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annual report of the department of social welfare for the YEAR ENDED MARCH 31 1969 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1970

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
annual report of the
department of social welfare
for the
YEAR ENDED MARCH 31
1969
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1970
  Victoria, British Columbia, November 23, 1969.
To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Social Welfare for the year ended
March 31, 1969, is herewith respectfully submitted.
D. R. J. CAMPBELL,
Minister of Social Welfare.
Office of the Minister of Social Welfare,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, British Columbia.
 Department of Social Welfare,
Victoria, British Columbia, November 22, 1969.
The Honourable D. R. J. Campbell,
Minister of Social Welfare, Victoria, British Columbia.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Social Welfare for the year ended March 31, 1969.
E. R. RICKINSON,
Deputy Minister of Social Welfare.
 DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE
April 1, 1968, to March 31, 1969
Hon. D. R. J. Campbell  Minister of Social Welfare.
SENIOR ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
E. R. Rickinson  Deputy Minister of Social Welfare.
J. A. Sadler  Assistant Deputy Minister and Director of Social
Welfare.
R. J. Burnham  Director of Operations.
T. D. Bingham  Director of Programmes.
DIVISIONAL AND INSTITUTIONAL ADMINISTRATION
J. McDiarmid  Departmental Comptroller.
J. V. Belknap  Superintendent of Child Welfare.
J. Noble_  Superintendent, Brannan Lake School for Boys.
Miss W. M. Urquhart  Superintendent,  Willingdon School for Girls.
Dr. P. W. Laundy  Director of Medical Services.
E. W. Berry  Division on Aging.
Mrs. A. I. Allen  Personnel Officer.
G. P. Willie  Superintendent, Provincial Home.
N. S. Brooke    \Casework Supervisors,  Social Assistance and
Mrs. J. P. Scott  ]    Rehabilitation Division.
D. W. Fowler  Training Supervisor.
C. W. Gorby  Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions.
A. G. Gilmore  Office Administrator.
A. W. Rippon  Research Officer.
T. W. L. Butters  Supervisor, Emergency Welfare Services.
REGIONAL ADMINISTRATION
J. A. Mollberg  Director, Region 1.
W. J. Camozzi  Director, Region 2.
G. A. Reed  Director, Region 3.
W. H. Crossley  Director, Region 4.
V. H. Dallamore  Director, Region 5.
A. E. Bingham  Director, Region 6.
A. J. Wright  Director, Region 7.
R. K. Butler  Director, Region 8.
  TABLE OF CONTENTS
General Administration: P.CE
Assistant Deputy Minister and Director of Social Welfare  9
Administrative Services  10
Divisional, Institutional, and Regional Administration:
Social Assistance and Rehabilitation Division  14
Child Welfare Division  17
Health Care Division  25
Division on Aging  26
Brannan Lake School for Boys  28
Willingdon School for Girls  30
Provincial Home, Kamloops  3 3
Community Care  34
New Denver Youth Centre  35
Region 1  37
Region 2  39
Region 3  41
Region 4  45
Region 5  48
Region 6  51
Region 7  54
Region 8 _'  56
Legislation
59
Statistics  61
  Report of the Department of Social Welfare
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
the assistant deputy minister reports...
J. A. SADLER
As our community responds to social and economic change, so do the communities' expectations of their various social and public services.
Large organizations are generally slow to respond, primarily because of
difficulties in communication. We have resolved some of our problems in this
area by decentralizing decision-making, streamlining administrative processes, and
reorganizing the Department.
In this latter regard, the previous positions of Assistant Director of Welfare
and Director of Regional Services were reclassified and given new authority. The
one new position created was Director of Programmes, to which Mr. T. D. Bingham
was appointed. He is now responsible for directing and co-ordinating the work
of all Divisions. Mr. R. J. Burnham was appointed Director of Operations and
assumes responsibility for all operations in the field, together with the Provincial
Home and New Denver Youth Centre.
Other major personnel changes in the year were the appointment of Mrs. A. I.
Allen, Personnel Officer; Mr. R. K. Butler, Regional Director, Region 8; Mr. J. V.
Belknap, Superintendent of Child Welfare; and Mr. C. W. Gorby, Chief Inspector,
Welfare Institutions.
We were sorry to lose the services of Miss Margaret Jamieson, Personnel
Officer, who left for early retirement, and were saddened with the sudden passing
of Mr. A. A. Shipp, Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions.
You will notice in the report this year we have used more pictures to tell our
story, and have limited the narrative sections. We have, however, provided more
extensive reporting from our eight regions to provide the reader with some idea of
the range of activities, concerns, problems, and accomplishments of our personnel
throughout the Province.
Statistical reporting has been limited in this Report, but current figures comparable with statistical reports of previous years are available on request from the
Department.
The problems of our society are many. Public expectations of our Department are great. The satisfactions we realize from achieving even partial successes
in the resolution of our collective socio-economic problems are regularly limited
by external forces over which we have no control. To do the best we can, to help
whenever we can, to work with concern, compassion, and common sense on behalf
of people is our goal.
 P  10
SOCIAL WELFARE
personnel reports..
MRS. ANNA I. ALLEN, Personnel Officer
Job Studies and Definitions
Because of reorganization and
changing responsibilities of staff, new
positions included:—■
Director—Operations.
Director—Programmes.
Director—Social Assistance and Rehabilitation.
Chief—Family Counselling, Protection, and Unmarried Parents Services.
Chief—Adoption and Child Care
Services.
Recruiting and Staff Selection
Actively recruiting at universities for
social work graduates and at technical
schools for case aides, appointments to
senior administration, social workers,
case aides, child-care staff, and clerical
totalled 349 for the year.
Our Total Staff—Clerical, Technical, and Professional (Casual and Permanent
as of March 31,1969)
General Administrative  11
Field Service  476
Child Welfare Division   38
Medical Services Division  18
Division on Aging  48
Social Assistance and Rehabilitation Division       5
Brannan Lake School for Boys  62
Willingdon School for Girls  50
New Denver Youth Centre  29
Provincial Home   3 5
Japanese Pavilion, New Denver     14
Total staff employed   786
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1968/69 P  11
training reports...
DOUGLAS W. FOWLER, Training Supervisor
Training Courses in Social Work
Three 2-week courses, 36 trainees.
Two 4-week courses, 27 trainees.
One 8-week course, 19 trainees.
One 1-week course, 7 welfare aides.
Seven experimental  workshops for
social workers.
Activities Included
206 applications reviewed,
268 employment interviews, and
366 written inquiries answered,
for employment in social work in
the Department of Social Welfare.
" It is of interest to note the continued upsurge on the part of our young
university graduates for a career in social work. In selecting ... we have had
a large number from which to choose."—Douglas W. Fowler, Training Supervisor.
J
 P  12
SOCIAL WELFARE
research
A. W. RIPPON, Research Officer
The Social Research Section has continued to search for answers to the social problems of today's society. The services provided
by the research section included study of the
Department's services to the Indians of British Columbia; the length of time persons receive social assistance; and a study of the
function of the case aide in improving services
to our citizens; foster care; community-based
home care; and the development of a system
to describe family characteristics prior to
child placement in a foster home. An examination of factors that affect children coming into the care of the Superintendent
of Child Welfare and the Children's Aid Societies is receiving financial grants from
the Department of National Health and Welfare, consultation from the University
of British Columbia, and the co-operation of the Department of Social Welfare, and
is expected to be completed by September, 1970.
emergency welfare services
T. W. L. BUTTERS, Supervisor, Emergency Welfare Services
Provincial policy requires that Departmental
social workers be aware of Department responsibilities in natural and war disaster situations. The
procedures to be followed by field staff in disaster
situations was rewritten.
The Province continues to recruit mass-care
personnel from non-governmental sources.
An intensive effort has been made to train
and orient Red Cross personnel in their role of registration and inquiry.
Discussions were initiated with senior officials of the Salvation Army regarding the role of that agency in disaster.
A symposium on the role of Emergency Welfare Services in the highly urban
area was held in conjunction with Federal officials.
Three Emergency Welfare Services Courses were held at the Provincial
Training College, Victoria.
In summation, our effort in organizing for any possible disaster in the Province
of British Columbia has continued to emphasize the role of the Departmental social
worker assisted in his responsibilities by a broad base of volunteers and volunteer
agencies.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1968/69 P  13
administration...
A. G. GILMORE, Office Administrator
Pamphlets.
Answering inquiries.
Assisting in training.
Serving in Division, institutions, regional
and district offices in the Department of
Social Welfare.
... public information
Public-speaking engagements.
Keeping the Department and the Public
informed.
\   ^ v
■        WCy°- _.
* -O   V
ft ^b
 P  14
SOCIAL WELFARE
social assistance and
rehabilitation division reports...
N. S. BROOKE and MRS. J. P. SCOTT, Supervisors
There are many reasons for requiring public assistance. For some it may be
only temporary need as a result of illness, accident, or lack of employment. For
some, it is lack of education and training. For others it is obsolescence because of
technological change combined with handicaps of age and health. A number are
victims of easy credit, combined with low earning potential, resulting in high indebtedness and job dismissals because of garnishee actions. Many are chronically
disabled by severe social problems such as alcoholism or by mental and physical
health problems. Many are one-parent families because the marriage has broken
down as a result of alcoholism, financial stress, youthful marriage, and inability of
the breadwinner to handle the responsibility of a family. Whatever the reason, all
recipients suffer from public disapproval that saps morale and undermines the will
and capacities for self-help. This has led us to a renewed search for methods of
providing substitute incomes that are less demeaning to the receiver and more
acceptable to the public.
SOCIAL ALLOWANCES   .   .   .   98,706   people   being  helped,   March
31, 1969, including
56,893 children and dependent wives.
10,191 heads of one-parent families.
9,602 heads of two-parent families.
22,020 single persons.
Applications and re-applications ....  97,473
Cases closed   94,559
Total number of cases, March 31,1969.. 98,706
" Total expenditures were $58,104,-
833 . . . one-third greater than for
the previous fiscal year."
BECAUSE   .   .
Increased allowances for children,
effective June 1, 1968. Additional
allowances for children of Social
Allowance families of $8 per month.
$15 per year recreation allowance.
$15 per year education allowances.
$15 per year clothing allowances
per child were granted.
Rising costs of living—More special
help, especially for shelter needed.
14,487 or 17'/2 per cent more
cases.
More migrants from other parts of
Canada.
V-t increase in provision of Home-
maker Services.
_J
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1968/69
P  15
Our responsibility is to provide consultation to local municipal and Provincial
welfare offices responsible for administration of Social Allowances and related services. These include care in institutions for elderly and disabled persons, home-
maker services when necessary for older persons or families during the emergency
absence of the mother. Special payments are available when necessary to ensure
basic needs of social assistance recipients are met. Other services are rehabilitative
to assist in return to self-dependence and preventive to ameliorate or resolve
serious social problems associated with limited income and public dependency.
REHABILITATION
Our rehabilitation services are primarily concerned with the return to employment of employable persons. The majority who receive social assistance are not
■employable. These include mothers with children, older men and women, or
persons with serious handicaps such as alcoholism, mental illness, or severe physical
disability. Many employable applicants are temporarily in need between jobs and
do not require services apart from temporary financial help. The remainder, approximately 20 per cent of social assistance recipients are presumed employable
when jobs are available that suit their capabilities. Most are handicapped because
of insufficient education or training. Emphasis has, therefore, been placed on
educational training for those who can benefit. With the co-operation of the Department of Education, school boards, and other educational agencies, approximately 600 persons were assisted in this way during the fiscal year. In the majority
of instances, sponsorship was by the Department. Some 165 disabled persons were
helped by the Rehabilitation Division, Health Branch, others were assisted directly
by the Department of Manpower. Results: One survey of 77 persons assisted
directly by the Department showed 31 employed at termination of training, 24
improved in functioning, and 14 requiring further training. Location employment
by Canada Manpower. Results: One survey of 77 persons assisted directly by
the Department showed 31 employed at termination of training, 24 improved in
functioning, and 14 requiring further training.   Location employment opportunities
has been considered a function of the Canada
Manpower. Social assistance recipients, however,
cannot compete well with other job registrants for
available jobs. Further, many employers do not
work through Canada Manpower. From time to
time, individual social workers have undertaken
to canvas local employers and reported success in
placing recipients in jobs.
