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Minister of Public Works REPORT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1968/69 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1970

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 " We believe that our Department can, and must, achieve
something rather more difficult than a high standard of building. We must be an organization that can develop ideas, can
investigate and experiment with new techniques. Above all,
we must improve our own programmes by studying and analysing the needs of the people we serve. We must lead, not follow."
—(Annual Report, Department of Public Works of British Columbia, 1961/62.)
  PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Minister of Public Works
REPORT
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
1968/69
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1970
  To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the Department
of Public Works for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1969, in compliance with the
provisions of the Public Works Act.
W. N. CHANT,
Minister of Public Works.
Office of the Minister of Public Works,
Parliament Buildings, December 30,1969.
  INDEX
Page
. 7
. 8
. 15
Report of the Deputy Minister	
Report of the Director of Design	
Report of the Director of Construction and Maintenance	
The Total Energy Concept  21
Report of the Civil Engineer.	
Role of the Department of Public Works	
Report of the Electrical Engineer	
Report of the Chief Engineer, Safety Inspection Services-
Report of the Chief Boiler Inspector	
Report of the Inspector of Electrical Energy	
Report of the Chief Gas Inspector	
Report of the Comptroller of Expenditure	
23
24
29
32
34
37
41
42
Tenders Received and Contracts Awarded  46
  REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER
The Honourable W. N. Chant,
Minister of Public Works,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, British Columbia.
Sir,—/ have the honour to submit for your consideration the Annual Report
of the Department for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1969.
Elsewhere in this Report will be those of the heads of divisions. These set out
work accomplished and planned, tenders let and accepted, and Departmental
accounts.
Change, for the sake of change only, is not necessarily a desirable end in itself.
However, very little remains static and we must be alert to any need for adjustment
to meet changing conditions. Not only that, but we must be able to recognize
signs of impending change and be prepared to make corrections when the time
is right to do so.
Previous reports have mentioned some trends and the passage of time has
demonstrated the general correctness of the observations made. One which has
particular pertinence at this time concerns the increasing administrative role of the
Department. If manpower is not to be correspondingly increased, the design role
must decrease. This trend has engaged our attention and measures are being taken
to adjust accordingly. This subject is dealt with in greater depth elsewhere in
this Report.
Spiralling prices of materials and the higher cost of labour are driving unit
costs of construction ever higher. Original estimates made in good faith are, more
often than not, obsolete by the time plans are ready for tender. To combat this,
the Department is placing much greater emphasis on a most critical analysis of
programmes, plans, material costs, and design methods with a view to the greatest
possible degree of objectivity in meeting the expanded need of Government construction.
The expertise of the Department is being called upon by other departments
and agencies of Government to a much greater extent than previously. This is
gratifying in that it demonstrates confidence. At the same time, however, it makes
demands upon the senior staff levels that can only be met by a very full effort. This
has been given cheerfully and with ample evidence of thoughtful interest.
It is perhaps appropriate to observe that the knowledgeable application of
administrative skills learned through the three-year Executive Development Course
sponsored by the Government has become quite apparent. As more staff members
undertake and complete this course, so the standard of competence rises. The
collective effect is noticeable.
I am pleased to report that Departmental morale is high. We have reason to
be proud of this and also reason to thank our staff for their truly fine efforts.
Yours respectfully,
Victoria, British Columbia.
A. E. WEBB,
Deputy Minister.
 D 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF DESIGN
When we reflect that in one short generation man has not only probed but
has unlocked and utilized the power within the atom and has now expanded his
activities to the reaches of outer space itself, we must wonder and exult at the
inherent capabilities of the human mind and spirit. While it is true that to date
man has shown a greater capability in controlling his technology than in controlling
himself, these achievements have provided many lessons.
Firstly, man's demonstrated ability to work with his fellows in the attainment
of lofty goals has shown that there is probably no limit to the results which can be
obtained if organization, desire, and faith are present.
We have also seen that significant results to stated problems can be achieved
when man realizes his interdependence. Because of this and because of the complexity of the problems which face us today, it is evident that today's problems
can best be solved through group or multi-disciplinary application of skill and
knowledge.
While the construction industry is among the last of the craft-oriented industries, evidence is being seen every day that the organizational and research techniques which produced the aero-space technology will be of significant benefit to
this industry. We members of this industry are accordingly required to prepare ourselves for the changes which will be forthcoming.
First and most significant of these changes is the realization that we are rapidly
approaching the point where we can afford neither the cost nor the time necessary
to solve our construction and housing problems in the traditional manner.
Secondly is the realization that we are all members of this industry, whether
Government agency, private developer, professional, or tradesman, and that the
benefits of improvement are shared by all, just as the faults of obsolescence are
charged to all.
This fact is of vital significance to this Department in its continued efforts to
obtain maximum benefit in the expenditure of public funds. The building process
is becoming more industrialized. The systems approach is already in use in Toronto
and Montreal and, while the approach is still in its infancy in Canada, and its
application requiring further assessment, the work being done and the benefits
already obtained are available for the entire user segment of this country.
In order to accommodate to these revised approaches and to participate in
the benefits of industrialization, a new discipline is required of all designers. Among
the requirements for this new discipline are:—
(1) The necessity for a national system of data retrieval and dissemination.
(2) The requirement for the unification of building codes throughout Canada.
(3) The initiation of dimensional co-ordination within the industry.
(4) The necessity to co-ordinate all design, construction,  and regulatory
agencies in the construction industry.
(5) The necessity ultimately to introduce the metric system into the construction industry.
The BEAM programme initiated by the Federal Department of Trade and
Industry has given invaluable leadership in the attempt to fulfil most of these ideals,
while the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada is this year attempting to provide
the catalyst which will enable the fourth item, in particular, to be realized.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1968/69 D 9
This Department is endeavouring to fulfil its responsibilities in this regard,
being the first Provincial Department to adopt modular co-ordination, by its active
participation in industry-design seminars and meetings, and also by designing exclusively in accordance with the provisions of the National Building Code, which
is the nearest approximation to a uniform building code in this country.
The necessity to remain in the van of contemporary thinking has thrown a
great responsibility on the Department to provide and encourage a programme
of continuing technical and professional education. This is being accomplished by
selecting that training which appears to be required by the exigencies of our programme, carefully choosing the personnel who can benefit by that training, and
then insisting on feed-back by the individual to the remainder of the Design group.
This keeps training cost to a minimum and ensures maximum benefit.
In accordance with the policy enunciated in last year's Report, greater emphasis
has been given this year to preliminary programming of our projects and the critical
evaluation of needs. The formalization of this process is requiring much time and
effort, but the benefits are becoming evident both in the refinement of programmes
as well as the greater efficiency of the design-production process.
Considerable reorganization has taken place within the Design Divisions and
which has resulted in a more efficient utilization of our human resources. The
Electrical Design Division has been transferred from Vancouver to Victoria, the
estimating group has been expanded from a purely architectural service to one providing cost data for all disciplines, and the contractural procedures have been
further unified to eliminate confusion in the construction field.
CONTRACTS AWARDED DURING THE 1968/69 PERIOD
Fifty-three principal contracts were awarded, aggregating approximately 18
million dollars. Of these, approximately 38.7 per cent were designed for the
Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance; 20.5 per cent for the
Department of Education; 14 per cent for the Department of Recreation and Conservation; 3.5 per cent for the Attorney-General, while the remainder, totalling
23.3 per cent, included projects for the Departments of Social Welfare, Agriculture,
and Highways, as well as Provincial Government buildings.
Particulars of these contracts will be found at the end of the Public Works
Report.    Several projects of particular interest are mentioned here.
1. Victoria—British Columbia Archives and Museum.—Three contracts were
awarded on this project in the total amount of $2,552,000. These provided for
the completion of the Main Archives and Curatorial Tower, and surrounding areas.
2. Vancouver—Courthouse.—Three contracts were awarded in the total
amount of $138,216 to continue the work of upgrading existing facilities.
3. Victoria—Glendale Hospital.—Five contracts were awarded for this work,
as follows:—
(1) Phase IVa, in the amount of $1,178,796, which provided for the completion of the boiler-house and laundry building serving both the Glendale
Hospital and the Victoria Vocational School.
(2) Phase Va, in the amount of $133,595, which included the pile foundations for the main institutional building.
(3) A contract in the amount of $ 105,022 for the supply of boilers.
(4) A contract in the amount of $174,502 for the supply and installation of
laundry equipment.
(5) Phase Vb, in the amount of $4,914,000, which provided for the completion of the entire main treatment unit.
 D  10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
4. Vancouver Jericho Hill School.—A contract was awarded in the amount
of $171,688, which provided a main soccer playing-field, tennis court, etc., to provide recreational facilities for the pupils at this school.
5. Vanderhoof—Highways Establishment.—A contract in the amount of
$378,296 was awarded for the construction of a maintenance depot at Vanderhoof.
This building was planned on a modular basis, and subsequent experience has indicated that the standard construction system used achieved substantial cost savings.
6. Victoria—British Columbia Vocational School.—A contract in the amount
of $2,285,000 was awarded for the first phase of the Vocational School, being the
workshop complex and comprising workshops for welding, steel fabrication, auto-
body, automotive, diesel engines, plumbing, carpentry, and electrical.
7. Brannan Lake School.—A contract in the amount of $156,900 was awarded
for the erection of a special unit to house 15 boys, including classrooms.
8. Kamloops.—A contract in the amount of $14,804 was awarded to erect
a weigh-scale station to assist in the operation of the Department of Commercial
Transport, owing to the increasing load of traffic being carried on Highway No. 5.
9. Burnaby—WilUngdon Avenue.—A contract in the amount of $323,259 was
awarded for the erection of a dairy laboratory for the Department of Agriculture.
10. Haney—Alouette River Unit.—A contract in the amount of $457,664 was
awarded for the erection of a kitchen and stores building at this site.
11. Williams Lake.—A contract was awarded in the amount of $1,549,000
for the erection of a Provincial Government building. This structure will replace
the existing antiquated Courthouse building and will consolidate all Government
offices in this area.
12. Duncan.—A contract in the amount of $833,000 was awarded for the
erection of Phase III of this project, being a five-story office tower for the Provincial
Building in Duncan.  This contract will complete the facility.
13. Essondale—Riverview Hospital.—A contract in the amount of $223,000
was awarded for alterations to the Westlawn Building. These renovations were to
relieve the critical situation with regard to washrooms, and to upgrade facilities within one wing of the building.
PROJECTS PLANNED DURING THE  1968/69 PERIOD
Approximately 75 projects were in various stages of planning during this
fiscal year under review. The major portion of these are outlined below.
