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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Ninety-eighth Annual Report 1968/69 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1970

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 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Ninety-eighth Annual Report
1968/69
By the Superintendent of Education
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1970
  The Honourable Donald Leslie Brothers OC tit.   u.-       ^^^mm
rs' yU> LLB-> Minister of Education.
  G. Neil Perry, B.A., M.P.A., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D.,
Deputy Minister of Education.
v  __.•       v- ■>'
.,"
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.),
Superintendent of Education.
  To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Ninety-eighth Report of the PubUc Schools of
the Province.
DONALD LESLIE BROTHERS,
Minister of Education.
January, 1970.
  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION,  1969
Minister of Education:
The Honourable Donald Leslie Brothers, Q.C., LL.B.
Deputy Minister of Education:
G. Neil Perry, B.A., M.P.A., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D.
Superintendent of Education:
F. P. Levtrs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.)
Assistant Superintendent (Administration):
J. Phillipson, B.A., B.Ed.
Assistant Superintendent (Instruction):
J. R. Meredith, B.A., M.Ed.
Assistant Superintendent
(Field Services):
C. I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed.
Assistant Superintendent
(University and College Affairs):
W. D. Reid, B.A., M.Ed.
Co-ordinator of Services:
J. L. Canty, B.A., M.Ed.
District Superintendents, Superintendents, and Inspectors of Schools:
H. D. Abbott, B.A., M.A., Nanaimo.
K. F. Alexander, B.Sc, B.Ed., Mission City.
N. A. Allen, B.A.(Hons.), Kamloops.
J. E. Beech, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent, Surrey.
G. C. Bissell, B.A., B.Ed., Castlegar.
R. S. Boyle, B.A., B.Ed., Dawson Creek.
C. A. Bruce, B.A., B.Ed., Revelstoke.
A. D. Campbell, B.A., B.Ed., Fort St. John.
D. H. Campbell, B.A., B.Ed., Squamish.
D. G. Chamberlain, B.A., B.Ed., M.C.C.T.,
Hope.
J. Chell, M.A., Superintendent, Victoria.
N. Clark, M.A., B.Ed., Inspector, Vancouver.
R. B. Cox, B.A., Prince Rupert.
C. Cuthbert, B.S.Acc, B.Ed., M.Ed., Oliver.
J. M. Evans, B.A., M.Ed., Port Alberni.
D. L. Feir, B.A., M.A., Quesnel.
H. C. Ferguson, B.A., West Vancouver.
R. E. Flower, B.A., B.Ed., Williams Lake.
W. B. Fromson, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent, North Vancouver.
G. W. Graham, B.A., Richmond.
S. J. Graham, B.A., New Westminster.
J. V. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
P. C. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Qualicum Beach.
R. R. Hanna, B.A., B.Ed., Gibsons.
W. L. B. Hawker, B.A., B.Ed., Haney.
C. Holob, B.S.A., M.Ed., Relieving Superintendent.
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.Paed., Victoria.
E. I. Irwin, B.A., B.Ed., Inspector, Vancouver.
F. L. Irwin, B.A. Vernon.
G. E. Johnson, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Powell
River.
E. E. Lewis, B.A., B. Pa_d., Duncan.
W. J. Logie, B.A., Campbell River.
A. J. Longmore, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Assistant Superintendent, Victoria.
R. F. Lucas, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Courtenay.
W. E. Lucas, B.A., B.Pa.d., North Vancouver.
A. P. McKay, B.Com., M.Ed., Kamloops.
D. E. McFee, B.A., M.A., Kitimat.
C. S. McKenzie, B.A., Trail.
D. H. MacKirdy, D.F.C., B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed.,
Ladysmith.
J. I. MacDougall, B.A.,M.A., M.Ed., D.Pa-d.,
Chilliwack.
W. A. Marchbank, A.B., B.Ed., Nelson.
E. Marriott, B.A., Cloverdale.
F. T. Middleton, B.A., B.Ed., Creston.
W. J. Mouat, B.A., M.Ed., Abbotsford.
G. H. Nelson, B.A., B.Ed., Coquitlam.
F. J. Orme, B.A., B.Pa.d., Kelowna.
G. M. Paton, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Penticton.
R. S. Price, B.A., B.Com., Sidney.
P. B. Pullinger, B.A., B.Ed., Cranbrook.
W. F. Ramsey, B.A., B.Ed., Merritt.
C. T. Rendle, B.A., Burnaby.
A. C. Rutledge, B.Ed., M.Ed., Kimberley.
R. F. Sharp, B.A., D.Psed., Superintendent,
Vancouver.
H. D. Stafford, B.A., M.Ed., F.C.C.T., Mur-
rayville.
E. C. Stewart, B.A., B.Ed., Terrace.
R. F. Thorstenson, B.A., Ladner.
D. P. Todd, B.A., B.Ed., Prince George.
J. Walsh, B.Sc., M.Ed., Vanderhoof.
D. N. Weicker, B.A., B.Ed., Fort St. John.
J. H. Wormsbecker, B.A., M.A., Ed.D., Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
C. C. Wright, B.A., Salmon Arm.
W. J. Zoellner, B.A., B.Ed., Courtenay.
 G 10
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SPECIAL OFFICIALS
Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment: P. J. Kitley, M.A.
Comptroller of Expenditures: S. E. Espley.
Supervisor of School Construction: H. Dickinson.
Director of Technical and Vocational Education: J. S. White.
Assistant Director of Technical and Vocational Education: V. E. Rickard, B.Ed.
Inspectors of Technical Classes: M. J. Tidmarsh and R. Smith.
Inspector of Technical and Vocational Education: P. C. MacGregor.
Registrar: E. A. Killough, B.Ed.
Director of Home Economics: Miss J. R. Irvine, B.Sc.(H.Ec).
Inspectors of Home Economics:
Miss J. Campbell, M.A., B.Sc.(H.Ec), Dip.Ed., and Mrs. H. Krueger, B.Sc.(H.Ec).
Director of Community Programmes: J. H. Panton, B.A., M.Sc.
Director of Curriculum: W. B. Naylor, B.A.
Director of Audio-Visual Services: B. A. Black.
Director of Research and Standards: C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Pasd.
Director of Correspondence Education: J. R. Hind, B.A., B.Paed.
Director of Textbook Branch: D. W. C. Huggins.
Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (for the Deaf and the Blind):
P. Freemantle, N.C.T.D., Dip.(Eng.), B.Ed.
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Report of the Superintendent of Education	
Reports:
Introduction by the Superintendent of Education	
Page
13
38
Assistant Superintendent (Administration and School Board Relations) 42
Coordinator of Services  45
Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment  47
Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (for the Deaf and the Blind) 51
Assistant Superintendent (Instruction)  53
Director of Curriculum..
Co-ordinator of Adult Education...
Division of Audio-Visual Services-
Director of School Broadcasts-
Assistant Director of Visual Education-
Director of Research and Standards	
Director of Correspondence Education	
Director of Textbook Branch	
Assistant Superintendent (Field Services).
Director of Home Economics	
Assistant Superintendent (University and College Affairs).
Director of Technical and Vocational Education	
Director of Community Programmes	
Registrar and Division of Examinations	
Commission on Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act
Strathcona Trust	
STATISTICAL RETURNS
Enrolment and Attendance by Type of School	
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex	
Distribution of Instructional Staff and P/T Ratios by Type of School.
Teachers' Certificates and Degrees	
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education.
Number of School Districts and Number of Schools in Operation.
11
57
58
62
62
63
67
69
72
74
77
81
88
106
116
125
126
13
14
15
16
19
20
 G 12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
Number of Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District—
Elementary	
Elementary-Junior Secondary.
Elementary-Senior Secondary.
Junior Secondary	
Secondary	
Senior Secondary_
Page
21
22
23
24
25
26
District-employed Instructional Staff  26
Summary, Showing Numbers of Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils  27
Classification of Teachers' Salaries by Type of School  28
Expenditure for Education for the Calendar Year 1968  33
Operating Costs per Pupil, Calendar Year 1968  33
Expenditure by School Districts for the Calendar Year 1968  34
Revenue by School Districts for the Calendar Year 1968  36
Yearly Fire Damage in Schools	
Transportation Assistance and Dormitories	
Special Classes in Public Schools	
Enrolment in Adult Education Courses
Enrolment in Correspondence Schools...
43
46
56
61
71
Enrolment in Courses in Home Economics  77
Enrolment in Universities and Colleges  82
Enrolment by Courses in Industrial Education  95
Enrolment by Courses in the British Columbia Institute of Technology  100
Teacher Certification and Supply  116
Examinations and Scholarships  122
Enrolment by Programme, Grades XI and XII  128
Summary of Enrolment by Schools in the Various School Districts  144
Recapitulation of Enrolment by Type of School, Sex, and Grade  198
 Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1968/69
Education Office,
Victoria, British Columbia, January, 1970
To the Honourable Donald L. Brothers,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Ninety-eighth Annual Report of the Public
Schools of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30, 1969.
ENROLMENT AND AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE
Enrolment in the public schools of the Province rose from 467,486 in June,
1968, to 489,596 in June, 1969, and is expected to have exceeded 500,000 in
September, 1969, an increase of 100 per cent in 13 years. The greatest increases
are now occurring in the secondary grades, although Grade XIII declined by an
additional 500 students as regional and district college enrolment increased. The
total of average daily attendance in all public day-schools rose from 425,514 to
447,643. Attendance as a percentage of enrolment rose from 91.0 to 91.4. In
schools in which most of the enrolment was in the elementary grades, regular
attendance increased from 91.9 to 92.9 per cent; in the three types of secondary
schools it decreased from 89.3 to 88.4 per cent, and in senior secondary schools
it decreased from 84.9 to 82.4 per cent.
Type of School
Number
of Schools
Enrolment of Pupils
Boys
Girls
Total
Per Cent
of Total
Attendance of Pupils
Mean Daily
Attendance
Per Cent
of Enrolment
Senior secondary. _
Secondary 	
Junior secondary	
Elementary-senior
secondary _
Elementary-junior
secondary	
Elementary	
18
108
85
17
53
1,172
8,692
44,089
28,446
5,856
8,082
157,653
7,768
41,179
26,937
5,468
7,378
148,048
16,460
85,268
55,383
11,324
15,460
305,701
3.4
17.4
11.3
2.3
3.2
62.4
13,570.5
74,920.6
50,263.7
9,971.9
14,212.7
284,703.8
82.4
87.9
90.8
88.1
91.9
93.1
Totals..
1,453
252,818
236,778
489,596
100.0
447,643.1
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled:—
In the Secondary School Correspondence classes, regular students (exclusive of the 4,594 officially registered in other
schools)        1,762
In the Elementary School Correspondence classes, regular students     668
Under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, pupils receiving instruction     3 2
Adult education—
Canadian Vocational Training Programme—
Day   21,014
Night   10,378
13
 G 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
Adult Education—Continued
Public-school adult education
141,217!
7,799
149
Secondary School Correspondence (adults only) 	
Elementary School Correspondence (adults only) 	
British Columbia Institute of Technology—
Day   2,685
Night  4,309
Vocational teachers-in-training (summer session) ...  120
Selkirk College   1202
University of Victoria non-credit courses  1,1573
University of British Columbia non-credit courses   7,0294
198,439
1 Includes 109,735 non-vocational.
2 This figure does not include the following enrolments: 35 summer session (credit), 344 extra-sessional
(evening division).
3This figure does not include the following enrolments: 1,413 summer session (credit and non-credit),
543 extra-sessional (evening division).
4This figure excludes single lectures and also does not include the following enrolments: 6,957 summer
session (credit and non-credit), 1,568 extra-sessional, 603 correspondence courses.
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
The following table provides a distribution of pupils by grade and sex for the
school year 1968/69 and a comparison of the totals with 1967/68. It will be
noticed that the greatest increases are now in the senior secondary grades.
Grade
Boys
Girls
Total,
1968/69
Total,
1967/68
Ratio,
1969:1968
Secondary
r.radeXHI        	
Grade XII          _
f-.-rtf.Xl         .   _
f-r-rt..x
Grade IX      	
Grade VIII-
Totals, Grades VIII to X.
Occupational 3	
Occupational 2	
Occupational 1	
Totals, occupational classes	
Totals, junior secondary grades-
Totals, secondary grades	
Elementary
Intermediate Special-
Grade VII	
Grade VI	
Grade V—	
Grade IV	
Totals, intermediate grades..
Primary Special	
Grade III	
Grade II	
Grade I—	
Kindergarten.
Totals, primary grades. _
Totals, elementary grades-
Grand totals	
880
13,341
15,455
530
12,178
14,621
1,410
25,519
30,076
1,910
22,846
27,335
2,758
19,766
20,206
20,630
21,680
1,642
19,113
19,469
20,061
20,454
4,400
38,879
39,675
40,691
42,134
4,571
37,058
38,130
38,763
40,021
85,040    |      80,739    |    165,779    |    158,543
2,062
1,131
3,193
3,649
.875
22,437
20,939
43,376
42,170
1.029
22,125
20,692
42,817
42,731
1.002
23,053
21,281
44,334
43,737
1.014
9,243
8,960
18,203
16,011
1.137
78,920    |      73,003    |    151,923    |    148,298
163,960    |    153,742    |    317,702    |    306,841
252,818    |    236,778
489,596
467,4862
.738
1.117
1.100
29,676
27,329
57,005
52,091
1.094
17,313
18,875
19,904
16,473
18,072
19,361
33,786
36,947
39,265
31,128
34,800
37,316
1.085
1.062
1.052
56,092
53,906
109,998
103,244
1.065
783
1,112
1,195
521
603
677
1,304
1,715
1,872
1,305
1,837
2,168
.999
.934
.863
3,090
1,801
4,891
5,310
.921
59,182
55,707
114,889
108,554
1.058
88,858
83,036
171,894
160,645
1.070
.963
1.049
1.041
1.050
1.053
1.046
1.035
1.047
i See pages 128 to 143 for enrolment by programme in Grades XI and XII.
2 Revised data.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
G 15
DISTRIBUTION OF INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF AND PUPIL/TEACHER
RATIOS BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
The number of teachers employed in the different types of schools and the
average number of pupils per teacher are shown in the following table. The average
number of pupils per staff member decreased in all except the senior secondary type
of school, where it increased from 20.11 to 20.89. The total decreased from 24.74
to 24.31:—
Type of School
Number
of
Schools
Supervising
Principals
Instructional Staff
Enrolling
Divisions
Special
Staff
Total
Instructors
Total
School
Staff
Average Number of Pupils
per Staff Member
Enrolling a
Division
Instructing
On Total
Staff
Senior secondary	
Secondary-
Junior secondary.—
Elementary-senior
secondary..
Elementary-junior
secondary	
Elementary	
18
108
85
17
53
1,172
18
106
84
16
33
367
521
2,834
1,851
384
559
9,855
District-employed
teachers	
249
1,199
710
139
117
911
187
770
4,033
2,561
523
676
10,766
187
788
4,139
2,645
539
709
11,133
187
31.59
30.09
29.92
29.49
27.66
31.02
21.38
21.14
21.63
21.65
22.87
28.40
Totals-
1,453
624
16,004
3,512
19,516
20,140
30.59
25.09
20.89
20.60
20.94
21.01
21.81
27.46
24.31
District supervisory staff members totalling 341 persons are not included.
 G  16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
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A-
 report of superintendent g 17
Teachers and Principals with and without University Degrees
Highest Degree
No Degree
Total Teachers
Type of School
Bachelors
Masters or
Doctorates
Per Cent of
Teachers
in School
Type
Number
Per Cent of
Teachers
in School
Type
Number
Per Cent
of All
Teachers
Senior secondary	
Secondary. 	
597
2,827
1,728
300
305
3,282
54
82
501
182
es
35
199
13
86.2
80.4
72.2
68.3
48.0
31.3
35.8
109
812
735
171
368
7,652
120
13.8
19.6
27.8
31.7
52.0
68.7
64.2
788
4,140
2,645
539
708
11,133
187
3.9
20.6
13.1
Elementary-senior secondary
Elementary-junior secondary
Elementary —	
District-employed   instructors 	
2.7
3.5
55.3
0.9
Total instructional staff1
District supervisory staff	
9,093
206
1,080
96
50.5
88.6
9,967
39
49.5
11.4
20,140
341
100.0
(100.0)
Total staff   	
10,475
51.1
10,006
48.9
20,481
(100.0)
1 Part-time teachers and 19 exchange teachers without British Columbia certificates are included.
Highest Degree by Faculty and Level (Teachers, Principals,
Administrative and Supervisory Staff)
Faculty
Bachelors
Masters
Doctorates
Totals
P&Ti
A&S2
P&T
A&S
P&T
A&S
P&T
A&S
Combined
Education 	
Arts	
Science.   	
4,512
2,976
793
208
220
116
96
52
17
13
1
4
4
8
19
138
97
5
4
1
2
4
5
2
1
1
561
356
81
10
5
9
9
5
3
2
2
5
2
57
29
4
1
2
2
3
5
2
8
2
5
6
5,078
3,332
874
218
220
121
105
63
22
16
11
6
9
8
23
200
126
9
5
1
2
4
7
4
6
4
1
5,278
3,458
883
223
Home Economics 	
Commerce and Business Administration..   	
Agriculture.. 	
Music... 	
221
123
109
70
26
Forestry 	
Philosophy..	
16
17
10
9
Pharmacy 	
Other  	
8
24
Totals	
9,039
260
1,050
98
17
11
10,106
369
10,475
IP &T:
2 A &S:
-Principals and teachers.
-Administrators, supervisors, and district instructors.
 G 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1968/69
It may be noticed that for the first time the number of teachers with university
degrees exceeded the number without degrees. It is believed to be a " first " for any
Canadian province and is due largely to an increase of 604 in the number of
Bachelors of Education.
Numbers of certificates and degrees, and per cent increases since June, 1968,
in the numbers held by teachers, principals, and supervisory staff, were as follows:—
1968/69
1967/68
Increase,
1969/68
Certificates
(P, P-A, P-B)    8,523
(P-C, S, E-A)    6,855
(L, E-B, E-C)    4,679
(S-T, E-T)       383
20
(P-A, P-B)    7,588
(P-C, E-A)    6,267
(E-B, E-C)    4,863
(S-T, E-T)       427
16
Per Cent
12 3
9.4
—3.8
10.3
25.0
20,460
19,161
6.8
Degrees
28
1,148
9,299
10,006
24
999
8,340
9,784
16.7
14 9
Bachelors  	
11.5
2 3
Total staff1 	
20,481
19,147
(6.8)
1 Includes two supervisors with degrees and 19 exchange teachers without British Columbia certificates in
1969. The degrees of exchange teachers were not included in 1968.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
G 19
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE
FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for the various years since
1877/78 and also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year
Number
Number
of
of
Teachers
School
Employed
Districts
56
45
69
59
128
104
267
169
429
213
607
268
816
189
1,597
359
1,859
374
2,246
575
3,118
744
3,668
788
3,784
792
3,854
803
3,948
811
3,959
830
3,912
821
3,873
827
3,942
762
3,956
773
4,025
763
4,092
741
4,194
721
4,220
720
4,248
730
4,224
696
4,055
661
4,162
654
4,354
650
4,512
86
4,833
89
5,116
93
5,496
97
5,873
97
6,272
98
6,598
101
7,105
100
7,574
104
8,185
104
8,690
102
9,474
103
10,171
102
10,839
101
11,513
98
12,137
97
12,772
99
13,571
100
14,415
100
15,327
93
16,173
93
17,457
87
18,889
85
20,140
85
Aggregate
Enrolment
Average
Daily
Attendance
Percentage of
Attendance
Government
Expenditure
for
Education
Total
Public
Expenditure
on Education
1877/78	
1882/83	
1887/88	
1892/93	
1897/98	
1902/03	
1907/08	
1912/13	
1913/14.	
1917/18	
1922/23	
1927/28	
1928/29	
1929/30	
1930/31	
1931/32	
1932/33	
1933/34	
1934/35	
1935/36	
1936/37	
1937/38	
1938/39	
1939/40	
1940/41	
1941/42	
1942/43	
1943/44	
1944/45	
1945/46	
1946/47	
1947/48	
1948/49	
1949/50	
1950/51	
1951/52	
1952/53	
1953/54	
1954/55	
1955/56	
1956/57	
1957/58	
1958/59	
1959/60	
1960/61	
1961/62	
1962/63	
1963/64	
1964/65	
1965/66	
1966/67	
1967/68	
1968/69	
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
164,212
173,354
183,112
195,290
210,174
223,840
240,674
260,069
277,070
291,223
305,837
321,760
340,290
358,905
378,641
400,064
420,790
445,228
467,486
489,596
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102,085
93,473
102,999
107,599
114,590
121,334
129,859
138,941
147,583
154,077
163,364
176,138
191,061
204,239
218,303
235,396
252,490
267,052
281,513
298,175
312,173
332,585
348,472
367,718
379,045
408,452
425,514
447,643
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
85.99
87.74
88.03
88.51
89.34
89.87
88.88
89.21
90.19
90.91
91.24
90.70
90.51
91.13
91.70
92.05
92.67
91.74
92.67
92.03
91.91
90.98
91.74
91.02
91.43
$48,
60
113,
174.
290,
473
544.
1,663
1,885
1,653,
3.176,
3,532,
3,765
3,743
3,834.
4,015.
2,849,
2,611
2,835,
2,972.
3,277
3,524
3,630
3,585,
3,963,
4,028
3,924,
4,244
5,022,
5,765
9,398
12,468,
17,363
22,809,
25,830
26,885
26,555,
24,060.
34,279
41,067,'
43,989
50,861,
53,288,
59,472.
70,174.
77,632,
83,782
95,497,
105,017.
119,871
144,702
181,854,
251,827,
,411.141
,758.751
679.361
,775.43
,255.26
,802.29
,671.60
,003.34
,654.11
,796.60
,686.283
1,518.95
;,920.69
,317.08
■,727.19
,074.37
,972.02
,937.80
,040.74
,385.04
,660.23
,962.69
,670.78
,769.00
,848.24
,397.88
,243.53
,898.82
,534.59
,205.50
,473.46
,653.18
,430.94
,631.23
',076.88
,980.43
,080.24
,233.15
$215,056
425,555
604,357
1,220,509
4,658,894
4,634,877
3,519,014
7,630,009
9,261,094
11,149,996
10,008,255
10,061,387
9,719,333
8,941,497,
8,213,369.
8,458,156.
8,775,353.
9,593,562.
10,193,367,
10,640,740,
10,521,684.
10,982,364.
11,120,801,
11,502,291.
12,231,029,
13,683,538.
14,818,625.
20,176,930
25,768,392
35,538,079
47,726,750
54,195.133
57,881,559
58,401,121
70,791,844,
,302.273J 80,823,263.
,740.343| 69,314,1®1
,524.32
,473.63
.028.94
,055.06
,999.84
,903.48
,121.79
,375.16
,594.75
,278.31
,607.40
,578.21
,287.923
77,653,192
90,483,765
101,351,107,
115,941,018,
133,401,622.
145,535,715.
157,614,783.
177,539,584.
199,114,313.
227,937,392.
269,217,969.
332,702,367,
384,336,617.
.222
,10
86
,85
97
56
61
,543
.98
.27
.66
.99
.81
.34
.04
.00
,78
64
08
.47
.92
49
94
35
.35
18
,81
.53
.09
.88
.37
.95
.48
.15
.25
713
tn*
.32
.63
.94
.06
.84
.48
79
.16
.75
.31
40
,21
68*
1 The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
2 Excluding unknown expenditure made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
3 Since 1922/23 this amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial universities
and since 1963/64 to school district and regional colleges.
* Since 1955/56 this amount is exclusive of capital expenditures from by-law funds.
 G 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS
The following table shows the number of classes of school districts in which
expenditure for school purposes was made during the school-year 1968/69:—
Municipal school districts  73
Rural school districts  12
Total
85
NUMBER OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN OPERATION BY TYPE,
JUNE, 1964-69
Type of School
Type
No.
Numbers Open in June
I     I
1964  1965 I 1966
1967
1968
1969
Change
1969-64
Senior secondary..
Secondary-
Junior secondary	
Elementary-senior secondary	
Elementary-junior secondary.	
Elementary and special	
Total schools	
44
73
103
1,055
9
97
52
58
83
1,084
1,368
1,383
Total net enrolment in thousands..
400
15
99
56
44
44
1,114
18
105
71
24
47
1,164
17
109
82
20
43
1,182
1,372
1,429
1,453
421
445
467
18
108
85
17
53
1,172
+ 13
+20
+41
-56
—50
+ 117
1,453
+85
490
+ 111
There are frequent changes in school type as, for example, the addition of
Grade VIII converts a school from elementary to elementary-junior secondary.
The table shows that the trend is away from the combined types of schools, and
recently toward schools enrolling students in the junior and senior secondary grades.
The increasing size of schools is indicated by a comparison of the increase of 85 in
the number of schools with the increase of 110,955 in the number of pupils. Additions to existing schools have accommodated a large proportion of the expanded
enrolment. In 1958/59 the mean enrolment per school was 249; in 1963/64 it
had risen to 277, and in 1968/69 to 337 pupils.
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
The number of schools enrolling pupils from Kindergarten or Grade I to
Grade VII declined during the year as annexes were combined and Grade VIII
classes were added, which converted them to elementary-junior secondary schools.
Enrolment is still increasing, but the earliest grades are now on a plateau and would
be declining if it were not for the opening of new kindergarten classes and an inflow
from private schools. Enrolment in special classes decreased during the year as
more pupils were absorbed in regular classes. The full-time instructional staff in
elementary schools increased 583 during the year or 5.7 per cent. The full-time
staff increase in all types of elementary and elementary-secondary schools was 671
or 5.9 per cent and the part-time staff increase was 17 or 4.5 per cent.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
G 21
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1.
2.
3.
4.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
52.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
75.
76.
77.
79.
Fernie	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere..
Nelson	
Slocan	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes..
Trail	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan..
Penticton	
Keremeos  	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke.	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen-
Vernon	
Kelowna	
Kamloops 	
Barriere	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake..
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo..
Merritt 	
Fraser Canyon _
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster..
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge _.
Coquitlam.
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver....
Sechelt	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte-
Prince Rupert	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George..
McBride	
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Saanich	
Gulf Islands .
Cowichan —
Lake Cowichan..
Ladysmith	
Nanaimo	
Qualicum	
Alberni	
Courtenay	
Campbell River-
Mission	
Agassiz 	
Summerland	
Ucluelet-Tofino_
5
6
7
7
14
7
12
5
11
3
5
2
10
3
3
6
6
2
12
30
28
5
6
30
21
5
10
6
4
28
31
27
57
17
34
89
9
38
19
33
33
13
9
13
10
5
1
8
5
7
9
38
4
20
20
42
14
14
5
24
8
10
30
9
18
17
17
16
5
2
3
25
69
50
22
86
20
66
25
103
26
10
28
86
16
3
35
41
20
110
199
267
16
22
126
96
23
52
53
35
174
150
132
543
178
317
1,492
117
522
126
478
421
167
57
102
63
14
1
86
37
35
37
313
16
138
104
587
107
95
18
121
40
54
231
41
178
142
106
73
20
22
17
25.5
76.2
52.3
23.1
95.3
20.4
70.6
25.7
113.3
29.5
10.0
32.5
93.2
16.0
3.0
40.0
45.2
22.0
127.9
219.6
322.5
16.6
23.0
138.0
101.8
25.0
58.0
57.4
40.0
180.5
152.0
147.0
600.6
205.0
350.7
1,698.7
132.0
582.1
138.1
514.5
485.6
205.7
64.0
118.2
69.1
16.0
1.0
96.6
38.8
36.4
41.2
352.2
16.5
153.1
113.8
656.8
111.0
103.2
20.5
129.5
43.0
56.8
244.5
44.2
189.1
160.0
117.7
77.6
24.0
24.1
18.4
774
2,307
1,411
551
2,495
540
1,774
608
2,871
847
177
857
2,764
478
46
1,017
1,266
688
3,627
6,365
8,103
425
585
3,515
2,901
662
1,542
1,579
1,104
5,665
4,452
4,063
17,186
5,792
10,163
47,684
3,611
16,266
4,000
16,220
13,164
5,443
1,578
2,962
1,743
285
12
2,740
1,117
878
1,040
9,724
409
4,278
2,869
19,914
3,521
3,121
459
3,617
1,100
1,587
6,636
1,156
5,642
4,299
2,861
2,048
548
709
449
 G 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
80. Kitimat   _.	
81    Fort 1ST.1-nn
1
4
4
6
1
5
11
10
6
17
23
1
1
1
69
20
9
11
28
28
61
9
97
89
17
2
12
85.0
22.0
9.0
12.0
30.5
28.1
65.5
9.0
100.0
92.9
18.0
2.0
12.6
2,180
562
82.  Chilmfin
149
265
631
666
1,784
176
2,914
2,590
527
87. Stikine     ...                     .....              	
89. Shuswap
Unattached:
32
University Hill
335
Totals      .
1,172
9,854
10,940.0
305,701
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The number of schools enrolling pupils in both junior secondary and elementary grades increased from 43 to 53 during the year after a decline of 121 during
the previous five years. In several cases these were temporary arrangements caused
by a shortage of separate junior-secondary accommodation for Grade VIII. The
enrolment increase from 13,164 to 15,460 was accompanied by a staff increase of
124 full-time and a decrease of two part-time teachers.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1. Fernie	
4. Windermere..
8. Slocan	
10. Arrow Lakes._
11. Trail	
13. Kettle Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan..
15. Penticton	
22. Vernon	
27. Williams Lake-
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
32. Fraser Canyon..
41. Burnaby-
44. North Vancouver..
47. Powell River	
50. Queen Charlotte—
52. Prince Rupert	
55. Burns Lake -
56. Vanderhoof	
57. Prince George..
58. McBride	
60. Peace River North-
61. Greater Victoria	
72. Campbell River	
83. Portage Mountain..
85. Vancouver Island North..
87. Stikine	
88. Skeena-Cassiar_
89. Shuswap-
Unattached:  John Stubbs Memorial-
Totals-
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
2
2
3
1
4
1
2
1
5
1
1
4
1
53
7
12
5
3
24
15
20
16
24
7
5
9
8
45
27
8
37
1
11
29
42
12
10
12
12
14
58
8
9
48
23
~56T~
8.0
13.5
7.0
3.0
30.0
17.7
30.0
21.0
34.0
7.2
6.0
10.0
9.0
58.0
35.0
10.0
41.5
1.0
13.0
36.7
52.5
12.2
10.0
19.0
13.4
18.0
68.8
9.0
9.3
66.2
27.0
697.0
202
318
133
40
728
408
722
466
662
164
98
157
225
1,379
770
210
891
12
266
831
1,065
346
234
395
265
279
1,503
195
196
1,466
834
15,460
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
G 23
The number of schools enrolling pupils in one or more elementary grades
through to the senior secondary grades, which was 44 in June, 1966, continued to
decline through 20 in 1968 to 17 in 1969. As a result, enrolment decreased from
12,024 to 11,324. The full-time teaching staff decreased from 550 to 514, and
the number of part-time teachers increased from two to seven.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1. Fernie	
7. Nelson    	
8. Slocan    	
1
1
2
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
33
13
14
25
5
11
186
29
13
17
15
11
12
42.0
17.0
18.1
32.5
6.3
12.5
272.0
39.5
15.0
24.0
24.0
15.0
17.0
986
304
337
754
18. Golden    	
19. Revelstoke     .  	
39. Vancouver   	
49.  Drain Falls
98
244
5,868
747
54. Smithers          -	
59. Peace River South   	
394
521
470
327
274
Totals
17
384
534.9
11,324
 G 24
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
Three more schools enrolling pupils in Grades VIII to X were in operation in
June, 1969, than in June, 1968, and 14 more than in June, 1967. Total enrolment
increased 7.6 per cent during the year and full-time staff, 10.1 per cent. Enrolment
in junior secondary schools has increased much more rapidly than that in the five-
or six-grade secondary schools during the past five years: 127 per cent v. 36 per
cent, although the greatest increases have occurred in Grades XI and XII. This
indicates a trend toward the separation of secondary schools into junior and senior
sections. Junior secondary enrolment, inflated by an inflow to Grade VIII from
private elementary schools, is expected to continue to grow rapidly for at least five
years, after which the growth rate should decline to relatively low levels. Retention
is no longer a factor in junior secondary enrolment, although immigration and
retardation are: in 1969, " retention," including both of the latter, reached 104 per
cent at the Grade X level, i.e., Grade X was 4 per cent larger than the corresponding
elementary stream from which it was derived.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley	
7. Nelson 	
9. Castlegar	
11. Trail	
15. Penticton	
22. Vernon	
24. Kamloops	
27. Williams Lake..
28. Quesnel	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey—	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
41. Burnaby..
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver	
47. Powell River	
52. Prince Rupert	
54. Smithers	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South-
60. Peace River North ..
61. Greater Victoria —
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich 	
65. Cowichan	
68. Nanaimo 	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni ..
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River..
89. Shuswap	
Totals .
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
3
2
1
7
1
5
7
5
2
1
1
1
4
2
1
9
2
3
3
3
1
2
4
1
1
85
18
20
24
11
22
14
37
75
21
6
49
59
12
202
13
121
196
112
62
26
27
9
83
39
24
225
30
40
54
75
8
43
53
37
7
1,854
24.0
29.0
34.0
16.0
31.0
19.0
51.0
110.6
30.0
21.0
65.5
72.0
17.0
279.3
20.0
167.0
286.0
166.5
89.0
44.0
39.0
14.0
114.5
56.0
33.0
319.0
43.5
55.0
69.5
108.3
12.0
58.8
75.0
55.0
12.0
2,636.5~
509
574
681
297
660
438
951
2,364
533
454
1,495
1,651
310
6,243
391
3,629
5,928
3,351
1,757
891
897
301
2,537
1,189
660
6,840
902
1,173
1,369
2,139
252
1,276
1,495
1,021
225
55,383
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
SECONDARY SCHOOLS
G 25
The number of schools enrolling pupils in Grades VIII to XII was 98 in June,
1969, and 10 others enrolled pupils in the VIII to XIII or X to XIII range. Although
enrolment in Grades VIII to XIII increased 7.5 per cent, enrolment in secondary
schools increased only 1.8 per cent, the reason being that most of the expansion
occurred in separate junior secondary (7.6 per cent) and senior secondary (32.7
per cent) types of schools. Full-time secondary-school staff increased 118 teachers,
or 3.0 per cent.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
2.
3.
4.
7.
9.
10,
11.
12,
14.
15.
16.
18.
19.
21.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
35.
36.
37.
39.
40.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
52.
54.
55.
56.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
75.
77.
79.
80.
81.
84.
85.
86.
. Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere...
Nelson	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes..
Trail 	
. Grand Forks	
Southern Okanagan,.
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen..
Kelowna	
Kamloops	
Barriere	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake..
Quesnel 	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo .
Merritt	
Fraser Canyon..
Chilliwack	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta	
Vancouver	
New Westminster-
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam-
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver	
Sechelt  	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Prince Rupert	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
McBride	
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Gulf Islands	
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan..
Ladysmith	
Nanaimo	
Qualicum	
Alberni.
Mission	
Summerland	
Ucluelet-Tofino..
Kitimat	
Fort Nelson	
Vancouver Island West	
Vancouver Island North..
Creston-Kaslo	
Skeena-Cassiar.-
Totals	
2
2
2
2
14
1
3
2
6
3
2
1
2
108
26
5
11
23
27
11
53
21
25
44
11
18
21
11
126
45
8
9
32
30
9
21
24
19
67
58
32
85
676
96
78
56
179
118
30
28
27
13
10
17
19
7
25
22
146
10
9
26
19
36
48
15
46
41
16
7
35
8
10
11
32
45
45.0
25.6
18.5
33.0
39.0
15.0
79.6
30.1
34.0
59.0
14.0
25.0
32.0
18.0
180.0
73.0
11.6
14.5
52.0
43.0
15.6
28.0
33.0
26.0
90.0
83.0
48.0
119.0
969.6
129.0
104.0
84.5
264.5
168.0
41.8
41.0
41.0
22.0
16.0
21.0
28.5
12.0
33.0
38.0
211.4
16.0
13.0
42.0
30.0
55.0
67.0
24.0
62.0
60.0
28.0
12.0
49.0
10.0
16.1
17.0
50.0
62.8
783
443
350
628
819
247
1,581
590
760
1,209
239
482
673
376
3,712
1,386
210
231
1,118
923
228
491
705
516
2,066
1,826
924
2,489
21,855
2,736
2,350
1,691
5,386
3,312
763
825
708
435
300
405
544
171
666
697
4,552
331
254
689
549
952
1,536
435
1,320
1,300
545
182
864
153
204
280
975
1,298
2,833     4,123.7   |  85,268
 G 26
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1968/69
SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The number of senior secondary schools, all of which have originated since
1962, increased to 18 in 1968/69. Seven schools enrolled students in Grades XI
and XII only, and 11 enrolled Grades XI to XIII. In spite of the fact that
Grade XIII enrolment is decreasing, total enrolment leaped upward from 12,407 to
16,460, an increase of 32.7 per cent during the year, and full-time teaching staff
increased 28.7 per cent.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
22. Vernon	
24. Kamloops -
34. Abbotsford .
36. Surrey	
38. Richmond—
41. Burnaby	
43. Coquitlam-
57. Prince George-
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River-
89. Shuswap	
Totals..
18
23
18
30
73
56
132
57
35
12
24
28
17
16
38.5
29.0
41.8
106.6
82.0
192.0
84.0
59.4
17.0
30.0
41.3
30.0
30.5
521
782.1
799
556
940
2,339
1,796
4,125
1,698
1,287
330
714
875
522
479
16,460
DISTRICT-EMPLOYED INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF1
(Not Assigned to Specific Schools)
District Number
and Name
Number of
Teachers
District Number
and Name
Number of
Teachers
District Number
and Name
Number of
Teachers
3
1
4
1
2
2
5
1
4
7
16
2
3
38.
39.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
52.
55.
56.
61.
62.
Richmond	
Vancouver
2
10
1
2
34
4
1
4
1
1
2
5
7
1
11
66. Lake Cowichan	
3
13
69. Qualicum	
7(1,  Alberni
2
North Vancouver	
West Vancouver	
14
1
79,  TTcliiplpt-Tofinri
1
80, K'timat
2
86. Creston-Kaslo	
88. Skeena-Cassiar	
89. Shuswap  _.	
3
9
Greater Victoria	
1
University Hill
1
Full time, 136.   Part time, 51.   Total, 187.
Total full-time equivalents, 160.1.
iThe district-employed instructional staff includes music, band, relief, remedial, visiting,  and permanent
substitute teachers, as well as librarians and home instructors.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
G 27
The net number of " schools " open in June, 1969, was the same as in June,
1968, although the number of pupils, divisions, and teachers all increased. Additions to existing schools have greatly increased their size and the replacement of
small schools with larger ones has increased the average enrolment per school. One-
roomed schools, of which there were 286 in June, 1959, and 213 in 1964, are rapidly
disappearing, so that only 102 remained in June, 1969.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1. Fernie  	
7
8
9
10
17
10
14
7
15
4
7
4
13
4
4
8
8
3
16
35
34
6
7
35
24
7
13
7
6
33
34
30
69
20
41
106
10
49
22
41
42
16
11
16
12
7
6
11
8
10
12
46
6
24
26
57
18
18
6
28
9
65
113
75
45
146
39
104
39
202
47
25
73
160
27
28
58
73
31
194
325
405
24
31
186
137
41
73
77
62
290
239
202
850
276
494
2,354
213
895
204
703
689
285
87
164
90
43
38
127
69
63
85
473
35
219
160
970
159
159
27
201
59
75.5
145.2
106.9
55.1
179.3
45.5
125.6
43.7
253.9
59.6
27.7
96.5
192.2
30.0
35.5
71.3
89.7
40.0
251.4
399.6
535.1
28.2
37.5
227.2
171.8
50.6
86.0
90.4
75.0
336.0
265.8
247.0
1,034.5
344.0
599.7
2,940.3
261.0
1,118.1
242.1
849.5
874.1
373.7
105.8
213.2
110.1
55.5
42.5
158.6
83.8
70.4
106.4
578.6
40.7
266.1
194.8
1,206.2
187.5
188.2
33.5
241.0
73.0
1,962
3,599
3. Kimberley  —    	
4. Windermere	
7. Nelson.   ...   	
2,428
1,219
4,108
1,010
9. Castlegar-   	
2,890
895
11. Trail                            	
5,840
12. Grand Forks 	
1,437
13. Kettle Valley. _ -	
585
2,339
15. Penticton         . .                                       ...     	
4,877
717
800
18. Golden     	
1,597
19. Revelstoke	
2,183
1,064
22. Vernon  	
6,039
10,077
24. Kamloops       	
25. Barriere	
26. Birch Island      _	
12,409
635
816
27, Williams 1.alee
5,330
4,376
1,047
2,033
2,284
1,845
9,226
7,043
6,199
26,692
8,672
15,588
75,407
6,347
27,698
6,350
22,960
21,077
8,755
2,341
4,888
2,451
1,032
903
28. Quesnel       _   	
29. Tjllooet
30. South Cariboo  	
31. Men-itt
33. Chilliwack        ..     	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley.	
36. Surrey  .       ~ ~ .-	
37. n. lta
38. Richmond     	
39. Vancouver.. - -	
41. Burnaby      	
43. Coquitlam	
46. Sechelt ,	
47. Powell River           	
49. Ocean Falls                                             	
4,084
2,112
1,549
2,415
14,613
926
58. McBride.   	
6,654
4,460
31,701
5,084
5,008
713
62. Sooke  ~  	
63. Saanich 	
64. Gulf Islands	
5,675
1,649
 G 28
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued
District Number and Name
Number of
Number of
Number of
Number of
Schools
Divisions
Teachers
Pupils
12
90
111.8
2,539
34
354
419.8
10,311
11
64
80.2
1,843
21
267
309.9
8,238
22
223
276.3
6,669
21
172
216.1
4,669
17
114
137.6
3,348
6
35
48.0
1,018
3
38
52.1
1,254
4
24
30.4
631
5
104
134.0
3,044
5
28
32.0
715
6
9
9.0
149
2
25
30.0
544
7
38
46.6
835
17
97
113.9
2,449
13
104
130.5
3,086
7
17
18.0
371
20
151
172.1
4,408
29
160
201.6
4,760
5
66
76.6
2,002
1,453
16,007
19,714.2
489,596
67. Ladysmith-
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum—
70. Alberni.
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River..
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz..
77. Summerland	
79. Ucluelet-Tofino..
80. Kitimat	
81. Fort Nelson	
82. Chilcotin 	
83. Portage Mountain	
84. Vancouver Island West ....
85. Vancouver Island North..
86. Creston-Kaslo	
87. Stikine	
88. Skeena-Cassiar	
89. Shuswap-
Four unattached districts .
Totals 	
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following tables classify teachers according to position, type of school,
and annual salary obtained by multiplying the June, 1969, salary by 10. All class
intervals in the salary distributions have a range of $500, centring on round numbers.
Supervising Principals (Principals Not Enrolling a Division)
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Junior
Sec.
Elem.-
Senior
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
per Cent
$20,750-21,249	
3
3
100.0
20,250-20,749	
.
1
	
8
1
10
99.5
19,750-20,249	
	
1
..
3
4
97.9
19,250-19,749	
	
1
1
8
3
13
97.3
18,750-19,249	
1
	
6
9
1
17
95.2
18,250-18,749	
1
	
8
12
1
22
92.5
17,750-18,249	
	
1
17
12
2
32
88.9
17,250-17,749	
18
2
1
2
9
6
38
83.8
16,750-17,249	
21
3
2
15
9
1
51
77.7
16,250-16,749	
65
2
1
9
8
3
88
69.6
15,750-16,249	
35
3
2
15
6
	
61
55.4
15,250-15,749	
45
2
1
3
3
	
54
45.7
14,750-15,249	
43
4
5
5
57
37.0
14,250-14,749	
39
3
2
	
2
46
27.9
13,750-14,249	
20
4
1
1
6
32
20.5
13,250-13,749	
25
1
	
1
1
28
15.4
12,750-13,249	
16
1
	
...
	
