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DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1970 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1971

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1970
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1971
  To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to transmit herewith the Annual Report of the Department
of Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31, 1970.
D. R. J. CAMPBELL
Minister of Municipal Affairs
Victoria, British Columbia.
 Victoria, British Columbia, January 19, 1971.
The Honourable D. R. J. Campbell,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir: I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of this Department for the
year ended December 31, 1970.
The year marked a continuation of the rapid expansion of local government
services and activities, both in the municipalities and in the regional districts. In
recognition of this, the Department structure has been reorganized along functional
lines which include Financial Management, Environmental Management, Administrative Services, Housing and Urban Renewal. The position of Programmes Coordinator was created, with the principal responsibility for co-ordinating the various
programmes and activities of the Department. An organization chart appears as part
of this Report.
The reorganization in the manner indicated in the chart made desirable a
change in the format of the Annual Report of the Department. Hopefully, the
change in format will result in a more meaningful presentation of the activities of the
Department over the past year.
J. D. BAIRD, F.C.I.S.
Deputy Minister
 CONTENTS
Page
Review of Departmental Activities  8
Legislation Changes-   12
New Incorporations and Changes in Structure  13
Assessment and Tax Collection  15
Revenues and Expenditures.  17
Reserves and Surplus  17
Capital Programmes  18
Regional District Activities  22
Environmental Management  24
Housing, Land Assembly, and Urban Development  27
Tables and Charts  29
Departmental Publications, 1970  42
Acts Administered  42
 W 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
The Honourable D. R. J. Campbell,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
J. D. Baird, F.C.I.S., Deputy Minister and Inspector of Municipalities.
W. K. Smith, F.C.I.S., Assistant Deputy Minister and Deputy Inspector of
Municipalities.
C. H. L. Woodward, F.C.I.S., Co-ordinator of Programmes and Services and
Office Manager.
G. E. Whelen, F.C.I.S., Research Officer.
Financial Management
J. H. Nuttall, Departmental Comptroller.
J. P. Taylor, Financial Analyst.
Administrative Services
T. F. Moore, F.C.I.S., Administrative Officer.
A. R. Clarke, Administrative Officer.
Environmental Management
D. L. South, M.T.P.I.C, Chief Planning Officer.
W. J. Tassie, M.T.P.I.C, Senior Planning Officer.
B. S. Jawanda, M.T.P.I.C, Senior Planning Officer.
Housing and Urban Renewal
J. T. Williams, Administrative Officer.
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 Report of the Department of Municipal Affairs, 1970
REVIEW OF DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES
The continued increase in population within the municipalities brings with it a
demand for services such as water and sewer facilities, road construction, and the
various other services demanded by those who choose to live in urban communities.
The problems of financing capital works at the local level are complex and varied.
At the time of the last Report of the Department, municipalities and regions were
faced with an extreme shortage in the supply of money available for this purpose,
with the resulting very high interest rate attached to whatever money that was available. To a large extent this problem has decreased with the availability of more
money for this purpose, accompanied by an easing in the interest rates, but this has
been replaced by an increase in the cost of materials and labour. Municipal revenues
available for capital and other purposes have continued to rise, with the result that
Councils have been able to expand their capital works and other programmes; at the
same time, they have been able to set aside substantial amounts in reserve and other
accounts as reflected in their audited annual financial statements and as indicated in
other sections of this Report. The gross assessed and taxable values of real property
within municipalities have also shown a substantial growth over the year, which,
of course, is related to the increase in revenues mentioned. Any increase in the
property-tax levy has been offset to some extent by the increase in the home-owner
grant to resident home-owners. The collection of the property tax remains at a very
high level, and in most cases has increased slightly over the previous year. Further
details of the assessment and taxation trends in municipalities are set out in those
sections of the Report relating to these matters. In our review of financial and other
statements received from municipalities and regional districts, a careful surveillance
is maintained to detect at the earliest moment any weakness which may appear in
the financial structure.
Departmental representatives travelled extensively throughout the Province
attending committee, council, and Regional Board meetings and completing inspections in 155 municipalities, improvement districts, and regional districts; 470 visits
were made in all. Attendance at such meetings as those of the Technical Planning
Committee meets legislative requirements. Others are instigated by Councils or
Regional Boards that may wish to discuss or request assistance on specific problems.
When inspections are undertaken, the visit provides an opportunity for Departmental
staff and local officials to discuss financial and administrative situations that are
directly related to the municipality concerned. Whenever possible, general administrative procedures can be reviewed and recommended; this practice leads to greater
consistency when by-laws and other data are submitted to the Department with
requests for registration or approval.
The publication, A Financial Information System for Municipalities, marks
the culmination of the work of the Eighth Federal-Provincial Conference on
Municipal Finance Statistics. The Department was represented at all but one of
the meetings of this conference and participated actively in the proceedings. Others
involved were representatives of the Departments of Municipal Affairs of the other
provinces as well as representatives of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. The
information contained in the publication, which consists of two volumes and a
supplement, is to provide a standard classification of accounts for municipalities
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1970
W 9
and other local governments which is national in scope and compatible with the
concepts and classification framework under development for use by the Federal
and provincial governments. Copies have been forwarded to all municipalities and
regional districts throughout the Province, as well as to their auditors for introduction as of January 1, 1971.
The systems analysis and electronic data processing study programme which
commenced in 1968 has been completed and final reports have been forwarded to
the participating municipalities and regions. The study was designed to serve a
dual purpose. The first phase was to provide an analysis of existing systems with
recommendations for improvement and modification where necessary. The second
phase dealt with the movement from manual systems to electronic data processing,
including an examination of the cost involved. The conclusions in the reports for
the various areas indicate quite clearly that substantial savings could be effected
by the adoption of common forms and systems, without any loss of identity. Banks
and other financial institutions have standardized many forms such as passbooks,
deposit and withdrawal slips. The adoption of similar practices by municipalities
and regional districts should result in savings not only in the cost of printing but
in the development of systems and in the training of new personnel. In the area of
electronic and other accounting equipment in use in municipalities, there is an
indication that much of the equipment is being used to only a fraction of its capacity,
and municipalities could effect substantial savings by delaying any further installation of this type of equipment until full use is made of that already in place. It is
considered that an excellent case has been made for the establishment of local
government data centres on a multiregional basis, to be controlled and operated
by the municipalities and regional districts. Participation in such centres on a joint
basis would eliminate the very costly process of developing programmes and systems
in isolation for individual municipalities, which is the practice which has been
followed in the past. We are endeavouring to encourage local governments to cooperate with each other in this matter, and on the administrative level a number
have displayed an active interest in the programme.
The Municipal Finance Authority of British Columbia Act enacted at the 1970
Session of the Legislature provided for the establishment of a Municipal Finance
Authority. The object of the authority is to provide financing of water, sewer, and
pollution-abatement facilities for the regional districts and their member municipalities by the issue of debentures or other evidences of indebtedness, and lending the
proceeds to those areas on whose request the financing is undertaken. The executive and administrative powers and duties of the authority are vested in a Board
of Trustees who are elected as prescribed in the Act. The authority held its inaugural meeting in Victoria on April 22, 1970, at which time the chairman of the
authority and chairman of the Board of Trustees were elected.
We have endeavoured to assist the authority in supplying financial and other
statistical information relating to local government in British Columbia and in the
preparation of draft by-laws.
The condition of the bond market generally over the past year has not been
attractive, and exceptionally high rates of interest prevailed throughout most of
the year. The picture now appears more favourable, and it is anticipated the
authority will be entering the market in the near future with a debenture issue on
behalf of its members.
The work of the Technical Branch of the Joint Study Committee on Provincial-
Municipal Finances was completed during the year, and copies of the report of
this committee were forwarded to the Union of British Columbia Municipalities.
 W 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The former Deputy Minister, Mr. J. E. Brown, now retired, acted as cochairman,
and other senior staff members served on the committee.
By-laws and other related documents are submitted to the Department in
draft form, at three readings and at adoption for various purposes, and all are
reviewed and examined before any suggestions are offered on form or content.
Many of the initial submissions are found to be satisfactory, while others result in
the exchange of considerable correspondence. Of the 916 by-laws examined and
registered, 75 were district by-laws, 236 town by-laws, 560 village by-laws, 34
regional district by-laws, and 11 improvement district by-laws; 124 certificates of
approval for municipal loan by-laws were issued and 24 debenture issues were
submitted for examination and certification, which consisted of 3,526 debentures
with a total par value of $5,367,907.
Minutes of Council were prepared for a variety of purposes and 456 were
subsequently approved by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council. Of this number,
95 authorized the abandonment and vesting of portions of highway in municipalities, 75 approved municipal rates by-laws for water and sewer and electricity, 41
authorized the appointment of members of Boards of Variance and Boards of
Commissioners of Police, and 98 were for regional district purposes, of which
35 approved zoning and subdivision by-laws; the balance met other legislative
requirements.
As the annual edition of Municipal Statistics is an important source of information to investment houses, financial institutions, and others, distribution of the
publication is made as early in the year as possible; Municipal Statistics includes
some 35 different schedules. Prior to publication, the financial and statistical
returns of the municipalities and regions are closely edited to ensure conformity and
adherence to statutory and other requirements.
