Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

Mental Health Branch PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT 1970 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1971

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0373660.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0373660.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0373660-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0373660-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0373660-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0373660-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0373660-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0373660-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0373660-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0373660.ris

Full Text

 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES
AND HOSPITAL INSURANCE
Mental Health Branch
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
1970
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1971
  To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C, LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Annual Report of the Mental Health
Branch, Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance, for the year 1970.
RALPH R. LOFFMARK,
Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance.
Office of the Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance,
Victoria, British Columbia, January 21,1971.
 Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance,
Mental Health Branch,
Victoria, British Columbia, January 21, 1971.
The Honourable Ralph R. Loffmark,
Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance,
Victoria, British Columbia.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Mental Health
Branch for 1970.
F. G. TUCKER, M.B., B.S., C.R.C.P., M.Sc,
Deputy Minister of Mental Health.
   DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES AND HOSPITAL INSURANCE
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH
The Honourable Ralph R. Loffmark, Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance.
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
F. G. Tucker, M.B., B.S., C.R.C.P., M.Sc,
Deputy Minister of Mental Health.
A. Porteous,
Assistant Deputy Minister of Mental
Health.
J. S. Bland, B.A., M.B., B.Chir., D.P.M.,
Consultant in Retardation and Children's
Psychiatric Services.
F. A. Matheson,
Departmental Comptroller.
Miss A. K. Carroll, B.A., M.S.W.,
Social Service Consultant.
Miss M. M. Lonergan, B.S.N.Ed.,
Nursing Consultant.
M.N.,
R. H. Goodacre, B.A., M.A., C.P.H.,
Sociologist.
R. S. McInnes, B.A., B.D., M.P.H.,
Statistician and Co-ordinator of
Community Services.
K. Denecke, B.Com.,
Assistant Statistician.
Mrs. F. Ireland, B.A., M.S.W.,
Co-ordinator of Boarding Homes.
R. H. Thompson,
Director, Information Services.
N. W. Wylie,
Administrative Officer.
COMMUNITY PSYCHIATRIC PROGRAMMES
P. Adrian, M.S.W.,
Acting Director, Upper Fraser
Valley Mental Health Centre.
A. L. Aranas, M.D.,
Director, Victoria Mental Health Centre.
A. J. Bennee, M.B., B.Ch., C.R.C.P.,
Director, North Okanagan Mental
Health Centre.
W. W. Black, M.B., B.Sc, D.P.M.,
C.R.C.P.(C),
Director, Boundary Mental Health Centre.
J. Brown, M.S.W.,
Acting Director, East Kootenay Mental
Health Centre.
R. L. Cameron, R.S.W.,
Acting Director, West Kootenay Mental
Health Centre.
P. Flor-Henry, M.B., Ch.B., M.D., D.P.M.,
Director, Simon Fraser Mental Health
Centre.
G. Graham Ellis, B.M., B.Ch., D.P.M.,
Director, South Central Interior Mental
Health Centre.
W. C Holt, M.D., CR.CP.(C),
Director, Burnaby Mental Health Centre.
W. T. Lawson, M.S.W.,
Acting Director, Central Vancouver Island
Mental Health Centre.
E. Luke, M.B., Ch.B., D.P.M., CR.C.P.(C),
Director, Central Fraser Valley Mental
Health Centre.
K. J. Mackay, M.B., B.S., Ch.B.(Aberd.),
L.M.C.C, CR.CP.(C),
Director, Upper Island Mental Health
Centre.
F. E. McNair, B.A., M.D., CM., C.R.C.P.,
Director, South Okanagan Mental Health
Centre.
E. J. Sopp, M.S.W.,
Acting Director, Selkirk Mental Health
Centre.
J. A. Steedman, M.D.,
Director, Northern Interior Mental Health
Centre.
S. G. Travers, M.S.W.,
Acting Director, Skeena Mental Health
Centre.
J. T. Wood, M.D.,
Director, Saanich Mental Health Centre.
 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
H. W. Bridge, M.B., B.Ch., M.Sc.,
C.R.CP.(C),
Director of Mental Health Services.
C. B. Watson, B.A., M.A.,
Administrative Officer.
G. L. Tomalty, B.A., M.P.A.,
Departmental Personnel Officer.
B. F. Bryson, B.A., M.D., CM., F.A.P.A.,
Superintendent, Riverview Hospital.
J. Walsh, M.B., B.Ch., D.P.M.,
Superintendent, Geriatric Division.
J. Bower, M.D., D.P.M.,
Superintendent, The Tranquille School.
A. Bishop, B.Ed.,
Assistant Personnel Officer.
Mrs. P. A. West, R.R.L.,
Consultant in Medical Records and
Statistics.
W. J. G. McFarlane, B.A., M.D., D.Psych.,
C.R.C.P.,
Clinical Director, Riverview Hospital.
A. P. Hughes, M.D., B.Sc, C.R.C.P.,
Superintendent, The Woodlands School.
Mrs. E. Paulson, B.S.N.,
Acting Director of Nursing Education.
BRITISH COLUMBIA YOUTH DEVELOPMENT CENTRE
P. A. Lavelle, M.B., B.Ch., D.P.M.,
Director, Residential Unit.
D. C Shalman, Ph.D.,
Director, Psychological Education Clinic.
A. A. Cashmore, M.D.(Lond.),
Director, Family and Children's Clinic.
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
Page
The Year in Review  13
Financial Review and Construction Summary  17
Personnel  21
Retardation and Children's Psychiatric Services  25
Social Work Consultation Services  26
Nursing Consultation Services  28
Statistics and Medical Records  30
Special Studies and Continuing Education  31
Information Services  32
COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
Burnaby Mental Health Centre  35
Simon Fraser Mental Health Centre  37
Boundary Mental Health Centre  37
Central Fraser Valley Mental Health Centre  38
Upper Fraser Valley Mental Health Centre  40
South Okanagan Mental Health Centre  40
North Okanagan Mental Health Centre  41
South Central Interior Mental Health Centre  42
Northern Interior Mental Health Centre  42
East Kootenay Mental Health Centre  44
West Kootenay Mental Health Centre  45
Selkirk Mental Health Centre  46
Skeena Mental Health Centre  47
Victoria Mental Health Centre  48
Saanich Mental Health Centre  49
Upper Island Mental Health Centre  50
Central Vancouver Island Mental Health Centre  50
IN-PATIENT SERVICES
Review of In-patient Services, 1970  55
Department of Nursing Education  58
Riverview Hospital  59
Geriatric Division  66
The Woodlands School  70
The Tranquille School  76
British Columbia Youth Development Centre  79
PATIENT MOVEMENT
Patient Movement Trends  87
Patient Movement Data  88
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS  91
 H
0_
<
£__
fl
<)
<z
z
OW05
£_r«
<:
z"<«
N
ES?
h-m|
St-r-
£
__g
<
a
n.
o
H<
<«
Z
w
S
SS
o «
vJLO
5Z
u
0^
2
TJJS
Islf
"BtU o
._"c £
— S^ = E
_coa
o    Uo
li
5   -cO
to
P.   £"
6&
§2
Kg
.B3-
s,.
_.  3
"SIS
-si-~e
SO     SO
Ph S
■a >
gQ
■D O
5^
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
The Year in Review
Financial Review and Construction Summary
Personnel
Retardation and Children's Psychiatric Services
Social Work Consultation Services
Nursing Consultation Services
Statistics and Medical Records
Special Studies and Continuing Education
Information Services
mental
health
branch
  ^^ ■>**>,:W M ^^
GENERAL
ADMINISTRATION
THE YEAR
IN REVIEW
F. G. Tucker, M.B., B.S., C.R.C.P., M.Sc,
Deputy Minister of Mental Health.
While every endeavour has been made to maintain a high level of care in our in-patient facilities,
in the past year an increasing emphasis has been
placed on the continuing development and evaluation of our community programmes. The burgeoning cost of health services renders it imperative that the most effective delivery
system of care be designed and maintained. In practical terms, this calls for the
reorganization of existing programmes and redeployment of already established resources. The problems involved in such a change are formidable and require a high
degree of good will and understanding by the personnel affected, and the co-operation of agencies and other Government departments who share our common
concern.
During the year a mental health centre was opened at Nelson to cover the
Selkirk region, and a new centre at Terrace provides services to the Skeena area.
This brings to 17 the number of centres now established in the Province. Consideration is also being given to relocating certain existing staff in order to permit the
opening of a further two or three centres and provide a more equitable distribution
of professional personnel. Once this is attained, I anticipate that further expansion
in the immediate future will be in the form of extension of existing centres and
establishment of satellites, rather than the provision of new ones.
There is still a lack of psychiatrists in the Interior and more remote areas of
the Province. I am, therefore, particularly pleased that the Psychiatric Section of
the British Columbia Medical Association has arranged for four psychiatrists in
private practice in North Vancouver to visit Dawson Creek in rotation. Travelling
expenses are borne by the Mental Health Branch and the psychiatrists are retained
on a sessional basis to provide consultation. In addition, they are free to consult
with local private physicians in their own time. I hope that similar programmes
can be developed on an interim basis in other poorly serviced regions. Mental
Health Branch Consultants regularly visit the Skeena region to augment the programme undertaken by the mental health centre, with particular emphasis on psychiatric and psychological consultation to schools. Thus, by a pragmatic approach,
using those resources available to us, we are gradually providing a network of
essential services throughout British Columbia.
The first regional mental health centre was established in Kelowna in 1962.
Within the over-all policy laid down by the Branch, this and subsequent centres
have enjoyed a high degree of local autonomy, so that they can most effectively
13
 M 14 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
meet the particular needs of their community and use to best advantage the varying
expertise of their staff. The advent of Medicare, the redefinition of the Provincial
Mental Health Programme in 1967, and the changing concepts in the provision of
health and social services are but a few of the factors over the past five years that
have challenged the ingenuity and ability of the centres. It has, therefore, appeared
appropriate during the past year to conduct an intensive study and evaluation of
the mental health centre programme to date. We are attempting to define more
clearly the unique role of the mental health centre in the community, and to evolve
techniques which will allow this relatively small professional group, each responsible
for a population of 50,000 to 120,000 people, to have the optimal impact on the
mental well-being of the communities which they serve.
Specific community psychiatric services continue to develop. The number of
psychiatric beds in general hospitals has increased from 348 to 382 in the past
year and a further 129 are in an advanced stage of planning or construction. Appropriately used, these beds facilitate admission, shorten the period of hospitalization,
and permit a rapid return of the patient to family and work. In November, the
Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance approved establishment of day
and night care and out-patient services at the Eric Martin Institute of Psychiatry,
the Vancouver General Hospital, Lions Gate Hospital, and the Prince George
Hospital, in addition to the service already approved at the Health Sciences Centre.
The therapeutic and economic advantage of partial hospitalization in many cases
cannot be over-emphasized.
We have been able to maintain a well-supervised boarding-home programme
in co-operation with the Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement;
however, I regret that we have not made better progress in establishing boarding-
home programmes outside the Lower Mainland and Victoria area on a regional
basis. This programme would not only enable certain patients to be retained in their
community, but would allow for the ready return of the patients who have spent a
relatively short period of time in the Riverview Hospital. In addition, it would allow
for the relocation of the longer-term mentally ill and retarded closer to their families.
We have had limited success in returning or diverting eligible patients into extended-
care facilities close to their place of residence.
The Branch Consultants have been particularly active during the past 12
months visiting the centres and establishing new programmes. In view of the professional and geographic isolation of many of the centres, the ongoing support and
advice of these Consultants is most necessary.
We have worked closely with the Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement on improving standards and controls, and in co-ordinating services to
the emotionally disturbed child. The Youth Resources Panel, an interdepartmental
professional advisory group, met regularly, reporting to the Deputy Ministers' Committee and to the Sub-Committee of Cabinet. The Rate Board, with representation
from the Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement and the Mental
Health Branch, reviewed the programme and standards of a variety of facilities for
children operated by private agencies, and advised the Deputy Minister of the Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement on the appropriate per diem
rates of payment.
Grants under the Treatment Resources Act were approved by Treasury Board
for the following agencies:—
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION M  15
Granville School Society  $36,666.66
Pacific Centre for Human Development     79,435.15
Vanderhoof and District Association for Handicapped Children     17,000.00
Powell River and District Association     20,031.00
The British Columbia Youth Development Centre at Burnaby was placed under
a board of management composed of representatives of the Mental Health Branch,
Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement, and the Department of
Education. The programme has developed satisfactorily and treatment results are
good. In the latter part of the year, accommodation for a day centre was completed
in the basement of the Burnaby Mental Health Centre, freeing the third cottage for
residential care.
I am pleased to record that the Forensic Clinic, previously situated in the
Burnaby Mental Health Centre, was relocated in Vancouver. The Department of
Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, is providing direction and supervision,
while the staff is provided by the Mental Health Branch. This includes a position
for a teaching fellowship.
Detailed discussion on the activity of the in-patient mental health facilities is
contained elsewhere in this Report; however, I must stress the increasing heavy
demands that are being made upon these institutions. This is due to a number of
interrelated factors.
Each year we attempt to develop higher standards of care, more sophisticated
treatment programmes, and better administrative services. The provision of mere
custodial care is no longer acceptable, and our staff are constantly endeavouring
to improve the level of functioning of even the most severely ill and retarded in our
hospitals. One has only to look at the long-term wards at Riverview Hospital, see
the vastly improved behaviour of the severely retarded at The Tranquille School
on being placed in the new Sage Building, or visit the autistic ward at The Woodlands School, and many other programmes, to realize the potential for improvement
that exists in these groups.
The days when patients assisted in running the services of mental hospitals or
schools for retarded are fast disappearing, and those able to function adequately in
a work situation have largely been returned to the community, or have been placed
in small, self-supporting units prior to discharge. This lack of patient help has
placed an increasingly heavy burden on our service departments, particularly the
dietary, housekeeping, and laundries.
Finally, the percentage of infirm, severely retarded, and disabled patients that
remain in our hospitals has increased markedly. Inevitably, this has placed increasingly heavy demands upon our nursing staff.
In order that we can accurately assess the changes taking place in our patient
population, the Consultant in Sociology devised and carried out a survey of all patients in our institutions. This project, which was carried out with the excellent cooperation of ward staff, provided us with detailed information of the level of function
and nursing need of every patient according to ward and area of residence. This
not only permits us to identify readily those patients requiring alternative and more
appropriate types of care and allows us to plan accordingly but, if carried out annually, will enable us to accurately assess the increasing demands for service within
our institutions.
 M 16
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
This study, our own experience, and that of other provinces and countries, has
clearly demonstrated that many patients can and should be returned to their community, providing adequate back-up resources are available to them. This enables
the hospitals to direct their full resources to that relatively limited group of patients
who require residential hospital care.
The programme for 1971 will emphasize the continuation of community-based
services and the expansion of facilities, services, and treatment programmes.
 FINANCIAL REVIEW
AND
CONSTRUCTION SUMMARY
Financial statements of the British Columbia Mental Health Branch for the
fiscal year ended March 31, 1970, are included at the end of the Annual Report.
Table A, a recapitulation of financial activities of the in-patient units, shows
a daily average population of 5,567.14, a decrease of 249.66 from the fiscal year
1968/69. However, due chiefly to salary adjustments and over-all maintenance
expenditure, an increase of $4,782,620, the daily per capita increased from $12.81
in 1968/69 to $15.74. The increase of $4,782,620 was made up of $3,931,155 in
salaries and the balance of $851,465 in supplies and expenses.
Maintenance revenue increased from $2,089,722 in 1968/69 to $2,116,207
in 1969/70.
Department of Agriculture farm operations at Essondale and Tranquille supplied the in-patient units with milk, meat, and vegetables valued at approximately
$500,000 during the year under review.
MAIOR CAPITAL PROJECTS
Eric Martin Institute, Victoria.—The Honourable W. A. C. Bennett, Prime
Minister of British Columbia, officially opened this new building on January 20,
1970.
On January 15, 1970, the patients housed in the Bay Pavilion, the psychiatric
unit of the Royal Jubilee Hospital, were transferred to the Eric Martin Institute.
The 300-bed Glendale Hospital, Victoria, will come into operation early in 1971.
17
 M 18 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
On February 24, 1970, 25 extended-care patients were transferred from The
Woodlands School in New Westminster to the Eric Martin Institute, and on June 3,
1970, an additional 23 patients were transferred. These transfers took place by
means of a helicopter, which was provided by 442 Squadron, Canadian Forces Base,
Comox.
Glendale Hospital, Victoria.—The general contractor for this 320-bed facility
was delayed during the summer due to labour difficulties in the construction industry.
At the year-end good progress was being made and it was anticipated that the contract would be completed early in 1971. After the general contract is completed,
the Department of Public Works will call for tenders for landscaping and site work.
A new society, The Glendale Lodge Society, was formed and a board of directors appointed to operate this new facility.
Renovation of Centre Building, The Woodlands School, New Westminster.—
A contract in the amount of $298,792 was let for phase three of this project,
which will provide a new patients' cafeteria, new offices, and general upgrading of
the basement area.
The Department of Public Works completed preliminary plans for five new
20-bed patients' units to replace Wing 4 of the Centre Building, Wards J and K, G
and Con.
Renovation of the West Lawn Building,
Riverview Hospital, Essondale.—Phase one
of this project was completed and the Department of Public Works finalized plans
and specifications for phase two. Renovations included the modernizing of bathroom
facilities and alterations to the sun porches
to provide medication and examination
Recently renovated ward and patient rooms,
dining areas in the West Lawn Build- Renovation of Riverside Building, River-
ing, Riverview Hospital, Essondale. view Hospital,  Essondale.—The  Depart
ment of Public Works was developing a programme for this project.
Laundry, Riverview Hospital, Essondale.—The Department of Public Works
was investigating sites for the location of a new laundry.
Five 20-bed Units, The Tranquille School, Tranquille.—The Department of
Public Works completed preliminary plans for this project.
COMMUNITY SERVICES
Two mental health centres opened during the period under review—Selkirk
Mental Health Centre, Nelson, started operating in April, 1970, and Skeena Mental
Health Centre, Terrace, started operating in May, 1970.
In September the Upper Island Mental Health Centre, Courtenay, moved into
new quarters in the recently completed third-floor addition to the Public Health
Unit Building.
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
M  19
>™
Official ceremonies were followed by an Open House, in the September opening of the
new quarters for the Upper Island Mental Health Centre, Courtenay.
INSTITUTIONS
Riverview Hospital, Essondale.—Two rather serious fires occurred at the
Riverview Hospital during the period under review. On March 26, 1970, a fire
started on Ward H3 in the East Lawn Building, and on April 7, 1970, there was
a fire on Ward West 2 in the Crease Unit. Fortunately there were no injuries in
either of these fires, and the Essondale fire department is to be commended for the
efficient manner in which they handled these two emergencies.
A position of Laundry Administrator was created and has now been filled.
With this appointment, a number of changes have been made in laundry handling
to improve this service to the institutions.
The staff bus subsidies were discontinued on March 31, 1970, and the service
was taken over by private operators, without benefit of subsidies.
The Department of Highways started work on a four-lane highway from the
three-way interchange, west of the Essondale grounds, past the Crease Unit to the
traffic light east of the boilerhouse. Work in connection with the construction of this
four-lane highway created certain problems, particularly in the Crease Unit.
The Woodlands School, New Westminster.—Preliminary planning was started
in connection with the conversion of Nurses' Home 3 into an academic school, etc.
Planning has been reactivated in connection with providing overnight accommodation at the Gold Creek Camp, Garibaldi Park.
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale.—New fire escapes were installed in Wards 4
and 5, 6 and 7, 8 and 9.
A new 23-passenger bus was in operation during the latter part of the year.
British Columbia Youth Development Centre, Burnaby.—A new board of
management, under the chairmanship of Dr. J. S. Bland, Consultant in Retardation
and Children's Psychiatric Services, was set up to oversee the operation of this unit.
A new van and trailer was received and placed in operation.
A contract was let for the renovation of the old kitchen area.
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace.—Preliminary plans for the complete renovation
of this facility have been completed and approved.
 M 20 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
Mr. W. E. Skillicorn, Supervisor of the Skeenaview Hospital since its opening
in 1950, retired October 31, 1970.
Dellview Hospital, Vernon.—An X-ray machine, acquired from the Department of Health, was installed at the year-end.
The Tranquille School, Tranquille.—To enable The Tranquille School to admit
patients direct from the community, it was necessary to divide two wards—Spruce
Grove and Pine Crest.
Planning for new fire escapes for the Greaves Building was proceeding.
 PERSONNEL
The statistics given in the following tables are based on the fiscal year April 1,
1969, to March 31, 1970. During that period changes in the establishment of the
Mental Health Branch were as follows:—
General administration and community services.-(increase)      5
In-patient care facilities (increase)    95
Total increase  100
The staff turnover for the fiscal year increased from 23.05 per cent to 25.8 per
cent, but since April, 1970, the turnover decreased.
The number of staff recruited during the fiscal year increased by 209, and
separations dropped 136. The number of nursing students enrolled dropped, and
as of November 15, 1970, totalled 166. The Nursing School received a large number of applicants who did not have the required educational standard.
As of March 31, 1970, total nursing personnel on staff was up 134. Total of
all staff was up 232.
Forty-three requests for classification reviews were received during 1970, and
forty of these were reviewed by the Branch Personel Department. A total of 37
classification requests was submitted to the Civil Service Commission for further
review. Twenty-six of the 37 were approved by the Civil Service Commission for
reclassification and the balance were in various stages of study at the year-end.
The studies made in 1969 on recreational instructors, occupational therapists,
physiotherapists, telephone operators, and housekeepers were finalized during the
year, and resulted in a new series of recreational therapist classifications, professional
grouping and better pay for occupational therapists and physiotherapists, some
changes in the telephone operators' series, and three grades of hospital housekeepers.
Job specifications for psychologists were approved and published.
Grievances, pay adjustments, complaints on various personnel matters, disciplinary matters and terminations, continued to take a lot of the time in this
Department.
As of October 31, 1970, the Mental Health Branch had 103 handicapped
employees.
STATISTICAL TABLES
Table A—Summary Showing Over-all Staff Totals in Relation to
Separation and Recruitment
Staff recruited, excluding students  1,605
Staff separated, transferred, etc., excluding students  1,373
Increase      232
Total staff, excluding students, as of March 31, 1970  4,125
Total staff, excluding students, as of March 31, 1969  3,893
Increase       232
21
 M 22 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
Table A.—Summary Showing Over-all Staff Totals in Relation to
Separation and Recruitment—Continued
Quarterly staff average, excluding students, 1969/70  4,075
Quarterly staff average, excluding students, 1968/69  3,917
Increase       158
Male
Student enrolment as of March 31,1970     13
Student enrolment as of March 31,1969     19
Female
Total
182
195
227
246
Change   —6        —45        —51
Student quarterly average, 1969/70     201
Student quarterly average, 1968/69     259
Change   — 58
Table B.—Breakdown by Classification of Recruitment and Separation
Activity for the Mental Health Branch, Excluding Student Psychiatric Nurses.