17
10.9
12,250-12,749	
9
2
1
1
1
	
14
8.2
11,750-12,249.     ..
7
3
1
	
11
5.9
11,250-11,749	
7
	
	
7
4.2
10,750-11,249	
7
	
	
	
	
7
3.0   .
10,250-10,749	
3
	
	
1
	
4
1.9
9,750-10,249	
3
	
	
	
	
3
1.3
9,250- 9,749	
1
	
	
	
—_
	
1
0.8
8,750- 9,249	
1
1
	
	
2
0.6
8,250- 8,749	
	
	
	
	
	
. 	
7,750- 8,249	
1
	
	
	
	
1
0.3
7,250- 7,749	
	
	
	
6,750- 7,249.	
1
	
	
	
	
1
0.2
Totals	
367
33
16
84
106
18
624
Total principals not enrolling a division, 624; median salary, $15,971; mean salary, $15,789.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
Full-time Teachers and Teaching Principals
G 29
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Junior
Sec.
Elem.-
Senior
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
per Cent
$19,750-20,249	
19,250-19,749	
18,750-19,249	
18,250-18,749	
17,750-18,249	
17,250-17,749	
16,750-17,249	
16,250-16,749	
15,750-16,249	
15,250-15,749	
14,750-15,249	
14,250-14,749	
13,750-14,249	
13,250-13,749	
12,750-13,249	
12,250-12,749	
11,750-12,249	
11,250-11,749	
10,750-11,249	
10,250-10,749	
9,750-10,249 	
9,250- 9,749	
8,750- 9,249	
8,250- 8,749	
7,750- 8,249..	
7,250- 7,749	
6,750- 7,249	
6,250- 6,749	
5,750- 6,249	
5,250- 5,749	
4,750- 5,249	
4,250- 4,749	
3,750- 4,249	
3,250- 3,749	
2,750- 3,249-	
Totals .
Medians.
1
5
8
15
25
45
49
47
66
113
74
223
200
144
420
288
284
853
872
,776
,245
,186
,123
824
385
81
26
7
4
1,390
2
4
1
9
7
16
12
25
35
11
29
36
43
62
76
76
73
45
53
27
7
3
1
4
1
2
19
18
49
15
54
17
16
38
27
26
27
47
34
62
19
19
7
5
2
1
10,:
$7,338      I $8,029     | $9,398"
6
9
6
10
10
12
18
39
94
87
139
182
79
201
146
188
216
273
253
305
166
69
19
7
653 514      I      2,536
1
I
$8,652
1
	
5
11
3
9
10
5
14
3
12
3
20
3
16
3
108
19
110
14
408
108
190
30
413
75
310
61
164
39
254
43
227
47
261
42
262
44
295
62
307
54
368
65
127
21
71
9
11
2
10
5
2
1
	
■
$9,858
4,000      i      757 18,850
[$10,104     |      $7,891
100.0
100.0
6
100.0
17
100.0
22
99.9
32
99.8
39
99.6
56
99.4
83
99.1
83
98.6
220
98.2
254
97.0
788
95.7
408
91.5
929
89.3
805
84.4
453
80.1
985
77.7
771
72.5
844
68.4
1,464
63.9
1,625
56.2
2,500
47.6
2,118
34.3
1,564
23.1
1,344
14.8
890
7.6
414
2.9
93
0.7
30
0.2
7
0.1
4
0.0
Total full-time teachers, 18,850, excluding district-employed and supervising principals;   mean salary, $8,488.
Part-time Teachers
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Junior
Sec.
Elem.-
Senior
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
per Cent
$9,250-9,749	
1
3
3
7
2
9
10
33
55
68
71
35
34
22
10
3
1
1
3
4
3
3
5
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
4
2
3
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
3
4
4
8
1
2
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
5
4
10
5
11
20
43
65
87
78
41
36
29
13
4
100.0
8,750-9,249 _
99.8
8,250-8,749	
7,750-8,249	
99.6
99.3
7,250-7,749	
98.9
6,750-7,249	
97.8
6,250-6,749	
96.9
5,750-6,249	
94.7
5,250-5,749	
93 6
4,750-5,249-
4,250-4,749   	
91.2
86 8
3,750-4,249	
77.4
3,250-3,749   	
63.2
2,750-3,249	
44.1
2,250-2,749. 	
27.0
1,750-2,249	
18.0
1,250-1,749	
10.1
750-1,249	
3.7
250-   749	
0.9
Totals	
366
23
1
19
28
13
456
Total part-time teachers, 456;  median salary, $3,405;  mean salary, $3,485.
 g 30 public schools report, 1968/69
Full-time Teachers and Principals Enrolling a Division
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Junior
Sec.
Elem.-
Senior
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
per Cent
$19,750-20,249	
1
1
100.0
19,250-19,749	
	
	
18,750-19,249	
	
	
	
18,250-18,749	
1
1
100.0
17,750-18,249	
	
 .
17,250-17,749	
	
1
1
100.0
16,750-17,249	
1
1
100.0
16,250-16,749	
5
	
5
100.0
15,750-16,249	
8
1
9
99.9
15,250-15,749	
15
15
99.9
14,750-15,249	
24
1
1
.	
	
26
99.8
14,250-14,749	
39
1
	
2
1
43
99.6
13,750-14,249-.
42
1
	
2
45
99.4
13,250-13,749	
42
4
13
12
63
11
145
99.1
12,750-13,249-
61
4
12
23
77
5
182
98.2
12,250-12,749	
101
13
33
53
271
75
546
97.0
11,750-12,249	
68
10
9
61
132
19
299
93.6
11,250-11,749	
194
17
42
88
298
49
688
91.7
10,750-11,249	
177
29
12
134
235
44
631
87.4
10,250-10,749	
133
8
8
59
121
28
357
83.4
9,750-10,249	
365
23
25
152
176
30
771
81.1
9,250- 9,749	
262
30
23
109
164
35
623
76.3
8,750- 9,249	
265
39
21
141
201
28
695
72.4
8,250- 8,749.   -
764
56
22
164
189
35
1,230
68.0
7,750- 8,249	
809
70
42
201
222
50
1,394
60.3
7,250- 7,749	
1,674
59
26
209
235
38
2,241
51.5
6,750- 7,249	
1,175
65
50
245
291
49
1,875
37.4
6,250- 6,749	
1,146
42
12
127
82
14
1,423
25.6
5,750- 6,249	
1,080
50
16
44
49
7
1,246
16.6
5,250- 5,749	
813
25
7
16
6
1
868
8.8
4,750- 5,249	
377
7
4
6
6
400
3.3
4,250- 4,749	
75
3  '
2
	
5
2
87
0.8
3,750- 4,249	
25
1
1
27
0.2
3,250- 3,749	
7
	
	
7
0.1
2,750- 3,249	
4
	
4
0.0
Totals	
9,752
557
382
1,845
2,829
521
15,886
	
Total enrolling divisions, 15,886; median salary, $7,697; mean salary, $8,244.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
Full-time Teachers Not Enrolling a Division
G 31
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Junior
Sec.
Elem.-
Senior
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
per Cent
$17,250-17,749	
5
5
100.0
16,750-17,249	
	
2
11
3
16
99.8
16,250-16,749	
1
1
6
9
17
99.3
15,750-16,249
9
9
5
23
98.7
15,250-15,749
1
6
14
3
24
97.9
14,750-15,249	
1
1
3
10
12
3
30
97.1
14,250-14,749	
6
3
1
10
18
2
40
96.1
13,750-14,249	
7
	
2
12
14
3
38
94.8
13,250-13,749	
5
5
6
6
45
8
75
93.5
12,750-13,249	
5
3
6
16
33
9
72
91.0
12,250-12,749	
12
3
16
41
137
33
242
88.5
11,750-12,249	
6
2
6
26
58
11
109
80.4
11,250-11,749
29
8
12
51
115
26
241
76.7
10,750-11,249.
23
6
5
48
75
17
174
68.6
10,250-10,749	
11
3
8
20
43
11
96
62.7
9,750-10,249
55
6
13
49
78
13
214
59.4
9,250- 9,749
26
6
4
37
63
12
148
52.2
8,750- 9,249
19
4
5
47
60
14
149
47.2
8,250- 8,749.
89
6
5
52
73
9
234
42.2
7,750- 8,249	
63
6
5
72
73
12
231
34.3
7,250- 7,749	
102
17
8
44
72
16
259
26.5
6,750- 7,249	
70
8
12
60
77
16
243
17.8
6,250- 6,749	
40
3
7
39
45
7
141
9.6
5,750- 6,249	
43
3
3
25
22
2
98
4.8
5,250- 5,749	
11
2
	
3
5
1
22
1.5
4,750- 5,249	
8
	
1
1
4
.	
14
0.8
4,250- 4,749	
6
	
	
	