On June 17, 1970, by Order in Council 2001, pursuant to special legislation
(the Municipalities Enabling and Validating (Amendment) Act, 1968), T. F. Moore
was appointed Commissioner to determine and redefine the boundaries of The Corporation of the Township of Chilli whack, The Corporation of the District of Kent,
and The Corporation of the District of Sumas. Three hearings have been held in the
offices of the municipalities, and the Commissioner is presently waiting for further
written submissions.
The Union of British Columbia Municipalities held its convention at Penticton,
and senior members of the staff attended to provide an opportunity for those interested to discuss local problems. Kamloops was chosen as the site for the annual
conference of the Municipal Officers' Association of British Columbia and, as at
similar meetings, Departmental staff participated in the programme. Senior members of the staff also participated as resource personnel in a number of other
seminars sponsored by the University of British Columbia and the Union of British
Columbia Municipalities.
The annual shield award presented by the Minister of Municipal Affairs as an
incentive to increase turn-out at municipal elections open to all municipalities in
three categories was received by the following for the year 1969:
Per Cent
Cities and towns—Revelstoke  75.45
District municipalities—Hudson's Hope  62.97
Village municipalities—Ashcroft  75.66
Second-place municipalities were Kelowna (cities and towns) with 68.60 per cent,
Gold River (district municipalities) with 62.93 per cent, and Lake Cowichan (village municipalities) with 73.71 per cent.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1970 W 11
In co-operation with the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service, a seminar was held in Burnaby which was attended by regional district representatives
and senior Departmental staff. Legislation was the main topic, although other
aspects of regional government were also discussed.
As the phase-out of the four-year municipal administration course sponsored by
the Department and provided by the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration of the University of British Columbia continued, the 1970/71 academic
year saw the third-year applications accepted for the last time. In the 1971/72
academic year, only fourth-year applications will be accepted. Arrangements have
been made with the Chartered Institute of Secretaries and the Certified General
Accountants' Association to accept applications from those persons who wish to
participate in courses directed toward local government administration and finance.
Upon graduation from the course offered by the Chartered Institute of Secretaries,
a person may apply for a senior certificate in municipal administration or finance,
depending upon experience and the office which he holds. Graduates may be
granted a professional degree "A.C.I.S." (Associate of the Chartered Institute of
Secretaries). Twelve persons employed in the municipal field have enrolled in this
course for the 1970/71 academic year.
Those persons enrolled in the undergraduate course of the Certified General
Accountants' Association, which refers to subjects principally in the financial administrative field, will, as they complete the various phases of the course, receive
recognition toward a certificate of proficiency in municipal finance. Since this
special course material includes mandatory subjects to meet the requirements of
certification of a certified general accountant, the student has the opportunity of
continuing his studies to meet the qualification of the professional designation of
"C.G.A." Twenty applications for enrolment in this special course have been received in the 1970/71 academic year from persons employed in the municipal field.
Prompted by the phasing-out of the Municipal Administration Course, and also
with the object of providing those presently certified and working in the field of
public administration with a means of upgrading their specific skills, a Continuing
Education Committee was formed by the Municipal Officers' Association. This
committee offered a two-day seminar in management techniques immediately prior
to the May 1970 conference of the association, the attendance at which exceeded
anticipated enrolment. The success of this initial venture has resulted in the presentation of two six-day seminars which will immediately precede and follow the 1971
conference of the association.
Enrolment in the present correspondence course, which has the first and
second years phased out, is: Third year, 35; and fourth year, 32. In addition, a
special one-year course for Assessors has an enrolment of five.
Nineteen certificates of proficiency were granted by the Board of Examiners,
on which the Department is represented. The following table shows the classifications of the certificates issued for 1970 and the total number which have been
issued:
Certificates 1970 To Date
Junior   4 75
Senior Administration   7 93
Senior Finance  6 93
Property Appraisal  2 53
Totals   19 314
 W 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
LEGISLATION CHANGES
The most significant legislation pertaining to municipalities during the 1970
Session of the Legislature was the enactment of the Municipal Finance Authority of
British Columbia Act, which is discussed elsewhere in this Report.
Amendments to the Municipal Act were mainly of a technical nature, but
certain amendments to the regional district provisions are of substance. The community and regional planning function which the majority of the regional districts
had been granted by Letters Patent were made statutory powers of all regional
districts. The power to undertake local works and services in nonmunicipal areas
and to provide contract services to municipalities was also made statutory. Regional
districts were also granted authority to permit Sunday sports and entertainment in
nonmunicipal areas on the same basis as municipalities, and the power to make
grants, not exceeding the product of one-tenth of a mill, to organizations deemed to
contribute to the general interest and advantage of the region. Another substantive
change was in the method by which regional districts may be granted certain
functions. The functions of public housing, trunk-sewers, and sewage disposal may
be granted at the request of the Regional Board alone. Also, where a requested
function is of a regulatory nature or a service of general application or benefit, it may
be granted if the request receives the affirmative vote of two-thirds of the Directors
with two-thirds of the votes and the consent of two-thirds of the member municipalities which are to participate. The annual cost of any such function must not
exceed the product of one-half mill, and the annual cost of all such functions combined must not exceed the product of one mill.
The Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act was again amended to meet
special circumstances relating to particular regional districts, municipalities, and
improvement districts.
An amendment to the Municipalities Aid Act increased the annual Provincial
local government grant by $2 to a total of $30 per capita. The total amount of the
grant in 1970 to all municipalities was $46,783,377. Services to which this grant
applied were the construction, repair, or improvement of streets and roads, control
of pollution, policing, parks, ambulance service, encouragement of tourism and
industrial development, social services, and other services for which the municipality does not receive Provincial grants or which are not included in Provincial-
municipal shared-cost programmes.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1970 W 13
NEW INCORPORATIONS AND CHANGES IN STRUCTURE
INCORPORATIONS AND CHANGES IN STATUS
Two new villages were incorporated as instant municipalities—the Village of
Tahsis on the 17th of June and the Village of Logan Lake on the 10th of November.
Effective the 2nd of January 1971, the Village of Lions Bay was incorporated after
a plebiscite that was held during December 1970. A vote was held in the Fort
Nelson area on the question of incorporation, which resulted in 87 voting in the
affirmative and 81 voting in the negative. The subject of incorporation of the area
is presently under review.
The District of Salmon Arm and the Village of Salmon Arm voted in favour of
amalgamation in June. Letters Patent were issued, effective the 1st of September,
which authorized the amalgamation of the two municipalities under the corporate
name of the District of Salmon Arm. A study completed by the Regional District
of Nanaimo on the feasibility of the incorporation of the area of Greater Nanaimo
as a municipality resulted in a plebiscite being held on the proposal to amalgamate
the City of Nanaimo and a number of adjacent improvement districts. The vote
failed by a narrow margin to support the concept of incorporation of a municipality
encompassing the larger area.
The population of 3,208 persons in the Village of Valleyview, established by
local census after incorporation in 1969, was well above the limitation set for villages by legislation and, as a result, Letters Patent were issued to change the status
of the village municipality to a town, effective the 1st of January, 1971.
Continued interest was shown by several Indian bands in the benefits of local
government, and progress has been made toward incorporation of one or two areas.
A proposal to incorporate the Cape Mudge Band is now before Federal authorities.
MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY EXTENSIONS
Twenty-three municipal boundary extensions were authorized by the issue of
supplementary Letters Patent; Table 1 shows the municipalities affected, together
with the resulting adjustment in areas and changes in population. Population is
determined by local census in the extension areas, and the original population is
established by using 1966 census figures as a base.
Plebiscites were held in extension areas proposed by the Councils of the Village of Cumberland, City of Fernie, Town of Quesnel, and Village of Valemount,
and the required three-fifths majority of the votes cast in favour of the proposal was
met in the areas of Cumberland, Quesnel, and Valemount; supplementary Letters
Patent were issued to authorize these extensions.
As a result of the representations made on the projected extensions to the
boundaries of the City of Kamloops, hearings were conducted by the Minister at
Kamloops on the 27th and 28th of October to provide an opportunity for the submission of briefs, both written and verbal, by those parties interested in the proposals.   After the hearings, the Minister's recommendations were made public.
IMPROVEMENT DISTRICTS AND LOCAL AREAS
The improvement districts of Shawnigan and Cowichan Bay petitioned for an
extension of their boundaries, and the extensions were authorized by issue of supplementary Letters Patent.
 W 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
In co-operation with the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service, 32 of
the 35 hospital improvement districts, transferred from the Water Rights Branch of
the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources to this Department, have
been dissolved under the provisions of the Regional Hospital Districts Act, and their
assets and liabilities transferred to the regional districts. Six of these dissolutions
were completed this year.
At the request of the Trustees of Draper Creek Waterworks District, the
improvement district was dissolved and the Council of the District of Mission agreed
to accept the assets and liabilities of the improvement district and supply the service
on a specified-area basis. Later, at the request of Council, the service was integrated
into the over-all municipal system. Cottonwood Island Improvement District, situated in an extension area of the City of Prince George, was dissolved, and the
obligation to provide the services that were objects of the improvement district was
assumed by the city.
A number of local service areas established under the Local Services Act were
either dissolved or the service was directly transferred to regional districts under the
authority of supplementary Letters Patent. Phair Flats and Burns Lake Local Areas
established for fire protection were dissolved, and the services are now provided on
a specified-area basis by the Regional Districts of Squamish-Lillooet and Bulkley-
Nechako respectively.
