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annual report of the DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION for the year ended March 31 1969 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1970

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 annual report
of the
DIRECTOR
OF CORRECTION
for the year ended March 31
1969
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY
  Victoria, British Columbia, February 10, 1970.
To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Annual Report of the Director of
Correction for the year ended March 31, 1969.
LESLIE R. PETERSON,
A ttorney-General.
 Department of the Attorney-General,
Corrections Branch,
Vancouver, British Columbia,
November 1, 1969.
The Honourable L. R. Peterson, Q.C., LL.D.,
A ttorney-General,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria,
British Columbia.
Sir,
I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Corrections Branch for the
twelve months ended March 31, 1969.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
S. ROCKSBOROUGH SMITH,
Director of Correction.
 DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL
CORRECTIONS BRANCH
The Honourable L. R. Peterson
, Q.C, LL.D., Attorney-General.
Gilbert D. Kennedy, Q.C.
Deputy Attorney-General.
SENIOR CORRECTIONS ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
S. Rocksborotjgh Smith, Director of Correction and Chief Probation Officer.
M. A. Matheson, Assistant Director of Correction.
C. D. Davidson, Assistant Chief Probation Officer.
HEADQUARTERS STAFF OFFICERS
F. St. J. Madeley,
Rev. W. D. G. Hollingwortii,
Probation Staff Training Officer.
Senior Protestant Chaplain.
R. V. McAllister,
Rev. T. F. M. Corcoran,
Supervisor of Research.
Senior Catholic Chaplain.
R. G. E. Richmond,
S. A. Thorvaldson,
Senior Medical Officer.
Supervisor of Classification.
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
R. E. FiTCHETT,
Personnel.
Mrs. M. M. Berg,
Catering and Services.
E. M. Pierce,
K. M. Richardson,
Training.
Probation.
GAOL SERVICE ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
W. H. Mulligan,
V. H. Goad,
Warden, Oakalla Prison Farm.
Director, New Haven.
E. W. Epp,
Warden, Haney Correctional Institution.
H. B. Bjarnason,
Warden, Prince George Regional Gaol.
W. Scott,
Warden, Kamloops Regional Gaol.
S. A. L. Hamblin,
Warden, Vancouver Island Unit
and Say ward Forest Camps.
O. J. Walling,
Warden, A louette River Unit.
PROBATION SERVICE A
G. J. Chapple,
Offker-in-charge, Chilliwack
Forest Camps.
DMINISTRATIVE STAFF
J. M. Armstrong,
O. E. Hollands,
Supervisor, Vancouver Region.
Supervisor, Fraser Valley Region.
A. E. Jones,
J. Wiebe,
Supervisor, Vancouver Island Region.
Supervisor, Interior Region.
R. G. McKellar,
J. V. Sabourin,
Supervisor, Northern Region.
Supervisor, Parole and Special Services.
BRITISH COLUMBIA PAROLE BOARD
0. Orr, Acting Chairman.                                                 M. G. Stade, Secretary.
Members:
Mrs. T. G. Norris.         E. Kelly.
Dr. G. Kirkpatrick.         A. Webster.
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 CONTENTS
Foreword-
Page
.   11
Chapter I. Staff and staff-training
Recruitment and separations	
Training	
Chapter II. Treatment of men
General
Population	
Juvenile admissions.
Discipline and security-
Social education
New developments	
Lay counselling	
Group counselling	
Religious training	
Community participation-
Education
Academic courses....
Vocational training..
Physical education	
Prison industries and farm production
Prison industries	
Farm production.
Specialized institutions
Alouette River Unit..
Forest camps
Organization.
Capacity and intake.
Achievement	
17
17
17
18
18
18
19
19
20
20
21
21
21
22
22
23
24
 Z 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Chapter III. Treatment of women
General
Page
Population  25
Discipline  25
Vocational and technical training  25
Academic education  25
Physical education and sports  25
Religious training  26
Recreation  26
Social casework  26
Group and lay counselling  26
Community participation  26
Narcotic Drug Research Unit  26
Paroles  27
Twin Maples Farm  27
Chapter IV. Health, hygiene, and safety  28
Chapter V. Community re-entry programmes  29
General
Type of paroles authorized (table)  29
Day parole  29
Day parole (table)  29
Work release  29
Work release (table)  30
Home leave  30
Vancouver Parole Services  30
Community involvement  30
Chapter VI. British Columbia Probation Service  32
Statistics  32
Genera]  32
Appointments and separations  3 3
Staff-trairiing-  33
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1968/69 Z 9
Chapter VI. British Columbia Probation Service—Continued
Page
Policy changes  33
Regional developments  34
Psychiatric services  34
Marpole Hostel  34
Chronic alcoholics released under a probation order  34
Search and leadership training (Porteau Cove)  35
Provincial probation offices.
35
Chapter VII. British Columbia Board of Parole
Statistical statements	
37
37
Annual Statistical Tables
42
  ANISTUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR
OF CORRECTION
Foreword
For the second year in a row there has been a marked decrease in the total
admissions to the gaols of the Province. The figure for the fiscal year 1968/69
shows a drop of over 4,500, or 32 per cent of last year's total. The policy of not
laying public drunkenness charges, which came into effect during the latter part
of the last fiscal year (January 1, 1968), was mainly responsible for this large
decrease in admissions, coupled with the wider use of adult probation. However,
it is of interest to note that in spite of the decrease in the total admissions of nearly
one-third, there was no drop in the number of 18- to 23-year-olds, the young-adult
age-group. This group has taxed our institutional accommodation to capacity and
were it not for the fact that an additional 150 in this category were placed on
probation this year we would have been forced to provide another institution to
take care of them.
There is no doubt that a large number of young adults could be dealt with
effectively on probation, with obvious savings to the taxpayer, if sufficient trained
staff were available to supervise them. However, the present probation staff, even
with a substantial increase in numbers this year, has not been able to cope with
the referrals from the Courts, so great has the demand been. Our statistics show
that during the four-year period 1965 to 1969, the probation case load across the
Province has doubled to reach an all-time high of 5,547, well over twice the daily
average population of all the gaols and correctional institutions in the Province.
It is obvious, therefore, that to increase the probation services to the Courts we
must attract and train more staff. As men and women with the desired qualities
and educational training are much in demand, we must be in a position to offer
salaries and working conditions that compare favourably with those of other professions and agencies.   At the present time we are not able to do this.
To lighten the load of the Haney Correctional Institution and New Haven (the
two institutions providing training programmes for the young-adult offender) so
that they can spend more time with the more difficult, hard-core offender, two
short-term camp programmes were instituted at Boulder Bay on Alouette Lake and
at Centre Creek in the Chilliwack River Valley. These two experimental programmes stressing physical challenge and achievement were modelled on earlier
experiments in search and leadership training with probationers conducted during
the summers of 1964 to 1968. These summer courses have shown beneficial results
and it was felt could be extended. It is too early as yet to say what the long-term
results of the two year-round camps will be in successfully dealing with a selected
segment of the young-adult offender population. Much will depend on the expertise
of the Central Classification Committee, who have the difficult task of selecting
candidates for this demanding programme, and, of course, on the highly trained
camps' staff responsible for providing the leadership.
People constitute the most important element in any correctional system.
Even in an age of automation and advanced technology it is still men and not
buildings and equipment that are required to change attitudes and behaviour. And
men with the level of character and personality necessary to succeed in this type
11
 Z 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
of work—able to withstand the frustrations and pressures, and often physical
danger—are hard to come by. The turnover of basic-grade officers in the Gaol
Service, though less than last year, was nearly 20 per cent, which means that much
costly time is spent in training officers who do not remain. To attract and retain
able young men who are prepared to make a career of this work is most difficult
when the rewards to be earned are expressed more freely in terms of personal satisfaction to be gained than in financial returns.
I am pleased to be able to report the increased use being made of community
re-entry programmes this year. There was a 26-per-cent increase in the use of
day parole, and a start was made in introducing a work-release programme and
home leaves for young-adult offenders. Tables detailing the results of these programmes are to be found in the body of this Report. It is felt that to be really
effective, work-release should be introduced as a sentencing alternative, available
to the Courts, rather than an administrative procedure as at present. In suitable
cases an offender could be ordered to attend a prison at night or on the week-end
for a stated period, while working during the day. Under the present system the
offender frequently loses his job going through the Court process and another has
to be found him, usually by the prison staff, before he can be placed on a work-
release programme.
