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Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT for the Year Ended… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1970

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 Minister of Mines and
Petroleum Resources
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
for the Year Ended December 31
1969
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1970
 BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES
AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES
VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Hon. Frank Richter, Minister.
K. B. Blakey, Deputy Minister.
J. W. Peck, Chief Inspector of Mines.
S. Metcalfe, Chief Analyst and Assayer.
M. S. Hedley, Chief, Mineralogical Branch.
R. H. McCrimmon, Chief Gold Commissioner.
J. D. Lineham, Chief, Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch.
R. E. Moss, Chief Commissioner, Petroleum and Natural Gas.
 Colonel the Honourable J. R. Nicholson,
P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Mineral Industry of the Province for the year 1969
is herewith respectfully submitted.
FRANK RICHTER,
Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources Office,
June 1, 1970.
 James Dickson, retired Chief Inspector of Mines, died in Vancouver
on September 8, 1969, in his eighty-eighth year. He was born in Scotland
and studied mining engineering at the Royal Technical College, Glasgow.
He came to British Columbia in 1912 and, after holding official positions
in several Vancouver Island coal mines, became manager of the Reserve
mine of the Western Fuel Company. In 1919 he left this position to join
the staff of the Department of Mines as Inspector of Mines and member of
the Board of Examiners for coal-mine officials. He became Chief Inspector
in 1926, which position he held until his retirement on April 30, 1947.
During his long tenure of office he was instrumental in introducing many
sound safety provisions in both the Coal and Metalliferous Mines Regulation Acts. He was especially active in promoting mine-rescue work and
in the training of mine personnel for this very important and necessary phase
of safety work.   Mr. Dickson is survived by two daughters and one son.
 CONTENTS
CHAPTER I
Introduction..
Review of the Mineral Industry..
CHAPTER II
Statistics—
Introduction	
Page
All
A 12
Method of Computing Production-
Metals	
Gross and Net Content-
Calculated Value	
Average Prices	
Industrial Minerals and Structural Materials.
Fuel	
Notes on Products Listed in the Tables	
Table 1.—Mineral Production:   Total to Date, Past Year, and Latest
Year	
Table 2.—Total Value of Mineral Production, 1836-1969	
Table 3.—Mineral Production for the 10 Years 1960 to 1969	
Table 4.—Mineral Production, Graph of Value, 1887-1969	
Table 5.—Production of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, and Molybdenum, Graph of Quantities, 1893-1969	
Table 6.—Production of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, Molybdenum, and Iron Concentrates, 1858-1969	
Table 7a.—Mineral Production by Mining Divisions, 1968 and 1969,
and Total to Date	
Table 7b.—Production of Lode Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc
by Mining Divisions, 1968 and 1969, and Total to Date	
Table 7c—Production of Miscellaneous Metals by Mining Divisions,
1968 and 1969, and Total to Date	
Table 7d.—Production of Industrial Minerals  by Mining Divisions,
1968 and 1969, and Total to Date	
Table 7e.—Production of Structural Materials by Mining Divisions,
1968 and 1969, and Total to Date	
Table 8a.—Production of Coal, 1836-1969	
Table 8b.—Coal Production and Distribution by Collieries and by Mining Divisions, 1969	
Table 9.—Principal Items of Expenditure, Reported for Operations of
All Classes	
Table 10.—Employment in the Mineral Industry, 1901-1969	
Table 11.—Employment at Major Metal Mines and Coal Mines, 1969	
Table 12.—Metal Production in 1969	
A 16
A 16
A 16
A 16
A 17
A 17
A18
A 18
A 18
A 27
A 28
A 30
A 32
A 33
A 34
A 36
A 38
A 40
A 44
A 46
A 48
A 49
A 50
A 51
A 52
A 53
A 5
 A 6 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1969
CHAPTER III
Departmental Work—
Page
Organization  A 57
Administration Branch  A 5 7
Mining Titles  A 5 7
Staff  A 57
Central Records Offices (Victoria and Vancouver)  A 57
List of Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders  A 59
Maps Showing Mineral Claims, Placer Claims, Placer-mining
Leases, and Map Indexes  A 59
Coal  A 59
Gold Commissioners' and Mining Recorders' Office Statistics,
1969  A 60
Petroleum and Natural-gas Titles  A 61
Staff  A 61
Petroleum and Natural-gas Revenue, 1969  A 61
Analytical and Assay Branch  A 62
Staff  A 62
Samples  A 62
X-Ray Powder Diffraction Analyses  A 63
Examinations for Assayers  A 63
Inspection Branch  A 63
Organization and Staff  A 63
Inspectors and Resident Engineers  A 63
Instructors, Mine-rescue Stations  A 64
Staff Changes  A 64
Fig. 1.—Index map showing inspectoral districts  A 65
Board of Examiners  A 64
Grub-staking Prospectors  A 66
Mining Roads and Trails  A 71
Mineralogical Branch  A 72
Staff  A 73
Staff Changes  A 73
Field Work, 1969 Season  A 73
Publications  A 74
Rock and Mineral Sets  A 74
Airborne Magnetometer Mapping  A 74
 CONTENTS
A 7
Departmental Work—Continued
Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch-
Administration	
Staff	
Headquarters, Victoria-
Field Office, Charlie Lake-
Staff Changes	
Board of Arbitration.
Conservation Committee-
Publications	
Page
A 75
A 76
A 76
A 76
A 76
A 77
A 77
A 77
A 77
CHAPTER IV
Petroleum and Natural Gas—
Petroleum and Natural Gas Titles     A 81
Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch     A 83
General Review     A 8 3
Field Office     A 83
Geological Section     A 84
Geological Laboratories     A 84
Core and Well Samples     A 84
Core and Sample Examination     A 86
Exploration     A 8 6
Reservoir Engineering Section     A 87
Oil Allowables, M.P.R.s, and Improved Recovery Schemes     A 87
Associated and Solution Gas Conservation Schemes     A 89
Gas Allowables and Well Tests     A 90
Hydrocarbon and Associated Sulphur Reserves     A 93
Miscellaneous     A 94
Development Section .    A 96
Drilling     A 96
Production  A 100
Pipe-lines  A 102
Oil-gathering System  A 102
Oil-transmission System  A 102
Gas-gathering System  A 102
Gas-transmission System  A 102
Gas-distribution System  A 103
Oil Refineries  A 103
Gas-processing Plants  A 103
Sulphur Plants  A 103
Well Records  A 103
Reports  A 105
Publications  A 107
 A 8 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1969
Petroleum and Natural Gas—Continued
Page
Statistical Tables—
Table 13.—Exploratory and Development Wells Completed, January to December, 1969  A 108
Table 14.—Geophysical Exploration, 1969  A 109
Table 15.—Surface Geological Exploration, 1969  A 123
Table 16.—Project and Individual Well M.P.R. Data at December 31, 1969  A 124
Table 17.—Gas-well Test and Allowable Data, December 31,
1969  A 130
Table 18.—Hydrocarbon and By-products Reserves, December
31, 1969  A 149
Table 19.—Oilfield Reservoir Data  A 150
Table 20.—Gasfield Reservoir Data  A 152
Table 21.—WeUs Drilled and Drilling, 1969  A 157
Table 22.—Oilfields and Gasfields Designated at December 31,
1969  A 162
Table 23.—Number of Producing and Producible Wells at December 31, 1969  A 167
Table 24.—Monthly Crude-oil Production by Fields and Pools,
1969  A 170
Table 25.—Monthly Natural-gas Production by Fields and Pools,
1969  A 172
Table 26.—Summary of Drilling and Production Statistics, 1969... A 175
Table 27.—Monthly Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and
Condensate/Pentanes Plus, 1969  A 176
Table 28.—Monthly Supply and Disposition of Natural Gas, 1969 A 178
Table 29.—Monthly Production and Disposition of Butane, Propane, and Sulphur, 1969  A 180
Table 30.—Monthly Gross Values of Crude Oil, Natural Gas,
Natural-gas Liquids, and Sulphur to Producers, 1969  A 181
Table 31 .—Crude-oil Pipe-lines, 1969  A 181
Table 32.—Crude-oil Refineries, 1969  A 182
Table 33.—Natural-gas Pipe-lines, 1969  A 183
Table 34.—Gas-processing Plants, 1969  A 185
Table 35.—Sulphur Plants, 1969  A 185
List of Illustrations—
Photographs—
Plate
Ia.—Sample washing facilities at the Field Office of the Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch, Charlie Lake     A 85
Ib.—Core examination facilities at the Field Office of the
Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch, Charlie Lake     A 85
II.—Exploration well, drilled by Dome Petroleum Ltd. on the
Ritchie anticline in the Bowser Basin east of Stewart     A 97
 CONTENTS A 9
Petroleum and Natural Gas—Continued
List of Illustrations—Continued
Drawings—
Fig. Page
2. Footage drilled in British Columbia, 1954-69     A 98
3. Petroleum and natural-gas fields, 1969     A 99
4. Oil production in British Columbia, 1954-69  A 101
5. Gas production in British Columbia, 1954-69  A 101
6. Petroleum and natural-gas pipe-lines, 1969  A 102
Map
1. Union Oil Project, Gething zone, Aitken Creek field  A 112
2. Triad Oil Project, Halfway zone, Beatton River field  A 112
3. Pacific Petroleums Project, Baldonnel zone, Beg and Beg
West fields  A 113
4. Pacific Petroleums Project, Halfway zone, Beg field  A 114
5. Pacific Petroleums Project, Mississippian zone, Blueberry
field  A 115
6. Boundary Lake zone Projects, Boundary Lake field  A 115
7. Pacific Petroleums Project, Baldonnel zone, Bubbles field A 116
8. Union Oil Project, Halfway zone, Bulrush field  A 116
9. Pacific Petroleums Project, Slave Point zone, Clarke Lake
and Clarke Lake South fields  A 117
10. Pacific Petroleums Unit 1, Halfway zone, Currant field  A 117
11. Canadian Superior Oil Unit 1, Inga sand zone, Inga field... A 118
12. Pacific Petroleums Project, Halfway zone, Kobes-Town-
send field  A 118
13. Baldonnel pool Project, Laprise Creek field  A 119
14. Union Oil Unit 1, Halfway zone, Milligan Creek field  A 119
15. Texaco Exploration Project, Baldonnel zone, Nig Creek
field  A 120
16. Pacific Petroleums Project, Wabamun zone, Parkland field A 120
17. Halfway zone Projects, Peejay field  A 121
18. Dunlevy pool Project, Rigel field  A 121
19. Halfway zone Units, Weasel field  A 122
20. Union Oil Project, Halfway zone, Wildmint field  A 122
CHAPTER V
Inspection of Mines—
Coal Mines Regulation Act  A 186
Mines Regulation Act  A 186
Fatal Accidents  A 186
Fatal Accidents and Accidents Involving Loss of Time  A 193
Dangerous Occurrences  A 195
Prosecutions  A 199
 A 10 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
Inspection of Mines—Continued
Page
Blasting Certificate Suspensions  A 199
Electrical-Mechanical  A 200
Environmental Control  A 207
Shiftboss Certificates  A 210
Certificates of Competency  A 211
Mine Rescue, Safety, and First Aid  A 212
John T. Ryan Trophy  A 215
West Kootenay Mine Safety Association Trophy  A 216
Safety Competition, Open-pit Mines and Quarries  A 216
Reclamation  A 216
Aid to Securities Commission  A 217
List of Drawings—
Fig.
7. Annual consumption of power in kilowatt-hours, 1960-1969  A 203
8. Average underground dust counts  A 208
9. Average crushing and grinding dust counts  A 209
 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MINISTER
OF MINES AND PETROLEUM
RESOURCES, 1969
CHAPTER I
Introduction
A report on the mineral industry in the Province has been published annually
since 1874. From 1874 to 1959 it was the Annual Report of the Minister of
Mines, and since 1960 it has been the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines and
Petroleum Resources.
Starting with 1969, the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum
Resources will contain a review of the mineral industry, and chapters dealing with
Statistics, Departmental Work, Petroleum and Natural Gas, and Inspection of
Mines. Technical reports on geology, mineral exploration, metal mines, placer,
industrial minerals and structural materials, and coal which formerly were included
in the Annual Report are being published separately in a volume entitled Geology,
Exploration, and Mining in British Columbia. A new series of annual publications
of that name begins with the 1969 volume.
This Annual Report contains a general review of the mineral industry as a
whole. The chapter on Statistics records the mineral production of the Province
in all its phases and in considerable detail. Current and past practices in arriving
at quantities and in calculating the values of products are outlined.
The organization of the Department and the work of its various branches are
outlined briefly in the chapter on Departmental Work.
The chapter on Petroleum and Natural Gas contains a general review and
records in considerable detail the development and production statistics of that
expanding industry.
Information concerning mine safety, fatal accidents, dangerous occurrences,
etc., and the activities of the Inspection Branch are contained in the chapter on
Inspection of Mines.
A 11
 1969
Change
(Per Cent)
$294,175,536
+ 17.2
21,222,411
— 18.6
55,331,584
+22.4
93,573,164
+ 12.9
Review of the Mineral Industry
By Stuart S. Holland
Production.—The value of the 1969 production of British Columbia's mineral
industry amounted to $464,302,695. A new record was established for the eighth
successive year and the previous year's total was exceeded by $59,274,207 or
14.6 per cent.   The total value to date has now reached $7,160 million.
The values of the four classes of products are as follows:—
1968
Metals  $250,912,026
Industrial minerals ... 26,056,782
Structural materials __ 45,189,476
Fuels  82,870,204
The increase in metal production by 17.2 per cent was due to the remarkable
increases in the production of copper ($24.3 million) and molybdenum ($14
million). The copper increase combined an increased quantity with an increase in
average price from 54.22 to 66.66 cents per pound; the molybdenum increase
largely was due to increased production at Endako mine.
The decrease in value of industrial minerals was due to a reduction in value
of sulphur ($5.8 million). Not only was the production from Jefferson Lake down
but there was a large reduction in the arbitrary price used in valuing the sulphur
content of the sulphuric acid produced by Cominco Ltd.
Structural materials increased in value (by $10.1 million) mostly due to
increased value of cement, sand, and gravel.
The value of fuels increased by 12.9 per cent despite decreased production of
coal. Both crude oil and natural gas continue to increase in quantity and value.
In 1969, coal contributed 7.3 per cent of the total value but, with the start of bulk
shipments of coal to Japan, this percentage should increase considerably in 1970.
During the next few years it is anticipated that the total value of production
will continue to increase. New production of copper is expected from several
important properties proceeding toward production, and several properties in production in 1970 or shortly thereafter will contribute significantly to the output of
molybdenum. Production of coal will increase greatly because of deliveries to Japan
starting in April, 1970. Petroleum and natural gas production are expected to
maintain a steady growth.
Provincial Revenue.—Direct revenue to the Provincial Government derived
from the entire mineral industry in 1969 was as follows:—
Free miners' certificates, recording fees, lease
rentals, assessment payments, etc.  $1,779,378.16
Royalties on iron concentrates  252,489.34
Rentals and royalties on industrial minerals
and structural materials  239,024.00
Fifteen-per-cent mining tax (received during
1969)   3,725,329.00
Coal licences   78,605.90
Petroleum and natural gas rentals, fees, etc  10,339,973.73
A 12
 REVIEW OF THE MINERAL INDUSTRY A 13
Sale of Crown reserves   $21,646,451.54
Royalties on oil, gas, and processed products    12,796,833.56
Miscellaneous   19,625.19
Total   $50,877,710.42
Metal Mining.—In 1969, 60 mines produced 31.8 million tons of ore. Eight
mines produced more than 1 million tons each and nine open-pit mines produced
more than 21 million tons.
In 1969, 29 concentrators were in operation. A new concentrator, capacity
24,000 tons per day, was completed at Brenda mine. Concentrators with total
capacity of 10,575 tons per day were under construction at the Granduc, Greyhound, Magnum, Silverquick, Mount Copeland, and True Fissure mines.
Exploration and development work reached a sufficiently advanced stage for
production to be expected within the next few years from the following properties:
Island Copper (copper-molybdenum) at Rupert Inlet; Lornex and Alwin (copper)
in Highland Valley; Newman (copper) on Babine Lake; Ingerbelle and Copper
Mountain (copper) at Princeton; Nadina (silver-lead-zinc) at Owen Lake; Invincible (tungsten) at Salmo; Annex (lead-zinc) near Remac; and Ruth Vermont
(silver-lead-zinc) near Golden.
During the year mining and concentrating operations were terminated by
Zeballos Iron Mines Limited (FL mine).
The Trail smelter treated 7,456 tons of crude ore and 359,937 tons of concentrates from British Columbia as well as a large tonnage of concentrates, ore, and
scrap from sources outside the Province. A total of 2,220,867 tons of concentrates
was shipped to foreign smelters. Of the total metal production of the Province,
concentrates representing 9.0 per cent of the total value were shipped to American
smelters and concentrates representing 43.3 per cent of the total value were shipped
to Japanese smelters.
Destination of British Columbia Concentrates
Smelters
Gold-Silver
Lead
Zinc
Copper
Nickel-Copper
Iron
Trail
Tons
2,707
Tons
157,603
9,542
Tons
199,627
83,517
Tons
Tons
Tons
United States.	
24,362
268,892
16.760      1      1.817.794
Most molybdenum is sold as molybdenite concentrate, but Endako Mines Ltd.
convert about 31 per cent of their output to molybdic oxide. Destinations of British
Columbia molybdenum are as follows: Canada and the United States, 10 per cent;
Japan, 14 per cent; and the bulk of the remainder sold in Europe, with the United
Kingdom taking 27 per cent.
Prospecting for, and exploration and development of, mineral deposits continued at a high level of activity throughout the Province. The chief interest was in
copper, copper-molybdenum, and molybdenum deposits in the Omineca, Kamloops,
Cariboo, and Atlin Mining Divisions. The number of mineral claims recorded in
1969 was 84,665, a 40-per-cent increase over 1968. Slightly less exploratory
diamond drilling but slightly more percussion drilling was done in 1969. The
employment statistics for exploration work were slightly less in 1969, 11,466 man-
J
 A  14
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1969
months, compared with 11,794 man-months in 1968. About 430 geological, geo-
chemical, and geophysical reports were accepted by the Department in 1969. They
represent not less than $2,060,000 in work done on claims.
The statistics of exploration and development of mineral deposits and mines
are presented as recorded on Dominion Bureau of Statistics forms. Comparable
figures for petroleum and natural gas are not available.
Exploration and Development Expenditures, 1969
Physical
Work
Land Costs
Head Office
Administration,
Etc.
Total
Exploration—prospecting   and   undeclared   mines—
422 companies    	
$34,357,000
$2,749,000
461,000
269,000
$7,272,000
446,000
5,204,000
$44,378,000
Exploration   on  or  near  declared  mines—27   oper-
$4,545,000
5,452,000
Development on declared or operating mines—
$64,757,000
19,837,000
$84,594,000
90,067,000
Totals               ...
$m.49fi nnn I sr47Qnnn
$12,922,000
$139,897,000
The foregoing represent minimum amounts, but the response by the industry
is sufficiently complete to provide figures that are substantially correct. Exploration
includes all work up to the point when a company declares their intention of
proceeding to production.
Departmental records indicate that a total of not less than 11,500 man-months
of work was done by company and contractor employees in prospecting for and
exploring metallic mineral deposits. This figure is not comparable with the one in
Table 10 which shows the total company employees reported to the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics.
Major operating expenditures in 1969 by companies involved in the exploration
and mining of metals, minerals, and coal were as follows:—
Mining operations—metals, minerals, coal  $133,903,585
Structural materials operations       13,488,952
Capital expenditures       70,738,768
Repair expenditures       21,296,769
Exploration and development     139,897,000
TotaL
$379,325,074
Capital and repair expenditures are listed separately because of difficulties in allocating them consistently. Actually most of the repair expenditures should be applied
to mining operations, and most of the capital expenditures to exploration and
development.
Coal Mining.—In 1969 the coal-mining industry of British Columbia was in
transition from a dormant period which had existed since about 1950 to a period
of expansion and greatly increased production resulting from the sustained demand
for coking-coal by the Japanese steel industry. The 15-year contracts signed by
Kaiser Resources Ltd., and the prospective contracts being negotiated by other
companies in the East Kootenay coalfield seem to indicate an immediate increase
 REVIEW OF THE MINERAL INDUSTRY A 15
in output to about 5 million tons per year, followed by a further increase to 9 million
tons and perhaps even higher. In order to carry out this expansion, a tremendous
increase in facilities both at the mines and at the shipping points, together with far-
reaching changes in railway transportation methods, has been necessary. The new
bulk-coal shipping terminals at Roberts Bank and at Neptune Terminal in Vancouver Harbour were substantially completed by the end of the year.
The amount of coal sold and used in 1969 amounted to 852,340 short tons
valued at $6,817,155, a decrease of $771,834 or 10.2 per cent. Almost all this
production (99 per cent) was from the Michel operations of Kaiser Resources Ltd.
Coal exploration has been stimulated by the more favourable outlook for sales
by the industry. Not only has exploration been active in the East Kootenay coalfield, but a number of other coal areas in the Province have been re-examined.
Perhaps the most significant discovery was east of Sukunka River, 36 miles south
of Chetwynd, where reserves of high-grade coking-coal in relatively flat-lying seams
are being explored.
Petroleum and Natural Gas.—The 1969 value of production of the petroleum
industry amounted to $86.8 million. For the fifth successive year there was a
substantial gain in production. Gains in production compared to 1968 for crude
oil were 16.3 per cent in value and 14.2 per cent in quantity, and for natural gas
were 13.7 per cent in value and 15.3 per cent in quantity. Crude oil was second
only to copper in value. Secondary recovery schemes from the oilfields producing
from Triassic formations accounted for the majority of the crude-oil production.
Large increases in gas production came from northern fields producing from reservoirs in Devonian formations. Eighty-five per cent of the Province's crude-oil
production came from the Boundary Lake, Peejay, Milligan Creek, Inga, and Weasel
fields. The major gas fields are Clarke Lake, Yoyo, Laprise, Nig Creek, Jedney,
and Rigel.
Exploration activities, as measured by the amount of seismic work and exploration drilling done, were down during the year. Development drilling was only slightly
less than in 1968, but the total footage drilled, including exploration, declined by
19 per cent.
The number of wells completed decreased by 9 per cent and no significant
discoveries were made.
No major changes were made to pipe-fine and marketing installations.
Net cash expenditures by the petroleum industry in 1969 follow:—
Exploration, including land acquisition and drilling   $57,599,000
Development drilling  11,241,000
Capital expenditures  9,702,000
Natural-gas plants operations  3,735,000
Field, well, and pipe-line operations  9,785,000
General (excluding income tax)  17,688,000
Total $109,750,000
 Statistics
CHAPTER II
INTRODUCTION
The statistics of the mineral industry are collected, compiled, and tabulated
for this Report by the Economics and Statistics Branch, Department of Industrial
Development, Trade, and Commerce, Victoria.
In the interests of uniformity and to avoid duplication of effort, beginning with
the statistics for 1925, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and the various Provincial
departments have co-operated in the collecting and processing of mineral statistics.
Producers of metals, industrial minerals, structural materials, coal, and
petroleum and natural gas are requested to submit returns in duplicate on forms
prepared for use by the Province and by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
As far as possible, both organizations follow the same practice in processing
the data. The final compilation by the Dominion Bureau is usually published
considerably later than the Report of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources
for British Columbia. Differences between the values of production published by
the two organizations arise mainly because the Dominion Bureau uses average prices
for metals considered applicable to the total Canadian production, whereas the British Columbia mining statistician uses prices considered applicable to British Columbia production. This method of pricing with respect to copper results in the Dominion Bureau of Statistic's value of copper production being considerably less than
the amount recorded in this report.
Peat, included under the classification of fuel by the Dominion Bureau, is not
regarded as a mineral or fuel, and accordingly is not included in the British
Columbia statistics of mineral production.
METHOD OF COMPUTING PRODUCTION
The tabulated statistics are arranged so as to facilitate comparison of the
production records for the various mining divisions, and from year to year. From
time to time, revisions have been made to figures published in earlier reports as
additional data became available or errors become known.
Data are obtained from the certified returns made by producers of metals,
industrial minerals and structural materials, and coal, and are augmented by data
obtained from custom smelters. For placer gold, returns from operators are augmented by data obtained from the Royal Canadian Mint. For petroleum, natural
gas, and liquid by-products, production figures supplied by the Petroleum and
Natural Gas Branch of the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources are
compiled from the monthly disposition reports and the Crown royalty statement
filed with the Department by the producers.
Values are in Canadian funds. Weights are avoirdupois pounds and short
tons (2,000 lb.), and troy ounces.   Barrels are 35 imperial gallons.
Metals
Gross and Net Content
The gross content of a metal in ore, concentrate, or bullion is the amount of
that metal calculated from an assay of the material, and the gross metal contents are
A 16
 STATISTICS
A 17
the sum of individual metal assay contents.   The net contents are the gross contents
less smelter and refinery losses.
In past years there have been different methods used in calculating net contents,
particularly in the case of one metal contained in the concentrate of another. The
present method was established in 1963 and is outlined in the following table. For
example, the net content of silver in copper concentrates is 98 per cent of the gross
content, of cadmium in zinc concentrates is 70 per cent of the gross content, etc.
Lead
Zinc
Copper
Copper-Nickel
Copper
Concentrates
Concentrates
Concentrates
Concentrates
Matte
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
Silver	
98
98
98
98
Copper  -	
Less 26 lb./ton
Less 10 lb./ton
85
Less 10 lb./ton
Lead __ 	
98
50
50
50
Zinc 	
50
90
Cadmium —	
70
70
Nickel	
—
88
__
Calculated Value
Prior to 1925 the value of gold and copper produced was calculated by using
their true average prices and, in addition, for copper the smelter loss was taken
into account.
The value of other metals was calculated from the gross metal content of ores
or concentrates by using a metal price which was an arbitrary percentage of the
average price, as follows: Silver, 95 per cent; lead, 90 per cent; and zinc, 85
per cent.
It is these percentages of the average price that are listed in the table on page
A 26.
For 1925 and subsequent years the value has been calculated by using the true
average price (see p. A 26) and the net metal contents, in accordance with the procedures adopted by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and the Department of
Mines and Petroleum Resources.
In the statistical tables, for gold the values are calculated by multiplying the
gross contents of gold by the average price for the year; for the other principal
metals, by multiplying the net contents of metals as determined by means of the
above table by the average price for the year.
Iron concentrate exported to Japan is valued at the price received by the
shippers. The value per ton of the iron ore used in making pig iron at Kimberley
is an arbitrary figure, being the average of several ores of comparable grade at their
points of export from British Columbia. The value of molybdenum is the amount
received by the shippers. The metals, bismuth, tin, mercury, and indium, are
valued on the basis of the price received by the shippers, and the value of antimony
is the net content multiplied by the average price for the year.
Average Prices
The prices used in the valuation of current and past metal production are
shown in the table on page A 26.
The price of gold used is the average Canadian Mint buying-price for fine gold.
In 1969 this was $37.69 per ounce.
The price used for placer gold was originally established arbitrarily at $17
per ounce, when the price of fine gold was $20.67 per ounce.   Between 1931 and
 A 18 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1969
1962 the price was proportionately increased with the continuously changing price
of fine gold. Since 1962, Canadian Mint reports giving the fine-gold content have
been available for all but a very small part of the placer gold produced, and the
average price listed is derived by dividing ounces of placer gold into total amount
received.
Prior to 1949 the prices used for silver, copper, lead, and zinc were the average
prices of the markets indicated in the table on page A 26, converted into Canadian
funds. The abbreviations in the table are Mont.=Montreal; N.Y.=New York;
Lond.=London; E. St. L.=East St. Louis; and U.S.=United States.
Latterly the prices of the principal metals, silver, copper, lead, and zinc are
average United States prices converted into Canadian funds. Average monthly
prices are supplied by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics from figures published
in the Metal Markets section of the Engineering and Mining Journal. Specifically,
for silver it is the New York price; for lead it is the New York price; for zinc it is
the price at East St. Louis of Prime Western; for copper it is the United States
export refinery price; and for cadmium the New York producer's price to consumer.
For nickel the price used is the Canadian price as set by the International
Nickel Company of Canada Ltd.
Industrial Minerals and Structural Materials
The values for industrial minerals and structural materials approximate the
amounts received at the point of origin.
Fuel
The price per ton used in valuing coal (see p. A 26) is the weighted average of
the f.o.b. prices at the mine for the coal sold.
The values for natural gas, natural-gas liquid by-products, and for petroleum
including condensate/pentanes plus are the amounts received for the products at
the well-head.
NOTES ON PRODUCTS LISTED IN THE TABLES
Antimony.—Antimony metal was produced at the Trail smelter from 1939 to
1944; since 1944 it has been marketed alloyed with lead. The antimony is a
by-product from silver-lead ores. In 1907 the first recorded antimonial ore mined
in British Columbia was shipped from the Slocan area to England. Since then
other out-of-Province shipments have originated in the Bridge River, North Lardeau,
Slocan, Spillimacheen, and Stuart Lake areas. In Table 7c the antimony assigned
to individual mining divisions is the reported content of ores exported to foreign
smelters; the antimony "not assigned " is that recovered at the Trail smelter from
various ores received there.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7c.