As unincorporated communities in the Province grow and new ones are established, we are continuing to encourage the people residing in such areas to consider
municipal incorporation, and all available assistance will continue to be offered to
incorporation committees to assist them in their efforts.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1970
W 15
ASSESSMENT AND TAX COLLECTION
The growth in assessed values of real property and revenue from taxation of
these properties over the past 10 years is portrayed in the following table. It will
be noted that revenue from this source of taxation in 1969 totalled $286,239,110,
and continues to be the major source of revenue of British Columbia municipalities.
Of the total taxation revenue, $148,880,076 represented taxation for general municipal purposes, and $137,359,034 represented taxation for school purposes.
Growth in Combined Assessed Values and Taxes in Municipalities
of British Columbia
Gross Assessed Values
Assessed Values Actually
Taxed
Tax
Year
All
Properties
Taxable
Properties
School
Municipal
Revenue
1961	
(Millions)
$3,717
4,808
5,292
5,7971
7,4772
6,3521
8,3292
6,9721
9,1922
(Millions)
$3,143
4,071
4,507
4,8851
4,9582
5,4001
5,6182
5.9051
6,2262
(Millions)
$2,508
3,315
3,653
3,950
4,402
4,835
(Millions)
$1,920
2,549
2,780
4,372
5,404
6,072
(Thousands)
$122,272
1966 	
192,056
1967...-	
224,840
1968	
251,693
1969	
286,239
1970    	
315,0003
i School values.
2 Municipal values.
1 Estimated.
A further analysis of the assessed values of real property is provided in the
table below, which indicates the distribution of 1970 assessed values by class of
municipality, with the percentage increase over 1969 shown in parentheses.
General Municipal Gross
Assessed Values
Assessed Values Actually
Taxed
All
Properties
Taxable
Properties
School
Municipal
Cities	
(MiUions)   (%)
$1,574    ( 9.5)
3,509    (12.7)
164    ( 0.6)
161    (19.3)
(Millions)   (%)
$1,025    ( 9.0)
2,349    (13.8)
102    ( )
102    (22.9)
(Millions)   (%)
$1,131    ( 7.7)
2,142    (12.3)
118    (-.-.)
Ill    (20.6)
(MiUions)   (%)
$934    (12.9)
2,318    (15.7)
98    (       )
96    (23.1)
Towns-.- -	
Subtotals. 	
Vancouver	
$5,408    (11.5)
3,784    ( 8.7)
$3,578    (12.2)
2,648    ( 8.9)
$3,502    (10.6)
1,333    ( 7.8)
$3,446    (14.7)
2,626    ( 9.5)
Xbtals	
$9,192    (10.4)
$6,226    (10.8)
$4,835    ( 9.8)
$6,072    (12.3)
The increase in assessed values actually taxed for general municipal purposes
from $2,780,000,000 in 1967 to $5,404,000,000 in 1969, and to $6,072,000,000
in 1970, was principally due to a change in policy by the Cities of Vancouver and
Penticton, and the Districts of Burnaby, Peachland, Summerland, and West Vancouver. These municipalities have elected to utilize a separate assessment roll for
general municipal purposes, in which land and improvements are assessed at their
actual value, as permitted by the provisions of the Municipal Act, rather than to
adopt the assessed values of land and improvements, as determined pursuant to
the  Assessment Equalization  Act.    Under  the  Assessment  Equalization Act,
 W 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
assessed values for taxation purposes under the Public Schools Act are 50 per cent
of actual value.
The total assessed values actually taxed for school purposes in the Province
in 1970 amounted to $6,371,733,456, which represents an increase of approximately
$600,000,000 over the values taxed in 1969. The assessment values in city, district, town, and village municipalities amount to 76 per cent of this total, or
$4,835,567,385. On this basis of growth, it is anticipated revenue will reach
$315,000,000 in 1970, from real property and other sources of taxation for school
and general municipal purposes, which would represent an increase of approximately 64 per cent over the revenue of five years ago.
Tax collections have again shown a slight improvement over the previous year.
The collection of current taxes in cities and districts exceeds 96 per cent of the
levy, villages collected in excess of 95 per cent, and towns were slightly lower, with
nearly 94 per cent.
Chart 1 shows the percentage of tax collections for the period 1959 to 1969,
inclusive, and Table 2 reveals further information relative to tax collections, by
class of municipality, for the years shown.
British Columbia municipalities continue to maintain the highest percentage
of current tax collections among provinces in Canada, publishing statistics of a
comparable nature, while the percentage of arrears of taxes is the lowest, as indicated in the 1968 published statistics.
British Columbia— Per Cent
Collection of current taxes  96.5
Arrears on adjusted levy     4.5
Alberta—
Collection of current taxes  89.2
Arrears on adjusted levy  13.7
Saskatchewan—
Collection of current taxes  89.0
Arrears on adjusted levy  12.0
Ontario—
Collection of current taxes  94.6
Arrears on adjusted levy     8.2
Nova Scotia—
Collection of current taxes  85.4
Arrears on adjusted levy  23.7
The tax-collection picture in municipalities has always been considered one
of the primary indications, not only of the efficiency of the administration, but also
of the ability of the taxpayer to meet the municipal tax levy promptly. While
economic factors may have contributed substantially to the favourable position
indicated in the property-tax field, municipal treasurers and collectors are to be
congratulated for their continued efforts in maintaining this high rate of tax
collection.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1970
W 17
REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES
A review of the audited financial statements and other statistical information
indicates that British Columbia municipalities, generally, continue to enjoy a favourable financial position. Table 3 and Chart 2 indicate the trends in various financial
aspects of municipal government, as compared to population and income.
During the year 1969, the last year for which audited financial statements are
available, revenues, including those of all utilities, were in excess of $460,000,000.
General municipal taxation of $149,000,000, and school taxation of $137,000,000,
were the major revenue sources. These have increased $19,000,000 and $16,000,-
000 respectively over the amounts receivable in 1968. Transfers from Other Governments accounted for $97,000,000 of which $86,000,000 was in the way of
Provincial Government grants, excluding capital and special-purpose grants, an
increase of $10,000,000 over the amount received in the previous year. Revenue
from Own Sources amounted to $77,000,000. The school taxation levy was offset
by the application of the home-owner grant payments of $48,000,000, an increase
of $7,000,000 over 1968, leaving a net of approximately $89,000,000 in school
taxes payable by the property owner.
Chart 3 indicates the per capita and percentage of revenues of the various
classes of municipalities by major source for the 1969 fiscal year. Chart 4 reflects
the expenditure by major function of these funds, on a per capita basis, and as a
percentage of total expenditure.
RESERVES AND SURPLUSES
Statutory reserve funds of the various municipalities have again shown a
marked increase over the previous year. At the end of 1969 these funds, held for a
variety of purposes, amounted to $39,000,000, an increase of $3,000,000 or 8.3
per cent over the previous year, after giving effect to the fact that during the year
1969 approximately $7,000,000 from reserve funds was expended on capital works
during the year. It is interesting to note that over the last five years the amount
held in these reserve funds has increased from $28,000,000 to the current figure of
$39,000,000, an increase of 39 per cent.
The total of statutory reserves and operating reserves and surpluses held in all
accounts of the municipalities was $94,805,709. This represents 29 per cent of the
total revenue, excluding school taxes, of the municipalities. Of this total, $72,189,-
227 is held in liquid form or in investments authorized by Statute, and a portion
of the surplus is represented in arrears of taxes and other receivables.
The following table provides an analysis of these reserves and surpluses by
class of municipality:
Reserves
Surpluses
Total
Total Revenuel
$17,211,545
27,089,773
797,315
875,503
$8,327,927
13,197,903
663,080
1,562,939
$25,539,472
40,287,676
1,460,395
2,438,442
(Per Cent)
27.44
Districts    - '...
33.83
17.61
36.16
Subtotals	
Vancouver  - - —
$45,974,136
22.817,607
$23,751,849
2,262,117
$69,725,985
25,079,724
30.69
25.80
Totals —  	
$68,791,743
$26,013,966
$94,805,709
29.23
i Excluding school taxation.
2
 W 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CAPITAL PROGRAMMES
The value of capital projects undertaken during 1969 by municipalities
amounted to $118,000,000. This represents a substantial increase over the programme of the previous year which amounted to $101,000,000. Of this total
programme, $102,000,000 was completed during the fiscal year, leaving a balance
of works in progress of $16,000,000 at the year-end. In the total capital programme,
municipalities were able to provide $36,000,000 out of current general revenue and
utility revenue funds, $7,000,000 from reserve funds, and approximately $5,000,-
000 was obtained from grants-in-aid from the Provincial and Federal Governments.
The balance of the amount expended was financed by debenture loans, temporary
bank loans, and other methods of financing. Earlier projections by municipalities
for capital expenditures in 1969 totalled $108,000,000, actual projects undertaken
during 1969 were valued at $118,000,000, indicating that municipalities, in some
instances, were able to accelerate their capital programme or, because of necessity,
were called upon to alter their capital budget programme. Figures reflecting the
activity in this area over the past five years are as follows:
Projects
Undertaken
Works
Completed
Works in
Progress
Source of Funds
Year
Revenue
Reserve
Funds
Grants
1965   	
1966     	
$103,000,000
118,000,000
117,000,000
101.000.000
$87,000,000
99,000,000
102,000,000
87.000.000
$16,000,000
19,000,000
15,000,000
14,000,000
16,000,000
$16,000,000
21,000,000
29,000,000
34,000,000
36,000,000
$5,000,000
5,000,000
6,000,000
5,000,000
7,000,000
$7,000,000
8,000,000
1967	
1968     -	
6,000,000
3,000,000
1969    	
118.000.000    1    102.000.000
5,000,000
The trend in authorized term borrowing over the past five years is indicated
below.
