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ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1971

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 ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
DEPARTMENT OF
INDUSTRIAL
r
DEVELOPMENT,
TRADE, AND
COMMERCE
FOR THE YEAR  ENDED
DECEMBER 31
1970
_
  The Honourable Waldo M. Skillings,
Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce.
  To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C, LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg to submit the Report of the Department of Industrial Development, Trade,
and Commerce for the year ended December 31, 1970.
WALDO M. SKILLINGS,
Minister of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce.
 To the Honourable Waldo M. Skillings,
Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce,
Victoria, British Columbia.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce for the year ended December 31,
1970.
ROBERT F. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce.
 DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE,
AND COMMERCE
Douglas Building, 617 Government Street,
Victoria, British Columbia
Honourable Waldo M. Skillings, Minister.
Robert F. Renwick, Deputy Minister.
M. H. A. Glover, Executive Director, Economic Research.
G. Geddes, Administrative Officer (Finance
and Personnel).
ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS BRANCH
J. R. Meredith, Director. G. R. Knight, Assistant Director.
J. L. 1'Anson, Economist.
TRADE AND INDUSTRY OFFICE
R. W. Kersey, Industry Development Officer.
D. H. T. Mollison, Trade Development Officer.
N. R. Blake,  Trade and Industry Development Officer.
DATA PROCESSING CENTRE
421 Menzies Street, Victoria
A. G. Lockyer, Manager, Systems and Programming.
G. A. Spring, Manager, Operations.
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE
1-3 Regent Street, London S.W. 1, England
Admiral M. G. Stirling, Agent-General.
F. C. MacKay, Trade Commissioner.
G.   S.   Gibson   (retired   June   30),  Deputy
Agent-General.
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE
599 Market Street, San Francisco, Calif. 94105, U.S.A.
[Vacant] Commissioner for Trade and Tourism.
S. C. Turbis, Assistant Industry and Trade
Commissioner.
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE
8833 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069, U.S.A.
L. Nevraumont, Industry and Trade Commissioner.
FIFTH BRITISH COLUMBIA INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR
Suite 1100, 475 Howe Street, Vancouver 2, British Columbia
J. N. Hyland, President.
D. K. Brown, Executive Director.
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 Copper-molybdenum mine, Peachland.
  CONTENTS
Pace
Economy '70  13
General Departmental Affairs  16
Economics and Statistics  18
Promotion—Trade and Industry  19
Data Processing  22
The Department Abroad  23
The Department in California  26
Expo '70, Osaka  26
Fifth British Columbia International Trade Fair, 1971  29
British Columbia Research Council  30
Spotlight on External Trade  31
Spotlight on Industrial Expansion  32
  BRITISH COLUMBIA ECONOMY, 1970
The British Columbia economy continued to show strength and vitality during
1970, in spite of many adverse factors. Tight money and higher interest rates
prevailed in Canada as well as in most of the nations with which British Columbia
trades. Housing starts in the United States were down sharply in the first six months
of 1970 and as a result exports of British Columbia lumber to the United States were
considerably less than in previous years. The Interior forest operations were more
severely affected by the reduced United States demand for lumber since a higher
proportion of their production is sold in the American market. Newsprint was also
adversely affected by the slowdown in the American economy and therefore failed
to reach anticipated levels. Labour-management disputes and consequent work
stoppages in some segments of the economy resulted in less production of pulp,
newsprint, lumber, and plywood than might have occurred otherwise. In spite of
these adversities, timber scaled in the Province during the year exceeded the record
1969 figure.
The mineral industry experienced another year of growth. Copper and molybdenum shipments showed substantial increases over 1969, as did asbestos. Several
new copper and copper-molybdenum developments came into production during
the year. Coal production and shipments increased dramatically in 1970 as initial
consignments on long-term sales commitments with the Japanese steel industry
were started. Roberts Bank superport commenced operation in May, with the
first shipment of East Kootenay coal to Japan. Crude-oil and natural-gas production remained ahead of 1969. Lead shipments in 1970 compared favourably
with the previous year, while zinc shipments declined. In value of shipments, copper
ranked first, followed by crude oil and then molybdenum. Labour-management
strife in the construction industry, as well as " tight money " for housing, caused a
drastic reduction in cement shipments during the year.
After experiencing a comparatively poor year in 1969, the commercial fishing
industry improved considerably in 1970, with the value of fish landed showing a
marked increase.
The population of British Columbia at June 1, 1970, was estimated at
2,137,000, an increase of 3.4 per cent over June 1, 1969.   This compares with the
Bulk-coal handling, Roberts Bank.
 Y 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Canadian population increase of 1.5 per cent in the equivalent period. Net immigration was responsible for over 72 per cent of the Province's additional 70,000
people, while natural increase (excess of births over deaths) made up the balance.
The labour force grew substantially during the year and the number of persons
employed increased, but at a lesser rate than previous years. The Federal Government's anti-inflationary measures and the labour-management disputes that occurred
in 1970 were largely responsible for a jump in the unemployment rate.
The Consumer Price Index and the General Wholesale Price Index rose during
the year at lesser rates than in 1969, indicating a slight easing of inflationary
pressures. The value of retail sales held firm throughout 1970, with a slight increase
over the 1969 level.
British Columbia industry, which exports a high proportion of its production,
was adversely affected by the Federal Government's action of unpegging the Canadian dollar. The latter rose from $0.92Vi to a high of $0.98Vi, in relation to the
United States dollar, as a result of this move. Exporters were immediately confronted with a lower return on their sales, while foreign manufacturers were placed
in a more favourable competitive position. The full effect of revaluation was partly
offset by price increases in certain segments of the industry.
The value of export shipments through British Columbia customs ports was
higher in 1970, with metals in ores and concentrates; non-ferrous metals; coal,
crude petroleum, and natural gas; wood pulp; paper and paperboard posting
important gains. Wheat exports rose fractionally. Foods and beverages, transportation and communication equipment were the main commodities contributing to
the increase in imports in the year. The United States remained as the Province's
most important customer, followed by Japan, European Common Market, and the
United Kingdom.
Another busy year was experienced by the travel industry, as evidenced by the
increase over the previous years in the number of foreign-licensed passenger-vehicles
W. A. C. Bennett Dam
f -
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1970
Y15
that entered British Columbia in 1970. Estimated tourist revenue continued its
steady advance.
A review of new manufacturing firms established in British Columbia during
1970 indicates that, while most were related to the wood industries, the trend is
toward an increasing number of firms manufacturing a wider variety of other
products, and this trend will serve to expand the Province's industrial base. Dominant in the list of new manufacturing firms other than the wood industry are metal-
fabricating industries—logging, sawmill, plywood-mill, and mining equipment;
transportation equipment industries—heavy trucks; food and beverage industries;
furniture and fixture industries.
Any upturn in the construction industry in North America would be beneficial
to British Columbia lumber, plywood, shingles, and other wood products in 1971.