Department of Education
1. Kamloops—British Columbia Vocational School.—The new establishment
will comprise the Classroom Administration and Workshop Building and the
Cafeteria.
2. Victoria—British Columbia Vocational School.—Planning continued to
provide a training cafeteria to seat approximately 300.
3. Kelowna—British Columbia Vocational School.—Planning was commenced
to provide a training cafeteria, which will enable food training to be carried out,
at the same time providing meal service for students at the school.
4. Terrace—British Columbia Vocational School.—Planning was commenced
to provide six dormitories, each housing 40 students, and a cafeteria building seating
approximately 270.
5. Nanaimo — British Columbia Vocational School. — Planning was commenced to add an additional floor to the classroom block, and a workshop for heavy
duty mechanics and carpentry, together with necessary classrooms.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1968/69 D 11
6. Burnaby—British Columbia Institute of Technology.—Planning continued
on a student multi-purpose centre, which would house gymnasium, toilet, locker,
and washroom facilities, serving both this unit and the existing sport field, vending
cafeteria, as well as offices ancillary to the student functions within the building.
Department of the Attorney-General
1. Lower Mainland Remand Centre.—Planning continued on this unit, which
is intended to relieve the situation at Oakalla by housing those prisoners held on
remand.
2. Burnaby Motor-vehicle Testing-station.—Planning continued on the provision of a station similar in design to the Victoria Station, and to include licence-
issuing facilities.
Department of Highways
Highways Maintenance Establishments.—Planning continued on the provision
of maintenance establishments at the following locations: Quesnel, Williams Lake,
Salmon Arm, Vernon, and 100 Mile House. This accommodation is all being
planned on a modular basis, utilizing the scheme developed in the last fiscal period
for Vanderhoof.
Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance
1. Riverview Hospital Laundry.—Planning commenced on the temporary upgrading of the existing laundry facilities and the long-term replacement of this unit,
which will enable it to provide the service required for the hospital when the Remand
Centre load is added.
2. British Columbia Building.—Upon being notified of the requirement to
erect a major building in Vancouver on Block 61, investigatory trips were taken
by senior design officials of the Department, and much useful data was obtained.
Programming studies were placed in hand to enable the requirements of this building to be properly ascertained, preliminary investigations made in the method of
engaging consultants, and a site soils survey was initiated.
GENERAL
The Design Division provided a greatly expanded programme of professional
consultation to other departments, including the following:—
Provincial Secretary (Senior Citizens Housing)
1. Fifty-one submissions of plans for senior citizens housing were made and
constructive criticism given on design and cost matters.
2. One submission for construction on University Endowment Lands was
reviewed and approved.
Municipal Affairs
1. Assistance was given in evaluating submissions for five Federal-Provincial
Housing Developments under design and construct contracts.
2. The Department provided the technical sub-committee which assessed the
entries to the Provincial Housing Plans Competition. Entries were judged, winners
chosen, and a final report of assessment was submitted.
3. Engineering consultation and advice were provided on a wide variety of
projects, including land drainage for the Duncan Land-Assembly Scheme, Alert
Bay Urban Renewal Waterfront development, totem-pole foundation designs for
Osaka and Halifax, Barkerville Historic Site, Craigflower Manor restoration, complete planning and design services for K'san Indian Village at Hazelton, as well as
 D  12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
the routine advisory services to the C.I.D.C., Ferry System and the Hospital Insurance Service.
Treasury Board
The Department participated actively in discussions initiated by the Treasury
Board in attempts to control rising construction costs. These discussions culminated in the formation of the Cost-Analysis Team, which contains three senior members of the Design Division of this Department and whose first project is to study
and advise on construction and operating-cost proposals for the University of British
Columbia Health Sciences Centre.
In conclusion, it is once again my pleasure to record the dedicated and creative participation of all sections of the Design Staff, whose response to daily problems is, as always, in accord with the highest professional standards. Their cheerful and willing response to every demand is a measure of the pride they take in
service of the people.
I would also record the constructive and harmonious relations which exist with
Construction and Maintenance Division and field personnel and the excellence of
co-operation received from the personnel of all Government departments and
agencies whom it is our privilege to serve.
G. L. Giles, M.R.A.I.C, Dip.
Pub. Admin.,
Director of Design.
Model of Multi-purpose Building, British Columbia Institute of Technology, Vancouver.
 Exterior of Library Building, British Columbia Institute of Technology, Vancouver.
Interior of Library Building, British Columbia Institute of Technology, Vancouver.
 Exterior of British Columbia Government Employees' Credit Union Building, Victoria.
Interior of British Columbia Government Employees' Credit Union Building, Victoria.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1968/69 D  15
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF CONSTRUCTION
AND MAINTENANCE
MAINTENANCE AND BUILDING MANAGEMENT
Changes to the Department's organizational structure early in the 1968/69
fiscal period left the position of Assistant Construction and Maintenance Architect
vacant. For a while this caused considerable pressure upon remaining personnel.
Later, however, a Co-ordinator of Maintenance and a Co-ordinator of Construction
were appointed. Although an orientation period is always required, even for senior
personnel, it is gratifying to report that the new organization is already proving its
worth by successfully processing a much larger volume of work more efficiently
than previously.
Considerable attention has been given to the cost of maintaining and cleaning
buildings, with special emphasis in certain areas. It is interesting to note that floor
care consumes 40 per cent of over-all cleaning-time. The use of synthetic walk-
off mats on the inside of entrances to buildings has substantially reduced the soil
load into the building. We have currently under active consideration the further
use of carpeting to reduce cost of maintenance. Carpeted areas can effectively reduce cleaning-time as much as 30 per cent, compared with other finishes. The use
of vinyl wall coverings around heavy traffic areas, and the design of buildings which
allow windows to be cleaned from the inside, are all matters which will reflect upon
the cost of future maintenance.
The travelling landscape and remedial crew visited and carried out work on
the majority of major buildings throughout the Province. This work included new
major landscape work to the grounds of: Kootenay Lake Trout Hatchery; Courthouse, Fort Nelson; Courthouse, Nanaimo; improvement to Dawson Creek Vocational School; new lawn and shrubs, 100 Mile Health Unit; Phase I landscaping,
Duncan Courthouse.
Nursery plant production at Essondale, Victoria, and Vancouver continued,
and many of the shrubs for the above work were obtained from this source. Approximately 30,000 bedding plants were raised in Vancouver and distributed for
planting as far north as Prince Rupert.
The apprenticeship scheme for gardeners sponsored by this Department, beside
providing tradesmen for the industry, is also providing skilled personnel for the
Department.
Work in the preparation of rented premises for occupancy by Government
departments included the preparation of plans, specifications, and supervision of
work at the following locations:—
Victoria—
Weiler Building, accommodation, Electrical Design Division, Public Works
Department.
1039 Johnson Street, accommodation, Probationary Officer, Department of
Attorney-General.
818 Yates Street, accommodation, Public Health Engineering, Health Branch.
845 Yates Street, storage facilities, Departments of Agriculture and Public
Works.
33 Dallas Road, accommodation, Civil Defence offices and storage.
 D  16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Vancouver—
2410 Nanaimo Street, accommodation, Motor-vehicle Branch, Department of
Attorney-General.
6237 West Boulevard, accommodation, Motor-vehicle Branch, Department of
Attorney-General.
Reroofing of Premises Included—
Courthouse, Vancouver (partial).
Courthouse, Vernon.
Oakalla Prison Farm, kitchen and boiler-house.
Dellview Hospital, laundry, Vernon.
Tranquille School, laundry, Kamloops.
Windermere Building, Victoria.
Liquor Control Board premises, 140 East Eighth Avenue, Vancouver.
Renovation and Reconstruction Projects Included—
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, Prime Minister's suite and incidental relocation of Forestry Offices.
The Woodlands School, New Westminster, Phase II renovations, Centre
Building.
Riverview Hospital, Wards E. 5, Centre Lawn Building.
Ferryman's residence, Lytton, design and construction.
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, Miniaturization Laboratory, carried out by
works crew, Zone No. 1.
Riverview Hospital, Crease Clinic, new admissions entrance.
New Denver Youth Centre, new laundry and fire protection system.
Data Processing and Motor-vehicle Building, Victoria, washrooms.
Nanaimo Vocational School, drainage system improvements.
British Columbia Medical Plan, 1410 Government Street, Victoria, alterations,
Third Floor.
Victoria International Airport, Department of Highways, Flight Operations
alterations.
Douglas Building, Victoria, installation of suspended ceilings, new electric panels, basement and First Floor.
Douglas Building, Victoria, Telephone Exchange, enlargement and renovations.
Jericho Hill School, Vancouver, activity and classroom, basement area.
Courthouse, New Westminster, Small Debts Court renovations.
Courthouse, Mission, general alteration of offices for new occupancy.
Our Superintendents, with their crews, have carried out a very full maintenance
programme. In this respect I would like to convey my thanks to this Division's
diversified Works Force who, by their efforts, have ensured the success of our work's
programme.
The Mechanical Operations and Maintenance Branch experienced a very busy
year and continued to provide technical assistance, supervision, and direction to the
field staff operating plants, equipment, and systems. Their responsibilities have
increased considerably, with many new buildings being completed and occupied.
In addition, the Headquarters staff component was engaged in the preparation of plans and specifications for alteration or additions to mechanical plant and
services. In the majority of instances this work entailed obtaining bids by public
tender, subsequent award of a contract, and the supervision of the work.
During the past fiscal period, some 21 projects were completed, and the following examples are typical:—
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1968/69
D  17
(a) Conversion of heating-boiler from coal to gas-firing, Motor-vehicle Building, Georgia
Street, Vancouver.
(_>)  Installation of a new heating-boiler, office building, 535 Burrard Street, Vancouver.
(c) Phase III renovations to steam-boiler plant, The Woodlands School, New Westminster.
(d) Conversion of heating-boiler from coal to oil-firing, Courthouse, Revelstoke.
O)  Renewal of heating system, Courthouse, Grand Forks.
(/) Installation of air-conditioning system, Telephone Exchange, Parliament Buildings,
Victoria.
(g) Installation of ventilation system in swimming-pool building, Brannan Lake School
for Boys, Nanaimo.
CONSTRUCTION
The most notable and important development this year was the appointment
of a Co-ordinator of Construction, who devotes his time exclusively to supervising
personnel engaged in construction duties. This has made it possible to accelerate
our training programme for Project Inspectors. Currently a review is being made,
which, we expect, will lead to the improvement of the system for recording and
processing project information. It is anticipated the appointment of an Electrical
Project Inspector will greatly facilitate supervision of this specialty, which is becoming more complex with every year.