Home leaves of up to 10 days for selected young-adult offenders have been
quite successful. The objective of the home-leave programme is to improve and
develop family relations. The leaves are carefully planned ahead of time with a
field probation officer reporting to the institution on the home situation and the
desirability for such a visit. When approved, the trainee reports to the field officer
on arrival at his home town and maps out a schedule with him. This usually includes
interviewing prospective employers, attending counselling sessions with his wife,
if he is married, and so on.
A growing number of volunteers, both individually and in groups, are becoming
involved in correctional work, particularly with the young-adult offender. These
contacts are proving most beneficial. Originally confined more to the young offender
on probation, or groups visiting prisons to put on a show, they are now extending
into areas involving lay counselling, hobby craft instruction, shopping trips for
female prisoners prior to release, tutoring individuals enrolled in correspondence
courses, and a wide variety of interest programmes.
The volunteers are usually selected and screened by their own organizations
beforehand, and once appointed must agree to attend regularly either weekly or bimonthly as required. They must be prepared to undergo a training and orientation
programme prior to undertaking their duties. This type of organized volunteer
assistance from community people frequently has a marked effect on even the most
difficult and recalcitrant young offender and can be a most rewarding experience
for the volunteer. I foresee an increasing role for the carefully selected, mature,
adult volunteer in corrections, particularly in the field of probation and parole where
there is a great need for acceptance of the offender by the community.
Increasing effort is being directed toward making prison a more exacting and
meaningful experience. Offenders are committed to prison as punishment, not for
punishment. It is, therefore, essential, that, whether young or old, they gain some
direction and assistance in fitting them for their eventual return to society. Some
are not prepared to accept any assistance and remain cynical and aloof to all
attempts to help them. However, they must still pull their weight in contributing to
the daytime work programme of the institution, and if unwilling, are made to do so,
but they take little part in any voluntary programmes that are designed for their
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1968/69 Z 13
welfare. Others willingly participate in programme and conform to all requirements
while in prison. Those in this group require considerable support and assistance on
the outside if the conformity they learnt in prison is to be maintained once they
return to society. Prison work programmes are roughly divided into four categories:—
(1) Production.—Producing for the needs of prison (food and clothing) and
manufacturing items required by other Government departments (auto
licence-plates, highway signs, etc.), as well as an extensive forestry and
park maintenance programme.
(2) Maintenance.—Providing all the institution services (including in some
cases construction of buildings) required by a population of over 2,000
men and women.
(3) Vocational Training.—Instruction in over 15 trades. Vocational training
is usually confined to the young-adult offender capable of learning a
skilled trade.
(4) Formal Education.—During the day, these programmes are reserved for
the young and those older men and women who are semi-illiterate and
unable to communicate effectively. During the evening an increasing
range of educational opportunities is being offered to all those interested
in participating, from academic upgrading to courses in first aid, log scaling, mining, and human behaviour. With the co-operation of many local
School Boards, these classes are given by visiting teachers from the community. In one instance the men are attending the normal night-school
programme in a nearby town and mixing with the public. In another
institution, two nuns from a teaching order visit on four days a week for
two hours to hold classes in academic upgrading. This is part of our
correctional programme which I hope can continue to expand. To be
effective it requires trained and experienced teachers of a high calibre,
for those under instruction are for the most part school failures and
drop-outs.
" Men must be taught as if you taught them not,
And things unknown proposed as things forgot."
—Alexander Pope.
Turning to women offenders, you will note from the statistics that there has
been an even-larger decrease in the number of women admitted than men. Female
admissions dropped by over 50 per cent, and the percentage of Indian women
admitted fell from 40 per cent of the total last year, to 20 per cent of this. However,
an interesting fact is, that whereas the age-group 23 and under represented 26 per
cent of the total admissions last year, this year it represented 41 per cent of the total.
This has heightened the interest shown in the proposed amendment to Federal
legislation which would provide a definite-indeterminate type of sentence for female
offenders under 21, with release on parole under supervision, similar to that in force
for young males. Preparations are already under way to devise a programme of
training suitable for these young women at the Women's Unit at Oakalla, should
the new proposal become law in the coming fiscal year.
The inadequacy of the present form of the definite-indeterminate sentence as it
applies to young-adult male offenders was discussed in last year's Report. It was
pointed out that a completely indeterminate sentence of two years less one day
would overcome the present apparent disparity in sentencing practice. As it now
stands, one youth can receive 12 months definite and 12 months indeterminate for
theft of an auto, while another youth appearing before another Court could equally
well receive three months definite and six months indeterminate for a similar offence
 Z 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
—the two youths both being sent to the same institution for training following committal. If it is felt that flexibility in sentencing is necessary for this type of offender,
considered to be in need of training, then it should be in terms of making the punishment fit the offender rather than the offence. It is asking the impossible to expect
correctional personnel to produce any lasting results if they are given insufficient
time to complete the job. One youth may take much longer to change his ways
than another, but this is seldom discernible in Court. This aspect of sentencing was
discussed with the Magistrates at their Annual Conference in Trail this year. It was
suggested that the most effective sentence from a training point of view is a short
definite one followed by a lengthy indeterminate portion. This allows the Central
Classification Committee sufficient flexibility to transfer those young adults requiring
a short, intensive period of training to programmes such as that at Boulder Bay or
Centre Creek, where they would be released on parole in from four to six months'
time. This type of sentence would also be suitable for the youth requiring a lengthy
period of retraining at Haney, New Haven, or Oakalla, for he could be retained at
these institutions well into the indeterminate portion of his sentence if his response
to training was slow and he was not ready for release.
Surely the ultimate objective must at all times be to return a former offender
to the community as well prepared to lead an honest and a useful life as is possible.
The present situation in regard to the treatment of alcoholics is detailed in
the body of this Report under the heading of " Specialized Institutions." Until such
time as municipalities are prepared to provide the necessary medical service required
under the new legislation, little more can be done. The fact that the chronic alcoholic is no longer being arrested and charged does not remove the problem. Those
agencies working in the " skid road " areas are greatly concerned with the conditions existing there during this interim period. It is to be hoped that in particular
the City of Vancouver, where the problem is greatest, moves quickly to set up at
least a temporary Detoxication Centre so that chronic alcoholics can be medically
examined and those in need of treatment brought before the Courts and an order
made for their retention at the Alouette River Unit. As for the unit itself, its
development continues, and this year a start was made on the construction of a new
kitchen and stores building which will be a most worth-while addition to the
present complex.
It is gratifying to be able to report that the site plan for the new Remand
Centre at Coquitlam was completed by the end of the fiscal year and the initial
planning of the structure itself is now under way. This institution, when completed,
will house all waiting-trial prisoners for the Lower Mainland now being held in
Oakalla, and will serve also as an admissions and classification centre for the same
area. As most of the problems associated with Oakalla stem from the expanding
waiting-trial population and the constant movement of prisoners to and from Court,
the advent of the new Remand Centre will be greeted with enthusiasm. At the
present time a daily average population of over 300 men and women are in the
process of going through the Courts. Added to this is a group of sentenced prisoners who have a 30-day waiting period in which they can appeal before commencing
their sentence.
Many of this latter group have received sentences of from two years to life
imprisonment and are awaiting the completion of their appeal period before they
can be transferred to the penitentiary to commence serving their sentence. Included
amongst these are some highly dangerous men of the professional criminal class
looking for an opportunity to escape before the gates of the penitentiary close upon
them. To hold these men securely in the accommodation available at Oakalla and
at the same time offer them any freedom of movement within the prison is almost
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1968/69
Z 15
an impossibility. It is little wonder that prisoners in this category frequently become upset and at times suicidal. A modern, secure prison with adequate facilities
for visitors, interviews with lawyers, correspondence, exercise, library, and a place
where a man can prepare his case for trial will be a great step forward in the
humane treatment of waiting-trial prisoners. This new prison will not be a place
for treatment and rehabilitation, but a secure, functional holding unit, where men,
many of them as yet unconvicted of any crime, can be treated as befits a citizen
before the Criminal Courts. It is planned that the same institution will house a
classification centre where those who have received a sentence can be interviewed,
medically examined, and classified to the facility best suited for them to serve their
sentence. It is hoped, too, that being located close to Riverview Hospital it will
be possible to use some of that hospital's facilities to institute a ward for the care
of disturbed prisoners not sufficiently mentally ill to warrant committal to a mental
hospital, yet requiring specialized treatment for a limited period of time. This
would help considerably in dealing with an increasing number of emotionally disturbed young adults, many of them grossly inadequate and unable to withstand
the regimen of prison.
