1
6.3
An alternative method of submitting proof of financial responsibility by way
of a bond of a guarantee or surety company, by a deposit of security with the Minister
of Finance, or by satisfying the Superintendent of Insurance that they could be classified as self-insurers, was taken advantage of by some of the larger corporations in
this Province. Upon receipt of appropriate certificates and bonds, 138 financial
responsibility cards were issued by this Division.
During 1969, 4,453 owners involved in accidents were unable to prove that the
operation of their motor-vehicle was insured or were in a position to respond in
 L 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
damages. As a result, the " uninsured " drivers or owners had their licences placed
under suspension until they submitted proof of satisfaction of claims or deposited
security sufficient in the opinion of the Superintendent to satisfy any judgment that
could be made as a result of the accident. This is an increase of 15 per cent from
1968, when 3,871 owners were affected.
A total of 4,827 licences were reinstated upon compliance wtih the requirements, as shown below:—
Revocation of Suspension
Judgment in favour of the uninsured motorist  11
Proof of satisfaction of claims  2,261
Valid policy  284
Owner, driver only  130
Stolen  15
Tourist   9
Legally parked  23
Damage under $250  16
Expiration of one year from date of accident  1,822
Security deposited with the Minister of Finance  203
Settlement agreement with Traffic Victims Indemnity
Fund   61
Total  4,827
A total of 667 new suspensions were requested as a result of unsatisfied judgments arising out of motor-vehicle accidents during the year. Of this total, 327
settlement agreements were concluded between the uninsured motorist and the Traffic Victims Indemnity Fund.
Suspension by Superintendent under Financial Responsibility Requirements
Offence
Dangerous driving—
Accident	
No accident	
Criminal negligence—
Accident	
No accident	
Drunken driving—
Accident	
No accident	
Impaired driving—
Accident	
No accident      2,797
Failing to remain at scene of accident _
Driving under suspension—
Accident	
No accident	
Suspension due to accident      3,159
Unsatisfied judgment—Accident	
Conviction and judgment outside Province
Unsatisfactory driving record	
Suspension by Superintendent :__
Suspended
Reinstated
40
10
261
357
2
7
16
9
1
46
79
898
9
2,797
4,368
562
703
11
318
335
3,159
4,205
508
326
195
527
20
192
273
440
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1969       L 33
Suspension by Superintendent under Financial Responsibility Requirements—
Continued
Offence Suspended Reinstated
Death by criminal negligence  9 1
Bodily harm by criminal negligence  2
Further or additional proof of financial
responsibility     3,973
Notices of juvenile offence        131
Totals
13,221
4,092
15,661
Release due to strike-off, 8,466.
Release due to section 92, Motor-vehicle Act, 5,870.
Suspension of Drivers' Licences by Court Orders and Recommendations, 1969
Months
Years
Other
Total
Under
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
9
1
2
Death by criminal negligence—Ac-
1
9
1
5
3
34
205
1,012
4
5
6
23
36
1
9
70
11
27
2
16
1
23
276
1,544
42
4
25
3
41
17
123
93
4
30
3
46
6
22
5
3
77
353
2
2
20
1
79
37
5
11
2
69
11
49
4
11
1
4
145
665
3
6
3
34
7
99
26
15
14
1
20
2
13
2
2
1
5
71
252
2
1
8
9
4
2
1
2
5
30
1
1
2
2
3
1
1
6
91
24
57
2
25
2
1
179
599
8
54
32
65
14
25
13
7
5
3
2
10
31
1
1
1
5
4
1
1
3
2
43
24
40
9
15
4
64
279
4
6
41
8
18
6
24
6
1
2
13
13
18
6
10
26
89
2
13
2
2
1
8
1
1
2
2
13
15
14
4
5
20
95
1
4
3
8
11
2
2
Injury by criminal negligence—Ac-
1
Criminal negligence—
Accident	
7
18
Failing to remain at scene of acci-
381
Dangerous driving—
Accident	
107
250
Driving while intoxicated—
35
No accident	
Driving while ability impaired (as
amended 1969)—
Accident-	
127
5
40
Driving while ability impaired—
Accident          .
1,078
No accident	
4,949
Breath sample not provided ..