For those not able to undertake full employment, the Department encourages self-help whenever possible. The first $50 of earnings in the case
of family heads does not reduce the social assistance rate that can be paid. Similarly, younger children may earn $40 per month up to $200 per month for older fully
employed children living at home before the social assistance rate is affected.
Rehabilitation committees are functioning in most of the larger centres. These
co-ordinate the services and resources of the Department of Social Welfare. Canada
Manpower, Health, and other community agencies on behalf of disabled persons
who require more intensive help before they can return to employment.
 P  16
SOCIAL WELFARE
PREVENTIVE SERVICES
Counselling
Our preventive services are intended
to assist in the solution, prevention, or
amelioration of problems or results of
poverty that may result in a need for
public assistance, now or in the future.
This programme required the services
of social workers in relation to marital,
child behaviour, mental health, or other
problems that impair the functioning of
individuals or of families.
The time available for this service has
become more limited because a greater
proportion of time has been required to administer assistance, partly because more
people need help, but more importunely because of greater need for overages and
special assistance to help cope with rising living costs.
Self-help
Two promising means for extended helping services that are being developed:
One is a group method and the other the involvement of social assistance recipients
in helping other recipients. For example, a person who has learned to budget skilfully assists less knowledgeable persons with their budgeting problems. Group
methods involve bringing several persons together at a time. These may be members
of a family, unrelated social assistance recipients, or social assistance recipients and
other persons.
To date the purposes have included provision of information, counselling,
solution of specific problems, and exploration of mutual and individual problems.
This last has been reported by participants to be particularly helpful. Most participants appear to gain in confidence and in desire to improve their situation.
DAY-CARE AND HOMEMAKER SERVICES
Day-care and homemaker services are provided to help persons or families whose income
is limited. In the case of day care, this may be
either to improve the quality of experience for
children of low-income families or to provide
suitable care while the mother is employed. This
service is not uniformly available to the poor,
however, and it is hoped that it can be made more
available by the involvement of recipients in providing this service. Provision of homemaker
services helps prevent breakup of families because of illness, and permits numbers of older
persons to be cared for in their own homes when
hospitalization or institutionalization might otherwise be necessary and often at greater cost.
BOARDS OF REVIEW
Thirty-three Boards of Review were held during the year, of which 22 were
in favour of the applicant.
 '■■■
REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1968/69
P  17
child welfare reports.
J. V. BELKNAP, Superintendent
" Strangely enough we are all seeking a form of devotion which fits
our sense of wonder."—a 16-year-old girl.
" I can't understand what has happened to her, she seems gone from
us."—a mother.
Somewhere between these kinds of searching, the social worker and many
other people in community-helping agencies find themselves trying to bring resolution to an increasing social problem in our society, youth estrangement.
Estrangement of the young from their parents and adult values is costly.   Youth's disenchantment with the mores and standards of our
R ,.   . Jm Hk community and its established systems can create
n costly chaos in society.   Personal damage ranging
from depressive disillusionment where creative
skills and talents are wasted, to complete bondage or death through use of dangerous drugs can
result.
Our society has never experienced a time in
which change teeters so precariously between
social order and total dissent.
The task of preserving value systems amid
the flux of change must fall mainly upon the
adult world.
The task of creating values that will be relevant to the future must rest with the young.
The task of developing a congruency which creates a harmony and balance
between the values and the feelings of the individual in his community rests with
all of us.
Our youth have the considerable burden of completing the social evolution
that their parents began and of working out its philosophy. They continue the war
of the previous generation against the absolute authoritarianism which flourished
most profoundly in the Victorian age.
They battle to win some place of value and dignity for the little man in our
sophisticated industrial and technological age.
One of the most damaging effects of estrangement deprives youth of a continuity with the past. Estrangement equally deprives parents of a continuity into
the future. A new generation never knows what lies ahead; estrangement blocks
the new generation from knowing what lies behind. The threat lies in the possibility
that disenchantment may destroy the opportunity for social evolution, leaving revolt
as the only option.
 P 18
SOCIAL WELFARE
The search for meaning and purpose is all-
consuming for the young. Many in the adult
world have a great deal of difficulty understanding and accepting this goal. These are the people
who have expended their energy and resources
in making what they feel is a safe and secure
world within which their children can flourish.
The lust of the young is for adventure and risk-
taking as a means of discovering themselves. To
suggest that the world has been prepared and
provided for them poses a threat to their quest
for developing their own integrity and to their
means of acquiring relevancy.
This present wave of youth has acquired a
perception of the future far in excess of previous
generations. This perception results from a permissive, concerned, and yet ambivalent family relationship. Many cherish self-
expression above self-control, compassion above aggression, spontaniety and adventure above caution and restraint. By the light of previous standards, the rejection
of affluence and goal orientation fatally combines toward the growth of destructive
attitudes.
Youth defines success as a denial of belief in present conventions, a massive
sense of confusion and lack of direction follows, deferring career decisions. Perhaps
a more variable and responsive manner of living in our increasingly complex world
will grow.
Democracy is still cherished as the most viable and vital process that man
has so far devised to serve our culture.
Many young people practise " the politics of conscience." They regard issues as
not being susceptible to resolution by democratic processes. On the one side, " politics of conscience " offers promise allowing for new dimensions for the individual
predicated upon a mature and aware conscience. On the other side, the menacing
possibility of totalitarianism or nihilism rises.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1968/69
P 19
CHILD WELFARE DIVISION
REORGANIZATION
The administration of services to children within the Department began the
process of reorganization in November, 1968. The services have been divided into
two functional areas under the direction and administrative control of two Chiefs
of Service who also act as Deputies to the Superintendent of Child Welfare.
MRS. I. G. PREDDY, Appointed Chief, Adoption and
Child Care Services
Directing services to people through
adoption and placement of children who
require care and custody in special care
facilities.
J. J. ALLMAN, Appointed Chief Family Counselling,
Protection, and Unmarried Parent Services
Directing services to families, protective services to children, and services to
unmarried parents and their children.
 P 20
SOCIAL WELFARE
FAMILY SERVICES
Family counselling services must be strengthened, for it is here we have
much opportunity to carry out preventive work. This type of service requires a
great degree of skill and knowledge on the part of the staff and must be tied closely
to concerns and efforts of the community.
It is encouraging to see the establishment of community-centred projects like
the Nanaimo Family Life Association. This type of development brings this Department and the community together and uses the voluntary skills of local people to
assist in counselling those who experience difficulties with life's problems. Similar
programmes are being developed in several other communities in British Columbia,
which provide an opportunity to people for learning life so their personal lives will
be enhanced and family security strengthened to meet the constantly changing needs
of society.
People in trouble must be given not only environmental help, but must be
involved in educational processes which provide insight to their problems and give
them skill in teaching others on a parent-to-parent basis. Steps are being taken
in this regard with the help of the Adult Education Division of the Department of
Education.
CHILD PROTECTION SERVICES, LEGISLATION
This year the 1968 Protection of Children Act
amendment came into force in September. This
Act offers temporary care for the child where
planning indicates that the natural parents can
be helped to become good parents. It offers
permanent care in a permanent foster home or
adoption home where it is clearly seen that the
child's link with his natural parents offers no
adequate security.
Though it is early to measure the effect of
this   amendment,   it   is   already   evident   more
thoughtful and careful planning for children is
being carried out because the amendment implicitly builds an expectation toward a deeper degree of accountability.
CHILDREN IN CARE
While the increase in our total child-care population increased, the rate of admission remained
constant with last year. The number of children
admitted under the Protection of Children Act
is down, but the number of non-ward care admissions rose.
The most notable factor is in the net increase
of children in care which is at its lowest point in
seven years. The average net increase in that period was 12.3 per cent. This year the increase
is 4.7 per cent.
There has been a marked increase in the use of our consultive services. The
nature of the consultation has improved in that issues and principles are being
sought out rather than case decisions. This shift indicates that our field services are
developing more self-reliance and confidence in dealing with their case practice.
This, coupled with the decrease in the numbers of children remaining in care indicates continuing improvement in services.
Iff Si
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1968/69
P 21
UNMARRIED PARENTS AND THEIR CHILDREN
Progress is being made in developing a more
reliable collaborative service between the various
community institutions—the welfare agencies, the
Courts, the prosecutory and enforcement arms—
to direct their functions to offer better help to
the child and his mother. Services to the putative
father are also now recognized as important to
the security of the child.
It is increasingly evident with the changing
moral and value system in our culture that we
must develop the means and attitudes in legislation, and programme, to preserve and strengthen
the integrity of these extra-conventional families.
New knowledge is needed to better understand the nature and dynamics of the family,
whether the family is created in or out of accord
with our community conventions.
It seems obvious that a child's future place in our society can be uncertain when
decisions must be made in circumstances where his mother is in a state of shame,
guilt, and secretiveness in a community that is unaccepting, and the father has fled
out of the fear of obligations.
^^SI-
TRANSIENT YOUTH
Throughout history children have moved out from their families to explore
their environment and to discover and establish themselves in the world. This is
now an increasing and perplexing situation in Canada as community agencies try
to cope with the increasing problems of children who suffer from, or respond to a
form of mass paranoia. The children are increasing in numbers and are younger
in age each year. They are open to and exploited by the criminal elements, who use
drugs and sex as means of enslaving them. Many of these children suffer from
general dissatisfactions with our society and are being used as corrosive and innocent
tools to subvert the country's ideologies. The tragedy is that these children are not
allowed the opportunity to participate in the established order and creating new
systems in an open and positive manner.
It is conservatively estimated that 3,000 transient children are living in this
Province. Most live in a pitiful state ignored in the main by the community. They
suffer in hunger and disease and in an atmosphere of hostility and hate.
The Youth Section created in response to this phenomenon by the two Children's Aid Societies in Vancouver City has helped alleviate some of this suffering.
The increase in demand is startling. In 1968, 573 children utilized this service.
The rate of increase indicates it will triple in the coming year.
ADOPTION SERVICES
The adoption service is a source of pride and
encouragement to social welfare practice and
programming. Its success is due to the energetic and creative leadership offered by our staff,
several of whom are acclaimed as leading experts
in North America. It is also due to the conscientious and full support of the community.
 P 22
SOCIAL WELFARE
In the placement programme, the vigour of the programme is revealed in substantial increase in the number of children placed, 138 to a total of 1,185. This
growth has continued steadily for the past five years. The total number of chlidren
placed by all agencies in the years 1964/65 amounted to 1,231, while this present
year under review amounts to 1,886.
Equally encouraging is the increase in the placement of infants directly from
hospital from the previous year, from 384 to 427, and of special notice is the
increase of placements of children with health problems from 67 to 128.
Community Adoption Activities
The involvement and participation of
the community is the most encouraging
aspect of the programme. The Adoption
Conference   in  December,   1967,   gave
impetus  to  this  and recommendations
springing from this event have been implemented in a variety of ways:   Adopting Parents' Associations;   a volunteer
information service;  workshops;  public
meetings;  and a committee of adoptive
parents who act as advisers to specialized adoption workers in certain offices.
One innovation which affords the possibility of a new approach to the adoptive
process is a project being carried out in three districts where a group approach is
utilized, placing emphasis on preparation for parenthood.   This approach relies
more heavily on education and less upon investigation.
International Placements
The community is becoming more aware of
the global needs of people and our adoption programme reflects this. This Department had the
privilege of making the first placement in North
America under the auspices of A.R. E.N.A.
(Adoption Resource Exchange of North America). Since March, 1968, A.R.E.N.A. has made
available to this Province 26 homes in the United
States. Four children have been so placed, with
another seven children pending.