Year
Regional
Districts
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Total
1966
$12,601,600    |  $10,206,513
1                            1
S771.500     I     _1.I_B.T75     1     S24.fi63.3KR
1967 	
1968	
$2,345,500
567,750
4,084,500
13,531,000
4,440,914    |    21,315,016
5.754.270    1    41.051.821
1,136,381
1,200,693
75,360
3,545,751
1,518,895    |      30.756,706
2.392.945     1       50.967.479
1969	
1970  	
6,288,970
15,909,500
11,552,108
13,903,894
1,342,616    [
558,050    |
1
23,343,554
47,448,195
The sharp increase in authorized borrowing between 1967 and 1968 is the
result of increased borrowing for sewer programmes. The decline shown in 1969
is a reflection of the restraint practised by municipalities in avoiding long-term debt
during the period when exceptionally high interest rates for this type of borrowing
were in effect. As in 1968, the sharp increase in authorized borrowings during 1970
is attributable to a substantial increase in borrowing for sewer programmes, due,
no doubt, to the rapid development in urban communities. There is also a modest
increase in borrowing for other capital projects such as parks and recreation, waterworks, and road improvements.
The difficulties experienced in the presentation of the five-year capital expenditure programme in its initial year have, in most part, been overcome, and the presentations for 1970 are now providing meaningful information and guidance to
municipalities, to the Department, and to financial institutions.  A summary of the
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1970            W 19
capital expenditure programmes by year is listed below.   Included in the "General"
heading, under "Classification of Expenditures," are all capital expenditures on
roads, sidewalks, buildings, land purchases, and other capital projects not related
to either water or sewerage systems.    It is encouraging to note that municipal
Councils are continuing in their effort to finance a large portion of their capital
works out of current revenue and reserves.  An analysis of this summary indicates
that expenditures from current revenue and reserves represent approximately 44
per cent of the total programmes.
Five-year Capital Expenditure Programmes Summary by Year for All
Municipalities (Including Vancouver)
Classification of Expenditures
Year
Water
Sewer
General
Total
1970  	
$14,060,144
8,748,075
9,976,234
8.532.700
$24,478,167
26,992,185
19,877,671
14.978.035
$92,747,863
96,337,844
86,438,837
74,008,969
$131,286,174
132,078,104
116,292,742
97,519,704
1971	
1972	
1973	
1974	
8,372,750    |      11,626,939
66.502,261
86,501,950
Totals    	
$49,689,903    |    $97,952,997
1
$416,035,774
$563,678,674
Source of Funds
Year
General
Revenue
Grants
Reserve
Funds
Prior Years'
Surplus
Debenture
Sales
1970	
1971    	
$36,183,598
35,551,505
33,890,638
34,347,729
33,626,566
$5,230,975
6,773,876
4,467,262
2,589,548
1,993,415
$25,571,539
15,485,871
12,386,048
10,228,454
8,970,000
$2,086,277
130,167
46,700
78,800
70,142
$62,213,785
74,136,685
65,502,094
50,275,173
41,841,827
1972	
1973	
1974 _  	
Totals	
$173,600,036
$21,055,076
$72,641,912
$2,412,086
$293,969,564
During 1970, municipalities were faced with increasing pressures to provide
municipal services, particularly sewerage systems, with the result that, while there
was one less borrowing by-law approved compared to the previous year, the total
borrowing authorized in 1970 was more than twice that of the previous year.
Ninety-nine term borrowing by-laws of both municipalities and regional districts
were approved by the Inspector of Municipalities.   Of these by-laws, 89 were subsequently adopted, either upon the initiative of Council following statutory advertising procedures, or, where necessary, the assent of the owner-electors.    This reflects the very high degree of taxpayer acceptance enjoyed by British Columbia local
governments in the presentation of borrowing measures.
The total new borrowings authorized by issuing agencies during the year of
$47,448,195 for various categories of projects are summarized on page 20.    The
amount authorized is nearly $24 million more than that authorized in 1969.   The
actual debt commitment for many of these schemes will be spread over a number of
years under a progressive construction programme.
Included in the total authorized borrowing is some $975,000 in short-term
loans authorized under the per capita borrowing provisions of the Municipal Act.
 W 20
british columbia
Borrowing Authorization, 1970
Purpose
Regionall
Districts
Cities
Districts
Townsr
Villages
Total'
Waterworks. ,"._,
$12,685,000
583,000
$965,000
5,551,000
20,000
4,766,500
750,000
3,857,000
$3,414,000
5,724,645
350,000
232,500
3,177,749
725,000
280,000
$850,000
2,434,000
$116,390
361,000
29,900
$5,345390
26,755,645
953,000
55,000
5,083,900
3,927,749
5,260
45,500
4,587,2601
795,251
■Equipment (including fire protec-
263,000
206,751
Totals      	
$13,531,000
$15,909,500 | $13,903,894
1
$3,545,751
$558,050
$47,448,195
Borrowing by the City of Vancouver and by the Metropolitan Sewer Boards
is not subject to the approval of the Inspector of Municipalities and, therefore, has
not been included in the above table. The borrowing authorized for regional districts does not include some $33,500,000 borrowed by the Greater Vancouver
Regional District on behalf of a number of its member municipalities and the
Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District.
Despite an over-all increase in the amount of borrowing authorized, there
was a decrease in the amount of anticipated borrowing for local improvement works.
Projects estimated to cost in excess of $3.6 million were given preliminary borrowing approval, which is some $4.3 million less than that authorized in 1969. While
many local improvement projects are financed internally through special improvement funds rather than by way of a debenture issue, projects in the amount of
more than $3 million were financed during the year by the issue of debentures and
are included by issuing authority in the previous table.
In addition to new loan-authorization by-laws, 44 security-issuing by-laws were
approved; these by-laws specify the details of debenture issues and other securities
which previously had been approved in principle only. The total debentures and
securities approved for issue in 1970 amounted to $27,644,068.
There were no municipal debenture issues guaranteed under the provisions of
the Municipalities Assistance Act in 1970. The total amount of debentures guaranteed by the Province under the Municipalities Assistance Act outstanding as at
December 31, 1970 was $64,259,746; details are shown in the following schedule.
In addition, debenture debt guarantee by the Province under the Greater Vancouver
Sewerage and Drainage Act outstanding as at the end of the year amounted to
$22,970,000.
Outstanding Debentures Guaranteed
Village
Municipalities
Assistance Act
Municipalities
Assistance Act
Total
$557,300
587,000
938,500
443,300
$12,329,845
12,073,301
2,061,500
3,308,000
$12,887,145
12,660,301
3,000,000
3,751,300
$2,526,100
$29,772,646
11,329,000
632,000
1,626,000
73,000
18,301,000
$32,298,746
11,329,000
632,000
1,626,000
73,000
18,301 000
$2,526,100
$61,733,646
$64,259,746
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1970
W 21
Total debenture debt as at December 31, 1969 of all municipalities, including
the City of Vancouver, is shown below. The debenture debt of the Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District and the Greater Vancouver Water District is
not included.
Sold
Unissued and
Unsold
Total
$65,675,965
90,395,607
7,793,543
6,629,659
1,077,575
$13,214,421
47,209,648
1,949,412
3,351,214
6,010,500
$78,890,386
Districts 	
137,605,255
9,742.955
Villages  	
9,980,873
7,088,075
$171,572,349      1    $71,735,195
$243,307,544
Vancouver	
166,935,753
166,935,753
$338,508,102       I     $71,735,195
$410,243,297
Debenture sales for all municipalities amounted to $28,244,350 for the year
1969. This resulted in an increase of $9,000,569 to the total outstanding debenture
debt of all municipalities for 1969, after giving effect to the retirement of debentures
maturing during the year.
The percentage of current revenue expended to service debenture debt, excluding utilities, in cities, districts, and towns declined in 1969, and increased slightly
in villages. Figures for 1969 are shown below, along with the 1968 figures in
parentheses:
Per Cent
Cities  7.0   (7.8)
Vancouver   8.9 (11.7)
Districts  6.3   (6.7)
Towns   7.4   (7.6)
Villages  6.0   (5.3)
Debenture debt of utilities is serviced almost entirely by revenues derived from
charges paid by the consumer and by frontage taxes.
 W 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REGIONAL DISTRICT ACTIVITIES
Previous Annual Reports of the Department have dealt with the incorporation
of regional districts, including an outline of the objects of the legislation which was
adopted during the 1965 Session of the Legislature and under which they have been
incorporated. The Report this year reflects the continuing interest and activity in
this field.
The past year marked a further expansion of local government services undertaken by the regional districts. Emphasis on the development of the regional concept of local government and on regional district services continues to absorb much
of the Department's time and resources.
Table 4 shows new functions assumed by the 28 regional districts in the
Province during the past 12 months. Table 5 summarizes the functions undertaken
to date by all regional districts. Of special significance is the assumption by two
regional districts of the powers of acquisition and development of regional parks,
under the Regional Parks Act, bringing to eight the number of regional districts with
this function. Other important new functions include the development of a trunk-
sewer and sewage-disposal system by the Central Fraser Valley Regional District.