42
Driving with more than 80 mgs. of
alcohol in blood (as amended
1969) —
9
38
Driving while under suspension—
32
222
Conviction and judgment outside
76
Driving without due care and at-
433
Exceeding speed limit—Accident	
219
102
Miscellaneous	
89
Totals               	
1,354
2,352
672
1,168
396
47
1,198
71
597
207
200
8,262
 L 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(b) Examination of Drivers
A total of 136,116 persons was examined by our Drivers' Examination Division
during 1969, compared with the 1968 total of 126,973. Original licence examinations amounted to 104,530, compared with 92,291 in 1968.
The Branch is conducting examinations in the major centres of the Province
on a daily basis, and smaller communities are being serviced by travelling units,
some on a weekly basis and some on a monthly basis, depending on the demand for
examinations. We are servicing more small centres every year as the population
expands in the smaller communities throughout the Province.
The examiners in charge of our drivers' examination units also spend a considerable amount of their time conducting interviews with persons called in under
our Driver Improvement Programme.
Original Drivers' Examinations
In 1969, a total of 104,530 applicants were examined for an original British
Columbia driver's licence. The results of the examinations showed 46,641 or 80 per
cent of male applicants passed, while 11,616 or 20 per cent failed. Female applicants had 12,025 or 26 per cent failures and 34,248 or 74 per cent passed.
Of the successful male applicants 33,272 or 71 per cent were given unrestricted
licences, while 13,369 or 29 per cent have one or more restrictions. There were
22,331 or 65 per cent female examinees who had no restrictions, while 11,917 or 35
per cent had one or more restrictions.
A certificate of competency for physical condition was issued to 639 male
examinees, 277 of them being in the 70-year-or-over group. Certificate of competency for physical condition was also issued to 269 female examinees, 57 of them
being 70 years of age and over.
Failure in one or more of the examinations caused this Department to suspend
the right to obtain a licence of 94 male and 50 female applicants.
In the road-test portion of the examination, 16,783 male examinees and 16,122
female examinees were given the passing grade of 70 per cent to 79 per cent, 6,897
male and 5,640 female examinees had between 80 per cent and 84 per cent, 4,808
male and 3,121 female examinees had 85 per cent and 89 per cent, and 2,949 male
and 1,046 female examinees attained 90 per cent or over.
For surrendering valid out-of-Province driver's licences, 15,204 male and
8,319 female examinees had the road-test portion waived.
In 1969, 818 applicants failed one or more written examinations, 604 being
male and 214 female applicants.
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L 43
Summary of Drivers' Examinations
Total  _
Unrestricted
Restricted  ~
SUMMARY OF ORIGINAL EXAMINATIONS, 1969 (GRAND TOTAL, 104,530)
Applicants Passed Failed Examinations
Number     Per Cent Reason Number
.    80,889 77.0 Total   23,641
  55,603 69.0 Failed road test    17,536
  25,286 31.0 Failed written test       825
Failed to complete __ _     1,765
Failed vision      3,509
Physical condition   6
Per Cent
23.0
Males
Females
Number
Road   test   waived   due   to   applicant   being
holder of a driver's licence from another
province or state of the United States 	
Qualified with 70 to 79 per cent  	
Qualified with 80 to 84 per cent 	
Qualified with 85 to 89 per cent 	
Qualified with 90 per cent and over  	
Qualified after second road test _
Qualified after third road test -
Qualified after fourth road test __ _
Qualified after five or more road tests
Qualified after second written test	
Qualified after third written test  	
Qualified after fourth written test	
15,204
16,783
6,897
4,808
2,949
3,608
599
106
20
488
28
3
Number
Road   test   waived   due   to   applicant   being
holder of a driver's licence from another
province or state of the United States 	
Qualified with 70 to 79 per cent	
Qualified with 80 to 84 per cent _ 	
Qualified with 85 to 89 per cent	
Qualified with 90 per cent and over 	
Qualified after second road test   -
Qualified after third road test   —
Qualified after fourth road test .
Qualified after five or more road tests
Qualified after second written test	
Qualified after third written test —	
Qualified after fourth written test	
8,319
16,122
5,640
3,121
1,046
3,452
638
92
21
181
Total	
Unrestricted
Restricted	
SUMMARY OF RE-EXAMINATIONS, 1969 (GRAND TOTAL, 31,586)
Applicants Passed Failed Examinations
Number     Per Cent
  30,026 95.0
  16,672 56.0
 13,354 44.0
Males
Number
Road test waived on surrender of a driver's
licence from another province or state of
the United States or certification by an authorized company     1,262
Qualified with 70 to 79 per cent  10,424
Qualified with 80 to 84 per cent   4,164
Qualified with 85 to 89 per cent -   4,823
Qualified with 90 per cent and over  4,831
Qualified after second road test   605
Qualified after third road test  85
Qualified after fourth road test   27
Qualified after five or more road tests  7
Reason
Total	
Number
_    1,560
Per Cent
5.0
1,419
2
Failed to complete .