An additional 20 children were placed elsewhere in Canada, the United States, Europe, and South America.
Beyond this, 12 children were referred from other parts of the world to this
Province.
Permanent Foster Homes
Our permanent foster home programme continues to grow, with 50 children placed under
these conditions. These placements are not included in the number of placements referred to
previously.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1968/69
P 23
New Adoption Procedures
The year in review completed the first year under the new policy in which the
Department processed the legal aspects of adoption. The Superintendent's office
submitted a total of 2,375 Court reports, of which 1,651 or 69.5 per cent were
processed completely. Most of the remaining 30.5 per cent were step-parent, relative, or private adoptions, the legal aspects of
which are still attended to by the legal profession.
It is estimated that a saving of $132,000 accrued
to these agency adoptive parents through this
process.
The Department is indebted to the Supreme
Court and to the British Columbia Law Society
for the excellent co-operation and confidence
that has been extended to our programme in
carrying out this new service to so many parents.
CHILD-CARE SERVICES
The Department's programme to care for the children entrusted to it by the
Courts and by parents' consent is the service most highly dependent upon public
participation. The main involvement comes through the many foster parents which
serve the community.
The foster parents in this Province have been
active in organizing associations and we may
expect to see continuing improvement in the total
programme.
Although the number of children in care has
increased, the most significant observation is the
marked increase in admission and discharges.
This reflects a heavy staff involvement and indicates that a more constructive approach in planning for children is being carried out by the field
staff.
There has been a significant lowering in the child-care population of under
three years and a marked increase in the 14 years and over. This latter presents
particular problems, as these children often have difficulty accepting another parental relationship. Foster parents similarly have difficulty in serving the complex
needs of this group.
It is satisfying to report that the number of children attending university or
taking vocational and technical training has increased.
Special Placement Services
The need for more and more specialized resources for the treatment and care
of children with particular or specific problems is apparent.   Marked progress has
been made in providing such resources
and will continue as viable programmes
emerge that have promise of meeting the
specific needs of these children. It is
with some optimism that we observe the
community response in participating with
the Department in building and operation of congregate care homes.    In the
 P 24
SOCIAL WELFARE
past several years each has shown a marked increase in the number of children served
in a variety of special homes. This year under review reveals a rise of 90 to a total
of 1,084.
Perhaps the most promising event of this year was the establishment of the
Youth Resources Panel. This is a group of the Departmental people representing
the Department of Social Welfare, Department of Education, Department of the
Attorney-General, and Health and Mental Health Services, who report through
their Deputy Ministers to a committee of Cabinet and are responsible for the
planning and determination of special resource needs.
Co-operation between various Departments in responding to the needs of
children has been growing substantially and the Youth Resources Panel gives this
co-operation a legitimate mandate for action.
DAY-CARE SERVICES
This year was marked by the continual spread of day-care services throughout the Province. It has seen the development of six new full day-care centres
and six more specialized centres for children with special needs. Additionally
a second summer day-care centre operated for primary children and more
after-school or " latch key " centres were
opened.
CONCLUSION
Constant and unrelenting energy must be devoted to a search for new ways
of helping all people realize their full potential. The excitement of exploration of
outer space must not deflect us from exploring the inner space of man. New
philosophical insights are as valuable to mankind as new technological advances.
The manner in which man behaves toward man becomes vital as the dimensions of
our earth become smaller and the consequence of the manner of living of one
nation merges upon the dynamics of all other nations.
There are many people who have made a major contribution to the welfare
of children through our programme. Appreciation and thanks to these people
can only be surpassed by the realization that they have made a significant and
lasting contribution to the lives of many children.
 SPf!
REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1968/69 P 25
health care division reports..
DR. P. W. LAUNDY, Director
JUT Mi '
This Division, formerly the Medical
Services Division, is now called the
Health Care Division, but this does not
indicate any change in functions which
are outlined in the 1966/67 Report.
This year, nevertheless, was one of
considerable change in the method of
providing health benefits and there was
an increase in the number of welfare
beneficiaries entitled to benefits from
79,085 to 85,430.
The volume of prescriptions filled for
the welfare recipient remains at a high level. The total cost of the drug programme
was $2,423,798, an increase of $266,616 over the previous year.
With the introduction of " medicare " came the sharing of costs by the Federal
Government in physicians' services. At the same time the Social Assistance Medical Services plan developed and operated for many years by the physicians of British
Columbia for social assistance recipients was incorporated in the British Columbia
Medical Plan. This new plan provided for optometric examinations previously
provided by this Division, and also added limited chiropractic, nursing, physiotherapy, and podiatric services.
Uifllflf   ""
NEW PROCEDURES
We have endeavoured where possible
to simplify procedures. For example, a
simplified authorizing and billing form
for glasses used by optometrists and
opticians was devised. Apart from being easier to complete and check, it will
provide more useful statistics about the
optical programme.
In co-operation with the Pharmaceutical Association, only one form is now
used for the prescription by the doctor,
for billing by the pharmacist and as a means of payment by the Government, eliminating much paper work for the pharmacist.
The handling of dental accounts was also simplified by removing the work
from the field staff.
NEW SERVICES AND SCHEDULES
At the end of 1968, a revised fee schedule for
dental work was agreed upon.
There has been an increase in the schedule
of payments to both the optometrists and opticians.
Certain additions were made to the extensive
drug list during the year.
 P 26
SOCIAL WELFARE
division on aging reports
E. W. BERRY, Director
During the year the Division continued to administer the Old-age Assistance
Act, Blind Persons Act, Disabled Persons Act, and Supplementary Social Allowance
to recipients of these categorical programmes as well as those receiving Old Age
Security and the Guaranteed Income Supplement.
Based on 1966 Dominion Bureau of Statistics Census, there were 178,666
citizens over 65 in British Columbia. This was 9.7 per cent of the population, but
in some areas because of climate, available housing, and medical and other services,
a much-higher proportion of the population was living in retirement. To help this
group live better with a greater sense of participation and belonging, new services
are being developed in British Columbia, some Province-wide and others on a local
experimental basis.
Senior Citizen Counsellors
Forty senior citizens are now serving as official
counsellors, trained to help in situations concerned
with housing, recreation, income maintenance,
death, or sickness of spouse, and other matters of
real concern to senior citizens.
Drop-in Centres
The Division offices now operate a " drop-in "
Service Centre in downtown Vancouver; 3,000 elderly citizens used these services from September,
1968, to March 31, 1969. Services include: Housing Registry, assistance in writing business and personal letters, finding part-time employment.
.'.!_«.:!:•■-"■■■■
Liaison with Province's Senior Citizens
Continuing contact and discussion with various
community projects and organizations such as
" Meal on Wheels," " Volunteers for Seniors," "Foster Grand Parents."
British Columbia Hydro Bus Passes
Over 10,000 senior citizens, blind, and handicapped persons in receipt of the Federal Guaranteed
Income Supplement and (or) Supplementary Social
Allowances purchased bus passes, good for six months,
at a cost of $5. They are for use in Greater Victoria
and Vancouver areas.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1968/69 P 27
During the fiscal year some administrative changes occurred:—
(1) June 1, 1968.—The maximum allowable monthly budget/income limit
for Supplementary Social Allowance to Old-age Assistance, Blind and Disabled
Persons' Allowances was increased from $111 to $137.10 for a single person and
from $218 to $244.20 for a married couple. This permitted recipients of these
allowances to have additional earnings to meet their monthly budget. The maximum
Supplementary Social Allowance payable to a recipient remained unchanged at
$30 per month.
(2) July 1, 1968.—The administration of the free health benefits available
to recipients under the Department of Social Welfare was transferred from the
Division to the local district and municipal welfare offices. This change coincided
with the Social Assistance Medical Services being transferred to the British Columbia Medical Plan. Recipients of Supplementary Social Allowance continued
to receive the free health benefits as formerly.
(3) January 1, 1969.—The maximum monthly budget/income limits for Supplementary Social Allowance were increased to $139.20 for a single person and to
$248.40 for a married couple to coincide with the 2 per cent increase in the Old Age
Security and Guaranteed Income Supplement.
TRENDS
The lowering of the age of eligibility for Old Age Security to 67 years of age
on January 1, 1968, and 66 years of age on January 1, 1969, continued to have its
effect on the Old-age Assistance case load and was reflected not only by a decrease
of 336 in the number of new applications received throughout the year, but by a
decrease in the number remaining in the case load at the end of the fiscal year (from
2,377 as of March 31, 1968, to 949 as of March 31, 1969).
 P 28
SOCIAL WELFARE
brannan lake school for boys reports...
J. NOBLE, Superintendent
Boys continued to arrive at the School in
ever-increasing nurribers. The increase over the
years can be related quite closely to the increase
in the over-all population in the Province. There
was a relatively high increase in the older age-
group, but this may have been due to the desire
to reduce the numbers being raised to Adult
Court. This would indicate the need for an
intermediate resource, such as a forestry camp
for older boys.
We improved our own summer camping programme and made use of other camping opportunities such as the Sea Cadet Camp at Comox, the Wilderness Campus in Jasper
Park, and the Search and Leadership Training Course at Porteau Cove.
The boys in the School worked voluntarily on a wide range of community
projects, including a Walkathon in Nanaimo, in which 36 boys and six staff raised
$282 for the United Appeal.
A rather unusual event was the Conference in Retreat, which was a group
experience of three days at an Island motel. The Minister, the Honourable Dan
Campbell; the Honourable Isabel Dawson; Mr. Rickinson, Deputy Minister; the
Superintendent of Child Welfare; a representative of the Attorney-General's Department; and staff members from both Brannan Lake School and Willingdon
School, along with six boys and six girls from the two schools, were led in a group
experience by a " facilitator." This was felt by all to have been a valuable method
of increasing understanding.
As usual, a regular flow of visitors from a variety of professions and the general
public passed through the School, although one stayed for three days. The Honourable Isabel Dawson had what the press described as a " live in " at the School. She
made herself completely at home for the three days and spent the time in conversation with boys and staff in informal situations, such as at meal-times and in cottage
sitting-rooms.
Among the boys arriving at the School, only 50 per cent had been living in a
two-parent home. The loss of father through death, divorce, separation, alcohol,
or nature of employment still seems to be a factor in a large percentage of cases.
We rarely see at Brannan Lake School boys who have been succeeding in the community, in school, or in sports. Surely the time has come to return to the concept
of community responsibility, now that delinquency in one form or another has become the No. 1 disease of childhood.
I would like to commend the staff at the School for their outstanding work
in an unusually taxing form of endeavour.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1968/69 P 29
Brannan Lake School Statistics
Run-aways.—83.2 per cent of the boys did not run away.  Understandably though,
run-aways from the School continue to cause concern to the local community,
a serious problem for the School.
Indians.—18 per cent of the 638 boys admitted had Indian status, but 24 per cent
of readmissions were from this group.
Readmissions.—Up 9 per cent to 30.9 per cent over last year, the success rate drops
when length of stay is decreased.
Average Age of Readmissions.—15.3 years.
This reinforces our belief that the school-leaving age is the point at which the
communities should concentrate their preventive efforts. Intermediate non-residential programmes are urgently required, perhaps our slogan should now be " Day
Care for Delinquents." It is clear that providing alternative homes is not always
the answer, since we are admitting increasing numbers of boys who have already
travelled the route of several foster homes plus group-home placements. During
the year we have had 93 wards of the child-care agencies admitted.
Average Stay.—Boys who left stayed for periods ranging from 1 to 28 months.   We
attempt to provide long-term care for those who obviously require it, but the
pressures of increased admissions resulted in an average length stay of 3.3
months.
 P 30 SOCIAL WELFARE
willingdon school for girls reports...
MISS W. M. URQUHART, Superintendent
Willingdon School for Girls admitted from the Courts 139 girls during the
year, April 1, 1968, to March 31, 1969. In this group there were 18 repeaters.