Project Inspectors were appointed to the following projects under construction
during this period:—
(17) British Columbia Institute of Technology, Instructional Communications Laboratory, Burnaby.
(18) British Columbia Vocational School, Workshop
Complex, Phase I, Victoria.
(19) Brannan Lake School, special unit, Nanaimo.
(20) Random Sample Poultry-testing Station, Abbotsford.
(21) British Columbia Vocational School, sawmill
building and conversion of existing classroom,
Prince George.
(22) British Columbia Institute of Technology, greenhouse and animal holding building, Burnaby.
(23) British Columbia Institute of Technology, addition to Food Training Centre, Burnaby.
(24) Dairy Laboratory, Willingdon Avenue, Burnaby.
(25) Alouette River Unit, kitchen and stores building,
Haney.
(26) Courthouse, Williams Lake.
(27) Glendale Hospital, Phase Vb, Victoria.
(28) Provincial Government Building, Phase III,
Duncan.
(29) Riverview Hospital, West Lawn Building, alterations, Essondale.
(30) Telephone Exchange, Willingdon Avenue, Burnaby.
(31) British Columbia Archives and Museum, Phas.
IVb, Victoria.
(1) Phase II renovations, 1019 Wharf Street, Victoria.
(2) British Columbia Archives and Museum, Phase
V, Victoria.
(3) Services Building, 547 Michigan Street, Victoria.
(4) Alterations and additions, Crease Clinic kitchen,
Riverview Hospital, Essondale.
(5) Revisions to Registry and reroofing, Vancouver
Courthouse.
(6) New ventilation systems, British Columbia Health
Insurance Building, 1450 Government Street,
Victoria.
(7) Roads and ancillary work, British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby.
(8) Glendale Hospital, Phase IVa, Victoria.
(9) Playing-fields and ancillary work, Jericho Hill
School, Vancouver.
(10) Phase II renovations, Centre Building, The
Woodlands School, New Westminster.
(11) Glendale Hospital, Phase Va, Victoria.
(12) Residential Care Centre for Children, Phase V
landscaping, Burnaby.
(13) British Columbia Vocational School, heavy duty
diesel mechanics workshop.
(14) Highways establishment, Vanderhoof.
(15) British Columbia Vocational School, Phase I, Industrial Instrumentation Laboratory, Burnaby.
(16) British Columbia Institute of Technology, landscaping Mechanical Building, Burnaby.
Major projects accepted as substantially complete during the fiscal period
include:—
(1) Terrace Vocational School, classrooms and workshops.
(2) British Columbia Institute of Technology, library,
playing-field, and track, Burnaby.
(3) Residential Care Centre for Youths, Phases IV
and V, Burnaby.
(4) British   Columbia   Museum   and   Archives,   Exhibit Block, Victoria.
(5) Dogwood Building, 1019 Wharf Street, Victoria.
(6) Motor-vehicle Inspection Station, Victoria.
(7) Services Building, Michigan Street, Victoria.
(8) Eric Martin Institute, Victoria.
(9) Government Office Building, Phase II, Duncan.
(10) Department of Mines Building, Charlie Lake.
(11) Tranquille   School,   alterations   to   laundry   and
dairy building, Kamloops.
(12) Sundry minor projects throughout the Province.
It is appropriate at this time to acknowledge the co-operation and help we
have received from the Capital Design staff.
Stanley Lloyd, M.R.A.I.C, A.R.I.B.A., Dip. Pub. Admin.,
Director of Construction and Maintenance.
 o
®
  Renovated Dogwood Building, reception area.
Renovated Dogwood Building, office area.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1968/69 D 21
THE TOTAL ENERGY CONCEPT
The definition of the term " total energy concept" has broadened in recent
times. The classic definition is that all energy requirement, electricity, heating, and
cooling, are met by one energy source. What might be called " partial " total energy
is an installation in which electricity is generated for either environmental comfort
or industrial processes, but some additional electricity must also be purchased.
Another definition shifts the emphasis from the end use to the supplying one.
This states that the energy available in the prime mover (either reciprocating engine
or turbine) is being fully utilized.
Generally speaking, the concept involves the use of a prime mover powered
by gas or oil to generate shaft horsepower and the recovery of the waste energy of
the products of combustion for the greatest possible use. What distinguishes a total
energy system from any other engine-drive system is heat recovery. In fact, some
engineers maintain that total energy systems are more accurately defined as energy
conservation systems, because that is essentially what they do.
Whatever the difference in defining total energy, the potential for the concept
is good, according to a study made by the Battille Memorial Institute in the United
States. The study indicated that there are some 72,000 future projects for which
total energy is feasible, forecasting through the year 1972. It does not include
industrial applications, which many claim is probably the best use.
A word of caution is needed. One engineer writes in a technical journal, " We
have been concerned about the number of uneconomical projects that have been
constructed for publicity purposes. They encourage people to think that there is
more opportunity than there really is. Total energy has a rather limited application, you must have the proper set of unique conditions to warrant its use."
This writer further points out that " Perhaps the major difficulty is that it is
extremely unfortunate to put in a total energy system where there is not an assured
continuity of service and care for the equipment." He visualizes a limitation on
the growth of total energy systems as more of a management and organization limitation rather than one of physical problems.
There have been numerous improvements in total energy plants in the last five
years, the most dramatic being the refinement of the gas turbine. Areas where further improvements are likely to occur are:—
(a) The safety devices on the prime mover, such as over-speed controllers,
low-oil pressure, high-temperature switches, low water-level switches.
These need to be more rugged and more simple, thus more easily serviced.
(b) Determining and controlling the flow of coolant in the ebullient system.
(c) Improvements to the heat-recovery system. Current heat-recovery apparatus is either a good muffler and a poor heat exchanger, or vice versa.
(d) The need for smaller packaged units rather than the custom design of the
larger plants.
Few engineering decisions are simple. In addition to the usual problems of
economically integrating a system, total energy systems impose upon the engineer
the further requirement of estimating the stability of the project and the accurate
predicting of the loads. Grossly oversized equipment that operates inefficiently will
surely turn out to be a burden to all concerned.
Nevertheless, despite the cautions indicated, the future of use of total energy
systems looks bright.
W. E. Mills, B.A.Sc, P.Eng., Dip. Pub. Admin.,
Senior Mechanical Engineer.
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 .,.■,..,•-■.
PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1968/69
D 23
REPORT OF THE CIVIL ENGINEER
This Department has always been a proponent of returning properly treated
sewage wastes to the land (see previous Public Works Reports). An interesting
and timely poem from the British magazine " Punch " is worth quoting.
Sewage, O why with rain dilute?
Your rain with sewage why pollute?
Each will the other spoil:
To mix them is the great mistake;
Your rain-fall to the river take,
Your sewage to the soil.
In modest tubes, not monstrous tunnels,
Collect your daily sewage runnels,
And on your meadows pour 'em.
Your rain-brooks, thus, you'll purify,
And then your rivers will supply
With needful streams to scour 'em.
So shall fat kine by thousands feed
On many a sewage-watered mead,
Whence fourfold crops will spring:
And from sleek farmers well content
Ten pound per acre extra rent,
Fields, thus manured, will bring.
Fat-kine, well-fed, mean milk and butter,
And beef and cheese—delusion utter
Such wealth to fling away!
Three millions sterling wherefore spend,
Into the German Sea to send
A thousand pounds a day?
Bazalgette and his Board of Works
Must be benighted as the Turks,
Of waste like this to think.
Besides, their tunnels, we all know,
On rainy days must overflow,
A nd make the river stink.
In no one project will you find
So many fallacies combined
As in this tunnel-scheme:
Its cost, immense: its profit, nil:
The sewage lost: the river still
A starved and stinking stream.
Rate-payers, up!   'Tis now or never;
" Sewage to soil and rain to river ":
Be this your battle-shout:
Be " Pipes and profit " your demand,
Not millions spent on tunnels grand,
To clean—your pockets out!
The above poem was published in Punch on August 14, 1858, and dealt with
public alarm over pollution in the Thames River. Due to an unusually hot season
the river sank to a very low level and, as all sewers emptied into it, an offensive
nuisance was created. As the weather grew warmer, alarm about the pollution
amounted to panic proportions and caused a Bill to be brought before Parliament.
Mr. Disraeli introduced this Bill before the House to authorize cleansing of the
Thames on the 15th of July, 1858. He said that after much deliberation the Government had come to the conclusion that the work must be met by local resources.
The Government proposed to enable the Metropolitan Board of Works to levy a
special rate of 3d. on the pound for 40 years. The Government proposed to guarantee the advances up to 3 million pounds at a rate of interest not exceeding 4 per
cent. Freedom would be granted to the Board as regards construction of the works,
and the whole were to be finished in five and one-half years.
It is hard to realize that, even with the growth of London's population, the
waters of the Thames are cleaner now than in 1858. It was stated in the papers
recently that a salmon was caught in the upper reaches of the river. This illustrates
that pollution can be cleaned up, if public opinion is aroused, and the taxpayers are
willing to pay.
J. R. Simpson, B.Sc, F.I.C.E., P.Eng., Dip. Pub. Admin.,
Senior Civil Engineer.
 D 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE ROLE OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS
For many years Departments of Public Works, Federal and Provincial, have
been performing a similar role. This has been relatively uncomplicated. In general, " Public Works " have been responsible for providing buildings and facilities
to enable the business of government to continue. These facilities may have been
in the form of Law Courts, administrative buildings, mental hospitals, gaols, and a
whole array of others. The Department of Public Works designed these and, after
occupancy, maintained them. It also became the housekeeper responsible for keeping them warm and clean.   This can be called the traditional role.
While the business of the Province was growing slowly, and while technological
advances were slow in being made, this role remained valid. With the growth of
the Province, and expanded advances in many fields, activities of each Government
department have become not only greater in scope but more complex. Technologies have advanced, methods have changed. Greater understanding of problems
involved has brought with it a new approach to programmes and treatments. All
this has inevitably affected architecture.
The all-too-familiar factor of inflation is apparent to all and needs no emphasis.
Cost escalation brings with it the need for more stringent cost control. While buildings must be adequate for the purpose to be met, they must not be over-designed
or over-built. Any unnecessary square footage is always to be avoided, but in these
expensive times it becomes of greater importance.
Similarly, materials and methods of construction need exhaustive study.
Materials are constantly undergoing change, with literally hundreds of new items
being marketed. Research is no longer a vague item for conversation, it is an urgent
necessity if the term " cost control " is to be meaningful.