Failed vision	
59
52
28
	
Females
Number
Road test waived on surrender of a driver's
licence from another province or state of
the United States or certification by an authorized company	
Qualified with 70 to 79 per cent — 	
Qualified with 80 to 84 per cent	
Qualified with 85 to 89 per cent	
Qualified with 90 per cent and over 	
Qualified after second road test _ 	
Qualified after third road test .
Qualified after fourth road test	
Qualified after five or more road tests
131
2,546
894
606
345
138
36
6
1
 L 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Chauffeurs' Examinations
In 1969, this Department conducted 2,424 Class A chauffeur examinations.
Of these, 2,173 or 90 per cent were satisfactory, while 251 or 10 per cent resulted
in failure in one or more portions of the examination.
There were 3,453 Class B examinations conducted, of which 2,327 or 67 per
cent were satisfactory and 1,126 or 33 per cent resulted in failure.
There were 44 Class A and 110 Class B chauffeurs refused issuance for one
or more reasons.
In 1969 our certification programme resulted in 1,056 Class A chauffeur
certifications.
CLASS A CHAUFFEURS CLASS B CHAUFFEURS
Passed (90 per cent) 2,173 Passed (67 per cent)  2,327
Failed (10 per cent)        251 Failed (33 per cent)      1,126
Certification   1,056 Failed—
Failed— Hearing        14
Hearing         9 Vision 111
Vision       44 Colourblind     19
Colourblind         9 Road test   559
Road test      109 Physical condition    45
Physical condition       21 Written 328
Written       51 To complete   —   50
To complete         5 To attend	
To attend         3 	
  Total 3,453
Total    2,424
(c) Driver Improvement Programme
Since its inception in 1953, the Driver Improvement Programme has experienced many changes. It began with the intention to educate drivers who had received unsatisfactory driving records and to try and help prevent them from being
involved in serious motor-vehicle accidents. In earlier days this was done exclusively
through interviews with the driver or by suspending the driver's licence.
In keeping with the primary concern of the Driver Improvement Programme
to reduce motor-vehicle accidents, continued expansion of the Division activities
has included increased involvement in promoting defensive driving courses. Several staff members have been trained as instructors and have conducted classes for
the Motor-vehicle Branch staff and other departments. One staff member has also
been on loan since 1968 to the British Columbia Traffic and Safety Council for the
purpose of extending their programme in regard to defensive driving courses. Letters recommending such a course are being forwarded to persons in most areas of
the Province whose driving record indicates further instruction in safe-driving practices is essential.
Our Juvenile Offence Programme, which came into being in 1967, is continuing
to prove successful. Upon receipt of juvenile offences issued by a peace officer, a
letter is forwarded to the parent or guardian of the juvenile, pointing out the offence
and recommending participation by the juvenile in high school driver-training or
defensive driving. This programme endeavours to place the responsibility for a
juvenile action on a highway in the hands of the parent or guardian, and enthusiastic
response from the parents in this regard is being experienced.
In 1969 we further extended our Driver Improvement Programme to our association with the various offices of the Alcoholism Foundation of British Columbia.
The co-operation we are receiving from the Foundation is exceptional and, although
we are still trying to enlarge our programme in this regard, we are pleased to say
that so far those who have chosen the services of the Foundation have benefited.
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1969       L 45
The data processing centre has played a major part in assisting the Driver
Improvement Programme. The assessing of a driving record is now simplified by
reviewing the unsatisfactory driving record of a driver on a single sheet printed by
our computer.   Previously this was done by handling bulky files.