An additional 35 were recalled from provisional release and some were only held
for a few days, just to bring to their attention that provisional release did imply
satisfactory behaviour. Eighty girls were charged with " unmanageability " and
a further 14 with " unsatisfactory probation " following an original charge of " unmanageability." Other charges ranged from " impaired driving " to " obstructing
a police officer by using obscene language."
This has been a good year at Willingdon School with a few highlights in the
programme, more spontaneous participation in activities by the girls, and greater
awareness of the girls' problems and needs on the part of child care staff.
PROGRAMME DEVELOPMENTS
At Parksville, in June, six girls joined six boys from Brannan Lake to discuss
their problems, thoughts, and ambitions with the Honourable Dan Campbell, the
Deputy Minister, and other senior staff members of the Department of Social Welfare. This was an exceptional experience for those taking part and an expression
to our total population of the genuine interest of adults in their thinking and outlook.
This was followed by a " live in " at the School by the Honourable Isabel Dawson
and frequently friendly visits to the girls since. These " happenings " have left little
doubt in the girls' minds of the real desire on the part of the adults they meet at,
and through Willingdon, to do all possible to bridge the communication gap.
A folk-singing group was formed by the girls on their own. The " pay-off "
came when they were invited to perform at the Sunday Flower Festival in July at
the Kitsilano Show Boat to an audience of several hundred citizens.
Six girls went to Wilderness Camp; the benefits of this experience have been
hard to assess. After this camp finished we admitted five other girls who had also
had this camp experience. As well as the regular holiday week-ends out, during the
summer the girls all got away for picnics and visits to the Pacific National Exhibition.
Twelve girls went to the opera Faust, and we plan to send a group to future performances of this nature. On the Women's Day of Prayer each year the girls join
with girls around the world in a service with the Anglican Young People's worker
as leader.
Our three school-teachers served an ever-changing population with girls returning to academic classes after months out of school. Many made remarkable progress. Art has been widely used in class and after school-hours by the teachers as
a therapeutic process, and frequently recorded music plays quietly in the classroom
as lessons and study progress in a relaxed atmosphere.
We were pleased to see in the British Columbia and Yukon Newsletter published by Indian Affairs Branch, three of our former native girls in the group of nine
graduates from Vancouver Vocational School in a course for trained family aides.
These girls returned to Vancouver from the far north to take upgrading, followed
by this special course.
A change in the policy of the British Columbia Hairdressisg Association in
November now makes it necessary for a student operator, after completing a thou-
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1968/69
P 31
sand hours of training, to gain a year's experience in a beauty salon before taking
the Government examinations for her licence. So, the school now only prepares girls
for the year's apprenticeship and can no longer graduate them as qualified hairdressers.
Our Sewing Department continues a valuable
resource for the girls who are not academically
inclined but have lots of manual dexterity waiting
to be developed and trained.
Services from Mental Health have been minimal, with the psychiatrist from the Burnaby
Clinic spending one half-day a month at the
school on a consultative basis and seeing a small
number of girls. Assessments at the Clinic have
been done by social workers and are of limited
. it-rlhi-fc,. value since they do not know the child.
Our volunteers continue their faithful and valuable work with the girls. This
year the Elizabeth Fry Society has recruited a group of young university girls for
visitors with excellent results. They also now admit Willingdon girls to their group
homes and their social worker keeps a close liaison with the school case-work
supervisor.
OTHER HAPPENINGS
In April, 1968, Dr. D. Susan Butt, Canadian Welfare Council and Assistant
Professor at the University of British Columbia, did a group-personality testing of
our population for a " Study of Socialization," and discussed the individual results
with the school social workers.   This was both helpful and interesting.
STAFF
Four masters-degree students (three male and one female) joined us from
September to April for their " practicum." All were group workers and carried
out group counselling using discussion and activities with the cottage groups. They
worked in close co-operation with the school social workers and child care staff
and, as they learned, so did they enrich our programme.
A staff-training programme was started for our child care staff. The staff who
participated gained insight, not just into the girls' behaviour but also into their own
feelings.
COMMENTS
Some of the pleasure of life at Willingdon School was marred by irresponsible
and unwarranted criticism organized by one of the new social service organizations
through the media of television and radio. While this has undone some of the work
that has been put into changing the public image of the institution from " reform "
to " training, treatment, and loving care " it also brought forth a deeper sense of
responsibility from girls both past and present and a healthy expression of their
loyalty to staff and school.
" New social agencies " in the community provide ready shelter, food, and
a sympathetic subjective ear for the run-aways of the Vancouver area. For the
average child to run away from the institution or own home is a lark and a chance
to sample life as a hippie for a few days. The seriously disturbed girls from Willingdon who used to run away and immediately go to the home of a family friend or
one of the school staff are now being kept by these new agencies who apparently
have no use for the older, established services or the parents and who make false
 P 32
SOCIAL WELFARE
promises which they cannot carry out about finding other resources, etc. The
availability of marijuana and hallucinogenic drugs such as L.S.D. and Speed (prescription drugs taken in overdoses) causes us great concern, particularly when girls
who have had no previous experience are given the chance to experiment when in
contact with undesirable elements. In the institution we meet with greater impact
the many problems of a variety of communities.
Perhaps, however, the results of this group-living institutional programme can
best be measured by the numbers of former girls now living happy, successful lives,
who write, telephone, and visit, bringing husband and children and regularly keep
in touch with their favourite staff.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1968/69 P 33
provincial home reports..
G. P. WILLIE, Superintendent
The Home at Kamloops.
coffee at
They are
Twenty-five more men are staying with
us, with 144 now resident in the Home.
While most of our guests are in the autumn of their lives, younger men, because
of failing health, are joining us. With all
their material needs met and the opportunity to share experiences with others of
common interest, the Home is a happy
place to live.
The community of Kamloops has also
been kind, taking residents for drives, outings, and into their homes.
We now have a much more complete
programme of health services, including
an activation programme organized by
the physiotherapist, regular medical
check-ups, and better treatment and care
facilities in our sick ward. A new development is the increasing use of the Home
by the medical community to care for men
who require minimal care for short
periods on an emergency basis. Later,
some leave for their homes, others apply
for permanent residency.
Ever wondered how their day is arranged? Here's the time-table: They
are awakened at 6.45, breakfast at 7.50,
10, lunch at 11.50, supper at 4.50, evening snack at 8, lights out at 10.
free, of course, to do as they wish the rest of the day.
Pets add a homey touch.
Gardeners are welcome
Serving senior citizens.
 P 34
SOCIAL WELFARE
welfare institutions
licensing division reports...
C. W. GORBY, Chief Inspector
Midway through the year the Division
suffered the loss of its Chief Inspector,
Mr. A. A. Ship. My appointment as
Chief Inspector took effect on October
1, 1968.
We began in 1968 a much-needed revision and renaming of the Welfare Institutions  Licensing  Act.     A  new   title,
Community   Care   Facilities   Licensing
Act was proposed for presentation to the
1969 Session.    The close contacts with
senior people in regard to the new legislation required that the Chief Inspector remain in Victoria.   The Vancouver office
operated under its senior supervisor, to whom it was necessary to grant increased
responsibility.
During 1968 there was a steady increase in day-care services to children, and
there evolved several new sub-services, all requiring regulation.
During the year, private investment initiated several plans to build modern
accommodation for elderly people in the Vancouver area. A few of these facilities
were to be built for elderly persons of limited income as non-profit enterprises, under
the Elderly Citizens' Housing Aid Act. Inquiries indicated that further developments would take place in the Lower Mainland and other large population centres.
Two parallel and perhaps complementary trends became apparent in 1968.
Because of the development of Government-sponsored extended-care facilities under
British Columbia Hospital Insurance, many private hospitals applied to become
licensed, in whole or in part, to provide boarding services for ambulatory elderly
people.
In the readjustment between extended-care services and those services provided
under the Welfare Institutions Licensing Act, the need for a new service area between complete bed care and ambulatory boarding-home care began to emerge.
At the conclusion of 1968 new trends in the establishment and diversification
of services to both children and elderly people forecast increasing responsibility for
the Welfare Institutions Licensing Division.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1968/69 P 35
new denver youth centre reports...
W. J. SCOTT, Superintendent
New Denver Youth Centre was opened in the
fall of 1965 as a residential resource for the emotionally disturbed teen-age boy. The Department
of Public Works has had a continuing programme
of remodelling the buildings to accommodate a total
of 32 boys in four cottages of eight boys each. We
are extremely grateful for the outstanding co-operation received from the Department of Public Works
during this period of renovation.
OUR PHILOSOPHY
It is our belief that the young teen-age boy with special behaviour problems
needs effective adult control over his life within a stable family-type living-unit.
This control must be non-punitive and non-rejecting. He then feels a greater
acceptance of himself as a person, and is more prepared to learn new skills in living.
These are provided him through more-effective living habits, education, recreation,
and individual therapy.
OUR PURPOSE
1. To provide a home for the boy where he can live in some stability in spite
of his problems. In doing this the Centre protects the boy from himself as well as
protecting the community from the effects of his problems.
2. To provide the boy with as many typical life situations as possible so that
the staff can observe his problems of adjustment on a realistic level.
3. To provide a way of living that will enable the boy to work through his
problems of adjustment.
4. To provide special services to help the boy cope with his problems, and to
build up particular deficiencies that he may have.
OUR FACILITIES AND PROGRAMME
The Setting.—Located on Slocan
Lake, which is nestled in towering mountains in the Kootenays. Outdoor opportunities include swimming, boating,
camping, ski-ing, fishing, etc.
Family Life.—The family group is the
foundation unit of life for the boys.
Eight boys live in each cottage with a
man and a woman team on duty at all
times as houseparents. The boys are
helped to learn new adjustments during
the stresses of their daily life.
Education.—Two classrooms, both
of them staffed with a teacher and a
teaching assistant, with up to 12 boys in
each, provide remedial and individual
education.   Ten boys who have made
 P 36
SOCIAL WELFARE
Lunchtime.
Community Activity.
sufficient adjustment are able to attend
the local junior-senior secondary school.
A fully equipped work-shop within the
Centre teaches woodwork to the local
secondary school as well as the boys in
residence.
Recreation.—Numerous facilities are
available in the cottages, as well as the
workshop, gymnasium, craftroom, lounge,
and games room. The immediate lake-
shore offers great scope. Various activities in the local community are used, as
well as the immediately available out-
of-doors. Special emphasis is placed
on work projects, such as building the
waterfront.
Summer Camp.—A three-weeks camp
was operated during the summer. Some
25 boys from around the Province
attended with boys from the Centre.
The camp period was used to assess the
new boys for future admissions.
Individual Work.—The social work
method is used for work with the individual boys and their problems. Psychiatric consultations were held periodically throughout the year. Individual
boys received further assessment and
intensive treatment in a clinical setting
on the recommendation of the visiting
consultants.
OUR RECORD
At the first of April, 1968, we had 24 boys in residence. There were 14 new
admissions during the year and eight boys were discharged.
The eight discharges were made up as follows:—
To parents or former foster parents  5
To intensive-treatment units  2
To Brannan Lake School via Juvenile Court  1
At the request of the New Denver District Office of our Department we
provided a home for a boy for a seven-week period while a suitable foster home
was being found.
In the course of the year there were seven cases of boys absconding. One boy
accounted for two of these. In another case the boy ran away from his own home
during a summer visit. As far as is known there were no cases of damage to either
public or private property.
One of the boys who was discharged during the summer to a former foster
home made a request at short notice to spend Christmas with us because, as he put
it, the two previous Christmases in the Youth Centre were the happiest he could
remember. In granting his request we no doubt made his Christmas, but he little
knew how much his request had contributed to make Christmas for all our staff.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1968/69 P 37
region 1 reports.