Arsenious Oxide.—Arsenious oxide was recovered at foreign smelters from
arsenical gold ores from Hedley between 1917 and 1931, and in 1942 and from
the Victoria property on Rocher Deboule Mountain in 1928. No production has
been recorded since 1942.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Asbestos.—British Columbia has produced asbestos since 1952 when the
Cassiar mine, the sole producer to date, was opened. From 1953 to 1961 the fibre
was valued at the shipping point in North Vancouver, but beginning in 1962 it has
been valued at the mine, and values for the preceding years have been recalculated
on that basis.   See Tables 1,3, and 7d.
 STATISTICS A 19
Barite.—Barite production began in 1940 and has been continuous since then,
coming from several operations in the upper Columbia River valley. Some barite
is mined from lode deposits and the rest is recovered from the mill-tailings ponds
of the former Silver Giant and Mineral King silver-lead-zinc mines. See Tables 1,
3, and 7d.
Bentonite.—Small amounts of bentonite were produced between 1926 and
1944 from deposits in the coal measures near Princeton. There has been no production since 1944.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Bismuth.—Since 1929 the Trail smelter has produced bismuth. It is a byproduct of lead refining and thus the production cannot be assigned to specific
properties or mining divisions.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7c.
Brick.—See Clay and Shale products.
Butane.—Butane is recovered as a by-product at the gas-processing plant at
Taylor and at oil refineries.   See Tables 1,3, and 7a.
Cadmium.—Cadmium has been recovered as a by-product at the Trail zinc
refinery since 1928. It occurs in variable amounts in the sphalerite of most British
Columbia silver-lead-zinc ores. In Table 7c the cadmium assigned to individual
mining divisions is the reported content of custom shipments to the Trail and foreign
smelters; that " not assigned " is the remainder of the reported estimated recovery
at the Trail smelter from British Columbia concentrates.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7c.
Cement.—Cement is manufactured from carefully proportioned mixtures of
limestone, gypsum, and other mineral materials. It has been produced in British
Columbia since 1905. Present producers are Ocean Cement Limited, with a 4.8-
million-barrel-per-year plant at Bamberton, and Canada Cement Lafarge Ltd. with
a 3.5-million-barrel-per-year plant on Lulu Island and a 1.2-million-barrel-per-year
plant at Kamloops.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7e.
Clay and Shale Products.—These include brick, blocks, tile, pipe, pottery, lightweight aggregate, and pozzolan manufactured from British Columbia clays and
shales. Common red-burning clays and shales are widespread in the Province, but
better grade clays are rare. The first recorded production was of bricks at Craig-
flower in 1853. Since then plants have operated in most towns and cities for short
periods, but today clayware production is restricted to plants in Vancouver, Haney,
Abbotsford, and Kilgard. On Saturna Island, shale is used to make light-weight
aggregate and pozzolan clinker and at Quesnel burnt shale is made into pozzolan.
Several hobby and art potteries and a sanitaryware plant are in operation also, but
these use mainly imported raw materials and their production is not included in the
tables.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7e.
Chromite.—Two shipments of chromite are on record, 670 tons from Cascade
in 1918 and 126 tons from Scottie Creek in 1929.   See Tables 1 and 7c.
Coal.—Coal was discovered at Suquash on Vancouver Island in 1835, at
Nanaimo in 1850, and later at numerous other places in British Columbia. First
production, by Mining Divisions: Cariboo, 1942; Fort Steele, 1898; Kamloops,
1893; Liard, 1923; Nanaimo, 1836; Nicola, 1907; Omineca, 1918; Osoyoos,
1926; Similkameen, 1909; and Skeena, 1912. The Nanaimo and Comox fields
produced virtually all of the coal until the opening up of the Crowsnest field in 1898.
The closing of the last large mine at Tsable River in 1966, and of the last small one,
near Wellington in 1968, marked the end of production from the once important
Vancouver Island deposits. The enormous requirements for coking-coal in Japan
created great activity in coal prospecting in various areas of British Columbia during
1969.   The signing of large contracts with the Japanese resulted in preparations for
 A 20 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
production at several deposits in the East Kootenays. First shipments to Japan via
special port facilities at North Vancouver and Roberts Bank began in 1970.
All the coal produced, including that used in making coke, is shown as primary
mine production. Quantity from 1836 to 1909 is gross mine output and includes
material lost in picking and washing. From 1910 the quantity is the amount sold
and used, which includes sales to retail and wholesale dealers, industrial users, and
company employees; coal used under company boilers, including steam locomotives;
and coal used in making coke.   See Tables 1, 3, 7a, 8a, and 8b.
Cobalt.—In 1928 a recovery of 1,730 pounds of cobalt was made from a shipment of arsenical gold ore from the Victoria mine on Rocher Deboule Mountain.
See Tables 1 and 7c.
Coke.—Coke is made from special types of coal. It has been produced in
British Columbia since 1895. Being a manufactured product, its value does not
contribute to the total mineral production as shown in Table 1. Up to 1966, coke
statistics had been included in the Annual Report as Table 9, but this table has
been discontinued. The coal used in making coke is still recorded in Table 8b.
Coke statistics are available on request from the Economics and Statistics Branch,
Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce, Victoria.
Copper.—Copper production started in 1894. Ore was smelted in British
Columbia first in 1896 at Nelson (from Silver King mine) and at Trail (from
Rossland mines), and four and five years later at Grand Forks (from Phoenix mine)
and Greenwood (from Mother Lode mine). Later, small smelters were built in the
Boundary district and on Vancouver and Texada Islands, and in 1914 the Anyox
smelter was blown in. Copper smelting ceased in the Boundary district in 1919,
at Trail in 1929, and at Anyox in 1935. British Columbia copper ore was then
smelted mainly at Tacoma, and since 1961 has gone chiefly to Japan.
Most of the production has come from southern British Columbia—from
Britannia, Copper Mountain, Greenwood, Highland Valley, Merritt, Nelson, Rossland, Texada Island, and Vancouver Island, although a sizeable amount came from
Anyox and some came from Tulsequah. During recent years exploration for copper
has been intense, interest being especially keen in very large, low-grade deposits
suitable for open-pit mining. This activity has resulted in the establishment of
operating mines at Merritt (Craigmont) in 1961, in Highland Valley (Bethlehem)
in 1962, on Babine Lake (Granisle) in 1966, and near Peachland (Brenda) in
1970. Large mines near Port Hardy (Island Copper) and Stewart (Granduc) are
nearing the production stage; the Lornex and Valley Copper properties in Highland
Valley are in the advanced planning stage; and more prospects are under study in
Highland Valley, the Stikine region, and other areas.   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7b.
Crude Oil.—Production of crude oil in British Columbia began in 1955 from
the Fort St. John field, but was not significant until late in 1961 (see Fig. 34), when
the 12-inch oil pipe-line was built to connect the oil-gathering terminal at Taylor to
the Trans Mountain Oil Pipe Line Company pipe-line near Kamloops. In 1969
oil was produced from 25 separate fields, of which the Boundary Lake, Peejay, Mil-
ligan Creek, Inga, and Weasel fields were most productive.
In Tables 1, 3, and 7a, quantities given prior to 1962 under "petroleum,
crude " are total sales, and from 1962 to 1965 include field and plant condensates
listed separately. Full details are given in tables in the Petroleum and Natural Gas
chapter of this report.
Diatomite.—Small amounts of diatomite have been shipped from Quesnel
periodically since 1928. A plant to process the material locally was built in the
town in 1969.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7d.
 STATISTICS A 21
Field Condensate.—Field condensate is the liquid hydrocarbons separated and
recovered from natural gas in the field before gas processing. See Tables 1,3, and
7a.
Fluorite (Fluorspar).—Between 1918 and 1929, fluorite was mined at the Rock
Candy mine north of Grand Forks for use in the Trail lead refinery. From 1958 to
1968, small quantities were produced as a by-product at the Oliver silica quarry.
See Tables 1,3, and 7d.
Flux.—Silica and limestone are added to smelter furnaces as flux to combine
with impurities in the ore and form a slag which separates from the valuable metal.
In the past, silica from Grand Forks, Oliver, and the Sheep Creek area was shipped,
but today only limestone, chiefly from Texada Island, is produced for flux. Quantities have been recorded since 1911.   See Tables 1,3, and 7d.
Gold, Lode.—Gold has played an important part in mining in the Province.
The first discovery of lode gold was made on Moresby Island in 1852, and the
first stamp mill, to treat gold-bearing quartz, was built in the Cariboo in 1876.
The principal gold-mining camps in order of production have been Bridge
River, Rossland, Portland Canal, Hedley, Wells, and Sheep Creek. At the present
time the only major producing gold mine is the Bralorne mine in the Bridge River
area. Currently more than half the gold is produced as a by-product from copper,
copper-zinc-silver, and other base-metal mining.   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7b.
Gold, Placer.—The early explorations and settlement of the Province followed
rapidly on the discovery of gold-bearing placer creeks throughout the country.
The first placer miners came in 1858 to mine the lower Fraser River bars upstream
from Yale.
Important placers were found in the Cariboo, Cassiar, Omineca, and Princeton
areas, and at Atlin, Cedar Creek, Fort Steele, Goldstream, Rock Creek, Squaw
Creek, and many other places.
Since World War II, placer-mining has been declining steadily.
A substantial part of the production, including much of the gold recovered from
the Fraser River upstream from Yale (in the present New Westminster, Kamloops,
and Lillooet Mining Divisions) and much of the early Cariboo production, was
mined before the original organization of the Department of Mines in 1874. Consequently, the amounts recorded are based on early estimates and cannot be accurately
assigned to individual mining divisions.
The first year of production for major placer-producing mining divisions was:
Atlin, 1898; Cariboo, 1859; Liard, 1873; Lillooet, 1858; Omineca, 1869.
In 1965, changes were made in the allocation of placer gold to the New Westminster and Similkameen Mining Divisions and " not assigned," to reconcile those
figures with data incorporated in Bulletin No. 28, Placer Gold Production of British
Columbia.   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7a.
Granules.—Rock chips used for bird grits, exposed aggregate, roofing, stucco
dash, terrazzo, etc., have been produced in constantly increasing quantities since
1930. Plants operate in Burnaby, near Hope, at Monte Creek, Sirdar, Vananda,
and Vernon.   See Tables 1,3, and 7d.
Gypsum and Gypsite.—Production of gypsum and gypsite has been recorded
since 1911. Between 1925 and 1956 more than 1,000,000 tons was shipped from
Falkland and some was quarried near Cranbrook and Windermere. Since 1956
all production has come from Windermere.   See Tables 1,3, and 7d.
Hydromagnesite.—Small shipments of hydromagnesite were made from Atlin
between 1904 and 1916 and from Clinton in 1921.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Indium.—Production of indium as a by-product of zinc-refining at the Trail
smelter began in 1942.   Production figures have not been disclosed since 1958.
 A 22 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
Iron Concentrates.—Iron ore was produced in small quantities as early as 1885.
Sustained production began in 1951 with shipments of concentrated magnetite ore
to Japan. The ore has been mined mainly from magnetite and copper-bearing
magnetite deposits on Vancouver Island, Texada Island, and Morseby Island.
Since 1961, calcined iron sulphide from the tailings of the Sullivan mine has
been used for making pig iron at Kimberley. The entire production, credited to the
Fort Steele Mining Division in Table 7c, is of calcine.   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7c.
Iron Oxide.—Iron oxide, ochre, and bog iron were mined as early as 1918
from several occurrences, but mainly from limonite deposits north of Squamish.
None has been produced since 1950.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Jade (Nephrite).—Production of jade (nephrite) has been recorded only since
1959 despite there being several years of significant production prior to that date.
The jade is recovered from a few bedrock occurrences and as alluvial boulders from
the Fraser River; the Bridge River and its tributaries, Marshall, Hell, and Cad-
wallader Creeks; O'Ne-ell, Ogden, Kwanika, and Wheaton Creeks; and Dease
Lake.    See Tables 1, 3, and 7d.
Lead.—Lead was first produced in British Columbia in 1887. Almost all has
come from the southeastern part of the Province, where the Sullivan mine has produced about 85 per cent of the Provincial total. Other important mines are at
Salmo, Pend d'Oreille River, and North Kootenay Lake.
In 1958, revisions were made in some yearly totals for lead to adjust them for
recovery of lead from slag treated at the Trail smelter.   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7b.
Limestone.—Besides being used for flux and granules (where it is recorded
separately), limestone is used in agriculture, cement manufacture, the pulp and
paper industry, and for making lime. It has been produced since 1886. Quarries
now operate at Cobble Hill, near Prince George, and on the north end of Texada
Island.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7e.
Magnesium.—In 1941 and 1942, Cominco Ltd. produced magnesium from
magnesite mined from a large deposit at Marysville.   See Tables 1 and 7c.
Magnesium Sulphate.—Magnesium sulphate was recovered in minor amounts
at various times between 1915 and 1942 from small alkali lakes near Basque,
Clinton, and Osoyoos.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Manganese.—In 1918-20 manganese ore was shipped from a bog deposit near
Kaslo and from Hill 60 near Cowichan Lake, and in 1956 a test shipment was made
from Olalla.   See Tables 1 and 7c.
Mercury.—Mercury was first produced near Savona in 1895. Since then small
amounts have been recovered from the same area and from the Bridge River district.
The main production to date was between 1940-44 from the Pinchi Lake and Takla
mines near Fort St. James. In 1968 the Pinchi Lake mine reopened and continues
in full operation. The Silverquick mine in Bridge River region is expected to
recommence production in 1970.   See Tables 1 and 7c.
Mica.—No sheet mica has been produced commercially in British Columbia.
Between 1932-61 small amounts of mica schist for grinding were mined near
Albreda, Armstrong, Oliver, Prince Rupert, and Sicamous.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7d.
Molybdenum.—Molybdenum ore in small amounts was produced from high-
grade deposits between 1914 and 1918. More recently, mining of large low-grade
molybdenum and copper-molybdenum deposits has increased production to the
point that molybdenum now ranks third in importance in annual value of metals
produced in British Columbia. The upswing began when Bethlehem Copper mine
recovered by-product molybdenum in 1964 to 1966. In 1965, Endako and Boss
Mountain mine, followed by the Coxey in 1966, and British Columbia Molybdenum
 STATISTICS A 23
in 1967, all began operations as straight molybdenum producers. In 1970, Brenda
mine, a combination copper-molybdenum producer, started operating. Other large-
scale combined metal deposits are in advanced stages of planning. See Tables 1, 3,
6, and 7c.
Natro-alunite.—In 1912 and 1913, 400 tons of natro-alunite was mined from
a small low-grade deposit at Kyuquot Sound. There has been no subsequent production.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Natural Gas.—Commercial production of natural gas began in 1954 to supply
the community of Fort St. John. Since the completion in 1957 of the gas plant at
Taylor and the 30-inch pipe-line to serve British Columbia and the northwestern
United States, the daily average volume of production has increased to more than
800,000,000 cubic feet (see Table 26). In 1969 there were 32 producing gas fields
(see Table 25).
The production shown in Tables 1, 3, and 7a is the total amount sold of
residual gas from processing plants plus dry and associated gas from the gas-
gathering system; that is, the quantity delivered to the main transmission-line. The
quantity is net after deducting gas used on leases, metering difference, and gas used
or lost in the cleaning plant. The quantity is reported as thousands of cubic feet at
standard conditions (14.4 pounds per square inch pressure, 60° F. temperature,
up to and including the year 1960, and thereafter 14.65 pounds per square inch
pressure, 60° F. temperature).
Full details of gross well output, other production, delivery, and sales are
given in tables in the Petroleum and Natural Gas chapter of this report.
Nickel.—One mine, the Pride of Emory near Hope, shipped nickel ore in
1936 and 1937 and began continuous production in 1958. Since 1960, bulk copper-
nickel concentrates have been shipped to Japan for smelting. See Tables 1, 3,
and 7c.
Palladium.—Palladium was recovered in 1928, 1929, and 1930 as a byproduct of the Trail refinery and is presumed to have originated in copper concentrates shipped to the smelter from the Copper Mountain mine.   See Tables 1 and 7c.
Perlite.—In 1953 a test shipment of 1,112 tons was made from a quarry on
Francois Lake.   There has been no further production.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Petroleum, Crude.—See Crude Oil.
Phosphate Rock.—Between 1927 and 1933, Cominco Ltd. produced 3,842
tons of phosphate rock for test purposes, but the grade proved to be too low for
commercial use. More test shipments were made in 1964 but there has been no
commercial production.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Plant Condensate.—Plant condensate is the hydrocarbon liquid extracted from
natural gas at gas-processing plants.   See Tables 1,3, and 7a.
Platinum.—Platinum has been produced intermittently from placer streams in
small amounts since 1887, mostly from the Tulameen and Similkameen Rivers.
Placer platinum also has been recovered from Pine, Thibert, McConnell, Rainbow,
Tranquille, Rock, and Government Creeks; from Quesnel, Fraser, Cottonwood,
Peace, and Coquihalla Rivers; and from beach placers on Graham Island. Some
platinum recovered between 1928 and 1930 as a by-product of the Trail refinery is
presumed to have originated in copper concentrates shipped to the smelter from the
Copper Mountain mine.   See Tables 1,3, and 7c.
Propane.—Propane is recovered from gas-processing plants at Taylor and
Boundary Lake, and at oil refineries.   See Tables 1,3, and 7a.
 A 24 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
Rock.—Production of rubble, riprap, and crushed rock has been recorded
since 1909.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7e.
Sand and Gravel.—Sand and gravel are used as aggregate in concrete work of
all kinds. The output varies from year to year according to the state of activity of
the construction industry.   See Tables 1,3, and 7e.
Selenium.—The only recorded production of selenium, 731 pounds, was in
1931 from the refining of blister copper from the Anyox smelter. See Tables 1
and 7c.
Silver.—Production of silver began in 1887 from silver-copper and silver-lead
ores in the Kootenays and has continued in this area to the present. Now, most
of the silver is a by-product of lead-zinc ores and nearly all is refined at Trail,
although some is exported with concentrates to American and Japanese smelters,
or may go to the Mint in gold bullion. Today the greatest single source of silver
is the Sullivan mine, which has recorded production since 1900. The only steady
producer that is strictly a silver mine is the Highland Bell at Beaverdell, in operation
since 1922. A former important mine, the Premier near Stewart, produced more
than 41,000,000 ounces of silver between 1918 and 1968. See Tables 1, 3, 6,
and 7b.
Sodium Carbonate.—Sodium carbonate was recovered between 1921 and 1949
from alkali lakes in the Clinton area and around Kamloops. There has been no
further production.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Stone.—Cut stone for building purposes is prepared from rock produced at
quarries in various parts of the Province when required. Two of the most productive
quarries have operated on Haddington and Nelson Islands.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7e.
Structural Materials.—In Table 7e the value of $5,972,171 for unclassified
materials is the total for structural materials in the period 1886-1919 that cannot
be allotted to particular classes of structural materials or assigned to mining divisions,
and includes $726,323 shown against 1896 in Table 2 that includes unclassified
structural materials in that and previous years not assignable to particular years.
The figure $3,180,828 in Table 7e under " Other Clay Products " is the value in
the period 1886-1910 that cannot be allotted to particular clay products or assigned
to mining divisions.   See Tables 1, 2, 3, 7a, and 7e.
Sulphur.—The production of sulphur has been recorded since 1916. From
1916 to 1927 the amounts include the sulphur content of pyrite shipped. From
1928 the amounts include the estimated sulphur content of pyrite shipped, plus the
sulphur contained in sulphuric acid made from waste smelter gases. The sulphur
content of pyrrhotite roasted at the Kimberley fertilizer plant is included since
1953. Since 1958, elemental sulphur recovered from the Jefferson Lake Petrochemical Co. plant at Taylor has been included.   See Tables 1,3, and 7d.
Talc.—Between 1916 and 1936, talc was quarried at Leech River and at
Anderson Lake for dusting asphalt roofing. There has been no production since
1936.   See Tables 1, 3, and 7d.
Tin.—Tin, as cassiterite, is a by-product of the Sullivan mine, where it has been
produced since 1941. The tin concentrate is shipped to an American smelter for
treatment.   See Tables 1,3, and 7c.
Tungsten.—Tungsten, very largely as scheelite concentrates, was produced from
1937 to 1958, first from the Cariboo in 1937 and during World War II from the
Red Rose mine near Hazelton and the Emerald mine near Salmo. The Red Rose
closed in 1954 and the Emerald in 1958.
 STATISTICS
A 25
A very small amount of wolframite came from Boulder Creek near Atlin. See
Tables 1, 3, and 7c.
Volcanic Ash.—The only recorded production of volcanic ash is 30 tons from
the Cariboo Mining Division in 1954.   See Tables 1 and 7d.
Zinc.—Zinc was first produced in 1905. Currently the total value of all zinc
production is greater than that of any of the other metals, lead being in second place.
By far the greatest amount of zinc has been mined in southeastern British Columbia, at the Sullivan mine, and at mines near Ainsworth, Invermere, Moyie Lake,
Riondel, Salmo, Slocan, and Spillimacheen. Other production has come from mines
at Portland Canal and Tulsequah and is coming from Britannia and Buttle Lake.
The greatest zinc mine is the Sullivan, which has contributed about 75 per cent
of the total zinc production of the Province.
Records for the period 1905 to 1908 show shipments totalling 18,845 tons of
zinc ore and zinc concentrates of unstated zinc content. In 1958, revisions were
made to some yearly totals for zinc to adjust them for recovery of zinc from slag
treated at the Trail smelter.   See Tables 1, 3, 6, and 7b.
 A 26
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1969
Prices1 Used in Valuing Production of Gold, Silver, Copper,
Lead, Zinc, and Coal
Year
Gold,
Placer,
Oz.
Gold,
Fine,
Oz.
Silver,
Fine,
Oz.
Copper,
Lb.
Lead,
Lb.
Zinc,
Lb.
Coal,
Short
Ton
1901 	
$
17.00
19.30
23.02
28.37
28.94
28.81
28.77
28.93
29.72
31.66
31.66
31.66
31.66
31.66
31.66
30.22
28.78
28.78
29.60
31.29
30.30
28.18
28.31
27.52
28.39
28.32
27.59
27.94
27.61
27.92
29.24
29.25
29.31
29.96
28.93
29.08
28.77
29.21
29.37
$
20.67
23.47
28.60
34.50
35.19
35.03
34.99
35.18
36.14
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
86.75
35.00
35.00
36.00
38.05
36.85
34.27
34.42
34.07
34.52
34.44
33.55
33.98
33.57
33.95
35.46
37.41
37.75
37.75
37.73
37.71
37.76
37.71
37.69
Cents
56.002 N.Y.
49.55  ..
60.78 „
63.36  „
51.33  „
63.45  ..
62.06  ..
60.22  „
48.93  „
50.812 ,.
50.64 .,
57.79 „
56.80 „
52.10  ..
47.20  „
62.38  .,
77.35  ..
91.93  „
105.57  „
95.80  ,.
59.52  „
64.14  „
61.63  ,.
63.442 „
69.065 „
62.107 ..
56.370 „
58.176 „
52.993 ..
38.154 „
28.700 „
31.671 „
37.832 ..
47.461 „
64.790 „
45.127 ,.
44.881 ,.
43.477 ..
40.488 ,.
38.249 ..
38.261 .,
41.166 „
45.254 ,.
43.000 ..
47.000 ..
83.650 „
72.000 ..
75.000 Mont.
74.250 U.S.
80.635 „
94.550 .,
83.157 ,.
83.774 ..
82.982 ..
87.851 „
89.373 „
87.057 ..
86.448 ..
87.469 ,.
88.633 „
93.696 „
116.029 „
137.965 „
139.458 „
139.374 ,.
139.300 ,,
167.111 „
1231.049 .,
1192.899 „
Cents
16.11 N.Y.
11.70  „
13.24  ..
12.82
15.59 „
19.28  „
20.00  .,
13.20  „
12.98  .,
12.738 .,
12.38  „
16.341 „
15.27 .,
13.60 ..
17.28 „
27.202 „
27.18  „
24.63  „
18.70  „
17.45  .,
12.50  .,
13.38  .,
14.42  „
13.02  „
14.042 „
13.795 ..
12.920 „
14.570 ..
18.107 ..
12.982 „
8.116 .,
6.380 Lond.
7.454 .,
7.419 ..
7.795 „
9.477 ..
13.078 .,
9.972 „
10.092 .,
10.086 „
10.086 .,
10.086 ..
11.750 „
12.000 ,.
12.650 .,
12.800 „
20.390 „
22.350 U.S.
19.978 „
23.428 ..
27.700 „
31.079 „
30.333 „
29.112 „
38.276 „
39.787 „
26.031 „
23.419 „
27.708 „
28.985 „
28.288 „
30.473 „
30.646 ,.
33.412 „
38.377 „
53.344 „
50.022 „
54.216 „
66.656 „
Cents
2.577 N.Y.
3.66 „
3.81  „
3.88  ,.
4.24  .,
4.81  „
4.80  .,
3.78  „
3.85  „
4.00  „
3.98  „
4.024 „
3.93  „
3.50  .,
4.17  .,
6.172 „
7.91  „
6.67 „
5.19  „
7.16  „
4.09  „
6.16  „
6.64  .,
7.287 ,.
7.848 Lond.
6.751 .,
5.256 „
4.575 „
5.050 „
3.927 „
2.710 „
2.113 „
2.391 ,.
2.436 .,
3.133 ..
3.913 .,
5.110 ,.
3.344 „
3.169 „
3.362 „
3.362 „
3.362 „
3.754 „
4.500 ,.
5.000 ..
6.750 „
13.670 „
18.040 „
15.800 U.S.
14.454 „
18.400 „
16.121 „
13.265 „
13.680 „
14.926 „
15.756 .,
14.051 .,
11.755 „
11.670 „
11.689 ,.
11.011 „
10.801 „
12.012 ..
14.662 „
17.247 „
16.283 „
15.102 „
14.546 „
16.039 „
Cents
$
2.679
1902	
1903	
1904	
1905	
1900 	
1907	
3.125
1908	
1909
1910	
1911	
4.60 E. St. L.
4.90  „
5.90  „
4.80  „
4.40  „
11.25  „
10.88  „
7.566 .,
6.94 „
6.24  „
6.52  .,
3.95 „
4.86  „
5.62  „
5.39  ..
7.892 Lond.
7.409 ..
6.194 ..
5.493 ..
5.385 „
3.599 ..
2-654 ..
2.405 „
3.210 .,
3.044 „
3.099 „
3.315 .,
4.902 ,.
3.073 ..
3.069 ..
3.411 „
3.411 ,.
3.411 „
4.000 „
4.300 ..
6.440 ..
7.810 ..
11.230 „
13.930 ..
13.247 U.S.
15.075 „
19.900 „
15.874 ..
10.675 .,
10.417 ,.
12.127 ..
13.278 ,.
11.175 „
10.009 „
10.978 ..
12.657 „
11.695 „
12.422 „
13.173 .,
14.633 .,
15.636 „
15.622 „
14.933 „
14.153 „
15.721  „
1912	
1913	
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917 	
1918	
4.464
1919	
1920	
1921  	
1923	
1924	
1925  	
1927	
1931	
4.018
3.795
1933 	
1934 —
1935	
1937 _.
1938 	
1939 	
194 0	
19 41	
1942	
1943	
1947 	
4.68
5.12
1948	
6.09
6.51
6.43
1951	
6.46
6.94
6.88
7.00
6.74
6.59
6.76
7.45
7.93
I960	
6.64
1961	
7.40
1962	
7.43
1963	
7.33
1964 	
6.94
1965 	
7.03
I960	
7.28
1967	
7.75
1968	
7.91
1969	
8.00
i See page A 17 for detailed explanation.
 STATISTICS
A 27
Table 1.—Mineral Production: Total to Date, Past Year,
and Latest Year
Products*
Total Quantity
to Date
Total Value
to Date
Quantity
1968
Value
1968
Quantity
1969
Value
1969
Antimony —
Bismuth 	
Cadmium  	
Chromite 	
Cobalt	
Copper 	
Gold—placer
— lb.
__ lb.
— lb.
..tons
—lb.
—lb.
-lode, fine .
Iron concentrates tons
Lead  lb.
Magnesium  lb.
Manganese  tons
Mercury2  lb.
Molybdenum  lb.
Nickel   lb.
Palladium  oz.
Platinum _ —	
Selenium _ 	
Silver 	
Tin 	
Tungsten (WO3)
Zinc 	
Others   	
_oz.
...lb.
-OZ.
„lb.
-lb.
...lb.
Totals
Industrial Minerals
Arsenious oxide lb.
Asbestos  tons
Barite   tons
B entonite  tons
Diatomite 	
Fluorspar 	
Fluxes — 	
Granules 	
.tons
.tons
_tons
.tons
Gypsum and gypsite ._ tons
Hydromagnesite  tons
Iron oxide and ochre tons
Jade   lb.
Magnesium sulphate
Mica 	
Natro-alunite
Perlite 	
Phosphate rock 	
Sodium carbonate
Sulphur 	
Talc  _ 	
Others  	
-tons
_..lb.
-tons
..tons
-tons
.tons
. tons
. tons
Totals .
Structural Materials
Cement tons
Clay products .
Lime and limestone .
Rock  	
Sand and gravel
Stone 	
.tons
.tons
-tons
_ tons
Not assigned .
Totals	
Fuels
Coal   	
Crude oil 	
Field condensate _
Plant condensate 	
Nat'l gas to pipe-line- M s.cf.
Butane   bbl.
Propane   bbl.
Totals  	
-tons
.bbl.
. bbl.
bbl.
Grand totals .