Statistics for the year 1969 regarding the Driver Improvement Programme are
quoted:—
Notices of Juvenile Offences (N.O.J.O. Programme),
January to December, 1969
Total number of offences committed to date (includes
Court actions)   15,098
Total number of notices of juvenile offences (N.O.J.O.) 14,958
Total number of advisory letters forwarded to parents 6,598
Notices of intent to suspend  568
Notices to attend for interview  135
Suspensions under N.O.J.O. (sec. 86)   243
Appeals (resolved and placed on probation)  61
A continued accelerated programme of public contact through schools and
various organizations is being conducted by the Driver Improvement Programme
staff, who are also assisted in the outside areas of the Province by members of the
Driver Examination Division staff.
Seaches of driving records and the preparation of abstracts of driving records
under section 116 (_>) of the Motor-vehicle Act have greatly increased within the
past years, which indicates that many firms employing personnel responsible for the
operation of motor-vehicles are now becoming more interested in the driving record
of their staff. This increase also reflects the attitude of the insurance industry, which
requires knowledge of the updated driving record before issuing motor-vehicle
liability insurance policies to an ever-increasing number of applicants.
Statistics of driving-record searches for the past three years are as follows:—
1967___. 101,410 1968.... 123,132 1969___. 137,133
The 1969 statistics of the Driver Improvement Programme are as follows:—
Warning Letters, Etc., January to December, 1969
Warning letters  20,090
Notices of intent to suspend  10,661
Interviews and hearings  4,170
Results of notices to suspend, interviews, and submissions—
Licences suspended   6,254
Licences placed on probation  2,439
 L 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Summary of Actions Taken under Driver Improvement Programme, 1969
Age
Total
16-20
Years
21-24
Years
25-30
Years
31-40
Years
41-50
Years
51-60
Years
61-64
Years
65-69
Years
70 and
Over
Warning letters	
3,004
2,954
50
1,016
1,013
3
1,728
1,714
14
666
527
226
534
525
9
3,157
3,116
41
1,184
1,180
4
1,902
1,879
23
920
964
409
674
668
6
1,909
1,873
36
781
778
3
1,107
1,089
18
478
531
251
455
442
13
1,410
1,369
41
604
598
6
817
798
19
388
332
168
399
385
14
716
688
28
374
367
7
432
427
5
199
123
87
221
204
17
355
343
12
167
165
2
216
212
4
100
46
40
111
105
6
53
51
2
19
19
28
28
13
6
6
26
25
1
40
40
17
17
18
18
9
2
2
9
8
1
17
16
1
8
8
6
6
4
1
10
8
2
20,890
6,598
10,661
10,450
211
Notices of intent to suspend-
Male 	
Interviews and hearings	
4,170
4,145
25
Result of notices to suspend,
interviews, and submissions—
Licences suspended —
Male  -	
6,254
6,171
83
2,777
2,532
1,189
2,439
2,370
Previously on probation—
Driver's   licence  placed   on
69
Impaired, 7,169; total infractions received, 249,966;  special restrictions, 713; juvenile offences, 15,098.
(d) Motor-vehicle Inspection
During 1969 the compulsory programme of motor-vehicle inspection was continued in Victoria and was expanded to include the Municipalities of Delta and Richmond through the Richmond Inspection Station.
The Richmond Inspection Station, which commenced operation December 15,
1969, was constructed with two lanes for the inspection of all types of motor-vehicles
and trailers.   The station is manned by 13 mo tor-vehicle inspectors and two clerks.
Notices requiring the owner of a motor-vehicle in the Victoria area to present
his vehicle for inspection were mailed to 39,029 owners during 1969, of whom
19,065 required a second notice. Notifications of suspension were given to 7,144
owners.
The following is a summary of vehicle inspection:—
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1969       L 47
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BRITISH COLUMBIA
During the inspection of motor-vehicles it was found that 42,317 did not meet
the standards of inspection and were rejected. The total number of defects found
were 86,684 or 2.04 for each rejected vehicle. The following are the causes for
rejection:—
Causes of Rejection
Model Year
Agel
Age 2
Age 3
Age 4
Total
1. Motor-vehicle licence	
441
283
1,337
452
923
842
230
265
419
37
64
81
12,567
147
4
2
53
944
1,351
1,664
54
1,713
1,441
266
366
46
8
531
769
73
240
293
398
1,705
860
1,373
1,476
137
493
951
100
346
126
9,138
112
2
2
53
960
2,779
2,193
78
1,900
1,584
633
438
39
10
923
836
101
202
215
298
1,006
908
876
1,021
108
285
784
138
486
160
3,919
93
2
36
588
1,999
1,601
54
1,503
1,042
534
584
26
11
661
678
83
214
148
132
287
226
446
410
93
133
365
72
220
86
1,438
71
22
355
1,201
815
55
940
742
240
348
19
2
341
373
34
119
1,097
1,111
4,335
2,446
3,618
3,749
568
8. Horn
1,176
9. Windshield-wipers	
10. Left window-raiser 	
2,519
347
1,116
453
13. Headlamps	
27,062
423
8
4
164
2,847
7,330
20. Tires, wheels-	
5,458
241
6,056
23. Service brakes   	
24. Pedal reserve 	
4,809
1,673
1,735
130
27. Tell-tale	
31
2,456
2,656
291
31. Miscellaneous - _
775
Vehicle Age Code:  Age 4, 1953 and prior; Age 3, 1954 to 1958; Age 2, 1959 to 1964;  Age 1,
1965 and after.