 Chapter I.   Starr and star! training
Recruitment and separations
The total authorized permanent complement for the Gaol Service this year
amounted to 1,143, an increase of six. This increase over last year was accounted
for by the addition of two nurses to the Gaol Service Hospital at Oakalla and four
Security Officers to the Haney Correctional Institution. The two extra nurses now
provide round-the-clock nursing care at the prison hospital. At the Haney Correctional Institution, the four new positions are being used to supervise the Remand
Unit there for juveniles who have been raised to Adult Court.
A total of 218 staff was appointed to the permanent ranks of the Gaol Service
to fill resignations and the additional positions added to the establishment. However,
the over-all separation rate dropped from last year's all-time high of 25.4 per cent
to 19 per cent. This turnover, amounting to 200 resignations, was concentrated at
the Security Officer level. The low initial salary of Security Officers continues as
the major factor in an extremely high separation rate at this rank. It is hoped
that steps can be taken to alleviate this waste of training effort and loss of
manpower.
Training
The Training Academy, opened in September, 1967, has now completed its
second year of operation. This year it was involved in training 173 officers as
shown hereunder:—
Staff by Institution and Rank at Training Academy
Institution
Security
Officers
Correctional
Officers
Principal
Officers
Total
Oakalla Prison Farm	
Haney Correctional Institution-
Alouette River Unit 	
New Haven 	
Vancouver Island Unit	
Prince George Regional Gaol	
Kamloops Regional Gaol	
Chilliwack Forest Camps	
Headquarters	
Totals	
38
34
6
1
11
14
10
5
119
10
8
2
3
5
3
1
1
53
48
11
2
16
21
13
8
1
21
33
173
In line with the changing concepts in corrections toward the use of camp facilities and closer staff-inmate relationships, the training given staff is becoming more
action- and experience-oriented.
Six Security Officer courses, each of six weeks' duration; one Correctional
Officer course of two weeks' duration; and two Principal Officer courses, each of
three weeks' duration, were completed for a total of 34,880 man-hours.
In addition to these training academy courses, the following specialized
courses and conferences were held at various locations throughout the year:—
(1) Food Service Officers'Course.
(2) Search, rescue, and survival training.
(3) Courses in fire-fighting techniques.
(4) A Medical Officers' Conference.
(5) A Staff Training Officers'Conference.
16
 Chapter II.   Treatment of men
General
Population
The daily average number of male inmates in institutions and camps was 2,197,
a drop of almost 100 from last year's average of 2,291. This is the first decrease in
the prison population for three years. Both the changes in policy on arresting
alcoholics, plus the rapid and continuous increase in probation case loads, can be
credited with this trend reversal.
There was a total of 9,279 male admissions for all receiving gaols, a drop of
31 per cent from last year's total of 13,390.
The following table illustrates the drop for the receiving gaols, especially at
Oakalla, which no longer is processing chronic alcoholics:—
Male Admissions to Receiving
Gaols
1967/68
1968/69
Difference
Per Cent
Difference
of 1967/68
Total
9,072
894
1,984
1,227
213
5,816
786
1,539
1,018
120
3,256
108
445
209
93
—36
—12
—22
—17
—44
Totals
13,390
9,279
4,111
—31
Juvenile admissions
The number of juveniles admitted to adult receiving institutions was 180, a
reduction of 27 from last year and the second consecutive year in which juvenile
admissions have decreased. This undoubtedly illustrates the wider range of preventive and probation services available to the Courts.
Discipline and security
The number of escapes from both institutions and forest camps dropped
significantly for the second consecutive year. This year's total was 124, as compared
to last year's 156 and the previous year's 164.
The number of infractions against Gaol Rules and Regulations rose 17 per
cent this year. The bulk of the increase was at Oakalla, which is used to house the
most aggressive and dangerous segment of the inmate population.
The Remand Wings at Oakalla, which were the scene of several major disturbances last year, experienced no problem this year. However, the most significant
change for the year in inmate discipline occurred at the Haney Correctional Institution, where there was a decrease of 26 per cent in disciplinary infractions.
A high rate of attempted suicides and self-inflicted injuries continued at Oakalla.
Fortunately, the number of actual suicides remained at three for the year. Oakalla's
success at coping with this problem is indeed to be commended. The 12-cell observation unit established two years ago for cases considered to be suicidal has proven
to be most effective.
17
 Z 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The total number of assaults upon staff throughout the Service decreased by
half this year to a low of 20. Considering that only two years ago assaults on staff
numbered 69, this marks a significant decline. The calibre of leadership displayed
by staff, their more-effective methods of control, and greater awareness of developing
problems have done much to create a more humane and stable climate, both in
institutions and camps.
Social education
New developments
During the year, extensive planning has taken place, resulting in the reorganization of the Haney Correctional Institution programme along the House lines
followed in the Borstal System of training. Basically, this involves a Housemaster
being in charge of each 50-man living unit at the institution. This Housemaster is
responsible for the total training programme of the trainee and prepares all reports
necessary for presentation of the case to the institutional Review Board. This
Review Board has been established to study cases being considered for parole and
must place its stamp of approval on each individual case before the trainee is granted
an appearance before the Parole Board. Both these changes have helped a great
deal in overcoming the largeness of the institution and in breaking down the communication barriers between staff and trainees. In effect, this institution is now
operating on the basis of eight small treatment units, with a Housemaster responsible
for the over-all co-ordination and planning within each unit.
One further change in organization at the Haney Correctional Institution was
the reclassification of Counsellors to Probation Officers. The current Counsellors
are being enrolled in the Probation Officers' Orientation Course, two at a time, in
order to qualify them as Probation Officers.
This establishment of Probation Officers in a young-adult training institution
has assisted greatly in preparing the young adults for re-entry into the community,
and has improved communication between the institution and the Probation Field
Service.
Lay counselling
All institutions reported continuing progress in their lay-counselling programmes. Of particular note is the development of lay counselling on a voluntary
basis in the Remand Units at Oakalla, priority being given to first offenders.
At the Haney Correctional Institution, lay counselling has continued to be a
responsibility of all House staff members. Each is assigned a case load of approximately six trainees, with the Housemaster making the assignments according to
the needs of the trainee and the individual skills of the staff member. The lay
counsellor is closely involved in decisions affecting any changes in the trainee's
programme and in consideration of parole readiness. In addition, lay counsellors
contribute to the report prepared by the Housemaster when a case is presented to
the British Columbia or National Board of Parole.
The regional gaols are all using lay counselling. Each inmate serving a sentence of 30 days or longer is assigned a specific officer as his lay counsellor.
Group counselling
Group counselling has continued as one of the most widely used correctional
methods in both institutions and forest camps. As in the past, Correctional Officers
provide the leadership for these groups.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1968/69
Z 19
At the Haney Correctional Institution, consistent with the redefinition of roles
and responsibilities noted above, group counselling has become increasingly the
responsibility of the House. The focus of these group sessions is on problem
solving. Consistent with the reality therapy approach, group leaders are encouraged
to focus on day-to-day problems of group members. Problems involving institutional behaviour or adjustment give immediacy to the groups' problem-solving
efforts. Regular community meetings involving all of the trainees in a House are
held weekly. The primary purpose of the larger community meeting is the development of individual and social responsibility among trainees.
Group marital counselling with trainees continued throughout the year, involving both trainees and their wives on a voluntary basis. These groups provide
an opportunity to deal both with many concerns young couples have regarding
marriage and with some of the effects upon the relationship of the offence and
incarceration of the husband.
At New Haven, group counselling continues to be carried out on three afternoons a week during working-hours on a compulsory basis.
In the regional gaols, encouraging developments were reported on the continuing use of group counselling on both a compulsory and voluntary basis.
Religious training
Two full-time and 17 part-time chaplains, under the supervision of two Senior
Chaplains, serve the corectional institutions of the Province.
Chaplains are available both for worship, religious instruction, all forms of
counselling, and pre-release assistance. New admissions are visited as are those
in hospital or isolation. In fact, there are few areas within an institution in which
the chaplain does not become deeply involved. By working with community
groups, chaplains have done much to lessen the gap between the institution and
the community.