	
6
0.3
3,750- 4,249
1
	
	
1
1
	
3
0.1
Totals	
638
96
132
691
1,171
236
2,964
	
Total full-time teachers not enrolling a division, 2,964;  median salary, $9,527;  mean salary, $9,790.
 G 32
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
District-employed Special Instructors
Salary
Number of Instructors
Full Time
Part Time
Persons
Full-time
Equivalents
Cumulative
per Cent
F.T.E.
Salaries
$13,750-14,249-
13,250-13,749...
12,750-13,249-
12,250-12,749-
11,750-12,249-
11,250-11,749-
10,750-11,249..
10,250-10,749-
9,750-10,249...
9,250- 9,749-
8,750- 9,249-
8,250- 8,749-
7,750- 8,249 ..
7,250- 7,749-
6,750- 7,249-
6,250- 6,749-
5,750- 6,249 -
5,250- 5,749-
4,750- 5,249-
4,250- 4,749-
3,750- 4,249 ..
3,250- 3,749-
2,750- 3,249...
2,250- 2,749...
1,750- 2,249...
1,250- 1,749-
750- 1,249...
250-    749...
Totals-
5
10
2
9
7
4
18
15
24
10
4
7
3
6
1
136
0.8
2.3
2.0
0.5
3.3
2.5
2.8
2.0
0.5
3.2
1.3
1.9
0.9
0.1
24.1
100.0
99.5
98.9
98.4
93.6
90.9
85.0
84.0
78.1
72.7
70.1
57.8
46.5
30.5
23.0
17.1
9.6
7.0
3.2
2.7
1.1
0.5
187 persons
ieo.i f.t.e.s
Medians:   Full time, $8,183;  part time, $3,437;  all F.T.E.s, $7,804.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
G 33
EXPENDITURES FOR EDUCATION, CALENDAR YEAR 1968
(Exclusive of Capital Expenditures from By-law Funds)
Total, expenditures by school districts  $285,686,761.00
Add—Department of Education expenditures
for administration, correspondence schools,
Teachers' Pension Fund, free textbooks
and maps, adult education, vocational and
technical schools, grants to colleges, universities, and school districts, etc.   $251,827,287.92
Less—Government grants to
school districts included above:
Direct grants $116,569,359.00
Grants  to  reduce  local
taxation       36,608,072.24
Total Government grants     153,177,431.24
Gross total,  Department of Education  expenditures        98,649,856.68
Grand total, expenditures $384,336,617.68
COST PER PUPIL, CALENDAR YEAR 1968
Grand total cost of education $384,336,617.68
Deduct—
Capital expenditure from current revenue ____ $2,501,891.00
Debt charges on school district debt   .... 37,211,621.00
Department of Education expenditures for
post-secondary and adult education,
correspondence schools, technical and
vocational   schools,   grants   to   colleges
and universities, etc. 88,545,345.40
 128,258,857.40
Total operating costs  $256,077,760.28
Operating cost per pupil for year on daily average attendance of 447,643 . $572.06
 G 34
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
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G 35
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PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1968/69
IN RETROSPECT
Although the school-year brought no amendments to the Public Schools Act,
it did see a slight change in the application of the financial formula when provision
was made for additional recognition of special classes in calculating the number of
instructional units. For each approved special class three-quarters of a unit is
allowed, this being in addition to the number of instructional units based on the
total pupil population.
Several major changes were made in the organization of the Department itself.
Most important was the establishment of a Division of Special Education to supervise provincially this very important part of the educational system. Special education has been recognized within the Public Schools Act since 1954, but its supervision has since that time been directly associated with the office first of the Chief
Inspector, then of the Assistant Superintendent (Instructional Services), and finally
of the Superintendent of Education. The recognition that it is a major function for
which one senior official is directly responsible should give the education of handicapped children fresh impetus. Mr. J. L. Canty, formerly Co-ordinator of Services,
is the new Director of Special Education and, since his appointment, has been actively engaged in studies concerned with his new duties.
Two former Divisions of the Department, Visual Education and School Broadcasts, have been consolidated under the direction of Mr. B. A. Black, formerly
Director of School Broadcasts. Much of the future of educational television will
lie in the production, purchase, and distribution of tapes for use in closed systems.
The distribution of films, film-strips, and similar aids to schools has always been a
major function of the Division of Visual Aids. By consolidating the two services,
duplication of the distributive function is avoided and there can be direct co-ordination of the productive function. Present activities of both services are maintained,
while provision for planned and unified development of them is facilitated.
Another consolidation of services occurred with the union of elementary and
secondary correspondence schools under one Division of Correspondence Education,
with Mr. J. Ross Hind in charge. In this field, in which British Columbia was a
pioneer, needs have changed over the years. The original purpose, that of bringing
education to children in isolated areas, still exists, but the expansion of population
and of greater school facilities has reduced the number of children needing this
service. Correspondence education now tends to supplement and expand curriculum offerings available to children in smaller schools, to extend to the adult population to a greater degree, to assist the child temporarily homebound through illness
and accident, and to assist industry with special vocational courses. The new
organization of the Division of Correspondence Education is designed to recognize
the continuous nature of learning and to facilitate it by reducing emphasis on its
segmentation.
It is not the purpose of this introductory statement to duplicate materials within
the body of this report. Perhaps, however, attention should be directed to the invitational seminar on problems arising from the use and abuse of drugs, with special
reference to education. This was convened by the Minister of Education in cooperation with the British Columbia School Trustees Association and the British
Columbia Teachers' Federation. Subsequently, local school programmes have been
developed in many parts of the Province.
There is some indication that the general teacher shortage which has plagued
the school system for almost two decades is now disappearing. Shortages still exist
in the highly specialized fields—commerce, home economics, and music—to mention
a few, but the number of qualified professional teachers available is markedly increasing.
  I
G 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SENIOR STAFF CHANGES
There have been no changes in headquarters staff other than those already
mentioned.
His colleagues within the Department were saddened by the sudden death just
at the conclusion of the school-year of Mr. Gordon Johnson, District Superintendent
of Schools for School District No. 47 (Powell River). Mr. Johnson, a principal
of long experience before joining the Department, had served as Inspector and District Superintendent in the Peace River, Prince George, and Kelowna areas. He
had just arrived in Kelowna to relax for a few days with friends there when his sudden demise occurred. Mr. Johnson was an outstanding educator, especially in the
elementary field, and his services will be sadly missed both by the Department and
his superintendency.
The following retirements occurred during the year:—
Mr. A. H. Plows, Director of Elementary Correspondence, served as a teacher
and principal in Westbank, Shawnigan Lake, and Cobble Hill. He was principal
for some years of the Fairbridge Farm School near Duncan. Enlisting in the army
at the outbreak of war in 1939 he had a distinguished career overseas. In the more
than 16 years with which he served the Department he showed outstanding ability
as an educator and administrator.
Others who retired after years of faithful service were Mr. Percy Wilkinson,
Assistant Registrar, and Mr. Bruce Barr, Librarian.
Mr. D. G. Chamberlain joined the Department as Inspector of Schools in 1954,
having previously served as teacher and principal in Pacific, Salmo, Nelson, and
Rossland. His superintendencies included Williams Lake and Alberni before his
appointment in 1964 as District Superintendent for Hope, Princeton, and Keremeos.
Mr. Joseph Chell was a teacher in Fernie and a principal in New Westminster
before the Department commandeered his services as Inspector of Schools for Nelson. After serving as District Superintendent at Prince Rupert and at Mission, he
was appointed in 1961 as assistant to the District Superintendent for Greater Victoria, and he succeeded to the latter post in 1966.
Mr. Floyd Irwin taught at Kimberley, Castlegar, Westbank, Rutland, and Nelson. He was principal of the Nelson Junior High School when appointed to the
Department as an Inspector of Schools in 1952. He served as District Superintendent in the Peace River districts before assuming the same position for Vernon
in 1958.
Mr. W. A. Marchbank taught in Riondel, Courtenay, and Creston, where he
was principal of the Junior-Senior High School, before joining the Department in
1957. He was District Superintendent for Peace River South and in the Southern
Okanagan before taking up his post at Nelson in 1966. His retirement has been
temporarily delayed while Mr. Weicker, District Superintendent at Fort St. John,
is on temporary educational leave of absence.
Mr. Harold Stafford came to the Department as Inspector of Schools in 1939,
having previously served as a teacher and principal in Hutton Mills, Peachland,
Woodfibre, and Kimberley. He served as Inspector of Schools at Prince George,
Courtenay, Campbell River, Alberni, and Howe Sound, and a number of other centres. In 1950 he went to Langley as District Superintendent of Schools, a post retained until his retirement. Active in Canadian as well as British Columbia educational affairs, he was a charter member and an early president of the Canadian
Association of School Superintendents and Inspectors.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
G 41
As replacements to the corps of District Superintendents, the following were
appointed at the end of the school-year: Mr. A. C. Campbell, formerly Director of
Secondary Instruction for School District No. 57 (Prince George); Mr. H. E. Cullis,
formerly principal of Sentinel Secondary School, West Vancouver; Mr. D. E. A.
Eldred, formerly Director of Elementary Instruction for School District No. 57
(Prince George); Mr. C. Hopper, formerly principal of Rutland Elementary
School; and Mr. R. G. Lyon, formerly Director of Elementary Instruction for
School District No. 70 (Alberni).
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
As in other years, the co-operation of my colleagues in the Department of
Education, the boards of school trustees and their staffs in the school districts, and
the principals and teachers in the public schools is gratefully acknowledged. I would
also like to tender my personal thanks to colleagues in other Departments of Government whose help has been eagerly sought and ungrudgingly given when advice
was necessary in dealing with problems somewhat beyond my sphere of training.
I have honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
F. P. LEVIRS,
Superintendent of Education.
 1
G 42 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
REPORT OF J. PHILLIPSON, B.A., B.Ed., ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT
OF EDUCATION (ADMINISTRATION AND SCHOOL BOARD RELATIONS).
School Construction
Construction of school buildings progressed at a rapid pace in the early months
of 1969. Tenders were called for over 1,100 classrooms from January to June.
This accelerated programme of construction should have a significant effect in providing for classroom needs throughout the Province.
The cost of school construction continues to be a matter of concern as material
costs and wages increase. A number of architects employed by School Boards have
given excellent service by designing schools in which modular concept principles,
the use of standardized components, and the use of pre-built components have been
evident. Through their ideas and research these professionals have managed to
offset rising costs to a significant degree. The Department appreciates the efforts
of all those who have co-operated in taking a serious view to provide functional
buildings at minimal cost.
Numerous " pilot" projects were carried out over the year by School Boards
in co-operation with the Department in order to achieve savings in both cost and
time. In School District No. 63 (Saanich) several projects were designed in such
a way that standardized components and a systems approach to construction techniques applied. Bidding on components for all projects preceded the call for general
tenders on individual schools. This project proved successful, although the resulting
work load on the district staff was heavy. In School District No. 23 (Kelowna)
nine small projects were tendered as a single contract. Again, components were
standardized and a favourable contract was finalized. In School District No. 62
(Sooke) the Department School Planning Division designed and supervised the
construction of a four-room elementary school under a " construction management "
approach. This is proving to be an excellent school, completely modern, economical, and incorporating many furnishings and fixtures built on a modular basis.
School District No. 43 (Coquitlam) met the cost limitation for secondary classrooms
by using a " construction management " technique rather than the general contractor
approach. Similarly, in School District No. 71 (Courtenay), the limitations of the
$16,000 per classroom (elementary) and $22,500 per classroom (secondary) formula were met by application of simple but extremely functional design. These
experiments have enabled our Boards and Department to evaluate different
approaches to construction. The experience gained has been valuable in spite of
the difficulties of making comparisons in a fluctuating construction market.
The pre-fabricating industry has also played an important role in supplying
classrooms at reasonable cost. This industry has been applying its efforts to the
design of total schools rather than portable classrooms, a move which the Department is encouraging.
In summary, the construction year 1968/69 has been highlighted by significant efforts on the part of many School Boards to get the best value for the construction dollar.
 ■
ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
G 43
Fire Losses
The number of schools damaged or destroyed by fires is becoming a matter of
increasing concern. The estimated losses for the first six months of 1969 approached
two million dollars, with six fires. One of these involved the total loss of a large
junior secondary school valued at one million dollars.
The following tables were derived from the Fire Marshal's Annual Reports.
The tables report fire losses ranging from $5 to $950,000. Tables II and III indicate some of the major causes of fire damage to schools in British Columbia.
The largest category comprises causes of unknown origin. Among these must
fall those fires where there is a suspicion of incendiary origin.
The dollar value used by the Fire Marshal are the actual costs, not the amount
covered by fire insurance.
Table I.—Yearly Fire Damage in Schools
Year
1957_.
1958_
1959.
1960.
1961_
1962.
1963_.
1964_
1965_.
1966_.
1967..
Number
of Schools
Damaged
Amount
25
$150,898
37
608,453
26
1,155,905
36
101,631
21
465,752
24
427,874
34
447,604
47
824,277
31
9,852
46
1,263,958
48
2,263,807
375
$7,720,011
Table II.—Major Causes of Fire Damage
Year
Incendiary
Smoker
Unknown
Short
Circuit
' Other
Total
1957	
1
4
9
7
7
7
12
15
6
14
17
4
5
2
6
4
5
3
5
7
3
6
9
8
8
3
5
2
7
8
7
7
2
2
3
5
1
12
17
7
15
11
8
15
19
12
13
20
25
1958                      .         	
37
1959   _     	
26
1°60
36
.%l
21
106?
24
1063
34
1964	
47
1965                                          	
31
1966  	
46
1967  	
48
Totals 	
99
44
70
13
149
375
 G 44
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
Table III.—Amount of Damage by Major Causes
Year
Incendiary
Smoker
Unknown
Short
Circuit
Other
Total
1957               	
700
i
1.642     ;        112.461
565
85,088
35,530
166,833
55,440
10,703
2,658
18,860
153,339
8,790
2,778
74,194
20,591
150,898
1958....               	
1,588    |    20,306    1       334,638
307,421    ;          204    i       792,840
33,916    \      4,933    :          52,079
6,886    ]     [       456,208
304,549           8,930    |          95,535
280,953    J          312    \          13,000
365,447               969    |       448,934
247    J       1,285    |            5,542
89,800           1,187    |       953,327
1,173,544    j          265    j     1,069,207
608,453
1959 	
1,155,905
I960......	
101,631
1961- -
465,752
1962 — 	
427,874
1963              	
447,604
1964             	
137
824,277
1965  	
9,852
1966-  	
145,450
200
1,263,958
1967  	
2,263,807
Totals 	
2,565,051    |    40,033
;
4,333,771
231,440
549,716
7,720,011
School District Relations
The staff of the General Administration and the School Planning Division has
met with hundreds of school trustees and officials throughout the year. In the matter
of preparing referenda, planning school projects, organizing transportation routes,
as well as carrying out the multiplicity of day-by-day tasks, we have endeavoured
to provide efficient service in expediting administrative matters affecting school
district affairs. The numerous expressions of appreciation are acknowledged and
the good relations which exist are most encouraging.
Visits to School Districts
The writer had the opportunity to visit the schools of nearly 30 districts in company with the Honourable the Minister during the past year. It is, indeed, an exciting experience to visit modern schools and to see learning taking place in modern
buildings with first-class equipment. In British Columbia we may well be proud of
the functional buildings, the fine furnishings, and the excellent instructional equipment that are being provided.
Statistical Data
Certain statistical data concerning the affairs of the Administrative Branch for
1968/69 are shown below:—
School District Organization
73
Municipal school districts	
Rural school districts     8
Unattached school districts     4
Total
85
School Board Organization
Three-member Board  2
Five-member Board  25
Seven-member Board  3 7
Nine-member Board  17
Official Trustees (number of districts)   4
Total
85
 ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
G 45
Capital Expenditures (Section 190 Approvals, Calendar Year 1968)
Site purchases and improvement  $4,128,892
Buildings—construction   19,373,122
Equipment    3,675,841
Plans and supervision  1,359,172
Total    $28,537,027
Referenda, Calendar Year 1968
Referenda approved by Department  $58,838,895
Referenda approved by owner-electors  $54,143,480
(a) Shareable   $54,143,480
(b) Non-shareable   Nil
Total   $54,143,480
Referenda defeated by owner-electors 	
4,695,415
$58,838,895
School
Districts
Successful referenda   19
Unsuccessful referenda   11
Total
Referenda
19
13
CO-ORDINATOR OF SERVICES
(Report of J. L. Canty, B.A., M.Ed., Co-ordinator)
Conveyance of School-children
The following statistics indicate details connected with the conveyanci
school-children during the school-year 1968/69:—
1. Number of large school districts providing transportation  73
2. Number of unattached school districts providing transportation 1
3. Total number of vehicles         755
(a) District-owned   544
lb) Contract  205
(c)  Other (water taxis, etc.)        6
4. Total daily approved mileage  57,190
(a) Average distance per vehicle (miles)        75.7
(b) Average number of trips per vehicle         2.0
Average distance per single trip       18.9
5. Total number of daily trips by all vehicles     1,501
6. Total number of pupils carried daily   65,985
(a) Elementary   32,113
(b) Secondary   33,872
7. Average number of pupils carried per vehicle       87.4
8. Average number of pupils carried per route        59.1
of
 G 46
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
Transportation Assistance
Transportation assistance, to a maximum of 10 cents per vehicle-mile travelled,
is made available for the transportation of children who reside where there are too
few children to justify establishment of a bus route.
During the school-year 1968/69, the Province shared in transportation assistance of 2,222 pupils in 61 school districts at a cost of $355,382.
Table of Transportation Costs
The following table indicates the relationship between the total district expenditures and the total conveyance costs over the past 12 years:—
Calendar Year
Total District
Expenditures
Conveyance
Costs
Conveyance
Costs as a
Percentage
of District
Expenditures
1957  	
$80,966,873
91,279,662
105,044,901
118,269,991
127,616,486
136,432,687
150,790,702
165,814,555
185,566,119
214,156,353
248,031,667
285,686,761
$2,104,443
2,236,918
2,340,813
2,477,202
2,611,370
2,721,510
2,886,696
3,125,447
3,475,895
4,009,393
4,610,089
5,355,378
2.5
1058
2.4
J05Q
2.2
I960
2.1
1061
2.0
1962
2.0
1Q63
1.9
1064
1.9
1965
1.9
1066
1.9
1967                -	
1.9
1968                            .
1.87
Summary of School Dormitory Data, 1968/69
School District and
Capacity
Occupancy
Staff
Grade Limits
Location
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Full
Time
Part
Time
From
To
24. Kamloops , 	
15
40
30
30
16
43
16
68
15
14
40
30
20
32
47
12
58
14
15
24
24
26
21
43
16
52
15
9
27
31
17
28
47
10
46
14
1
4
4
4
3
4
2
6
2
Nil
Nil
Nil
1
Nil
Nil
Nil
2
Nil
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
13
12
27. 100 Mile	
12
29. Lillooet 	
12
55. Burns Lake	
12
13
58. McBride  	
12
12
64. Gulf Islands 	
12
Totals-	
297
287
?3fi       1     9.Q
30
3
Boarding Allowances
For pupils who are unable to take advantage of transportation or dormitory
facilities, the School Board is empowered to provide a boarding allowance. Under
this arrangement a pupil can receive up to $40 a month on a basis shared by the
Department of Education. During the past school-year 1968/69, the Province
shared in boarding allowances of 634 pupils in 45 school districts, who received a
total of $250,300.
Special Education
During the latter part of the year the Co-ordinator of Services undertook the
duties of developing a Special Education Branch within the Department. The immediate requirements were:—
 ADMINISTRATION BRANCH G 47
(1) To establish procedures by which special education programmes in school
districts would receive approval for grant purposes:
(2) To develop the liaison services with other departments and various private
agencies whose work concerns handicapped children.
Included in this is representation of the Department of Education on such
bodies as the Provincial Youth Resources Panel, the Community Care Facilities
Licensing Board, and Sechelt Indian Education Advisory Committee.
Approval procedures were established by the end of the school-year, and
Boards of School Trustees were notified during the summer months.
During the school-year, assistance was given several school districts in the
development of special education programmes to operate within institutions controlled by other authorities.
Jericho Hill Schools
The Jericho Hill Schools for the Deaf and for the Blind have been included
in the work of the Special Education Branch. The report of the superintendent of
the school is printed separately.
During the year the Advisory Board met in October, December, February,
May, and June to consider items of business and to receive briefs and opinions from
various groups.
A significant item drawn to the Board's attention toward the end of the year
was the planned development of a professional advisory council to the superintendent
of the schools.
At its June meeting the Board received with regret the resignation of Mrs. R. S.
Wood and Mrs. Joan Boyd, who have ably represented the parents of pupils in the
deaf and the blind schools respectively.
School Utilization Committee
At the end of the 1968/69 school-year, this committee, established by the
Minister of Education to make recommendations for the more effective utilization
of the schools, was in the process of preparing its final report.
The committee received many submissions from various organizations in the
Province, particularly from recreation commissions. These submissions, together
with the Committee's own readings, should enable it to produce a report which will
offer more guidance in this matter.
TEACHER RECRUITMENT
(Report of Philip J. Kitley, M.A., Co-ordinator)
With the recognition that an adequate supply of suitable well-qualified teachers
is not something that can be left simply to chance or the natural laws of economics,
this Division is charged with the responsibility of assisting in the identification,
evaluation, encouragement, and guidance of persons who might be expected to make
a contribution to teaching in British Columbia.
During the past year this has involved continuous contact with representatives
of the Province's faculties of education, the British Columbia School Trustees Association, and the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, as well as the development
and provision of information about teaching to the many groups and individuals
making inquiries.
Specifically, the Division has supported the 104 Future Teachers Clubs of the
Province's senior secondary schools, by distributing informational and programme
material, by visits and other contacts, and through the encouragement of conferences
and workshops as deemed suitable.
  ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
G 49
The Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment shared in the planning and the programme of the September 27, 1968, workshop for sponsors of Future Teachers
Clubs, presented under the auspices of the British Columbia School Trustees
Association. On November 22, 1968, a visit was made to the campus of Western
Washington State College at Bellingham, in company with the Departmental Registrar, for the purpose of discussing with students (largely from British Columbia)
details of the teacher-education programme and teacher employment. Some direction was given in the planning of the Future Teachers Conference at the University
of Victoria, January 30 and 31 and February 1, 1969, in which the Division also
participated, and the Division was involved in the planning of the May 9, 1969,
Southern Vancouver Island Future Teachers Conference sponsored by the Greater
Victoria School Board. The Division was also represented on the programme of
the British Columbia School Trustees Association School District Orientation Days
held at the University of Victoria and the University of British Columbia, March 20
and 21, 1969.
During the year this has also meant representation on such standing committees
as the Joint Board of Teacher Education, and chairmanship of the Advisory Committee on Teacher Recruitment; and contact with ad hoc committees such as the
University of British Columbia Committee on the Future of the Faculty of Education.
In the period July 22-31, 1969, interviews were held with 123 persons at the
University of British Columbia and the University of Victoria summer sessions concerning problems connected with teacher-education programmes or teaching positions.
Continuous study was made of ways and means of meeting the critical shortage
of teachers of commerce. In spite of the withdrawal of financial support by Canada
Manpower Services, plans were laid for further special programming for interested
student teachers at the University of British Columbia. It was anticipated that at
least five to ten students would enrol in this special programme in the fall of 1969.
There were one or two indications during the year that the chronic teacher
shortage was beginning to show signs of easing, though shortages, particularly in
specialist areas, continued to be critical. The following table shows the distribution
of categories of teaching certificates as reported by school districts in October, 1968.
There is a marked trend toward improvement in the amount of training undertaken
by British Columbia teachers:—
Elementary
Schools
Secondary
Schools
Total
99
(0.8%)
4,415
(37.6%)
3,291
(28.0%)
3,952
(33.6%)
250
(3.0%)
551
(6.4%)
577
(6.7%)
7,181
(83.8%)
349
(1.7%)
4,966
(24.4%)
3,868
(19.1%)
11,133
(54.8%)
Totals                                    	
11,757
8,573
20,330
The policy of awarding scholarships to outstanding classroom teachers was
continued by the Honourable the Minister of Education, the Co-ordinator of Teacher
Recruitment acting as secretary of the Selection Committee. Scholarships were
awarded as follows:—
Mr. W. Halyk, Dr. Knox Secondary School, Kelowna.
Mrs. A. H. Rosene, Sir Charles Kingsford-Smith Elementary School, Vancouver.
 G 50
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
Miss R. P. Wilson, John Oliver Secondary School, Vancouver.
Miss H. van Wageningen, Oakridge School for Retarded Children, Vancouver.
In all, 69 requests for application forms were received, and out of these 20
completed applications were returned.
Guidance Services
The Guidance Services of the Department of Education involve provision of
guidance-information material to schools, and some direction in the areas of school
counselling and the guidance programme. In connection with the latter, the Director was a member of a Guidance Curriculum Revision Committee which met regularly throughout the year.
The Division initiated a small committee to examine recommended school
counsellor qualifications and arranged for submission of a report giving specific
details. A start was also made on examination of guidance needs at the elementary-
school level.
The work of the Division brought the Director into active contact with a number of groups and projects during the year, including the following:—
Meetings with the Vancouver Board of Trade and planning of such functions
as the Business-Education Conference held at the University of British
Columbia July 16, 1968.   This brought together a group of school counsellors and business men for discussion of common interests and concerns
relative to employment.
Attendance and participation in similar conferences arranged with the British
Columbia Chambers of Commerce at Kelowna, November 28, 1968, and
Dawson Creek, April 18, 1969.
Preparation of explanatory details relative to student records and school-
leaving certificates, for the information of members of the Chambers of
Commerce.
Meetings with the British Columbia Aviation Council relative to the development of suitable occupational information in connection with the industry.
Participation in a counsellor workshop at the University of Victoria, August
19-22, 1968.
Meetings with several university classes studying topics related to the school
guidance programme.
Meeting February 15, 1969, with an advisory group set up by the Victoria
Kiwanis Club to consider youth vocational counselling services.
Joint chairmanship of the Invitational Seminar on Problems Related to the
Use of Drugs, held for school district representatives, February 27 and
28, 1969.
Attendance at the Canadian Guidance and Counselling Association Conference, June 1-4, 1969.
In particular, the appreciation of this Division must be expressed to members
of the British Columbia Counsellors' Association who during the year have shown
an amiable and energetic capacity for co-operation.
Department of Education Display
Working under the chairmanship of Mr. S. Halton, the Director assisted with
the development of a completely new Department of Education display in the British Columbia Building, Vancouver.
 ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
G 51
Federal-Provincial Young Voyageur Program
The Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment acts as Co-ordinator of the Young
Voyageur Program for British Columbia. During the summer the Province received
17 groups of senior-secondary school students (408 in all) from other provinces,
and sent to other provinces the same number. Students spend a full week in a host
community, and enjoy a programme of cultural and social events. A schedule has
been developed whereby it is expected that all senior-secondary schools of any size
will be represented at least once every two years. Following is a list of host centres,
which also acted as rallying points for British Columbia travellers:—
British Columbia
Centres
Port Alberni
Burnaby
Castlegar
Chilliwack
Cloverdale
Coquitlam
Cranbrook
Haney
Kamloops
New Westminster
Penticton
Sidney
Vancouver
Vernon
Victoria
Williams Lake
Host Communities
for British Columbia
Young Voyageurs
Kitchener, Ont.
Dalhousie, N.B.
Leaside, Ont.
Montreal, Que.
Levis, Que.
Liverpool, N.S.
Montreal, Que.
Quebec, Que.
St. Stephen, N.B.
Charlottetown, P.E.I.
Dartmouth, N.S.
Prince Albert, Sask.
St. John's, Nfld.
Montreal, Que.
Trois Rivieres, Que.
Trenton, Ont.
Montreal, Que.
Young Voyageurs Were
Received from the
Following Centres
Quebec, Que.
Barrie, Ont.
Montreal, Que.
Fort William, Ont.
Winnipeg, Man.
Brantford, Ont.
St. John, N.B.
Etobicoke, Ont.
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.
Victoriaville, Que.
Montreal, Que.
Riviere du Loup, Que.
Yarmouth, N.S.
Shawinigan, Que.
Halifax, N.S.
Regina, Sask.
St. John, N.B.
In most instances a number of school districts were represented in each unit,
and in all cases more than one or two schools. For example, five districts and six
schools were represented in the unit for which Cranbrook was a rallying and reception point.
The project involves the active co-operation of many people, including the
District Superintendents who generally act as local chairmen, the teachers who consent to act as unit escorts (two to a group), the families who billet visiting students,
and public-spirited committee members. The success of the whole project rests
upon the enthusiastic co-operation of many people and organizations in a large number of communities, without which it could not succeed. Unstinted praise must go
to the many who have co-operated in making this project an outstanding exercise
in Canadian citizenship.
JERICHO HILL SCHOOLS
Special School for Aurally or Visually Handicapped Children
(Report of P. Freemantle, N.C.T.D., DIP.(Eng.), B.Ed., Superintendent)
The net enrolment for the 1968/69 school year was divided as follows:—
Day
Resident
Total
117
51
118
32
235
83
Totals  ....	
168
150
318
 G 52
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
The school-year opened with five off-campus classes, which represented a drop
of one from the previous year. One class was withdrawn when insufficient numbers enrolled.
During October, 1968, work was started on the development of the recreation
area in the south and east part of the campus. Unfortunately, the heavy snowfall
in January delayed completion until June, 1969, but we now have a large play area
immediately south of Blake Hall. It incorporates a climbing pyramid, swings,
teeter-totters, a roundabout and a quarter clover-leaf, and a sand-pit surrounds
the equipment. Further south there is a playing-field for football, track events,
baseball, and tennis. By September, 1969, the whole area should be ready for use.
Also, a covered playground for use of the junior blind is located between the dormitory and classroom wings on the east side of Blake Hall. Preliminary plans have
been drawn up for the proposed dining-room/infirmary complex. It is hoped that
this will soon proceed to construction.
The programme of integration of blind pupils in sighted schools continues with
the invaluable assistance of the British Columbia Telephone voluntary group, The
Pioneers' Club. This club has, for many years, provided braille copies of prescribed
texts through the assistance of transcribers at the Canadian National Institute for
the Blind. Again, this year, a number of blind students from the Province of Alberta
have been enrolled. Where it is desirable, these youngsters also transfer back at
the Grade XI level to public schools in Alberta.
Since September, 1968, a full programme in the pre-vocational areas of
seamstress/garment repair, horticulture, and small-appliance repair has been operating. By the end of the term two girls were placed in the garment repair course
and one boy went on to television and radio repair. These courses will continue in
1969/70.
Two deaf candidates from this Province successfully passed entrance examinations for Gallaudet College. This now brings the total from British Columbia
to six.
The Tenth World Games for the Deaf were held in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, during August. On May 14th, a " Swim-A-Thon " was held at the school to help raise
funds to send nine swimmers, including four from the school, from the Province.
Officials from Victoria participated during the evening, and the Honourable the Minister of Education attended the events during the afternoon. Also, a fashion show
was staged in Lord Byng High School Auditorium, in aid of the Games, and several
of our girl students participated as models.
The support of the staff and the co-operation of the Department of Education
and Advisory Board throughout the past year are gratefully acknowledged.
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
G 53
INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
REPORT OF J. R. MEREDITH, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION (INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES)
This Branch of the Department has general supervisory responsibility for educational services in the field of instruction. Certain of these are administered by
particular Divisions of the Department and a separate report is provided by the
Directors.
Accreditation
There was a continuation of the procedure whereby senior secondary schools
can apply for authority to recommend a proportion of Grade XII pupils for standing in certain subjects leading to graduation on the Academic-Technical Programme.
During the year 1968/69, the Accrediting Committee assessed applications from
60 schools and recommended that 46 be accredited. The following is a statistical
summary of the status of senior secondary schools in respect of accreditation. The
size of the school and the attendant limitations in curriculum, staff, and facilities are
major factors in the majority of cases where schools are not accredited: —
Total number of schools offering Grade XII  138
Number of schools assessed, 1968/69     60
Number of schools not accredited  14
Number of schools accredited for one year  18
Number of schools accredited for two years     4
Number of schools accredited for three years  12
Number of schools accredited for four years  12
Total number of schools accredited, 1968/69      46
Number of schools accredited in previous years and still retaining
accreditation      78
Total number of schools accredited as of 1968/69  124
Teacher Certification
A Teacher Certification Committee was established by the Superintendent of
Education in 1967 to advise on particular problems which arise from time to time
in connection with determining the certificate to be granted in individual cases and
to consider the present regulations as they may apply to new teacher education programmes.
During the year 1968/69 the Committee held seven meetings. Twelve special
appeals from previous decisions on certification were considered. The majority of
these involved training taken in whole or in part in jurisdictions outside of the Province of British Columbia. The committee also considered the matter of certificating
teachers for vocational courses and the question of requiring a university degree for
the professional certificate.
Choice of Programmes, September, 1968
The year 1968/69 was the third year of the reorganized junior-senior secondary school curriculum. The following shows the choice of programmes of the
55,106 pupils enrolled in Grades XI and XII. Figures in parenthesis are for the
first year of the reorganized curriculum:—
 1
G 54
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
Programme
Academic and Technical
Commercial 	
Industrial 	
Community Services	
Per Cent
63.2
(63.3)
17.7
(18.7)
11.8
(11.4)
4.1
(3.9)
1.6
(1.3)
1.6
(1.4)
Visual and Performing Arts	
Other programmes (Agriculture, Specific Vocational)	
Provision is made in the above programmes for pupils to include in their particular programme courses from other programmes. Provision is also made for
pupils to choose from one of three specialties in each programme. As a result of
evaluations undertaken during the year, revisions were made to increase the choice
of courses in the Humanities and the Technical Specialties of the Academic and
Technical Programme.   The evaluation studies are continuing.
Organization of Secondary Schools
September to September comparison showed relatively little change in the
types of school organization during the year.   Types are shown below:—
Number of Schools
1967/68 1968/69
Senior secondary     17 18
Secondary   110 110
Junior Secondary	
Elementary and secondary	
Elementary and junior secondary
82
20
43
84
16
44
There have been some changes in the sizes of schools as indicated by secondary
school enrolments.   Enrolment in September is shown below:—
Number of Schools
Over 2,000 _
1,001-2,000
501-1,000
251-   500
101-   250
51-   100
Under 51	
1967/68
3
34
102
54
43
14
18
1968/69
2
49
98
55
35
14
19
Grade XIII Enrolment
The decline in enrolment in Grade XIII programmes noted last year continued
as a reflection of the establishing of district and regional colleges:—
1967/68 1968/69
Number of districts with Grade XIII       26 19
Number of schools       28 24
Enrolment (June)   1,910 1,410
Since it will not be feasible for all districts to participate in a district or regional
college and since Grade XIII has the potential for providing educational opportunities at a comparable level, consideration is being given to a reorganization of this
programme to bring it more closely in line with those offered in other institutions.
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
G 55
Kindergartens
There was a marked increase in the number of school districts providing kindergartens and a consequent increase in the number of schools and enrolment, as
follows:—
1967/68 1968/69
Number of districts with kindergartens          39 49
Number of schools        254 300
Enrolment  16,011 18,203
Schools for Trainable Retarded Children
The table below shows enrolments in schools operated by local chapters of
the Association for Retarded Children of British Columbia and supported by education grants:—
Districts
Schools
Enrolment of Pupils in Relation to Grants
Fully
Eligible
Kindergarten
Ineligible
Total
1967 	
1968
36
34
38
35
424
441
29
28
49
29
502
498
Classes for trainable retarded children were also operated as part of the regular
public school system:—
1967/68 1968/69
Number of school districts     18 20
Number of schools     18 20
Number of pupils  758 867
Local Supervisory Personnel
The following table shows the number of district teachers employed in supervisory and special capacities as at September 30th:—
1967/68 1968/69
Directors of instruction	
Supervisors of instruction
Teacher consultants	
Special counsellors
District teachers other than relieving teachers
34
116
32
57
121
36
124
28
62
158
Totals.
360
408
 g 56 public schools report, 1968/69
Special Classes in Public Schools
Enrolments,  as reported on September  30th,  are shown in the following
table:—
Type of Class
Number of Teachers
Number of Pupils
1967
1968
1967
1968
335
162
12
51
12
16
2
2
20
79
3
9
6
318
196
14
48
16
15
1
2
23
83
2
10
8
5
2
1
4,577
2,298
(2)
791
153
272
11
13
143
758
(2)
72
37
4,029
1,983
(2)
748
187
297
6
51
186
867
Speech 1  	
(2)
76
62
36
50
16
Totals	
709
744
9,125
8,594
1 Enrolment varies greatly.
2 Not given.
Special Projects
A number of special projects and assignments were undertaken during the year
and are summarized as follows:—
1. Problems Related to the Use of Drugs.—Arising from studies and recommendations concerning the problems of the use of drugs, a special three-day invitational seminar was organized for the specific purpose of providing opportunity for
selected teachers to acquire further knowledge and insight into drug problems, with
particular reference to young people and to develop new educational approaches to
these problems for use at the community and school levels. The seminar was sponsored jointly by the Department of Education, the British Columbia School Trustees' Association, and the British Columbia Teachers' Federation. A total of 76
school districts was represented. Seven specially selected resource persons attended
to assist in the study and discussions of the physiological, psychological, legal, and
community aspects of the problem and the development of educational programmes
to meet the problem. The seminar was followed up by the organization of local
seminars and workshops, the preparation of special units of study, the showing of
special films, the organization of school and community liaison committees, and
preliminary work to establish resource centres of educational materials.
2. Educational Innovations.—A survey of all schools was undertaken primarily for the purpose of obtaining general information in respect of new methods
and practices as presently initiated and operated by local education authorities.
A total of 282 secondary schools and 1,087 elementary schools report some educational innovations. These include such things as individualized reading programmes, continuous progress plans, use of semester systems, special courses, and
use of new aids for teaching and learning. A report was prepared summarizing
these practices and identifying the school districts in which they were in operation
to assist school authorities in discussing these developments with one another.
Follow-up studies of an evaluative nature are being undertaken.
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
G 57
3. Special Assignments.—Special acknowledgment is made for the privilege
of serving as a member of the official Canadian delegation to the Fifteenth Session
of the General Conference of UNESCO. It is an honour to report that the work of
the Canadian delegation was well received and that Canada's permanent delegate
was elected as a member of the executive. Other special duties included acting as
the representative of the Department on the Instructional Media Committee appointed by the Council of Ministers of Canadian Education to investigate problems
in the use of radio and television, assisting the Superintendent of Education in special cases of teacher appeals, and acting as an appointed member of the Senate of
the University of British Columbia.
DIVISION OF CURRICULUM
(Report of W. B. Naylor, B.A., Director)
The main responsibilities of the Division of Curriculum are the development
of new courses and the revision of prescribed courses in the curriculum, the preparation of course outlines and curriculum guides for authorization and publication,
and the evaluation and selection of textbooks for authorization. In addition, the
Division advises on the administration of the curriculum and prepares administrative and other bulletins dealing with curriculum policy. A close liaison has been
maintained and advice and assistance provided on matters related to curriculum to
other Divisions within the Department, in particular: Administration, Technical
and Vocational, Home Economics, Research and Standards, Textbook, Correspondence Education, and Examinations. Advisory committees of teachers and other
experts assist the Division in this work.
The extent of the assistance given by these advisory committees may be illustrated by the fact that during the year under review a total of 19 committees comprising 186 members held 118 meetings on curriculum matters. An estimated
5,081 hours of members' time was devoted to this work. It is significant to note
that the assistance given by members of these committees is voluntary. The policy
of providing for released time for teacher members was continued.
Revision work was continued in the following curriculum areas: Art, commerce, French, health education, home economics, music, physics, science, and
social studies. New studies were undertaken in the fields of creative writing, guidance, mathematics, and physical education. In addition, a committee was formed
to revise the presently prescribed kindergarten programme. A total of 14 new or
revised courses and 104 new textbooks was prepared for use in September, 1969.
The regular procedure for reviewing books for school libraries was continued. Of
the estimated 750 books reviewed, 636 were recommended, and two lists with notations were issued to schools. Two special summer workshops were held—one to
do course writing in the field of elementary health education and the other to prepare the curriculum guide for a revised Grade IX science course.
The extent of action research that has gone into the production of the presently
prescribed Science 9 course is worthy of note and is illustrative of the course development work done by this Division with the assistance of advisory committees.
Since its inception in experimental form in 1966, this course has undergone two
major revisions as the result of careful evaluation of three years of trial teaching.
In addition, the Division, acting on the advice of its advisory committee in this field,
has supervised the preparation of the textbooks commissioned specifically for this
course, and provided information to school district officials and teachers regarding
teaching aids, equipment, and facilities.
 G 58
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1968/69
The special committee formed to evaluate the curriculum organization at the
secondary-school level continued its study. As a result of recommendations made
by this committee, the structure of the Academic and Technical Programme was
modified. It is anticipated that changes to the other programmes will be recommended as this study proceeds.
Acknowledgment
Grateful acknowledgment is extended to the British Columbia Teachers' Federation and to the three public universities for their co-operation, and in particular
to the members of this organization and these institutions who served on the committees. Particular acknowledgment is extended to the members of the two Professional Committees on Curriculum Development, who met regularly throughout
the year to advise on matters affecting the curriculum for the elementary and secondary schools of this Province.   Their help and advice has been most valuable.
Curriculum Consultants
The practice was continued whereby two outstanding teachers in the Province
are released on loan by Boards of School Trustees to work with the Division of
Curriculum. This year's appointees were Mr. G. H. Kelly (Saanich) and Mr. C. T.
Tobacco (Victoria). The enthusiasm and knowledge, combined with the practical
experience and professional training of both Mr. Kelly and Mr. Tobacco, made an
invaluable contribution to the work of this Division.
Information and Related Services
Services related to the curriculum were also provided by the staff of the Division. In this regard the Director addressed the annual conventions of the Canadian
Association of Publishers Educational Representatives and the Federated Council
of Sales Finance. The Director also participated in the annual meeting of the
Directors of Curriculum of the western Provinces. In addition, members of the
Division represented the Department at meetings on air-age education, consumer
education, education in respect of civil and criminal law of Canada, and various
conferences and symposia convened by universities and other organizations for the
purpose of discussing educational development and problems.
PUBLIC SCHOOL ADULT EDUCATION
(Report ofA.L. Carder, M.A., Co-ordinator of Adult Education)
The enrolment in Public School Adult Education has tripled in the past six
years. During the school year 1968/69, the enrolment increased by 11 per cent
over the previous year to a total of 141,217.
A breakdown of the above total indicates 31,482 were enrolled in vocational
courses while 109,735 were enrolled in non-vocational courses. The most notable
areas of growth were in training courses for the service trades (up 25 per cent),
academic credit courses (up 22.6 per cent), non-credit liberal studies (up 40 per
cent), and parenthood education courses (up 32 per cent).
Services of the Adult Education Division
The major function of this Division is to offer a consulting service to local
directors of adult education and other school district officials. During the past year
the Co-ordinator responded to requests for visits to 22 school districts.   He also
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
G 59
assisted with five regional conferences for directors of adult education as well as
two Provincial meetings of directors.
For the past two years this Division has attempted to develop methods of community evaluation of programmes and community participation in planning. During the past year, community evaluation and planning workshops were held in seven
centres. Each workshop resulted in a considerable growth in the scope of the programme, as well as a large increase in enrolment.
This Division continues to act as a communications centre through which ideas
and methods developed in one district are made available to other districts. Also,
through this Division, pamphlets, films, books, and course outlines are distributed
to local directors.
A major function of this Division has been to maintain a liaison with other
branches of Government which have adult education functions and problems.
Through such liaison, numerous co-operative programmes, workshops, and courses
have been developed in all areas of the Province which are of benefit to the local
school district and to the Department of Government concerned.
Finally, this Division has to assist voluntary adult education organizations such
as the Y.M.C.A., church groups, senior citizen associations, the Canadian Association for Adult Education, and the Canadian Vocational Association.
Co-operation with Other Government Agencies
Many Government Departments, both Provincial and Federal, have adult education roles concerned with preventative, correctional, rehabilitative, or upgrading
functions. During the past few years a liaison has developed between many Government branches with local directors of adult education. These co-operative arrangements have been of mutual benefit because they marry the financial and technical resources of the branch of Government to the organizational and educational
skills of the local directors of adult education.
The value of this type of co-operation is indicated by the following examples:—
1. Driver Education.—In addition to regular driver-training courses, a Defensive Driving Programme has been put into operation throughout the Province in
co-operation with the Motor-vehicle Branch. Last year over 3,000 drivers were
referred to these courses.
2. Corrections Branches.—Assistance is given by local directors of adult education in the development, direction, and operation of educational programmes in
both Provincial and Federal prisons.
3. Department of Health.—This Division and local directors of adult education collaborated in a television consumer-education series on Channel 8 called
" Beat the Budget." Local viewer-discussion groups were organized and some
5,000 brochures distributed. The video tapes were used later in some districts having closed-circuit television equipment.
4. Social Welfare.—The Social Welfare Department, in its concern for prevention and rehabilitation, has been making a large number of referrals of clients
to adult education classes and paying the fees of such clients. In addition, members of the Social Welfare Department at both regional and central levels have participated in the planning of programmes.
This Division has collaborated with the Social Welfare Department in developing in-service education programmes of social workers, conferences for Senior
Citizen Counsellors, and conferences on parent education.
 G 60 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
5. Department of Travel Industry.—This Division, through the local directors
of adult education, has assisted in organizing hospitality conferences, tourism workshops, and courses for the upgrading of the skills of various categories of employees
and supervisors engaged in the hospitality industry.
6. Department of Agriculture. — In collaboration with District Agriculture
representatives, various educational programmes have been organized in the Fraser
Valley, the Okanagan, and Peace River areas. Discussions have been held with
ARDA officials and co-operative programme planning meetings held to develop
adult education programmes.
7. Indian Affairs Branch.-—During the past two years there has been a gradual
shift of the adult education classes for Indians from the jurisdiction of the Indian
Affairs Branch to local school districts. Presently, 80 per cent of these classes are
now operated through local school districts on a purchased-services basis. Last year
there were 87 classes organized especially for Indians with an enrolment of some
1,800.   An additional 200 were enrolled in regular night classes.
The Victoria School District, through its Institute of Adult Studies, operates
special classes for young adult Indians. To develop this programme they engaged
Chief Philip Paul as a full-time counsellor. The programme has been so successful
that it was found necessary to engage a second Indian as an assistant to Chief
Philip Paul.
In response to the needs of so many young Indian adults wishing to complete
secondary school, the Department has authorized a special Adult Secondary School
Programme for native Indians, consisting of the following subjects: English 12,
Social Studies 11, Indian History 12, Law and Legislation 12, Social Change 12,
and two optional specialty courses.
Development of Basic Education Programmes
As a result of discussions with personnel making surveys for ARDA, this Division has become aware of the substantial number of functionally illiterate adults in
British Columbia. Through collaboration with Indian Affairs, the Social Welfare
Department, Manpower, and the Corrections Branch, 35 basic-education classes
have been organized.
At first, directors of adult education found the identification and recruitment
of illiterate adults difficult. However, once a start was made, the students helped
to recruit other students. Hence in some areas these classes are growing rapidly.
Most classes contain a large number of persons on Social Assistance. So many of
the latter type of students are able to " get off welfare " as a result of these classes
that the classes are more than paying for themselves in savings to the Welfare
Department.
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
G 61
Summary Showing Trends in Enrolment, Number of Classes, Number
of Instructors, and Number of School Districts Participating
(These statistics are gathered from annual reports submitted by the directors
of adult education of the participating school districts.)
Year
Number
of School
Districts
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
1959/60	
58
64
65
68
70
70
71
69
671
631
40,867
40,917
46,548
70,405
78,461
91,579
100,292
112,105
127,659
141,217
1,796
1,945
2,273
2,949
3,454
3,828
4,141
4,982
5,610
6,394
1,578
1960/61	
2,220
1961/62   	
2.219
1962/63   	
1963/64    	
3,070
3,964
1964/65 —	
4,261
1965/66  	
1966/67
5,067
5,637
6,230
7,406
1967/68     	
1968/69	
i The number of districts is smaller due to amalgamation of school districts.
Vocational Programme
Year
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
1959/60                                   	
13,539
12,530
9,783
14,317
17,510
21,393
25,477
28,556
29,977
31,482
540
552
518
685
880
1,029
1,194
1,432
1,479
1,554
322
1960/61                	
552
1961/62                                                                                      	
512
1962/63      - 	
681
1963/64  --	
910
1964/65         - -   -                    ...                   	
1,116
1,384
1965/66                                                                                             	
1966/67                                                                                        	
1,511
1967/68	
1,566
1968/69                                                                               	
1,767
Non-vocational Programme
1959/60--
1960/61..
1961/62..
1962/63..
1963/64.
1964/65..
1965/66.
1966/67-
1967/68..
1968/69-
27,328
28,387
36,765
56,008
60,951
70,186
74,815
83,549
97,682
109,735
1,256
1,393
1,755
2,264
2,574
2,799
2,947
3,550
4,131
4,840
1,256
1,648
1,707
2,389
3,054
3,145
3,683
4,126
4,664
5,639
 G 62
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
Classification of Courses and Enrolment
Vocational Programme1
Course
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
Business Management-
Commercial	
Automotive 	
Machine Shop	
Construction Trades..
Electronics	
Lumbering and Forestry-
Engineering 	
Service Trades	
Agriculture-
Vocational Preparatory-
Miscellaneous	
5,237
8,243
1,266
1,261
2,398
1,389
2,605
1,221
1,908
631
845
4,478
245
404
75
88
118
67
83
65
100
34
69
206
252
510
76
87
144
71
104
98
101
32
71
221
Totals-
31,482
1,554        :        1,767
i These are vocational courses sponsored by night schools operated by local school districts only.
Non-vocational Programmes
Academic (for credit)	
English and Citizenship	
Liberal Studies (non-credit) _
Fine Arts	
Domestic Arts	
Hobbies and CraftS-
Parent Education-
Recreation and Fitness-
Miscellaneous 	
Totals-
Grand totals..
21,871
925
981
5,691
347
367
9,781
430
452
10,957
499
678
14,180
735
886
11,395
614
734
4,882
134
81
15,361
629
793
15,617
527
667
109,735
4,840
5,639
141,217
6,394
I
7,406
The cost of instruction and administration of the above programmes for the
school year 1968/69 was $2,705,050.61. This figure does not include light, heat,
extra custodial services, or depreciation of plant. Provincial grants-in-aid amount
to just over 25 per cent of the above figure. In most school districts the balance of
the above costs are raised through the participants' fees.
Not only is this programme growing in enrolment, but also in variety and depth.
This probably reflects an expanding adult population with a growing awareness of
its needs for continuing education.
DIVISION OF AUDIO-VISUAL SERVICES
School Broadcasts
(Report of Barrie A. Black, Director)
Programmes Presented
Radio
Provincial programmes (planning, preparation, supervision of production, evaluation)   92
Regional programmes produced locally (planning, preparation, supervision, evaluation)   20
Regional programmes produced elsewhere (planning, evaluation)  36
National programmes (planning, evaluation)  48
Total number of radio programmes presented
196
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
G 63
Television
Provincial programmes (planning, preparation, supervision of production, evaluation)
28
Regional programmes produced locally (planning, preparation, supervision of production, evaluation)  6
Regional programmes produced elsewhere (planning, evaluation)  21
National programmes (planning, evaluation)  74
Total number of television programmes presented  129
Manuals and Guides (Prepared and Distributed)
Primary music booklets	
Intermediate music booklets	
A Propos and Chantez booklets	
British Columbia Teachers' Bulletins—
Elementary 	
Secondary 	
Calendars—
Radio	
Television
60,000
70,000
18,000
10,000
3,000
13,000
13,000
Use of School Broadcasts
Schools reporting	
Schools using radio broadcasts	
Divisions using radio broadcasts	
Students using radio broadcasts	
Schools using television broadcasts ___
Divisions using television broadcasts
Students using television broadcasts _
1,264
834
4,047
121,964
668
4,155
128,004
Comparison of School Broadcast Utilization
Radio
Television
1967/68
1968/69
Increase or
Decrease
(-)
1967/68
1968/69
Increase
Schools using	
Divisions using.  _	
Students using	
809
3,607
127,843
834
4,047
121,964
25
440
-5,879
530
2,876
91,674
668
4,155
128,004
138
1,279
36,330
The Division of School Broadcasts has recently been combined with the Visual
Education Branch to form the Division of Audio-Visual Services. The new Division
will continue to provide the present services to the schools of the Province, while
exploring and developing new services and distribution techniques as the needs
dictate.
Visual Education
(Report of R. Kerkham, Assistant Director)
Submitted herewith is the circulation report of the Division of Visual Education
covering the period of September 1, 1968, to August 31, 1969:—
 G 64
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
District Number and Name
1. Fernie 	
2. Cranbrook 	
3. Kimberley 	
4. Windermere 	
7. Nelson 	
8. Slocan            . 	
Number of
Motion Pictures
Supplied
        267
        204
        256
        153
        579
        107
        250
223
Number of
Filmstrips
Supplied
290
131
313
233
823
52
9. Castlegar 	
10. Arrow Lakes        	
542
39
11. Trail	
12. Grand Forks _      	
          81
286
115
409
13. Kettle Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan	
15. Penticton       	
          78
        312
            408
90
14
322
16. Keremeos.—        	
33
5
17. Princeton      _._
          98
95
18. Golden             	
260
269
19. Revelstoke   	
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen 	
22. Vernon 	
23. Kelowna       	
        544
        226
        708
        348
545
376
843
339
24. Kamloops 	
25. Barriere _
        840
        172
          21
559
26. Birch Island ....         	
25
27. Williams Lake .    	
        1,002
1,712
28. Quesnel 	
29. Lillooet  	
30. South Cariboo
        427
        279
235
1,164
249
187
31. Merritt	
32. Fraser Canyon	
33. Chilliwack _________	
34. Abbotsford 	
35. Langley    	
36. Surrey  	
37. Delta                           ____
        163
         174
     2,337
        544
        897
     3,289
          233
268
291
1,625
582
793
4,741
135
38. Richmond
6
530
39. Vancouver 	
40. New Westminster .
        932
1,124
355
41. Burnaby	
42. Maple Ridge 	
43. Coquitlam 	
44. North Vancouver 	
            5
        715
        702
        628
471
1,414
918
255
45. West Vancouver   ...
         315
191
46. Sechelt 	
47. Powell River ....   	
        514
        486
576
379
48. Howe Sound 	
49. Ocean Falls ...      	
        338
            301
120
392
50. Queen Charlotte	
52. Prince Rupert ...       .
        513
           317
;7
*_5
54. Smithers 	
        230
^98
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
G 65
District Number and Name
55. Burns Lake    ._
Number of
Motion Pictures
Supplied
196
Number of
Films trips
Supplied
351
56. Vanderhoof  	
              145
395
57. Prince George      	
              197
44
58. McBride 	
59. Peace River South _     	
        332
499
174
469
60. Peace River North	
_____           368
439
61. Greater Victoria  __     	
437
62. Sooke 	
63. Saanich	
        576
594
651
896
64. Gulf Islands	
_      _____       387
420
65. Cowichan     	
231
175
66. Lake Cowichan _       	
76
6
67. Ladysmith 	
_    _____       262
75
68. Nanaimo              	
722
323
69. Qualicum     _   .	
290
556
70. Alberni          	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
75. Mission      	
        717
     1,019
        868
        459
898
2,301
2,401
445
76. Agassiz   _        ______
56
232
77. Summerland 	
....        142
182
79. Ucluelet-Tofino ____     	
78
152
80. Kitimat ....•        	
172
90
81. Fort Nelson	
....              380
440
82. Chilcotin	
83. Portage Mountain     	
          51
200
109
220
84. Vancouver Island, West	
85. Vancouver Island, North	
86. Creston-Kaslo
        339
        356
491
263
431
181
87. Stikine 	
88. Skeena-Cassiar    _           	
        184
431
319
716
89. Shuswap
____           452
328
Unattached
        483
547
Miscellaneous
725
253
Totals   —_     _ __
  36,075
40,719
During the past year the Division reproduced 50 tapes from our own recordings
for distribution to the schools and reprinted 75 manuals to accompany filmstrips.
A total of 350 free filmstrips were packaged and distributed to the secondary schools
of the Province. Distribution has been increased considerably because of the circulation of Recreation and Conservation and Community Programme films. Members of this staff attended several conferences this year, including the DAVI Conference in Portland.
The Photographic Section prepared three master filmstrips from which 40
prints were reproduced. Four other filmstrips were copied and two slide-talk programmes were produced. Classroom pictures taken at New Westminster, Langley,
and Burn_. by were made in black and white and colour transparencies, the latter
being usefm in the P.N.E. display. Pictures of family home life on Canada's West
Coast we--   taken for the Canada Year Book.    The British Columbia Industrial
 XT
i.
pH_M
Cypress Park Elementary School, West Vancouver, an open-area school. Young girl
reading a book which she has drawn from the library on her own, as is common in this
type of school.
Eagle Harbour Elementary School, West Vancouver, an open-area school.
Young boy doing his mathematics in the primary grades.
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES G 67
Design competition used our photographic facilities on three occasions to produce
photographs of articles made by competing students, which were then published in
book form. Photographic coverage of the Forest Technology Exhibit took place
during open house at the British Columbia Institute of Technology, and this Division assisted photographically during the British Columbia Institute of Technology
convocation ceremonies. Copies of other photographic materials to be used in conjunction with the Indian display in the Provincial Museum were processed, together
with material on Egyptian archeology for use on a television School Broadcast
programme. Four photo-murals were made for the Provincial Museum, ranging in
size from 7 to 9 feet and 11 by 18 feet. This Division also acted as co-ordinator
for the Department during the construction of the Educational Exhibit at the P.N.E.
The Visual Education Branch has recently been combined with the Division of
School Broadcasts to form the Division of Audio-Visual Services. The new Division
will continue to provide the present services to the schools of the Province while
exploring and developing new services and distribution techniques as the needs
dictate.
RESEARCH AND STANDARDS BRANCH
(Report of C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Pa>d., Director)
The removal of the word " Tests " from the title of the former " Division of
Tests and Standards " and the insertion of " Research " has increased the scope of
the Branch but has not greatly changed its emphasis or direction. During the school-
year 59,542 tests were administered to junior and senior secondary pupils in attempts
to establish current standards and determine whether or not progress is being made.
These included: One form of a mathematical ability test to 19,953 Mathematics 10
students, four forms of a mathematics test to 16,302 Mathematics 11 students, three
forms of an English test to 19,531 English 12 students, and a new aural French test
taped and administered to 4,116 students in French 12.
The Math 11 test consisted chiefly of new-course, i.e., "modern maths,"
items with a seeding of old-course items for comparison with the results of previous
testing. The Mathematics 10 and English 12 tests consisted chiefly of items previously administered to students of equivalent course background before major
curriculum changes had been made. The English tests were administered to compare standards in usage and comprehension in the new English 12 course with data
obtained from the former English 40 enrolment in 1961 and 1963. As the validity
and difficulty of the items had been determined on the former student-population
it has been possible to determine the areas in which advances or declines have
occurred as the result of course reorganization and increasing retention to the
Grades X to XII levels. A comparison of the items that had been administered to
students enrolled in the former Mathematics 30 course as well as to the current
Mathematics 11 group showed that the latter had made considerable progress. The
only exceptions were items in which the mathematical vocabulary had changed.
The French 12 aural tapes were of comparable quality to those of 1967 and
much better than the 1968 edition which had been reproduced poorly from the
master tape. While no comparisons with aural competence of students a decade
or more ago are possible, it is quite probable that the 78 per cent of the current
population of French 12 students that was tested is much further advanced in both
aural and oral aspects of the language. It should be noticed, however, that although
the number of students enrolled in French 12 is considerably larger (5,281 in September, 1968, versus 1,469 in September, 1960), it is still only a small proportion,
18 per cent, of the corresponding elementary school stream that might have continued the language.   In other words, we still are a long way from being bilingual.
 G 68 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
In June of 1961, retention of British Columbia elementary children (minus
deaths, plus net immigration) to Grade XI was 79 percent and to Grade XII, 64
per cent. In June, 1969, Grade XI was 95 per cent and Grade XII, 85 per cent of
the corresponding elementary cohort populations. Grade X is now equal to (i.e.,
100 per cent of) the corresponding average of Grades II to VI. In spite of the
increase, the proportion of Grade XII enrolled in the academic stream is almost
exactly the same as it had been for many years, two-thirds of the Grade XII
enrolment, a fact which should cause considerable concern to administrative
authorities involved in post-secondary planning.
Early in the year, norms were completed for students enrolled in various
Grade XII and XIII subjects, the tests (School and College Ability and Henmon-
Nelson) having been administered in the spring of 1968. While the total population
was at virtually the same level as in 1965, it is notable that the science subjects and
mathematics had been much more selective and the humanities (History, French,
English Literature) had become much less so during the three-year interval in which
the new courses were introduced. The distributions of ability were compared with
the distributions of scores in examinable subjects and the marks assigned by teachers
in accredited, non-accredited and private schools. All of the latter were found to
be almost invariably higher. An extensive computer analysis of the two sets of
scores has led to a proposal that school marks be weighted according to the variance
of the differences from examination scores and the differences between the means
in individual subjects. This proposal is under consideration by the Board of
Examiners.
The scaling of examination scores was carried out on the 360-30 computer
for the first time this year, and new scales were set up in an attempt to bring different
subjects in line, although they no longer control the failure rates at the Grade XII
level as rigidly as they did in the past. Studies were also made of the amount of
over-recommendation.
Earlier in the year, Mr. R. May collected available information on a variety of
university and college administrations in other provinces, states, and countries. A
study was also made of Canadian post-secondary enrolments up to 1966/67.
The rapidity of growth, the need for change, and the number of decisions that
must be made produce parallel needs for data, research, and information on an
up-to-date and continuous basis. Unfortunately our data collection often follows
the change or decision and unforeseen side-effects frequently occur. As an example,
the ungraded progress plan is supposed to eliminate repetition, reduce retardation,
and remove the stigma of failure. In actual practice, repetition is eliminated, but
research shows that retardation tends definitely to increase and the stigma of being
a " slow-learner " apparently is just as great as being a pupil who " failed Grade III."
The circulation of such research results that may apply to British Columbia, even
though they are often negative, is an important function of the Branch. There are,
of course, limitations. A few years ago there were about 30,000 educational research theses in existence, a majority of them in the field of teaching methods; they
now are being produced on this continent at a rate of at least 30,000 a year.
Other studies conducted in the Branch in 1968/69 included a study of
enrolment trends in private schools, as shown by Dominion Bureau of Statistics
data. This has been downward in the elementary and junior grades, upward in
senior grades, and partly explains our previous tendency to underestimate Grade I
enrolments. The methods previously used to estimate the first grade were refined
in another study. This was done by incorporating factors for pupils aged 8 and 9
as well as the modal age 7, and by dealing with births and immigration on a July-to-
June basis instead of using calendar-year data.
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES G 69
DIVISION OF CORRESPONDENCE EDUCATION
(Report of J. R. Hind, B.A., B.Pced., Director)
The year 1968/69 was marked by several events which will alter the format
of this report from Correspondence Branch reports of former years. The first of
these was the reorganization of the old Branches into the new Division of Correspondence Education. The others were the mail strike in 1968 and the development
of new statistical procedures for the recording of persons who register for courses.
Another innovation will be the introduction of a small amount of statistical material,
which gives some further indication of the value of this instruction as provided in
the Province. It is hoped in the future to have more of this type of information
available.
On January 1, 1969, the separate Elementary and Secondary Correspondence
Branches amalgamated to form the Division of Correspondence Education. This
change coincided with the retirement of Arthur H. Plows, B.Ed., Director of the
Elementary Correspondence Branch. The reorganization called for three senior
officers to assist the Director in the major areas of activity, as follows: Supervision
of Instruction, Supervisor of Course Writing, and Registrar. Further, the growing
burden of course production and revision was eased by the appointment of a Course
Writer with research qualifications to co-ordinate the activities of course writing at
the elementary level (Grades I-VII), and to assist in identifying sections from all
courses which require revision.
The work of reorganization was allowed to proceed at a moderate pace for the
balance of the year. This was necessary to avoid the interruption of established
procedures which were not standardized and would be difficult to alter in the middle
of a school term. At the conclusion of the period covered by this report it had
become increasingly evident that the reorganization was enabling the new Division
to provide a greatly improved service to the people of the Province.
The mail strike in 1968 and changes in statistical procedures affected enrolment
figures adversely in 1968/69 and make it difficult to provide a meaningful comparison with former years. It will be appreciated that a service which provides instruction via mail is dependent upon the continuation of mail service without interruption.
The strike of postal workers, which occurred between July 18 and August 9, 1968,
reduced enrolment at this vital time of the year by 396 new students and 48 re-
registrations over 1967/68 and seriously curtailed the work of correction of papers
belonging to students already registered. The largest group of new students affected
were those who registered for instruction after the receipt of Departmental examination results. In addition to this, data processing was able to introduce a refinement
which enabled us to eliminate the possibility of counting twice in a given fiscal year
a student who applied for a second time in the same year. The enrolment figures
which follow should be regarded therefore as a base year for comparisons in future
years.
The details of programmes of study and regulations at the secondary level
continued to be set forth separately from the elementary level in the booklet, " Regulations and Detail of Courses for Secondary School Education." In the past this
booklet has been released in July of each year, together with application forms. The
information about elementary school courses appeared in pamphlet form, including
application forms. Plans were under way for the rewriting of the Regulations and
Detail of Courses booklet to include the information about elementary school
courses. This new booklet will first appear in July, 1969, under the title, " Regulations and Detail of Courses for Correspondence Education."   During 1968/69 the
  INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
G 71
Division listed a total of 163 courses. The secondary-level listing included 10 new
courses and three major revisions. The Grades I-VII Programme included eight
new courses, ranging from Grades I to V.
The details of service rendered by the Division during 1968/69 follow:—
Enrolment
(a) By Age:
18 years and under
19 years and older _
Unclassified	
Grades I-VII
  668
  149
Totals
817
Grades VIII-XIII
6,356
7,799
31
14,186
Note.—The Grades I-VII total includes approximately 97 students enrolled
at the Pouce Coupe office. Of the 14,155 classified students at the secondary level,
8,489 were male and 5,666 female.
(b) By Residence:
British Columbia
Elsewhere in Canada
Outside Canada	
Grades VIII-XIII
  13,208
758
189
Total
_ 14,155
with  209
Note.—Enrolment of persons abroad was 189, compared witn _iuy m
1967/68. While no accurate figures are available for Grades I-VII, there is
reason to believe that this section of the enrolment totals slightly under 100.
(c) In Schools.—Certain pupils were unable to obtain normal classroom instruction in particular Grades IX-XIII courses, as follows:—
1967/68 1968/69
Small secondary schools (fewer than 140 pupils
in Grades IX-XII)       870
795
Larger secondary schools (more than 140 pupils
in Grades IX-XII) 	
Private schools 	
Totals
low:
Courses not offered in school
Timetable difficulties	
Failure in a subject	
Acceleration 	
3,636
3,477
260
322
4,766
4,594
tie numbers
mvolvec
1967/68
1968/69
2,641
2,212
794
802
577
444
4
4
Note.—Grades I-VIII pupils in attendance at schools are not permitted to
register for correspondence instruction.
(d) Of Adults.—(i) Per cent of total enrolment for Grades I-VII, 18.2 per
cent; Grades VIII-XIII, 59.09 per cent.
(ii) Counselling and evaluation of documents continued to be provided at
all levels. Adults received two copies of letters of evaluation. One was supplied
for information, the second for presentation to the office of the Registrar when the
adult became eligible for standing in terms of a programme of study.
 G 72
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
(e) By Special Arrangement.—The tabulation which follows represents persons who receive instruction without payment of registration fees:—
Grades VIII-XIII 1967/68
Illness       479
Needed at home  6
Living too far from a school      284
Correctional institutions  1,155
Social assistance      165
Immigrants (special English)         90
Totals
Grades I-VII
Unclassified
2,179
1967/68
1968/69
534
3
340
937
194
102
2,110
1968/69
717
Instruction
(a) The appointment of a Supervisor of Instruction represented a major step
in co-ordinating the efforts of instructors and course writers.
(b) The success of correspondence instruction as offered in this Province is
reflected in a recent report from Simon Fraser University. Of 17 students who
were admitted to that university with a background predominandy based on correspondence education, achievement at the University was averaging as follows:
Group with A, 4; with B, 8; with C+, 5.
TEXTBOOK BRANCH
(Report of D. W. C. Huggins, Director)
New prescriptions in the 1968/69 school-year were comprehensive in nature,
and concentrations of new texts were to be found in the language arts area of Grade
VII, the science and social studies areas of Grade VIII with alternate French programmes being introduced at the Grade VIII and Grade XI levels of language
instruction. The unusually large number of titles introduced in the changed curricula created serious problems in production planning for the publishers involved,
which in turn resulted in delays in the delivery of some of these new texts to the
Textbook Branch. In all these areas of review, late arrival of texts was experienced,
one of the Grade VII books not arriving in the Textbook Branch until late November. Consequently, considerable strain was placed on the permanent staff of the
order-filling section in effecting expedient handling of the texts to minimize the
redistribution period.
Magnetic tapes keyed to the alternate French programmes were produced under
the auspices of the Textbook Branch and made available to schools at cost. The
editing and recording of this material was effected by the Language Laboratory of
the University of Victoria, to whose staff we are indebted. During the 1968/69
'school-year, 132 sets of tapes to Ecouter et Parler and 75 sets of tapes to Parler et
Lire were sold throughout the Province.
Continuing review of office procedures, order-filling methods, and materials-
handling systems has resulted in improved methods of ordering, receiving, and
distribution of textbooks. Constructive criticism received from school administrations has assisted considerably in improving service to the schools from the Textbook
Branch, and a completely revised school-opening order form has been prepared to
meet the requirements of the 1969/70 school-year.   At the time of reporting, this
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
G 73
revised order form appears to have assisted in the more efficient exchange of communication between the Textbook Branch and the schools, with a resultant improvement in the distribution of books within entitlement and requirement
The repair of textbooks continues to be a significant saving in the costs of
operation of the Textbook Branch. More school districts have been directed to
the summer programme this past year, thus adding to savings in inventory maintenance and reducing order quantities placed with this Branch.
The purchasing activities of the Textbook Branch during the 1968/69
fiscal year involved the issuance of 2,525 purchase orders. These orders covered
the requirements to meet the needs of the schools of the Province for prescribed
texts and supplementary materials, as well as the items required by the British
Columbia Institute of Technology and the vocational schools of the Province.
During this period, 2,758,683 pounds of books and supplies passed through the
Textbook Branch in the filling of 7,459 requisitions from schools and 12,570
invoices for sales. This movement of books and supplies entailed the handling of
90,338 cartons and parcels. Sales were made to the Government of the Yukon, the
Government of the Northwest Territories, and the Indian schools of British Columbia, as well as to schools, school districts, and stores throughout the Province.
Statistical comparisons of operations are shown below:—
1969
1968
Increase (+) or
Decrease (—)
Amount
Per
Cent
Sales	
Purchases.
Year-end inventory	
Operating costs (sales)..
Accounts receivable	
Advances from Consolidated Revenue Fund-
Rental Plan operations—
Depreciation expense  	
Operating costs .
Gross cost of plan-
Fees collected	
Net cost (subsidy) of plan-
Charges to the Free Vote (Grades I to VI).
Delivery activities—
Freight-
Items-	
Weight (lb.)..
Express—
Items	
Weight (lb.)..
Mail—
Items	
Weight (lb.)..
Cost	
$1,968,852
$4,013,535
$1,859,615
$147,724
$35,024
$4,560,885
$2,274,182
$98,482
$2,372,664
$1,086,007
$1,286,657
$1,241,386
57,500
2,627,430
32,838
131,253
$18,127
$1,576,183
$3,658,173
$2,538,765
$135,511
$24,406
$4,393,848
$1,756,785
$90,341
$1,847,126
$1,038,172
$808,954
$861,869
49,271
2,135,409
6
238
47,390
96,897
$14,464
+ $392,669
+$355,362
—$679,150
+$12,213
+$10,618
+$167,037
+$517,397
+ $8,141
+$525,538
+$47,835
+ $477,703
+$379,517
+8,229
+492,021
-6
-238
— 14,552
+34,356
+$3,663
24.9
9.7
26.8
9.0
43.5
3.8
29.5
9.0
28.5
4.6
59.1
44.0
16.7
23.0
100.0
100.0
30.7
35.5
25.3
 G 74
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1968/69
INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES
REPORT OF C. I. TAYLOR, B.A., B.Ed,
(Field Services)
Staff
Assistant Superintendent
In 1968/69 there were on staff 54 District Superintendents and three Assistant District Superintendents.
Special Staff consisted of one Director of Home Economics and two Inspectors
of Home Economics.
The staff of School District No. 39 (Vancouver) included one Superintendent
of Schools, two Assistant Superintendents of Schools, and two Inspectors of Schools.
There is no change in total staff, but one less Assistant District Superintendent
in School District No. 41 (Burnaby). This allowed for the organization of one
new superintendency, School District No. 46 (Sechelt) and University Hill (unattached).
Staff Retirements
Mr. W. G. Gurney, School District No. 70 (Alberni).
Mr. I. H. R. Jeffery, School District No. 42 (Maple Ridge).
Mr. A. D. Jones, School District No. 65 (Cowichan).
Mr. F. A. McLellan, School Districts No. 63 (Saanich) and No. 64 (Gulf
Islands).
Staff Appointments
Mr. A. D. Campbell, ex Principal, Mount Baker Secondary, Cranbrook.
Mr. C. Holob, ex Principal, Alpha Junior Secondary, Burnaby.
Mr. W. F. Ramsay, ex Principal, Alberni District Secondary, Alberni.
Mr. J. Walsh, ex Director of Instruction, Courtenay.
Staff Transfers
Mr. A. D. Campbell, from appointment to School Districts No. 81, No. 83,
and No. 87 (Fort St. John).
Mr. J. M. Evans, from School Districts No. 55 and No. 56 (Vanderhoof)
to School District No. 70 (Alberni).
Mr. R. R. Hanna, from School Districts No. 30 and No. 31 (Merritt) to
School District No. 46 (Sechelt) and University Hill (new superintendency).
Mr. W. L. B. Hawker, from School Districts No. 81, No. 83, and No. 87
(Fort St. John) to School District No. 42 (Maple Ridge).
Mr. E. E. Lewis, from School Districts No. 3 and No. 4 (Kimberley) to
School District No. 65 (Cowichan).
Mr. W. F. Ramsay, from appointment to School Districts No. 30 and No. 31
(Merritt).
Mr. C. T. Rendle, from Assistant District Superintendent, School District No.
41 (Burnaby), to District Superintendent, School District No. 41 (Burnaby).
Mr. A. C. Rutledge, from Relieving District Superintendent to School Districts
No. 3 and No. 4 (Kimberley).
Mr. J. Walsh, from appointment to School Districts No. 55 and No. 56 (Vanderhoof).
Mr. C. Holob, from appointment to Relieving District Superintendent.
Mr. C. I. Taylor, from District Superintendent, School District No. 41 (Burnaby), to Assistant Superintendent (Field Services).
 INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES
G 75
Staff Recruitment
The number of applications received to fill the vacancies caused by retirement
showed a marked increase over 1967/68. Credit must go to the District Superintendents who took an active part in the recruitment of staff. Five appointments were
made, effective August 1, 1969.
In-Service Education for District Superintendents
Zone Conferences
These conferences are organized and chaired by the District Superintendents
in five zones of the Province. They are most valuable for the discussion of problems and exchange of information among field staff.
The following were held:—
Zone Location Dates
Island Courtenay November 28th
Alberni March 28th
Fraser Valley Hope September 30th
Langley February 24th
Okanagan-Mainline-Cariboo Williams Lake October 24th, 25th
Salmon Arm March 13th, 14th
Northern Prince Rupert October 18th
Fort St. John March 7th
Kootenay Creston November 15th
Cranbrook May 1 st
Seminar for District Superintendents
(Sponsored by the University of Victoria)
This, the second annual conference for District Superintendents, was held at
Harrison, January 15th, 16th, and 17th. Twenty-nine District Superintendents
attended. The Seminar had the over-all theme, "The Psychology of Learning,"
a unique type of conference, and most helpful to the participants. We are indebted
to the University of Victoria for their sponsorship.
Department of Education Conference
This conference, called in alternate years, was held this year on April 10th and
11th in the Provincial Museum Building, Victoria. Excellent accommodation, facilities, and service were provided by the Museum staff.
The Honourable D. L. Brothers, Minister of Education, opened the Conference on April 10th.
The first day was planned and developed by the District Superintendents and
chaired by the President of their Association, Mr. G. W. Graham.
Three papers were presented and discussed:—
(1) The Role of the District Superintendent of Schools.
(2) Curriculum Planning.
(3) Legislative Changes.
The second session on April 11th was opened by Dr. G. N. Perry, Deputy
Minister of Education.
Dr. T. C. Byrne, Deputy Minister of Education for the Province of Alberta,
gave an address: "A Suggested Conceptual Framework for Evaluation of a School
System."   This excellent paper was discussed in a plenary session.
 G 76 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1968/69
The afternoon was devoted to discussion of questions sent in by the District
Superintendents to the Department. Mr. F. P. Levirs, Superintendent of Education, chaired this session.
All District Superintendents and the Superintendent's staff from Vancouver
were present.
Canadian International Development Agency
The Department of External Affairs in Ottawa again requested that the Field
Services Branch of the Department of Education conduct interviews for the selection of British Columbia teachers for service overseas in the developing nations of
the West Indies, Africa, and South East Asia.
A total of 54 interviews was conducted from December 10 to 19, 1968, in
Victoria and Vancouver.
A final selection was made by C.I.D.A. of 10 teachers from British Columbia
for this service.
The interview teams were chaired by the Assistant Superintendent (Field Services) and by Mr. W. D. Reid, Assistant Superintendent (University and College
Affairs). Members of the teams were: Mr. E. E. Lewis, District Superintendent,
Duncan; Mr. W. E. Lucas, District Superintendent, North Vancouver; Mr. K. M.
Aitchison and Mr. J. Cairnie of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation.
Investigation Committee
The following appeals by teachers from the action of Boards of School Trustees under section 134 of the Public Schools Act were held:—
January 3 and 7, 1968—Powell River.
March 12 and 31, 1968—Grand Forks.
June 10, 1968—North Vancouver.
June 17, 18, 20, 1968—West Vancouver.
June 23, 1968—West Vancouver.
Appointed by the Superintendent of Education to act as chairmen of these
Investigation Committees were:   Mr. J. R. Meredith, Assistant Superintendent
(Instruction); Mr. J. L. Canty, Co-ordinator of Services; and the Assistant Superintendent (Field Services).
Annual and Monthly Reports of the District Superintendents
of Schools
The Field Services of the Department of Education has had another very busy
year. The District Superintendents are very much involved in the administrative
work of the Boards of School Trustees to which they are attached.
In addition to this they are responsible for the supervision of all educational
staff and for the efficiency and effectiveness of the schools in their districts.
It is reported that the average number of meetings attended by District Superintendents is 10 per month during the school-year. These are board, committee,
and district staff meetings and take much of the District Superintendents' time.
Written reports on teachers, totalling 3,675 in number, were submitted by the
District Superintendents to the Department in 1968/69.
Some trends, as reported by the District Superintendents, are as follows:—
(a) There has been a considerable increase in the number of libraries established in elementary schools, and in the general adequacy of these libraries.
A number of resource centres have been established in the districts.
 INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES
G 77
(b) The open-area classroom is definitely a part of the elementary education
picture. More Boards are building open areas for the elementary grades.
This, combined with the continuous progress approach, the individualization of instruction, and the " discovery " method, has made interesting
changes in the work of the elementary schools.
(c) In the secondary schools the trends appear to be toward the use of modular time-tables, the extended school-day, and the semester system of
organization.
(d) The integration of Indian students in the district public schools continues
to increase.
(e) Closer liaison between members of district staffs and other agencies such
as Social Welfare, Health, Mental Health, and Manpower is noted.
(f) A number of kindergartens were established in school districts during
the year.
(g) There is an increase in the use of television as an aid to instruction, particularly through the utilization of video tapes.
(h) A great range of in-service training activities is reported. These are for
the most part Board- and teacher-sponsored and take the form of seminars, conferences, workshops, and short courses.
(i) The enrolment of pupils in elementary schools in many districts appears
to be levelling off due to the decrease in birthrate; the secondary enrolment continues on the increase, partly due to the holding-power of the
schools and the greater variety of course opportunities.
(j) Some districts continue to show large annual increases of student population, others continue to increase steadily at percentage rates of from
3 to 8 per cent; five districts show a slight decrease in total enrolment.
(k) Most District Superintendents report that recruitment of teachers was
much less difficult this year due to a larger number of applicants. Specialists in certain subject-areas are still difficult to obtain. It is also reported that staff retention in school districts improved over previous years.
General
This has been a most interesting and productive year. The new title, "Assistant Superintendent (Field Services)," more aptly describes the work than the former title, " Chief Inspector."
My thanks and appreciation go to Dr. G. N. Perry, Deputy Minister of Education, to Mr. F. P. Levirs, Superintendent of Education, and to other members of
Headquarters Staff for their help during this first year. To the 57 men in the field,
may I say that it has been a pleasure and a privilege to work with you.
HOME ECONOMICS
(Report of Miss Jean R. Irvine, B.Sc.(H.Ec), Director)
The total enrolment in Home Economics and Community Services Programme
courses in the public schools of British Columbia, during the 1968/69 session, was
68,988.   The enrolment by courses was as follows:—
HE 8  18,897 CT91  11,205
FN91  11,263 CC9      2,210
FN9/CT91         139 CFS 9     3,462
1 In many cases, these courses are combined and taken over a two-year period.
 G 78
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
Oc 1, 2, 3
1,590
33
Jericho Hill	
Fdll   5,074
Fd 12a   978
Fd 12b   381
Txll   4,052
Tx11/12a  26
  1,394
  18
  498
  1,823
  1,927
  225
CR 12 _.            3,793
Tx12a 	
Tx12a/12b
Tx 12b 	
Mgtll 	
CC 12 	
HIS 12 	
(2)
(3)
(4)
Notes regarding enrolment figures:—
(1) HE 8 enrolment is 18,897, showing an increase of 965 over the total for
last year.
CFS 9 enrolment is 3,462, an increase of 509 over last year.
The total enrolment in Fd 11, Fd 12a, Fd 12b is 6,433, which includes
boys and girls enrolled in these courses, and is an increase of 806 over
the total for last year.
Course enrolments for Grades XI and XII Foods, Textiles, Management,
Child Care, and Home and Industrial Services total 16,396, showing an
increase of 991 over the total enrolment in these courses for last year.
This indicates a fairly large number of students on other programmes
(including Academic and Technical) are taking Community Services
courses as electives.
In addition, some students were enrolled in Home Economics and (or) Community Services Courses with the Division of Correspondence Education.
The total number of students enrolled on the full Community Services Specialty
Programme is 2,242, showing an increase of 332 over the total for last year, as
follows:   Foods, 897; Textiles, 849;  and Home and Industrial Services, 496.
During the current year there were 247 schools offering Home Economics
courses, showing an increase of seven schools over the total for last year.
Home Economics departments were included in six of the new schools which
opened last September: Brocklehurst Junior Secondary School, Norkam Senior
Secondary (School District No. 24), J. N. Burnett Junior Secondary (School District No. 38), Lakewood Junior Secondary (School District No. 57), Dean Heights
School, and Shoreline Junior Secondary (School District No. 61). Mackenzie
Elementary-Junior Secondary School (School District No. 57) offered Home Economics in then curriculum for the first time this year. In School District No. 25,
Barriere Secondary School was rebuilt and the Home Economics department reopened in September, 1968. Tsolum Elementary-Junior Secondary School became
an elementary school and the pupils were accommodated elsewhere in School District No. 71.
The number of Home Economics rooms (Combination, Foods, Clothing and
Textiles) in use was 589, an increase of 61 over the total for the previous year.
There were auxiliary facilities, namely, management areas in many secondary and
senior secondary schools, as well as 11 teaching-cafeteria kitchens. A teaching-
cafeteria kitchen was opened at Queen Elizabeth Senior Secondary School, in School
District No. 36 (Surrey). These kitchens provide auxiliary teaching and practical-
experience facilities for students on the Foods Specialty of the Community Services
Programme.
There were Home Economics departments in secondary schools in 79 out of
85 school districts of the Province, as well as two unattached schools and the Jericho Hill School.
This year there were 590 teachers of Home Economics or Community Services
courses, an increase of 38 over the total number of teachers for last year. Of this
number, 303 (51 per cent) had Home Economics degrees or the equivalent.   There
  G 80
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
were 15 men instructing or collaborating with Home Economics teachers in teaching one or more of CFS 9, Fd 11, Fd 12a, and Fd 12b.
Members of the Division of Home Economics made consultative visits with
281 Home Economics teachers. In addition, group conferences were conducted
with Home Economics teachers in nine school districts.
During the year, frequent consultative contacts were made with Miss M. Johnson, Supervisor of Home Economics in Victoria Schools, and with Mrs. M. Murphy,
Co-ordinator of Home Economics in Vancouver Schools. A half-day conference
with Miss M. Johnson; Mrs. M. Murphy; Mr. W. B. Naylor, Director of Curriculum; Mr. P. J. Kitley, Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment; and the members of
the Division of Home Economics was held in Victoria during December.
A member of the Division of Home Economics was at the University of British
Columbia for a portion of each week of Summer Session 1969 to interview teachers
and prospective teachers of Home Economics. At the University of British Columbia, the Director participated in a meeting regarding teacher education at university
level as it relates to Home Economics in public schools, participated in a symposium
on new concepts of curriculum design, attended the fall meeting of the Council of
the School of Home Economics, met with and spoke to a Home Economics Orientation class, and met with and spoke to an Ed 404 (HE) class.
The Director attended a meeting of the British Columbia Nutrition Co-ordinating Committee regarding basic concepts of nutrition education for today's youth.
At the invitation of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation Convention
Committee, the Director was one of the speakers in the Teachers of Home Economics Specialist Association's panel discussion at the Easter Convention. In June,
the Director attended the American Home Economics Association Annual Convention, which was held in Boston, Mass.
The Home Economics Register has been revised, and the new booklet, " Home
Economics and Community Services Record of Pupils' Attendance and Achievement," will be available to the schools in September, 1969.
The first Director of Home Economics for the Province of British Columbia,
Dr. Jessie L. McLenaghen, passed away in Vancouver, on December 19, 1968.
Before her appointment to the Department of Education in August, 1926, Miss
McLenaghen had received her B.Sc. degree from Columbia University and had
experience in the field of education in Albany, N.Y., and in Saskatchewan. In British Columbia, due to Miss McLenaghen's efforts, Home Economics became an optional subject for junior matriculation in 1927, Home Economics course outlines
for elementary, junior high, and high school were put into effect, and the first Department of Education recipe book, for the use of elementary and junior high school
classes, was published. She was instrumental in raising the standard of teacher-
preparation for Home Economics. Miss McLenaghen was the first President of the
Canadian Home Economics Association, an office which she held from 1939 to
1941. In 1956, 10 years after her retirement from the position of Provincial Director of Home Economics, Miss McLenaghen received an honorary LL.D. degree
from the University of British Columbia. The Jessie L. McLenaghen Scholarship,
to be awarded annually to a graduate of the School of Home Economics, was established in 1968, at the University of British Columbia. To the late Dr. McLenaghen,
a well-deserved tribute is paid for her outstanding foresight and leadership, her contribution and service in developing Home Economics in the public-school system
of British Columbia.
Mrs. Helen Ann Krueger, B.Sc.(H.Ec) (Alberta), was appointed in September, 1968, to the position of Inspector of Home Economics. Her teaching experience has been in Alberta and at Prince Rupert, British Columbia.
 DIVISION OF UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE AFFAIRS
G 81
DIVISION OF UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE AFFAIRS
REPORT OF WILLIAM D. REID, B.A., M.Ed., ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION (UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE AFFAIRS)
General
The Division was occupied with the establishment of two regional colleges
(Capilano College and Okanagan Regional College) in addition to its functions
with respect to the other post-secondary institutions and Student Aid in the Province. Despite difficulties which both Capilano College and Okanagan Regional
College experienced in opening in temporary quarters, or in the use of shared after-
hours secondary school facilities, services additional to those previously offered
through Grade XIII to students in the areas served were provided by the new colleges through more comprehensive programmes.
Much credit for the breadth of offerings in the colleges must go to the British
Columbia Institute of Technology. The latter has assisted the smaller and newer
colleges by providing general courses at the first-year level in the colleges permitting
students who are successful in these to transfer to the second-year level in several
specific sophisticated courses at the Institute. The areas in which this service has
been provided are Electronics and Commerce.
Selkirk College and Vancouver City College have continued to make significant contributions to post-secondary education in this Province. During the year
a contract was let for the new buildings which will house Vancouver City College
on the Langara Campus. The new building is expected to be completed by September, 1970.
The table below, numbered I, shows the state of development of the colleges
as at June 30, 1969.
Table I
Regional or District College Present Status
Vancouver City College In operation 4 years.
Selkirk College (Castlegar) In operation 3 years.
Okanagan Regional College In operation 1 year.
Capilano College (North Shore) In operation 1 year.
Malaspina College (Nanaimo) To open in September, 1969.
College of New Caledonia (Prince George)  -To open in September, 1969.
Douglas College (West Fraser Valley) Approved but not open.
Kamloops College Approved but not open.
To the regional college councils and the planning committees which preceded
them must go much credit for overcoming difficulties which always attend the establishment of a new institution. The devoted men and women who have served the
Province and its young people on regional college councils and planning committees
have done so with vigour and imagination.
Enrolments.—Tables II and III below show the enrolment figures for universities and regional and district colleges as well as the British Columbia Institute of
Technology for the year 1968/69:—
 G 82
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
Table II.—British Columbia Universities
University
of British
Columbia
University
of
Victoria
Notre Dame
University
of Nelson
Simon Fraser
University,
Fall Semester
Full-time degree enrolment—
16,965
1,964
4,631
133
498
4,794
459
Totals	
18,929        |        4,764
498        |        5,253
Part-time degree enrolment—
Correspondence 	
603
2,506
282
5,664
675
1,251
6
4
42
295
Off campus
	