The long-term outlook for pulp and paper is good, as world demand is forecast
to be greater than world production.   Any recovery in the American economy in
1971 should bring about a marked improvement for the pulp and paper industry in
the Province. In addition, the forest industry should operate in 1971 with a
minimum of interruptions caused by labour-management disputes as a result of
two-year term agreements signed in 1970. Interest rates and the availability of
mortgage financing for housing are the main variables which will have a bearing
on the prospects for the construction industry in 1971. The slowdown in house
construction created a pent-up demand for housing, and activity is expected to be
brisk when financing becomes available.
The mineral industry should give considerable stability to the British Columbia
economy in 1971. The full impact of several major mine developments that came
into production through 1970 will be reflected in the 1971 results. Development
is continuing in several major mine projects throughout the Province. Long-term
sales contracts with foreign countries for British Columbia mineral products are
a stabilizing force in the Provincial economy.
Coal drag-line, East Kootenay.
 Y 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
GENERAL DEPARTMENTAL AFFAIRS
Many activities of the branches of the Department in 1970 were directed
toward the expansion of the Province's industrial base. New industrial and commercial enterprises were actively encouraged and promoted, established businesses
were provided assistance and advice regarding markets, market trends, new products
and processes, etc., and increased domestic and export trade was advocated and
supported. Economic and statistical research covering a broad range of subjects
was undertaken to support the objective of broadening British Columbia's economic
base.
During the year the Department had visits from representatives of many manufacturing and prospective manufacturing firms who sought data regarding resources,
transportation, raw materials, markets, population, site location, financing, etc.,
which might assist them in their investigations as to the feasibility of establishing
facilities in British Columbia. In addition, the Department staff answered numerous
requests for information on location-sites, including zoned industrial areas; availability of raw material; electric power; water supply; services; education; etc.
Information was also provided regarding the services and facilities of the British
Columbia Research Council, which are available for industrial and scientific
research.
Many of the activities were performed in co-operation with other British
Columbia Government departments, the British Columbia Hydro and Power
Authority, Federal Government departments, various boards of trade and chambers
of commerce, municipal and civic governments, manufacturing associations, trade
associations, industrial commissions, railway industrial agents, and foreign-trade
representatives in Canada and overseas.
The Department continued its programme in sponsoring regional district economic surveys and various regional industrial expansion brochures. Specifically, the
Department co-operated on the following economic surveys and feasibility studies:
Regional District of Central Kootenay, Peace River Regional District, Boundary Development Committee, Cariboo Regional District, Regional District of Comox-
Strathcona, and Okanagan Regional Industrial Development Council.
Thirteen towns, cities, and municipalities received the co-operation of the
Department in the preparation of industrial development promotional brochures.
BULLETIN
During 1970 the Trade and Industry Bulletin completed 21 years of continuous
publication, listing trade inquiries, export opportunities, manufacture under licence
agreements available to British Columbia firms, notices of tenders, and news of
general commercial interest. Special reports were also included covering participation in trade fairs, amended trade regulations, and market reports on selected
regions. The increased use of the Bulletin by the trade representatives of other
nations bears out the importance of this publication to the commercial and industrial
organizations in Western Canada. The circulation of the Bulletin increased to 2,400
copies per month.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1970
Y17
SEMINARS AND CONFERENCES
During the past year, the Department actively participated in or co-sponsored
several seminars, courses, and conferences directly related to economic matters,
trade, and industrial development.
A two-day Trade and Industry Development Conference was held in Vancouver, January 8 to 9, 1970. The conference considered the problems faced by
primary and secondary industries, export trade, and other sectors of the Provincial
economy.
The Department took an active role, in conjunction with the Federal Department of Regional Economic Expansion and local industrial development groups, in
seminars at Terrace and Radium. The purpose of these seminars was to acquaint
voluntary and professional industrial commission members in the smaller towns and
centres of the Province with the professional techniques of industrial development
and promotion. The course instructors dealt with a wide range of topics, including
the role of the community, organization and financing for industrial development,
internal promotion, and site location of industrial parks.
During the year, Department officials attended a variety of meetings and
general business conferences. These included the Natural Resources Conference,
Federal-Provincial Conference on Economic Statistics (Banff), and a conference on
data processing (Minneapolis, Minn.). Other meetings attended were Canadian
Manufacturers' Association (Vancouver), Regional Economic Expansion (Victoria), Kootenay Industrial Development Association (Vancouver), and Council of
Forest Industries (Vancouver).
The Department was host to 16 Federal Assistant Trade Commissioners-in-
training, who received a short briefing on the Province and its economy before leaving Canada for their various foreign posts. Staff members in British Columbia
House, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Victoria attended Basic Industrial Development courses at universities in Berkeley, Calif., and Edmonton, Alta.
Mobile Spar.
 Y 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS
The Economics and Statistics Branch in 1970 consisted of 12 professional
economists and research officers and a support staff of 15. The functions of the
Branch cover a broad range of economic research which includes the study of
economic trends and conditions; in co-operation with Federal and other Provincial
Government departments, the collection and analysis of statistical data relating to
the Province's economy; the detailed study of particular economic sectors; and
assistance to other Government departments and industry generally. The services
provided by the Branch are based on the staff's expertise in such areas as statistical
analysis, economic forecasting, resource economics and development, domestic and
foreign trade, regional economic development, finance, marketing, and transportation. During the year the Branch maintained its usual close liaison with other
Government departments and agencies in connection with the collection and dissemination of statistical and economic data. Members of the staff attended and
participated in several conferences and seminars within and beyond the Province.
These meetings, which covered a variety of pertinent subjects, enabled the staff to
meet with people from Government, business, industry, and labour to discuss
mutual problems, information, methods, etc.
The Branch undertook several studies in co-operation with other Provincial
Government departments and agencies, specifically the Departments of Agriculture;
Finance; Labour; Mines and Petroleum Resources; Lands, Forests, and Water
Resources; and the Provincial Secretary. Many individual requests for economic
and statistical information covering a broad range of interests concerning the Province were handled by the staff.
A number of special projects were undertaken by the Branch throughout the
year involving specific industry and resource studies as well as regional economic
surveys. The Branch issued monthly, quarterly, annual, and periodic publications
throughout the year in fulfilling one of its functions of disseminating information
and statistics of current economic conditions and trends.
Following is the list of publications issued by the Branch in 1970:—
Bulletin of Business Activity (monthly).
Summary of Economic Activity (annual).
British Columbia Business Outlook (annual).
External Trade Through British Columbia Customs Ports (annual).
British Columbia Preliminary Salary and Wage Rate Survey (annual).
British Columbia Housing Statistics.
Industrial Expansion in British Columbia (quarterly).
Selected Forest Industry Statistics of British Columbia (periodic).
British Columbia Minerals Production and Trade (periodic).
The Central Kootenay Regional District Study.
The Bulkley-Nechako Regional District Study.