51,839,908
6,614,320
38,482,201
796
1,730
4,047,312,919
5,234,917
16,926,021
24,426,855
15,613,477,321
204,632
1,724
4,171,110
87,272,937
38,273,303
749
1,407
731
478,769,477
17,921,267
16,019,324
14,149,964,862
$
15,777.
12,921.
68,983
32,
987,453,
96,943.
500,143.
221,376.
,312,844,
88,
32,
10,447,
150,374.
32,769.
30.
135,
1,
341,169,
15,777.
38,663,
,346,480
23,854.
173
,622
,525
295
420
911
212
,166
081
455
184
668
358
,096
,890
,462
,008
,389
,358
294
751
,629
691
1,159,960
207,783
1,341,437
614,779
868,533
3,823,095
820,122
62,488
1,141,133
508,476
288,070
4,016,788
160,993,338
670
123,896
2,094,745
231,627,618
87,284,148
19,571
4,672,242
21,437,569
32,782,257
167,421,925
399
117,830
2,074,854
210,072,565
111,596,758
11,720
4,440,659
19,787,845
33,693,539
19,799,793
3,317,160
32,552,722
3,372,225
25,512,001
2,979,130
46,533,644
3,396,208
7,130,866
358,191
16,475,795
497,885
5,779,108
288,427
11,136,283
470,136
299,396,264
43,550,181 301,163,774
2,961,024
47,345,957
10,949,453
-|5,176,300,638|-
250,912,0261-
294,175,536
22,019,420
837,689
324,659
791
7,442
35,682
4,052,705
367,269
3,815,025
2,253
18,108
333,792
13,894
12,822,050
522
1,112
3,842
10,492
6,959,040
1,805
12,352,167
1,161,879
273.
164,185
3,473
16.
175.
795,
7,469,
5,482.
13,689.
27.
155.
281.
254,
185
9.
11.
16.
118.
91,575.
34.
5.
,201
,884
,857
85S
,325
950
371
634
269
536
050
414
352
,818
398
,120
894
983
,777
871
213
74,667
21,968
14,833,891
164,206
856
39
42,259
30,237
246,374
17,159
1,117
157,679
436,928
689,847
49,015
105,670
320,521
9,650,285
79,600
26,949
22,342
34,746
280,894
26,332
349,122
288,238,7751.
26,056,782|.
200,177,647
73,012,388
50,502,234
46,893,060
231,736,219
9,204,354
5,972,171
656,363
2,016,892
3,385,712
22,665,961
1,654
13,634,166
4,388,505
3,337,277
3,524,439
20,271,723
33,366
795,591
1,911,881
3,756,559
29,132,650
2,177
15,659,000
190,620
81,917
654,701
764,032
42,635
3,824,593
4,913
21,222,411
16,459,571
4,585,719
3,237,032
4,456,211
26,553,699
39,352
-| 617,498,073|.
45,189,476|-
-| 55,331,584
142,445,046
133,927,942
294,051
9,800,559
1,619,686,307
4,674,283
2,955,601
616,723,876
290,174,807
658,368
5,411,033
162,764,099
1,495,770
945,789
959,214
22,151,353
54,163
960,252
224,233,203
527,546
400,800
7,588,989
50,082,837
122,408
247,455
24,531,445
168,814
128,256
852,340
25,309,036
78,147
944,111
256,223,244
417,540
327,501
6,817,155
58,176,213
180,520
263,278
27,897,585
133,613
104,800
_|1,078,173,742|-
82,870,204| |    93,573,164
 7,160,211,228
405,028,488
464,302,695
1 See notes on individual products listed alphabetically on pages A 18 to A 25.
2 Excludes 1968 and 1969 production, which is confidential.
 A 28 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1969
Table 2.—Total Value of Mineral Production, 1836-1969
Year
Metals
Industrial
Minerals
Structural
Materials
Fuels
Total
1836-86-
1887	
1888	
1889	
1890	
1891	
1892	
1893	
1894	
1895	
1896	
1897	
1898	
1899	
1900 _
1901-
1902-
1903-
1904-
1905-
1906...
1907-
1908-
1909-
1910..
1911-
1912-
1913-
1914-
1915-
1916.
1917..
1918-
1919.
1920-
1921-
1922-
1923-
1924-
1925-
1926-
1927-
1928-
1929-
1930-
1931-
1932-
1933-
1934-
1935-
1936-
1937-
1938-
1939_
1940-
1941-
1942_
1943-
1944_
1945_
1946_
1947_
1948-
1949-
1950-
52,808,750
729,381
745,794
685,512
572,884
447,136
511,075
659,969
1,191,728
2,834,629
4,973,769
7,575,262
7,176,870
8,107,509
11,360,546
14,258,455
12,163,561
12,640,083
13,424,755
16,289,165
18,449,602
17,101,305
15,227,991
14,668,141
13,768,731
11,880,062
18,218,266
17,701,432
15,790,727
20,765,212
32,092,648
27,299,934
27,957,302
20,058,217
19,687,532
13,160,417
19,605,401
25,769,215
35,959,566
46,480,742
51,867,792
45,134,289
48,640,158
52,805,345
41,785,380
23,530,469
20,129,869
25,777,723
35,177,224
42,006,618
45,889,944
65,224,245
55,959,713
56,216,049
64,332,166
65,807,630
63,626,140
55,005,394
42,095,013
50,673,592
58,834,747
95,729,867
124,091,753
110,219,917
117,166,836
2,400
46,345
17,500
46,446
51,810
133,114
150,718
174,107
281,131
289,426
508,601
330,503
251,922
140,409
116,932
101,319
223,748
437,729
544,192
807,502
457,225
480,319
447,495
460,683
486,554
543,583
724,362
976,171
916,841
1,381,720
1,073,023
1,253,561
1,434,382
1,378,337
1,419,248
1,497,720
1,783,010
2,275,972
2,358,877
2,500,799
2,462,340
$
43,650
22,168
46,432
77,517
75,201
79,475
129,234
726,323
150,000
150,000
200,000
250,000
400,000
450,000
525,000
575,000
660,800
982,900
1,149,400
1,200,000
1,270,559
1,500,000
3,500,917
3,436,222
3,249,605
2,794,107
1,509,235
1,247,912
1,097,900
783,280
980,790
1,962,824
1,808,392
2,469,967
2,742,388
2,764,013
2,766,838
3,335,885
2,879,160
3,409,142
3,820,732
4,085,105
3,538,519
1,705,708
1,025,586
1,018,719
1,238,718
1,796,677
2,098,339
1,974,976
1,832,464
2,534,840
2,845,262
3,173,635
3,025,255
3,010,088
3,401,229
5,199,563
5,896,803
8,968,222
9,955,790
10.246,939
10,758,565
1,240,080
1,467,903
1,739,490
2,034,420
3,087,291
2,479,005
2,934,882
3,038,859
2,824,687
2,693,961
2,734,522
3,582,595
4,126,803
4,744,530
5,016,398
4,832,257
4,332,297
4,953,024
5,511,861
5,548,044
7,637,713
7,356,866
8,574,884
11,108,335
8,071,747
10,786,812
9,197,460
7,745,847
7,114,178
8,900,675
8,484,343
12,833,994
11,975,671
13,450,169
12,836,013
12,880,060
12,678,548
9,911,935
12,168,905
11,650,180
12,269,135
12,633,510
11,256,260
9,435,650
7,684,155
6,523,644
5,375,171
5,725,133
5,048,864
5,722,502
6,139,920
5,565,069
6,280,956
7,088,265
7,660,000
8,237,172
7,742,030
8,217,966
6,454,360
6,732,470
8,680,440
9,765,195
10,549,924
10,119,303
63,610,965
1,991,629
2,260,129
2,502,519
2,682,505
3,613,902
3,119,314
3,594,851
4,230,587
5,659,316
8,394,053
10,459,784
10,909,465
12,434,312
16,355,076
19,674,853
17,445,818
17,497,380
18,955,179
22,461,826
24,980,546
25,888,418
23,784,857
24,513,584
26,377,066
23,499,071
32,458,800
30,194,943
26,382,491
29,521,739
42,391,953
37,056,284
41,855,707
33,304,104
35,609,126
28,135,325
35,207,350
41,330,560
48,752,446
61,517,804
67,077,605
60,720,313
65,227,002
68,689,839
55,763,360
35,233,462
28,806,716
32,639,163
42,407,630
48,837,783
54,133,485
74,438,675
64,416,599
65,711,189
75,028,294
77,566,453
76,471,329
67,151,016
54,742,315
62,026,901
72,549,790
112,583,082
145,184,247
133,226,430
139,995,418
 STATISTICS A 29
Table 2.—Total Value of Mineral Production, 1836-1969—Continued
Year
Metals
Industrial
Minerals
Structural
Materials
Fuels
Total
1951	
1952
$
153,598,411
147,857,523
126,755,705
123,834,286
142,609,505
149,441,246
125,353,920
104,251,112
105,076,530
130,304,373
128,565,774
159,627,293
172,852,866
180,926,329
177,101,733
208,664,003
235,865,318
250,912,026
294,175,536
$
2,493,840
2,181,464
3,002,673
5,504,114
6,939,490
9,172,792
11,474,050
9,958,768
12,110,286
13,762,102
12,948,308
14,304,214
16,510,898
16,989,469
20,409,649
22,865,324
29,364,065
26,056,782
21,222,411
$
10,606,048
11,596,961
13,555,038
14,395,174
15,299,254
20,573,631
25,626,939
19,999,576
19,025,209
18,829,989
19,878,921
21,366,265
23,882,190
26,428,939
32,325,714
43,780,272
44,011,488
45,189,476
55,331,584
$
10,169,617
9,729,739
9,528,279
9,161,089
9,005,111
9,665,983
8,537,920
10,744,093
11,439,192
14,468,869
18,414,318
34,073,712
42,617,633
42,794,431
50,815,252
60,470,406
74,141,627
82,870,204
93,573,164
$
176,867,916
171,365,687
1953
152,841,695
1954
152,894,663
1955    -
173,853,360
19S6
188,853,652
1957   -
170,992,829
1958
144,953,549
1959	
I960
147,651,217
177,365,333
179,807,321
229,371,484
255,863,587
267,139,168
280,652,348
335,780,005
383,382,498
405,028,488
464,302,695
1961
1962   .    .
1963
1964
1965	
1966	
1967	
1968 	
1969 	
Totals	
5,176,300,638
288,238,775
617,498,073
1,078,173,742    | 7,160,211,228
 A 30
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1969
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 A 32
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
Table 4.—Mineral Production, Graph of Value, 1887-1969
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1
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A 33
Table 5.—Production of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, and
Molybdenum, Graph of Quantities, 1893-1967
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1)           c
1
 a 34 mines and petroleum resources report, 1969
Table 6.—Production of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, Molybdenum,
and Iron Concentrates, 1858-1969
Year
Gold (Placer)
Gold (Fine)
Silver
Copper
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
1858-90
Oz.
3,246,585
376,290
507,580
25,060
32,680
30,000
33,240
45,290
34,150
29,180
18,820
16,850
13,040
13,720
21,690
24,710
24,750
16,476
20,912
9,191
8,424
6,983
8,955
17,176
20,400
23,928
25,181
30,929
43,389
54,153
57,759
49,746
39,067
43,775
32,904
14,600
11,433
12,589
15,729
6,969
20,332
17,886
19,134
23,691
17,554
14,245
8,684
7,666
3,865
2,936
5,650
7,570
3,847
3,416
3,315
4,620
1,842
866
1,535
891
670
399|
$
55,192,163
6,397,183
8,628,660
426,000
555,500
510,000
565,000
770,000
580,500
496,000
320,000
286,500
221,600
233,200
368,800
420,000
420,750
280,092
355,503
156,247
143,208
118,711
152,235
291,992
395,542
562,787
714,431
895,058
1,249,940
1,558,245
1,671,015
1,478,492
1,236,928
1,385,962
1,041,772
462,270
361,977
398,591
475,361
200,585
585,200
529,524
598,717
717,911
494,756
403,230
238,967
217,614
109,450
80,990
157,871
208,973
107,418
99,884
96,697
135,411
55,191
25,053
44,632
25,632
19,571
11,720
Oz.
$
Oz.
221,089
22,537,306
31,222,548
1,892,364
3,132,108
3,465,856
3,602,180
3,366,506
3,301,923
2,929,216
3,998,172
3,403,119
3,377,849
2,673,389
7,101,311
6,032,986
8,341,768
7,654,844
10,748,556
10,470,185
10,627,167
9,960,172
11,328,263
7,550,331
7,150,655
7,021,754
8,613,977
9,269,944
9,547,124
11,305,367
10,861,578
10,821,393
12,327,944
12,175,700
9,677,881
8,526,310
5,705,334
6,157,307
6,365,761
5,708,461
6,720,134
7,637,882
9,509,456
8,218,914
8,810,807
8,378,819
9,826,403
7,903,149
8,405,074
8,129,348
7,041,058
6,198,101
7,446,643
7,373,997
6,189,804
6,422,680
5,269,642
4,972,084
5,549,131
6,180,739
7,130,866
5,779,108
$
214,152
13,561,194
16,973,507
958,293
1,810,045
1,968,606
1,876,736
1,588,991
2,059,739
2,265,749
3,215,870
3,592,673
3,235,980
1,591,201
4,554,781
3,718,129
5,292,184
5,286,818
6,675,606
5,902,043
6,182,461
5,278,194
4,322,185
2,254,979
2,264,729
2,656,526
4,088,280
6,005,996
4,308,330
5,073,962
4,722,288
4,381,365
4,715,315
4,658,545
4,080,775
3,858,496
2,453,293
2,893,934
5,324,959
4,110,092
5,040,101
5,671,082
7,667,950
7,770,983
7,326,803
7,019,272
8,154,145
6,942,995
7,511,866
7,077,166
6,086,854
5,421,417
6,600,183
6,909,140
7,181,907
8,861,050
7,348,938
6,929,793
7,729,939
10,328,695
16,475,795
11,136,283
Lb.
$
1891-1900.    .
632,806
2,322,118
228,617
257,496
272,254
247,170
250,021
221,932
114,523
164,674
152,426
120,048
135,765
197,856
179,245
247,716
209,719
201,427
178,001
180,662
145,223
160,836
146,133
181,651
223,589
297,216
365,343
404,578
460,781
557,522
587,336
583,524
571,026
444,518
224,403
186,632
175,373
117,612
243,282
286,230
288,396
283,983
261,274
255,789
253,552
258,388
242,477
191,743
223,403
194,354
173,146
205,580
159,821
158,850
154,979
138,487
117,124
119,508
126,157
123,896
117,830
12,858,353
47,998,179
4,725,512
5,322,442
5,627,595
5,109,008
5,167,934
4,587,333
2,367,191
3,403,811
3,150,644
2,481,392
2,804,197
4,089,684
3,704,994
5,120,535
4,335,069
4,163,859
3,679,601
3,734,609
3,002,020
3,324,975
3,020,837
4,263,389
6,394,645
10,253,952
12,856,419
14,172,367
16,122,767
19,613,624
21,226,957
22,461,516
21,984,501
17,113,943
8,639,516
7,185,332
6,751,860
4,322,241
8,514,870
10,018,050
10,382,256
10,805,553
9,627,947
8,765,889
8,727,294
8,803,279
8,370,306
6,603,628
7,495,170
6,604,149
5,812,511
6,979,441
5,667,253
5,942,101
5,850,458
5,227,884
4,419,089
4,506,646
4,763,688
4,672,242
4,440,659
35,416,069
379,957,091
36,927,656
51,456,537
46,460,305
45,009,699
56,918,405
65,379,364
59,007,565
61,483,754
42,459,339
44,887,676
39,036,993
32,359,896
57,720,290
64,845,393
72,306,432
89,339,768
89,202,871
97,908,316
102,793,669
92,362,240
64,134,746
50,608,036
43,149,460
49,651,733
39,428,208
21,671,711
46,057,584
65,769,906
73,254,679
77,980,223
66,435,583
50,097,716
42,307,510
36,300,589
25,852,366
17,500,538
41,783,921
43,025,388
54,856,808
42,212,133
43,249,658
42,005,512
49,021,013
50,150,087
44,238,031
43,360,575
31,387,441
12,658,649
16,233,546
33,064,429
31,692,412
108,979,144
118,247,104
115,554,700
85,197,073
105,800,568
172,739,548
160,993,338
167,421,925,
4,365,210
1901-1910  	
56,384,783
1011
4,571,644
101?
8,408,513
ion
7,094,489
1014
6,121,319
1915
9,835,500
101-
17,784,494
1917.
16,038,256
1918   -
15,143,449
1Q10
7,939,896
109(1
7,832,899
1071
4,879,624
107?
4,329,754
1073
8,323,266
1074
8,442,870
1075
10,153,269
10?_
12,324,421
1077
11,525,011
197ft
14,265,242
1070
18,612,850
loin
11,990,466
1011
5,365,690
103?
3,228,892
1031
3,216,701
1034
3,683,662
1035
3,073,428
101(5
2,053,828
1037
6,023,411
1038
6,558,575
1030
7,392,862
1940
7,865,085
1041
6,700,693
104?
5,052,856
1043
4,971,132
1944
4,356,070
1045
3,244,472
1946
2,240,070
1047
8,519,741
i04«
9,616,174
1049
10,956,550
1050
9,889,458
1051
1057.
11,980,155
13,054,893
1051
14,869,544
1054
14,599,693
1055
16,932,549
i105fi
17,251,872
1957
8,170,465
1Q5R
2,964,529
1959
4,497,991
1060
9,583,724
10-1
8,965,149
196?
33,209,215
1061
36,238,007
10K4
38,609,136
1065
32,696,081
1066
56,438,255
1067
88,135,172
1068
87,284,148
1969.
111,596,758
Totals -   -
5,234,917
96,943,212
16,926,0211500,143,166
478,769,477|341,169,358
1
4,047,312,919
987,453,911
 STATISTICS
A 35
Table 6.—Production of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, Molybdenum,
and Iron Concentrates, 1858-1969—Continued
Year
Lead
Zinc
Molybdenum
Iron Concentrates
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
1858-90
Lb.
1,044,400
205,037,158
407,833,262
26,872,397
44,871,454
55,364,677
50,625,048
46,503,590
48,727,516
37,307,465
43,899,661
29,475,968
39,331,218
41,402,288
67,447,985
96,663,152
170,384,481
237,899,199
263,023,936
282,996,423
305,140,792
307,999,153
321,803,725
261,902,228
252,007,574
271,689,217
347,366,967
344,268,444
377,971,618
419,118,371
412,979,182
378,743,663
466,849,112
456,840,454
507,199,704
439,155,635
292,922,888
336,976,468
345,862,680
313,733,089
320,037,525
265,378,899
284,024,522
273,456,604
284,949,396
297,634,712
332,474,456
302,567,640
283,718,073
281,603,346
294,573,159
287,423,357
333,608,699
384,284,524
335,282,537
314,974,310
268,737,503
250,183,633
211,490,107
208,131,894
231,627,618
210,072,565
$
45,527
7,581,619
17,033,102
1,069,521
1,805,627
2,175,832
1,771,877
1,939,200
3,007,462
2,951,020
2,928,107
1,526,855
2,816,115
1,693,354
3,480,306
6,321,770
12,415,917
18,670,329
17,757,535
14,874,292
13,961,412
15,555,189
12,638,198
7,097,812
5,326,432
6,497,719
8,461,859
10,785,930
14,790,028
21,417,049
13,810,024
12,002,390
15,695,467
15,358,976
17,052,054
16,485,902
13,181,530
16,848,823
23,345,731
42,887,313
57,734,770
41,929,866
41,052,905
50,316,015
45,936,692
39,481,244
45,482,505
45,161,245
44,702,619
39,568,086
34,627,075
33,542,306
38,661,912
42,313,569
34,537,454
37,834,714
39,402,293
43,149,171
34,436,934
31,432,079
32,782,257
33,693,539
Lb.
$
Lb.
$
Tons
29,869
13,029
19,553
$
70,879
1891-1900
45,602
1901-1910.
12,684,192
2,634,544
5,358,280
6,758,768
7,866,467
12,982,440
37,168,980
41,848,513
41,772,916
56,737,651
47,208,268
49,419,372
57,146,548
58,344,462
79,130,970
98,257,099
142,876,947
145,225,443
181,763,147
172,096,841
250,479,310
202,071,702
192,120,091
195,963,751
249,152,403
256,239,446
254,581,393
291,192,278
298,497,295
278,409,102
312,020,671
367,869,579
387,236,469
336,150,455
278,063,373
294,791,635
274,269,956
253,006,168
270,310,195
288,225,368
290,344,227
337,511,324
372,871,717
382,300,862
334,124,560
429,198,565
443,853,004
449,276,797
432,002,790
402,342,850
403,399,319
387,951,190
413,430,817
402,863,154
400,796,562
311,249,250
305,124,440
262,830,908
299,396,264
301,163,774
894,169
129,092
316,139
324,421
346,125
1,460,524
4,043,985
3,166,259
2,899,040
3,540,429
3,077,979
1,952,065
2,777,322
3,278,903
4,266,741
7,754,450
10,586,610
8,996,135
9,984,613
9,268,792
9,017,005
5,160,911
4,621,641
6,291,416
7,584,199
7,940,860
8,439,373
14,274,245
9,172,822
8,544,375
10,643,026
12,548,031
13,208,636
13,446,018
11,956,725
18,984,581
21,420,484
28,412,593
37,654,211
38,181,214
43,769,392
67,164,754
59,189,656
40,810,618
34,805,755
52,048,909
58,934,801
50,206,681
43,234,839
44,169,198
50,656,726
45,370,891
51,356,376
53,069,163
58,648,561
48,666,933
47,666,540
39,248,539
43,550,181
47,345,957
68,436
1911
1912
1913
1914.
1,987
3,618
12,342
6,982
960
662
2,000
20,560
11,636
1,840
1915
1916
1917   	
1918.
1919
1,000
1,230
1,472
1,010
1,200
243
5,000
6,150
7,360
5,050
3,600
1,337
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
197.5
1926	
1927
1928.
20
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933.
1934
1935
1936
1937_
1938.
1939.
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
679
5,472
3,735
1949
27,579
1950
1951
113,535
900,481
991,248
535,746
610,930
369,955
357,342
630,271
849,248
1,160,355
1,335,068
1,793,847
2,060,241
2,002,562
2,165,403
2,151,804
2,154,443
2,094,745
2,074,854
790,000
195?
5,474,924
1953
6,763,105
1054
3,733,891
1955
3,228,756
1956
2,190,847
1057
2,200.637
195ft
4,193,442
1959
6,363,848
1960.
1961
5,414
	
9,500
10,292,847
12,082,540
1067
18,326,911
1963
20,746,424
1964
1965
28,245
7,289,125
17,094,927
17,517,543
19,799,793
25,512,001
47,063
12,405,344
27,606,061
31,183,064
32,552,722
46,533,644
20,419,487
21,498,581
1966	
1967
1968
20,778.934
20,820.765
21,437,569
1969	
19,787,845
Totals-
15,613,477,321
1,312,844,455
14,149,964,862
1,346,480,629
87,272,937
1
150,374,096
24,426,855
221,376,081
 A 36 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
Table 7a.—Mineral Production by Mining
Division
Period
Placer Gold
Metals
Industrial
Minerals
Structural
Materials
Quantity
Value
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1908
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1908
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1989
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
Oz.
$
S
17,836,888
18,405,941
102,016,297
39
13
38,047,185
4,207,167
4,175,587
65,374,111
$
$
252,147
720,329
1,617
33
44
735,790
564
279
2,610,007
33,253
905
1,319
17,388,423
16,404
8,253
54,152,737
9,398
3,240,125
Cariboo 	
20,325
17,159
330,891
1,641,596
3,163,065
318,805
14,951,029
908,130
301,290
10,171
243,069
848,377
51,913,572
63,604,507
2,099,657,238
1,198,872
162,427
3,125,430
622,488
17,506,787
854,053
954,652
10,536,946
1,969,011
550,966
464,845
20,531
468,450
7,319,882
191,951
242,046
469
11,268
61,568,607
6,669,642
8,103,442
171,686,685
28,771,845
28,590,173
119,358,593
2,885,855
172,082
4,000
2,327,897
5,257
6,590
6,540,155
16,545,342
16,571,947
178,999,476
83,899
5,237
192,612
65,175
143,355
1,352,887
197,831
407,141
1,090,831
60,000
77,000
1,414,256
175,256
5,074
115,662;
1,668,475
1,098,440
1,846,785
Liard 	
27,595
604,785
16,834,642
1,757,941
1,702,577
50,184
68
1,248,151
2,111
6,522
1,994,821
1,783,316
146,004,796
14,469,272
14,697,537
181,386,409
11,393,570
8,954,030
331,519,804
4,025,552
4,433,216
39,589,568
16,214,155
24,604,511
161,990,174
32,973,405
48,228,491
184,299,502
2,503,608
1,149,705
55,597,603
8,057,739
85,430
321,635
Nanaimo .,.	
92,938
1,925,432
2,946,975
3,677,117
3,734,777
866
19,300
50,579,509
553,065
407,632
3,586
89,026
5,613,768
10,069,041
76
31,355
2,148
595,910
12,144,104
134,587,199
108,142
234
4.764
10,050
19,646
25,438
60,944
267,251
98,392
0,285,214
1,118,497
1,099,603
1,066,556
56,289
1,499,482
9,973,692
168,656
221,974
240
5,466
2,416,291
344,454
72,647
7,582
164,477
11,244,631
2,449,885
204,621
393,486
45,507
878,204
120,195,258
21,338,011
31,021,577
287,391,422
8,082,963
7,966,095
253,812,540
649,615
1,473,803
87,824,831
7,706,930
9,406,761
256,291,050
47,271
75,130
331,631
1,242,611
18,558
3,912,039
629,842
1,698,129
Slocan _	
4,603
105,569
1,240,215
12,350,844
195,400
203,113
366
9,397
1,740,989
105,734
239,263
851
24,260
2,984,934
93,829
168,659
6,984,826
8,659,515
9,724,164
182
5,306
106,512,476
646,140
670,781
2,732
72,885
3.978
210
140
189,141
4,721,700
2,137,372
52,973,047
5,350,768
9,059,352
11,561,907
628
5
15,680
151
16,687,533
17,592,586
17,489,981
286,627,039
176,828,427
2,944,111
4,071,124
1,525,520
17,262,256
34,867,531
Totals     	
1968
1969
To date
670
399
5,234,917
19,571
11,720
96,943,212
250,892,455
294,163,816
5,079,357,426
20,056,782
21,222,411
288,238,775
45,189,476
55,331,584
617,498,073
 statistics
Divisions, 1968 and 1969, and Total to Date
A 37
Fuels
Coal
Crude Oil and
Condensates
Natural Gas Delivered
to Pipe-line
Butane and
Propane
Division
Total
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Tons
$
Bbl.
$
M S.C.F.
$
Bbl.
$
$
18,089,035
19,126,270
105,299,073
944
1,332
55,780,824
5,882,326
7,346,905
290
1,100
134,797,782
908,130
301,290
3,223,484
945,726
7,463,598
6,726,731
280,788,017
63,059,566
842,865
71,418,571
59,958,552
2,405,740,374
2,244,876
1,196,698
75,002,670
6,841,724
8,282,698
175,798,719
29,875,542
30,443,548
15,087
59,765
143,397,940
23,165,768
26,331,294
144,022,552
50,452,700
58,620,011
296,244,208
224,233,203
256,223,244
1,619,686,307
24,531,445
27,897,585
162,764,099
928,346
745,041
7,629,884
297,070
238,413
2,441,559
93,584,498
105,030,533
99,433
699,521
650,461,275
2,166,201
2,110,188
151,069,815
93
1,494
18,213,058
18,575,669
74,324,471
301,144,744
540,482,849
12,144,466
9,768,803
338,313,429
14,154,593
16,656,468
16,322,297
24,788,610
2,929,584
11,080,836
123,897
90,424
3,391,044
174,204,321
13,395
34,216,611
9,475
49,410,909
499,029
199,224,664
2,999,515
1,470,071
1,122
5,008
64,309,582
72,647
264,621
4,617,442
19,553,725
144,557,784
21,967,853
32,719,706
36
116
301,094,166
8,278,303
255,502,926
755,349
1,713,066
90,834,045
16,460,274
19,299,584
369,793,658
693,411
745,911
5,759,262
10,302,173
11,562,047
103,720,781
25,258,548
23,698,477
391,729,873
959,214
852,340
142,445,046
7,588,989
6,817,155
610.723,876
23,165,768
26,331,294
144,022,552
50,452,700
58,620,011
296,244,208
224,233,2031  24,531,445
256,223,244    27,897,585
1,619,686,307|162,764,099
1
928,346
745,041
7,629,884
297,070
238,413
2,441,559
405,028,488
464,302,695
7,160,211,228
 A 38
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
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A 43
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 a 44 mines and petroleum resources report, 1969
Table 7d.—Production of Industrial Minerals by
Division
Period
Asbestos
Barite
Diatomite
Fluxes (Quartz
and Limestone)
Granules (Quartz,
Limestone, and
Granite)
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1986
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
Tons
$
Tons
$
Tons
$
Tons
$
Tons
$
Atlin
856
17,159
7,442
175,325
48
168
1
8
21,968
26,949
324,651
80
164,206
190,620
3,473,777
3,259
12,612
200
200
250
357
607
4,000
1,790,502
1,540,319
4,000
Kamloops	
5,257
6,590
11,847
74,667
79,600
837,689
14,833,891
15,659,000
164,185,884
23,293
22,328
847,554
59,330
81,777
1,156,678
3,500
3,226
13,609
7,090
14,540
38,298
3,000
3,500
99,047
5,845
61,578
196,209
197,831
407,141
7,601
8,174
1,026,756
60,000
77,000
1,414,256
18,945
98,139
16,397
12,923
176,163
167,995
98,392
802,611
3,699.031
601,019
1,050,722
29,692
418,606
21
14
159
210
140
1,835
9,605
157,080
Not assigned.