Totals       	
9,055
1,926        i             52        j           295
27,984
6,690
550
5,548
Table III.—British Columbia Colleges and British Columbia
Institute of Technology
British
Columbia
Institute of
Technology
Selkirk
College
Okanagan
Regional
College
Capilano
College
Vancouver
City College,
Fall
Semester
Full-time enrolment—
Transfer programme—  	
Technical programme 	
2,354
320
143
282
28
401
89
2,123
540
Totals	
2,354        !         463
310        !         490        j      2,663
Part-time enrolment—
Transfer programme   	
2,400
215
119
89
2
294
1,462
Totals  ...
2,400                   334        |            91
294
1,462
4,754
797
401          1          784
4,125
Table IV shows the chairman of each regional or district college council and
the principal of each college which was in operation or under full preparation for
opening in 1969.
Table IV.—Regional and District Colleges
College
Chairman of Council
Principal
Vancouver City College.
Selkirk College..
Okanagan Regional College .
Capilano College	
Malaspina College...
College of New Caledonia-
Mr. J. C. Melvin Scott (Board Chairman,
School District No. 39) 	
Mr. J. E. Fletcher...	
Mr. C. L. Finch  	
Mr. C. P. Jones      	
Mr. J. Whitlam	
Mr. S. C. Evans 	
Mr. J. D. Newberry.
Mr. A. E. Soles.
Dr. R. F. Grant.
Mr. A. H. Glenesk.
Dr. Carleton M. Opgaard.
Mr. W. E. Franke.
 British Columbia Institute of Technology:  Medical Laboratory, blood-grouping
instruction in the medical laboratory blood bank.
 G 84
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
Canada Student Loans
During the loan-year 1968/69, which began July 1, 1968, the Division issued
10,503 loans in the total amount of $7,545,720. The average amount of a loan
was $718.43.
During the year the British Columbia Student Aid Committee met with the
Financial Aid Officers of the major post-secondary institutions in the Province to
discuss procedures for the loan-year 1969/70. As a result of the meeting, a handbook for Financial Aid Officers was produced by this Division. The Financial Aid
Officers also participated in the redesign of application forms and worksheets for
use in the coming loan-year.
The head of the Division, who acts as Chairman of the British Columbia Student Aid Committee, attended three meetings of the Plenary Committee for Canada
Student Loans in Ottawa at the invitation of the Plenary Committee, of which he
is a member. These meetings resulted in some changes in policy and procedure,
to which all participating Provinces agreed. It is noted that requests of this and
other Provinces have resulted in provisional authority to issue loans, the total value
of which will be increased in the loan-year 1969/70. It is anticipated that all British Columbia students who meet the needs criteria agreed to by participating Provinces will be able to obtain a loan in the loan-year 1969/70.
Scholarships and Bursaries
Scholarships
The Provincial Government continued its programme of scholarship assistance
to students proceeding with appropriate post-secondary education at the universities, the regional and district colleges, British Columbia Institute of Technology,
and Grade XIII, with awards going also to those competing in the Grade XII examinations. Again, this year, approval was given to the winning of an award on
the basis of competition on completion of a semester of study at those institutions
on a semester system, with payment to be made for taking a further appropriate
semester. The regular full-year competition remained for other institutions. Competitions, therefore, occur three times a year, and data for 1969 will not be complete until the close of the 1969 year. First-class awards were valued at three-
quarters the tuition fee of the next period of study; second-class awards were of
two types, with upper second-class awards representing one-half the tuition fee, and
lower second-class awards one-third such fee. Approximately one-half the second-
class awards were of upper value and one-half lower. An average of 70 per cent
continued to be the minimum requirement for second-class awards.
Figures covering Government of British Columbia scholarships are shown in
Table V below:—
Table V.—Scholarships
Award Year
Awards Authorized
First Class
Second Class
Total
Amount
April 1, 1967, to March 31, 1968.
April 1, 1968, to March 31, 1969.
2,174
2,583
4,755
5,713
6,929
8,296
$1,397,705
1,624,080
  G 86
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1968/69
Bursaries
The Provincial Government annually provides Government bursaries to assist
students to undertake further training. An average of 65 per cent is required, together with evidence of financial need. Assessment is based on the last full year
of academic studies undertaken.
The value of bursary awards made this year varied from $120 to $400. These
awards are made available to those undertaking undergraduate university and college studies within the Province (Universities of British Columbia, Victoria, Simon
Fraser, and Notre Dame, and regional and district colleges, as well as the British
Columbia Institute of Technology), recognized nurses' training in the Province, and
for recognized university study outside British Columbia in undergraduate courses
of training not available in this Province; for example, veterinary science. Responsibility for final decision on awards and general bursary policy rests with the British Columbia Student Aid Committee, chaired by the Assistant Superintendent
(University and College Affairs). Notification to all candidates is made by the
Registrar's Office, with cheques issued through the Departmental Comptroller's
office.
Government bursaries authorized are shown in Table VI below:—
Table VI.—Bursaries
Award Year
Awards Authorized
Number      Amount     Average Award
September 1,1967, to August 31,1968 ...
September 1, 1968, to August 31, 19691..
3,939
4,060
$693,680
732,545
$176.10
180.43
i Exclusive of 23 awards (veterinary science) totalling $57,500.
The Academic Board for Higher Education in British Columbia
The head of the Division was appointed to the Academic Board in August
of 1968. Service with the Board has been challenging and stimulating as well as a
pleasure.
The Academic Board's membership this year has included:—
Dean I. McTaggart-Cowan University of British Columbia
Dean S. N. F. Chant Lieutenant-Governor in Council
Professor R. J. Baker_ Simon Fraser University
Dr. R. R. Haering Simon Fraser University
Professor C. B. Bourne University of British Columbia
Dean F. Tyler University of Victoria
Dr. R. E. L. Watson University of Victoria
Mr. W. D. Reid Lieutenant-Governor in Council
Mr. E. C. Roper. Lieutenant-Governor in Council
Mr. D. W. Franklin serves as Executive Secretary to the Board.
During 1968/69 the Academic Board has been very active. The following
activities represent a sketch only of the highlights of these activities. The Board
convened a meeting of representatives of universities and colleges to attempt to
find a solution to the problems of transfer of credits by students proceeding from
one institution to another in the Province. The meeting resulted in a much better
understanding on the part of participants from both types of institution and in the
general acceptance of programmes which students  completed  successfully.    A
 DIVISION OF UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE AFFAIRS G 87
further outgrowth of the conference saw the establishment of subject-area or
discipline committees, which will meet twice annually to review progress and
discuss change.
The Board also convened a meeting of administrative officers of universities
and colleges to study and determine better methods of forecasting post-secondary
enrolments.   Additional research in this important area is continuing.
The Board continued to hold its regular meetings, details of which appear in
the Board's Annual Report to the Minister of Education.
The Board visited, examined, and reported to the Minister upon the progress
and development of Capilano College and Okanagan Regional College during the
year.
Meetings with College Principals
The principals of the district and regional colleges met in October, 1968, with
the Honourable the Minister of Education for an introductory meeting.
Subsequently, the principals have met on several occasions to discuss problems, find solutions, compare projected programmes, and generally to co-ordinate
their plans to some degree. The principals intend to continue to meet several times
each year to further their studies and to exchange information. The head of this
Division has been invited to attend the meetings which the principals convene.
This courtesy is appreciated and does serve the purpose of keeping the Department
of Education aware of developments and future plans.
Educational Research Institute of British Columbia
The Educational Research Institute of British Columbia meets frequently to
act as a funding and co-ordinating body in the area of research. This body is
autonomous and has representation from the British Columbia School Trustees
Association, the universities, the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, the Parent-
Teacher Federation, and the Council of Public Instruction. The Institute reports
its activities annually at a general meeting in April of each year. Copies of its
reports are obtainable from the Executive Secretary, 1177 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver 1, British Columbia.
The writer has had the privilege of representing the Minister and the Department of Education as a member of the Board of Directors of the Educational Research Institute of British Columbia and as a member of the Post-Secondary Sub-
Committee of the Council of Ministers of Education of Canada.
It is with respect and appreciation that one offers thanks to the Deputy Minister
of Education, his senior colleagues in the Department of Education, officials of
universities and colleges, as well as to members of regional college councils, for
the many courtesies and much co-operation which he has received during the
past year.
 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. S. WHITE, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND REGIONAL DIRECTOR FOR CANADIAN
VOCATIONAL TRAFNING.
It seems almost trite to say that this field of education continues to grow at a
significant pace. Nevertheless, that has been the situation during the past year
and there is little evidence to suggest that the pace will slacken. The impact of
Canada Manpower in the training field, by ever-increasing demands for more and
more training, has brought new problems of how to meet their requirements, problems, and demands.   These have been successfuUy met.
Our physical plants constantly undergo changes in the form of additions to
existing units, together with totally new construction. During the year a completely
new but separate addition to the Victoria School came into operation, which
enabled us to increase our offering of existing courses and also to add a new
course, whilst at the same time provide much-needed improvements to the instructional areas of other programmes. A completely new school opened at Terrace
and is gradually making its presence known throughout that general area. The
Library at the British Columbia Institute of Technology and the new Curriculum
Development building were completed and occupied during the year, thus providing
extended services in these fields. Ten construction projects, commenced in the
previous year, reached varying levels of progress during this year and included
instrumentation laboratory (B.C.V.S., Burnaby), extension to the foods centre
(B.C.I.T.), diesel workshop (Burnaby), cafeteria and dormitories (Terrace),
additional classrooms (Nanaimo), agricultural buildings (Dawson Creek), greenhouse and animal holding building (B.C.I.T.), sawmill shed (Prince George), and
a complete workshop complex in Victoria. Whilst these are progressing, some
14 more projects are in varying stages of planning to cater for modifications and
(or) additions throughout the Province, including a new school at Kamloops.
At the request of the Federal authorities, this Branch undertook to send a team
of vocational instructors and a " project manager " to Malaysia in order to assist
the Malaysian Government to establish a Trade Teachers Training College. The
primary purpose is to " set up " the College and to instruct Malaysian personnel,
who will themselves become vocational instructors. Mr. L. Smith, principal of the
British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby, was appointed project manager
and Messrs. G. W. Bradbury and J. P. Conlon of the Burnaby Vocational School,
together with Messrs. K. L. Wheeler and J. B. Lock of the Vancouver Vocational
Institute comprise this, our first foreign-aid team, and reports to date indicate
good progress is being made.
Mr. T. Held, of the Burnaby school, was granted leave-of-absence for one
year in order to assist the Jamaican Government in the field of welding, and again
satisfactory results are reported.
A revival of interest in agricultural training resulted in the graduation from
the British Columbia Vocational School at Dawson Creek of its first class in
Vocational Agriculture. The graduates are from many regions of British Columbia
and most, though not all, will be returning to their home areas to pursue their
interests in various types of agriculture enterprises.
During the year, Mr. J. H. Knight resigned from the position of principal of
the British Columbia Vocational School, Nelson, and his place was taken by Mr.
J. P. Wapple.   Mr. Wapple came from the Salmon Arm School District, where he
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
G 89
taught as an Industrial Education teacher, served as a counsellor, and also as
Director of Adult Education.
Certain of the highlights of the operations of the vocational schools are shown
under the following separate headings together with a summary of enrolments.
British Columbia Vocational School—Burnaby
Enrolment has increased by 2.8 per cent from last year. Most categories are
down slightly, with the exception of pre-employment training, which increased by
13.6 per cent.   Reductions have occurred in apprentice and pre-apprentice classes.
Additional classes were created to meet increased training demands for Appliance Servicing, Building Service Workers (as mobile courses in several centres),
Electrical, and Commercial Training in (a) Bookkeeping and Accounting; (b)
Secretarial; (c) Court Reporting and Stenotype Operator Training. In May,
the Foods Training Department (Chef Training, Baking, and Retail Meat Processing) catered to the Sixth National Conference of the Canadian Vocational Association. The standard of training offered by the school received national attention
and many fine compliments were received. Industrial Instrumentation was started
and is expected to become well established as physical facilities improve.
Because of a reduced demand, offerings in Bricklaying were cut by one-half.
At the request of the Advisory Committee, the five-month course in Basic Welding was dropped and all general welding courses are now of 10 months' duration.
Upgrade training continued to occupy an important place in our general training
philosophy and two Basic Driver pilot courses of four weeks each were offered to
truck-drivers for the trucking industry. Close co-operation between Canada Manpower and the Automotive Transport Association created full employment for
graduates. A four-week pilot course was conducted in Hardwood Floor Laying
during May to retrain hardwood-floor workers in the basic skills of carpet installation. A three-week refresher course in Heavy Duty Mechanics was offered in April
on an afternoon basis to upgrade experienced mechanics in preparation for certification under the Tradesmen's Qualification Act.
Burnaby Lake Division.—Training is now well established on this separate
campus, extra classes in Electrical Apprentice and Appliance Servicing training
being added during the year.
Pre-employment programmes continue to receive wide interest and support.
All facilities are filled to capacity. To reduce pressure on the Commercial Department, two classrooms were borrowed from the Division of Industrial Education.
Two classrooms in the British Columbia Institute of Technology are now assigned
for these classes. Interest in Aircraft Maintenance training remains very strong
with more applicants for the programme than the Advisory Committee feels can be
placed in the industry at this time. A somewhat similar situation exists in Retail
Meat Processing training. Welding services continue to be popular, with facilities
used to capacity.
Community Relations.—A total of 61 group-tours of this school was made by
1,234 prospective students. Mr. D. A. Evans, Vocational Counsellor, attended
10 Career Days, resulting in many applications for training.
Conference rooms and other school facilities were placed at the disposal of
various service groups and associations. This procedure has been popular with
many organizations and has provided a useful community service.
  TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
G 91
Night School
The Night School Division again had a very successful year. Many of the
programmes were repeated and new courses were added to fill the needs of industry. Flexibility is a must in this type of training and courses which have
served a purpose but are redundant must be dropped in favour of new programmes
that will keep personnel in industry up to date. Local adult-education meetings
have served a very useful purpose in co-ordinating the activities of the adult-education directors and ourselves in this Lower Mainland area to provide a very broad
coverage for the greatest number of people in need of a wide variety of courses.
New courses commenced in the following: Construction Foremen, Transit and
Level for construction labourers, Basic Electricity and Electronics (designed for
shop-maintenance personnel), Blueprint Reading and Spool-sheet Draughting (piping trades), Bulletin and Pictorial Lettering (sign trade), Asphalt Paving, Electrostatic Spray-painting, Sheet-metal Shop Practice, Blueprint Reading for Plasterers,
Acoustic Tile (lathers), Plasterboard Application, Blueprint Reading (structural
steel), Aircraft Maintenance Upgrading, and Mathematics for Electricians.
As predicted in the 1967/68 report, some full-time short-term upgrading
courses commenced in 1968/69. These operated on a 3.30 to 10.30 p.m. schedule,
with the student enrolment considered as day school.
The night-school apprentice population increased from 1,361 to 1,453, even
though more classes were changed over to day school. Trade Extension enrolments,
at 134, were down slightly from last year.
British Columbia Vocational School—Dawson Creek
This last school-year has witnessed a significant increase in enrolment, partly
attributable to the inauguration of the second phase of the agriculture programme
as well as to the ever-increasing awareness of the public of programmes offered at
the school. Participation by night-school students in the varied upgrading programmes has also contributed to a greater utilization of the school's facilities.
Participants in the night-school programmes have travelled from as far as 100
miles to take advantage of these programmes.
With near completion of facilities at the school farm and the acquisition of
live stock, practical training in animal husbandry is now possible.
School facilities have been extensively used throughout the year by the
Department of Agriculture for short courses in Farm Management, Agriculture, and
for various 4-H activities and by the automotive, heavy equipment, and welding
industries for short courses in those fields.
During the year, members of the Cook Training class participated in the
Annual Chefs' Ball in Vancouver, where they received recognition for their contribution. The Cook Training class also had the privilege of preparing a luncheon
during the visit to the Peace River region by His Honour, the Lieutenant-Governor
of British Columbia.
British Columbia Vocational School—Kelowna
Enrolment in both day and night classes remained steady from the previous
year.   The Basic Training for Skill Development 12 course commenced in April.
Throughout the year the school assisted various community organizations.
Several Government vehicles were repaired and painted by the Auto Body classes.
An air-brake board was designed and built by the automotive personnel and used
for the training of apprentices, journeymen, and some Royal Canadian Mounted
Police officers.
 G 92 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
British Columbia Vocational School—Nanaimo
Enrolments for both day and night classes showed small increases.
Tradesmen's qualification classes were offered off-campus for the benefit of
the logging industry. These took place in 14 centres, from Chilliwack to the Queen
Charlotte Islands.
Six buildings were moved from the Army Camp to the school property. These
buildings provided us with 64 beds, which were badly needed, as well as two small
classrooms and an additional stores building. Work on the third floor of the Administration Building is proceeding, and this addition will provide six additional classrooms and a dental assistants' laboratory.
British Columbia Vocational School—Nelson and Kootenay
School of Art
Substantial increases took place in the over-all enrolment picture, both day and
night.
Additional classes were provided in Basic Training for Skill Development and
Building Service Worker Programmes whilst the night school embarked on Mill-
wrighting and Instructor Upgrading courses.
During the year considerable progress was made in working with Notre Dame
University toward the establishment of a combined four-year Fine Arts degree, the
two institutions sharing the training.
Former graduates of the school's Beauty Culture course carried off the first
three places in a Regional Hairdressers Association Styling competition, whilst Miss
Renatta Agostinis, of the Commercial Division, was crowned as Carnival Queen.
Several divisions of the school entered award-winning floats in the Nelson
Annual Mid-summer Parade.
The Kootenay School of Art covered itself in glory in many ways, e.g., the
production of a sculptural mural for Cominco resulted in an award of a $500
scholarship. This success was repeated in a commission from the City of Nelson
to produce a coat of arms in marble concrete for the central tower of the City Hall.
Several exhibits were shown at national and local shows and a highly successful Art
Display/Sale/Tea raised some $2,000 for additional scholarships. Finally, Messrs.
D. O. MacGregor and M. R. Levitt were awarded travelling research grants by the
National Design Council.
All of these events, together with radio interviews on training offered in the
school, not only contribute in large measure to the success of the operation but
create a most favourable atmosphere in the community at large.
British Columbia Vocational School—Prince George
Day enrolment reflected an encouraging increase which more than offset a fall
in night-school activity.
Most of the established pre-employment programmes operated at or near
capacity throughout the year. More students could have been accommodated in
welding, but a slackening in construction activity has reduced demand for general
welding training and the night-shift course (11 p.m. to 6 a.m.) was discontinued.
A continuous and increasing demand for Commercial training resulted in the
introduction of an upgrading course. Practical experience was gained by the
General Commercial classes through their participation in the office activities of
voluntary community projects.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION G 93
Other community projects which enjoyed mutual benefits with the Heavy
Equipment and Tractor Operator courses included a large playing-field, a road,
garbage dump, and several school grounds.
In the growing area of Basic Training for Skill Development training, the
senior course in Prince George enrolled 18 students.
A surplus of job opportunities faced the 16 graduates of the Dental Assistants
course.
Because of low enrolments in the Pre-apprentice Automotive and Heavy Duty
Mechanic classes, it was possible to provide upgrading training for journeymen, with
considerable benefit to these tradesmen.
The night-school programme meets requests not only from individuals but from
local firms which sponsor their employees for specialized training. A project named
" Mobilearn," which provides training in hydraulics and pneumatics for the lumber
industry has proved highly successful. The course is offered at various locations
as required by industry and accommodates shift workers by holding classes in the
afternoons and evenings. The mechanization of the sawmill industry has introduced
new equipment often unfamiliar to many of the older workers and the Mobilearn
course enables such workers to update their knowledge and ability.
Instructors were involved in numerous visits to industry, and others participated
in conventions organized by their respective professional groups. Mr. John Tow-
land, Millwrighting instructor, undertook a Federal assignment in Malaysia in May,
1969.
British Columbia Vocational School—Terrace
The first students accepted into training on September 2, 1968, enrolled in
Basic Training for Skill Development, General Commercial, Secretarial, Commercial Advanced Options, Electronics (Technical), and Navigation. Additional
courses added during the year were: Marine and Stationary Engineering, Fishermen
Upgrading, Marine Engine Repair, General and Upgrading Welding, Automotive,
Carpentry, and Heavy Duty Pre-apprentice training.
A number of changes were made in content and presentation of both the Electronics and Commercial programmes, thus permitting greater versatility. The number of intakes was increased in General Welding, Carpentry, Electronics, and Commercial to provide greater availability.
The monthly enrolment increased from the original 45 students of September,
1968, to 138 students in May, 1969, with a total of 295 students registered during
the 10 months the school has been in operation.
The dormitories and cafeteria presently under construction will provide better
living accommodation for students. Meanwhile, steps are being taken to extend the
publicity programme throughout the region so as to give wider knowledge of the
opportunities for training available in the school.
British Columbia Vocational School—Victoria
There was a substantial increase over the previous year's enrolment and
although all training programmes presently offered shared in this increased enrolment the most significant areas of increase were in the Practical Nursing and
Commercial General programmes. It is anticipated that occupancy of the workshops now nearing completion will more than double the existing day-school enrolment. In addition, the shops and classrooms will be available for night-school
programmes teaching new skills as well as for the upgrading of presently employed
tradesmen.
 G 94 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1968/69
Inspection Report—Regional Vocational Schools
During the past year all regional vocational schools were visited for varying
periods of time.
In addition, the Canadian Forces School of Military Engineering was visited
during the month of February and the Haney Correctional Institution was visited
during the month of March, when discussions were held with the supervisor and
the warden.
Heavy demands were made on the supervisor's time for the purpose of interviewing and selection of staff in no less than 90 competitions at Victoria, Burnaby,
Nanaimo, Prince George, Vancouver, Dawson Creek, Penticton, and Prince Rupert.
Meetings were also held with numerous groups, including the Technical Education and Manpower Conference; Vocational School's Principals' Conference;
Personnel Department of Columbia Cellulose Pulpmill Division, Prince Rupert;
and the Society of Industrial Accountants executive meeting. The last-named
was for the purpose of discussing the curriculum in bookkeeping and accounting.
Finally, a five-week course, entitled "A Survey of Technical and Vocational
Education," was organized and held at the University of British Columbia summer
school during the month of July for vocational instructors.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
G 95
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 G 98 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
Vocational Night-school Enrolment in Regional Schools
School
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
Rnrnahy
2,787
71
590
783
255
821
36
42
6,1921
1,7391
3,186
159
287
583
121
877
25
34
4,676
401
3,138
201
574
651
154
690
176
32
59
4,445
258
Totals  	
13,316
10,349
10,378
i These figures include some non-vocational classes.
Night-school Enrolment in School Districts
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
9,158
8,885
702
3,087
11,096
9,033
659
2,687
7,449
12,216
338
Miscellaneous  —    	
6,277
Totals	
21,832
23,475
26,280
British Columbia Institute of Technology
The fine new playing-field and running-track were completed and are now in
use by students and staff on the campus.
One project that was approved by the Provincial Government last year was
the establishment of a branch bank on the campus. The Canadian Imperial Bank
of Commerce was the successful tenderer and negotiations were started to get the
bank premises and student store and barber shop built as soon as possible.
New Training Programmes
The past year has been one of change and development in planning of training
programmes as a result of the advent of regional colleges in British Columbia and
because of requests from industry to develop new training programmes.
The Advisory Council approved last year of the concept of transfer programmes
from regional colleges to the British Columbia Institute of Technology after first year
in the regional colleges. This plan will develop a great deal of momentum in the
future as more regional colleges are developed.
The following new training options were established: Environmental Option
in Building Technology, Retail Marketing Option in Marketing Programme of Business Management Technology, Manpower Option in Administrative Management
Programme of Business Management Technology, and Photogrammetry Option in
Surveying Technology.
Late in the year the Advisory Council approved a number of changes in existing programmes and a number of additional training options. Students for these
options will be enrolled in the fall, 1969, and the fall, 1970. These new training
options will be included in next year's report.
  G 100
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1968/69
The limit of expansion of student population in the present buildings, without
going to Saturday operation or year-round operation, has probably been reached.
If the estimated enrolment of 2,700 is reached in 1969/70, it will fill available classrooms and laboratories. If the expansion by 1975 to about 4,200 students is carried out to take care of existing programmes, the many new training programmes
under investigation at the present time and the transfer of students from regional
colleges will require additional training areas.
The Government has appointed an architectural firm to investigate the feasibility of building residences to accommodate 750 students in attendance at the three
training centres on this campus.
Day Enrolment
Male Female
Broadcast Communications
Building
Business Management	
Chemical and Metallurgical
Civil and Structural	
Electrical and Electronics
Food Processing	
Forest Products	
Forestry	
Health	
Hotel, Motel, and Restaurant
Instrumentation 	
Mechanical __
Mining
Natural Gas and Petroleum
Surveying
Medical Laboratory __.
Medical Radiography
73
112
432
91
104
285
48
66
179
90
87
79
123
40
34
88
5
4
Totals.
1,940
16
84
10
31
1
433
14
60
96
745
Total day enrolment 	
Total night-school enrolment
2,685
4,309
Co-ordination with Industry and Other Agencies
The emphasis on upgrading the existing labour force has resulted in the need
for many short, intensive, upgrade training programmes. There is little difference
in the amount of organizational work required in head office for a course of six
weeks' duration than for a course of six months' duration. A total of 59 short full-
time day courses were developed and commenced during the school-year 1968/69
throughout British Columbia. This increase in flow has created an ever-increasing
amount of planning and development.
The above, and the increase in demands by Canada Manpower, have been
additional to the normal duties of the Co-ordinator of Adult Vocational Training.
These latter include attendance at on-going advisory committee meetings held by
this Department or the Department of Labour. In the last year there have been
meetings to discuss on-going or new training for Canadian Merchant Service Guild,
Pipeline Contractors Association, hospitality industry, hospital maintenance engineers, hospital orderlies, millwright upgrading, fabrication welders, stationary engi-
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
G 101
neers, data processors, electronics technicians, sign painters, fishermen, oil-burner
servicemen, meat cutters, hairdressers, deck officers, vocational training for the deaf,
D.P.W. and C.W.B. tests for welders, aircraft-maintenance workers, diamond drillers, truck-drivers, log scalers, shingle sawyers, pre-school teachers, prospectors,
steamfitters, interior loggers, carpet layers, British Columbia Ferry personnel, industrial accountants, dental assistants, and dockyard electronics technicians.
Representation was provided on the planning committees for the Provincial
Alliance of Businessmen, Canada New Start planning committee, B.C. Council of
Agencies, and the training and selection committee for the rehabilitation of the disabled. Finally the Co-ordinator participated in the Conference of North American
Public School Adult Educators at Seattle, the Conference of British Columbia Directors of Adult Education at Kelowna, and the Canadian Vocational Association Conference in Burnaby.
The school-year 1968/69 was the first year courses offered by the adult regional
vocational schools were eligible for Canada Student loans, and a total of 39 courses
in these schools were involved. In all, 78 applications, totalling approximately
$60,000, were approved. It is anticipated the volume will increase in future years
as more vocational students become acquainted with this means of financial aid.
Curriculum Development Division
During the year the Division's responsibilities centred around the development
of course outlines, instructional materials, examinations, and publicity materials.
Course Outlines
Course outlines were developed in the following fields:—
(a) Apprenticeship and Pre-apprenticeship Courses.—Cook Training, Industrial Instrumentation, Sign Painting, Machine Shop, Structural Steel Erection, Sheet
Metal, Electricity, Baking, Boat Building, Office Machine Mechanic, Heavy Duty
Mechanics Upgrading, Automotive Mechanical Repair, Industrial Electricity, Oil
Burner Mechanic, Hairdressing, Resilient Floor Laying, Carpet Laying, and Foundry Work.
(b) Pre-employment Courses.—Basic Training for Skill Development Levels
2 and 3, General Welding, Commercial General, Commercial Secretarial, Commercial Bookkeeping, Mechanical Draughting, Marine Electronics, Stationary and Marine Engineering, Electronics Night School, Electricity/Electronics 11 and 12, Data
Processing, Marine Diesel and Gas Engine, Diamond Drill Helpers, Dental Assistance, Electric Heating Installation, First Mate Home Trade, Master Home Trade,
Vocational Education 181, Map Draughting, Architectural and Structural Draughting, Diesel Truck Operation, Draughting Familiarization 1 and 2, Waiter/Waitress
Training.
Instructional Materials
(a) Printed instructional materials were developed for almost all the courses
offered in the British Columbia regional vocational schools in addition to a great
number for the British Columbia Institute of Technology.
(b) Some 23 manuals were developed for a wide variety of courses.
In the area of photography a number of slide sets and film loops were developed for use as instructional material in addition to a film for the Federal Government project DACUM.
Large photographs were prepared for the Department of Education display
and the logging show at the Pacific National Exhibition.   Along with these, many
 G 102
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1968/69
black and white photographs and colour slides were taken in numerous training
centres throughout British Columbia.
Examinations
Tradesmen's Qualification examinations were developed in Sheet Metal, Automotive, Bricklaying, Plumbing, and Heavy Duty Trades, and Practical Nursing examinations for Medical-Surgical, Maternity, and Paediatrics were developed with
revisions to other sections.
This Division accepted the responsibility for printing the examinations for the
British Columbia Institute of Technology. A total of 618 pages for a total of 13,762
individual sheets was run.
Publicity materials produced by this Division were distributed to district superintendents, principals, counsellors, and Industrial Education instructors throughout
the Province, and also to educators in other parts of Canada, United States, and in
numerous foreign countries.
This Division has also been associated with and has carried out work for several education displays.
Secondary Schools and Industrial Teacher Training
The Technical Branch provides assistance for approved programmes in technical, industrial, commercial, agricultural, community services, visual and performing arts, occupational, and other programmes for particular occupations.
Construction and Equipment
The 34 school districts qualifying under the Vocational Schools Assistance Act
have completed 78 projects with equipment in place. This concludes the 75:25
Federal-Provincial sharing.
Ten additional projects are in the process of submission and approval under
the transitional capital agreement which allows funds on a 50:50 basis. The Vocational Schools Assistance Act Amendment Act, 1965, requires that where the Federal-Provincial sharing is 50:50, the school board provides 20 per cent, the Province 40 per cent, and the Federal Government 40 per cent of the capital costs. The
gross cost of these 10 projects is $3,695,000.
Technical books are being assessed to provide textbooks to the value of $300,-
000 in 70 senior secondary schools.
Staffing
A survey of all schools was conducted in the fall of 1968 to establish the requirements for industrial, commercial, and community services teachers for September, 1969, and September, 1970. The survey indicated that approximately 65
additional technical teachers would be required for September, 1969. The graduating class from the Industrial Education Accelerated Programme at the University
of British Columbia numbered 84. Fifty-nine were sponsored by Canada Manpower
and 25 by the Province of British Columbia.
Recruitment
Seventy-five persons have been recruited for teacher training during the
1969/70 year—50 sponsored by Canada Manpower and 25 by the Province. The
demands for industrial education teachers as forecast for September, 1970, should
be met.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
G 103
In-service Training
Electricity/Electronics Workshop, Easter, 1969
Fifty-one teachers attended the workshop held at the Vocational Teacher Training Unit in Burnaby. The teachers were from all parts of the Province and attended
in then own time during the latter part of Easter week. Local school boards assisted in some out-of-pocket expenses and the Department of Education co-ordinated the workshop and paid for all operating costs.
Construction Workshops, 1968/69
Two-day workshops were held in Prince George, Kimberley, Keremeos, Qualicum, and Abbotsford. Approximately 110 construction teachers were in attendance.   The objectives of the workshop were
(1) a study of successful group projects in the construction programme;
(2) procedures to follow and development of large projects;
(3) adapting the construction programme to schools of varying sizes;
(4) organization of the building programme in keeping with local industry;
(5) ensuring that production and practical work advances early in the school
year;
(6) integrating other vocational programmes, i.e., Community Services and
Commerce;
(7) co-operating with local industry and unions.
Practically every senior secondary school in the Province was represented at
one of the workshops. Members of the Technical Branch of the Department coordinated the programmes with the assistance of Mr. Cook, of the Abbotsford Senior
Secondary School, and Mr. McGlashing, of the Keremeos Secondary School.
In addition to the workshop in Abbotsford, a special tour of the vocational
facilities there was conducted for representatives of Canada Manpower, the Department of Indian Affairs, and officials of the Department of Education.
Electricity 8
The Industrial Education 8 Laboratory Manual for Electricity has been distributed to all district superintendents, principals, and industrial education teachers
throughout the Province. Together with the recent list of teaching systems, the new
manual will make it possible for every Grade VIII student to receive an adequate
exploratory period of study during the Grade VIII year.
Student Enrolment
Industrial Education pupils in Grades VIII, IX, and X normally enrol in the
equivalent of one course or block of time, although it is permissible to enrol for
additional study. Grades XI and XII pupils selecting Industrial Education normally
take from one to three courses. The following figures are the enrolments in various
Industrial Education courses being taken by students:—
 G 104
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
I.E. 8   20,615
I.E. 9   37,160
I.E. 11   21,557
I.E. 12   10,389
Course total  89,721
Occupational 1      1,056
Occupational 2         616
Occupational 3         443
Course total.
2,115
Programmes for particular occupations
(specifics)      1,062
Grand course total
Teachers instructing in Industrial Education
92,898
868
The number of formal inspections by the inspectors of Technical classes have
been fewer, thus allowing more time for supervision and consultations with district
superintendents of schools, Shop Teachers Association, secondary-school supervisors, and others. Requests for assistance were frequent, and were met promptly.
Evening sessions have been continued throughout the Province by the inspectors at
several Interior centres, with attendances and results reflecting keen interest.
Supervisory and Management Training
Communications and Human Relations—a programme designed to assist management in the matter of better employee-management relations, improved communications, and a better understanding of the needs of people.
Work Study Techniques—a programme developed to assist in the critical matter of cost control in production where there is a direct relationship between material costs, labour costs, and net profit.
The increase in management training of supervision is an indication of the continued success of these two " key " programmes.
The aluminum industry in British Columbia continues to use the facilities of
the Work Study programme in their over-all training programme, while school
boards and mining have enrolled their management people in both programmes during the year. One very important addition to the enrolment came from the union.
At least two of our large craft unions have trained conference representatives and
will be carrying out extensive programmes in the field. The Workmen's Compensation Board of British Columbia has used our facilities to set up a series of courses
designed to train and upgrade those men and women who are presently being rehabilitated due to injury.
Enrolment
Communications and Human Relations
Work study
  209
  125
Conferences with industry  609
Total
943
Tourist Services
Conventions and seminars held by the professional associations of the tourist
industry provided important communications for the Department and, when coupled with some 31 orientation trips throughout the Province, had a most beneficial
effect on the planning and presentation of many courses.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
G 105
Training programmes were conducted either by the Department or in conjunction with school districts over a wide area.
Enrolment
Supervisory training for hotel/motel housekeepers and operators.
Hostesses and head waiters	
42
51
123
61
10
136
36
Hospitality seminars (number of persons)   456
Waiter and waitress—upgrading
Dining-lounge management	
Restaurant management	
Waiter and waitress (basic) 	
Travel counsellors	
Total
915
Armed Services Vocational Training
Whilst further changes in policy were made by the Federal authorities, the
Technical and Vocational Branch continued to assist in the administration of the
two centres at Naden (Esquimalt) and Chilliwack.
Sundry Courses
The Air Brakes course conducted by the Department of Commercial Transport
enrolled some 32 students, whilst this Branch of the Department of Education was
able to provide some assistance to the Forest Service, Department of Lands, Forests,
and Water Resources, with their Forestry Training school which enrolled some 48
students in the basic course and 87 in various short courses.
 G 106
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1968/69
COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
REPORT OF J. H. PANTON, M.Sc, DIRECTOR
The Community Programmes Branch continued to study the feasibility of providing recreation services through regional districts during the 1968/69 year. This
has developed into some practical application in the Central Kootenay Region.
As a result, we have had an opportunity to determine the benefits of professional
recreation leadership in a regional district situation. This has proven most beneficial and has indicated that many of the problems of providing programme leadership for small communities can be solved with professional direction provided by
the people themselves. The future of recreation service in the Province may well
depend upon policies and procedures which are developed relative to regional district recreation service.
The annual seminar in Kelowna was discontinued in favour of a study seminar
attended by five selected people from each region in the Province and convened at
the University of British Columbia. The 40 delegates spent five days studying recreation in British Columbia, and many problems and procedures were discussed
and presented to the Branch.
More emphasis was placed on regional projects during 1968/69, and the field
staff organized and conducted several very significant projects which are listed later
in the report.
At present, recreation education seems to be of paramount importance for
individuals and governing bodies. A new awareness of the great potential and immediate benefits must be evident to a much greater degree than in the past if recreation is to perform the role it should in community life.
The growth chart for Recreation Commissions in British Columbia to March
31, 1969, follows:—
1958   250 1964   359
1959   266 1965   375
1960   281 1966   390
1961   307 1967   396
1962   332 1968   408
1963   351 1969   417
This does not indicate growth of recreation in the Province. There are few
communities not reached by the Community Programmes Branch and there are not
many new commissions established during a year. The Community Programmes
Branch is now endeavouring to strengthen existing commissions rather than organize
new ones.
Services extended by the Community Programmes Branch to British Columbia
communities are as follows:—
(1) Advice to public agencies and individuals on recreational matters by a
staff of regional recreation consultants.
(2) Fitness and Amateur Sport Division, which provides special service to
sports organizations, communities, and schools.
(3) Adult Education Division, which provides grants, consultation, clinics,
and conferences to School Board Adult Education Divisions.
(4) Aid to recreation to the blind through White Cane Clubs organized by
staff member Mr. Joseph Lewis.
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
G 107
(5) Large and comprehensive library of books, booklets, films, and filmstrips
on innumerable recreation topics.
(6) Drama library, materials, and advisory services.
(7) Leadership training through regional workshops, conferences, clinics,
seminars, and a Provincial study seminar.
(8) Grants-in-aid to Recreation Commissions on behalf of full-time recreation directors and to aid with the expenses of public recreation programmes.
(9) Provide resource personnel and act in advisory capacity for Provincial
conferences.
(10) Special grants to those Recreation Commissions who conduct summer
swimming and playground programmes.
Recreation Commissions
The following is a list of recreation commissions in British Columbia and the
annual Provincial Government grant allocated for the year:—
* Commissions receiving grants for directors' salaries.
t Inactive commissions.
Recreation Commission
Abbotsford 	
Adams Lake	
tAinsworth	
Alert Bay	
tAlexandria 	
Alexis Creek	
Appledale
Argenta-Iohnsons Landing
Armstrong
tArrowhead-Sidmouth
tArrovv Park West	
Ashcroft 	
Avola	
Baker Creek _
Baldy Hughes
Balfour	
Bamfield 	
tBarnhart Vale ....
tBarnstone Island.
Barriere 	
tBear Creek	
Beaver Creek	
tBeaverdell 	
Bella Coola	
Belmont Park	
Bessborough	
Birch Island	
Blackburn Road .
Black Creek	
tBlue River	
Blueberry Creek	
Bonnington-Corra Linn
Boston Bar	
Boswell	
Bouchie Lake	
tBowen Island 	
Bralorne-Pioneer
Bridesville 	
Brisco 	
Annual
Grant
$480.00
360.00
720.00
240.00
180.00
300.00
600.00
300.00
240.00
240.00
240.00
540.00
480.00
360.00
480.00
300.00
540.00
240.00
240.00
240.00
480.00
240.00
240.00
420.00
420.00
360.00
600.00
240.00
240.00
Recreation Commission
Britannia Beach 	
tBrocklehurst  ,_
tBrookmere 	
*Burnaby 	
Burns Lake	
Burton 	
Cache Creek	
*Campbell River
Canal Flats	
Canyon 	
Carrier	
Cape Mudge
tCawston 	
Cecil Lake	
Cedar	
*Central Kootenay
Central Saanich	
Chapman Camp __
Chase	
Chase River	
Chehalis Crossing ...
tChehalis Reserve	
Cherry Creek	
Cherryville
Cheslatta District
Chetwynd 	
*Chilliwack	
t Christian Valley
Christina Lake ...
Clayhurst	
Clearwater	
Clinton 	
Columbia Valley.
*Comox Village ...
Coombs 	
*Coquitlam 	
*Courtenay
Cowichan Indian Band
*Cranbrook 	
Annual
Grant
$480.00
3,600.00
480.00
420.00
240.00
1,800.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
420.00
240.00
420.00
1,500.00
480.00
480.00
300.00
360.00
420.00
600.00
480.00
480.00
300.00
1,000.00
300.00
240.00
300.00
300.00
240.00
1,500.00
240.00
3,300.00
2,400.00
540.00
2,100.00
 G 108
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
Recreation Commission
Crawford Bay	
Crescent Valley	
Creston  	
Cultus Lake	
Annual
Grant
.....      $300.00
360.00
600.00
480.00
Cumberland        1,500.00
Cutbank        240.00
tDawson Creek      	
Decker Lake	
Deep Creek	
*Delta 	
Denman Island
Departure Bay _
Deroche	
Dewdney
420.00
300.00
2,700.00
420.00
540.00
360.00
420.00
600.00
480.00
600.00
District of Matsqui	
District of Mission	
District of Salmon Arm	
*District of Surrey     4,500.00
Doe River        240.00
Donald        240.00
tDragon Lake	
Duhammel 	
Duncan 	
Eagle Valley	
East Kelowna	
East Wellington
Edgewater 	
Elko	
Emerald Mines .
tEnderby	
Erickson 	
Errington	
*Esquimalt	
Falkland 	
Fanny Bay 	
Farmington —
Ferndale 	
tFernie	
Field 	
Forest Grove	
Fort Fraser	
tFort Nelson	
tFort St. lohn ....
Francois Lake _.
Franklin River .
tFraser Lake	
Fruitvale	
600.00
600.00
240.00
600.00
420.00
420.00
240.00
600.00
420.00
300.00
1,500.00
300.00
480.00
360.00
300.00
600.00
300.00
420.00
  420.00
  300.00
  480.00
  240.00
  ? 60.00
  420.00
  600.00
  540.00
Gibsons   No grant
Gillies Bay  420.00
tGiscome        	
t Glenmore        	
Glenora  420.00
tGolata Creek  	
Golden   	
Fulton River
Gabriola Island .
Galiano 	
Galloway	
Genelle	
Gold River ...
Grand Forks
900.00
900.00
600.00
Recreation Commission
t Great Central 	
Greenwood 	
Gray Creek	
Grindrod 	
Groundbirch 	
tHaida Masset	
Annual
Grant
$420.00
240.00
300.00
420.00
Halfmoon Bay  No grant
Happy Valley-Glen Lake  420.00
Harewood   540.00
Harrison Hot Springs  600.00
tHarrop        	
Hatzic Prairie   240.00
Hazelton  300.00
Hedley  240.00
Hixon  600.00
Holberg (R.C.A.F.)
Holberg 	
Hope
Hornby Island .
Horsefly	
Houston	
Inonoaklin 	
Invermere	
loco 	
lordan River ...
lustportel	
Kaleden 	
Kamloops	
Kaslo 	
Kelly Lake	
* Kelowna	
Kent	
tKeremeos 	
Kersley 	
Kettle Valley
Kilkerran	
*Kimberley ....
Kingfisher 	
Kitwanga Valley
t Kootenay Bay	
tKyuquot 	
Lac la Hache	
Ladysmith 	
tLa France 	
Laidlaw 	
Lakeview Heights
Langford 	
*Langley 	
Lantzville 	
Lardeau 	
Lavington Coldstream
Lillooet 	
Lister 	
Little Fort	
tLone Butte	
Lower Nicola	
Lower Similkameen .
Lumby	
Lund	
Lytton 	
Mahatta River	
300.00
240.00
600.00
300.00
300.00
600.00
600.00
600.00
480.00
480.00
360.00
420.00
600.00
600.00
240.00
2,700.00
480.00
300.00
240.00
240.00
2,400.00
300.00
360.00
300.00
540.00
240.00
300.00
480.00
1,500.00
600.00
240.00
600.00
240.00
480.00
300.00
240.00
No grant
300.00
420.00
420.00
300.00
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
G 109
Recreation Commission
Mahood Falls 	
Malaspina 	
Maple Ridge	
Mara	
Mayne Island	
*Merritt	
Merville	
Metchosin 	
Mica Creek	
Midway 	
tMinstrel Island
Minto	
*Mission City _
Montney  	
Montrose	
Moose Heights
Moricetown .	
Mount Currie .
tMud River	
McConnell Creek
tMcBride 	
Mackenzie 	
t McLeese Lake	
Nakusp 	
*Nanaimo 	
Nanaimo Indian Band
Nanoose 	
Naramata 	
tNarcosli Creek	
Nazko 	
Nelson 	
New Denver 	
New Hazelton	
tNew Massett	
New Westminster
Nicomen Island _
Noralee Clemretta Colleymount..
North Bend	
*North Cowichan	
tNorthfield	
North Saanich	
North Shore (Nelson)
North Shuswap	
tNorth Vancouver	
*Oak Bay	
t Okanagan Centre	
Okanagan Falls
Annual
Grant
$180.00
300.00
600.00
240.00
360.00
1,800.00
420.00
480.00
300.00
300.00
420.00
1,200.00
300.00
600.00
180.00
300.00
360.00
240.00
600.00
600.00
3,300.00
420.00
420.00
300.00
240.00
No grant
240.00
360.00
No grant
360.00
360.00
480.00
1,500.00
tOkanagan Indian Band .
tOkanagan Mission 	
tOliver 	
100 Mile House.
tl50 Mile House.
tOsoyoos 	
Oyama	
Palling	
Parksville	
tPaul Creek ____
tPeace Canyon
Peachland	
Pemberton Valley
Pender Harbour ...
420.00
600.00
360.00
1,400.00
240.00
360.00
300.00
420.00
600.00
600.00
540.00
No grant
Recreation Commission
tPendleton Bay	
Penticton 	
tPitt Meadows 	
Pleasant Valley	
Popkum 	
*Port Alberni	
Port Alice 	
*Port Coquitlam	
*Port Hardy	
Port Mellon	
*Port Moody	
Port McNeill	
Port Renfrew	
*Port Simpson	
Pouce Coupe 	
*Powell River	
*Prince George	
*Prince Rupert	
Princeton	
Proctor 	
Progress .
tQuadra Island —
Qualicum Beach .
Queen Charlotte .
t Quesnel 	
Radium lunction
Red Bluff	
tRedwell 	
tReid Lake 	
Revelstoke	
* Richmond 	
Riondel 	
Riske Creek	
Riverside 	
Rivervale 	
Roberts Creek	
Robson	
Rock Creek	
Roe Lake	
Rose Lake	
tRound Lake	
Royston 	
Rutland 	
tSaanich Indian Band
Salmo 	
*Salmon Arm	
Saltspring Island	
Saltair	
tSandspit	
Saturna	
Savona 	
Sayward .
Seabird Island
Sechelt	
70 Mile House and Watch Lake .
tShalalth 	
Shawnigan Lake	
Shirley	
Sidney	
Silver Creek (1) 	
Silver Creek (2) 	
Annual
Grant
$600.00
420.00
480.00
3,000.00
420.00
1,800.00
900.00
No grant
1,200.00
540.00
420.00
900.00
300.00
3,300.00
1,500,00
2,700.00
600.00
480.00
300.00
300.00
360.00
360.00
300.00
480.00
4,000.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
240.00
No grant
600.00
240.00
360.00
300.00
360.00
300.00
420.00
600.00
600.00
420.00
240.00
300.00
480.00
240.00
No grant
180.00
480.00
240.00
540.00
300.00
300.00
 G 110
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1968/69
.Annual
Recreation Commission Grant
Silverton    No grant
Skidegate Mission
tSlocan	
tSmithers 	
Soda Creek
Songhees Indian Band
Sooke 	
tSorrento 	
Southern Cortez ...
South Cowichan ..
South Hazelton	
South Kelowna ...
Southside	
South Slocan	
t South Taylor	
South Wellington
Sparwood 	
Spence's Bridge	
Sproat Lake	
*Squamish
tSquamish Indian Band .
Stewart 	
tStikine (Telegraph Creek)
Straiton	
Stuart Island	
Sumas 	
Summerland 	
Sunnybrae
Sunrise Two Rivers
Sunrise Valley	
Sunset Prairie	
tTappen
Tarry's and District.
*Tasu	
Tatla 	
tTatlayoko Lake .
Taylor
Tchesinkut Lake
tTelkwa 	
Texada 	
*Terrace 	
Thornhill	
Tofino 	
$600.00
240.00
480.00
540.00
420.00
540.00
360.00
300.00
360.00
420.00
360.00
600.00
180.00
420.00
3,500.00
420.00
360.00
240.00
600.00
480.00
180.00
300.00
240.00
240.00
300.00
1,200.00
420.00
420.00
300.00
300.00
2,400.00
600.00
540.00
Recreation Commission
Topley
Annual
Grant
       $480.00
     3,000.00
240.00
300.00
600.00
480.00
420.00
360.00
360.00
♦Vancouver Parks Board  31,200.00
600.00
240.00
     1,200.00
540.00
        804.00
        300.00
600.00
t Tower Lake	
*Trail-Tadanac _
Trout Lake	
Tulameen 	
Ucluelet	
Union Bay	
University Hill .
Valemount	
Valleyview 	
Vanderhoof
Vavenby 	
*Vernon 	
View Royal
*Wallace Gardens
Wardner	
Warfield	
tWasa Lake	
Wellington	
tWells 	
  420.00
  420.00
  300.00
  300.00
  180.00
  240.00
"West Vancouver  3,300.00
Westbank 	
West Bench __.
Westbridge ....
West Creston
Westsyde 	
Whaletown	
White Lake	
Williams Lake
Willow	
Wilson Creek .
Windermere ...
Winfield	
Winlaw 	
Wistaria (Ootsa)
tWoodfibre 	
Wynndel	
Yahk 	
Yale 	
Ymir  	
Zeballos	
360.00
420.00
600.00
360.00
No grant
420.00
300.00
360.00
240.00
600.00
240.00
360.00
300.00
420.00
During the year 83 Recreation Commissions were inactive or not receiving a
grant.   Three commissions have been amalgamated into regional districts.
Quarterly Reports
The quarterly reports of Recreation Commissions indicate that almost every
type of recreational activity has participant interest in British Columbia. Although
there are many approaches to community recreation organization and promotion,
all communities seem to be very concerned with leisure-time services, especially to
young people. There is also much interest in elderly citizens' programmes. The
middle-age group is not very often emphasized by community recreation groups.
The quarterly reports do indicate that many thousands of British Columbians
engage in a wide variety of public recreation programmes. This does not include
the thousands who have recreation pursuits of their own which are not part of a
public recreation programme.
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
G 111
Quarterly reports also indicate the need for planning, programming, and leadership in public recreation.
Staff
Two new appointments were made, as follows:—
Mr. D. E. Brown appointed in September, 1968, to serve the north-west from
the Smithers office.
Mr. A. D. Collier appointed in July, 1968, to serve the Kootenay area.
Both of the above are highly qualified academically and soon after appointment they were influential in establishing renewed interest and improved procedure
in their areas.
The consultant staff travelled 52,481 miles and made 872 visitations in conjunction with their work during the year.
The annual staff meeting was convened in Victoria, November 27th to 29th.
Community Programmes Branch staff and locations follow:—
A. L. Cartier, Victoria—Adult Education.
K. K. Maltman, Vancouver—Sports and Fitness.
D. M. McCooey, Abbotsford—Fraser-Sechelt.
E. W. Mayers, Kamloops—Central British Columbia.
G. J. Pynn, Victoria—Vancouver Island.
D. E. Brown, Smithers—North-west British Columbia.
J. M. MacKinnon, Kelowna—Okanagan-Similkameen.
R. C. Davis, Quesnel—North-east British Columbia.
A. D. Collier, Nelson—Kootenays.
Miss A. Adamson, Victoria—Drama.
Leadership
The provision of recreation education opportunity and the development of
leadership services is the major role of the Branch. The field staff are continually
evaluating field services to determine the most effective and acceptable way of involving communities so that each community will be given the opportunity to understand
recreation and take advantage of all services supplied by Government and many
other agencies.
Local clinics, regional conferences and workshops, zone meetings, and Provincial seminars, workshops, and conferences come within the scope of Community
Programmes Branch aid. The Province is almost a network of these activities, as
indicated by the statistics listed in this section.
The Provincial seminar in Kelowna was discontinued in favour of a study
seminar at the University of British Columbia, as reported earlier.
The Provincial Conference at Port Alberni was well attended by delegates from
all over the Province. The resource personnel were excellent. Conference keynote
speaker was Dr. A. F. Klein, of New York.
Several excellent seminars for Recreation Commission personnel, municipal
personnel, school boards, and recreation professionals were conducted in the Community Programmes Branch regions.   These served as excellent education media.
 G 112
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
Leadership Statistics
Regional
Number
Participants
Number of
Commissions
Cost
Clinics  	
Conferences   	
Seminars 	
Workshops
98
6
4
1
3,474
517
124
130
238
69
56
1
$7,754.69
3,658.40
1,180.88
167.50
Provincial
The attendance was 40 at a study seminar in Vancouver, June 19 to 22, 1968.
Total cost was $3,046.40.
Miscellaneous Activities
Glenayre Park Research Project, Port Moody
Provincial Advisory Board study
Visitation Project to British Columbia camps
' Learn by Seeing " trip
Recreation Students' Forum, Vancouver	
" Quest for Quality " Conference, Vancouver
Community Development Workshop
  $500.00
  30.65
  195.41
  150.00
  99.28
  300.00
  30.00
British Columbia Recreation Conference  600.00
Canadian Red Cross Aquatics  72.00
Greater Vancouver Workshop  780.00
Notre Dame Drama Leadership Workshop  300.00
British Columbia Federation of School Athletic Associations  192.00
Special grants to communities conducting playground programmes and swimming instruction and water safety totalled $12,212. One hundred and fifty-eight
communities received this aid. These grants are provided to encourage community
activity in these extremely important aspects of recreation.
Library Services
A start was made on revision of the Community Programmes Branch film service in order to delete old films and establish a procedure designed to encourage
groups and organizations to recommend films relative to their activities which should
be included in the library.
More use could be made by local organizations of the many excellent publications in the Branch library.
Publications
Community Recreation is forwarded to all Recreation Commissions and many
other agencies on a quarterly basis.
Drama
Interest in the theatre continues to accelerate. The increase in the number of
Arts Councils throughout the Province contributes significantly in this regard.
During the 1968/69 season the increase in the number of entries in all festivals
was noticeable, with over 35 speech arts and drama competitions held throughout
the Province. Noticeable, also, was the increase in public support of all artistic
endeavours.   Monetary prizes, scholarships, and technical awards were given, rather
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
G 113
than the usual challenge cups. Adjudicators were quick to praise this change and
feel the better standard of production is the result of more training and desire to
reach professional levels.
Workshops and clinics have become the accepted way in which to further this
desire. More attention is being paid to sets, lighting, costumes, properties, as well
as speech and manners in historical and modern plays. More speech training is
required and more emphasis is being placed on this by teachers, directors, and workshop specialists.
The second British Columbia Secondary School Festival was held in Grand
Forks and followed along the lines of a regular school-day. For four days students
attended sessions on speech, acting, directing, playwriting, and general production.
Specialists were brought in for this purpose. Evenings were devoted to festival
plays, and adjudication was given following the plays and discussed at an open
forum the following morning. This new type of festival-learning process proved
most popular with both students and teachers.
Kamloops was the host city for the one-act final festival. This, too, placed
more emphasis on the learning aspect rather than on the winning of awards. Standard of production was noticeably higher than in the past. This was felt due to
attendance at workshops set up by Community Programmes Branch and Dominion
Drama Festival.
The British Columbia Regional Festival, held in Victoria in March, brought
five full-length plays from Cranbrook, Prince Rupert, Vernon, and Vancouver for
adjudication by Dennis Sweeting of Toronto. Vernon was chosen to represent the
West at the Dominion Drama Finals held this year in Kelowna.
The British Columbia Drama Association was very active during the 1968/69
season. The Community Programmes Branch works closely with this organization,
offering help and advice where required. Financial assistance is given to workshops,
and fees for adjudicators and festival grants are paid by this Branch of the Department.
The drama library continues to provide a valuable service to teachers, drama
clubs, and specialists. More than 8,000 technical books, plays, periodicals, and
other pertinent information are sent out annually. Inquiries are received from other
parts of Canada and the United States and indicate the widespread interest in the
work done by the Drama Division of the Community Programmes Branch.
The Cultural Fund grants to help advance the artistic side of life have provided
many scholarships to talented performers, as well as assisting the groups to raise
their standard of production, and they in turn have contributed much to their own
community.
Sports and Fitness Division
(K. K. Maltman, B.P.E., Co-ordinator)
1968/69 was the second year of a three-year agreement between Canada and
the Provinces which has provided Federal aid to Provincial sports and fitness projects. The Federal and Provincial contributions to this programme were the same
as in 1967/68.
The Fitness and Amateur Sport Division operated similarly to the previous
year as it was limited to an identical Federal contribution. The same patterns of
service were followed that have been effective during the past few years; consultations and advice concerning Provincial projects, clerical assistance to sports bodies,
and administration of the Federal-Provincial grants.   Also, as in the past, a great
 G 114 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
deal of communication was established between sports bodies, their members, the
general public, and the Community Programmes Branch.
Significant Trends and Services
1. Because of the continuation of a substantial grant to the British Columbia
Sports Federation-Recreation office, the Federation has emerged as a highly effective
body and an invaluable asset to sports in British Columbia. This trend will probably continue and the British Columbia Sports Federation and British Columbia
Recreation Association will be able to provide more extensive services to sports
organizations and Recreation Commissions in the Province.
2. Federal-Provincial assistance has enabled the Federation-Recreation office
to establish more effective communication for sports and recreation.
3. AU sports and agencies participating in the Federal-Provincial Programme
were convened for development and appraisal meetings, which are an educational
media for understanding and discussing services and projects related to the Federal-
Provincial Programme.
4. Advisory and consultative services.
Federal-Provincial Projects, 1968/69
Fitness and Amateur Sport Division office  $22,589.31
Summer aid for recreation students  5,700.00
B.C.S.F./B.C.R.A. office, Vancouver  19,500.00
Seminar for recreation and sports people  3,040.40
Greater Vancouver Workshop  1,500.00
Scholarships and bursaries  14,400.00
Archery projects  2,000.00
Badminton development  1,000.00
Minor baseball development  2,500.00
Basketball development  3,500.00
Boys' clubs, leadership development  1,000.00
Boy Scouts, leadership development  800.00
Cricket promotion  500.00
Fencing development   1,000.00
Football clinics  2,500.00
Girl Guides water safety  400.00
Golf, junior development  500.00
Gymnastics development  4,000.00
Handball promotion  500.00
Hockey coaches and officials  3,500.00
Hockey, field, men's  1,410.91
Hockey, field, women's  2,500.00
Kayaking and canoeing  2,000.00
Lacrosse, leadership training  1,200.00
Mountaineering development  1,000.00
Rugby clinics and development  1,500.00
Skating, figure  3,500.00
Ski-ing development  3,500.00
Ski-ing, water, development workshop  400.00
Soccer, coaching, etc  2,500.00
Softball, clinics  614.95
Swimming, competitions  2,000.00
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
G 115
Federal-Provincial Projects, 1968/69—Continued
Swimming, synchronized	
Swimming, water safety	
Tennis, coaching and clinics
Table tennis, promotion
Track and field, coaching and conferences
Volleyball, school
Wheelchair sports and recreation	
Weightlifting, organization and clinics
Wrestling, clinics and development	
Yachting, training and seminar	
Youth Hostels, trail making	
Y.W.C.A., research, etc.	
Bowling, workshops for teaching	
Boy Scouts, Provincial Leadership Course
Photographic equipment 	
Total
$2,700.00
500.00
2,000.00
1,000.00
5,000.00
3,700.00
600.00
1,000.00
3,200.00
1,500.00
1,000.00
1,200.00
500.00
400.00
1,602.67
$138,458.24
 G 116
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF
EXAMINATIONS
REPORT OF EDWARD A. KILLOUGH, B.Ed., REGISTRAR
For reference convenience this report includes data covering a number of years.
Teacher Registration and Certification
I. Each teacher employed in the public schools must hold a valid certificate,
and this office must establish certification and maintain an individual record for each
teacher. The following chart shows recent increases in the number of records for
employed teachers:—
1
1964/65
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
2a	
15,263
359
883
6.1
1,757
12.1
350
2,640
18.3
16,281
377
1,018
6.7
2,061
13.4
481
3,079
20.2
17,575
450
1,294
7.9
2,146
13.2
442
3,440
21.1
19,075
434
1,500
8.5
2,571
14.6
556
4,071
23.2
20,330
2b                             -	
406
2c                         	
1,255
2d                   	
6.6
3a   .      ..	
2,891
3b	
15.2
4  	
5a   ...                   	
517
4,146
5b .   .	
21.73
1. School-year.
2a. Teachers employed, as at October, from district nominal rolls. Figures include supervisors, consultants,
relieving teachers, etc.
2b. Numbers with temporary certificates or letters of permission for lack of qualifications, or qualified but
overage, included in 2a. A change in age regulations occurred for 1966/67 and continued thereafter. See
Table if below for details.
2c. Increase in teachers employed.
2d. Percentage increase in teachers employed.
3a. Numbers who were teaching as at June 30th in previous school-year, not teaching in November of
year shown;  that is, drop-outs.
3b. Drop-outs as a percentage of numbers employed in previous year.
4. Numbers who left positions during school-year shown.
5a. Numbers of teachers needed in September of year shown to staff new positions and replace drop-outs
from June previous; that is, teacher demand. This does not include replacements for staff changes during the
school-year.
5b. Teacher demand for September as a percentage of numbers employed in previous year.
II. The following table indicates the types and numbers of temporary certificates and letters of permission issued to teachers in the public schools for the applicable school-year:—
Letters of Permission
Temporary
Elementary
(E-C)
Temporary
Secondary
(P-C)
Vocational
C
Total
Year
With
Without
Temp.
Cert, and
Degree
Degree
Total
L. of P.
(S-T)
(E-T)
1964/65 	
7
5
131
216
347
359
1965/66	
15 (1 E-B)
5 (1 P-B)
131
224
355
2
377
1966/67	
6 (1 E-B)
3 (1 P-B)
156
271
427
14
450
1967/68 	
2
2
191
229
420
10
434
1968/69	
2 (1 E-B)
-
195
194
389
15
406
III. During the period up to the end of 1955/56, teacher-training was carried
out in normal schools or in the one-year courses for graduates at the University.
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
G 117
Enrolments, therefore, in such one-year courses were easy to determine. Since
1956/57, such training has been in the Faculties of Education of the universities
and enrolment figures are more difficult to relate to completion of a basic teacher-
training programme as enrolments cover all years of training.
(Note.—Figures are for the University of British Columbia and the University of Victoria only, through the following Sections III, IV, V, and VI.)
1964/65
1965/66
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
2,429
2,382
	