The Pacific Rim—An Evaluation of British Columbia Trade
Opportunities.
The Columbia-Shuswap Regional District Study.
Pulp and Paper Industry in British Columbia (periodic).
Pacific Coast Ports of North America (monograph).
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1970
Y19
The library of the Branch is recognized as one of the most complete and comprehensive sources of economic and statistical data in the Province, and it is being
continually improved and updated with the latest economic and major Government
publications, as well as the leading current business, economics, trade, and commerce
journals.
Mr. Harold V. Bassett, who has been in charge of labour statistics for the
Branch for many years, retired in September, 1970. Mr. Bassett started his career
with the Department of Labour in 1935, transferring to the Department of Industrial
Development, Trade, and Commerce in 1939. He is recognized as being one of the
leading labour statisticans in the Province and he will be greatly missed by the entire
Department.
PROMOTION—TRADE AND INDUSTRY
Special attention was provided during the year to industries seeking new plant
locations, and among other things specific information was furnished with respect
to planned industrial sites zoned for exclusive industrial uses. Assistance was also
given to established businesses as required. Manufacturing under licence was encouraged as much as possible, along with an industrial development advertising
programme, resulting in the Department receiving business inquiries.
A representative of the Department took part in the annual California Tourist
Promotion project and took advantage of this opportunity to discuss with many
businessmen the industrial development taking place in British Columbia.
A new Composite Industrial Map of the Lower Mainland was completed
during the year. The map illustrates the zoned heavy and light industrial areas,
along with the location and railway approaches of the Roberts Bank superport.
 SECONDARY MANUFACTURING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
Sonar sounding set.
Portable barker-chipper.
Apple juice.
Hydraulic winch.
  Y22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
DATA PROCESSING
The main Data Processing Centre for the Government is an important branch
of the Department and is situated at 421 Menzies Street in Victoria. The centre
provides computer, systems and programming, and general systems analysis services
to most Government departments and agencies. Staff consists of over 100 clerical,
keypunch, and computer operators, and over 35 analysts and programmers. Equipment used is two System 360 computers with magnetic-tape drives, card reader/
punches, printers, direct-access equipment, and a plotter. This equipment is in
operation three shifts, five days a week, handling a wide variety of record-keeping,
accounting, technical, and scientific projects.
During 1970 the centre carried out several equipment studies aimed at
reducing staff costs and providing adequate equipment to handle the growing work
load. These studies included an investigation of optical character-reading as a
means of coping with increased keypunch volumes, use of computer/microfilm
equipment as a means of reducing computer times, and a major study to establish
future computer needs.
Based on the above studies, the centre has arranged for use of optical character-
reading service bureau facilities in Vancouver, commencing in January, 1971. Also
equipment needs for the next two or three years have been established and equipment
changes are being arranged.
During the year operating staff and several of the analysts and programmers
attended informative and educational seminars, equipment demonstrations, and
Data Processing Centre.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1970
Y23
courses.    These included three major computer conferences and a number of systems and data processing courses of one to two weeks' duration.
The centre also arranged and gave a number of tours of the centre to high
school and university students, and other interested groups. Talks on data processing career opportunities and the computer field have been given at Provincial
Government administrative management courses and to interested student groups.
SYSTEMS AND PROGRAMMING DIVISION
Analysts in this Division carried out over 40 systems and equipment feasibility
studies during the past year. These studies have brought about a number of
changes in systems in departments and in the centre. Results of the equipment
studies are either being introduced or are under active consideration.
During the year, analysts and computer programmers have completed a number
of changes and improvements on large-scale education examination and superannuation projects which were originally introduced in 1969. Major systems studies
are presently being carried out in the Motor-vehicle and Superannuation Branches.
A major study of Liquor Control Board warehouse systems was completed
in February. As a result of this study, a small computer will be installed at the
warehouse early in 1971 and it will be used to keep daily records of inventories
and produce shipping and other related documents.
OPERATIONS DIVISION
This Division successfully introduced a large direct-access device onto the
computers early in the year. This device speeds up processing of several jobs and
will allow the centre to maintain adequate computer services until late in 1971.
During the last four months of the year the Division co-operated with the
Department of Education on an experimental keypunch training course conducted
in the evenings, using facilities in the centre. This may develop into a continuing
course, provided there is sufficient demand for graduates.
The Systems Management Section has now been transferred from Systems
and Programming Division into the Operations Division. This section is made up
of a small group of specialist programmers who are responsible for introduction
and maintenance of control systems used internally by the computers. This transfer
has been quite successful and has improved operations in the Computer Room.
THE DEPARTMENT ABROAD—
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, LONDON, ENGLAND
British Columbia House was again pleased to receive visits from several
members of the Executive Council of the Government of British Columbia in 1970.
The Agent-General made arrangements for them to meet with officers of the
Government in Britain and with leading businessmen in London.
During the year the Agent-General travelled in Austria and Sweden, where
he met with businessmen for discussions on various aspects of the Province's
economic growth and industrial development. He also visited numerous centres
in the United Kingdom, where he filled speaking engagements and toured industrial
plants. In London, the Agent-General maintained continuous liaison with officials
of both British and Canadian Government departments and representatives of
the financial and industrial communities.
 Y24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
On June 30, 1970, Mr. G. S. Gibson, who had served as Deputy Agent-General
in British Columbia House for over 20 years, retired from the Government service.
During his career in British Columbia House Mr. Gibson served under five Agents-
General.
In August of 1970, major renovations to the ground floor of British Columbia
House began and will be continued for a period of about eight months. When
these renovations are completed, the Agent-General and his staff will move to
modern office accommodation on the ground floor. A visitors' reading and writing
room will be maintained on an extended mezzanine floor, while the conference
room/theatre, previously located on the first floor, will be replaced by a new room
in the basement.
VISITORS, FILMS, AND PUBLICITY
Each year sees an increase in the number of visitors registered at British
Columbia House, London. Generally reduced transatlantic fares, low-cost charter
flights, and an ever-increasing number of charter flights brought the 1970 total of
visitor registrations to more than 5,400. This increase in registrations is automatically followed by an increase in the volume of letters and parcels handled by the
office staff. In 1970, there were 29,600 letters and parcels handled on behalf of
the visitors.
One hundred and seventy films from the library maintained at British Columbia
House were sent out on loan to study groups, social groups, schools, business
gatherings, etc., during the year. These films were shown at 90 different screenings
to a total audience in excess of 9,000 people.
The News Letter, published in the name of the Agent-General and issued
monthly from British Columbia House, enjoyed increased circulation in 1970.
This increased readership is another indication of the high level of interest shown in
British Columbia by the people of the United Kingdom and Europe.
IMMIGRATION AND TOURISM
Requests for information on immigration increased in 1970, with the total
number of inquiries exceeding the 2,000 mark for the first time in recent years.
School-teachers topped the list with 60 per cent of the total number of inquiries.