One camp chaplain reports his most effective contact has been through direct
involvement in the work programme, working alongside the trainees during the
day, eating lunch with them, and by informal chats with individuals. Whatever the
means used, the chaplain is often able to develop a very close relationship with
an inmate and provide the necessary impetus to bring about change.
Community participation
Oakalla, being located within the largest urban area in the Province, has
received the greatest attention from the public. During the year, 41 groups of
interested citizens and organizations visited the institution for organized tours. In
addition, some 215 visits were made to the institution by volunteer groups from
the community. Amongst those organizations visiting were: Alcoholics Anonymous sponsors, job therapy volunteers, leaders and workers from the Vancouver
Indian Centre, students from the University of British Columbia, and members of
the Elizabeth Fry Society, the Legion of Mary, the John Howard Society, St.
Andrews Wesley Church, and the Mormon Missionary. In addition, some 15
individuals from the community assisted in specialized functions. These were
mainly school teachers, recreation coaches, and discussion-group leaders.
The Haney Correctional Institution Cadet Corps placed 13th out of 43 Cadet
Corps in the Province. Twenty-six cadets attended a 10-day summer camp at
Albert Head on Vancouver Island.
 Z 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
As in the past, A.A. groups have continued at all facilities with a,high level
of assistance provided by volunteer members from the community. Inmates from
a number of institutions attended A.A. meetings in the community on a monthly
or bi-monthly basis.
At Prince George Gaol the inmates volunteered to work in their own time
on a Kiwanis project erecting a historical replica of Fort George on the banks of
the Fraser River. This project was received very well by the community and drew
favourable publicity from the local newspapers. As a result, several inmates were
given employment leads and one man placed on Work Release through the sponsorship of the Kiwanis Club. Another project took a crew of volunteers to the
Nechako Improvement District, where a park-site was cleared for the community.
Many institutions and camps donated blood to the Red Cross Blood Donor
Clinics throughout the year. At Oakalla, three Blood Donor Clinics were held,
with 608 inmate volunteer donors participating.
Education
Academic courses
At the Haney Correctional Institution there were several encouraging developments in remedial teaching this year. Two new classes were added to better prepare
trainees for vocational-shop entry.
With the introduction of monthly progress meetings to ensure a review of effort
and achievement, correspondence course completion rose from 30 to 37 per cent.
At New Haven, the remedial teacher, Mrs. Bernice Govier, continued her
dedicated and valuable service. A total of 21 trainees received instruction and
coaching in elementary English and mathematics.
Oakalla has relied on the Department of Education correspondence courses
for the bulk of its educational programme. However, this approach is far from
satisfactory with persistent young offenders, nearly all of whom are school drop-outs.
In an effort to bring a higher level of motivation to this group, a full-time teacher
was assigned this year to the Westgate A Unit. There are now over 24 young
offenders involved in two classes each day. The results to date have been encouraging and it is hoped that this effort can be expanded in the future.
At Vancouver Island Unit, approximately 25 per cent of all sentenced inmates
took part in some form of academic training. School, which is being supervised by
two nuns from St. Ann's Academy, is progressing at a high level, and those inmates
considered capable have been switched to programmed learning, with most satisfactory results.
The programme of academic training and upgrading initiated at the Kamloops
Regional Gaol during the past year was continued and intensified by increasing the
number of class nights from two to four. The basis of this programme was to upgrade students to Grade X (vocational) to enable them upon discharge to qualify
for entry to one of the Provincial Vocational Schools.
At Prince George, the addition of the new library and study room provided a
much-improved environment for study, and elementary level courses continued
under the instruction of a Correctional Officer.
Vocational training
To meet the needs of an increasing number of younger inmates with no prior
work experience and little idea how to plan their own future, the Haney Correctional
Institution established a series of preparatory courses for trainees prior to entering
vocational training. This allows them the opportunity to explore trade opportunities,
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1968/69 Z 21
their own interests and skills, and also become accustomed to shop routine, regulations, and safety requirements.
At New Haven, the wood- and metal-working shops continued, as did the
carpentry, fibreglass, and upholstery shops at Oakalla.
At Kamloops, a three-month course in cookery was offered for the first time
by the Adult Education Department of the local school district, and the Department
of Mines and Resources put on a short course for prospectors at the Regional Gaol.
Both courses met with an enthusiastic response.
Prince George added three new courses this year, log scaling, power-sawing,
and basic mechanics. Of four inmates who wrote the scaling examination, three
were successful.
Physical education
The compulsory physical education programme for all young offenders continued throughout the year. In addition, a wide variety of field sports and gymnasium activities was offered. The use of outside teams visiting the institutions and
inmate teams participating in community leagues was further extended, and all
institutions reported positive results.
Prison industries and farm production
Prison industries
The major development in the prison industries programme occurred this year
in the Prince George Regional Gaol, which was, by virtue of its major addition last
year, able to expand significantly its prison industries production. The tailor-shop,
with more room and additional inmates, was able to produce 11,282 articles of
inmate clothing. Of this total amount, half was shipped out for use in other institutions. The shoe-shop set up this past year made commendable progress. A total
of 1,426 pairs of romeo work slippers was manufactured and 400 were shipped to
other institutions.
Vancouver Island Unit again produced a large number of cement blocks, drain
tiles, cedar stakes and shakes in the security compound for young offender parole
violators. Over 15,000 drain tiles were produced and shipped to Twin Maples
Farm, where they are being used in a land-drainage scheme. The 25,000 cedar
stakes produced were all shipped to the Forest Service for use in survey work
throughout British Columbia.
The major production shops at Oakalla Prison Farm continued in operation
throughout the year. The breakdown, in terms of units produced, is shown below:—
Prison Industry Units
Tailor-shop         13,964
Sheet-metal shop        56,808
Licence-plate shop   2,737,266
Knitting-mill (socks)  doz. 2,257
Shoe-shop pr. 8,029
Farm production
The farm programmes at the regional gaols were further expanded this year,
and in spite of the poor weather a large amount of food was produced. This has
helped considerably in holding down the over-all food costs. The total farm production is detailed in the following table:—
 Z 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Commodity
Oakalla
Prison
Farm
Vancouver
Island
Unit
Rayleigh
Camp
Prince
George
Regional
Gaol
Total
Beef _	
Pork
Vegetables
Fowl    	
Milk
tons
.  tons
tons
lb.
tons
  lb.
            doz.
  tons
1.2
82.4
70.1
1,856.0
128.0
17,004.0
132.0
16.7
20.8
162.5
1,650.0
15.8
247.5
137.0
49.5
33.7
103.2
529.6
3,506.0
128.0
Fruit
Eggs    .
850.0
11,840.0
170.0
850.0
28,844.0
439.0
As a result of more intensive planning and co-ordination of the various farms,
the Vancouver Island Unit, Kamloops and Prince George Regional Gaols were
able to ship significant quantities of produce and beef this year to other institutions,
and the two canneries increased their production. Plans for the coming year call
for the development of the beef herd at the Vancouver Island Unit and the breaking
of additional land at Prince George.
Specialized institutions
Alouette River Unit
The amendment to the Summary Convictions Act providing for an indeterminate sentence for chronic alcoholics was itself amended by the action of the
Legislature in 1968. The object of the new amendment was to remove the alcoholic
offender from the law and deal with him as a medical problem rather than a legal
one. The City of Vancouver, where the problem is greatest, is planning a diagnostic
and detoxication centre which, when it is completed, will allow the implementation of the new amendment. Chronic alcoholics will then be committed directly
by the Courts to the Alouette River Unit for a one-year indeterminate period. This
will eliminate the previous procedure of the alcoholic being admitted on conviction
to a prison for classification.
Meanwhile, the Alouette River Unit is being developed with additional facilities
to equip it for the eventual treatment of the chronic alcoholic committed on an
indeterminate basis.
The Twin Maples Farm camp for females has now been brought under the
administration of the Alouette River Unit and provides a similar rehabilitation
programme for female alcoholics.
An encouraging development in the treatment of the alcoholic is the establishment of Half-way Houses in various communities throughout the Province. These
facilities are organized or operated by groups of concerned citizens who have evidenced a high degree of interest and involvement in their work. Four such Half-way
Houses are now in full operation in the Cities of Haney, Prince George, Prince
Rupert, and Mission.