The programme of inspection through the use of a mobile inspection unit was
continued during 1969. This marks the fifth year of operation of this programme,
which started in 1964.
The mobile inspection unit consists of a panel truck and trailer which is outfitted with equipment to check steering mechanism, wheel alignment, brake and
headlamp adjustments. In addition, checks are made by the inspection unit staff
of other vehicle lamps, mufflers, and exhaust systems, the condition of window glass,
windshield wipers, tires, and other items whose poor condition could prove dangerous.
The mobile unit visited 28 communities in the Province in 1969. A total of
13,565 vehicles was inspected. Of that number, 59.5 per cent were rejected on first
inspection. The following table shows the number of rejected vehicles on which
defects were corrected and subsequently passed on reinspection. In addition, it
was reported that many had their vehicle defects corrected after the inspection unit
had left the community.
Causes of rejection at the 28 different locations throughout the Province are
one or more of the following:—
 report of the superintendent of motor-vehicles, 1969
Mobile Inspection Unit
L 49
Summary of Inspections, 1969
(28 Locations)
Model Year
Age 1
Age 2
Age 3
Age 4
Total
Presented for inspection	
180
49
131
73.1
72
72
252
9
8
35
11
26
28
3
12
6
3
11
2
88
2
23
49
31
43
19
14
11
26
20
5
2
634
135
499
78.7
175
175
809
33
24
130
42
52
59
3
22
43
11
23
22
342
3
8
81
143
72
7
128
60
60
37
1
3
76
57
8
15
2,770
789
1,981
71.5
921
921
3,691
91
33
434
124
153
190
11
60
80
10
28
69
1,390
1
12
261
402
232
2
393
186
109
73
1
7
181
174
8
19
9,981
4,514
5,467
54.7
2,378
2,378
12,359
253
42
832
133
221
213
15
82
99
6
7
17
4,125
14
2
53
534
401
436
13
575
314
43
141
2
206
421
5
30
13,565
5,487
8,078
59.5
3,546
3,546
Rejected on inspection   	
Percentage rejected	
Passed on reinspection 	
17,111
386
Causes of Rejection
107
1,431
310
452
490
32
8   H"rn
176
228
30
69
110
5,945
18
2
75
899
995
20. Tires, wheels
771
22
22. Exhaust, muffler- .         	
1,139
579
226
262
2
27. Tell-tale       . .     _
12
7.8. ParVing-hraVp
489
672
26
66
Vehicle Age Code: Age 4, 1953 and prior; Age 3, 1954 to 1958; Age 2, 1959 to 1964; Age 1,
1965 and after.
The mobile vehicle inspection programme is operated on a voluntary basis.
Its success depends on community support and sponsorship, so that the maximum
number of interested motorists may be encouraged to subject their vehicles to the
critical inspection routine. We enjoyed enthusiastic community support during
1969, with the result that it was often not possible to inspect all the vehicles which
were brought to the testing-locations.
Prior to the visit of the inspection unit to a community, groups of citizens who
are interested in traffic safety are approached to sponsor the visit. Sponsorship involves the development of a publicity campaign, usually as public service announcements in the local newspaper and by radio and television stations, arranging for a
suitable inspection site, and recruiting and organizing voluntary help to assist the
two qualified mechanics who are assigned to the programme by the Branch. We
have also been assisted by the municipal governments of the communities to a
great extent.