Thirty per cent were received from professionals and skilled tradesmen, and 5 per
cent from unskilled workers.
Our Director of Travel Promotion reports an increasing number of requests
for information on transportation to the Province and touring within British
Columbia from travel agents in the United Kingdom and Europe.
TRADE PROMOTION
The Province's trade with the United Kingdom maintained a relatively high
level in spite of labour problems in transportation and port facilities on both sides of
the world, and in spite of strikes or the threat of strikes in some major industries.
During the year the Trade Commissioner visited France, Italy, Germany, and
Belgium on the Continent and made a number of trips in the United Kingdom.
In every centre he found an increased awareness of the industrial potential of
British Columbia.
The Trade Commissioner's office dealt with a slightly increased number of
general trade inquiries concerning the two-way movement of goods and services
between British Columbia and the United Kingdom and Europe.   The office was
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1970
Y25
also called upon to provide information of a general nature (labour rates, market
prospects, taxation rates, etc.) to a number of major industrial concerns.
The concept of timber-frame housing construction has received increased
acceptance both in the United Kingdom and on the Continent and should result
in maintaining the high level of consumption of British Columbia's forest products
in these regions.
Increased competition, particularly from French apple-growers, has made
inroads into the Province's exports of fresh apples to the United Kingdom.
British Columbia manufacturers continue to look to the market of the United
Kingdom and assistance was rendered by the Trade Commissioner's office to producers of educational toys, internal-combustion engines, pipe-making machinery,
and food products.
INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PROMOTION
Throughout the year information on manufacturing opportunities in British
Columbia was provided to over 200 firms in Britain and Europe through the medium
of a direct mailing campaign. Monthly bulletins and special reports on British
Columbia's industrial development were forwarded to banks, industrial concerns,
and individual company representatives. A continuation of the promotion of
licence manufacture agreements resulted in a greater number of inquiries in 1970.
The Trade Commissioner accompanied the manager of the Vancouver and
Lower Mainland Industrial Development Commission on a two-week tour of five
major centres in Germany. Their tour included participation in a two-day business
opportunities symposium in Frankfurt. The Trade Commissioner also participated
in a " Canadian Day Seminar " at the International Trade Fair held in Ghent,
Belgium. During the year he also attended the International Trade Fairs held in
Milan, Italy, and Hanover, Germany, and accompanied the manager of the Fifth
British Columbia International Trade Fair on part of his tour of European cities.
GENERAL
In July of 1970, Britain began negotiations to become a member of the
European Common Market, and the result of these negotiations will have a profound
bearing on British Columbia's position in the United Kingdom market. If Britain
is successful in her attempt to join the Common Market, it appears very unlikely that
Canada will be given any special consideration in spite of her long, traditional
position as a supplier to the United Kingdom.
While there has. been no relaxation of the regulations governing the export
of sterling to dollar regions, the new Government in Britain has announced that
the import deposit charges, which require deposits preceding import of goods,
will be terminated at the end of 1970.
 Y26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE DEPARTMENT IN CALIFORNIA—
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS ANGELES
The main functions of the two British Columbia offices in California in 1970
were seeking, developing, and maintaining markets in the State of California for
products manufactured in the Province; researching products consumed in the
State that could be manufactured in British Columbia; and promoting the establishment by California manufacturers of branch plants in the Province.
A close liaison has been maintained between the California officers and United
States Federal and State authorities, industrial commissions, power companies,
banks, and other prospect-generating agencies. Many representatives of these
agencies have been afforded every facility and, where appropriate, introductions to
personnel of the British Columbia Government and industrial commissions and
businessmen active in promoting the economic development of the Province. During the course of 1970, representatives from the Federal Department of Regional
Economic Expansion and representatives of various industrial commissions throughout British Columbia visited California, and the facilities and personnel of the San
Francisco and Los Angeles offices were placed at their disposal. Appointments
were made on their behalf with companies who were giving serious consideration to
the establishment of manufacturing facilities within the Province.
Representatives from both California offices attended an industrial development course at the University of California in Berkeley to study industrial development promotion techniques. They also made frequent factory-site visits to learn
first hand of the many developments in industry and to inform management of
industrial development opportunities in British Columbia. Departmental studies and
publications were distributed to interested manufacturers.
British Columbia businessmen seeking either to expand markets for their
products or to establish trading relationships with American manufacturers desirous
of entering the British Columbia market visited the area and were given assistance
by our offices. During some of these visits, " manufacturing under licence " was
discussed. Many British Columbia companies, including manufacturers of cookies,
concrete masonry, furniture, and a food processor were successful in finding suitable
distributors, agents, or representatives through the assistance of the British Columbia
personnel in California.
Officials of both offices visited several important trade fairs and shows featuring
such products as tree-fruit machinery, furniture, mobile houses, house trailers, boats,
electronics, and computers throughout the State in order that they be better acquainted with this vast market. Additionally, close relations were maintained with
the United States Department of Commerce and the Canadian Trade Commissioners.
Both offices maintain an up-to-date supply of industrial films and slide presentations which are distributed to interested business and travel groups.
BRITISH COLUMBIA PAVILION, EXPO '70, OSAKA, JAPAN
The British Columbia Pavilion at Expo '70, Japan, was an outstanding success
in every way. The soaring log structure captured the imagination of the Japanese
people and the lower levels became one of the most popular Expo spots for visitors
to take pictures of one another. An estimated 1,200 persons would move on and
off the logs each hour on a fine day and hundreds more would crash the rope
barriers to reach higher levels whenever vigilance was relaxed. The wood-block
plazas and connecting bridge were visited by an additional estimated 3,500 persons
 ■..■',.':■ --...»" -,t.v- /....-.■.,:,  -
INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1970 Y 27
British Columbia Pavilion, Osaka, Japan.
 Y28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
each hour and it was only on the rare or exceptionally rainy day when the food
concession was not thronged.
The theatre inside the Pavilion presented 45 daily showings of a film widely
acclaimed as one of the best at Expo '70. Its popularity was attested to by capacity
attendance (350 to 375 persons) for at least 11 hours for each of the 183 days Expo
was open, thus bringing between 14 and 15 thousand guests inside the Pavilion daily.
The Minister of the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce, the Honourable Waldo M. Skillings and party, visited Osaka in March to
participate in the opening ceremonies for Expo '70 which took place March 14,
1970. The Prime Minister of British Columbia, the Honourable W. A. C. Bennett,
other ministers and officials, participated in the opening ceremonies of British
Columbia Day, May 28, 1970.
The participation of British Columbia at Expo '70 involved more than the
Pavilion itself. Fifteen performing groups from the Province, by far the largest
single contribution of voluntary entertainers from any area or country in the world,
played at all Canadian pavilions (Canada, British Columbia, Ontario, Quebec) and
in major Expo entertainment areas. On British Columbia's Special Day, log-rolling
contestants from both the Province and Japan and the Royal Canadian Mounted
Police Musical Ride attracted a crowd which paralleled that for Canada Day, to
make both days the leaders amongst all national and special days for all participating
countries.