Forest camps
Organization
Gold Creek Camp on Alouette Lake was relocated last year farther up the
lake to commence a new project of clearing the upper lake of hundreds of acres of
floating debris and develop it for recreational use.
This new camp at Boulder Bay, along with Centre Creek Camp in the Chilliwack Valley, has undertaken the development of an experimental programme for
young-adult offenders serving definite-indeterminate sentences who it is felt do not
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1968/69
Z 23
require a lengthy period of retraining. Both these camps are operated along the
lines of Outward Bound Training, stressing challenge and achievement. The Boulder
Bay course is of four months' duration, while the Centre Creek course takes six
months to complete. Those who successfully complete these courses are recommended to the British Columbia Parole Board for release under supervision to the
community. To provide an accurate evaluation of the effectiveness of this training, a
matched control group is being sent to the Haney Correctional Institution for the
more traditional form of young-offender training provided at that institution. Both
the group at the camps and the control group at the Haney Correctional Institution
wil be followed after release to determine whether a short, sharp, intensive period of
training, stressing physical challenge, is effective for this type of offender.
If the camp programme proves to be effective, it can be doubled by adding
those in the control group presently being sent to the Haney Correctional Institution.
We are particularly concerned with the development of such non-institutional
programmes for the less-criminalistic young-adult offender in order that the Haney
Correctional Institution can concentrate on the most disturbed and aggressive
young offender who has failed to respond to other forms of treatment. As mentioned previously, we are being faced with an increased proportion of young
offenders who are presenting more severe problems all the time.
On June 28, 1968, the first group of 12 trainees started on their four-month
training programme at Boulder Bay. By March 31, 1969, 36 had successfully completed the course and been granted parole. At Centre Creek Camp, the first group
of 11 trainees started their six-month course on September 1, 1968.
Capacity and intake
The total forest camp capacity was increased by 60 over last year with the
opening of the Hutda Lake Forest Camp in the spring. This now makes a total
in the Province of 11 minimum-security forest camps for male prisoners. The
rebuilding of the original camps in the Chilliwack Valley is now almost complete,
with no change in their capacity. The number of admissions during the year was
as follows:—
Camp
Snowdon Forest Camp	
Lakeview Forest Camp	
Rayleigh Forest Camp	
Clearwater Forest Camp	
Chilliwack Forest Camps (4) 	
Admissions,
1968/69
161
144
632
320
_  482
Boulder Bay Forest Camp      124
Pine Ridge Forest Camp      198
Hutda Lake Forest Camp      240
Total
2,301
Snowdon Forest Camp on Vancouver Island continued to be kept for first
offenders with no previous institutional experience. Many of the young marijuana
offenders were classified to this camp. It is of some concern to note that there
were 19 admissions with university level education this year and that of the total
161 admissions, 50 were for breaches of the Narcotic and Drug Act. Fortunately,
the forest camp experience emphasizing vigorous manual labour in a rugged outdoor environment appears to have been a maturing one for this particular group.
Escapes from the forest camps for the year numbered 40, an increase of 1 over last
year. This figure represents 1.8 per cent of the total transferred to forest camps,
an impressively low figure.
 Z 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Achievement
All camps continued to make significant contributions to the Forestry and
Parks programmes throughout the Province.
Crews were trained at each camp for fire suppression, but because of the cool
summer they were called out only four times—three in the Interior and one in the
Chilliwack Valley. The only fire occurring in a park was at Myrtle Lake in Wells
Gray Park. Here, a crew of seven and one officer was flown in by helicopter to
extinguish the blaze.
Several Provincial Parks benefited from inmate work crews during the summer.
In the Golden Ears Park, Boulder Bay Camp continued to work on the removal of
several hundred acres of floating debris on Upper Alouette Lake. From this debris
the camp has been able to salvage sawlogs and cut up several hundred cords of
wood for use in public camp-sites. Crews from the Haney Correctional Institution
also worked in this area cutting wood, maintaining grounds, and clearing beaches.
Wells Gray Park in the Interior received the services of crews from Clearwater
Camp for clearing access roads, trails, camp-sites and clean-up and maintenance
work.
In the summer months, a detached camp of 20 from Clearwater was established at Mahood Lake for clearing lakeshore and the construction of boat ramps,
trails, and roads. On Vancouver Island, from Snowdon, crews continued work on
the development of Quinsam and Elk Falls Parks. They installed 3,400 feet of
pipe-line to provide a water service at Miracle Beach Camp-site. Chilliwack
Camps provided crews for maintenance and clearing camp-sites in the Cultus Lake
Park.
The development of forest-fire-suppression roads and trails was again a significant work area for the camps. Road right-of-way and trails were cleared, roadside
undergrowth slashed and burned, bridges reconstructed, and gravel hauled to fill
wash-outs and holes. Attention to flood control was given by clearing out ditches,
constructing culverts, and cleaning creek beds considered to be dangerous.
The sawmills at Pine Ridge, Lakeview, Chilliwack, and Hutda Lake Camps
produced a total of 464,018 board-feet of lumber; 108,689 board-feet were supplied to the Forest Service, 23,268 board-feet to the Parks Branch, and the remainder was used in camp construction and renovation. Other wood production
included several hundred cords of firewood supplied to the Parks Branch for campsites; 265,000 stakes for survey work by the Forest Service; and 14,000 fence
posts for the Highways Department.
Reforestation work was again carried on throughout the year. Several hundred
acres across the Province were prepared for reforestation and then planted with
seedlings from nurseries constructed and maintained by camps' inmates. The tree
nurseries at Chilliwack and Snowdon were expanded even further this year and
work continued at the Haney Correctional Institution on the preparation of land
for future nursery development. In addition, the nurseries at Rayleigh and the
Alouette River Unit were in full operation all year.
The first major project in range management occurred this year with the
establishment of a detached camp on Opax Mountain manned by inmates from
Kamloops Regional Gaol. Here, crews worked on fencing and trail building in
connection with a range experiment.
The Co-ordinating Committee of Senior Corrections Branch and Forest Service
representatives met twice during the year to decide on major projects and the
co-ordinated use of resources.
 Chapter HI.   Treatment of women
General
Population
The average daily population decreased considerably this year to 80. The
peak reached was 110. The total admissions were 558, of which 114 were native
Indians. There were 245 crimes against public order and peace. Of these, 41 per
cent were for liquor violations and 36 per cent for breaches of the Narcotic and
Drug Act.
The facilities of the Remand Unit were again taxed to their limit with an
increasing number of emotionally disturbed women requiring medical attention and
constant observation, the result of excessive use of hallucinatory and other drugs.
A great deal of concern is felt for the non-delinquent type of law-breaker,
usually a first offender charged under the Narcotic Control Act for possession or
casual trafficking in marijuana. In the majority of cases, a common characteristic
of the family environment was found to be the permissive attitude toward the use of
marijuana by either parents or other adult authority.
With greater emphasis on lay counselling and group discussion in this unit,
there was more opportunity for the newly committed offender to develop freely and
release some of her hostilities.
Discipline
There were 135 offences against Gaol Rules during the year. As in previous
years, some offences were used for learning experiences through group discussion
and lay counselling.
Vocational and technical training
The sewing-room, kitchen, and laundry continued to operate as training areas
for those home-making skills in which many of the women are deficient.
General maintenance by an inmate crew was carried out under the direction
of a male staff carpenter. In all cases, the objectives have been development of
good work habits and the importance of team work.
Academic education
An average of eight students per month was involved in educational courses.
The academic classroom operated 230 days.
Physical education and sports
Physical education and organized sports continued to have a positive effect on
the inmate population. Although players on the softball team were less skilled than
in past years, good sportsmanship improved. Socialization with the outside players
does much to give inmates an insight into the lives of average working-girls who
are able to accept standards set by society.
25
 Z 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Religious training
Both the Protestant and Roman Catholic chaplains carried out active programmes. This year a greater number of inmates participated than ever before.
Twelve women received diplomas upon completion of a course in Bible Study.
Recreation
Every effort was made to involve inmates in outdoor activities whenever
weather permitted.
Some of the outside groups who came regularly on a voluntary basis to participate in programmes with inmates were:—
The University of British Columbia students.
Elizabeth Fry Society.
Legion of Mary.
St. Andrews-Wesley Church members.
Alcoholics Anonymous.
The contribution of these organizations was of immeasurable value in keeping inmates in touch with normal people from the community.