 L 50 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The aims of the programme are (a) the inspection of vehicles and (£>) the
development of public interest in the need to maintain vehicles in a safe mechanical
condition. The percentage of vehicles rejected is still high, particularly when it is
considered that these vehicles were voluntarily submitted. The percentage would
be much higher if it were possible to examine the many vehicles in doubtful mechanical condition on the highways whose owners have no intention of submitting them
to a voluntary inspection.
Public interest in the programme is still high. We are usually requested to
provide the inspection service more frequently. The need for additional facilities,
equipment, and personnel to bring the programme to a stage where it can offer
routine inspection to a larger percentage of motorists is evident.
4. CENTRAL REGISTRY
The Superintendent of Motor-vehicles also carries the title of Registrar-General
and is responsible for the operation of the Central Registry. Documents submitted
under the Bills of Sale Act, the Conditional Sales Act, the Assignment of Book Accounts Act, and Mechanics' Lien Act, which concern all types of personal chattels,
are registered in the Central Registry. In the case of corporations, personal chattels
other than motor-vehicles are recorded with the Registrar of Companies.
The registration of documents with the Central Registry continues to increase,
as the following statistics will indicate:—
Year Documents Accepted Total Revenue
1965   196,906 $683,006.50
1967   209,688 717,436.50
1969   245,144 838,188.75
Therefore, during the 1969 calendar year the Central Registry accepted for
registration 48,238 more documents than in the 1965 calendar year. The total
revenue received by the Central Registry for the registration of the documents increased by an amount of $155,182.25. A large percentage of the documents now
being accepted for registration include more than one vehicle, or encumbers a
vehicle plus other chattels. In 1969 a total number of 245,144 documents were
accepted for registration, whilst the Data Processing Division key-punched 377,037
lien cards.
The request for search information has also increased and to meet this challenge the teletype section of the Motor-vehicle Branch was transferred to the Central
Registry. The Central Registry may now receive requests for search information
by counter, mail, telephone, telex, teletype, and TWX. In 1969 the total value of
search requests was $146,933.50, an increase in revenue of $15,487.45 over the
1968 calendar year.
The Central Registry administers approximately 1,700 Search Fee Accounts,
and this Search Fee Account may be used to obtain search information pertaining
to motor-vehicles and drivers' records in addition to the regular lien-searching.   In
1969 the Central Registry accounted for 117,289 drivers' abstracts for the value of
$234,578. Therefore, in fact, for the 1969 calendar year the total revenue accounted for by the Central Registry was the sum of $1,072,766.75.
A statistical comparison with the 1968 calendar year follows, which gives a
detailed report of the various activities of the Central Registry.
 report of the superintendent of motor-vehicles, 1969     l 51
Statistical Comparisons with Year Ended December 31, 1969,
to Year 1968
January 1 to December 31
Documents filed under—                                           1968 1969
Conditional Sales Act      73,043 84,166
Bills of Sale Act  131,527 134,819
Mechanics' Lien Act     17,769 21,108
Assignment of Book Accounts Act          391 394
Companies Act          185 225
Documents discharged under—
Conditional Sales Act       1,423 1,792
Bills of Sale Act       1,668 1,413
Mechanics' Lien Act       1,013 1,091
Assignment of Book Accounts Act            22 30
Companies Act             63 106
Total documents accepted  227,104 245,144
Total value of—
Documents accepted  $642,054.00 $689,056.00
Searches      131,446.05 146,933.50
Photographic copies         2,085.25 2,199.25
Total revenue  $775,585.30 $838,188.75
The total number of cards punched by data processing re document registrations, January 1 to December 31, 1969, was 377,037 (serial cards, 225,964; alphabetical cards, 151,073).
5. SCHOOL BUSES
Control over the use and operation of school buses engaged in the transportation of students to and from the public schools in the Province is the responsibility
of the Superintendent of Motor-vehicles. The control extends to the setting of minimum standards for the construction and maintenance of school buses and provides
for periodic inspection of school buses. This inspection is carried out on behalf of
the Superintendent by mechanical inspectors of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police
and by the Motor Carrier Branch of the Public Utilities Commission. In December
of 1969, supervisory motor-vehicle inspectors at the Victoria Inspection Station and
the Richmond Inspection Station were appointed mechanical inspectors for the
inspection of school buses. School buses in the Victoria area and Greater Vancouver
area are inspected at these stations or by an inspector from a station. It is also
necessary that evidence of satisfactory insurance coverage, in accordance with the
carrying capacity of each school bus, be supplied to the Superintendent.