Recruited Separated
Physicians        41 41
Registered nurses         91 66
Psychiatric nurses  302 242
Female psychiatric aides  235 236
Male psychiatric aides        75 79
Teachers            8 5
Occupational therapists        16 15
Industrial therapists (seamstress)           6 10
Recreational therapists         10 8
Psychologists  28 18
Social Workers (psychiatric)   25 25
Dietitians           4 3
Cooks           6 9
Kitchen helpers  108 103
Clerks   44 40
Clerk-stenographers   56 50
Laundry workers  46 35
Miscellaneous professional  85 36
Miscellaneous technical  40 32
Miscellaneous   379 317
Sub-totals   1,605 1,370
Miscellaneous adjustments, transfers, etc      -f-3
Totals   1,605 1,373
Note.—Table B and Table C include 384 staff employed as holiday relief.
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
Table C.—Summary of Staff Turnover
Nursing Staff
M 23
Classification
1968/69
1969/70
Change
Male psychiatric nurses	
Female psychiatric nurses..
Registered nurses	
Per Cent
12.34
28.16
27.09
Per Cent
20.6
27.77
41.18
Per Cent
+ 8.26
—0.39
+ 14.09
Note.—Calculations made against the year-end staff, totals.
By Pay Division
Pay Division
Temporary
Relief Staff
Excluded,
1968/69
Temporary
Relief Staff
Excluded,
1969/70
General administration, including mental health centres and nursing
Per Cent
16.6
22.9
21.82
23.8
32.9
14.7
47.4
17.2
12.9
Per Cent
28.64
24.30
The Woodlands School	
22.37
The Tranquille School	
25.4
24.5
19.4
44.0
30.0
29.5
23.05
25.8
Note.—Calculations made against the year-end staff totals.
Table D.—Comparison of Staff Totals by Unit, with Totals
for the Preceding Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year 1968/69
Positions
in Establishment as of
March 31,
1969
Number on
Staff as of
March 31,
1969
Fiscal Year 1969/70
Positions
in Establishment as of
March 31,
1970
Number on
Staff as of
March 31,
1970
General administration 	
Department of Nursing Education _	
Mental health centres	
Sub-totals	
In-patient care—
Riverview Hospital	
The Woodlands School	
The Tranquille School	
Valleyview Hospital	
Dellview Hospital	
Skeenaview Hospital —	
British Columbia Youth Develop
ment Centre  	
Sub-totals	
Total Civil Service positions 	
Student psychiatric nurses	
Totals -..	
60
68
130
258
1,656
873
372
448
98
74
195
3,682
3,940
325
4,265
52
68
101        |
61
71
131
221
I
263
1,661
899
377
467
97
76
93
1,680
924
395
449
98
74
157
3,670
|        3,777
3,891
246
4,040
325
4,137
4,365
55
68
106
229
1,734
960
410
469
98
76
149
3,896
4,125
195
4,320
 M 24
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
o
t-
<
en
<
X
V
Z
<
os
n
x
H
<
W
33
<
H
Z
w
Z
n
n.
<
H
c/_
O
z
DS
D
55
ft.
o
Z
o
I
w
w
pa
<
gs
m m ^ c. h in h      ts^f
w N vj m t in N rs
ON C*. VO (S cs
+
,
VD   P-
t>
Ov
m
vfi
CS
OS
T—
"
Oi
tn \o co oo o oo so
N •* oo m © oj h
ri so vd p cjn © -<t
m "<t -<t so m tn
O0 iH © <N O O i-H
© v> <r> cn m tn
«   *-< CS   TH
vn
Ov
m
m
r-i
M^
K
&
or
fN
ts
m
CS
VO
VC
hCi^onvotNm
o vo >n o- o*- os o
tn ^ tn cn tn ~*t th
1 fi O j-H n *■*
oo >n rs       Tf v
vo co in co <
O  l-H    «_
O _-t °. '
hOOJJ
pi J3 o ii k
5,60 o E
si lis
•2 5 afflr
£z
a> o
*J   rt
'«>_.^H^«S
booShhS
la:
•«. +
i
S
 RETARDATION AND
CHILDREN'S
PSYCHIATRIC SERVICES
During the year a gradual expansion of community services took place for
emotionally disturbed children and for the mentally retarded. Much time was spent
in attempting to set up regional blueprints for needed facilities.
Psychiatric services for children, both acute and longer stay, were still insufficient, and in some areas, agencies which had provided excellent service were not
able to cope with the new challenges presented by more complicated and sophisticated problems. Together with representatives in other Government departments
and community agencies, ways were explored in which services and facilities might
be blended to provide an adequate spectrum of resources, so that a disturbed child
could be given the appropriate treatment, whether on a day or residential basis.
Three further programmes for the adult mentally retarded were developed by
communities during the year. In the north, the Smithers Farm Training Centre
began operating and gradually building up to its proposed residential capacity of 30
young people. In the Kootenays, the Dr. Endicott Home developed a residential
training programme for 12 adult retarded people, in addition to its existing school
programme. At Ladner, the Farm Training Centre expanded its residential capacity
from 10 beds to 40.
At the beginning of the year the transfer of young physically handicapped retarded children from The Woodlands School to a ward of the Eric Martin Institute
in Victoria provided much-needed extra beds for this type of problem. At the year-
end the ward at the Eric Martin Institute had 62 beds for pediatric extended care,
and was providing a considerable additional service for Vancouver Island.
Planning for the Glendale Hospital in Victoria continued and the society that
was formed to operate it expected Glendale to be in operation in 1971. This resource
will have 150 beds for physically disabled mentally retarded persons of all age-
groups, and a further 150 beds for severely retarded children and adults. In addition, it will contain an Out-patient Clinic and a short-stay assessment area for
retarded people of all functional levels.
25
 SOCIAL WORK
CONSULTATION SERVICES
The year 1970 continued to offer challenge, and to present all social workers
in the Mental Health Branch with opportunities for creative and innovative planning
and programming for community-based mental health services.
During the year, all mental health institutions and centres were visited. The
consultative social services rendered were focused on:—
(1) Development of a broad programme of services to meet the expectations of
communities and the service policies of the Branch.
(2) Organizational and clinical procedures for those centres directed by social
workers.
(3) Community self-study and social-planning techniques.
(4) Development of community-care facilities for the mentally disordered.
(5) Bibliographical and technical aspects of community education and interpretation for mental health.
In line with the growing emphasis on community-based services for
the care and treatment of the mentally disordered, social workers in the
institutions and in the mental health centres continued to extend communication and inter-planning ideas toward the major objective of the expansion of services at the community level.
(6) Assistance in the recruitment, retention, and development of staff to the
chief personnel officers of the Civil Service Commission and the Mental
Health Branch.
(7) Assistance to the School of Social Work, University of British Columbia,
in the development of practicum programmes, as well as in the evaluation
of social work education content.
(8) Beginning preparation for the manualization of standards of services at
pre-school and residential levels, necessary in the care and treatment of
mentally disordered children.
(9) Assistance to the Rate Board and Liaison Committee in the study and
programme evaluation of new resources in the continuity of the resources
needed for the care, training, and treatment of children with emotional
and mental disorders.
(10) Consultation to the boarding-home co-ordinator in the regionalization of
the development of community-care facilities for adult mentally disordered
people.
(11) Consultation in regard to regional planning of social services to mentally
retarded children and adults and their families; the co-ordination of
agency services necessary in regionalization; and the requirement that
planning comprehend needs, both basic and special, as well as demographic and epidemiological factors.
THE BOARDING-HOME PROGRAMME
At the end of 1970 there were approximately 850 persons released from
mental health facilities to boarding-home care for whom Mental Health Services
provide a continuing overview. In addition, there were many other ex-patients
settled into boarding homes who no longer require the services of the Mental Health
Branch.
26
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
M 27
A co-operative programme with the Department of Rehabilitation and Social
Improvement for regionalization of the boarding-home programme commenced in
the Southern Vancouver Island Region through the appointment of a regional psychiatric boarding-home social worker to the area. This appointment resulted in a
consolidation and enhancement of services to the boarding-home clients; and expansion of community programmes with a rehabilitation function, and an expansion
of boarding-home resources.
In other areas of the Province, also, there was the development of an encouraging number of new facilities and an increase in community involvement in the programme goals. Reorganization of the occupational therapy programme, provided
by Riverview Hospital to the boarding-home clients, resulted in the formation of 12
community occupational therapy centre programmes staffed by community activities
volunteers, with the Riverview Occupational Therapist as Consultant.
A study of services and programmes which are desirable, or are already provided within the homes, was undertaken with a view to reassessment of board-care
rates.
Table I.—Boarding-home Programme, January ]
to October 31,
1970
Patient Movement
Riverview
Hospital
Valleyview
Hospital*
The
Woodlands
School
The
Tranquille
School
Patients on boarding-home programme as of January 1, 1970    	
411
70
74
82
3
29
60
101
10
27
9
124
49
15
70
40
Returns to boarding-home care from institutions (replacements)
Returns to institution during year  	
5
5
1
Discharged from boarding-home programme  	
63        |          11
Patients on boarding-home programme as of December 31, 1970 2
447                  72       |        155        |        115
1 Figures in this column include projected figures to December 31, 1970.
2 All totals include a projected figure to December 31, 1970. An additional 56 discharged persons in boarding homes in southern Vancouver Island are supervised by Mental Health Services.
EXPLANATORY NOTES, TABLE I
1. Twice as many placements to boarding-home care were made from Valleyview Hospital as were made
in the previous year, reflecting a significant effort on the part of the Social Service staff at Valleyview Hospital.
Such placements have a social and financial value and free beds for persons acutely in need of the hospital
services.
2. Returns to Riverview Hospital from boarding-home care were significantly down from the previous year
(25 per cent fewer returns). The assignment of a Consultant Psychiatrist specifically to the boarding-home
programme would seem to be the primary reason for this achievement. Persons were maintained at the
boarding-home level by special attention to their treatment needs at a time of stress, who would formerly have
been readmitted to hospital for this treatment.
3. About one-third of the persons who return to Riverview Hospital from boarding homes do so because
of physical cause rather than psychiatric breakdown. Between one-half to three-quarters of the persons who
return to the other reporting institutions do so because of physical causes.
4. Of the 29 Riverview Hospital persons who were discharged from boarding-home care, five were discharged to employment which enabled them to be self-supporting; twelve were discharged to live on their own
on Social Allowance, with or without part-time employment; seven returned to live with their families; four
moved to other boarding homes under the supervision of the Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement;   one woman was married.   All but two of these persons have maintained the gains made.
5. The policy of Valleyview Hospital is to discharge from leave all persons who are able to pay their own
way in boarding homes who are doing well under the care of their community physician. Valleyview continues
to provide a consultative service in these cases.   Sixty-three such discharges were made in 1970 (projected figure).
Table II.—Patients on Boarding-home Leave Employed
as of October 31, 1970
Degree of Employment and Earnings
Riverview
Hospital
The
Woodlands
School
The
Tranquille
School
4
30
1
1
5
18
1
Fully or partially employed, partially self-supporting toward board payment
With seasonal job or small but regular job, earning own comforts, clothing,
1
2
13
Totals                                          	
35
74          1          17
 NURSING
CONSULTATION
SERVICES
Nursing consultation during the past year was channelled into consultation
services, educational activities, and study projects.
Twenty-five consultation visits of a general or specific nature were made to
14 mental health centres by the Consultant; regular monthly conferences were held
with the Acting Director, Department of Nursing Education; and general visits were
paid to Dellview and Skeenaview Hospitals and to The Tranquille School.
The Consultant studied a number of problems on request, gathered data, and
submitted reports with recommendations.   These concerned matters such as
(1) staffing requirements for a newly opened ward;
(2) bed numbers for various types of psychiatric units;
(3) staffing pattern for an adult psychiatric unit;
(4) changing pattern of long-term residential patients' conditions;
(5) present staffing pattern and nursing-care hours per patient in in-patient
facilities;
(6) utilization of different classifications of nursing personnel in in-patient
facilities;
(7) evaluation of the functions of the mental health nurse;
(8) five-year projection of nursing-personnel requirements for various types
of psychiatric facilities in the Province.
Educational activities included
(1) arranging for orientation of new and visiting nurses to mental health
facilities;
(2) arranging for courses for mental health nurses conducted by the Family
and Children's Services, British Columbia Youth Development Centre;
(3) providing lecture-discussion sessions with nurses enrolled in various kinds
of nursing programmes;
(4) facilitating arrangements for field work and (or) mental health centre
experiences for university nurses, students, and faculty;
(5) reviewing applications for continuing education;
(6) participating in the review of nursing curricula ih a number of programmes;
(7) assessing the validity of various nursing courses for eligibility for salary
bonus.
Considerable time was devoted to the provision of information, regarding the
programmes and services of the Mental Health Branch, to nurses interested in employment opportunities.  Assistance was provided to the Civil Service Commission
28
 GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
M 29
in recruitment measures, and the interviewing and selection of candidates for senior
nursing positions.
The Consultant served on
various committees on planning and policy within the
Branch, and on professional
and education committees in
the community. These included
the University of British Columbia Course Advisory Committee on Continuing Education for Nurses, the Registered
Nurses' Association Board of
Nurse Examiners, and the
Committee on Nursing Education, the B.C.I.T. Advisory
Committee to the Nursing Option, the Council of Psychiatric
Nurses, and the Nursing Liaison Committee. Through the medium of the latter,
senior nurses involved in mental health, and related areas of education and service,
were able to share information and increase their knowledge of mental health programmes and resources in the Province.
Photograph taken during graduation exercise of the
School of Psychiatric Nursing, April 16, 1970.
 STATISTICS AND
MEDICAL RECORDS
During the year a full programme of statistical research was undertaken.
Routine reports were produced according to plan, and a number of special studies
were prepared. New units were included in the statistical system, and changes
introduced in the basic reporting systems.
REPORTING FORM DEVELOPMENT
The pre-registration questionnaire for The Woodlands School and The Tranquille School was revised. When all patients are reported on these forms it will be
possible to prepare many lists formerly done by hand with tabulating equipment,
with minimum delay. In addition, the form for the mental health centres was
changed, simplifying reporting, and permitting special research in areas unique to
each centre.
ROUTINE DATA RETRIEVAL
A statistical bulletin was issued each month, and special studies accompanied
a number of issues. Statistical tables for 1969 were released. In addition, nearly
60 specific requests for data were filled.
SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT
Further work was undertaken to develop a proposal for computer services.
With the development of regional services at The Tranquille School, their patients
were reported on, utilizing the system used for The Woodlands School.
ADMINISTRATIVE AND PLANNING STUDIES
One-week time-studies of activities and community contacts were conducted
for all the mental health centres and the out-patient services of the British Columbia
Youth Development Centre. Special data were developed for a committee considering possible reorganization of the Riverview Hospital. Also, special tables were
prepared for Riverview Hospital's quarterly medical-care evaluation. A study of
dental care at The Tranquille School was completed. In co-operation with the
Registry of Handicapped Children and Adults, a sample survey of those registered
with unspecified level of retardation was done to ascertain level and resource utilization.
RECORDS DEVELOPMENT AND REPORTING CONTROL
Two new mental health centres opened during the year and required orientation.
In addition, changes in clerical personnel in the centres required additional assistance,
and special assistance was given to The Tranquille School during their changeover.
30
 SPECIAL STUDIES
AND
CONTINUING EDUCATION
PSYCHIATRIC HOME CARE
During the year, application was made to the Department of National Health
and Welfare for Public Health Research Grant funds to support a study designed
to examine home care as a less expensive and more appropriate alternative to
mental hospital care. The project will compare home care, which has an " active
treatment emphasis," with mental hospital care, in terms of bed replacement, patient
progress, and service costs. It will also compare home care, which has an " aftercare emphasis," with the absence of home care, in terms of the impact on hospital
readmission, patient functioning, and family disruption. This project will provide
the type of information required for decision-making, regarding the introduction of
home care as a community service, as an appropriate alternative to hospital care in
terms of patient care and cost effectiveness.
PATIENT CATEGORIZATION
All patients occupying beds in the six Mental Health Branch operated institutions were surveyed to determine the level of community care most appropriate to
the management of their physical and behavioural service requirements. Of the
5,387 patients surveyed, 2,461 displayed characteristics considered to be manageable only in a psychiatric facility. Two thousand three hundred and fifty required
essentially personal care and attention, rising from minimal 24-hour supervision
found in a basic licensed boarding home to intermediate or intensive personal care.
The balance were non-ambulatory patients or those who required 24-hour skilled
nursing care and whose behavioural characteristics were of a secondary nature.
NURSING STAFFING STANDARDS
The technique developed to rapidly and systematically document patient characteristics for community-care categorization purposes was in the process of being
modified, as an aid to establishing nursing staffing standards which are related
to patient service requirements, based on recorded physical and behavioural
characteristics.
ADULT PSYCHIATRIC SERVICES
A further extension of the patient-categorization survey has been the definition,
for mental health programme planning purposes, of a series of patient-care classifications ranging from acute psychiatric to personal care and attention, for in-resident
facilities, and for ambulatory care. As part of a Branch planning project, the
establishment of standards, in terms of both bed and programmes required and
staffing standards for adult psychiatric services, was in the process of being completed at the year-end.
A series of multi-disciplinary workshops using Branch staff and teachers was
organized as part of the programme of continuing education for mental health
centre personnel. The first family group therapy took place in November. Others,
dealing with learning disabilities in children, behaviour modification, and group
techniques were scheduled for early 1971.
31
 INFORMATION
SERVICES
The Director was appointed December 15, 1969, and his first major undertaking was production of the Annual Report for that year. In January he co-ordinated
the arrangements for the official opening of the Eric Martin Institute of Psychiatry
in Victoria, which took place on January 20.
During the following months, efforts were directed toward the development
of informational literature, and by the year-end the following major pamphlets
had been completed: The Riverview Hospital Handbook (revised); Mental Health
in British Columbia; The British Columbia Youth Development Centre, " The
Maples"; and The Mentally Retarded in British Columbia. Through the cooperation of the Industrial Therapy Department, Riverview Hospital, pamphlet
display racks were made available to the mental health centres.
At the request of the Intra-Governmental Co-ordination Sub-committee, Centennial '71, a summary was prepared of the development of mental health facilities
and services in British Columbia for the period 1850 to 1970. In July, major
renovations were made to the Branch's exhibit in the British Columbia Building
at the Pacific National Exhibition.
Eleven issues of the monthly in-service publication, The Mental Health Branch
Newsletter, were published during the year and forwarded to all mental health
facilities and centres for distribution to their staff members. Publicity arrangements
were handled for the transfer of patients by helicopter from The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, to the Eric Martin Institute, Victoria, on flights originating in
February and June.
Assistance was provided to the staff of the British Columbia Youth Development Centre in their planning for open houses held by the centre on November 8
(for the general public) and November 9 (for professional personnel).
A branch symbol was developed for use on informational material, press releases were written, material in the Physicians' Administrative Manual was revised,
and a photographic file of senior staff was started. 1970 was a year of orientation
and programme development for the Information Services.
32
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
Burnaby Mental Health Centre, Burnaby
Simon Fraser Mental Health Centre, New Westminster
Boundary Mental Health Centre, Surrey
Central Fraser Valley Mental Health Centre, Maple Ridge
Upper Fraser Valley Mental Health Centre, Chilliwack
South Okanagan Mental Health Centre, Kelowna
North Okanagan Mental Health Centre, Vernon
South Central Interior Mental Health Centre, Kamloops
Northern Interior Mental Health Centre, Prince George
East Kootenay Mental Health Centre, Cranbrook
West Kootenay Mental Health Centre, Trail
Selkirk Mental Health Centre, Nelson
Skeena Mental Health Centre, Terrace
Victoria Mental Health Centre, Victoria
Saanich Mental Health Centre, Saanich
Upper Island Mental Health Centre, Courtenay
Central Vancouver Island Mental Health Centre, Nanaimo
J. .
JTI
mental
health
branch
  COMMUNITY
MENTAL HEALTH
SERVICES
During 1970, with the addition of mental health centres in Nelson and Terrace,
local service became available to virtually all populous areas of the Province. These
two additions brought the number of mental health centres to 17. Centres are located
in Burnaby, Chilliwack, Courtenay, Cranbrook, Kamloops, Kelowna, Maple Ridge,
Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster, Prince George, Saanich, Surrey, Terrace, Trail,
Vernon, and Victoria. There were nearly 5,000 admissions to service at these centres
in 1970.
The standard staff complement of a mental health centre consists of a psychiatrist, psychologist, social worker, mental health nurse, and two clerical positions.
Notwithstanding intensive recruitment efforts, it was not possible to employ a full
staff complement in each mental health centre. Nanaimo and Trail, while without a
psychiatrist in the centre, nonetheless had services available through private practitioners, but in Cranbrook, Nelson, and Terrace there was no psychiatric coverage.
Consequently, efforts were under way to provide consultative psychiatric services to
these centres.
Work progressed on programme clarification and policy development. In direct
services to citizens, policy priority was given to the more serious mental, emotional,
and behavioural problems. These include major chronic mental illness, major childhood and adolescent maladjustment, acute mental or emotional problems in adults,
geriatric mental illness, adult personality disorders, and mental retardation. The
mental health centres need not provide direct service for each of these groups, but
must insure that they are available in the local community from some source. Besides direct treatment, the centres are concerned with the primary prevention of
mental disorder. In primary prevention, the centres work through various community organizations.
During the year, in addition to policy development, the centres began a process
of outlining community needs, and defining priorities for their work based on these
needs.
BURNABY
MENTAL HEALTH
CENTRE
The Mental Health Centre, Burnaby, is an out-patient community psychiatric
facility located in the approximate geographic centre of the Lower Mainland at the
junction of Willingdon Avenue and Canada Way in Burnaby. The centre is organized in three functional, closely related units—the Burnaby out-patient team, the
out-patient team serving other geographic areas of British Columbia without their
own mental health centre (mainly East Vancouver and North Vancouver), and the
day hospital.   Referrals to the Centre are on an " open " system, that is, referral
35
 M 36 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT, 1970
may be made by medical practitioners, social agencies, school and public health
personnel, an interested friend or relative, or the patient himself.
The functions of the Mental Health Centre, Burnaby, are
(1) to provide comprehensive diagnostic and consultative services to adults
and children with emotional disorders from the Burnaby community, as
well as limited treatment facilities;
(2) to provide similar services to adults from other areas of the Province not
served by local mental health centres, especially East Vancouver;
(3) to provide specialized treatment resources such as day hospitals (milieu
therapy), behaviour therapy, group and family therapies, as seem appropriate and feasible;
(4) to engage in training of health care personnel and research on emotional
illnesses and their treatment;
(5) to employ the knowledge and skills of multi-disciplinary teams to develop
and implement a wide variety of community-oriented preventive programmes in the mental health field, using the broadest possible definition
of mental health and prevention.
During the past year, the Centre maintained its previous treatment and intake
loads and developed several indirect treatment services, including a Patients' Social
Club, which uses Centre facilities Tuesday evenings. This club provides an opportunity for patients, ex-patients, boarding-home residents, and others in the community with social handicaps to meet together in an ongoing programme of recreational activities.
Last year's report alluded to the provision of direct assessment and treatment
services, as well as an educational and consultative programme for public health and
school personnel in the Burnaby School District.
The Centre's approach in this area was developed around the application of
the principles of learning theory to problems encountered in the classroom.
The Day Hospital continued to offer an almost unique programme of milieu
therapy. Testimony to the high regard in which the Day Hospital is held by the
professional community was a very large number of requests for educational and
orientation programmes in this facility for student nurses, social workers and psychologists, medical students, and interns, as well as staff from other hospitals or
institutions (including Lions Gate Hospital and the University of British Columbia
Health Sciences Centre) seeking to implement features or parts of the programme
in their operations.