Social casework
In addition to the individual and lay counselling programmes now maintained
at this unit, a great deal of assistance is given in both the internal programmes and
the after-care planning and counselling of inmates by the Elizabeth Fry Society, the
Salvation Army, the John Howard Society, and the Vancouver Indian Centre. The
staff of the unit are able to refer those they counsel to the agency most suited to the
individual.
Group and lay counselling
Lay counselling by staff members continued throughout the year to the point
where staff are gaining considerable insight into the needs of their charges. Through
both group and lay counselling, many disturbing situations are resolved and prove
useful learning experiences.
Community participation
Three Blood Donor Clinics were held during the year, with good participation.
Service organizations and family visits at Christmas and Easter also brought the
community closer to the inmate population. Whenever possible, selective groups
of inmates participated in humanitarian projects in the community.
Narcotic Drug Research Unit
Since most addicts are now assigned to the female unit of the Matsqui Drug
Treatment Centre, the Narcotic Addiction Treatment Unit for females was closed.
Paroles
During the year, two inmates were granted day parole and 16 received National
paroles.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,   1968/69
Z 27
Twin Maples Farm
In November of 1968 the administration of Twin Maples Farm was transferred
from Oakalla Prison Farm to the Alouette River Unit. The result has been distinctly favourable. An expanded farm programme has been enthusiastically undertaken by both staff and residents.
The aim has been to provide useful training in gardening, poultry raising, and
in those home-making skills which will be of benefit to the women returning to
rural areas.
A tailor-shop, employing up to seven inmates, was opened at the unit to
manufacture some of the more-specialized types of outdoor clothing apparel required by inmates throughout the Gaol Service. The quality of workmanship was
exceptionally high. It is planned to use the tailor-shop as a winter work programme
when the farm work slackens for the season.
Alcoholics Anonymous meetings were held regularly, both at the farm as
well as in the community, throughout the year.
Upgrading academic courses are available to all residents in the classroom.
Hobbies are encouraged and the value of physical exercise is stressed. Use is made
of a local community swimming-pool.
Both Protestant and Roman Catholic chaplains conducted services regularly.
Whenever possible, contact with the community is encouraged through service
organizations and Blood Donor Clinics. The farm and its residents continued to
be favourably accepted by the neighbourhood generally.
 Chapter IV.   Health, hygiene, and safety
A high level of medical services continued to be supplied throughout the Gaol
Service under the direction of the Senior Medical Officer. Assisting him were 11
part-time medical officers covering the regional gaols and forest camps as well as
a full-time physician at the Gaol Service Hospital at Oakalla. Extensive use was
made of visiting specialists and out-patient clinics. The 11-bed security ward at
the Vancouver General Hospital was again used to good advantage, with over 200
admissions.
As in the past, the severest problem faced by the medical staff is that of the
highly disturbed inmate. The largest single category of admissions from other units
to the central hospital on the Oakalla grounds was for mental observation. A great
deal of staff time is consumed with these cases, especially those who are not
committable under the Mental Health Act. Although several meetings were held
in regard to policy on the transfer of border-line cases to Riverview Hospital, the
issue is still far from being resolved.
The number of accidents increased this year to a total of 777. This increase
can be partially attributed to the increased proportion of young irresponsible inmates, many of whom are now being transferred to forest camps and working with
axes in the forest. This same group also show a disproportionate number of accidents resulting from sports activities.
There were 19 Boards of Inquiry held to investigate accidents. Fortunately,
most of them were of a minor nature and only seven cases resulted in any permanent
disability. The organization of Safety Committees in each institution and camp
has resulted in a much more responsible attitude being taken by inmates toward
accident prevention.
28
 Chapter V.   Community re-entry programmes
General
There was a total of 869 cases released by various authorities for supervision
in the community—58 per cent by the British Columbia Parole Board, 33 per cent
by the National Parole Board, and 9 per cent by miscellaneous means. The details
are given in the following table:—
Type of Paroles Authorized, 1968/69
Released from—
National
Parole
Combined
National/
British
Columbia
Parole
British
Columbia
Parole
Chronic
Alcoholics*
Other 2
Total
Haney   Correctional   Institution   and
33
74
37
29
32
36
25
23
1
23
3
3
1
1
349
53
57
2
26
1
20
4
1
31
1
1
1
405
Oakalla Prison Farm (male).	
135
98
62
Vancouver Island Unit and camps
Prince George Regional Gaol	
60
36
25
24
21
2
....        |        ....
1
Totals       	
291        |        31
508
36                    3                869
1 Released under section 64, Sumr
2 By Order in Council under supei
Day parole
nary Convictu
vision of Chi
yns Act.
li Probatior
l Officer.
Day paroles continued to increase, with 104 compared to 82 last year. The
over-all success rate of those completing day parole amounted to 87.5 per cent, and
45 per cent of these were retained by their employers after release from the institution.   Three continued with Vocational School attendance.
The following table gives details of day-parole releases:—
Total
Released,
Day Parole
Successful
Day Parole Terminated by—
Released from—
Expiration
of
Sentence
Granting of—
Injury
Revocations
or
Suspensions
National
Parole
British
Columbia
Parole
35
30
20
16
3
1
27
28
20
13
3
23
21
15
9
3
71
1
1
8
Oakalla Prison Farm (male)
Oakalla Prison Farm (female)
6        ]          1
5        |        ....
1          !            3
2
3
Prince George Regional Gaol
|         _         |
Totals  	
104                  91
15                  4                  1                 13
Work release
Important amendments were made to the Provincial Gaol Rules and Regulations on May 7, 1968, enlarging the powers to release prisoners undergoing sentence
29
 Z 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
in Provincial institutions for educational or humanitarian reasons. The offender
placed on work release is still a prisoner, he has a sentence to serve, and must spend
his non-working hours under confinement.
The first work releases were authorized on May 17, 1968. A total of 26
cases were granted work release; 25 were able to secure employment for varying
periods up to 81 working-days. The total earnings of those released on work
release amounted to $11,213, an average of $448 per person. Thirty per cent of
these total earnings helped to support prisoners' families, 13 per cent went toward
compensation and debts, 9 per cent to help defray costs of imprisonment, 20 per
cent toward the cost of clothing and personal expenses, and 28 per cent to savings
which the prisoner took out with him on his final release from the institution.
The over-all success rate of those completing work release amounted to 69
per cent. After release from the institution, 78 per cent of these were retained by
their employers. It is interesting to note that half of those involved in this programme were eventually granted National parole.
The following table gives details of this programme:—
Total
Work
Releases
Successful
Work Release Terminated by—
Expiration of
Sentence
Granting of
No
Work
Located
Injury
Death
National
Parole
British
Columbia
Parole
tions or
Suspensions
16
5
3
2
12
1
3
2
6
1
4
3
2
2
1
2
1
1
Vancouver Island Unit	
Prince George Regional Gaol
Kamloops Gaol	
3
Totals	
26
18
7
9
2
1
2
1
4
Home Leave
During the year a total of 17 were granted home leaves for periods of up to
10 days. Twelve of these were trainees from the Haney Correctional Institution.
Only one leave had to be cancelled for misbehaviour.
The objective of the home-leave programme is primarly to allow the sentenced
young-adult prisoner, who is undergoing a period of training and is working toward
release on parole, an opportunity to visit his home for the purpose of strengthening
home and community ties and helping him to prepare himself for his final release
to the community.
Vancouver Parole Services
During the year, 222 new cases were assigned to Provincial Parole Officers
working in the Greater Vancouver area for supervision; 106 successfully completed
their paroles and 79 were revoked.
Community involvement
Job Therapy Inc., a private association of laymen from various church congregations in the Greater Vancouver area, organized two teams of volunteers to meet
regularly with groups of young adults at the Haney Correctional Institution and
Oakalla Prison Farm on a bi-monthly basis. This programme has proved to be
particularly helpful to the homeless offender who has no regular visitors.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1968/69
Z 31
St. Leonard's House accommodated 36 young-adult parolees for varying
periods of up to 12 months. The Dick Bell-Irving Home continued to serve young
trainees from New Haven released on parole under the supervision of the British
Columbia Borstal Association. A privately operated residence in the City of
Vancouver accommodated 38 Provincial parolees during the year.
Such resources are economical and favourable alternatives to what otherwise
would be unsatisfactory and unsupervised urban placements. Without these facilities, many resourceless offenders would not have been released until the expiration
of their sentences.