Totals-
1968
1969
To date
74,667
79,600
837,689
14,833,891
15,659,000
164,185,884
21,9681    164,206
26.949     190.620
856
17,159
42,259
22,342
4,052,705
157,679
81,917
7,469,371
30,237
34,746
367,269
436,928
654,701
5,482,634
324,659
3,473,857
7,442
175,325
Other:  See notes of individual minerals listed alphabetically on pages A 18 to A 25.
i Arsenious oxide.
2 Bentonite.
3 Fluorspar.
4 Hydromagnesite.
5 Iron oxide and ochre.
6 Magnesium sulphate.
 STATISTICS
Mining Divisions, 1968 and 1969, and Total to Date
A 45
Gypsum and
Gypsite
Jade
Mica
Sulphur
Other,
Value
Division
Total
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Tons
$
Lb.
$
Lb.
$
Tons
$
$
$
9,3987
9,398
20,3254
20,325
17,159
10,013,800
143,012
30012
318,805
873
6,236
156,1914 6 10
162,427
104,181
64,775
931,260
3,125,430
622,488
17,190,989
3,125,430
622,488
112,878
298,824
16,8949
17,506,787
246,374
689,847
764,032
7,049,281
854,053
280,894
954,652
2,451,699
1,2765 11
10,536,946
4,000
783,5783
2,327,897
5,257
6,590
1,246,918
6,323,178
424,700
2,075
203,0556 10
6,540,155
1,810
5,825
33,048
42,095
6,060
278,987
2,125
11,960
44,447
83,899
5,237
187,483
50,450
44,903
648,512
1,709,326
900,987
14,769,145
16,545,342
16,571,947
178,999,476
83,899
5,237
5,12911
192,612
65,175
143,355
1,352,887
197,831
407,141
55,9015
1,090,831
60,000
77,000
1,414,256
2 407
10,050
10,050
5,110
14,447
21,757
19,646
25,438
49,484
	
19,646
25,438
11,4601 8
1,1173
60,944
267,251
98,392
1,588,800
25,938
306,5331 3 6
6,285,214
250
1,700
16,8582
18,558
634,250
10,815
41,624
8,500
17,544
680,943
178,678
93,829
168,659
6,468,831
1,240,215
93,829
168,659
97,3895
6,984,826
160,500
3,978
3,978
210
140
30,22611
189,141
157,390
221,900
4,656,701
4,721,700
2,132,459
52,968,134
4,721,700
4,913
4,913
2,137,372
52,973,047
246,374
280,894
689,847
764,032
13,689,269
49,015
26,332
333,792
105,670
42,635
281,414
320,521
349,122
6,959,040
9,650,285
3,824,593
91,575,777
1,117
4,913
1,719,426
26,056,782
21,222,411
3,815,025
12,822.050 185,818
288,238,775
7 Natro-alunite.
s Perlite.
o Phosphate rock,
io Sodium carbonate.
ii Talc.
12 Volcanic ash.
 a 46 mines and petroleum resources report, 1969
Table 7e.—Production of Structural Materials by
Division
Period
Cement
Lime and
Limestone
Building-
stone
Rubble,
Riprap,
and
Crushed
Rock
Sand and
Gravel
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1068
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
1968
1969
To date
$
$
$
$
14,880
29,760
325,251
$
237,267
690,569
2,914,874
1,108
109,440
139,485
301,041
98,478
180,259
206,882
1,762,686
458,496
218,772
859,092
216,813
241,000
2,058,912
231,305
1,306,897
2,810,698
12,731,515
449,634
82,518
1,110,519
340,153
223,845
43,873
71,941
5,129,238
154,951
1,800
127,989
30,386
1,845
273,314
174,157
813,185
7,746,907
219,175
392,719
790,109
50,750
153,640
915,154
240,856
379,662
1,687,701
9,852
615
520,056
1,197,593
1,521,911
13,406,399
200,801
1,000
50,840
13,122
38,000
134,136
1,050
750
19,800
2,570 016
128,574
135,411
42,560
1,097,182
923,233
315
12,315
1,032,535
8,983,241
1,538,766
1,309,858
7,267,630
34,680
100
2,902,586
2,824,043
43,979,665
98,801
59,713
338,259
203,772
196,728
2,725,077
2,000
2,029,721
527,675
3,450,735
2,394
602
423,187
6,282,416
Nelson   	
442,018
4,310,292
5,006,682
20,974
59,566,464
108,142
8,000
156,696
302,334
138,709
1,926,621
1,950
11,805
222,453
46,022
16,976
425,798
15,000
5,708
638,757
258,356
215,639
2,925,007
953,801
797,269
1,535
4,612
9,990
926,312
8,037,185
156,710
210,169
43,774
33,018
2,117,046
Revelstoke  —
298,432
1,000
5,575
2,017,512
249,021
387,778
10,500
11,571
24,000
3,213,856
371,486
1,482,490
1,645,300
144,000
7,629,288
Slocan  —  	
195,400
7,114
125,648
1,442
712
228,378
17,104
64,348
8,186,761
6,165
3,750
286,974
8,397
14,194
486,824
68,452
15,465
711,095
195,999
1,000
115,143
1,499,198
104,292
238,551
32,500
85,520
2,638,536
Vancouver	
6,473,239
7,282,301
53,483,995
2,169,172
2,377,515
40,885
4,012,560
16,800
39,699,683
623,175
667,031
46,499
12,688
15,213
914,597
97,852
4,758,189
7,160,927
9,177,270
146,683,152
1,231,829
1,814,118
55
20,764,591
2,875,659
4,055,659
315,498
505,018
24,182,921
Totals	
1968    1   13,634.1661   3.337.277
33,366
39,352
9,204,354
3,524,439
4,456,211
46,893,060
20,271,723
1969    ]
To date
16,459,571
200,177,647
3,237,032
50,502,234
26,553,699
231,736,219
 STATISTICS                                                         A 47
Mining Divisions, 1968 and 1969, and Total to Date
Brick
(Common)
Face,
Paving,
and
Sewer
Brick
Firebricks,
Blocks
Clays
Structural Tile
(Hollow
Blocks),
Roof Tile,
Floor
Tile
Drain Tile
and
Sewer
Pipe
Pottery
(Glazed
or Un-
glazed)
Other
Clay
Products
Unclassified
Material
Division
Total
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
252,147
720,329
3,240,125
330,891
1,641,596
3,163,065
14,951,029
908,130
301,290
1,969,611
556,966
464,845
7,319,882
191,951
242,046
2,885,855
172,082
175,256
1,668,475
1,098,440
1,846,785
16,834,642
1,757,941
1,702,577
8,057,739
85,430
321,635
2,946,975
3,677,117
3,734,777
56,579,500
553,065
407,632
5,613,768
10,069,041
12,144,104
134,587,199
108,142
184,099
1,118,497
1,099,603
1,066,556
9,973,692
168,656
221,974
2,416,291
344,454
72,647
2,449,885
264,621
393,486
3,912,039
629,842
1,698,129
12,356,844
195,400
203,113
1,740,989
105,734
239,263
2,984,934
8,659,515
9,724,164
106,512,476
646,140
670,781
5,350,768
9,059,352
11,561,907
176,828,427
2,944,111
4,071,124
34,867,531
45,000
6,000
133,952
1,193
184
4,651
15,807
7,800
8,118
37,000
39,445
136,010
114,361
6,922
72,379
....
1,104,295
38,939
35,758
19,110
2,864
1,500,230
1,744,939
11,337,073
1,734
729,537
763,727
17,486,944
23,391
55,878
1,103,247
18,972
8,526
3,056,647
809,762
1,082,091
18,698,874
27,222
27,612
512,556
550,146
302,139
4,828,941
14,250
1,844,003
5,274
1,363
11,992
4,925
8,324
142,208
241,216
580,778
12,724
23,362
88,304
131,467
6,202
1,011
5
18,224
4,325
20
645,511
541,112
4,099,358
1,814,647
29,552
119,930
1,050
705,821
1,072,346
136,504
3,180,828
5,972,171
1,734
1,500,230
1,744,939
11,656,030
729,537
763,727
18,193,314
23,391
55,878
1,181,801
18,972
8,526
3,780,692
809,762
1,082,091
19,775,545
27,222
27,612
672,422
1,277,657
888,696
12,495,847
45,189,476
55,331,584
617,498,073
14,250
5,256,737
5,972,171
 a 48 mines and petroleum resources report, 1969
Table 8a.—Production of Coal, 1836-1969
Year
Quantityl
(Short Tons)
Value
Year
Quantityl
(Short Tons)
Value
1836-59-
1860	
1861
1862	
1863	
1864	
1865	
1866	
1867	
1868	
1869	
1870	
1871	
1872	
1873	
1874	
1875	
1876	
1877	
1878	
1879	
1880	
1881	
1882	
1883	
1884	
1885	
1886	
1887.	
1888	
1889	
1890	
1891	
1892
1893	
1894—__
1895	
1896	
1897__
1898-
1899-
1900_
1901-
1902-
1903-
1904-
1905-
1906-
1907-
1908-
1909-
1910-
1911-
1912-
1913-
1914-
1915-
41,871
15,956
15,427
20,292
23,906
32,068
36,757
28,129
34,988
49,286
40,098
33,424
55,458
55,458
55,459
91,334
123,362
155,895
172,540
191,348
270,257
299,708
255,760
315,997
238,895
441,358
409,468
365,832
462,964
548,017
649,411
759,518
,152,590
925,495
,095,690
,134,509
,052,412
,002,268
999,372
,263,272
,435,314
,781,000
,894,544
,838,621
,624,742
,887,981
,044,931
,126,965
,485,961
,362,514
,688,672
,314,749
,541,698
,211,907
,713,535
237,042
076,601
$149,548
56,988
55,096
72,472
85,380
115,528
131,276
100,460
124,956
176,020
143,208
119,372
164,612
164,612
164,612
244,641
330,435
417,576
462,156
522,538
723,903
802,785
685,171
846,417
639,897
1,182,210
1,096,788
979,908
1,240,080
1,467,903
1,739,490
2,034,420
3,087,291
2,479,005
2,934,882
3,038,859
2,824,687
2,693,961
2,734,522
3,582,595
4,126,803
4,744,530
5,016,398
4,832,257
4,332,297
4,953,024
5,511,861
5,548,044
7,637,713
7,356,866
8,574,884
11,108,335
8,071,747
10,786,812
9,197,460
7,745,847
7,114,178
1916-
1917-
1918_
1919-
1920-
1921-
1922-
1923-
1924_
1925-
1926-
1927-
1928-
1929-
1930_
1931-
1932_
1933-
1934_
1935-
1936_
1937_
1938_
1939-
1940-
1941-
1942-
1943-
1944-
1945-
1946-
1947_
1948-
1949„
1950-
1951-
1952-
1953-
1954-
1955-
1956-
1957-
1958-
1959-
I960-
1961-
1962-
1963-
1964-
1965-
1966-
1967-
1968-
1969-
2,583,469
2,436,101
2,575,275
2,433,540
2,852,535
2,670,314
2,726,793
2,636,740
2,027,843
2,541,212
2,406,094
2,553,416
2,680,608
2,375,060
1,994,493
1,765,471
1,614,629
1,377,177
1,430,042
1,278,380
1,352,301
1,446,243
1,388,507
1,561,084
1,662,027
1,844,745
1,996,000
1,854,749
1,931,950
1,523,021
1,439,092
1,696,350
1,604,480
1,621,268
1,574,006
1,573,572
1,402,313
1,384,138
1,308,284
1,332,874
1,417,209
1,085,657
796,413
690,011
788,658
919,142
825,339
850,541
911,326
950,763
850,821
908,790
959,214
852,340
Totals..
$8,900,675
8,484,343
12,833,994
11,975,671
13,450,169
12,836,013
12,880,060
12,678,548
9,911,935
12,168,905
11,650,180
12,269,135
12,633,510
11,256,260
9,435,650
7,684,155
6,523,644
5,375,171
5,725,133
5,048,864
5,722,502
6,139,920
5,565,069
6,280,956
7,088,265
7,660,000
8,237,172
7,742,030
8,217,966
6,454,360
6,732,470
8,680,440
9,765,395
10,549,924
10,119,303
10,169,617
9,729,739
9,528,279
9,154,544
8,986,501
9,346,518
7,340,339
5,937,860
5,472,064
5,242,223
6,802,134
6,133,986
6,237,997
6,327,678
6,713,590
6,196,219
7,045,341
7,588,989
6,817,155
142,445,046     $616,723,876
I
i Quantity from 1836 to 1909 is gross mine output and includes material lost in picking and washing.
1910 and subsequent years the quantity is that sold and used.
For
 STATISTICS
A 49
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90,424
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1
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 A 50
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1969
Table 9.—Principal Items of Expenditure, Reported for Operations
of All Classes
Class
Salaries and
Wages
Fuel and
Electricity
Process
SuppUes
Metal-mining-
Exploration and development-
Coal-	
Petroleum and natural gas (exploration and production)-
Industrial minerals-
Structural-materials industry-
Totals, 1969 	
Totals, 1968-
1967-
1966-
1965-
1964-
1963-
1962-
1961-
1960-
1959-
1958-
1957-
1956-
1955-
1954-
1953-
1952-
1951-
1950-
1949-
1948...
1947-
1946-
1945-
1944-
1943-
1942_
1941-
1940-
1939-
1938-
1937-
1936-
1935-
$71,516,839
29,885,859
5,334,375
3,815,613
5,307,033
7,590,608
$123,450,327
113
94
93
74,
63.
57,
55.
50
52.
49
48
56
57
51
48
55
62
52.
42.
41,
38.
32.
26.
22.
23.
26.
26.
26.
23,
22.
22.
21.
17.
16.
459,219
,523,495
,409,528
,938,736
,624,559
,939,294
,522,171
,887,275
694,818
,961,996
,933,560
,409,056
,266,026
,890,246
,702,746
,543,490
,256,631
,607,171
738,035
,023,786
,813,506
160,338
,190,200
,620,975
,131,874
051,467
,913,160
,050,491
391,330
.357,035
.765,711
,349,690
,887,619
,753,367
$10,051,142
248,354
1,159,018
3,095,609
$14,554,123
13,818,326
13,590,759
12,283,477
11,504,343
10,205,861
10,546,806
9,505,559
8,907,034
7,834,728
7,677,321
8,080,989
8,937,567
9,762,777
9,144,034
7,128,669
8,668,099
8,557,845
7,283,051
6,775,998
7,206,637
6,139,470
5,319,470
5,427,458
7,239,726
5,788,671
7,432,585
7,066,109
3,776,747
3,474,721
3,266,000
3,396,106
3,066,311
2,724,144
2,619,639
$37,779,749
 910,822
1,596,253
2,802,735
$43,089,559
38,760,203
34,368,856
28,120,179
30,590,631
27,629,953
12,923,325
14,024,799
17,787,127
21,496,912
17,371,638
15,053,036
24,257,177
22,036,839
21,131,572
19,654,724
20,979,411
27,024,500
24,724,101
17,500,663
17,884,408
11,532,121
13,068,948
8,367,705
5,756,628
6,138,084
6,572,317
6,863,398
7,260,441
6,962,162
6,714,347
6,544,500
6,845,330
4,434,501
4,552,730
Note.—This table has changed somewhat through the years, so that the items are not everywhere directly
comparable. Prior to 1962 lode-mining referred only to gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc. Prior to 1964 some
expenditures for fuel and electricity were included with process supplies. Process supplies (except fuel) were
broadened in 1964 to include " process, operating, maintenance, and repair supplies . . . used in the mine/mill
operations; that is, explosives, chemicals, drill steel, bits, lubricants, electrical, etc. . . . not charged to Fixed
Assets Account . . . provisions and supplies sold in any company operated cafeteria or commissary." Exploration and development other than in the field of petroleum and natural gas is given, starting in 1966.
 STATISTICS A 51
Table 10.—Employment in the Mineral Industry, 1901-69
_
OJ
_
_
Metals
Coal Mines
Structural
Materials
n_!
■_ -
II
TJ ca
*_
_
_        _,
ill
ca _ _■
»   CCJ   Q
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37\>
_ &_
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«J _ c
Pl, _) _
Year
Mines
1 I
«     &
15     2
2 u
H"*_ >
x c_f
M _Q
_
_
o
-
_
_
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u
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O
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2.736
2,219
1,662
2,143
2,470
2 680
1,212
1.126
1,088
3.948
3,345
2,750
3.306
3,710
3,983
3,943
3,694
3,254
3,709
3,594
3,830
4,278
4,174
4,144
5,393
5,488
4,390
4,259
3,679
2,330
2.749
3,618
4,033
5,138
7,610
8,283
8,835
8,892
7,605
6,035
4,833
6,088
8,046
7,915
8,197
9,616
10,192
10,138
10,019
9,821
8,939
7,819
7.551
7,339
7,220
9,683
10,582
10,724
10,832
12.831
13,730
11,006
9.412
9,512
9,846
9,006
7,434
7,324
7,423
7,111
8.228
8.264
8.6S1
9,051
10.864
10.151
12,537
13,101
3,041
3,101
3,137
3,278
3,127
3,415
2,862
4,432
4.713
5,903
5,212
5,275
4,950
4,267
3,708
3,694
3,760
3,658
4,145
4,191
4,722
4,712
4,342
3.894
3.828
3.757
3.646
3,814
3.675
3.389
2.957
2,628
2,241
2,050
2,145
2,015
2,286
2,088
2,167
2,175
2,229
1,892
2.240
2.150
1,927
1,773
1,694
1,594
1,761
1,745
1,462
1,280
1,154
1,076
1,100
968
1,020
826
765
894
705
548
501
446
405
347
260
195
245
933
910
1.127
1,175
1,280
1,390
907
1,041
1,705
1,855
1,661
1,855
1,721
1,465
1,283
1,366
1.410
3,974
4,011
4,264
4,453
4,407
4,805
7,922
1902	
7,356
1903	
7,014
1904	
1.163
1 240
7,759
1905	
8,117
1906	
1 303
8,788
1907	
2 704 1  239
3,769
6,073
6,418
7,758
6,873
7,130
6,671
5,732
4.991
5,060
5.170
7,712
2,507
2,184
2 472
1,127
1,070
1  237
9,767
1909	
9,672
1910	
11,467
10,467
2.43511.159
1912	
2,472
2,773
2,741
2.709
3,357
3,290
2,626
2.51 S
1,364
1,505
1,433
10,966
1913	
10,949
1914	
9,906
1915	
1,435
2,036
2,198
1,764
1   740
9.135
10.453
1916	
1917	
10,658
1918	
1,76915,427
1,821|5,966
2 158IR 349
9,617
10 225
1919	
1920	
2 07411   K05
10,028
9,215
1921	
1,355
1.510
2,102
2,353
2 298
975
1,239
1,516
1,680
2 840
2,163
1,932
1.807
6,885
1922	
6,644
9,393
1923	
0.149
9,767
1924	
1,52415.418
1.61515,443
1,56515,322
1,57915.225
1,52015,334
1,35315.028
1,25614,645
l,125|4,OR2
98013,608
85313.094
843|2,893
82612,971
79912,814
86713,153
874|2.962
80912,976
69912,874
494J2.723
468|2,360
611 J2.851
68912.839
9,451
1925	
10,581
1926	
209
415
355
341
425
688
874
1,134
2,606|1,735
2,671|1,916
2,707|2,469
2,926|2,052
2,316|1,260
1.463|    834
1.355|    900
1,788 1,885
808
854
911
966
832
581
542
531
631
907
720
1,168
919
996
1,048
1,025
960
891
849
822
672
960
1,126
1,203
1,259
1,307
1,516
1,371
1,129
1,091
1 043
2,461
2,842
2.748
2,948
3,197
3,157
2,036
2,436
2,890
2,771
2,678
3,027
3,158
3.187
2,944
3,072
3,555
2,835
2,981
2,834
2,813
3,461
3,884
3,763
3,759
4,044
4,120
3,901
3,119
3,304
3 339
493
647
412
492
843
460
536
376
377
536
931
724
900
652
827
766
842
673
690
921
827
977
1,591
2,120
1,916
1,783
1,530
1,909
1,861
1,646
1,598
1,705
1,483
1,357
1,704
1,828
1,523
909
1,293
1,079
1.269
1,309
1,207
1,097
324
138
368
544
344
526
329
269
187
270
288
327
295
311
334
413
378
326
351
335
555
685
656
542
616
628
557
559
638
641
770
625
677
484
557
508
481
460
444
422
393
372
380
549
124
122
120
268
170
380
344
408
360
754
825
938
369
561
647
422
262
567
628
586
679
869
754
626
660
491
529
634
584
722
854
474
446
459
589
571
517
528
509
639
582
684
582
567
14,172
1927	
14,830
15,424
1928	
1929	
1930	
14,032
1931	
1932	
10,524
11,369
1933	
1934	
1935	
1   9<n 12 74011  497
13,737
1936	
1,124
1,371
1,303
1,252
1.004
939
489
2,95911,840
3,60311,818
3,849|2,260
3,90512,050
3,923|2,104
3,901|1,823
2 92011 504
1937	
16,129
16.021
15 890
1938	
1939	
1940	
15,705
15,084
1941	
1942	
13,270
1943	
212|2,394|1.099
255[1,896|1,825
209|1,933|1,750
347 1,918 1,817
36013,O24|2,238
348|3.143|2,429
303|3,034|2,724
32713 39915 415
12,448
1944	
12,314
1946	
532
731
872
545
516
463
2,305
2,425
2,466
2,306
2,261
1 025
 1
11,933
194 7	
1948	
16 397
1949	
16,621
1950	
1951	
205
230
132
199
103
105
67
75
99
3,78513,695
4,171|3,923
3,145|2,589
2,64412,520
2,564|2,553
17 863
1952	
1953	
396
358
378
1,550
1,434
1.478
15,790
1954	
14,128
14,102
1955	
1956	
2,637|2,827
2,39312,447
1,919|1,809
1.93711.701
14 539
1957	
	
838|3,328
625[3,081
618|3,008
64813,034
62613,118
949|3,356
85013,239
82213,281
96513.529
1,01413.654
99213,435
1,072|3,283
1.09913.468
13,257
11,201
1958	
260
291
288
237
228
247
267
244
1,086
1,056
1,182
942
776
748
713
649
1959	
10,779
1960	
86 1,78211,959
74|1,785|1,682
35|1,67711,97_
11 541
1961	
11 034
1962	
270
11,560
1963	
43|1,713|2,012
5|1,839|1,967
211.75212.019
450
772
786
1,894
1,264
3,990
1,270
10,952
1964	
11,645
1965	
441
12.283
1966	
1967	
2
 |
2,006|2,296
1,92812,532
1,823|2,369
1.79412.470
2671    614
197|   457
358|    553
4551     700
478114,202
I   507113,380
400116,212
1968	
1968	
71
1
416 16.437
I
i Commencing with 1967, does not include employment in by-product plants.
Note.—These figures refer only to company employees and do not include the many employees of contracting firms.
 A 52
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
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CHAPTER III
ORGANIZATION
The organization of the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources is
displayed in the diagram on page A 58.
ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
The Administration Branch, consisting of three divisions, Mining Titles, Petroleum and Natural Gas Titles, and Accounts, is responsible for the administration of
the Provincial laws regarding the acquisition of rights to minerals, coal, petroleum,
and natural gas, and deals with other departments of the Provincial service for the
Department or for any branch.
Mining Titles
Staff
R. H. McCrimmon Chief Gold Commissioner
E. J. Bowles Deputy Chief Gold Commissioner
J. G. B. Egdell Gold Commissioner, Vancouver
Gold Commissioners, Mining Recorders, and Sub-Mining Recorders, whose
duties are laid down in the Mineral Act and Placer-mining Act, administer these
Acts and other Acts relating to mining. Mining Recorders, in addition to their own
functions, may also exercise the powers conferred upon Gold Commissioners with
regard to mineral claims within the mining division for which they have been appointed. Similar duties may be performed by Mining Recorders with regard to
placer claims, but not in respect of placer-mining leases.
Recording of location and of work upon a mineral claim as required by the
Mineral Act and upon a placer claim or a placer-mining lease as required by the
Placer-mining Act must be made at the office of the Mining Recorder for the mining
division in which the claim or lease is located. Information concerning claims and
leases and concerning the ownership and standing of claims and leases in any mining
division may be obtained from the Mining Recorder for the mining division in which
the property is situated or from the Department's offices at Victoria, and Room 320,
890 West Pender Street, Vancouver 1. Officials in the offices of the Gold Commissioner at Victoria and the Gold Commissioner at Vancouver act as Sub-Mining
Recorders for all mining divisions. Sub-Mining Recorders, who act as forwarding
agents, are appointed at various places throughout the Province. They are authorized to accept documents and fees, and forward them to the office of the Mining
Recorder for the correct mining division. Officials and their offices in various parts
of the Province are listed on page A 59.
Central Records Offices ( Victoria and Vancouver)
Transcripts of all recordings in Mining Recorders' offices throughout the Province are sent to the office of the Chief Gold Commissioner in Victoria twice each
month, and include the names of lessees of reverted surveyed mineral claims. These
records and maps showing the approximate positions of mineral claims held by
record and of placer-mining leases may be consulted by the public during office hours
at Victoria and at the office of the Gold Commissioner at Vancouver, Room 320,
890 West Pender Street. The approximate position of mineral claims held by
record and of placer-mining leases is plotted from details supplied by locators.
During 1969, twenty-one investigations were carried out pursuant to section
80 of the Mineral Act.   Six investigations with regard to certificates of work being
A 57
  DEPARTMENTAL WORK
A 59
wrongfully or improperly obtained resulted in 49 certificates of work being cancelled.
Fifteen investigations with regard to mineral claims having been located or recorded
otherwise than in accordance with the Mineral Act resulted in 182 mineral claims
being cancelled.
List of Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders
Mining Division
Location of Office
Gold Commissioner
Mining Recorder
Alberni
T. S. Dobson   .
D. P. Lancaster	
F. E. P. Hughes	
T. S. Dobson.
Atlin 	
Atlin   	
F. E. P. Hughes.
Fort StffplR
B. J. H. Ryley.—  	
W. G. Mundell—
B. J. H. Ryley.
Golden	
Grand Forks. 	
Kamloops	
Victoria	
W. G. Mundell.
R. Macgregor
F. J. Sell 	
E. J. Bowles -	
J. A. Baker. — —	
E. B. Offin	
R. Macgregor.
F. J. Sell.
E. A. H. Mitchell.
J. A. Baker.
Kamloops 	
Liard    _	
Nanaimo _.
Nelson	
New Westminster.-	
Merritt  -
Smithers	
E. B. OrEn.
Nelson
New Westminster 	
Nicola	
G. L. Brodie	
J. F. McDonald	
L. P. Lean- 	
G. H. Beley	
T. S. Dalby _
D. G. B. Roberts 	
W. L. Marshall 	
T. H. W. Harding	
T. P. McKinnon	
W. L. Draper	
J. Egdell..... 	
N. A. Nelson	
E. J. Bowles	
G. L. Brodie.
J. Hoem.
L. P. Lean.
G. H. Beley.
T. S. Dalby.
Revelstoke 	
Similkameen	
Revelstoke ~  -
Princeton 	
Prince Rupert 	
Kaslo   	
Rossland 	
Vancouver	
Vernon —
Victoria	
D. G. B. Roberts.
W. L. Marshall.
T. H. W. Harding.
Slocan -	
Trail Creek 	
Vancouver.  	
Vernon-   _ 	
Victoria 	
T. P. McKinnon.
W. L. Draper.
Mrs. S. Jeannotte (Deputy).
N. A. Nelson.
E. A. H. Mitchell.
Maps Showing Mineral Claims, Placer Claims, Placer-mining Leases,
and Map Indexes
From the details supplied by the locators, the approximate positions of mineral
claims held by record and of placer-mining leases are shown on mineral reference
maps which may be inspected in the central records offices of the Department of
Mines and Petroleum Resources in Victoria and Vancouver. Copies of these maps
may be obtained on request made to the Chief Gold Commissioner, Victoria (price,
$1.25 per print).
The boundaries of surveyed claims and leases are shown on the reference maps
and other maps of the British Columbia Department of Lands, Forests, and Water
Resources. Indexes to their published maps, reference maps, and manuscript maps
as well as indexes to air photographic cover are available through the Director,
Surveys and Mapping Branch, British Columbia Lands Service, Victoria.
Coal
Information concerning the ownership and standing of coal licences and coal
leases may be obtained upon application to the Chief Gold Commissioner, Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Victoria. Maps showing location of coal
licences and coal leases are also available upon application and payment of the
required fee.
Licences  Coal Revenue, 1969
Fees    $14,798.00
Rental      63,807.90
Total
$78,605.90
During 1969, 381 coal licences were issued, totalling 226,514 acres. As of
December 31, 1969, a total of 760 coal licences, amounting to 422,178 acres, were
held in good standing.