1970 had considerable activity in the general area of prevention by mental
health centre staff. In addition to programmes such as " Secure " (a programme for
the agoraphobic), the Centre worked effectively with a number of professionals and
lay groups in the community to provide new and needed services. The Family Life
Education Committee was assisted in presenting two courses entitled " Preparation
for Marriage," and a further such course was scheduled for 1971. Additional courses
were being developed on parent-child and parent-teenager relationships. Centre staff
also assisted the Family Planning Clinic in giving counselling to those seeking its
services. Under the auspices of the Burnaby Advisory and Co-ordinating Committee, special studies of deficiencies in services in a particular area of Burnaby with
a low-rent housing project were carried out. Efforts were made to develop community initiative in this area in improving social and recreational facilities, and a
neighbourhood information centre will soon go into operation staffed by " Opportunities Programme " volunteers with the co-operation and backing of the mental
health centre and related agencies and organizations.
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
M 37
During the year, teaching programmes continued with nursing, psychology,
social work, and rehabilitation medical students. The Day Hospital's rotation for
University of British Columbia nurses improved with a more organized orientation
programme. An entire new training programme for second year British Columbia
Institute of Technology nursing students was developed. Using the Day Hospital
and the Out-patient Department, with major assistance from a B.C.I.T. field instructor, the Centre provided practical experience in psychiatry for 18 B.C.I.T. nurses
a year, and was becoming a favoured placement for these students. Additional requests for training programmes were received from Vancouver City College Nursing
School and from Riverview Hospital. In co-operation with Simon Fraser Mental
Health Centre and Royal Columbian Hospital, 1970 saw the first placement of a
medical intern in the Centre. Members of the staff were also collaborating with
other Mental Health Branch officials in developing in-service training programmes
in a number of special areas, including behaviour modification techniques.
During 1970 the Mental Health Centre, Burnaby, continued to search out and
apply the latest and most effective techniques to aid the emotionally ill, to develop a
community structure and institutions, to prevent emotional disorders, and to do its
part in transmitting this knowledge and skill to others.
SIMON FRASER
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE,
NEW WESTMINSTER
During 1970 the patient load consistently and considerably increased, and the
Centre was soon functioning to maximum capacity. The Centre had an average
monthly case load of 151, with an average of 20 new cases evaluated each month.
Nevertheless, the waiting-list for both children and adults was approximately three
months.
Indirect treatment activities of the Centre were also increasing, and included
organization of a crisis centre in New Westminster, systematic contact with the
public health units, with the Probation Services, and with the school, as well as
with follow-up of patients discharged from the mental hospital. In addition, family
psychotherapy had to be carried out more and more, and group psychotherapy for
adolescents was being organized.
BOUNDARY
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE,
SURREY
At the time of the last report, this Centre had been in operation only a few
months, and had commenced direct service only in the last two months of 1969.
From the beginning, requests for direct service were heavy, and this continued
during the year. New cases were seen at a rate of about 20 per month, in a proportion of two children to every adult. Referrals of children came from the schools,
private physicians, social agencies, and public health nurses, and in roughly that
order of frequency. Adults were referred from Riverview for aftercare, private
physicians, social welfare, probation services, and the Courts. Most of the adults
had chronic problems; for example, psychosis in remission, neurotic characters and
other personality difficulties, social inadequacy, etc.    Very few were acute forms
 M 38
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
of neurosis, depression, or psychosis, which seemed to indicate that these are being
dealt with elsewhere, i.e., by referral to private psychiatrists or by direct admission
to hospital arranged by attending physicians.
Children's problems in particular involved the Centre with whole families
and family therapy, which was time consuming but provided real possibilities for
preventive work. This focus on prevention in childhood also decided Centre staff
to become involved in a number of cases of marital disharmony. Therapeutic
endeavours encompassed individual counselling, psychotherapy of an uncovering
or supportive type as necessary, but with an emphasis on brevity and drug therapy.
A full complement of professional staff was present throughout the year, and
several attended educational courses or conferences. The mental health nurse,
Miss Patience Silbernagel, attended a one-month course, organized by Dr. Cash-
more, at the Youth Development Centre. Mr. Andrew Feldmar, psychologist,
attended a week-end neuropsychology workshop at the University of Victoria and
has also attended, one half-day weekly, an advanced course in psychological testing
by Dr. D. Martino at the Youth Development Centre. Miss Joy Bryenton, social
worker, attended for two days at " Conference 70," run by the Child Welfare
League of America, to see a demonstration in family therapy. Then, in November,
both Miss Bryenton and Mr. Feldmar attended a workshop in family therapy run
by Dr. Cashmore at the Youth Development Centre.
The demand for direct service during the year accounted for most of the available time, and it will take time to develop indirect services, but a beginning was
made. All agencies were advised of the over-all policy for the Centre, emphasizing
the intention to provide consultation and educational activities. A monthly consultation visit by the social worker was provided to the Whalley Public Health Unit,
which is in the area with the heaviest concentration of social problems.
Orientation meetings were held with school administrators and counsellors,
and monthly meetings were held with the senior counsellors of the Surrey School
Board, together with the senior public health nurses. The psychologist is the staff
member in closest touch with the schools, and he made frequent visits to schools
to see children as they behave in class and to discuss practical problems with
teachers.
All professional staff members were involved in giving talks to various community groups.
There is a marked lack of community facilities for young people in the area.
Mr. Feldmar, staff psychologist, found a number of other people interested in a
drop-in centre for youth, and he worked hard at gaining support for the idea in
the hope that such a centre could be established in Surrey. At the year-end it
looked as if this would be achieved shortly.
A good start has been made by the Centre, which focused mostly on direct
service and staff development, with indirect services minimal. This can be expected
to change with increasing acceptance by the community.
CENTRAL FRASER VALLEY
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE,
MAPLE RIDGE
In March, Mr. Dieter Meiners, M.S.W., Social Work Consultant, joined the
Centre, bringing the staff to full complement.
Throughout the year the greater part of the energies of the Centre were utilized
in direct treatment service, including assessment and follow-up of children and
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
M 39
adults, referred by schools, the Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement, family physicians, probation, the Courts, correctional agencies, self-referral,
and others.
Children, adolescents, and their parents were assessed by a multi-disciplinary
approach. The findings and recommendations were conveyed to the parents and
later to the school personnel at a weekly clinical conference. Consultation was also
given to the three general hospitals in the area, and as a result, psychiatric patients
were frequently managed in the local hospitals.
The socio-educational functions of the Centre progressed, and some notable
contributions were made. The most outstanding finding was the number of children
referred with academic problems, and (or) emotionally disturbed, who were found
to have dyslexia. Sometimes the diagnosis was made in retrospect. The child
whose reading deficit was secondary to an emotional problem was likely to show
a rapid gain once remedial tutoring was instituted.
This interest stimulated some of the local teachers to take courses in remedial
reading, and the School Board in Maple Ridge appointed three additional remedial
teachers.
The Centre's psychologist attended a local school to give a school-entrance
battery of screening tests to Grade I children, in order to identify the children most
likely to develop learning problems and to set up a preventive programme, and
Mission has obtained the services of a school psychologist.
Under the auspices of the Centre, the Maple Ridge Branch of the Association
for Parents of Children with Learning Disabilities was formed during the year, and
later became a self-sufficient group. The Centre continued to serve in an advisory
role.
The local branch of the Canadian Mental Health Association requested the
Centre's assistance in establishing a centre for Lay Counselling and Information
Service, where people with problems of any nature could go for short-term therapy
and, if necessary, be directed to an appropriate agency. An executive committee
was established and a three-month pilot study was begun. Social workers, ministers, and nurses donated their time in the evenings to man an office where people
could walk in, and the Centre provided lectures on interviewing technique and
ongoing case discussion. After three months there were seventeen female and five
male clients who had visited the office. The possibility of the group serving an
educational function in conjunction with night school and seminar work-shops was
being explored at the year-end.
The Centre advised on the desirability of abortion, and the Director is also
a member of the Therapeutic Abortion Committee.
The Centre provided service to other community lay and professional groups,
and notably among these was the formation of a Big Brothers Association in Maple
Ridge.
The Centre was also involved in participation on two seminars dealing with the
" Psychological Aspects of Marriage," one held in Maple Ridge and the other in
Mission. Lectures on mental health and on the function of the Centre were given
to various groups throughout the year, including the nursing staff at Mission
Hospital.
In the future the Centre proposes to expand its consultative service to the
school, with observation and discussion of the problems at a classroom level, as
well as in committee.   Closer liaison with school counsellors was also anticipated.
 UPPER FRASER VALLEY
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE,
CHILLIWACK
This Centre's catchment area remained unchanged during the year, coinciding
with the boundaries of School Districts Nos. 32 (Hope), 33 (Chilliwack), and 34
(Abbotsford), as well as the community of Agassiz, which actually falls into the
Central Fraser Valley Mental Health Centre's area but is served by this Centre due
to geographical proximity, and their utilization of related health and social services
from Chilliwack.
Direct assessment and treatment services were sustained fairly consistently
with the previous year, referrals coming from physicians, all social agencies, and
patients themselves. Patients requiring longer-term individual psychotherapy were
generally referred on to private psychiatrists, and the Centre concentrated more on
short-term counselling, employing a variety of marital, family and group techniques. Dispensation of psychotropic drugs to physicians for financially handicapped
patients continued as an important aspect of the treatment programme.
Indirect services were strengthened as consultative and educational services
became more consolidated. Case consultation with the schools and social agencies
held high priority, while community groups, such as the Family Life Institute,
Canadian Mental Health Association, Association for Children with Learning Disabilities, received support and assistance with projects and programming. Two
short workshops, one on short-term counselling and another on group therapy, were
sponsored by the Centre with school counsellors and social agencies participating.
In addition, team members made themselves available as resource personnel to
community groups in family life education and public speaking on related issues in
mental health and illness.
Finally, there was a sustained interest in community development for mental
health. The Family Life Institutes, established in Abbotsford and Chilliwack in
1969, developed a more definitive identity as an informal drop-in centre for people
with a variety of social and emotional problems, and received immediate attention
or referral to another agency. Volunteer services in both communities expanded in
strength and diversity and became more efficient with improved orientation and
training programmes. These new organizations contributed significantly toward
citizen involvement in self-help projects and appeared to hold considerable potential in the over-all preventive mental health programme.
SOUTH OKANAGAN
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE,
KELOWNA
The South Okanagan Mental Health Centre has undertaken a comprehensive
mental health service in a previously unserviced area, with an out-patient service
being given in conjunction with the public health unit, a hospital service at the
Kelowna General Hospital, and a private service being undertaken by the one
psychiatrist in residence here. During the year, there was a substantial reduction
of admissions and readmissions to the Riverview Hospital, educational activities
40
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES M 41
were undertaken in co-operation with the Provincial Mental Health Branch and
with the University of British Columbia, and evaluative studies continued to be
done, not only with regard to the Centre's effectiveness with its case load, but with
regard to significant community problems, such as suicide. The latter studies were
undertaken in conjunction with other health resources.
Additional services were required to an extent far beyond the capability of
one professional team to meet. The initial population base, when the Centre started
in 1962, included 175,000 persons in three health units in the Interior of the Province. Since that time the area serviced has been decreased to one health unit and
a population of 75,000 persons. Further thought has to be given with regard to
the successful development of the full potential of the Centre.
The Centre continued to use the Nurses' Home at the Kelowna General Hospital for an eight-bed unit. The average length of patient-stay was under 20 days.
There was no restriction on the patients admitted to this unit, except the restriction
of bed limitation, yet only a handful of patients treated on the ward were certified
to Riverview Hospital, either at the time of their stay, or later. This service was
fairly equally divided between patients from the Kelowna and Penticton areas,
with a few patients coming in from elsewhere. The out-patient services operated
from the ward were increasing.
There continued to be many service demands upon the Centre. At times,
elective assessments were backlogged four or five weeks, but emergency appointments were dealt with the same week, often the same day. A heavy regular case
load of out-patient treatment was undertaken at the Centre. Unfortunately, some
persons require supportive assistance over a period of years and the Centre had an
accumulation of some patients who took up approximately one-third of the case
load, and who really require a special programme to be developed for the continuing
community care of the chronically ill. Various members of the professional staff
were specifically involved in such major undertakings as consultant service to the
schools with regard to emotional problems and special learning problems, the provision of leadership in the community Social Planning Council, and participation
in the Citizens Committee to the Family and Children's Court, in the development
of new resources to help face family crises and develop methods of strengthening
family units.
The Centre's effectiveness will be increased during the coming year with the
addition of a second psychiatrist to this community. Dr. Kenneth J. Davies will
be joining Dr. McNair in private practice and will also have a sessional appointment
at the Centre.   There was also prospect of a psychiatrist moving into Penticton.
NORTH OKANAGAN
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE,
VERNON
During 1970 this Centre provided the same services as in the previous year.
The Centre's policy of having no restrictions on referrals (i.e., referrals are
accepted directly from patients themselves, school counsellors, etc.) resulted in
minimal delays and improved the working relationships with schools and other
referring agencies. The Centre was without a psychologist until July, when Mr.
Frank Hawkhead joined the staff from the United Kingdom.
 M 42 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
At the Vernon Jubilee Hospital Psychiatric Unit, for the first seven months
of 1970, the bed occupancy was 122 per cent. The average length of stay was 15.6
days. All members of the Centre staff provided helpful service to the Psychiatric
Unit, e.g., group therapists, psychological assessment, nurses' conference, helping
with rehabilitation, and follow-up of patients.
SOUTH CENTRAL INTERIOR
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE,
KAMLOOPS
There was a steady increase in the activities of the Centre during the first part
of the year. Staff changes led to a temporary cut-back in the summer, but a marked
increase in referrals characterized the autumn. Case-load data for the period
November 1, 1969, to October 31, 1970, showed 89 active cases at the onset and
210 at the close; 169 cases were opened and 48 closed.
Two members resigned during the year—Dr. G. A. Carey, psychologist, on
April 30, and Mr. Brasset, psychiatric social worker, on December 5. Dr. Ellis,
psychiatrist, consulted from July 1 and became full-time Director on September 21.
At the year-end the personnel consisted of a psychiatrist, a mental health nurse,
and a stenographer. A psychologist had been appointed and was expected on staff
early in 1971.
During the year there was an emphasis on public education and professional
consultation, which included a series of education lectures sponsored by the Canadian Mental Health Association, but presented by the Centre. Following the
Director's arrival, medical referrals increased rapidly and physicians became the
main referral source.
The immediate goal of the Centre was to acquire and maintain a full and
stable team. It was hoped that this would be achieved by the spring of 1971. At
the year-end, direct service received priority and both out-patient and in-patient
care were given, the former at the Centre and the latter on the 24-bed psychiatric
ward of the Royal Inland Hospital.
When the psychologist arrives, priority will be given to resuming the travelling
clinic to Ashcroft, Merritt, Lillooet, and Clearwater. The Director met with relevant persons in these communities to assess the current need.
The Centre provides consultative services in the Greater Kamloops area to the
Public Health Service, school counsellors, welfare and probation officers, and the
Courts.
It was expected that 1971 would be a year of rapid growth and development,
and that not only would there be consolidation of efforts within the catchment area,
but that constructive links for co-operation and research would be forged with
adjacent centres, particularly in the Okanagan.
NORTHERN INTERIOR
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE,
PRINCE GEORGE
The land surface encompassed by this Centre is vast, and it is estimated that
within this area there is a population of approximately 156,000. These people are
provided with minimal consultative and treatment services by the Centre staff, con-
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES M 43
sisting of a psychiatrist Director, psychiatric social worker, psychologist, and mental
health nurse. The service is minimal due to the large population requesting assistance, the vast area, and limited auxiliary resources.
THE SOUTHERN AREA
(100 Mile House, Williams Lake, Quesnel, and adjacent areas)
During the year, the mental health team consulted to this area on the basis
of one day per month to each of Williams Lake and Quesnel. The consultation
consisted of assessing individual cases for various referral groups in the community,
such as public health nurses, social welfare, school staff, and family doctors. On
occasion there were referrals from the probation officer or Courts. In addition, all
the Riverview Hospital patients discharged to this area were referred to the public
health nurse for follow-up.
During the year, there were discussions with various agencies regarding future
development of resources. In November a committee was struck in Williams Lake
to establish the need for additional services, and the Centre team provided criteria
to evaluate the situation.
On several occasions, stimulating discussions in the high schools were held
with the students, mainly centred on drug problems, family life, and social concerns.
THE NORTHERN AREA
(Fort Nelson, Fort St. John, Hudson Hope, Chetwynd, Dawson Creek,
and adjacent areas)
The provision of service to this area took on a new focus in March of 1970.
As a result of Centre staff meetings with various agencies, these groups, together
with the medical community, requested increased psychiatric consultation. A consultative service commenced in April, consisting of four psychiatrists, consulting
one day to community agencies and one day to the medical doctors. The consultation was on a four-weekly basis in Fort St. John and Dawson Creek. The consultant
psychiatrists were on a rotation, so that each came from Vancouver for two days
every eight weeks. In addition to the psychiatrist from Vancouver, the mental
health nurse from the Centre staff consulted to the area.
Starting in January of 1971, the public health nurses will be notified of the
Riverview Hospital discharges, which will provide patients with a better follow-up.
PRINCE GEORGE AND DISTRICT
(East to Valemount and West to Burns Lake)
Much of the Centre's activity and effectiveness was felt in Prince George.
Approximately 40 new cases were assessed each month. In addition, each member
of the staff was involved in various community projects.
During the past year, the regional hospital programme for day-patients developed and was accepted by the community and Provincial Government. A crisis
centre telephone service was established. An expanded volunteer programme of
visiting patients at home and assisting with in-patients in the hospital programme
proved beneficial. A parents' organization, for those with children with learning
disabilities, was formed. The Big Brothers Association became established, a very
vital and useful group in this area. The Association for Retarded Children was
revitalized by the commitment of a service group to build a hostel in this area. The
hostel would provide boarding facilities for retarded children while attending school
 M 44 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
or workshop programmes or even while parents vacationed. All these developments took place because of the active involvement of at least one of the Centre staff.
In the past year the mental health team was completed with the addition of
a psychologist. The expanded outlook provided by this discipline was beneficial,
both to the staff and patients. Because Prince George School District has a large
staff in their " special service " department, the psychologist in the unit was able
to concentrate on areas other than school problems.
The Centre's staff handled approximately 700 active cases during the year.
It was hoped that in 1971 effort will be directed toward prevention.
EAST KOOTENAY
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE,
CRANBROOK
During its first complete year of operation, the East Kootenay Mental Health
Centre team, consisting of a psychiatric social worker and a mental health nurse,
had a direct case load of 160. The Centre operated under an open referral system,
accepting referrals from all community social agencies, self referrals, and those
directly from the medical practitioners.
Since its inception, this Centre has emphasized prevention as well as treatment.
Indirect and preventive services included a variety of activities. Both the psychiatric
social worker and the mental health nurse provided a consultative service to doctors,
public health nurses, school personnel, social workers, probation officers, and
ministers, and accepted a variety of speaking invitations from service clubs, churches,
professional groups, schools, P.-T.A., and others. In May, the mental health nurse
was a panelist on a Drug Information Forum sponsored by the local School Board
for the purpose of sharing drug information with the community at large. The
Centre's staff edited a Mental Health Question and Answer column, which ran
weekly in the Cranbrook Daily Townsman newspaper. During the summer months,
the psychiatric social worker, together with the Medical Health Officer and the local
Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement Supervisor, assisted in the
organization of a "head-start" type play-school for 15 4-year-olds. This school
operated in the basement of the Community Health Centre Building during July
and August, under the direction of a full-time teacher who was assisted by teenagers
and local mother volunteers. This pilot project triggered the development of a cooperative pre-school for the area, and stimulated an interest in future work toward
the creation of a day-care centre. During the latter part of the year the Centre staff
embarked on a limited family life education programme, by offering evening discussion groups to anxious parents of teenagers in both Cranbrook and Kimberley.
The appointment of a psychologist would provide the opportunity to assist the
schools in their efforts to identify and help emotionally disturbed children. The
addition of this third member would also strengthen the direct-treatment capabilities
and permit the provision of a more meaningful and consistent service to the other
communities of the catchment area—Creston, Invermere, and Fernie.
During the past year the Centre achieved a good balance between therapeutic
and indirect service, and was preserving and expanding its indirect services in order
to maintain its role as catalyst and community change agent.
 WEST KOOTENAY
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE,
TRAIL
The year 1970 represented the beginning of a change in the programme of
this facility. While the early months reflected a continuation of the emphasis on
direct-treatment services, the second half stressed the community development
aspects of mental health. The central components of this latter programme were
the development of needed community resources for children and adults, consultation to other agencies and professionals, lay and professional education, and the
stimulation of volunteer programmes to complement the professional efforts. With
the opening of the Cranbrook (September, 1969) and Nelson (June, 1970) Mental
Health Centres, the region served by this facility now encompasses a population of
approximately 44,000 people.
The Centre's efforts were directed toward fuller utilization of lay and professional resources, in order to cope with the mental health needs of individuals,
families, and groups within our catchment area.
Dr. G. R. Mansfield resigned as Director of the Centre as of August 31, 1970,
but continued to work in close liaison with us, serving as a valuable consultant and
treatment resource. The addition to our staff of Mr. Steven Horvath, psychologist,
as of September 1, 1970, added greatly to the skills offered by the Centre. The
provision of acute-treatment services through private psychiatry and the Trail
Regional Hospital's Psychiatric Unit will enable our staff to expand its preventive
and educational programmes in the future.
The demand for direct service continued to be excessive, in terms of the professional staff available, and a screening programme was established to ensure the
best use of resources available. Consultation and support to other agencies and
professionals was being actively encouraged in order to assist them in carrying out
treatment services to individuals and families. In setting priorities, a programme
was developed which emphasized parent, family, and marital counselling; preventive follow-up of patients discharged from acute-treatment units; and individual
and group therapy for adolescents and young adults (stressing emergency or focal
psychotherapy).
The Centre supported, in an advisory capacity, groups such as the Canadian
Mental Health Association and the Association for Community Planning.
Miss L. L. Pollard, mental health nurse, was instrumental in the establishment
of a Canadian Mental Health Association chapter in Grand Forks, as well as providing programme material, and gave an orientation lecture-discussion series for
new volunteers.
Assistance was provided to the Association for Community Planning in carrying out an extensive professional survey which delineated resource needs of the
district. Staff also spoke at meetings of numerous community groups to stimulate
interest in broad planning of services, and served on committees in the area of
research.
The Youth Liaison Committee continued to be a vital body in fostering interagency communication and case consultation.
Another aspect of Centre work involved the continuation of two activity-
discussion groups for adolescents and the one-parent family group.    In addition,
45
 M 46 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
staff were in the process of developing, under a lay counsellor, a group for predelinquent boys, and are doing so in co-operation with the Probation Service.
The Centre was also closely involved in the formation of a Big Brother Association in Trail.
Co-operative arrangements with the Trail Regional Hospital were established
in June for the dispensing of medication for indigent patients. This was an
important preventive measure, in that those persons who need this type of assistance
in order to continue to function at a higher level in the community are not denied
access by reason of cost.