The view of the Pavilion waterfall and pond from the reception room early
became a favourite visiting place for many prominent Japanese businessmen and
Government officials, besides most members of the Imperial Family. It also became
a temporary " Expo oasis " for many distinguished visitors from abroad who used
the Pavilion as a daily " jumping-off " place during those days spent at the Expo site.
In a popularity poll conducted by a major Japanese newspaper, the British
Columbia Pavilion ranked among the top five foreign pavilions. Total attendance at
Expo '70 was approximately 64 million, of which an estimated 5 million were
foreign visitors to Japan.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1970 Y 29
FIFTH BRITISH COLUMBIA INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR,  1971
The Fifth British Columbia International Trade Fair is scheduled to be held
on the Pacific National Exhibition grounds in Vancouver from June 2 to 12,
inclusive, 1971. This trade fair, sponsored by the Department of Industrial
Development, Trade, and Commerce, will be known as ImpoExpo '71 and will
be a significant special event among those which are being planned for British
Columbia's Centennial celebration.
Planning for the trade fair commenced in July, 1969, and by the end of 1970
considerable progress had been achieved. In the solicitation of exhibitors, first
priority has been directed to international participants, principally those national
governments which have an established or growing trading relationship with British
Columbia and Canada. Firm space contracts have been concluded with 13 countries
and space reservations are being held for three more. Another five countries have
shown an encouraging response, while negotiations are continuing with an additional
eight countries.
In the final quarter of 1970, space sales attention was directed to major
Canadian corporations or associations, as the trade fair provides an excellent
opportunity for exposure of merchandise to a select audience of buyers and an
interested public.
Almost 250,000 square feet of floor space in five international pavilions,
including the Pacific Coliseum, is available for exhibitors. These pavilions will
feature all the various elements of international trade—consumer products, raw
materials, industrial products, construction materials and equipment, governments
and their agencies, tourism, and transportation. An outside exhibit area will feature
large-size exhibits, including construction, logging, and mining equipment.
A new symbol and short title, ImpoExpo '71, was designed for the fair.
The official symbol represents the flow of trade to and from British Columbia,
imports from its overseas and continental suppliers, and exports to its world-wide
customers. In keeping with the progressive look at present-day trade shows and
fairs, the simple, but easily remembered short title is not only descriptive of the
fair but also designed to attract participation.
An innovation has been introduced in the planning for the 1971 trade fair
in that all of the detailed information concerning exhibitors, their products and
services, and attending buyers will be catalogued and cross-referenced by the use
of a computer programme. In addition to streamlining what normally has been
a laborious manual undertaking, exhibitors and buyers will have quick access to
selected types of information from computer print-out stations located in the trade
fair buildings.
The Fifth British Columbia International Trade Fair is recognized internationally as one of the major trading events in North America. It will attract
professional buyers from North America's largest corporations. At the 1967 trade
fair, more than 10,000 buyers viewed thousands of products from many nations and
public attendance exceeded 130,000. Substantially higher numbers are anticipated
for ImpoExpo 71.
While the concept of the British Columbia International Trade Fair is to
provide a show place and market place for British Columbia's trading partners, it is
designed also to portray to British Columbia's citizens the importance of international trade to this Province. An interesting, entertaining, and informative programme to promote public attendance is being planned in co-ordination with the
planning and efforts of British Columbia's Centennial Committee.
 Y30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
1500
1200
-S   900
o
Q
T3
C
nj
en
_3
O
_c
600
300
t
NCOME
i
• s_
«r
1
i'N.
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1945 50
-«-   Earned Income
55 60 65 70
—- British Columbia Government Grant
BRITISH COLUMBIA RESEARCH COUNCIL
The British Columbia Research Council is an independent, non-profit industrial research society, registered under the Societies Act of British Columbia and
initially sponsored by the Department in 1944. From the time of its establishment
it has received an annual grant from the Department by which it has been able to
carry out in-house research projects and carry them through to such a stage of
development that they may be of interest to and supported by industrial companies.
The research arm of the society, British Columbia Research, has its offices and
laboratories located at 3650 Wesbrook Crescent, on the southern section of the
campus of the University of British Columbia.
In addition to a grant of $320,000 received from the Department, British
Columbia Research had, during 1970, an earned income of $1,230,000, made up
mainly from industrial and Government contracts.
British Columbia Research undertakes research and development in applied
biology, applied chemistry, applied physics, and engineering, and makes available
to industry and Government departments business services in the areas of operations
research, economic and feasibility studies, technical information, management, and
productivity. The research and technical services are undertaken for clients on a
confidential, contract basis and at cost.
During 1970 a substantial expansion in water and atmospheric pollution
research took place, accounting for contracts totalling $250,000. Ecological studies
were initiated for a number of large companies in various parts of the Province.
A highly sensitive system for the detection of small quantities of materials in the
vapour state, as odours or pollutants, was developed, and the collection of data
on wave climate at various points along the coast was expanded. Studies on ferro-
cement for construction of boats and on the development of non-poisonous systems
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1970
Y31
for insect control were continued. Through the co-operation of Atomic Energy
of Canada Ltd., a neutron activation unit was installed and the use of this equipment
in industrial problems was commenced.
SPOTLIGHT ON EXTERNAL TRADE
A vital function of the Department is that of researching, seeking, and advising
all concerned on various aspects of development and expansion of export markets
on which British Columbia is extremely dependent for economic growth. It is esti-'>
mated that in excess of 60 per cent of the Province's net value of commodity production (not including construction) is exported. The list of British Columbia
products exported includes an increasingly diversified range of manufactured and
resource-based goods.
Forest-based commodities continue to dominate exports, with approximately
60 per cent of the total, while products of the mineral industry amount to an estimated 25 per cent. Fish products—consisting mainly of canned salmon, agricultural
products—of which apple and apple products are the predominant items, chemicals
and fertilizers are also important export items. Approximately 55 per cent of British
Columbia products exported are sold to the United States. Japan, the European
Common Market, and the United Kingdom in that order represent the other major
export markets for the Province's products.
The value of all exports through British Columbia customs ports was in excess
of $2.5 billion in 1970. Commodities of British Columbia origin accounted for
approximately 62 per cent of this total.
Prospects for the export of British Columbia products appear extremely bright.
The housing market in the United States shows evidence of a resurgence and may
British Columbia Research, Vancouver.
 Y 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
require increased amounts of British Columbia lumber products. World demand for
pulp and newsprint is expected to overtake production in the very near future.
Long-term contracts for many of the products of the Province's mineral industry,
including some mines just coming into production, indicate a steadily growing, stable
future for mineral exports, particularly coal and copper. Export of natural gas to
the United States should also increase as a result of export agreements approved by
the National Energy Board in 1970.