It is now more than ever necessary for Public Works Design staff to understand in greater depth the purposes of their user-clients, the departments. This
makes it imperative for Design staff to spend considerably more time with the user
department and in doing research. The programming, planning, and budgeting
stage must be done well before the actual design stage is entered into. Research
is continuous. Without such an intensive study, the Treasury Board cannot truly
be said to be properly advised.
This Department of Public Works has recognized this trend and has trained,
and still is training, its more senior personnel in this administrative role. Naturally,
with the emphasis on programming and planning, there is less time available for pure
design work. There are two ways to deal with the situation. The first would be to
increase Design staff, the other to place more work with the private sector of the
architectural and engineering professions.
There is much to recommend the second course. To begin with, it is not easy,
in these prosperous times, to recruit and hold Design staff. Again, even if it were,
demands on their time would fluctuate. At times they would be too busy, at others
not busy enough. The private sector, having a much wider field, can adjust to these
fluctuations more readily. Further, as a matter of philosophy, it can be argued
that it is good to encourage economically healthy professions.
The Department of Public Works of this Province is not alone in being confronted with this changing role. A recent interprovincial conference of Deputy
Ministers of Public Works revealed that this subject was one of common interest.
It would appear, however, that we compare favourably on having recognized the
change and in meeting the new set of conditions.
J
 HERITAGE COURT
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PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1968/69 D 29
REPORT OF THE ELECTRICAL ENGINEER
The number of projects undertaken by the Electrical Engineering Division this
year continued to increase in number, size, and complexity. In addition, there was
a very significant increase in the number of projects produced by consulting electrical engineers. This has resulted in desirable and mutually beneficial associations,
and exchanges of information relating to designs, methods, and procedures.
A major upheaval occurred during the move of the Division from Vancouver
to Victoria. On completion, however, the benefits were immediately apparent.
Co-ordination of work with other Divisions at all working-levels became feasible
for the first time. The resulting increase in efficiency is most gratifying, although
still further improvement can be effected if and when all Divisions work in a single
building.
The demand for communications facilities continues to grow with the occupation of more Government buildings and rented premises. Additional personnel and
increasing use of the telephone place an ever-increasing load on equipment. Lines
and exchanges are being increased and modernized as funds permit. A major new
telephone project is the co-ordinated telephone exchange at the British Columbia
Institute of Technology, which will replace a number of obsolete or inefficient
exchanges in the area. The exchange in the Parliament Buildings has now been
increased to 11 positions, all continuously working during business hours. New
automatic exchanges have been installed at Oakalla and The Woodlands School,
replacing inefficient manual exchanges. Additional lines have been added to the
" Telpak " system of inter-city private lines, and provision is being made to establish
" Telpak " stations at additional locations.
Telephone operators are indispensable and vital individuals in the business and
Government environment, even where there is available the most modern and efficient of automatic exchanges. The Department is particularly fortunate in the
quality of the supervisors and operators who, without exception, are maintaining
their image of cheerful efficiency.
The provision of technical assistance and advice to the Director of Construction and Maintenance and his staff, including Superintendents of Works, Electrical
Foremen, and Project Inspectors, has continued as required.
A major innovation in the electrical design of new buildings has been the
inclusion of equipment to detect and, in some cases, to protect against ground faults.
In its smallest application this new equipment will protect one outlet, such as an
underwater light in a swimming-pool or fountain, and eliminate what in the past
has been a very serious hazard to life. In its larger applications, ground-fault protection is being used to increase both equipment and personnel safety. This is presently an optional improvement in system quality. It is reasonable to assume it will
soon be a code requirement.
Modern buildings are now incorporating a number of other new materials and
techniques, such as better electrical insulation; utilization of waste heat in the lighting systems; better control of heating, lighting, and power, using solid state techniques; larger capacity and smaller size protective devices, and many others. These
improve the quality of the systems, but also increase the cost in proportion to total
costs. It is, therefore, important to devise methods of reducing the expense of installation, and this will continue to be the subject of intensive study by this Division.
J. B. Hall, P.Eng., M.E.I.C,
Senior Electrical Engineer.
   D 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER, SAFETY
ENGINEERING SERVICES DIVISION
The extensive industrial growth in the Province is imposing ever-increasing
work loads on all our Branches.
In the case of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Branch, this increase also reflects
a further increase in annual reinspection of industrial power installations.
The extension of natural-gas service to North Central British Columbia from
Prince George to Prince Rupert has required an increase in inspection facilities.
The impact of the availability of this fuel will materially encourage further industrial
development.
The very extensive electric-power development and subsequent distribution is
making large blocks of power available to industry as well as to smaller users. Each
new installation, and there are many, is subject to inspection and approval by the
Electrical Branch prior to being energized. The extent of this activity comes into
clearer focus when it is realized that each new pulp-mill requires from 40,000 horsepower to 100,000 horsepower. The side effects of these large developments also
brings about many new consumers even, in some cases, completely new communities.
Our electrical staff is becoming too small to carry these duties efficiently, and some
effort should be made to realign districts and supplement the staff.
The policies under which this Division functions must be subject to constant
review. It seems to be indicated that further decentralization be undertaken. It is
possible that more efficient operation would result if it is proven to be economic
to do so.
Integration of our inspection services is proceeding. In this respect, a properly organized training plan would ultimately prove to be beneficial. Integration
should not only continue in the field, but integration of office administration should
also be pressed forward. Some degree of success in this field has been experienced
in the past year and continued efforts are being made to improve this function.
Our billing and accounting methods are under review, and it seems that it may
be advisable to use our automated facilities in Victoria for our annual renewals of
certificates and for annual fees.
Our staff are to be complimented for the dedicated service they have rendered,
and commend them to you in this respect.
Again, I wish to express my personal appreciation for your continuous support.
Respectfully submitted.
L. Robson, P.Eng.,
Chief Engineer.
 Installation of engine generator sets at new Hudson Bay store, Richmond.
This is an example of the new " total energy system " approach
to provide electricity, heat, refrigeration, and air conditioning.
Engine:  Fuel, natural gas, inspected by Gas Branch.
Heat Exchanger:  Steam and hot water, inspected by Boiler Branch.
Electric Generator:  Power and lighting, inspected by Electrical Branch.
A fully integrated design involving all three branches of this Division.
Lathe 52 inches x 18 inches, imported from lapan—another example of equipment
submitted for British Columbia approval by our Safety Engineering Division.
 D 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CHIEF INSPECTOR OF BOILERS
AND PRESSURE VESSELS
GENERAL
There has been a continuation of steady growth of industry throughout the
Province, which is reflected particularly in the pulp and paper industry.
Three new chemical-recovery boiler plants commenced operations in 1968.
The main features of the first steam plant consisted of the highest steam operating-
pressure in British Columbia, and equipped with the most up-to-date safety features
that modern technology can provide, including the first recovery unit in British
Columbia to be provided with an automatic blow-down device for use during an
emergency shut-down.
The most noteworthy item in the construction of the second recovery unit was
that practically all the components were manufactured in Japan. This unit also
features modern control devices, recommended by experts in the industry, in addition to the automatic blow-down device.
The third recovery unit is one of the largest on the North American Continent,
this unit is also fitted with fully modern controls, equipment, and devices.
Since World War II there has been a steady increase in the importation of
various components for steam-boilers and piping in general, from Europe and the
Orient, which has culminated with the manufacture of all the components for one
of the recovery boilers mentioned above being fabricated in Japan (under licence).
There is no doubt that this steady increase in the manufacture and export of these
components from Japan will increase, since all imports are of high quality, and they
are constructed in compliance with A.S.A. and A.S.M.E. standards.
The willingness of the Japanese manufacturers to comply with all standards
and regulations, together with the " drive " and capabilities of the manufacturers'
representatives, is most noticeable.
A district office for the Boiler Inspection Branch was opened in Nanaimo, and
has certainly proved a success in providing a much-improved service to the pulp-
mills located on the central and northern portions of Vancouver Island, also achieving a considerable saving in time and expense from the continual travelling to and
from Vancouver to these stated locations. At the present time serious consideration
is being given to opening a district office in the Terrace-Prince Rupert area in the
near future.
OPERATIONS
Generally, vocational training centres (welding) in Vancouver, Burnaby, Nanaimo, Prince George, Dawson Creek, and Kelowna have been extremely busy all
through the year, with the general influx of welders from Europe, occasionally the
mid-east, and the other Canadian Provinces. Some of these welders are sponsored
by Canada Manpower. This year, 2,805 welders were tested, compared to 2,633
during 1967/68. If there is no decrease in the steady growth of industry, and the
sponsorship by Canada Manpower continues, it is assumed that the number of
welders' tests will be steadily increased.
Up until this year, the number of operating engineers who have written examinations has steadily increased, but this year the total of all grades examined is 772,
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1968/69 D 35
a reduction of 99 compared to those examined in 1967/68.    Canada Manpower
also sponsors some operating engineer candidates.
Recovery Boilers Summary
During the year there were 24 emergency " shutdowns." All were executed
without appreciable damage to property, and without personal injury.
Proven emergency procedures are being followed in all recovery boiler plants
as a result of effective co-ordination and instruction. There were 17 other cases
where the boilers were taken out of service because of early detection of minor
defects.
Some changes in the scope of activities and the purpose for the " Black Liquor
Advisory Committee for British Columbia " are becoming necessary now that the
first phase of the need for the committee has been almost completed.
GENERAL HIGHLIGHTS
British Columbia has the first power-boiler equipment with digital computerized controls, which would bring the boiler into service by pushing one button.
These developments will have far-reaching effects in the training requirements and
the qualifications for operating personnel, and hence the Boiler and Pressure Vessel
Branch and vocational training centres.
Quality control of welding during fabrication of and also during repairs to
various boilers was a major problem all year. Radiography and other non-destructive testing means were used increasingly throughout, where employed, many hazards
were eliminated which otherwise would have gone undetected until failure occurred.
There appears to be an ever-increasing need for some form of calculator for the
use of the Design Survey Section. This problem was considered some years ago
but was discarded. Again this problem has arisen. There is no doubt that, with
the assistance of such a technical aid, the Design office personnel would be able to
absorb a greater work load more efficiently.
ACCIDENTS
There were no fatal accidents during the year.
On May 3, 1968, there was a most unusual accident, a portable compressed-
air vessel, size 6%-inch diameter by 19%-inch O.A., was located in the owner's
car when the explosion occurred. The vessel ruptured into two pieces and caused
extensive damage to the car trunk, one piece being blown through the side of the
car trunk and striking a retaining-wall.