Presentation to, and participation in, lay and professional education continued
to be a significant aspect of the Centre's work. All staff members were involved in
lectures, group discussions, film presentations, seminars, radio talks, and workshops. Some of the themes covered were mental illness, child development, community mental health needs, drugs, alcoholism, marriage, mental retardation, and
adolescent adjustment difficulties. Several series were presented to such groups
as the Homemakers, prenatal classes, church Family Life groups, volunteers,
mothers of pre-school children, and hospital nurses. These covered a wide range
of mental health related topics and were directed toward enabling others to become
more effective in their work.
SELKIRK
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE,
NELSON
The Centre is located in Nelson and was opened in June, 1970. It serves a
catchment area situated between the Selkirk and Purcell Mountains and serves a
population of approximately 30,000 persons.
The Centre is comprised of a psychiatric social worker, and a clerk-stenographer
and a community mental health nurse who joined the staff in August and September
respectively. The Centre was housed in temporary quarters in the Selkirk Health
Unit, and moved into its own office in December.
During the first month of operation, much time was spent in acquainting the
community with the Centre.
During the year a backlog of case situations, and the general community concern about mental health, necessitated involvement in immediate therapy, or assessment and referral of urgent cases, and a broader approach to the problems of the
community. Specific cases were mostly medical or self-referrals, until arrangements
for referrals and (or) consultation with the Department of Rehabilitation and Social
Improvement and the school system had been made.
The Centre assisted university and senior high school students, together with a
group of citizen volunteers interested in their problems, to establish a Crisis Centre
primarily organized to handle the cases of acute drug abuse, and to interest university students to become involved in a programme akin to Big Brothers. It also
arranged a drug seminar for those manning the Crisis Centre.
The Centre also provided a seminar to hospital nurses on the handling of
severely disturbed patients. Centre staff presented one evening in a series of night-
school courses in pre-school child development, and provided films and discussions
for the Police Department in the various aspects of identifying and dealing with
people with various types of mental illness.   Lectures and discussions were held in
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
M 47
classes of Grade X to Grade XII students, ranging from 10 to 65 persons on a
variety of topics.
In addition to Nelson, the Centre visited and consulted with local authorities
in Kaslo, Nakusp, Salmo, and Slocan, and was successful in establishing regular
monthly consultative clinics in each community, setting up Mental Health Advisory
Boards, and assisting the communities to identify and deal with some very trying
social and community problems.
The consultative clinics involved all those professionals and semi-professionals
who serve these often isolated communities in which personal and family problems
have gone untouched for years. There were a number of services available to
the public, but it required an enabling and co-ordinating body to make better use
of them, and in this respect the Centre appeared to have served well.
The Centre is a member of, and has taken an active part in, such organizations
as the Provincial Rehabilitation Committee, Youth Services Committee, Union
Board of Health, Chamber of Commerce Youth Services, etc. It was successful in
having speeches and items of interest carried by the local newspaper and radio
station.
During a brief period of time, and despite its small number of staff, the Centre
has made an impact upon the area, but it will require some time for a full programme
to be developed. For two professional staff to deal with five separate communities
with many hundreds of cases requires almost total emphasis upon consultative clinics.
The Centre's staff will continue to accept direct referrals, but on a limited basis,
and with re-referral to an appropriate agency at the earliest opportunity.
During the year, considerable effort was expended in internal discussions, and
in the preparation of written outlines, toward developing a community mental health
service.
SKEENA
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE,
TERRACE
The Skeena Mental Health Centre opened in June, 1970. The area of responsibility for the Centre is that of the Skeena Public Health Unit. The population of
this area is approximately 58,728, according to 1969 statistics. The Centre is
located in Terrace, which is geographically the centre of the area served.
The staff included a psychiatric social worker, a psychologist, and a stenographer. Psychological and psychiatric consultation were also available from a
travelling team from The Maples.
The Centre provided direct and indirect services to the area served, and there
were 86 active cases as of November 27 on the files. During the year an extensive
travelling clinic programme was initiated. The Centre provided consultative services to physicians, schools, social agencies, and ministerial groups, and the staff was
active in the promotion and development of local community services. The Centre
provided educational programmes both to professional and non-professional groups,
and the topics ranged from "Alienated and Alienating Youth " to " Fight Training."
The Centre was still developing, and considerable time was spent in assessing
the mental health needs of the area. Public education was a priority, and was implemented through the use of television, radio, newspaper, and public meetings.
 VICTORIA
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE,
VICTORIA
During the year, the Victoria Mental Health Centre provided its multi-
disciplinary services to the various community agencies. However, due to the fluctuation in staff numbers, the direct-treatment service, which is a sustaining function
of this Centre, and the referral-intake system, were streamlined to meet the demands
without jeopardizing the quality of the treatment programme.
The retardation programme functioned very well. Considerable time was
spent by Mrs. Bridget Moncrieff, psychiatric social worker assigned to this programme, with the Pearkes Clinic for Handicapped Children. This resulted in the
development in the community of two important resources:—
(1) The Society and class for autistic children; and
(2) The Tuesday Club for severely physically and (or) mentally handicapped
youngsters.
Mrs. Moncrieff's functions became increasingly significant as a result of her active
involvement with the various families, physicians, and agencies. As a result of
the publicity concerning the autistic children, many anxious parents asked for
assessment and (or) advice concerning their children.
The boarding-home programme during the first four months of 1970 was
supervised mainly by Mrs. Rebecca Hoodless, mental health nurse, until the
appointment of Mr. Paul Bingham, psychiatric social worker. He is responsible
for the placement and rehabilitation of the many psychiatrically handicapped patients
in the areas covered by School Districts Nos. 61, 62, 63, and 64.
The art therapy programme, under the supervision of two volunteer art teachers and the mental health nurse, progressed considerably. The patients participating
in this programme had their paintings exhibited at the Vancouver Art Gallery, in
connection with a Canada-wide competition.
The Centre was active in the assessment and recommendation for cases referred by the legal profession. This function is very significant and needs further
expansion in terms of treatment for the criminal offenders, and an appropriate
facility is needed to carry out psychiatric treatment and (or) a rehabilitation programme for these people in this community. The Eric Martin Institute of Psychiatry
is unable to provide this, due to lack of a security ward.
As of September, 1970, this Centre became a practicum placement facility for
the doctor of philosophy psychology candidates of the University of Victoria. It
differs from the other placements in that its service is primarily extra-institutional.
Dr. Frank Spellacy, a neuropsychologist from the University of Victoria, is in
charge of the practicum programme, and also provides services for the Centre's
Neuropsychology Unit. Since October, 1969, the date the Unit commenced
operation, 61 cases had been tested, with a total of 183 testing sessions done by
Mr. William de Bosch Kemper, psychologist assistant.
Other psychological testing and evaluation, normally done by our full-time
master of arts psychologist, Mrs. Marianne Webb, who had been on leave of absence
since July, 1970, was done by the psychologists assigned to the Neuropsychology
Unit.
48
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES M 49
Various members of the professional staff participated in the preventive aspect
of community psychiatry by providing consultations, talks, and lectures to the
various community organizations. Staff were actively involved in lecturing to the
student nurses of the Royal Jubilee Hospital and St. Joseph's Hospital schools of
nursing, and lectures were also given to various schools in the community.
SAANICH
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE,
SAANICH
On January 9, 1970, the Centre moved from its location in the Eric Martin
Institute in Victoria to the Credit Union Building on West Saanich Road, Royal
Oak. The new location is close to being the demographic centre of the region served,
and considerably reduces the distance travelled by patients or clients from Central
Saanich, North Saanich, Sidney, and the Gulf Islands. Total population of the catchment area is approximately 100,000 people, in a region which contains urban areas,
suburban areas, and extensive rural lands.
The staff consisted of a psychiatrist Director, a clinical psychologist, a mental
health nurse, two psychiatric social workers, and two office staff.
Services during the year included diagnostic studies done with patients referred
by their family doctors. Diagnostic assessments were also done at the request of
professionals from other agencies, including those of the Family and Children's
Court, Family and Children's Service, Greater Victoria Metropolitan Board of
Health, Saanich Welfare Department, Provincial Department of Rehabilitation and
Social Improvement, John Howard Society, Canada Manpower, Rehabilitation Service, Cool-Aid, Citizens' Counselling Centre, and others. These studies were undertaken if other resources were not available to the referring agency.
The number of cases in treatment almost doubled the number served prior to
the move to Royal Oak, including a substantially higher proportion of school children and adolescents. Waiting-lists were either minimal or non-existent, and therefore the Centre was able to provide rapid assessments for most agencies. As a result,
the services were utilized to a considerable extent by the people in School District
No. 62, which is outside of the Centre's geographic region.
Efforts in preventive psychiatry, and other aspects of primary prevention, were
developed through a number of activities. The Centre was particularly active during the year in work with the school districts. Assistance was provided in the development of a workshop on the problems of adolescents, including the drug problem,
for School District No. 63. It was a two-day programme involving training work with
all the teachers in the district. There was also a brief workshop on drugs and drug
abuse for the school counsellors, public health nurses, principals, and administrators
and their assistants in School District No. 63. Centre staff participated in presenting
the psychiatric and medical side of the drug problem, in a workshop on drug abuse
at School District No. 68 in Nanaimo, and presented a similar programme to the
community members and the Family Life Association of Port Alberni. A lecture
was prepared on the problems of communication that exist between adolescents and
adults, and was presented to the Principals' and Vice-Principals' Association of
Vancouver Island in Nanaimo, and to the Principals' and Vice-Principals' Association of British Columbia in Vancouver.   Lectures and consultative services were
4
 M 50 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
provided by Dr. Wood for the School District No. 61 pilot project on training elementary teachers in Family Life education. All of the professional staff members in
mental health work participated in the development of consultative activities with
other individuals and agencies. Much of this work followed traditional lines in
which the Centre provided services for other agencies in the assessment of their
clients.
This first year in the Centre's new location was one in which the staff invested
considerable effort in getting to know, and working with, the professionals of other
agencies who serve the region. The ultimate benefit of this will be felt eventually
by clients needing help in the area of emotional problems, regardless of which
agency it may be that is serving them.
UPPER ISLAND
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE,
COURTENAY
The Centre's area of responsibility includes the communities of Courtenay,
Comox, and Campbell River, and extends north of Fanny Bay to Cape Scott, including various small islands along the eastern coast. Demographically, the population is quite scattered, but totals approximately 75,000.
During the year the Centre provided primarily direct psychiatric services, and
the monthly case load averaged 30 new cases per month. As a secondary function,
the Centre was involved in some community-oriented services, and these included
a weekly Travelling Clinic to Campbell River; monthly, as of August, 1970, to
Gold River; and monthly, as of October, 1970, to the Port Hardy area. In these
communities the clinics provide direct consultation and case management; act in
an advisory capacity to various community groups; and consult and advise the
school districts of the areas. Representatives from the Centre attended meetings of
the Rehabilitation Committees. Staff interactions with St. Joseph's General Hospital, Comox, and Cumberland General Hospital were very rewarding. Liaison
with Central Vancouver Island Mental Health Centre was useful, and some children
from the area attended the summer camp conducted by the Nanaimo staff. The
Centre was involved in the evolution of the Big Brother movement locally, and with
two developing Crisis Centres in Courtenay and Gold River.
The Centre's interaction with dependents of the Canadian Forces Base, Comox,
personnel was in the nature of direct service, and the percentage of dependents seen
was high, especially in the area of counselling of a family nature.
In the following year the Centre intends to shift the emphasis of service from
a direct to a more indirect approach and, also, to concentrate on education.
CENTRAL VANCOUVER ISLAND
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE,
NANAIMO
The staff of the Central Vancouver Island Mental Health Centre consisted of
a clinical psychologist, a mental health nurse, a part-time pharmacist, a part-time
receptionist, a stenographer, and a social worker as Acting Director.   The lack of
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES M 51
medical staff was compensated for by an expansion of private psychiatric services in
the area. Nanaimo has three psychiatrists in private practice, and psychiatrists are
practising part-time in Duncan and Port Alberni. Dr. J. E. Boulding, of Nanaimo,
acts as the Centre's psychiatric consultant on a sessional basis. In addition, Family
Life Associations are now functioning actively in all three of these communities.
The Centre's emphasis was on consultative work with community groups and
agencies, educational programmes, group training for counsellors, and work with
schools. The Centre also did assessment and short-term therapy sessions with
a small number of children. Chronic cases were referred successfully to local
physicians, and through them to other community resources. Cases involving
marital counselling were referred to the local Family Life Association. Since the
beginning of the year our case load was reduced by about 50 per cent through
closing and referring inactive cases.
The Centre worked very closely with all school districts in the area, and during
the year held close to 100 school conferences, as well as many group meetings with
school counsellors, teachers, and principals. In return, some school special counsellors provided psychometric services for children on the case load.
Camp Nan-Wah-Kawi, a school camp operated by the Centre, serves Courtenay
and Campbell River, as well as the Nanaimo area. In 1970 the camp took 28
children, selected from a large number of referrals as showing extremely difficult
school and behaviour problems, for a two-week period. A day-long workshop for
parents was held prior to camp, and visits were made to every school. A professional staff of 20, including three from the Centre, worked intensively with these
children, using the behaviour-modification approach. Contracts were made between
children and teachers, and the children were heavily rewarded for the completion of
these, as well as for certain selected behaviours. The programme was highly structured, with relatively few periods of free time. At the beginning of camp, each
child was given the Valett Psychoeducational Inventory of Learning Skills.
The camp was extremely successful in terms of the children's enjoyment, active
participation in classroom work, and other group activities, and the absence of
aggressive and unco-operative behaviour. Extensive daily records were kept on the
behaviour of each child, and these, together with the results of the Valett testing,
were compiled into a detailed assessment and prescription for home and school
functioning. These have been interpreted to parents and teachers through school
conferences. Follow-up visits will be made to each school, and a further parents'
workshop is scheduled for January, 1971.
Invaluable assistance was received over the year from the Central Vancouver
Island Health Unit, and in particular from the public health nurses. Without their
skills in making home visits and reporting on these, the Centre could not have
functioned.
  IN-PATIENT SERVICES
Review of In-patient Services, 1970
Department of Nursing Education
Riverview Hospital
Geriatric Division
The Woodlands School
The Tranquille School
British Columbia Youth Development Centre,
The Maples, Burnaby
A
mental
health
branch
  IN-PATIENT
SERVICES
REVIEW,  1970
The policy of the Mental Health Branch, formulated in 1967, has, with each
succeeding year, been increasingly implemented, with resultant changes in the
demands upon the in-patient facilities. In order to provide the best possible service
to the groups in greatest need, the in-patient facilities have, during 1970, continuously reviewed their policies and procedures, and where possible, adjusted their
programmes in order to provide the optimum service to the appropriate patient
groups.
As the policy is implemented throughout the Province, certain pressures develop in the in-patient services, which make the maintenance of existing standards
of patient care difficult. Increasing numbers of mentally disordered or mentally
retarded people can be treated and cared for in a variety of community resources,
with the result that the in-patient facilities deal with patients who require a great
deal more service. During 1970, the percentage of in-patients who required large
amounts of staff time increased substantially, placing ever greater demands upon
the staffs of the institutions.
The in-patient populations included greatly increased numbers of old patients,
bedridden patients, and the more severely mentally disturbed and the more severely
and profoundly retarded, all of whom require greatly increased allocations of staff
time merely to maintain existing standards of care. This circumstance renders it
essential that the institutions continuously review their programmes and procedures
in order to make the most effective use of their resources.
In order to assess the needs and make economic use of resources, a great deal
of work was done in the institutions, in conjunction with Mr. Goodacre and other
members of the Deputy Minister's staff, in determining the most effective and economical type of operation. Surveys of patient populations, and categorization of
patients according to the type and quantity of service required to care for them,
progressed well during the year. Statistical confirmation became available which
supported the earlier impression that many in-patients in the Mental Health Services
are in institutions, not because it is the most appropriate means of dealing with their
cases, but simply because the type of resource which would be most effective and
most economical for their care does not exist in sufficient quantity in the community.
When the various community programmes can be developed to meet the full requirements of the population, it can be confidently predicted that two-fifths of the
in-patient population presently in the institutions will be able to be returned to
resources in the community.
In Riverview Hospital, the ongoing review of policies and practices has had the
following results: The clarification of admitting policy; closer identification of types
of care needed by varying patient groups; steps to formalize the hospital's relationship with the Faculty of Medicine of the University of British Columbia; consulta-
55
 M 56 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
tion toward the expansion and transfer of the out-patient department to Vancouver
in co-operation with the University of British Columbia; and greater clinical involvement in the boarding-home programme, to which a full-time psychiatrist has been
assigned. A committee was set up to report to the Deputy Minister on the feasibility of an internal reorganization of the hospital, in such a way as to assign predetermined amounts of the various available services to geographic regions and
specific communities within the Province. This latter objective is essential in order
to avoid duplication and to ensure that the community facilities continue to serve
the groups in greatest psychiatric need, rather than to select particular types of
cases and leave Riverview Hospital with the burden of continuing to care for those
psychiatric patients who were being admitted to the Mental Health Services before
the new community facilities were established. Experience in other areas has shown
this latter measure to be essential if the work of the mental hospital is to be taken
over by the community resources.
The Geriatric Division showed increasing energy and activity in its community
involvement during the year. Although the hospital continued to give an excellent
service to many hundreds of geriatric patients who might more appropriately be
cared for in boarding homes or nursing homes and whose need for psychiatric treatment or supervision is very limited, the accent was on active psychiatric assessment
and treatment, and the provision of effective consultation services to the community.
The community consultation service has an educational as well as a clinical value,
in that the consultants are commonly able to indicate to the medical and nursing
profession in the community the type of treatment and resource which might be
suitable for those many patients referred for admission to Valleyview Hospital, but
not in fact in need of the psychiatric services for the provision of which Valleyview
Hospital exists.
Dellview Hospital at Vernon also continued throughout the year to upgrade
its standards of service to patients and to increase its activity in terms of community involvement in the district. Regular psychiatric consultations by the Director of the North Okanagan Mental Health Centre, and a close working relationship
with that and other centres, greatly increased the involvement of the hospital in the
life of the community.
The Retardation Services continued to develop along lines similar to those
in other divisions of the Mental Health Services. The accent was upon increased
community responsibility and provision of care in the form of hostels, group homes,
sheltered workshops, etc., and the in-patient facilities participated in and cooperated with this trend. The result was that the percentage of severely and profoundly retarded trainees in The Woodlands School and The Tranquille School
continued to increase. Of the less severely retarded, only those with concomitant
emotional disorders of a more severe kind are admitted.
The Woodlands School was preoccupied during 1970 with taking steps to
maintain standards at their existing levels, without the necessary staff increases.
Special attention was directed to attempting to hire staff with the best and most
appropriate qualifications, and increasing and improving in-service education programmes for staff. The application of the most suitable methods of training and
treatment in given areas also proved effective in such programmes as behaviour
modification, and the introduction of a therapeutic community approach to groups
who benefit from this service.
During the year The Woodlands School staff undertook a great deal of public
education, and many groups had orientation visits. The close liaison with many
faculties and departments of the University of British Columbia continued.
 IN-PATIENT SERVICES M 57
Perhaps the best single index of the enthusiasm and dedication of The Woodlands School staff in promoting patient welfare was the camping programme, which
was only made possible by the donation by many staff members of a total of hundreds of volunteer hours of their own off-duty time, for which they asked no return
in time off or financial remuneration.
The Tranquille School went through many changes in orientation and activity
during 1970. The school essentially operated as a pleasant, custodial annex to The
Woodlands School until October, 1969, when it achieved independence and was
made responsible for its own admission programme and services to Mental Health
Planning Regions 1, 2, and 6. Throughout 1970, all levels and categories of staff
in the school worked most energetically to set up a programme that would accent
training and treatment for the severely and profoundly retarded children and adults
of the Interior of the Province. Although the programme was hampered by delays
in minor construction and the outbreaks of epidemics of two infectious diseases, by
the later months of 1970 the programme had been progressing along the lines
planned, although at a slower rate due to temporary staff shortages. In many areas,
the improvement in standards of care and service was quite evident, and great credit
was due all department heads for their energy and enthusiasm in working together
co-operatively under the leadership of Dr. John Bower.
Early in 1970, the British Columbia Youth Development Centre at Burnaby
was separated administratively from the in-patient services and its subsequent administration has been by a board of management chaired by Dr. J. S. Bland, Consultant in Retardation and Children's Psychiatric Services, with board members representing Mental Health Services, the Department of Education, and the Department
of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement.
The Department of Nursing Education continued its established programme
under the direction of Mrs. Paulson.
Graduation ceremonies were held in the New Westminster Secondary School
Auditorium on the evening of April 16, 1970. The graduating class of 87 included
5 men. The speaker was Dr. Frank McNair, Director of the South Okanagan Mental
Health Centre.
The annual meeting of the Council of Psychiatric Nurses was held on April
30, 1970.
As the volume of service needed to maintain the standards of care of a changing patient population increases, the work of the volunteers in the in-patient facilities
becomes ever more valuable, and is greatly appreciated.
 DEPARTMENT OF
NURSING EDUCATION
During the year, ongoing changes and modifications took place in all programmes conducted in the Department. Increased emphasis focused on the patient
as an individual, and on additional community facilities available to assist him in
all stages of his illness and rehabilitation.
The total enrolment of students in the psychiatric nursing programme was 90—
81 women and 9 men. These were selected from 347 applicants. Two-thirds of
the applicants not accepted failed to meet academic requirements. Eighty-eight
students (83 women and 5 men) completed the programme; of these, 38 were
graduates of the February class, and 50 of the September class. Twenty-eight
students withdrew from the programme for a variety of reasons; none withdrew
because of academic failure. The year-end census was 164, as compared to 184
the previous year.
Stage One orientation courses are arranged according to need. At The Woodlands School and Valleyview Hospital, classes are given when the required number
of new aides is available. At Riverview Hospital, new aides receive classes immediately upon employment.
Stage Two courses are scheduled when it is convenient for the facilities concerned to release aides. At The Woodlands School, instruction will be provided by
the multi-disciplinary in-service education.
At Riverview Hospital, clinical programmes for aides continued in the six units
during the year.   Attendance and staff participation increased.
Two hundred and thirty-one students completed their affiliation in psychiatric
nursing—77 from the Royal Columbian Hospital School of Nursing, New Westminster; 43 from St. Joseph's Hospital School of Nursing, Victoria; 85 from St. Paul's
Hospital School of Nursing, Vancouver; 6 from the University of British Columbia
School of Nursing; and 20 public health nurses of the Health Branch. The last
group of students (basic baccalaureate degree) from the University of British
Columbia School of Nursing completed its affiliation at the Riverview Hospital in
April as plans were being formulated for students to have their clinical experience
in psychiatric nursing at the Health Sciences Centre. In August, the St. Joseph's
Hospital School of Nursing (Victoria) withdrew from the programme as plans
were in process for affiliation at the Eric Martin Institute in 1971.
The liaison between the Division of Occupational Health and the Student
Nurses' Infirmary, which commenced in the latter part of 1969, proved to be
functionally feasible and successful, and enabled continuity of health care to
employees who become ill or injured at work.
Residence accommodation was provided for 229 students and 153 transient
staff. Due to the fact that more students are now living out (50 at the end of the
year) and the smaller enrolment classes, two residences are vacant.
58
 RIVERVIEW
HOSPITAL
GENERAL COMMENTS
During 1970, Riverview Hospital continued to provide a comprehensive psychiatric in-patient and out-patient service for adult mentally ill residents of British
Columbia. It is recognized that many changes are taking place in our society and
that it is the responsibility of the hospital to be aware of the changing needs in our
community, and to be prepared to meet the challenges of new demands in the care
and treatment of the mentally ill.