Two new Half-way House residences for alcoholics were developed during the
year—Fraser House in Mission and St. Benedict's Lodge in Victoria. There are
now a total of five such Half-way Houses in the Province, including Maple Ridge
House in Haney, Chatham House in Prince Rupert, and the Harvey Elliott House
in Prince George. During the year the five houses accommodated a total of 644
men for varying periods.
Close to 100 per cent of all offenders sentenced to Provincial correctional
institutions and gaols eventually returned to the community. It is in the community
that they have to learn to survive and overcome pressures and temptations. The
more prisoners are introduced to the responsibilities of community living with
sufficient safeguards to protect society, the better prepared they will be to face
reality when they are no longer under any authority or supervision.
We are greatly indebted to employers and voluntary sponsors and to those
agencies both public and private concerned with the rehabilitation of offenders for
their invaluable assistance during the year. The variety of programmes now being
offered to assist offenders to re-enter the community is encouraging.
 Chapter VI.   British Columbia Probation Service
Statistics
Comparative Case Statistics for the Years 1967/68 and 1968/69
New probation cases—
Males                                                                                                  1967/68 1968/69
Under 18 years  1,926 2,131
18 to 24 years, inclusive      709 873
25 to 39 years, inclusive      282 359
40 to 64 years, inclusive      147 167
65 years and over          6 6
3,070 3,536
Females—
Under 18 years      262 220
18 to 24 years, inclusive       104 94
25 to 39 years, inclusive        41 58
40 to 64 years, inclusive        16 11
65 years and over        2
423 385
Totals, new probation cases      3,493 3,921
New parole cases—
National parole        68 122
Order in Council          5 3
Provincial parole       572 520
645 645
New miscellaneous and voluntary cases (this figure
includes   Provincial   releases   from   training
schools)   2,364 2,976
Grand totals  6,502 7,542
Comparison of Probation Service Activity
1967/68
1968/69
Increase (+)
or
Decrease ( —)
Per Cent
3,493
645
2,364
1,787
2,283
3,921
645
2,976
1,756
2,413
+428
+612
— 31
+ 130
12 0
New parole cases	
New miscellaneous cases -	
Pre-sentence reports—
Juvenile	
Adult                 	
25.4
2.0
6.0
32
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1968/69 Z 33
General
The number of new probation cases totalled 3,921, an increase of 428 over
the previous year. This total was made up of 3,536 male probationers and 385
female probationers. The greatest percentage involved were young male probationers—60.3 per cent were under the age of 18, 24.7 per cent were between the
ages of 18 and 24, and only 15 per cent were over the age of 25.
The total case-load carry-over at the end of the year was 5,547, as compared
to 4,565 for the previous year. This case load divided between the total field staff
gives an average case load per officer of 58.4 cases, as compared to 53.7 the previous
year.
Appointments and separations
As a result of a vigorous recruitment campaign throughout the year, 32 qualified officers were added to the Probation Service. During the same period, 15 staff
left the Service to take up appointments elsewhere.
Staff-training
Training carried on as in previous years. Two 17-week courses were held for
university graduates selected for induction into the Service and one 12-month non-
degree course. In May, a Training Centre was established at Marpole next to the
Probation Hostel with individual offices for each trainee and a number of lecture
and seminar rooms. This will now serve as a centre for all future Probation
Officer Training Courses.
During the year a number of Probation Officers completed the three-year
Correctional Certificate Course offered by Vancouver City College, and six Probation Officers were granted financial assistance to continue post-graduate studies at
various universities throughout the country.
The Probation Service's 11th Annual Conference was held in Kamloops in
October and focused on the community as a resource potential for the field Probation Officer. Miss A. Selander, Executive Director of the Voluntary Association
for Health and Welfare for British Columbia, was the keynote speaker.
Policy changes
The general policy initiated by the Attorney-General in respect to not charging
juveniles with Provincial Statute or municipal by-law offences was continued
throughout the year. This was further augmented by an experiment in Kamloops
Subdivision area, which commenced in October, in which Probation Officers, upon
being advised that an alleged offence had been committed by a juvenile, were to
interview the juvenile and his parents prior to any formal charges being laid. If,
after assessing the youth's background and circumstances and further discussion
with the police, it was felt that the matter could best be dealt with informally, then
the Probation Officer would assume the supervision of the juvenile on a voluntary
basis without a formal Court order.
The experiment was evaluated at the conclusion of a six months' period and
the results were found to be sufficiently satisfactory to continue the policy for a
further period.
As a result of the policy initiated by the Attorney-General in June, 1968,
whereby prosecutors were required to obtain Departmental approval before making
application to have a child raised from the Family and Children's Court to Adult
 Z 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Court, the number of children so transferred underwent a substantial decrease,
88 as compared to 137 for the previous year.
Regional developments
Probation Officers have continued their interest in the community development
of much-needed facilities and resources. Staff have participated in a variety of
activities such as radio interviews, seminars on drug usage, as well as talks and
discussions with a wide variety of community groups. In most areas, officers have
gathered resource material for use by Family and Children's Court Committees and
have assisted in promoting the organization of local remand facilities. Efforts have
also been made by many officers to involve interested community people who have
the time to give to act as probation sponsors.
A close liaison has been maintained with the Salvation Army's House of
Concord, which has continued to be a most helpful resource to the Probation
Officers of the Lower Mainland. A field officer works closely with the staff of the
house and supervises all probationers who reside there. The Regional Probation
Officer for Region II serves as a member of the Admission Committee for the house.
In Chilliwack, Probation Officers were involved in an interesting community
experiment aimed at curtailing the incidents of shoplifting by juveniles. Merchants
in the area who were involved in the experiment were pleased with the results.
Three Probation Interviewers attached to Family and Children's Courts in
various parts of the Province have assumed the responsibility of assisting with the
initial contacts in respect to maintenance cases, undertaking the pre-screening of
maintenance order applications and following up on the enforcement of the orders.
Where casework services are required, the interviewer transfers the case to a Probation Officer.
Psychiatric services
The Probation Officers in the Greater Vancouver area continued to use the
diagnostic and group treatment services offered by Dr. Bennet Wong. Dr. Anthony
Marcus, the Head of the University Forensic Clinic, also saw a number of probationers referred for psychiatric diagnosis and treatment.
Marpole Hostel
Six youths were in residence at the hostel at the beginning of the year. During
the year, 20 boys were admitted and 19 discharged, leaving seven in residence at
the end of the year.
The hostel and its residents have been fully accepted by the Marpole community, as evidenced by the interest and support afforded the hostel by the community associations and service clubs in the area.
A Probation Officer was closely associated with the hostel throughout the year,
rendering a casework service to the residents and liaisoning regularly with the school
counsellor to keep as many of the residents as possible attending school regularly.
Chronic alcoholics released under a probation order
A significant development in the programme for chronic alcoholics has been
the formation of Half-way Houses sponsored by various private organizations. Such
Half-way Houses are complementary to the treatment provided in an institution,
as the majority of alcoholics do not have community roots and frequently reside in
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1968/69
Z 35
substandard housing in the " skid road " area. The Half-way House provides
improved living accommodation, an environment geared to the non-use of alcohol,
as well as companionship and support of other residents and the staff. In such an
atmosphere the alcoholic can see an alternative way of fife for himself from which
he should derive some personal satisfaction. Half-way Houses have been established at Haney, Mission, Burnaby, Prince George, and Prince Rupert. They have
played a most important part in helping to re-establish the alcoholic offender in the
community following his treatment in an institution.
Search and leadership training (Porteau Cove)
For the fifth consecutive summer a Search and Leadership Training Course
was held for probationers from across the Province selected on the basis of their
failure to respond to normal probation methods. Thirty-four attended, ranging in
age from 14 to 17. All but one graduated at a special ceremony on the final day,
which was attended by parents, Magistrates, and a number of field Probation
Officers.
The programme now based at Porteau Cove Camp in Howe Sound lasts for
one month. The total group is subdivided into three patrols of 10 to 12 lads each,
with two staff attached. These Co-ordinators, as they are called, remain with the
patrol throughout their whole month-long course and are responsible for their
initial indoctrination, their training, and their progress.
The programme commences in camp, where basic survival skills and techniques are acquired and each group learns to live together and function as a group.
As progress is made, expeditions into the mountains or on the water commence.