This vessel was charged to approximately 1,200 p.s.i. and had been at this
pressure for some months. An examination of the vessel revealed considerable
internal corrosion, in some places a reduction of 50 per cent of the original vessel
wall thickness of 0.136 inch was noted.
It is feasible that the unusual atmospheric temperature for an afternoon in
May was sufficient to increase the internal pressure of this vessel (particularly due
to its location) until the bursting point of the thinned areas was reached.
Coloured photographs and copies of our report on this accident were mailed
to all scuba-diving testing centres. Intensive internal and external inspection, dry-
air charging, and hydrostatic testing every five years will be performed by these
testing centres.
S. Smith, P.Eng.,
Chief Inspector.
—
 Radial drill-press imported from lapan for use at
Skookumchuck Pulp Mill. Example of equipment
submitted for British Columbia approval by Electrical Branch.
Pulp-drier imported from lapan for Skookumchuck Pulp Mill, note multiple electric drives,
approval by Electrical and Steam Boiler Branches.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1968/69
D 37
REPORT OF THE  INSPECTOR OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY
ADVISORY BOARD FOR QUALIFICATION OF ELECTRICAL
CONTRACTORS
As a result of amendments to the Regulations Governing Certificates of Competency for Electrical Contractors, passed by Order in Council in August, 1968, a
new Advisory Board for Qualification of Electrical Contractors was appointed to
replace the Board of Examiners for Electrical Contractors. The new Board comprises:—
G. A. Harrower, Chief Inspector of Electrical Energy, Chairman.
J. Smith, Inspector of Electrical Energy, Vice-Chairman.
G. W. Brand, City Electrical Inspector.
L. Bemister, representing Vancouver Electrical Association.
D. H. Topp, representing the Electrical Contractors Association of British
Columbia.
R. Bartholomew, professional engineer.
The first meeting of the new Board was held at 501 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, on February 19, 1969.
During the calendar year of 1968, certificates of competency were issued in
the numbers following:—
Class A	
  233
Class PA	
Class PB	
Class PC
  102
Class B	
  431
  225
Class C
  454
Class TC	
  278
  1
1967.
Total, 1,724
The total of 1,724 represents a 4Vi per cent increase over the calendar year
EXAMINATIONS FOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
During the fiscal year 1968/69, 370 candidates for certificates of competency
wrote examinations as follows:
Class A
Pass
     41
Class B      67
Class C     99
Fail
40
71
52
Sub-totals
207
Total, 370
163
PERMITS
During the fiscal year 1968/69 the total number of permits issued was as
follows:—
Residential  44,262
Non-residential   10,787
Total
55,049
This represents a slight decrease of 4.3 per cent from the previous fiscal year.
 D 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Despite the decrease in the Province-wide total, the activity in the Lower Mainland area remains at a substantially higher level than for the rest of the Province,
and it is hoped that at least one new Inspector can be appointed to the staff to take
care of this increased activity.
DISTRICT OFFICERS AND INSPECTIONS
In October, 1968, it was decided to open a new district office at Terrace. Up
until the end of the fiscal year it had not been possible to find a suitable appointee
to this office.
The number of inspections carried out during the fiscal year in each district is
listed below:
Office Inspections
Abbotsford  3,019
Alberni  2,009
Campbell River  1,985
Chilliwack   2,518
Clinton   1,608
Courtenay   2,179
Cranbrook   1,713
Dawson Creek   1,332
Duncan   2,348
Fort St. lohn  1,523
Kamloops   1,744
Kelowna   2,888
Delta-Langley   3,651
Nanaimo  2,620
Nelson    1,816
Installations
Approved
without
Inspection
645
480
41
352
568
385
20
35
503
15
713
523
922
1,037
18
Office Inspections
New Westminster      3,329
Penticton     2,744
Powell River     1,412
Prince George      5,299
Prince Rupert     1,322
Quesnel       2,053
Richmond      4,262
Salmon Arm      2,173
Smithers      1,734
Trail      1,083
Victoria     6,343
Sub-totals   64,707
Grand total, 74,171
Installations
Approved
without
Inspection
833
250
214
133
262
167
306
85
957
9,464
APPROVAL OF EQUIPMENT
A further increase was recorded this year in the number of applications for
approval of electrical equipment not listed by a recognized laboratory service. The
number this year was 895, 8.9 per cent over 1967/68 and 58 per cent over the
year 1966/67.
An arrangement with the C.S.A. Testing Laboratories has been concluded
which will permit the diversion to C.S.A. of a substantial portion of this approvals
work, and it is hoped that this plan will go into operation shortly.
PLANS INSPECTION
The plans inspection service examined a total of 3,330 drawings, representing
718 separate projects, of these, 132 projects remained pending at the end of the
fiscal year. Authorization has been received for the appointment of another staff
member to Vancouver office staff, which it is hoped will permit us to maintain the
plans inspection service on a current basis.
CANADIAN STANDARDS ASSOCIATION
The Chief Inspector attended meetings of the Approvals Council (Electrical)
and of the Committee on Canadian Electrical Code Part I at St. John's Newfoundland, in June, and at Toronto, in November. At the latter meeting it was decided
that C.S.A. should issue a tenth edition of the Canadian Electrical Code for use by
the electrical trades.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1968/69
PROJECTIONISTS
D 39
During the fiscal year, the Branch assisted the Fire Marshal in conducting
examinations of 18 candidates for projectionists' licences. Of the 18 candidates,
14 were first class, of whom 7 passed and 7 failed; 4 were second class, of whom
1 passed and 3 failed.
MAINTENANCE ELECTRICIANS
At the request of the Department of Highways, the Branch conducted examinations of 15 candidates for appointment as maintenance electricians, of these, 7
passed, 8 failed, and the results of all examinations were transmitted to the Department of Highways.
OVERHEAD ELECTRIC-LINE CONSTRUCTION
During the fiscal year, the Branch checked 1,337 applications for permits to
erect or add to pole-lines on Crown land or Provincial highways. In addition, 97
applications to install television cables on power pole-lines were processed, an increase of 8.1 per cent over the previous year.
ACCIDENTS
A total of 88 incidents alleged to have been caused by electrical equipment
were investigated during the fiscal year. Nine fatalities, 10 non-fatal injuries, and
69 fires resulted from these incidents.
Of the incidents involving fires, 6 were reported by our Inspectors to be not
of electrical origin, 16 others were doubtful.
One of the fatal incidents involved a cow electrocuted when a worn cab-tire
cable contacted metal work of her stall. One involved a defective guitar (electrical),
one adult and three children died in three fires, two of which were declared to be
non-electrical. The remaining three involved experienced electrical workers, two
of whom died in contact accidents and one of whom was killed by a falling pole.
PROVINCIAL CODE COMMITTEE
The British Columbia Provincial Committee of Canadian Electrical Code Part
I, under the chairmanship of the Chief Electrical Inspector, has held five meetings
since it was reactivated in January, 1968. The results of these meetings have been
highly gratifying, since many of the recommendations of the committee have been
acted upon by the C.S.A. Committee on Canadian Electrical Code Part I, resulting
in changes in the Code rules.
CHIEF INSPECTORS' CODE INTERPRETATION COMMITTEE
A new committee was formed in 1968 for the purpose of promoting uniformity
of application of electrical regulations under the Act. The committee held six meetings during the fiscal year, and the improvement in uniformity or rule interpretations
has been gratifying.
I trust that the foregoing information relative to Branch activities will be of
value to you in making your report.
G. A. Harrower, P.Eng.,
Chief Electrical Inspector.
 GLASS  BLOWING
Glass blowing operation at Simon Fraser
versity Glass Blowing Department. Most 1
ratory glass tubing and receptacles for rese
and testing formed and fitted on site. He
applied from natural gas supply. An exa;
of a commercial gas installation subject t(
spection and approval by Gas Inspection Br;
End view of picture above, showing a glass pipe
of about 7 inches or 8 inches diameter and about
24 inches to 30 inches in length being expanded in
length and diameter for make up into a research
life vessel.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1968/69
D 41
REPORT OF THE CHIEF GAS INSPECTOR
r>
THE ACT
No amendments were made to the Gas Act or pursuant regulations.
THE BRANCH
The Gas Inspection services were extended into the following communities:
Vanderhoof, Smithers, Fraser Lake, Houston, Princeton, Prince Rupert, Burns Lake,
Midway, District of Terrace, District of Kitimat, Endako, Elko, Naramata, West-
bank, and Skookumchuck.
The prospects for the coming year are very bright. Undoubtedly, a new record
volume of gas will be consumed in the year 1969/70. Every year for the past 13
years the gas industry has achieved new records.
In the coming year, Pacific Northern Gas Company will be installing distribution-lines in Fort St. James.
Inland Natural Gas Company Limited will be extending into Clinton and
Lumby.
Columbia Natural Gas Company will be servicing Sparwood, Natal, and Michel.
All the gas utilities will be greatly extending their distribution systems.
Night schools for Grade I gas-fitters were held in Vancouver, Burnaby, Prince
George, and Abbotsford.
A short course for Grade I gas-fitters was given in Vanderhoof, Burns Lake,
Smithers, Terrace, and Prince Rupert.
Night schools for Grade II gas-fitters were held in Burnaby and Prince George.
ACCIDENTS
There were 21 incidents investigated by this Branch. One incident was investigated at the request of the Fire Marshal, where propane gas was involved. Another
incident was investigated at the request of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and
the cause of death was found to be carbon monoxide gas produced by a gasoline
engine. The other 19 incidents involved fires or accidents on premises served by
natural gas. Of these, nine incidents were not caused by natural gas. The remainder were of a minor nature. There were no fatalities caused by natural gas during
the year.
SUMMARY OF WORK
I
1968/69            1967/68
\
1966/67
1,494
1,210
948
1,719
622
606
236
70
120
6,866
14,393
1,345
1,180
862
1,516
537
596
152
73
151
8,527
14,443
1,289
w
1,057
§
898
1,496
1
521
f.
536
1
183
I
t
I
Gas-fitters' re-examinations    ,
Number of gas-fitters passed examinations   -	
Number of gas permits issued, municipalities    _	
Number of gas permits issued by this Branch	
61
167
9,479
13,943
\
A.
G. Kanee
N, P.Eng.,
Chief Insp
ector.
 D 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF EXPENDITURE
The following pages present in detail the expenditures relating to the construction, alterations, and repairs on the various Government buildings and institutions,
etc., coming under the management, charge, and direction of the Minister of
Public Works.
A. E. Rhodes,
Comptroller of Expenditure.
STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES, FISCAL YEAR 1968/69
ADMINISTRATION AND MAINTENANCE VOTES
(For details see Public Accounts.)
Vote 273—Minister's Office 	
Vote 274—General Administration 	
Vote 275—Government Buildings (Maintenance)
Vote 277—Rentals 	
Vote 278—Safety Inspection Division, Vancouver
  $28,381.38
  276,094.00
.(Gross) 11,187,918.95
(Gross) 1,965,618.93
  908,027.72
$14,366,040.98
Less credits—
Items recovered from the Department of Education re Technical and
Vocational Schools (Government Building Vote)        1,229,174.44
Items recovered re Vocational Training, Energy Board, etc. (Rental
Vote)   	
275,912.39
$12,860,954.15
CAPITAL
Vote 276—Construction  of  Provincial  Buildings   (see  expenditure  by  building)    (Gross)  $16,052,111.18
Less credits—
Items recovered from the Department of Education re Technical and
Vocational Schools 	
3,318,957.73
$12,733,153.45
SUMMARY
Gross expenditure, Department of Public Works—
Administration and maintenance	
Capital 	
Less credits—
Maintenance
Capital 	
Net expenditure
$14,366,040.98
16,052,111.18
$30,418,152.16
1,505,086.83
3,318,957.73
$25,594,107.60
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1968/69
D 43
-1
Project No.
599-B
599-B-l
242-B-4
612-B
631-B
30-B-4
421-B
421-B-l
539-B
636-B
645-B
495-B
548-B
6-B-34
235-B-l
25-B-13
468-B-l
619-B
482-B
289-B
289-B-
626-B
384-B
644-B
499-B
79-B-10
79-B-13
637-B
541-B
623-B
640-B
615-B
613-B
642-B
519-B
39-B-18
39-B-62
39-B-65
39-B-70
39-B-71
39-B-73
39-B-74
31-B-9
544-B
470-B
479-B
628-B
614-B
611-B
5-B-102
5-B-116
5-B-119
VOTE 276—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS
Description
Alouette River Unit—
Sewage-disposal system 	
Haney kitchen stores building 	
Abbotsford—
Brooder-house,  Random  Sample Poultry-testing Station ..
Purchase of property
Fraser Valley Trout Hatchery 	
Brannan Lake School Special Unit	
Bull River Fish Hatchery 	
Aeration tower and pumps 	
Burnaby—
Residential Care Centre for Children 	
Dairy laboratory 	
Telephone exchange, Willingdon Avenue 	
Cedarvale—ferryman's residence 	
Charlie Lake—alterations to Department of Mines building ....
Colony Farm—repairs to piggery 	
Dawson Creek Public Library Commission—garage extension
Dellview Hospital—roads, paths, and drainage 	
Duncan Courthouse 	
Fernie—Government Agent's residence
Expenditure
$1,043.49
65,445.50
136,890.45
15,652.50
20,814.82
169,319.87
8,646.18
61,254.69
Fort Nelson—Government Office Building and residence	
General Expenses 	
Wages and expenses (Casual Design staff) 	
Grand Forks Courthouse—heating system 	
Grounds improvement—various Government buildings 	
High Arrow Dam—purchase of repair garage	
Hutda Lake (Men's Camp)—prefabricated building for use as correctional institution 	
lericho Hill School—
Dormitory unit and development 	
Playing-fields and ancillary work 	
Kamloops—weigh-scale	
Kootenay Base Camp (Salmo-Creston Summit) 	
Lytton—ferryman's house 	
Maillardville—purchase of property and renovations 	
Nanaimo area—structural alterations  .	
1,169
30
4.
2
59.
10.
3.
5.
315.
1.
9.
128,
569.
24.
46.
26.
Nelson—purchase of property and moving Highways residences	
Nelson—purchase of property 	
New Denver—dormitory alterations 	
Oakalla—
Security fence 	
Roads 	
Renovations to kitchen 	
Central Classification Section—alterations and improvements
Piggery and cooker 	
Security  	
Tailor shop and root-house 	
Pearson TB. Hospital—modifications 	
Port Hardy—Department of Health Staff, prefabricated house	
Prince George—
Addition to Men's Gaol 	
Structural alterations 	
Prince Rupert—wiring Courthouse
Region No. 4—fencing Highways yards	
Richmond—purchase of property (Motor-vehicle Inspection Station)
Riverview—
Alterations and renovations to kitchen and staff rooms, dining-
room areas 	
Landscaping roads, parking, etc. 	
Garbage-handling incinerator	
970.13
537.50
358.18
,124.88
,355.85
951.39
612.00
000.00
498.28
597.05
530.44
629.58
588.39
399.62
556.78
250.00
24,465.16
16,710.26
139,674.86
15,020.78
3,121.62
15,241.19
201,580.80
20,387.65
11,047.96
11,500.00
53,861.19
5,000.00
5,000.00
4,985.20
8,035.31
9,029.86
28,610.04
15,000.00
20,001.65
1,335.00
5,917.55
24,260.14
7,797.99
21,475.21
55,191.77
15,219.80
20,566.09
21,935.04
 D 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOTE 276—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project No.
5-B-121
5-B-133
5-B-134
5-B-135
5-B-136
5-B-137
24-B-9
24-B-10
24-B-12
635-B   •
506-B
553-B
10-B-12
10-B-49
10-B-54
10-B-56
10-B-57
10-B-58
476-B
408-B
610-B
546-B
546-B-l
605-B
502-B
604-B
617-B
292-B
385-B
464-B
486-B
487-B
492-B
518-B
536-B
550-B
552-B
554-B
601-B-2
627-B
629-B
630-B
607-B
607-B-l
7-B-40
7-B-46
7-B-48
7-B-49
7-B-50
7-B-51
7-B-52
7-B-53
7-B-54
Description
Riverview—continued
Structural alterations 	
Admitting Suite, Centre Lawn Building
Renovation of fire-alarm system
New mattress-sterilizer building and equipment 	
Transformers and main switch panels, East Lawn Building
Valleyview Hospital—ventilation and electrical systems	
Skeenaview Hospital—■
Sanitary sewerage	
Alterations and renovation 	
Wiring  	
Slim Creek—maintenance depot 	
Stewart—Highways residence	
Terrace—weigh-scale station	
Tranquille—
Water supply and sewage disposal	
Playground 	
Dairy building 	
Structural alterations	
Renovation of fire-alarm system
Laundry extension 	
Vancouver Island Gaol (Saltair) 	
Vancouver—
Structural alterations 	
Vancouver Courthouse, new courtroom facilities
Willow Chest Centre, alterations ...
West elevator replacement
411 Dunsmuir Street, exterior renovation
Vanderhoof—Highways maintenance establishment
Vernon Courthouse—
Purchase and demolition of property	
Elevator and alterations 	
Victoria—■
Structural alterations 	
Parking facilities (Parliament Buildings) 	
Eric Martin Institute (mental hospital, Lee Avenue) 	
British Columbia Museum and Archives Building	
Acquisition of property (Parliament Buildings Precinct) ...
Data Processing Centre (Motor-vehicle Building) 	
Dogwood Building, 1019 Wharf Street 	
New electrical distribution system (Parliament Buildings)
Motor-vehicle Testing-station 	
Windermere Building 	
Glendale School	
Roof repair to hangars (Victoria International Airport)
Services Building, 547 Michigan Street
Roofing and Parapets (Windermere Building)
New ventilation systems (B.C.H.I. Building)
Salary increases (general) 	
Williams Lake—
Purchase of property 	
Courthouse 	
Woodlands—
Landscaping, fencing and paving, etc. 	
Structural  alterations  	
.(Credit)
Renovations (Centre Building)
Industrial Therapy Unit 	
Renovations (boiler plant)
Renovation (fire-alarm system)
Dumb-waiter (Cedar Cottage)  .
Telephone cables
Garbage-handling facilities
Expenditure
$53,537.85
38,612.74
3,121.64
2,776.21
3,159.72
107,371.15
4,411.33
15,698.71
4,843.63
38,776.86
1,447.05
3,087.43
4,995.69
9,992.42
130,260.05
49,996.83
11,163.12
24,182.48
422.68
49,979.00
205,724.26
2,545.27
341.08
24,388.80
291,269.23
2,204.76
42,207.11
95,251.64
23,206.02
2,568,114.55
2,493,853.55
31,473.56
22,207.89
472,177.31
92,621.25
198,890.58
20,000.00
821,277.08
25,192.80
68,339.86
3,319.50
116,977.32
840.00
11,300.00
46,955.64
2,593.73
8,475.10
443,252.32
9,817.36
191,197.84
3,402.00
6,145.00
1,373.61
18,123.36
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1968/69
D 45
VOTE 276—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project No.
401-B-l
401-B-2
401-B-3
401-B-4
401-B-6
401-B-7
401-B-9
401-B-10
507-B
481-B
481-B-2
231-B-5
231-B-6
312-B-l
407-B
633-B
229-B-4
299-B-5
79-B-14
412-B-l
Description
Vocational Schools—
British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby—
Addition   	
Library
Extension to the Mechanical Building
Alterations to (1962) Building	
Playing-field and track 	
Roads and ancillary site work	
Addition to Food Training Centre
Greenhouse and animal-holding building
Burnaby Vocational Teacher College	
Dawson Creek Vocational School 	
Auto Body Shop, Welding Shop, and Teaching Farm
Nanaimo Vocational School—
Relocation of huts 	
Purchase of property
Prince George Vocational School—Sawmill Building and conversion of existing classrooms 	
Terrace Vocational School	
Victoria Vocational School Workshop Complex, Phase I	
British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby—
Industrial Laboratory, Phase I 	
Heavy Duty Diesel Mechanics Workshop 	
lericho Hill School—vocational classrooms 	
British Columbia Vocational School, Kelowna—alterations to
Workshop No. 1, Administration Building, and new storage
building  	
Expenditure
$95,715.79
713,990.29
18,723.35
34,881.10
13,440.07
240,307.45
188,149.71
20,610.86
45,378.38
7,650.43
116,754.25
938.12
2,500.00
125,212.59
755,087.42
860,221.38
86,586.15
74,375.47
17,099.77
44,272.94
$16,052,111.18
 /
D 46                                                   BRITISH COLUMBIA
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED
FOR BUILDINGS
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
Services Building, 547 Michigan Street, Victoria:
Bird Construction Co. Ltd ._  	
Herb Bate Ltd  	
$63,546.00
56,264.00
66,603.00
60,534.00
56,994.00
64,834.00
62,635.00
61,342.00
58,800.00
59,315.00
6,908.00
6,421.00
5,926.00
6,546.00
6,649.00
17,997.00
16,695.00
17,725.00
16,950.00
16,790.00
17,590.00
21,649.00
15,209.00
22,034.00
19,550.00
21,396.00
20,970.00
17,915.00
9,987.00
9,220.00
67,451.00
61,386.00
67,300.00
73,135.00
66,665.00
8,010.00
23,360.00
18,130.00
9,125.00
11,848.00
31,325.00
103,148.00
99,972.00
44,500.00
45,720.00
47,500.00
42,381.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Burns & Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd  	
W. Campbell Ltd 	
M. P. Paine	
T. Lambie & Son Ltd	
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd _	
C.N.I.B. Stand, Parliament Buildings, Victoria:
Williams Bray & Williams Ltd	
T. Lambie & Son Ltd	
W. Campbell Ltd	
Ferryman's Residence, Lytton:
Burdett Construction Co. Ltd _ 	
Foster Wightman  	
William Construction Ltd	
Pine Tree Construction Co. Ltd	
Mike Wiznowick (Mike's Construction)	
Alterations and Additions to Crease Clinic Kitchen, Riverview Hospital,
Essondale:
Royal City Construction Co. Ltd	
Burdett Construction Co. Ltd	
Hodgson, King, & Marble Ltd	
Seaward Construction Co. Ltd 	
Sunscreens, Courthouse, Nanaimo:
Columbia Manufacturing Co. Ltd	
Revisions to Registry and Reroofing Vancouver Courthouse, Vancouver:
A. W. Gillis Ltd  	
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd	
Elevators, British Columbia Archives and Museum, Victoria, Phase V:
Dover Corp. (Canada) Ltd., Turnbull Elevator Division	
Otis Elevator Co. Ltd	
Montgomery Elevator Co. Ltd. 	