Every effort was made to reassess the hospital's programmes in the light of new
knowledge and trends in accepted modern psychiatric treatment methods, with
special emphasis on preserving the dignity of the individual and the development of
independence and self-reliance in all residents. The development of a treatment
milieu, in which a patient may have the maximum opportunity to deal with his problems, and a co-ordinated team approach to treatment and rehabilitative measures,
continued to be the guidelines for all staff at
Riverview Hospital. Increased involvement
of the community in the affairs of the hospital
continued to be encouraging, and staff members were increasingly interested and involved
in the development of new resources for psychiatric care in the community. During the
year a number of significant steps were taken
in line with these concepts. In June, the Riverview Hospital admitting policy was reviewed and formally written to clarify the
present function of the hospital in relation to
the type of mental disorder for which this facility is able to provide appropriate care and
treatment. Riverview is primarily committed to the care and treatment of the adult
mentally ill person and provides comprehensive treatment programmes designed for
the adult individual, but which are most inappropriate for the care of children.
A special committee, composed of consultants from the office of the Deputy
Minister of Mental Health and senior officers from Riverview, was recently formed
to study the feasibility and organizational changes required to regionalize the hospital
in order that it may better serve the community and the needs of the various hospital
regions for in-patient psychiatric treatment services.
In September, a further reduction in the official bed count was sanctioned, which
reflects the gradually decreasing resident population, and, in particular, the need to
reduce patient congestion and crowding of wards in order to appropriately treat
and rehabilitate the mentally ill person. At the year-end the official bed count for
Riverview Hospital was 2,898, a decrease of 121 since July, 1968, and 136 since
October, 1966.
The statistical record of patient movement during 1970 showed a general increase compared to 1969. There were significant increases in the number of admissions, but there was a concomitant increase in separations to boarding-home placements and out-patient care, so that the average resident population was slightly
reduced. During 1970, the average daily resident population numbered 2,506, compared to 2,541 for the previous year.   The number in the boarding-home programme
59
Kitchen, Centre Lawn Unit (dietician
and cook).
 M 60
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
averaged 430, an increase of 27, while the average number of patients under outpatient supervision was 1,132, an increase of 64.
During 1970, Riverview Hospital provided 905,741 patient-days of care and
treatment for in-patients in the facility.
TREATMENT SERVICES
During the past year there was a significant change in the direction of the
population trends noted in the previous Annual Report. The number of patients admitted to Riverview Hospital in 1970 increased from the comparable figure for 1969,
thus reversing a downward trend in admissions that had begun only in the previous
year. The number of patients in residence remained relatively stationary compared
to the previous year, while a progressive increase in patients on boarding-home leave
continued, resulting in a significant change in the resident population of the hospital.
Long-term patients with a minimal residual disability have been resettled in the
community, leaving, in hospital, patients with greater residual psychiatric disabilities,
or who are more aged and infirm. The effect of this population change is that the
remaining long-term patients can contribute less to their own care and, in fact, require more active staff care in hospital and a more intensive rehabilitation and
follow-up service if they are to be successfully rehabilitated to the community.
During February, a hospital-wide " categorization of patients " survey was initiated
by the Consultant in Sociology and carried out by the nursing staff, the results of
which will be most helpful in determining the areas of greatest need, and the type
and quality of care and treatment required to serve the changing resident population.
In an effort to meet these needs, increased emphasis was placed on out-patient
care and rehabilitation. The capacity of the Venture Rehabilitation Residence for
men was increased by six additional beds. A supervising psychiatrist was assigned
on a full-time basis to the Rehabilitation Department and boarding-home programme. Workshops were initiated for the boarding-home operators, and a closer
co-operation with the community physicians was fostered in addition to the continued visits to each home and each patient by the hospital psychiatrist and social
worker.
Plans were initiated to move the Vancouver section of the Out-patient Department into Vancouver City, and to establish a closer liaison with the Vancouver
General Hospital. Plans for the initiation of a pilot home-care treatment project
were submitted by the Consultant in Sociology.
Workshop projects in the long-stay areas increased in scope, from which some
patients may be graduated into sheltered workshops in the community, as these are
developed.
A behaviour modification project, utilizing the principles of learning theory, was
initiated in the East Lawn Unit. This
project was supported by a National Health
grant to our Psychology Department. The
interest and utilization of the therapeutic
community approach continued, particularly on the university-affiliated Clinical
Teaching Unit. Liaison with the University
of British Columbia, Department of Psychiatry, was strengthened with the appointment of the Clinical Director to the
Advisory Committee to the Acting Head of
Patient receives radiology services.
 IN-PATIENT SERVICES M 61
of the University Department, and to the Resident Graduate Selection and Admissions Committee. This Clinical Teaching Unit is now recognized by the Royal
College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada for postgraduate training in psychiatry
within the university's Department of Psychiatry training programme.
The Department of Surgery at the University of British Columbia found it
necessary to terminate the surgical residency programme, which necessitated the
appointment of a full-time Surgical House Officer. With the continuing support
and service of the consulting surgeons, it was possible to continue without interruption the surgical service for Riverview and Valleyview Hospitals and The
Woodlands School.
A serious effort was made during the year to develop and refine techniques
for measuring and improving the quality of care provided to Riverview Hospital
patients. Within the framework of the Medical Staff Organization, psychiatrically
and surgically oriented Medical Audit Committees intensively reviewed the quality
of medical care received by patients during the year. Of the many recommendations
made by these committees, several important programmes were implemented to
safeguard the health of our patients. The annual physical " check-up " examinations are now being accompanied by routine blood and urine tests, and all female
patients over the age of 20 are receiving cytological examinations for uterine cancer.
In addition, anaesthesia for all patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy is now
being administered by a certified anaesthetist. The dental health of patients in the
long-stay areas is also being enhanced by the introduction of routine prophylactic
dental examinations, in addition to the normal service for dental problems. The
installation of three new dental chairs, replacing outmoded equipment, further enhanced the dental service. A Poison Control Information Centre was established
in the North Lawn Unit and is constantly available to the Essondale area. Cardiac-
monitoring equipment, with synchronized defibrillator, was obtained during the
year, but, due to the lack of specially trained nursing staff, it was not possible to
put the monitoring equipment into service.
Educational programmes in association with the University of British Columbia were conducted for postgraduate residents in psychiatry, undergraduate medical
students, students in the faculties of nursing, law, social work, education, and in the
School of Rehabilitation Medicine. Programmes, lectures, or practical experience
were provided for nurses from the British Columbia Institute of Technology and
other hospitals, psychology students, church ministers, police recruits, laboratory
technicians, student sanitary inspectors, school counsellors, as well as the general
public. In-service orientation for new staff of the various mental health centres
was also being provided.
Due to the declining number of tuberculous patients in hospital, together with
modern chemotherapies for this disorder, it was possible to reduce the number of
beds for tuberculous patients to six, so that the remaining beds on this 16-bed ward
could be converted to use for patients suffering from chronic brain syndrome.
The Medical Staff Organization held is first annual meeting on the evening of
February 18, at which time reports of the various committees were presented.
During the year, increased emphasis was placed on further improvement in the
credentials and qualifications of members of the active medical staff. Six physicians
took their certification examinations in psychiatry. One physician took his fellowship examination, one the fellowship examination in internal medicine, and nine
physicians took other qualifying examinations. As of mid-1970, there was a total
of 92 doctors with either active, consulting, courtesy, resident, or honorary staff
appointment to Riverview Hospital.
 M 62 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
Unfortunately, toward the latter part of 1970, emphasis had to be shifted
toward efforts to maintain the quality of service and to minimize restrictions imposed
by the inability to replace staff resigning. The d fficulty in filling certain medical-
record positions led to the decision to postpone the request for a further survey by
the Canadian Council on Hospital Accreditation.
The Nursing Division continued to maintain a quality nursing service to all
patients, although hampered by a variety of situations which, at times, seriously
encroached on the quality and amount of nursing care provided. Nursing staff was
freed of housekeeping duties in all but one unit of the hospital. However, the loss
of nursing positions required to implement this change, together with a continuing
high level of staff illness, increased vacation allotments, and increasing hours of
nursing care required by the ageing population in the long-stay areas of the hospital,
was cause for much concern. Experience
during the year further indicated the
immediate need for additional infirmary
wards, and additional nursing service to
meet the needs of our elderly patients.
Nursing personnel continued to be involved in a variety of multi-disciplinary
treatment programmes, including the development of  an  additional  patient-inte-
Recently renovated ward in West grated ward programme in the Crease Unit,
Lawn Building. an(j   an   ad0iescent-gr0Up   programme   in
Centre Lawn. Special care was provided for six infants who accompanied their
mothers on admission to hospital, where the presence of the infant was considered
especially significant in the treatment programme for the mothers.
Early in the year a nurse was assigned to assist in introducing and co-ordinating
the new centralized programme for administering electroconvulsive therapy in each
unit. Approximately 500 such treatments were given monthly by the medical staff,
the intravenous anaesthesia being conducted by an anaesthetist.
Three new minimal-care residences were opened for men, which provide more
home-like living conditions for 41 men. The previously established minimal care
programmes for women continued to operate most satisfactorily.
Resident camping programmes were again found to be very valuable experiences for many long-stay patients. Two camp-sites were available, and through the
voluntary donation of time, in addition to their regular duties, nursing staff provided this important recreational opportunity for a total of 186 men and women.
In August, Miss M. L. Carmack, Director of Nursing, was welcomed back
from educational leave, having obtained the degree, bachelor of science in nursing,
at the University of Washington. In addition, three nurses obtained dual qualifications by successfully completing the two-year option programme at the Britsh Columbia Institute of Technology. Another two were in their second year. Several
nursing staff were also assisted in attending programmes offered by the Extension
Department, University of British Columbia, on behaviour therapy and implementation of change in nursing service. The stimulation and increased knowledge provided by such courses are considered vitally important in the maintenance of a high
standard of patient care.
Psychiatric social services were provided for 4,385 patients, representing 3,363
in-patients and 1,022 out-patients. Service to the latter group increased considerably, primarily through home-visiting, which is time-consuming but nevertheless
 IN-PATIENT SERVICES M 63
indispensable in preventing unnecessary returns to hospital. Pre-admission social
service was also stressed, not only for the provision of direct service to families of
referred patients, but in terms of preventive work, better utilization of hospital
beds, and education of the community toward greater understanding of the hospital
and its most appropriate use, as one of a range of services for mentally ill persons.
The Psychology Department, in its major service commitment of psychometric
evaluation of patients, prepared over 500 reports in response to referrals for diagnostic evaluation, intellectual measurement, and personality assessment. The automated testing system became operational early in the year, through computer access
provided by the Department of Psychology, Simon Fraser University. In addition,
psychology staff provided psychotherapeutic services, involving over 300 group
and conjoint therapeutic services, and a similar number of individual interviews.
A wide range of occupational therapy and recreational therapy programmes
was made available to patients. Increasing emphasis was placed on attempts to
expand occupational therapy service to patients in the boarding-home programme,
and greater patient awareness of the community through recreational programmes
involving community resources. The Canadian Mental Health Association Volunteers continued to be most helpful in this regard.
At the end of September, Rev. John F. O'Neil, the first full-time chaplain appointed to the Mental Health Services, left the hospital on retirement following 17
years of service. During the year, special attention was given to the role of the
Chaplain Service in the hospital, and steps were taken to involve the chaplains
to a greater degree with the therapeutic programmes of the hospital, and in fostering
greater involvement by community clergy in the care of patients.
The medical records staff expanded service in several areas, particularly in the
development of improved procedures for the provision of separation notices of
Riverview patients to the mental health centres. In addition, reorganization of
procedures for recording daily hospital census was also accomplished, which provided a clearer picture of the daily bed occupancy and will be helpful in a proposed
study of the bed utilization in the hospital. An assistant medical record librarian
was appointed the first of the year, as a first step toward implementing the recommendations of the Canadian Council on Hospital Accreditation for a Medical
Record Department, as outlined in the previous Annual Report. Unfortunately,
it was not possible to proceed further in the development of this service. The demands for statistical data are becoming greater each year, and the need for electronic
data processing, in order to produce information in a more rapid and acceptable
manner, is especially felt in this area. There was a considerable increase in the
number of surveys requested, and a greater utilization of the medical record for
study and research during 1970.
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES
The emphasis in the administrative divisions continued to be placed on the
achievement of maximum effectiveness of service, at minimum cost. The continuing
decline of reliable and effective patient help, and the problems of staff recruitment
in many areas, were of special concern throughout the year.
The year was notable for increased co-operation and liaison with the Provincial
and local levels of the executive structure within the Psychiatric Nurses Association
of British Columbia, and the British Columbia Government Employees' Union.
Monthly meetings were initiated among the Essondale Executive of the Psychiatric
Nurses Association, the Superintendent, Director of Nursing, and the Personnel
 M 64 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
Officer for the purpose of informal exchanges of opinions and information, and
factual communication concerning controversial topics. It was felt that these meetings and the frequent contacts between the Personnel Officer and the various representatives of the employee organizations throughout the year served to allay many
false rumours and resulted in a marked reduction in the number of grievances.
In October, a 20-week course in supervisor training was instituted for Housekeeping Supervisors, drawn not only from Riverview Hospital but from most of the
mental health facilities in the Lower Mainland area.
The appointment of a Laundry Administrator during the year was of considerable assistance to the Business Administrator in updating the laundry, linen, and
clothing services to Riverview, Valleyview, and The Woodlands School. As a result
of improved staff utilization and management procedures, and the introduction of
several pieces of new equipment, the main laundry plant increased production by
600,000 pounds, and the dry-cleaning plant by 24,000 pounds. The need for a
replacement laundry to correct the urgent problems of outdated and overworked
equipment, and improved working conditions for staff and patients, was still of
paramount importance. During the year, much time was spent with architects and
consultants in reviewing the total hospital requirements for laundry, linen, and
clothing service, and in developing plans for a replacement laundry. A start was
also made in the introduction of the use of synthetic fabrics and coloured materials
to replace the standard white linens and sheeting. A new look was also being
developed for staff uniforms and improved patient wearing-apparel.
A Committee on Linen and Clothing Standards was established, under the
Riverview Business Administrator, to study the updating and development of systems and methods to provide a higher standard of service within the various mental
health facilities.
The productivity of the Industrial Therapy Department was enhanced by the
completion of a new chromium plating and storage building. New teaching and work
procedures were developed with the change to polyester " wash and wear " fabrics.
The Audio-Visual Section experienced increased demands for service, particularly in the Film Library. Requests from out-of-hospital sources for films had
grown to such an extent that it was necessary to completely revise the Film Catalogue, which was reprinted by the hospital printing department.
Approximately 150 patients contributed each day to the work in the Industrial
Therapy Division, and were placed there through the Rehabilitation Department for
therapeutic and educational purposes, and trade-training experience.
Housekeeping services were extended during the year to all patient-occupied
areas in the large East Lawn Unit, and to Home 10, which was used as a residence
for patients from West Lawn during the renovation programme. Due to lack of
patient help and a deficiency in housekeeping staff, several areas, including the
Riverside Unit and the dining areas, were of concern in maintaining satisfactory
housekeeping standards.
Early in the year the dietary service was reviewed by professional food service
consultants, and recommendations made for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the service. The recommendation that a central commissary concept of food
production be implemented was under a feasibility study, using the large East Lawn
kitchen as the central food-production area. During the year, ever-increasing demands were placed on the Dietary Department by treatment programmes requiring
extra catering for social activities for patients, and menu modifications for special
diets. During February, many dietary staff were able to benefit from an in-service
training programme for food handlers, conducted by the Simon Fraser Health Unit.
 IN-PATIENT SERVICES
M 65
The Public Works Department carried out normal maintenance of the buildings and there were no major breakdowns in utility service. Although this Department was unable to complete a number of much-needed projects, several projects
were completed. Noteworthy among them were the renovations to the garage
compound, the provision of a metal-plating shop at the rear of the Industrial Therapy
Building, the renewal of East Lawn floors, and the West-2 and West-4 carpeting.
 GERIATRIC
DIVISION
This Division is made up of three mental health facilities, with a total complement of 1,306 beds. Valleyview Hospital is the largest of the three units, with 767
beds, and accepts patients from the Lower Mainland and adjacent areas of the
Province, as well as from Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands. Dellview Hospital,
Vernon, consisting of 239 beds, accepts patients from the Okanagan and Kootenay
areas. Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, with 300 beds, all for males, accepts patients
from the northwestern part of the Province. Boundaries are not clearly drawn and,
for convenience of transportation, patients from the extreme northern areas may
have to be admitted to Valleyview Hospital. Persons aged 70 years and over,
suffering from psychiatric illness and in need of treatment, or whose behaviour due
to psychiatric illness is so disturbed that they cannot be adequately cared for elsewhere in the community, are accepted for admission. Organic deterioration leading
to dependency, without a behaviour problem, is not considered sufficient to warrant
committal to a geriatric mental health facility. Pressures to admit patients are
unequally distributed, and Valleyview Hospital, on which the pressure is greatest,
transfers patients to other units when possible, to relieve this pressure. The least
demand for the beds available is in the Skeenaview Hospital area.
VALLEYVIEW HOSPITAL
In spite of the fact that two-thirds of the beds are allocated to female patients,
the greatest admitting pressures were for female admissions. This was accounted
for by the preponderance of females in the population, especially in urban areas,
and also to the fact that the average length of stay in hospital is greater for female
than for male patients.
To meet, in part at least, the problems raised by waiting-lists, the hospital
provided a medical consultation service in the Lower Mainland area.   This service
was designed to assess the need
for admission. It was most effective, however, in granting
priority for admission to those
most in need of treatment, as
well as those whose behaviour
is most disturbed.
Of the beds made available
for new admissions during the
year, 44 per cent were due to
deaths, mainly in the long-term
care areas.
Applications for admission
were received at an average
rate of 58 per month, an increase of two over the previous
year.
Of this number, 43 who resided in the Lower Mainland area were seen in
consultation by the hospital's medical staff. As a result of assessment, one-third
of those seen were not considered to be suitable for committal to a mental health
This is the main building of the Valleyview
Hospital, Essondale.
66
 IN-PATIENT SERVICES
M 67
facility. Admissions averaged 37 per month, two less per month than in the
previous year.
The rehabilitation and discharge programme was successful, especially in the
latter half of the year. An average of 19 patients per month were discharged, an
increase of nine per month over the previous year. Of the total number of patients
returned to the community, 53 per cent went to boarding homes or guest homes,
33 per cent returned to their own homes or those of relatives or friends, and 13
per cent went to private hospitals. One patient, through the efforts of friends, was
admitted to an extended-care facility. Of those patients who went to boarding
homes or guest houses, over 80 per cent had adequate finances to meet care costs
for at least a year.
Fifty-one patients were transferred to Dellview Hospital and nine patients were
transferred to Skeenaview Hospital.
A special survey, with a view to categorizing patients in accordance with
nursing-care needs, was completed at the beginning of the year.
Treatment Services
The hospital's permanent medical staff was maintained at full strength during
the year. While a considerable proportion of medical services was devoted to care
and treatment of physical illnesses, better co-ordination and involvement of ancillary
services led to  improved psychiatric treatment and rehabilitation programmes.
The hospital's dental department provided a satisfactory programme of dental
care for patients.
The services of consultants in all specialties were available as required.
The pathological laboratory, under the supervision of the pathologist at Riverview Hospital, functioned satisfactorily. Work continued on the checking of new
methods in order to improve the quality and quantity of output.
M'Jk        A good standard of nursing
. »* I    care  for  patients  was  main
tained. The nursing staff total
of 320 showed an improvement
in the ratio of nurses to aides,
but they still formed only
slightly more than half the
total. A review of nursing
practices and procedures was
made, with a view to economy
of staff time. Several minor
changes, including adjustment
of patient accommodation,
were necessary to enable the
staff to provide adequate care
for patients.
Valleyview Chapel and Auditorium. Two senior nurses attended
a workshop on behaviour therapy, and the Director of Nursing attended an institute
on " Implementation of Change." Both were held in Vancouver. One psychiatric
nurse completed general nursing training at the British Columbia Institute of
Technology.
The Social Service Department operated at almost full strength throughout the
year. Workers were increasingly involved in group work with convalescent patients.
 M 68 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT, 1970
This brought the workers into earlier and closer contact with patients who have
potential for discharge. The position of Director of the Physiotherapy Department
was vacant from June to November, when a replacement was obtained. A part-time
podiatrist was attached to the Department.
The Occupational Therapy Department maintained its full complement of staff
during the year, and a good therapeutic programme was provided for patients. An
average number of 97 patients attended the centre daily. Classes were also held on
wards for those patients unable to attend the centre. Five volunteer workers contributed to this programme.
The Recreational Therapy Department, ably assisted by 10 regular volunteers,
provided a varied programme of entertainment for patients.
Business Administration
Regular maintenance and decoration of buildings was well maintained by the
Public Works Department.
The increase in cost of meals provided for staff, from 30 cents to 75 cents,
reduced the attendance for meals by approximately 50 per cent.
A 24-passenger bus was purchased for the Recreational Therapy Department,
to be used for taking patients on bus trips.
An accident prevention programme was in operation, and some improvement in
the incidence of accidents to staff was reported.
DELLVIEW HOSPITAL, VERNON
This hospital is situated adjacent to the Vernon Jubilee Hospital, where special
services are available as required. Medical services were supplied by a visiting
physician, part-time, and a psychiatric consultation service was provided on a regular
basis.
Ophthalmic and podiatry services were provided by visiting physicians. Dental
requirements were met by a local dental surgeon.
Admissions from the community averaged seven per month. From other
geriatric units, 51 patients were transferred in.
Three patients per month were discharged from hosptial. Private hospitals
are not available in this area, but the accommodation available in boarding homes
and guest houses has been adequate and satisfactory.
A good standard of nursing care was maintained.
The Director of Nursing attended an institute on " Implementation of Change "
at Vancouver as part of the in-service training programme for staff.
A full and continuing programme of occupational and recreational therapy
was provided for patients. Volunteers from the community gave valuable help in
handicraft sessions and in arranging entertainment.
Categorization of patients in accordance with nursing-care needs was completed
during the year.
Business Administration
During the year, responsibility for the maintenance of personnel records and
establishment control files was transferred from Valleyview Hospital to Dellview
Hospital.
The capacity and efficiency of the laundry was increased by the replacement of
some machinery.
 IN-PATIENT SERVICES M 69
An X-ray apparatus for taking miniature chest films, loaned by the Division
of Tuberculosis Control, was installed. This will provide a chest X-ray service for
patients, staff, and community.
SKEENAVIEW HOSPITAL, TERRACE
The demand for the admission of patients in this area was less than one per
month, and the patient population was maintained by transfers from Valleyview and
Dellview Hospitals.
Three patients were discharged to the community and three patients were transferred to Valleyview Hospital.
Medical services are provided by a local physician on a part-time basis. Special
diagnostic and treatment facilites, including surgery, are available at the local Mills
Memorial Hospital.
An occupational therapy programme, mostly in woodworking, was of great
value.
A recreational programme received considerable help from local service and
church organizations. The mingling of patients with community groups has been
of great benefit to patients.
Business Administration
Plans were being developed for total renovation of the kitchen, with a small
addition.   Foundation and other external repairs have continued.