Greater Vancouver is in the process of assuming public housing, which is a first in
this field. Of interest in the Greater Vancouver Regional District is the progress
being made to meet urban-transportation problems through consideration of a
regional approach to public transportation.
Reflected in the summary of functions is the growing range of activities of
regional districts and the variation in the types of services being provided. Following some five years of operation, regional districts now provide 27 different services
as functions on behalf of member areas. By comparison, in 1966 the number of
different functions provided was eight. The trend toward the development of
services on a multimunicipal approach continues to grow. Many municipalities are
now co-operating through the medium of the regional district in providing services
and facilities for greater community areas, or in concert with the regional district are
conducting an examination of the possibilities of such an approach. Regional provision of services common to municipalities and neighbouring nonmunicipal areas
continues to expand. Many community services in the nonmunicipal areas of the
Province are being provided by regional districts either as a direct service or by a
municipality on contract through the regional district.
Apart from new functions, or expanded functions to include additional participating member areas, a number of regional districts were issued supplementary
Letters Patent for such purposes as the extension or revision of both external and
internal boundaries, administrative amendments to functions, powers and Board
structure, and other similar procedural changes. All regional districts were granted
supplementary Letters Patent providing the means of controlling large public
gatherings.
At the last Session of the Legislature, all regional districts were given the
statutory power of providing local community works and services for nonmunicipal
areas subject to either a successful vote or petition of the owners of benefitting
properties. Previously this power had been extended upon request only as a function
for and on behalf of the nonmunicipal member areas of the regional district. Of the
15 specified service areas created for this purpose last year, two were established
by the petition method and the remainder were created following a favourable vote.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1970 W 23
Table 6 lists the specified service areas established during 1970 and gives an
indication of the scope of service extended to nonmunicipal communities. Prior to
the introduction of regional government, nearly all community services in the non-
municipal areas of the Province were provided by improvement districts administered
by the Water Rights Branch of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water
Resources, improvement districts incorporated under the Municipal Act, or in some
instances local areas established under the Local Services Act; the latter two being
administered by the Department of Municipal Affairs. Most nonmunicipal communities in need of local works or services are now turning to the regional district.
Of the 15 specified service areas established in regional districts during 1970, many
would have been formed as improvement districts or as local areas, with the resulting
duplication of administrative organization had the regional district not been available
as the means of providing the service. A number of the communities thus served
are urban in character and will in time be absorbed within the boundaries of adjacent
municipalities. Others, more rural in character, or isolated, likely will retain their
present nonmunicipal status.
As well as being empowered to provide local community services on behalf
of the nonmunicipal areas and the power to undertake works and services by contract for municipalities, the statutory powers of all regional districts have been
broadened to include the responsibility for developing and adopting a regional plan,
which may be described as a general scheme without detail for the projected uses
of land. Coupled with the responsibility for developing a regional plan, each
Regional Board is charged with developing community planning services for those
portions of the regional district which are not municipally organized. This has been
in co-operation with the Department and has resulted in the orderly transfer from
Provincial jurisdiction of a number of community planning areas throughout the
Province to the local regional district. In each case the regional district assumed
or is negotiating the assumption of the existing building, subdivision, and land-use
regulations as local by-laws, together with Departmental field personnel where staff
was employed. Many regional districts have now adopted community planning
regulations where none previously existed, and others have broadened the scope
and application of former community planning area regulations.
As a result of this shifting in jurisdiction, the Departmental planning staff has
been relieved of much of its former community planning duties and has been able
during the past year to concentrate on its liaison role, both in respect to membership on the technical planning committees of the regional districts and in the encouragement of the development of regional plans. In facilitating this changeover,
the planning officers on staff have been given new assignments, and each now has
a group of regional districts for which he is charged with liaison duties.
The range and scope of regional services continues to grow. In all instances
the request for a service is initiated by the member area or areas of the regional
district that are to benefit. For many services the Regional Board merely consolidates and co-ordinates a service previously provided independently by one or more
municipalities. To assist regional districts in meeting administration expenses, an
annual grant of $6,000 is made to each regional district by the Province. In addition,
each regional district is given an annual grant calculated at 15 cents per capita, with a
minimum of $5,000, to assist in meeting costs incurred in environmental management.
 W 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
The change of the name "Regional Planning Division" in the Department to
"Environmental Management" is timely because in the past five years public attitude and demand have changed. While the historical goals of regional planning have
been much the same as the demands of today, the former stress was on quantity
and abundance, where now there is an added emphasis on the quality of the environment and concern for man to be a part of the environment, rather than being a
master of it. Abstract goals, such as the reverence for life, self-realization of the
individual, ecological balance, and the strong desire to maximize every opportunity
to make the environment a good place in which to live, have an everyday and
popular recognition. The word "planning" itself can be called the anticipation of
future action. Putting that anticipation into action implies that the environment
will have to be managed in the full sense of the word. Formerly, planning in the
public's mind was equated in terms of regulation and, specifically, the control of
private land use through the zoning by-laws. Now, the emphasis is shifting onto
what is commonly called "development," where both the private and public sectors
are partners in moulding the future environment. There has to be an accepted
legal and administrative means of achieving these goals, and in the Department there
are three Acts passed by the Legislature which do a great deal in allowing these
objectives to be met.
The Municipal Act is most important in providing the opportunity to create
the ways and means of achieving goals. Not only are the municipalities given this
opportunity, but the regional districts have this same opportunity and, accordingly,
the whole of the Province (except the relatively uninhabited north-west corner) is
affected.   Regional plans are a good general guideline to guide future development.
The regional plan for the Lower Mainland has been in operation since 1966
and is performing a better job than was anticipated. The administrative set-up,
with four regional districts administering the plan, the reference of all matters to
technical planning committees, and, above all, the quarterly meeting of the review
panel affecting all four regional districts, has kept the plan a workable document,
and, moreover, has pointed out to individual municipalities what matters in development are purely local and those which have regional implications. Regional
plans were passed by the Regional Boards of Alberni-Clayoquot, East Kootenay,
and Bulkley-Nechako Regional Districts last year, and they must be tested and
reviewed from time to time. Administratively, a regional plan reflects the hopes
and aspirations of the region in the future. It also reflects the concern that some
of the kinds of problems which beset either municipalities or regions can be prevented in the future.
The technical planning committees are functioning in all regions. Not only
do they perform their duty as an adviser to the Regional Board where the Board
can get a consensus from municipal, Provincial, and in some cases, Federal departments, but communication has improved a great deal between all agencies, and
matters of mutual concern are discussed and acted on in more of a collective manner than was the case in the past. In one regionl district, government officials meet
quite voluntarily over and above their statutory requirements, and to this end the
Ministers' Land Use Committee has endorsed a recommendation from their technical committee and their technical subcommittee, which follows: "Co-operation
among civil servants in the resource departments in the field, which is already
evident, should be encouraged.   For example, civil servants concerned should make
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1970 W 25
use of the designated personnel already on the regional district technical planning
committees."
Community planning in regional districts receives a great deal of attention,
and here the Regional Boards are coming to grips with immediate land-use problems. The regulatory by-laws, such as zoning, building, and subdivision, have
been passed to cover large areas in most regional districts now, and if they have
not been passed, with one or two exceptions, they are in preparation. While almost
all the regional districts have their planning staffs, they are overwhelmed in many
cases with demands made on them, and, accordingly, the Department, wherever
it can, has helped out over and above the usual assistance, to do contract work
for either small municipalities or in settled parts of electoral areas where the
problems are urgent.
Contract work is being done on Bowen Island and Lions Bay in the Greater
Vancouver Regional District, in the new Village of Tahsis in the Comox-Strathcona
Regional District, and general contract work for large areas in both the Cariboo
and Nanaimo Regional Districts.
There has been an increasing interest in regional districts and municipalities
with the idea of issuing the development permit as a more positive way of developing areas to promote greater efficiency and quality.
A municipal Council or Regional Board may set aside the traditional minimum
standard zoning and subdivision by-laws and enter into more of a contractual
arrangement with a person who wants to use the land in a way other than that
specified in the by-laws. In the public interest, care must be taken to realize
present and future public costs as an impact of the development, and the fulfilment
of community goals which should be achieved in part at least. The public is protected in the same way as it has been for many years, because the issuance of a
development permit is the equivalent to the amendment of a zoning by-law, and
the necessary advertising opportunity for the objectives of the project to be
inspected, and a public hearing are mandatory.
Early in 1970, with the possibility of the Olympic Winter Games coming to
the Garibaldi area, the Department prepared an intensive and comprehensive report
in which from time to time nine of the staff were involved, and excellent co-operation
was given from the Provincial departments affected, such as the Departments of
Lands, Highways, Recreation and Conservation, Mines and Petroleum Resources,
and so on. From this report the necessary regulatory by-laws were passed, and
the administration of the report was turned over to the regional district.
Special mention should be made of the technical planning committee of the
Greater Vancouver Regional District, which contains about half the population of
the Province. While the technical planning committee is large, it works in such a
way that all members are involved in working committees on special problems which
are reported to the Board. The rapid-transit study was one which received a great
deal of attention, and other kinds of problems are being studied consistently. The
important thing to emphasize is that studies are not being done by the regional staff
in a vacuum; municipal, Provincial, and Crown agencies are involved, as well as the
staff of the regional district, and in this way the Board receives a consensus and an
integrated opinion, rather than a two-tier attitude that could have evolved if the
technical planning committee did not exist. Furthermore, the exchange of technical information is a noteworthy by-product of the technical planning committee.