J. A. MOLLBERG, Regional Director
Region 1 encompasses the capital
city of the Province on the south, as
well as fishing, logging, and mining,
expanding from one end of the Island
to the other. It can be compared to
a Province of British Columbia in
miniature, with a metropolitan centre in the south and new horizons
opening up in the north. These exciting developments are responsible
for a marked increase in population
and case loads. The school population of Vancouver Island increased by
18.5 per cent, while the school population for all of British Columbia increased by 3.3 per cent. The total
population of the Province and Vancouver Island would have also in-
5 creased proportionately. From this
it is apparent that Vancouver Island
is one of the fastest-growing regions in the Province. Total case loads have only
increased by 9.6 per cent, however, Social Allowance families have increased by
31 per cent and single people by 20 per cent. The reduced case load can be
accounted for by the decrease in Old-age Assistance recipients, while the increase
in Social Allowance confirms that industrial and population expansion brings a corresponding increase in social problems.
During the year a new office was opened in Parksville and a worker added to
the Campbell River staff. This has increased service at the local level. The northern end of the Island is booming and a further expansion of offices will be necessary.
Because of the increase in population and social problems, our staff have been under
considerable pressure and an increase is required as soon as possible.
A developing problem is the migration of our Indian population from the north
and west portion of the Island to Port Alberni and Victoria. These people are
facing a critical housing shortage as well as problems in adaptation to a new cultural
way of life. It is becoming more and more apparent that total health, education,
and welfare services to Indians will have to be assumed by the Provincial Government in order to attack some of the basic causes of social problems and to implement some preventive programmes.
Housing remains one of the most critical problems within the region. Home
ownership is now out of reach of many wage earners and impossible for Social
Allowance recipients. We require additional subsidized housing. Possible solutions include a reduction in interest rates on mortgages and Provincial and municipal Governments developing fully serviced building lots for sale to the general public at a reasonable cost to reduce the present speculative, inflationary cost of land.
The above suggestions could not only create more housing for all economic levels
of society but help create necessary employment.
 P 38
SOCIAL WELFARE
Our rehabilitation committee has continued to function on the Island and
we have been active sending people for further education to help in their rehabilitation. A community-sponsored counselling bureau was established in Nanaimo
and is performing a worthy and useful function in the community.
As a new arrival in the region, I would like to thank all staff for their sincere
co-operation and help. I would also like to thank the many interested community
groups who have helped to meet the needs of the people in Region 1.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1968/69 P 39
region 2 reports..
W. J. CAMOZZI, Regional Director
I wish that "figures spoke for
themselves," then there would be no
need for annual reports. Certainly
there has been an increase in volume
and the flow has been enormous.
These numbers have been handled with increased sophistication as
projects develop and communities
move to look after proven needs. In
Vancouver, our predictions as to the
utilization of a large hostel have been
proven far beyond our expectations.
Although there are many specialized
housing projects under way and
opened, there seems to be no way the
lower-income group, on or off assistance, can hope to have private housing within their means.
Children with problems increase
in numbers, in mobility, and in the intensity and variation of difficulties. There have been great efforts to meet these
phenomena by all the agencies and all are reaching out to get problems early with
services and facilities to avoid greater problems later. In contiguous areas like the
North Shore (population now around 140,000), project workers hired by the municipalities, together with rehabilitative committees, join to solve problems that
cross boundaries. This same feeling of co-operation maintains in the New Westminster, Coquitlam, and Delta areas.
Elected representatives are more and more interested in welfare developments
and spend greater proportions of their time with this concern and have gained
appropriations for greater service in their communities. Burnaby and local Elks
and Lions Clubs shared with the Province to start the building of two " family
group homes " for children aged from 12 to 17. This is a natural development for
children that is worthy of study and emulation for others. While writing with emulation it would be great if appropriate municipalities would try to secure something
like the Receiving/Remand Home in Richmond. It would take some effort to
organize, but it really pays off in the long run.
The adoption project in New Westminster is very successful and the group
method of processing adoption applications is being applied here and in other
offices in the region.
Municipalities have shown leadership in the " meals-on-wheels " idea that,
with the help of Civil Defence and vocational schools, has worked well in Vancouver, New Westminster, and on the North Shore.
There has been an increase in facilities for the retarded under private sponsorship. Examples are the Ladner Farm Training School, sponsored by the Variety
Club, and the Association for Retarded Children, which enlarged its training facilities and opened a home to care for children for a short stay, to give parents relief.
J
 P 40
SOCIAL WELFARE
It also opened a unit in Burnaby and contemplates similar services on the North
Shore. The Province has actively participated in this. Mention must be made of
Mr. and Mrs. A. Hutson who, working out of Ryerson United Church, and with
no public support, gave a marvellous " breather " service by looking after retarded
children, allowing the mothers a day free.
Well-established agencies such as Vancouver's Central City Mission have seen
the need to change traditional roles and to shift emphasis so that a differentiated
service goes out to young people, and a more individualized approach is developing
toward the traditional clientele in the skid row, recognizing that some are beyond
redemption and simply must be housed and fed. Other services range up to those
who with treatment can be useful and happier citizens. This approach is part of
the " Inner City Project" in which the churches have taken a major part to provide
" drop-in " off-street protection from the rain if nothing else, as well as counselling
and support by graduate and undergraduate volunteers from the universities' humanity faculties.
The Foster Parents' Conference, with delegates from most of the Province in
December, 1968, was a success.
Programmes for upgrading, retraining, and rehabilitation of Social Allowance
recipients have increased at a great rate. I am convinced, however, that education
is not our business. The great demand from people for help in this regard, the
number of judgments that have to be made, the special pleading, all tend to vitiate
what was meant to be a mere pilot endeavour.
Administrative detail increases and efficiency decreases (at a geometric rate
as more value judgments are made), and good programmes can be lost if they are
specialized (as education is) and have to be handled with the regular housework
of the Department. It's time we decided what that housework is. In any case it
has not been so promulgated, understood, or stream-lined that other superstructures
can be erected upon it and handled with aplomb or economy.
Congratulations to all of us in this work. There is nothing much more exciting than to realize that some good can come from our individual efforts and that
the opportunity for greater service is there for the taking.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1968/69
P 41
region 3 reports...
G. A. REED, Regional Director
This report highlights some of the
developments that have taken place
during the past year; some changes
that occurred; some of the activity
and concern of staff to help the less
able, the less fortunate, the less well-
adjusted, and more-troubled members of our communities. It will
reveal some of our involvement and
partnership with many in the community who give leadership and concern for others. The technological
explosion of the space age has not
eliminated the importance of people
to each other. This has awakened
interest in communities to know their
" people " problems and to be constructively involved. Much of our
concern in the future must be with
the deprived and disassociated groups
in our communities and to help them contribute through involvement, rather than
opting out. In our service to them and in our work with communities we must
seek ways of integrating them into the social and economic life of the community
so that their life and that of the community is enriched. We think of special
groups we try to serve—the aged and disabled, the unhappy family, the separated
family, the economically deprived family, the separated child and young adult.
The special resources developed or developing within this region, while having
much merit within themselves, will be of little value if they separate these groups
from the community, or if they are inadequate or insufficient to meet existing and
changing needs.
Our case loads and costs changed very little. The total case load for all
categories of service decreased slightly, while costs in financial assistance increased
slightly. The latter is partly due to special allowances for children. This is
especially significant in view of the population and economic growth. The turnover
figures of a monthly average of 1,747 cases opened and 1,738 cases closed indicates
an approximate increase of 9 per cent from the previous year and attests to the
activity and concern of staff in helping others help themselves. In our concern
to help those who can be usefully employed, we have enjoyed excellent co-operation
and assistance from Canada Manpower, community-based rehabilitation committees, and we look forward to the added resource of the Provincial Alliance for
Businessmen next year.
Hostels have been of great assistance in meeting some of the needs of transient
persons.   With new premises, the Kamloops Hostel can accommodate 35 persons
 P 42
SOCIAL WELFARE
daily and many, with the assistance of
their part-time social worker, found
temporary employment. Howard House
in Vernon sponsored by the John Howard Society provided a similar service.
In addition they developed a " self-
help " programme wherein transients
find employment through work projects
run by themselves. For families receiving assistance, an increasing problem is
finding suitable housing at a cost they
can afford. Low-cost housing programmes are indicated in the urban
areas.
Families receiving financial assistance
tend not to be an effective and participating member of community activities
and groups. When self-confidence is
badly shaken and financial conditions
leave little to spare, the result can be
a dropping-out of normal community
activities to a sub-culture of the " have
not " or " deprived " or to nothing. No
community can afford this loss. Special
child allowances and recreational grants
help in the financial sense, but interest
must be developed on all sides. In this area we sponsored financially and contributed our interest and help, along with the Health and Welfare Association, to
an " Idea Exchange Class " through the Adult Education programme in Penticton.
In this group, young separated mothers met as a group while their children attended
play-school organized by a community group. With leadership, they exchanged
ideas on home management, budgeting, child care, and relearned skills in communicating with others. In turn, mothers participated in the play-school programme and gained insights which would increase their effectiveness with their
children. Much was learned about community resources such as the public library,
which could be joined without cost, and how to select books. Many had had no
experience on this and lacking self-confidence, feared to venture forth.
HP      H_HI_________   _____________H_    '-"^ We  continue  our  concern  of the
previous report about the rate of ad-
j.       ^8 If ^OW^PtH mission of children to care, especially
j^/i    -y^g ^ ®&mr IPjW        in  particular   cases.     Our  main   re
source for substitute parental care has
been the foster-home programme, enjoying the devoted service of many
families that open their hearts and
homes to children needing this care.
They are a major part of the " unsung heroes " that represent community concern for others. The Foster
Parent Recognition Banquet in Penticton in November, 1968, acknowledged the contribution they have made. The
Foster Parent Association shared this activity with us and developed the FAN
__,   *
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1968/69 P 43
motif on the programme, which represented the link between foster, adoptive, and
natural parents. This interest and activity of foster parents has led to the establishment of local associations in Lillooet,
Vernon, Salmon Arm, and Revelstoke.
All major centres in the region now have
local associations. The Regional Foster
Parent Association held a workshop at
the Naramata Centre for Continuing
Education, at which foster parents, foster children, and social workers spent
a week-end in mutual exploration of
how we can help each other and improve service. In Lillooet, the Association has nearly completed a manual by
foster parents for foster parents.
The area of community-sponsored group-care facilities for children with
special needs shows development. Group-living homes, particularly for teen-agers,
have or are developing in Lillooet, Kamloops, Revelstoke, Golden, Vernon,
Kelowna, and Penticton. Some will be a receiving home to be shared with the
Probation Department for children before Court. The end of the fiscal year saw
the formation of the Human Resources Society in Penticton, whose purpose is to
develop child-care resources and community-based family and children's services
programmes aimed at involving the total community in preventive services to
troubled families and children.
New Family Court committees have developed
in Salmon Arm and Revelstoke.    Another special
resource is Marion Hillard Home for Unmarried
Mothers at Kamloops, sponsored by the Anglican
Church.    In its two years of operation, 100 girls
have been in residence.    This has required additional   placement   resources   for   babies   pending
permanent planning through adoption.
Finding suitable resources for the elderly, who through infirmity or illness
cannot care for themselves, has been of major concern to staff.   There is increasing
need for facilities for those who need partial bed care or personal services and
supervision above that of room and board.   Facilities for this group will delay the
need for complete bed care. In Kelowna,
a Volunteer Recreational Services programme has been initiated and has provided activity and interests for those in
boarding and nursing care. In Kamloops, Thrupp Manor, a non-profit community-supported boarding-home for the
elderly, opened in May, 1968, for 54
persons. This received a grant from
the Elderly Citizens' Housing Aid Act.
We have also helped community groups
establish a " meals-on-wheels " service
for the elderly in Penticton, Kelowna, and Kamloops.
Each of the four main centres now have directories or inventories of services
to people within the community which we have helped prepare. In Kelowna, we
participated in the formation of the Central Okanagan Community Social Planning
J
 P 44
SOCIAL WELFARE
Council, whose purpose is to improve conditions of community life. A similar
organization is developing in Vernon.