Access Doors for Gang Locking, Main Building, Oakalla Prison Farm,
Burnaby:
Brittain Steel Ltd  	
Kay-Son Steel Fabricators & Erectors Ltd   	
Inlet Metal & Machining Co. Ltd 	
New Ventilation Systems, British Columbia Health Insurance Building, 1450
Government Street, Victoria:
E. J. Hunter & Sons Ltd	
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd 	
Steam   Generator,   Boiler-plant  Renovations,   The   Woodlands  School,   New
Westminster, Phase III:
Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd.	
Foster Wheeler Ltd	
 i
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h
 D 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
Renewal of Heating System, Courthouse, Grand Forks:
$21,902.00
25,248.00
24,972.00
20,750.00
22,344.00
26,650.00
20,917.00
14,995.00
12,165.00
13,266.00
12,880.00
13,245.00
15,939.00
13,114.00
8,813.00
13,329.00
28,028.00
26,535.00
213,099.00
261,127.00
209,800.00
249,028.00
69,890.00
75,870.00
72,207.00
1,196,427.00
1,205,000.00
1,178,796.00
1,239,220.00
1,218,600.00
23,289.64
25,388.40
27,313.00
24,272.83
28,750.94
22,654.00
24,900.00
18,600.00
18,950.00
18,731.00
23,550.00
19,529.00
157,880.00
158,000.00
143,317.00
58,400.00
47,300.00
43,163.00
Awarded.
fe
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
A # A pinmhing fy f(f artng T trl.
Renovations to Fifth Floor, Weiler Building, Broughton Street, Victoria:
H  K   Fowler A Sons ltd,
E. J. Hunter & Sons Ltd. 	
M   P. Paine Cn.
Industrial Instrumentation Laboratory, British Columbia Vocational School,
Burnaby, Phase I (a Federal-Provincial Project):
Welding Shop, British Columbia Vocational School, Dawson Creek (a Federal-Provincial Project):
Steel-Bilt Industries Ltd	
Steel Decking, British Columbia Archives and Museum, Victoria, Phase V:
Westeel Rosco Ltd  	
Roads and Ancillary Site Works, British Columbia Institute of Technology,
Burnaby:
Alterations to Vancouver Courthouse, Vancouver, Phase V:
-
Renovations to Steam-boiler Plant, The Woodlands School, New Westminster,
Phase --.-B.Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd   	
Glendale Hospital, Victoria, Phase IVA:
C J. Oliver Ltd.—                 	
Burns & Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd   	
E. J. Hunter & Sons Ltd	
Landscaping and Irrigation, Motor-vehicle Testing-station, Victoria:
A. C. McEachern Ltd.               	
O.K. Trucking Co. Ltd.               _.     	
Renovations to Health Engineering Offices, 818 Yates Street, Victoria:
Bird Construction Co. Ltd   —	
J. Bobiak Construction Co. Ltd.                                                 ....   	
H. E. Fowler & Sons Ltd 	
T. Lambie & Son Ltd _	
Farmer Construction Co. Ltd — .
Williams Bray 8c Williams Ltd   _ 	
Sawmill Building and Conversion of Existing Classrooms, British Columbia
Vocational School, Prince George:
Smith Bros. 8c Wilson Ltd.            	
Heavy Duty Mechanics Workshop, British Columbia Vocational School,
Burnaby:
Steel-Bilt Industries Ltd  	
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1968/69 D 49
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
Playing-field and Ancillary Work, Jericho Hill School, Vancouver:
E. H. Shockley <S; Sons Ltd  	
Doyle Construction Co. Ltd 	
Ratcliffe & Sons Construction Ltd 	
Johnson Trucking Ltd	
A. C. McEachem Ltd 	
Standard General Construction (International) Ltd	
Glendale Hospital, Victoria (Foundations), Phase Va:
Pacific Piledriving Co. Ltd 	
C. J. Oliver Ltd      	
Wakeman & Trimble Contractors Ltd.—  	
Burns & Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd      _ 	
G. H. WheatonLtd     _	
Farmer Construction Ltd  	
Renovations to Central Building, The Woodlands School, New Westminster,
Phase II:
Seaward Construction Ltd.    	
Armstrong & Monteeth Construction Co. Ltd  	
Bird Construction Co. Ltd    __	
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd—  	
Western Building Ltd 	
Ratcliffe & Sons Construction Co. Ltd.  	
Concrete Topping Slabs, British Columbia Archives and Museum, Victoria,
Phase V:
R. S. Reynolds Concrete Ltd	
Burns 8c Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd	
Economy Cement Ltd. 	
Multi-tier Library Shelving, British Columbia Archives and Museum, Victoria,
Phase V:
Western Shelving Ltd	
Shanahan's Ltd.. 	
Steel Equipment (a division of Eddy Match Co. Ltd.) -	
Sunshine Office Equipment Ltd  	
New  Auxiliary  Boiler,  British   Columbia  Archives  and  Museum,   Victoria,
Phase IVa:
Blake's Plumbing & Heating Ltd   	
M. Griffin Ltd _   	
Residential Care Centre for Children, Burnaby, Landscaping, Phase V:
A. C. McEachern Ltd    	
Bert Murray Landscaping Ltd— —   	
Johnson's Trucking Ltd     	
Holland Landscapers Ltd 	
Highways Establishment, Vanderhoof:
Seaward Construction Ltd  —	
Basarab Construction Co. Ltd —    	
North Country Construction Co. Ltd     	
Dezell Construction Co. Ltd 	
Burns 8c Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd 	
Jericho Hill School, Vancouver, Alterations to Basement of MacDonald Hall
and Tyler Building:
Timm Construction Co. Ltd   —
Highland Construction Ltd 	
Gadicke Construction Co. Ltd  	
Kelsey Construction Co. Ltd  	
Doyle Construction Co. Ltd    	
Sprayed  Fireproofing,   British   Columbia   Archives   and  Museum,   Victoria,
Phase K.Gallagher Bros. Contracting Ltd	
Brown & McLennan Plastering 8c Stucco Contractors..-	
Frank G. Browne   	
Chalifour Bros. Construction Ltd. 	
David M. Skrypmyk _ —
Landscaping   between  Mechanical  Building  and  Library,  British   Columbia
Institute of Technology, Burnaby:
A. C. McEachern Ltd	
Jensen & Johnson Landscape Contractors Ltd.	
Ratcliffe & Sons Construction Ltd.- 	
Brooder-house No. 2, Random Sample Poultry-testing Station, Abbotsford:
Burns & Dutton Construction Ltd   	
R. A. Adair Construction Ltd 	
Western Building Ltd _    ;  	
Burdett Construction Co. Ltd _. _   	
Brockland & Hemmingway Ltd  	
$195,279.00
171,688.00
187,871.00
196,000.00
175,697.00
197,991.00
162,920.00
149,927.80
149,277.00
147,570.00
155,070.00
133,595.70
I
| Awarded.
Awarded.
603,904.00
562,176.00
558,778.00
594,484.00
638,000.00
514,510.77
Awarded.
27,913.00
11,750.00      Awarded.
18,500.00    I
103,682.65
77,897.00
93,408.00    |
73,422.72    [ Awarded.
25,763.00
25,800.00
92,965.30
107,900.00
86,823.00
108,625.00
441,818.00
397,000.00
378,581.00
378,296.00
392,000.00
17,533.00
22,000.00
19,878.00
20,385.00
21,466.00
28,800.00
45,963.00
28,568.00
41,903.00
47,732.00
32,972.45
36,429.00
43,875.00
171,000.00
177,736.00
168,000.00
169,955.00
173,500.00
I
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
 D 50                                                   BRITISH COLUMBIA
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
Dawson Creek Vocational Farm School, Earth-fill Dam and Appurtenances,
Dawson Creek:
$40,880.00
188,500.00
177,907.00
156,900.00
174,980.00
174,648.00
176,452.00
2,330,000.00
2,285,000.00
2,424,104.00
2,473,219.00
2,370,606.00
2,321,000.00
64,950.00
54,240.00
17,096.00
12,090.00
14,700.00
16,198.00
13,278.00
13,918.00
14,000.00
20,519.00
27,646.40
40,909.00
21,882.00
37,666.00
35,710.00
27,511.00
44,372.00
34,985.00
23,230.00
22,566.00
32,912.00
20,785.00
21,600.00
23,189.00
22,400.00
339,404.00
338,600.00
331,599.00
349,000.00
12,519.00
13,910.00
11,144.00
19,185.00
24,420.00
25,935.00
Not awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Special Unit, Brannan Lake School, Wellington:
A & B Construction Co. Ltd _     __
Burdett Construction Co. Ltd  	
British Columbia Vocational School,  Victoria (a Federal-Provincial Project),
Phase I:
G. H. Wheaton Ltd. __ 	
C. J. Oliver Ltd 	
Burns & Dutton Construction Ltd.   	