1,297
	
	
1,318
	
3,726
1,793
	
	
3,700
1,846
.
409
377
2,192
	
2,223
	
1,725
1,729
	
	
378
2,103
	
	
453
2,182
432
770
1,202
462
748
1,210
12
16
28
9
24
33
444
786
1,230
471
772
1,243
100
204
304
67
161
228
134
469
603
158
561
719
234
673
907
225
722
947
1966/67
M.
F.
T.
2,426
	
	
1,321
	
	
3,747
 _.
1,859
	
426
	
2,285
1,691
	
	
388
	
2,079
367
796
1,163
13
14
27
380
810
1,190
75
208
283
128
498
626
203
706
909
1967/68
Total
1968/69
Total
la.
lb_
lc_
2a_
2b..
2c-.
3a._
3b..
3c_
4a-
4b._
4c-
5a..
5b„
5c...
2,543
1,480
4,023
1,890
488
2,378
1,624
441
2,065
1,238
41
1,279
325
586
911
3,077
1,846
4,923
2,330
629
2,959
References:   M.=_:male;  F.=female; T.=Total.
1. Teacher-training enrolments, in all years: (a) Elementary training; (b) secondary training; (c) total.
Additional persons from Simon Fraser University and Notre Dame were trained and entered teaching. Charts
VII, VIII, and IX.
2. Enrolled in training programmes likely leading to a certificate at end of year.
The discrepancy between the total of 3c and totals of 4c plus 5c arises because the Industrial Education,
Commerce and Internship programmes are not completed until after the university term ends, and thus individuals on these programmes are not included in 3c. Further, some not included in 3c later passed further work
to be included in 4c plus 5c. Of the 116 persons on these programmes in 1967/68, 95 were teaching in November, 1968.
Except for 1964/65 and 1965/66, University of Victoria students are included in elementary training above,
although some are secondary.   The distortion is relatively small.
3. Listed by training-college at close of year (June), and teaching considered likely (includes those who
may be considered for temporary certificates, but not those who failed the year or failed practice teaching and
a limited number of special cases) prior to summer session and supplementals.
4. Number of those listed in 3 who were teaching as at November in school-year following training: (a)
Numbers with regular certificates; (_•) numbers with temporary certificates; (c) total, after summer session
and supplementals.
5. Numbers of those listed in 3: (a) Not teaching as at November but certificates issued; (£>) not teaching and no certificate issued or requested;   (c) total not teaching.
IV. The following table shows the certificate classification awarded those in
the training college in the year shown who were teaching in November of the year
following, i.e., actual supply from the training college. Note that while the demand
for teachers has risen significantly, the supply from these two teacher-education
institutions has remained relatively constant in recent years.
Type
1964/65
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F. 1 T.
1
E-T	
E-C	
E-B	
E-A   	
ST   	
P-C	
6
22
61
59
6
67
221
2
16
46
236
234
120
131
3
22
68
297
293
6
187
352
5
9
10
78
73
7
67
223
4
24
28
227
243
143
106
1
33
38
305
316
7
210
329
5
5
3
33
41
8
49
238
3
9
23
232
260
5
151
128
2
14
26
265
301
13
200
366
5
11
14
83
53
10
51
255
R
9
18
192
237
11
166
163
20
32
275
290
21
217
P-B	
418
P-A	
6
Totals - -—
444
786
1,230
471
772
1,243
380 | 810
1
1,190
483 | 796 | 1,279
1    1
 G 118
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
V. The following chart shows the certificate classification of those in these
training institutions in the year shown who were not teaching in November following. E-T and S-T indicate that had the individual taught, a letter of permission
would have been required. The figures do not include those who would not have
received a certificate or those who would not have been considered for a letter of
permission, nor those in programmes not normally leading to certification, e.g., first-
year elementary, various years secondary. It is worth noting the number of trainees
qualifying for higher level certificates who were not teaching in November following.
In 1966/67, of 727 persons qualified with P-C or higher certification, 156 did not
teach (21.5 per cent); 89 of these held P-B or P-A certificates. In 1967/68, of
807 persons qualifying for P-C or higher certificates, 166 (20.6 per cent), including
110 holding P-B certificates, were not teaching as of November, 1968.
Type
1964/65
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
E-T  	
E-C	
E-B 	
F-A
35
39
68
40
4
17
30
1
79
119
295
120
3
22
33
2
114
158
363
160
7
39
63
3
26
32
61
47
8
15
35
1
107
110
313
129
7
28
28
133
142
374
176
15
43
63
1
24
13
41
39
14
24
46
2
88
89
296
145
4
43
38
3
112
102
337
184
18
67
84
5
24
13
43
26
8
15
63
80
84
295
159
13
41
47
104
97
338
185
ST	
P-C- 	
P-B	
21
56
100
P-A	
Totals  	
234
195
673
591
907
786
225
191
722
608
947
799
203
165
706
614
909
779
192
160
719
626
911
Total eligible certificates	
786
Total E-T, S-T	
39
82
121
34
114
148
38
92
130
32
93
125
VI. From the preceding tables can be calculated supply from these training
institutions as a percentage of demand:—
1964/65
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
la	
lb                       . ...
2
3 a  	
3b	
1,923
1,120
2,646
65.5
42.3
2,103
1,230
3,079
68.3
39.9
2,182
1,243
3,440
63.4
36.1
2,079
1,190
4,071
51.1
29.2
2,065
1,279
4,146
49.8
30.8
la. Numbers in training college listed in June previous as likely available to teach in September of school-
year shown.
lb. Numbers in training college in June previous actually teaching in October of school-year shown.
2. Numbers needed in September to staff new positions and replace drop-outs from June previous; that is,
teacher demand.   This does not include further replacements required during the school-year.
3a. Numbers listed in training college in June as a percentage of demand;   that is, la as a percentage of 2.
3b. Numbers from training college who taught, as a percentage of demand; that is, lb as a percentage of 2,
actual training-college supply as a percentage of demand.
VII. The following tables show the numbers of those who completed successfully the Professional Development Programme (teacher-education) at Simon Fraser
University and the certificates for which they were qualified as at November following.
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
(a) Numbers Teaching as at November Following
G 119
Type
Aug.,
1966
Dec,
1966
Apr.,
1967
Aug.,
1967
<-\£J
Dec,
1967
Apr.,
1968
Aug.,
1968
00
M. F. T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.F.
T.
M. F. T.
1 1
M.
F.
T.
1
M.|F.
T
cdr--
IM.  	
E-C 	
10
1
1
2
1
1
12
5
4
12
1
4
4
12
1
9
2
1
2
10
28
1
12
28
1
3
9
4
12
21
10
1
4
30
14
1
16
46
54
3
28
6
2
16
5
15
4
6
5
21
6
22
1
10
1
6
9
52
2
9
10
62
3
15
3
—
1
27
30
1
33
—
E-B...	
45
E-A   -	
S-T _  	
P-r
10
P_B  	
15 18
70
P-A 	
Totals 	
10
4
14
5
21
26
5
39
44
25
36
61
131
24
30
54
18
72
90
26184
110
254
(b) Numbers Not Teaching as at November Following
E-T         	
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
3
3
2
5
1
2
2
8
1
1
9
3
3
1
2
2
13
5
1
14
7
3
26
12
11
1
1
1
2
3
~2
3
3
1
3
10
2
3
1
2
11
11
1
2
13
14
2
4
33
1
6
3
13
14
1
5
14
20
1
8
E-C     ._
F,T.
1
1
30
E-A	
37
S-T	
P-C         	
4
P-B
15
P-A         . 	
Totals	
1
1
2
4
6
10
5
10
15
5
19
24
49
3
7
8
25
10
33
43
86
VIII. The following tables show the numbers of those listed by Notre Dame
University who undertook teacher education leading to certification. The figures
are not complete because of a variation in the system of reporting:—
(a) Numbers Teaching in Public Schools as at November Following
Type
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
E-T
1
2
3
E-C	
.
	