The seaports of British Columbia represent Canada's main access to the Pacific
Rim countries and are therefore key shipping-points on the North American west
coast. Highly automated assembly wharves, bulk storage facilities, mechanized
container wharves, ports with easy access for large ships, and with all the equipment
that facilitates loading and unloading of the super-cargo carriers are rapidly being
developed on the British Columbia coast to service our expanding external trade.
Details of import and export trade of the Province are provided in the departmental
publication External Trade Through British Columbia Customs Ports (annual).
SPOTLIGHT ON INDUSTRIAL EXPANSION
The level of capital and repair expenditures in the Province, covering both the
private and public sectors, exceeded the $3 billion mark for the first time in 1970.
Outlays totalled $3,040 billion, approximately 7 per cent above the corresponding
1969 level of $2,848 billion.
The per capita volume of expenditures amounted to $1,391, nearly 27 per
cent over the per capita level of $1,096 in Canada as a whole. Expenditures by
manufacturing industries accounted for nearly $500 million, with paper, pulp, and
allied industries totalling $151 million, the largest part of manufacturing investment.
The new pulp and paper operations of Eurocan Pulp & Paper Co. Ltd. at Kitimat
started initial production at the end of 1970, as did the refiner groundwood-mill of
Finlay Forest Industries Ltd. at Mackenzie. Contracts were awarded during 1970
on two new kraft-pulp operations at Quesnel and Mackenzie and on a major expansion of the pulp-mill at Kamloops.
Wood industries ranked second in terms of manufacturing investment, with
capital and repair expenditures totalling $130 million. Highlighting major projects
in these industries were the completion of the world's largest kiln-dried dimension
lumber-mill by Bulkley Valley Forest Industries at Houston and the commencement
of two new veneer operations at Heffley Creek (near Kamloops) and at Prince
George.
In other manufacturing industries, food and beverage firms reported expenditures of $51 million, compared with $31 million in 1969. Much of the 1970 investment by these firms was applied in the alcoholic beverages, dairy products, and
meat-processing industries.
Expenditures by trade, finance, and commercial service enterprises showed a
decrease of approximately 10 per cent from $250 million in 1969 to $224 million
in 1970. Construction started during the year on two major commercial complexes
in Vancouver city—Project 200 and the Royal Centre, while steelwork was completed on the first phase of the Pacific Centre.
Development of new mines reached an unprecedented level in 1970, with the
emphasis on coal and copper ore. Seven new operating mines provided employment
for about 750 persons in the mining and milling phases of their operations. These
are situated near Fort Nelson, Golden, Greenwood, Keremeos, Peachland, Revelstoke, and Rossland. The massive open-pit coal-mining operation near Natal,
enlarged recently by Kaiser Resources Ltd., commenced shipments early in 1970.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1970 Y 33
The new copper mining and milling operation of Granduc Operating Co. near
Stewart is expected to begin shipments late in 1970 or early in 1971.
Construction is now under way on several major copper, copper-molybdenum
operations in the Province after the successful negotiation of export agreements.
These mines will be situated in the Highland Valley near Ashcroft, Babine Lake,
Bull River near Fernie, Port Hardy, and at Princeton. Work is also under way on
an open-pit coal mine near Sparwood and a major enlargement of the asbestos mine
near Cassiar has been undertaken.
Expenditures by utilities in 1970 are expected to reach $770 million, an
increase of $147 million or 23 per cent over the 1969 level. Significant among
projects in this sector were various new ocean shipping-facilities related to the
commencement of shipments from major coal mines in this Province and in Alberta,
the extension and improvement of railway routes, the enlargement of hydro-electric
facilities and natural-gas pipe-lines. Most noteworthy in the Greater Vancouver
area was the completion of the Roberts Bank deepsea terminal and the Centennial
Pier container-handling terminal.
Late in 1970, development work was begun on a further extension of the Pacific
Great Eastern Railway, a 350-mile railway route extending from Takla Lake to
Dease Lake. Tenders will be called by the Pacific Great Eastern Railway for construction of 100 miles of new line north of Takla Lake which will form part of the
350-mile extension from Takla Lake to Dease Lake. Substantial expansion of
natural-gas pipe-lines in British Columbia is anticipated after the approval of export
agreements by the National Energy Board. Two pipe-lines companies report expenditures of nearly $145 million will be undertaken to raise line capacities.
The following tables list companies undertaking capital and repair expenditures
in the manufacturing industry during 1970. In most cases, only firms with a minimum capital investment of approximately $100,000 were included.
 Y34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Distillery at Winfield.
Bulk-loading, Roberts Bank.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1970 Y 35
NEW MANUFACTURING PLANTS BUILT OR UNDER CONSTRUCTION
IN BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1970
Estimated
Food and Beverages Employment
Fiesta Thrift Bakeries, Langley—bakery products  (1)
Foremost Foods Ltd., Burnaby—milk, cottage cheese, ice cream  35
Hiram Walker & Sons Ltd., Winfield (near Kelowna)—distilled beverages 200
Leather
2 Phoenix Manufacturing Ltd., Port Coquitlam—clogs  16
Textile
2 King Fiber Glass Co., Surrey—fibreglass mats and woven roving  (1)
Smith Watson Textiles Ltd., Langley—down and feathers for pillow manufacturing     5
Clothing
2 Continental Fashions, Vancouver—ladies' clothing  5
Grandview Furrier, Vancouver—fur goods  (J)
Wood
Acorn Lumber Ltd., Delta—lumber    60
Aerospan Aircraft Hangers Ltd., Surrey — glulam arches for clearspan
buildings   (l)
Balco Forest Products Ltd., Heffley Creek (near Kamloops)—veneer  38
B.C. Forest Products Ltd., Mackenzie—studs    100
Bulkley Valley Forest Industries Ltd., Houston—lumber  310
2 Canadian Willamette Ltd., Golden—cedar fencing  36
Crown Zellerbach Canada Ltd., Armstrong—unsanded plywood sheathing 135
Ferguson Lake Sawmills Ltd., Bear Lake—lumber  50
Lancer Lumber Ltd., Richmond—lumber  8
Nootka Cedar Products Ltd., Tahsis—lumber  100
North Central Plywoods Ltd., Prince George—veneer  40
Northwood Pulp Ltd., Lumber Division, Prince George — lumber, chips,
hog fuel     156
2 Pacific Spar Ltd., North Vancouver—yacht masts, spars  (])
Parta Industries Ltd., Grand Forks—industrial grade particle board  60
Peace Wood Products Ltd., Taylor—lumber  15
Space Insta-Fab Industries Ltd., Surrey—prefabricated cottages  (*)
Westcoast Cellufibre Industries Ltd., Vancouver—lumber, chips  10
Westmount Woodworks Ltd., Vancouver—cabinets, sash and door  12
Furniture and Fixture
Comfort Manufacturing  (1963)  Ltd., Westbank—upholstered furniture  40
Tiki Foods Ltd., Vancouver—portable food counters  8
Paper and Allied
B.C. Forest Products Ltd., Mackenzie—bleached kraft pulp  150
Cariboo Pulp & Paper Co., Quesnel—bleached kraft pulp  150
Crown Zellerbach Canada Ltd., Kelowna—corrugated containers  45
Eurocan Pulp & Paper Co.  Ltd.,  Kitimat—linerboard,  unbleached  kraft
pulp, sackcraft paper  735
Finlay Forest Industries Ltd., Mackenzie—refiner groundwood pulp  25
2 Western Newsprint Ltd., South Burnaby—converted newsprint  20
Printing and Publishing
Accountamatic One-Write Systems Ltd., Victoria—business forms, accounting systems   (*)
Messenger Publications Ltd., Surrey—Surrey-Delta Messenger weekly newspaper     6
R. & L. Enterprises Ltd., Vancouver—business forms . ... (*)
Trend-Ad Printing Ltd., Vancouver—flyers, posters, business forms .. ,(.,)»