 A 60
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
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 departmental work . a 61
Petroleum and Natural-gas Titles
Staff
R. E. Moss  Chief Commissioner
W. W. Ross  Deputy Chief Commissioner
This Division of the Administration Branch is responsible for the administration
of the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act and the collecting of revenue from fees, rents,
dispositions, and royalties. Information concerning all forms of title issued under
the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act may be obtained upon application to the office
of the Chief Commissioner, Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Victoria. Maps showing the locations of all forms of title issued under the Petroleum
and Natural Gas Act are available, and copies may be obtained upon application to
the office of the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Victoria. Monthly
land reports and monthly reports listing additions and revisions to permit-location
maps and listing changes in title to permits, licences, and leases, and related matters
are available from the office of the Chief Commissioner upon application and payment of the required fee.
During the year there were four dispositions of Crown reserve petroleum and
natural-gas rights resulting in tender bonus bids of $21,646,451.54.
As of December 31, 1969, 41,557,220 acres or approximately 64,933 square
miles, a decrease of 1,999,588 acres over the 1968 total, of Crown petroleum
and natural-gas rights, issued under the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act, were held
in good standing by operators ranging from small independent companies to major
international ones. The form of title held, total number issued, and acreage in each
case were as follows:—
Form of Title Number Acreage
Permits   525 31,893,990
Natural-gas licences  ■.      	
Drilling reservations   31 350,546
Leases (all types)   3,887 9,312,684
Total  41,557,220
Petroleum and Natural-gas Revenue, 1969
Rentals and fees—
Permits   $1,772,064.01
Drilling reservations  79,796.10
Natural-gas licences 	
Petroleum, natural-gas, and petroleum and natural-gas
leases      8,488,113.62
Total rentals and fees  $10,339,973.73
Disposal of Crown reserves—
Permits   $16,516,391.81
Drilling reservations   1,394,215.34
Leases  3,735,844.39
Total Crown reserves disposal  $21,646,451.54
 A 62
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
Royalties—
Gas   $3,730,633.92
Oil   9,017,352.18
Processed products  48,847.46
Total royalties	
Miscellaneous fees 	
$12,796,833.56
19,625.19
Total petroleum and natural-gas revenues  $44,802,884.02
ANALYTICAL AND ASSAY BRANCH
S. W. Metcalfe _
N. G. Colvin	
R. J. Hibberson
R. S. Young	
F. F. Karpick	
Staff
-Chief Analyst and Assayer
Analyst
-Analyst
-Analyst
Assayer
Samples
A reasonable number of samples are assayed without charge for a prospector
who makes application for free assays and who satisfies the Chief Analyst that
prospecting is his principal occupation during the summer months. A form for use
in applying for free assays may be obtained from the office of any Mining Recorder.
During 1969 the chemical laboratory in Victoria issued reports on 2,437
samples from prospectors and Departmental engineers. A laboratory examination
of a prospector's sample generally consists of the following: (1) A spectrographic
analysis to determine if any base metals are present in interesting percentages; (2)
assays for precious metals and for base metals shown by the spectrographic analysis
to be present in interesting percentages. The degree of radioactivity is measured
on all samples submitted by prospectors and Departmental engineers; these radiometric assays are not listed in the table below.
The laboratory reports were distributed in the following manner among prospectors who were not grantees, prospectors who were grantees under the Prospector's
Grub-stake Act, and Departmental engineers:—
Samples
Spectrographic
Analyses
Assays
Prospectors (not grantees)..
Prospectors (grantees)	
Departmental engineers	
Totals	
2,032
140
265
1,974
137
92
5,246
387
1,060
2,437
2,2031
5,793
1 An additional 156 spectrographic analyses were done for prospectors and Departmental engineers, but the
results were not reported.
Samples submitted to the laboratory for identification are examined by the
Mineralogical Branch of the Department. During the year, 65 such samples were
examined.
Reports were issued on 25 samples submitted by the Petroleum and Natural
Gas Branch. Fifteen of these were samples of formation waters from wells being
drilled for gas and oil in the Province, and four were crude-oil samples of the same
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 63
origin. In addition, five samples of material from two suspected oil seeps were
examined, and oily black particles were examined and found to contain metallic
lead.
Reports were issued on 205 samples of a miscellaneous nature.
For the Purchasing Commission, reports were issued on 21 samples of coal
submitted for proximate analysis and calorific value. Three samples of detergents
were examined for their content of phosphorous pentoxide.
For the Department of Recreation and Conservation, Fish and Wildlife Branch,
11 water samples were examined for their trace metal contents.
For the Department of Agriculture, Field Crops Branch, 22 potato extracts
were examined for their trace-metal contents, one gypsum sample was analysed,
and the iron content of a water sample was determined.
For the Department of Highways, Materials Testing Branch, nine samples of
water were examined.
For the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Inspection Branch,
one smoke bomb was identified. For the Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch, one
rosin sample was identified.
For the Queen's Printer, one sample of type metal was examined by spectrograph.
For the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources, Forest Protection,
two fire-fighting chemicals were analysed for their ammonium sulphate contents, and
three others for their diammonium phosphate contents. The pH and hardness of
water from 35 lakes were determined. For Engineering Services, the chloride contents of two cement samples was determined. For the Groundwater Division, a
drilling slurry and two water samples were examined. For the Water Rights Branch,
three water samples were examined, and in addition, another water sample for the
Comptroller of Water Rights.
For British Columbia Health Services, Pollution Control Branch, one sediment
and one water were examined for their iron contents, and 11 other waters were
examined for trace metals.
For the City of Victoria, Smoke Inspection, determination was made of the
weights of residue and soluble salts collected in 63 bottles of water placed in various
locations in the city.   One scale sample was also identified.
For citizens of the Province, four coal samples and three water samples were
analysed, and a sample of peat was examined.
X-ray Powder Diffraction Analyses
One hundred and eleven analyses of this type were performed for identification
purposes.
Examinations for Assayers
Provincial Government examinations for certificates of efficiency were held in
May and December. As a result of the May examination, eight candidates passed
and eight failed. In the December examination, one candidate was granted a supplemental and nine failed.
INSPECTION BRANCH
Organization and Staff
Inspectors and Resident Engineers
J. W. Peck, Chief Inspector Victoria
J. E. Merrett, Deputy Chief Inspector of Mines Victoria
L. Wardman, Senior Inspector, Electrical-Mechanical Victoria
 A 64 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
D. R. Morgan, Senior Inspector, Mining Roads .Victoria
V. E. Dawson, Inspector, Mechanical Victoria
A. R. C. James, Inspector, Aid to Securities Victoria
W. B. Montgomery, Inspector, Reclamation Victoria
S. Elias, Senior Inspector, Environmental Control Vancouver
B. M. Dudas, Inspector, Environmental Control Vancouver
W. C. Robinson, Inspector and Resident Engineer Vancouver
J. W. Robinson, Inspector and Resident Engineer. Vancouver
R. W. Lewis, Inspector and Resident Engineer Cranbrook
David Smith, Inspector and Resident Engineer Kamloops
E. Sadar, Inspector and Resident Engineer Kamloops
Harry Bapty, Inspector and Resident Engineer Prince Rupert
P. E. Olson, Inspector and Resident Engineer Nelson
W. G. Clarke, Inspector and Resident Engineer Prince George
A. D. Tidsbury, Inspector and Resident Engineer. Prince George
W. H. Childress, Technician, Noise Surveys .Vancouver
Inspectors are stationed at the places listed above and inspect coal mines, metal
mines, and quarries in the districts shown on the accompanying Figure 1. They
also may examine prospects, mining properties, roads and trails, and carry out
special investigations under the Mineral Act. The Environmental Control Inspectors
conduct dust, ventilation, and noise surveys at all mines and quarries, and where
necessary make recommendations to improve environmental conditions. D. R.
Morgan supervises the roads and trails programme and prospectors' grub-stakes.
W. B. Montgomery administers the reclamation sections of the Coal Mines and
Mines Regulation Acts. A. R. C. James is mining adviser to the Securities Commission.
Instructors, Mine-rescue Stations
A. Littler, Instructor, Mine Rescue and First Aid Fernie
T. H. Robertson, Instructor, Mine Rescue and First Aid Nanaimo
J. A. Thomson, Instructor, Mine Rescue and First Aid Kamloops
G. J. Lee, Instructor, Mine Rescue and First Aid Nelson
Staff Changes
In February, 1969, A. R. C. James was transferred from Vancouver to Victoria. His position as Inspector and Resident Engineer at Vancouver was filled
by J. W. Robinson, who joined the staff in March. B. M. Dudas joined the staff
as Inspector, Environmental Control, Vancouver, in May. In August, W. B. Montgomery joined the staff in Victoria as Inspector, Reclamation. At Prince George a
second district was established and A. D. Tidsbury was appointed in September as
Inspector and Resident Engineer for that district.
Board of Examiners
Board of Examiners (Coal Mines Regulation Act)
J. W. Peck, Chairman Victoria
A. R. C. James, member Victoria
D. R. Morgan, member Victoria
The Board conducts written and practical examinations for the various certificates of competency under the provisions of sections 25 and 26 of the Coal Mines
Regulation Act, and advises the Minister on the granting of interchange certificates
under this Act.   Under the new Act the Board is no longer responsible for issuing
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK
A 65
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 A 66
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
coal miners' certificates;  these are now issued after examination by the District
Inspector.
Board of Examiners (Mines Regulation Act)
J. E. Merrett, Chairman.
A. R. C. James, member...
W. C. Robinson, member.
 Victoria
 Victoria
.Vancouver
The Board conducts written examinations in various mining centres for applicants for underground shiftboss certificates. The Board is also empowered to grant
provisional certificates without examination and under such conditions as the Board
considers necessary.
Grub-staking Prospectors
Under the authority of the Prospectors' Grub-stake Act the Department has
provided grub-stakes each year since 1943 to a limited number of applicants able
to qualify. Grub-stakes up to $500 for food, shelter, and clothing, plus a reasonable
travelling allowance, are available to a limited number of qualified prospectors who
undertake to prospect in British Columbia in areas considered favourable by the
Department in accordance with a long-range plan for the development of the Province. Experienced prospectors may be granted a maximum of $300 for travelling
expenses if prospecting is to be done in remote areas where air transportation is
necessary.
Application forms and terms and conditions under which grub-stakes are
granted may be obtained from D. R. Morgan, Senior Inspector, Department of
Mines and Petroleum Resources, Victoria.
Samples and specimens received from grub-staked prospectors are analysed
spectographically, assayed, and tested for radioactivity. Mineralogical identifications are made on request.
Grub-stake Statistics
Field Season
Approximate
Expenditure
Men
Grub-staked
Samples and
Specimens
Received at
Department
Laboratory
Mineral
Claims
Recorded
1943_
1944_
1945..
1946-
1947-
1948-
1949_
1950-
1951-
1952_
1953._
1954-
1955-
1956-
1957-
1958-
1959-
I960-
1961-
1962-
1963...
1964-
1965..
1966-
1967_
1968-
1969...
$18,500
27,215
27,310
35,200
36,230
35,975
31,175
26,800
19,385
19,083
17,850
19,989
21,169
20,270
22,000
24,850
21,575
28,115
29,175
26,730
29,000
31,751
24,717
26,787
29,891
31,224
21,758
90
105
84
95
91
92
98
78
63
50
41
48
47
47
46
47
38
50
47
52
50
53
42
43
47
47
27
773
606
448
419
469
443
567
226
255
251
201
336
288
163
174
287
195
358
309
233
150
213
241
224
148
234
151
87
135
181
162
142
138
103
95
137
95
141
123
183
217
101
211
202
241
325
189
843
351
219
239
432
402
221
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 67
In 1969, 46 applications were received and 27 grub-stakes were authorized.
One grantee was unable to go out, and his initial payment was returned. Grantees
who were unable to complete the terms and conditions of the grant received only
partial payment. Seven prospectors were given grants for the first time. Four
grantees proved to be unsatisfactory.
D. H. Rae interviewed applicants in Vancouver and contacted 23 grantees in
the field where he gave advice and direction to those who needed it. The following
notes comprise Mr. Rae's summaries of the prospecting activities and results. They
are based on observations made by him in the field and from information contained
in the diaries of the grantees.
Alberni Mining Division.—In the Gretchen Creek valley (on the north side of
Great Central Lake), spotty copper mineralization with magnetite occurs in volcanic
rocks and greenstone. Small rock outcrops containing some chalcopyrite were found
on both the north and south sides of View Lake. In the Coleman Creek area (off
Alberni Canal), minor mineralization by chalcopyrite and pyrite was investigated.
In the Thunder Mountain area, spotty chalcopyrite and pyrite mineralization occurs
in greenstone and volcanics.
Cariboo Mining Division.—In the Pinegrove Creek valley, minor chalcopyrite
and pyrite mineralization was prospected; in the Heyde Creek area, much overburden was encountered; off the Bowron Lake road, pyritized greenstone was observed; and at the north end of McLeod Lake, deep overburden was reported.
A base camp was established at Le Bourdais Lake, about 50 miles northeast of
Williams Lake, and eight weeks were spent prospecting and soil sampling in the area
within reach of the lake. During the 1968 season a large piece of high-grade chalcopyrite float was found on the lakeshore, but no further material was found and the
source of the float was not located. The area northwest of the lake is underlain by
black to grey limestone showing some pyrite and pyrrhotite mineralization. On the
west side, back from the lakeshore, exposures of grey limestone and green andesite
were found, and along the lakeshore the outcrops were mainly limestone, andesite,
and pyritized argillite, with some chert, greenstone, and schist, along with some basic
rocks. A short distance back from the lakeshore very few outcrops were found.
Nothing of importance was found in the entire area.
Some work was done in the Francis Lake area, southeast of Prince George; on
the north side of the lake outcrops of pegmatite were prospected; on the northwest
side more outcrops of pegmatite occur, along with monzonite and some small gossans; some inconclusive soil sampling was done in this area. On the southwest side
some minor mineralization in the granite intrusive was observed, and a contact zone
between granite and altered sediments shows traces of copper mineralization; on the
south side of the lake the contact zone shows some barren quartz veins. On Government Creek, quartz-monzonite float shows minor molybdenite mineralization; some
work was also done in the Willow River area. In the Nechako valley near Prince
George several gossans and minor occurrences of diatomite were investigated. Up
Dome Creek, various rock outcrops were examined, but nothing of interest was
found. In the Baldy Hughes area very few outcrops were found; 6 miles east of
Baldy Hughes road construction had exposed volcanic rocks. Near Tacheeda Lake
and in the Tacheeda Creek valley, quartz stringers were found in sedimentary rock;
at Teapot Mountain, outcrops of fine-grained andesite were reported. Some granite
outcrops were found in the Saxton Lake area. In the Ptarmigan Creek valley, float
containing both chalcopyrite and malachite was picked up, but the source of the
float was not located. In the Sugarbowl Mountain area, minor mineralization was
observed in outcrops of sandstone, and some inconclusive testing of creek water was
done.   South of Nazul Lake, serpentinized peridotite was found.
 A 68 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
Clinton Mining Division.—Some work was done in the Leon Creek area where
outcrops of quartzite, dolomite, and marble occur. Near Kelly Lake, malachite
stain and narrow pyritized quartz stringers were found associated with two granite
contacts.   Outcrops of serpentine, basalt, and volcanic ash were also seen.
Fort Steele Mining Division.—In the Ezekiel Creek valley, granite outcrops
show some barren-looking quartz veins; pyritized outcrops of slate were examined
in a creek bed; and some minor occurrences of chalcopyrite were reported.
Golden Mining Division.—In the Whitetail Lake area some occurrences of
gypsum were prospected. Considerable time was spent in the wide Dutch Creek
valley checking outcrops and soil sampling. This work covered both the Copper
Creek valley and the Rock Creek valley. Up Mineral Creek, widespread but narrow
occurrences of barite were investigated. Very little useful information on these
areas was submitted.
Kamloops Mining Division.—Some work was done on the east side of Adams
Lake, opposite Skwaam Bay, and a group of claims was staked.
Liard Mining Division.—A base camp was established on the west side of Dease
Lake, about a mile south of Porter Landing, and considerable work was done in the
area west, southwest, and northwest of the camp. Close to the lake there were some
rock outcrops, but the overburden was deep and covered a wide area. In the Thibert
Creek valley, minor traces of copper and iron sulphides were found; some barren-
looking quartz float was picked up, and granitic outcrops were examined. Near
Delure Creek, traces of sulphide mineralization were observed and outcrops of slate
were examined. On the east side of Delure Creek, exposures of granite, serpentine,
and greenstone with quartz stringers were prospected. Nothing of importance was
reported in this area. South of the camp, halfway down the lakeshore, numerous
rock outcrops were examined and small amounts of pyrrhotite were found. On the
east side of Dease Lake, much overburden and heavy undergrowth are present. Outcrops of sedimentary rocks and serpentine were examined. One prospector, Walter
Walcow, died of a heart attack in Cassiar hospital after doing some heavy work in
preparing to cross Dease Lake to his prospecting area. In spite of this his partner
took over and carried on the projected work.
Lillooet Mining Division.—Some work was done on the north side of the Yala-
kom River where pyritized rock outcrops were sampled. In the Marshall Creek area
some minor copper mineralization was reported.
In the Cayoosh Creek valley along a forestry access road considerable pyrite
and pyrrhotite were found in silicified schist; some fairly good values in gold were
found in this material.
Nanaimo Mining Division.—In the Buttle Lake area close to the edge of Strathcona Park some copper stain was found in a rock cut along the road, and outcrops
of basalt show minor amounts of native copper. At the top of the ridge above the
rock cut, two fine-grained dykes cut through the underlying basalt; both dykes
showed some native copper and copper sulphides but assays of samples taken were
very low. At the south end of Quinsam Lake the diorite bluffs show minor magnetite, chalcopyrite, and malachite mineralization. Volcanic rocks are exposed along
a fault zone and show narrow stringers of magnetite. Outcrops of basalt in this area
also show some chalcopyrite in narrow quartz stringers. Some exposures of crystalline limestone were also examined.
On Mount Arrowsmith, claims were staked to cover an area showing strong
copper mineralization.
In the Salmon River area, wide outcrops of limestone were carefully sampled.
In the Holberg Inlet area, a base camp was established on Hushamu Creek on
the north side of the inlet, and a considerable amount of line-cutting, soil sampling,
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 69
and surface prospecting and geological investigation was done. The underlying rocks
are mainly tuff, various other volcanics, and greywacke along with some Bonanza
Group rocks. On the south side of the inlet, outcrops of volcanics show minor chalcopyrite and copper carbonates. Some quartz-feldspar outcrops were examined near
Coal Harbour. Heavy undergrowth and deep overburden hampered this work very
considerably.
Nelson Mining Division.—In the Kloosh Creek valley, slate and shale outcrops
were reported along the pyritized argillite showing minor copper mineralization;
pyritized quartzite was also examined and some encouraging geochemical anomalies
were mapped.
Up Cultus Creek, argillite float showing copper mineralization was picked up,
and heavily oxidized limy rocks showing specks of chalcopyrite were investigated by
trenching, but nothing of importance was uncovered.
In the Midge Creek area some prospecting on fissure veins in granodiorite was
completed, and trenching was done on an oxidized zone showing considerable quartz
and manganese dioxide (pyrolusite) and carrying erratic values in gold.
In the Trail Creek area, a small mineralized zone was investigated. Some work
was done along Kelly Creek and near Champion Lakes, but nothing was reported.
In the Erie Lake area, near Charbonneau Creek and in the Record Creek valley,
outcrops of granite and limestone were examined. At Kelly Mountain many outcrops of sedimentary rocks were reported. Sedimentary rocks also underlie much
of the Champion Creek area. Nothing was reported from the Marsh Creek valley,
although some work was done there. Near Blizzard Mountain a fault zone was prospected. Nothing of interest was seen in the Erie Creek area, but at Dominion Mountain some float containing galena and chalcopyrite was picked up.
South of Boundary Lake, a low-grade, mineralized zone was exposed by surface
stripping. Along the Priest River, the underlying rocks are mainly limestone, diorite, and schist, and in this area small pockets of galena and chalcopyrite were prospected. Fairly good assays in silver were reported where tetrahedrite was visible in
and near a bed of grey limestone.
On flat terrain near Lister, open-cutting was done on a series of quartz veins
showing patches of heavy iron and copper sulphides. Some fairly good assays were
obtained from samples taken of this material.
New Westminster Mining Division.—In the Agassiz area, on a high ridge west
of the town, limestone bluffs show minor chalcopyrite mineralization in quartz
stringers, and rhyolite float picked up here showed specks of molybdenite. On the
east side of Bear Mountain a 12-foot width of fine-grained limestone showed some
molybdenite and chalcopyrite mineralization.
Some work was done in the ChiUiwack River valley where outcrops of limestone, schist, and granite were examined. Some gold colours were found in the
gravel beds of two small creeks flowing into this river, and float containing small
specks of chalcopyrite was picked up.
In the Coquihalla River valley, at Fifteen Mile Creek, copper stain was found
along a granite-serpentine contact.
A base camp was established at Kwoiek Lake, at the head of Kwoiek Creek,
which flows easterly into the Fraser River a few miles north of Boston Bar. Access
to the area by way of an old trail up the creek valley was very rough and hazardous
and the whole area was found to be a rugged one for prospecting. The underlying
rocks are mainly various phases of diorite with lesser amounts of sedimentary rocks
and some schist. Some barren quartz stringers were found in the schist. Heavy
boulders of barren, rusty quartz were found in the creek bottom.   A wide belt of
 A 70 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
serpentine was examined. It contains some fairly wide quartz veins showing crystals
of pyrite and some sericitization. Zones of quartzite and serpentized basic rocks,
some fine-grained hornblende diorite, and graphitic phyllite were also reported.
Nothing of economic importance was discovered in this area.
In the Hicks Creek and Alouette Lake areas, outcrops of pyritized granite were
examined. On the west side of Harrison Lake some lead-zinc mineralization in
greenstone was reported and 10 mineral claims were staked. The Cartmell Creek
area was found to be underlain mainly by greenstone and schist; at Simms Creek
iron pyrite was found in limestone. Disseminated copper mineralization was prospected near Weaver Lake.
Near Greendrop Lake the underlying granite shows some narrow quartz
stringers carrying some galena. A short time was spent up the Siwash Creek valley,
on the east side of the Fraser River, where outcrops of schist, serpentine, and pyrox-
enite were examined.
Omineca Mining Division.—Some work was done in the Lome Creek area.
Northwest of Perow, considerable work was done in the valley adjacent to Byman Creek. Float containing chalcopyrite and pyrite was found in an area underlain
by andesite and mixed types of volcanic rocks; minor arsenopyrite and limonite
mineralization was reported, but nothing of commercial interest was found. At the
head of Byman Creek, reddish-coloured andesite, some conglomerate, odd outcrops
of porphyry, rhyolite, and other volcanics showing traces of copper mineralization
were prospected.   Nothing of real interest was examined.
A logged-off area, well supplied with logging access roads, and located about
10 miles northwest of Wistaria, was fairly well prospected; exposures of volcanic
rocks showing minor pyrite and chalcopyrite mineralization were sampled. The assay
returns were very low. West of Shelford Hills, narrow quartz stringers in andesitic
rocks show some chalcopyrite; outcrops of mixed volcanic rocks and shale were reported, and a large gossan was prospected. Some exposures of basalt were observed.   Nothing of economic interest was found in the entire area.
Up Tahtsa Reach, some time was spent searching for an area known to contain
some copper showings. Soil and rock samples were taken. The underlying rocks
were reported to be granite and basalt with quartz stringers. A contact zone showing some mineralization was prospected, and 10 mineral claims were staked covering
an area where good copper float had been found.
Considerable work was done on a group of claims staked late in 1968 on the
north side of Tchentlo Lake, a few miles from the west end of the lake. In fractures
in diorite near the contact with the Cache Creek series, sufficient chalcopyrite and
molybdenite mineralization is present to warrant a programme of stripping, drilling,
and blasting. The result of this work warrants more intensive exploration in 1970.
The mineralization is spread over a wide area, 2,600 feet by 800 feet, and the geochemical work done by one mining company gave good results. On the north side
of Chuchi Lake some work was done on rock exposures showing minor mineralization of copper, lead, and zinc. Near Klawli Lake the area is underlain by volcanics
and granite showing traces of copper mineralization.
On the north side of Tchentlo Lake a short distance up the hill from Gidegingla
Lake an extensive mineralized zone was located close to the contact between diorite
and Takla volcanics. This zone was opened up by drilling and blasting, and the
sampling indicated good values in copper across mining widths. Further work is
warranted on these claims. North of the east end of Chuchi Lake a narrow shear
zone shows minor copper, lead, and zinc mineralization. South of the river connecting Chuchi and Tchentlo Lakes, outcrops of coarse granodiorite contained minor
amounts of disseminated pyrite.   Some work was also done east of Klawli River,
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 71
along a contact between Takla volcanics and diorite, where low assays in copper
were obtained.
On Diamond Island in the Nechako River some old open cuts were examined,
but nothing was found. The area close to the Kenny Dam was found to be underlain
by volcanic rocks. Near Sinkut Mountain, exposures of serpentinized peridotite
were investigated.
Some prospecting was done in the McConnell Lakes area. Two mineralized
zones showing interesting values in copper were discovered, but no further information is available.
Revelstoke Mining Division.—Considerable work was done from a base camp
established alongside a logging-mining road about 6 miles south of Ferguson. South
of Nettie Lake Mountain, prospecting was done where outcrops of chlorite schist
and quartz veins in argillite occurred; some of these veins showed minor amounts of
galena. North of Nettie Lake Mountain, the underlying rocks were mainly phyllite,
argillite, and quartzite, with minor amounts of limestone. Near Triune Mountain,
outcrops of limestone, schist, and quartzite were examined. In the Index Creek
area the underlying rock appeared to be phyllite. On Silvercup Mountain, outcrops
of phyllite and sericite schist and quartz veins in quartzite were prospected. Along
Ferguson Creek some old properties were examined where the principal rocks were
peridotite showing some short-fibre but brittle asbestos. A limestone-slate contact
was also checked over. Near the old Molly Mac mine, argillaceous limestone was
observed. Up Bunker Hill Creek, phyllite, argillite, and limestone were found, and
in the Bunker Hill mine area claims were staked on a phyllite-limestone contact.
Similkameen Mining Division.—In the Treasure Mountain area, basic rock
outcrops were examined; a serpentine belt in the Britton Creek area was prospected;
outcrops of schist and argillite were examined in the Lawless Creek valley; and
some work was done between lim Kelly and Railroad Creeks, where outcrops of
diorite were reported. In the Shawatum Mountain area up Nepopekum Creek,
pyritized andesite showing mineralization of pyrite and galena was sampled. Assay
returns were very low.
Slocan Mining Division.—In the Duncan River area a mineralized zone in
limestone was reported, and sheared diorite showed minor mineralization of galena
with specks of tetrahedrite.
Vancouver Mining Division.—In the Squamish area, on the edge of Garibaldi
Park, minor copper mineralization was reported in the underlying volcanics.
Vernon Mining Division.—Up Bouleau Creek, a tributary of Whiteman Creek,
the rock outcrops were dark-coloured volcanics. At Bouleau Lake, volcanics were
reported and a rhyolite-gabbro contact was prospected.
Victoria Mining Division.—Near Francis Lake, close to the Nitinat River,
some copper float was picked up, but its source was not found.
Mining Roads and Trails
Provision is made in the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources Act
whereby the Minister may, with the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council,
authorize the expenditure of public funds for the construction or repair of roads and
trails into mining areas. Assistance on a half-cost basis may also be provided on
roads and trails to individual properties.
Requests for road and trail assistance must be made to the Department before
the commencement of work. The type of access upon which assistance may be given
depends upon the value of the property, the stage of development, and the amount
of work to be done.   A trail is sometimes sufficient for initial exploration, and a
 A 72 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
tractor-road may be adequate for preliminary work. Subsequent development might
warrant assistance on the construction of a truck-road. A carefully drawn sketch
or plan of the location of the road is required to be submitted and, where warranted
by the amount of assistance requested, a report on the property by a professional
geological or mining engineer may be required. An engineer from the Department
may be required to report on the property before a grant is made and to inspect
the road after the work has been done.
The total mileages and expenditures under " Grants in Aid of Mining Roads
and Trails "during the 1969/70 fiscal year were as follows:—
Roads— Miles Cost
Construction     143        $234,906.25
Maintenance     336 97,984.81
Trails—
Maintenance   1.25 500.00
Bridges—
Construction        69,389.83
Maintenance        15,500.00
Total   $418,280.89
Work was continued on the Stewart-Cassiar road. Construction of this road
was initially financed under the " Roads to Resources " agreement between the Governments of Canada and British Columbia. Total expenditure on the road to date
is $20,936,968.38. The Federal Government's contribution of $7,500,000 was expended by the end of September, 1967, and since that time the whole cost of construction has been provided by the Provincial Government.
The construction is done by contract, and is supervised by the Department of
Highways on behalf of the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources. Two
major contracts were in progress during 1969—Projects 1391 and 1702. Further
road construction was done under Project 1391, covering the 29.08-mile section
between Burrage River and Ningunsaw River, contract for which was awarded to
Ben Ginter Construction Company in November, 1965, and started the following
year. The project was 73 per cent completed by the end of 1969. Project 1702,
covering construction of 38.10 miles of road between the south and north Bell-
Irving Crossings and clearing and grubbing the North Bell-Irving Crossing and the
Ningunsaw River was 60 per cent completed by the end of 1969. There was no
major bridge construction in 1969.