.
1
1
E-B	
4
8
12
2
5
7
3
4
7
E-A
2
—
2
1
1
3
1
9
12
S-T .       	
1
PC.   	
3
3
2
1
3
P-B	
1
1
P-A	
—
—
—
—
Tot
7
10
17
6
5
11
9
16
25
(b) Numbers Not Teaching in Public Schools as at November Following
E-T 	
1
3
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
2
1
1
8
2
1
1
1
10
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
6
16
11
1
3
F-r.
8
F.B
17
E-A	
13
S-T
P-C	
1
P-B 	
P-A
1
Totals.	
1
6
7
2
13
15
7
36
43
 G 120
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
IX. The supply of teachers from the training institutions of the Universities of
British Columbia, Victoria, Simon Fraser, and Notre Dame, as calculated from the
lists provided by these institutions, is shown below. Data for Notre Dame are not
included in figures prior to 1968/69 but represented less than 1 per cent of the
demand. Figures prior to 1966/67 include only the Universities of British Columbia and Victoria.
1964/65
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
1	
1,120
2,646
42.3
1,230
3,079
39.9
1,257
3,440
36.5
1,321
4,071
32.4
1,558
4,146
3
37.6
1. Numbers in training institutions listed for previous training-year, actually teaching in October of school-
year shown.
2. Numbers needed in September to staff new positions and replace drop-outs from June previous;  that is,
teacher-demand.   This does not include further replacements during the school-year.
3. Numbers from training institutions who taught, as a percentage of demand;  that is, actual training-institution supply as a percentage of demand.
X. Teacher Recruitment, United Kingdom.—Again in 1968, District Superintendents of Schools proceeded overseas to carry out recruitment in the United
Kingdom. School Boards are encouraged to list the number of specific positions
available.
(1) These lists are used by the interviewing officers, who offer appointment
direct to one of these positions.
(2) On return from the United Kingdom, the interviewing officers provided
the Registrar with a list of suitable persons interviewed for whom appointments had not been made. This special listing was circulated to District
Superintendents and Boards in order that direct negotiations and appointments might be made.
(3) A number of other individuals worked independently of the interviewing
officers and in many cases came direct to the Province or were appointed
direct by Boards, although negotiations commenced under the recruitment plan.
The chart following indicates these refinements of recent years. Figures for
official United Kingdom recruitment are as follows:—
September—
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
Elementary certificates-
20
21
21
20
12
43
23
49
72
16
60
41
19
Independent   	
44
Totals	
41
53
115
148
104
Secondary certificates—
14
14
21
5
7
21
13
18
35
3
12
32
8
Independent	
25
Totals    -	
28
33
52
50
65
69
86
167
198
169
In addition to the above group, an indefinite number of teachers from the
United Kingdom proceed annually to this Province.
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
G 121
XI. Teacher Exchange.—Teacher-exchange applications proceed through the
Registrar's office. The number of applications from British Columbia teachers
annually exceeds the exchange positions available. In 1967/68, as a special Centennial project, encouragement was given to interprovincial exchange between
English-speaking and French-speaking teachers. Nine individuals from British
Columbia undertook such an exchange. This project was continued for 1968/69
and 11 teachers undertook an exchange. Exchanges in recent years were as
follows:—
1963/64
1964/65
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
22
1
23
20
2
24
2
25
10
1
16
Interprovincial-.	
11
Totals	
23
23
22
26
36
27
Division of Examinations
I. Examination Preparation and Marking.—Again this year, school students
required to write Grade XII Departmental examinations received final standing
based on the average of a mark assigned by the school plus the mark earned on the
regular Departmental examination, each of equal weighting. However, this year,
for the first time, all regular Departmental examinations were entirely objective in
format and therefore scored by computer rather than by teacher and clerical markers.
Grade XII scholarship examinations and Grade XIII examinations remained predominantly subjective in format, and consequently teachers were utilized to mark
these papers. Grade XII students writing for scholarship purposes were required
to write special scholarship examinations in two courses.
Until the end of the school-year 1964/65, there was an annual increase in
examination candidates registered with the Division. The following two years saw
the phasing out of former University Programme Departmental examinations at the
Grades XI-XII level, and introduction of new Academic-Technical Programme
requirements characterized by fewer examinations. Consequently, although
1967/68 brought a significant increase both in the number of students registered
for and the number completing Grade XII Academic Programme, a reduction from
25 to 11 in the number of examinable Grades XI-XII courses accounts for a
decrease in papers marked in 1967/68.
Again in 1968/69, a similar increase occurred in the number of Grade XII
Academic-Technical Programme students. The number of regular examinations
written decreased, however, since this year's recommended scholarship candidates
were not required to write the regular examination in addition to the special scholarship examination.
Number of Markers
1964/65
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
562
15
519
15
344
11
300
16
151
August 	
14
Totals	
577
534
355
316
165
 G 122
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
Number of Candidates (June)
1964/65
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
XII	
XIII	
28,246
4,792
18,586
3,068
21,952
2,784
17,470
2,016
18,910
1,224
XII and XIII
620
Totals                   	
33,038
21,654
24,736
19,486
20,754
Papers Marked in June
1 Special scholarship examinations.
Papers Marked in August
Number Completed in June
XTT
9,490              9,870
936      1           733
10,722
602
11,448
470
12,253
XTTT
268
Totals       --
10,426
10,603
11,324
11,918
12,521
XII1            	
t
4,927
24,676
10,534
5,466
21,955
8,813
5,345
XII       ___	
XIII       	
60,333             38,919
18,825              12,278
19,242
4,978
Totals 	
79,158
51,197
40,137
36,234
29,565
XIII.
2,018
2,181
1,226
961
447
Number of Candidates (August)
-XTTT
1,556
909     ]           658
1
528
326
Number Completed in August
XIII-
267
202
87
67
41
For 1968/69, examinations (covering 11 courses) were prepared for June for
those working on the Academic-Technical Programme. Fifteen Grade XIII courses
were examined in both June and August. In June, 1969, 172 regular and special
examination centres were established in the Province and 14 outside British Columbia, with the farthest removed centres being in Holland and Germany.
II. Scholarship Examination Results.—The table below indicates the number
of Grade XII and Grade XIII students making application and qualifying for Provincial Government scholarship awards. Grade XII scholarship averages are based
on the candidate's best two scholarship examinations. For Grade XIII, averages
comprise marks on English and four other Departmental examinations based on
Grade XIII courses.
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
G 123
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
Total
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
Total
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
Total
First class (80 to 100 per cent) 	
Second class (70 to 79.9 per cent)	
959
786
43
159
1,002
945
954
894
20
103
974
997
1,264
949
18
63
1,282
1,012
Total eligible	
Ineligible..	
1,745
595
202
225
1,947
820
1,848
666
123
153
1,971
819
2,213
1,136
81
316
2,294
1,452
Total applications	
2,340
427
2,767
2,514
276
2,790
3,349
397
3,746
The tabulation below indicates the top-ranking Grade XII and Grade XIII
scholarship candidates for the school-year 1968/69, and the schools attended by
these students. Two Grade XII students, William Holmes, of Brentwood College,
and Per Ake Suneby, of J. Lloyd Crowe Secondary School, shared the honour of
ranking first on the scholarship examinations, and of winning the Governor-General's
silver medal. A tie also occurred for second-highest position, with the Governor-
General's bronze medal being awarded to Adrian William Belshaw, of St. George's
School, and Arthur James Rosenthal, of Sir Winston Churchill Secondary School.
Name
School
Average
Grade XII
William Holmes..
Per Ake Suneby_
Adrian William Belshaw „
Arthur James Rosenthal...
Steven Joseph Gergel...
Michael Edward Hoskinson-
William David Batiuk	
Clarence Marvin Currey-	
Mark Aurel Louis DuMont...
Diane Jacalyn Kent 	
Helen Kin-Yi Leung..
Svend Johannes Robinson-
Larry D. Stoffman.
Terrance Warren Gunderson..
Johan De Kleer	
Dean-Ping Ian Lu.
Andrew Michael Goetze..
David Allan Warner	
Philip Ralph Barkworth-
David Andrew Goodall...
Peter Hoy.
Brian Arthur Moore..
Rosita Tseng .
Barry Douglas Adam	
Raymer Palmer Grant	
Melvin Donald Klassen	
Chris G. Maurice Nyberg..
David M. Pai 	
Ronald Gordon Purver	
John Charles Sobkowicz..
Charlotte Barnes	
Heather Jill Brock _.
Alan Joseph Deschner..
Bruce Dunwoody	
Elin Sigurdson...
Terrence Stephen Waters	
Top-ranking Grade XIII Candidates
Glennis Eileen Wright	
Theresa Maralynn Keller	
Jo-Lynn Shaw  	
Arlene Mary Elkin..
Marilyn Louise Cram..
Brentwood College	
J. Lloyd Crowe Secondary..
St. George's Secondary..
Sir Winston Churchill Secondary..
Cowichan Senior Secondary 	
Vancouver College 	
J. Lloyd Crowe Secondary 	
Carson Graham Senior Secondary ~
Vancouver College	
Sentinel Secondary	
Gladstone Secondary..
Burnaby North Senior Secondary	
Sir Winston Churchill Secondary	
Georges P. Vanier Senior Secondary-
New Westminster Secondary	
Burnaby North Senior Secondary	
Burnaby North Senior Secondary	
Sentinel Senior Secondary...
West Vancouver Secondary	
Southern Okanagan Secondary-
Britannia Secondary _	
Point Grey Secondary	
Killarney Secondary	
Delta Secondary..
Delbrook Senior Secondary-
Victoria Senior Secondary-
Carson Graham Senior Secondary..
Windermere Secondary	
Lord Byng Secondary School	
Mount Douglas Senior Secondary...
Pitt Meadows Secondary  	
Norfolk House 	
Delta Secondary...
Sentinel Secondary	
Prince of Wales Secondary..
Argyle Secondary	
Kamloops Senior Secondary...
Chilliwack Senior Secondary..
Chilliwack Senior Secondary ...
Chilliwack Senior Secondary..
Chilliwack Senior Secondary..
99.00
98.50
98.00
98.00
97.50
97.50
97.50
97.50
97.50
97.50
97.50
97.00
97.00
97.00
96.50
96.50
96.00
96.00
96.00
96.00
96.00
95.50
95.50
95.50
95.50
95.50
95.50
95.50
95.00
95.00
95.00
95.00
95.00
95.00
86.80
86.00
84.80
83.40
83.00
 G 124
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1968/69
Detailed information on Provincial Government scholarship awards, as well
as Provincial Government bursaries and Canada student loans, appears in the
Report of the Assistant Superintendent of Education (University and College
Affairs).
 EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT
G 125
EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT
REPORT OF MRS. VERNA KINGSLEY, SECRETARY TO
THE COMMISSION
During the school-year 1968/69, a total of 428 applications was considered
by the Commission. Of these, 138 were turned down, the main reason being that
family income was higher than the ceiling set by the Commission for grant purposes.
For the first payment of the grant, 290 students were eligible; for the second payment of the grant, 273 applications were approved. Of the 17 students who became
ineligible for the second payment, 13 had withdrawn from school and 4 were turned
down because of poor reports.
The students who were eligible for the second payment of the grant were distributed by grades as follows: Grade IX, 65; Grade X, 74; Grade XI, 78; Grade
XII, 52; Occupational II, 3; Occupational III, 1.
The students in the greatest financial need received $120.87 for the year and
the balance received $105.87.
 G 126
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1968/69
STRATHCONA TRUST
REPORT OF THOMAS H. BUCKHAM, B.Com., SECRETARY, LOCAL
COMMITTEE, STRATHCONA TRUST FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA
For many years the Province has participated in the Strathcona Trust. An
annual grant of approximately $1,600 has been received in recent years. The money
has been utilized to encourage physical fitness in the schools, as well as cadet training.
The Local Committee, Strathcona Trust for British Columbia, administers the
money received and consists of military representatives and representatives of the
Department of Education. The annual meeting was held on April 14, 1969, at
headquarters of the Department of National Defence, Pacific Region, Vancouver.
Cadet awards have been made to the National Cadet Camp and to the Annual
Cadet Trades Training Camp at Vernon for cadet rifle-shooting competition. Awards
were also made to British Columbia cadets attending Bisley.
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
 G  128
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1968/69
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 G  144
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total
Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 1 (Fernie)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Fernie
Elementary-Junior Secondary—J affray
Elementary—■
Isabella Dicken 	
Elko ... 	
Grasmere  	
Sparwood    _	
Waldo	
Totals, District No. 1	
District No. 2 (Cranbrook)
Secondary—Mount Baker -	
Junior Secondary—Laurie  	
Elementary—■
Muriel Baxter	
Cranbrook Central _	
Moyie   	
T. M. Roberts __	
Tenth Avenue   	
Amy Woodland 	
Totals, District No. 2	
District No. 3 (Kimberley)
Secondary—Selkirk	
Junior Secondary—McKim	
Elementary—
Blarchmont- - 	
Chapman Camp —-	
Lindsay Park  _	
MarysviUe-   	
Meadowbrook   -	
Wasa     —
A. A. Watkins	
Totals, District No. 3	
District No. 4 (Windermere)
Secondary—David Thompson	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—■
Canal Flats - —
Edgewater  	
Elementary—■
Brisco —  	
Galena —  	
Invermere 	
J. Alfred Laird -	
Radium  	
Wilmer -	
Windermere 	
Totals, District No. 4	
District No. 7 (Nelson)
Secondary—L. V. Rogers 	
Junior Secondary—Trafalgar.	
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Salmo .
Elementary—
Balfour    _	
Blewett   - 	
A. I. Collinson	
Harold Lakes   —
Hume —  	
Nelson Central  — —
North Shore	
Procter  	
Rosemont —
Salmo    .  	
South Nelson 	
W. E. Wasson 	
Willow Point._	
Ymir    	
Totals, District No. 7 	
986
202
390
45
53
272
14 |
486
103
213
27
27
132
7
1,962
995
783
509
272
617
15
510
384
509
424
259
148
320
7
274
208
273
500
99
177
18
26
140
7
16
98
7
6
40
1
14
108
9
13
43
2
16
95
8
11
35
3
967
104 |  168 |  189 |  168
359
250
124
297
8
236
176
236
60
54
122
599
1,913
443
238
574
299
230
120
114
54
134
67
218
107
82
49
65
32
568
286
1,686
236 |  347
279
205
275
110
60
67
111
33
33
282
41
20
37
34
12
13
45
28
17
63
26
11
19
33
2,428 |  1,252 |  1,176
202 |  197
350
184
168
80
150
83
14
10
13
9
225
119
136
68
51
29
40
18
72
41
166
67
4
4
106
68
22
22
31
1,219
641
578
27
12
1
4
22
28
9
36
11
6
4
18
33
7
7
135
130
628
681
304
32
150
131
28
460
474
110
91
210
350
370
16
29
44
343
338
161
16
76
60
20
232
243
55
45
103
186
202
4
19
25
285
343
143
16
74
71
8
228
231
55
46
107
164
168
12
10
19
64
54
22
49
44
58
41
27
76
63
69
4
3
3
68
55
58
67
60
53
74
57
59
269
40
18
34
31
16
12
49
200
21
11
5
5
16
23
9
12
_19
121
4,108 | 2,128 | 1,980
279
5
9
4
21
12
20
18
3
5
5
42
47
48
64
42
53
16
10
17
19
12
13
33
32
28
43
46
42
47
30
45
7
6
3
17
12
9
6
5
|  326
269
301
13
13
18
18
12
6
8
13
21
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 145
ENROLMENT
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
1  |  2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
105
11
6
26
94
23
9
6
33
86
15
5
11
30
80
34
37
16
	
164
25
---
110
30
117
18
120
94
	
8
163
165 |  147
151
16 | 	
189
140
135
120
94
35
73
70
30
68
37
73
67
" 73
37
68
73
103
5
5
7
333
102
162
273
231
160
37
14
102
5
33
	
65
34
75
318
276
250
281
47
5 |   5 |   7
333
264
273
231
160
45
17
28
18
96
31
30
~~30
12
82
"~31
152
12
14
10
199
188
80
151
192
171
45
12
26
	
	
13
21
99
6
	
216
204 |  185
183
6
12 |  14 |   10
199
188
231
192
171
	
.
15
17
21
31
6
7
8
16
16
~~55
9
15
23
~63
4
8
10
64
17
30
82
15
77
74
31
21
15
2
20
21
8
11
6
13
109
105 |  96
101
8
4 |   8 |   10
111
97
77
74
31 | 	
5
19
18
5
68
70
17
13
34
40
34
4
5
23
18
4
62
71
10
18
18
66
38
10
71
24
28
~66
62
27
~~19
~55
10
8
9
4
6
8
"307
60
~288
39
184
61
39
224
220
36
4
16
18
6
63
58
13
16
24
	
	
51
48
5
16
	
10
327
327 |  343
352
21
18
13 |  14
367
327
284
263
256
 G 146
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
II
III
Primary
Special
District No. 8 (Slocan)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—-
Lucerne 	
Mount Sentinel-
Elementary-Junior Secondary—W. E. Graham
Elementary—
Crescent Valley.  	
New Denver  _	
Silverton	
Slocan 	
Slocan Park-
South Slocan..
Winlaw	
Totals, District No. 8 „
District No. 9 (Castlegar)
Secondary—Stanley Humphries	
Junior Secondary—Kinnaird	
Elementary—
Blueberry Creek 	
Brilliant-   _	
Castlegar	
Kinnaird	
Ootischenia—
Pass Creek	
Robson	
Shoreacres—.
Tarrys	
Twin Rivers-
Valley Vista	
Woodland Park-
Totals, District No. 9	
District No. 10 (Arrow Lakes)
Secondary—Nakusp .
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Needles .
Elementary—
Burton    —
Edgewood..
Fauquier	
Glenbank....
Nakusp	
Totals, District No. 10.
District No. 11 (Trail)
Secondary—
J. Lloyd Crowe .
Rossland	
Junior Secondary—Trail..
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Fruitvale.
Elementary-
Beaver Falls    —
Cook Avenue..
Genelle	
Glenmerry	
MacLean	
Montrose	
Laura J. Morrish..
Sunningdale	
Tadanac 	
Trail Central —
James L. Webster-
Totals, District No. 11..
125
212
133
123
99
52
86
60
57
63
65
110
71
70
49
26
55
31
32
32
60
102
62
53
50
26
31
29
25
31
010
541
819
399
297
150
101
66
43
22
166
84
402
212
40
15
38
20
204
107
36
16
155
73
366
197
79
39
144
78
469
420
147
35
21
82
190
25
18
97
20
82
169
40
66
890
1,478
247
127
40
25
64
34
54
30
13
10
164
80
313
150
120
15
30
24
3
84
163
895 |  456 |  439
1,148
433
660
728
15
273
35
319
357
256
502
175
96
507
336
5,840
607
218
344
404
7
139
21
153
185
133
272
103
49
257
165
3,057
541
215
316
324
134
14
166
172
123
230
72
47
250
171
2,783
26
32
14
23
21
13
14
16
47
31
14
16
102
87
108
19
11
23
43
82
84
28
26
57
6
9
6
6
8
6
37
36
7
13
5
16
29
22
59
41
38
18
21
24
260 |  275 |  245
55
	
10
17
11
11
12
12
3
4
6
31
28
27
29
44
33
55
84 |  105
89
57
7
46
7
44
42
43
55
19
21
68
40
449
73
42
11
46
49
29
61
23
13
59
31
445
76
40
8
50
57
30
68
26
21
57
56
489
10
10
11
12
T6
"IF
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 147
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
|
IV
V
VI
VII
Special
1
2  I  3
1
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
31
20
32
28
6
5
7
27
33
23
25
30
29
23
27
22
25
40
5
32
19
5
26
22
29
19
	
	
	
	
16
9 |  21
18 1  27
12
17
90
78 |  98
80
5
6 |   5 |   7
83
84
72
65
37
7
10
13
235
206
62
215
185
183
	
	
17
16
15
	
	
	
	
	
72
48
55
102
14
5
8
6
_
4
9
5
—
_
	
39
28
29
35
11
	
22
33
33
	
66
60
65
106
	
	
	
32
25
24
	
	
	
268
227 |  232
243
14
7 |   10 |   13
235
268
215
185
183 | 	
92
61
37
32
25
10
8
5
12
	
	
	
7
8
5
11
8
11
	
	
	
26
27
25
	
43
34
28
47
	
	
88
82 |   66
59
	
  | 	
99
69
42
32
25 | 	
426
386
336
5
7
3
77
119
97
74
51
16
11
11
312
310
84
85
44
73
39
69
34
113
87
28
9
45
36
54
44
	
48
52
38
82
52
39
70
57
41
75
	
36
79
28
24
17
27
12
28
12
77
65
58
89
24
41
43
61
64
	
-	
487
486
485
501
24
21 |   18
1
14
502
516
523
460
387 1
 G  148
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total  I   Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 12 (Grand Forks)
Secondary—Grand Forks  —
Elementary-
Christina Lake  	
Grand Forks — - —	
John A. Hutton   	
Totals, District No. 12..
District No. 13 (Kettle Valley)
Elementary-Junior Secondary—■
Greenwood—. -  	
Midway 	
Elementary—
Beaverdell — 	
Bridesville — - -	
Kettle Valley-
Midway Annex..
Westbridge	
Totals, District No. 13 -
District No. 14 (Southern Okanagan)
Secondary—Southern Okanagan .
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Osoyoos-
Elementary—
Okanagan Falls 	
Oliver —
Totals, District No. 14„
District No. 15 (Penticton)
Secondary—Penticton  — ~	
Junior Secondary—McNicoll Park  _
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Princess Margaret
Elementary—
Carmi Avenue _
Columbia	
Kaleden 	
Naramata..
Nkwala	
O'Connell --_
Queens Park_
Snowdon	
Uplands-
West Bench .
Totals, District No. 15-
District No. 16 (Keremeos)
Secondary—Similkameen 	
Elementary—
Cawston 	
Hedley.
Keremeos..
Totals, District No. 16-
District No. 17 (Princeton)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—-Princeton.
Elementary—
Allison Pass  _ _	
Coalmont -— -—
Tulameen  	
Totals, District No. 17	
District No. 18 (Golden)
Secondary—Golden..
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Field...
Elementary-
Alexander Park	
Columbia Valley 	
590
58
601
188
311
27
314
100
279
31
287
1,437 |  752 |
685
300
108
59
35
33
21
29
146
55
32
IS
10
11
11
585 |   283
760
722
89
768
2,339
1,209
438
466
560
23
107
159
278
539
481
313
168
136
388
393
47
416
154
53
27
17
23
10
18
302
372
329
42
352
1,244 | 1,095
640
236
242
286
12
54
S9
127
277
260
165
91
69
569
202
224
274
11
53
70
151
262
221
148
77
67
4,877 | 2,548 | 2,329
239
168
61
249
117
84
30
130 |
122
84
31
119
717
361
356
754
10
13
23
800
482
98
250
107
410
6
7
12
435
260
53
134
61
344
4
6
11
365
222
45
116
46
13
61
27
78
34
12
77
35
101
25
20
25
12
18
7
16
7
9
6
2
I  67 |
69
53
74
26
122
222
57
23
15
28
41
68
65
66
25
9
68
10
102
180
75
9
25
36
66
63
51
28
17
64
111
183
99
16
27
39
68
76
39
22
12
397 |  370 |  398
38
30 31
12 j 7
30 |  27
38
72 |  65
67
67
53
1
4
5
63
10
31
21
59
66
30
22
19
6
25
59
3
4
4
70
37
16
13
120 |  124 |   13
14
14
10
10
10
50 |   10
 ENROLMENT-
STATISTICAL RETURNS
-Continued
G   149
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV         V
VI
VII
1     1     2     1     3
1             1
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
8
79
29
10
83
34
118
10
10
3
117
111
116
128
95
7
78
29
14
114 |     116 |     127
118
14 |       10 |       10 |         3
117
111
116
128
95
33
37
3
13
5
36
7
14
7
24
33
	
47
58
42
	
16
9
6
6
	
	
70 |       58 |       64
57
-   - 1   -  1   	
47
58
42
 - 1   ------ 1   	
63
13
100
74
14
105
74
10
99
13
..„--
8
	
	
14
154
67
125
71
122
52
209
115
93
8
98
22
17
199 |     176 |     193
183
39 |       13 |         8 |       14
221
196
174
209
115
71
25
20
43
98
65
49
27
19
87
14
15
43
58
69
51
17
32
49
95
14
25
38
76
70
19
27
11
12
25
131
157
140
122
150
144
143
131
133
355
354
56
76
14
19
38
89
63
16
57
29
20
1
405 |     417 [     386
413
17 |       11  |       12 |       25
428
416
407
355
354
56
25
9
22
8
31
25
12
27
2
3
7
53
49
46
39
40
16
7
27
30
4
50
64 [       61
64
4 |         2 |         3  |         7
53
49
46
39
40
65
63
2
1
56
2
7
60
1
6
4
1
56
64
44
54
43
1
1
3
70
66
65
61
6 |         4 |         1
56
64
44
54
43
....
8
42
16
11
89
13
8
8
9
4
127
10
122
6
79
7
82
9
51
12
21
19
 G 150
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
I
Total   I   Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
II
III
Primary
Special
District No. 18 (Golden)-
Elementary—Continued
Donald	
Golden	
-Continued
Nicholson ....
Rogers Pass..
Totals, District No. 18-
District No. 19 (Revelstoke)
Secondary—Revelstoke	
Elementary-Senior Secondary-
Elementary—
Big Eddy	
Farwell	
-Mica-
Mount Begbie	
Mountain View..
Selkirk	
Trout Lake	
Totals, District No. 19-
District No. 21 (Armstrong)
Secondary—Armstrong 	
Elementary—
Armstrong..
Len W. Wood.
Totals, District No. 21..
District No. 22 (Vernon)
Senior Secondary—Vernon..
Junior Secondary—
Charles Bloom	
W. L. Seaton 	
Elementary-Junior Secondary-
Elementary—
B.X .	
-Clarence Fulton
Beairsto	
Cherry viHe.-
Coldstream.
Harwood	
Lavington	
Lumby...
Lumby Primary	
Okanagan Landing .
Silver Star	
South B.X. —
West Vernon..
Totals, District No. 22-
District No. 23 (Kelowna)
Secondary—
George Elliot 	
Kelowna  	
Dr. Knox	
George Pringle..
Rutland	
Elementary—
Bankhead	
Benvoulin	
Black Mountain-
Central 	
De Hart 	
East Kelowna—
Ellison	
Glenmore	
Glenn Avenue_
Gordon	
Graham	
33
20
457
219
155
79
15
6
13
238
76
9
10
64
26
5
5
69
71
24
28
2
2
597
832 j
673
350
244
129
109
54
247
131
233
122
434
215
227
118
16
7
765
.._ |     162
163
323
115
55
116
111
219
109
9
37
24
50
27
87
3
32
26
56
30
62
2
28
28
49
30
66
3
2,183 | 1,126 | 1,057
228 |  208 I  204
376
450
238
194
232
118
182
218
120
79
99
064
544
799
408
241
124
710
349
662
316
176
97
621
340
67
27
401
201
543
265
131
51
406
207
120
61
180
96
469
244
48
26
465
223
520
79
99
391
117
361
346
79
281
40
200
278
80
199
59
84
225
22
242
6,039 | 3,035 | 3,004
233
1,762
889
307
521
521
46
19
414
112
100
54
461
162
108
42
117
905
447
160
242
261
27
11
194
60
52
26
224
93
61
20
116
857
442
147
279
260
19
8
220
52
48
28
237
69
47
22
25
89
9
60
64
18
89
26
51
5
73
16
104
10
57
72
20
38
31
28
68
18
92
101
101
62
18
12
95
14
11
29
21
65
67
9
13
4
3
19
9
19
34
85
67
82
32
26
21
13
__
165 |  15
12
12
I-
20
88
19
9
	
46
82
16
20
88
14
31
71
13
68
5
509 |  554 |  536 |  54
17
13
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 151
ENROLMENT-—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
112     13
1             1
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
4
4
52
22
3
5
22
2
121
i
J
  1   	
  1   	
-  1	
-       -   -
53
33
14
	
3
145
147 |     142
130
14
8 |         9 |         4
137
128
86
91
51
18
15
38
37
68
1
21
36
147
3
17
167
2
10
6
5
157
14
139
20
120
17
137
11
99
29
16
54
73
38
14
	
2
212
177 |     207
186
14
10 [         6 |         5
171
159
137
148
99
	
102
69
29
99
110
10
2
104
66
71
59
64
	
102
98 |       99
110
  1       W |         2
104
66
71
59
64
39
84
8
53
74
21
87
25
77
84
24
77
13
60
77
15
59
25
83
61
92
31
63
9
51
66
19
56
31
51
3
16
5
17
5
11
82
258
183
82
211
188
64
197
199
427
372
21
86
9
11
	
74
72
18
20
	
64
14
68
12
72
10
510
552 ]     494
469
41
19 |       22 |       16
523
481
460
427
372 |   	
66
88
27
70
88
94
25
102
99
117
91
36
35
17
67
343
249
75
171
60
315
242
80
133
49
312
208
71
122
34
376
103
37
60
23
328
87
44
35
74
6
83
32
Z_
15
15
79
	
21
 G 152
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 23 (Kelowna)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
183
269
399
95
113
121
11
168
92
190
493
430
133
568
225
165
301
242
128
95
140
202
47
54
65
7
89
50
104
249
238
68
304
101
80
157
141
67
88
129
197
48
59
56
4
79
42
86
244
192
65
264
124
85
144
101
61
	
32
26
43
14
69
31
4
55
15
28
82
61
22
97
32
49
48
32
16
50
16
44
20
7
58
21
34
74
68
24
79
25
40
45
18
51
45
24
25
55
12
23
75
59
22
66
24
39
57
23
Oyama  —
	
1
Rutland - -	
12
10
Winfield                                       	
7
Totals, District No. 23	
10,077
5,158
4,919
	
970
913
890
83
District No. 24 (Kamloops)
556
276
1,110
463
954
947
9
12
541
262
579
230
248
239
514
65
191
497
34
501
495
276
522
201
405
174
132
247
341
484
382
175
119
228
286
147
620
251
508
499
5
5
284
152
299
121
130
114
277
41
96
238
17
266
259
146
274
108
230
92
62
123
175
251
196
99
61
123
270
129
490
212
446
448
4
7
257
110
280
109
118
125
237
24
95
259
17
235
236
130
248
93
175
82
70
124
166
233
186
76
58
105
51
3
5
82
36
74
56
44
29
83
76
12
68
62
43
91
27
65
25
21
30
58
66
48
26
14
23
3
4
88
35
75
60
48
30
78
82
10
90
61
46
57
22
56
15
30
37
38
63
40
31
22
30
3
3
71
40
64
57
43
27
93
67
12
71
69
34
63
24
63
15
15
40
63
80
64
22
20
35
Secondary-
Junior Secondary—
North Kamloops 	
	
Elementary—•
Beattie                     -  .
Dallas 	
	
25
4
A. E. Perry          	
13
1
Totals, District No. 24	
12,409
6,555
5,854
51  |  1,167
1,151
1,158
43
District No. 25 (Barriere)
Secondary—Barriere.—        	
Elementary—
210
310
15
19
100
163
4
11
110
147
11
8
52
1
6
44
5
3
48
3
3
Chu Chua -	
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G  153
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
16
36
34
57
54
25
26
22
52
53
15
68
49
27
52
39
24
35
55
26
76
61
20
80
64
27
38
64
27
48
59
29
27
60
75
15
78
57
37
64
	
	
	
	
	
	
48
12
22
	
20
	
18
30
67
53
6
15
88
	
55
30
31
40
5
6
	
852
824
879
883
71 |  36 |  35
17
905
830
762
610
517
	
72
28
99
45
72
53
63
70
70
36
74
33
44
33
24
32
53
71
60
22
16
36
68
37
103
33
58
68
63
65
79
34
79
30
53
21
5
40
38
72
55
20
17
31
60
49
90
41
64
70
83
68
90
37
84
20
49
29
13
35
42
71
59
31
8
39
	
16
18
22
25
23
19
68
214
304
439
72
150
317
446
69
397
99
272
328
44
346
228
23
311
56
	
	
100
37
74
57
62
34
66
40
63
69
64
39
60
45
7
10
62
36
	
18
33
49
5
61
56
23
	
22
34
1,164
1,106 | 1,069
1,132
62
34
47
42
1,025
985
837
718
562
56
38
1
41
4
55
2
	
	
	
52
39
49
47
23
32
3
3
	
 G  154
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total       Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 25 (Barriere)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Little Fort	
Louis Creek _
Totals, District No. 25-
District No. 26 (Birch Island)
Secondary—Clearwater. 	
Elementary—■
Avola..    — —
Birch Island.
Blue River
Dutch Lake
Star Lake	
Vavenby	
Totals, District No. 26..
District No. 27 (Williams Lake)
Secondary—
100 Mile House.
Columneetza.
Junior Secondary—Williams Lake _
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Bridge Lake  _.
Horsefly 	
Elementary—
93 Mile   	
100 Mile House..
150 Mile House-
Alexis Creek	
Big Creek	
Big Lake
Boss Mountain-
Buffalo Creek ...
Canim Lake East-
Chilcotin Road —
Crescent Heights.-
Deka Lake	
Dog Creek	
Eagle Creek	
Forest Grove	
Gang Ranch	
Glendale	
Kwaleen 	
Lac la Hache	
Lakehill	
Likely 	
Lone Butte 	
McLeese Lake	
Meldrum Creek	
Mountview	
Poplar Glade	
Riske Creek East.
Wildwood	
Williams Lake —
Wright Station .	
Totals, District No. 27-
District No. 28 (Quesnel)
Secondary—Quesnel	
Junior Secondary—Cariboo	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Wells-Barker-
ville   	
Elementary—
Alexandria._
Australian....
Baker _	
Barlow Creek.
Bouchie Lake.
38
43
635
14
21
24
22
313 |  322
67
231
118
44
25
43
19
76
45
283
157
98
46
41
16
113
19
24
31
126
52
25
11
6
9
41
11
66 |  72
45
14
6
5
15
66
816 [  426 |
390
555
287
563
272
533
266
59
28
105
61
50
30
455
250
204
104
43
21
21
12
14
6
67
27
53
26
13
6
115
65
258
133
15
9
21
11
38
21
186
98
14
8
269
152
113
60
149
77
47
22
22
10
42
23
25
12
10
5
223
105
339
156
49
29
115
60
529
280
16
8
923
454
98
49
10
430
123
207
268
291
267
31
44
20
205
100
22
9
8
40
27
7
50
125
6
10
17
88
6
117
53
72
25
12
19
13
5
118
183
20
55
249
8
19
5,330 I 2,740 I 2,590
19
456
224
52
30
4
200
72
110
467
230
46
19
6
230
51
97
78
88
95
7
5
10
20
11
16
4
12
6
73
68
66
35
51
15
7
3
10
5
7
4
3
1
4
13
10
6
10
11
10
1
1
24
19
14
45
38
32
2
2
3
6
3
1
6
5
6
29
24
18
4
4
43
42
42
21
19
18
15
15
19
7
9
6
4
3
3
9
8
2
3
5
3
3
1
2
42
43
33
38
32
60
16
9
5
17
14
21
55
58
74
2
1
1
569
530 |  514
10
3
75
25
42
	
14
13
6
9
2
2
66
50
16
27
25
26
12
12
13
13
11
IT
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 155
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
7
10
6
9
	
	
9
	
54
55
54
57
 - 1     1    - 1   	
52
39
49
47
23
	
	
2
5
4
63
60
38
38
21
9
11
7
5
7
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
-	
14
10
8
11
	
	
	
	
	
	
49
57
47
64
	
	
	
	
	
	
5
8
,
	
	
	
88
87
62
75
2
5 |        4
63
60
38
38
21  I   -	
139
150
116
84
66
229
192
142
	
	
	
17
8
	
276
232
	
	
7
9
6
9
6
16
10
3
13
10
10
9
	
	
9
	
—
	
6
54
58
68
55
	
30
24
16
20
_
	
	
	
	
8
6
1
4
1
3
10
7
3
5
1
7
6
2
	
	
	
	
	
3
2
9
6
3
	
	
12
3
3
	
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
19
15
12
12
	
	
..
	
45
4
3
28
2
3
33
2
2
37
	
	
	
	
	
	
2
1
6
10
5
27
1
38
27
2
38
21
1
27
21
2
39
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
"'"
11
15
13
16
19
22
22
37
10
11
4
4
3
2
3
	
7
7
1
5
5
1
11
2
2
	
	
	
	
	
	
....
42
26
37
37
45
42
85
.. ..
	
.
2
5
5
7
10
19
16
18
	
	
	
71
87
69
89
15
—
	
	
	
	
9
3
	
	
	
	
	
517
501
469
492
15
17 1        8 |   	
431
382
345
276
208
	
158
205
187
231
142
	
	
	
	
17
16
4
205
113
99
	
	
13
10
3
38
11
9
60
11
5
69
9
	
	
	
	
7
5
4
	
	
56
16
	
	
	
	
	
	
15
12
15
13
33
30
31
20
	
	
 G  156
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
II
III
34
28
37
50
37
62
16
17
13
14
14
12
22
32
30
11
6
9
4
9
5
5
10
8
21
9
4
17
20
12
8
10
4
31
27
36
33
16
18
49
40
48
14
13
16
13
12
14
Primary
Special
District No. 28 (Quesnel)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Carson	
Helen Dixon -
Dragon Lake.
Kersley _
Lakeview.	
Le Bourdais —
Moose Heights..
Narcosli	
Nazko Valley	
Pinecrest	
Quesnel View..
Red Bluff _„
Rich Bar.	
Riverview	
Strathnaver..
West Fraser..
Totals, District No. 28-
District No. 29 (Lillooet)
Secondary—Lillooet	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Bralorne..
Elementary—■
Blackwater Creek  	
Bridge River	
Cayoosh	
Pavilion 	
Riverview..
Totals, District No. 29~
District No. 30 (South Cariboo)
Secondary—
Ashcroft-
Kumsheen _
David Stoddart_
Elementary—
Ashcroft -	
Big Bar Creek ...
Cache Creek	
Chasm 	
Clinton..	
Green Lake.
Lytton-
Scotty Creek  _
Seventy Mile House.
Spences Bridge	
Totals, District No. 30 —
District No. 31 (Merritt)
Secondary—Merritt	
Elementary—
Collettville -    	
Diamond Vale.—
Merritt Bench	
Merritt Central._
Nicola Lake	
Nicola-Canford.
Totals, District No. 31-
District No. 32 (Fraser Canyon)
Secondary—Hope.
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Boston Bar-
Elementary—
Coquihalla..
North Bend _
Silver Creek-
Yale	
Totals, District No. 32..
225
352
99
119
173
50
18
44
63
128
22
231
106
268
83
101
125
174
53
47
98
22
9
29
33
68
11
125
53
139
55
50
100
178
46
72
75
28
9
15
30
60
11
106
53
129
28
51
4,376 | 2,239 | 2,137
228
157
15
91 I
434 |
27 1
95 |
113
82
7
47
202
16
52
115
75
44
232
11
43
55
19
4
12
34
10
31
11
20
6
3
9
11
39
45
1
3
26
26
047
519 1
188
99
153
80
150
69
460
233
23
10
230
110
30
14
319
183
20
8
332
173
35
26
43
21
50
23
528
55 |  110 |  92 [  108
89
73
81
227
13
120
16
136
12
159
9
22
27
97
33
37
67
3
53
4
44
3
43
7
8
9
2,033 | 1,049 [  984
167 |  241
705
178
364
141
585
50
261
2,284
516
225
636
84
301
83
370
84
190
80
302
27
125
335
94
174
61
283
23
136
1,178 | 1,106
275
112
340
42
153
48
1,845
970
241
113
296
42
148
35
27
54
"40
875
129
40
63
20
74
22
73
292
26
82
16
38
21
I
66
3
41
3
48
2
23
5
9
44
4
20
6
51
3
28
6
10
10
208
40
58
34
65
43
240
15
106
17
37
10
17
54
21
64
16
26
198
17
77
16
34
14
15
508J  429 I  455 [
2
12
14
14
182 I  29
15
6
21
183
185
158
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G  157
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
29
27
46
24
43
43
44
58
15
_	
16
15
12
10
19
21
16
23
_
_	
17
7
24
13
15
4
18
	
	
	
	
	
6
12
6
6
9
8
3
	
	
	
	
	
	
11
19
9
40
	
	
	
	
—....
	
	
37
41
31
28
6
11
9
13
-
	
_
_
34
39
31
27
	
_
15
12    13
	
15
11 |  15
21
	
	
	
	
	
379
410 |  393
363
31
17
16
4
370
323
290
231
142
....
7
8
4
64
46
43
26
30
13
18
19
18
	
16
15
8
	
2
18
16
15
8
_
53
60
62
69
17
4
5
2
2
■	
	
	
	
90
99
98
97
17
7 |   8
4
80
61
51
26
30
	
74
48
37
29
	
	
4
6
4
50
45
25
45
29
41
21
19
14
	
45
46
37
44
4
5
4
_
.
34
29
23
30
—	
_
3
7
6
-
	
29
34
35
45
	
_
5
1
3
3
	
	
23
6
39
8
61
3
47
17
	
	
	
	
10
6
6
7
10
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
165
182 |  178
173
17
4 |   6
4
169
118
107
69
14
	
21
23
12
159
144
117
122
107
21
29
31
48
44
51
34
12
29
37
.
	