We have also sought greater utilization of existing resources within communities that can assist in our programme of service to people. We have sponsored and
participated, along with Probation Services and school counsellors, two group sessions at Naramata involving disturbed young people. In Kamloops the Boys' Club
and the Y.W.C.A. initiated a summer day-camp programme in which many children of families receiving Social Allowance participated as a result of the recreational grant to families.
In March, 1969, we held a three-day regional staff development with focus
on understanding youth today. Fifteen youths from the Anglican Church Sorrento
Training Centre participated with us. These youths greatly stimulated our staff to
a renewed appreciation of them as persons and the problems they face in society
today.
During the year, meetings were held throughout the region of senior representatives of other Government departments primarily concerned with human resources.
The main focus was the examination of the non-achievers in the school system who
could be those requiring direct services in future years.
The emphasis in this report has been our greater involvement with the communities we serve. We have appreciated the interest, concern, and help of many
community persons, and to them we express our thanks. Our progress is due to
the conscientious and dedicated effort of Provincial and municipal staff, and their
effort, activity, and creative energy is greatly appreciated.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1968/69 P 45
region 4 reports.
W. H. CROSSLEY, Regional Director
Changes in population, both in
numbers and age-groupings, have
been a dynamic factor in " forcing "
change in the region. These are complicated by new, different attitudes in
sections of the younger population toward education, society, and families.
Throughout the region there is an
increasing number of senior citizens
requiring care out of their home, such
as boarding-home, intermediate, and
extended care, or else adequate accommodation at a reasonable rate.
Creston notably is a retirement area,
on a small scale similar to the Sechelt
Peninsula for the Greater Vancouver
area. There is a particular problem
in areas with a long-standing Douk-
hobor population where the percentage of older folk who came in immigration waves around the turn of the century is high.
The challenge is to provide facilities
—the response from communities is encouraging and wide-spread. In Creston,
a non-profit society was formed and approved for a grant under the Elderly
Citizens' Housing Aid Act, and a 38-bed
boarding-home, Swan Valley Lodge,
opened September 16th. In Grand
Forks, a similar society has been approved to build a 30-bed boarding-home.
The plans are approved, so work should
commence in the forthcoming year. The
Rotary and Kiwanis Clubs, jointly in Trail, have now been actively working toward
a 54-bed boarding-home. In this instance the City of Trail and the Regional Government of West Kootenay aided considerably. The old buildings have been cleared
from the site and tenders called.
Three communities, Castlegar, Nakusp, and Cranbrook, are active in planning
or building low-rent apartment complexes for senior citizens. The Rotary Club
is sponsoring a 12-unit one in Castlegar and opened a larger one in Cranbrook this
year. In Nakusp, a society formed jointly by the Rotary Club and Senior Citizens
Group, was actively moving toward approval for a 10-unit complex.
" Meals-on-wheels " service became available to the senior citizens of Nelson.
They serve three hot meals a week to an average of 17 senior citizens. Reasonably
priced meals are prepared at Mount St. Francis, and all driving and delivery is done
 P 46
SOCIAL WELFARE
by volunteers.    This service is pleasant and preventive, and was sponsored and
started by the Nelson Homemakers Society.
New extended-care beds in Cranbrook and those planned for Trail will help
our staff better aid disabled persons who can no longer remain at home.
Another noticeable population change affecting all offices in the region with
greatest impact in Trail, Nelson, and Cranbrook has been an increase in the 13- to
20-year age-group needing service. In fact, a very high percentage of children admitted to care in Trail this year has been in the teen-group. Selkirk College at
Castlegar, Notre Dame University, the British Columbia Vocational School, and
Kootenay School of Art in Nelson are, of course, helpful, but they attract young
people to the area who are restless in the communities which lack social outlets for
them. Their modern outlook and in some cases " hippy " ways have caused concern because of an attendant incipient drug problem. Unfortunately, this most
affects not the students themselves but younger copiers unequipped to cope, such
as marginal secondary-school students, school drop-outs, or youngsters in conflict
at home or in society. The community has looked to us for leadership in meeting
this problem. We are faced with a challenge in offering it, since we must go beyond
our comfortable, traditional role.
In the Trail area a new pilot project was initiated to help teen-agers. It offered
prevention and treatment, a rare combination. In co-operation with Grant McKeen,
Executive Director of Youth Resources from Vancouver, our Special Placements
Section, and the Trail office personnel a series of three week-end camps were held
in the spring at a camp donated by the Girl Guide Association. Each camp went
from Friday night until late Sunday afternoon. Every camp was made up of the
same group of 17 youngsters, from 12V_t to 17, 10 girls and 7 boys. There were
six children from Social Allowance families, two from Probation, and the rest wards
of the Superintendent of Child Welfare. They were all socially accident-prone.
The camp made use of volunteers from different sections of the community, as well
as Trail staff and Youth Resources excellent staff. Much was learned and we are
firmly committed to the expansion of the programme next year. This typifies our
increasing belief in this region that, except for unusual situations, little is accomplished in sending children out to expensive treatment resources where liaison with
our staff, relationships, and on-going treatment with families or co-ordinated training with foster parents cannot be firmly maintained. Does it help a child to change
him but leave his return environment as is? We must develop local alternatives
and resources.
In January the Nelson and District
Child Care Society, after several years'
hard work and great community support,
opened the Wesley Black Child  Care
Home, a receiving and observation home
for eight children, ages 6 to 15.    The
home was named after the Hon. Provincial Secretary, due to his unflagging help
and interest.   Such a home for different
age-groups is basic to our programme
and needed in each large community in
Region 4.   In Trail, the Knights of Columbus have formed a committee to start on the development of such a resource.
A tremendous step forward in acquiring knowledge about social needs was made
in September with the completion of the first half of the Community Welfare Re-
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1968/69
P 47
sources Development Project. This Federally shared project employed a master's
degree student aided in the final months by two talented staff members in between
university terms. In brief, the project catalogued existing resources, measured their
utilization, and determined the need for resources as seen by our staff in each office
and by a cross-section of professional and semi-professional people in the larger
communities in the region. In one town we were also able to include a client sample for their ideas. The results are helpful to us for future planning and guidance
in community work.
Another population and economic growth which affected our work took place
in the East Kootenay, first in the Cranbrook area due to pulp-mill construction
which led to increased population and a transient labour influx, and then in the
Fernie area as a result of the Kaiser Coal developments. Unfortunately, the work
for unskilled, non-union men was largely illusory. As a result, Cranbrook and
Fernie offices were under heavy pressure. The escalation in rentals in Fernie
worked a hardship on our fixed-income portion of the case load.
In Fernie we were forced to move office space due to a large company renting our cramped office space at a rent we had no desire to compete with. We were
more than lucky to obtain more attractive, efficient space at a reasonable rental.
Office Administration Division installed a streamlined accounting system and file-
control method. This has enabled the staff to cope with the rising load to date.
This system was installed in Grand Forks office in the same week. It is our aim
to have it in every office next year.
In the summer an extra worker was available in Cranbrook. He surveyed
over 120 single men in our case load who had been categorized as unemployed
employables on intake. These men, when thoroughly studied, proved to be unemployable due to health, age, a social functioning, lack of education or skill. In a
sense they were employable, but realistically no employer with a choice would
hire them. There were 30 who would be really employable and another few who
might be rehabilitated. Do we in pressured offices give a false statistical picture
this way?    I think we do.
In summary, total numbers in our case loads have not increased greatly, but
the shift in cases is significant. Our pension case loads have decreased due to
changed Federal programmes, but cases requiring much social work time have
increased. There is a growing demand and need for community involvement.
Our project showed that this fell most heavily on the District Supervisors or experienced workers. The trend to a sharing with community groups in tackling
mutual problems is good, but we will have to refine techniques, improve communication, and make more staff time available to meet this exciting challenge.
So many groups, individuals, and fellow professionals have co-operated fully
with us that our task in trying to fulfil a changing, sometimes confusing new role
as a Department and as individual social workers has been lightened.
J
 P 48
SOCIAL WELFARE
region 5 reports
V. H. DALLAMORE, Regional Director
During this fiscal year the rate of
population increase in Region 5
slowed down according to estimate,
but our case loads continued to increase at a disturbing rate. The total
case load on March 31, 1969, was
5,848, an increase of 16.6 per cent
over the total of 5,012 which existed
one year earlier.
In general, the enlargement of the
case load was continuous, the year-
end total being the greatest of the
monthly figures for the year.
The major area of change was in
the Social Assistance case load. This
category of service increased from
2,742 to 3,568, a disturbing 30.1 per
cent. This particular area of service
grew to 61 per cent of the total case
load, compared with 54.7 per cent
at the beginning of the year.
A feature of this change was the shift toward the Prince George District.
There the increase amounted to 746 cases, whereas in Quesnel it was 103, and in
Williams Lake 31. In Vanderhoof the case load total decreased by 44. The Prince
George case load amounted to 61 per cent of the total for the region on March 31,
1969.   One year earlier it occupied 55.7 per cent of the regional total.
Our statistics reflect the growth of the City of Prince George as an urban
centre participating in the long-lived shift of population from the smaller communities and rural areas. It is estimated that the population increased approximately
5 per cent in the year. Many of the newcomers have come to stay, but also many
are transient visitors.
Transiency contributes to the rather substantial numbers of short-term assistance cases. In Prince George there are between 300 and 400 new applications for
service each month. The Hostel for transient single men, with a capacity of 44, is
regularly unable to provide for those needing its type of accommodation. The
overflow has been mostly accommodated by the Salvation Army's Harbour Lights,
up to a high in January of 548 man-days.
Although the economy in general has stabilized with more industry functioning
on a steady year-round basis, the weather causes periodic unemployment. This
year a delayed break-up caused some unemployment in the spring and a continued
period of severely cold weather added to it in the winter. Logging and construction
were the hardest-hit industries.
Development was most significant in the Fort St. James area of the Vanderhoof
District. Work proceeded on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway and the spur line
to Fort St. James was officially opened in the summer. Development at Pinchi
Mine and work in mining and construction of housing provided much employment.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1968/69 P 49
Fort St. James and the surrounding area occupies one social worker full time,
and it seems likely that a separate office will have to be opened there soon.
Williams Lake enjoyed a generally good economy and there was particularly
substantial activity in building. In the 100 Mile House area of the Williams Lake
District, work on a large land-development scheme provided many jobs.
Child Welfare services changed very little. Whereas the increase in the previous fiscal year amounted to 8.4 per cent, this year it was 1.3 per cent. The number
of children in care actually decreased by nine to a total of 586, as compared to the
rest of the Province, which increased slightly. This is a gratifying outcome of the
determined efforts of heavily laden staff to improve the general standard of child
welfare in the region.
The most frequent reason for admitting children to care was " desertion or
abandonment." That reason ranked fifth in the Province as a whole. The second
most-frequent reason for admission was " awaiting adoption placement." In the
Province that reason ranked first.
The reasons for discharge were primarily for return " to parents or relatives "
and, secondly, " apprehended but not presented," coinciding with the Province as
a whole.
The significance of the reasons for both admissions and discharges, particularly
" apprehended but not presented " lies in a community behaviour pattern of the
area. Many children are deserted by their parents for a short period while a drinking bout is on.   Most children are returned when their parents sober up.
Admissions to care pending adoption placement are largely related to illegitimate births. An increasing number of these are by women coming here from other
areas but, nevertheless, births to local unmarried parents seem to be remaining high
in number. We do not have accurate statistics about the number of unmarried
parents we have served, as many are included in the Social Assistance statistics.
However, the 58 unmarried parent cases included in the March 31, 1969, statistics
for the region is more than double to 26 reported in the case-load statistics for
March 31, 1968.
Family Service has increased slightly, from 210 to 226. This relates to casework in " own homes," forestalling the removal of children for placement in foster
homes or helping families to continue to provide adequately for children returned
to them.
An outstanding feature of the year was the increase in public awareness of
welfare problems and steps taken to do somethin about them locally. Some
examples follow:—
In Prince George the Community Welfare Council and the Resource Planning
Board continued to examine needs, determine priorities, and encourage organizations concerned with health and welfare services in the local area.