In 1969 the number of permits issued for vehicles to be used as school buses
were 892 renewal permits and 134 permits for new vehicles, for a total of 1,026, as
compared to the 1968 figure of 1,006. Of these permits issued, 24 were cancelled
as the result of the lapse of insurance coverage or of poor mechanical condition.
In 1969, school buses were involved in 67 accidents, of which 47 resulted in property
damage only. Twenty-seven students and 18 persons other than students were injured in 19 injury accidents. There was one fatal accident involving a school bus
where one person other than a student was killed.
 L 52 BRITISH COLUMBIA
6. PERMITS FOR FLASHING RED AND AMBER LIGHTS,
SIRENS, AND THEFT ALARMS
The Superintendent may, under the provisions of the Motor-vehicle Act Regulations, issue permits to allow a vehicle to be equipped with a flashing red or amber
light. The regulations specify that certain emergency vehicles and tow cars may be
equipped without obtaining a permit. The permits are required for vehicles such
as public utility vehicles which must stop on a highway to repair power or telephone
lines. In each case the permit is issued where a hazard exists and only with the
approval of the local enforcement agency.
In 1969, 158 permits for flashing amber lamps and 16 permits for flashing red
lamps were issued. In addition, nine permits were issued to allow the installation of
sirens on vehicles. These vehicles were usually ambulances or the personal vehicle
of the chief of a volunteer fire department in a small community.
One permit was issued for the installation of a theft alarm in a vehicle.
7. STAFF
At December 31, 1969, the staff of the Motor-vehicle Branch totalled 398,
which was a slight increase over the 1968 figure of 380. Of this total, there were
319 permanent employees on payroll, with six requisitions outstanding at the Civil
Service Commission; the balance of staff consisted of 76 temporary employees.
Our licence-renewal period of January and February would have been made
more difficult without the able assistance of 66 staff members of the Liquor Control
Board. These members worked with the staff of the Motor-vehicle Branch anywhere from a few days to two months during a time that demanded endurance,
accuracy, and a good deal of patience. We sincerely thank the Chairman and administration of the Liquor Control Board for their co-operation in providing capable
assistance, and thus greatly reducing the need for temporary employees at that time.
The staff of the Motor-vehicle Branch cannot be forgotten, for without their
dedication to duty and continued loyalty, the new and expanding programmes would
be extremely difficult to cope with. The population of British Columbia continues
to increase and similarly motor-vehicles and their drivers increase. New systems
must be implemented and programmes changed to keep abreast of our growing and
expanding communities. The staff of the Motor-vehicle Branch have taken these
changes in stride throughout the Province with very little additional assistance. It is
the line employees who must be depended upon to carry out responsibilities given to
them by their supervisors and we are aware that work loads continue to increase.
We are ever grateful for a very capable staff who constantly give their best to support
this Branch in our role in today's world.
CONCLUSION
The activities set out in this Report will give some idea of the work requirements
of the Branch. There is no alternative to the continuing increase of motor-vehicle
registrations and the increasing number of drivers licensed to operate in British
Columbia. The Branch will continue to strive for improved methods of administration so as to cope with these increased work requirements. It becomes very apparent
that a continuing increase in percentage of staff time is going to be necessary in the
driver-licensing field, and there is no substitute for the personal contact with the
driver who is having problems. Much staff training has gone into the techniques
so necessary to successfully deal with the public in this sort of an approach. It is
going to be necessary to recruit and train additional people for these functions.   The
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1969        L 53
opportunity presented through the Province's innovative " no-fine " approach provides tremendous opportunities to take concrete action in dealing with the hazardous
driver on our highways. We will continue to place great emphasis in rehabilitative
attempts to deal with the driver who has difficulties. The rapid expansion of defensive driving programmes throughout all parts of British Columbia has proven to be
a great asset in this approach.
Without the co-operation which the Branch continues to receive from many
persons and organizations throughout the Province, it would be extremely difficult
to carry on its programmes. I am extremely grateful for the willing assistance I
receive from members of your Department. The assistance we receive from the
Courts and enforcement agencies is equally valuable and without their assistance
it would be difficult indeed to meet many of our obligations.
Respectfully submitted,
RAYMOND A. HADFIELD,
Superintendent of Motor-vehicles.
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1971
530-1270-9035

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