Mr. W. E. Skillicorn, Supervisor of the hospital since its opening 20 years ago,
retired on October 31. The new Supervisor, Mr. Vernon Phillips, was appointed and
took up duty on November 16, 1970.
 THE
WOODLANDS
SCHOOL
The first consideration for any retarded child or adult is how to meet his needs
in his own home and community, and The Woodlands School's role is that of providing, primarily, a supportive service. The school helps communities who, though
they have a wide spectrum of services, find need for special programming or care
for an individual.
The school is fortunate in the planning that has gone into its renovated buildings, and which is being projected for new buildings. Emphasis has been placed on
privacy, on the opportunity to care for personal possessions, and on toilet and bathing
facilities that will permit training for a maximum degree of self-care. The availability
of new resources, especially Glendale Hospital, will bring some relief in the school's
overcrowding, which will permit Woodlands to carry out its role of training residents
for return to the community.
Definite attention was paid to improving the quality of personnel and the
delivery of their services.
During the year, a multi-discipline in-service education committee was reactivated to look after all aspects of ongoing educational needs of staff for the entire institution. The chairman of this committee is Miss Schultz, Co-ordinator of In-service
Education, a position newly created. Medical grand rounds were held monthly,
and the Hospital Unit had weekly ward rounds. In the Psychiatric Unit, comprehensive seminars in basic psychiatry were provided for all members of the clinical
teams.
In a facility the size of The Woodlands School, the efficient delivery of specialized services is dependent on adequate communication. Toward this end, a
number of committees were formed, responsible to the Superintendent through the
programme committee, which is the senior clinical and administrative personnel.
Minutes of Department and Unit meetings, as well as monthly reports, received wide
circulation among the staff. Probably the most consistent vehicle of communication at The Woodlands School was the weekly news bulletin, which listed the various
meetings, clinics, and other events for the following week, and has a second page
for brief items of interest.
The search for new and more efficient ways of delivering service was carried
out at various levels of the organization. The therapeutic community approach has
proven of considerable success when applied to the wards for severely disturbed,
and acting-out adolescents and young adults at The Woodlands School. In the
fall, one of the wards in the Training Unit became the focus for a multi-discipline
behavioural approach under the capable guidance of Mrs. Bernard, Head of the
Psychology Department, and had the complete support of other departments. The
Academic School programme adapted some of the methods of behaviour therapy
to their delivery of service.
Young psychotic and severely emotionally disturbed educable children were
able this year, for the first time, to progress at their own rate from ward treatment
programmes to kindergarten and primary class because of the adoption of an
70
 IN-PATIENT SERVICES
M 71
An audio teacher helps a retarded child through
the developmental stage in learning to speak.
integrated curriculum and consistent methods of behaviour modification. Through
a similar innovation begun last year, trainable children and adolescents were progressing through early developmental
programmes into a pre-community
placement programme, which will prepare them for boarding homes. X-ray
films are now read and stored at The
Woodlands School, instead of Riverview. A consultant radiologist from
the community gave us direct and excellent service, so that staff physicians
and consultants were able to receive
prompt diagnostic help.
A number of activities took place
this past year, in an effort to foster
more parental involvement. As in other
years, there have been two issues of the newsletter to parents. Visiting hours were
altered, and contain only a few restrictions. Hospital Unit residents can be visited
between the hours of 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Training Unit and Psychiatric Unit,
2 to 9 p.m., and without restrictions on the week-end. A number of wards planned
" open house " programmes to acquaint the parents and community with the staff,
programme, and the physical plant.
The Woodlands School has close liaison with a number of different faculties
at the University of British Columbia.    Staff attended workshops and seminars
sponsored by the university, and the
various faculties use The Woodlands
School as a training area for their students. Educational Medical, Physiotherapy, Social Work, Nursing, and
Physical Education students spend
varying amounts of time at The Woodlands School, from orientation tours to
field work placements.
Numerous agencies visited Woodlands during this past year. Some of
the senior administrative and clinical
staff were members of professional
advisory panels and boards of directors giving direct community service
through a variety of organizations.
The Woodlands School received an
increasing number of requests for groups to have orientation visits, but the limitation
of staff time and the interruption of resident programmes would not permit extensive
involvement. An " open house " for Lower Mainland Grade XII students was arranged in March. The orientation was presented four times in two days to a total
of 300 students. For the many others for whom no visit could be arranged, suitable
films were suggested, or referral to other resources that would provide additional
information in the field of mental retardation. Thirty-one children attended
" Summer Magic," a highly successful and most enjoyable playground programme,
operated by the Burnaby Parks and Recreation Department.
The Minister is an interested spectator,
on the arrival in Victoria, as patients are
carried from the Canadian Forces helicopter to a waiting bus, supplied by the
British Columbia Society for Crippled Children.
 M 72
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
PiSWMfs1ia:M;iP; -:::.:;.:_:; :::._ .s_
The Minister met the first flight when it
arrived at the Eric Martin Institute in Victoria, and posed with the helicopter crew
from 442 Squadron, Canadian Forces Base,
Comox.
The school's waiting-list, which stood
at 200 at the first of the year, was reduced by about one-third, as of September 30. In that period there were 61
names added to the waiting-list, and
142 admissions to the institution.
There was a decrease in the number of
30-day admissions in the first nine
months of 1970, as compared with the
same period of 1969. As of September
30, there were 305 residents in supervised boarding homes and other community placements.
There has been a general decrease in
communicable diseases at The Woodlands School during the year, particularly in the enteric diseases. A great
deal of credit for this goes to the public
health nurse, and to the continuous and perseverent health education given to
nursing personnel and the multi-discipline co-workers. Staff are aware of the
catastrophic effects of epidemics in the institution, and all departments co-operate
completely in preventive programmes.
In February and June a total of 48
multiple-handicapped children were
transferred from The Woodlands School
to the Eric Martin Institute in Victoria,
by means of an Armed Forces helicopter. This was a very humane
method of transfer for the children, and
was most economical in the use of
staff time.
The Carnival is an annual event in
May of each year. As well as the extensive participation of staff in this
event, volunteers donate a great deal
of time, and the surrounding community becomes involved in the parade
and the day's events, which are always
appreciated. The majority of camping
for Woodlands' residents during the
year was again on a day basis to Gold
Creek Camp. One of the highlights was the period of several weeks when nursing
staff volunteered their free time in order to provide for an overnight camping
experience for a few of the residents at the camp. Community camps were utilized
for some of the physically handicapped children, as well as some of the school
boys and girls. These community camp experiences were made possible through
the generous financial support provided by parents and radio station CKNW, New
Westminster.
Dr. F. G. Tucker (centre), Dr. A. P.
Hughes, and Dr. H. W. Bridge were photographed on the carnival midway as they
discussed the day's events.
 IN-PATIENT SERVICES M 73
TRAINING, EDUCATIONAL, AND TREATMENT SERVICES
The residents of The Woodlands School are divided into three functional units,
and the multi-discipline team approach is the basic concept in terms of training and
care throughout all three units.
The Hospital Unit, although an extended-care facility, also provides acute care
for physical illness as needed for the other two units. The nursing staff in this unit
provided a high standard of care, and with the help of other departments, were able
to conduct a number of programmes and projects.
A programme for 15 blind youngsters was in operation under the co-ordination
and direction of the nursing staff. Most of the emphasis was placed on self-care
skills, but the Training and Education Department augmented the programme with
motor tactile and auditory perceptual training.
Twenty beds were set aside in one ward to handle all the acute physical illness
for the entire institution. General anaesthetics were being administered regularly
at The Woodlands School for dental work. The pre-anaesthetic and post-anaesthetic
supervision and care was carried out on this acute medical ward.
The therapeutic community approach in the Psychiatric Unit has already been
referred to as one of the more progressive programmes introduced this past year.
An improvement of patients, an increased morale of staff, and a greater parental
involvement were attributed to this programme. During the year there was a re-
evaluation of the special-treatment ward for autistic children. One of the greatest
hopes in the treatment programme for the brighter residents is that of a half-way
house, and a more extensive involvement in vocational and rehabilitation programming.
For the first half of the year, Dr. Brooks, Deputy Superintendent, was carrying
the responsibilities of the Director of the Training Unit, as well as all of his other
responsibilities. On July 2, Mr. L. Leaf was appointed as the Director of this unit.
Emphasis in the Training Unit was placed on the development of training programmes which will help prepare residents of the unit to return to the community,
especially to supervised boarding homes. Alder Lodge in Maillardville has been
successful in meeting these objectives. Within the Training Unit a greater integration of male and female nursing staff on wards has provided a more home-like environment. Team nursing with the profoundly and severely retarded residents is
proving of value.
Out-patient assessments continued to be carried out four days per week, and
for the period January to September, 121 patients were seen.
The Medical Records Department processed over 900 referrals to medical
consultants. The institution of a podiatry service within the hospital area will improve the care of our residents. The clinical and chromosomal laboratories were
offering a high standard of investigative procedures, which was due not only to the
competency of the laboratory staff, but also to the liaison that has been established
between the laboratory and the Vancouver General Hospital, and University of
British Columbia laboratories. The school is particularly indebted to the Department
of Genetics, University of British Columbia, for their continuing consultative
services.
The Physiotherapy Department provides a consultative service to the nursing
personnel in regard to the management of physical handicaps, and to the types of
equipment that would be most beneficial.
The school is indebted to the Western Institute for the Deaf for the excellent
audiological assessments given to the residents.
 M 74 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
The Director of Nursing, Miss Curie, was evaluating the utilization of nursing
staff to determine if there were ways in which their skills could be used more effectively. There is an apparent change in the role of the psychiatric nurse and the
psychiatric aide at The Woodlands School, from one who primarily delivers care,
to one who has a prime responsibility for providing developmental training. The
Nursing Department has recognized their need for assistance from educators and
psychologists, in order to organize and operate these developmental programmes.
To support the concept of regionalized services to the retarded, a social worker
from The Woodlands School was loaned to the North Shore to make a preliminary
survey of the retarded in their community, and their needs. One of the obvious
needs revealed in the survey was the lack of co-ordination of services, with a result
that resources are not always being used effectively and efficiently.
The function of the Training and Education Department is to set up learning
situations for the residents of The Woodlands School. Field trips to the community,
and community recreational experiences, many made possible by volunteers, organizations, and agencies outside the Mental Health Services, increased substantially
over the last year. Seventy-five post-school-age residents, one-third with major
physical handicaps, as well as retardation, worked and earned in our sheltered
workshops. This year, for the first time, these steady workers enjoyed a week's
vacation with pay from the workshop. Regular reports of progress in vocational
training were instituted, and 18 residents received awards for their achievements.
Nonetheless, the disappointments and failures of some of our young adults who
have moved into the community promoted a searching reappraisal of vocational and
rehabilitation services. The recognized need for planning to integrate ward life,
workshops, training areas, and intra-mural jobs into a goal-directed preparation for
community employment resulted in a submission being made for a National Health
grant. This submission recognized the resident's need for complementary social
growth as well as vocational training. In addition to structured recreational programmes in our gym, swimming-pool, and games room, a " Drop-in" Centre,
requiring the co-operation of several disciplines, was enjoyed by many residents.
Community recreation was enjoyed this year by hundreds of Woodlands' residents
as they took part in such programmes as swimming, bowling, visits to zoos, and
professional sports events.
During the year, Mrs. P. Bernard was appointed Head of the Psychology Department. Her leadership and desire to introduce innovative dynamic programmes
had its impact on most of the clinical departments at The Woodlands School. She
has directed the department's time and efforts to ward problems and on finding ways
of increasing the discharge rate, rather than on psychometric assessments. To this
end the psychologists became increasingly active in group therapy, behaviour modification, staff guidance, and inter-disciplinary projects.
A total of 14,473 hours of service was given by the volunteers during this year,
in contrast to 9,521 hours in 1969. Part of this additional service could be contributed to the availability of full-time, paid stenographic services in the department
this year. To be effective, volunteers require special in-service programmes, and two
such programmes were conducted at The Woodlands School in the fall.
The Provincial Auxiliary to The Woodlands School continued to extend their
fullest co-operation to the volunteer projects of the institution. A great deal of
organization went into the preparations for the annual Christmas Light Tour, which
was enjoyed by over 600 of our residents. The CKNW Orphans Fund continued to
be most supportive of the special financial needs of various programmes within the
institution.
 IN-PATIENT SERVICES M 75
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
The establishment at The Woodlands School remained at a total of 924 positions. Some of the departments, especially Medical Records and the Business
Office, had considerable turnover during the year. The number of days lost due to
illness and workmen's compensation increased considerably. In the period of the
first nine months, a total of 8,106 days was lost due to illness, and a total of 540
days lost due to accidents.
Regular monthly meetings, held with local members of the Employees' Union
and the Psychiatric Nurses Association, were an effective method of improving communication between employees and management. The frequency of compensatable
accidents within the institution showed an appreciable decline during the year, even
though the number of days lost due to accidents increased. The programme of six-
monthly accident-prevention competitions continued and at the end of each period
a dinner was held honouring the representatives from the winning zones.
The Business Administrator spent a good deal of time with representatives of
the Construction and Design Division of the Department of Public Works, with
regard to planning for the many proposed structural alterations of the institution.
The plans for Wards 71 and 74 playgrounds were submitted and were enthusiastically received by all the members of our staff.
Further meetings were held with representatives of the Branch, and the Department of Public Works, regarding Gold Creek Camp. It was proposed that the
Department of Public Works provide the services, e.g., light, heat, water, cooking
facilities, and a mess hall, as well as some basic housing accommodation, and the
branch would endeavour to enlist the assistance of outside community services,
agencies, and individuals to further develop the site over a period of years.
The three renovated wards in Wing II of Centre Building were completed early
in the new year, and are now very cheerful and homelike.
The Business Administrator reorganized the parking areas at The Woodlands
School, and issued parking stickers, which resulted in a vast improvement in our
parking situation.
Funds were provided from the Patients' Comfort Fund for the purchase of a
special Bunny Bus to be used for the transportation of multi-handicapped patients
and for the purchase of 20 Cassette Playback machines.
The local Department of Public Works provided a doorway leading from the
Ward 71 playground directly into the ward area. This has made the management
of patients in this area much easier for the ward staff.
The Department of Public Works has installed one speed arrester on the
grounds, with the intent that if this proves satisfactory the remainder would be installed as per our request.
Five fire alarms were transmitted to the New Westminster Fire Department
during the year, four of these were false alarms. The Business Administrator met
with the Fire Chief from the City of New Westminster, and representatives of the
Department of Public Works, to discuss ways in which the number of false alarms
being transmitted could be minimized.
Part of the new fire-alarm system was installed, including a new master enunci-
ator board at the powerhouse and an enunciator map at the back entrance gate.
The various shops in the Industrial Therapy Department provided a variety
of custom items for use throughout the institution, such as special clothing, orthopaedic shoes, special reclining chairs for cerebral palsy patients, television stands,
and commode chairs. In additon, they repaired and maintained countless items of
clothing, furniture, and other equipment.
 THE
TRANQUILLE
SCHOOL
The past year was one that considerably altered the character of the school in
virtually every area. The accent was on change, seen as the culmination of the
treatment-team process, and permeation of the therapeutic approach, to training
and treatment to all levels in the school.
Tranquille, traditionally, was thought of as an area largely devoted to the custodial care of the mentally retarded. However, from the very first, the staff experimented with training methods and other programmes for the retarded. All the
patients for permanent admission to the school were first screened by The Woodlands
School, and most of them came as transfers from that institution.
At the end of 1968, regionalization was first suggested, and the patient progress
toward regionalization had continually accelerated until Tranquille became an independent training-school hospital. During the year, the emphasis within the school
was placed on training methods, with team participation in virtually all areas of the
.. ,, r_s      school's work.
The school is now in its regional function
as an independent hospital centre for the
mentally retarded.    The focal point of the
Jf ^fifes.- programme was centred on the pediatric
ward, and a special staff has been placed
there. The regional area is roughly comprised of Health Unit areas 1, 2, and 6.
During the year there were 26 permanent
admissions to Tranquille School, while 10
30-day   admissions   were   accommodated.
Also during the year 60 patients were trans-
The 300-bed Sage Building at ferred to boarding homes and three went on
The Tranquille School. extended leave.
MEDICAL AND TREATMENT SERVICES
The direction of Clinical Medical Services was assumed by Dr. M. A. A. Setty,
an internist whose efforts were largely directed toward the medical and extended-
care areas of the school. Dr. Setty is building up a modern pattern of delivery of
medical service to the trainee-patients, which has resulted in improvement in patient
care. He was assisted by a full-time physician, Dr. V. Neumann, and a part-time
one, Dr. Gordon E. Tomm. All the patients have had a physical examination during
the year. A very effective consultation service embraced all the specialists in the
area. Laboratory investigations were carried out at the Royal Inland Hospital in
Kamloops. Dr. Setty founded a Department of Electrocardiography. The Physiotherapy Department, with a full-time therapist, Miss V. Ornar, was of great help
to the patients.
Treatments at Tranquille were given both individually and in group settings.
Generally speaking, the medical treatments were given by the medical staff on the
wards.    Other treatments, such as behaviour-modification procedures, were con-
76
 IN-PATIENT SERVICES M 77
ducted by Mrs. Harmon and the staff; and other professional staff conducted group
therapy and behavioural therapy sessions.
Psychiatric consultations were given by the Superintendent, with application to
therapeutic procedures and treatment, and consultative services were extended to the
mental health centre and to other agencies and facilities throughout Kamloops and
the region. The Social Work Department was extremely busy providing psychotherapeutic procedures for the families of the mentally retarded who required this
type of service.
NURSING SERVICES
This is the largest department within the school. Directed by Mr. Alex Mcintosh, its operations extended to many areas of the school. In addition to giving
normal nursing care to the patients, its members were involved in social work,
administration, training, and in clinical teams. Members of the profession were
seconded to other departments frequently on a full-time basis. Much extra nursing
time was needed because the new focus on training took a great deal of time,
especially in behaviour-modification areas.
PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES
Mrs. Alice Harmon directed this department for the year and, in addition to
psychological duties, made commendable contributions to training and behaviour-
modification programmes. She was conducting continuous staff education and
seminars in training and behaviour modification; was a member of the clinical and
management teams, and provided consultative and educational services to the
community. Together with a co-author, she published a book on behaviour modification.
SOCIAL WORK SERVICES
This department is headed by Mr. Horst Maerzke, who was responsible for
the waiting-list, Out-patient Department, community employment, and the aftercare programme throughout the area, together with a therapeutic treatment programme, and also served as a member of the clinical and administrative teams.
GENERAL
During Mental Health Week, May 1 to 8, the school held " open house."
A large barbecue was held at the end of September. These, together with Carnival
Day, were the social highlights of the year. Carnival Day placed greater emphasis
on more participation by the patients, which gave the patients a much greater feeling
of satisfaction and achievement.
The school was grateful to Dr. H. M. Richards, Medical Health Officer, for
his services during the year.
A seven-day-week operation took place in the Laundry Department, with
approximately 54 trainees working in that area.
The Transportation Department had eight vehicles of different types and sizes,
which travelled a total of 99,848 miles during the year.
Half-a-dozen female trainees in the Housekeeping Department were being
instructed in working alongside the female building service workers in the Greaves
Building.
The Fire Department did its usual excellent job. All standpipes were upgraded, new hose replacement completed, and new nozzles and drip valves installed.
 M 78 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
Some progress was made in the installation of the fire-alarm system.
Public Works was able to make the necessary divisions on the top floors of
Main and Central Buildings to create four wards out of two.
The school Safety Committee is to be congratulated on its hard work in this
field, and a day-long workshop was conducted on November 23, involving committee members and a faculty from the outside.
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
YOUTH DEVELOPMENT CENTRE, BURNABY,
THE MAPLES
-John Fulker, photographer
The British Columbia Youth
Development Centre, known as
The Maples, provides a comprehensive and intensive treatment service for children and
adolescents up to the age of
17 years. It is organized in
three functional units — the
Family and Children's Clinic,
the Psychological Education
Clinic, and the Residential
Unit, which became operational in 1969.
Mr. Taylor resigned from the Board and a replacement was pending at the
year-end.
A board of management was appointed to administer The Maples in February,
1970.   The following constituted the board of management:—
Chairman—
Dr. J. S. Bland, Consultant in Retardation and Children's Psychiatric
Services.
Members—
Dr. H. W. Bridge, Director of Mental Health Services.
Mr. T. D. Bingham, Director of Programmes, Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement.
Mr. C. I. Taylor, Department of Education.
Executive Secretary—
Mr. D. R. McCallum, Business Administrator, Mental Health Services,
Burnaby.
An " Open House " at The Maples was held on November 8 and 9 and was
attended by a large number of lay and professional people. It was preceded by the
first formal visit by the Minister, who accompanied a Press Tour through the buildings. The staff of The Maples were encouraged by the interest shown by lay
people and professionals alike, in the extent and variety of services offered to disturbed children and their families.
79
 M 80 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
THE PSYCHOLOGICAL EDUCATION CLINIC
The Psychological Education Clinic experienced a successful year in the first
year of operation. The Maples School had a total of 55 children attend seven
classes. In September, 1970, we could only operate six classes, since we lost two
and one-half teacher positions. At the present time we have 43 children in the
school. The children came from a variety of educational and clinical backgrounds
and were graded according to their cognitive development and emotional state.
They represented several geographical areas, including Vancouver, Burnaby, New
Westminster, Coquitlam, Surrey, Richmond, and North Vancouver. The ages of
the children ranged from 6 to 15 years, but the majority of the children were between
the ages of 7 and 12 years.
It is always difficult to assess success, but one of the criteria is the number of
children returned to regular classes. In the first year of operation we accepted
children throughout the year and as late as April, but by the end of June 45 per
cent were able to return to the regular school system. This figure was encouraging
and surpassed expectations. Other examples of success are the increase in the
child's self-concept and self-esteem, which leads to improved peer, teacher, and
family relationships. The secondary effect of the child having a better concept of
himself is that others now find him more enjoyable to have around, and consequently
reward him for his new behaviour. It did not take very long before parents were
reporting that the child was a pleasure to have in the home, whereas a few months
previously they had wanted the child out of the home. The third measure of success is the number of psychosomatic complaints the child had while attending regular school, but no longer requires while attending The Maples School.
One of the main purposes of the Psychological Education Clinic is to try and
prevent school problems and related behavioural problems from developing, by
working with the child and the family before they reach the point that special schooling is required. The preventive programme consists of providing an assessment
service with consultation to the schools and other referral sources. Most success
was with the younger child, and after the age of 10 the success rate diminished
rather rapidly, demonstrating that prevention requires less time and energy and is
a most economical service to provide the community. The preventive programme
is not limited to the Lower Mainland area but includes the Province. Assistance
was provided to schools in a variety of areas, and a parapetetic psychologist consulted with schools on behaviour management, cognitive problems, and set up workshops. The last workshop on the "Alienated Youth and the Alienating Youth " was
of such interest that a repeat has been requested.
Efforts continued to find out more about the children that were admitted into
the school, which will, in turn, help with all children's problems. Several studies
have been conducted in the past, such as " Self Concept Changes in Adolescents
Following Behaviour Modification "; "Assessment of the Critical Dominance Theory
of Dyslexia as Measured by a Visual Auditory Integration Task "; "A Computer-
assisted Instruction Programme for Children with Learning Disabilities "; and
various studies on behaviour modification in the classroom and at home.