The role of the planning officers is changing. Where previously they were
consultants and administrators helping to administer community planning areas and
preparing community plans for small municipalities, now the administrative role is
 W 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
lessened and a more creative challenge is given where they provide leadership, give
all the help they can to the regional districts, supply technical information, and creatively do a wide pattern of jobs when called upon in addition to their former tasks.
Regional planning, or environmental management, must not only tell the people
what the region is, but how it works, so that there is a sound foundation for the
Boards to make decisions on.
The Local Services Act continues to be an important administrative device for
the Department.  There are now only nine community planning areas left—■
Community Planning Area Number 12 (Dawson Creek),
Community Planning Area Number 13 (Woodhaven),
Community Planning Area Number 14 (Courtenay-Campbell River),
Community Planning Area Number 15 (Taylor-Fort St. John),
Community Planning Area Number 16 (Sicamous),
Community Planning Area Number 17 (Fort Nelson),
Community Planning Area Number 23 (Shawnigan),
Community Planning Area Number 24 (Subdivision-Gulf Islands),
Community Planning Area Number 25 (Denman Island),
the others having been phased into the regional district operations.   Nevertheless,
from time to time there is a need to use the Local Services Act for a particular kind
of immediate problem.   Community Planning Area Number 24, which is a subdivision regulation covering the islands in the Strait of Georgia, provided a stop-gap
regulation to meet a special purpose.   There was concern about rapid development
of the Gulf Islands, and this holding device restricted subdivisions to parcels of 10
acres or more until the various regional districts bordering around the islands in the
Strait of Georgia could prepare plans and help create orderly development.   As soon
as a regional district prepares the plans, the regulation affecting that set of islands
is rescinded.   Community Planning Area Number 25 was established on Denman
Island to help enhance development and protect the landscape.
Subdivision regulations were passed which cover all areas of the Province that
are not already covered by regional district or municipal subdivision by-laws. These
regulations were drafted by an interdepartmental committee, with officials from the
Attorney-General's Department, the Departments of Lands, Health, Highways, and
Municipal Affairs. The regulations are being given as wide a distribution as possible. They can be easily adapted as a municipal or regional district by-law.
The Highways (Scenic Improvement) Act, which was passed in 1968, is now
receiving a great deal of attention. Many municipalities have asked that their roads
be designated under this Act, and, similarly, the regional districts have shown an
equal interest. The intent of the Act is to remove unsightly accumulations from the
sides of the highways and on private land abutting them. In the regional districts,
in co-operation with the Department of Highways, we have taken action on request,
but the action taken is a Departmental responsibility and not that of the regional
districts. Table 7 shows how many regional districts and municipalities have had
their highways designated so far.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1970 W 27
HOUSING, LAND ASSEMBLY, AND URBAN REDEVELOPMENT
PUBLIC HOUSING
Although public housing activity at the beginning of this year was slow, projects developed rapidly and there are 683 units of accommodation under contract
for construction. This will bring the total of completed and contracted accommodation to 3,448 units. A further 100 units are awaiting contract or partnership
approval, bringing the programme to a total of 3,548 units in response to municipal
requests.
In addition, the municipal Councils of Port Alberni, Surrey, Langley, and
Vancouver are requesting assistance in various forms of public housing which will
provide over 1,000 units. Some of the smaller municipalities of the Province have
made tentative approaches for assistance, and it is anticipated that there will be
public housing activity in these communities in the coming year.
An important development is the proposal of the Greater Vancouver Regional
District to undertake public housing as one of its functions, thereby making the
provision of public housing in the Greater Vancouver area a regional responsibility.
A summary of activity in this field follows.
Municipality
Units of Accommodation
Completed
Contract
Approved
Proposed
Total
Cities—
50
134
184
90
15
101
50
341
101
20
40
247
50
New Westminster _ __	
101
20
50
134
184
Districts—•
431
40
116
Surrey  	
-----
247
Subtotals—   —	
473
2.292
593
90
307
100        |          729
1,373
3,211
Totals                          _.	
2,765
683         1         100         1        1.036
4,584
LAND ASSEMBLY
Previous programmes of development of land for residential purposes by the
Provincial-Federal partnership have provided 1,532 lots. Current programmes at
Ladysmith and Masset will provide 196 residential lots. There have been some
discussions with other municipalities with regard to new land-assembly projects.
A firm request is being studied for a modest development of 30 to 40 lots in North
Cowichan. The large land holding by the Provincial-Federal partnership in the
District of North Vancouver is being studied as part of a long-range development
programme of the entire area. Negotiations are under way in response to a formal
request of the District of Mackenzie to develop approximately 125 acres of municipal
land for a wide range of residential forms. The following presents a summary of
activity in this field.
 W 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Mackenzie, 125-acre land development.
North Vancouver, 740-acre land bank.
Municipality
Residential Lots
Completed
Contract
Proposed
Total
Cities—
Courtenay   - 	
Duncan  - -  	
135
157
50
177
185
480
132
216
93
103
34
135
157
50
177
185
Trail
480
Districts—
34
132
216
93
103
1,532
196
34
1,762
URBAN REDEVELOPMENT
The suspension of Federal approval of projects of urban redevelopment is still
in effect. Current activity is aimed at completing projects in Vancouver, Burnaby,
and Sparwood. Three projects were approved in 1970 for Port Coquitlam, Surrey,
and Delta, which it is anticipated will rejuvenate the business cores of these communities within a short period of time.
With the exception of a special programme of experimental rehabilitation in
Vancouver which is being studied, there are no new proposals from municipalities
for urban-renewal activity.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1970
W 29
TABLES AND CHARTS
Table 1—Municipal Boundary Revisions, 1970
Municipality
Area (Acres)
Before
Added
After
Population
Before
Added
After
Cities
Courtenay	
Dawson Creek-
Fernie	
Grand Forks..
Kamloops	
Kelowna	
Prince George	
Prince George (reduction)..
Vernon  .	
Districts
Coldstream-
Towns
Quesnel-
Quesnel (second) _
Smithers 	
Williams Lake	
Villages
Ashcroft-
Ashcroft (second) ..
Cache Creek	
Cumberland 	
Lillooet.—	
100 Mile House-
Osoyoos _	
Port Edward	
Valemount	
1,880.50
4,304.98
1,226.19
2,372.42
7,763.97
5,271.00
6,348.70
12,098.64
2,245.21
18,872.00
2,782.65
3,287.90
1,326.00
1,969.80
288.30
321.15
314.90
183.00
342.02
261.82
451.50
2,256.00
640.00
38.60
257.21
2.33
66.81
527.80
21.00
5,749.94
—430.27
1,131.77
18.71
434.25
170.00
173.49
1,770.94
32.85
612.48
162.91
53.00
335.64
26.49
1.24
729.60
346.00
1,919.10
4,562.19
1,228.52
2,439.23
8,291.77
5,292.00
12,098.64
11,668.37
3,376.98
18,890.71
3,287.90
3,457.90
1,499.49
3,740.74
321.15
933.63
477.81
236.00
677.66
288.31
452.74
2,985.60
986.00
5,861
12,392
2,781
2,634
22,177
17,006
24,985
25,867
11,562
2,660
5,725
5,900
3,135
3,592
1,154
1,154
816
1,534
1,386
957
1,186
1,800
656
Nil
5,861
82
12,474
5
2,786
135
2,769
(!)
	
3
17,009
882
25,867
171
25,696
7
11,569
Nil
175
177
21
34
Nil
137
5
230
119
82
11
Nil
2,660
5,900
6,077
3,156
3,626
1,154
1,291
821
1,764
1,505
1,039
1,197
1,800
739
i Figures not available at time of printing.
 W 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 2—Percentage Tax Collections
Percentage of
Current Levy
Collected
Total Collections
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
Outstanding Taxes
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
1939
Cities (Except Vancouver)
81.10
94.13
95.92
96.28
96.61
96.65
96.82
91.00
95.74
95.66
96.03
96.36
95.67
96.11
77.60
92.32
96.05
96.51
96.69
97.00
96.85
89.55
88.69
92.87
92.81
93.21
93.98
93.45
76.50
92.45
96.04
95.21
95.64
95.45
95.70
99.10
100.46
100.01
100.40
100.30
100.20
100.32
103.10
100.57
100.39
100.20
100.15
98.87
99.96
95.80
99.28
100.31
100.67
100.17
100.29
100.08
97.06
98.00
99.93
98.90
99.75
100.20
99.46
98.30
99.90
'100.31
99.08
100.07
99.97
100.27
40.16
1946
7.85
1965
5.49
1966	
5.12
1967                                                                                        	
4.57
1968                                                                                        	
4.44
1969
1939	
Vancouver
4.15
30.06
1946
5.90
1965	
6.45
1966 	
5.80
1967  	
1968                                                                           	
5.04
5.75
1969    	
5.22
1939	
Districts
34.81
1946  	
9.45
1965
5.33
1966	
4.64
1967	
4.22
1968     -	
3.90
1969                    	
3.95
1958 .
Towns
13.62
1959	
15.18
1965	
9.94
1966
10.16
1967.   ..