	
-_
70
12
35
79
101
100
17
—
	
	
	
19
26
28
5
	
	
215
208 |  209
162
34
21 |  23
12
159
144
117
122
107
	
16
9
7
105
106
101
104
68
21
21
14
30
22
24
8
89
71
77
80
10
12
13
34
41
35
42
10
13
7
	
	
	
164
158 |  146
152
	
16 |   9
1
127
130
109
104
68
 G 158
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No, 33 (ChiUiwack)
Secondary—
1,014
1,052
720
321
454
115
334
54
89
87
589
132
119
78
129
242
186
181
534
50
251
85
217
243
62
382
95
129
43
100
233
540
366
535
534
362
144
216
66
159
33
51
51
284
69
65
36
55
123
85
91
258
23
139
46
98
133
26
189
42
66
28
51
127
285
196
479
518
358
177
238
49
175
21
38
36
305
63
54
42
74
119
101
90
276
27
112
39
119
110
36
193
53
63
15
49
106
255
170
55
48
29
52
51
61
57
29
56
30
65
45
12
37
5
11
19
44
20
13
15
14
28
48
22
60
9
38
12
21
34
9
44
27
22
20
33
71
51
19
47
9
8
16
43
21
18
13
18
23
45
21
54
12
41
9
13
25
10
35
32
31
15
29
66
42
17
44
11
10
16
47
18
19
15
7
27
42
20
68
10
37
10
19
20
12
42
36
18
21
30
65
37
Junior Secondary—
A, P. Riinrtle
Elementary—
Chadsey          -                  —
Greendale
Kipp	
F. d. T.pary
	
18
Miller
Robertson.    .	
Sunshine Drive	
19
17
Yarrow      	
4
Totals, District No. 33-	
9,226
4,666
4,560
578
739
715
718
58
District No. 34 (Abbotsford)
Senior Secondary—Abbotsford 	
Junior Secondary—
Abbotsford
940
1,140
511
220
187
340
109
173
147
41
146
112
51
404
22
81
128
26
107
81
238
106
398
107
40
27
227
496
599
264
116
82
189
60
101
81
24
74
46
28
219
13
44
72
12
50
41
133
52
194
54
19
16
107
444
541
247
104
105
151
49
72
66
17
72
66
23
185
9
37
56
14
57
40
105
54
204
53
21
11
120
	
62
17
49
16
21
24
7
13
8
47
11
13
7
12
10
24
12
56
15
3
16
38
14
36
13
22
29
6
11
9
47
14
14
9
20
13
29
10
47
11
10
11
46
21
54
17
22
24
7
26
20
8
47
8
18
10
13
8
33
20
57
15
7
	
Elementary—
Ab botsf ord	
Aberdeen...                     	
Alexander.   . .
	
Bradner                .          .   _         	
	
Dunach                          	
Glenmore             ,.           —         	
Godson   .                                	
19
11
Jackson                                    ..	
	
King	
	
Matsqui...                 .                         	
	
13
Peardonville.                ~                        -
Philip Sheffield
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 159
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
112     13
1            1
VHI
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
19
39
13
15
10
89
15
19
12
14
23
21
53
10
27
14
40
29
10
49
22
9
26
70
39
18
40
10
12
14
95
17
12
10
18
39
18
57
39
16
43
31
1
53
20
11
30
55
46
14
33
20
121
20
22
16
25
86
~io
16
44
37
8
56
9
33
65
43
14
39
28
251
281
116
178
251
238
125
151
31
211
187
80
125
467
188
351
151
98
16
39
6
13
12
86
21
16
16
13
13
25
18
65
9
16
	
39
8
37
38
12
47
  1   	
16
15
24
	
	
	
22
51
50
15
9
687
687 |     705
698
80 |       14 |       39 |      28
826
765
634
655
502
98
16
34
69
11
28
20
8
30
15
13
51
19
20
10
10
40
11
60
14
9
68
35
47
18
26
22
6
24
19
4
45
16
20
16
16
32
25
54
22
4
68
37
51
15
31
35
15
54
10
24
18
14
51
17
60
13
91
24
26
14
369
189
379
180
328
142
456
402
82
       	
58
	
	
29
34
19
23
28
7
31
19
9
51
3
43
11
19
18
10
29
11
37
17
7
14
	
-  1
	
 G 160
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 34 (Abbotsford)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Simpson     	
South Poplar  	
Margaret Stenersen  	
Straiton  	
Swensson	
Ten-Broeck—
Upper Sumas.
Totals, District No. 34..
District No. 35 (Langley)
Secondary—■
Aldergrove.
Langley.
Junior Secondary—Fort Langley..
Elementary—
Aldergrove 	
Anderson — 	
Belmont  	
Coghlan .
County Line —
East Langley _.
Fort Langley-	
Glenwood	
Langley Central .
Langley Prairie—
Lochiel 	
Mclnnis 	
Milner  -	
Murrayville	
North Otter—	
Otter	
Patricia	
Peterson Road -
Simonds 	
South Carvolth-
South Otter	
Sperling	
Tillicum	
TophamRoad...
West Langley.	
Willoughby	
Wix-Brown	
Totals, District No. 35	
District No. 36 (Surrey)
Senior Secondary—
North Surrey	
Queen Elizabeth	
Semiahmoo	
Secondary—
Princess Margaret-
Lord Tweedsmuir—
Junior Secondary—•
William Beagle	
Cloverdale 	
Johnston Heights —
Newton 	
Mary Jane Shannon .
West Whalley	
White Rock	
Elementary—■
Anniedale —
James Ardiel	
Bear Creek	
Harold Bishop...
Henry Bose	
David Brankin..
218
198
108
11
30
57
312
120
98
54
4
16
27
162
98
100
54
7
14
30
150
7,043 | 3,667
3,376
689
1,137
310
339
87
259
146
152
20
272
200
280
139
109
56
105
233
128
269
50
121
240
91
52
88
30
105
273
132
87
650
1,180
509
484
440
827
854
791
870
1,022
1,009
870
210
493
171
192
476
352
364
584
159
177
37
140
77
69
9
142
127
161
66
51
28
57
127
68
150
27
76
129
51
25
44
14
67
140
68
42
325
553
151
162
50
119
69
83
11
130
73
119
73
58
28
48
106
60
119
23
45
111
40
27
44
16
38
133
64
45
62
68
66
6,199 | 3,276 | 2,923
365
601
280
266
249
422
438
428
489
502
534
477
107
253
93
112
224
190
285
579
229
218
191
405
416
363
381
520
475
393
103
240
78
80
252
162
28
37
37
23
28
36
23
29
32
6
2
2
17
6
7
34
23
39
36
40
613
46
18
34
12
21
11
28
20
15
32
16
15
19
38
17
27
12
22
31
11
12
17
13
24
28
22
50
35
8
14
41
32
15
15
28
18
9
26
44
18
30
18
16
43
32
17
23
13
15
13
13
29
36
21
18
28
23
9
6
17
26
28
35
18
17
9
7
13
15
17
14
28
31
23
19
12
16
561 |
550
34
80
33
25
72
60
34
82
31
30
82
45
28
83
22
38
58
52
574 |  635 |  43
12
11
23
16
17
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 161
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1  1  2
1
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
30
34
21
31
29
25
23
34
24
58
1
48
46
45
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—~
600
664
609
646
68
24 |  26 |  14
558
559
470
456
402
82
11
12
5
180
150
136
94
101
	
	
23
21
10
217
103
248
101
200
106
240
178
	
46
48
47
67
15
17
15
	
.	
.	
43
16
52
41
	
	
13
14
15
	
.
.
15
20
20
30
	
	
	
	
	
	
38
46
38
52
21
38
25
36
	
	
_
,
19
32
13
55
45
101
11
	
	
	
13
15
12
13
13
15
20
12
24
27
33
46
15
24
17
16
15
30
25
38
15
10
7
6
_
	
14
21
21
	
30
62
29
25
	
13
15
17
	
6
12
6
_
.
14
12
17
22
~~18
8
19
13
	
	
	
	
29
25
29
41
17
28
17
13
13
11
	
	
	
503
576
528
517
58
34
33
15
500
499
442
334
279
.---
324
264
62
	
	
	
	
	
	
589
253
509
188
82
68
105
210
169
25
243
172
21
11
5
278
259
253
12
17
11
292
282
240
24
19
9
247
254
238
12
15
14
326
301
202
15
7
9
350
346
295
25
10
6
345
302
321
13
13
13
287
255
289
30
24
26
34
63
65
60
60
11
25
22
27
22
26
23
28
69
58
64
57
48
36
43
37
14
	
	
	
 G  162
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
1
III
Special
District No. 36 (Surrey)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
354
391
520
272
443
60
432
112
114
21
427
124
395
489
118
423
279
159
141
227
197
645
210
176
44
175
619
277
211
166
711
337
937
225
294
508
278
332
559
39
128
51
331
241
247
180
197
183
445
690
168
188
205
260
156
253
39
237
62
58
10
236
56
232
276
65
222
146
93
61
95
109
333
103
93
23
94
314
137
105
83
356
190
506
123
156
269
149
169
287
21
63
30
167
121
139
92
105
100
236
335
101
166
186
260
116
180
21
195
50
56
11
191
68
163
213
53
201
133
66
80
132
88
312
107
83
21
81
305
140
106
83
355
147
431
102
138
239
129
163
272
18
65
21
164
120
108
88
92
83
209
355
67
80
46
63
48
49
24
54
15
12
10
64
18
62
96
16
73
37
15
19
35
23
90
31
30
55
70
32
29
28
94
50
137
42
72
59
55
77
14
20
28
47
39
45
25
26
26
45
62
47
47
39
63
39
52
20
66
20
12
11
64
19
76
61
13
65
27
34
26
26
31
75
29
33
59
97
40
28
22
105
53
123
43
64
29
49
88
17
13
17
35
30
29
31
23
28
69
63
55
47
50
72
36
58
16
67
19
16
67
31
53
69
19
57
50
23
11
42
22
106
31
33
61
82
47
35
26
116
46
159
6
36
76
32
60
77
8
17
6
56
37
39
30
42
25
67
66
62
J. T. Brown  	
Cedar Hills	
21
Simon Cunningham — 	
3
13
15
A. H. P. Matthew- 	
51
24
Old Yale Road                                   	
Port Kells	
8
T. E. Scott                      	
14
16
H. T. Thrift                    	
Tynehead— - —
White Rock        -	
16
K. B. Woodward          	
46
4
Totals, District No. 36 - 	
26,692
14,089
12,603
  | 2,538
2,462
2,590
264
District No. 37 (Delta)
Secondary—
Delta	
1,252
1,237
391
666
126
303
35
113
653
532
526
654
650
210
346
67
169
26
62
332
277
290
1
598
587
181
320
59
134
9
51
321
255
236
100
49
18
8
25
104
94
92
93
39
19
11
22
104
89
66
102
38
24
7
19
102
69
87
North Delta                 	
Junior Secondary—Tsawwassen	
Elementary—
12
Cliff Drive                                                	
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 163
ENROLMENT—-Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
50
41
65
87
37
63
60
11
17
66
17
44
66
20
42
50
20
13
29
32
71
20
25
68
33
32
24
93
45
131
42
39
71
29
38
81
23
48
37
29
25
27
33
54
103
55
68
85
31
49
64
10
21
59
20
57
51
22
51
37
25
21
27
29
76
30
19
83
34
29
23
116
47
123
48
45
70
35
52
77
25
43
27
34
29
29
21
70
126
34
52
79
36
59
50
22
18
45
45
67
13
51
38
19
23
32
24
78
20
17
84
45
33
18
92
44
129
55
43
61
37
44
68
12
43
29
40
17
24
32
63
110
	
	
	
71
71
45
51
31
71
12
18
	
	
49
19
58
64
15
71
27
23
13
13
28
36
36
79
38
19
19
11
	
20
107
46
28
25
25
95
36
135
74
8
	
29
80
41
17
	
34
91
18
43
42
16
31
23
26
18
44
114
17
2,371
2,235
2,331
2,188
207 |  122 |   92 |   67
2,125 | 1,999
1,968
1,619 | 1,302 |  212
96
54
19
82
72
83
75
69
13
76
79
67
77
54
108
68
67
19
9
4
7
6
193
312
191
194
273
200
314
246
278
221
247
166
111
65
9
15
77
61
64
 G  164
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
HI
Primary
Special
District No. 37 (Delta)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
East Delta	
English Bluff-
Heath	
Kennedy	
Ladner	
Richardson-	
South Park	
Sunbury..
Sunshine Hills.
Totals, District No. 37..
Lord Byng 	
Sir Winston Churchill
Gladstone  	
Eric Hamber 	
Killarney	
King George	
48
167
538
130
477
755
406
68
249
21
74
266
68
261
390
195
37
141
District No. 38 (Richmond)
Senior Secondary—■
Richmond 	
Steveston  _
Junior Secondary—
Hugh Boyd  	
J. N. Burnett  	
Cambie  _.
Hugh McRoberts _	
Robert C. Palmer	
Elementary—
Blundell 	
Bridgeport 	
Samuel Brighouse	
Lord Byng 	
William Cook.   	
Crestwood 	
General Currie 	
Howard de Beck- - _
Alfred B. Dixon_	
Harry Eburne 	
John T. Errington -	
W. D. Ferris. 	
Garden City 	
B. W. Garratt 	
James Gilmore—	
R. M. Grauer 	
Hamilton 	
Austin Harris 	
Thomas Kidd-	
Alexander Kilgour	
Walter Lee 	
Charles E. London	
Duncan McDonald	
Donald E. McKay	
James McKinney	
Mitchell 	
Sea Island 	
Sidaway  	
Manoah Steves	
Tait 	
Thompson 	
F. A. Tomsett  _
James Whiteside 	
Daniel Woodward  	
Totals, District No. 38	
District No. 39 (Vancouver)
Secondary—
Britannia..	
8,672
4,536
1,092
610
704
336
850
420
499
236
715
338
809
402
756
394
506
263
417
220
707
373
529
272
466
238
36
19
98
41
52
26
537
266
109
57
494
266
173
99
491
272
120
60
824
415
450
231
99
40
51
30
361
177
215
91
346
187
101
48
79
40
186
102
92
52
528
266
309
164
166
88
219
117
118
70
331
174
88
44
466
239
339
226
5,588
8,009
1,377
717
1,670
847
1,849
962
1,865
955
1,689
866
1,956
991
521
269
27
93
272
62
216
365
211
31
108
4,136
482
368
430
263
377
407
362
243
197
334
257
228
17
57
26
271
52
228
74
219
60
409
219
59
21
184
124
159
53
39
84
40
262
145
78
102
48
157
44
227
173
7,579
660
823
887
910
823
965
252
9
24
98
21
73
102
58
14
33
922
13
31
112
65
71
~32
29
54
20
38
40
35
42
117
45
17
16
68
58
53
36
15
29
28
84
49
30
51
28
62
19
80
52
| 1,519
16
21
76
20
69
115
46
12
29
847
13
32
103
65
62
34
23
66
20
49
46
40
41
125
38
9
11
46
50
51
34
10
32
18
66
45
23
54
29
33
19
66
56
1,409
10
32
98
19
43
113
63
12
28
866
41
99
77
63
32
69
29
57
70
64
37
103
43
16
14
59
52
60
31
15
35
26
67
40
24
36
31
40
14
64
70
1,478
5
17
11
54
14
14
17
15
60
 r
STATISTICAL RETURNS
G  165
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
1
IV
V
VI
VII
Special
1  1  2
1
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
13
33
26
31
_
 —
	
._...
77
83
53
53
	
,	
21
23
15
6
.
...
—
	
70
63
62
60
20
	
	
104
106
95
98
11
70
66
7
41
62
	
	
6
8
34
40
39
46
	
	
	
	
	
	
830
820
715
693
45
28 |   4 |  13
696
667
560
499
413
	
52
468
458
114
391
313
20
16
295
288
231
	
	
17
15
	
194
236
150
241
155
206
119
83
121
87
122
97
16
22
20
18
309
240
242
241
222
235
118
31
15
94
112
88
99
	
38
79
90
84
11
	
77
60
74
59
22
	
	
	
77
75
ioi
~95
	
	
	
26
76
78
~73
98
101
98
95
— -
	
	
83
138
"lis
80
118
97
108
108
39
17
12
17
11
	
10
47
59
53
29
55
53
46
48
35
	
14
14
11
36
33
21
20
84
78
65
84
43
33
39
47
13
26
22
22
19
38
40
4i
59
39
	
——
30
50
21
71
53
59
61
65
51
	
61
56
1,478
1,383 | 1,430
1,345
61
75
69 |  52
1,274
1,162
1,049
859
771
114
27
2
15
7
239
289
317
267
214
20
319
324
329
327
351
47
7
10
365
361
407
315
337
27
11
438
402
370
306
311
27
12
12
16
341
342
308
330
300
1
19
8
368
419
427
384
331
	
101
111
98
116
95
 G   166
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 39 (Vancouver)—Continued
Secondary—Con tinned
909
2,244
1,273
1,132
1,840
1,846
1,684
1,739
2,082
2,047
586
587
848
313
640
280
458
801
547
431
406
114
441
215
571
352
851
657
808
430
527
112
708
581
311
600
768
318
636
451
523
868
188
682
882
569
650
586
135
626
679
257
474
480
371
812
199
896
465
227
937
274
270
463
1,117
575
454
1,164
669
559
957
910
824
879
1,062
1,122
295
303
427
164
319
151
249
392
282
215
211
63
209
96
298
179
431
333
414
214
275
65
356
285
168
298
393
155
315
251
264
432
111
351
446
284
357
284
63
317
319
138
247
245
203
438
108
454
254
117
466
156
140
226
559
296
455
1,080
604
573
883
936
860
860
1,020
925
291
284
421
149
321
129
209
409
265
216
195
51
232
119
273
173
420
324
394
216
252
47
352
296
143
302
375
163
321
200
259
436
77
331
436
285
293
302
72
309
360
119
227
235
168
374
91
442
211
110
471
118
130
237
558
279
84
98
57
67
58
61
58
113
61
63
50
27
38
57
64
47
119
57
95
62
71
28
101
65
96
87
57
103
61
58
51
81
48
80
110
55
71
65
56
77
66
53
54
84
29
65
51
94
61
58
111
61
42
52
118
66
	
69
81
85
80
54
75
50
104
69
36
42
21
33
51
81
26
109
56
111
52
62
29
120
69
75
77
53
78
88
65
52
85
39
72
90
59
79
81
26
81
50
78
56
72
24
68
37
99
47
57
112
72
51
61
155
68
76
74
90
74
61
78
65
95
68
57
40
17
51
49
78
32
117
54
89
46
70
28
111
70
72
79
60
79
65
46
54
76
47
73
124
67
90
71
27
71
69
59
61
62
40
77
59
84
50
58
91
59
51
57
141
78
81
70
100
60
54
66
56
92
73
52
56
22
32
58
77
31
108
57
134
62
66
27
109
70
68
86
65
58
79
53
59
100
54
63
104
65
67
70
26
74
52
67
66
69
37
74
52
140
41
54
79
47
53
33
154
71
Sir Charles Tupper  	
Windermere   	
Elementary-Senior Secondary—
Kitsilano  __	
Elementary—
4
Begbie Annex—. ,  	
15
15
34
Edith Cavell                	
19
27
George T. Cunningham	
100
12
General Gordon 	
Sir Wilfred Grenfell  	
15
15
36
Annie B. Jamieson.	
Lord Kitchener  _	
David Livingstone- -	
-.--.
Dr. A. R. Lord	
13
Dr. H. N. MacCorkindale -  	
14
Dr. R. E. McKechnie ...   	
18
15
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G  167
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
|
IV
V
VI
VII
Special
1  1  2
1
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
52
21
3
32
218
442
220
224
167
449
245
222
187
437
247
216
188
426
280
229
149
414
249
241
31
54
22
32
347
314
366
363
311
28
25
21
36
413
361
332
323
307
	
	
30
352
398
341
313
250
87
80
16
28
278
338
323
290
299
65
39
60
35
46
408
391
342
398
298
190
147
8
26
6
426
339
354
308
243
59
65
75
77
68
64
61
58
9
135
156
93
150
89
75
120
32
83
13
60
68
98
49
86
52
88
	
81
29
70
67
40
65
41
74
44
40
24
58
45
73
59
27
46
69
62
32
50
77
65
26
	
68
85
22
9
105
108
82
90
13
80
79
79
101
82
99
80
52
93
51
107
44
46
15
77
67
54
60
	
96
89
78
77
82
66
62
75
80
	
88
52
128
114
87
42
126
81
39
103
83
35
47
	
77
46
31
76
89
75
58
9
	
142
134
93
125
95
125
103
103
111
99
63
132
88
112
95
	
77
105
80
77
81
81
77
77
72
78
69
74
	
81
130
106
60
57
113
62
59
93
58
57
50
13
49
58
59
75
135
136
126
130
97
127
126
130
77
62
155
54
152
73
156
81
35
73
54
59
44
38
47
136
139
144
130
73
52
55
49
48
 G 168
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pu
pils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 39 (Vancouver)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
542
808
193
412
440
50
652
850
249
801
493
678
180
564
592
713
973
226
744
855
637
445
201
1,043
760
181
511
557
125
787
642
587
640
277
427
115
207
226
19
328
442
128
398
251
357
88
294
293
370
486
116
369
434
332
246
93
548
406
87
267
275
63
387
326
301
360
265
381
78
205
214
31
324
408
121
403
242
321
92
270
299
343
487
110
375
421
305
199
108
495
354
94
244
282
62
400
316
286
280
63
103
46
50
86
103
62
85
58
54
42
42
73
81
120
51
84
93
58
76
134
60
45
82
39
28
91
72
62
79
75
115
58
46
12
98
93
60
87
51
57
46
43
77
90
113
55
79
130
77
64
127
64
49
68
46
29
90
91
64
79
55
111
51
48
21
96
101
65
104
48
66
38
45
92
90
111
58
85
132
71
14
61
129
58
52
57
44
31
93
86
74
66
78
118
42
40
17
83
97
62
102
61
52
42
40
62
95
98
62
88
109
88
73
122
90
35
69
51
37
104
95
67
76
13
Oakridge  	
193
7
Sir William Osier  	
Queen Alexandra 	
27
13
10
12
12
14
3
12
Southlands 	
15
12
6
12
75,407
38,604
36,803
5,944
6,005
6,040
6,048
713
District No. 40 (New Westminster)
2,736
179
273
92
454
654
380
475
568
536
1,391
91
136
54
227
327
199
253
283
268
1,345
88
137
38
227
327
181
222
285
268
	
27
21
26
60
68
57
66
69
83
27
34
33
64
63
60
65
78
54
23
33
33
58
77
48
67
80
78
Elementary—
12
11
14
6,347
3,229
3,118
	
477
478
497
37
District No. 41 (Burnaby)
Senior Secondary-
1,418
1,431
1,276
585
629
707
1,234
1,120
976
677
1,379
667
484
179
800
747
631
312
316
355
633
578
453
376
719
341
237
90
618
684
645
273
313
352
601
542
523
301
660
326
247
89
44
86
57
26
45
79
73
24
39
92
61
36
Junior Secondary—
Cariboo Hill       — -	
Kensington    	
Moscrop  	
Royal Oak               	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Edmonds 	
Elementary—
Armstrong   	
8
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 169
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
1      1     2
1
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
70
72
67
62
92
85
82
76
13
	
	
	
43
51
53
39
22
74
45
67
70
74
64
49
63
12
	
	
	
	
	
105
105
120
126
112
108
72
103
45
110
61
104
39
93
69
105
46
	
	
	
	
	
60
98
29
 .
41
223
68
61
54
59
46
       	
	
131
106
108
139
120
129
120
9
	
	
	
110
94
95
86
4
1 1         3
6
3
3
114
84
80
73
28
_	
86
86
82
89
87
102
96
81
83
88
79
	
	
	
119
139
115
110
57
119
45
109
64
23
	
49
14
90
86
89
87
114
101
94
13
	
	
	
	
92
20
84
75
74
65
82
66
88
84
77
79
71
71
30
	
 .
5,823
5,511
5,413
5,499
1,460 |     244 |     224 |     235
5,505
5,472
5,404
5,166
4,700 |         1
20
26
20
56
28
15
549
571
552
551
414
24
33
50
61
42
74
47
67
13
	
	
	
70
104
104
115
123
60
57
48
39
60
69
56
67
11
,	
	
89
99
76
77
66
98
72
74
11
	
	
	
506
558
509
514
35 |       56 |       28 |       15
549
571
552
551
414 |   	
646
602
170
43
18
200
189
242
449
380
195
219
244
437
380
190
221
221
348
360
743
654
627
622
42
91
45
90
62
155
32
48
344
200
378
319
206
363
313
191
325
	
	
36
74
84
69
72
68
	
	
.. .
	
	
15
39
31
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
 G 170
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 41 (Burnaby)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
583
236
150
695
516
442
635
245
446
742
215
228
642
665
342
439
233
616
380
549
585
421
138
253
385
210
377
508
560
306
361
281
401
612
539
286
118
80
362
261
206
315
120
241
370
112
115
339
322
177
224
112
324
193
271
300
224
67
132
214
100
196
263
297
152
197
131
200
298
290
297
118
70
333
255
236
320
125
205
372
103
113
303
343
165
215
121
292
187
278
285
197
71
121
171
110
181
245
263
154
164
150
201
314
249
	
66
37
26
94
67
70
72
43
59
88
32
24
81
99
43
50
34
94
45
68
84
64
22
22
43
32
42
71
75
57
31
43
63
66
72
65
29
23
100
65
72
68
38
66
114
40
24
103
102
50
66
35
90
56
73
80
53
23
40
41
27
44
89
71
52
44
27
51
93
64
91
39
24
99
61
42
95
35
61
106
40
30
101
100
57
68
35
88
60
72
89
54
23
32
63
30
70
86
83
35
54
36
64
111
79
Buckingham
	
Capitol Hill
12
19
12
11
14
Gilpin
Inman.                                                    ...    .
Kitchener..             _ 	
12
Lochdale  	
Lyndhurst	
10
Maywood   ...              _   	
9
Nelson
Parkcrest 	
Riverside      	
11
Rosser	
Schou               	
Sperling	
Stride      .   	
	
9
Westridge       . ..	
13
Totals, District No. 41   	
27,698
14,197
13,501
2,192
2,299
2,441
140
District No. 42 (Maple Ridge)
Secondary—
Garibaldi.                                             	
542
1,452
356
103
58
174
224
257
287
268
277
188
279
162
482
237
162
111
74
230
158
269
284
721
180
52
34
87
118
138
147
141
142
90
148
80
244
106
88
57
38
121
83
136
258
731
176
51
24
87
106
119
140
127
135
98
131
82
238
131
74
54
36
109
75
133
21
20
26
32
36
42
40
34
28
50
29
59
30
22
22
16
26
27
31
9
19
31
29
33
33
48
33
14
38
22
61
35
18
15
11
31
26
29
17
19
36
36
27
49
42
34
29
38
23
56
28
26
10
10
31
21
28
Elementary—
Albion
Alouette                                               	
=
Fairview -	
Glenwood                                              ...
	
25
Maple Ridge                                          	
12
Thorn Hill
Totals, District No. 42
6,350
3,235
3,115
591
535
560
37
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 171
ENROLMENT-
-Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
Special
1           2
1
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
94
85
91
91
32
35 1       32
21  |       19
32
21
16
104
84 I       97
75
30
81
72
72
67
12
64
73
65
90
56
104
	
96 |       83
15
24 |       28
32
34
59 1       56
61
84
115 |       90
109
91
15
40 1       32
31
34 |       35
40
41
88 |       93
84
92
92 |       88
111
73
30 |       42
45
50
13
71  |       50
69
55
25 1       38
32
34
107
79
80
62
16
51
58
50
51
75
69
76
116
86
96
74
76
68
59
69
54
21
23
39
15
38
37
       	
	
45
57
41
53
68
19
I
32
32
31
26
	
55
52
63
51
  |  	
87
82
93
  |	
81
91
75
84
  |  	
55
35
39
33
47
57
61
56
11
-  1  	
47
37
45
37
  1  	
52
63
56
52
1             1
93
85
91
73
 1 1 ;
75 |       91
62
56
27
 - 1   	
 i i	
2,408 | 2,335
2,389
2,217
158 |       32 1       91 |       18
2,382 [ 2,363 | 2,169
2,043 | 1,851  |     170
12
24
17
19
14
18
69
36
28
1
169         155
Ill
247
73
60
241
37
47
235
51
297
113
299
82
13
20
        	
40 |       36
33
18
58 |       29
41
33
42 1       55
26
40
36
	
35 |       36          31
34          33 1       39
33
12
27
24 |       23
28
15
45
32 |       44
32
22
15 |       31
20
—      	
67
59 1       77
61
30
36
30 !       44
34
18
25  |       23
19 1       11
30
20
14
11
11  |         5
10
33
39 |       33
37
31
21 I       16
16
1
50
46 |       39
46
	
	
  1   -
—
596
546 |     552
1
526
57 |       69
1
36
28
579
536
431
338
333
	
 G  172
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kin-
der-
Grade
;arten
I
II
III
94
60
68
58
172
134
149
193
11
12
15
52
42
52
59
62
64
64
70
116
107
97
94
66
95
86
72
38
45
46
46
50
68
74
22
58
45
45
37
32
23
31
22
62
86
72
75
107
102
106
88
59
66
66
69
122
101
96
98
7
13
58
70
40
51
93
73
73
52
35
42
37
28
61
78
114
67
64
62
34
35
105
82
86
82
64
81
72
59
57
72
71
64
60
94
86
84
89
104
112
95
29
19
14
26
97
90
80
86
58
63
69
69
57
56
59
40
69
117
97
97
78
86
67
86
Primary
Special
District No. 43 (Coquitlam)
Senior Secondary—Centennial	
Secondary—
Moody-
Port Coquitlam-
Junior Secondary—-
Sir Frederick Banting-
Como Lake	
Mary Hill	
Montgomery	
Winslow	
Elementary—
Alderson	
Viscount Alexander-
Anmore	
Austin Heights -
Lord Baden-Powell—
Sir Frederick Banting-
Brookmere	
Cape Horn	
Cedar Drive	
Central 	
Coronation Park-
Glen	
Glenayre..
Harbour View..
Hillcrest	
loco 	
James Park	
Kilmer	
Leigh	
Mary Hill-
Mi Uside_
Montgomery..
Moody-
Mountain View-
Mundy Road	
Parkland	
Pleasantside	
Porter Street	
Ranch Park	
Rochester	
Seaview	
Sunny Cedars	
Vanier	
Totals, District No. 43_
District No. 44 (North Vancouver)
Secondary—
Argyle	
Delbrook	
Carson Graham..
Handsworth	
North Vancouver-
Windsor	
Junior Secondary—
Balmoral	
Hamilton	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Sutherland	
Elementary—
Blueridge	
Braemar	
Brooksbank	
Burrard View	
Canyon HeightS-
Capilano	
Carisbrooke	
Cleveland	
Cloverley	
1,698
635
1,056
567
609
465
520
1,190
464
1,160
86
456
543
766
523
339
360
347
223
563
690
514
796
74
436
470
271
580
346
614
554
523
610
732
139
718
474
415
712
104
618
922
322
543
307
341
236
267
586
254
568
39
251
266
367
258
169
194
180
125
300
351
259
420
41
227
241
130
297
174
307
279
268
317
374
77
377
262
224
362
61
315
776
313
513
260
268
229
253
604
210
592
47
205
277
399
265
170
166
167
98
263
339
255
376
33
209
229
141
283
172
307
275
255
293
358
62
341
212
191
350
43
303
22,960 | 11,858 | 11,102
1,018
522
830
424
1,197
692
1,066
543
666
329
609
301
863
442
894
473
770
424
163
100
529
266
406
200
324
161
671
330
472
251
593
286
721
354
348
190
2,164 | 2,245 | 2,188 | 2,039 |
496
406
505
523
337
308
421
421
346
63
263
206
163
341
221
307
367
158
—
	
49
51
63
43
43
46
65
75
75
52
44
37
68
78
104
74
68
64
74
88
94
94
97
96
48
50
50
11
17
13
2
16
16
5
12
45
"15T
12
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 173
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Inter-
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
171
164
135
805
98
741
67
152
	
11
3
7
12
11
288
173
221
212
161
167
215
142
18
20
23
137
215
196
12
11
3
1
148
107
148
210
153
192
40
42
40
30
18
8
574
313
247
46
16
156
125
103
98
19
.
	
	
	
11
19
18
70
68
45
38
14
	
70
70
69
63
11
	
	
97
78
47
42
32
44
23
82
88
85
71
37
41
30
29
66
82
75
56
36
37
37
26
57
32
	
..
	
	
	
30
49
36
38
37
63
85
69
62
67
48
6
99
106
8
55
82
6
30
76
34
54
-—
—
-
6
48
14
55
43
52
29
33
34
32
30
66
71
51
61
11
37
34
33
30
17
	
	
78
51
64
66
80
67
58
59
14
71
57
78
61
60
70
67
	
	
	
65
16
80
83
8
86
88
19
84
81
100
	
	
	
	
	
24
78
17
55
54
56
40
5
49
47
54
41
125
92
40
75
59
	
	
	
	
	
	
78
83
73
"67
	
1,984
1,877
1,728
1,623
219
85
60 |  43
1,598
1,483
1,251
1,118
950
152
	
166
234
225
308
108
221
276
522
172
246
567
261
244
234
191
136
..
183
172
165
146
	
	
	
	
	
	
156
153
118
109
73
	
	
	
55
59
72
94
431
252
270
432
230
319
187
126
	
	
	
99
Ill
73
101
60
86
	
	
	
58
	
47
35
30
79
	
 .
,	
	
	
	
93
108
106
110
76
70
69
51
79
88
95
75
122
110
103
99
54
36
49
39
10
	
	
	
	
 G 174
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
II     I    III
Primary
Special
District No. 44 (North Vancouver)-
Continued
Elementary—Continued
Eastview	
Fromme  	
Highlands—
Keith Lynn-
Larson 	
Lonsdale	
Lonsdale Annex_
Lynn Valley	
Maplewood	
Monteray	
Montroyal 	
Norgate	
North Star	
Prince Charles	
Queen Mary 	
Queensbury	
Ridgeway..
Ridgeway Annex...
Ross Road	
Seymour Heights..
Sherwood Park-
Upper Lynn	
Westover	
Westview	
Totals, District No. 44..
DistrictNo. 45 (West Vancouver)
Secondary—
Hillside	
Sentinel	
West Vane uver	
Elementary—
Caulfeild	
Cedardale	
Chartwell	
Cypress Park	
Eagle Harbour..
Gleneagles	
Glenmore	
Hollyburn	
Irwin Park	
Pauline Johnson..
Ridgeview	
West Bay	
Westcot	
Totals, District No. 45~
District No. 46 (Sechelt)
Secondary—
Elphinstone	
Pender Harbour-
Elementary—
Bowen Island	
Davis Bay	
Egmont	
Gibsons	
Langdale	
Madeira Park.
Roberts Creek..
Sechelt	
West Sechelt	
Totals, District No. 46	
607
469
571
263
446
363
61
306
219
129
362
296
635
70
576
460
650
112
459
520
338
503
176
346
326
245
288
143
238
187
25
153
116
66
197
150
338
39
294
266
335
46
235
260
177
251
99
188
281
224
283
120
208
176
36
153
103
63
165
146
297
31
282
194
315
66
224
260
161
252
77
158
1,077
10,950
987
494
848
439
1,477
756
529
259
328
174
304
159
188
90
128
57
436
219
480
251
505
262
508
268
506
255
480
231
536
278
515
264
10,127
493
409
721
270
154
145
98
71
217
229
243
240
251
249
258
251
8,755 | 4,456 | 4,299
633
356
130
66
9
9
43
22
10
4
573
303
114
71
210
103
125
66
441
235
53
28
2,341
1,263
277
64
21
6
270
43
107
59
206
25
41
30
43
29
57
47
58
51
51
46
45
60
558
107
84
74
37
56
61
42
30
38
57
68
77
108
63
60
53
62
65
52
61
26
30
72
66
78
34
58
65
50
33
45
57
46
91
72
58
66
59
79
37
59
60
28
51
1,878 | 1,858
52
31
36
40
32
54
58
63
60
51
50
60
53
33
42
37
34
32
51
51
53
74
51
59
63
50
101
67
85
43
47
65
48
29
46
43
36
87
75
84
121
58
69
67
78
30
52
1,960
65
51
40
33
35
62
72
68
59
63
52
60
63 |
640 |  630 |  723
18
54
1,078
152
2
12
3
70
22
21
23
55
19
227
58
22
18
21
33
10
176
82
21
31
17
36
14
213
11
37
14
~W
10
11
7
13
41
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G  175
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Inter-
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
Special
1
1
2  1  3
1
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
92
73
69
67
15
75
66
60
51
64
95
81
85
9
34
40
31
44
64
70
55
46
32
54
46
110
71
51
37
33
50
31
75
80
64
36
34
47
23
81
	
	
=
	
52
5
47
28
54
46
88
26
33
79
71
79
66
26
75
62
99
69
55
101
57
63
100
67
103
	
67
87
96
62
85
86
46
54
80
64
	
52
60
41
33
30
37
29
47
50
	
38
27
1,866
1,929 ] 1,756
1,696
192 |  59 |  72 |  94
1,719
1,612
1,478
1,484
1,340 | 	
216
194
203
197
177
79
85
83
16
17
13
173
302
170
300
176
255
153
305
176
269
91
36
41
44
37
16
44
49
50
48
38
55
67
37
38
15
	
	
57
61
72
47
5
47
58
63
56
28
65
60
68
64
65
71
65
72
17
66
57
67
70
72
69
71
96
65
80
79
65
	
701
692 |  701
676
81 |   16 |   17 |   13
691
664
634
655
622 | 	
8
4
149
175
129
92
76
1
34
43
19
21
13
2
9
4
70
3
67
60
86
	
	
	
	
	
	
20
10
19
34
20
34
34
18
15
11
20
43
10
80
77
63
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
210
195
202
203
	
8
4
183
218
148
113
89 ]
1
 G 176
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 47 (Powell River)
Secondary—Max Cameron	
Junior Secondary—Brooks_
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Texada..
Elementary—
Blubber Lake   .	
Cranberry Lake.
J. P. Dallos	
Edgehill	
False Bay	
Gillies Bay	
Grief Point	
Henderson 	
J. C. HiU	
Kelly Creek.	
Lund	
Stillwater	
James Thomson-
Totals, District No. 47	
District No. 48 (Howe Sound)
Secondary—
Howe Sound-
Pemberton—
Elementary—
Alta Lake	
Brackendale	
Britannia Beach.
Creekside	
Mamquam.
Pemberton Meadows..
Signal Hill	
Squamish	
Stawamus	
Woodflbre..
Totals, District No. 48-
District No. 49 (Ocean Falls)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—
Charleson .
Sir Alexander Mackenzie-
Elementary—
Bella Coola	
Namu	
Owikeno	
Shearwater	
South Bentinck-
Totals, District No. 49-
District No. 50 (Queen Charlotte)
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Masset	
Port Clements—
Queen Charlotte _
Sandspit	
Tasu	
Elementary—Moresby	
Totals, District No. 50	
District No. 52 (Prince Rupert)
Secondary—Prince Rupert	
Junior Secondary—Booth Memorial .
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Oona River-
Elementary—
Conrad Street. 	
Digby Island	
Kanata 	
King Edward ..
825
891
210
52
309
728
255
24
61
452
244
244
145
28
73
347
424
475
112
33
172
378
128
14
26
233
119
125
73
19
41
175
544
164
13
207
175
9
432
40
165
380
240
82
2,451
449
298
190
37
31
15
12
265
85
5
102
83
3
236
21
84
203
127
46
233
145
100
22
17
6
4
032
527
309
164
134
70
295
163
108
58
45
24
12
4
435
897
12
430
9
252
437
232
510
7
222
5
142
216
401
416
98
19
137
350
127
10
35
219
125
119
72
9
32
172
4,888 |    2,547 |    2,341
279
79
105
92
6
196
19
81
177
113
36
1,260 |    1,191
216
153
90
15
14
9
505
145
64
132
50
21
903 |       483 |       420
203
387
5
208
4
110
221
60
28
48
31
55
19
39
82
29
8
26
57
38
34
30
7
368
26
26
50
40
32
41
41
34
34
42
4
45
26
3
59
23
47
41
16
47
27
30
14
6
1
1
126
33
24
29
19
9
4
118
66
3
62
63
33
45
86
30
3
29
65
23
35
36
1
39
41
86
32
69
35
32
26
7
55
......
2
3
30
31
30
12
3
3
61
59
17
23
42
44
32
27
10
9
174 |     264 |     227 |     211
48
24
24
7
4
33
16
20
8
3
3
1
110
84
31
20
31
11
9
2
104
69
1
28
70
28
15
29
14
3
1
69
5
35
61
411 |     396 |     412 |
14
14
12
90 |
14
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 177
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
vn
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
29
30
65
33
4
56
27
22
6
27
34
47
77
36
4
35
72
35
32
3
29
29
33
38
168
25
3
31
17
52
8
18
12
372
24
371
23
212
110
19
318
259
36
30
	
39
98
36
	
2
773
27
	
41
22
4
41
  1   	
413
333
399
367
8 |       18 |       12
396
394
341
318
259
36
1
1
18
50
30
58
37
10
23
22
42
38
42
23
13
24
21
50
32
29
17
15
21
17
10
129
35
109
46
102
39
97
28
59
16
3
27
	
20
_.._    1   	
	
61
31
38
31
9
11
26
	
220
205
203
188
37 |       21 |       17
10
164
155
141
125
75
32
23
30
22
16
2
7
3
1
26
16
32
4
4
4
3
36
18
24
1
4
1
10
	
	
31
43
3
36
37
32
32
26
22
20
18
33
1
3
1
2
95
81
89
84
10 |     |     |   	
77
73
64
48
38
	
34
41
15
28
12
2
2
30
11
23
11
6
42
6
19
13
3
	
	
	
24
16
23
9
3
27
12
19
7
2
19
4
22
4
3
	
	
11
29
8
	
	
3
3
2
	
88
100
81
83
2 |   	
	
	
75
67
52
  1
„
4
36
32
58
54
28
64
2
39
30
59
	
17
21
10
364
2
302
65
183
1
198
156
16
68
37
15
62
 G 178
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 52 (Prince Rupert)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
422
550
335
305
209
277
163
133
213
273
172
172
48
90
74
56
50
54
87
61
45
73
104
48
54
Totals, District No. 52 	
4,084
2,116
1,968
48 ]     465
417
449
14
District No. 54 (Smithers)
300
301
394
104
595
38
206
174
156
151
217
57
322
16
98
94
144
150
177
47
273
22
108
80
37
104
33
15
2
41
85
29
30
9
27
89
44
15
90
7
33
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Silverthorne
Elementary—
9
14
Telkwa  	
Wa'n"t Park
Totals, District No. 54  	
2,112
1,111
1,001
141
176
184
189
23
District No. 55 (Burns Lake)
405
85
181
475
43
137
43
46
34
100
205
46
85
264
21
66
24
20
19
61
200
39
96
211
22
71
19
26
15
39
15
13
77
10
27
9
16
7
21
10
12
61
5
18
6
6
2
8
12
13
81
7
24
7
5
2
26
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Elementary—
16
Topley      	
Totals, District No. 55	
1,549
811
738
  |     195
128
177
16
District No. 56 (Vanderhoof)
544
386
445
25
66
127
30
120
34
83
91
464
267
204
241
13
34
73
12
65
21
40
46
261
277
182
204
12
32
54
18
55
13
43
45
203
43
48
5
21
27
8
21
7
16
16
48
51
47
5
6
31
6
17
5
10
20
34
32
49
2
15
29
3
13
5
16
11
39
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Fort St. James
Elementary—
Mapes            	
Prairiedale                          	
	
13
Totals, District No. 56 	
2,415
1,277
1,138
  |     260
232
214
13
District No. 57 (Prince George)
1,287
341
530
919
747
567
219
279
574
121
258
473
665
186
246
477
373
309
102
165
300
57
139
254
622
155
284
442
374
258
117
114
274
64
119
219
31
112
33
71
90
35
126
11
21
71
36
92
25
40
64
Junior Secondary—
Connaught
Lakewood              	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Kelly l.n_H
MacKenzie
Winton 	
Elementary—
52
8
Beaverley
14
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 179
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2    3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
37
77
38
63
42
30
32
74
35
26
37
71
34
45
13
	
	
	
59
55
395
303 |  313
317
28
17 |  21 |  10
366
302
249
198
156
16
35
16
84
8
22
26
11
83
6
26
34
118
40
19
12
11
121
27
138
36
111
28
108
18
81
11
27
17
83
6
19
17
—. |
 —
	
150
165 |  152
192
19
19 |   12 |   11
148
174
139
126
92
7
13
63
5
22
6
6
9
16
11
19
56
9
11
5
8
8
7
9
30
55
18
4
6
20
11
4
96
7
26
87
23
71
17
73
43
14
15
54
7
12
17
10
1
6
16
140
147 |  134
122
12
20 |   11 |   4
129
110
88
73
43
37
38
3
7
3
16
4
16
13
73
35
41
5
7
4
17
3
10
15
70
49
38
20
134
4
6
4
123
41
51
111
18
52
82
26
43
121
93
54
38
5
10
40
6
16
10
15
16
39
14
	
249
210 |  207
241
14
4 |   6 |   4
215
181
151
121
93
26
76
13
27
50
18
76
17
33
51
126
11
10
18
56
80
63
35
116
200
351
311
176
24
128
169
289
256
163
5
97
161
279
180
102
4
731
475
81
29
68
12
49
16
48
60
17
 G  180
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
II
III
28
29
19
64
64
62
59
64
53
15
1
4
2
1
1
70
76
67
39
36
40
7
9
7
32
31
36
62
66
33
98
105
92
110
77
82
17
18
32
48
11
11
65
57
62
8
9
12
36
39
34
44
18
23
18
26
23
81
95
84
1
1
1
33
56
30
98
85
93
5
6
3
6
6
6
10
7
15
68
77
81
16
18
8
4
3
3
124
137
114
11
6
9
19
16
11
54
54
31
65
62
52
Primary
Special
District No. 57 (Prince George)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Buckhorn	
Carney HiU	
Connaught	
Finlay Forks...
Foreman	
Fort George Central-
Fort George South	
Fraserview	
Giscome	
Hart Highway	
Harwin	
Highland	
Hixon	
Island Cache	
King George V_
McLeod Lake—
Millar Addition..
Nechako North-
Nukko Lake	
Peden Hill	
Penny	
Pineview	
Quinson	
Red Rock	
Reid Lake	
Salmon Valley-
Seymour	
Shady Valley.—
Sinclair Mills	
Spruceland	
Stone Creek	
Upper Fraser—
Van Bien——
Vanway	
Totals, District No. 57	
District No. 58 (McBride)
Secondary—McBride..
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Valemount.
Elementary—
Crescent Spur	
Dome Creek	
Dunster ,	
McBride Centennial-
Totals, District No. 58	
District No. 59 (Peace River South)
Secondary—South Peace	
Junior Secondary—
Central	
Frank Ross.
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Chetwynd..
Elementary—
Canalta	
Crescent Park-
Dawson Creek-
Irvine Dean	
Devereaux	
Correspondence-
Grandview	
Kelly Lake	
McLeod	
Moberly Lake—
Parkhill	
James Paul—
Pouce Coupe..
Rolla	
158
352
52S
27
17
532
258
43
189
338
655
515
149
70
500
53
109
142
106
522
10
230
578
40
29
66
521
64
17
779
50
99
246
306
79
173
267
11
10
262
128
24
93
177
352
264
72
44
2S5
28
51
69
52
278
6
149
302
22
15
33
261
29
12
400
28
51
123
156
79
179
261
16
7
270
130
19
96
161
303
251
77
26
215
25
58
73
54
244
4
81
276
18
14
33
260
35
5
379
22
48
123
150
16
18
14,613 [ 7,579
7,034
171
346
46
16
50
297
99
183
24
10
30
158
72
163
22
6
20
139
24
37
35
7
4
5
46
926 |  504 |
422
61 |  97
666
347
724
387
465
220
521
259
283
155
299
154
563
300
43
21
92
48
76
34
552
278
79
41
161
79
51
25
375
191
59
26
268
135
144
77
319
337
245
262
128
145
263
22
44
42
274
38
82
26
184
33
133
67
56
59
63
8
18
19
91
23
27
13
79
15
37
28
52
6
2
5
34
37
7
2
7
27
99 |
80
40
50
68
10
14
12
98
4
19
11
38
19
44
21
51
40
62
2
13
10
57
14
22
19
57
12
42
25
10
34 | 1,754 | 1,630 | 1,491 |
84
17
17
23
3
10
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G  181
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
1  1  2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
37
12
29
92
1
6
81
26
5
23
53
101
72
13
74
6
21
13
73
3
35
68
11
4
13
78
6
1
90
12
8
30
37
12
48
78
2
3
67
33
9
22
43
81
52
18
83
7
19
12
59
19
73
7
5
11
90
1
106
5
16
24
39
21
33
82
1
78
36
17
45
90
52
29
71
2
50
2
26
83
74
2
86
13
18
25
	
	
.....
	