Instructional Communication Laboratory, British Columbia Institute of Technology Library, Burnaby:
British Columbia Vocational School, Dawson Creek, Phase II:
Renovations to Motor-vehicle Offices, 623 West Boulevard, Vancouver:
Gadicke Construction Co. Ltd.. .	
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd   	
Rock Garden, British Columbia Archives and Museum, Victoria:
Burns & Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd.	
T. Lambie & Son Ltd.        	
Hutda Lake Sewage Lagoons, Prince George:
Firefighting System, Youth Centre, New Denver:
Renewal of West Elevator, Willow Chest Centre, Vancouver:
Kootenay Pass Highways Storage Building, Salmo-Creston:
Heavy Duty Diesel Mechanics Workshop, British Columbia Vocational School,
Burnaby, Phase II:
Addition to Food Training Centre, British Columbia Institute of Technology,
Burnaby:
E. H. Shockley & Son Ltd _            .         . 	
Instrumentation and Power Laboratories, British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby:
British Columbia Vocational School, Dawson Creek:
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1968/69 D 51
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Remarks
Materials Technology Laboratory, Vocational Teachers College, Burnaby:
A. W. Gillis Ltd   	
Kelsey Construction Ltd 	
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd    — 	
Burdett Construction Co. Ltd _, -    	
Renovations to Steam-boiler Plant, The Woodlands School, New Westminster,
Phase IIIc:
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd —- -
Mainland Construction Co. Ltd —
British Columbia  Vocational School,  Kelowna, Site Preloading  (a Federal-
Provincial Project):
Midvalley Construction Ltd  	
W. C. Arnett & Co. Ltd _    	
Serwa Bulldozing Co. Ltd....  	
Aeration Tower, Kootenay Trout Hatchery, Bull River:
Granley Installation Ltd     —
E. H. Shockley & Son Ltd—   - 	
A. E. Jones Co. Ltd 	
Russ Reid Ltd   —   —
Weigh-scale Station, Kamloops:
Max Daburger Contracting Ltd  	
McGregor Construction Ltd   	
Turner Construction Co. Ltd 	
Bud Hannis Ltd   —	
R. Marini 8c Sons Ltd —     —.
Greenhouse and Animal-holding Building, British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby (a Federal-Provincial Project):
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd   	
Brockbank & Hemmingway Ltd  	
Gadicke Construction Co. Ltd —	
A. W. Gillis Ltd  	
Laundry Equipment, Glendale Hospital, Victoria:
Neifer Installations Ltd  	
Nicholson 8c Creasy Ltd 	
B.C. Laundry Equipment Ltd 	
Stanley Brock Ltd	
Renovations lo Motor-vehicle Offices, 2410 Nanaimo Street, Vancouver:
Dietcher's Construction   -	
E. H. Shockley 8c Son Ltd  —  	
Allan & Viner Construction Ltd 	
Westwood Contractors Ltd 	
N. W. L. Hunter Construction Ltd 	
Hartley-Leslie & Hartley Ltd _	
Gadicke Construction Co. Ltd	
Royal City Construction Co. Ltd  —
Pacific East Construction Co. Ltd   —	
Burdett Construction Co. Ltd   _ —	
British   Columbia   Vocational  School,   Dawson   Creek   (a   Federal-Provincial
Project), Phase IV:
Dyke Construction Co. Ltd   	
Access Doors for Gang Locking, Main Building, Oakalla Prison Farm, Burnaby, Phase III:
Northwest Scale Service Ltd -	
B.C. Ventilating Ltd ._ - - _. 	
Kay-Son Steel Fabricators & Erectors Ltd  _ 	
Inter-City Machine Shop 8c Manufacturing 	
Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd.  — —
Brenda Steel Fabricators Ltd.— _   	
Mitchell Sheet Metal 4& Steel Fabricators  - -
Brittain Steel Ltd     	
Industrial Instrumentation Laboratory, British  Columbia  Vocational School,
Burnaby (a Federal-Provincial Project), Phase 11:
Westgate Mechanical Contractors Ltd.. 	
Whittrick Mechanical Contractors Ltd.     	
H. S. Crombie Ltd.-     -	
Boilers, Glendale Hospital, Victoria:
Babcock & Wilcox Canada Ltd 	
Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd  	
Toronto Ironworks Ltd _ — 	
Foster Wheeler Ltd — -	
$19,107.00
18,609.00
16,440.00    | Awarded.
17,000.00
41,930.00
37,389.00    | Awarded.
18,975.00    | Awarded.
22,587.00
22,990.00
74,378.40
71,116.00
86,967.00
69,670.00      Awarded.
18,950.00
15,986.00
14,804.00    i Awarded.
20,624.00
15,500.00
63,414.00    | Awarded.
69,000.00
72,768.00
73,138.00
I
121,800.00    |
201,877.85    |
174,502.75    | Awarded.
188,683.00
20,500.00
23,643.00
23,430.00
22,770.00
22,000.00
25,000.00
22,555.00
19,481.00
22,100.00
21,532.00
198,980.00
11,900.00
12,542.00
18,325.00
14,975.00
23,520.00
9,594.43
6,390.00
27,735.00
6,715.00
8,673.00
6,600.00
105,022.00
117,386.00
105,520.00
115,957.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
 D 52 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
Industrial Instrumentation Laboratory, British Columbia Vocational School,
Burnaby, Boiler-house (a Federal-Provincial Project), Phase Ha:
A. W. Gillis Ltd.                             	
$27,556.00
21,947.00
26,500.00
25,800.00
26,085.00
25,794.00
25,761.00
67,784.00
11,766.76
39,198.61
9,787.16
6,789.05
10,273.81
135,839.21
16,536.01
38,000.00
46,686.00
34,396.00
36,800.00
36,400.00
36,660.00
21,800.00
31,400.00
23,721.00
23,760.00
24,255.00
19,846.00
17,003.00
18,950.00
23,833.00
336,555.00
334,656.00
335,000.00
365,730.00
323,259.00
329,959.00
331,534.00
366,366.00
469,950.00
468,812.00
504,000.00
503,376.00
457,664.00
459,000.00
479,632.00
1,659,887.00
1,614,000.00
1,584,194.00
1,746,800.00
1,683,000.00
1,564,000.00
1,652,250.00
1,549,000.00
1,622,669.00
1,693,272.00
866,000.00
853,397.00
833,000.00
859,000.00
879,000.00
877,420.00
24,487.00
25,500.00
Hartley-Leslie 8c Hartley Ltd.   .
Shelving and Cabinets, British Columbia Archives and Museum, Victoria:
Pedlar People Ltd        	
R. W. Matthews Agencies Ltd   -       —
Garbage-handling Facilities, The Woodlands School, New Westminster:
Awarded in part.
Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd  	
Government Agent's Residence, Fernie:
Landscape Alterations, Courthouse, Vancouver:
A. W. Gillis Ltd.                       - ,   - -	
Dairy Laboratory, Willingdon Avenue, Burnaby:
Bird Construction Co. Ltd 	
Pine Tree Construction Co. Ltd-  — —
International Construction Co. Ltd  -	
Kitchen and Stores Building, Alouette River Unit, Haney:
Burns & Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd   	
Pine Tree Construction Co. Ltd  	
Provincial Government Building, Williams Lake:
The Foundation Company of Canada Ltd	
Provincial Government Offices, Duncan, Phase 111:
Solither Construction Co. Ltd	
Repairs to Hangar No. 2, Department oj Highways, Patricia Bay:
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1968/69 D 53
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Remarks
Glendale Hospital, Victoria, Phase Vb:
Smith Bros. & Wilson Ltd - 	
$5,045,597.00
4,999,909.00
4,914,000.00
5,084,600.00
5,145,490.00
5,215,212.00
5,152,543.00
5,222,800.00
4,979,000.00
103,945.00
111,636.00
54,060.00
58,164.00
58,632.00
52,297.00
248,450.00
243,615.00
227,722.00
242,940.00
253,750.00
223,000.00
270,530.00
238,938.00
254,500.00
297,792.00
15,216.00
14,440.00
47,370.00
368,182.00
296,000.00
320,000.00
69,987.00
53,981.57
53,200.00
58,474.00
57,375.00
56,400.00
9,985.00
9,675.00
52,781.00
54,499.00
51,761.00
54,085.00
43,950.00
61,447.00
305,668.00
287,783.00
309,635.00
299,000.00
87,600.00
113,712.00
148,320.00
104,400.00
112,641.60
108,904.00
Burns <& Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd  -   	
Awarded.
Dawson & Hall Ltd     , „	
Tanin Western Contractors Ltd.  _   	
Northern Construction Co. (Division of Morrison-Knudson Co. Inc.)	
Heavy Duty Diesel Mechanics Workshop, British Columbia Vocational School,
Burnaby, Phase HI:
Stevenson Constrction Co. Ltd. - 	
Grimwood Construction Co. Ltd 	
Industrial Instrumentation Laboratory, British  Columbia  Vocational School,
Burnaby, Steam-boiler Plant (a Federal-Provincial Project), Phase III:
Mattias & Nicol  (Mechanical Division of Commonwealth Construction
Ltd.)	
A & A Plumbing 8c Heating Ltd. _ _	
Awarded.
Alterations to West Lawn Building, Riverview Hospital, Essondale:
Armstrong & Monteith Construction Co. Ltd	
Ratcliffe 8c Sons Construction Co. Ltd 	
C. J. Oliver Ltd	
International Construction Co. Ltd.         	
Landscape Maintenance, Playing-field, and Track, British Columbia
of Technology:
Institute
Jensen & Johnson Landscape Contractors Ltd.	
Awarded.
Brethers Tree Service..                	
British Columbia Archives and Museum, Victoria:
Burns & Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd.. —-  	
Whittick Mechanical Contractors Ltd. -	
Awarded.
Private Telephone Exchange, Willingdon Avenue, Burnaby:
A. J. D. Appolonia .,, -	
D. Ballarin   	
Awarded.
Lawn Irrigation System, Parliament Buildings:
C.   T   McFXnwell Plumhine __ Heatine Ltd   _	
Storage Building, British Columbia Vocational School, Kelowna (a
Provincial Project):
Federal-
Addition  to  Administration  Building,  British  Columbia  Vocational
Nanaimo (a Federal-Provincial Project):
School,
A & B Construction Co. Ltd	
Bird Construction Co. Ltd.-	
Landscape Maintenance, Burnaby and Vancouver:
Janitorial Services at the British Columbia Institute of Technology
Cafeteria, Boiler-house and Dry-kiln Building, Burnaby:
Building,
 Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1970
480-769-6423

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