9.84
1968 __ 	
9.06
1969.   -  	
9.08
1939	
Villages
38.71
1946      •          	
1             11.90
1965	
5.52
1966	
f               6.48
1967 	
1968
6.16
6.15
1969	
6.39
Table 3—Trends in Financial Aspects of Municipal Government
Compared to Population and Income Expressed as Indexes
Year
Population
Total Revenue
(Excluding
Utilities)
Building
Permits
Debenture
Debt
Maximum
Values
Taxable
Total B.C.
Personal
Income
1959	
1960	
1961	
1962 -   	
1963	
1964	
1965	
1966	
1967	
1968	
1969	
100.00
103.02
102.60
107.64
109.99
113.59
117.61
119.68
125.63
130.46
136.48
100.00
108.12
115.44
122.31
130.82
140.39
160.07
180.80
208.84
239.57
270.58
100.00
76.53
81.17
92.72
105.90
140.95
165.22
167.88
204.75
218.99
258.09
100.00
104.99
106.45
107.22
114.66
116.68
121.69
133.12
135.72
135.69
139.06
100.00
107.51
111.97
123.20
124.32
128.00
136.62
147.44
162.48
175.68
195.66
100.00
104.28
105.94
113.05
119.23
129.91
146.66
163.16
180.53
195.19
226.46
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1970
W 31
Table 4—Functions Assigned to Regional Districts During 1970
Alberni-Clayoquot—
Disposal sites (auto bodies and refuse).
Regional parks.
Control of nuisances and unsightly premises.
Capital—
Parks acquisition (Colwood and Langford).
Trunk-sewers and sewage disposal without
a vote in electoral areas.
Central Fraser Valley—
Trunk-sewers and disposal (Matsqui, Sumas,
and Abbotsford).
Civil Defence.
Central Kootenay—Sports centre (Nakusp and
defined part of Electoral Area K).
Central Okanagan—
Refuse disposal (Electoral Areas B, C, D,
E, and F and denned part of G and I).
Soil-removal    regulation    (electoral    areas
only).
Comox-Strathcona—
Noise control (Electoral Areas A to J).
Emergency    answering    service    (Comox,
Courtenay,   Cumberland,   and   Electoral
Areas A, B, and C).
Cowichan Valley—
Ice arena (Lake Cowichan, Electoral Area
I, and defined part of F).
Control of fireworks, firecrackers  (all but
Duncan and North Cowichan).
Control of firearms (electoral areas only).
East  Kootenay — Refuse  disposal   (Electoral
Areas A to G).
Fraser-Fort George—
Control of untidy premises.
Nuisance removal.
Health regulation.
Soil-removal regulation (electoral areas).
Nanaimo-
areas).
-Soil-removal  regulation   (electoral
North Okanagan—
Okanagan Basin Water Board.
German measles immunization.
Okanagan-Similkameen—
Soil-removal regulation (electoral areas).
German measles grant.
Powell River—
Regional parks.
Refuse disposal (Electoral Area D exempt).
Ambulance service.
Cemetery operation.
Squamish-Lillooet—Fireworks regulation (Lillooet, Pemberton, and electoral areas).
Sunshine    Coast — Soil-removal    regulation
(electoral areas).
All regional districts were given regulatory powers for the purpose of exercising
control over extraordinary gatherings.
 W 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 5—Regional District Functions as at December 31, 1970
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Regional planning1
Community planning1
Building inspection1
Contract services1
Local works and services1
Grants-in-aid1
p
p
p
P
V
P
p
p
y
V
p
X
X
Control of gatherings	
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
p
p
p
V
p
P
V
p
V
V
p
V
p
P
V
p
V
p
Y
p
p
X
p
X
X
X
Okanagan Basin Water Board—.
P
v
P
Recreation facilities —
p
p
P
p
p
p
p
v
p
p
V
Refuse disposal.	
X
P
p
P
P
P
p
p
X
Regional parks -. .
X
p
X
p
p
X
X
X
X
Sewers  	
X
p
P
Y
p
p
p
p
P
Water  _	
p   1 1
X
1 Assigned by Statute to all regional districts.
X=indicates function. P=indicates application of function in part of regional district only.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1970
W 33
Table 6—Regional District Specified Service Areas Established
During 1970
Bulkley-Nechako—
Electrification (Colleymount).
Sewer study (Vanderhoof North Side).
Cariboo—Fire protection (Red Bluff).
Central Kootenay—Fire protection (Ymir).
Central Okanagan — Refuse disposal  (West-
bank).
Comox-Strathcona—
Fire protection (Hornby Island).
Waterworks  (Lake Trail and Powerhouse
Road).
Fraser-Fort George—Street lighting (Crooked
River).
Kitimat-Stikine—Street lighting (South Hazelton).
Nanaimo—
Fire protection (Protection Island).
Fire protection (Errington).
Fire protection (Coombs-Hilliers).
Okanagan-Similkameen—
Refuse disposal (Area CI).
Fire protection (Cawston and Keremeos).
Squamish-Lillooet — Fire    protection    (Alta
Lake).
Table 7—Highways Designated Under Highways (Scenic Improvement)
Act, 1968
Regional District
All
Highways in
Municipality
Certain
Highways in
Municipality
All Highways
in Regional
District
Outside of
Municipalities
Certain
Highways in
Regional
District
Outside of
Municipalities
Alberni-Clayoquot	
Cities—Port Alberni..
Capital.
Districts—
Esquim alt-
North Saanich .
Saanich 	
Cariboo..
Towns—Quesnel	
Villages—100 Mile House-
Central Fraser Valley—
Cities—Langley	
Districts—
Langley  —
Matsqui- ,
Central Kootenay—
Cities—Nelson..
Columbia-Shuswap—
Districts—Salmon Arm
Comox-Strathcona	
Towns—Comox	
Cowichan Valley-
Districts—North Cowichan
East Kootenay 	
Cities—Kimberley -	
Districts—Sparwood	
Fraser-Fort George	
Greater Vancouver—
Cities—
Port Coquitlam	
White Rock  	
Districts—
Coquitlam 	
Richmond— 	
Surrey	
Kitimat-Stikine—
Districts—Kitimat -	
Mount Waddington  	
Nanaimo..
Cities—Nanaimo	
Okanagan-Similkameen	
Districts—Summerland-
Villages—
Keremeos. 	
Oliver	
Osoyoos   	
Peace River-Liard
Cities—Dawson Creek-
Towns—Fort St. John.-
Villages—Taylor —
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
 W 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
PERCENTAGE      TAX       COLLECTIONS
CHART 1
LEGEND
Cities  Villages
Districts  Vancouver
•••••••♦•Towns
%
97
PERCENTAGE    OF    CURRENT    LEVY   COLLECTED
— ^.»•»*
====^
'v
J5^"'
*><
••**"
 s.
f.^l
95
_•_-?*'
I^^==
• "'          -*• "*
i
*'
...•■■
••..
*••...
.„•■
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
»•**
.•'
'*•-,
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.*
i
,♦♦*♦*♦*
•
"••■
89
r
0
*      ~~^
-* -■ — ■
■s--,^--^--^
1    -_-—*_^
A--_^_^—n
%
16
14
OUTSTANDING    TAXES    AS    A    PERCENTAGE  OF    CURRENT     LEVY
\
<
	
'.
12
\
,.•■■
'■■._
■■._
10
9
t
**♦-■
"•.
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»-~-C_
*"—-___   **
v.
5
^
■~^__a___**_
,.♦*
•
\,
0
1959 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 1969
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1970
W 35
TRENDS    IN     FINANCIAL   ASPECTS    OF   MUNICIPAL    GOVERNMENT
COMPARED     TO    POPULATION    AND      INCOME
CHART  2
LEGEND
—>->-_-__■_Population  in   millions ••♦•••
— — — — — Total   revenue   in   millions   of  dollars
Building   permits   in    millions of dollars       	
——— Debenture   debt     in     millions   of    dollars
Maximum values taxable in
hundreds of millions of dollars
Personal   income in hundreds
of millions of dollars
-___:
,»»	
1939 40
6* 1949
 W 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
MUNICIPAL  REVENUES
BY   MAJOR   SOURCE   1S6S
CITIES   (EXCLUDING  VANCOUVER)
CHART 3
UTILITIES0'
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER   PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE   GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION*2'
PROVIDED   BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
%   OF   REVENUE
 100%
2.72 ( 3.26)
12.72 (13.37)
1.12 (1.10)
10.09 ( 9.49)
9.58 ( 9.87)
33.32 (33.39)
15.61 (15.52)	
30.45 (29.52)
S PER CAPITA
$211.75   (253.40)
$ 7.95 ( 8.28)
37.00 (33.82)
3.27 ( 2.80)
29.44 (24.06)
28.00 (25.00)
97.23 (84.62)
88.86 (74.82)
1808   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$110,062,605   TOTAL POPULATION-377,228
DISTRICTS
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER   PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE   GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL MUNICIPAL TAXATION'2'
PROVIDED   BY  PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
% OF   REVENUE
100%
iiIii 111
S   PER   CAPITA
$250.03    (228.09)
9.64 (10.51)
.60 (    .60)
5.97 ( 5.70)
11.00 (11.12)
36.76 (35.11)
18.83 (18.02)	
36.03 (36.96)
«?#£«3««3t
$24.82 (23.72)
1.55 ( 1.52)
15.29 (12.89)
28.00 (25.00)
94.11 (79.39)
92.26 (83.58)
1968   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$167,276,519   TOTAL POPULATION-653,349
NOTE'-  (1)  Utilities   represents   amount   appropriated   from   utility   operations   for   General   Municipal   Purposes,   is   not   Major
Source of   Revenue   for   Districts, Towns, Villages  and   Vancouver,  included   in 'Licenses  and   Other1   for  1968   and   1969.