MINERALOGICAL BRANCH
The function of the Mineralogical Branch is to assist in the development and
use of the Province's mineral resources by making a variety of geological studies,
publishing data concerning mineral occurrences and their potential, by collecting
and storing geological and statistical data and making it available to the public, and
by recording the activities of the industry. The Branch is capable of supplying general geological information as well as specific information regarding mineral deposits
and the mineral industry. It provides rock and mineral identification of specimens
submitted by prospectors and others, contributes lectures in courses on prospecting,
participates in scientific discussions, and arranges educational exhibits.
Field work by officers of the Mineralogical Branch includes areal geological
mapping, detailed geological examinations of mineral deposits and mining camps,
and examination of properties of current exploration interest. The results of major
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK
A 73
mapping projects are published in a series of bulletins, and shorter reports are published annually in a newly instituted series entitled Geology, Exploration, and Mining
in British Columbia.
Editing of the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources, of Geology, Exploration, and Mining in British Columbia, 1969, and other
publications is the responsibility of Stuart S. Holland. Copy for printing is prepared by and under the direction of Mrs. Rosalyn J. Moir.
gists :-
Staff
On December 31, 1969, the professional staff included the following geolo-
M. S. Hedley
.Chief of the Branch
Stuart S. Holland Deputy Chief of the Branch
 Geologist
 Geologist
 Geologist
 Geologist
 Geologist
 Geologist
 Geologist
 Geologist
 Geologist
 Geologist
 Geologist
 Geologist
N. C. Carter
B. N. Church ..
G. E. P. Eastwood
James T. Fyles	
E. W. Grove	
E. V. Jackson	
J. W. McCammon
W. J. McMillan ....
K. E. Northcote ___.
V. A. G. Preto	
A. F. Shepherd _
A. Sutherland Brown
All but three are registered professional engineers, and these have applied for
registration. Nine hold the Ph.D. degree and one is completing work for that degree.
Staff Changes
D. B. Craig resigned on April 11th to accept a position with the Federal Government, Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Resources.
N. D. McKechnie resigned on April 30th after 20 years of service to undertake
consulting work.
R. V. Kirkham resigned on May 23rd to accept a position with the Mineral
Deposit section of the Geological Survey of Canada.
J. M. Carr resigned on June 30th after 13 years' service to accept a position
with an exploration company.
Three of the resulting vacancies were filled by the following appointments:—
W. J. McMillan, geologist, a graduate of the University of British Columbia
and a Ph.D. from Carleton University, joined the staff on May 30, 1969.
E. V. Jackson, geologist, a graduate of the University of New Brunswick, joined
the staff on June 9, 1969.
B. Neil Church, geologist, a graduate of the University of British Columbia
and a Ph.D. from University of British Columbia, joined the staff on June 18, 1969.
Field Work, 1969 Season
N. C. Carter, with one assistant, completed the remapping of the mineralized
area north of Alice Arm. He also made property examinations and checked on
current exploration work in the Terrace area and Babine region.
 A 74 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
B. N. Church, on joining the Department, started work in the Owen Lake-
Goosly Lake area south and southeast of Houston, mapping known deposits and
studying the relationship of the mineralization to the Tertiary volcanic rocks.
G. E. P. Eastwood spent a month near McLeese Lake on detailed mapping of
an extensive area of copper mineralization.
J. T. Fyles completed mapping the molybdenum-bearing area at Rossland, and
made a number of property examinations, principally in the Kootenay region.
E. W. Grove spent the summer in the office, writing up the results of the previous five years' fieldwork in the Portland Canal-Unuk River area.
J. W. McCammon examined deposits of industrial minerals and structural
materials in various parts of the Province.
W. J. McMillan, with one assistant, started work in the Highland Valley area
preparatory to making an exhaustive study of the mineralization of the entire region.
This study will build on and carry forward the work of J. M. Carr.
K. E. Northcote, with one assistant, continued regional mapping of the geology
and mineral deposits of the north end of Vancouver Island north and west of Holberg
Inlet.
V. A. G. Preto, with one assistant, completed remapping and study of the
important copper mineralization on both sides of the Similkameen River in the
Copper Mountain area. This area includes the former Granby Company holdings,
now the property of Similkameen Mining Company Limited, and others.
A. Sutherland Brown made field studies of mineral deposits of copper and
molybdenum in various parts of the Province preparatory to publishing a bulletin
on the occurrence of these metals.
Five field assistants were employed on the various projects.
Publications
Technical reports of the Mineralogical Branch were published in Geology,
Exploration, and Mining in British Columbia, 1969. In addition, the Branch published Bulletin No. 56, Geology and Geochronology of the Guichon Creek Batholith,
by K. E. Northcote, and also Map 69-1, " Geological Compilation Map of Smithers,
Hazelton, and Terrace Areas," by N. C. Carter and R. V. Kirkham.
Six scientific and educational reports and papers resulting directly from their
work as staff geologists were also published by officers of the Branch.
Copies of seven mineral inventory maps covering the Queen Charlotte Islands,
Vancouver Island, and the Princeton area and Xerox copies of the relevant inventory
cards were made available in 1969. Details of this material may be requested from
the Chief of the Mineralogical Branch, Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Douglas Building, Victoria.
Rock and Mineral Sets
Sets of rocks and minerals are available for sale to prospectors, schools, and
residents of British Columbia. Information regarding them may be obtained from
the Chief of the Mineralogical Branch, Douglas Building, Victoria.
Airborne Magnetometer Mapping
The project of airborne magnetometer mapping, jointly financed by the Geological Survey of Canada and the British Columbia Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, continued in 1969. In May, 1969, a three-year contract was
signed with Geoterrex Ltd.
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK
Summary of aeromagnetic maps released is as follows:
A 75
Release Date
Number
Scale
When Flown
April 8, 1969	
April 8, 1969	
May 6, 1969._	
May 6, 1969	
February 25, 1970..
May 28, 1970	
15
2
18
6
20
10
1 mile=-l inch
4 miles;-1 inch
1 mile_=l inch
4miles=l inch
1 mile=l inch
1 mile_zl inch
Central British Columbia
South central British Columbia
Central British Columbia
Central and southern British Columbia
Central British Columbia
Central British Columbia
1968
1966
1968
1966
1967
1967
The maps as well as index maps showing the coverage by aeromagnetic mapping in British Columbia may be obtained from the British Columbia Department
of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Room 411, Douglas Building, Victoria, or the
Geological Survey of Canada, 100 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3.
The basic data used in compiling the maps are on open file at the Geological
Survey of Canada in Ottawa, where interested parties may arrange to obtain them
for special processing.
The Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Observatories Branch)
operates a magnetic observatory at Victoria. Services available to geophysical
exploration companies and other interested agencies include:—
(a) Three-hour range indices of magnetic activity; these provide a measure
of the intensity of the magnetic disturbance (on a 0-9 scale) for each
three-hour period. The monthly listings of these indices are normally
mailed within a few days after the end of each month.
(b) Copies of magnetograms are available through a local duplicating firm
at a charge of $7.50 for a monthly set. These recordings of the magnetic
field can be used to control field surveys, in particular to correct for the
diurnal changes and magnetic disturbances. The area over which this
control is valid depends on the required accuracy; for ±5 gamma accuracy, it covers an elliptic region reaching roughly as far as longitude
118 degrees to the east and latitude 50.5 degrees to the north.
Further details can be obtained by writing to the Officer-in-charge, Victoria
Magnetic Observatory, R.R. 7, Victoria.
PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS BRANCH
The Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch is responsible for the administration
of the Drilling and Production Regulations made pursuant to the Petroleum and
Natural Gas Act. These regulations, made by Order in Council 308, dated February 3, 1969, supersede the former Regulations Governing the Drilling of Wells and
the Production and Conservation of Oil and Natural Gas, and the Regulations
Establishing Gas-Oil Ratio Adjustment Factors, Oil Production Allowables, Overproduction and Underproduction.
The regulations provide for the use of efficient and safe practices in the drilling,
completion, and abandonment of wells; for the orderly development of fields discovered within the Province; and for the conservation and prevention of waste of
oil and natural gas within the reservoir and during production operations.
Every well location must be approved by the Branch before the well is drilled.
All operations related to drilling and production are inspected frequently to ensure
compliance with the provision of all regulations, including such features as facilities
and practices used, adequate plugging of abandoned wells, surface restoration of
 A 76 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1969
well-sites, well-testing and measurement procedures employed, disposal of produced
water, protection of installations against fire, and general conservation.
Investigations are made of complaints of property damage resulting from
drilling and producing operations, and from geophysical work programmes.
Comprehensive records of all drilling and producing operations are maintained
at Victoria and are made available for study, or are published, for the use and benefit
of anyone interested in oil or gas development in British Columbia. Samples of bit
cuttings, as well as all core, obtained from every well drilled in the Province, are
collected and retained at the field office located at Charlie Lake, where they may be
studied by interested persons. Charlie Lake is adjacent to the Alaska Highway,
about 5 miles northwest of Fort St. John.
Detailed reservoir engineering and geological studies are conducted on the
basis of technical information submitted to the Branch from operating companies,
as well as information acquired through field work by Branch personnel. Estimates
of the reserves of oil and natural gas are made annually, at the end of December.
Crown-owned oil and natural-gas rights are evaluated prior to being disposed of
by public tender.
Administration
The Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch is subdivided for administrative purposes into three sections. These sections and their supervisors are as follows: Development Engineering, W. L. Ingram; Reservoir Engineering, A. J. Dingley; and
Geology, S. S. Cosburn.
The field office at Charlie Lake, which includes the core and sample laboratory,
is supervised by the District Engineer, D. L. Johnson.
Staff
Headquarters, Victoria
J. D. Lineham Chief of Branch
W. L. Ingram Deputy Chief of Branch
and Senior Development Engineer
M. B. Hamersley Development Technician
J. F. Tomczak Statistician
A. J. Dingley Senior Reservoir Engineer
B. T. Barber  Reservoir Engineer
P. S. Attariwala  Reservoir Engineer
P. K. Huus  Reservoir Technician
S. S. Cosburn Senior Petroleum Geologist
D. L. Griffin Petroleum Geologist
T. B. Ramsay Petroleum Geologist
J. Y. Smith Petroleum Geologist
J. E. Hughes (until April 30th) Petroleum Geologist
A. S. Nemeth (until November 30th) Petroleum Geologist
Field Office, Charlie Lake
D. L. Johnson  District Engineer
T. B. Smith Field Engineer
D. A. Selby Field Technician
G. T. Mohler Field Technician
W. B. Holland Field Technician
L. A. Gingras Field Technician
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 77
Staff Changes
J. E. Hughes, petroleum geologist, resigned, effective May 1st.
J. Y. Smith, petroleum geologist, joined the staff on July 3rd.
T. B. Smith, field engineer, joined the staff on November 3rd.
A. S. Nemeth, petroleum geologist, resigned, effective December 1st.
Board of Arbitration
Chairman:   A. W. Hobbs, solicitor, Department of the Attorney-General.
Members: S. G. Preston, agrologist, Department of Agriculture; J. D. Line-
ham, engineer, Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
The Board of Arbitration, established under the authority of the Petroleum and
Natural Gas Act, grants right of entry by oil and gas companies upon alienated land
and determines conditions of entry and compensation therefor. It also terminates
the right of entry when a company has ceased to use the land.
Three right-of-entry orders were made in 1969. Two of those applications,
and one carried over from 1968, were heard at a hearing held at Fort St. John on
September 22nd. The three cases were settled by Board awards dated November 3rd.
An application for right-of-entry was received on December 11th. A right-of-
entry order was made on December 15th and the application will be heard in 1970.
Conservation Committee
Chairman: K. B. Blakey, Deputy Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
Members: M. H. A. Glover, economist, Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce; N. D. McKechnie, geologist, Department of Mines
and Petroleum Resources, resigned on May 15th and has not been replaced.
The Conservation Committee is responsible to the Minister of Mines and
Petroleum Resources and was established originally on October 11, 1957, under
the authority of the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act.   Its duties are as follows:—
(1) To act as an advisory committee to the Minister on such questions of
conservation that the Minister, in writing, shall refer to the Committee
for consideration and recommendation.
(2) To deal with such questions of conservation and production in the various
fields of British Columbia as may arise between two or more operators in
the same field or between operators and the Branch when appeals on such
questions are made to the Minister and referred by him to the Committee.
The Conservation Committee did not meet in 1969.
PUBLICATIONS
A list of the publications of the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources
is available free on request to the Chief of the Mineralogical Branch or Chief of the
Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch, Douglas Building, Victoria.
Publications that are in print may be obtained from the Department of Mines
and Petroleum Resources, Douglas Building, Victoria, and from the Geological
Survey of Canada, 100 West Pender Street, Vancouver. Current publications may
also be obtained from the Gold Commissioner's Office, Room 320, 890 West Pender
Street, Vancouver.
Publications are available for reference use in the Departmental library, Room
430, Douglas Building, Victoria, in the reading-room of the Geological Survey of
Canada, 100 West Pender Street, Vancouver, in the offices of the Inspectors of
Mines in Nelson and Prince Rupert, as well as in some public libraries.
 Petroleum and Natural Gas
CHAPTER IV
CONTENTS
Page
Petroleum and Natural Gas Titles  A 81
Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch  A 83
General Review  A 8 3
Field Office  A 83
Geological Section  A 84
Geological Laboratories    A 84
Core and Well Samples     A 84
Core and Sample Examination     A 86
Exploration     A 86
Reservoir Engineering Section    A 87
Oil Allowables, M.P.R.s, and Improved Recovery Schemes     A 87
Associated and Solution Gas Conservation Schemes     A 89
Gas Allowables and Well Tests     A 90
Hydrocarbon and Associated Sulphur Reserves     A 93
Miscellaneous     A 94
Development Section    A 96
Drilling     A 96
Production  A 100
Pipe-lines  A 102
Oil-gathering System  A 102
Oil-transmission System  A 102
Gas-gathering System  A 102
Gas-transmission System  A 102
Gas-distribution System  A 103
Oil Refineries  A 103
Gas-processing Plants  A 103
Sulphur Plants  A 103
Well Records  A 103
Reports  A 105
Publications  A 107
Statistical Tables—
Table 13.—Exploratory and Development Wells Completed, January to
December, 1969  A 108
Table 14.—Geophysical Exploration, 1969  A 109
Table 15.—Surface Geological Exploration, 1969  A 123
Table 16.—Project and Individual Well M.P.R. Data at December 31,
1969  A 124
78
 PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS
A 79
Statistical Tables—Continued
Table 17.—Gas-well Test and Allowable Data, December 31, 1969	
Table 18.—Hydrocarbon and By-products Reserves,  December  31,
1969	
Table 19.—Oilfield Reservoir Data	
Table 20.—Gasfield Reservoir Data	
Table 21.—Wells Drilled and Drilling, 1969	
Table 22.—Oilfields and Gasfields Designated at December 31, 1969—
Table 23.—Number of Producing and Producible Wells at December
31,1969	
Table 24.—Monthly Crude-oil Production by Fields and Pools, 1969—
Table 25.—Monthly Natural-gas Production by Fields and Pools, 1969
Table 26.—Summary of Drilling and Production Statistics, 1969	
Table 27.—Monthly Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Condensate/Pentanes Plus, 1969	
Table 28.—Monthly Supply and Disposition of Natural Gas, 1969	
Table 29.—Monthly Production and Disposition of Butane, Propane,
and Sulphur, 1969	
Table 30.—Monthly Gross Values of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, Natural-
gas Liquids, and Sulphur to Producers, 1969	
Table 31.—Crude-oil Pipe-fines, 1969	
Table 32.—Crude-oil Refineries, 1969	
Table 33.—Natural-gas Pipe-lines, 1969	
Table 34.—Gas-processing Plants, 1969	
Table 35.—Sulphur Plants, 1969	
Page
A 130
A 149
A 150
A 152
A 157
A 162
A 167
A 170
A 172
A 175
A 176
A 178
A 180
A 181
A 181
A 182
A 183
A 185
A 185
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Photographs
-Sample washing facilities at the Field Office of the Petroleum and
Natural Gas Branch, Charlie Lake	
-Core examination facilities at the Field Office of the Petroleum and
Natural Gas Branch, Charlie Lake	
II.—Exploration well, drilled by Dome Petroleum Ltd. on the Ritchie anticline in the Bowser Basin east of Stewart	
Plate
Ia.-
Ib,
Drawings
Fig.
2. Footage drilled in British Columbia, 1954-69.
3. Petroleum and natural-gas fields, 1969	
4. Oil production in British Columbia, 1954-69...
5. Gas production in British Columbia, 1954-69.
6. Petroleum and natural-gas pipe-lines, 1969	
A 85
A 85
A 97
A 98
A 99
A 101
A 101
A 102
 A 80 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
Drawings—Continued
Map Page
1. Union Oil project, Gething zone, Aitken Creek field  A 112
2. Triad Oil project, Halfway zone, Beatton River field  A 112
3. Pacific Petroleums project, Baldonnel zone, Beg and Beg West fields  A 113
4. Pacific Petroleums project, Halfway zone, Beg field  A 114
5. Pacific Petroleums project, Mississippian zone, Blueberry field  A 115
6. Boundary Lake zone projects, Boundary Lake field  A 115
7. Pacific Petroleums project, Baldonnel zone, Bubbles field  A 116
8. Union Oil project, Halfway zone, Bulrush field  A 116
9. Pacific Petroleums project, Slave Point zone, Clarke Lake and Clarke
Lake South fields  A 117
10. Pacific Petroleums Unit 1, Halfway zone, Currant field  A 117
11. Canadian Superior Oil Unit 1, Inga sand zone, Inga field  A 118
12. Pacific Petroleums project, Halfway zone, Kobes-Townsend field  A 118
13. Baldonnel pool project, Laprise Creek field  A 119
14. Union Oil Unit 1, Halfway zone, Milligan Creek field  A 119
15. Texaco Exploration project, Baldonnel zone, Nig Creek field  A 120
16. Pacific Petroleums project, Wabamun zone, Parkland field  A 120
17. Halfway zone projects, Peejay field  A 121
18. Dunlevy pool project, Rigel field  A 121
19. Halfway zone units, Weasel field  A 122
20. Union Oil project, Halfway zone, Wildmint field  A 122
 PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS A 81
PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS TITLES
Petroleum and Natural Gas Titles, under the direction of the Chief Commissioner, is responsible for the administration of the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act,
which includes all matters related to and affecting title to Crown petroleum and
natural-gas rights, including the collection of revenue from fees, rents, dispositions,
and royalty. Regulations governing geophysical operations and petroleum-development road regulations are also administered by the Chief Commissioner.
During the year there were four dispositions of Crown reserve petroleum and
natural-gas rights resulting in tender bonus bids of $21,646,451.54.
As at December 31, 1969, 41,557,220 acres, or approximately 64,933 square
miles, of Crown petroleum and natural-gas rights, issued under the Petroleum and
Natural Gas Act, were held in good standing by operators ranging from small
independent companies to major international ones. The form of title held, total
number issued, and acreage in each case were as follows:—
Form of Title Number Acreage
Permits       525 31,893,990
Natural-gas licences           	
Drilling reservations         31 350,546
Leases (all types)   3,887 9,312,684
Total  41,557,220
Details of land disposition for the years 1947-1960, inclusive, may be found
on page A 61 of the 1960 Annual Report. Details of land disposition for the years
1961-1969, inclusive, are included in this report.
Petroleum and Natural-gas Revenue, 1969
Rentals and fees—
Permits   $1,772,064.01
Drilling reservations  79,796.10
Natural-gas licences    	
Petroleum, natural-gas, and petroleum and natural-gas leases  8,488,113.62
Total rentals and fees  $10,339,973.73
Disposal of Crown reserves—
Permits   $16,516,391.81
Drilling reservations        1,394,215.34
Leases       3,735,844.39
Total Crown reserve disposal     21,646,451.54
Royalties—
Gas   $3,730,633.92
Oil     9,017,352.18
Processed products   48,847.46
Total royalties     12,796,833.56
Miscellaneous fees  19,625.19
Total petroleum and natural-gas revenues  $44,802,884.02
Details of yearly revenue, 1947-1960, inclusive, are tabled on page A 61 of
the Annual Report for 1960. Details of yearly revenue from 1961-1969, inclusive,
are included in this report.
Administration of the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act in the Department is
divided between Petroleum and Natural Gas Titles and the Petroleum and Natural
Gas Branch.
 A 82
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
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 PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS A 83
PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS BRANCH
The Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch, under the direction of the Chief of
the Branch, is responsible for administration of the Drilling and Production Regulations. The regulations specify the conditions which must be employed for
efficiency and safe practice in the drilling, completion, and abandonment of wells;
for well spacing; prevention of waste;  conservation; and all related matters.
GENERAL REVIEW
Production of crude oil and natural gas during 1969 continued their steady
increases that have occurred since completion of major pipe-line connections from
the northeastern corner of the Province. Gains in production compared to 1968
were 14.2 and 15.3 per cent respectively for oil and natural gas. Secondary recovery
schemes from the oilfields producing Triassic oil accounted for the majority of the
crude-oil production. Large increases in gas production resulted from further
developments in the northern fields producing from reservoirs of Devonian age.
Drilling and exploration activities fell off significantly, with no apparent change
expected in the immediate future. The drilling completed during 1969 failed to
make any significant discovery that would result in a large-scale development. This
decrease in drilling operations provided the Branch with the opportunity to review
assigned production allowables and reserve calculations and reoriented the field
staff to more emphasis on the inspection of the production facilities.
No major changes were made during 1969 to the pipe-line and marketing
installations in the Province.
FIELD OFFICE
The field office of the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources is located
at Charlie Lake, British Columbia, near Mile 52 on the Alaska Highway. A sub-
office located in the Provincial Building at Fort Nelson is used periodically by the
field staff.
The field office staff is responsible for enforcement at the field level of the
Drilling and Production Regulations.
The Provincial standard for bottom-hole pressure-gauge calibration is located
at Charlie Lake. The new regulations, effective February 3, 1969, required that
any gauge to be used for sub-surface pressure measurement must be calibrated to
this standard before it can be lawfully used in British Columbia. During 1969,
465 pressure gauges were calibrated and calculated without charge, and a copy of
the results was forwarded to the respective companies.
During 1969, seven vehicles were driven a total of 118,318 miles to conduct
inspections and (or) perform surveys pertaining to the drilling and production
phase of the oil and gas industry. A specialized bottom-hole unit was employed to
conduct surveys on 78 wells. These surveys are used as a check on the pressure
data submitted by operating companies or for special studies conducted by Departmental personnel.
Continued fast growth of oil and natural-gas production claimed a large percentage of the inspections made by the field staff. Complete meter calibrations
were done on 166 gas meters, and an additional 773 gas meters were fast checked.
Twenty-two new gas-measurement sites were inspected, and the meter runs micro-
metered to ensure that they met with A.G.A. specifications for gas measurement.
Surface production equipment, storage facilities, and production batteries were
inspected on 105 occasions.
 A 84 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
In compliance with the provisions of the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act, 1965,
the field office staff supervised lease restoration on two abandoned sites.
Inspections were carried out at 220 drilling-sites and 1,520 producing or
abandoned leases. Six hundred and sixty-nine water-storage or disposal sites were
inspected during 1969, with the view to strictly enforcing the regulations pertaining
to the storage and disposal of produced formation water.
GEOLOGICAL SECTION
During 1969, the Geological Section interpreted, recorded, and filed geologic
data from northeastern British Columbia. New data were incorporated into the
sub-surface maps for determination of oil and gas reserves, land evaluations, permit
and lease work evaluation, and special projects. The main sources of information
for the geologic studies were permit and lease reports, submitted drilling and production data, well logs, samples, and core.
Geological data were interpreted in relation to the reservoir geology of the oil
and gas fields. Fields receiving the greatest attention were those producing from
the Halfway and Charlie Lake Formations in the Fort St. John area, and the Slave
Point and Pine Point Formations in the Fort Nelson area. Special projects were
undertaken to deal with numerous industry submissions. All approved well locations are classified by the Section according to the Lahee System, as defined by the
American Association of Petroleum Geologists. A summary of the wells classified
by the Lahee System is shown in Table 13. Six classifications are used that are
based upon the geological interpretation, which are described as follows: (1) New
field wildcat—drilled in a geological environment where hydrocarbons have not
yet been discovered; (2) new pool wildcat—drilled in a geological horizon where
other pools have been found but the geological conditions are such that searching
for a new pool is very hazardous; (3) outpost—drilled with the intent of extending
an already partly developed pool by a considerable distance; (4) and (5) deep-pool
and shallow-pool tests—drilled within the known limits of a pool with the intent of
searching for hydrocarbons below or above respectively the pool or producible
horizon; and (6) development—drilled with the intent of further exploiting the
pay horizon or pool within the area which has already been essentially proved for
production.
Geological Laboratories
Core and Well Samples
All cores from British Columbia wells must be preserved in labelled boxes
having an inside length not greater than 30 inches and must be delivered to the
geological laboratory for permanent storage. During 1969, 1,236 boxes of core
from 90 wells were received at the laboratory. At the end of 1969, 28,428 boxes
from 1,684 wells were being stored.
Unless otherwise directed, any operator who drills a well for petroleum or
natural gas is required to take a sample of drilled rock (bit cuttings) at least every
10 feet of depth. Each sample, consisting of several ounces of rock fragments, is
placed in a small bag at the well, labelled, and submitted to the geological laboratory, where it is washed and bottled.
Each 10-foot sample is divided, resulting in three complete sets of samples for
each well. One set is retained at the Charlie Lake sample library, one is sent to
headquarters at Victoria, and the other to the Institute of Sedimentary and Petroleum Geology, Geological Survey of Canada, in Calgary.    The remainder of the
 PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS
A 85
■..:;,.-
Plate Ia.—Sample washing facilities at the Field Office of the Petroleum and Natural Gas
Branch, Charlie Lake.
Plate Ib.—Core examination facilities at the Field Office of the Petroleum and Natural Gas
Branch, Charlie Lake.
 A 86 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
10-foot sample from the original sample-bag is retained at the laboratory for a
period of one year should further samples be required. The main sample-examination facilities are at Charlie Lake; limited facilities are available at Victoria.
The Charlie Lake sample library and the Geological Survey of Canada sample
library in Calgary each has a set of samples from wells drilled in British Columbia
since 1948; the Victoria sample library has samples from wells drilled since September, 1957. At the end of 1969 the Charlie Lake sample library contained
667,364 samples, while 665,725 samples were retained in the Victoria library.
During 1969, samples were received at the laboratory from 177 wells. A total
of 52,062 10-foot samples was washed and bottled in 1969.
Core and Sample Examination
A nominal fee is charged for the use of core- and sample-examination facilities
provided by the Department.
In 1969, 8,283 boxes of core from 475 wells were studied by oil company
personnel and other interested individuals. Cores from 30 wells were temporarily
removed from the laboratory by the operators for further studies. Samples from
21 wells were studied, using the laboratory facilities at Charlie Lake.
Since the core- and sample-examination laboratory at Charlie Lake was made
available to the public in February, 1961, 68,839 boxes of core have been removed
from the racks for examination.
Exploration
In northeastern British Columbia during 1969, 23 oil and gas companies
employed seismic crews for a total of 182 crew-weeks. During February, the most
active month, 12 crews were working. Two companies did gravity work in northeastern British Columbia and one company ran a magnetometer survey in northeastern British Columbia. Surface geological parties worked in northeastern British
Columbia and in the Stikine area. These exploration activities are listed in Tables
14 and 15.
Except for one exploratory test in the Bowser Basin, all the drilling for oil and
gas was confined to northeastern British Columbia. Of the 35 producing oil wells
completed in 1969, 1 was completed in the Mississippian, 2 in the Permian, 31 in
the Triassic, and 1 in the Cretaceous. Of the 40 gas wells, 9 were Devonian, 5
Permian, 15 Triassic, and 11 Cretaceous. All these potentially productive wells
were located in the plains area of northeastern British Columbia.
Twenty-six wells were drilled to Devonian horizons during 1969. The wells
FPC Peggo b-53-I and Pacific Cabin d-57-B discovered gas in the Slave Point
Formation, and Sulphur Point gas was discovered in new areas by Apache CPOG
IOE Clarke d-24-I and Mobil Sahtaneh c-70-I. Four development gas wells were
completed in the Slave Point of the Clarke Lake Field.
One Debolt Formation oil well was completed in the Blueberry area. Two
Belloy Formation oil wells and five Belloy gas wells were completed in the Stoddart
area.   One of these, CDR Eagle 11-29-84-18 discovered a new Belloy oil pool.
Most of the drilling in northeastern British Columbia was to Triassic objectives,
and discoveries were made in the Halfway, Charlie Lake, and Baldonnel Formations.
The development drilling was mainly aimed at Triassic production in the Boundary
Lake field, the non-continuous Halfway trend, and in the Inga field. The numerous
Charlie Lake Stray sands are proving an added stimulus to Triassic exploration.
One oil well was completed in the Bluesky-Gething Formation and 11 gas wells
were completed in Upper and Lower Cretaceous strata.
 PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS
Gas Discoveries, 1969
A 87
Well
Authorization
No.
Well Name
Total
Depth
(Ft.)
Status
444
2581
2446
174
2423
2533
2496
2516
2442
2470
2436
2453
2425
Mesozoic
Pacific et al Siphon 11-27-86-16	
Pacific West Prod Siphon 7-34-86-16-
Dome LaGarde 10-12-87-16	
Pacific Ft St John SE 7-3-83-17 (49).
Texcan N Cache 6-28-88-22 __	
Amarillo Cabot N Inga d-51-K.	