The Prince George Receiving Home
Society officially opened a receiving-
home for children under 12 years of
age, November 25, 1968. They went
on with plans for a group-living home
for boys and a group-living home for
girls to be ready for occupancy in the
fall of 1969. They also looked forward
to erecting a receiving-home/reception
centre for adolescents.
The Island Cache Project, started
in August, 1968, as a demonstration of
 P 50 SOCIAL WELFARE
community development in a specific community on the outskirts of the City of
Prince George.
First steps were taken to organize a United Appeal to be operative in the fall
of 1969.
In Quesnel, preliminary discussions took place about formation of a Community Welfare Council. Also broad community support of plans for a youth
centre was forthcoming, while expansion of the senior citizens' facilities took place.
In Vanderhoof the Retarded Children's Association started to enlarge their
services by erecting a residence to enable more out-of-town pupils to attend their
school. They received broad community support and now expect to have this
facility operate in 1970.
In Williams Lake the Community Welfare Council continued to meet and is
giving thought to resource needs in the area. The Catholic Women's League give
an annual drive to adoption-home finding by sponsoring a public meeting.
Needless to say, staff were deeply involved in these and other community
development activities. The latter include the development of a Foster Parents'
Association in Prince George, which has given much help in developing our foster-
home programme. Group sessions for teen-agers were started in Prince George
and in Williams Lake District.
In Prince George and Vanderhoof, prospect for more effectiveness in all areas
of work came with the appointment of two District Supervisors in December, 1968.
This broadened the establishment to three Supervisors resident in Prince George,
with one of them travelling weekly to Vanderhoof.
In closing, I want to congratulate and thank staff for the job they have done.
I also want to thank the many persons in the local communities who have contributed so much to the welfare programme in their areas.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1968/69 P 51
region 6 reports...
A. E. BINGHAM, Regional Director
We serve a population of about
220,000, spread unevenly across 16
municipalities and unorganized area
in the Fraser Valley.
We have been told that the Fraser
Valley is one of the fastest-growing
areas in Canada. At the same time
this growth is taking place, rapid
changes are occurring all about us.
Changes in our value systems, our individual economic status, our goals,
our geographic locations, our everything. Change is characterized by
some degree of turbulence. One of
the challenges faced by Social Welfare
is to design and carry out relevant
measures to meet the new areas of
stress and deprivation caused by rapid
social change.
Our services within the region
have taken progressive steps in the past year.
COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION
One of the trends, sparked by our Minister, is involvement of the community.
There is a dynamic force in community involvement and we must increasingly call
upon it if we are to experience real success in meeting the challenges of the 70's.
In Abbotsford, in part with Department stimulation and leadership, the
Matsqui, Sumas, Abbotsford Community
Services Council was formed. This
council is specifically interested in health
and welfare planning and action on a
community basis.
The Chilliwack area is served by a
similar council under the Chilliwack
Community Chest and Services. Both
of these councils resulted in increased
citizen involvement and active participation of people with social concern.
For a variety of reasons, there are in
each community many social and human
needs that are not, and cannot be met
by existing health and welfare services.
These councils are seeking out unmet
needs, establishing a list of priorities,
and then attempting to develop a system
 P 52
SOCIAL WELFARE
to meet them.    In this way, citizens have a large and professional opportunity to
participate in the solution of problems they feel are important.
Each of these organizations compiled and published a Directory of Community
Services, and a Department grant was made to assist with the costs.
Two students in their master's year at
the School of Social Work assigned to
our Abbotsford office for field experience
in community  organization  helped  to
give direction to committees established
by   the   M.S.A.   Community   Services
Council.    These committees were concerned with developing youth services,
a Family Life Institute, housing for senior citizens, a Volunteer Bureau, a community Information Centre, and operating   a    community    Christmas    Cheer
Bureau.
The   Chilliwack   Community   Chest
and Services this year, in addition to
publishing the Community Directory, es-
-*• ~^>™^®r   _____-_____-________-.--__i__-MKl     tablished a " meals-on-wheels " service.
The Soroptomists look after administration costs, the hospital provides the food,
and the volunteer organizations deliver the meals at 55 cents each. This council
also administers the Homemaker Service and have committees working on such
things as recreation, corrections, youth, aging and senior citizens, health and
rehabilitation, Volunteer Bureau, family and child welfare, community priorities,
and United Appeal.
Surrey Social Service Department is to be congratulated on the appointment
of a qualified, full-time community development worker.
USE OF GROUPS
We are making increasing use of group experiences to provide social services
to individuals and families. This has unlocked new potentials to serve people in
a space-age world. The groups were established through interest of our social
workers, which led them to try various approaches. Different types of groups were
formed and group structures were evolved according to different purposes, to provide information to prospective adopting parents, to provide support and enrichment
experiences for one-parent families, and to provide socialization and counselling for
children in group foster homes. For one-parent families and for children in group
homes, we found it helped with personal problems and to reduce feelings of isolation.
Case Aides
An important occasion was the introduction of case aides. All human-service
occupations face manpower shortages, and a case aide can relieve the caseworker
of much of the financial fact-finding investigation, so that the social worker has
more time to devote to those families in the case load requiring more time and skill.
MINI YOUTH CONFERENCE
A one-day " Mini Youth Conference " held in December was organized by Bob
Stanbrook of the Chilliwack staff. It was attended by interested adults, social
workers, group-home parents, and the young people from four group foster-homes.
 •
■
REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1968/69
P 53
A panel of young residents of group homes
discussed topics such as " do we live in a
pill-conscious world? " How do adults set
examples for us as far as drugs, pills, and
alcohol are concerned? Do school sex-education programmes help young people? They
also discussed modern music, religion, the
Department of Social Welfare, and the pros
and cons of group homes.
ADULT EDUCATION
We are making increasing use of adult education
resources in each community. One of the difficult
problems is that of providing suitable upgrading for
those unemployed, whose basic education is less than
Grade X (which is usually necessary for entrance to
vocational training courses at the British Columbia
Vocational Schools). During the year under review,
Adult Education in Surrey, along with Surrey Social
Service Department and Manpower, set up a full-time five-month course for upgrading to Grade X. The first class of adults graduated in February. Twenty-two
people graduated, of which 17 were Social Welfare referrals.
MISSION OFFICE
A district office was opened in Mission in June,
more available to the residents of Mission and area,
provided from Abbotsford.
This will make our services
Previously the service was
FOSTER PARENT ASSOCIATIONS
Two Foster Parent Associations were formed in the region, one at Haney and
one at Abbotsford. They are educational and supportive in nature. They give
foster parents an opportunity to share experiences within the groups, and enhance
foster parents' ability to cope with difficult children and situations and better utilize
agency services.
HOMEMAKER SERVICE
There are four community-based Homemaker Services organizations in this
region, located in Langley, Chilliwack, Central Fraser Valley (Abbotsford and
Mission), and Surrey, each receiving grants from the Department of Social Welfare,
providing certain in-home services to help maintain and strengthen family life and
safeguard the care of children and the functioning of dependent adults. The Surrey
V.O.N. Homemaker Service extended to cover the City of White Rock. The White
Rock Soroptomist Homemaker Society withdrew in June, 1968, after they had
pioneered and demonstrated the need for the service. We appreciate their good
work.
I wish to express my gratitude to those concerned people in the communities,
men and women of Provincial and municipal staffs who have given the community
and Government agencies such as Health, Education, Manpower, Probation and
others, the news media for their ideas and practical help to our Senior Administration, who, by their concepts of decentralized decision-making, enabled us to be
creative and innovative.
 P 54
SOCIAL WELFARE
region 7 reports...
A. J. WRIGHT, Regional Director
Economic development in the region remained at an all-time high during the past year. Pulp-mill development accounted for the largest increase. Both Eurocan and Bulkley
Valley started construction, resulting
in an increase in population and job
placement. These mills are located at
Kitimat and Houston. This effected
the economies of the neighbouring
cities of Terrace and Smithers, where
a corresponding increase in demand
for services in the communities resulted. Unfortunately, Terrace was
not as well prepared for this as was
Smithers and a severe housing shortage resulted. It is anticipated that in
the next two years a large increase in
population will result in the central
part of the region, which will result
in an increase in the demand for services from this Department.
With a setback in the mining situation because of a strike in the Stewart area,
the anticipated growth in this area did not materialize. Elsewhere in the region
there was a continued production, which resulted in some stability. Prince Rupert
fishermen continued to have a fairly good year with no interruptions, although there
was some indication that some canneries would not open the following year. This
caused concern among a large group dependent upon these canneries for their
livelihood.
There was no significant increase in the staff complement during the past year.
The case load increase was not to the extent anticipated, nor was it evident in all
offices. Only small increases were noted in Terrace, Smithers, and Kitimat, where
large increases were expected. Prince Rupert decreased and Burns Lake remained
fairly constant. While service demands by clients in receipt of Social Allowance
changed very little, there was a large increase in costs resulting when clients had to
pay higher rents to retain accommodation. A severe winter resulted in a sharp
increase in requests for assistance due to an unusual number of lay-offs and a
shortage of fuel among those people in receipt of continuing assistance.
Because of the pulp-mill expansion, we also saw a large increase in the number
of transient single people and families in search of employment. This caused a
severe overloading at times on the two hostels in Terrace and Prince Rupert which
were operating at times far in excess of their capacity. The influx of transients also
resulted in the office in Smithers negotiating with a local hotel to open its doors to
handle transient men.
With four Senior Citizens' Homes operating to capacity in Burns Lake, Smithers, Terrace, and Prince Rupert it became apparent that a second home in Prince
Rupert was necessary.   As a result negotiations were started in an effort to purchase
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1968/69 P 55
land and start the building of this second development. It is hoped this will be
completed in 1970. A homemakers' group was also established in Prince Rupert,
which has been of great value, particularly to the older population of that city.
Child Welfare resources in the region continue to operate to full capacity and
the need for further ones are evident. Applewhaite Hall for teen-age boys was filled
to capacity after six months of operation and appears to be serving its function well.
McCarthy House for girls has not done as well, chiefly because of a change of
houseparents resulting in a move for the girls in residence from the home. It is
hoped that the home will reopen later this year. The other receiving homes in
Terrace and Hazelton are always full and perform a worth-while service to our
younger citizens. In both Kitimat and Prince Rupert building is well under way to
provide permanent foster homes. It is hoped that each of these establishments will
provide a permanent home for eight of our children in care.
A notable development for the region has been the negotiations to acquire
the Experimental Farm in Smithers by the Retarded Children's Association. It is
hoped this farm can be developed to provide a sheltered workshop for retarded
children whose parents are residents of the north. Because of its location and size,
this will be a tremendous resource for these children.
Work with community groups occupied a good deal of staff time. In Burns
Lake, Prince Rupert, and Smithers, coffee-houses for teen-agers were established
and were well received by the teen-agers of each community. Resources Committees in Terrace and Kitimat continue to discuss problems of mutual concern to
various organizations in the communities. Contact has been maintained in all
municipalities with the Courts, Probation Officers, and municipal councils and other
interested groups in an effort to focus attention on juvenile problems existing in each
community. This has resulted in the formation of Juvenile Court Committees in
most communities.
 P 56
SOCIAL WELFARE
region 8 reports
R. K. BUTLER, Regional Director
There have been a number of interesting changes and encouraging developments which have affected the
demand for and the delivery of services in Region 8.
Unemployment remained a problem. The region showed a decrease
in the number of employables applying for and obtaining Social Allowance. The opposite was true in the
area served by the Dawson Creek
District office, where there was a
definite increase in unemployment.