(2) General   Municipal  Taxation  includes  Ad Valorem Tax,   Business  Tax,  Sewer and Water   Frontage Tax  and  Special
Assessments.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1970
W 37
UNI CI PAL  REVENUES
BY   MAJOR   SOURCE   1969
TOWNS
CHART 3
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER    PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE   GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION"'
PROVIDED   BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
%  OF   REVENUE
 100%	
10.71   (12.22)
.79  (    .97)
8.54 ( 8.44)
12.56   (12.44)
33.80 (31.59)
18.73 (18.29)
33.60 (34.34)
till! III
$ PER CAPITA
S 222.30   (204.36)
$23.65 (24.94)
1.76 (2.41)
19.00 (17.26)
28.00 (25.00)
75.17(64.57)
74.72 (70.18)
1968   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$10,955,848    TOTAL POPULATION-49,285
VILLAGES
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER   PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION*"
PROVIDED   BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
'/. OF   REVENUE
 100%
12.28 (12.32)
.77 (1.29)
17.63 (17.33)
33.52 (30.69)
22.26 (21.35) —
35.80 (38.37)
$  PER  CAPITA
$151.30    (153.88)
$17.26 (18.97)
1.17 ( 3.65)
28.00 (25.00)
50.71 (47.22)
54.16 (59.04)
1968   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$8,552,849       TOTAL POPULATION - 56,551
NOTEj-  (1) General   Municipal   Taxation  includes   Ad Valorem Tax,   Business   Tax,. Sewer  and  Water   Frontage  Tax   and   Special
Assessments.
 W 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
MUNICIPAL  REVENUE
BY   MAJOR   SOURCE   1969
VANCOUVER
CHART 3
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER   PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE   GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION0'
PROVIDED   BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
X   OF   REVENUE
13.65 (12.80)
.47 (   .33)
13.77 (14.56)
8.96 (8.81)
34.43 (35.49)
13.55 (12.78)  —
28.72 (28.01)
ajWHfltn
$ PER  CAPITA
$312.39   (283.51)
$ 42.63 (36.25)
1.46 (   .93)
43.01 (41.28)
28.00 (25.00)
107.57(100.63)
89.72 (79.42)
1988   FIGURES    SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$128,198,805     TOTAL POPULATION-410,375
NOTE:-  (1) General   Municipal   Taxation  includes  Ad Valorem Tax,   Business   Tax, Sewer and  Water   Frontage Tax  and   Special
Assessments.
REVENUE   SHOWN   FOR   ALL  CLASSES   OF   MUNICIPALITIES    INCLUDING    VANCOUVER    DOES    NOT    INCLUDE
APPROPRIATION   OF   PRIOR   YEARS    SURPLUS.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1970
W 39
REVENUE    EXPENDITURES
BY    MAJOR    FUP.CTEQW    1969
CITIES   (EXCLUDING   VANCOUVER)
CHART 4
GENERAL   GOVERNMENT
FIRE
ADMINISTRATION   OF  JUSTICE
OTHER  PROTECTION
PUBLIC   WORKS
SANITATION   AND   WASTE   REMOVAL
SOCIAL  WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT   CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL   EXPENDITURES  FROM   REVENUE
OTHER
%  OF   EXPENDITURE
 100%
6.05
4.32
6.05
2.06
7.05
3.82
( 6.06)
( 4.41)
( 6.36)
(1.87)
(7.18)
( 3.86)
mzz&
14.06   (13.28)
30.28   (29.51)
7.37   ( 8.29)
5.94   (6.40)
13.00   (12.78)
i ■jii ■j iii11
$ PER  CAPITA
$294.73   (254.66)
wm,
$17.82 (15.44)
12.73   (11.25)
17.82
6.07
20.77
11.25
(16.20)
( 4.77)
(18.29)
( 9.83)
41.42   (33.83)
89.19    (75.16)
21.69   (21.12)
17.50    (16.31)
38.47    (32.48)
1988   FIGURES    SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$111,180,069     TOTAL   POPULATION-377,228
DISTRICTS
%  OF   EXPENDITURE
 100%
GENERAL   GOVERNMENT
FIRE
ADMINISTRATION  OF  JUSTICE
OTHER   PROTECTION
PUBLIC  WORKS
SANITATION  AND WASTE REMOVAL
SOCIAL   WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT   CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL  EXPENDITURES   FROM   REVENUE
OTHER
5.84 ( 5.76)
3.33 ( 3.38)
4.91 (4.96)
1.67 ( 1.78)
7.37 ( 8.00)
2.71 (2.54)
10.39  (9.60)
35.49 (35.71)
6.91   ( 6.95)
8.68  ( 7.84)
12.70   (13.48)
'WMa
$   PER  CAPITA
S260.43   (234.55)
$15.22
8.69
12.78
4.35
19.19
7.07
27.07
(13.51)
( 7.93)
(11.63)
( 4.18)
(18.78)
( 5.97)
(22.51)
92.42   (83.75)
18.01    (16.30)
22.62    (18.38)
33.01     (31.60)
1968   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$170,104,091     TOTAL   POPULATION - 653,349
NOTE:- Expenditures   for   Health   included   in  'Other'.
 W 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REVENUE    EXPENDITURE
BY    MAJOR   FUNCTION    1969
TOWNS
CHART 4
GENERAL   GOVERNMENT
FIRE
OTHER    PROTECTIONS
PUBLIC   WORKS
SANITATION   &  WASTE    REMOVAL
SOCIAL WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT   CHARGES    (NET)
CAPITAL   EXPENDITURE  FROM   REVENUE
OTHER
X  OF   EXPENDITURE
1°°%	
$ PER  CAPITA
$221.50   (206.30)
7.84   (8.15)
1.56   (1.55)
2.36   (2.36)
8.00   (8.79)
4.69   (4.51)
12.32 (11.67)
33.93 (34.43)
9.63 (8.59)
7.88 ( 9.52)
11.79 (10.43)
$17.56  (16.80)
3.47    (3.20)
5.23    (4.88)
17.73   (18.14)
10.38  (9.31)
27.29 (24.07)
75.16 (71.03)
21.32 (17.73)
17.47 (19.65)
25.89 (21.49)
1968   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$10,916,043    TOTAL   POPULATION-49,285
VILLAGES
'/.   OF EXPENDITURE
100%
GENERAL     GOVERNMENT
FIRE
OT   "
OTHER PROTECTIONS
PUBLIC  WORKS
SANITATION  &  WASTE   REMOVAL
EDUCATION
DEBT  CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL  EXPENDITURE  FROM   REVENUE
OTHER
12.05 (11.62)
2.50 (2.06)
2.79 (2.61)
10.02 (9.87)
5.09 (4.66)
37.16 (37.80)
7.13 (5.94)
10.50 (13.87)
12.76  (11.57)
$   PER   CAPITA
$146.56   (156.86)
$17.65 (18.23)
ffi ten
14.68 (15.48)
7.46    (7.30)
54.46 (59.29)
10.45 (9.32)
15.39 (21.76)
18.71 (18.15)
1968   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN  PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-S 8,287,798     TOTAL   POPULATION-56,551
NOTE:—  Expenditures   for    Health   included   in  'Other'.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1970
W 41
REVENUE    EXPENDITURES
BY    MAJOR    FUNCTION    1969
VANCOUVER
CHART 4
GENERAL   GOVERNMENT
FIRE
ADMINISTRATION   OF  JUSTICE
OTHER   PROTECTION
PUBLIC   WORKS
SANITATION   AND   WASTE  REMOVAL
SOCIAL WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT   CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL   EXPENDITURES  FROM  REVENUE
OTHER
%  OF   EXPENDITURE
 100%
$ PER   CAPITA
$330.76   (309.30)
3.23 ( 3.14)
5.70 ( 5.63)
9.40 ( 8.83)
1.97 (2.64)
2.65 (2.26)
3.12 (2.78)
17.08 (16.88)
26.97 (25.67)
8.55 (10.85)
6.27 (7.72)
15.06 (13.60)
g%8g%5
	
$10.69 ( 9.72)
18.85 (17.42)
31.11  (27.31)
6.53  ( 8.18)
8.77  ( 6.99)
10.33   ( 8.61)
56.52   (52.23)
89.22 (79.42)
28.29 (33.58)
20.75 (23.90)
49.70 (41.94)
1968   FIGURES    SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$135,738,088    TOTAL   POPULATION-410,375
NOTE - Expenditures   for   Health   included   in  'Other'.
 W 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENTAL PUBLICATIONS, 1970
Annual Report, year ended December 31, 1969.
Municipal Statistics, year ended December 31, 1969.
Statistics Relating to Regional and Municipal Governments, May 1970.
A Guide to Municipal and Regional District Administrative Procedures, May
1970.
A Guide to Municipal and Regional District Financial Management, May
1970.
Provincial Subdivision Regulations, November 1970.
Land Use Colour and Coding Guide, December 1970.
Zoning Colour and Coding Guide, December 1970.
ACTS ADMINISTERED BY DEPARTMENT OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
Municipal Act.
Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act.
Local Services Act.
Highways (Scenic Improvement) Act, 1968.
Municipal Finance Authority of British Columbia Act.
Housing Act.
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1971
1,500-171-596

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