Placid Banner Sandy d-28-G	
Champlin Flatrock 10-9-84-16.	
Pan Am Redeye d-89-D _
Palaeozoic
Apache CPOG IOE Clarke d-24-I-
Mobil Sahtaneh c-70-I 	
FPC Chevron Peggo b-53-I —
Pacific Cabin d-57-B - _	
4,680
4,740
4,420
6,688
5,034
5,490
3,837
4,900
3,430
7,720
7,767
7,031
6,953
Baldonnel and Halfway gas.
Baldonnel and Charlie Lake gas.
Baldonnel and Charlie Lake gas.
Charlie Lake gas.
Charlie Lake and Halfway gas.
Inga gas.
Halfway gas.
Halfway gas.
Halfway gas.
Sulphur Point gas.
Sulphur Point gas.
Slave Point gas.
Slave Point gas.
Oil Discoveries, 1969
2548
\
Mesozoic
| Chaut Dunbar Stoddart 11-23-85-19 	
5,990
6,249
2502
Paleozoic
| CDR Eagle 11-29-84-18               	
1
RESERVOIR ENGINEERING SECTION
The Reservoir Engineering Section is responsible for determination of reservoir
and production characteristics of oil and gas pools in the Province. This involves
interpretation of reservoir pressure, rock and fluid properties, and production data.
The results of these studies are applied in making recommendations concerning the
approval of submissions from industry for improved recovery and other production
schemes, and also for estimating Provincial hydrocarbon and hydrocarbon-associated sulphur reserves.
The section ensures that requisite reservoir data are obtained, either by industry
or Branch personnel, and maintains files of these data. In addition, oil and gas
allowable production rates are established by the Section. Other responsibilities
of the Section include matters affecting conservation and correlative rights, approval
of measurement practices, and approval of produced water-disposal schemes.
Oil Allowables, M.P.R.s, and Improved Recovery Schemes
Maximum permissive rates (M.P.R.s) are assigned to all oil wells in the
Province, either as individual wells or for groups of wells in the form of project or
unit M.P.R.s. Single-well M.P.R.s are based on well-bore net-pay properties, while
project M.P.R.s are derived from mapped pore volume data and the estimated
recovery factor for the production scheme in effect. Monthly oil allowables are
established from M.P.R. values, and periodic checks are made to ensure that wells
and projects are being produced in accordance with regulations governing overproduction.
Section 74.03 of the Drilling and Production Regulations provides for the
carry-forward of oil allowable underproduction from one production period to the
next, provided this circumstance is caused by a situation not controllable by the
 A 88 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
operator involved. During the year several requests for such a carry-forward were
approved. Under section 71.02 of the regulations, daily oil production cannot
exceed 125 per cent of the M.P.R. In connection with applications under section
74.03, requests were also received for waiver of section 71.02 to enable wells in the
Inga B pool and Stoddart field to make up underproduction. These requests were
not granted, since in the Branch's opinion all wells capable of exceeding their M.P.R.
would be able to make up the underproduction during the 1969/70 production
period.
A report is issued monthly, in which M.P.R.s are summarized by field and
operator. Table 16 presents individual well and project M.P.R.s as of December
31, 1969, while Maps 1, 2, 5, 6, 8, 10, 11, 14, 17, 19, and 20 show the areas included in project or unit M.P.R. approvals.
During 1969 a total of 43 single-well M.P.R.s was issued. This includes
revisions to 23 previously approved values due to re-evaluation of pertinent data or
changes in well spacing, and four interim M.P.R.s which were revised to permanent
status. As discussed in last year's report, during 1968 many project and single-well
M.P.R. reapplications were received in response to an attempt to obtain uniformity
in parameters included in M.P.R. calculations. By early 1969 these had all been
reviewed and, effective March 1, interim M.P.R.s were issued pending final exhaustive evaluation of the submissions. The interim M.P.R.s outstanding at the end
of 1969 are identified in Table 16. At the time these interim M.P.R.s were issued,
all project approvals were amended to conform with the requirements of the new
Drilling and Production Regulations which came into force on February 3, 1969.
Annual or semi-annual progress reports are now required for all projects, together
with brief monthly status reports detailing withdrawal balances.
In May, an application was received from Tenneco Oil & Minerals Ltd. for an
increase in M.P.R. for all wells operated by that Company in the Inga A pool, Inga
field. Following extensive review, the application was not approved due to lack of
substantiating data and the fact that formation of a unit in this pool was being
actively pursued.
At the end of 1968, a waterflood M.P.R. had been approved for Inga Unit
No. 1, but was not in effect since water injection had not commenced. Following
first water injection in lune, 1969, the M.P.R. became 7,064 stock tank barrels per
day as of June 1. This was later increased to an interim level of 7,400 stock tank
barrels per day following unit enlargement on August 1, 1969. The M.P.R. was
finally pegged at 7,246 stock tank barrels per day on October 1, 1969, following
completion of an infill drilling programme which provided additional reservoir data
leading to some modification of the pool maps.
At the beginning of 1969 an application by Pacific Petroleums Ltd. was under
review for increase in the M.P.R. allocated to Weasel Unit No. 2. This application
was occasioned by unit enlargement and some infill drilling leading to revised pool
maps. At the end of January the M.P.R. was set at 1,143 stock tank barrels per
day, to become effective when water injection into the project was commenced.
An alternative water-injection pattern was also approved during January. Initial
water injection into the project was in March, 1969.
During February, 1969, application was received from Pacific Petroleums Ltd.
for approval of three additional water-injection wells to be drilled in Peejay Unit
No. 1. Approval was granted immediately for two of the wells and the third was
approved following additional clarification of the reasons for the proposal.
In May, an application was received from Union Oil Company of Canada Ltd.
for permission to inject, into the well located in d-24-J/94-H-2, gas produced as
 PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS A 89
a result of oil production from the Halfway Sand in Milligan Creek Unit No. 1.
Following review of the relevant data, the scheme was approved at the end of June.
The proposal had been advertised in the Gazette during the intervening period and
had elicited no objections.
An application was received in August from Tenneco Oil & Minerals Ltd.
requesting approval for modification of the waterflood pattern in Weasel Unit No. 1.
Approval was granted.
At the end of August a request was received from Union Oil Company of
Canada Ltd. for an increase in the M.P.R. for the Aitken Creek Gething pool
project. It was claimed that pool performance to date was indicative of a higher
ultimate recovery factor than was currently being recognized in the M.P.R. calculation. Following extensive review, the M.P.R. was increased to 1,125 stock tank
barrels per day, to become effective on January 1, 1970.
One application for removal of oil allowable off-target penalty factor was
received during 1969. This was made by Texaco Exploration Company, and
related to the well in C-32-A/94-A-14 producing oil from the Dunlevy Sand. No
objections were made to the proposal to lift the penalty when it was advertised in
the Gazette. Consequently, the off-target penalty factor was removed, effective
March 1, 1969.
During the year the Reservoir Engineering Section examined two situations
involving lease-line problems in adjacent waterflood projects. The first of these
related to Weasel Units Nos. 1 and 2, and the allocation between these projects of
water injected at their common boundary. A mutually satisfactory solution was
obtained to this problem. The second problem arose because of a reservoir voidage
imbalance in the vicinity of the boundary between Peejay Unit No. 3 and the Peejay
Tenneco project. Reservoir-pressure survey data indicated the presence of a substantial pressure sink in this area which, if not corrected, would allow lease-line
drainage from Unit No. 3 and also result in reduced ultimate oil recovery from the
common oil pool. Various alternate solutions to the problem were examined by
the Branch and by the working-interest owners of the projects involved. The technically superior solution was to combine the projects under one operator, thus
allowing for optimum waterflood-pattern selection without regard to artificially
imposed lease-line considerations. This was the route adopted by the working-
interest owners, and by year-end negotiations which would lead to absorption into
Unit No. 3 of the Tenneco project were well advanced.
Associated and Solution Gas-conservation Schemes
Solution gas is always produced as a by-product of oil production. This gas
is dissolved in the oil at reservoir pressure and temperature conditions, but due to
decreases in these parameters as the oil is brought to the surface much of the dissolved gas is evolved. In many cases the volume of this gas, in excess of lease
equipment fuel requirements, is so small that it is not economical to install gathering
facilities to market the gas. This excess gas is flared. Many oil pools are discovered
in which the oil is originally overlain with gas, known as a gas cap. It is often
impossible to produce the oil without also producing some gas-cap gas, in addition
to the solution gas. This could be detrimental from the point of view of ultimate
oil recovery, since production of the gas cap reduces the reservoir energy available
to produce the oil.
Gas produced with oil can be conserved in two ways—either it can be collected
and marketed or it can be collected and injected back into the producing reservoir
or a storage zone.    Conservation is encouraged by incentives.    In the case of
 A 90 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
schemes with marginal economics, a reduced royalty rate may be applied to gas
that is sold. Wells or projects that produce with a gas-oil ratio in excess of 1,000
standard cubic feet stock tank barrels have their allowable reduced by a factor which
is dependent on the level of gas-oil ratio (Division 89, Drilling and Production
Regulations). This factor may be modified if the gas is conserved, either by
reinjection or by marketing. However, in the case that gas-cap gas is to be marketed, the Branch needs to be satisfied that such concurrent production will not be
harmful to ultimate oil recovery.
At the beginning of 1969, two conservation schemes were in operation that
marketed solution gas, and five projects involving return of gas to the producing
reservoir were active. The gas-injection projects are included in Table 16. The
schemes involving gas sales were in effect in the Boundary Lake and Blueberry
fields. In the latter, solution gas from the Pacific-operated Debolt pool project is
collected and compressed along with gas-well gas from other pools in the field. Gas
not used as fuel or flared is then either delivered to the sales gas system or used
for gas-lifting at individual oil wells. The Boundary Lake system comprises a gas-
treating plant (for extraction of liquids) and services oil wells in the four waterflood
projects producing from the Boundary Lake Sand in this field.
At the end of 1968, Monsanto Oil Ltd. had been granted approval for relief
from gas-oil ratio penalty for Dunlevy Sand oil wells in a section of the Rigel field
(located in 19-87-16 W6M, 13 and 23-87-17 W6M). This approval was contingent on implementation of a gas sales-type conservation scheme. By the end of
1969 the scheme had not been put into effect, but firm plans were well advanced.
In December, 1969, two applications were received for approval of gas sales-
type conservation schemes. One, made by Canadian Superior Oil Ltd., concerned
collection of solution gas being produced from Inga Unit No. 1, the plan being to
collect separator and stock-tank-evolved gas, compress it, and market it through the
sales gas-line already passing through the north end of the unit carrying gas from
gas fields to the northwest of Inga. The proposal was being reviewed by the Reservoir Engineering Section at year-end. The second application was for a scheme to
be known as the " Northeast British Columbia Gas Gathering System," and was
made by Union Oil Company of Canada Ltd. as operator of the system. The proposal was to build a gas-line from the Westcoast Transmission Co. Ltd. terminal,
located in 21-87-15 W6M, generally northwest for some 43 miles. Operators of
properties along the route (from Currant in the south to Beatton River in the north,
see Fig. 3) were to be responsible for necessary collection and compression facilities
to deliver gas to the line at any of three injection points. At year-end the proposal
was still under review by the Reservoir Engineering Section.
Gas Allowables and Well Tests
The " daily gas allowables " or production rate limits (P.R.L.s) for gas wells
in the Province are established from the results of absolute open-flow potential
(A.O.F.) tests. These tests are witnessed by Branch field personnel and the data
collected are interpreted by the Reservoir Engineering Section to establish P.R.L.s
and also for use in reservoir studies.
Restriction of individual well production rates has not been deemed necessary
in some gas pools, and in these cases either Project Allowables have been issued, or
the pools' operators have approval to produce according to " Good Engineering
Practice" (G.E.P.). Table 17 presents A.O.F. test data, individual well P.R.L.s,
Project Allowables, and G.E.P. schemes in effect at December 31, 1969. The areas
included in the various Project Allowable and G.E.P. schemes are shown in Maps
3, 4,7, 9, 12, 13, 15, 16, and 18.
 PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS A 91
When the revised Drilling and Production Regulations came into force on
February 3, 1969, major changes in the testing requirements for gas wells became
effective. The specific regulations are included in Divisions 79 through 87. Because
of this and the desire to update testing procedures, the Reservoir Engineering Section
prepared a pamphlet entitled " Procedures for Gas-well Testing and Assignment of
Production Rate Limits." This was mailed to all companies operating in the Province under cover of a " Memo to All Operators," dated September 5, 1969. This
pamphlet consolidates all gas-well testing requirements, methods, schedules, and
P.R.L. calculations. Under these new procedures, the basic A.O.F. test for wells
in the Province is now the isochronal or modified isochronal test. Wells have to be
tested initially and after one year of production by either of these methods. All
wells operating during 1969 whose A.O.F. exceeded 8 million standard cubic feet
per day are required to be tested prior to the end of 1970, by one of these methods,
if not already so tested. Thereafter, annual static bottom-hole pressure measurements and single-point flow test data are required, with a full multipoint test every
fifth year. Wells with an A.O.F. less than 8 million standard cubic feet per day
require a single-point flow test every fifth year, together with annual static bottom-
hole pressure measurements. Testing schedules have been arranged so that meaningful reservoir pressure data are obtained from the various gas pools in the Province.
Daily gas allowables, effective on completion of the initial test or on October 1st,
in subsequent years, will be calculated from the results of multipoint or single-point
A.O.F. tests. Initially the P.R.L. will be 25 per cent of the A.O.F. Subsequently,
however, the P.R.L. will reflect a rate that produces an equivalent wellbore pressure
drawdown to that produced at initial reservoir conditions at the original P.R.L.
During 1969, several operator-proposed testing programmes were reviewed
and approved with modifications where necessary. Three new wells in the Sunrise
field were allowed to produce for a period of one month prior to being A.O.F. tested.
This concession was granted to allow clean-up of the wells, which were producing
completion fluids that hindered attempts to obtain meaningful A.O.F. test data.
Several wells were allowed to flare gas for the purpose of testing or obtaining gas
samples for analysis.
The study of the Baldonnel reservoir in the Inga field, incomplete at the end
of 1968, was finalized early in 1969. It was concluded that the gas accumulation
was separated from the down-dip oil. On this basis, P.R.L.s were issued for the
three wells completed as gas producers in the Baldonnel and for which A.O.F. test
data had been obtained during 1968.
At the end of 1968, an application was under consideration from Imperial Oil
Ltd. for establishment of Good Engineering Practice in the Dunlevy Sand, Rigel
field. Some apparent problems concerning equity between operators were successfully resolved and the project became effective on March 1st.
At the beginning of 1969 the Reservoir Engineering Section had under study
an application by Amarillo Oil Company (now Pioneer Exploration Ltd.) for
approval to produce Inga Sand zone gas wells in the Jeans West field. Additional
reservoir-pressure data in the area had been requested toward the end of 1968. It
was hoped that these data would assist in resolving whether or not the gas accumulation was connected to the adjacent oil pool in the Inga field. The data were
inconclusive, but additional drilling between the two fields indicated that the oil
and gas were most probably in communication. This, and the fact that objections
to the proposal were received from working-interest owners in Inga Unit No. 1,
resulted in further consultation with the applicant to determine the safeguards that
would be required before production could be allowed. The application was subsequently withdrawn, and the working-interest owners in the area proceeded to dis-
 A 92 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT. 1969
cuss the practicality of forming a unit for the purpose of concurrently producing
the gas in conjunction with oil from Inga Unit No. 1. At year-end a concurrent
production system had been modelled for computer solution, and unitization negotiations were well in hand.
In July, an application was received from Pacific Petroleums Ltd. for approval
of production by Good Engineering Practice of gas wells in the Baldonnel and Halfway Zones in Beg and Beg West fields. The proposal was advertised in the Gazette
on July 24th and 31st, and no objections were received. Since there were no technical reservations involved, the scheme was approved, effective September 1, 1969.
In September, an application was received from Amoco Canada Petroleum
Company Ltd. requesting approval for a pool allowable for the Nahanni gas pool
in the Beaver River area. The submission was advertised in the Gazette on October
2nd and 9th. No objections were registered, and studies indicated no technical
reasons for withholding approval on a short-term basis, pending actual producing
history data. However, the productive area of this Nahanni pool extends into the
Yukon. Consequently, before a decision was made with respect to the submission,
it was considered advisable to contact the Resource Management Division of the
Federal Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development. This was done
in order to arrange for complementary production rates between the " Federal " and
" Provincial" portions of the pool, and to collect data on which a decision could
be made regarding distribution of royalty from production under a " pool allowable "
scheme. As of the end of 1969, consultation was continuing, but no mutually
acceptable distribution of reserves had been arrived at.
A request was received from Mobil Oil Canada Ltd. for permission to produce
the well located in C-91-D/94-I-14 at rates in excess of its P.R.L., for a period
beginning in mid-October and extending until January 15, 1970. The reason for
the application was that an adjacent well (c-78-C/94-I-14) had developed a tubing
leak, and repair was not expected to be accomplished before mid-January. These
two wells are the only wells producing from the Pine Point pool in the Sierra area.
Since all productive acreage is leased by Mobil Oil, no equity considerations arose,
and total production rate from the pool was to remain stable. The request was
therefore granted.
Husky Oil Ltd. applied in May for transfer of the gas allowable for the well in
C-100-H/94-J-10 in the Clarke Lake field to another well in the field. The request
was not approved. Generally the principle of transferring gas-well allowables is
inconsistent with the theory of setting such production limits. Unlike oil well allowables, which are based on reserves, gas well production-rate limits are based on
production tests and are assigned at a level designed to minimize well-bore damage.
Transfer of allowables, therefore, defeats this object. Specifically with regard to
Clarke Lake, two additional factors are pertinent. Most wells in the field are in
the Slave Point project, which has an allowable of 400 million standard cubic feet
per day. Thus, transfer of allowable to a well in this area is meaningless. The
wells that are restricted to individual production-rate limits are those offsetting the
well in a-65-G/94-J-10. These wells were excluded from the project at the specific
request of the operator of the a-65-G well because it was considered that undue
drainage of this tract would occur. Thus, transfer of another well's allowable to
one of these wells would defeat the purpose of their rate limitations. Husky was
advised to discuss with Pacific Petroleums Ltd., the project operator, the possibility
of including the spacing area for c-100-H into the project, and to subsequently apply
to the Branch for enlargement of the project for this purpose.
 PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS A 93
Hydrocarbon and Associated Sulphur Reserves
Table 18 presents estimated reserves, at year-end 1969, of oil, gas, and gas
by-products (hydrocarbon liquids and sulphur). The major review and normalization of reserves estimates begun in 1968 was continued during 1969, resulting in
modifications to several previous estimates of ultimate recovery. These are shown
under the heading " Revisions in 1969 " in Table 18. The current estimates of oil
and gas reservoir rock, fluid, and producing characteristics are presented in Tables
19 and 20.
The proved oil reserves in the Province as of December 31, 1969, are estimated
at some 253 million stock tank barrels. Drilling during 1969 proved up 2.9 million
stock tank barrels of reserves, and revisions to previous estimates added a further
2.3 million stock tank barrels. However, 25.3 million stock tank barrels were produced during the year, resulting in a net decrease in proved reserves of 20.1 million
stock tank barrels when compared with reserves at the end of 1968.
Proved reserves represent oil for which it is believed there is a 90 per cent or
better chance that the estimated volumes will be recovered. Probable reserves are
carried where the probability is estimated to be 50 per cent or more. These include
primary reserves on undrilled acreage and reserves attributable to probable increases
in ultimate recovery from pools under improved recovery schemes or for which such
schemes are planned. Probable oil reserves are estimated at 85 million stock tank
barrels, as of December 31, 1969. This is 14.3 million stock tank barrels less than
the estimate made for year-end 1968. One reason for this is the transfer of some
reserves from the probable to proved category, based on the performance of some
improved recovery projects. A fair proportion of the decrease is, however, due to
revisions of previous estimates for some pools.
Gas and gas by-products reserves shown in Table 18 are " established " reserves. These comprise the proved reserves plus a percentage (usually 50 per cent)
of the estimated probable reserves. As of December 31, 1969, the established raw-
gas reserves are estimated at 8.9 trillion standard cubic feet. Adjustment for removal
of a percentage of the liquid hydrocarbons and acid gases results in established
residue gas reserves of 7.8 trillion standard cubic feet, or 8.1 trillion standard cubic
feet when converted to a standard heat content of 1,000 B.T.U. per standard cubic
foot. These volumes represent slight increases over the corresponding estimates at
the end of 1968. It is readily seen that 75 per cent of the increase is due to drilling
in 1969, with major reserves increases in the Rigel, Stoddart, Dahl, Blueberry, and
Beavertail areas. Adjustments to previous reserves estimates accounted for the
other 25 per cent of the increase, representing 160 billion standard cubic feet; of
this, 134 billion standard cubic feet is due to the inclusion of reserves of associated
gas in the Crush, Inga, Milligan Creek, part of Peejay, Rigel, and Wildmint fields.
These reserves were not previously carried, as gas-conservation schemes were not
in effect. However, at year-end 1969, schemes for these fields were well in hand
and inclusion in the reserves estimates was considered justified. In the case of Inga
field, these reserves include gas in the gas-cap to Inga Unit No. 1 in the Jeans West
area. The item in Table 18 identified as " cumulative production adjustment " is to
allow for the cumulative gas produced from these proposed conservation schemes up
to December 31, 1968.
Natural-gas liquids reserves at year-end 1969 are estimated at 124 million
stock tank barrels, some 5.5 million stock tank barrels more than the estimate at
December 31, 1968. This increase is entirely due to drilling during 1969 in the
area served by the Fort St. John gas plant. No liquids are extracted from gas
processed at the Fort Nelson plant, due to the very low liquid content of this gas.
 A 94 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
As in the case of gas reserves, the item " cumulative production adjustment" in
Table 18 is to adjust the December 31, 1968, cumulative natural-gas liquids production for liquids produced from the proposed conservation schemes.
Estimated sulphur reserves at December 31, 1969, at 3,736 thousand long
tons, are 939 thousand long tons more than the 1968 estimate. The reason for this
substantial increase is that for the first time sulphur reserves are being carried for
gas accumulations serving the Fort Nelson gas plant. Subject to National Energy
Board approval, this plant is due to have a sulphur-extraction facility in operation
by the fall of 1971 and inclusion of these sulphur reserves is therefore considered
justified. The cumulative production adjustment in Table 18 includes cumulative
sulphur produced, to December 31, 1968, from the area served by the Fort Nelson
plant and also from the proposed gas-conservation schemes previously discussed.
It should be noted that residue gas, natural-gas liquids, and sulphur production
and reserves estimates are based on theoretical calculations of the quantities of these
materials contained in the raw-gas reserves. Comparisons between actual and
theoretical production during 1969 are included in footnotes to Table 18. The
apparent low sulphur extraction efficiency is due to the fact that the theoretical
values include the sulphur not in fact extracted from the gas in the Fort Nelson
plant.
Miscellaneous
During 1969, several proposed schemes for produced-water disposal were
examined. In January, Mobil Oil Canada Ltd. drilled a well in d-92-D/94-I-14
for the purpose of disposing of water produced as a result of gas production from
the Pine Point Formation in the Sierra area. Approval was granted on an interim
basis, pending final evaluation, for disposal into the Debolt Formation in this well.
Pacific Petroleums Ltd. applied in March for permission to transport water produced from the Cadomin zone in the well located in 8-15-85-14 W6M to the Boundary Lake injection plant. This plant is operated by Imperial Oil Ltd., and provides
water for waterflooding the Boundary Lake zone in this field. Test data indicated
that the water could be treated to avoid incompatibility problems, and the request
was therefore granted.
At the beginning of November an application was received from Texaco Exploration Co. for approval to dispose of water produced from the Inga Sand in the
well located in 16-13-87-24 W6M. The proposal was to truck the water to the
Nig Creek field disposal well located in a-31-F/94-H-4 for disposal to the Baldonnel
Formation. At the time this well was used solely for the purpose of disposing of
water produced with gas from the Baldonnel zone in the Nig Creek field. Laboratory tests indicated that mixing of Inga and Baldonnel waters would cause calcium-
carbonate precipitation. This would be detrimental if allowed to occur unchecked
in the bore of the disposal well, since " plugging " of the disposal zone would occur.
Texaco proposed to control any tendency to such plugging by injection of hydrochloric acid. In mid-November, interim authorization was granted for the proposal,
subject to several conditions imposed to ensure that the disposal well's capacity was
not impaired, in order that Nig Creek gas production would not be curtailed due to
inability to dispose of produced water.
Two applications were dealt with concerning gas metering during 1969. At the
end of 1968, Mobil Oil Canada Ltd. requested waiver of the requirement for individual well-gas metering for production from three wells in the Sierra area. The
application was not approved as it stood. However, a compromise scheme was
authorized whereby individual pool production would be metered and individual
well rates within a pool would be estimated by prorating on the basis of monthly
 PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS A 95
production tests through the dehydration plant. In December 1969, Union Oil
Company of Canada Ltd. was informed that the Branch would waive the requirement for chart records on integrating orifice meters for all injection points into,
and the custody transfer point from, the proposed Northeast British Columbia Gas
Gathering System. This waiver was granted on condition that digital readout orifice-
flow computers of approved design would be installed instead of the conventional
meters at these locations. It was considered that greater metering accuracy would
be obtained with the proposed equipment. One condition of the waiver is that
three-monthly reports followed by annual reports are to be filed with the Branch,
detailing meter gas balances into and out of the system.
Several comprehensive reservoir studies were made during 1969, in conjunction with the Geological Section. Pools included were the Nahanni in the Beaver
River area, the Halfway in the Peejay field, the Bluesky-Gething in Aitken Creek
field, and the Baldonnel and Halfway in the Beg and Beg West fields. In addition,
preliminary work was started on a study of the potential value in waterflooding the
Inga A pool in the Inga field. In addition to the annual reserves estimates, a review
was made of potential associated- and solution-gas reserves in the general area of
the proposed Northeast British Columbia Gas Gathering System. Some of these,
for which firm conservation commitments have been made, are included in the
Provincial Reserves estimate as of December 31, 1969.
The revised Drilling and Production Regulations stipulate the frequency with
which progress reports are required from operators of improved recovery schemes.
During 1969, such reports were reviewed for all the projects listed in Table 16, with
the exception of Inga Unit No. 1; water injection into this project had only been
taking place for six months by year-end 1969. In addition, a progress report for the
Slave Point project in the Clarke Lake field was reviewed. Where necessary, items
arising from these reports were discussed with the operator. As a further check on
efficacy of the improved recovery schemes in operation during the year, withdrawal
balances since initiation were calculated for all projects.
During the year, several proposed testing procedures and test results were
reviewed relative to segregation in dual- or triple-zone completion wells. In all cases
examined it was concluded that segregation was effective.
Amongst several miscellaneous applications dealt with during 1969 was one
from Tenneco Oil & Minerals Ltd. for permission to flare approximately 100 million
standard cubic feet of gas from the well located in 16-12-87-24 W6M. This well
was completed in the Inga Sand, lower structurally than off-setting oil wells. However, the sand appeared to be gas-bearing. It was contended by the applicant that
production of the 100 million standard cubic feet of gas would deplete the interpreted local gas accumulation and permit the well to go on stream as an oil producer.
For several reasons, approval to flare this volume of gas was withheld. Normal
initial production testing routine was followed when the well was placed on stream
in March, and the well came in immediately as an oil producer, although with a gas-
oil ratio well above that observed in adjacent wells. At year-end the gas-oil ratio
was still about five or six times as high as the nearby wells.
Another application that was considered during the year concerned possible
modification of gas-well spacing areas in a projected drilling prospect. It was concluded that modification was not desirable and that sections 13.06 and 13.09 of the
regulations adequately covered the situation that might develop if the plans materialized into concrete action. Several proposed M.P.R.s were reviewed for wells
in Alberta in spacing units adjacent to the Boundary Lake field, courtesy of the Alberta Oil & Gas Conservation Board.   It was ensured that the proposed allowable
 A 96 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
rates were consistent with those that would have been applicable in British Columbia,
and, therefore, that no lease-line problem existed.
Several requests for general or specific reservoir-fluid analysis data were dealt
with during 1969. As in previous years, a map detailing maximum detected concentrations of hydrogen sulphide in produced gases was prepared in September.
This map is on file at the Branch field office, for the benefit of personnel about to
work in the field. During the year many requests for Branch estimates of Provincial
and individual pool reserves were received.
In order to expedite the handling of such things as improved recovery submissions, a set of guidelines was prepared in January detailing the data required in
support of various applications to the Branch. These were included in the Drilling
and Production Regulations booklet, published by the Branch later in the year.
Topics covered were: Water disposal, pressure maintenance or improved recovery,
relief from gas-oil ratio penalties, concurrent production of oil and gas, removal of
gas-well rate restrictions, and gas processing. In November, guidelines for gas-
conservation scheme submissions were issued, in the form of a " Memo to All
Operators."
During September, a " Memo to All Operators " was issued on the subject of
reservoir-pressure surveys in oil wells. Minimum requirements were detailed and
proposals for survey schedules during 1970 were solicited. By year-end several
schedules had been received and discussed with the operators where necessary.
The finalized Province-wide schedules had not been issued by the end of December,
pending review of outstanding submissions.