With each successive sortie, the challenges increase and eventually culminate in a
week-long expedition, when the demands placed on the groups are heavy and
definite objectives have to be attained. One of the features of the training is a
36-hour solo expedition, when each lad goes off on his own to a selected spot in the
wilderness to be by himself and live off the land. Faced with himself, alone, and
in the wilderness, this is sometimes the turning point for a youth who has seldom,
if ever before, had to stop and think about his life.
Time alone will indicate the long-term results of this type of training. This
year, each youth will continue to have at least six months' supervision by a field
Probation Officer on returning to his home location. Initial reports from these
officers invariably indicate that some positive change has taken place in the probationer as a result of the course experience.
Provincial Probation Offices
Headquarters:
1075 Melville Street, Vancouver 5.
Abbotsford:
Courthouse, Abbotsford.
Burnaby:
6355 Gilpin Street, Burnaby 2.
Campbell River:
110 Birch Street, Campbell River.
Chilliwack:
Room 75, Courthouse,
77 College Street, Chilliwack.
Cloverdale:
5691—177b Street, Cloverdale.
Courtenay:
Courthouse, Courtenay.
Cranbrook:
Room 213, Courthouse,
102 South 11th Avenue, Cranbrook.
Dawson Creek:
10300b Tenth Street, Dawson Creek.
Duncan:
271 Canada Avenue, Duncan.
Fort St. John:
Courthouse, Fort St. John.
 Z 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Haney:
Room 4, Mide Block,
22336 Lougheed Highway, Haney.
Kamloops:
118 Victoria Street, Kamloops.
Kelowna:
435 Bernard Avenue, Kelowna.
Lillooet:
Courthouse, Lillooet.
Marpole Probation Office:
8982 Hudson Street, Vancouver 14.
Marpole Hostel:
8982 Hudson Street, Vancouver 14.
Merritt:
2025 Granite Avenue, Merritt.
Nanaimo:
Courthouse, Nanaimo.
Nelson:
Courthouse, Nelson.
New Westminster:
100, 320 Columbia Street,
New Westminster.
New Westminster Family and
Children's Court:
511 Royal Avenue, New Westminster.
North Vancouver:
1676 Lloyd Avenue,
North Vancouver.
Penticton:
Courthouse, Penticton.
Port Alberni:
1101 Sixth Avenue North,
Port Alberni.
Powell River:
4687 Ewing Place, Powell River.
Prince George:
Courthouse, Prince George.
Prince Rupert:
Courthouse, Prince Rupert.
Revelstoke:
307 First Street, Revelstoke.
Richmond:
110, 815 Park Road, Richmond.
Sechelt:
P.O. Box 99, Sechelt.
Smithers:
P.O. Box 2267, Smithers.
Surrey Family and Children's Court:
17671—56th Avenue, Cloverdale.
Terrace:
P.O. Box 1598, Terrace.
Trail:
203, 805 Spokane Street, Trail.
Vancouver:
719, 193 East Hastings Street, Vancouver
4.
3200 East Broadway, Vancouver 12.
Vernon:
3402—30th Street, Vernon.
Victoria:
1039 Johnson Street, Victoria.
2020 Cameron Street, Victoria.
Williams Lake:
Courthouse, Williams Lake.
 Chapter VII.   British Columbia Board of Parole
During the year ending March 31, 1969, 537 trainees were released on
parole, 532 on the regular order of parole and five under the condition of day
parole. This is an increase of about 11 per cent over last year. During the same
period, 192 had their paroles revoked, an increase of 13 per cent from last
year's rate.
Board membership has been retained at five—Mr. Oscar Orr, Acting Chairman; Mr. Eric Kelly; Mrs. J. M. Norris; Mr. Arnold Webster; and Dr. G. Kirk-
patrick.
During the year, Mr. F. C. Boyes, the only remaining charter member of the
Board, died. His deep understanding of human nature enabled him to add strength
of purpose and enjoyment of life to the many who came in contact with him.
Mr. M. G. Stade, for 20 years Secretary to the Board, retired in March. His
dedication contributed greatly to the successful operation of the Board.
The statistical statements which follow indicate the number of meetings held,
the number of cases considered, a comparative statement of parole releases and
revocations, the number of revocations due to Court action as compared with
technical violations of the conditions of parole, and miscellaneous statistical information.
Statistical statements, British Columbia Board of Parole
Statement No 1.—Summary of Meetings Held and Cases Considered,
April 1,1968, to March 31,1969
Number of sittings held     84
Day paroles
Reviews
Decisions made—
New cases considered 	
Miscellaneous—
British Columbia-National paroles considered   42
  7
  42
  9
  16
  240
  26
  6
513
Special consideration	
Decisions reconsidered
Revocations considered
Other decisions  	
Administrative decisions
Total decisions made
In co-operation with National Parole Service—
Applications for National parole supported by British Columbia Board of
Parole 	
388
901
41
Disposition of cases—
Support withdrawn 	
Granted National parole
Cases pending 	
36
5
Total
41
Applications for National parole not supported by British Columbia Board
of Parole       1
Total new cases considered
Average number of cases dealt with per sitting
Released on parole during the fiscal year 	
42
10.7
532
37
 Z 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statement No. 2.—Progressive Summary of Meetings Held and
Cases Considered, 1949 to 1968/69
Year
Number of
Meetings
Decisions Made
New
Miscellaneous
Total
1949_
1950_
1951-
1952_
1953-
1954_
1955_
1956-
1957-
1958_
1959_
I960-
1961-
1962_
1963	
1964 (January, February, and March)..
1964/65	
1965/66	
1966/67	
1967/68—	
1968/69	
Totals.
5
12
12
14
23
37
44
51
69
84
93
70
74
69
73
17
76
81
84
89
84
457
450
389
417
331
355
91
374
426
417
470
513
460
684
460
356
319
259
63
270
320
342
327
388
15
79
61
72
147
343
409
521
621
917
1,134
849
773
650
614
154
644
746
759
797
901
1,161
11,106
Average number of decisions per meeting, 9.6.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1968/69
Z 39
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 Z 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statement No. 5.—Miscellaneous Statistical Information,
Year Ended March 31,1969
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
Parolees
Total released on regular order of parole-
Average age (years)..
Average training period (months)	
Institutional comparison—
Vancouver Island Unit (months)..
Chilliwack Forest Camps (months) -
Oakalla Prison Farm (months) 	
New Haven (months) -
Haney Correctional Institution (months) .
Kamloops Regional Gaol (months)	
Alouette River Unit (months)  	
Revokees
Total revocations	
Average age (years)	
Average training period (months)	
Average period on parole (months)	
Occurrence of revocation relative to period of parole—
During 1 to 4 months (per cent)_
During 5 to 8 months (per cent).
During 9 months or over (per cent)..
Day Parole
Released on the condition of day parole—
From Haney Correctional institution.-
From New Haven	
From Oakalla Prison Farm—
From Vancouver Island Unit-
Totals	
411
466
20.4
20.8
13.1
13.1
17.5
12.1
7.9
10.2
14.1
13.9
10.5
12.0
13.5
13.4
161
146
20.1
20.8
13.1
12.8
3.8
4.1
69
64
24
23
7
13
532
20.5
11.5
15.5
8.3
15.1
11.3
11.1
26.6
8.5
192
20.1
12.7
5.1
58
28
14
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1968/69
Z 41
6,000
900
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
5,000
900
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
4,000
900
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
3,000
900
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
2,000
900
800
700
600
500
400
300
1,200
2,100,000
2,000,000
- —— - —— - .' Probation case load                                                                                                                /
1,900,000
1,800,000
/ i
y   i
1,700,000
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y*^                      i
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x                                      /
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1,300,000
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1,000,000
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.--■ ■~xr ~Z-"'
- 6,000
_ 900
_ 800
_ 700
_ 600
_ 500
_ 400
_ 300
- 200
_ 100
- 5,000
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- 800
- 700
- 600
- 500
_ 400
_ 300
_ 200
- 100
- 4,000
- 900
_ 800
_ 700
- 600
- 500
_ 400
- 300
- 200
- 100
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_ 900
- 800
- 700
~ 600
- 500
_ 400
- 300
- 200
_ 100
_ 2,000
_ 900
_ 800
- 700
- 600
- 500
- 400
_ 300
- 1,200
1957/5S  1958/59  1959/60   1960/61   1961/62  1962/63  1963/64 3964/65  1965/66  1966/67  1967/68 1968/69
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Z 43
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