THE FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S CLINIC
Intake
The Maples Intake Committee continued as a central team, with representatives from each of the three units. Referrals to the Intake Committee of families
requiring the services of the Family and Children's Clinic showed an unusual de-
 IN-PATIENT SERVICES M 81
cline during the middle of the year, with some recovery following publicity in the
fall. At the year-end it was not clear what the reasons for such a decline might
have been, nor whether it represented a trend that would continue, but it seemed
certain that it was not the result of a decrease in the numbers of children and families
in need of help.
Assessment and Consultation
These services were provided to agencies, both within and outside the Lower
Mainland, which requested help with certain children or families, usually those presenting particularly difficult problems. A continuing service was provided to Brannan Lake School, and to Special Placements and Adoption Sections of the Child
Welfare Division.
Travelling Clinic
Several clinic staff members continued to provide varied services alongside the
newly developing Skeena Mental Health Centre at Terrace. These included psychiatric consultation to family doctors in Prince Rupert; training sessions and workshops with community groups in Prince Rupert, Terrace, and Smithers; consultation to school boards re classroom programmes. Assessment and consultation
services to the Coast Garibaldi Health Unit increased during the year, with regular
visits by two staff members to Powell River, Gibsons, and Squamish.
Treatment
Psychotherapy in its varied forms continued to be one of the principal functions
of the clinic. A large proportion of the families referred to the clinic required some
form of psychotherapy for one or all of the family members. When regular weekly
out-patient attendance was not possible, e.g., families referred from out of town,
experiments are being conducted with a brief, intensive treatment programme which
requires the family to live near the clinic for a week. A considerable amount of
therapy time is being spent with the children in the pre-school programme and in
the school, and with the parents of these children. It is in the area of the treatment
services that continuing staff shortages are being most keenly felt.
Day Programmes
The pre-school programme had two groups—one for children from 3 to AV2
years of age at referral, and another for children of AV2 to 5V_i years. Referrals to
the latter group dwindled during the year, and it was felt that this may be partly
due to a policy of integration of the disturbed child into the regular kindergarten
setting. Consultation and treatment services were offered to the children of The
Maples School, and were provided in a more intensive form to two classes containing children who are severely emotionally disturbed.
Camp
For the second year, a summer camp programme of two weeks' duration was
held for 18 children between the ages of 9 and 12 years. After much difficulty,
a site was finally located at Chehalis Camp, and it was staffed by nine of the clinic
staff, plus three volunteers. The programme was very successful and the experience
provided great benefit and insight for both children and staff.
 m 82 mental health branch report, 1970
The Community Team
The Community Team completed its first six months of operation at the end of
August, and evaluative reports were prepared by Mr. Ricketts, representing the
Family and Children's Clinic, and by Dr. Roberta McQueen, representing the Public
Health Unit 4 in Vancouver.
Training
Formal training programmes were set up during the year for mental health
nurses from regional mental health centres. The training programme lasted for
four weeks (an initial phase of three weeks, plus one week two months later).
A five-day " long week-end " programme was being devised for a group of
other mental health centre professionals, with an emphasis on family-group therapy.
Brief workshops were also held during the year for Probation Officers, homemakers,
special school counsellors, and volunteers.
THE RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT UNIT
Development of the Therapeutic Milieu
1970 was a year of steady development of the Residential Treatment Unit.
Two cottages provided a therapeutic living experience for up to 30 adolescents of
both sexes, and the third cottage continued to function as a Day Clinic. Late in
the year, an arts and crafts area was opened, which enabled us to develop further
the potential and talents of staff and teenagers.
An " education" programme was operated from February to May as an
integral part of living in the cottage. This was run by counsellors, who encouraged
youngsters to follow their own general interests. Many have since returned to
school.
On February 19, 1970, the second cottage opened, for a younger age-group.
It was staffed by more experienced counsellors, and all the lessons learned from
opening the first cottage were applied. As a result, this cottage experienced steady
development.
The Day Clinic has continued to run smoothly since it was opened in September, 1969. It provides a more structured programme, based on group-therapy
methods backed by participation in arts and crafts and physical activities, aimed at
developing the youngsters' artistic talents and recognizing their own potential. There
was provision for 20 adolescents, and the length of stay averaged four months.
A series of camping expeditions was held during the summer, which paid good
dividends in increasing the intimacy and interdependence of the group.
By fall the community feeling among adolescents and staff had developed considerably, and there was general satisfaction with treatment results. A follow-up
group was held each Wednesday evening for youngsters who had left the cottages
and who wanted to continue their treatment.
Columbia Youth Vista, a non-profit, tax-deductible society, offered to provide
extra facilities for the Residential Unit, and ran a successful Fall Fair following the
" Open House." This society aims at providing group homes to serve the needs
of the Residential Unit and Day Clinic.
Development of the Staff Group
A series of information tours was held to show professional personnel that the
programme was operating well, despite the preponderance of delinquent boys for
whom there were inadequate facilities.   The staff continued to run the education
 IN-PATIENT SERVICES
M 83
programme and to provide activities and outings for the young residents. The
board of management was formed in February and was seen as a confirmation of
the success of the venture, and as a source of further support. There was general
relief when the boys were moved out to the cabin near Golden Ears Park, and the
staff began to concentrate on restoring the cottage to a therapeutic environment
once again.
An extensive camping programme took place in the summer. Morale was
high, and the improvement in the residents was noticeable.
During the fall there was the " Open House," Fall Fair, in-service training
programme, and a deeper participation in the residential community. At the end
of a year's full operation, the staff had all grown considerably, as people, felt secure
in their ability to handle whatever happened, and looked forward enthusiastically
to further expansion and challenge.
Programme
There was a large measure of freedom given in the internal running of the
cottages. The residents recognized that freedom in the community must involve
responsibility to that community, so they accepted the rules voluntarily, and became
involved in a democratic process of relative self-government. A community meeting was held daily, in which young people and staff participated freely.
In addition to the community meetings, there were regular Gestalt Therapy
groups available to the youngsters. Staff also used these opportunities to work out
a problem. There was another group for staff each week. There were also talking
groups, one a direct encounter-confrontation type, the other a non-directive, very
relaxed, informal group, in which sensitivity techniques were freely used.
Part of the recreational play area at the British Columbia Youth Development
Centre, Burnaby.
 M 84 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT, 1970
Counsellors enjoyed " doing their thing " with the youngsters, and pottery,
weaving, knitting, tie-dye, batik, photography, music, cooking, sewing, woodworking, sports, trampoline, sailing, ski-ing, camping, and many other activities were
warmly shared. These activities usually provided opportunities for greater contact
and increased intimacy, and also for the working-out of aggression. The various
resource persons who came in on a sessional basis were used to train counsellors,
who have the real responsibility of caring for and helping the youngster to grow.
The needs of families were also catered to. The social workers held groups
in which the whole family participated, together with one of the child-care counsellors. Follow-up of these groups is continued even after the youngster has been
discharged from care.
At the year-end a parents' group had been instituted which could develop along
many lines, e.g., sensitivity experience, information of adolescent growth, learning
to relate better as couples, discussing child rearing in the modern world, or the
unit-treatment philosophy. The teenage group met with the parents' group from
time to time.
It was hoped to be able to have certain parents live in the cottage over a weekend as part of the family therapy.
Social workers also spent a lot of time contacting other agencies, arranging
admissions, discharges, follow-up, etc., and relating to the community.
An in-service training programme was run for counsellors. There was a rota
system to provide counsellors with the responsibility for doing all the cottage administration, and also for planning and carrying out the daily programme. The Cottage Head acted as a resource person when needed, but otherwise concentrated on
the over-all functioning and therapy. Each Friday was a training-day, when half
the staff from each cottage attended. The programme was repeated twice to cover
all staff.
Future Developments
In order to meet the objectives of the Residential Unit, there are some services
which must be provided to complete the process of taking in a non-functioning and
rebellious teenager and returning him to the general community as a functioning
person. To do this, an outdoor programme is needed to prepare unmotivated
youngsters for intimacy in relationships, for assuming responsibility for their own
behaviour, and for tackling their own problems. This would enable them to embark
on treatment when they arrived at The Maples, and their stay would be considerably shortened. Group homes are required that would meet the needs for discharge
from residence, or to provide placement for youngsters who wish to attend the
Day Clinic. After a time in the general community, when they have developed
perspective, two further services are required—one, a free school at which they can
learn at their own speed, with a view to meeting Grade XII educational requirements; the other facility needed is a sheltered workshop, where the youngster can
be introduced to work, and learn some money-making skills which will enable him
to become a productive member of society.
 PATIENT MOVEMENT
Patient Movement Trends
Patient Movement Data
mental
health
branch
  PATIENT
MOVEMENT
PATIENT
MOVEMENT
TRENDS
TRENDS, SEPTEMBER, 1970
Facility
Residential Programmes
Facilities for the mentally ill —
Riverview.-
Youth Development Centre..
Geriatric facilities, total	
Valleyview.	
Dellview.	
Skeenaview..
Facilities for the mentally retarded-
The Woodlands School _	
The Tranquille School. _	
Out-patient Programmes
Mental health centres, total.
Burnaby	
Chilliwack —
Courtenay	
Cranbrook (October, 1969)2-
Kamloops.	
Kelowna... 	
Maple Ridge	
Nanaimo   —
Nelson (June, 1970).
New Westminster	
Prince George	
Saanich 	
Surrey (Boundary)	
Terrace (June, 1970).
Trail   	
Vernon-
Victoria .
Riverview Out-patient Service3„
Youth Development Centre	
Woodlands waiting-list	
Tranquille waiting-list	
Sum of Entries*
24-12
Months
Previous
3,955
3,247
21
687
505
139
43
283
231
52
3,977
855
297
44
90
332
88
254
152
658
72
264
399
472
516
646
144
12
Months
to Date
4,008
3,276
49
683
461
165
53
312
257
55
4,721
660
269
355
131
160
343
375
104
16
232
613
249
208
53
135
450
368
481
539
89
69
Per Cent
Change
+ 1.3
+0.9
+ 133.3
—0.6
—8.7
+ 18.7
+23.3
+ 10.2
+ 11.3
+5.8
+ 18.7
—22.8
—9.4
+706.8
+77.8
+3.3
+326.1
-59.1
+52.6
—6.8
+245.8
—48.9
+ 12.8
—22.0
-6.8
— 16.6
—38.2
Resident or Case Load
12
Months
Ago
3,705
2,482
9
1,214
729
232
253
1,861
1,251
610
3,973
849
254
44
84
293
69
483
140
719
131
103
487
317
1,030
335
189
100
End of
Month
3,658
2,469
19
1,170
681
228
261
1,837
1,263
574
4,964
683
243
340
108
200
438
286
244
14
262
732
246
178
51
42
570
327
1,085
325
144
74
Per Cent
Change
1 Includes permanent transfers, admissions from community, and returns from leave and escapes.
2 Date in parentheses states date opened.
3 Does not include about 35 patients in the Centre Lawn out-patient area case load.
+ 1.3
—0.5
-111.1
—3.6
—6.6
— 1.7
+3.2
-1.3
+0.9
—5.9
+24.9
— 19.6
-4.3
+672.7
+ 138.1
+49.5
+314.5
—49.5
+87.1
4-1.8
+ 87.8
-59.2
+ 17.0
+3.2
+5.3
—3.0
—76.7
—26.0
87
 PATIENT
MOVEMENT
DATA
DATA, 19701
Entries
Exits
Facility
Total
M
a
.2
Q<!
s
o
fl
So
2*
p. i-l
§ f
a t-
t3.a
li
Total
w
O
oa
a
1
5
*n
Ct>
%
o
i-l
ll
<5.S
•5
ta
a
All residential facilities, total -	
4,322
4,010
3,276
55
679
461
165
53
312
257
55
3,555
3,346
2,782
44
520
412
96
12
209
179
30
617
558
487
8
63
44
18
1
59
53
6
150
106
7
3
96
5
51
40
44
25
19
4,385
4,052
3,306
37
709
495
169
45
333
242
91
2,044
1,935
1,846
25
64
53
5
6
109
94
15
1,676
1,517
1,334
8
175
141
31
3
159
111
48
150
109
8
3
98
63
32
3
41
20
21
515
491
118
Youth Development Centre	
1
372
238
101
33
Facilities for the mentally retarded
24
17
7
All out-patient facilities, total—	
5,987
4,809
660
269
355
131
160
343
375   ■
104
32
232
613
249
227   -
106
135
450
368
481
539
89
69
	
	
	
4,961
3,747
826
280
59
23
44
198
158
343
5
110
600
134
40
6
196
367
358
426
549
134
105
	
	
Cranbrook (October, 1969)2	
Kelowna.	
Nelson (June, 1970) _	
Saanich	
Surrey	
Terrace (June, 1970)	
Trail                                   	
Victoria  	
Riverview Out-patient Department...
1 Table compiled from actual data through September, 1970, and projected for the remainder of year.
2 Data in parentheses state date that centre became active.
 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
The  following  are   financial  reports   of  the  Mental
Health Branch for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1970.
mental
health
branch
  FINANCIAL
STATEMENTS
FINANCIAL TABLES
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence Each
Year, the Total Amounts Spent for Maintenance, and the Gross
Yearly and Daily per Capita Cost, 1960/61 to 1969/70.
Institution
Average
Number in
Residence
Maintenance
Expenditure
Yearly
per Capita
Cost
Daily
per Capita
Cost
1960/61
237.72
3,008.02
1,415.30
126.01
287.16
695.41
232.05
290.70
$1,313,678.32
6,775,567.11
3,637,555.12
542,556.16
518,591.72
1,754,500.08
448,792.02
417,856.55
$5,526.16
2,252.50
2,570.17
4,305.66
1,805.93
2,522.97
1,934.03
1,437.41
$15.14
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale—
The Woodlands School, New Westminster
6.17
7.04
11.80
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
4.95
6.91
Dellview Hospital, Vernon.	
5.30
3.94
6,292.37
$15,409,097.08
$2,448.85
$6.71
1961/62
241.92
2,824.58
1,351.62
250.33
284.90
736.29
230.38
287.28
$1,344,906.48
6,927,591.07
3,639,782.25
657,736.27
507,315.85
1,848,097.68
464,314.47
443,255.07
$5,559.30
2,452.61
2,692.90
2,627.47
1,780.68
2,510.01
2,015.43
1,542.94
$15.23
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.—
The Woodlands School, New Westminster
The Tranquille School	
6.72
7.38
7.20
4.88
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale...	
Dellview Hospital, Vernon	
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace	
6.88
5.52
4.23
Totals for the year 	
6,207.30
$15,832,999.14
$2,550.71
$6.99
1962/63
236.68
2,719.32
1,365.03
307.13
214.18
724.07
232.55
296.21
$1,371,120.17
7,058,027.01
3,817,685.18
779,642.07
478,229.75
1,939,191.04
469,458.08
441,445.13
$5,793.14
2,595.51
2,796.78
2,538.48
2,232.84
2,678.18
2,018.74
1,490.31
$15.87
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.—
The Woodlands School, New Westminster
The Tranquille School    	
7.11
7.66
6.95
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale 	
Dellview Hospital, Vernon	
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace	
6.12
7.34
5.53
4.08
Totals for the year	
6,095.15
$16,354,798.43
$2,683.25
$7.35
1963/64
220.63
2,791.99
1,306.35
433.92
94.07
737.69
236.51
292.83
$1,442,627.00
7,534,673.00
3,916,660.00
1,077,011.00
414,787.00
2,029,118.00
512,128.00
713,594.00
$6,538.67
2,698.67
2,998.17
2,482.05
4,409.35
2,750.64
2,165.35
2,436.89
$17.87
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale
The Woodlands School, New Westminster
The Tranquille School     	
7.37
8.19
6.78
14.41
7.52
Dellview Hospital, Vernon	
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace	
5.92
6.66
Totals for the year	
6,113.99
$17,640,598.00
$2,885.28
$7.90
1964/65
227.59
2,740.84
1,314.20
512.79
753.91
234.70
290.44
$1,573,366.00
8,054,536.00
4,501,364.00
1,509,947.00
2,351,885.00
553,985.00
510,679.00
$6,936.16
2,938.71
3,425.17
2,944.57
3,119.58
2,360.40
1,758.29
$18.94
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.—
The Woodlands School, New Westminster
8.05
9.38
8.07
8.55
6.47
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace	
4.82
Totals for the year __	
6,074.47
$19,055,762.00
$3,137.02
$8.59
91
 M 92
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence Each
Year, the Total Amounts Spent for Maintenance, and the Gross
Yearly and Daily per Capita Cost, 1960/61 to 1969/70—Continued.
Institution
Average
Number in
Residence
Maintenance
Expenditure
Yearly
per Capita
Cost
Daily
per Capita
Cost
1965/66
Riverview Hospital, Essondale	
The Woodlands School, New Westminster
The Tranquille School 	
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale	
Dellview Hospital, Vernon 	
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace..	
Totals for the year 	
1966/67
Riverview Hospital, Essondale	
The Woodlands School, New Westminster
The Tranquille School  	
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale	
Dellview Hospital, Vernon .—	
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace	
Totals for the year	
1967/68
Riverview Hospital, Essondale 	
The Woodlands School, New Westminster
The Tranquille School 	
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale	
Dellview Hospital, Vernon	
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace	
Totals for the year	
1968/69
Riverview Hospital, Essondale	
The Woodlands School, New Westminster
The Tranquille School 	
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale	
Dellview Hospital, Vernon	
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace	
Totals for the year.—	
1969/70
Riverview Hospital, Essondale 	
The Woodlands School, New Westminster
The Tranquille School  	
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale.-	
Dellview Hospital, Vernon	
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace	
Totals for the year..	
2,797.80
1,291.27
562.37
763.44
227.35
295.38
2,760.21
1,307.53
602.46
760.73
219.13
284.32
5,934.38
2,716.22
1,282.95
660.10
755.53
220.07
290.38
5,925.25
2,643.12
1,283.72
652.61
746.21
225.56
265.58
2,506.21
1,257.98
608.46
711.15
225.36
257.98
5,567.14
$10,230,637.00
4,981,190.00
1,876,093.00
2,510,228.00
595,532.00
551,447.00
5,937.61 $20,745,127.00
$11,162,462.00
5,376,492.00
2,267,399.00
2,668,056.00
635,710.00
589,492.00
$22,699,611.00
$12,111,825.00
6,001,180.00
2,813,051.00
2,948,516.00
734,800.00
666,762.00
$25,276,134.00
$13,072,972.00
6,364,354.00
3,096,131.00
3,165,707.00
808,169.00
696,355.00
5,816.80 $27,203,688.00
$15,423,584.00
7,534,683.00
3,593,393.00
3,698,227.00
922,330.00
814,091.00
$31,986,308.00
$3,656.67
3,857.59
3,336.05
3,288.05
2,619.45
1,866.91
$3,493.85
$4,044.06
4,111.95
3,763.57
3,507.23
2,901.06
2,073.34
$4,459.07
4,677.64
4,261.55
3,902.58
3,338.94
2,296.17
$4,265.83
$4,946.04
4,957.74
4,744.23
4,242.38
3,582.95
2,622.01
$10.02
10.57
9.14
9.01
7.18
5.11
$9.57
$11.08
11.27
10.31
9.61
7.95
5.68
$3,825.10 $10.48
$12.18
12.78
11.64
10.66
9.12
6.27
$11.66
$13.55
13.58
13.00
11.62
9.82
7.18
$4,676.74
$12.81
$6,154.15
$16.86
5,989.51
16.41
5,905.72
16.18
5,200.34
14.25
4,092.69
11.21
3,155.64
8.65
$5,745.55
$15.74
 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS M 93
Table B.—Summary Statement Showing the Gross and Net per Capita
Cost of Patients in All Mental Health Institutions for the Year
Ended March 31, 1970.
Gross operating costs—
Riverview Hospital, Essondale  $15,423,584.00
The Woodlands School, New Westminster  7,534,683.00
The Tranquille School, Tranquille  3,593,393.00
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale  3,698,227.00
Dellview Hospital, Vernon  922,330.00
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace  814,091.00
Gross cost, all institutions  $31,986,308.00
Less collections remitted to Treasury       2,116,207.00
$29,870,101.00
Daily average population  5,567.14
Gross per capita cost, one year  $5,745.55
Gross per capita cost, one day  $15.74
Net per capita cost, one year  $5,365.43
Net per capita cost, one day  $14.70
 M 94
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
o
0\
X
o
p.
<
a
w
Q
Z
m
CO
X
fa
Z
o
«
O
o
E
fa
4>
fa
<
SJ
hH
Oh
&
in
3
0
O
p -a
>
ca
B.
a
W
jj
>
P.
t»
H
^
ffi
3
H
5
fa
o
fa
Z
W
S
w
Hh
h.
fa
(/_
fa
1/1
z
fa
fa
X
py
u
fa
fa
M
a
o t-
l-H
rt if so tn m t- 00 vo 0
O VO O0 Tf
ts
rn cn d Ov
m
■&!■..
vo^vD\e«Mmoowt^vqn'*HcS'^^in_o
CO
Tf  O VO_ O
o\T-*odrivjDo.rirn   ' os 06 as as o-   ' th cn   "\o
t^
cn pi in i-I
Tf
8(3 o
l> CN                Tf fN         fM                       (N                       thth         0
0
cn      1-1
m
m                cn tn                           ot                                \D
CN
1—1
*tf
VO
vo
&>
«■
W3-
o.
vo^c^o*-HC-»cotneo©vo\oeor-coincntNcn
<n
»o m 0 rl
Tf
C3
oMo\'r->ocooNT-<r--f>.ooor-t~-fNi^os<N'o
»n
ON  CO  ID Tf
0O
„o g
c^coinvoovocor~~i-Hir_t--vo>n©<nv".©.Tfco
CO
tr- tn th t-
3*JS
socnTHsocosOtnasoi'^tTH-H-mtco      m^ho
VO
m t- as cs
cn
r- tn <n      vo cn      m      ncj^Nth      cn co      cn
VI
00      cn
CN
O  O V-
o
0\                eo co                           m                                tn
m
Tf
o"                                 t-h"                                                                                                  t-T
»n
«_■
*«•
tfr
1"°
vo     !
: m
Vi
vo
VO
co
VO
CO
CO
00
U£_
Ov
t-;
^f
»-J
y
0"
I>
O
0
8
a
Cm
n-
>n
so
sO
vO
o   .
rr
Tf
5«
«r>
t/3-
&*_-
tf_
^,fa
•5"
<
>.
o
•O ON
^
i    : 0    !
i    : 0
__,
__,
"S
M
m    !
0
V.
in
V
rtrj
fN
|
Os     j
m
\o
VO
>•
55 fa-
VO
00     1
cn
00"
00
Tf
j
cn    !
0
00
CO
s !_
a .2
«/_-
1
1
|
1
CN
-*
«■
Tf
to
s;2
a ot. fl
; co
CO
co
a.Hoo
! ^
■^r
Tf
rvices ;
pplies i
blicW<
epartm
j
i __?
00
00
Tf
! co
CO
CO
i^t
Tf
Tf
«5£o
:    1
1 tfi-
o^-
«■
TH    U
V 3
vOHr.ovor.wv)MOvOiHMhMin^r)    ;
CN
vo cn O cN
o«Nc3sT-'r-icoo\r-.t^*<NofNr~t^'r.r-ONtN    i
Tf
ov co m Tf
t-
r.oov.vor'VO»rNi-i"nr,'ov.ov.irtO\^    !