1 Under five employees.
- New listings which commenced operations in 1969 but were reported subsequent to the 1969 report.
J
 Y36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Plastic film and
packaging plant.
Rubber-mill.
Feed-mill.
Biscuit plant.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1970 Y 37
NEW MANUFACTURING PLANTS BUILT OR UNDER CONSTRUCTION
IN BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1970—Continued
Estimated
New
Metal Fabricating Employment
Folgan Engineering Co. Ltd., Richmond—tools,  dies, jigs,  and special-
purpose machinery     (i)
2 Horton Steel Works Ltd., Delta—plates for oil-refinery tanks       14
Maxam  Metal  Products  Ltd.,  North  Burnaby—products  for  ventilation
systems          (!)
Spir-L-OK Industries (Northern) Ltd., Dawson Creek—culvert and ventilation pipe        (!)
Machinery
Mansini Steel Manufacturing Ltd., Kamloops—vibrating screens, conveyors    (l)
Thompson Machine Works Ltd., Parksville—sawmill machinery, steel fabricated products          7
Transportation Equipment
Bert-Well Industries of B.C. Ltd., North Burnaby—truck interiors     (*)
California Fibreglass Ltd., Coquitlam—pleasure boats     (x)
Denor  Plastics Ltd.,  Surrey—reinforced-fibreglass products,  boats,  truck
canopies      (*)
Globe   Manufacturing   1969,   South  Burnaby—cargo   and   furniture  van
bodies        (!)
Homco Industries Ltd., Westbank—mobile homes       50
Instamatic Signals (1969) Ltd., Burnaby—" Instamatic " deceleration warning units for vehicles           9
Island Ferro-Cement Boats Ltd., Victoria—ferro-cement boats     (x)
Vanguard Trailers Ltd., Winfield—campers, trailers     100
2 Westank Industries Ltd., North Vancouver—tank trailers, storage tanks       20
Electrical Products
B.C.  Die  Casting  Co.  Ltd.,  Delta — electronic  housing  units,  electrical
couplers and connectors       10
Non-metallic Mineral Products
Canada Cement Lafarge Ltd., Kamloops—cement, concrete, and related
products            73
McGauley Ready Mix Concrete Co. Ltd., Sparwood—ready-mix concrete        9
Metro Concrete Ltd., Delta—ready-mix concrete     O)
Chemicals and Chemical Products
Chemonics Industries Ltd., Kamloops—fire retardent chemicals     (*)
Fiberplast Products Ltd., Winfield—polyesters, alkyds       10
Metafina Chemicals, Division of Caromar Sales Ltd., Delta—non-corrosive
metal salts         5
Miscellaneous Manufacturing
Kodiak Manufacturing Co., North Vancouver—plastic film products, textile
swatches       (!)
2 Maskell Enterprises, Delta—PVC-ABS plastic pipe-fittings     (!)
MAJOR MANUFACTURING PLANT EXPANSIONS BUILT OR UNDER
CONSTRUCTION IN BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1970
Estimated
Food and Beverages Em^oTment
Andres Wines Ltd., Port Moody—wine  Nil
Armbruster Holdings Ltd., Fort St. lohn—meat processing  Nil
Canada Safeway Ltd., Milk Department—fluid-milk products  Nil
Casabello Wines Ltd., Penticton—wine  Nil
Dutch Dairy Farms Ltd., Armstrong—cheese, butter  (*)
Empress Manufacturing Co., Division of Macdonalds Consolidated Ltd.—
jams, jellies, marmalades  Nil
Fletcher's Ltd., Vancouver—meat processing  35
Fraser Valley Milk Producers' Association, Dairyland Division (two projects)—fluid-milk processing    _   Nil
1 Under five employees.
2 New listings which commenced operations in 1969 but were reported subsequent to the 1969 report.
 Y38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAJOR MANUFACTURING PLANT EXPANSIONS BUILT OR UNDER
CONSTRUCTION IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1970—Continued
Estimated
Food and Beverages—Continued Employment
Intercontinental Packers Ltd., Vancouver—meat processing   Nil
Labatt Breweries of B.C. Ltd., New Westminster—malt beverages  (two
projects)     Nil
Molson Brewery B.C. Ltd., Vancouver—malt beverages (two projects)  Nil
National Feeds Ltd., Matsqui—live-stock feed  Nil
The Quaker Oats Co. of Canada Ltd., Burnaby—pet foods  44
Ritchie-Smith Ltd., Matsqui—poultry feed and cattle feed  6
Uncle Ben's Tartan Breweries (B.C.) Ltd., Prince George—malt beverages Nil
Textile
Westmills Carpets Ltd., Kelowna—tufted carpets and rugs  15
Clothing
Tyrol Manufacturing Corporation Ltd., North Vancouver—ski and general
sportswear     15
Wood
Aspen Lumber Ltd., Merritt—lumber  (x)
Atco Lumber Ltd., Fruitvale—lumber, chips  N/7
Boundary Sawmills Ltd., Midway—lumber  70
2 B.C. Forest Products Ltd., Victoria—lumber, plywood  Nil
2 Brownmiller Bros. Lumber Co. Ltd., Quesnel—lumber  (*)
Canyon Creek Sawmills Ltd., Valemount—lumber    Nil
Colcel Properties Ltd., Pohle Lumber Operations, Terrace—lumber, pulp
chips   12
Crestbrook Forest Industries Ltd., Cranbrook—lumber, pulp chips  30-40
Crestwood Kitchens Ltd., Richmond—kitchen cabinets, countertops  Nil
Crown Zellerbach Building Materials Ltd., Kelowna—lumber  Nil
Downie Street Sawmills Ltd., Revelstoke—lumber  11
Ernst Planing Mills Ltd., Quesnel—lumber  12
Evans Products Co. Ltd., Commercial Lumber Co. Division, Lillooet—
lumber    20
Federated Co-operatives Ltd., Canoe—lumber  40
Grand Forks Sawmills Ltd., Grand Forks—lumber  50
Imperial Lumber Ltd., Surrey—lumber  Nil
Lavington Planer Mill Ltd., Lavington (near Vernon)—lumber, chips  27
Mill and Timber Products Ltd., Surrey—speciality cedar products, siding
and panelling     10-15
Northwood Mills Ltd., Okanagan Falls—lumber  92
Northwood Mills Ltd., Princeton—lumber  76
The Pas Lumber Co. Ltd., Anzac Siding—lumber  18
Plateau Mills Ltd., Engen (near Vanderhoof)—lumber  40-50
Rayonier Canada  (B.C.)  Ltd., Marpole Sawmill Division, Vancouver—
lumber    Nil
Rayonier  Canada   (B.C.)   Ltd.,  Woodfibre  Pulp   Division,  Woodfibre—
lumber, chips   25
Revelstoke Sawmill (Radium) Ltd., Radium—lumber  Nil
Slegg Forest Products Ltd., Cowichan Bay—lumber  50
Sooke Forest Products Ltd., Sooke—lumber  Nil
West Fraser Mills Ltd., Quesnel—lumber  46
Tubafour Stud Mills Ltd., Quesnel—lumber, studs    Nil
Furniture and Fixture
George F. Laidler Co. Ltd., Vancouver—household and office furniture  (x)