In previous years the Reservoir Engineering Section has assisted the Chief
Commissioner in evaluating acreage posted for disposition of Crown land. Early
in 1969 a set of correlations was prepared which enables the selection of a value
for such acreage based only on reservoir rock properties and estimated fluid distribution. These are now used generally by the Geological Section, and the Reservoir
Engineering Section is only consulted in the case of unusual circumstances. A special
evaluation was made for the Provincial Department of Finance. This concerned the
value of part of an estate that included an over-riding royalty interest in a large
spread of productive and potentially productive acreage in the Fort Nelson area.
One or two other miscellaneous tasks were undertaken during the year to supply
various Provincial and Federal Government personnel with data and interpretations. These included such things as providing information for Provincial representatives at the National Energy Board hearings in Ottawa in the fall of 1969.
The Section assisted the Development Section in the continuing project to improve
and modify the computer application, reporting current and historical production
data.
Early in 1969 the reorganization of the Reservoir Engineering Section's files,
begun in 1968, was completed. Other action to upgrade the Section's utility included the purchase during the year of an electronic calculator, well suited to engineering calculations; and the enrolment of one staff member in a comprehensive
reservoir engineering course at the University of Alberta.
DEVELOPMENT SECTION
Drilling
A marked decrease was recorded in drilling operations completed in the Province during 1969. Over-all footage drilled was 19 per cent less than 1968, mainly
due to the reduction in exploratory drilling. Exploratory wildcat footage was down
32 per cent from the 1968 level and the footage attained at wells classified as
 PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS
A 97
exploratory outpost decreased 29 per cent. The development footage remained
almost constant, relative to the previous year. Footages drilled during 1969 were
as follows: Development 433,868 feet, compared to 442,747 feet for 1968; exploratory outpost 189,672 feet, compared to 265,891 feet; and exploratory wildcat
250,245 feet, compared to 366,247 feet. The year 1969 was the first year since
1964 that the total footage drilled did not exceed 1 million feet. Two factors were
responsible for this decrease. The general orientation of exploration funds to northern Canada from the Prairie regions and the lack of new discoveries in British
Columbia to initiate follow-up development drilling programmes.
All drilling operations, except for one exploratory wildcat venture in the
Bowser Basin area, were carried out in the northeastern corner of the Province.
In total, 59 operating oil companies employed 51 different drilling rigs to complete
the 1969 drilling.
S'.'irs-   ■{.'■:■ ■■■ ,
H V%2
 A 98
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
Wells completed decreased 9 per cent to 171 wells in 1969 from 194 completions in 1968. Twelve wells were given finished drilling status at the end of the
year. Production casing has been set in these wells, indicating that they are expected
to be producers but will be evaluated at a later date. Because of the use of this
temporary status, a true comparison to the 1968 completions cannot be made. In
1969, there were 40 gas wells completed, compared to 34 in 1968. Thirty-five oil
completions were made in 1969, 11 less than in 1968, while 80 abandonments were
recorded, compared to 105 during 1968. The number of wells drilling at the end
of the year was 24. As in previous compilations, if more than one zone is completed in a well, each productive zone is counted as a well. As two multiple-gas
completions were made in 1969, 169 wells were actually drilled. Wells drilled and
drilling during 1969 are listed in Table 21. Monthly footages drilled since 1954
are given graphically on Figure 2.
Well classifications were assigned by the Development Section during 1969 to
each proposed well location in accordance with the Drilling and Production Regulations. A Lahee classification was also determined, which was described in the
Geological Section of this report. The Branch classification system is explained by
the following definitions. A development well is located within a spacing area that
is contiguous to a spacing area containing a well capable of production from the
same objective geological pool. Exploratory wells are divided into two types—
wildcat and outpost. An exploratory wildcat well is located more than 4V_ miles
from any capable well, and an exploratory outpost well is located in the area between
development and wildcat wells. Development wells are further classified as deep-pool
or shallow-pool tests where undeveloped pools below or above the objective pool
is being explored. With the revised Drilling and Production Regulations, which
were effective on February 3, 1969, the Branch classification is the basis used for
the release of well information. Release of data for exploratory wildcat wells is
made one year after the rig release date, while the information from all other wells
is available 30 days after the rig release date.
Workover operations were undertaken at many newly completed wells in addition to stimulation treatments performed on some of the declining wells. A work-
over is considered to be any operation carried out after the rig release date that
changes the producing interval, or alters, or intends to alter, the producing characteristics of a well. A producing interval may be changed by perforating, cementing
perforations, or by running casing or plugs. The producing characteristics of a well
may be changed by any operation performed to increase the productivity of the well.
Changes may include perforating, acidizing, fracturing, installing a pump, or changing a choke, but do not include the replacement of equipment.
290
260
220
200
180
SO
140
120
100
eo
60
40
20
0
1     1     1     1     1
FOOTAGE DRILLED IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
1954 to 1969 inch
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,
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1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
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1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
Figure 2. Footage drilled in British Columbia, 1954-69.
 PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS
A 99
FIELDS AND POOLS,  DECEMBER 31.   1969
.                           FIELD
PRODUCING  HORIZON
*
OIL
CAS
.
AIRPORT
HALFWAY
AITKEN CREEK
GETHING
-,
BEAR FLAT
GHARLIE  LAKE
BEATTON   RIVER
HALFWAY
HALFWAY
BEATTON   RIVER UEST
BLUESKY-CETKING
1}
BEAVERDAM
HALFWAY
7
BEG
BALDONNEL
EEC  WEST
BALDONNEL
9
BERNADET
BLUESKV-GETHIW
to
BLUEBERK.
*__,
DUHLEVY
BALDONNEL
11
BLUEBERRY  EAST
1
BALDONNEL
12
DUNLEVY
13
BOUNDARY  LAKE
BOUNDARY   LAKE
HALFWAY
BLUESKY-GETHING
GETHING
HALFWAY
DUNLEVY
BALDONNEL
BOUNDARY  LAKE   NORTH
HALFUAY
IS
BUBBLES
BALDONNEL
i.
BUICK CREEK
DUNLEVY
17
BUICK  CREEK EAST
DUNLEVY
BLUESKY-GETHING
18
BUICK CREEK NORTH
BLUE SKY-GETHING
W
BUICK CREEK UEST
___v,
BALDONNEL
GETHING
20
BULRUSH
HALFWAY
j.,
BULRUSH  EAST
HALFWAY
22
CHARLIE  LAKE
GETHING
CLARKE LAKE
SLAVE  POINT
CLARKE  LAKE  SOUTH
SLAVE POINT
CRUSH
HALFWAY
CURRENT
HALFUAY
HALFWAY
DAWSON CREEK
DUNVEGA-;
28
FARRELL  C!£EK
CHARLIE  LAKE
29
.CRT ST. JOHN
BELLOY
HALFWAY
CHARLIE  LAKE
BALDONNEL
30
FORT ET.   JOHN   SOUTHEAST
CAEOMIN
31
BALDONNEL
32
HALFWAY
CHARLIE LAKE
-_?,T_-
33
HIGHWAY
DUNLEVY
BALDONNEL
34
INGA
BALDONNEL
INGA
INGA
JEANS UEST
36
___
GETHING
BALDONNEL
37
JEDNEY UEST
BALDONNEL
38
—»—»
DUNLEVY
CHARLIE LAKE
St
KOTCHO  LAKE
40
LAPRISE  CREEK
BALDONNEL
41
LAPRISE  CREEK VEST
BALDONNEL
-'.■>
WIIII-AN  CREEK
HALFUAY
41
H08ERLV LAKE
CHARLIE LAKE
«
HONTNEY
CHARLIE  LAKE
45
KETTLE
BI.UESKY-GETHI KG
46
NIG CREEK
BALDONNEL
BALDONNEL
47
NORTH PINE
CHARLIE LAKE
CHARLIE LAKE
43
OSFREY
HALFUAY
49
PARKLAND
HABAHDH
= n
PEEJAY
HALFUAY
HALFWAY
11
FEEJAY WEST
HALFWAY
-,,
PETITOT  RIVER
S3
RED CREEK
CHARLIE   LAKE
1*
RIGEL
DUNLEVY
DUNLEVY
«
SIERRA
rs
STODDART
CHARLIE   LAKE
BELLOY
•>?
STODDART UEST
BELLOY
SUNRISE
CADOTTE
TWO RIVERS
BALDONNEL
60
-EASEL
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HALFUAY
UII DMINT
HALFUAY
HALFUAY
WILLOW
BLUESKY-GETHING
HALFUAY
63
HOLE                                                                  HALFWAY
HALFUAY
44
YCYO
PINE   POINT
Figure 3. Petroleum and natural-gas fields, 1969.
 A 100 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1969
Five new fields were designated by the Branch during 1969, and field boundaries were amended on 10 occasions. The new fields were at Bear Flat, Moberly
Lake, Sierra, Sunrise, and Two Rivers. Boundaries were changed for the Beatton
River West, Clarke Lake, Fort St. John, and North Pine fields in one instance and
in two cases to the Inga, Rigel, and Stoddart fields. At the end of 1969, there were
64 designated fields which are listed in Table 22 and shown on Figure 3.
All submissions pertaining to drilling operations are studied for approval by the
Development Section. Such approvals must be obtained prior to commencement of
drilling a well, changing a well name, abandoning a well, or any alteration proposed
to change the physical characteristics of a well. When a submission is received by
the Development Section, the information, which may include details of the proposed
programme, the title under which the petroleum and natural-gas rights are held,
and any other relevant requirements of the regulations, is reviewed. With each
application to drill a well, a surveyed position must be given which is examined to
assure conformation with target and spacing regulations. A spacing area is assigned
to the proposed well and, if the location does not meet the target-area requirements,
a production penalty is calculated.
Any application that is submitted to alter the equipment in a well or the proposed programme for a well is handled in a similar manner. Details of the application are examined and given approval by the various sections of the Branch. Prior
to the abandonment of a well, the operator must transmit an abandonment programme to the field engineer for his approval, but all other types of alterations are
studied at Victoria, where official records are retained.
During 1969, 178 well authorizations were issued. Six of these authorizations
were cancelled when the operators decided not to drill the proposed locations.
The disposal of salt water produced with petroleum and natural gas was accomplished by evaporation in surface pits or by injection to subsurface formations.
Eight disposal wells situated in the producing areas are in operation in the Province.
During 1969 there were 3,334,048 barrels injected into the disposal wells and
584,267 barrels delivered to flare pits for evaporation.
Water-flood operations to enhance production from oil fields increased in 1969
by 7 per cent. A total of 47,392,661 barrels, including both fresh and formation
water, were injected into nine producing pools in the Province. Fields receiving
the largest quantities of water were Boundary Lake, 16,148,469 barrels, and Peejay,
14,128,819 barrels.
Production
Significant gains were made in the production of crude oil and natural gas from
British Columbia wells during 1969. Crude-oil production increased 14.2 per cent,
compared to 1968, to 25,309,036 barrels and natural gas was up 15.3 per cent to
324,127,117 thousand standard cubic feet.
Five fields each contributed over 1 million barrels and in total over 85 per cent
of the Provincial supply. These were Boundary Lake, 8,914,827 barrels; Peejay,
5,838,825 barrels; Milligan Creek, 3,601,026 barrels; Inga, 2,714,618 barrels;
and Weasel, 1,182,457 barrels, which are all under active water-flood programmes.
Declines in production were reported from several smaller fields, notably Bulrush,
Osprey, and Rigel.
Natural-gas production from the largest producing fields remained nearly constant. The sizeable Provincial increase resulted from new production by the
Sierra field and large gains from the Kotcho Lake and Yoyo fields. The aforementioned three fields, plus the Clarke Lake field, all located in the Fort Nelson area,
produced 49 per cent of the total.   The major producing fields in order of volume
 PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS
A 101
were Clarke Lake, 102,176,861 thousand standard cubic feet; Yoyo, 31,915,254
thousand standard cubic feet; Laprise, 26,210,563 thousand standard cubic feet;
Nig Creek, 19,039,190 thousand standard cubic feet; Jedney, 18,486,525 thousand
standard cubic feet; and Rigel, 15,238,425 thousand standard cubic feet.
Monthly crude-oil and natural-gas production by fields and pools for 1969 are
given in Tables 24 and 25.
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1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
Figure 4. Oil production in British Columbia, 1954-69.
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GAS  PRODUCTION IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
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1963
"19*64
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969"
Figure 5. Gas production in British Columbia, 1954-69.
 A 102
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
Graphs of monthly production for the years 1954 to 1969 are shown on Figures
4 and 5.
Some changes were noted in the production and sales volumes of butane, propane, and sulphur, compared to 1968. A reduction in the butane sales to the
United States was one of the obvious differences.
General statistics showing well operation and production data are given in
Table 26. The monthly dispositions of various petroleum products are shown in
Tables 27, 28, and 29.   Monthly values to the producers are given in Table 30.
Pipe-lines
Oil-gathering System
The only changes reported for 1969 to the oil-gathering system was the addition
of 4 miles to the Trans Prairie Pipelines (B.C.) Ltd. network.
Oil-transmission System
The throughput volume carried by Trans Prairie Pipelines (B.C.) Ltd. was
increased from 53,897 barrels per day in 1968 to 60,157 barrels per day in 1969.
Gas-gathering System
During 1969, extensions to the gas-gathering facilities from the Kotcho Lake
and Sierra fields were put into operation.
Gas-transmission System
Capacities of the gas-transmission systems in the Province were increased, particularly the Pacific Northern Gas Ltd. line, which was raised from 23,000 million
standard cubic feet in 1968 to 44,000 million standard cubic feet in 1969.
PIPELINES    of
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
Figure 6. Petroleum and natural-gas pipe-lines.
 PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS A 103
Gas-distribution System
Expansions and extensions were completed to all Provincial gas-distribution
systems during 1969.
Oil Refineries
Imperial Oil Enterprises Ltd. completed alterations at the loco refinery to
increases the cracking capacity to 11,400 barrels per calendar day.
Gas-processing Plants
No changes were made to the gas-processing plants in British Columbia during
1969.
Sulphur Plants
No changes were reported in the operation of the sulphur plant located at
Taylor.
Tables 31, 32, 33, 34, and 35 provide data on the pipe-lines, oil refineries, gas-
processing plants, and the sulphur plant. Figure 6 outlines the major pipe-line
systems operating in the Province.
Well Records
Information concerning the petroleum and natural-gas industry in British
Columbia is collected and compiled by the Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch.
The data are made available to interested persons, in strict accordance with
Division 43 of the Drilling and Production Regulations. Location, elevation, current depth, casing, status, and monthly production of individual wells are released
upon request. Other information is held confidential, depending upon the classification assigned by the Branch at the time of approval of the well authorization. Information from any well or portion of a well that is classified as wildcat is available
one year after rig-release date. Data from all other classifications of wells are
available 30 days after rig-release date. Confidential well information may be released to an interested person if a letter is received by the Branch from the operator
of the well authorizing its release.
Information is provided by the Branch by publication, examination of Branch
records, or reproduction of documents filed. Cost-defraying charges are made by
the Branch for these services.
The records maintained by the Branch are in constant use by the Reservoir,
Development, and Geological Sections; therefore, they must be kept up to date and
in a manner suitable for many purposes. As published reports are expanded to
meet the requirements of industry and other governmental bodies, the methods of
keeping records must be altered.
The Branch has representation on the Statistical Sub-committee which was
established at the request of the Mines Ministers' Conference in 1955. This committee is composed of representatives from each Province actively engaged in the
petroleum industry and of personnel employed by oil companies. The objectives
of the group are as follows:—
(1) Standardization of forms designed for the same purpose but which are
required individually by both the Provincial and Federal Governments
under different formats.
(2) Standardization of forms to accommodate machine accounting procedures
for reporting production statistics to Provincial Governments.
(3) Amendment of existing model report forms to conform with present requirements.
 A 104 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
(4)  Investigation of ways and means to obtain the co-operation of both Provincial and Federal Government agencies and provide early availability of
information on all phases of the oil and gas industry.
One meeting of the Statistical Sub-committee was held in 1969, when discussions were held concerning the procedures and reports employed by the Provincial
authorities.   The Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch has adopted many features
of the model forms prepared by this committee and uses the following applications
and reports:—
Form No. Form Name
1. Well Register.
2. Application for a Well Authorization.
3. Application to Amend a Well Authorization.
4. Application to Change a Well Name.
5. Application to Abandon a Well.
6. Application to Alter a Well.
7. New Oil Well Report.
8. New Gas Well Report.
9. Application for M.P.R.—Individual Well.
9a. Application for M.P.R.—Unit/Project.
10. Report of Wells Connected to a Battery.
BC SI. Test Data and Production Report.
BC S2. Monthly Disposition and Crown Royalty Statement.
15. Monthly Gas-gathering Operations Report.
16. Monthly Natural Gas Plant Statement.
17. Monthly Natural Gas Processing Statement.
18. Monthly Sulphur Plant Operations Statement.
19. Monthly Refinery Operations Report.
20. Monthly Crude Oil and Condensate/Pentanes Plus Purchaser's Statement.
21. Monthly Liquefied Petroleum Gas Purchaser's Statement.
22. Well Completion Report.
23. Supplement to Well Completion Report.
24. Work-over Report No.
*25. Work-over Card.
*26. Monthly Operations Report.
27. Application for a Rig Licence.
28. Monthly Water Flood Operations Report.
29. Monthly Water Receipts and Disposal Report.
30. Statement of Nominations and Estimated Requirements for British Co
lumbia Crude Oil and Condensate/Pentanes Plus.
31. New Service Well Report.
32. Production Allowable Report—Crude Oil.
*33. Drilling Report.
34. Application for Test-hole Authorization(s).
*35. Report of Well Inspection.
*7c. Meter Inspection Report.
*7d. Battery Inspection Report.
fMonthly Natural Gas Distributor's Statement.
fMonthly Report on Oil Pipeline Gathering Operations.
* For departmental use only.
t Used in conjunction with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
 PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS A 105
Reports
Schedule of Wells
An annual volume was compiled and published giving all well information
released during 1969. It covered the period from 8 a.m. January 1st to 8 a.m.
January 1 st of the succeeding year.
The data are arranged alphabetically by the well names and provide the following information when applicable: Well authorization number, well name, location,
classification, co-ordinates, elevation, total depth, status including geological pool,
interval open to production, casing details, spud date, rig-release date, logs, core
intervals, sample intervals, drill-stem test data, and geological markers determined
by the Branch.
The information is condensed from reports submitted to the Branch by the
various operators.
Weekly Report
A weekly report is published for Departmental use from data collected by the
field office staff at Charlie Lake. The week reported is from 8 a.m. on Friday to
the succeeding Friday.   The following information is included:—
(1) Spudded wells.
(2) Cancelled locations.
(3) Changes of well names.
(4) Changes of well classification.
(5) Changes of well status.
(6) Suspended wells.
(7) Finished drilling wells.
(8) Abandoned wells.
(9) Oil wells.
(10) Gas wells.
(11) Work-overs.
(12) Operating wells.
(13) Approved wells not spudded.
(14) Summary of well count, giving the following total?-.—
(a) Finished drilling wells.
(b) Abandoned wells.
(c) Oil wells.
(d) Gas wells.
(e) Water-injection wells.
(f) Gas-injection wells.
(g) Water-source wells.
(h) Observation wells.
(i) Disposal wells.
( / ) Completed wells.
(k) Locations drilled.
(I) Multiple completions.
(m) Drilling wells.
(n) Suspended wells.
(o) Approved but not spudded wells.
(p) Locations in good standing.
(q) Locations approved.
(r) Locations cancelled.
 A 106 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
The number of completed wells is calculated by two methods to provide verification. The number of wells of different status, counting each zone of a multiple
completion as a well, is compared to the number of locations drilled less the multiple
completions.
The number of locations in good standing is calculated also by two methods.
The total number of locations drilled, drilling, suspended, and approved but not
spudded is compared to the total number of locations approved less the number of
locations cancelled.
Oil and Gas Production Report
The Oil and Gas Production Report is prepared monthly from returns made
by the operators of producing wells, pipe-lines, gas plants, oil refineries, and distribution facilities. All production data are compiled and maintained by a computer
application.   The contents of the report are as follows:—
(1) Graphical presentations of the daily average oil production, the daily average marketable gas production, and the monthly footage drilled, with
comparative graphs of the totals for the preceding year.
(2) Monthly summary of the drilling and completion activity, with cumulatives
for the year.
(3) New oil- and gas-well reports received during the reported month.
(4) The number of producing and producible oil and gas wells by field and
pool.
(5) Production of crude oil, condensate, natural gas, and water by individual
well, project or unit, field and pool, with gas/oil and water/oil ratios calculated, where applicable. The quantities are given for the current month,
the current year to date, and the all-time cumulative.
(6) Estimated oil production for the succeeding month, which is based upon
the pipe-line returns reported to the Branch field office.
(7) Crude oil and condensate/pentanes plus disposition, with comparable
totals for the same month of the preceding year.
(8) Tabulation of nominations and estimated requirements for British Columbia crude oil and condensate/pentanes plus.
(9) Natural-gas supply and disposition, with comparable volumes for the same
month of the preceding year.
(10) Value of natural-gas sales to British Columbia distributors.
(11) Value of crude oil and natural gas to British Columbia producers.
(12) Production and disposition of butane, propane, and sulphur.
(13) Value of butane, propane, and sulphur to British Columbia producers.
(14) Water-flood operations showing the number of injection wells, and volumes
of water by current month, current year, with total cumulative figures for.
each field and pool. The totals are also given for the same month of the
preceding year.
This report is compiled and mailed to subscribers approximately two weeks
after receipt of the returns from the operators.
Drilling and Land Report
The Drilling and Land Report is published and distributed monthly, concurrently with the Oil and Gas Production Report.
The Drilling Section is compiled from information forwarded by the Branch
field office and contains the following:—
(1) Monthly summary of drilling and completion activity, with cumulatives
for the year
 PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS A 107
(2) Summary of the well count, giving the following totals:—
(a) Locations drilled.
(b) Finished drilling wells.
(c) Abandoned wells.
(d) Oil wells.
(e) Gas wells.
(/) Water-injection wells.
(g) Gas-injection wells.
(h) Water-source wells.
(i) Observation wells.
(/) Disposal wells.
(k) Total wells completed.
(3) Well authorizations approved.
(4) Locations cancelled.
(5) Well authorizations outstanding.
(6) Changes of well status.
(7) Changes of well classification.
(8) Changes of well names.
(9) Suspended wells.
(10) Drilling and completed wells.
(11) Rig licences issued.
(12) Rig licences renewed.
(13) Rig licences cancelled.
(14) Well data released from confidential status.
(15) Descriptions of designated fields.
(16) Drilling and production schemes approved by the Branch during the
recorded month.
The Land Section is prepared by the Petroleum and Natural Gas Titles Section
and contains the following:—
(1) Acreage synopses.
(2) Summary of changes in acreage held under the following titles:—
(a) Permits.
(b) Leases.
(c) Natural-gas licences.
(d) Drilling reservations.
(3) Geophysical licences issued and renewed.
(4) Notices regarding sales of Crown petroleum and natural-gas rights.
(5) Summary of disposition of permits, leases, natural-gas licences, and drilling reservations.
Publications
Various publications, maps, and services concerning petroleum and natural-gas
operations in British Columbia are available. A catalogue containing descriptions
and prices is available from the Chief Petroleum and Natural Gas Commissioner,
Administration Branch, or the Chief, Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch, Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, British
Columbia.
 A 108
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
ON
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petroleum and natural gas a 109
Table 14.—Geophysical Exploration, 1969
Seismic Surveys
Note.—Unless otherwise shown, the exploration method used is the reflection
seismic survey. For indicating location, the National Topographic Series grid
system is used, except in the Peace River Block, where the township system is used.
Company
Location of Survey
Number
of Seismic
Crews
Number
of Crew-
weeks
January
94-J-8  -	
1
J
"1
i
1
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
2
94-P-6	
2
94-0-6	
3
94-0-9; 94-P-12	
1 4
94-H-3, -4, -5, -6	
1
94-1-12, -13     	
1
Tp. 84, R. 23, W. of 6th M _..
1
94-J-15
2
94-P-6     __       	
1
Gulf Oil Canada Ltd -
93-1-10    	
2 4
93-P-7 -- - ..   	
1 3
94-P-7 	
1
Hudson's Bay Oil & Gas Co. Ltd	
94-J-10,-11,-14,-15 —
4
94-1-4; 94-H-13
3 3
93-P-9
4
94-1 8, -9
94-0-1, -8, -9, -11, -12, -13, -14, -15 -	
94-P-3, -4, -5, -6, -12 „.„	
94-P-3, -4, -5, -6	
Tp. 83, 84, R. 18, 19, W. of 6th M.
10.5
1 0
05
94-A-13, -14.	
4 0
February
94-P-ll          	
94-0-13 	
1
3
94-O-H   	
4
94-0-5, -6	
94-P-6
3
Canadian Pacific Oil & Gas Ltd. _	
1
94-J-9 —         	
2.5
94-1-5, -12	
0.5
Gulf Oil Canada Ltd	
2.7
Hudson's Bay Oil & Gas Co. Ltd	
94-J-9, -10, -11, -14, -15, -16	
94-0-1, -8     -   	
4
French Petroleum Company of Canada
94-P-9, -10, -15, -16	
94-P-7           	
1
94-1-4; 94-H-13— -	
4
94-1-3; 94-1-4   	
3
94-P-5; 94-0-9 	
1.5
94-1-8, -9	
94-0-1, -8, -9, -11, -12, -13, -14, -15	
94-P-4, -5, .17.	
11.5
Union Oil Company of Canada Ltd.
94-H-2, -16 - -	
94-1-6  -	
0.6
2
94-A-13, -14-         -
1
 A 110 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1969
Table 14.—Geophysical Exploration, 1969—Continued
Seismic Surveys—Continued
Company
Location of Survey
Number
of Seismic
Crews
Number
of Crew-
weeks
March
Amerada Petroleum Corporation.	
Chevron Standard Oil Limited	
Canadian Pacific Oil & Gas Limited-
Imperial Oil Enterprises	
Pacific Petroleums Ltd	
Hudson's Bay Oil & Gas Co. Ltd	
Gulf Oil Canada Ltd  _.
Marathon Oil Company  	
Amoco Canada Petroleum Company
Placid Oil Company   	
Texaco Exploration Company __..
Union Oil Company of Canada Ltd.
April
Central-Del Rio Oils Ltd  _
Midwest Oil Corporation	
May
Tenneco Oil & Minerals Ltd	
Mesa Petroleum Company	
June
Canadian Pacific Oil & Gas Ltd	
Mesa Petroleum Company 	
Hudson's Bay Oil & Gas Co. Ltd	
July
Canadian Pacific Oil & Gas Ltd	
Hudson's Bay Oil & Gas Co. Ltd _
Texaco Exploration Company	
Texas Gulf Sulphur Company 	
Canadian Industrial Gas & Oil Ltd. -
August
Central-Del Rio Oils Ltd 	
Canadian Pacific Oil & Gas Ltd _
Texaco Exploration Company _
Texas Gulf Sulphur Company	
September
Texas Gulf Sulphur Company 	
October
Central-Del Rio Oils Ltd	
Chevron Standard Oil Limited	
Texas Gulf Sulphur Company	
November
Central-Del Rio Oils Ltd 	
Chevron Standard Oil Limited	
December
Hudson's Bay Oil & Gas Co. Ltd	
Union Oil Company of Canada Ltd.
94-0-14.
94-O-H-
94-0    ...
94-J-8	
94-J-9	
94-J-9	
94-1-9,-10,-11
94-0-1
94-P-13 ._
93-1-10 	
94-1-4; 94-H-13
14, -15, -16.
9,-10,-15,-16 —
94-0-7,
94-1-3 _
94-0-4,
94-N-l,
94-H-2,
94-1-14
94-1-6.
94-P-5-
10-
5, -6, -7, -8, -9, -10, -11, -12, -13, -14 -
2, -7, -8  _	
16    	
94-A-7 	
Tp. 85, 86, R. 22, 23, W. of 6th M.
94-1-14.
94-G-9.
94-B-1-.
94-G-9-
93-P-l, -
94-B-8	
93-P-5	
93-P-l, -2,
93-1-16	
93-0-91	
93-1, P	
93-P-8—
94-B-8 —
94-A-13..
93-1-16-
93-0-9—
93-0-9.
94-A-7.
94-P-7-
93-P-5-
94-A-7.
94-P-7...
94-G-7	
94-P-7, -10.
2
4
2
3
1
1
4
2.4
0.9
0.6
1.1
1
5
2
1.7
2
1.3
1
0.7
2
1
1.5
2
4
0.5
2
1 Seismic refraction.
 PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS
Table 14.—Geophysical Exploration, 1969—Continued
Gravity Surveys
A 111
Company
Location of Survey
Number
of Crews
Number
of Crew-
weeks
January
Tenneco Oil & Minerals Ltd..
February
Tenneco Oil & Minerals Ltd..
Canadian Delhi Oil Ltd	
March
Tenneco Oil & Minerals Ltd..
Canadian Delhi Oil Ltd	
April
Tenneco Oil & Minerals Ltd.
94-1, J, P-
94-1, J, P. 	
94-J-5, -14	
94-0-1,-2,-3,-8-
94-P-4,-5.	
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Table 15.—Surface Geological Exploration, 1969
A 123
Company
Location of Survey
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Amoco Canada Petroleum Company.—
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Canadian Pacific Oil & Gas Ltd	
French Petroleum Company of Canada
Union Oil Company of Canada Ltd	
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August
Canadian Pacific Oil & Gas Ltd._	
Union Oil Company of Canada Ltd	
Amoco Canada Petroleum Company	
September
Canadian Delhi Oil Ltd.  	
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 A 124
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