The economy of the South Peace
River area has been affected by a
25 per cent reduction in the number
of persons registered for employment,
which is a direct result of the completion of the Peace River power project,
and nothing to replace it. There was
a sizeable decrease in the number of jobs available and an increase in the number
of females registered for employment, which was an attempt by the women to supplement their husbands' reduction in wages which occurred when the power project
was completed. The Fort St. John District showed a sizeable reduction in the
number of employables granted assistance during the year. This area experienced
a 20 per cent increase in its labour force, and double the number of job placements
over the year. The greatest increase in the labour force and job placements occurred
in Fort Nelson, which is explained by the increased mining activity. Most of the
region continues to depend on seasonal employment. The City of Fort St. John
increased its population with the incorporation of Aennofield on April 30, 1968.
Another important change in the region was the increase of 20 per cent in services to the one-parent Social Allowance group. Marital incompatibility resulting
in family crisis and desertion is one of our major social problems. Severe hardships
are created for the wives and the children because of economic and social changes
in their family-life style. This area of our work has been the most time-consuming
for our staff, and has pointed out the need for delivery of family service by our most
experienced and knowledgeable staff and the need for preventive programmes. Prevention must entail education that counselling is available, so families will request
services before complete breakdown occurs, better collaboration between the professional groups that have a specific service to offer, early detection of children presenting problems, and premarital counselling. That marital incompatibility is a major
problem is further supported by our 34 per cent increase in the family-service category. A 5 per cent decrease in the number of children in care over the year was
in part a result of the staff's emphasis on family service, prevention, and development
of supportive services.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1968/69
P 57
There were two factors that became vividly apparent while providing financial
services. The first was the great indebtedness of an increased number of families
applying for assistance, an indebtedness that gave no hope of resolution. Our social
workers need to be better prepared in the area of debt counselling. The second
factor was the increasing demand by Social Allowance recipients for academic upgrading and vocational training.
Over-all there was only an increase of nine cases in the region between March
31, 1968, and March 31, 1969.
Resource development and collaboration with other agencies and community
groups has been most rewarding. We were fortunate in having a Manpower office
opened in Fort St. John on April 10, 1968. Our referral system between Canada
Manpower and ourselves is a positive and successful programme, resulting in a
more-thorough assessment and a more-appropriate plan for our clientele. In Fort
St. John and Dawson Creek, the Rehabilitation Committees' multi-disciplinary
approach to problem solving and resource finding has benefited clients and increased
understanding of the roles and philosophy of the various organizations involved.
The latter, through the work of the Deputy Ministers' Interdepartmental Committee
at the local level, resulted in defining areas of service gaps. Our relationship with
the vocational school in Dawson Creek and our Adult Education Departments in
the region have been most fruitful. The Adult Education Director in Dawson Creek
was responsible for the development of a Basic Preparatory Course to upgrade
individuals to the Grade X level to allow them to enter the vocational school system
for further training. The number of persons applying for and being sponsored in
training by Canada Manpower, Division of Rehabilitation, and ourselves has increased. Demands have been placed on staff to ensure the client taking training
has the best possible chance to succeed.
The Open Door Society for retarded children, supported by the local Kinsmen
Club in Dawson Creek, have been studying the feasibility of establishing a training
workshop and assessment centre for the mentally, socially, and physically handicapped. The Nawican Indian Friendship Centre is continually improving its programme and increased its membership. It provides an excellent meeting place for
the Indian people of the Peace River area. The Dawson Creek Homemaker's
Association notices a greater proportion of its services utilized by non-clients. The
Council of Women in Fort St. John expect to establish a Homemaker Association
for their city in the coming year. In November, 1968, our group home for teen-age
children in Dawson Creek, sponsored by the Dawson Creek Rotary Club, was completed, and the first children were admitted the next month. This is an excellent
example of a number of groups and governments working together to meet the
needs of our youth. The City of Dawson Creek was most helpful in the development
of this group home and supporting the Homemaker Association, and their present
project is the construction of subsidized housing units throughout the city. The
Peace River Haven Society of Pouce Coupe, continue their plans to develop boarding-
home facilities for our senior citizens to be located in Pouce Coupe close to the 26-
bed extended-care facilities of the Pouce Coupe Hospital, which officially opened on
October 26, 1968. There is still a need for the development of day-care facilities
throughout the region, particularly with the increase in one-parent families.
In June, 1968, a case aide joined the Dawson Creek District office, resulting
in an improvement of our practical services to our clientele. In March, Dr. W. R.
Duncan, Assistant Director of our Medical Services Division, conducted a workshop
on the role and policies of our Department with respect to medical services. In
May, Mr. John A. MacDonald, Assistant Professor of the School of Social Work,
 P 58
SOCIAL WELFARE
University of British Columbia, led a regional institute on " Basic Law for Practising Social Workers." In November our regional staff-development conference was
held in Dawson Creek, to which we invited the clients representing one-parent
families, our Indian and Metis community, and parents and children experiencing
conflict to discuss our programmes.
In the coming year we foresee a further stabilization of the economy throughout our region and continuing effort of our communities toward the establishment
of resources to improve the social conditions of their people. It is with pride that
I thank all the individuals, agencies, and groups throughout the region for their concern with identifying and alleviating social problems and for their co-operation with
our Department.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1968/69 P 59
LEGISLATION
ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. Ill)
This Act establishes the Department of Social Welfare as having jurisdiction
of all matters relating to social and public welfare and social assistance.
SOCIAL ASSISTANCE ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 360, as Amended)
The purpose of this Act and its regulations is to provide financial assistance
and other services that are essential for a reasonably normal and healthy existence
to individuals and families who are unable to maintain themselves by their own
efforts.
PROTECTION OF CHILDREN ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 303, as Amended)
The purpose of this Act is to provide protection and care for children who are
neglected, abused, abandoned, or without proper supervision or guardianship.
CHILDREN OF UNMARRIED PARENTS ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 52, as Amended)
This Act is to ensure that the interests of the mother and her child born out of
wedlock are protected.
ADOPTION ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 4, as Amended)
The purpose of this Act is to provide the same rights and privileges for adopted
children as those of children born to both parents in a family.
OLD-AGE ASSISTANCE ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 270)
The purpose of this Act is to provide financial assistance to persons between
65 and 68 years of age who have limited assets or income.
DISABLED PERSONS' ALLOWANCES ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 113, as Amended)
This Act provides financial assistance to persons over 18 years of age who are
totally and permanently disabled and who have limited assets or income.
BLIND PERSONS' ALLOWANCES ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 29, as Amended)
This Act provides financial assistance to blind persons over 18 years of age
and who have limited assets or income.
 P 60
SOCIAL WELFARE
TRAINING-SCHOOLS ACT
(1963, Chap. 50)
The purpose of this Act is to provide training, reformation, and rehabilitation
of children committed to the training schools.
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS LICENSING ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 406, as Amended)
The purpose of this Act is to ensure that adequate standards of care and supervision are provided for persons who receive services from such institutions as
boarding homes, orphanages, maternity homes, hostels, creches, day-nurseries, playschools, and kindergartens.
PROVINCIAL HOME ACT
(R.S.B.C. 1960, Chap. 307, as Amended)
The purpose of this Act is to provide care for persons who are unable to maintain themselves by their own efforts.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1968/69 P 61
STATISTICAL REPORTS AND TABLES
A Statistical Report of the Department of Social Welfare's activities
for the fiscal year 1968/69, to compare with activities reported in previous
Annual Reports, is available on request from Division of Office Administration and Public Information, Department of Social Welfare, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria.
Table 1.—Comparison of Number of Cases by Category of Service
in the Province as of March 31, 1968 and 1969
Category
Cases at March 31st—
Minus or
Plus
Change
Minus or
Plus
1968
1969
Per Cent
Change
2,041
2,102
+61
+0.03
Social allowance—
Single person _	
Couple	
20,619
2,111
6,417
8,463
951
22,020
2,452
7,150
10,191
1,127
+ 1,401
+341
+733
+ 1,728
+ 176
+6.8
+ 16.2
+ 11.4
+20.4
+ 18.5
Totals	
38,561
42,940
+4,379
+ 11.4
Blind Persons' Allowance	
Disabled Persons' Allowance	
Old-age Assistance	
607
2,874
4,974
24,432
858
183
1,003
1,051
2,865
5,956
999
832
23
51
574
2,991
3,985
23,783
729
296
977
942
2,937
6,241
962
853
90
—33
+ 117
—989
—649
— 129
+ 113
-26
— 109
+72
+285
—37
+21
+67
—51
—5.7
+4.1
—24.8
—2.7
17.7
+61.7
2.7
Foster home pending	
—11.6
+2.5
+4.8
3.8
+2.5
+91.3
100.0
Health and institutional service	
Totals	
87,310
90,402
+ 3,092
+3.5
 P 62
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 2.—Number of Cases Receiving Service in the Province by
Category of Service during the Year 1968/69
Category
Cases Open
First of
Year
Cases
Opened
during
Year
Cases
Closed
during
Year
Cases Open
End of
Year
Cases
Served
during
Year
Family Service - -	
Social allowance—
Single person  -	
Couple - _ 	
Two-parent family ._	
One-parent family 	
Child with relative 	
Blind persons' Allowance— - 	
Disabled Persons' Allowance	
Old-age Assistance 	
Old Age Security Supplementary Social
Allowance -  	
Adoption Home pending —	
Adoption home approved	
Child in adoption home - _..
Foster home pending — _	
Foster home approved— - 	
Child in care - -	
Unmarried parent  _	
Welfare institution  	
Health and Institutional Service 	
Area development project —	
Totals - _	
2,041
20,619
2,111
6,417
8,463
951
607
2,874
4,974
24,432
858
183
1.003
1,051
2,865
5,956
999
832
23
51
87,310
2,627
63,011
5,206
14,575
13,429
1,252
231
1,176
2,406
7,956
1,775
1,087
1,962
1,123
1,409
4,834
1,713
346
471
8
126,597"
s
2,566
61,652
4,981
13,975
11,577
1,078
261
1,024
3,181
8,843
1,856
963
1,950
1,208
1,348
4,521
1,739
325
404
59
123,511
2,102
22,020
2,452
7,150
10,191
1,127
574
2,991
3,985
23,783
729
296
977
942
2,937
6,241
962
853
90
90,402
4,668
83,630
7,317
20,992
21,892
2,203
838
4,050
7,380
32,388
2,633
1,270
2,965
2,174
4,274
10,790
2,712
1,178
494
59
213,907
Cases served during year is total open first of year plus cases opened during year.
For Individual Categories.—Cases open first of year plus cases opened during year minus cases closed during
year does not equal cases open at the end of the year as redistributed cases have been subtracted from open and
closed, and these are sometimes opened in one category and closed in another. Total open and closed redistributed balances.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1968/69 P 63
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 P 64
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 4.—Comparison of Gross Exenditures and per Cent of Total
Expenditures of Department of Social Welfare by Major Categories
of Expenditure for Fiscal Years 1967/68 and 1968/69.
Main Service
1967/68
1968/69
Value
Per Cent
Value
Per Cent
$899,874
1.2
$906,468
1.0
1,199,708
1.6
1,293,253
1.4
3,554,038
4.6
4,113,573
4.4
11,831,129
15.3
14,386,541
15.3
5,659,512
7.3
5,026,363
5.3
43,784,078
56.7
58,250,133
61.9
9,027,750
11.7
7,625,137
8.1
1,258,259
$77,214,348^
1.6
~~Too.o
2,469,835    |        2.6
$94,071,303
100.0
Administration. „ _ _  	
Institutions  _ _ 	
Field Service..__ __ _ _	
Maintenance of dependent children — _ _„-
Medical services, drugs, etc... -   	
Social Allowances, etc — _ _ _	
Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowances, Disabled Persons' Allowances, and Supplementary Social Allowances
for aged and handicapped  _ _ _	
Grants in aid of construction of homes and recreation centres
for elderly citizens	
Totals - — -      -
Summary of Gross Welfare Expenditures in 1968/69
Value of
Services
Per Cent
of Total
Per Cent of
Increase or
Decrease over
Previous Year
$906,468
27,289,565
65,875,270
1.0
29.0
70.0
+0.7
+22.7
Allowances 	
+24.7
Totals  	
$94,071,303
100.0
+23.8
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia
1970
1,700-170-600

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