>n
r- tn th t—
CN
vOcOT-ivocNvoino\CNTt.-it^-coOO       conn    !
cn t- as oa
0
MTir)      >o tN      tn      cn CN 00 cn 1-1      cs 0
Tf
co      cn
Os                    oo cO                                 VI
O"                                       TH
Tf"
Ov
cn
v±
trt-
vie-
_
=3
CD
tH
u
«
w_
fl
<u
O
V
t«
a
•—«
X
rt
W
C
00
O
q
<u
S
a
E
c
1
>
p
c.
1
.
3
v_
fl
O
3
M
cr1
j:
O
"D
V
fa-.
fl
rt
1
a
E
<+-i
O
a
0
C
c
0
a
C
#<D
c
1
-2
2_
0     r.
&
c
«
tH
rt
CD
I-l
tu
0
ti
J
St
3
u
<r
O
u
6
W
a
rt
5
c
X
a
|
■a
\
0
•a
j.
.aB
CJ
l-H
3
<_>
'C
rt
rt
W
c
c
0)
s
3
<u
3 a:
.■y 1-
ss
a-a
>
1
Cl
c
c
a
5
1
T3
!j
ll
0
_2
c
c
S
a
rt
"rt *ci
c
c
0
t
3
•a
cu
s
eg i
» £
.a c
|«
V
fl
3
O
M           |
tO            cl
CD          3
C             5.
b i
0
m
\H
l-H
■o
3
l/l
•0
fl
u
0.
X
u
cu
u
i
c
a
>
£
1.
u
I
C
■g
2
cz
X
p
1
3
«
«
0
c
01
ft
0
a
fl
a
a3
c
c
3
a
■j
c
c
X
3
<
1
z
rt
ft
c
c
s
tu
s
0
3
ft
2
'3
CQ
Kj
3
<
 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
M 95
o
r-
X
u
p.
<
a
n
Q
Z
m
CO
n
H
Z
o
CN
Bi
O
fa
«
fa
H
1/3
z
9
H
K>
fa
fa
i-T
o
o
x
O
oo
a
z
<
fa
Q
O
O
fa
X
H
fa
o
H
Z
fa
2
w
H
<
H
00
fa
u_
Z
fa
fa
>.
fa
a
c
-4
cot^cScocSvome:
ovONTfvoocomcn
Tf
ct\ on «n
_»_*s
q^vOvoNifiinpioq^movnooeoHtH
y
Tf  i-l  V.
in
•^HW
r^ovi   ' pi vp oi Tf   ' wi h ad Tf wi ri d   'vd
Tf        '  t^
oi
rtr"^ O
cn th           t-Tfcs                    i-i               cst>
t-              th Tf                       cs                       co
et
so
U=r
CO              T-l
CO
Ov
o.
-v s
o\r-vooovTfcocoocSfSococsov)coo
CO
m Tf vo
CO
OS
.—i  fa
&      ft
Tf«ncoi*OfScncovoo\ovcn»-iTft-vovor-
CO
on co r-
CO
m
co CS o
VD
Ov CO t%          t- r-l  t^. in          VOi-«TfVOVOfSVO          CO
O
CO       ts
Tf
tn T-.           i-ivoco                    r-               csr^
on               cs m                        cs                        Tf
s
Tf        <S
CO
>n
so
vi"
r-"
f-
v>
to-
6Q-
<*S
•oo
flr-
rtOv
!     1 o
\ in
o
m
in
O
m
in
fl'-'
1 oo"
oo
00
S
a
i   ; co
cn
CO
i **
«■
«■
3
32
tj
•<
Ih
O
•o"er\
a10
§2
m
V.
in
C
CO
00
CO
CD
vo
V©
vo
>
fl
B -
1
ON
j
i
o\
On"
gS
CO
CO
y_-
1 "-1
3 «
s§
•a S^h-j
c p*51
.
j
I
o  o
0
ca.H O §
i> y
I>
ices
ies J
cW
cn   cn
CO
tr-  t-
j
t^
> ft~ &
i
Tf
Tf
Tf
V3-
«S£a
tj U
ONr^voOTfTfcocnofScSOoocSOWoco     !
ro
in Tf vo
CO
ID 3
TfincoTfr-cscooovooNOvcoT-.-^-i>vovo
oo
os co r-
T-
oc^ocor-i>rHTf      c-)Tft>csr-cscSi-i
O
CO CS o
cn
wifl
3 £
ON co c-       so ti t- tn       vOi-"TfvovocSvO          i
vo
CO         CN
o
m th          ti so co                    r»               n
fN
Tf            (S
vo
on^              cs m                        cn
iO
o ft
in
r-T
y
«■                                                                                     i
v_-
w-
Hi
I
fl
o
(D
ft
R
W
■fi
*rt
fl
DO
.2
.5
«
kH
5
E
>
p
i
3
ft
O
1
B
u
QJ
.3
tj
<D
5
O
<4-H
c
rt
.
O
*rt
u
off
1
fl
fl
o
O
_<D
ft
c
'5
.2
3
S 2
> S
ft
o
*
it
H
u
fl .2
3
a.
o
O
«
OQ
■fi
fl
ft
o
CD
-
.9 I
1
*rt
CO
C
is
CD   <L
ft *•
S fl
CD _te
I*
>   <-
1 >
Cfl  ^
1 i _.
CJ    H-
fl «
M   1"
V
.3
f
c
g
•a
fl
rt
-rt "o
§1
fl
.2.
if
TJ   a,
■
TJ
fl
3
O
oa       |
«T       J.
Increase
Rent ded
Board	
c
S
c
><
i
a
.i
0
s
1
1
1
I
3SS|S_..2SS5
oo       £
•S      *
TJ           K-
a
3
*T_?
D
c
f-
c
c
^
c
a
5
f
c
c
<
p.
c
ft
pq
<
 M 96
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT, 1970
o
o
C7\
X
o
s
<
Q
fa
Q
Z
w
OT
B
H
Z
O
CM
.—(
B!
O
fa
fa
o
o
«
oo
u
fa
fa
s
a
z
«:
Bi
H
fa
o
H
Z
fa
§
fa
H
<
H
00
fa
OT
z
fa
fa
X
W
w
fa
fa
co
<:
H
SO
ffifa-
-3S
a fags
Mi
a,2
t_SJS«
00
t/_.ftT
U  fl
a Ot
£ x
r*«-ir^vOv.QO«n1'or^i>coinoofntsoooo»-i
copooovoooocoOooTrvir^coi^Tfco^HO
OOOcOfNOvodoo     V rn » vi rt r. in 0\ h" ri
OOMth SOh SO TI ,-, ,-H
OV th SO th o\
Tf  CO
ON t-   ■
CO i-H VD CO O
TfOTfr^O'-ii-icot-corSOvOVDvDro
  4 Os Os Tf 00 <"- —
h CO V. K. i
efoCr
cs cs
Ov cs
od ri
TH ©   1—I
t-h      in cS
.i/."*Of.P-0*-i-facncOcocSOvovovo
■.i-ivoinocnoocsoNCTvinooTfincvovi-"
. voooOiOvi'to i>oocomi-HOfsor-
4* vd" th \n th th rn
■i OhH
■lovCTvinooTfmcvovi-"
t^ oo co >n i— o_ cs^ © t-
h" On th rH cn Oi
c— in
O   rt
m cs
■.si:
_Se.
Sol'
gi
3__9 2
Uh<H     CCi    >l   tH   &
> 2
se
HO
T3 «
So
<5 32
rt H
faO
.   «E
ffl c o
a> C g
a '3 §
».Sh
a
^ o.
2 3
aj u
00
M
T3
>
o
.
3
<
Oh
0.0.
o SS.2 tj
■s fl g js
 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
M 97
Table F.—British Columbia Youth Development Centre
The British Columbia Youth Development Centre expenditure statement covers
the following departments:—
General Administration for all units of the Mental Health Branch, Burnaby;
Family and Children's Clinic;
Psychological Education Clinic;
Residential Unit.
General Administration covers 43 staff (salaries, $256,476).
for General Administration are divided among the following units:—
The salaries
Mental
Health
Centre,
Burnaby
Family and
Children's
Clinic
Psychological
Education
Residential
Unit
Total
$64,119
$64,119
252,108
30,230
$32,060
105,814
20,164
$96,178
248,087
45,700
$256,476
606,009
96,094
Buildings and grounds	
$64,119
$346,457
29,935
$158,038
14,967
$389,965
44,903
$958,579
89,805
Totals                 -	
$64,119
M76.392     1       $173,005
$434,868
$1,048,384
Note.—The Family and Children's Clinic, Psychological Education Clinic, and the Residential Unit were
all placed into gradual operation during the fiscal year 1969/70.
Table G.—Expense Statement of the Valleyview Hospital, Essondale,
for 12 Months Ended March 31, 1970
Salaries, Supplies, and
Operating Expense
Vouchered
Expenditure
Services and
Supplies from
Public Works
Department
Actual Cost
of Operations
Yearly per
Capita Cost
$2,976,152
8,993
3,636
1,147
173,088
334,976
19,894
2,031
77
4,250
358
110,240
2,401
8,973
2,269
1,464
295
$2,976,152
8,993
3,636
1,147
173,088
334,976
19,894
2,031
77
4,250
358
110,240
2,401
8,973
2,269
1,464
295
86,051
$4,184.98
12.65
5.11
1.61
243 39
471.03
Laundry  ., —	
27.97
2.86
Patients' library _
Maintenance and operation of equip-
.11
5.98
.50
155.02
Occupational and recreational therapy..
3 38
12 62
3.19
206
.41
$86,051
121 00
Less—■
Increase in inventory from in-
$3,650,244
22,445
143
15,480
$86,051
$3,736,295
22,445
143
15,480
$5,253.87
31 56
..
.20
21.77
	
$3,612,176
$86,051
$3,698,227
$5,200.34
 M 98
MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
o
r-
X
u
Ph
<
Q
w
Q
Z
m
en
X
H
Z
o
:-
X
Ir*
O
P.
z"
o
z
e.
w
>
<
I—I
p.
CO
O
a
>
hJ
w
p
w
H
Ph
o
H
Z
pa
%
m
H
<
y_
Z
W
Ph
X
P.
P3
PQ
<
y:
ov Tf r- t—
ro
(N O
V2
rr-
CO VO
m
■n
CO
m
Ov
CSO\l>C©t"^CScOTfrfT-iT-HVD.-H©00©
■sr
CO  rf
vo
"*>n»r.rHijnoivd   "r-i      as th      ov cs ov
vd
r-^ vd
CS
T--VQ
(N                                     T-H   T-H   T-H                                      Tf                                     T-H    Wl
Ov
It
CO                               TH   Tf                                        TH                                         tn
Oi
©
#8
8.2
US
-*tOs^trt<STirt-^^rtrttr-OsTitr,'r-
sort<OTiasTiososTioiTHSooi--tosr-
-#
cs cs
CO
00
V*> O
CO
rt m cn -*t co Os t-      cn      vom      © co o\
M3
VD h
CO
= 1
so
so th ti      vo cn co                cn           rif.m
t-
T-l   CO
cs
cn                    CN OV                           CD                           CN
C*
CS
VO                                                                                                                                                                 T-l
68-
g.
Ov
eg-
<!?
■g^
fiOv
« rH
T-H   ©
©       |
«_,
&U
I
C- vo
CO      |
i i
j   ;
s
s
fi
a.
a
fim
vo'en
■^   i
■*
rf
o^
tfl-
Ol
cs
i>i u
i   i
<3f?
tfl-
<>1   Ih
p
u ca
^s
»Cv
T_)VD
0
"S
u
>
fiOv
C^i-H
co t*    :
!     ! Os
VD
s_?
w„-
so tn    i
:    i co
1      1 CO
1
o
©
i   |
©
©
fi
am
Tf  CO       i
|  CO
(N
CS"
OS3
t~ ei
6fl-           |
!   i *H
V3-
cs
tfl-
as
^2
-oSiS^
vices an
plies fro
lie Worl
partmen
r*
r~
r-
Os
tn
Oi
tn
Q\
tn
CN
*i &,___  ii
w
vi-
tfl
th ^
u a
-rJ-Ov2lr_C_Ot^Tt^-VOTtlnt*-OVT-ll/>
sOrfC>TiOsrHOsQSTlO\cnsC04rtOs
rJ
fS CS
OO
tT
tn ©
CO
rft-rirn-i-cnt-'t-      cn      v. co      ooo
C*
vd r-
CO
t3 fi
voth<-h      c^r. m"                Tf           cn" cN
CO
CO
3 (U
co                 cS Ov                      co
o
Os
o ft
-> X
vo
00
r—
tfl-
«■
tfl-
u
m
a
u
ft
M
W
M
#g
<3
Ih
<D
n
O
c
1
1
r
C
fl
.
cn
E
t
S
c
1
,£
a.
a
e
a
£
MH
CO
i
o
a
o
•a
c
c
r
D
"tH
c
0
p"
it
J!
i-
t
a.
QJ
a
i-
*«
a.
1
-
c
o
tH
B
£
CO
a
. 1-
1
C
•a
a -
1
i
'a
fi
fi
o
X
•o
tH
a
___ x ^
l
« U .*
C
U
c
ca
c
d
c
«■
<
c
=1
1
>
n
t-
f
*
1 E
1
4
c
s
u
1.
._
2
E
a
8
c
?
,1
fl
2
B
c
c
1
h
§
09
C
CJ
c
c
I
c
c
>
i
a.
c
i
t
s
1
P5
F    '
o
pq
t
o
fi
<
 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
M 99
o
r-
X
o
<
Q
PJ
Q
Z
m
en
X
H
Z
O
pq
3.
H
Pi
O
ft
W
u
p.
Pi
w
H
i-f
<
ft
cn
O
X
w
>
<:
z
ft
»
ft
BC
ft
ft
O
ft
Z
ft
S
w
ft
<
ft
00
z
ft
ft
X
p.
ft
ft
ft
<
°-0
go
fiov
tf T-H
Wt-T
sco
0.fi
5 *-
Bft-
c o 15 c
>    ftfiS    ft
)h  Q_X!  OJ
*S£0
o ft
a
O
t—   COV_T-(VOCSCT\>J-.OOTf©T-HCO©T-HCO
©, © cN vo Ov oo cs C\tn vo © Ov tn Ov oo vd vp
cN oo Ov    " t-h t-h f^    *    *cs©"cs"covdcococs
CN ©CNt-H t-Ht-h «__.__■.
OV_ *-"    Tf T-.
CN co
UOT-HVDr-UO©CN<NOvCN©VO>nvO'-HCO\
mr-oouo©cNvorHtsr-ovcN©ooc-ovo
c» © co t-h co oo rf th so tn th^os tr-^oi<o> rt
vfcSCN       SOOOrf oi as       t-Tcnvoc-^
Ov CS O CN co
©
VO ©
vc
m Tf
VO
fN
VD ©
>n
vt
tjfl-
♦«■
vo
Tf
r- oo
5.
©
CN VD
Tf  <N
+»
00
tfl-
V.T-H NDr^UOCOcscSO\CN©Ov«nVD<-i©
int^co«n©vovor-icNir-ovcs©cor-ov
OO ©  CO  rH  CO  t^ Tf T-HVOV.TfO\r-^CN©
tri CN CS"       vo" o" rf" cs" t-^       r-T cS 'O
i>"     !
CO CN
tr- oo
CN VO
rt  CS
cu   u
u ft ta
c o> y ■
EM
.IS
■a >,
11
SS-S.S
•a B 2 6 s -S I
e3 333 >. 72 -h 29 '
CA   Ch
.   o  c ■
a*
>ls_
*c3 5   ■ "w «
m ft o tn 'fi ■■
QJ fi -2 <u .2 1
fi o *2 fi tn fia
a> o 3 u fi 3
OCXOPQpq
fi a
P5W
 M 100 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
Table J.—Expense Statement of the Community Services for
12 Months Ended March 31, 1970
Mental Health Centre Expenditure Mental Health Centre Expenditure
Bumaby      $480,929                Courtenay   $40,225
Victoria        205,703                Cranbrook  24,150
Kelowna          78,804               Vernon  63,765
Trail          59,037               Nelson  Nil
Nanaimo          69,157                Maple Ridge  64,269
Prince George          65,420               Surrey  62,225
Kamloops          40,741                New Westminster.. 79,561
Chilliwack          59,801                Terrace  2,493
Expansion of Community Services  79,007
Grand total, Community Services  $1,475,287
Table K.—Expense Statement of General Administration for
12 Months Ended March 31, 1970
Expenditure   $834,558
Table L.—Expense Statement of the Department of Nursing
Education for 12 Months Ended March 31, 1970
Expenditure   $1,016,116
Table M.—Institutional Stores
Net undistributed stores as per Public Accounts  $148,358
Adjustments re farm profit       11,687
$160,036
Inventory adjustments, plus on hand, March 31, 1969     593,244
$753,280
Less on hand, March 31,1970     603,644
Net increase in inventory1  $149,636
1 The increase in inventory has been transferred to the following institutions proportionately, using the
1 vouchered expenditure " as the basis for distribution:—
Riverview Hospital (56 per cent)    _ _   $83,796
Woodlands School (29 per cent)  _          43,395
Valleyview Hospital (15 per cent)         22,445
$149,636
Reconciliation with Public Accounts, 1969/70
Table K—General Administration—
Salaries         $455,535
Expenses  379,023
Vouchered expenditure        $834,558
Deduct salary adjustments  37,212
As per Public Accounts       $797,346
 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS M 101
Reconciliation with Public Accounts, 1969/70—Continued
Table L—Department of Nursing Education—
Salaries         $975,479
Expenses  40,637
Vouchered expenditure      $1,016,116
Deduct salary adjustments  37,008
As per Public Accounts        $979,108
Table J—
Mental Health Centre, Burnaby—
Salaries         $349,550
Expenses  131,379
Vouchered expenditure        $480,929
Deduct—
Building and grounds  $29,935
Portion of British Columbia Youth Development Centre salaries    64,119
  94,054
As per Public Accounts  386,875
Mental Health Centre, Victoria—
Salaries         $148,714
Expenses  56,989
Vouchered expenditure        $205,703
Deduct buildings and grounds   3,704
As per Public Accounts  201,999
Mental Health Centre, Kelowna—
Salaries   $63,392
Expenses   15,412
Vouchered expenditure  78,804
Mental Health Centre, Trail—
Salaries   $48,436
Expenses  10,601
Vouchered expenditure  59,037
Mental Health Centre, Nanaimo—
Salaries   $43,000
Expenses   26,157
Vouchered expenditure  69,157
Mental Health Centre, Prince George—
Salaries          $54,584
Expenses  10,836
Vouchered expenditure  65,420
 M 102 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
Reconciliation with Public Accounts, 1969/70—Continued
Table J—Continued
Mental Health Centre, Kamloops—
Salaries   $37,248
Expenses  3,49 3
Vouchered expenditure  $40,741
Mental Health Centre, ChiUiwack—
Salaries   $43,806
Expenses  15,995
Vouchered expenditure  59,801
Mental Health Centre, Courtenay—
Salaries   $29,404
Expenses  10,821
Vouchered expenditure  40,225
Mental Health Centre, Cranbrook—
Salaries   $11,080
Expenses  13,070
Vouchered expenditure  24,150
Mental Health Centre, Vernon—
Salaries   $54,132
Expenses  9,633
Vouchered expenditure  63,765
Mental Health Centre, Maple Ridge—
Salaries   $47,376
Expenses  16,893
Vouchered expenditure  64,269
Mental Health Centre, Surrey—
Salaries   $43,126
Expenses  19,099
Vouchered expenditure  62,225
Mental Health Centre, New Westminster—
Salaries   $58,383
Expenses  21,178
Vouchered expenditure  79,561
Mental Health Centre, Terrace—Vouchered expenditure  2,493
Expansion of Community Services  79,007
Deduct salary adjustments, all Community Services  76,560
 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
M 103
Reconciliation with Public Accounts, 1969/70—Continued
Table C—Riverview Hospital (including rehabilitation
and out-patient services)—
Salaries   $ 10,976,206
Expenses       4,447,378
Vouchered expenditure  $15,423,584
Deduct—
Salary adjustments   $1,153,284
Buildings and grounds     1,484,848
Decrease in inventories  28,465
       2,666,597
$12,756,987
Add sundry adjustments, rent and board, etc. 133,271
As per Public Accounts	
Table G—Valleyview Hospital—
Salaries      $2,976,152
$12,890,258
Expenses
Vouchered expenditure
Deduct—
Salary adjustments       $327,612
Portion of farm profit  1,817
Buildings and grounds  86,051
Add sundry adjustments, rent and board, etc.
722,075
$3,698,227
415,480
$3,282,747
38,068
As per Public Accounts
Table H—Dellview Hospital-
Salaries 	
Expenses 	
Vouchered expenditure
Deduct—
$636,464
285,866
$922,330
3,320,815
Salary adjustments —   -   _
$70,176
125,977
1,038
Buildings and grounds	
Portion of farm profit	
197,191
$5,354
2,035
Add—
Sundry  adjustments,  rent
and board, etc.
Increase in inventories	
$725,139
7,389
As per Public Accounts
732,528
 M 104 MENTAL HEALTH BRANCH REPORT,  1970
Reconciliation with Public Accounts, 1969/70—Continued
Table I—Skeenaview Hospital—
Salaries         $495,855
Expenses  318,236
Vouchered expenditure        $814,091
Deduct—
Salary adjustments         $49,620
Buildings and grounds        137,409
  187,029
Add—
Sundry adjustments, rent,
board, etc.	
Increase in inventories	
$6,955
251
$627,062
7,206
As per Public Accounts          .. 	
Table D—The Woodlands School-
Salaries      	
$5,959,049
Expenses  	
1,575,634
Vouchered expenditure	
$7,534,683
Deduct—
Salary adjustments       $608,256
Buildings and grounds        473,170
Portion of farm profit  3,633
Decrease in inventory  1,135
       1,086,194
$6,448,489
Add sundry adjustments, rent, board, etc  65,705
Vouchered expenditure     $3,593,393
Deduct—
Salary adjustments       $253,212
Buildings and grounds        554,313
Portion of farm profit  5,969
813,494
$634,268
As per PubUc Accounts       6,514,194
Table E—The Tranquille School-
Salaries      $2,421,894
Expenses       1,171,499
$2,779,899
 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS M 105
Reconciliation with Public Accounts, 1969/70—Continued
Table E—The Tranquille School—Continued
Add—
Sundry adjustments, rent,
board, etc.         $31,722
Increase in inventory  654
$32,376
As per Public Accounts     $2,812,275
Table F—British Columbia Youth Development Centre—
Salaries         $862,485
Expenses  185,899
Vouchered expenditure     $1,048,384
Deduct—
Salary adjustments         $49,908
Buildings and grounds, etc. 89,805
  139,713
As per Public Accounts  908,671
Table M—Net undistributed stores (as per Public Accounts)  148,358
Special Warrants—
Special Warrant 8—Grant to Youth Resources Society  32,895
Special Warrant 17—Grant to Association of Mentally Retarded
of British Columbia  20,000
Special Warrant 18—Grant of the Endicott Home, Creston  35,000
Special Warrant 30—Grant to Kelowna Group Living Home
Society   12,667
Total expenditures (as per Public Accounts)   $31,139,352
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1971
1
785-87M404

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0373660/manifest

Comment

Related Items