52
100
3
4
93
32
	
6
28
36
88
70
22
70
9
17
14
70
2
31
78
8
2
10
53
16
3
122
7
16
35
26
1,377
1,289 | 1,239
1,157
82 |  80 |  63 |  35
1,178
1,010
823
731
475
81
23
9
3
10
35
40
5
4
8
29
30
4
8
32
37
30
47
22
29
19
36
22
34
8
1
7
40
90
80 |  86
74
  1 --- 1
67
69
48
36
22
64
56
40
55
8
21
12
86
12
27
33
43
14
89
41
33
86
6
12
9
79
9
24
55
32
9
86
23
118
6
64
3
19
36
31
27
22
15
16
11
11
2
251
182
68
259
153
62
85
165
130
45
281
48
254
31
46
39
54
59
9
29
14
8
77
	
14
20
8
67
13
39
20
 G  182
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total  I   Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
II
III
17
15
15
15
12
10
33
47
52
69
102
91
9
7
9
66
36
47
Primary
Special
District No. 59 (Peace River South)—Cont'd
Elementary—Continued
South Taylor	
Tate Creek	
Don Titus_
Tremblay
Willowbrook-
Windrem	
Totals, District No. 59..
District No. 60 (Peace River North)
Secondary—North Peace 	
Junior Secondary—Bert Bowes	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—■
Attachie  	
Goodlow	
Prespatou Valley..
Transpine-
Elementary—■
Airport	
Altona	
Ambrose	
Buick Creek-
Charlie Lake..
Clayhurst	
Flatrock	
Fort St. John Central.
Grandhaven	
Alwin Holland 	
Mile 18, Beatton River Road.
Montney	
North Pine	
Robert Ogilvie	
Osborn    	
Peejay Camp	
Rosefield	
Taylor 	
Upper Pine	
Wonowon  	
Totals, District No. 60..
District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)
Secondary—■
Esquimalt.
Mount Douglas .
Mount View	
Oak Bay	
Victoria.
Junior Secondary-
Central .
Colquitz..
Dean Heights..
Esquimalt 	
Gordon Head „
Lansdowne	
Oak Bay —
Reynolds	
S.J. Willis .
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Shoreline-
Elementary—
Bank Street	
Beacon Hill	
Blanshard..
Braefoot	
Burnside	
Cedar Hill...
Cloverdale ...
Craigflower-
Doncaster	
94
91
193
604
40
211
45
43
109
302
17
109
49
4S
84
302
23
102
6,654 |    3,402 |    3,252
697
342
660
344
12
5
66
32
81
46
75
33
122
59
17
6
199
95
7
5
189
96
28
14
42
21
726
388
202
112
486
249
41
19
61
32
25
11
277
139
40
24
14
7
32
15
195
99
116
54
50
31
690
671
602
1,202
1,387
894
919
59
791
867
955
959
511
885
395
294
101
497
192
363
251
627
483
378
335
306
648
829
456
484
40
433
446
468
494
265
428
195
132
53
248
101
188
126
332
253
429
355
316
7
34
35
42
63
11
104
2
93
14
21
338
90
237
22
29
14
138
16
7
17
96
62
19
4,460  |    2,278  |    2,182
312
336
296
554
558
438
435
19
358
421
487
465
246
457
200
162
48
249
91
175
125
295
230
456
60
79
89
86
2
2
12
14
9
12
15
17
9
14
7
23
21
21
5
3
33
38
35
2
30
27
32
2
5
8
6
5
8
117
104
115
36
31
36
82
76
60
7
8
4
14
7
7
3
2
4
39
62
39
7
8
10
2
2
3
4
4
6
35
31
36
31
14
15
9
12
9
	
	
	
49
44
37
29
28
23
78
62
68
27
32
44
52
64
52
39
30
34
78
72
82
55
66
63
106
104
97
12
745 |  667 |  650 |
30
520 |  502 |  486 |
30
15
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 183
ENROLMENT—Continued
Gr
_de
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
14
14
12
15
64
2
9
19
14
59
7
17
113
	
	
	
	
11
46
68
6
41
38
627
587
583
543
67
37 |  27
13
501
474
425
329
285 |  46
1
6
9
9
22
1
32
24
2
8
76
25
38
1
12
6
31
3
1
6
21
13
6
2
6
7
11
20
31
2
16
3
6
80
20
67
4
11
3
38
2
2
2
17
12
6
1
5
5
6
2
25
3
4
94
21
67
4
4
5
31
1
3
24
8
3
23
15
11
351
1
4
5
6
1
5
309
255
240
153
3
10
11
13
15
6
30
2
35
4
5
82
33
34
8
1
28
62
6
2
37
10
3
6
31
1
23
5
  | 	
414
353
368
316
92
23
15
11
373
309
255
240
153 1	
53
55
48
38
37
81
73
88
36
51
65
77
68
68
113
59
36
50
30
77
	
154
20
17
31
18
16
20
19
21
18
23
16
15
29
15
10
15
19
15
336
319
279
314
341
383
200
292
132
288
287
292
289
310
333
159
294
110
101
22
20
174
269
202
260
164
264
253
243
152
249
94
291
367
284
533
530
298
282
298
495
588
	
39
21
58
41
62
34
90
69
	
124
13
 G 184
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
822
312
499
613
339
35
354
640
228
1,092
695
587
615
628
485
340
654
136
980
668
591
448
600
27
255
245
584
470
358
69
616
420
816
441
144
235
310
174
18
185
322
107
572
339
291
300
315
259
175
315
70
504
347
314
229
292
14
127
128
316
247
164
38
337
217
424
381
168
264
303
165
17
169
318
121
520
356
296
315
313
226
165
339
66
476
321
277
219
308
13
128
117
268
223
194
31
279
203
392
92
91
87
54
118
76
60
55
67
47
109
81
75
101
83
119
53
77
60
85
59
48
56
52
61
66
48
153
76
70
80
82
58
45
77
30
107
94
76
60
67
31
62
78
31
69
50
73
93
62
45
61
43
46
84
55
136
86
68
62
77
70
31
69
29
123
83
87
59
63
34
62
59
34
81
52
103
108
51
59
85
55
51
78
58
129
87
84
101
90
69
35
77
36
118
82
58
58
73
36
67
70
46
80
65
103
	
Glanford    ..              „
Handicapped Children's Clinic..    ~
Hillcrest
12
	
33
Lake Hill  	
2
9
	
7
Richmond          .     	
	
Solarium....                          ~  ..
South Park      	
11
20
Tolmie	
15
43
Willows..    -         .    -   -	
	
Totals, District No. 61              .
31,701
16,337
15,364
1,819
2,457
2,459
2,609
167
District No. 62 (Sooke)
330
331
302
600
479
13
302
201
31
590
196
42
194
73
383
193
361
463
179
167
165
302
251
8
172
107
16
295
99
20
100
41
210
101
184
230
151
164
137
298
228
5
130
94
15
295
97
22
94
32
173
92
177
233
110
112
82
66
28
27
6
91
28
11
31
16
64
26
35
53
56
38
26
5
89
17
11
27
13
57
25
25
47
56
39
32
2
102
18
9
25
13
68
34
45
64
Junior Secondary—
Dunsmuir
Elementary—
13
24
Metchosin
6
Totals, District No. 62      	
5,084
2,647
2,437
304
482
436
507
43
District No. 63 (Saanich)
714
407
374
392
131
331
487
404
219
200
199
60
179
260
310
188
174
193
71
152
227
~58
59
9
38
33
14
32
40
24
43
37
Junior Secondary—
Elementary—
4
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 185
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
Special
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
114
104
112
114
58
41
41
	
_
—
	
	
	
44
73
69
70
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
70
88
79
87
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
52
53
49
35
	
.
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
19
..
	
1
2
1
	
51
46
49
50
..
	
	
	
	
	
	
92
90
86
90
63
4
	
	
	
	
114
125
90
119
75
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
85
111
81
93
81
79
64
81
82
86
92
112
	
	
..
	
	
73
79
86
72
12
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
78
73
68
69
34
39
35
32
13
	
93
98
96
97
	
	
	
	
	
	
41
131
122
117
132
14
	
	
	
	
	
	
73
85
84
52
82
70
37
88
77
38
	
	
	
	
	
64
43
77
70
64
103
	
	
	
16
	
58
57
67
53
38
40
33
33
63
66
63
66
16
75
60
42
60
39
53
54
	
	
	
..
. .
	
59
26
	
81
85
74
69
73
57
61
62
122
114
117
124
	
	
	
	
	
2,662
2,597
2,449
2,493
257
122 |  112 |  103
2,596
2,363
2,469
2,006
1,961
188
142
15
4
84
86
58
58
26
102
110
90
	
	
12
17
12
200
189
170
	
	
46
56
47
42
	
	
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
43
37
36
30
27
27
31
2
24
3
34
6
	
	
7
79
83
44
71
37
75
34
	
	
	
	
	
	
18
11
29
	
	
27
33
22
"""
10
10
50
3
44
8
45
	
	
	
	
	
	
55
27
28
31
22
__
	
	
	
_
.
_
38
35
39
32
	
- _
_
54
56
49
47
5
	
	
	
	
	
	
444
459
417
397
32
27
21 |   12
386
385
318
246
168
„...-.
346
320
48
16
15
12
135
115
114
	
15
	
113
115
131
	
	
	
	
	
	
138
135
119
	
	
	
20
16
20
28
35
39
31
42
13
	
	
	
	
72
68
88
68
18
	
_.._
■	
	
	
	
	
	
 G 186
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 63 (Saanich)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
182
94
94
237
167
102
96
315
128
196
561
86
52
51
133
84
48
52
167
74
96
283
96
42
43
104
83
54
44
148
54
100
278
57
58
66
23
13
33
26
31
12
12
37
20
20
66
31
17
32
39
20
9
10
33
18
20
81
26
12
29
40
18
20
11
35
16
20
60
Elk Lake..         	
9
13
Royal Oak	
Saanichton _	
Sansbury	
Sidney —   „„ -	
12
Totals, District No. 63-	
5,008
2,647
2,361
298
373
396
391
38
District No. 64 (Gulf Islands)
254
39
18
33
356
13
121
20
10
16
171
7
133
19
8
17
185
6
36
5
2
2
46
2
4
4
7
43
4
4
2
4
43
1
Elementary—
Galiano Island-               	
	
Saltspring	
Saturna Island  	
	
Totals, District No. 64	
713
345
368
36
57
62
54
	
District No. 65 (Cowichan)
689
314
563
492
157
408
18
49
245
118
124
206
180
445
91
49
119
251
203
188
164
15
44
72
224
200
16
31
328
152
308
255
77
235
10
24
127
63
55
103
98
239
50
24
64
124
100
103
81
11
21
42
128
98
10
361
162
255
237
80
173
8
25
118
55
69
103
82
206
41
25
55
127
103
85
83
4
23
30
96
102
6
31
44
35
30
92
106
25
58
24
59
49
28
14
36
27
9
99
31
25
~ I
15
36
14
5
23
32
29
38
13
28
24
31
7
27
46
26
17
10
20
25
11
9
25
60
21
45
17
24
27
95
10
25
26
11
14
29
13
2
Junior Secondary—
Quamichan. 	
Elementary—
	
A lexander  	
Bayview	
23
18
Crofton        	
Drinkwater	
33
Gibbins Road  	
Charles Hoey, V.C	
Mill Bay 	
15
Shawnigan Lake „    	
Somenos   	
Tansor 	
_Z
Totals, District No. 65 	
5,675
2,930
2,745
390
479
416
444
89
District No. 66 (Lake Cowichan)
549
160
56
339
90
15
16
196
228
280
88
23
160
45
10
10
104
107
269
72
33
179
45
5
6
92
121
39
49
28
27
10
18
5
4
53
25
40
5
10
5
2
42
31
46
11
19
5
5
52
39
Elementary—
J. H. Boyd --   .
Caycuse —     	
8
Mayo	
	
Vmi-rt
Totals, District No. 66.   ..
1,649
827
822
116
142
135
177
8
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 187
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
25
28
17
39
20
12
9
41
21
19
83
22
14
29
24
11
19
35
21
16
54
27
13
32
28
16
7
34
21
15
57
	
	
	
8
32
26
13
15
43
11
16
94
410
412 |  384
388
31
31 |   15 |  12
386
365
364
346
320
48
7
3
3
48
6
1
10
49
4
2
4
48
2
57
3
1
2
53
65
50
29
6
3
1
43
4
57
61
66
60
  |   | 	
63
53
65
50
29
33
31
40
26
18
31
88
5
29
23
31
8
34
30
31
26
55
29
20
27
20
72
9
28
23
55
37
30
72
28
15
11
26
87
37
26
46
32
28
28
30
30
117
184
212
98
136
198
84
99
155
82
328
251
26
26
55
21
26
19
32
25
91
39
9
27
23
32
15
15
31
16
442
458 |  431
408
60
28
30
30
513
432
420
328
251
26
11
76
13
32
10
72
13
29
91
19
6
3
5
118
125
110
102
80
9
88
17
12
	
5
25
144
132
124
110
12
6 |   3 |   5
118
125
110
102
80 | 	
 G  188
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kinder
Grade
garten
I
II
III
29
44
11
16
9
25
15
18
41
7
7
9
1
33
70
58
52
46
28
27
25
51
32
22
—
31
31
20
	
1
5
2
Primary
Special
District No. 67 (Ladysmith)
Secondary—
Chemainus	
Ladysmith	
Elementary—■
Chemainus	
Crozier Road-
Davis Road-
Diamond	
Ladysmith	
Ladysmith Primary-
Mount Brenton	
North Chemainus—
North Oyster	
Thetis Island	
Totals, District No. 67..
District No. 68 (Nanaimo)
Secondary—Nanaimo District	
Junior Secondary—
John Barsby	
Wellington	
Woodlands	
Elementary—
Bayview—	
Brechin . .	
Chase River	
Christopher Robin„
Cilaire	
Departure Bay	
Dufferin Crescent-
Extension	
Fairview	
Forest Park	
Gabriola	
Georgia Avenue-
Pauline Haarer	
Hammond Bay__
Harewood —	
Mount Benson	
Mountain View—
North Cedar	
Northfleld	
Park Avenue	
Princess Anne	
Princess Royal	
Quarterway	
Quennell	
Rock City	
Rutherford	
Seaview	
South Wellington-
Waterloo 	
Woodbank.	
Totals, District No. 68~
District No. 69 (Qualicum)
Secondary—Qualicum Beach	
Junior Secondary—Parksville	
Elementary—
Bowser .	
Errington	
French Creek..
Hilliers	
Home Lake	
Little Qualicum..
Nanoose	
Parksville	
Qualicum Beach -
470
482
298
47
58
64
324
213
278
105
187
13
232
237
154
26
32
32
156
105
161
49
105
238
245
144
21
26
32
168
108
117
56
82
5
2,539 | 1,297 [ 1,242
171
205
210
180
1,536
904
353
882
237
416
230
40
288
276
496
29
572
389
42
125
189
64
267
318
123
251
42
268
280
187
224
361
364
83
208
124
36
107
10,311
435
252
48
68
134
33
22
50
101
480
220
Totals, District No. 69-
1,843
854
682
464
440
177
176
443
439
120
117
219
197
110
120
19
21
155
133
129
147
259
237
18
11
307
265
197
192
20
22
72
53
94
95
28
36
144
123
170
148
61
62
133
118
20
22
137
131
150
130
89
98
121
103
183
178
192
172
37
46
104
104
69
55
14
22
53
54
35
46
28
~43
38
38
79
43
33
41
Tl"
42
30
40
37
41
Ti
~27
26
5,362 | 4,949
749
234
121
26
35
71
18
11
23
55
254
100
948
201
131
22
33
63
15
11
27
46
226
120
895
33
46
79
44
53
24
"42
27
32
7
77
57
5
53
39
10
"ii
14
32
34
55
73
36
58
11
25
9
6
12
873
13
54
30
134
32
50
22
33
33
32
5
80
76
6
29
53
7
14
43
18
40
32
46
13
24
31
13
28
14
6
13
793
2
12
27
17
56
41
46
58
24
50
27
31
4
76
46
37
11
51
48
16
30
27
41
37
22
52
14
23
18
7
12
816
11
53
31
162 I  133
21
21
11
10
19
16
4
11
71
14
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G  189
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
1
2  1  3
1
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
55
70
32
15
1
60
76
32
31
1
70
91
32
22
	
18
11
10
109
104
106
121
84
100
74
78
58
79
40
11
	
	
74
12
20
15
37
3
185
173 |  200
215
27
18
11
10
213
227
184
152
137 | 	
36
37
35
--54
46
34
5
47
45
9
12
48
37
18
24
35
49
31
76
37
16
27
14
5
15
61
26
39
136
4
76
49
7
11
44
38
23
25
38
20
109
45
12
18
19
6
13
57
41
27
159
65
54
62
31
19
32
36
128
50
39
~~21
9
12
14
10
21
389
174
275
369
179
251
260
123
334
622
582
51
44
43
20
50
21
39
34
4
72
62
7
	
27
13
48
42
15
27
	
36
49
23
	
24
21
50
15
27
17
21
17
6
21
.___
832
792
819
821
70
21
24 |  21
838
799
717
622
582
51
10
12
20
10
56
23
12
18
23
13
74
22
29
27
18
60
30
8
10
6
74
85
* 	
80
68
76
75
110
95
21
9
18
19
55
43
~ _2
165
131
162
164
12
8
10
6
159
148
151
110 |
95
	
 G  190
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 70 (Alberni)
1,320
479
797
622
280
600
249
734
109
31
424
141
240
208
395
97
548
284
148
167
365
692
254
385
328
146
314
135
379
52
8
219
72
137
88
213
46
277
150
68
91
183
628
225
412
294
134
286
114
355
57
23
205
69
103
120
182
51
271
134
80
76
182
59
47
92
61
31
61
116
65
57
55
66
38
59
55
94
11
9
59
15
37
28
55
18
64
34
28
21
60
71
30
71
23
98
14
2
51
28
38
56
38
23
35
36
31
18
48
77
46
70
41
99
12
6
57
17
32
63
54
11
34
48
17
22
43
Junior Secondary—
A W Nfill
Elementary—
56
13
FabT
Gill           —                     	
7
r. w firay
C T H<ltr>n
11
Wood    ...
	
Totals, District No. 70  	
8,238
4,237
4,001
644
751
711
749
87
District No. 71 (Courtenay)
875
400
454
223
418
279
31
183
239
675
595
393
13
13
143
12
612
343
12
391
143
222
467
188
232
117
215
148
16
92
127
354
302
197
6
6
67
6
310
168
6
207
85
108
408
212
222
106
203
131
15
91
112
321
293
196
7
7
76
6
302
175
6
184
58
114
137
83
57
77
44
42
32
33
27
86
77
44
3
4
25
2
78
45
6
32
16
32
46
27
38
71
77
48
2
3
23
1
83
37
6
40
14
41
42
31
39
103
77
56
4
2
22
1
82
44
44
16
36
Junior Secondary—
Elementary—
31
Bljit-k r.rppV
12
Totals, District No. 71	
6,669
3,424
3,245
440
542
557
599
43
District No. 72 (Campbell River)
Senior Secondary—Campbell River	
522
1,021
55
210
15
431
337
139
193
201
262
116
213
285
491
31
96
12
222
177
65
97
110
127
63
104
237
530
24
114
3
209
160
74
96
91
135
53
109
30
6
25
66
76
19
37
23
22
48
6
23
64
6
63
20
23
39
15
36
6
31
59
74
24
40
32
16
28
Junior Secondary—Campbell River	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Sayward 	
Elementary—
Arbutus
15
Cedar   .      	
	
9
Elm
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G  191
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
99
66
67
50
34
21
164
174
316
178
176
265
113
129
216
421
288
51
61
33
31
24
31
77
56
77
98
	
_
34
24
85
14
4
71
15
33
91
13
4
69
14
39
89
1
61
11
	
104
14
5
56
18
16
38
32
35
32
32
31
34
	
	
31
„
14
12
83
19
99
70
	
88
10
34
15
27
52
44
25
	
23
47
18
37
38
33
	
	
42
691
683 |  672
603
51
50
34
21
654
619
458
421
288
51
414
394
67
	
	
	
148
172
157
134
95
148
	
	
_
78
60
85
	
	
22
19
13
129
123
112
36
42
45
36
	
	
	
29
31
33
80
32
32
76
36
57
	
34
51
14
82
53
73
57
4
35
45
50
49
9
1
3
4
27
4
73
24
57
68
	
22
4
81
13
34
47
55
40
30
52
94
	
	
	
39
15
14
22
30
35
29
26
21
33
	
499
545 |  523
496
55
22 [  19 |  13
527
474
440
414
394
67
33
28
23
343
317
255
302
193
27
22
4
6
21
64
2
23
66
9
29
57
5
7
5
11
6
11
29
55
70
65
33
68
27
54
33
	
37
26
21
34
21
21
24
38
13
28
21
33
17
19
33
12
33
 G 192
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 72 (Campbell River)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
49
209
196
207
9
9
11
264
20
105
98
114
7
5
6
131
29
104
98
93
2
4
5
133
.....
16
1
32
22
26
2
2
3
37
28
24
27
2
1
56
30
24
23
3
46
Rockland —
	
4,669
2,366
2,303
47
446
433
436
24
District No. 75 (Mission)
1,300
59
145
61
156
68
148
71
17
29
470
47
200
71
39
246
221
683
29
77
26
80
37
70
40
8
14
262
27
101
34
21
126
116
617
30
68
35
76
31
78
31
9
15
208
20
99
37
18
120
105
9
21
15
21
11
17
3
6
7
58
9
21
7
8
42
40
8
19
9
21
15
12
10
7
7
62
9
33
9
6
32
33
11
18
7
4
9
24
10
4
5
64
11
25
12
4
28
23
Elementary—
14
3,348
1,751
1,597
  |     295
292
259
14
District No. 76 (Agassiz)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Agassiz	
Elementary—
470
7
92
36
369
44
215
4
54
21
195
24
255
3
38
15
174
20
70
2
12
10
51
12
3
6
5
75
10
"Ti
4
50
10
	
10
1,018
513
505
70
87
99
75
10
District No. 77 (Summerland)
545
582
127
272
310
63
273
272
64
69
17
89
18
84
16
Elementary-
Trout Creek
Totals, District No. 77
1,254
645
609
86
107
100
District No. 79 (Ucluelet-Tofino)
182
38
122
289
90
22
57
154
92
16
65
135
27
49
11
22
47
6
15
35
7
9
25
Elementary—
Tnflnn
Totals, District No. 79	
631
323
308
76
80
56
41
—
District No. 80 (Kitimat)
864
300
825
627
428
480
159
410
320
231
384
141
415
307
197
37
106
79
60
38
106
85
46
43
114
86
55
36
113
87
60
Elementary—
Kilriala
6
Totals, District No. 80
3,044
1,600
1,444
282
275
298
296
6
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G  193
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
10
14
11
14
38
29
25
27
	
	
.	
	
	
	
	
27
26
30
27
	
	
	
	
24
40
30
37
	
	
	
	
2
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
39
30
29
27
	
	
	
	
	
441
430 |  420
404
22
33
28 |  23
355
333
272
302
193
27
18
26
309
260
233
254
200
10
6
8
7
28
19
18
22
	
.	
	
	
9
10
11
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
25
25
21
39
	
	
	
	
	
	
11
13
9
23
22
15
35
	
	
10
13
5
11
4
14
	
	
1
53
60
66
62
31
. .
10
8
	
	
	
	
34
32
25
30
6
9
38
13
4
33
10
8
36
14
	
	
	
37
31
29
34
31
	
	
298
292 |  276
291
31
18
26 | .-..
309
260
233
254
200
	
44
27
37
109
93
66
53
41
1
1
9
19
22
13
8
6
3
52
12
20
19
10
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
12
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
82
82 |  72
69
10
 | 	
109
93
66
53
41
	
4
4
2
109
118
113
106
89
79
75
106
80
15
24
14
23
	
-
	
	
	
	
94
99 [  120
103
4 |   4 |   2
109
118
113
106
89
	
11
7
13
42
34
29
28
18
9
5
16
11
13
9
	
	
_
	
	
	
32
32   36
26
7
	
	
	
	
	
	
57
48
49
35
7
11
7
13
42
34
29
28
18
	
11
10
5
238
181
169
129
101
20
46
33
42
25
128
99
83
76
	
	
	
..
	
	
84
66
66
74
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
49
62
41
42
7
	
	
	
	
	
307
260
232
217
7
11
10
5
238
181
169
129
101
20
 /—
G 194
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 81 (Fort Nelson)
Secondary—Fort Nelson	
Elementary—
Camp Mile 392	
Camp Mile 456 _	
G. W. Carlson  	
Fireside 	
Totals, District No. 81	
District No. 82 (Chilcotin)
Elementary—
Anahim Lake .	
Chezacut    _
Kleena Kleene..
Poplar Grove
Puntzi Mountain..
Tatlayoko Lake _
Totals, District No. 82-
District No. 83 (Portage Mountain)
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Hudson Hope-
Elementary—General George R. Pearkes	
Totals, District No. 83	
District No. 84 (Vancouver Island West)
Secondary—
Gold River—   	
Captain John Meares..
Elementary—-
Fair Harbour	
Gold River	
Kyuquot
Tahsis River..
Zeballos	
Totals, District No. 84-
District No. 85 (Vancouver Island North)
Secondary—North Island	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Alert Bay
R. H. Richmond-
San Josef   	
Robert Scott	
Woss Lake	
Elementary—
Coal Harbour—
Echo Bay	
A. J. Elliot	
Fort Rupert	
Kokish	
Mahatta River—
Minstrel Island-
Port McNeill	
Quatsino	
Sea View	
Winter Harbour-
Totals, District No. 85_
District No. 86 (Creston-Kaslo)
Secondary—
Crawford Bay-
Prince Charles.
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Kaslo-
Elementary—
Canyon -
J. A. Cochran-
Creston	
153
10
35
506
11
149
279
265
82
7
19
269
7
38
20
16
5
10
7
13
11
37
16
35
21
161
132
544
293
124
62
80
36
25
13
373
169
21
10
171
94
41
25
835
409
280
146
439
219
172
90
262
no
473
248
157
80
11
5
20
8
104
45
65
28
51
31
18
8
8
3
204
113
14
4
164
89
7
3
118
857
327
90
174
843
70
424
167
46
98
457
71
3
16
237
4
715 |       384 |       331
18
11
3
2
21
14
~69~
118
133
251
62
44
12
204
11
77
16
426
134
220
82
152
225
77
6
12
59
37
20
10
5
91
10
75
4
2,449 |    1,230 |    1,219
48
433
160
44
76
386
58
65
58
25
83
43
42
73
27
41
58 |       92 |
95
122
I       34 |
23
76
76 |
65
6
48
5
24
5
59
39
68
17
6
2
14
19
11
3
1
24
3
38
2
226 |     306
35
19
20
89
99
38
32
42
26
1
4
19
12
11
3
3
27
3
33
2
256
37
15
22
71
71
25
59
4
44
3
26
56
31
35
13
4
5
20
19
8
6
2
32
2
48
1
29
16
20
62
59 |
85 [
282 |
13
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 195
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
1
3
3
4
53
2
2
4
52
1
3
57
1
4
	
57
1
1
38
31
12
11
	
56
2
	
62
62 |       59
61
4 |   .	
	
59
|       38
1       31
12
11
|   --
5
7           4
3              1
2
2
2
1
2
7
1
	
	
	
3
1
2
4
6
3
3
2
1
2
3
	
13
23
14
16
	
     |   	
1
	
	
	
—
44
59
33
42
-
32
48
21
	
	
44
59 |       33
42
----- 1   -  1
32
48
21
3
46
1
21
3
2
31
3
15
3
4
41
4
16
6
	
26
23
5
31
17
31
14
24
10
12
16
1
45
20
6
	
72
74 |       54
71
	
	
54
48
45
34
28
60
34
30
53
10
3
13
5
21
1
1
28
30
24
40
15
3
11
8
1
22
2
37
37
11
55
18
1
11
3
1
29
1
8
	
33
29
17
15
48
14
73
17
19
12
14
1
55
22
11
10
64
47
50
24
26
59
20
1
16
15
8
2
1
22
2
4
I
251
231 |     184
204
8 |   	
156
136
98
64
47
23
18
25
120
27
10
24
117
26
29
130
18
13
10
29
186
32
27
179
32
32
194
29
18
120
26
12
137
15
16
12
21
104
13
15
	
 G 196
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
1
I
II
III
Special
District No. 86 (Creston-Kaslo)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
198
39
65
74
121
128
52
91
21
30
45
57
68
23
107
18
35
29
64
60
29
	
26
10
12
10
38
13
11
23
10
9
13
33
17
10
39
8
13
16
26
17
8
Yarik
3,086
1,597
1,489
122 |     283
260
254
13
District No. 87 (Stikine)
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Cassiar	
Elementary—
Atlin
195
37
17
29
10
36
47
97
21
7
14
5
19
27
98
16
10
15
5
17
20
24
26
8
3
4
5
7
26
8
3
7
7
9
14
8
3
4
2
7
2
	
Totals, District No. 87-
371
190
181
24
53
60
40
District No. 88 (Skeena-Cassiar)
Secondary—
235
1,063
196
12
233
432
116
383
99
40
68
416
40
76
95
346
246
39
263
10
114
547
107
7
122
205
57
194
56
25
27
222
17
47
51
175
131
20
146
5
121
516
89
5
111
227
59
189
43
15
41
194
23
29
44
171
115
19
117
5
	
25
33
31
155
74
10
9
9
18
17
124
8
30
1
21
4
33
60
25
70
25
6
9
10
14
13
105
5
41
1
30
2
21
81
30
133
6
11
8
9
11
82
17
7
48
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Stewart	
Elementary—
12
E. T. Kenney    	
14
Kitsault
Smith Hj.7F-.nn
Thornhill
Tlpl-nris
Totals, District No. 88.
4,408
2,275
2,133
  |     544
442
496
26
District No. 89 (Shuswap)
Senior Secondary—Salmon Arm.
479
225
447
535
155
329
56
82
406
205
12
17
158
49
13
74
29
92
46
210
120
225
296
84
164
21
38
209
108
6
11
93
20
6
41
15
36
27
269
105
222
239
71
165
35
44
197
97
6
6
65
29
7
33
14
56
19
22
30
15
40
_ 16
11
16
61
36
3
24
9
3
11
5
13
5
49
17
11
14
48
31
6
17
8
4
15
1
16
3
46
~~14
7
16
53
22
~4
28
6
1
15
3
9
9
Junior Secondary—Enderby	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Eagle River
J. L. Jackson-
North Shuswap
Shuswap.
Elementary—
Ashton Creek
Bastion
M. V. Beattie
Carlin
Centennial-
12
Deep Creek
Falkland
Glenerien
Grandview Bench.
Grindrorl
KinRfish...
Malflkwa
Mara
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 197
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Intermediate
Occupational
Grade
i
IV
V
VI
VII
Special
1            2
3
VIII
DC
X
XI
XII
XIII
31
11
7
14
21
7
14
31
6
7
27
11
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
—
—
—
26
19
17
19
I
	
	
	
	
	
	
3
9
11
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
	
269
256 |     250
242
28
18 |       13 |       10
247
238
255
164
164
-
30
3
17
5
17
14
5
	
	
	
	
9
9
9
	
	
6
1
2
10
3
2
4
4
1
1
4
1
	
	
	
	
3
	
	
	
	
—
5
7
5
9
5
3
	
	
_
	
	
52
39 |       40
33
	
	
	
	
12
9
9
  |   	
14
2
31
71
15
1
20
73
23
~51
63
17
7
11
11
8
4
85
257
23
1
49
275
10
33
207
13
22
166
10
136
22
—
2
32
70
30
14
—
11
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
5
11
6
9
110
4
11
97
3
8
109
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
85
15
—
5
13
13
84
3
7
11
74
7
39
1
2
15
16
58
6
33
3
48
27
5
14
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
_..-
	
45
2
	
—
436
385 |     351
340
43
24
22 |       12
366
334
253
188
146
—
	
	
	
93
_66
~66
279
200
47
27
..—-
39
13
41
36
17
59
	
19
23
11
43
145
24
99
55
142
7
96
38
159
5
75
	
—
10
22
8
14
9
	
	
	
	
	
—
51
37
22
54
24
72
38
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
32
	
—
4
24
13
20
7
17
6
13
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
5
14
10
9
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
6
14
5
13
5
14
4
13
	
-I
	
	
	
zz
zz
■—
8
7
4
10
	
—
	
	
	
	
—
 G  198
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1968/69
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
I
II
III
Special
District No. 89 (Shuswap)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
43
57
151
16
552
120
46
67
182
117
26
30
81
5
290
60
23
31
96
59
17
27
70
11
262
60
23
36
86
58
114
8
11
16
3
76
14
11
9
19
13
5
10
25
4
55
21
9
7
27
24
11
8
29
4
65
9
4
14
30
12
North Broadview                 	
North Canoe	
Notch Hill	
Salmon Arm ...
13
Totals, District No. 89	
4,760
2,431
2,329
181
433
427
419
25
Unattached Schools
Elementary-Senior Secondary—University Hill
Elementary-Junior   Secondary — John  Stubbs
Memorial	
Elementary-
274
834
527
32
335
143
434
266
14
175
131
400
261
18
160
110
52
68
109
60
5
51
116
65
3
54
104
76
6
38
Totals, unattached schools	
2,002
1,032
970
230
225
238
224
RECAPITULATION OF ENROLMENT, 1968/69, BY
Grade
Elementary
Elementary-
Junior Secondary
Elementary-
Senior Secondary
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
XIII
	
	
XII  .    -                     	
619
786
805
855
947
57
75
55
615
759
767
844
881
41
26
48
1,234
XI
4
3
1
12
4
5
2
35
3
1
1,545
1,572
1,699
1,828
98
X       —	
DC -	
VIII       	
Occupational 3 	
Occupational 2	
Occupational 1 	
2
1
23
894
1,207
1,259
28
44
60
805
1,116
1,261
18
42
39
1,699
2,323
2,520
46
86
99
3
1
101
103
26
24
50
3,492
3,281 |    6,773
4,199
3,981
8,180
2,444
18,423
19,480
19,892
20,897
2,003
21,806
21,403
22,321
8,958
1,371
17,930
18,814
19,335
19,745
1,108
20,303
20,066
20,651
8,701
3,815
36,353
38,294
39,227
40,642
3,111
42,109
41,469
42,972
17,659
47
871
520
543
636
51
529
595
590
208
26
750
476
520
547
21
523
513
530
191
73
1,621
996
1,063
1,183
72
1,052
1,108
1,120
399
181
472
206
195
147
8
102
127
142
77
111
433
179
206
162
2
113
113
100
68
292
VII   .   . 	
VI-                      	
905
385
V    -	
IV   .                           -	
401
309
10
TTT  	
II 	
I      	
Kindergarten 	
215
240
242
145
157,627
148,024
305,651
4,590
4,097 |    8,687
1,657
1,487
3,144
Totals	
157,653
148,048
305,701
8,082
7,378
15,460
5,856
5,468
11,324
i Vocational school, district and regional college, correspondence, adult, and night-school enrolments are
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 199
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Inter-
Occupational
Grade
IV
V
VI
VII
Special
1
1
2
3
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
14
3
2
9
11
8
. .
26
21
16
18
5
69
69
59
16
16
	
 _
...
12
12
7
13
7
39
	
8
8
14
15
28
35
43
19
20
18
11
	
	
	
	
	
	
466
386
375
387
16
19
23 |       11
404
366
343
279
200 |   	
38
42
41
47
58
48
95
86
69
60
	
	
	
46
39
	
	
	
61
77
71
55
10
4
5
5
3
	
 _
1
47
42
35
	
.	
	
	
	
	
	
207
210
180
156
10
	
	
89
80
47
58
48
TYPE OF SCHOOL, GRADE, AND SEX OF PUPILS
Junior Secondary
Secondary
Senior Secondary
Totals,i Public Schools
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
	
267
8,990
10,399
8,730
7,138
7,232
324
439
509
190
8,245
9,784
8,175
6,892
7,017
227
234
292
457
17,235
20,183
16,905
14,030
14,249
551
673
801
613
3,732
4,270
340
3,318
4,074
953
7,050
8,344
880
13,341
15,455
17,313
18,875
19,904
783
1,112
1,195
530
12,178
14,621
16,473
18,072
19,361
521
603
677
1,410
	
25,519
30.076
6,882
6,723
9,219
10,190
209
288
297
13,605
18,893
20,633
539
809
868
33,786
9,674
	
36,947
10,443
39,265
330
521
571
44
33
26
10
70
43
1,304
1,715
1,872
28,421
26,926 | 55,347
44,028
41,056
85,084
8,692 |    7,768 | 16,460
88,858 |    83,036 |  171,894
25
11
36
61
123
184
2,758
19,766
20,206
20,630
21,680
2,062
22,437
22,125
23,053
9,243
1,642
19,113
19,469
20,061
20,454
1,131
20,939
20,692
21,281
8,960
4,400
	
38,879
	
39,675
40,691
	
42,134
3,193
	
	
43,376
42,817
	
	
	
44,334
	
18,203
25 |         11 |         36
61
123 |       184
	
	
	
163,960
153,742
317,702
28,446
26,937
55,383
44,089
41,179
85,268
8,692
7,768
16,460
252,818
236,778
489,596
not included.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1969
6,030-1069-8364

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