Paper and Allied
Intercontinental Pulp Co. Ltd., Prince George—bleached kraft pulp  Nil
Kamloops Pulp & Paper Co. Ltd., Kamloops—bleached kraft pulp   150
MacMillan Bloedel Ltd., Island Paper Mills Division, Delta—fine papers.... Nil
MacMillan Bloedel Ltd., Powell River—newsprint.    Nil
1 Under five employees.
2 New listings which were undertaken in 1969 but were reported subsequent to the 1969 report.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1970 Y 39
MAJOR MANUFACTURING PLANT EXPANSIONS BUILT OR UNDER
CONSTRUCTION IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1970—Continued
Estimated
New
Employment
Paper and Allied—Continued
MacMillan  Bloedel  Packaging Ltd.,  New Westminster—corrugated  containers         Nil
Northwood Pulp Ltd., Prince George—bleached kraft pulp     Nil
Rayonier Canada (B.C.) Ltd., Port Alice—chemical cellulose       12
Printing and Publishing
Agency Press Ltd., Vancouver—lithographed products     Nil
Today Publications Ltd., Kimberley—newspaper printing         6
Primary Metal
Cominco Ltd., Trail—high-purity metals       10
Mainland  Foundry  and  Engineering Ltd., Vancouver—foundry products    Nil
Metal Fabricating
2 ICL Engineering Ltd., Richmond—metal products  Nil
Kelowna Tire Ltd., Kelowna—automobile wheel weights  (])
Lister Bolt & Chain Works Ltd., Richmond—steel chain, bolts, and drop
forgings   Nil
Titan Steel & Wire Co. Lta., North Surrey—wire and wire products  30
Tree Island Steel Co. Ltd., Richmond—strapping-wire, nails   (x)
Machinery
Bingham Pump Co. Ltd., Burnaby—industrial centrifugal pumps       10
Canadian Car (Pacific) Division, Hawker Siddeley Canada Ltd., Vancouver
—sawmill machinery      Nil
Gearmatic Co. Ltd., Surrey—hydraulic winches       (*)
Transportation Equipment
Boise Cascade Mobile and Recreational Products, Division of Boise Cascade Home and Land Ltd., Penticton—mobile homes       30
Non-metallic Mineral Products
British Columbia Cement Co. Ltd., Bamberton—portland cement  Nil
Canada Cement Lafarge Ltd., Richmond—concrete pipe  Nil
Canada Cement Lafarge Ltd., Vancouver—cement, ready-mix, and related
products   (!)
Cascade True-Mix Ltd., Chilliwhack—ready-mix concrete  (l')
Construction Aggregates Ltd., North Vancouver—aggregate  Nil
Domtar Construction Materials Ltd., Gypsum Division, Surrey—gypsum
wallboards and plasters  (*)
Ocean Cement Ltd., Vancouver—ready-mix cement  (*)
Petroleum and Coal Products
Gulf Oil Canada Ltd., Port Moody—gasoline, diesel fuel, fuel oil, liquid
sulphur, asphalt            5
Chemicals and Chemical Products
Electric Reduction Co. of Canada Ltd., North Vancouver—sodium chlorate    (*)
Reichhold Chemicals (Canada) Ltd., Port Moody—alkyds, polyesters     (x)
1 Under five employees.
2 New listings which commenced operations in 1969 but were reported subsequent to the 1969 report.
 Y40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAJOR REPLACEMENT PROJECTS BUILT OR UNDER CONSTRUCTION BY BRITISH COLUMBIA MANUFACTURERS, 1970
__ ,. Estimated
Food and Beverages Expenditures
Royal City Foods Ltd., Burnaby—processed fruit and vegetables  $1,122,000
Wood
1 Bulkley Valley Forest Industries Ltd., Houston—lumber  300,000
Chateau Homes Ltd., Westbank—wooden prefabricated houses  150,000
Citation Cabinets Ltd., Richmond—kitchen cabinets, bathroom vanities  500,000
Pacific Pallet Ltd., Aldergrove—wooden pallets  100,000
Western Glass & Windows Ltd., Vancouver—wooden-frame windows 150,000
Paper and Allied
Martin  Paper  Bags  Ltd.,  Bag and  Specialty  Division,   Burnaby—
merchandise bags, notion and millinery bags, wrapping-paper ....       260,000
Primary Metal
Associated Foundry Ltd., Surrey—grey iron soil-pipe and fittings        300,000
Cominco Ltd., Trail—refined zinc  21,700,000
Metal Fabricating
1 Great West Steel Industries Ltd., South Burnaby—structural steel..... 500,000
Singer Valve Co. Ltd., Surrey—automatic control valves  200,000
Westeel-Rosco Ltd., Vancouver—metal products for the construction
industry     100,000
Wright's Canadian Ropes Ltd., Richmond—wire rope  590,000
Zenith Steel Fabricators Ltd., Richmond—structural metal products.... 1,000,000
Machinery
1 Bradston Machinery Ltd., Port Coquitlam—sawmill machinery        125,000
Letson & Burpee Ltd., Surrey—iron and steel castings, industrial chain,
sawmill and pulp-mill machinery        400,000
Unitran   Manufacturers   Ltd.,   Surrey — baling  machines,   material-
handling equipment         350,000
Electrical Products
Pirelli Cables (1968) Ltd., Richmond—electrical wire and cable        200,000
Non-metallic Mineral Products
Canada Cement Lafarge Ltd., Coquitlam—ready-mix concrete, concrete products     3,000,000
Fairey & Co. Ltd., Surrey—insulating firebrick        235,000
i New listings which were undertaken in 1969 but were reported subsequent to the 1969 report.
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1971
1500-970-7392

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